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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 77 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLOUDY

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CROSS CAMPUS Self-improvement. A new Twitter account suggesting ways to improve Yale’s campus popped up this week. The account, @BestYale, is produced by a group of undergraduates calling themselves Undergraduates for the Best Yale College, or UBYC. The tweeters suggest we “make Wine Mondays schoolwide,” “Install trampolines in college courtyards,” and “MICHELLE BRANCH FOR SPRING FLING.”

DIGITAL AGE EXHIBIT AFFIRMS DRAWINGS’ ROLE

DISCRIMINATION

MEDICAL RECORDS

HEALTHY FOOD

East Haven cops arrested on charges of mistreating Latinos

YALE SEEKS EFFICIENCY WITH NEW DATABASE

Dining option comes to Audubon area, joining two new eateries

PAGE 8 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE 7 CITY

STUDENT ACTIVISM

Elis hit GOP campaign trail

BY CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTER Organizers of Sex Week 2012 said the administrative ban on corporate sponsors will limit their ability to attract the type of high-profile speakers who have come in past years. Connie Cho ’13, one of the Sex Week directors, said organizers have turned to “grassroots fundraising efforts” — reaching out to residential college masters, students, alumni and the Yale College Dean’s Office — in an attempt to meet their target budget of $20,000, which Cho said was in line with that of the 2010 event. Still, Sex Week 2012 will hold the same number of activities as in 2010, Cho said, and she does not expect the fundraising challenges to compromise the event’s quality.

Madame Senator? Former Secretary of the State Susan Bysiewicz ’83, a candidate for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Joe Lieberman ’64 LAW ’67, was in town Tuesday night to speak to the Yale College Democrats. Fishy. The New Haven Police

Department responded to two reports of suspicious packages on Tuesday. One unattended backpack on Church Street near City Hall shut down traffic shortly before 6 p.m. Members of the NHPD’s Bomb Squad x-rayed the backpack and determined it posed no threat. A second report of a suspicious package near College and Chapel streets was a false alarm.

The lack of corporate sponsorship has definitely affected editorial decisions and has challenged us to work harder to collaborate with our speakers. CONNIE CHO ’13 Co-director, Sex Week 2012

Renewed. In a Monday press release, New Haven officials announced that, for a second year, they would group schools into three different “tiers” based on their students’ performance. Schools in Tier III, the lowest, are subject to district intervention.

Too Damn High” video — to encourage Daniels to join the GOP primary race. But Knowles and Eden could not convince Daniels to run. Even after the duo met with Daniels in both Washington, D.C. and Indiana, the gover-

“There’s a list of names that we just can’t bring to campus because they have high honoraria and travel costs,” she said. “We’ve had to make decisions based on the topic of events and how well we can reach out to other speakers that speak on similar subjects without dropping quality.” Administrators recently approved organizers’ proposal to continue using University facilities for the biennial event, which will take place from Feb. 4-14, despite a November recommendation by the Advisory Committee on Campus Climate to ban Sex Week from campus. Previous years’ sponsors have included the manufacturer of Trojan condoms and sex toy distributor Babeland. Cho said organizers face the challenge of both meeting administrators’ expectations to provide quality sex education and also overcoming the ban on

SEE CAMPAIGN PAGE 6

SEE SEX WEEK PAGE 4

In charge. Kathryn Krier

DRA ’07 will take over as the next head of the Office of Undergraduate Productions starting May 1. She is currently coordinating this semester’s Shakespeare at Yale program.

Got tix? Not yet. Students

interested in cheering on the men’s basketball team against Harvard on Friday will have to wait until Friday morning to get their hands on tickets. Free student section tickets for the Harvard-Yale game will be made available at 9 a.m. on Friday and can be purchased at the Ray Tompkins House at 20 Tower Parkway.

What a girl wants. Two female

sophomores have started a new blog called “By Yale Women For Yale Men” that hopes to explicate to Yale men exactly what women want, what women need and how to avoid being a huge dork around girls, whether they’re single or in a relationship.

A modern man. A kettle corn vendor operating on Elm Street is now accepting major credit cards. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1970 About 250 people turn out in spite of 20-degree temperatures to protest a proposed 5000-car garage on State Street, claiming it would exacerbate the city’s already dire pollution problem. Submit tips to Cross Campus

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Sex Week faces fiscal challenges

EARL LEE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Suitemates Owen Barrett ’15 and Hillary Ryan ’15 founded Yale’s Youth for Ron Paul chapter, which now has nearly 50 members. BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER

F

or Michael Knowles ’12, who served as former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman’s national youth cochair, the presidential candidate was not always his first choice.

Instead Knowles, along with fellow Yalie Max Eden ’11, had decided to support Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels. In fall 2010, the pair started the Student Initiative to Draft Daniels Political Action Committee, which raised money and produced commercials — such as Knowles’ widely viewed “The Deficit Is

SOM study spaces in flux BY DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTER Since the School of Management’s student center Donaldson Commons closed in December, the school has worked to provide students with replacement study spaces until its new campus opens in 2013. SOM converted several rooms in its main building at 135 Prospect St. into individual and group study spots for students after the school’s student center closed. Though administrators told students that Donaldson would be razed to make room for Yale’s new residential colleges, it was unclear how the facilities would be replaced until late last semester. Students interviewed said they were initially apprehensive about the change, but are now satisfied with using the temporary facilities as SOM awaits completion of its new campus on Whitney Avenue. “I think we are now officially in between the old campus and

the new campus,” Shawn Isakson SOM ’12 said. “We’re definitely in this transition space — they’re just trying to kind of patch things together for just the next year or two.” SOM student government president Bryce Hall SOM ’12 said the student government provided administrators with student feedback on how to compensate for Donaldson’s closure, though he added that the student government was not involved in any decision-making and that administrators had started working on a solution before the academic year began. Isakson, who attended an informal meeting with SOM Dean Edward Snyder over tea last semester, said that when the issue of Donaldson’s closure was raised, Snyder appeared “slightly unaware” of how greatly the change would impact student life. “He came in, brand new to the SEE STUDY SPACE PAGE 6

New title brings little change for Lorimer BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER

DAVID SUWONDO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

University Secretary Linda Lorimer will become Yale’s first University vice president.

Though Linda Lorimer will relinquish her longtime title of University secretary this summer to become Yale’s first University vice president, administrators say the change will not significantly alter her role. The job of University secretary has grown throughout Lorimer’s 18 years in the position to include eight different offices spread across Yale, and Lorimer has become one of the University’s elite administrators. As Kimberly Goff-Crews ’83 LAW ’86 assumes the role of secretary, many of the position’s current responsibilities will remain with Lorimer, bringing the Office of the Secretary back to the state it was in when Lorimer was appointed in 1993. While Lorimer will also have fewer responsibilities in her new role of University vice president, both Lorimer and University President Richard Levin said the shift in positions does not indicate that she will leave Yale anytime soon. “It symbolizes the recognition that Lorimer’s job had become so huge that to accomplish all the pieces we really needed SEE LORIMER PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “[University Properties] has totally wrecked the landscape for most of yaledailynews.com/opinion

us.”

Restoring real community policing

GUEST COLUMNIST ZEKE BLACKWELL

On leadership B

training

H

undreds of leaders of campus student groups gathered Monday night and again last night in a leadership training session about sexual misconduct and hazing. What actually occurred Monday was less than helpful, both because the administration did not seem fully prepared to discuss the difficult questions of sexual harassment, but also because students were unwilling to engage in the discussion in general. The presenters read off scripts while students slept, distracted themselves with homework and laughed at the speakers, and each other. Yes, our campus faces problems of sexual misconduct, as do many other places. And it’s good that people here were willing to question the status quo, point out those problems and make the plea to change things for the better. We should be working towards minimizing sexual harassment and encouraging a campus climate where people feel comfortable talking about issues of sexism, bad traditions and apathy. Yet when Yale’s effort to start conversations about these issues is this poorly executed, I worry that these leadership sessions were more of a public relations move than a genuine attempt to further a dialogue. It was not an engaging presentation. It was cheesy at times. Presenters spoke in vague terms about how aligning individual values with Yale’s institutional values will prevent untoward behavior. One speaker told a story with no clear point about how she had the time of her life in a food fight her high school administration frowned on. We watched a video about a softball player, which made great points about sportsmanship and exactly no points about sexual misconduct. The final portion, led by Hannah Peck DIV ’11 and Ben Flores ’10, was the only one relevant to the sexual climate at Yale. The rest of the session seemed to direct the conversation away from the serious issues of sexual misconduct and hazing toward a more abstract conversation about institutional values and leadership, which, though potentially useful, seemed an easy way to hide from bigger issues. Tuesday and Wednesday’s sessions may be different. But as problematic and unhelpful as Monday’s presentation may have been, I was also troubled by my own response and the responses of many of the students I observed. I came into the session thinking this was a productive step

