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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 90 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLEAR

29 37

CROSS CAMPUS We will always love her.

W. SQUASH CANTABS SQUEAK PAST BULLDOGS

NEW HAVEN POLICE

ARCHITECTURE

M. HOCKEY

DeStefano appoints former political foe to police commission post

SYMPOSIUM EXAMINES ROLE OF HAND DRAWINGS

Troubles continue for Elis with two weekend road losses in upstate N.Y.

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 CULTURE

PAGE B4 SPORTS

Confidentiality concerns arise

M. BASKETBALL

STUNNING COMEBACK

Students eating in Berkeley College were treated to a boombox rendition of Whitney Houston’s “Star-Spangled Banner” late Sunday night. As the late music star’s version of the national anthem played, students eating in the dining hall at the time said the mood turned solemn. Houston died Saturday at the age of 48.

ADMINS ACKNOWLEDGE DIFFICULTIES IN KEEPING SEXUAL MISCONDUCT COMPLAINTS PRIVATE BY CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTER The Rhodes Trust’s knowledge of the informal sexual assault complaint against Patrick Witt ’12 has highlighted the challenges that the University faces in upholding its confidentiality procedures.

Don’t go. Piersonites

concerned about Pierson Master Harvey Goldblatt’s anticipated departure at the end of the next academic year are circulating a petition in to encourage the longtime master to stay. Master G, who has served as Pierson master since 1994, is also the chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT Although administrators said all parties involved in formal or informal sexual misconduct complaints — including University officials, complainants and respondents — are asked not to speak about case proceedings, University spokesman Tom Conroy told the News Sunday night

The Elis rallied from a 21-point deficit Saturday to sneak past Columbia by a single point. PAGE B1

Yale Tomorrow, yesterday.

Though the University pulled in $3.88 billion in its recordbreaking five-year Yale Tomorrow campaign, Stanford University announced it had raised $6.2 billion in the five-year Stanford Challenge campaign, which ended Dec. 31. Stanford garnered 560,000 gifts from 166,000 donors to surpass its $4.3 billion goal, according to a press release.

Conspiracy theories. A

new debate has emerged concerning the University’s offer during World War II to evacuate the children of Oxford University staff from war-torn Britain to the United States, according to a recent article in The Daily Mail. Some scholars argue that Yale extended the invitation in an attempt to save Britain’s “intellectually superior children,” the article stated.

Forget Sex Week. Ezra Stiles

College’s “Arts Week” ended Sunday with a “classical brunch” event held in Master Stephen Pitti’s house. Organized by Stiles’ Arts Week coordinators, the series ran Feb. 5-12 and featured cookiedecorating activities, crafts projects and a cabaret show in the Crescent Theater.

But not completely. Sex Week events held today include a Yale Faculty Lunch Series talk with Office of LGBTQ Resources Director Maria Trumpler, a workshop on the “imperfect art of dating” at St. Thomas More and a “Fornication 101” talk with Oh Megan! Sex Week began Feb. 4 and will conclude tomorrow on Valentine’s Day. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1918 Student managers of Yale’s eating houses meet to approve the University’s food conservation rules, intended to save money on food. The rules, by request of the United States Food Administration, state that Mondays and Wednesdays will be observed as “wheatless” days, Tuesdays as “meatless” days and Saturdays as “porkless” days. In addition, at least one meal every day must be either meatless or wheatless. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Int’l efforts expand in Latin Amer. BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER This past weekend, Yale expanded its efforts to increase the University’s presence abroad into a new region: Mexico — the first Latin American country with which the University has partnered. From Thursday to Saturday of last week, Yale hosted a group of 22 public and private sector leaders from Mexico for the inaugural CIDE-Yale Mexico Leadership Program. The program — jointly run between Yale and Mexico’s Center for Research and Training in Economics (CIDE) — offers discussions led by Yale faculty on governance, public policy and leadership. Yale has offered similar highly customized senior leadership programs to other international partners including senior cohorts of Chinese government and university officials and members of the Indian parliament, but last weekend marked the first leadership program conducted with a Latin American partner. “This is an example of the kind of high level leadership training that we’ve been doing in a variety of countries around the world,” University President Richard Levin said, “I do think it’s a great way to establish Yale as an institution of excellence in these countries, by going directly to leadership levels and have them come away with an opinion that Yale can contribute something really valuable to their thinking.” Since 1996, Levin has led the UniverSEE MEXICO PAGE 4

that administrators are not investigating how the information leaked to the Rhodes Trust. Still, administrators acknowledged difficulties in enforcing confidentiality rules, and higher education experts interviewed said universities are limited in their ability to control the flow of information. “Our processes cannot control for conversations that happened before [somebody brings a complaint to University officials],” said Melanie Boyd ’90, assistant dean of student affairs. “The fact that someone is participating in a [University] process does not somehow create a magical cone of silence around that entire event, but it does set up an expectation SEE CONFIDENTIALITY PAGE 4

CA R E E R C H O I C E S

Finance continues to draw Elis

Y

ale’s most recent report on post-graduation career choices indicated a sustained decline in the number of students entering jobs in business and finance. Still, as the majority of this year’s application processes for such jobs are winding down, interest and competition among Yale’s Wall Street hopefuls seems to have remained as intense as ever. LORENZO LIGATO reports.

A report compiled by the University’s Office of Institutional Research last June showed that the number of Yalies who had gone into “business and finance” — a category that includes jobs such as banking, real estate, accounting and areas of consulting — had decreased significantly over the past decade. The decline has been mirrored across Ivy League schools since 2006: at Princeton, according to an annual report issued by Princeton’s Office of Career Services, 35.9 percent of the class of 2010 entered finance after graduation, down from 46 percent in 2006. Similarly, at Harvard, while more graduates enter finance than any other field, a survey administered in May 2011 showed that only 17 percent of the graduating class held a job in finance, after a peak of 28 percent in 2008. Still, the declining numbers do not necessarily point to a change in students’ career ambitions. Yale professors and students interviewed said that despite international financial instability and a rising anti-banking climate that boiled over in the form of Occupy Wall Street, they still observe great interest in the field. In this year’s finance recruiting season, Yalies submitted 2,781

GRAPH STUDENTS EMPLOYED ONE YEAR AFTER GRADUATION IN BUSINESS OR FINANCE 2010

14%

2008

26%

2006

24%

2004

26%

2002

20%

2000

31% 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35 YDN

internship applications, said Allyson Moore, associate dean of Yale College and director of Undergraduate Career Services. Even though this number represents a drop from last

year’s 3,148 applications, she said the recruiting process remains as competitive as ever. SEE FINANCE CAREERS PAGE 6

Economy drives growth in master’s apps BY ANTONIA WOODFORD STAFF REPORTER Total applications to Yale’s master’s programs jumped 19 percent this year, with the largest increases in programs that professors say lead to promising job prospects during a time of economic uncertainty. Master’s programs in computer science, engineering and applied science, and statistics have steadily attracted more applicants over the past five years, and continued to generate

additional interest this admissions cycle. Those three programs received 45 percent, 41 percent and 28 percent more applications, respectively, this January than they did in 2011, according to data from Robert Colonna, director of admissions for the Graduate School. Professors interviewed said these programs are probably more attractive to students because they provide qualifications for the types of jobs that remain attainable in today’s economy. “Many students applying to

master’s programs have a specific employment goal in mind, so the demand for jobs in those areas must be good,” Graduate School Dean Thomas Pollard said in a Friday email. But directors of these master’s programs said they appeal to students for more than just the career possibilities they create. Holly Rushmeier, chair of the Computer Science Department, said in a Friday email that she views the increased interest in her department’s master’s degree as part of a “worldwide increase

in computer science.” More students are enrolling in computer science courses at the undergraduate level at Yale and elsewhere, Rushmeier said, leading more students to continue studying the discipline at the graduate level. She said students often become interested in computer science because they experience the impact of technology companies such as Google and Facebook and of devices like smartphones in their daily lives, in addition to seeing “career potential” in the field.

Applications to the master’s program in computer science have steadily risen from 43 in 2008 to 94 in 2010 and 231 in 2012, according to data from the graduate admissions office. In the statistics master’s program, applications have also “gone through the roof” in recent years, said David Pollard, director of graduate studies for statistics. The program received 276 applications this year, up from 56 applications in 2008. SEE MASTERS PAGE 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “How was not having locks on bedroom doors ever an acceptable soluyaledailynews.com/opinion

GUEST COLUMNIST SAM COHEN

Palin’s mob mentality While I disagree with just about every single thing that was said at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C. this weekend, I do agree that these types of gatherings are healthy for political movements — they offer a chance to hash out ideas, test new lines of attack, showcase rising stars and provide energy and inspiration to the movement’s followers. I was excited to be outraged by the ideas of the speakers and indignant at their unfair attacks on President Obama — and I was as happily outraged and indignant as I had expected. But, as I watched conservative icon Governor Sarah Palin speak, I was also filled with disappointment and foreboding. In the middle of her speech, Palin was interrupted by a group of Occupy protesters attempting to “mic check” her. As with most interrupted speeches, the angry audience turned on the protestors, shouting “USA! USA! USA!” to drown out their protest. From the crowd, this was a perfectly understandable reaction — I find it as annoying as they do when AIDS activists interrupt President Obama or Occupy activists interrupt Republican candidates. What was both frightening and disappointing, however, was to see Sarah Palin relish in shutting up the protestors. Most often, interrupted politicians just smile politely until security guards clear the protestors, or they argue back about the policy being criticized. Rarely does a speaker actively try to drown out the opposition simply by using a microphone to out-shout them. Palin, as rogue as ever, hesitated and then decided to follow the mob. “USA! USA! USA!” she began chanting while she waved her fist. And when security had removed the rabblerousers, she smirked and said to her followers, “See, you just won! You see how easy that is?” That message is precisely the problem in America today. Politics should not be about winning by drowning out the opposition. Movements should win because their ideas and policies are better and because they are championed with optimism. Being able to silence opposition so easily is not something Palin should be proud of. It is a sad sign that loud voices and clever slogans are more powerful than sound policy and calm thinking. With this degeneration of politics, it’s no wonder Congress has a 15 percent approval rating.

“A mob’s always made up of people, no matter what. Mr. Cunningham was part of a mob last night, but he was still a man,” Harper Lee wrote in “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Sarah Palin, in the midst of savoring the dominance of a mob mentality, forgot that political movements are driven by individuals. Too often, I have dismissed the Tea Party as a bunch of angry, cranky, white kooks — I forget that the members of the Tea Party are not just protestors, but are mothers and fathers. Too often the Republican Party, the party that famously espouses the importance of the individual, forgets that the Occupy Wall Street protestors aren’t just a bunch of commies to be squashed, but are desperate Americans seeking relief. We can disagree over policy, we can disagree over governing philosophy and we can disagree over moral issues. But everyone of every political stripe should agree that no one benefits when we drown out a minority opinion just because we can. Sarah Palin is not a disgrace because her policies are dumb, nor because she can’t name a newspaper. She is a disgrace because she preaches the lowest, meanest, basest form of politics.

MANAGING EDITORS Alon Harish Drew Henderson ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Serna OPINION Julia Fisher DEPUTY OPINION Jack Newsham NEWS David Burt Alison Griswold CITY Everett Rosenfeld Emily Wanger FEATURES Emily Foxhall CULTURE Eliza Brooke

SCI. TECH Eli Markham SPORTS Zoe Gorman Sarah Scott ARTS & LIVING Nikita Lalwani Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi Chase Niesner Erin Vanderhoof MULTIMEDIA Christopher Peak Baobao Zhang MAGAZINE Eliana Dockterman Molly Hensley-Clancy Nicole Levy PHOTOGRAPHY Zoe Gorman Kamaria Greenfield Victor Kang

When Yale students steal from the Occupy New Haven protests, we buy into that politics — we see the protests as nothing more than a big mass of tents, and we forget the individual protestors’ hopes and fears. When we stage a kiss-in to protest homophobic speakers, we reduce ourselves to a loud stunt and discredit the value of our ideas. We all like to say that politics is superficial at best. But that will never change if we wait for politicians like Sarah Palin to realize that politics is no more civil than every individual American’s conduct. SAM COHEN is a freshman in Calhoun College. Contact him at samson.cohen@yale.edu .

