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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 95 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLEAR

33 40

CROSS CAMPUS Rest in peace. Responding

to a report that a person had been shot at 70 Bassett St., a New Haven Police Department officer shot and killed a pit bull at the address when it ran at him and his dog, Boris. Boris and the officer were not harmed.

Rolling in the dough. An

annual report released by the Council for Aid to Education last week showed that 14 Connecticut universities raised a combined $746 million in 2011, with Yale receiving more than three-quarters of all donations. Spurred by the end of the Yale Tomorrow fundraising campaign, the University’s $580 million total was the third-largest in the country, falling short of Stanford’s $709 million and Harvard’s $639 million.

M. HOCKEY BULLDOGS ROUT CRIMSON AT HOME

NUCLEAR WEAPONS

DIVINITY SCHOOL

M. SQUASH

Global Zero conference stresses urgency of disarmament

‘IDOL’ REVIVES TRADITION, DRAWS CHEERS

Historic season ends with disappointing sixthplace finish at nationals

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE B1 SPORTS

NYPD monitored MSA STUDENTS OUTRAGED OVER ‘VIOLATIONS OF CIVIL RIGHTS’; UNIVERSITY WAS UNAWARE, ADMINS SAY BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER New York Police Department officers monitored Muslim students at Yale and at least 14 other colleges around the Northeast, the Associated Press first reported Saturday. Detectives went undercover and “as a daily routine” in 2006 and 2007

surveyed the websites, forums and blogs of Muslim student associations at colleges including Yale, Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania. The names of students and professors involved in Muslim student associations and related events were recorded in reports prepared for New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, though

none were charged with a crime. Yale spokesman Tom Conroy said Saturday that the University did not know about the police activity detailed in the NYPD report. After hearing of the surveillance, members of the monitored organizations expressed outrage at what they perceived to be illegal police activity. “Members of the Yale Muslim Students Association are shocked and saddened by this violation of our SEE MSA PAGE 7

YES-W draws over 100

SEE YES PAGE 7

SEE FACULTY PAGE 4

Not the usual ecstasy. New Haven Police Department officers arrested three men last Thursday during a dubstep event at Toad’s after they were caught with Ecstasy powder, NHPD spokesman David Hartman said.

Hackathon. The student group Yale Hackers held a Googleand Microsoft-sponsored hackathon on Saturday in which several dozen student programmers coded for 24 hours to determine whose app would reign supreme. In the end, Bay Gross ’13 took home the first-place prize of $500 and a Kindle for an app that provides a contact management system for Yale student groups. Just a paper chair. On Sunday, the Hartford Courant profiled Zach Rotholz ’11, the founder of York Street’s Chairigami. The profile examined Rotholz’s innovative use of cardboard in home furnishings and noted that since the store opened, he has sold between $6,000 and $7,000 worth of his furniture. Head MUNTY in charge. Yale’s

Model United Nations team won “Best Large Delegation” at this weekend’s Harvard National Model United Nations tournament. The win comes after the team’s victories in national and global competitions last fall and spring.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1979 In a Calhoun Master’s Tea, author Norman Mailer says journalists get the specifics, but “you can only take facts so far.” Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

The second annual Yale Engineering and Science Weekend featured a science-themed extracurricular bazaar.

Organizers of the second annual Yale Engineering and Science Weekend (YES-W) solicited involvement from alumni of the program and slightly modified the schedule of events to help showcase the University’s resources to over 100 prospec-

tive students interested in science and engineering. YES-W, which started Saturday and continues through Monday afternoon, has remained largely similar to last year’s program, and forms part of the Office of Undergraduate Admissions’ attempt to recruit top engineering and science students, Deputy Dean of Admis-

Promise seeks to boost participation BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER Since it was unveiled 15 months ago, the New Haven Promise program has begun to pay for New Haven students’ higher education. Announced in November 2010, the Promise program awards college tuition scholarships to New Haven public high school graduates who meet certain academic and disciplinary standards and matriculate to an in-state institution. Over the past year, the program — primarily funded by Yale and administered by the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven — has distributed over $93,000 to students in tuition money through 115 scholarships. Promise administrators said the program is poised to significantly boost its participation rate among New Haven students in the coming years and is making strides toward its goal of creating a “college-going culture” in New Haven’s schools. “College credentials are a central component to success, and we are working to promote col-

BY GAVAN GIDEON AND ANTONIA WOODFORD STAFF REPORTERS

sions Jeremiah Quinlan said. Though none of 10 participants interviewed, who have all received “likely letters” indicating their probable admission to Yale, said they were completely sure whether they would matriculate, eight said the weekend increased the likelihood they would

version of HarvardLunch and YaleLunch, websites which randomly match up interested students to grab lunch, popped up at Princeton about two weeks ago, the Daily Princetonian reported.

BY ANDREW GIAMBRONE AND CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTERS

MEETING REINSTATED AS PROFESSORS REQUEST DISCUSSION OF YALE-NUS

This weekend, administrators reversed their decision to cancel next week’s Yale College faculty meeting after professors objected to delaying a planned discussion of Yale’s liberal arts college in Singapore. In a Friday email to faculty members, Yale College Dean Mary Miller cancelled their March 1 faculty meeting, citing “very few agenda items of Yale College business.” But in a Sunday email to the News, she said she reinstated the meeting on Saturday after realizing that faculty wanted to talk “sooner rather than later” about Yale-NUS, the college jointly operated by Yale and the National University of Singapore set to open in 2013. The discontent among members of the faculty follows a highly-attended Feb. 2 meeting at which professors criticized the centralization of the University’s administrative services. Several faculty members interviewed said their complaints this weekend reflect a more general discontent with the distribution of decision-making power at the University. “I think that [administrators] misjudged the degree to which not just NUS but other governance issues have been upsetting the faculty,” political science professor Seyla Benhabib said. “We need to be on record for having expressed our misgiving.” Behind the recent resistance to administrative policy is an informal group of senior professors — with currently around 30 members — that formed this semester to discuss issues of University governance, professors involved said. Six faculty members associated with the group said administrators have not adequately consulted faculty in making major decisions, such as the creation of Yale-NUS and the implementation of Shared Services, the business model intended to streamline administrative services. English professor Jill Campbell, a

Matchmaker expands. A

In case you missed it. Actress and writer Evelina Fernández was on campus Friday for a performance of her play, “Luminarias,” put on by ¡Teatro! de Yale College.

Faculty concerns prompt reversal

City asks Occupy to leave Green

lege aspirations early in New Haven kids,” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. said.

We want to start at early childhood and put in place behaviors that make kids competitive for college. JOHN DESTEFANO JR. Mayor, New Haven According to city officials and Promise administrators, New Haven Promise is currently paying tuition for 105 enrolled students at 16 different schools in Connecticut, including two at Yale, and efforts are underway to build participation in the coming years. Ten students who received the scholarships either deferred or decided to attend college out of state, forfeiting their scholarships. “I am hoping [that] 250 kids qualify this year,” said Adriana SEE NH PROMISE PAGE 4

SELEN UMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

City Hall has requested that Occupy New Haven leave its campsite on the Upper Green in two meetings with the protest’s leaders. The protesters have so far refused to comply. BY NICK DEFIESTA AND LORENZO LIGATO STAFF REPORTERS If City Hall has its way, Occupy New Haven may soon leave its home on the New Haven Green. Two meetings were held at City Hall on Feb. 8 and Feb. 15 to discuss the future of Occupy New Haven, the anti-economic inequality protest that has been encamped on the Green since mid-October. Members of the municipal government have argued

that the presence of the protesters on the Green is limiting others’ right to use the public place and has offered several proposals it finds acceptable to both parties. But leaders of Occupy New Haven have said the group will decline the city’s offer and that the protest will not leave the Green until major social and political changes are brought about. At the first of the two meetings — SEE OCCUPY PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “I like how a basic human right ( freedom from religious persecution) is yaledailynews.com/opinion

surefire controversy.”

‘FRASHIZZLE’ ON ‘FIGHTING ISLAMOPHOBIA AT YALE’

Finding paths in opportunity Stand up for

GUEST COLUMNIST JESS BELDING

Muslims’ rights W

hen the president and vice president of the Yale Muslim Students Association wrote their op-ed last week (“Fighting Islamophobia at Yale,” Feb. 17), they had reason to expect that like any other Yale students, they would be able to express their opinions freely without fear of reprisal. But recently revealed evidence that the New York Police Department has been keeping tabs on the MSAs of 15 colleges, including Yale, suggests that their call for tolerance may be falling on deaf ears. The NYPD’s surveillance suggests that Muslims’ First Amendment rights have been deemed an acceptable casualty of the war on terror. When Muslim students’ right to privacy is so blatantly disregarded, it is not just their problem. It is everyone’s problem. When law enforcement officials declare that it is not their duty to protect the rights of maligned minorities, but to further marginalize them, they misunderstand their duty in a way that is dangerous for all of us. When police set a precedent of surveillance of student groups, the freedom of all political student groups is threatened.

SINGLING OUT MUSLIMS OBSCURES REAL CRIME The NYPD, like any law enforcement agency, has a limited amount of time and resources. When it wastes those resources unconstitutionally monitoring broad segments of the population rather than pursuing actual leads, it is not protecting us from terrorism. Research on racial profiling in New York in the 1990s shows that racial profiling reduced officers’ ability to judge suspicious behavior accurately. By defining “suspicious behavior” in such a way that any Muslim student who prays is viewed as a potential threat, the police are certain to overlook instances of suspicious behavior by actual criminals who do not fit their limited profile. Instead of doing an effective job of preventing terrorism, well-meaning law enforcement officials have subjected Muslims in America to a different kind of terror. Especially after 9/11, Muslims have not only been the target of hate crimes but have also had their civil liberties trampled upon. The Council on American-Islamic

Relations has documented thousands of civil rights complaints by Muslims over the years, ranging from employment discrimination and verbal harassment to warrantless wiretapping and baseless inclusion on terrorist watch lists. American Muslims are often asked why they fear increased police surveillance when they have nothing to hide. Besides bearing an implicit accusation of guilt, that question entirely misses the point. The Fourth Amendment protects the right of Americans to live securely without fear of unreasonable searches or seizures — not out of empathy for criminals, but out of concern for those unfairly targeted by law enforcement. The question is not what Muslims have to hide, but what reason police have to search. Muslims’ right to peaceful assembly and free exercise of their religion means that merely belonging to a Muslim student group can never justify police surveillance. I certainly do not mean to equate violation of Muslims’ civil rights with the devastation of 9/11. But in a just society, the existence of largeorder injustices like terrorism is not grounds to justify nearconstant suspicion of minorities. In a just society, the dramatic increase in the number of hate crimes committed against Muslims since 9/11 would be reason for law enforcement officials to step up their efforts to protect Muslim communities instead of treating them like criminals. There is a culture war being waged in America today. On the one hand, the right believes that “peaceful Muslim” is an oxymoron and will use whatever ignorant and inflammatory rhetoric it can to exclude Muslims from American society. On the other hand, there are those who see such fear-mongering for what it is and fight for an America based on pluralism and understanding. The NYPD seems to have chosen its side in this fight. The Council on AmericanIslamic Relations is now asking Yale to take concrete steps to protect its Muslim students’ rights against warrantless surveillance. It is time for Yale to choose its side: defend Muslim students’ rights, or be complicit in the erosion of the civil liberties of all students.