‘MSMONEYPENNY’ ON ‘BROADWAY LIQUOR TOLD TO LEAVE’

from the administration — but also expecting to be bored. And I think many students shared this attitude of apathy. Three girls behind me even passed a flask during the presentation and constantly disrupted attempts to take the session seriously by quietly — and not so quietly — heckling the speakers. I was internally annoyed, but I did nothing to stop their behavior, even though I knew one of the girls. I just turned around and laughed at them once or twice and sank back further into my seat, disengaging. I am disappointed with myself that I was unable or unwilling to even ask them to be quiet, much less to ask them to think about what they were doing. At one point, we were instructed to turn to our neighbors and discuss our individual and organizational values. I suspect that maybe 5 percent of the conversations that followed took these questions seriously, probably because discussing large, vague concepts like values with strangers is not comfortable. The speaker then asked, “What are Yale’s institutional values?” After several seconds of sideways glances and stifled giggling, she sternly followed with “Silence?” which was met with laughter. But this point is serious. If we cannot discuss Yale’s institutional values in a meeting held expressly for that purpose, how are we going to change them in our day to day interactions? We should be conscious of the way we approach problems of hazing and sexual discrimination. That awareness begins with trying seriously to talk about these issues. I’m not saying the lecture was worth an hour and 15 minutes of busy Yale students’ time — because, due to the way it was organized, I don’t think it was — but it became a complete waste of time when the majority of students couldn’t be bothered to engage. Perhaps the administration needs to invest more fully in addressing problems of sexual misconduct. But it was students who raised these complaints, students who asked for this discussion, and if students are too apathetic to support the University’s small attempt to start this discussion — imperfect though it may be — then maybe silence has become something we value. ZEKE BLACKWELL is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at ezekiel.blackwell@yale.edu .

ringing back what many people call community policing will not cure New Haven’s crime problem. Because it never really left. Huh? Look here, supposedly knowledgeable crime columnist, you might say, it’s been well established that community policing in New Haven was dead. Media outlets declared its demise, city and police officials admitted as much and residents mourned its passing. Then Chief Dean Esserman was brought back to the city specifically to revive it. Why, even you, in a column just months ago, urged candidates in the Ward 1 aldermanic election to help bring back community policing. All true — to a point. The death and revival of community policing has been the dominant narrative for New Haven policing, and a powerful one because it harkens back to the good old days of the 1990s when Esserman first helped implement community policing and sent crime plummeting. Who doesn’t want to root for the triumphant return of the good guys? But the narrative is an incomplete and only partially accurate one. The current perception of community policing is of a strategy that mainly involves building trust for the police in neighborhoods by engaging with the community and solving conflicts before they become crimes. That strategy was indeed developed in the early 1990s, but the rumors of its death have been greatly exaggerated. Each of New Haven’s 10 police districts has a manager — he or she

gets to know the neighborhood, its officers, its heroes and thugs and is given some measure of autonomy in COLIN ROSS making the strategy from Gangbuster h e a d q u a r ters match the needs of the district. T h i s decentralization is a key aspect of effective community policy, and it never went away. Different district managers certainly do better or worse at implementing it, and lackluster leadership can lead some patrol officers away from community engagement. But go to any district’s monthly management meeting of police and residents to this day and you will see a largely cohesive partnership that fosters coordination and mutual respect. But none of that respect prevented last year’s 34 murders. Okay, so if decentralization and community engagement aren’t what’s missing from the so-called return of community policing, then what is? Some might say walking beats — the return of set areas where officers patrol and interact with the community. Unlike neighborhood engagement, these actually have faded away in recent years. At his swearingin ceremony, Esserman proudly announced that they would return, eliciting loud cheers and applause from the audience.

But though a very public symbol of community policing, are walking beats actually that central to the strategy’s crime reduction? The man who hired Esserman, Mayor John DeStefano Jr., didn’t think so in 2009, nor did the police chief, James Lewis. As Lewis told me at the time, “What we saw with foot patrols is that crime would move, but it would be just two blocks over. It never went away.” Lewis successfully cut crime by 10 percent and increased residents’ and cops’ confidence in the department without the much-heralded walking beats. So not the walking beats. But what then? The answer is the often-overlooked aspect of 1990s community policing that goes against the approach’s public perception: sending the right people to jail. Using the combined resources of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, the New Haven Drug Gang Task Force targeted and took out the city’s largest and most violent drug gangs. The arrests were often built on the intelligence gathered from community engagement, demonstrating to all that police would protect residents and that violence and drug dealing that paralyzed neighborhoods would not be tolerated. The dual experiences of New Haven and New York confirm the necessity for the aggressive enforcement side of community policing. In the 1980s, each city’s police department was lost in the woods. The NHPD was relying on ineffective, faux-macho tactics such

as the beat-down posse (speaks for itself), which aroused anger at the police and did little to fight crime. The NYPD was on the opposite track, forbidding patrol officers from making drug arrests and mandating community meetings over crime-fighting. This too aroused anger: residents wanted officers to actually reduce crime, not just make nice. Former NYPD Chief William J. Bratton, Esserman’s mentor, finally turned things around when he decentralized authority for fighting crime and wrested control of high-crime areas from criminals. Just as in New Haven, thanks to community engagement and aggressive enforcement, the right people went to jail and crime rates plunged. Police say that the city’s current criminals are far less organized than their 1990s predecessors. This lack of central authority makes it much harder for the deterrence that comes with enforcement to stick. But there are ways — renowned criminologist David Kennedy has already visited and is trying to show New Haven how other cities have reduced violence using a combination of persuasion, incentives and force on criminals. That would be a real return to community policing, which New Haven does desperately need, but in its full, original form. COLIN ROSS is a senior in Berkeley College. His column runs on Wednesdays. Contact him at colin.ross@yale.edu .

GUE ST COLUMNIST ZAK NEWMAN

Impatience and new resolve in 2012 S

ince the president delivered his State of the Union address last night, talking heads have already spent a good deal of time analyzing its impact on his prospects for re-election. But they missed the point of the speech. The address is an opportunity for the president to redirect the national agenda. It’s an opportunity for the American people to reconnect with what they see as a disconnected and do-nothing Congress. It’s an opportunity for the president to restore citizens’ belief in the possibility of America. That’s exactly what we saw last night. And that’s exactly what we need. As President Obama said, we need to bring jobs back to the United States and stop encouraging corporations to ship jobs abroad. We need to spur public investment to restore our infrastructure and technology economy. Most important, we need to be serious about the fact that regulation in itself is not a business killer but that, when implemented effectively, it protects

workers and businesses and develops the trust needed for trade. Last night the president showed again, as he did in Osawatomie, Kan. in December, that he will not tolerate the partisan gridlock that has held our nation’s future hostage and denied opportunities to hardworking Americans. His administration will start immediately implementing needed policies for clean energy production that conservative brinkmanship has made nearly impossible. If Congress continues to fail to act, the president will step in. But in spite of the gridlock and in the midst of growing frustration towards opportunity inequality, Americans are better equipped to take on the challenges of our new economy than they were when President Obama took office. Since that day three years ago, we’ve seen the addition of 3 million jobs to the economy and the growth of new clean energy jobs in place of those lost to the recession. We can do more of this; it’ll just require us to

move beyond the kind of winnertake-all politics that have come to characterize Washington in recent years. I am not blind to the politics behind the speech, or to the chorus of voices wishing to replace that of President Obama at the rostrum of next year’s address. The president drew a hard line on the Republican field’s empty rhetoric on taxation and the economy and revealed Republicans’ position for what it is: an outgrowth of selfish politics and moneyed interests playing in political campaigns. No one truly believes that an expiration of the Bush tax cuts will rob capitalists of an incentive to do business and send the American economy careening into a ditch. No one seriously holds the assertion that a fair tax system that doesn’t rob our middle class of its welfare will induce a Eurozone-style financial crisis. The economy can be and will be better, but only if Republicans in Congress and around the country admit these truths. Our politics today values compelling stories and misleading

narratives over leadership in the face of hard realities. Judging from Congress’s approval ratings, the American people are over it. We want strong and honest leadership, and that’s what we’re going to get from the president in the year to come. President Obama’s speech last night did not point out the Republicans’ failings so much as it extended an olive branch. As he said in the address, “This nation is great because we worked as a team. This nation is great because we get each other’s backs. And if we hold fast to that truth, in this moment of trial, there is no challenge too great.” Republicans in Congress and running for office should take note: the nation is waiting for you to get on board. More than your political futures depends on it.

Reason for skepticism in Bahrain

Brian Dooley, the organization’s Human Rights Defenders Program’s director, stated that the regime “continues to undermine its stated commitment to human rights reform by holding sham trials, attacking human rights defenders and denying access to international observers.” Reporters Without Borders is skeptical as well. In a press release published January 7th, the organization warns, “The international community must not be taken in by the duplicity with which the [Bahraini] government expresses a desire to punish those responsible for the abuses while continuing to crack down on dissent.” I could go on. Al-Khalifa presented the views of the despotic regime ruled by his family. I have presented the views of Bahrain’s protestors and respected NGOs. Yalies can now make up their minds.