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The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2013. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

SILLIWIN01 ON “BEDROOM LOCKS TO SPAN ALL COLLEGES”

The great big sinkhole You have to give Mayor John DeStefano credit for consistency. Without fail, he sticks to three basic principles of economic success: Tax, spend and tax again. This past week, a parade of poor decisions emanated from City Hall. In his State of the City Address last Tuesday, DeStefano crooned that New Haven’s Grand List — a measure of taxable property — increased by $861 million. Higher valued property means more tax revenue, an additional $6 million per year by the mayor’s estimate. The mayor injected a not so subtle subtext into the State of the City: With this fiscal windfall, he can further combat New Haven’s social ills, be they high unemployment or failing public schools. It’s time we said enough. Any more money for DeStefano’s administration throws good cash after the bad. Last year, the city spent close to $224 million from its taxpayers (not to mention $200 million in grants from the state — again, the taxpayer’s dollars). Much of that paid for shoddy school reform and

bloated pension obligations. And the mayor plans on spending close to $30 million more in 2012. On the same NATHANIEL day as his ZELINKSY address, the mayor’s office ON POINT held a meeting to promote DeStefano’s latest brainchild: a downtown streetcar, projected to cost a whopping $20-$30 million. Yup, that’s right. A streetcar. On fixed tracks. With trolleys — buses apparently don’t cut it for New Haven commuters. Now you see why DeStefano likes that rise in revenue. The mayor claims the trolley will pay for itself. If that happens, call the Guinness Book of World Records. We would have to document the first profitable public transport system in history. Until then, we can confidently say that the mayor is planning another Elm City sinkhole.

DeStefano sees businesses as a honey pot for funding ineffective projects. And his resulting tax policies send a clear message to entrepreneurs: Stay out of New Haven. Sadly, the mayor’s brand of economic illiteracy repels jobs at the very time his constituents need them most. But this tax-more think-less trend is nothing new for the city. In the past, the mayor has proposed a local option sales tax, a scheme that would have forced retailers out of town. And the Board of Aldermen continues to extort Yale with the threat of opening High and Wall Street to cars if the University doesn’t fork over more money. Instead of spending with abandon, we need to find prudent ways to cut back on our recklessly rising budget and taxes. An easy first step would be dismantling Occupy New Haven — few to no people actually live there, but the cost of policing the Green daily drains the city’s resources. DeStefano needs to emulate many liberal mayors around the country in taking down the costly tents.

And in the long run, he must seriously grapple with the challenges to New Haven’s fiscal solvency. Paying lip service to benefit reform is not enough — the city faces a mountain of pension debt that only increases with time. Admittedly, DeStefano faces intractable political partners at the local and state levels. The union-backed Board of Aldermen all but refuses to act maturely when it comes to the budget. And Gov. Dannel Malloy continues to promote policies that stifle job growth throughout Connecticut. But the mayor’s poor colleagues are no excuse for his own bad decisions, the great trolley boondoggle chief among them. DeStefano should ask himself how he wants history to remember his 20 year mayoralty. Does he want to be lauded for taking gutsy steps to save his city? Or will his legacy be one of inept fiscal management? Right now, my bet is on the latter. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a junior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

S TA F F I L L U S T R AT O R I L A NA S T R AU S S

A Run-In With Cupid

POLITICIANS SHOULD LISTEN TO DISSENT RATHER THAN DROWNING IT OUT AS PALIN DID AT CPAC.

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tion?”

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Julia Fisher, Opinion Editor, Yale Daily News http://www.yaledailynews.com/contact opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 90

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T C H R I S T I A N VA Z Q U E Z

CPAC smitten by Mitt, Marco Last weekend, I traveled to Washington, D.C., with about 20 other Yalies to attend to the Conservative Political Action Conference. I wasn’t sure what to expect. The week before, I had grown disillusioned with the infighting present in the GOP and the dragged out contest the primaries seemed to become after a string of Rick Santorum victories in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri. Like many college Mitt Romney supporters, I threw my support behind Mitt after his victory in the New Hampshire primary. But I wasn’t expecting to encounter a Romney crowd at CPAC. After all, Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Santorum seemed content to continue deriding Romney and one another. Surely, the anti-Romney sentiment would be felt at a conference of conservative activists with a history of delusional support for Paul. But my expectations could not have been more off. The GOP infighting that has been the wide subject of media attention was not as intense as I thought it would be. In fact, in calling on candidates to prove their conservative chops, my party has been using the primaries to strengthen the final nominee. A common adage at the conference was that we are no longer running a Rockefeller Republican for the White House. And on Fri-

day, Romney delivered a speech that reassured the conservative base that this is true, leveling jabs at Obama and at the liberals of his home state of Massachusetts.

YOUNG CONSERVATIVES WILL FORM AN IMPORTANT BASE OF SUPPORT FOR ROMNEY IN NOVEMBER. But Romney’s support from conservatives wasn’t the only momentous victory he scored at CPAC. As his victory among a pool of voters of whom 44 percent were students showed, Romney has the support of the young Republican base. Young people, who have supported Ron Paul in the past two election cycles, voted for Romney because we believe he is the only candidate with the fiscal aptitude and leadership ability to reverse the growth of the dependency state that has been expanding for far too long. Young vot-

ers were crucial in the Reagan and Bush victories of the ’80s, and if 2008 is any indication, they will present a major portion of the 2012 electorate. If the Republicans plan on ousting Obama in November, Romney must be the nominee. Romney made it clear that his time as a businessman and governor will prove invaluable assets as president. He spent close to three decades eliminating waste, balancing budgets and turning around failing business. We want to nominate someone who can fix Washington, not some career politician who is a client of it. Those still not committed have to look at his record within the context of the state that he governed. He was the governor of Massachusetts, not Utah, and he had to deal with the circumstances of his liberal electorate. But as much as possible, he still led as a true conservative, using his line-item veto power more than 800 times across four budgets. But more than ideology, conservatives need to focus on what ticket the GOP must create in order to defeat Obama in November. This is why Senator Marco Rubio of Florida was able to win 34 percent of the vice presidential straw poll vote in a field of 11 choices that included popular conservatives like Chris Christie,

Bob McDonnell and Paul Ryan. A Romney-Marco Rubio ticket would likely carry the vitally important state of Florida and help forge a Republican victory in November. The mindset we must have at the moment is a strategic one. Santorum’s statement that nominating someone who is not a true conservative would be a hollow victory is not only unfounded when considering Romney — it’s absurd. Conservatives would align more favorably with any of the GOP candidates than President Obama. The only way that Republicans can take back the White House is by nominating Romney. Although the prolonged primary season will serve to anchor Romney ideologically, it also allows Obama and the Democrats to do what they are most skilled at — campaigning. But Mitt Romney is simply the best candidate. He’s a committed leader and a successful businessman. Unlike many of the other candidates, he is not an amalgam of empty rhetoric. Many decried Reagan in the same manner three decades ago — and they were wrong. CHRISTIAN VAZQUEZ is a junior in Branford College and a former production and design editor of the News. Contact him at christian.vazquez@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2011 · yaledailynews.com

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PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 7:00 PM Google Tech Talk. Nikolas Coukouma from Google will be speaking about how the company approached making Google Docs available offline. Hosted by Ventures in Science. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Rm. 207. 11:59 PM Shades Valentine’s Day Jam: A Midnight Love Affair. Bring yourself, your lovers and your friends to start off Valentine’s Day right with the musical (and sexual) healing of Shades! Free admission. Saybrook College (242 Elm St.), Dining Hall.

CORRECTIONS AND C L A R I F I CAT I O N S FRIDAY, FEB. 10

The article “New Haven lauds growth of tax base“ implied that all grand list growth translates into increased property tax revenue. In fact, since mill rates are adjusted to compensate for revaluations of properties, only net new grand list growth — the portion not due to revaluation — translates into increased tax revenue. The article “Alpha Sigma Phi expansion slows“ incorrectly referred to Nicholas Ribovich ’14 as interested in helping to form an Alpha Sigma Phi chapter at Yale. A chart accompanying the article “Law School loan forgiveness reduced” stated that students could remain in the Law School’s COAP program for ten years from the date of entry in the program. In fact, students can use COAP for up to ten years, but those years do not have to be consecutive.

Env. engineering shifts senior req’t BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER The environmental engineering major joined the rest of Yale’s engineering programs in officially offering its seniors the option to complete a team design project instead of individual research.

Teaching chemical engineers how to accomplish their goals… should be a priority now.. WILLIAM HUTCHISON ’12 This spring, the design project seminar in chemical engineering expanded to include environmental issues, but only one environmental engineering major has enrolled in the course. Paul Van Tassel, chair of the Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department and professor for the course, said the course allows students to develop products as they would with an engineering firm, adding that he hopes it will grow more popular with environmental engineers in the future. “The design component brings the course between academic and professional [work],” he said. “It’s great for them to be able to work with other majors and to have design experience. It’s going to be valuable for their careers.” All engineering programs now offer either senior design seminars or opportunities to form a team under the guidance of a professor. After a series of lectures on the design process, the 13 members of the Van Tassel’s chemical and environmental engineering course will split into several groups with specific projects, such as research into alternative fuels. Rawan Maki ’12, the only environmental engineering major in the class, said she enrolled because she thought the course would enable her to evaluate the “real-life” considerations of professional engineers. “It would be useful for anybody thinking of environmental consulting, management and definitely engineering to understand the processes

of design,” she said. Dana Miller ’12, another environmental engineering major, is also pursuing a team project, though she is getting credit for an interdisciplinary design course in mechanical engineering that is not officially an option for environmental engineering majors. Another motivation for expanding his course, Van Tassel said, was to further integrate the two fields of chemical and environmental engineering. Since its inception in 1998, the environmental engineering major at Yale has grown slowly, restricted by its faculty size of four, he said, adding that it has remained combined with the chemical engineering program to ensure it has sufficient resources. William Hutchison ’12, a chemical engineering major in Van Tassel’s course, said he appreciates the greater emphasis on environmental issues in the design course. “Teaching chemical engineers how to accomplish their goals while avoiding negative environmental impact as much as possible should be a priority now,” Hutchison said. “Chemical engineers are responsible for designing and creating plants that can have huge impacts on the environment.” Maki said she has noticed that chemical and environmental engineering majors are becoming increasingly connected, calling environmental engineering a “chemistrybased, technical, design major.” But Hutchison still sees a large separation between the majors. He said he found that even cross-listed courses often only focused on one of the fields. “I haven’t really felt the combination of the two departments very much,” Hutchison said. “The two fields are fairly distinct, so I suppose it would be better if they were separate, but I can’t say it’s been bad that they are combined.” Five students majored in environmental engineering last year, and three majored in engineering science with a focus on environmental engineering. The two majors merged this year. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

Conflict minerals Control of these resources finances — and spurs — fighting between armed groups, both domestic and foreign. The minerals include gold, wolframite, coltan and cassiterite, which are used to make consumer electronics.

Mayor places former foe on police board BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER After a bitter campaign against Mayor John DeStefano Jr. in September’s primary, Anthony Dawson was appointed to the Board of Police Commissioners Friday. Although Dawson, a lieutenant in the protective services department at Yale-New Haven Hospital and a former 16-year alderman, unsuccessfully challenged DeStefano in the mayoral primary on a platform of correcting the mayor’s policing and public safety blunders, DeStefano appointed the Hill resident to the six-person Board of Police Commissioners. After dropping out of the mayoral race after a poor performance in the Sept. 13 primary, Dawson endorsed the mayor’s candidacy 10 days before the general election. City officials stressed that there was no connection between Dawson’s endorsement and the mayor’s decision to appoint him to the board. “As a longtime member of the Board of Aldermen, a member of Yale-New Haven Hospital’s protective services team and a tireless advocate of New Haven residents, Tony will be a great addition to the Board of Police Commissioners and support to Chief Esserman,” DeStefano said in a Friday press release. In endorsing DeStefano, Dawson lauded the mayor’s focus on community policing strategies and other methods to improve public safety, despite criticizing his leadership on these same issues while campaigning against

YDN

When Anthony Dawson announced his mayoral candidacy in May, he attacked Mayor John DeStefano Jr. for his handling of crime issues in the city. Now, he will serve on DeStefano’s Board of Police Commissioners. him. At the May 14 press conference announcing his mayoral candidacy, Dawson said he would strengthen the city’s police force, which he said had been “gutted” by DeStefano’s administration for several years. Dawson also levelled charges of “patronage and corruption” against DeStefano, pointing to the rotation among city boards and commissions of mayoral appointees. But at the Oct. 28 press conference in which he endorsed DeStefano, Dawson retracted his past criticism and acknowledged that DeStefano had “reset” community policing strategies by bringing in Esserman as NHPD chief. “What I said then was a political statement that I was making

at the time,” he said at the press conference. “After the primary, people felt that we should pull it together.” In selecting Dawson, DeStefano looked for people who would bring a diverse group of talents and perspectives to the role, City Hall spokesman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said. Richard Epstein, the current chairman of the Board of Police Commissioners, said Dawson will bring his longstanding community involvement and interest in the Elm City’s policing to the board. Dawson said he has been a “supporter” of the New Haven Police Department since he worked in the department’s summer youth program at age 16, and

looks forward to working with rank-and-file officers and NHPD Chief Dean Esserman. Dawson’s decision to endorse DeStefano was unrelated to his appointment to the Board of Police Commissioners, Benton stressed. “Anyone who suggests this is something that is simply based on political support does a disservice to Mr. Dawson,” Benton said. “I think if you look at his record he’s someone who’s certainly wellqualified to serve on the board.” Dawson will replace Bishop Theodore Brooks on the six-person board, and his term will last until Feb. 1, 2015. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