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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

like global women’s rights. The Western canon teaches us how to live the good life. But it also does a shoddy job of directing us toward the ideal summer internship or career. One professor I asked for advice told me not to worry. Students who specialize in one topic do so to avoid life’s difficult question: Who do you want to be? They pick the easy way out by following the trends of the moment. Down the road, they realize they dislike their chosen themes. He might be correct — in fact, I can think of some cases where I know he is. On the other hand, many of my friends exude genuine passion for their chosen field of study. Even if they are faking it, I still have no idea what to do, even just for a summer. When I talked to another mentor about my summer dilemma, he turned my question back on me: “If you could have an ideal three months, what would it entail?” Unfortunately, if I could answer that question, I never would have walked into his office. We can heap some blame on society. A world of themes

encourages everyone to have one. When a business looks at two otherwise equal resumes, it chooses the applicant who specializes in the industry. The themeless lose out, and doors begin to close. Your options do not look as limitless as you originally thought. Against this backdrop, I can see why so many Yalies go into banking, consulting or Teach for America for a summer or after graduation. These employers require no theme; they sometimes even admire a liberal arts education. I would love to end this column with a tidbit of advice for like peers struggling to find internships or jobs at this very moment. But I still cannot answer the question for myself. I don’t know if I will have answered it six months or five years from now. I am not sure I ever will. But that doesn’t make the question any less important. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a junior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

Internships as Bowling

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T M I C H E L L E TAY L O R

Learning to deal with inanity

THIS ISSUE COPY STAFF: Emily Klopfer COPY ASSISTANTS: Adrien Chiem, Elizabeth Malchione PRODUCTION STAFF: Anya Grenier, Rebecca Levinsky PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Katy Osborn EDITORIALS & ADS

when I don’t know where to start? To some extent, having too many options can be paralyzing. I would think some seniors NATHANIEL searching for ZELINKSY jobs could commiserate. It seems ON POINT that everyone expects me to have a theme. At every family gathering, the question inevitably arises: “So, what do you study?” And I try to mumble something. Sometimes, I take the subject of a seminar and make it my focus du jour. Other times, I play up my major. Regardless, I can’t escape the sensation of not knowing what specialized topic defines me. The problem originates with the liberal arts education, a concept I swallowed hook, line and sinker — and one I still believe in. Unfortunately, cross-disciplinary, broad-based learning does not lend itself to a focused theme

S TA F F I L L U S T R AT O R I L A NA S T R AU S S

JESS BELDING is a junior in Davenport College. Contact her at jess.belding@yale.edu .

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400 Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Max de La Bruyère

A

ll my friends seem to have a theme. They build their Yale careers around sexy topics like public health, economic development or the environment. One friend has wanted to be a pediatric oncologist since age 7; another fell in love with paleontology after a middle school class trip. When they search for summer internships or contemplate careers after Yale, they know exactly where they are going — be it an African NGO or medical school. But I have no theme. I can’t help but feel left out. I still haven’t found that thematic North Star to guide my life. When I told my friends this, they scoffed: Wasn’t my theme conservative politics? Yes, to some extent. But my public persona at Yale reflects my beliefs, not necessarily my life plan. I have academic passions and values I hold dear. But those do not make a road map for the future. As I contemplate my options for this summer, I find myself at a loss, despite possessing limitless possibilities. This freedom frustrates me. How do I begin looking

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COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 95

W

hy am I here? It’s a question I have been asking myself a lot this semester. As in, why am I sitting in the back row of this gut QR lecture, picking at a Clif bar and obsessively checking my email? Put otherwise: Why does Yale have distributional requirements? I’m pretty sure I am going to forget everything I am learning in this class, even if I actually put effort into it (which, of course, I don’t). I’m not lazy; I’m just being realistic. I can just barely recall a time in high school when I was actually good at solving math problems. It’s hard to believe, though, because before taking my gut QR class, I completed an online QR skills assessment test in which I answered 5 of 13 multiple choice questions correctly. So in the four semesters that have elapsed between my first (and, might I add, very legitimate) QR credit and this one, I have regressed from being a competent and fairly advanced problem solver into a fifth grader. A fifth grader in remedial math. I’m improving, of course, because I have to do weekly problem sets with actual math problems. But in two years, won’t I just be a fifth grader again?

This logic seemed pretty flawless to me. Happily, however, my mother was able to provide some perspective. I was explaining to her, very reasonably, that I probably hadn’t done so well on my gut QR midterm. Some of the questions, it turned out, required me to have done more than skim the text and play with my phone during lecture. My mother was very concerned. Why hadn’t I been doing my reading, or paying attention in class? She was very stern. I whined a little, faked some tears, and when she’d calmed down, confessed the truth: the lectures are excruciatingly boring. It’s pretty difficult to focus, and it all seems pretty useless. After all, English majors don’t need math or science. And I’m fairly certain that, after the semester ends, I’ll forget whatever facts I managed to cram in the night before the final. Still, my mother was appalled. “Michelle,” she said quietly, “sometimes we have to do things we don’t want to do.” “Even when they’re useless?” I asked. “Especially then,” she said. I was stunned. Of course, I realized, some tasks can be unpleasant. Generally, though, they have a real purpose which

provides one some motivation to complete them. For example, I don’t like doing laundry, but there comes a time every few weeks when I really need clean underwear.

POINTLESS TASKS ARE A FACT OF LIFE On the whole, I like my classes. I don’t always like writing papers or taking tests, but I always feel good for having learned a little more about something I love from an assignment. Over the years, I’ve also enjoyed watching myself build skills I hope to use after college — if nothing else, I’m developing a way of understanding the world through literature. I think we all feel that way about our own fields of study: we enjoy learning from them, and that’s why we chose them. But that’s not how life works. It’s shocking, I know. I’m still reeling a little bit. But people have to do things they don’t enjoy, even when it doesn’t benefit or satisfy them. Like obeying traffic laws and filling out tax returns — two things I have yet to

do — we have to fulfill our distribution requirements, whether or not we find them gratifying or useful in the long term. It doesn’t matter if you won’t remember a word of Swahili five years from now, or why that painting of that woman by that guy changed the course of Western art. You’re going to take that class and you’re going to pass, if only just barely, because you have to. In fact, to prepare you for life’s inanity, you should have to do more useless things to graduate from Yale, like holding your breath for five minutes, or paying really close attention to Mary Miller’s speech at the Freshman Assembly. Yale students need to realize, as viscerally and as boringly as possible, that life doesn’t make sense. I spent too much time feeling fulfilled and thoroughly educated by my program of study at Yale. Nothing should work that efficiently, and no one should be that satisfied. It simply isn’t natural. Sometimes we have to do things we don’t want to do, especially when they waste our time. And that’s why we have distribution requirements. MICHELLE TAYLOR is a junior in Davenport College. Contact her at michelle.a.taylor@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20 12:00 P.M. “Has the Islamic Republic Secularized? ReligionState Relations and the Transformation of Religious Authority in Contemporary Iran.” Princeton University Near Eastern studies professor Mirjam Künkler will speak at this Religion and Politics Colloquium. Lunch will be provided. Rosenkranz Hall (115 Prospect St.), Room 202.

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, FEB. 17

The article “Global Zero comes to Yale” incorrectly stated that Matt Brown LAW ’01 and Bruce Blair SOM ’84, the cofounders of Global Zero, met at Yale. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15

A graphic for the article “Sex Week offers STI testing” included a statistic from the Sexual Literacy Coalition survey that 58 percent of respondents reported that their last sexual relationship was a one-time encounter. In fact, that figure referred to the percent of respondents whose last sexual relationship was a one-time encounter and who have never been tested for STIs. TUESDAY, FEB. 14

The article “Elis dominate on road trip” stated that Vicky Brook ’12 is the captain of the women’s tennis team. In fact, Stephanie Kent ’12 is the team’s captain.

Week promotes engineering BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER This week the School of Engineering & Applied Science will host its first ever “Engineers Week” to promote opportunities in the field and raise enthusiasm about the discipline. Coinciding with National Engineers Week, the events — ranging from an ice cream social on Monday to a catapult design competition on Friday — were conceived and planned by graduate engineering students Ying Zheng ENG ’13 and Enping Hong ENG ’14, with the assistance of faculty in engineering and applied science. Zheng and Hong said the week’s purpose is to encourage more Yalies to major in engineering by demonstrating the field’s resources and career opportunities. “The problem isn’t that [engineering] opportunities aren’t here at Yale,” Hong said. “The problem is that people aren’t connected to them.” Zheng said she and Hong were invited to plan Engineers Week after Glenn Weston-Murphy, a research support specialist and lecturer in the engineering school, noticed that they had successfully planned engineering career events for undergraduates earlier this year. In addition to their studies, Zheng and Hong are in the undergraduate engagement track in the Advanced Graduate Leadership Program at the engineering school, which focuses on improving internship and research opportunities for engineering majors in Yale College. Hong said that while the week’s events are open to all Yale College students, several events are targeted at students who have yet to declare a major in order to convince more members of the classes of 2014 and 2015 to go into engineering. Currently, 4 percent of Yale College students graduate with majors in engineering. Hong pointed to a panel with members of Yale’s engineering faculty, to be held Thursday in Prospect Street’s Dunham Laboratory, and an academic fair with engineering student groups, planned for Tuesday evening in Dunham’s Engineering Student Center, as events that will showcase the career opportunities for engineers. Although the week has been planned by graduate students, engineering school Deputy Dean Vincent Wilczynski said it fits into the school’s strategic plan established under Dean T. Kyle Vanderlick. “One of the long-term plans of the [engineering school] is to foster ‘the culture of engineering on campus,’” Wilczynski said. “This is an exact example of what that really means.” Kayla Matheus ’11, an intern at the school’s new Center for Engineering Innovation and Design who assisted Hong and

ENGINEERING WEEK EVENTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS ANGELA DAVIS In the 1960s, Davis was associated with the Black Panther Party and the Communist Party. She helped found the grassroots organization Critical Resistance, which popularized the concept of the “prisonindustrial complex.”

Conf. examines black sexuality BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER Over 700 students from across the country gathered on campus this weekend to discuss sexual issues in the black community during the 17th annual Black Solidarity Conference. The three-day conference, titled “Stigmas and Stereotypes: An Exploration of Black Sexuality,” included speeches by prominent civil rights advocates, small group discussions and film screenings. Wesley Dixon ’15, who served on the conference’s executive committee, said the conference sought to explore the evolution of black sexuality in modern American society. “The goal of the conference was to educate and subsequently empower conference participants by fostering an understanding of the nuances of black sexuality and the role they play in molding the issues and structure of black communities,” he said, adding that sexual issues “are oftentimes avoided and considered a taboo among AfricanAmericans.” Topics of discussions included faith and sexuality, perceptions of masculinity and femininity, homosexuality and the portrayal of black sexuality by the media, Dixon said. Angela Davis, an American political activist and author who gave the conference’s keynote speech Saturday night at the Omni Hotel, said in her address that the conference’s theme coincided well with the current social and political circumstances encountered by the African-American community. The Occupy movement — which

she said is spreading the ideals of freedom and equality — and the election of the United States’ first black president should empower the black community to expand lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer rights in particular among African-Americans. Davis said many AfricanAmericans categorize people into distinct genders when evaluating sexual issues, but they should instead consider sexuality as a spectrum. She encouraged attendees to take steps to create a culture that accepts LGBTQ individuals. Kevin Moore ’12, president of the conference’s board, said in a speech that the conference was intended to draw all types of students, not just AfricanAmericans. Davis said AfricanAmericans share many of their challenges with other groups, such as women, the working class and environmentalists. Organizers said while the majority of participants were African-American, some of the discussions attracted students of varying races and ethnicities. “Usually, the word ‘black’ implies a kind of insularity,” Moore said, “yet I think everyone, regardless of race, could feel the conference’s strong presence on campus during the past couple of days.” Attendees at the conference included Yale students as well students from between 30 and 40 U.S. universities. Michael Daniels, a junior at Morehouse College — an all-male, historically black college in Atlanta — said the small discussion groups fostered productive debate. “Even though the conference didn’t specifically focus on com-

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Angela Davis delivered the keynote speech at the 17th annual Black Solidarity Conference on Saturday. ing up with concrete solutions, I believe the small, localized debates gave us space to voice some of the concerns we feel we have no space to voice at our own schools,” Daniels said. Khalfani Lawson, a student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta, said the conference helped him realize that African-Americans face a significant challenge in fully embracing “different manifestations of sexuality.”

But Veronique Hob-Hob, a junior at Williams College, said her experiences growing up in Cameroon, where homosexuality is illegal, made it difficult for her to take part in discussions, though she said the conference was educational. The Black Solidarity Conference was established in 1994. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .

MONDAY

Ice cream social TUESDAY

Activities fair Lunch with faculty Career advice workshop WEDNESDAY

Lunch with faculty THURSDAY

Academics open house FRIDAY

Catapult design contest Engineering trivia contest

Zheng with planning the week, said she hopes the events will help spread excitement about the major. “I think that Engineers Week is evidence of a current drive for more of an engineering community at Yale — one that gets undergrads excited right from the start,” Matheus said. Hong said he thought a large number of students had shown interest in the week’s events, but it was still too early to know how many students would attend its programming. The week has been advertised around campus with fliers and group emails, as well as through social networking, he said. As of Sunday evening, 38 students had indicated on Facebook that they were attending the kickoff event, an ice cream social in William L. Harkness Hall for students interested in engineering. Though only eight of 15 undergraduate engineering majors interviewed had heard about the week or its planned events, they agreed that promoting the engineering resources to students is a good move for the school. Themistoklis Davris-Sampatakakis ’15, a mechanical engineering major, said that Yale’s academics are superb for engineering majors, citing the oneto-one student-to-faculty ratio. But a shortage of career assistance, particularly a lack of oncampus recruiting, has made it difficult for engineering students to find jobs after Yale, he said. Sagar Yadama ’15 agreed, adding that an increase in the number of engineering majors could benefit the quality of the programs by encouraging Yale to increase its support for the field and create a greater variety of opportunities. “Once it gets more competitive, they’re going to have to give us more,” Yadama said. National Engineers Week was created in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .

Summit zeroes in on disarmament BY HOON PYO JEON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Over the weekend, Yale played host to an international summit of students, activists and experts who gathered to discuss nuclear disarmament. The Global Zero Summit, called “Reaching Zero: Student Summit at Yale 2012,” held a two-day discussion about the elimination of nuclear weapons, which included panels featuring prominent speakers, film screenings on Old Campus and discussions among the participants. In organizing this weekend’s events, Harrison Monsky ’13 and Matt Shafer ’13 collaborated with Global Zero, an nonprofit anti-nuclear weapons advocacy organization that includes 300 world leaders and more than 450,000 citizens worldwide. While many attendees said the conference bolstered their optimism that a nuclear weaponfree future is feasible, some said they thought the conference overlooked some critical elements of nuclear disarmament. “The summit was a huge success,” Monsky said. “In all, we hosted 300 students — three times the number of attendees than we originally expected. We were also happy to see a strong showing from members of the New Haven community outside of Yale.” Matt Brown LAW ’01, who founded Global Zero with Bruce Blair SOM ’84, highlighted the significance of ongoing changes in the geopolitical landscape. He said various factors — such as fis-

HARRY SIMPERINGHAM/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Hans Blix, former Swedish prime minister, spoke at the Global Zero conference, underlining the role of universities role in the removal of nuclear weapons. cal crises and upcoming elections in major nuclear powers — will converge to create the best opportunity since the end of Cold War to get world leaders together to address disarmament. Hans Blix, former Swedish foreign minister and one of the summit’s most high-profile speakers, emphasized the crucial role of universities in proposing approaches to eliminating nuclear weapons. He called universities the ultimate think tanks because they are centers of critical thinking and dynamic examinations of international politics. The current state of nuclear

Sixty-seven years ago, the power of nuclear weapons was unleashed, and it should never be repeated. It’s important that youth of this generation continue to develop this issue. RICHARD LEVIN, UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT

[With] a blueprint to get to zero nuclear weapons, we have shown the direction to be travelled, and world leaders must start moving. The challenge is to get citizens and political leaders to understand the problem, and make them uncomfortable by showing the facts. MATT BROWN LAW ’01, CO-FOUNDER OF GLOBAL ZERO

proliferation is a manifestation of politicians’ “collective incompetence to manage the world,” Blix said, adding that the strategy of mutual deterrence is obsolete. Blix said he is optimistic, however, about the eventual success of Global Zero’s mission. “Is there any sunshine in this scene? Yes,” Blix said. “But we do need some injection of new dynamism.” Other speakers at the conference included Seyed Mousavian, an Iranian policymaker who has served on Iran’s nuclear diplomacy team, Acting Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Rose Gottemoeller and ex-CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilson. University President Richard Levin, who delivered the conference’s opening remarks, told the News Thursday night that he would continue his support for the Global Zero movement. “This is an organization that was started by Yale graduates, and it appears to be gaining considerable momentum,” Levin said. “Yale is very pleased and proud to be able to host the very impressive list of speakers, and we’ll do our best to help them along.” Ten summit attendees said they felt optimistic about the chances of eliminating nuclear weapons after attending the conference’s events. Paul Mouginot, a graduate student from Paris, said he was inspired by the message that grassroots activism can bring about change. “You don’t have to create com-

panies to be an entrepreneur,” he said. “Likewise, you don’t have to be an ambassador to create a meaningful impact.” Anthony White, a junior at Brown University, said that the summit inspired him to strengthen the Global Zero chapter at Brown. For Beenish Pervaiz, a college sophomore from Lahore, Pakistan, the summit was a source of motivation and inspiration especially because, she said, many Pakistanis consider nuclear power an element of national pride. “Coming from Pakistan which has 90 percent approval rating for nuclear weapons, I appreciate all this positive energy for this cause,” Pervaiz said. But other attendees concluded that the conference lacked specific suggestions for future disarmament and focused too specifially on the United States. Johnny Bowman, a former president of the Harvard Undergraduate Council who graduated in 2011, said the conference did not adequately address the fundamental question of “what to do next.” Owen Cabon, a graduate student from Paris, said he found the summit to be too focused on America. It is important to involve European nuclear powers such as France and the United Kingdom in the movement to bring about a nuclear weapon-free world, he said. Global Zero was launched in Paris in December 2008. Contact HOON PYO JEON at hoonpyo.jeon@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

General Assembly General Assemblies refer to meetings of the Occupy New Haven protest, where proposals are worked out in a horizontal, transparent and democratic way, according to protesters.

Occupy defies city request to move

Meeting to focus on Yale-NUS FACULTY MEETING FROM PAGE 1

SELEN UMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

City officials have been in talks with Occupy New Haven, which it has asked to relocate from the New Haven Green. OCCUPY FROM PAGE 1 attended by representatives of Occupy New Haven, the Yale Police Department, the New Haven Police Department, the city’s parks department and the Chief Administrator’s Office — the city invited the protesters to move the camp to another location, City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said. The Occupy New Haven encampment is one of the few nationwide protests to maintain much of its strength in the same position through the winter. “We didn’t come to into the meeting with any specific plan or end date,” Benton said. “But we did state our concern that there can’t be a permanent encampment on the Green.” The Green is supposed to be available for a variety of public uses, Benton said, including events like the International Arts and Ideas Festival and the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, as well as impromptu events such as frisbee games or dog walks. Having a permanent encampment on the upper part of the Green, she said, means other people are not able to use the Green in the way it was intended. Some of the proposals floated by city officials included having Occupy New Haven relocate to another space or only occupy the Green for a certain part of the day. But following the first City Hall meeting, at their weekly assembly on Feb. 12, the Occupy protesters decided not to relo-

cate their encampment, regardless of the potential alternative locations offered by the City. “The camp is part of our political statement,” said Ina Staklo, a member of Occupy New Haven. “We are not going to dissemble it, for now.”

There is a misconception that Occupy New Haven is detached from the rest of the New Haven population. INA STAKLO Member, Occupy New Haven The protesters on the Green also expressed their desire to collaborate with the city and make accommodations for future city events and festivals, Staklo said. “There is a misconception that Occupy New Haven is detached from the rest of the New Haven population, but that’s not true,” she said. “We support the people and want to collaborate to everything that is for the people.” A second meeting was held last Wednesday, in which Drew Days LAW ’66, a law school professor and head proprietor of the Green — which is owned by a trust of prominent Elm City citizens — expressed his concern that there needed to be a specific date at which the protesters’ presence on the Green would terminate.

Staklo said that Days’ presence caused Wednesday’s meeting to get “pretty heated.” Still, Benton said she believes the two meetings between city officials and protesters were promising. “I think there has been a dialogue and I think that dialogue is going to continue,” she said. Staklo said that if the protesters were to depart from their current location, it would be only in the interest of expanding the movement. Occupy New Haven’s current objective, she added, is to expand and strengthen its ties with other Occupy movements in New England. Chris Garaffa, a member of Occupy New Haven, said that the city’s offer to accommodate the protest in another location is motivated by political purposes. “We made no agreement yet, but it’s clear that the City wants Occupy off the Green,” Garaffa said. “They want to squash our movement.” He added that he believes Yale’s Commencement ceremony in May is a factor in the city’s desire to relocate the encampment. “They just don’t want the camp in the background for Commencement,” he said. Benton responded that the University had nothing to do with the city’s request, and University Secretary Linda Lorimer said the secretary’s office, which plans Commencement, has had “no involvement with any suggestion that Occupy New Haven move at all.”

At the end of the second meeting, city officials and Occupy protesters decided that the city would develop a specific plan to be proposed to protesters at the next meeting, Benton said. She added that the groups did not set a time frame to meet again, but that it would likely be very soon. While fewer and fewer Occupy protests have maintained their physical presence, members of New Haven’s contingent said they were determined to maintain a strong presence on the Green. “People in Occupy New Haven want to stay here and are willing to defend the camp,” Garaffa said. Unlike many other Occupy protests across the nation, Occupy New Haven has had a cordial relationship with the city since its inception. City and police officials have said since the protest began on Oct. 15 that safety was their primary concern about the encampment, and have repeatedly said since then that they had no plans to evict the protesters as other cities have done. The New Haven Green was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1970. Tapley Stephenson contributed reporting. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu and LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

member of the group, added that the group is also discussing policies at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “We have come together as a loose, informally-constituted discussion group to share information and views in the belief that well-informed, open interchange and debate leads to better understanding and decision-making, as well as to a healthier university community,” Campbell said in a Sunday email. Professors opposed to the Yale-NUS project said Singapore’s authoritarian style of government and the country’s violations of civil rights and academic freedoms are not conducive to a liberal arts environment. Classics professor Victor Bers, who asked Miller at the February meeting to place Yale-NUS on the agenda for March, said faculty were told previously that Yale-NUS was “entirely separate” from Yale College and thus that Yale College faculty would “have no jurisdiction in the matter.” University President Richard Levin said there was “widespread discussion” about the Yale-NUS project during the six months before the Singaporean college was officially announced in March 2011. Administrators held two open “town hall” meetings for faculty about Yale-NUS in the fall of 2010 and met with faculty groups expressing concern about civil liberties in Singapore, Levin said. About 25 professors attended the first town hall meeting in September 2010. Still, Levin said the decision to create Yale-NUS ultimately rested with the Yale Corporation, since it is a new school and not a program within Yale College. Some professors interviewed said they can better influence University policies in Yale College faculty meetings — which follow parliamentary procedure and are permanently recorded in minutes — rather than in “town hall” meetings. A few faculty members said they questioned the intentions behind Miller’s original decision to cancel the March 1 meeting. “My reaction was that this was an attempt to suppress discussion,” computer science professor Michael Fischer said. “The administration, when it comes to decisions it has made, doesn’t want a diverse discussion.” But Miller said she has “no desire” to avoid discussions on issues that pertain to Yale College, adding that faculty members should “feel assured” she will include on the agenda issues they find important and that are “appropriate for consideration” by Yale College faculty. She also confirmed that Yale-NUS will be included on the agenda for next week’s meeting. Miller added she has occasionally canceled faculty meetings in the past, such as in March 2010, to ensure each meeting has at least two important items on the agenda. The meetings, which occur on the first Thursday of each month, typically include reports from standing or ad hoc committees. Besides discussion of Yale-NUS, Miller said she has only “routine business” from the Course of Study Committee scheduled for the March 1 meeting. Miller said she will release the final agenda for next week’s faculty meeting today. Tapley Stephenson contributed reporting. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu and ANTONIA WOODFORD at antonia.woodford@yale.edu .