ZAK NEWMAN is a junior in Jonathan Edwards College and president of the Yale College Democrats and the College Democrats of Connecticut. Contact him at zak.newman@ yale.edu .

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Facts in clinical research To the Editor: A recent article (“Medical School Seeks Volunteers,” Jan. 23) cites Yale Project manager Laurie Feldman as stating, “People don’t usually know that clinical research does not mean using people as guinea pigs.” When it comes to investigational medications, her statement is not supported by science. According to University of Pennsylvania professor of biostatistics and epidemiology Brian Strom, “the people who get the drug in the first few years after its approval are actually being experimented on.” Dr. Sally Burtles of Cancer Research, Inc. states: “We do trials in people because animal models are very poor predictors of human metabolism making humans in many ways guinea pigs.” It is clear that some Yale researchers and the general public are afflicted with the same research misconceptions as Feldman. I strongly urge both sides to inform themselves and to separate the facts from the fiction. GERALD ARDIGLIANO JAN. 24 The writer is the Coordinator of Medical Progress Through Awareness.

Saqer al-Khalifa, the media attaché of the embassy of Bahrain in Washington D.C., dubbed my piece (“Terror in the dark,” Jan. 19) on Bahraini and Saudi crimes against protesters and Islam’s holy sites “a grossly distorted account.” The Sunni dictatorship in Bahrain is reforming itself, he argues. However, several respected human rights organizations and other NGOs, on whose reports my original piece was based, are skeptical. Horrendous reports of torture continue to come out of Bahrain. On January 6th, Amnesty International published the story of an 18-year-old student, Hassan ‘Oun, who was tortured by the Bahraini police and threatened with rape. In its press release, Amnesty International’s Hassiba Hadj Sahroui commented that similar cases “keep piling up” and that “Bahraini authorities’ promises of change ring ever more hollow.” Human Rights First is skeptical as well about the Bahraini regime’s chatter about reform. In a press release on January 9th,

FAISAL HUSAIN JAN. 24 The writer is a first-year graduate student of history.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25 7:00 PM “Fear, Inc.”: A Panel Discussion. “Fear, Inc.,” a 2011 report published by the Center for American Progress, describes the orchestrated propagation of Islamophobia in America by key groups and figures. Panelists will include: professor Muneer Ahmad (Yale Law School), professor Zareena Grewal (American studies) and professor Andrew March (political science). LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 317. 8:00 PM Wei-Yi Yang, piano. Ravel’s “Valses nobles et sentimentales,” the composer’s elegant tribute to the waltzes of Vienna, and his enigmatic symbolist collection “Miroirs,” will be played by Yang at this concert, in addition to Schubert’s monumental late “Sonata in A major, D. 959.” Yang’s playing is “untiring, passionate and poetic … a job to behold,” according to Classics Today. Sprague Hall (470 College St.), Morse Recital Hall.

CORRECTIONS TUESDAY, JAN. 24

The article “Bard’s history at Rep traced” and its accompanying caption both said that the Whitney Humanity Center’s exhibit on Shakespeare productions at the Yale Repertory Theatre included 28 photographs of past productions. In fact, the exhibit has 28 pieces, including both photos and reproductions of posters from the productions. A photograph of Avery Brooks in the 2004 production of King Lear, which ran with the article, was mistakenly credited to Shakespeare at Yale. In fact, it was taken by Joan Marcus.

Senate Dems unveil jobs plan BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER With two weeks before the start of this year’s legislative session, Connecticut’s Senate Democrats proposed a jobs plan they say will help the state continue its economic recovery. Several senators held a press conference Tuesday afternoon at AdChem Manufacturing Technologies headquarters in Manchester to unveil a proposal they said is one of their highest priorities heading into the 2012 legislative session. According to the senators, the plan, which focuses on aiding jobs growth in small businesses, will protect and increase the number of instate jobs and boost the state’s still flailing economy, which took a hit last week when ratings agency Moody’s downgraded Connecticut over its budget woes.

The doomsday predictions that manufacturing is dead in Connecticut are way off base. STEVE CASSANO State Senator (D-Manchester) According to a press release from Adam Joseph, a spokesman for the Senate Democrats and former City Hall spokesman, the Democrats’ proposal has five major components: pushing to expand the state’s definition of a small business from 50 to 100 workers, fighting unemployment discrimination, starting a “Made in Connecticut” marketing campaign, expanding programs to help post-9/11 combat veterans find work in the state and creating a “Connecticut Treasures” program to highlight the state’s educational and tourist destinations. The measure seeks to build off the momentum created by an October jobs bill passed by Connecticut’s General Assembly with a nearly unanimous vote. The October bill invested $60 million in city infrastructure, removed “excessive” regulations, cut business taxes and provided funds for small businesses to expand. The Democrats’ plan aims to capitalize on the increased small-business funding by expanding the definition of small business to a business

with up to 100 employees. This act, the senators claim, will expand existing state business loans and grants to an addition 2,600 local companies. State Sen. Steve Cassano (D-Manchester) said at the conference that expanding the state’s definition of a small business will not only increase the number of potential applicants for state loans, but will also help firms like AdChem undertake an expansion that it might not do otherwise. “The doomsday predictions that manufacturing is dead in Connecticut are way off base, Cassano said. “All you have to do is look at the recent growth in small manufacturers like AdChem to see that. There is long-term stability there.” The plan also includes expanding Connecticut’s Subsidized Training and Employment Program, or STEP-Up, to specifically target veterans who served in combat in the past decade. According to the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, the unemployment rate for these veterans in Connecticut is 15.5 percent, compared with 11.5 percent nationally. City Hall spokesperson Elizabeth Benton ’04 said that while city officials have not had the opportunity to review the specifics of the proposal, Mayor John DeStefano Jr. shares the senators’ focus on job growth, which will be a “major priority” for DeStefano over the next two years. Although she said there is no “silver bullet” for strong economic development, Benton said the city is working on short and long-term efforts to sustain job growth in the city. She cited the mayor’s Office Construction Workforce Initiative, which helps New Haven residents find jobs in the construction industry, and the Small Contractor program as ways the city has helped place residents in local jobs. Also part of City Hall’s strategy for job growth, she said, are its efforts to attract new businesses to New Haven as well improve its school system through reforms. The current unemployment rate in Connecticut is 8.4 percent, slightly below the national rate of 8.5 percent. In New Haven, the rate is higher, at 8.7 percent. Connecticut’s State Senate is comprised of 36 members, 22 of whom are currently Democrats, enough to security the majority required to pass a bill. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu .

23

Percent of Americans who admit Hispanics are discriminated against

A 2009 Pew Research Center poll shows that 23 percent of Americans surveyed think that Hispanics face significant discrimination in the United States.

FBI arrests 4 East Haven cops BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER Federal Bureau of Investigation agents arrested four East Haven Police Department officers early Tuesday morning after they were indicted for systematic mistreatment of Latino residents. The indictment accuses the four officers, including one sergeant, of over 30 “overt acts” in a conspiracy against Latinos, and the charges levelled against them include three counts of excessive force, three counts of false arrest, three counts of obstruction of justice and four counts of conspiracy against rights. Tuesday’s arrests came after a threeyear investigation by the United States Department of Justice, which documented what Janice Fedarcyk, assistant director-in-charge of the FBI’s New York office, called a “four-year pattern of egregious behaviour.” “The four police officers charged today allegedly formed a cancerous cadre that routinely deprived East Haven residents of their civil rights,” Fedarcyk said at a Bridgeport press conference on Jan. 24 following the arrests. “The public should not need protection from those sworn to protect and serve. In simple terms, these defendants behaved like bullies with badges.” Unsealed in Bridgeport, Conn., Tuesday, the indictment alleges that EHPD officers John Miller, Dennis Spaulding, David Cari and Jason Zullo conducted unlawful searches and seizures and assaulted people already handcuffed. The officers also attempted to

prevent civilians from videotaping police on duty and filed false reports to cover up their actions, according to the indictment. “There is no place for excessive force in a police station or on the streets,” U.S. Attorney for Connecticut David Fein said at the press conference. “There is no place for false statements in police reports. No person is above the law, and nobody — even a person arrested for a crime — is beneath its protection.” The federal indictment documents a conspiracy involving the four officers and other EHPD officers that waged a campaign of harassment and intimidation against witnesses and other officers who tried to investigate or report misconduct about the abuses.