Petition urges conflict-free investing BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER The student organization Yale Accountability and Corporate Transparency for Congo called for the University to become a “conflict-mineral free campus” in a recent petition sent to faculty members. For the past two years, undergraduate and graduate student activists have lobbied the Yale administration to end any dealings with companies whose products contain “conflict minerals” from the Congo — minerals the students claim drive deadly conflicts in the region. Though the proposal has been under the review of Yale’s Advisory Committee on Investor Responsibility for over a year, students have renewed their efforts on the issue by asking faculty and U.S. Senator John Kerry ’66 to pressure the administration to adopt the resolution. But ACIR committee

chair Jonathan Macey LAW ’82 said Sunday that it is difficult for companies to know whether their products contain conflict minerals and that there is no concrete evidence that the students’ proposal would positively impact conflicts in the Congo. “We couldn’t conclude with any certainty that if we started boycotting them it wouldn’t do more harm than good,” Macey said. The newest effort to present a faculty petition to administrators has come from Jason Stearns GRD ’15, Julia Spiegel LAW ’13 and Nell Okie, a New Haven resident and member of the undergraduate-run New Haven Alliance for Congo. Okie said she has reached out to members of the Yale community as well as Kerry, who she said sent a letter to University President Richard Levin in support of the proposal. The organizers had collected 14 faculty signatures

as of Sunday night, according to Okie. She added that New Haven’s Peace Commission has also asked the Board of Aldermen to make the city “conflict mineral-free.”. Spiegel said she and other activists are working to get input from experts that can be brought to the ACIR. “We’ve gathered a series of Congo expert letters of support that we are going to deliver to Professor Macey and President Levin,” Spiegel said. “We’ve also written detailed follow-ups to ACIR about issues that may be holding up action, and we put together a faculty letter.” Macey said the ACIR is continuing to deliberate on the issue, adding that data conflicts on whether the mineral trade in the Congo actually harms the region. While the petition claims that Stanford, Dartmouth, Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania have implemented policies opposing conflict minerals,

Macey said the policies at those universities are “so full of contingencies” that they essentially have no effect. Zahra Baitie ’14, the president of the Yale Undergraduate Association for African Peace and Development, said Yale can play a pivotal role in the conflict minerals issue because of the University’s status and purchasing power. Like Spiegel, Baitie noted the importance of collecting additional data on the topic. “Information rather than signatures is what is needed,” Baitie said. “Advocates at Yale are working to help the Yale administration make an informed decision.” In addition to the recent faculty petition, the African peace and development association drafted a letter on the issue to Levin, Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and Macey in November. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

SEX WEEK SHOWCASES DRAG

ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

BAD ROMANTICS FLAUNT DRAG ATTIRE The Bad Romantics, the campus drag troupe, put on two performances Sunday in Trumbull’s Nick Chapel as part of Sex Week. Hannah Mogul-Adlin ’13 as ‘Twilight Sparkle,’ Kris Harvey ’13 as ‘Robyn Gisele Jones’ and Yoni Greenwood ’15 as ‘Bette Gayvis,’ pictured above, performed a lipsynch and dance to ‘Pretty Girl Rock’ by Keri Hilson. A Sex Week panel about gender expression and drag at Yale followed.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Univ. not investigating Rhodes leak

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS ERNESTO ZEDILLO GRD ’81 Zedillo’s dissertation was about Mexico’s external debt crisis. He worked at Mexico’s Central Bank and was the minister of budget and planning and then minister of education before serving as president from 1994-2000.

Yale hosts Mexican leaders

CONFIDENTIALITY FROM PAGE 1 of confidentiality around that entire process.” Cases brought to the University-Wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct (UWC), which handles both formal and informal complaints, are kept confidential in order to guarantee the “integrity of the whole process,” said UWC Chairman Michael Della Rocca. UWC members “explicitly go over the rules regarding confidentiality” — which require keeping the content of the proceedings private — with all parties at the beginning of each hearing in formal procedures, Della Rocca said, adding that the expectation of confidentiality also applies during informal complaint proceedings. While only the UWC addresses formal complaints, individuals can bring informal complaints to Title IX coordinators or the UWC. Students can also elect to press charges with the Yale Police Department. Though Della Rocca said there are no specific sanctions in place for students who fail to uphold confidentiality expectations, he said administrators may alert the Yale College Executive Committee or notify a student’s residential college dean in the event of a violation. One female student interviewed, who filed a formal complaint with the UWC last year and wished to remain anonymous due to the sensitive nature of a misconduct complaint, said she thought the committee’s confidentiality regulations were unclear, adding that she felt pressured to accept the confidentiality terms since they were presented to her right before she had to give her testimony. She said she agreed not to “distribute [her] statement or the perpetrator’s statement or talk about the proceedings,” adding that she did not clarify the expectations because she “just wanted to go forward” with the hearing. “What they said was vague enough to make me feel intimidated and frightened,” she said. But Della Rocca said reading confidentiality procedures before a student’s testimony is intended to help students feel more comfortable sharing their experiences. He added that all “main parties” in a formal hearing are given a copy of the UWC procedures in advance. “The success of [the UWC complaint process] is dependent on the commitment of the UWC’s members and of all those participating in the UWC’s processes to honor confidentiality in order to protect the rights and interests of all parties,” Della Rocca said in a Sunday email. Four higher education law experts interviewed said university administrators generally prefer to keep proceedings confidential to protect the individuals involved, and three added that universities are motivated to maintain confidentiality to prevent public scrutiny of its proceedings or avoid negative press about its cases. Peter Lake, director for the Center for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy at Stetson University, said universities’ disciplinary systems are typically much more private than the criminal justice system, a discrepancy Lake said gives students a sense of protection but also generates speculation about “what’s going on behind the curtain.” He said sexual misconduct proceedings often encourage “self-censorship” since students decide it is in their best interest not to discuss such sensitive cases publicly. “Our justice system tries to be for the most part visible, and college discipline never really evolved that way,” Lake said. “[University sexual misconduct proceedings are] oriented toward private resolution … I don’t think it’s meant to be secretive, but it was seen as a thing not to be worked out in the public square.” Kristen Galles, a Virginia-based Title IX lawyer who has been litigating Title IX cases since 1993, said complainants are “under no obligation to keep things quiet” unless they have already made a contractual agreement not to discuss the sexual misconduct events or proceedings. Fifty-two complaints of sexual misconduct were brought to University administrators between July 1 and Dec. 31 of last year, according to a report on sexual misconduct cases released last month. Gavan Gideon and Tapley Stephenson contributed reporting. Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

University Vice President and Secretary Linda Lorimer, at left, heads Yale’s international programs and helped stage this weekend’s events. MEXICO FROM PAGE 1 sity in efforts to increase Yale’s international standing, partly via programs to engage academic, business and political leaders in countries like China, India and Singapore. Last weekend’s leadership session was the fourth in a series with Mexico — three other sessions were hosted last year in Mexico City with CIDE, according to Joao Aleixo, assistant secretary of international affairs responsible for covering Latin America. Aleixo added that Yale faculty or alumni were present at all sessions, both teaching and leading discussions. Topics of discussion for last weekend’s leadership session included economic regulation, environmental management and health care access — issues that George Joseph, assistant secretary for international affairs and leadership programs, said “Mexico and the world are focusing on.”

Joseph added that the goal of the weekend leadership program was not to present the University as having definitive answers to important problems, but instead to show how different topics of global governance are addressed in other parts of the world. He added that the 22 participants represent a “critical leadership strata” across Mexican government and civil society. Participants included Mexican Supreme Court members, governors of various Mexican states, ministers, academics, members of congress and private sector leaders, according to Aleixo. “Not [all participants] are economics or health professionals — their responsibilities within Mexico vary,” Joseph said. “The goal was to expose participants of different perspectives and different ways of thinking about the issues.” Faculty members that taught last weekend’s leadership sessions included former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo, who

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

University President Richard Levin delivered an address to the 22 Mexican visitors who attended this weekend’s leadership program.

currently directs the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, John Gaddis, director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, and Thomas Pogge, professor of philosophy and international affairs. Zedillo said he spoke to the group of Mexican leaders about “the mismatch” between the fast-paced intensification of globalization and the slower evolution of international cooperation. He added that participants commented that the program was “stimulating and valuable.” “Given the level of the Mexican individuals attending the program, I think this sets an excellent high bar for future undertakings and will favor more attractive initiatives that will allow Yale to develop a relationship with Mexico congruent with the enormous importance that Mexico has for the U.S. and vice versa,” Zedillo said. In addition to interacting with faculty members, the program attendees also met with Arturo Sarukhan, Ambassador of Mexico to the U.S., and Carlos M. Sada, Consul General of Mexico in New York. Planning for the weekend’s program began three years ago when the Office of International Affairs decided it wanted to develop a leadership program for Mexico similar to the ones it has offered for countries like China and India since 2004, Joseph said. He added that Yale chose CIDE, a leading social science research center in Mexico, as the project’s international partner, and CIDE representatives first visited Yale 18 months ago to discuss the project. Once the Office of International Affars knew who the program’s participants would be, Joseph said, planning began on what topics would be covered. Aleixo and Joseph said that engaging with Mexico is a strategic priority for Yale given the political, economic and cultural importance of the US-Mexico relationship. As the first leadership program with a Latin American partner, Joseph added that last weekend’s session opens the door to further collaboration with Latin American countries and institutions. He said that Yale is planning to conduct a leadership program with Argentina later this spring and hopes to hold a program with Brazil as well. The discussions for this weekend’s program were held at the Greenberg Conference Center on Prospect Street. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

The Feminist Sex Wars These debates, which took place among feminists in the 1970s and ’80s, opposed anti-pornography and sex-positive feminism and, according to some, helped bring about the end of the era of second-wave feminism.

Arch symposium debates role of drawing BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA AND NATASHA THONDAVADI STAFF REPORTERS Does hand drawing have a place in today’s world of architecture education and practice? This weekend, members of the architectural community flocked to the School of Architecture to debate this question. From Thursday to Saturday afternoon, over 20 architects, professors and developers of technical design tools gathered at the school to debate the place of hand drawing in current architectural practice. Conceived about a year ago by Yale professors Victor Agran ARC ’97 and George Knight ARC ’95, the symposium, entitled “Is Drawing Dead?”, brought together hundreds of individuals from the field to consider the drawbacks and opportunities of the digital age. Though computer drawing has been commonplace in architectural schools and firms for over 15 years, the recent rise of parametric drawing — a technique that has afforded architects increased opportunity for precision by assigning “intelligence” to an object — has enlarged the debate over the relative virtues of digital and manual drawing, Knight said. The advantages of this technique have led some architectural educators to place less emphasis on traditional drawing, Architecture School Dean Robert Stern said. “I hope that this symposium will help clarify the value of drawing to architects, and I know for myself that [it] will certainly shape my teaching,” Knight said. He added, however, that he hopes the symposium will also allow architects to appreciate the value of various drawing techniques, from the different phases in the evolution of digital draw-

ing to the painting techniques that emerged during the Italian Renaissance. Each of these methods, Knight said, has different virtues and is suited for different purposes. Yet while architects often apply a certain method to a particular project, the architectural community still needs to define the pros and cons of each one. Despite the symposium’s diversity of perspectives — speakers included architects, historians, neuroscientists and computer engineers — the participants largely agreed that freehand drawing is, if not an architects’ most important tool, at least a significant one.