New Haven Promise admins seek to expand reach NH PROMISE FROM PAGE 1 Arreola, interim director for New Haven Promise. “Now that the scholarship is out there, the application is online and we’ve developed the program, we expect the numbers to go up.” As part of the effort to increase Promise participation, she said, students are invited to sign a pledge form between ninth and 12th grade committing to strive for good grades, a strong school attendance rate and community service. Students who sign pledges are able to remain in communication with the Promise program and receive periodic newsletters with information such as volunteer opportunities, Arreola said. In conjunction with New Haven Promise, College Summit — a national nonprofit that helps school districts prepare low-income students for the college application process — has also been offering classes in New Haven high schools including “College 101” and “financial awareness.” But to achieve the “collegegoing culture” critical for the future workforce in the state and city, Arreola said students and families should be thinking about college before high school. To that end, she said, school administrators introduced “Pathway to Promise,” a program for preK-8 schools that is designed to adapt the skills that College Summit is teaching to a pre-high school setting, last fall. Yale-New Haven Hospital committed $500,000 annually for the next four years to fund this effort. “We want to start at early childhood and put in place behaviors that make kids competitive for college and instill a logic that teaches

kids to see the worth of a college education,” DeStefano said. While Promise distributed approximately $93,000 in scholarship money this year, William Ginsberg, CEO of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, said the scholarship awards will also grow because of the way the program is structured. The Promise program is being implemented in stages — graduating seniors are eligible for scholarship money based on how long they have been in high school since the program’s announcement, Ginsberg said. Those who accepted the scholarship last year received 25 percent of the full award, this year’s seniors will be eligible for 50 percent, and next year’s seniors will be eligible for 75 percent before full funding kicks in the year after they graduate, he added. Ginsberg said beyond distributing tuition money, Promise officials have worked to “build the machine” that will allow the program to grow. “We’ve put in place mechanisms to monitor kids’ performance in schools and in college, get pledges signed, process scholarship applications, make payments to universities and determine what students are entitled to,” Ginsberg said. “These processes had to be built in the first year, and the staff did an excellent job of doing that.” New Haven Promise was announced on Nov. 8 2010 at a ceremony at Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School on Crown Street. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .

SARAH SULLIVAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

University President Richard Levin and Gov. Dannel Malloy joined city officials for the announcment of New Haven Promise on Nov. 8, 2010, at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School on College Street. Yale is the primary funding source for the program’s college scholarships.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“You got a certain something. I can’t put my finger on it right now, but it’s got a lot of character.” STEVEN TYLER AMERICAN IDOL JUDGE

Muslim students convene at Yale BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER Muslim students from across the Ivy League gathered at Yale this weekend to network and share spiritual and cultural experiences. Approximately 130 students participated in the third annual Ivy Muslim Conference, which is co-sponsored by the Chaplain’s Office and the Muslim Students Association. The conference was designed to connect Muslim students with their Ivy League peers, and attendees heard from keynote speaker Ingrid Mattson, attended preprofessional panels and learned about community and campus activism. Though the conference is not yet an official University event, Yale coordinator for Muslim life Omer Bajwa said he hopes it will become a fixture of Yale’s religious programming. “This is an opportunity for fellow Muslim Ivy students to engage intellectually, socially and spiritually,” Bajwa said. “We want to build a sense of community across different campuses.” The conference began in spring 2010 after Bajwa, who was the interim Muslim chaplain at Cornell until 2008, decided he wanted to organize an event that would integrate Muslim stu-

dents from different schools. He worked with fellow Muslim chaplains to make the concept a reality. Though the first conference was small and did not include all the Ivy League schools, Bajwa said those who attended considered it a great success and asked Yale to host the event again in 2011. Attendance doubled that year, and remained high this semester, Bajwa said. The conference was initially supposed to rotate among the Ivies, Bajwa said, but has been held at Yale for the past three years because the University is centrally located between the Ivy League schools and had enthusiastic support from its students. While most attendees were undergraduates, Bajwa said graduate students and alumni were also invited because they could offer perspectives on living as American Muslims after college and also give students career advice. Mostafa Al-alusi ’13, president of the Yale Muslim Students Association, said the conference aimed to help people connect their academic or professional lives with their spiritual lives, adding that many Muslim students struggle with the intersection between the two. In her keynote address, Mattson, the first

female president of the Islamic Society of North America, discussed what it means to be both a spiritual Muslim and a leader in today’s society. At various points in the conference, the students broke into smaller discussion groups that Bajwa said were intended to encourage discussion about the challenges Muslim students face, such as how to approach their faith in a secular world, and about possible solutions to those problems. The event was not solely religious, though the spiritual aspect of the conference was important, said Nooreen Reza ’15, a member of the Yale Muslim Student Association who helped organize the conference. Reza said the conference primarily focused on fostering communication and relations between students in Muslim student associations at different schools. She added that networking events such as career panels and campus and community activism workshops were particularly important in helping students form connections. Nine student attendees, all of whom identified as Muslim, said they appreciated the sense of community the conference developed. “The real power is having a collective of smart kids together

Greens seek Elm City boost BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER Saturday marked a significant effort by the Green Party to expand its influence in New Haven. On Saturday morning, members of the Green Party of Connecticut sat down in the children’s activity room of the New Haven Free Public Library to discuss the future of their party’s platform. The meeting, the first of its kind for the state’s chapter of the party, saw nine Green Party supporters and three members of the party’s state executive committee debate the wording and content of the changes to the state platform submitted by local party members. Later that day, Green Party vice presidential hopeful Howie Hawkins spoke in the Elm City to drum up support for the pary’s presidential ticket, headed by Jill Stein. “We need to find out what information people need in order to make an informed decision on our platform,” Patricia Kane, the state chapter’s secretary, said. “If you don’t know enough about an issue or understand a policy, how do you vote on it?” Kane, who is one of the members of the party’s five-person state executive committee, said she did not know how many attendees to expect, but was very happy with how the meeting went. Members of all four formal chapters of the Green Party of Connecticut — New Haven, New London, Hartford and Fairfield — constituted the 12 attendees. She added that she hopes news of the meeting travels by “word of mouth” to other Green Party supporters and that similar events take place in the future throughout the state. Ronna Stuller, co-chair of the executive committee, said she was also pleased with Saturday’s

meeting. “Every group can be contentious, but talking about the issues makes us think of why we exist as a party and why we need to have a political presence,” Stuller said. “It brings people together for a common goal, even if they don’t get along on a personal level.” Later in the day at Atticus Bookstore and Café on Chapel Street, Hawkins spoke to a group of volunteer petitioners from the Connecticut branch of the National Green Party.

Talking about the issues makes us think of why we exist as a party and why we need to have a political presence. RONNA STULLER Green Party of Connecticut, Executive Committee Co-chair Connecticut Green Party cochair Mike DeRosa, who was in attendance at Atticus, said the petitioners are trying to qualify a Green Party candidate for the 2012 presidential ballot. DeRosa and Kane both said they expect Stein to be the party’s nominee, which will be determined this summer. “There are rules which serve to keep third parties off the ballot, so we need to petition for proof of support,” DeRosa said. “It’s just another example of the twoparty duopoly that people are growing more frustrated with.” Recent elections, he said, have shown an increase in the number of people willing to vote for third parties. He added that there are approximately 1,900 registered Connecticut Greens, and that he

estimates that 20,000 state voters identify with the party — 2 percent of the state-wide vote. “We don’t have the use of traditional, conventional media, like the Democrats or the Republicans, to get our message out there,” Kane said. “We don’t have billionaires backing us up, so we have to be innovative.” The Green Party is still in a “fledgling stage,” Kane added, but with the prominence of the Occupy movement and general dissatisfaction with the Obama administration, “people are looking for alternatives” to the traditional party system. Green Party member Jerry Martin described the party as a “very loose group of individuals with very different goals,” and added that it is sometimes difficult to juggle everyone’s wishes, as they come from varied activist groups and volunteer organizations. He said some members are focused on local and state issues, while others want to work toward national goals. “We have a bottom-up power structure — power really resides in statewide party membership,” Kane said, emphasizing the Green Party’s differences from the nation’s two major parties. “The chapters are quite autonomous and the executive committee doesn’t control who runs for office.” The amendments to the state party platform discussed Saturday morning included the elimination of corporate personhood, the abolition of the death penalty and the establishment of a land value tax. Later this spring, the statewide Central Committee will vote on the proposed changes in a public meeting to be held in Portland, Conn. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

On Saturday, officials of the state’s Green Party convened in the New Haven Free Public Library to discuss proposed changes to the party’s platform and how to rally support for the national party’s presidential ticket.

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Ingrid Mattson, the first female president of the Islamic Society of North America, delivered the keynote address of the third annual Ivy Muslim Conference, held at Yale over the weekend. in once place really trying to focus energies on a certain goal,” Shihan Khan MED ’17 said. “This is a medium for the whole Ivy circuit to come together and grapple with tough issues.” Dartmouth undergraduates Amir Khan and Tasneem Khalid said they gained ideas for strengthening their college’s Muslim Student Association — which only has about 15 active

members — by talking with students from other institutions.” “We can learn from bigger MSAs,” said Amir Khan, a sophomore. “The hardest thing is getting everyone together in the same room to talk about it.” Abdul Rafay Hanif, a sophomore at Columbia, said his favorite part of the conference was when students got food, played sports and socialized together on

Friday night, which he said was helpful in connecting with his peers. The Yale Chaplain’s office and the Yale Muslim Students Association will co-sponsor the Critical Islamic Reflections Conference on April 14. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .

Divinity School students seek ‘Idol’ BY DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTER Divinity School students jammed to “Party Rock Anthem” and other popular tunes Friday night as they revived “Divinity School Idol” for the first time in recent years. Modeled on television singing contest “American Idol,” the competition thrust four contestants — who had been nominated by their peers — into the spotlight of the Divinity School’s Marquand Chapel to perform songs, dances, skits and instrumental pieces. The event was part of a greater effort to revive the Open Party, a student group at the Divinity School that brings together students of a variety of faiths to discuss their roles in the school and that has coordinated the event previously. Students interviewed said they were happy to see the tradition return. “The performers were so wonderful and I thought they were so incredibly brave and willing and good sports and great fun to agree to do this,” said Julie Kelsey DIV ’84, assistant dean of students for pastoral concerns and one of three judges for the competition. “I haven’t laughed that hard in a long time.” Though the competition focused on the contestants’ performances, the four students — Leonard Curry DIV ’13, Jared Gilbert DIV ’12, Nicholas Lewis DIV ’13 and Kate Stratton DIV ’12 — were evaluated on several criteria. In addition to their creative numbers, each contestant was asked to collect different types of donations, such as toiletries or school supplies, as part of a drive for New Haven charity Youth Continuum, and each answered Divinity School trivia questions posed by Dale Peterson, associate dean of student affairs.

The performers were so wonderful and I thought they were so incredibly brave… I haven’t laughed that hard in a long time. JULIE KELSEY DIV ’84 Assistant dean of students, Yale Divinity School The winner will be determined based on donations gathered, judge evaluations, correct answers in the quiz and audience votes. Three Divinity School faculty and staff who served as judges will announce the competition’s winner at the school’s 11 a.m. coffee hour today. The goal was to evaluate contestants’ abilities in three areas — “mind, body and soul,” said Open Party coordinator Esther Boyd DIV ’14. The competition’s format was different this year, Boyd said, since the “American Idol” contest is no longer as popular or relevant as it was when the Open Party began holding the event. Boyd added that Divinity School Idol is the main event hosted by the affinity group, which aims to attract “atheist, agnostic, nontraditional, multi-religious and nonreligious Divinity School students.” “In the beginning, the group was looking to do something for the whole Divinity School, as a kind of gift to the school,” Peterson said. “At the time, there wasn’t really a talent show as such at the Divinity School.” Peterson said he has enjoyed having the Open Party coordinate the event in past years and was glad to see it return this weekend. Though students are unsure as to when the

DIVINITY SCHOOL OPEN PARTY

Jared Gilbert DIV ’12 was one of four performers at this year’s “Divinity School Idol” competition. contest was last held, the most recent year listed on the Divinity School Idol trophy, which passes on to each successive winner, is 2007. After all four contestants answered quiz questions from Peterson, Gilbert took the stage first to perform. Dressed in drag, he sang and acted out a brief musical skit about a fictional prospective Divinity School student, “Summer Clarence.” His skit was riddled with inside jokes, such as a parody of Assistant Director of Admissions Sean McAvoy DIV ’11, and drew laughter from the approximately 45 attendees. Chloe Starr, a professor at the Divinity School and in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, said she appreciated the skit’s “theatricality.” While Gilbert described himself as “not necessarily a great singer,” he said he enjoyed writing the parody of Divinity School life, which he set to Disney music. “And I’m always looking for an excuse to do some drag,” he added. Lewis, who followed Gilbert, performing a clarinet solo that required the audience to clap, stomp and exclaim to the beat. Stratton came next, singing and dancing in a musical skit. Finally, Curry capped off the night by singing part of R. Kelly’s “I Believe I Can Fly” and then dancing to “Party Rock Anthem” by LMFAO. All four contestants said they thought the competition was worthwhile because of the donation drive for Youth Continuum, which addresses homelessness among youth. Stratton said she appreciated that all the contestants incorporated “absurd” elements into their performances. “I didn’t want to get up and take it too seriously, and be like, ‘Oh, look at how well I sing,’ or ‘Oh, look at how great of an actor I am,’” Stratton said. “All three of [the other contestants] are incredibly talented and have legitimate skills they could have displayed.” “American Idol” first premiered in 2002. Contact DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

FROM THE FRONT

Middle Eastern and North African Law Students’ Association This group of students at the Yale Law School provides a forum for engaging the Yale community on the legal, political, social and cultural issues affecting the peoples of North Africa and the Middle East, according to the Law School’s website.