No person is above the law, and nobody — even a person arrested for a crime — is beneath its protection. DAVID FEIN U.S. Attorney for Connecticut Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez, who heads the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, said at the Bridgeport news conference that the officers had abused their power and created a “climate of fear” within the community. He said the indictment was consistent with a separate Justice Department report released last month that found wide-

spread police discrimination against Latinos in East Haven. Fein said more arrests could be made as the investigation continues. His office’s indictment already implicates an unnamed “Co-conspirator 1” for refusing to provide the East Haven Board of Police Commisioners with an arrest report involving Cari and dismissing the commission’s request to investigate Miller’s alleged misconduct. Fred Bow, the chairman of the East Haven Board of Police Commissioners, told the New Haven Register that those actions were taken by EHPD Chief Leonard Gallo. But the chief’s attorney, Jonathan Einhorn, told the Register that “it’s obvious” from the indictment that Gallo is “Co-conspirator 1” and that it was “unfair” to make such allegations when no charges have been made. East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo Jr. told the News Tuesday afternoon that he stood by his 50-person police department, which has launched an internal investigation into the four charged officers. “It’s certainly very unfortunate that our police department has to go through something like this,” Maturo said, “I stand by our police department from top to bottom.” All four officers pleaded not guilty in U.S. District Court in Bridgeport on Tuesday afternoon, and three were released on bond. Zullo was not immediately able to post bond and remains in custody. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

Philanthropy class to donate $100,000 BY ANTONIA WOODFORD STAFF REPORTER Students who applied to the Yale College seminar “Philanthropy in Action” were in for a surprise when they saw the course’s syllabus: members of the class would have the opportunity to distribute $100,000 to charities of their choosing. The course is the recipient of a grant from the Once Upon a Time Foundation, which gave between $50,000 and $100,000 to similar courses at eight universities this academic year, said Sam Lett, the foundation’s president. By allowing students to donate such large sums of money, Lett said the foundation hopes to motivate them to engage thoughtfully in philanthropy. He added that he would like to expand the initiative to additional schools in the future. “What is unique about this is that it’s not just a theoretical course in philanthropy,” Dean of Undergraduate Education Joseph Gordon said. “The students are actually performing philanthropy.” Maxim Thorne ’89 LAW ’92, who is teaching the seminar at Yale, said the course will first ground students in the history, political theory and economics of philanthropy, and then ask them to apply the metrics they learn for evaluating which charities to support. The class will also bring in prominent philanthropists throughout the spring. Students will interview the guests on camera through the Yale Media Center, and the interviews will be posted to Youtube and iTunes, Thorne said.

“What is unique about this is that it’s not just a theoretical course in philanthropy.” JOSEPH GORDON Dean of Undergraduate Education Thorne had proposed teaching a college seminar on philanthropy before the Once Upon a Time Foundation independently approached Yale about providing money for students to donate. Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs George Levesque, who oversees the college seminar program,

said the foundation’s grant opened up a “really interesting pedagogical opportunity” that would not otherwise have been possible. He added that the program intentionally did not advertise the $100,000 grant for the course so that only students “genuinely interested” would apply. Student demand for the course was high regardless: Thorne said he received 185 applications and more than 80 students emailed him or attended the seminar’s first meeting. Frances Sawyer ’12, a student in the course, said she was “thrilled” when she learned about the $100,000 grant from the syllabus. “Very few people get the opportunity to make these types of decisions, and to be able to do this in a class setting is great,” Sawyer said. “It really makes the idea of philanthropy more tactile and gives you a whole new rubric of things to think about.” Lett said the foundation’s idea for the initiative sprang from a desire to educate students about the value of giving back to their communities. It first provided funding a few years ago for students at three high schools in Fort Worth, Tex. — where the foundation is based — to donate to prescreened nonprofits. Last spring, the foundation sponsored a course similar to Yale’s at Texas Christian University. Students in a senior colloquium called “Nature of Giving” at TCU’s honors college were given $20,000 by the foundation to donate to local charities in the Fort Worth area, said Ron Pitcock, who taught the course. Pitcock said after his students studied the evolution of philanthropy in the United States from the days of Andrew Carnegie to Warren Buffett and examined theories behind philanthropic giving, they visited charities and debated the merits of each one. The class started with a list of 100 local charities that they eventually narrowed down to 40, then 10, and finally three, he said. “The students said it was unlike any class they had taken in their college years,” Pitcock said. “It was the first time where they felt they had a responsibility not only to themselves for learning, but also to the community to make the right decisions.” This academic year, the foundation expanded its

CREATIVE COMMONS

Maxim Thorne ’89 LAW ’92 is teaching a Yale College seminar on philanthropy entitled “Philanthropy in Action.” model beyond TCU to seven other universities, Lett said. The University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan offered courses on philanthropy sponsored by the foundation this fall, and Yale joins TCU, Stanford University, the University of Texas, the University of Virginia and Princeton University in offering a course this spring. Doug Bauer, who has cotaught a philanthropy course in Penn’s urban studies program for over a decade, said receiving money from the foundation this fall to make actual donations was “a real eye-opener” for students. In previous years, his course would use mock scenarios to simulate the experience of running a philanthropic foundation, but with actual funding “it became a very serious endeavor,” he said. Philanthropists who will visit Yale’s class include Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen and civil rights leader Julian Bond. Contact ANTONIA WOODFORD at antonia.woodford@yale.edu .

PHILANTHROPY COURSES AT OTHER SCHOOLS TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

“Nature of Giving” colloquium was offered for seniors in the university’s honors college in spring 2011. The class donated $20,000 to three local organizations in Fort Worth, Tex. This year, the class has been given $100,000 to donate and contains sophomores, juniors and seniors. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

“Third Sector and the City: The Role of Philanthropy and Nonprofits in Urban Communities” has been offered in Penn’s urban studies program for more than a decade, but this fall its students received $100,000 to donate. The class split the money among 13 charities in the greater Philadelphia area.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Without sponsors, funding uncertain SEX WEEK FROM PAGE 1 corporate sponsorship. Although this “seems like a recipe for failure,” she said she and the other Sex Week coordinators are “optimistic” that they will still offer a strong event. Still, Cho said limited funds have prevented organizers from reaching out to some speakers who have historically spoken at Yale, such as author and biological anthropologist Helen Fisher. She added that Sex Week organizers wanted to invite sex advice columnist Dan Savage but did not think their budget would accommodate his asking prices. In an effort to reduce costs, Cho said organizers will “tap into more Yale resources” this year by offering a larger number of activities moderated by students and faculty members, who are easier to recruit since they do not need to be reimbursed for travel or food expenses. In addition, Cho said Sex Week will not distribute its traditional magazine as another cost-saving measure. Three partner organizations interviewed said they did not expect their activities to incur large costs because they plan to invite only students and professors to speak. Cho added that the event runs the risk of “last-minute downsizing if the grants … and private donations don’t pull through.” “The lack of corporate sponsorship has definitely affected editorial decisions and has challenged us to work harder to collaborate with our speakers,” she said. “But ultimately … we’re happy to put in the extra effort.” Sex Week organizers have also asked for funding from the Dean’s & President’s Discretionary Funds budget, though Cho said organizers have yet to hear back from the Dean’s Office. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said in a Tuesday email that her office has not yet decided whether to help

finance some Sex Week activities. The lack of corporate sponsorship has prompted organizers to co-sponsor activities with campus organizations and reach out to private donors, Cho said. The organizers have created a Facebook event asking Yale students to contribute to the initiative and drafted letters for partner organizations to solicit donations from their alumni. Cho said the Communications and Consent Educators program, a new organization run by the Dean’s Office that promotes awareness of sexual misconduct prevention, has agreed to help fund a “consent and communication” talk by Jaclyn Friedman, Executive Director of Women, Action & the Media. Hilary O’Connell ’14, an associate director for Sex Week and coordinator of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Cooperative, which provides support for LGBTQ students at Yale, said she is “absolutely thrilled” that the LGBT Coop will be co-sponsoring several events, including one on online dating among the LBGTQ community. She added that the LGBT Co-op will apply for funding from the Undergraduate Organizations Funding Committee and solicit donations from the group’s alumni. Still, not all partner organizations have agreed to enlist alumni support. Sam Gardenswartz ’13, co-president of the Jewish organization Yale Hillel, said though his group will likely co-sponsor an event about the role of religion in sexuality, he does not plan to contact alumni for donations. Other student groups that have agreed to co-sponsor Sex Week activities include the Yale Dramat, Peer Health Educators and the Yale Political Union. Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

4

Number of honorary degrees University Secretary Linda Lorimer has received for her efforts to advance women. Lorimer has also been awarded Argentina’s Order of Merit, the American Bar Association’s Sandra Day O’Connor Award and the Yale Medal for conspicuous service to Yale.