We need to adjust our drawing. We can no longer rely on shapes we track on a piece of paper. PATRIK SCHUMACHER Architect, Zaha Hadid Architects “Even though the symposium is conceived as a synthesis of many different points of view, one can guess the answer to the overarching question the symposium poses,” said Jeremy Kargon ’85, a Baltimore-based architect and professor who attended the symposium. “No, drawing is most definitely not dead.” But some speakers explained that the divide between manual drawing and technological influence is not binary. Deanna Petherbridge, from the University of the Arts in London, said in her Friday talk titled “The Remains of Drawing” that though supporters of traditional drawing often accuse digital tools of being

restrictive, architects can use computers to supplement their manual work, rather than create completely new images. “I am making a distinction between using technology to enhance drawing and heavily restricted cyber imagery,” she said. Similarly, Yale professor of computer science Julie Dorsey encouraged “a constructive dialogue” between hand-sketches and techniques that can enhance them digitally. She added that an architect could initially generate a design through hand drawing but later add computer modifications. But a few panelists said they felt computers are more than complements to hand drawing and are instead becoming increasingly necessary tools. Architect Patrik Schumacher, a partner at Zaha Hadid Architects in London, explained that digital media could allow architecture to respond to the complex design demands of an increasingly diverse society. “We need to adjust our drawing,” he said. “We can no longer rely on shapes we can track on a piece of paper. We need to let our repertoire of aspects and opportunities proliferate, and acknowledge that there is a difference between what we as humans desire and what we can do.” Though the speakers did not reach a fully conclusive decision by the end of the symposium, the attendees were unfazed. Peter Logan ARC ’13 said that by examining architecture through the lenses of different academic fields, the symposium highlighted how architecture is a hybrid discipline. Architect Karen Nichols, a principal at Michael Graves & Associates, agreed, adding that she felt the debate that was the conceit of the symposium was

NOT QUITE SAFETY DANCE

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

An Architecture School exhibit featuring works by visiting professor and architect Massimo Scolari, which went on display last week in Rudolph Hall, examines the role of architectural hand drawings in the digital age. necessary. “Everyone is so focused and impassioned here,” she said. “The diversity of opinion is truly stimulating, and the debate going on is truly healthy.” An exhibit featuring works by visiting professor and architect

Diverse feminist views collided Saturday in a panel discussion about the ethics of pornography.

SEX WEEK

HASIDIC WEDDING DRAWS CROWD TO COMMONS A wedding reception for a local rabbi’s daughter drew hundreds of people to Commons on Sunday for a night of dancing and revelry.

Architecture are supported by the J. Irwin Miller Endowment Fund. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu and NATASHA THONDAVADI at natasha.thondavadi@yale.edu .

Panel split on porn BY MICHAEL MAGDZIK CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Massimo Scolari, whose drawings capture the artistic spirit of buildings, went on display last week in Rudolph Hall. Scolari’s talk, titled “Representations,” opened the symposium on Thursday evening, Symposia at the School of

Three feminists from a range of professions spoke about the industry and its impacts on women before a mostly student audience of about 60 people. The talk continued Sex Week 2012’s dialogue on controversial social issues as the panelists shared their views on how the industry has shaped modern attitudes toward sex and become more socially acceptable. “Pornography is a pervasive commodity on campus and in society,” Sex Week co-director Paul Holmes ’13 said as he introduced the speakers. Gail Dines, a professor of sociology at Wheelock College in Boston and anti-pornography activist, argued that pornography can be understood through a Marxist lens. Likening the porn industry to those of food and fashion, which she argued shape how people eat and dress, Dines said the porn industry determines the power

dynamics and economics of sex. A strong opponent of porn, Dines condemned the industry for “selling humans.” She added that porn productions demean women by portraying them as sexual objects, and also often exploit the actresses involved. “Nothing explained patriarchy to me like pornography,” she said. Independent porn producer and actress Maggie Mayhem defended her industry, arguing that pornography can be a creative and liberating exercise for both actresses and viewers. Mayhem said actresses can use porn as a manner of self-expression. She likened acting and producing porn to authoring a novel, while she compared watching porn to reading and interpreting the work. “No one perspective should be allowed to dominate the entire discourse,” she said. “Instead of taking away images, I want more voices.” Mayhem, who stars in her own porn productions, said she went into the field to “immortalize her youth” in her work. Carolyn Bronstein, a professor of communications at DePaul University in Chicago and author of “Battling Pornography: The American Feminist Anti-Pornog-

raphy Movement, 1976-1986,” brought a historical perspective to the discussion. Bronstein suggested that pornography helps people of alternative sexualities — those whose sexual preferences are not “married, heterosexual and procreative” — discover desire and find others similar to them. She added that the rise of the Internet has made anti-pornography efforts unlikely to achieve wide success. “We’ll never eradicate porn,” Bronstein said. As the discussion concluded, the panelists encouraged audience members to continue debating the issues when they returned to their dorms. Chris Pagliarella ’12, who said he considers himself “anti-porn, generally,” said he found the event to be a “stimulating intellectual conversation.” Pagliarella said he agreed with Dines’ claim that porn abuses women both physically and ideologically. The Economist reported in October that the proportion of Google searches with the word “porn” had tripled between 2004 and 2011. Contact MICHAEL MAGDZIK at michael.magdzik@yale.edu .

Submit to the

2012 WALLACE PRIZE Yale’s Most Prestigious Independently Awarded Writing Prize Submit your unpublished fiction and creative nonfiction to the Yale Daily News Building, 202 York St., by 4 PM on Monday, February 27th. Pick up applications in the English department office or at the YDN.

Winning entries will be published in the Yale Daily News Magazine

VIVIENNE JIAO ZHANG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Panelists diverged about the ethics of pornography at a Sex Week event.


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“They must feel the thrill of toting up a balanced book, a thousand ciphers neatly in a row … When gazing at a graph that shows the profits up, their little cups of joy should overflow.” MARY POPPINS NANNY

Rise in master’s apps concentrated in growing fields 45%

40

50

41% 28%

30

20

10

0

Computer science

Engineering and applied science

Statistics

Percent growth in applications from 2011 to 2012

Percent growth in applications 2012-’13

50

43% 40

28%

30

20

13% 10

0

American studies

Master’s Programs MASTERS FROM PAGE 1 David Pollard said the number of applicants from China in particular has “skyrocketed.” Many Chinese students enroll in oneyear master’s programs to increase their exposure to American education, he said, and to improve their chances of admission to doctoral programs in the United States or Canada. He added that the likelihood of getting “good jobs” with a master’s degree in statistics also draws students to the program. Unlike this year’s fastest-growing master’s programs, the doc-

toral programs that witnessed the largest increases in applicants this year have not experienced consistent application growth. Doctoral programs in American studies, geology and geophysics, and epidemiology and public health saw 13-percent, 43-percent and 28-percent rises in applications in 2012, respectively, which professors attributed to the programs gaining strength and national recognition. Total applications to the Graduate School’s doctoral programs rose 1.9 percent this year. David Bercovici, chair of the Geology and Geophysics Depart-

ment, attributed the increase in his department’s applications to the program’s improvements in recent years. Applications to the program had dropped by 14 percent in 2011. The department has hired new faculty members over the past few years, Bercovici said, and has also produced “high-profile science” research, such as publishing a paper last week in the science journal Nature about a future supercontinent. He added that he has noticed an increase in the number of U.S. citizens applying to the geology and geophysics program, particularly from top insti-

Epidemiology and public health

Geology and Geophysics

PhD Programs tutions such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Duke and Ivy League schools. Kathryn Dudley, director of graduate studies for American studies, said her department’s Ph.D. program has always been strong, but has likely attracted more applicants because of increased national visibility as well as the research interests of its faculty. Yale’s Ph.D. program in American studies ranked best in the country in a 2010 National Research Council (NRC) survey, and the department’s chair is the president-elect of the Ameri-

can Studies Association — both of which give the program an “extremely high profile” nationally, Dudley said. Students also find faculty research topics such as economic inequality and social movements particularly relevant now, she said, adding that the program also offers a master’s certificate in public humanities that allows students to get jobs outside academia after graduation. Despite this year’s significant increase, applications to the American studies Ph.D. program fell 15 percent in 2011. The University’s doctoral program in epidemiology and public

YDN health also performed well in the 2010 NRC rankings, said Christian Tschudi, director of graduate studies for the program. He added that the magnitude of the increase in applications to the program — which has five distinct Ph.D.-granting divisions — was “unexpected,” but that he believes interest in public health may be growing nationally. The Graduate School has 20 terminal master’s programs and 44 doctoral programs. Contact ANTONIA WOODFORD at antonia.woodford@yale.edu .

Wall Street appeal appears to remain steady FINANCE CAREERS FROM PAGE 1 “Given my presence in the recruiting process currently, I wouldn’t have been able to discern that fewer and fewer Yale students decide to go into finance/consulting post-graduation,” Cecillia Xie ’13, a Trumbull junior interested in consulting, said. “Perhaps it’s because I’m in the middle of it all, but I still get the impression that a large percentage of Yale students attempt to work in those two fields.”

ON THE DECLINE?

According to the University’s report on “Life After Yale College” that summarized postgraduation plans for the senior class, the percentage of students employed in business and finance had declined to a low of 14 percent, after a peak in 2000 when 31 percent of the Yale senior class went to work in those sectors after graduation. While only 93 graduates of the class of 2010 held jobs in areas of business and finance, Yale professors still questioned whether this drop in numbers truly constitutes a trend.

“Last year’s rate [of Yale graduates holding finance jobs] is the lowest it has ever been reported since the early 1990s,” said professor Anthony Smith, director of undergraduate studies for the Economics Department. “However, I’m not convinced this is really a trend. Just talking to students, I still detect substantial interest in finance and consulting.” Smith said that variations in numbers from year to year are likely to occur, adding that he “wouldn’t read too much into these data.” For instance, he said, the percentage of Yale graduates in finance and business dropped to 20 percent in 2002, likely because of the economic downturn, but rose again to 26 percent in 2004 when the economy recovered. Smith added that the report compiled by OIR does not include information about every Yale College graduate. Of the 1,280 questionnaires sent to members of the Yale class of 2010, only 869 were returned. Statistics professor Jonathan Reuning-Scherer agreed that he would also be reluctant to regard

the drop in hiring as a trend. He said that, although the numbers of Yale graduates working in business and finance for 2010 are lower than in previous years, the three previous years for which data are available — 2004, 2006 and 2008 — all have similar values around 25 percent. To declare the decrease a “trend,” he added, one would have to wait a few more years or notice a one- or two-year dip: “Only time will tell,” he said. Moore said the number of applications to business and finance jobs in 2011 was 650 higher than the 2010 figure, indicating a “cyclical” nature of student interest. “We have seen continued interest from Yale students in finance jobs,” said Jennifer Worthington, who works in human resources for the investment bank Barclays Capital, in an email. “Since 2010, we have had an increase in the number of interns and graduates joining Barclays Capital from Yale.” Smith said that, as the DUS for the Economics Department, he has interacted with several undergraduates who plan to work in

finance and consulting and added that Yalies’ interest in the areas of business and consulting is also confirmed by their academic preferences, as demonstrated by the popularity of economics and financial theory courses.

FINANCE IN THE ‘MILLENIAL’ GENERATION

While it remains to be seen whether the drop in hiring will become a trend, public discourse has been shaken by the anti-corporation movement sparked by Occupy Wall Street last fall. This October, Occupy New Haven — the city’s branch of a nationwide protest regarding income inequality — took root on the New Haven Green, and a month later Yale students organized a protest at a Morgan Stanley information session at The Study hotel.. Smith said he did not believe Occupy was related to the reported changes. But Marina Keegan ’12, former president of the Yale College Democrats and an organizer of the Occupy Morgan Stanley protest, said she believes that the decrease in the number of finance internship applications this year is par-

tially due to the critical questions about income inequality raised by the national Occupy Wall Street movement. “There’s definitely been more conversation around this issue on campus and nationally, so it’s exciting to see that there are almost 400 less applications this year,” Keegan said. Moore, the UCS director, said that there might be several causes for the drop in the percentage of Yale College graduates entering finance, listing generational values as one. “Many of these students are ‘millennials,’ who, as a generational cohort, tend to believe in the socially redeeming value of work and, as such, may be more civic-minded than prior generations,” Moore said. A junior in Ezra Stiles planning to go into finance after graduation attributed the declining number of students entering finance to an increasingly negative perception of those who work within financial system. “The vast majority of people think that those holding jobs in finance take advantage of the rest of America,” said the junior, who

declined to give his name, citing concerns about endangering his employment prospects. “Whether this is true or not, it’s up for debate though.” Still, Keegan said that although the current generation may value creative and civic-minded activities more than previous generations, financial companies are not blind to this switch. “Even if there’s this change, banks understand that and play into it to recruit students, which I think is scary,” she said. A junior in Morse College pursuing a career in sales and trading said that he believes the financial system has been “indiscriminately” and “unfairly” demonized, though he added that there might be a silver lining. “[T]his drop in hiring might be a positive thing,” he said, requesting anonymity to protect his employment prospects. “The people dissuaded by the pseudoethical popular rhetoric about Wall Street were probably only in it for the money rather than a genuine interest in the job.” Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Mostly sunny, with a high near 40. West wind between 10 and 16 mph. Low of 22.

WEDNESDAY

High of 42, low of 34.

High of 46, low of 31.