YES-W seeks to attract science students YES FROM PAGE 1 attend Yale next fall. “I think it’s a little early on to tell if they’re set on coming to Yale, but they’re really excited about being here,” said John Lor ’15, who hosted two students from his high school this weekend.

The energy and the atmosphere this year have been fabulous. JEREMIAH QUINLAN Deputy dean of admissions, Yale College Quinlan said the organizers tweaked the 2012 schedule to give students more free time after receiving feedback from last year’s participants that number of activities prevented students from exploring the campus on their own. He added that the student hosts who were alumni of the program were able to connect with the prefrosh since they had attended the inaugural program last year. Activities over the weekend included tours of Yale’s science facilities, eight “master classes” taught by science and engineering professors, a symposium on undergraduate research and a science-themed extracurricular bazaar. Shortly after arriving on campus Saturday, students participated in a competition called “Yale Junk Wars,” in which teams used an assortment of materials to build machines that could control a small ball and make noise at regular intervals — all while listening to music played by a student DJ. Quinlan said since the program is still relatively new, the Admissions Office will evaluate it in May to determine whether to make any further changes. Prospective students interviewed said YES-W aided them in

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

Activities at this year’s Yale Engineering and Science Weekend included “master classes” taught by Yale professors and a science-themed extracurricular bazaar. learning about Yale’s science and engineering resources as well as student life. Five students interviewed said prior to YES-W, they had perceived Yale as a humanities-oriented school, and that the weekend helped convince them that the University provides undergraduates with accessible science and engineering resources. Nithin Tumma, who attends

Port Huron Northern High School in Michigan, said he felt the weekend’s events demonstrated that Yale focuses more on undergraduates in the sciences than do other universities that he has applied to and visited, including Harvard, Stanford, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Louis Gaudet, another YES-W attendee, said the weekend exposed him to aspects of Yale

that apply to his interest in mathematics more than orientation events offered by other universities. Still, Gaudet said the program may not necessarily influence his decision to matriculate to Yale, adding that he believes many of the Ivy League universities have similarly high academic standards in the sciences. Gabriele Savaneviciute, a senior at Riverhead High School

in Long Island who is also considering MIT and Stanford, said she was impressed by what she perceived to be Yale’s emphasis on liberal arts education, even for students focusing on science and engineering. “You can tell Yale is putting its best foot forward this weekend, and it’s nice that they’re taking such a personal approach,” she said. “I like how a lot of the pro-

fessors here teach undergraduates. What’s the point of having all these Nobel Prize winners if they just sit in their offices?” The concluding reception for YES-W will be held today at 5 p.m. in Luce Hall. Contact ANDREW GIAMBRONE at andrew.giambrone@yale.edu and CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

Report reveals NYPD tracked Muslim student groups MSA FROM PAGE 1 civil rights and basic dignity as students based purely on religious and/ or national identity,” said Mostafa AlAlusi ’13, the group’s current president, in a Sunday email to the News on behalf of its members. “Discrimination on the basis of faith is just as wrong and unacceptable as discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation or any other identity.” The group’s statement said the NYPD’s monitoring of Yale’s Muslim students “destroys the very conditions that make Yale a world-class university,” citing its infringement upon the “spirit of open inquiry, a diverse student body, [and] a principled commitment to inclusion.” In a Nov. 22, 2006 NYPD secret document titled “Weekly MSA Report” obtained by the News from the Associated Press, an NYPD officer reported that he visited the websites and forums of Muslim student associations at Yale, Columbia, Penn and

eight other colleges and “did not find significant information.” Vice President and Secretary Linda Lorimer said the University was unaware of the NYPD’s monitoring of Yale students. “I have spoken with [Associated Vice President for Administration] Janet Lindner and she has consulted with [Yale Police Department Chief Ronnell Higgins], and we know of no such activity involving Yale students or Yale student organizations,” Lorimer said in an email Sunday night. “The University supports [the Muslim Student Association’s] goals and aims and is grateful for its leadership on our campus. I am one of the many who have been both inspired and educated by the MSA.” NYPD spokesman Paul Browne told the Associated Press that his department deemed it “prudent to get a better handle on” what was occurring at Muslim student associations around the Northeast by monitoring student websites and collecting publicly available information. At least 12

people arrested or convicted on terrorism-related charges around the world were associated with Muslim student associations, Browne said.

The NYPD should not be spying on students a hundred miles outside of its jurisdiction on the basis of nothing but their religion. YAMAN SALAHI LAW ’12 Member, Middle Eastern and North African Law Students’ Association Browne said the NYPD’s monitoring only took place in 2006 and 2007, but the Associated Press documented cases of undercover monitoring as recently as 2009, when police set up a safe house in New Brunswick, N.J., to follow the Muslim student group at

Rutgers University. Kelly and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg have said repeatedly that the NYPD only follows legitmate leads about suspected criminal activity. The reports obtained by the Associated Press do not document any criminal activity. Police should only investigate people if they have a reasonable suspicion of criminal activity, said Yaman Salahi LAW ’12, a member of the Middle Eastern and North African Law Students’ Association who said he is interested in studying the surveillance practices of local police departments. “If the NYPD thinks membership in a Muslim student group counts as reasonable suspicion, then we have a serious problem on our hands,” he said in a Saturday email to the News. “The NYPD should not be spying on students a hundred miles outside of its jurisdiction on the basis of nothing but their religion.” Salahi added that Yale should reassure the community that it does not cooperate with law enforcement

activities that infringe upon students’ rights in order to stand up for its students’ rights. Sarah El-Ghazaly LAW ’12, a codirector of Yale’s Muslim Law Students’ Association, said she personally found the police conduct “highly offensive.” Students should be able to participate in religious organizations at their colleges without fear of being monitored by police and named in secret reports, she said. “I’m not offended because I’m Muslim,” she said. “I would be equally offended if I heard that the police were monitoring Bible study groups or any other religious group.” Other schools’ Muslim students associations monitored by the NYPD include New York University, Syracuse University and Albany University. Tapley Stephenson contributed reporting. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

S

NATION & WORLD

T

Dow Jones 12,949.87, +0.35% NASDAQ 2,951.78, -0.27%

S Oil $104.92, +1.63%

S S&P 500 1,361.23, +0.23% T T

10-yr. Bond 2.01%, +0.02 Euro $1.32, +0.50

Iran cuts oil to UK, France BY ALI AKBAR DAREINI ASSOCIATED PRESS TEHRAN, Iran — Iran has halted oil shipments to Britain and France, the Oil Ministry said Sunday, in an apparent pre-emptive blow against the European Union after the bloc imposed sanctions on Iran’s crucial fuel exports. The EU imposed tough sanctions against Iran last month, which included a freeze of the country’s central bank assets and an oil embargo set to begin in July. Iran’s Oil Minister Rostam Qassemi had warned earlier this month that Tehran could cut off oil exports to “hostile” European nations. The 27-nation EU accounts for about 18 percent of Iran’s oil exports. However, the Iranian action was not likely to have any significant direct impact on European supplies because both Britain and France had already moved last year to sharply curtail oil purchases from Tehran to less than 3 percent of their daily needs. The EU sanctions, along with other punitive measures imposed by the U.S., are part of Western efforts to derail Iran’s disputed nuclear program, which the West fears is aimed at developing atomic weapons. Iran denies the charges, and says its program is for peaceful purposes. The spokesman for Iran’s Oil Ministry, Ali Reza Nikzad-Rahbar, said on the ministry’s website Sunday that “crude oil exports to British and

French companies have been halted.” “We have our own customers and have no problem to sell and export our crude oil to new customers,” he said. Britain’s Foreign Office declined comment, and there was no immediate response from French officials. The semiofficial Mehr news agency said exports were suspended to the two countries Sunday. It also said the National Iranian Oil Company has sent letters to some European refineries with an ultimatum to either sign long-term contracts of two to five years or be cut off.

We have our own customers and have no problem to sell and export our crude oil to new customers. ALI REZA NIKZAD-RAHBAR Spokesman, Iranian Oil Ministry Mehr did not specify which countries were sent the ultimatum, but Spain, Italy and Greece are among Europe’s biggest buyers of Iranian oil. Iran’s targeting of Britain and France appeared to be a political decision to punish the two countries for supporting tougher sanctions against Iran over its nuclear program. Sunday’s announcement follows a flurry of contradictory signals by

Iran about backlash against the EU for imposing a boycott on Iranian oil. Last week, state media said Iran was planning to cut off oil exports to six EU nations, including France, but later reports said the nations were only told that Iran has no problem finding replacement customers for the European shipments. The EU sanctions, imposed last month, were part of Western efforts to target Iran’s critical oil sector in attempts to rein in Tehran’s nuclear program. Also on Sunday , the secretary general of Iran’s central bank said a decision by SWIFT, an international banking clearinghouse used by nearly every country and major corporation in the world, to shut Iran out from its respected network will not harm the country. “The country will not face any problems as a result of the SWIFT measures,” Mahmoud Ahmadi was quoted as saying by the official IRNA news agency. He added that Iran has been “pursuing alternative solutions” since Western nations imposed sanctions on Tehran. He did not elaborate. SWIFT said in a statement on its web site Friday that it will comply with expected instructions from the EU to cut off Iranian banks. SWIFT has previously brushed off international efforts to use its network to target countries or companies, telling enforcers that it does not judge the merits of the transactions passing through the portal.

Romney faces doubts

VAHID SALEMI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Iranian oil worker repaired a pipe at an oil refinery in Tehran in 2000.