Secretary portfolio trimmed LORIMER FROM PAGE 1 a second person,” Levin said. “[The position] is going back to what it originally was.” Throughout Yale’s history, the role of secretary has largely been defined by those who have filled it, Yale historian Gaddis Smith ’54 GRD ’61 said. While many secretaries have had little impact on University policy and served mainly as recordkeepers, Smith said Lorimer has been one of the most influential in the past century. Smith said Lorimer’s approach to the position has closely resembled that of Anson Phelps Stokes 1896, another prominent Yale secretary who served from 1901 to 1921 under then-President Arthur Hadley. Stokes assumed many duties traditionally overseen by the University president, such as fundraising and alumni relations, and was widely expected to be Hadley’s successor until he lost popularity because of his pacifist views during World War I. Throughout their tenure, Lorimer and Levin have shared responsibilities and jointly executed major University initiatives. The two worked to repair town-gown relations through the New Haven Initiative in the early 1990s and today are leading Yale’s efforts to expand globally with projects such as Yale-NUS College and the Yale India Initiative. Lorimer also serves as one of Levin’s longest-standing advisers. “President Levin has close relationships with many of his advisers, and he relies on all of them, but I think he and Linda complement one another unusually well,”

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

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Penelope Laurans, master of Jonathan Edwards College and special assistant to Levin, said in a Tuesday email. “They each have different strengths but are completely on the same wave length … I think they think and plan with almost wordless understanding.”

I think [Levin and Lorimer] think and plan with almost wordless understanding. PENELOPE LAURANS Master, Jonathan Edwards College and Special Assistant to the President Since taking office, Lorimer’s responsibilities have expanded to include overseeing the offices of international affairs, public affairs and communications, digital dissemination, emergency management, and sustainability, in addition to the Association of Yale Alumni and the Yale University Press. Lorimer will retain these added duties as vice president, leaving Goff-Crews with the secretary’s original responsibilities of coordinating the Yale Corporation, organizing major public events and serving as a liaison to the Chaplain’s Office. When Lorimer eventually leaves Yale, Levin said her responsibilities will likely be distributed among the University’s officers. Levin and Laurans said it made sense that the University gradually gave Lorimer more responsibilities, considering her administrative talent.

“Linda is an idea person,” Laurans said. “She has more energy than three horses running a steeple chase all together. You can’t keep up with her.” Lorimer said that under Goff-Crews, the secretary role will continue to be a job that those who hold it balance with overseeing other major projects at the University. Lorimer’s predecessor, Sam Chauncey, helped bring coeducation to Yale. When Goff-Crews assumes the position, she will also become the University’s first vice president for student life. Levin said earlier this month that offering Goff-Crews the secretary job both helped recruit the University of Chicago administrator and lightened Lorimer’s workload. While Lorimer’s new title of University vice president will lack the specification given to all other vice presidents — such as development, human resources and administration, or general counsel — Levin said this designation does not formally elevate Lorimer above the others. Deputy Secretary Martha Highsmith said the lack of designation is indicative of the broad influence Lorimer holds at Yale. “I think this is a recognition that her role in the University really is Universitywide,” Highsmith said. “She has that peripheral vision that spans the entire University.” Lorimer came to Yale as assistant general counsel of the University in the fall of 1978. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

TIMELINE LINDA LORIMER AT YALE 1977 Lorimer graduates from Yale Law School. 1978 Lorimer returns to the University and serves in a number of administrative roles through 1986. 1983 Lorimer becomes associate provost of the University, the youngest person appointed to the position in Yale history. 1986 Lorimer temporarily departs Yale to become the president of Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Va. 1990 While still serving at RandolphMacon Woman’s College, Lorimer is elected to the Yale Corporation and serves in the role until 1993. 1993 Lorimer returns to Yale as University secretary. During her tenure, the position expands to encompass seven new offices across the University. 1995 The title of vice president is added to Lorimer’s current role as secretary. 2012 Lorimer will relinquish her title of secretary after 18 years on the job to become University vice president.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Always be smarter than the people who hire you.” LENA HORNE AMERICAN ACTRESS

Spanish politician offers remedies for EU ills BY THEODORA BALLEW CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Former Spanish foreign affairs minister Ana Palacio argued Tuesday afternoon that the European Union must address cultural shortcomings and revise its strategies for dealing with the current economic crisis. Palacio, who is a also a senior fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, spoke to a group of over 40 students and faculty members in the International Room of Sterling Memorial Library about European public policy. European leaders must not only implement policies that lead to economic growth, Palacio said, but they must also adjust the outdated structures formed during the Cold War and accept their current position in the world. “The economy is part of the crisis, but it is not the whole story,” Palacio said. “There is a lack of focus on the more fundamental problems in the European Union. There is an ideological message that we have to address beyond economics.” Austerity, Palacio claimed, is not an solution by itself to the economic crisis, as some have suggested. Without economic growth as well, struggling European countries will not be able to repay their loans. She added that countries need to develop credibility for any fiscal plans to be successful. Besides recovering from the economic crisis, Palacio said, the European Union faces other challenges in remaining stable. Since the European Union formed during the Cold War, its structure is not entirely appropriate for today’s needs, and she suggested that the current system often slows the process of implementing policies. Palacio, who called herself a “diehard optimist,” also said European people should

assume a more positive outlook and learn to appreciate their assets. “[Europeans] are plagued with all kinds of ‘isms’ — we are the kings of ‘isms,’ all these bad ‘isms,’” she said. “The European attitude is one of skepticism against the backdrop of entitlement.” On top of addressing its internal economic challenges and cultural problems, Palacio said Europeans must “find [their] place in the world.” In discussing Europe’s relationship to the United States, she said Europeans must accept that the United States’ focus has shifted away from Europe and “embrace [the fact that] America is looking East.” Palacio called for European countries to turn to each other and better integrate their cultures and policies. In response to a question from the audience, she added it is a mistake to forget European countries’ violent history with each other since that same history forms bonds between them. “We are the Europeans of the 21st century,” she said. “The future is a future of more integration [of our cultures], without forgetting that we each have our particularities.” Five audience members interviewed all said they appreciated the chance to hear the views of a European politician, and some added that they were struck by her positive outlook. Eva Guadamillas ’14, an international student from Spain, said she enjoying hearing a perspective other than those of American economists. Matt Williams ’13, a global affairs major, said Palacio offered “a good overview of the thought process of politicians.” Contact THEODORA BALLEW at theodora.ballew@yale.edu .

The crisis of the EU beyond economic issues is a crisis of trust. Integration is what we need to go forward. ANA PALACIO, FORMER FOREIGN AFFAIRS MINISTER OF SPAIN

I liked that she wasn’t trying to be too PC. She was very candid. MATT WILLIAMS ’13, AUDIENCE MEMBER SELEN UMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Ana Palacio, a former official in the Spanish government, spoke about her solutions to the European economic crisis Tuesday.

Yale to integrate med records BY MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS STAFF REPORTER Starting next year, the different divisions of the Yale Medical Group will begin sharing their patient records with each other in an attempt to reduce error and increase efficiency. EPIC, an integrated medical records software created by Epic Systems Corporation, will connect patient records from the School of Medicine, YaleNew Haven Hospital and Yale Health, officials said. Yale’s switch to EPIC will cost approximately $250 million when it is completed in 2013, establishing a significantly more efficient process for patients and doctors alike. “Using EPIC, doctors are seeing patients, filing charges and sending prescriptions,” said Steven Schlossberg, chief medical information officer at YaleNew Haven. “This process will provide an improved clinical and research foundation for the School of Medicine and Yale New Haven Health System to evolve the model for delivery of health care to meet the challenges facing all of us.” Daniel Barchi, chief information officer at the medical school, said that the idea to implement integrated medical records arose because the Yale Medical Group, like most health care systems, faced difficulty in sending information back and forth between the different facilities. He added that in most health care systems across the country, each clinic operates a different way, making records prone to errors when patients see other doctors within the same health care system, creating “an unsafe environment.” “Even with the great amount of work [put into the health care system], it is not guaranteed that the patient will have attention in

every respect [without a shared records system],” Barchi said. He cited a 1999 Institute of Medicine report, which identified thousands of patients who died prematurely because of medical information errors, such as prescribing drugs by mistake or receiving another patient’s medicine. An integrated medical record, he said, allows physicians to keep track of their patients and their individual medical histories, preventing mistakes.