SMALL TALK BY AMELIA SARGENT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 4:00 PM Scott Wallace - In Search of the Amazon’s Last Uncontacted Tribe. Scott Wallace is a writer, producer and photojournalist specializing in hard-hitting reportage of world and national affairs. Come hear him speak about his work with the last uncontacted tribes of the Amazon. Davenport College (248 York St.), Aud.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 4:30 PM Master’s Tea with Rachel Saltz. Come hear New York Times film critic Rachel Saltz talk about critiquing Bollywood films, the evolution of Bollywood over the years and how she got interested in it all. Pierson College (261 Park St.), Master’s House.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

4:30 PM Disaster, Development and Democracy: Japan after 3-11. Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor of Government at Wesleyan University, will discuss how Japan has responded to the “Triple Disaster” on March 11, 2010. She will focus on governmental responses at the national and local levels, civil society responses and those from business. She will also discuss the potential long-term effects of the disaster on Japan’s politics, economy and society. Hosted by Council on East Asian Studies. Sociology Department (10 Sachem St.), Rm. 105.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16 4:00 PM Day of Remembrance Master’s Tea with Susumu Ito. Mr. Susumu Ito was a member of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during WWII. His regiment rescued the Lost Batallion and liberated Dachau concentration camp, and in November were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal. We are so excited to meet this extraordinary man who did so much for his country at a time when Japanese Americans were told “Japs Go Home.” Hosted by Japanese American Students Union. Morse College (302 York St.), Master’s House.

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2/13/12

By Anna Gundlach

3 __ Bator, Mongolia 4 Fellow 5 Feature of a clear day 6 Dog also called a Persian Greyhound 7 Garden entrance 8 Too much of a good thing 9 Little wagon’s color 10 Have in one’s hands 11 Classico competitor 12 Norwegian royal name 13 Indoor ball brand 18 Shepard who hit golf balls on the moon 19 Lone Star State sch. 23 LAPD alerts 25 Grazing lands 26 Blue Ribbon beer 27 Dickens villain Heep 28 Underwater ray 29 Examine grammatically 30 Last Supper query 31 Mountain quarters 32 “Dallas” surname

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37 Thousands, in a heist 38 Buy for the future, as gold 39 German road 41 Manners to be minded 42 Rock-throwing protesters 44 Marsh duck 45 Heavy metal band named for a rodent 46 “’Bout this large”

SUDOKU EASY

2/13/12

49 Boo-boo, to tots 50 Turn at the casino 51 __ of Mexico 53 Senate page, for one 54 Rocking Turner 55 Expert server, in tennis 56 Whodunit quarry 58 Rapa __: Easter Island 59 Japanese dramatic form

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Dow Jones 12,824.00, +0.45% S S&P 500 1,347.70, +0.53%

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Greek austerity deal passes amid rioting BY DEREK GATOPOULOS AND NICHOLAS PAPHITIS ASSOCIATED PRESS ATHENS, Greece — Greek lawmakers on Monday approved harsh new austerity measures demanded by bailout creditors to save the debt-crippled nation from bankruptcy, after rioters in central Athens torched buildings, looted shops and clashed with riot police. The historic vote paves the way for Greece’s European partners and the International Monetary Fund to release $170 billion in new rescue loans, without which Greece would default on its mountain of debt next month and likely leave the eurozone — a scenario that would further roil global markets.

Vandalism and destruction have no place in a democracy and will not be tolerated. LUCAS PAPADEMOS Prime Minister, Greece Lawmakers voted 199-74 in favor of the cutbacks, despite strong dissent among the two main coalition members. A total 37 lawmakers from the majority Socialists and conservative New Democracy party either voted against the party line, abstained or voted present. Sunday’s clashes erupted after more than 100,000 protesters marched to the parliament to rally against the drastic cuts, which will ax one in five civil service jobs and slash the minimum wage by

more than a fifth. At least 45 businesses were damaged by fire, including several historic buildings, movie theaters, banks and a cafeteria, in the worst riot damage in Athens in years. Fifty police officers were injured and at least 55 protesters were hospitalized. Forty-five suspected rioters were arrested and a further 40 detained. As the vote got under way early Monday, Prime Minister Lucas Papademos urged calm, pointing to the country’s dire financial straits. “Vandalism and destruction have no place in a democracy and will not be tolerated,” Papademos told Parliament. “I call on the public to show calm. At these crucial times, we do not have the luxury of this type of protest. I think everyone is aware of how serious the situation is.” Since May 2010, Greece has survived on a $145 billion bailout from its European partners and the International Monetary Fund. When that proved insufficient, the new rescue package was approved. The deal, which has not yet been finalized, will be combined with a massive bond swap deal to write off half the country’s privately held debt. But for both deals to materialize, Greece had to persuade its deeply skeptical creditors that it has the will to implement spending cuts and public sector reforms that will end years of fiscal profligacy and tame gaping budget deficits. As protests raged Sunday, demonstrators set bonfires in front of parliament and dozens of riot police formed lines to keep them from making a run on the building. Security forces fired dozens of tear gas volleys at rioters, who attacked them with firebombs and chunks of marble broken off

KOSTAS TSIRONIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters passed by a burning cinema in Athens on Sunday after Greek lawmakers approved a new austerity deal. the fronts of luxury hotels, banks and department stores. Clouds of tear gas drifted across the square, and many in the crowd wore gas masks or had their faces covered, while others carried Greek flags and banners. Masked rioters also attacked a police station with petrol bombs and stones. A three-story building was completely consumed by flames as firefighters struggled to douse the blaze. Streets were strewn with stones, smashed glass and burnt wreckage, while terrified

Adele takes six Grammys

MARK TERRILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Adele won awards for best pop solo performance for “Someone Like You,” song of the year, record of the year and best short form music video for “Rolling in the Deep,” and album of the year and best pop vocal album for “21.” BY NEKESA MUMBI MOODY ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES — Adele, who captured the world’s heart with an album about a broken romance, emerged as the top winner at Sunday’s Grammy Awards, winning six trophies including the prestigious trifecta of record, song and album of the year. The singer, who also made a triumphant comeback from vocal cord surgery on the Grammy stage, sobbed as she won the night’s final award, album of the year, for “21.” It was last year’s top-selling album with more than six million copies sold and remains lodged at the No. 1 spot on this year’s charts. Her victories tied her with Beyonce as the most wins by a woman in one evening. “Mom, gold is good!” Adele shouted as she took the album of the year trophy. The celebration of Adele, a big-voiced, soulful singer, came on a night where the Grammys marked the loss of one of music’s great female voices - and one of its most prized talents overall. Whitney Houston died the night before the Grammys, casting a shadow over music’s biggest night. But while her death lent a somber overtone to the evening’s

show, it did not overwhelm it, perhaps best proved by the show’s closing number, a rollicking jam session featuring Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, and Dave Grohl among others. The night’s other big winners were Grohl’s Foo Fighters, who won five Grammys. They noted that they made their album “Wasting Light” in a garage. “To me this award means a lot because it shows that the human element of making music is what’s most important. Singing into a microphone, learning to play an instrument and learning to do your craft, that’s the most important thing for people to do,” Grohl said as the band accepted their best rock performance trophy for “Walk.” “It’s not about being perfect. It’s not about sounding absolutely correct. It’s not about what goes on in a computer. It’s about what goes on in here (your heart) and what goes on here (your head). ... Long live rock `n’ roll!” Among the evening’s performances was a dance-heavy number by Chris Brown, and performances by McCartney and Springsteen, who kicked off the show by performing his new song “We Take Care of Our Own,” a rousing song that references the troubles of the nation. But the evening’s most moving

moment came as Jennifer Hudson - who has called Houston an inspiration and one of her biggest idols - emerged to sing one of Houston’s signature songs, “I Will Always Love You.” Dressed in black, with only the accompaniment of a piano, Hudson appeared to fight back tears as she sang the song, ending with the line, “Whitney, we will always love you.” The show started off on a somber note, as host LL Cool J appeared in black, and told the audience: “There is no way around this. We’ve had a death in our family.” He then led the audience in prayer to “our fallen sister.” “Heavenly father, we thank you for sharing our sister Whitney with us,” he said, as celebrities like Lady Gaga and Miranda Lambert bowed their heads in prayer. “Though she is gone too soon, we remain truly blessed to have been touched by her beautiful spirit.” He then introduced a clip of a glowing Houston singing “I Will Always Love You.” In his performance of “Runaway Baby,” Bruno Mars also mentioned the death: “Tonight we’re celebrating. Tonight we’re celebrating the beautiful Miss Whitney Houston.” And Stevie Wonder said: “To Whitney up in heaven, we all love you.”

passers-by sought refuge in hotel lounges and cafeterias. “I’ve had it! I can’t take it any more. There’s no point in living in this country any more,” said a distraught shop owner walking through his smashed and looted optician store. Athens Mayor Giorgos Kaminis said rioters tried to storm the City Hall building, but were repelled. “Once again, the city is being used as a lever to try to destabilize the country,” he said. Conservative New Democracy leader Antonis Samaras said the

rioting “hurts the entire country.” “We are seeing scenes from a future that we must do our utmost to avert,” he said. Papademos’ government — an unlikely coalition of the majority Socialists and their main foes, New Democracy — had been expected to carry the austerity vote. Combined, they control 236 of Parliament’s 300 seats. Still, they faced strong dissent: Besides the 37 lawmakers who voted against the bill or abstained, a further six voted against sections of the proposed measures.

After the vote, the coalition government announced those 43 lawmakers had been expelled. Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos said the measures were vital to the country’s very economic survival. “The question is not whether some salaries and pensions will be curtailed, but whether we will be able to pay even these reduced wages and pensions,” he told lawmakers before the vote. “When you have to choose between bad and worse, you will pick what is bad to avoid what is worse.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

“Class, race, sexuality, gender — and all the other categories by which we categorize and dismiss each other — need to be excavated from the inside.” DOROTHY ALLISON WRITER

T H E C O R N E L L D A I LY S U N

Univ. raises record $3.8 billion BY AKANE OTANI STAFF WRITER Despite a financial crisis that caused philanthropy to plummet nationwide, the University raised 80 percent, or $3.83 billion, of its “Cornell Now” fundraising campaign goal as of Feb. 3, putting it ahead of track to reach its target of $4.75 billion by 2015. The campaign, originally launched in 2006 as “Far Above … The Campaign for Cornell,” is the most ambitious fundraising effort in the University’s history, according to Richard Banks ’72, associate vice president for alumni affairs and development. Donations to “Cornell Now” are meant to support the University’s most pressing initiatives, which include capital projects, faculty renewal and financial aid, Banks said. Banks credited the capital campaign’s success to an “incredibly supportive alumni body.” While gifts to Cornell dropped sharply between 2008 and 2009, the University has seen its donations grow to new heights in recent years. In 2011, an outpouring of donations catapulted the Cor-

nell Annual Fu n d , a n annual fundraising program, to an all-time record of more than CORNELL $30 million, Banks said. Large gifts have also enabled the University to fund several capital projects in the 2010-11 fiscal year: The new humanities building, the first to be built since 1905, has already “exceeded” its fundraising goal, while Weill Cornell Medical College’s Belfer Research Building, the second most expensive building project in Cornell’s history, was financed in large part by donations, according to Banks. Generous donations have also allowed the University to accelerate its faculty renewal process, Banks said. With its oldest faculty ever, the University must prepare to replace the 50 percent of its faculty positions it anticipates being vacated over the next 10 years, the Sun reported in November. Two years ago, President David Skorton asked the University’s alumni affairs and develop-

THE COLUMBIA D A I LY S P E C TAT O R

Gender-neutral expansion approved

ment office to raise $50 million over five years to support the initiative. Just 18 months later, the office had raised $23.5 million of its goal, Banks said. “We’re well ahead of that 10 million-a-year pace,” he said. “That’s the sort of initiative that has a lot of traction among alumni.” The University has also made headway in its financial aid initiatives, raising more than $240 million of its target of $350 million for student scholarships, according to Banks. Banks cited strong leadership among the University’s Board of Trustees as a major contributing factor to the capital campaign’s success. Trustee Stephen Ashley MBA ’64, co-chair of the “Cornell Now” campaign, said that he appeals to donors by asking them to recall their experiences at Cornell and the generosity of prior Cornellians. “When I approach someone to give a gift to the campaign, I generally ask them to remember what Cornell did for them: how they were broadened as an individual and how the people who preceded us as students had built

a base on which we grew,” Ashley said. “Now, it’s our turn to provide to students as a group so they can have the same kind of opportunities — if not better — that we had.”