Two judicial officials slain in Syria attacks BY BRIAN MURPHY AND BASSEM MROUE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DARIN OSWALD/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney talked about his plan to fix the U.S. economy at a rally in Idaho Friday. BY THOMAS BEAUMONT ASSOCIATED PRESS DES MOINES, Iowa — If Mitt Romney wins the Republican nomination for president, he’ll face the urgent task of inspiring the party’s conservative core and rallying them to beat President Barack Obama. Judging by his performances in the primaries and caucuses so far, and the challenge he faces next week, he’s got his work cut out for him. Even Republicans who think he’ll be the nominee worry about whether he can generate the intensity required to beat the Democratic incumbent. These party leaders and activists, from the states voting Feb. 28 and the most contested ones ahead in the fall, say Romney has made strides toward addressing this problem. But, they say, he needs to do more to convince the Republican base that he’s running to fundamentally reverse the nation’s course, not simply manage what they see as the federal government’s mess. “I think Romney will be the nominee, but there is still tremendous work to be done,” said Sally Bradshaw, a Florida Republican and adviser to former Gov. Jeb Bush. “He has got to find a way to unify the party and increase the intensity of support for him among voters who have supported Newt Gingrich, or Rick Santorum or Ron Paul or some-

one else. And that is going to be the key to how he does in the fall.” Romney leads in the delegate count for the nomination, and by a wide margin in private polling ahead of the Arizona primary Feb. 28. But the rising challenge from former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum in the contest also that day in Michigan, where Romney was born and raised, underscores doubts about Romney’s ability to ignite fervor in the GOP base. He nearly tied Santorum in Iowa, although entrance polls showed that more of Santorum’s backers than Romney’s said they were strongly behind their chosen candidate. Romney lost the primary in South Carolina last month to former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. More of Romney’s supporters in that state said they would support him with reservations in the general election than would support him enthusiastically. Santorum swept caucuses Feb. 7 in Colorado and Minnesota, and the nonbinding Missouri primary. Romney’s challengers have risen by sounding more conservative and displaying sharper differences with Obama, while nipping Romney’s appeal as the most electable against Obama. Romney, a former Massachusetts governor with a moderate past, has campaigned more as the likely GOP nominee, portraying himself as acceptable to swing

voters in a race where polls show voters prizing most a candidate’s perceived ability to beat Obama. Romney has pivoted toward the GOP’s conservative base in light of Santorum’s surge. He dove into the debate over whether birth control ought to be covered by health insurance provided by church-backed employers by faulting the Obama administration’s original push to do so as an “assault on religion.” But Romney was accused of overreaching after recently telling influential conservative activists, “I was a severely conservative Republican governor.” “In Romney’s case it’s like the difference between someone who grew up speaking Spanish and someone who went to school to speak Spanish,” said Constantin Querard, an Arizona Republican operative. “The moment Romney starts speaking, people know the difference.” A Pew Research poll taken last week shows the Republican voters nationally who think Romney is a strong conservative has dipped to 42 percent from 53 percent in November. Romney’s campaign aides say it’s unrealistic to think conservatives staring at the possibility of a second Obama term will not unify behind Romney. “President Obama is the best unifier the Republican Party could ever hope for,” Romney’s political director, Rich Beeson, told The Associated Press.

BEIRUT — Gunmen in Syria staged a guerrilla-style ambush that killed a senior state prosecutor and a judge Sunday in an attack that suggested armed factions are growing bolder and more coordinated in their uprising against President Bashar Assad’s regime. The roadway slayings — reported in an opposition-dominated northern region by the Syrian state news agency — came a day after a deadly hit-and-run attack on a political figure in the heart of the pro-Assad city of Aleppo. The targeted killings have not reached Assad’s inner circle, but they indicate a growing shift toward violent tactics by the opposition as it brings aboard more military defectors and seeks to tighten control over the small pieces of territory in its hands. The fears of a looming civil war have neighboring Jordan racing to finish a refugee camp near the Syrian border to handle a possible exodus of people fleeing for safety. Meanwhile, Egypt became the latest Arab nation to publicly snub Assad by ordering the withdrawal of its ambassador in Damascus. The Syrian government has offered some concessions, including proposing a referendum next week that could allow more political voices to challenge Assad’s Baath Party. But the opposition demands nothing short of Assad’s resignation. And the regime has not eased off its attacks on the opposition forces, which it describes as “terrorists” carrying out a foreign conspiracy to destabilize the country. In Homs in central Syria, government forces sent in reinforcements as they shelled the rebel-held Baba Amr district that has been under near constant barrage for nearly two weeks, said the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The group said at least 14 people were killed Sunday across Syria, half of them by government troops. “I’m worried that Syria is going to slide into a civil war,” British Foreign Secretary

William Hague told the BBC on Sunday. The U.N. last gave a death toll for the conflict in January, saying 5,400 people had been killed in 2011 alone. But hundreds more have been killed since, according to activist groups. An opposition group, Local Coordination Committees, says more than 7,300 have been killed since the uprising began more than 11 months ago. There is no way to independently verify the numbers, since Syria bans almost all foreign journalists and human rights organizations.

I’m worried that Syria is going to slide into a civil war. WILLIAM HAGUE Foreign Secretary, United Kingdom The latest assassinations came on a road in the northwest province of Idlib, which has become a patchwork of areas held either by the government or mutinous soldiers who have safe-haven bases in nearby Turkey. The state news agency SANA said gunmen opened fire on a car carrying Idlib provincial state prosecutor Nidal Ghazal and Judge Mohammed Ziadeh, who were killed instantly. The driver also was fatally wounded. Idlib has witnessed intense clashes between troops loyal to Assad and army defectors who attack and then melt into the rugged mountains. In June, the town of Jisr al-Shugour became the first area to fall into the hands of rebels, who were accused by the government of killing scores of people and setting government buildings on fire. Syrian troops loyal to Assad retook the area shortly afterward. On Saturday, SANA said gunmen shot to death Jamal al-Bish, a member of the city council of the nearby northern city of Aleppo. The city has been a center of support for Assad since the uprising began.

LOCAL COORDINATION COMMITTEES IN SYRIA/AP PHOTO

Protesters hold a banner against Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin during a demonstration against Syrian President Bashar Assad Friday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Sunny, with a high near 43. North wind between 10 and 14 mph. Low of 23.

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

High of 46, low of 35.

High of 54, low of 35.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21 4:00 PM “The Feminization of Indigeneity and the Paradox of Hawaiian Sovereignty.” Wesleyan University anthropology and American studies professor J. Kéhaulani Kauanui, author of “Hawaiian Blood: Colonialism and the Politics of Sovereignty and Indigeneity,” will speak. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York St.), Room 119a. 7:00 PM Yale-New Haven Regular Singing. Come sing from the Sacred Harp, an American shape-note songbook, first published in 1844, that advertises itself as “the best collection of sacred songs, hymns, odes, and anthems ever offered the singing public for general use.” Newcomers are always welcome! William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Room 205.

PANCAKES AND BOOZE BY TAKUYA SAWAOKA

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22 4:30 PM “Concord of Sweet Sounds: Shakespeare’s Musical Influences.” The program will explore Renaissance England and the composers, foreign influences, and popular songs and dances that shaped Shakespeare’s musical offerings. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.).

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23 5:00 PM “‘Save Our Children’: Gay Rights, Conservative Politics, and Racial Conflict in the 1970s.” Gillian Frank, a postdoctoral fellow at Stony Brook University, will speak. Sponsored by the Yale Research Initiative on the History of Sexualities. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York St.), Room 211. 8:00 PM Yale TAPS presents: “License to Tap.” TAPS, Yale’s only all-tap dancing group, is putting on its winter show. The program will feature everything from Broadway-style tap to cloginspired dancing, from the Beatles to Missy Elliott and more. Reserve free tickets at yaledramacoalition.org/taps2012. OffBroadway Theater (41 Broadway).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

8:00 PM “Clutch Yr Amplified Hear Tightly and Pretend.” Created by Adam Rigg DRA ’13. Dinner and drinks will be served at 6:30 p.m. Tickets $15, students $10. Yale Cabaret (217 Park St.).

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit SMALL TALK BY AMELIA SARGENT

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de La Bruyère, Editor in Chief, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Like Eastwood’s Harry 6 Aromatic resin 11 Emeril catchword 14 Start of un año 15 Add to the mix 16 Freudian subject 17 *Get really angry 19 Cocktail cooler, in Coblenz 20 Paris airport 21 Having trouble deciding 22 Hindu social division 24 Fish eggs 25 *Belfast-born flutist 27 “For shame!” 29 Sedative 30 Suffix with bed or home 31 Arthur of tennis 34 Selected on a ballot, with “in” 35 *2004 loser to George Bush 39 Source of quick cash, briefly 42 Operating system since the ’60s 43 Ball hit over the wall 47 Steals 50 Title street of kids’ TV 51 *Sandwich request 55 Accomplished 56 Islamic deity 57 College head 58 Shower affection (on) 59 __ tai: cocktail 60 One of the four that end this puzzle’s starred answers 63 Rock producer Brian 64 Stealthy craft 65 Zellweger of “Chicago” 66 Room with bookcases 67 Tolerate 68 Flowers with swordlike leaves, briefly

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2/20/12

By Geoffrey Lewis

DOWN 1 Expels from the country 2 “Should I deal you a hand?” 3 Abundantly supplied (with) 4 Helen of __ 5 Partner of hither 6 __ salts 7 “Filthy” dough 8 Preppy collars 9 Downed Russian space station 10 Mushroom with a black-edged top 11 Secretion used in hives 12 Stir up 13 Strolled, as to the saloon 18 French state 23 “Float like a butterfly” boxer 25 Karate relative 26 Habitué 28 __ Mahal 31 Landers or Lee 32 Enjoy the slopes 33 Put a spell on 36 Awed crowd reaction 37 Stat start 38 Casual hellos

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39 Humiliated 40 Like many rural roads 41 Thousand thousand 44 “Papa Don’t Preach” singer 45 Radiated 46 Flights leaving around midnight, usually 48 iPhone, e.g., briefly

SUDOKU EASY

2/20/12

49 Rules of conduct 50 In __: harmonious 52 Twin Cities suburb 53 Subatomic particle 54 Oohed and __ 58 Face-off with pistols 61 Squealer 62 Nonprofit’s URL ending

7 8 2 7 6 8 4 1

4 1 8 3 4 9 9 6 8 5 2

9 3 3 7 5 6 5 6 9 2 8 3 6 7 1 3 5 1 4 1 5 5 4 7 7 9


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

N

ew Haven’s Union Station, designed by American architect Cass Gilbert, opened in 1920 after its predecessor at the station’s Union Avenue site burned down. The beaux-arts building underwent significant renovations in 1985, and its restored interior contains an ornately decorated ceiling, limestone walls and stainless steel tunnels leading from the terminal to the tracks. Staff photographer VIVIENNE JIAO ZHANG reports.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Knicks 104 Mavericks 97

NBA Heat 90 Magic 78

SPORTS QUICK HITS

GYMNASTICS VICTORY AGAINST SCSU Yale gymnasts earned their highest score of the season Saturday at 190.825. The team, which has faced a high attrition rate in recent years, recognized the senior class in Talis Trevino ’12 and Mia Yabut ’12 after the meet. Check tomorrow’s News for more.

MBBALL Syracuse 74 Rutgers 64

SOCCER Barcelona 5 Valencia 1

NHL Wild 2 Bruins 0

MONDAY

TENNIS ECAC INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIP The women’s tennis team, ranked No. 25 in the nation, won this weekend’s championship for the fourth year in a row. The men’s team placed eighth in last weekend’s championship, losing to Harvard, Princeton and Columbia in consecutive days. Check tomorrow’s News for more.

“To get the sweep was big, and we go on the road feeling pretty good about ourselves.” KEITH ALLAIN ’80 HEAD COACH, MEN’S HOCKEY YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

MEN’S HOCKEY

ELIS SWEEP FINAL HOMESTAND With crucial wins over Dartmouth and Harvard, the Bulldogs turned their final home games of the season into their first winning streak since November. PAGE B3 GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale’s leading scorer Brian O’Neill ’12, right, was held without a goal on Saturday, but he contrubuted three assists to the Elis’ 7–1 rout of Harvard at Ingalls Rink.

Elis fall to Cantabs BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER CAMBRIDGE, MASS. — Going into this weekend, the Bulldogs controlled their own destiny. Now they will not be able to get by in the Ivy League without a little help from their friends.

BY ADLON ADAMS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER PRINCETON, N.J. — Ranked No. 1 in the nation for two weeks during the season, the Bulldogs entered the Men’s College Squash Association National Team Championships with high hopes. The season highlight, a win over Trinity that broke a historic 252-game winning streak, indicated Yale squash was on its way to top. But the Elis left Princeton, N.J., in a disappointing sixth place.

MEN’S BASKETBALL YALE 70, DARTMOUTH 61 HARVARD 66, YALE 51 Yale (17–7, 7–3 Ivy) took care of business at Dartmouth (5–21, 1–9 Ivy) 70–61 on Friday night, but it could not conquer the balanced attack of Harvard (23–3, 9–1 Ivy) and fell 66–51 in Cambridge, Mass on Saturday. The Elis now trail the Ancient Eight-leading Cantabs by two games in the standings with four games remaining on the schedule. Forward Greg Mangano ’12 said that the loss complicates winning at least a share of the Ivy League championship for the first time since 2002. “We need some help now,” Mangano said. “It makes it tougher now to win the championship. [But] I’ve seen crazier things happen … We can’t act like the season’s over.” The game at Harvard seemed an inevitable loss for the Elis soon after it started when the Crimson surged to a 35–15 advantage, but Yale finished the first half on an 11–0 run in the final SEE M. BASKETBALL PAGE B2

Squash finishes sixth in nation

MEN’S SQUASH

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Greg Mangano ’12 led Yale this weekend with 22 points, 11 rebounds and five blocks.