[EPIC] will provide an improved clinical and research foundation for the School of Medicine and the Yale New Haven Health System. STEVEN SCHLOSSBERG Chief medical information officer, YaleNew Haven Patients can also access their medical records via a patient portal, through which they can refill their prescriptions, request appointments and review medication lists, Schlossberg said. One of the challenges of the EPIC records system, Barchi said, is implementing it at a new site, as the program takes time to build and install. It is also important, he said, to verify that the program works well in all environments. After the contract with Epic Systems was signed in 2010, a team of more than 100 people built and configured the EPIC program at Yale, Schlossberg said. Some sites, including Emergency Services at Yale-New Haven Hospital, began using the

program in October 2011, he said. Robert Alpern, dean of the medical school, said the logistical challenge of programming and teaching doctors to use EPIC leads to delays in its implementation. The program’s cost, he added, is due to the large staff needed to build and program EPIC. Despite the greater access to patient records, EPIC protects patients’ information, Barchi said. Only authorized physicians and nurses have access to records, and all access is monitored. Schlossberg added that if unauthorized employees are caught accessing patients’ records, they are immediately fired. Susan Casey, practice coordinator in the Bridgeport office of internal medicine, and pediatrics specialist Dr. Andrew Cutney — one of the Yale clinics using EPIC — commended the program because of its paperless approach. There were a few difficulties in the implementation process, Casey said, but she added that they are “ironing out all those problems.” Founded in 1979 and located in Verona, Wis., Epic designs software for mid-sized and large medical groups, hospitals, and integrated healthcare organizations. Health care systems using EPIC include Los Angeles’s Cedar-Sinai Medical Center, the Cleveland Clinic and Johns Hopkins Medicine. Although other companies provide medical records software — such as Cerner, Mckesson and Siemens — Epic has become the dominant software provider in the U.S. market in recent years, according to earnings reports for the company. Contact MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS at mariana.lopez-rosas@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

Donaldson Commons

Named after William H. Donaldson, the School of Management’s founding dean, Donaldson Commons was located at 140 Prospect St. and closed for budgetary reasons in 2010.

Yalies work on Republican campaigns CAMPAIGN FROM PAGE 1 nor announced on May 21 that he would not join the presidential race. The following day, the Yalies received a call from John Weaver, Huntsman’s chief strategist, who had seen the work Knowles and Eden had done in trying to draft Daniels. He invited the duo to join the Huntsman campaign. Although Knowles served as the leader of college supporters in Huntsman’s organization, most college-aged students who work on campaigns spend most of their time in entry-level positions, calling voters or inputting data. The work of any student volunteer on a campaign can be frustrating, though, and Knowles is just one of a handful Yalies who have worked on one of the GOP challengers’ political campaigns this past year. Knowles said he felt the experience was worthwhile even after Hunstman decided to leave the race on Jan. 16. Tyler Carlisle ’15, whose candidate of choice is former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, said that his time spent working for the Santorum campaign, too, has been rewarding. “Whenever you work on something for a very long time it’s great to see it come to fruition, just like any other project or undertaking that you do,” he said.

JOINING THE CAMPAIGN

Knowles said that soon after receiving Weaver’s call, he and Eden were flown to a Huntsman fundraiser to meet the governor. “He just walked up, he looked

at me and said ‘You, you’re great, I’m glad we have you,” Knowles said. “It was just such a striking way to meet the governor, who was at that point a very serious contender for president.” Knowles said he spent his summer working for Huntsman on the Hertog Political Studies Fellowship in Washington, D.C., where he built the campaign’s organization of young voters and young professionals. Along with cochair Jeb Bush Jr., the son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, and Mike Ventre, the chair of the New York College Republican State Committee, Knowles contacted other college Republicans in an effort to convince them to join Huntsman’s network. Knowles travelled around New Hampshire with Huntsman to convince voters to support the former U.S. ambassador to China’s campaign. Once in a while, Knowles said, working for the campaign could be “surreal.” In one story Knowles described, he was riding in a car with Eden, Huntsman and Huntsman’s wife when the candidate asked the Yalies if they wanted to go into politics. Knowles said they responded in the affirmative — they were working with the governor for a reason — and he said Huntsman then gave them some advice: don’t run for Congress. “It’s difficult to get anything accomplished [in Congress],” Knowles recalled Huntsman telling them. “You can do a lot more as an executive.” Huntsman then abruptly stopped speaking, Knowles said, directed his gaze out the window

and pointed: “Hold on guys, check out that moose.” Although Huntsman poured the majority of his time and resources into New Hampshire, betting the survival of his campaign on success in the Granite State, the former ambassador placed a distant third in New Hampshire behind former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Rep. Ron Paul. Still, Knowles said he felt Huntsman “did quite well” in the state given the candidate’s media coverage and low poll numbers in weeks leading up to the election. Carlisle, from New Hampshire, said he began volunteering for Santorum’s presidential campaign about a year ago after he first met the candidate. The decision to volunteer for Santorum, Carlisle said, hinged not only on his support of the candidate’s political stance but also on Carlisle’s own ability to be a part of the campaign. “It’s always a mix of things,” Carlisle said. “It’s certainly a combination of the candidate’s positions that you support and the opportunity to be involved with the campaign stuff.” In comparison, suitemates Owen Barrett ’15 and Hillary Ryan ’15 said they spent part of their fall term debating political philosophy before they stumbled upon their candidate: Ron Paul. “I’d always liked the libertarian philosophy, and I agreed with his approach to politics,” Ryan said of his candidate. The two then realized they wanted to commit to Paul’s libertarian ideals and founded Yale’s

R O N PA U L Owen Barrett: “We walked up to one house, with a little dog barking at us as we went to the door. We knocked on the door and a woman opened and said in a sad voice ‘What, the dog didn’t scare you away?”

RICK SANTORUM Tyler Carlisle: “We were running around all day at the Aimes straw poll, driving go-carts around. We ended up getting a set of secret service radios; all the staff had wires.”

JON HUNTSMAN Michael Knowles: “We stopped off the plane when we were going to meet Huntsman and an aide come up to us and said ‘We have an hour to kill... do you want to have a cigar and a beer?”

CREATIVE COMMONS

Youth for Ron Paul chapter — joining nearly 500 other chapters at high schools, colleges and universities across the nation. Barrett and Ryan sought to use the group to find like-minded Paul supporters on campus in order to spread the candidate’s core message and help Paul win the Republican nomination. Their involvement soon brought them to Iowa, which hosts the first contest of the primary, over winter break. Though they joked about “spending Christmas with Paul” after receiving an invitation to do so from Edward King, the head of Youth for Ron Paul, Barrett said that the two realized that they wanted to “contribute meaningfully” to the campaign while it was in its early stages in Iowa. “I’d never been on the ground in an election,” Ryan said. “I wanted to see how that worked.” Although he said his work in New Hampshire primarily consisted of “not sleeping” — and he missed the first three days of the semester because of it — Carlisle said he did it because Santorum’s mix of working-class populism and social conservatism resonated with him. “Really, campaign staff don’t do it because they’re getting paid,” Carlisle said. “[Campaign staff are] a lot of dedicated people who took significant financial losses [to volunteer], who truly believed in the message.” The high point for Knowles, he said, was when he went with Huntsman to Dixville Notch, a 12-person village in New Hampshire that is traditionally the first to vote in the state’s primary. “That was probably my favorite moment, stumping in New Hampshire — he tied for first [in Dixville Notch],” Knowles said. “Just being a part of something that is bigger than yourself is great.”

RETURNING TO CAMPUS

In a race with as many candidates as were in the GOP primary — 11 candidates were officially declared at one point during the primary season — there are bound to be some frustrations. But as candidates like Huntsman dropped out of the race, Knowles, currently chairman of the Yale College Republicans, said he took solace in the fact that more and more conservatives have emerged on campus over the past year. At this weekend’s Partisan Pong, which set the Yale Democratss against the Yale Republicans in a competition of beer pong, Knowles said he thought the Yale Republicans would be outnumbered 300 to four. Instead, he said he was surprised to find that both sides had roughly the same number of people, with Knowles estimating roughly 30 to 40 people showing up to support the GOP — which he said wouldn’t have been possible two or three years ago. “These national races helped the Yale community,” Knowles said. “They helped the conversation and helped getting people more involved.” While he was still in the race, Knowles said, Huntsman had the support of nearly every college conservative, including the various chairmen of state College Republican chapters. At the cam-

TORY BURNSIDE-CLAPP/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Tyler Carlisle ’15, who supports Rick Santorum’s presidential candidacy, spent time working for Santorum’s campaign. paign’s high point, the campaign counted amongst its supporters 180 college chapters, he said. While Santorum is generally considered among the most conservative GOP candidates, Carlisle said he has not seen any backlash at Yale — “where the majority of the population is liberal” — for his involvement in the campaign. He added that, through organizations such as the William F. Buckley Program and the Yale Political Union, he has made a number of friends who are also conservative. “I would say that the campus is more conservative than people would think,” Carlisle said. “People will disagree with ideas, that’s fine, that’s a natural part of the process.” Knowles, who acknowledges that Romney ultimately “clobbered” Huntsman in New Hampshire, said he found out about Huntsman’s withdrawal from the race by reading the news, and had it confirmed by other Huntsman staffers over Facebook. Still, he said it didn’t come as a surprise, as the campaign “knew it was a matter of time” after a disappointing third-place finish in New Hampshire. After Daniels decided not to run and Huntsman left the race, Knowles said he is calling it quits for now. “I’m done,” Knowles said. “I’m clearly terrible at picking presidents, so I’m done.” While he wrote a Romney endorsement for the Daily Caller and said he’s happy to help out the Romney campaign, Knowles is heading to New York to work as an actor and as the executive directory of a charitable foundation, and said he does not plan to be working in the White House next year. Eden left Huntsman’s campaign last year to work on a business venture, Knowles added. Still, Knowles does not think

his efforts have been in vain. Now, he said, the Yale Republicans have at least 20 members in regular attendance, with many more who come to events like partisan pong. “After we had the national exposure last year, the College Republican Committee at Yale grew leaps and bounds,” Knowles said. “Our membership originally was like two people.” At the same time, Ryan and Barrett said they are hopeful that, whether or not Paul eventually wins the nomination, the chapter can continue to grow at Yale. Barrett said he thinks many Yalies would find that Paul is the candidate who actually aligns closest with their views, despite what he described as “a certain blue-washing” of students at Yale who do not necessarily think about government but subscribe to popular beliefs. Nominating Paul, he said, would be good for the Republican Party, not only because he would be the best choice, but because it would bring in new voting demographics that the party desperately needs. Barrett added that if Paul does not win the nomination, his choice in November will be incredibly difficult given how similar the candidates are. Still, Barrett felt he had made at least a small difference: “There was one awesome moment where we walked up to a door, a woman answered and we gave her our little sale,” he said. “We were able to really turn her around; we were able to give her a yard sign in her yard.” Ryan chimed in, “It’s totally depressing that you can totally change someone’s political philosophy in five minutes.” So far at Yale, Youth for Ron Paul has garnered nearly 50 supporters.