When I approach someone to give a gift to the campaign, I generally ask them to remember what Cornell did for them. STEPHEN ASHLEY MBA ’64 Co-chair of “Cornell Now” campaign Ashley added that alumni and “friends of the University” are drawn to giving back to Cornell because its institutional goals, outlined in the five-year strategic plan for the University, have had a widespread appeal among donors. “The provost’s strategic plan has some overarching goals that are inspirational and resonate with our donor base,” Ashley said.

The provost distributes unrestricted gifts, or donations with unspecified purposes, among the colleges, each of which sets its own three-to-five-year fundraising goal within the University-wide campaign. Provost Kent Fuchs said that when he began his work, the University shifted its campaign goals away from centralized priorities and toward individual colleges. “There’s no magic in terms of knowing that you’ll raise a certain amount of money, but we have a goal that we track every year … All the deans are held accountable for raising that amount of money for their colleges,” Fuchs said. Continuing the University’s fundraising success will be crucial as Cornell moves forward with its new New York City tech campus, Fuchs said. Still, at a meeting Wednesday, some Faculty Senate members raised concerns that resources would be diverted away from the Ithaca campus. Fuchs said that rather than detracting from the University’s fundraising campaign, the tech campus will most likely increase donations to the University.

“My firm belief is that there will be a lot more philanthropy that we expect will go into the campus,” Fuchs said. “I don’t expect another $350 million gift but I expect hundreds of millions of dollars over the next 10 years, including from sources who’ve never given to Cornell before.” Fuchs added that he believes that the University will not only be able to keep the fundraising goals it set prior to its tech campus victory but also raise additional money for the Ithaca campus. “This puts us at a level of visibility and set of contacts that we didn’t have before,” he said. “Donors who were giving elsewhere are now giving to Ithaca.” Still, Banks did not rule out the possibility that after “Cornell Now” ends in 2015, the University would factor the tech campus into its future campaigns. “Will it change the goal eventually? It might, but now is not the time to talk about it,” Banks said. Ashley, describing enthusiasm over the tech campus as “electric,” said that the University’s latest venture will only help it meet its campaign goals.

THE DARTMOUTH

Greek growth mirrored across Ivies

BY BEN GITTELSON SENIOR STAFF WRITER Open housing will be an option in all upperclassmen dorms during this year’s housing lottery, Dean of Student Affairs Kevin Shollenberger said. Columbia College COLUMBIA Interim Dean James Valentini and School of Engineering and Applied Science Dean Feniosky Peña-Mora approved a recommendation from the Open Housing Task Force to expand open housing on Friday, Shollenberger said in a statement. Shollenberger noted that the policy will not include Furnald, Hartley, and Wallach halls, all of which house some first-years. Under the open housing policy, any two upperclassmen can live together in a double, regardless of gender. Shollenberger said that the deans approved open housing after the task force’s “careful review” of the yearlong pilot program, which allowed for gender-neutral housing in six upperclassmen dorms this year. Avi Edelman, ’11, who serves on the Open Housing Task Force and was one of the original authors of the open housing proposal, said he was proud of everyone who has worked on the policy. “It’s really exciting to see so many hours of work and so much passion from so many students over the course of three years finally result in a campus-wide change that I really think is going to do a lot to make students feel safe and comfortable at Columbia,” Edelman said. Ryan Cho, ‘13, who also serves on the task force and is a resident adviser, said the deans’ approval was “expected” and “forthcoming.” He said it was a positive sign for students that they were able to get the policy approved. “The biggest thing is to make sure residents are comfortable in the living space they have, so this is just another opportunity for students to be comfortable in the spaces they live in,” Cho said. Barry Weinberg, ’12, who is also a member of the task force, called the policy’s finalization “wonderful” and “satisfying.” “I texted my friend with whom I was planning on living when I thought the proposal was going through in 2009, and three years later, we finally got it,” Weinberg said. “I just smiled.” Edelman explained that the task force, in conjunction with the Housing office, will now focus on outreach and education about the policy—particularly, making sure the housing website lists buildings with open housing and gender-neutral bathrooms, and staying in touch with students utilizing the new policy. Edelman said student support was crucial in pushing the policy, noting that almost 1,000 students signed a petition for open housing and that about 20 student groups signed a statement of support for it.

THE DARTMOUTH

Dartmouth’s increasing Greek affiliation in recent years is reflective of a larger membership trend across Ivy League institutions. BY MADELINE ZEISS STAFF WRITER Interest and participation in Greek life has recently increased at Dartmouth and several other Ivy League institutions, reflecting national increases in the number of affiliated college students. Greek life has been on the rise across peer institutions likely due to the growing acceptance of Greek life, making fraternities and sororities a more natural and mainstream decision for many students. Nationwide, the number of women in sororities has increased 8.4 percent from 248,120 women in 2008 to 268,983 in 2010, according to statistics compiled by the National Panhellenic Conference. Similarly, growing numbers of female Dartmouth students have rushed in the past three years, Panhellenic Council President Ellie Sandmeyer ’12 said. “The increase is nothing too dramatic, but enough to think about expanding the system,” she said. Greek affiliation increased from about 64 percent of eligible students affiliated in fall 2008 to 68.2 percent affiliated in fall 2010, according to statistics provided by Greek Letter Organization and Societies Director Wes Schaub. Data for the Class of 2014 is still being compiled, he said. Sandmeyer said she did not see why the numbers wouldn’t continue to increase. “We’ve had high levels of interest and many houses doing well,”

she said. “We try to make sure everyone ends up with a bid, so sororities have had to DARTHMOUTH [take] higher pledge classes than they would ideally like.” The Panhellenic Council will vote on the possibility of opening a ninth sorority, Delta Zeta, on Monday, according to Sandmeyer. “We need all houses to unanimously support it,” she said. “I think generally the presidents are in support of lower class sizes, and it seems a good time.” However, opening a new sorority would be a “logistic nightmare,” Sandmeyer said. Part of the process will involve negotiations with the sorority’s national headquarters, which will require extensive resources, according to Schaub. “If they could come in the right way we would be open to that, but they probably need a couple of terms to get their staff in place,” he said. The expansion of Dartmouth’s fraternity system “probably won’t happen in the near future,” Schaub said. “There have been discussions with historically African-American fraternities about expanding, and I have been approached by a couple national headquarters looking to expand, but I have not had any conversations with under-

graduate students about expanding,” Schaub said. Students at Dartmouth often join Greek houses because of the social outlet they provide, Sandmeyer said. “It doesn’t include the only social space, but it does have the majority of students,” she said. “We just don’t have a lot of places you can go out in Hanover, so we host a lot of events.” Increased interest in rush may be due to such a large portion of affiliated female students, according to Sandmeyer. “We have such a large portion of girls in houses, so I think the decision to rush seems easier,” she said. “It doesn’t seem like a departure from the normal thing to do, and as numbers get higher every year, rushing seems more and more normal.” The sororities also have “great” events and seem like attractive social groups as a part of a Panhellenic community, Sandmeyer said. “The sorority presidents get along well, and there’s no stereotypical animosity between houses, which makes them seem more attractive,” she said. Schaub said that students’ tendency to form small social groups contributes to the popularity of Dartmouth’s Greek organizations. “I think that when you go off to college, you get put into class with lot of people, and it’s very much human nature to break down into small social groups,” he said. “And I think we see that here with peo-

ple finding small friend groups and joining fraternities and sororities to build those relationships.” Harvard University’s Panhellenic Council consists of only three sororities, but 250 women registered for winter rush, The Harvard Crimson reported. The president of Harvard’s Panhellenic Council said in an interview with The Crimson that she hopes that the addition of a fourth sorority “may happen soon.” Prospective sorority members said increased interest led to crowded rush events, according to The Crimson. Some prospective members said that Harvard women are more motivated to rush due to the growing popularity of sororities on campus, The Crimson reported. Harvard’s fraternities also reported an increased interest during winter rush, as over 100 men attended Sigma Chi fraternity’s first rush event and about 72 signed into Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity’s first event, The Crimson reported. Additionally, five of Harvard’s six Greek organizations now possesss their own property near campus, further solidifying the presence of Greek life at Harvard, according to The Crimson. Harvard has not formally recognized sororities, fraternities and final clubs since 1984, when administrators revoked official status due to allegedly discriminatory recruitment policies, The Crimson reported.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

Y

alies have a wealth of resources when it comes to connecting with their spiritual selves. Staff photographer VIVIENNE JIAO ZHANG captured scenes at Harkness Chapel – a Buddhist sanctuary located at the base of Branford’s iconic tower — and the Young Israel House at Yale, which is housed in the Slifka Center.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

MBBALL Michigan St 58 Ohio St 48

MBBALL UNLV 65 San Diego St 63

SPORTS QUICK HITS

MIKE DAVIES TENNIS HALL OF FAME INDUCTION The former pro and CEO of the New Haven Open at Yale will be inducted to the Tennis Hall of Fame on July 14. Davies was an innovator whose ideas included the color of the modern tennis ball and hard court, the time between points and the tiebreaker.

NBA Celtics 95 Bulls 91

NHL Rangers 3 Capitals 2

SOCCER Real Madrid 4 Levante 2

MONDAY

TRACK TEAMS PLACE THIRD AT HYP At the annual rivalry meet against Harvard and Princeton, the Bulldogs were outscored by wide margins on both the men’s and women’s teams. Lindsey Raymond ’12 and Matthew Bieszard ’12 led the Bulldogs with personal bests. See tomorrow’s News for the full story.

“It was a special thing that they happened on the same night.” CHRIS GOBRECHT ON HER 500TH WIN AND MEGAN VASQUEZ’S ’13 1,000TH POINT YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

W. SQUASH

NO. 1 OUTLASTS NO. 2

Elis beat injuries, Harvard BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER Playing without two starters and just a week after a disappointing 8–1 loss to No. 2 Princeton, the No. 3 men’s squash team overcame the odds to top No. 4 Harvard Sunday.

M. SQUASH No. 1 Hywel Robinson ’13 and No. 9 Charlie Wyatt ’14 were unavailable for yesterday’s matchup with the Cantabs (14–3, 5–2 Ivy), but the Elis (14–1, 6–1 Ivy) hurdled that obstacle to defeat their archrival 5–4 at the Brady Squash Center. Samuel Clayman ’12, who won the decisive game for Yale, said that missing those two players put the Bulldogs at a disadvantage from the beginning. “With us missing [Robinson and Wyatt] this was definitely an upset on paper,” Clayman said. “For us to get a win missing those guys is really huge.” Clayman’s four-game victory over Cantab Julian Kirby made the overall score 5–3 and

After falling to Yale 5-4 in the national championships last year, Harvard got its revenge on Sunday with a 5-4 victory that clinched the Ivy League title. PAGE 2 GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Millie Tomlinson ’14, left, playing in the No. 1 spot for Yale, fell to world No. 28 Amanda Sobhy of Harvard in three games as the Crimson beat the Elis on Sunday.

Milestones and victories for Yale BY JOHN SULLIVAN STAFF REPORTER Friday night was a historic one for the women’s basketball team. Guard Megan Vasquez ’13 became the 17th player in Yale’s women’s basketball history to score 1,000 points in her career, and coach Chris Gobrecht picked up her 500th career victory in the team’s 86-73 win over Cornell at the John J. Lee Amphitheater.

W. BASKETBALL “It was a special thing that they happened on the same night,” Gobrecht said of her and Vasquez’s accomplishments. “Megan has had a lot to do with many of the wins that have come in recent years, and she has been one of the players that has brought Yale to a different level of competition, so I’m glad that [these achievements] happened together.” Vasquez matched her career-high of 25 points in the Bulldogs’ (14-8, 6-2 Ivy) win, and Gobrecht added that she was glad that Vasquez’s contribution was so important on the night she reached this milestone. Vasquez and the team finished up the weekend in top form the next night, as the junior led the Elis to a 73-59 victory over visiting Columbia. Not content with her 25 points from the night before against Cornell, Vasquez set a new career-high with 28 points on Saturday. The Bulldogs’ offense was firing on all cylinders Friday night, and the team jumped out to an early lead against the Big Red (9-12, 3-4 Ivy). Yale led by 12 seven minutes into the game and went on a 9-2 run in the last two minutes of the first half to go into the break up 41-25. This quick start was important for a team that had trailed at halftime in every Ivy League game up until that point. In three of the previous four contests the Elis had come out of halftime and gone on big runs to retake the lead,

but against first-place Princeton last weekend the team could not get going in the second half and lost 72-47. “We’ve played really well in the second half up to this point,” captain Michelle Cashen ’12 said. “But there’s no guarantee we’ll always be able to do that as the Princeton game showed. [Starting quickly] is something we’ve been focusing on recently and it was good to see in the game on Friday.” The Bulldogs assisted 24 of their 30 made baskets on Friday and shot 48.4 percent from the floor, well above their season average. Ten of those assists came courtesy of guard Aarica West ’13, a career-high for the junior. Cornell actually outshot Yale, amassing a 53.1 percent mark from the field, but the Elis made up the difference with 12 offensive rebounds that they converted into a 19-9 edge in second-chance points. The team also capitalized well on Cornell’s mistakes and turned 17 Big Red turnovers into 21 points for Yale. Coming into this weekend, the Columbia game on Saturday had all the makings of a one-sided rout, but the 73-59 final score belies a close game of which Yale was fortunate to come out on top. The Lions (2-19, 0-7 Ivy) still have yet to win a conference game but had forced a good Brown team to overtime the night before and were in no mood to lie over for the Bulldogs. Gobrecht said that she watched film of the Columbia-Brown game and knew that the Elis would not be facing the same team that was blown-out, 94-35, against Princeton earlier this year. The Bulldogs started off well for the second night in a row and made four consecutive shots during a two-minute stretch in the opening minutes of the game. Around the 15-minute mark, however, the team went cold and allowed Columbia to go on a 12-2 run to take a 19-13 lead. The team spent the rest of the first half climbing back and, SEE W. BBALL PAGE B2

STAT OF THE DAY 89

SEE M. SQUASH PAGE B2

Big rally in Big Apple

COLUMBIA DAILY SPECTATOR

Captain Reggie Willhite ’12, left, led men’s basketball to a 21-point second half comeback against Columbia on Saturday. BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER On Friday night, the Bulldogs came out on the wrong end of a one-point game at Cornell, but captain Reggie Willhite ’12 made sure that did not happen again at Columbia on Saturday.