STAT OF THE DAY 5

The Bulldogs were seeded No. 3 entering the tournament, but started off on the wrong foot with an 8–1 loss to No. 6 Cornell on Friday. The Elis followed with a 6–3 victory over No. 7 Dartmouth on Saturday, but finished off the weekend with a loss to No. 5 Rochester 5–4. Captain Ryan Dowd ’12 said the team had hoped to win the tournament, and the losses were especially painful for the seniors. “We were expecting a tough weekend. The odds weren’t with us to win it all, but it was definitely possible,” Dowd said. “There are just so many good teams that are all really close in ability, so it could have been any of those teams that won.” On Friday, the Bulldogs were down 3–0 after the first round of matches against Cornell. Ned Martin ’14 and Joseph Roberts ’15 lost 3–1 at No. 6 and No. 9 respectively, while Ricky Dodd ’13

played out five games but lost narrowly by a 3–2 margin at No. 3. No. 7 Robby Berner ’12, who defeated Cornell’s Owen Butler in four games, recorded Yale’s only win against Cornell. Hywel Robinson ’13 came back after three weeks with a torn ligament in his toe to play at No. 2 but ended up reinjuring himself. Head coach Dave Talbott said regardless of the injury, the team just couldn’t come back from a 3–0 deficit. Robinson added that he hopes to both recover 100 percent from his injury and best his coach in a squash match before the start of next season. “You know, we played spotty yesterday, and Cornell played really strong,” Talbott said. “[The Big Red] played as well as they could’ve possibly played, and we didn’t match it. We got a little bit tight trying to come back. It’s really hard to win when you’re already down 3–0. It gives you no margin for error.” On Saturday, the Bulldogs managed to pull a 6–3 victory over a No. 7 Dartmouth. All four seniors — No. 3 John Roberts ’12, No. 4 Dowd, No. 6 Berner and No. 7 Samuel Clayman ’12 — won their matches against the Big Green, whereas Friday only Berner was able to secure a victory. No. 9 Eric Caine ’14 and No. 5 Martin both swept their matches in three games apiece. John Roberts said he was proud of the way the team came back against DartSEE M. SQUASH PAGE B2

THE NUMBER OF GOALS THE WOMEN’S HOCKEY TEAM SCORED AGAINST DARTMOUTH ON SATURDAY. The team had scored a total of five goals over the last eight games, dating back to Jan. 21. Their previous highest total came in the 3-2 win against Union back in Nov. 11.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“I think I’ve been asked that one-point question 4,000 times.” CARL EDWARDS NASCAR DRIVER, ON LOSING THE 2011 SPRINT CUP TITLE BY ONE POINT

Squash slides to sixth in country M. SQUASH FROM PAGE B1 mouth after losing the previous day to Cornell. “I thought we played pretty well,” he said. “We fought really well, and it felt good to get a win especially after our loss and still feeling the effects from that. We came back firing.” On Sunday, Yale went up against No. 5 Rochester and fell 5–4 in a close match. At No. 1, Kenneth Chan ’13 lost 3–0 after a match of long rallies, and No. 2 Dodd also suffered a losing sweep. The middle of the ladder, Nos. 3, 4, 5 and 6 , came out on top, with Berner winning at No. 6 in a tight 3–2 match. Clayman, Roberts and Caine all lost 3–2 at No. 7, No. 8 and No. 9 respectively. Clayman said the team suffered losses at the bottom of the ladder, as it adjusted the lineup to fill the spots for the injured Robinson and Charlie Wyatt ’14. “We were a little thinner than we usually are because our No. 2 [Robinson] is injured,” Clayman said. “Our 2-9 spots all had to shift, and it really showed when we lost 7, 8 and 9 all in five games.” He added that during the season, Yale bested Rochester in a close 5–4 match even when the entire Yale ladder was healthy. Everyone in the top nine said Berner was the strongest presence on the court for Yale. Berner came out of the weekend with a perfect 3–0 record. Walk-on Sam Shleifer ’15 was given a chance to play at No. 10, his first competitive collegiate match, and split his two matches after five games each. At least five to seven players on the Yale squad are expected to qualify for the individual national championships at Amherst College in Massachusetts, Dowd said. VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

After a season in which it ended Trinity’s 252-match winning streak, injuries hurt the men’s squash team at nationals championships. The Elis finished sixth.

Elis roll in final tuneups

Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .

Elis can’t solve Harvard

M. LACROSSE FROM PAGE B4 Greg Mahoney [’12] who does too,” Levings said of the Bulldog’s top attackman and midfielder, respectively. “Our defense has been together for three years now, so they’re playing very well too.” Both Gibson and Mahoney were recently named to the “Watch List” for the 2012 Tewaaraton Award, the honor handed out to the top lacrosse player in the country each year. Gibson will head an attack unit that also features Brandon Mangan ’14, although Levings said the third spot is still up for grabs. Gibson was named first-team All-Ivy last season and finished second on the team in scoring with 20 goals and 36 points. Mangan started all 12 games last year as a freshman and finished the season with 11 goals.

We always want to play as hard as we can and just let the chips fall where we may. DYLAN LEVINGS ’14 Midfielder, men’s lacrosse team While all three of Yale’s close defenders have started together for the past three seasons, the team has yet to decide who will fill the gap left by first-team All-New England goalkeeper Jonathan Falcone ’11. During Saturday’s game, Jack Meyer ’14, Peter Spaulding ’13 and Eric Natale ’15 all played in goal, though Meyer saw the most net time. The Bulldogs open their season next Saturday at home against St. John’s. Levings said the team is looking forward to the matchup because the Bulldogs pulled in a narrow 10–8 victory last season. “We faced them last year, and they played us tough,” the face-off specialist said. “We took a pretty big lead, and they battled back against us.” Saturday’s game will mark the start of a tough season for the Bulldogs, as Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Cornell are also ranked among the top 20 teams in the country. Last year, the Elis were ranked as high as No. 14 in the country during the season and finished tied for third in the Ivy League, although they did not get a bid into the NCAA Tournament. This year, the team aims to get that bid. “Coach [Andrew Shay] would say that we’re taking the season one day at a time and we go into every game thinking that we can win,” Levings said. “We always want to play as hard as we can and just let the chips fall where we may.” The game is scheduled for Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Reese Stadium. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Austin Morgan ’13 scored 17 points against Dartmouth on Friday and hit all 12 of his free throws, helping Yale to a 66–48 victory. M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1 four minutes to make it a nine-point game at the half. The Bulldogs started the second half like they finished the first and trimmed the once insurmountable Crimson lead to 42–38 when Mangano sank two free throws with 13:40 to play. Yale head coach James Jones said that the run reminded him of the Elis’ 21-point comeback against Columbia Feb. 11, which ended with a 59–58 win. “What we did last week was a miracle,” Jones said. “I thought we were there [again]. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t think we were going to win. It’s hard to come back all of the time.” Harvard did not let Yale get any closer, however, as six different Cantabs scored down the stretch to push the lead back to double digits. Harvard head coach Tommy Amaker said that a balanced offense has been one of his team’s best attributes. “One thing I love about this team is that we don’t have a go-to guy,” Amaker said. “We refer to the go-to guy as the open man.” When the storied rivals faced off in New Haven on Jan. 27, guard Laurent Rivard led the Crimson with 18 points and guard Brandyn Curry scored only four. It was

Curry who stole the show Saturday, dropping 18 just one night after being held scoreless against Brown. Nine Cantabs scored, with eight of them scoring at least four points. Mangano led the Bulldogs with 22 points, 11 rebounds and five blocks for his second double-double of the weekend. He scored 16 points and pulled down 15 rebounds at Dartmouth the night before.

What we did last week was a miracle. I thought we were there [again]. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t think we were going to win. It’s hard to come back all of the time. JAMES JONES Head coach, men’s basketball Guard Austin Morgan ’13 paced the Bulldogs with 17 points against Big Green as he hit all 12 of his free throws to overcome a career-high 23 points from Dartmouth

forward Gabas Maldunas. Mangano said that the game in Hanover was as much of a must-win as the game against Harvard. “We wanted to focus on getting a win [at Dartmouth] so this game [at Harvard] would still mean something,” Mangano said following the loss to the Crimson. “We were able to do that and focus our energy toward coming in here and trying to beat them. We weren’t able to do it.” The Bulldogs have four games remaining in the regular season, with the next game at home this Friday against Columbia. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

YALE 66 DARTMOUTH 48 YALE

38

28

66

DARTMOUTH

16

32

48

HARVARD 71 YALE 51 HARVARD

27

44

71

YALE

22

29

51


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Bill Haas wins Northern Trust Open in sudden death American Bill Haas won his fourth PGA Tour title on the 20th hole of the fourth round Sunday by making a 43 ft birdie putt. Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley had tied Haas at -7 before entering sudden death. Mickelson, playing for his 41st tournament, and second consecutive title this year after winning at Pebble Beach, missed on a chip-shot from the sand trap. Keegan Bradley missed his 15 ft putt.

Elis blast Ivy foes

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

7

1

2

.800

14

6

7

.648

Yale

5

4

0

.556

12

13

2

.481

Harvard

3

3

4

.500

8

8

11

.500

Dartmouth

3

4

3

.450

10

13

4

.444

Princeton

2

4

2

.375

8

13

6

.407

Brown

2

6

1

.278

8

15

4

.370

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Yale 7, Harvard 1

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 Yale at Princeton, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Princeton

9

0

1.000

19

4

.826

Yale

7

3

.700

15

9

.625

Harvard

6

3

.667

13

10

.565

Brown

6

4

.600

15

9

.625

Cornell

4

5

.444

10

13

.435

Penn

3

6

.333

10

13

.435

Dartmouth

2

7

.222

4

19

.174

Columbia

0

9

.000

2

21

.087

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Harvard 71, Yale 51 GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Kevin Limbert ’12 scored twiceas Yale routed the rival Cantabs, 7–1, on Saturday in their last regular season home game this year. BY JIMIN HE AND KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTERS In the last regular season homestand of their career, the seniors of the men’s hockey team went out in high fashion.

MEN’S HOCKEY YALE 5, DARTMOUTH 3 YALE 7, HARVARD 1 The Bulldogs (12–13–2, 9–10–1 ECAC) showcased the dynamic offense for which they are known. The team clinched a 5–3 win over Dartmouth (10–13–4, 7–10–3) on Friday night before throttling archrival Harvard (8–7–11, 6–4–9) 7–1 the next day. With the ECAC playoffs fast approaching, the wins launched the Elis into a tie with St. Lawrence for seventh place in the conference. Head coach Keith Allain ’80 said the two games combined showed the team at its full potential. “I think it’s been our best weekend of the year, certainly at home,” he said. “To get the sweep was big, and we go on the road feeling pretty good about ourselves.”