SOM students seek replacement study space STUDY SPACE FROM PAGE 1 job, and he’s trying to figure out a million different things,” Isakson said. “The University tells him, ‘We’re taking down Donaldson,’ and something he might not have realized was that SOM students used that space a whole lot.” Tiffany Young SOM ’13 said she thought the shortage of study spaces would prompt students to explore other parts of Yale. She said she once worked on a group project in a Bass Library study room — a study option some of her group members did not know existed. But SOM spokeswoman Tabitha Wilde said Donaldson Commons did not have a “long history” with students as a study location. “It had only been open to students for a few years, and we don’t expect its loss to affect student life,” Wilde said in a Friday email. Sherilyn Scully, SOM’s director of student and academic services,

and Diane Palmeri, SOM’s chief administrative officer and associate dean for finance and administration, could not be reached for comment.

It’s a little sad because Donaldson really felt like our space. We’re in a space now that doesn’t really belong to us. JENNIFER BELLIVEAU SOM ’12 Student life co-chair, School of Management student government Eight students said the closure of Donaldson Commons most noticeably impacted student life by forcing the “Closing Bell” — SOM’s weekly happy hour — to relocate.

Jennifer Belliveau SOM ’12, a student life co-chair for SOM’s student government, said the happy hour now takes place on Thursday evenings in Kline Biology Tower’s cafe, as there is no SOM space large enough to accommodate the crowd of over 100 that attends the event. “It’s a little sad because Donaldson really felt like our space,” she said. “We’re in a space now that doesn’t really belong to us.” When construction finishes on the new campus, several students said the student body will likely become more isolated from the rest of Yale. Kevin Spinella SOM ’12 said the school’s new facilities will have “all of the available study space anyone could want.” Donaldson Commons formerly housed a dining facility that was closed for budgetary reasons in 2010. Contact DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Since Donaldson Commons closed in December, SOM students have sought other places to study and socialize.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

NEWS

50

Healthy food comes to Audubon BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER Yalies now have a new healthy eating option on Audubon Street. The Pure Health Lounge, which offers healthy items including sandwiches, wraps, salads, smoothies and frozen yogurt, celebrated its opening at a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday morning. Around 50 people visited the store, located at 99 Audubon St., which is now in its third week of operation. Pure Health the third business to open in the Aubudon/Whitney area this academic year, joining Katalina’s Bakery on Whitney Avenue and the Luvena Leslie Salon on Audubon Street. “The ribbon-cutting ceremony was packed,” said co-owner Ray Sbrega. “A lot of people came, including many dignitaries.” Attendees at the event included Abigail Rider, director of Yale University Properties, Anthony Rescigno, president of the Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce, Tony Bialecki, deputy director of the city’s Office of Economic Development, and Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04. Pure Health, which opened on Jan. 3, has already attracted a steady following of regular customers, Sbrega said. Their current customer base is composed of local residents and members of the downtown business sector who frequent the store mid-day, said Sbrega, adding that they will work on expanding their breakfast and evening clientele. Now that students are back from winter break, Pure Health plans to reach out more to Yale’s campus, added co-owner Patty Sbrega, who is also Ray Sbrega’s wife. Pure Health has been working with the Yale Event Management Association (YEMA) — an undergraduate organization that promotes local businesses — on a marketing strategy. “Once the kids find out we’re here, I think it’ll really boost business,” said Ray. The YEMA has helped to plan a daylong promotional event that will take place on Friday and include discounts, tastings, smoothie-making demonstrations and a raffle, said Patty Sbrega. Although the store is “a little far” from campus, YEMA co-president Lucy Chen said, YEMA’s past events in the area like its recent kick-off at Katalina’s Bakery

Percent of pneumonia cases caused by viruses

According to the American Lung Association, approximately 50 percent of all pneumonia cases in the United States are caused by viruses and not bacteria.

Pneumonia, hygiene linked BY MOHAMMAD SALHUT STAFF REPORTER Those who don’t brush their teeth regularly may be putting themselves at greater risk of contracting pneumonia. Samit Joshi, a postdoctoral fellow in infectious diseases at the Yale University School of Medicine, presented a study at the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s annual meeting in Boston, claiming that changes in the types of oral bacteria can have a significant impact on the risk of developing pneumonia. Joshi cited poor oral hygiene as one of the most common risk factors for pneumonia, with the risk doubling if a person has severe gum problems.

PURE HEALTH LOUNGE

City officials joined University Properties director Abigail Rider in welcoming Pure Health Lounge to the Audubon/Whitney area at a ribbon cutting Tuesday morning. have drawn large crowds. Chen added that she expects the number of customers to increase as the weather improves. The Elm City Pure Health Lounge is the store’s first franchise in Connecticut, although there are nine other locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. The Sbregas began looking into franchises two years ago, said co-owner Patty Sbrega, and chose Pure Health for its healthy vibe. The Sbregas selected the Aubudon location due to its proximity to the Yale School of Music, the Whitney Humanities Center, the ACES Magnet School and the downtown community. Pure Health, which moved into a Yale University Properties-owned building, is part of the recent trend of growth in the Audubon/Whitney Arts and Retail District that University Properties hopes to continue, said Yale University Properties marketing and promotions coordinator Brittney Lipsett in an email to the News Tuesday afternoon. “University Properties is actively working to fill vacancies in the Audu-

bon/Whitney Arts and Retail District,” said Lipsett in the email. “There has been an increase in interest for the area due to the new retail additions including Luvena Leslie Salon, Katalina’s Bakery, Elm City Artists and Pure Health Lounge.” Ray Sbrega said he is confident that the store fits in well with other businesses on the street, as each one has its own specialty. Matthew Osborne, a New Haven resident who visited the store for the first time Tuesday, said he does not think the store needs to worry about competition in the area. “This place seems unique,” he said. “There’s no place that concentrates on juices the way they do here and it’s a great addition to the community of café options.” Pure Health Lounge is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Most of the bacterial organisms that cause infections are neighbors of the oral floor. SHELDON CAMPBELL Microbiology professor, Yale School of Medicine The study analyzed the oral health of 37 subjects, from a variety of age and health backgrounds, over the period of one month. Though only a small percentage of the patients developed pneumonia, those who did acquire the disease also saw significant increases in the number of oral bacteria associated with pneumonia. “Our findings might improve the way we prevent pneumonia in the future by maintaining [the types of] the bacteria which live within our mouths,” Joshi said in an interview with the Global Medical News Network (GMNN). While the study was not

designed to demonstrate the direct relationship between pneumonia and these bacteria, Joshi told the GMNN that he hopes his experiment will be replicated by larger independent studies to determine a causal link. Upon hearing the findings of the study, the British Dental Health Foundation, an oral health charity, issued a press release stating that poor oral hygiene may lead to the development of pneumonia. “During the winter months we’re all susceptible to colds, coughs and chesty viruses due to the drop in temperature,” Nigel Carter, the foundation’s chief executive, said in an interview in The Telegraph. “What people must remember, particularly those highlighted as vulnerable, is that prevention can be very basic.” Carter added that links between gum disease and overall health have been well-documented, and that keeping up good oral health can help stave off illness. Sheldon Campbell, a professor of microbiology at the Yale School of Medicine who was not affiliated with the study, said that while he was not surprised by Joshi’s findings, they are significant because they place an even greater emphasis on oral hygiene. While there are many variables that might affect the development of a disease, poor oral hygiene will likely negatively affect patients, Campbell said. “Most of the bacterial organisms that cause infections are neighbors of the oral floor,” he said. “There are too many variables to accurately say, but it’s likely that oral microbodies probably impact the development of certain diseases.” Approximately 3 million Americans are infected with pneumonia annually. Contact MOHAMMAD SALHUT at mohammad.salhut@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE says School of Arch in new exhibit

12:30 P.M., WED. JAN. 25 STUDENT RECITAL The Yale Institute of Sacred Music presents Paul Thomas, an aspiring church musician and a graduate student in organ performance.