M. BASKETBALL

Willhite scored 24 points, including the game-winning lay-up, with 13.4 seconds to play, as the Elis came back to stun Columbia 59–58 a day after a disappointing 85–84 overtime loss to Cornell (10–12, 5–3 Ivy). The Lions (14-10, 3-5) led 51–30 with 11:30 remaining in the second half, but the Bulldogs (16-6, 6-2 Ivy) outscored Columbia 29–7 the rest of the way. “[Head coach James Jones] kept

telling us we weren’t going to get it all back in one possession,” forward Brandon Sherrod ’15 said. “[Jones said] we have to keep chipping away.” Forward Greg Mangano ’12 had not made a field goal before the run, but his three followed one of Willhite’s seven steals to cut the deficit to 55–50 with under five minutes left, forcing a Columbia timeout. ColumSEE M. BASKETBALL PAGE B3

THE NUMBER OF POINTS KNICKS POINT GUARD JEREMY LIN SCORED IN HIS FIRST THREE STARTS, the most by any player since the merger of the ABA and NBA in 1976-77. The Harvard alumnus was assigned to the Knicks’ D-League team on January 17; he is now their starting point guard.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Mickelson surges to win Pebble Beach, Tiger sinks Pro golfer Phil Mickelson, ranked No. 17 in the world, started the fourth round of the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am six strokes behind the lead. On the sixth hole, however, Mickelson made a 20-foot eagle putt for the lead. Starting with him in the second-to-last group, world No. 18 Tiger Woods struggled with his putting and finsihed three over par on the day, dropping to 15th place.

Harvard wins national championship rematch BY KATIE DONLEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s squash team was leading Harvard, 4–3, with two games left in its match Sunday afternoon and the Ivy League title on the line.

W. SQUASH The two teams’ last regulation match had been the 2011 national championships, in which No. 2 Yale won a 5–4 nailbiter over the No. 1 Cantabs. Harvard won again in a preseason scrimmage this year and has held the national No. 1 ranking since. On Sunday, two weeks before national championsips, Yale (15-1, 6–1 Ivy) was looking to establish itself as the superior team. Harvard (14-0, 7–0), its co-captain and No. 3 Nirasha Guruge said, was looking for revenge. “Last year was a pretty bad loss,” Guruge said. “It motivated us to train harder and gave us the determination to come down here and get the championship back.” No matter the Cantabs’ desire for revenge, Yale rebounded from an early 2–1 deficit and built its late 4–3 lead with some surprising victories, including an upset by Kim Hay ’15 at the No. 2 spot and another by Katie Ballaine ’13 at No. 5. With the overall score at 4–3, the two remaining matches unfolded on neighboring courts, as spectators packed three-deep on the Brady Squash Center balcony and around the door to the court below. On one court, Shihui Mao ’15 contested the No. 7 spot with Harvard’s Sarah Mumanachit, a junior who had been on the losing end of the last — and deciding match — of the 2011 national championship against Yale. On the court next to Mao’s, Alexandra Van Arkel ’12 took on Harvard’s Haley Mendez at the No. 4 spot. One victory in those two matches would clinch the match for Yale. But neither could convert. Mao lost a five-game battle, Van Arkel lost 3–0 despite a close-fought

final game, and the Elis fell to the Crimson, 5–4. “We worked all season to get today,” head coach David Talbott said. “We were in a position to win, and we just couldn’t close it.” Yale ran into difficulties early, going down 2–1 after the first three matches and watching captain Rhetta Nadas ’12 upset by Guruge, 3–1, at the No. 3 spot. Nadas faltered after taking her first game against Guruge, losing the next two by scores of 11–2 and 11–3. Though she was visibly tired in the fifth game, taking extra time between points to catch her breath, Nadas fought off three match balls, rallied back from a 10–7 deficit, and took an 11–10 lead that brought her within a point of forcing a decisive fifth game.

We worked all season to get to today. We were in a position to win, and we just couldn’t close it. DAVID TALBOTT Head coach, men’s and women’s squash But Guruge would win the next three points and the match, clinching the victory after Nadas missed a diving forehand near midcourt. Yale made up for that loss with an upset of its own, as Hay defeated former individual national champion Laura Gemmell in five games. Hay dropped two consecutive games to Gemmell, who entered the match with a 38–1 career college record, after having won the first, and looked visibly upset after the second loss, throwing her racquet to the floor before exiting the court. By the time she returned for the fourth game, however, she had calmed down. “The coaches talked with me and set my head straight,” Hay said. “They told me to play my game and not worry about any-

thing else.” Hay stormed to victory in the next two games, clinching the match and tying the overall score between Harvard and Yale at 2–2. Yale had a setback at the No. 1 spot, where Millie Tomlinson ’14, last year’s individual college national champion lost to Harvard freshman phenomenon — and world No. 28 — Amanda Sobhy. But it received an important victory from Ballaine, who beat Harvard’s Natasha Kingshott in what Ballaine called the best game she has ever played. That victory set up Mao’s and Van Arkel’s crucial matches and put players on both teams on pins and needles as they watched from the sidelines. “It was a little bit of a heart attack there,” Harvard’s Sobhy said. “We all might have aged a bit.” “It was a lot of pressure on [Mao and Van Arkel].” Talbott said. The Crimson’s Mumanachit weathered that pressure, bouncing back after Mao forced a deciding fifth game and winning that fifth with a commanding 11–3 performance. Her victory tied the overall score, 4–4. And although Van Arkel staged a late rally after losing the first two games of her match, she could not convert on a game ball at 10–9 and went on to lose, 12–10. With that, Harvard won 5–4. “It was disappointing,” Ballaine said. “But we have another chance at national championships, and in the next two weeks we’re really going to gear up to win that.” On Friday, Yale coasted past No. 8 Dartmouth, 9–0. All but two Elis won their matches 3–0. Tomlinson led the way with a sweep of Dartmouth No. 1 Corey Schaefer. Nadas ran into trouble early, dropping her first game, but bounced back to capture the next three in a row. CSA National Team Championships will be held in two weeks at Harvard. Contact KATIE DONLEY at katie.donley@yale.edu .

Elis make history

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Megan Vasquez ’13 scored the 1,000th point of her Yale career on Friday against Cornell. W. BBALL FROM PAGE B1 despite a 12-3 run to close out the period, went into halftime down 32-29. The Lions actually extended their lead once the game got underway, scoring five of the first seven points of the second half. From that point on though, the Bulldogs’ superior talent prevailed, and the Elis systematically disposed of their opponents. Yale outscored Columbia 44-27 in the second half as the Bulldogs

forced 11 Columbia turnovers and shot a blistering 53.1 percent from the field. Yale returned home this weekend after playing the previous two weekends on the road, and guard Sarah Halejian ’15 said that the familiar environs made a big difference. “It was much nicer to be home this weekend,” the freshman said. “We were able to relax and not having to travel made a big difference. We definitely seemed more

tired on Saturday last weekend after traveling the whole time.” Cashen added that the less rigid schedule and even being able to sleep in their own beds had an impact on the team. The Bulldogs remain at home next weekend to face Dartmouth on Friday night and a rematch against Harvard at 6 p.m. on Saturday. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

Despite injuries, men’s squash takes two wins M. SQUASH FROM PAGE B1 clinched the victory for Yale. Although No. 3 John Roberts ’12 and No. 5 Neil Martin ’14 swept their opponents, other Bulldog victories were not as one-sided. No. 2 Richard Dodd ’13 needed four games and No. 6 Robby Berner ’12 was pushed to five games in order to emerge victorious. What made these matches more difficult was the fact that without Robinson at his usual No. 1 position, players were moved up higher in the order. “We don’t have a very deep bench, so having guys step up like this, I think the guys are almost as excited as they were for Trinity,” head coach David Talbott said. “Guys stepped in and played a spot or two up and impressed.” Clayman was particularly impressive. Berner said Clayman was an American walkon to the team his freshman year, something extremely rare in the squash world. He added that last year Clayman was last on the bench, but he worked his way into the starting lineup. The victory came in Yale’s final match before the CSA Team Championships to be held at Princeton next weekend. Although the loss to Princeton Feb. 4 took away the Elis’ hopes of repeating as Ivy League Champions, yesterday’s victory assured the Bulldogs of a second-place finish in the Ancient Eight. Berner added that Yale, Trinity, and Princeton form a “bit of a triangle” as Yale defeated Trinity, Trinity upended Princeton, and Princeton took down Yale this season. Berner said the home team was victorious in all of these matches. Talbott said that the Bulldogs had been riding high after stopping No. 1 Trinity’s 13-year winning streak last month, but the loss at Princeton took that away. He added that he felt defeating the Crimson yesterday could restore the team’s energy. “After the big win at Trinity, the bad loss to Princeton took the wind out of us,” Talbott said. “Hopefully we have our momentum back, and we can take that into nationals.” On Friday, the Elis defeated Dartmouth in Hanover, NH 6–3. The class of 2012 is only the second class of seniors to go undefeated against Harvard all four years, Berner said. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite missing two of their starting players, No. 1 Hywel Robinson ’13 and No. 9 Charlie Wyatt ’14, the Elis came away with a 5-4 win against Harvard on Sunday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS JAKE ELLENBERGER UFC welterweight Jake Ellenberger is on a hot streak, winning his last five fights, four by knockout. In his last fight he KO’ed No. 8 welterweight Jake Shields in less than a minute. Next Ellenberger will fight Diego Sanchez, described by Ellenberger as “a tough cat.”

Yale conquers Lions by one

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S HOCKEY IVY

M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1 bia’s Meiko Lyles hit a triple to come out of the timeout, but that would be the Lions’ final basket of the evening. Willhite cut through the Columbia defense all night long, and he hit two more baskets after the timeout before guard Jesse Pritchard ’14 hit the biggest shot of his career from beyond the arc with 36 seconds left, making for a one-point ball game. Pritchard said that his mind was clear when he pulled the trigger on the three. “I wasn’t really thinking,” Pritchard said. “When I caught the ball I just got my feet set and knocked it down.” The Lions did not appear to have the same ice running through their veins. After Willhite’s basket, senior forward Blaise Staab went to the free throw line with 3.2 seconds until the final buzzer, but the pressure got to him, and he missed both attempts. The Bulldogs got the miss that they needed against Columbia, but Cornell guard Jonathan Gray seemingly could not miss Friday night as he scored a careerhigh 29 points to upend the Elis in Ithaca. “He was hot,” Sherrod said. “He really wasn’t missing anything. Every shot was nothing but net.” Gray connected from downtown with 12 seconds left in regulation to give Cornell a 71–69 lead after being down by as many as 13 points. Bulldog guard Austin Morgan ’13 forced overtime with a lay-up, but two more threes from Gray and a free throw sunk

the Elis’ victory chances. Morgan scored a team-high 22 points and all five Bulldog starters scored at least nine points. Yale had fallen two games behind No. 21 Harvard (21-3, 7-1) with the loss to Cornell, but Harvard fell 70–62 at Princeton Saturday. The Elis are now one game behind the Ancient Eight-leading Cantabs as they prepare to clash in Cambridge Feb. 18. “We got embarrassed [the last time Yale played Harvard],” Sherrod said. “We want revenge.” Sherrod added, however, that the Elis have to take each game one at a time. Morgan agreed with his younger teammate, stressing the importance of not looking ahead. “We’re mostly thinking about Dartmouth,” Morgan said. “The next day we’ll think about Harvard.” The Bulldogs travel next to Hanover, N.H. on Feb. 17 to face Dartmouth.