POWER PLAY TRIUMPHS

Kevin Peel ’12 did not see the ice much in Friday’s game against Dartmouth. But when he did, he made it count. Peel, despite only getting on the ice for the team’s power plays, scored a goal and notched a crucial assist in the final period that led to Yale’s fourth goal against the Big Green. It was Peel’s first time playing since Feb. 3, when he sustained a concussion against St. Lawrence. “It’s hard to stay warm on the bench,” Peel said. “The guys played really well tonight, and I just got a couple of fortunate bounces on the power play. It was nice just to be able to go out there and play a little bit.” With the Bulldogs clinging to a 3–2 lead in the third period, Chad Ziegler ’12 deflected Peel’s shot for a goal that gave the Elis a 4–2 lead. Although the second and third periods were filled with goals, the opening period was deadlocked until Yale broke through with 3:13 to go. On a counterattack, Andrew Miller ’13 found Anthony Day ’15, who had an open look on net. Goalie James Mello stopped that attempt, but Kenny Agostino ’14 was there waiting for the rebound. Before Mello could locate the puck, Agostino fired it into the back of the net, and Yale jumped out to a 1–0 lead. Dartmouth tied the game at 1–1 six minutes into the second period. But Brian O’Neill ’12 struck back and gave the Elis a 2–1 advantage less than a minute later. After receiving a pass from Colin Dueck ’13, O’Neill put the puck past Mello and raised his hand in triumph before the rink’s audience completely realized what had happened. “[Dueck] got the puck out to me, and I had all day,” O’Neill said. “If you make a decent shot, it’s going to go in.” But with just four minutes remaining

in the second frame, Dartmouth caught Yale off-guard with a counterattack and tied the game up at two. With the game hanging in the balance going into the third period, the Yale power play caught fire at the perfect time. Within the first five minutes of the final period, the Elis notched two power-play goals to take a 4–2 lead. The first goal came just two minutes into the frame on a perfectly executed power play. O’Neill picked out Jesse Root ’14 standing in the right circle and served up the puck. Root took a slap shot that found the roof of the net and claimed a 3–2 lead the Bulldogs would not relinquish.

I think it’s been our best weekend of the year, certainly at home … We go on the road feeling pretty good about ourselves. KEITH ALLAIN ’80 Head coach, men’s hockey The team scored a second-straight power-play goal just two minutes later off Ziegler, which gave Yale some breathing room. The team’s performance with a man-advantage marked improvement over last weekend, when the Elis scored only once off of 13 power plays. Although Dartmouth pulled within one with 10 minutes remaining, the Elis finished off the Big Green with nine seconds left when Peel scored an emptynetter, and the Big Green went home defeated.

CANTABS OVERWHELMED

Scoring three goals in the opening period, the Bulldogs dominated the tempo of Saturday’s game against Harvard from the beginning. The smackdown continued throughout as Yale racked up seven points to outmatch the Cantabs’ one. O’Neill notched three assists, and Agostino finished with two goals and two assists. Nearly nine minutes into the game, O’Neill gave the sold-out crowd at Ingalls Rink a lesson on puck handling. As Yale’s first power play wound down, the forward sprinted into the slot while fending off three defenders. O’Neill then quickly passed the puck to Antoine Laganiere ’13 for the opening goal. The Elis kept their red-hot offense rolling less than a minute later. Agostino skated down the right side of the rink and sent the puck across the ice to Andrew Miller ’13, who squeezed the puck into the net to widen the Elis’ lead to 2–0. Agostino said the Bulldogs’ ability to move the puck from defense to offense was responsible for much of their success over the weekend. “Transition hockey is so big in college hockey, and we capitalized on transitions numerous times,” Agostino said. “That’s how we got a lot of our goals this weekend.” With less than two minutes left in the

opening period, Harvard struggled to set up its offense in front the Yale net, which allowed Agostino to slip behind the Crimson defense unnoticed. Laganiere sent the puck to a wide-open Agostino for the easy breakaway goal. In a desperate attempt to maximize its scoring chances, the Crimson pulled its goaltender off the ice in exchange for an extra skater with less than a minute to go in the opening frame. The gamble led to two concurrent penalties for Yale and set up a five-on-three power play goal for Harvard just 23 seconds into the second period. But the Bulldogs answered a minute and a half later as forward Kevin Limbert ’12 scored on a breakaway to give the Elis a 4–1 lead. Allain said Limbert’s goal was a pivotal moment in the game. “For us to answer the way we did was huge,” Allain said. “When they scored it was a potential for the momentum and the game to slip into their favor, but I think with Limbert’s goal, we put our hands right around it again.” Tempers flared as the Crimson players increasingly favored an aggressive playing style. In a span of three minutes, the referees whistled seven penalties, five of which they assigned to the Cantabs. The Crimson finished the game with 13 penalties, while the Bulldogs had eight. Agostino took advantage of the chaos and scored an unassisted power play goal 8:48 into the second period, which put the Elis ahead by 5–1. Limbert said better awareness around the net led to the Bulldogs’ high-flying attack. “People are putting the extra effort in and making a solid tape-to-tape pass, and the receiver on the other hand is ready to shoot the puck,” he said. “I think everyone is making crisp passes and is ready to release the puck as soon as it’s on their stick.” With 1:29 left in the game, Limbert tallied his second goal of the night off a rebound from Matt Killian ’15. One minute later, Agostino fed fellow forward Day for the freshman’s first collegiate goal. The Elis will be back in action next weekend when they travel to Princeton and Quinnipiac for their final regularseason contests of 2012. Contact JIMIN HE at jimin.he@yale.edu and KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

YALE 5 DARTMOUTH 3 YALE

1

1

3

5

DARTMOUTH

0

2

1

3

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Harvard

9

1

.900

23

3

.885

2

Penn

7

2

.778

15

11

.577

3

Yale

7

3

.700

17

7

.708

4

Princeton

6

3

.667

15

10

.600

5

Cornell

5

5

.500

10

14

.417

6

Columbia

3

7

.300

14

12

.538

7

Brown

1

9

.100

7

20

.259

Dartmouth

1

9

.100

5

21

.192

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Harvard 66, Yale 51

3

2

2

7

HARVARD

0

1

0

0

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 Columbia at Yale, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

9

1

0

.900

26

3

0

.897

Dartmouth

6

3

1

.650

18

8

2

.679

Princeton

6

3

.650

12

OVERALL 13 4 .483

Harvard

6

4

0

.600

20

8

1

.707

Brown

2

8

0

.200

8

14

7

.397

Yale

0

10

0

.000

1

27

1

.052

IVY 1

LAST WEEK

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Harvard 4 Yale 0

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

1

Harvard

7

0

1.000

14

0

1.000

2

Yale

6

1

.857

15

1

.938

3

Penn

5

2

.714

8

3

.727

4

Princeton

3

3

.571

10

3

.769

5

Cornell

3

4

.429

11

6

.647

6

Dartmouth

1

5

.286

6

6

.500

7

Brown

1

5

.143

9

8

.529

8

Columbia

0

6

.000

5

10

.333

SUNDAY, FEB. 12 Harvard 5, Yale 4

YALE

OVERALL

1

LAST WEEK YALE 7 HARVARD 1

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 Yale at Columbia, 7:00 p.m.

NEXT WEEK

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 Howe Cup at Harvard, TBA

r e c y c l e y o u r y d n d a i l y


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS DERECK CHISORA After losing to WBC champion Vitali Klitschko, British boxer Dereck Chisora continued fighting at the post-fight press conference, sparking a brawl with fellow boxer David Haye, who was in attendance. Onlookers and entourages became entangled in the scuffle.

Eli loss tightens Ivy race BY JOHN SULLIVAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER With a postseason bid hanging in the balance, the Bulldogs missed an opportunity to solidify their second-place position in the Ivy League on Saturday night.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL YALE 66, DARTMOUTH 48 YALE 71, HARVARD 51 After Yale (15–9, 7–3 Ivy) beat Dartmouth (4–19, 2–7 Ivy) 66–48 Friday night and Harvard lost to Brown, the Elis had a chance to hand the Crimson its fourth loss and go a long way towards securing their secondstraight trip to the Women’s National Invitational Tournament. But Harvard (13–10, 6–3 Ivy) won 71–51, snapping the Bulldogs’ three-game winning streak against the Crimson. “I know it’s cliché to say, but they wanted it more than we did,” head coach Chris Gobrecht said of the Cantabs. “Harvard played like a team that was pretty upset that it had lost to us three times in a row, and that was evident. They were throwing all the punches and we were just ducking them.” After the Dartmouth win, Gobrecht told the News she was worried by the team’s sloppy play in the second half and feared it would carry over into the Harvard game. Sure enough, the Crimson jumped out to an 11–2 lead in the first six minutes of the game the following night, as the Elis missed nine of their first 10 shots. Harvard’s lead grew to 24–10 with eight minutes remaining in the half, but Yale battled back. Janna Graf ’14, who led Yale in scoring with 15 points for the game, scored six of the Elis’ 12 points to close out the half, and the Bulldogs held the Crimson without a field goal for over eight minutes. Yale had a chance to tie it up on Hayden Latham’s ’15 three-point attempt with 15 seconds remaining in the half, but the shot fell short, and Harvard’s Emma Golen made a jump shot with one second on the clock to give the Crimson a five-point lead at the break. The Elis cut the lead to four on guard Megan Vasquez’s ’13 threepointer one minute into the second half, but that was as close the Elis got for the rest of the game. The Crimson slowly started taking over and broke the game open with about seven minutes remaining. Vasquez fouled Harvard forward Victoria Lippert, who went to the line for two free throw attempts, and a technical foul called on West gave Harvard two more shots from the charity stripe. Lippert converted all four chances to increase the Crimson lead to 16, and the Elis never could recover. While they did not say poor referee calls could account for

VIVIENNE JIAO ZHANG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Janna Graf ’14, left, led Yale in scoring with 15 points against Harvard, but the Elis fell 71–51. Yale remains in second place in the Ivy League, a half game ahead of Harvard. the outcome of the match, both Gobrecth and West said the officiating helped rank up the score in Harvard’s favor. Harvard shot 25 free throws and made 17 of them, while Yale was awarded only 10. “The officiating was a really big factor in the game,” West said. “The officials messed with our heads and took us out of our game. It seemed like no matter what we did on defense we got called for fouls.” Despite the unfocused play Gobrecht said categorized the first game of the weekend, the Bulldogs came out on top against Dartmouth. The Big Green came in with only one Ivy League win under its

belt, and the Bulldogs dominated the opening half. Yale’s defense was stifling and held Dartmouth to only 16 points while forcing 16 turnovers. With the Bulldogs’ offense clicking as well, the team assisted 11 of its 14 baskets in the first half and went into the break up by 22. “In the first half we were shooting well, and we went with the game plan we set out with,” guard Aarica West ’13 said. “We let up in the second half though, and I think we were just riding the waves of that first-half performance.” In the second half, the Big Green outscored the Elis 32–28, and while Yale still won by double digits, Gobrecht said she was

less than thrilled with the team’s performance. The weekend leaves rivals Yale and Harvard battling for second after Princeton pulled wins over Cornell and Columbia this weekend and effectively locked up its third consecutive Ivy League title. The Tigers (19–4, 9–0 Ivy) would have to lose three out of their final five games to allow the Bulldogs or the Crimson to steal the title — a monumental collapse for a team that has lost only one conference game in the past three seasons. A first-place finish in the Ivy League grants the victor an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament, but the second-place team still gets a postseason berth in

the Women’s National Invitational Tournament. The Bulldogs are currently in second at 7–3, a half-game ahead of Harvard. Yale has four games remaining on its schedule, and the Cantabs have five. Both teams must still face Princeton once more. Guard Allie Messimer ’13 said the weekend’s loss to Harvard boosted the team’s determination to finish strong in the games remaining this season. “This loss will be a huge motivation for the team, and hopefully will give us the edge to finish off the next four games.” The Bulldogs go on the road next week to face Columbia and Cornell before returning home for the final weekend of the sea-

son. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

YALE 66 DARTMOUTH 48 YALE

38

28

66

DARTMOUTH

16

32

48

HARVARD 71 YALE 51 HARVARD

27

44

71

YALE

22

29

51

Elis finish preseason strong BY JOHN SULLIVAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While the scrimmages the No. 18 Bulldogs played against Tufts and Quinnipiac this weekend were unscored, Yale’s performance showed promise as the team prepares to kick off its official season next Saturday.

MEN’S LACROSSE Although no official statistics were kept, and the scoreboard itself showed only time, midfielder Dylan Levings ’14 said Yale outplayed both Division III Tufts and Quinnipiac. Yale’s offense moved the ball well and opened up scoring opportunities early and frequently against each opponent. The defense meanwhile effectively contained the other teams’ offenses and the Yale goalkeepers were rarely tested. Levings said the team was happy with its offensive and defensive development at this point in the season. “We have Matt Gibson [’12], who looks good all the time, and YDN

Matt Gibson ’12, left, who is an early candidate for the top individual lacrosse award in the country, led Yale in two weekend scrimmages.

SEE M. LACROSSE PAGE B2

Today's Paper  

Feb. 20, 2012

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