38

14

85

YALE

34

37

13

84

23

36

59

CBIA

30

28

58

on Friday. During that game, the Elis were able to keep pace with the Raiders in the goal column throughout all three periods. But on Saturday, Yale fell behind early and faced a four-goal deficit until only five minutes remained in the game. Still, Allain said he was still impressed with the team’s efforts. “I’m real proud of the way we hung in there tonight,” he said. “We battled back against some adversity on road. The bottom line is we had to work way too hard for goals, while theirs came much too easily.” For the third game in a row, the Elis gave up a goal in the first five minutes to fall into an early hole. Forward Sean Collins scored his first goal of the period from the left circle on a slap shot. He fol-

T

%

Cornell

7

1

2

.800

13

6

6

.640

Harvard

3

2

3

.562

7

7

10

.500

Dartmouth

2

3

3

.438

9

12

4

.440

Yale

3

4

0

.429

10

13

2

.440

Princeton

2

4

2

.375

7

12

6

.400

Brown

2

5

0

.286

8

14

3

.380

THIS WEEK

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 Dartmouth at Yale, 7:30 p.m.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Princeton

5

0

1.000

17

4

.810

Yale

6

2

.750

14

8

.636

Harvard

5

2

.714

12

9

.571

Brown

5

3

.625

14

8

.636

Cornell

3

4

.429

9

12

.429

Penn

2

5

.286

9

12

.429

Dartmouth

1

6

.143

3

18

.143

Columbia

0

7

.000

2

19

.095

Reggie Willhite ’12 led Yale’s comeback at Columbia with 24 points.

and that send us the message that we need to get going.” In the final period, the Bulldogs outshot the Big Red 15–2, but it took them almost 16 minutes to get the puck across the goal line. Nick Jaskowiak ’12 finally broke through with a slap sho, his second goal of the year. The Bulldogs struck again with 51 seconds remaining to pull within two. After a pass from Fallen, O’Neill scored his second goal in two nights and 17th of the year by putting one over Cornell’s Andy Iles’ shoulder. “I think in our next couple of games, we need to be much more consistent in all three phases of our games,” Root said. “We need to play more confidently and take the pressure off.” The Elis will be back in Ingalls Rink for the regular season finale

IVY

Contact JIMIN HE at jimin.he@yale.edu and KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

CORNELL 4 YALE 2 2

2

0

4

YALE

0

0

2

2

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 Dartmouth at Yale, 7:00 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

next weekend to take on Dartmouth and Harvard. The games begin at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.

CORNELL

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, FEB. 11 Yale 73, Columbia 59

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

7

1

.875

20

2

.909

Yale

6

2

.750

16

6

.750

Penn

5

2

.714

13

11

.545

Cornell

5

3

.625

10

12

.400

Princeton

4

3

.571

13

10

.524

Columbia

3

5

.375

14

10

.591

Brown

1

7

.125

7

18

.304

Dartmouth

0

8

.000

4

20

.182

NEXT WEEK

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 Yale at Dartmouth, 7:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 11 Yale 59, Columbia 58 COLGATE 4 YALE 2 COLGATE

1

1

2

4

YALE

0

1

1

2

OVERALL

Harvard

LAST WEEK

WOMEN’S HOCKEY IVY

Close loss for w. swimming SWIMMING FROM PAGE B4 The men’s team had a solid meet across the board, continuing to post consistent and season best times. The men set pool records in the 200-yard medley relay and the 200-yard backstroke. Mike Lazris ’15, Ronald Tsui ’15, Paschall Davis ’14 and Pat Killian ’14 swam the record-breaking 200 medley relay in 1:34.90. Rob Harder ’15 broke the 200yard backstroke record with a time of 1:49.91, which was only one third of Harder’s impressive meet. He went on to take first in the 1000-yard freestyle (9:36.15) and second in the 200-yard IM (1:54.82). Another standout individual performance was Alexander Benz’s ’12 100-yard breaststroke (58.98). He ended his Yale swimming career with his first ever first-place finish. At the women’s meet, the divers posted a 1,2,3 sweep in both the one and three-meter diving events. In the one-meter event, Paige Meneses ‘14 (291.51) took first, while Rachel Rosenberg ’12 (276.30) and Lauren Gardainier ‘15 (242.62) took second and third. On the 3-meter event, Rosenberg topped the charts with a 298.05, followed by Meneses (272.92) and Gardanier (272.32). Abigail Nunn ’12 and Allison West ’14 swam the

W L

LAST WEEK COLUMBIA DAILY SPECTATOR

lowed up with another goal from the same spot with just three minutes remaining in the period. About five minutes into the second period, Locke Jillson took a shorthanded attempt from the top of the right circle that found its way into the Yale net. Following the goal, Allain pulled Malcolm for Connor Wilson ‘15, who made his collegiate debut. Wilson was thrown into the fire right away. Just two minutes after being put on the ice, Cornell’s John McCarron grabbed a rebound off a Wilson save and put it in with about 12 minutes remaining in the period. “Cornell is a tough place for a goalie who hasn’t had a whole lot of experience to play,” Root said. “[Wilson] did a great job of stepping in last night and I think that definitely energized us. We were kind of slow to start off the game

%

IVY

Elis meet defeat in New York M. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4

T

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

YALE 59, COLUMBIA 58 YALE

W L

SATURDAY, FEB. 11 Cornell 4, Yale 2

CORNELL 85, YALE 84 33

SCHOOL

LAST WEEK

Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

CORNELL

OVERALL

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

9

1

0

.900

24

3

0

.875

Princeton

6

3

1

.650

10

13

4

.480

IVY 1

Dartmouth

4

3

.562

16

OVERALL 8 2 .667

Harvard

4

4

0

.500

18

8

1

.688

Brown

2

6

0

.250

8

12

7

.420

Yale

0

8

0

.000

1

25

1

.056

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 Yale at Dartmouth, 7:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 11 Cornell 6, Yale 1

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Harvard

7

0

1.000

14

0

1.000

Yale

6

1

.857

15

1

.938

Penn

5

2

.714

8

3

.727

Princeton

3

3

.500

9

3

.750

5

Cornell

3

4

.429

11

6

.647

Brown

1

5

.167

9

7

.562

7

Dartmouth

1

5

.167

5

6

.455

Columbia

0

6

.000

5

9

.357

1

3

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s swimming and diving team will take on the Ivy League Championships in two weeks. 200-fly, in place of the injured Hayes Hyde ’12 and Alexander Forrester ’13. Both Teuscher and Albrecht impressed with their times of 2:09.38 and 2:09.73, respectively. Both teams are preparing to rest and taper for Ivy League Championships. While men’s head coach Tim Wise said the team’s goal of finishing in the top

three at Ivy League Championships will be difficult, he is happy with the progress the team has made. Teuscher said she hopes this loss was a learning experience for her team, and that it will motivate the team to perform better at Ivy League Championships. Teuscher said she believes her team will be ready for championships.

“I have confidence that the girls will have their heads in the right place,” she said. The Ivy League Championships will take place Feb. 23-25 at Harvard for the women’s team, and March 1-3 at Princeton for the men’s team. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

OVERALL

LAST WEEK

SUNDAY, FEB. 12 Harvard 5, Yale 4

NEXT WEEK

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 Howe Cup at Harvard, TBA

r e c y c l e y o u r y d n d a i l y


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“I’m not giving him no damn suggestions, [Jeremy Lin] only scored forty points against us, he’s fine.” KOBE BRYANT LAKERS SHOOTING GUARD

Bulldogs drop two more games BY JIMIN HE AND KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTERS Sometimes, having an advantage in shots on goal does not translate into victory.

M. HOCKEY In suffering back-to-back 4–2 losses against Colgate (17–10–3, 11–6–1) and No. 13 Cornell (13–6– 6, 10–3–5) on the road, the men’s hockey team (10–13–2, 7–10–1 ECAC) learned this lesson the hard way this weekend. The Bulldogs outshot the Raiders 35–28 and the Big Red 34–25 but could not outscore their opponents. With four games left before the ECAC playoffs, the losses dropped the Elis into a tie with Dartmouth for eighth place in the conference. “We came out with two losses, but those were very winnable games,” forward Kenny Agostino ’14 said. “We feel encouraged going into the playoffs.”

RED RAIDED

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Brian O’Neill ’12 scored Yale’s final goal against both Colgate and Cornell this weekend but could not carry his team to victory in either game.

Austin Smith, the nation’s most prolific scorer, was not the Colgate skater to fear on Friday night. Smith recorded an emptynet goal with 47 seconds remaining but was otherwise not a primary threat. But Colgate’s John Lidgett scored twice, including the goal that broke a 2–2 tie to give the Raiders a 4–2 win over the visiting Elis. “I think we didn’t capitalize on enough opportunities this weekend,” Agostino said. “Against Colgate, I really thought we were the better team.” Despite skating neck-andneck with the Raiders for 60 minutes, the Bulldogs failed to convert several golden opportunities and went just 1–5 on the power play. Just three and a half minutes into the first period, Colgate struck for an early power-play goal. Six seconds after forward Charles Brockett ’12 went to the box for hooking, Colgate’s Corbin McPherson sent a weak shot through traffic that beat Jeff Malcolm ’13 and gave the Raiders an early lead. “We worked very hard tonight and created a lot of chances,” head

coach Keith Allain ’80 said. “We were close, but still not running on all cylinders.” The Elis kept it competitive in the second period and managed to knot things up with about 10 minutes remaining. Yale was given a power play when Colgate’s Chris Wagner was penalized for tripping. On the ensuing man-advantage, forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 one-timed a pass from Jesse Root ’14 into the back of the Colgate net. But Yale’s fifth and final penalty of the night gave the Raiders an opening that they jumped at with about five minutes remaining in the period. A long Colgate shot bounced off the boards and, after a scramble in front of the net, popped out to a waiting Colgate forward who banged it home for the 2–1 lead. “I think if we had gotten more traffic [in front of the net] and more screen plays, we might have been able to capitalize on our scoring opportunities.” Root said. Yale tied things up again with another rebound off the boards behind the net. Defenseman Tommy Fallen ’15 took a long shot that fell to Brian O’Neill ’12 on the left side of the net. He tapped it in for his 16th goal of the season. But the Raiders struck back. Off of a faceoff, a failed Yale clearance ended up on the stick of Thomas Larkin, who moved the puck to Lidgett for his second goal of the night. After Allain pulled Malcolm from the net, the man-advantage created two opportunities for the Elis to score. But the Bulldogs could not find the net, and Smith, a favorite for the Hobey Baker Award, put one away to seal the 4–2 victory for Colgate.

IVY LEAGUE WOES

Saturday, the Elis traveled to Cornell and again fell by a twogoal margin, this time in front of a sold out Lynah Rink, allowing the Big Red to clinch the Ivy League title. Despite finishing with the same score, Saturday’s matchup with Cornell looked much different than the game against Colgate SEE M. HOCKEY PAGE B3

Elis split meets at Brown BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER The men went out with a bang, and the women suffered a heartbreaking defeat at the swimming and diving regular season finale against Brown Saturday.

SWIMMING The men’s team (6-2,5-2 Ivy) overcame Brown (1-8, 1-6) with a score of 180-120. The women’s team (3-4,3-4) lost to Brown (2-6,1-5) by the smallest possible margin, a nail-biting 151-149. The men’s record is a remarkable improvement from last year’s 2-8 finish, but the women’s record is a step back from last year’s record of 6-4. “Losing by such a small margin was really tough for the last meet of the season.” said swimmer Molly Albrecht ’13, “In the end it came down to a touch out on the wall.” The women’s team came tantalizingly close to victory. They lost in several races, such as the 100yard butterfly, the 100-yard freestyle and the 200-yard individual medley by only tenths of a second. In the last relay, the Bulldogs needed to come in first and third to win the meet, but missed the mark, placing first and fifth. However, the last relay far from tells the story of the meet as a whole. “I hate looking at it that way,” said Christina Teuscher, the head coach of the women’s swimming and diving team, “because two points can be found anywhere in the meet.” The first through fifth place swimmers score 9,4,3,2 and 1 points respectively, while first through third place relays are given 11, 4 and 2 points respectively, she added. When the meet is that close, it comes down to who places second, third and fourth, Albrecht said. SEE SWIMMING PAGE B3

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s swimming and diving team pulled off a decisive victory, 180–120, against Brown on Saturday.

Today's Paper  

Feb. 13, 2012

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