BY LIZ RODRIGUEZ-FLORIDO STAFF REPORTER Weeks before hosting a symposium titled “Is Drawing Dead?” the Yale School of Architecture has opened a new exhibit that takes a step back to honor the basics of the craft. Composed of approximately 24 pieces hand-drawn by students last semester, “Visualizing Form” went up Jan. 17 on the third floor of Rudolph Hall. The show runs alongside the symposium taking place Feb. 9-11, which aims to answer the question “What value does drawing still have in architecture?”, said Victor Agran, an architecture professor involved with the symposium. “The answer is complicated, but can also be answered simply — drawing has tremendous value in architecture,” said Agran. Yet while drawing is a fundamental skill for architects, most of the final models students produce in the studios of Rudolph Hall are designed with digital 3-D modeling software, Linda Lee ARC ’13 said in an email. However, she said, drawing is is an essential exercise in the design process. While computer graphics bring projects to a finish, most architects still use sketches to develop their concepts, said Lee, whose work is on display in the exhibit. “Visualizing Form” draws on work from the courses “Processing & Presentation,” “Form and Representation” and “Formal Analysis,” with pieces ranging from geometrical illusions to three-dimensional cutout cityscapes. At the same time, the school’s upcoming symposium will feature three days’ worth of lectures exploring the definition of drawing in the past and present, Agran said. In the age of digital production, he said, the thinking stage is harder to come by and drawing is atool to help it along. Agran said that under the leadership of Dean Robert A.M. Stern, Yale’s School of Architecture has begun to place a heavier emphasis on drawing in the past five years. Though many universities prioritize computer-generated graphics,

Woolsey Hall, 500 College St.

6 P.M., WED. JAN. 25 THE AMULETIC DESIGN OF THE MITHRAIC BULL-WOUNDING SCENE University of Chicago’s Christopher Faraone — the coauthor of Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World (2005), and Animal Sacrifice Revisited: Issues of Violence, Solidarity, and Centrality in a Greek and Roman Religious Practice (2011) — explores the oft-produced image of Hellenized Persian god Mithras wounding a bull. Sterling Divinity Quadrangle, Niebuhr Hall, 409 Prospect St.

4 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26 THE POLITICS OF PLEASURE AND PLAY IN LATINO/A LITERATURE AND PERFORMANCE Albert Laguna, a literature professor at Columbia College of Chicago, discusses the topic of his NYU dissertation, which includes stand-up comedy and dramatic novels as emblems and critiques of transnational identity. Hall of Graduate Studies, 401, 320 York St.

7 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26 “TREE OF LIFE” The award-winning, and much maligned, Terrence Malick film comes to Yale as part of a multidepartment program in “Religion and Film;” come for Brad Pitt, stay for the meaning of it all. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

“CRIMES OF THE HEART” Gabe Greenspan ’14 directs Beth Henley’s classic tragicomedy about three sisters in Mississippi who grapple with their pasts and look toward to the future. Davenport College, Theater, 248 York St.

7 P.M., FRI. JAN. 27 TAIWAN FILM FESTIVAL King Hu’s “Touch of Zen” and Chung Monghong’s “The Fourth Portrait” kick off the five-day festival with a classic martial arts epic and a modern coming-of-age tale, respectively. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

8 P.M., FRI. JAN. 27 OUT OF THE BLUE PRESENTS: JAMS BOND The coed pop/rock a cappella group performs its 24th annual “jam.” William L Harkness Hall, Sudler Hall, 100 Wall St.

3 P.M., SUN. JAN. 29 REFLECTING ON WATER Moses Ballan ’13 offers an hour-long guided tour through the Yale University Art Gallery; expect gushing analysis. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M., MON. JAN. 30 DOUBLE BASS RECITAL The Yale School of Music’s Nahee Song ’12 performs her contrabass — which first enjoyed popularity as a solo instrument in the 1700s — for the general public. William L Harkness Hall, Sudler Hall, 100 Wall St.

The popular restaurant got its name in 1975, when a Yale undergraduate won a yearlong naming contest, receiving a four-serving hot fudge sundae every week for a year.

DRAWING NOT DEAD,

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

8 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26

Claire’s Corner Copia

Yale’s focus on developing drawing skills gives student-architects an additional tool for creative discovery, Alexander Chabla ARC ‘13 said. The “Roman Architecture” seminar, for instance, requires intensive hand-drawing assignments, he said. Chabla’s piece in the student exhibition, a paper relief drawing titled “Precedent Analysis: Richard Galpin,” emerged out of an interrogation of the work of artist Richard Galpin and attempts “to create a new reading of the urban environment” through the pulled in and out fragments of his piece.

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Some actors approach a new show with years of experience under their belts. Others bring to the table a fresh eagerness and a yearning to absorb as much as they can. And sometimes, at Yale, the two types fuse their skills to put together a production larger than the sum of its parts. Jen Mulrow ’14 and Charles Margossian ’15 said they are discovering the uniquely demanding but worthwhile nature of this cooperation as they perform in the Yale School of Drama’s production of “The Seagull,” which went up last night and will run through Saturday. Mulrow said that though she and Margossian hold relatively minor parts, the show’s director, Alexandru Mihail DRA ’12, has given them advice on how to play their roles in ways that add to the production’s impact. One staging decision he made was for the two to portray a happy couple in the background of the play in order to highlight the tensions within the relationships of the main characters.

[Drawing] allows you to use the mistakes you’ve made to see something you wouldn’t see if you simply deleted it.

I wouldn’t say directors and other cast members go out of their way to coddle undergrads.

MATEUS BENARROS ’13

The painstaking process of drawing calls for more “concentration” and “critical analysis,” architecture major Mateus Benarros ’13 said. Even if one erases a line, he said, part of the mark will always remain on the paper. “[Drawing] allows you to use the mistakes you’ve made to see something you wouldn’t see if you simply deleted it, leaving no traces behind,” Benarros said. “The use of computer, the digital approach, works faster and is generally more clear. When using computers, the process almost gets lost, leaving the final composition to speak for the entire project.” The student exhibition coincides with another exhibit at the School of Architecture featuring about 160 paintings, drawings and watercolor works by Italian architect and artist Massimo Scolari. The show, “Representation of Architecture,” focuses on the relationship between drawing and buildings and will run Feb. 6 through May 4.

In ‘Seagull,’ undergrads learn from pros

SAM LASMAN ’12

JOY SHAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

“Visualizing Form,” an exhibit of drawings by School of Architecture students, is on display on the third floor of Rudolph Hall.

Student curators take over Green galleries

Meanwhile, the Drama School school actors are teaching the undergrads a thing or two about loosening up. Mulrow said watching the actors’ rehearsal process has been valuable to her, adding that she has observed graduate students go “offbook” and experiment more freely than undergraduates do. Margossian said this open environment and the other actors’ responsiveness to improvisation has allowed him to become more creative with his own character. Working in close proximity with School of Drama students pushes undergrad actors to redefine their limits, said Sam Lasman ’12, who worked with School of Drama students on the Cabaret production of “Wuthering Heights.”Lasman is a staff columnist for the News. “I wouldn’t say directors and other cast members go out of their way to coddle undergrads,” Lasman said. “On the contrary, you’re really forced to up your ante to match their level.”

At the same time, Mulrow said, learning that acting students feel the same performance anxiety that undergraduates do has been reassuring. Carmen Zilles DRA ’13, who plays Masha in “The Seagull,” said she finds an undergraduate perspective refreshing, having worked with undergraduates on a show called “Rodeo” last November. Undergraduate enthusiasm can help remind “jaded” drama students about how exciting it can be to put up a production, she said. “It’s contagious and really lovely and always reminds me to approach my work that way, with the same openness and excitement and gratefulness at the fact that I get to be involved,” Zilles said. Likewise, Lasman said undergraduates can learn something from the professional work ethic of graduate students in theater. Many college students, he said, treat theater as a diversion from their studies. Mulrow admitted that being involved in “The Seagull” has been a large time commitment for her, but that she was willing to negotiate her college schedule accordingly. “[Graduate theater] is worth it if you’re willing to devote the time to it,” she said. “I haven’t seen my friends a lot, haven’t gone to film screenings, missed a section — you have to be able to [re]distribute your priorities a little bit.” Students in the School of Drama are not the only graduate students Yale College actors encounter on the stage. Drama students are not allowed to participate in undergraduate productions, but this is not the case for actors from Yale’s other graduate and professional programs. Charles Gillespie DIV ’13, a graduate student who acted in last fall’s “Assassins” and will soon star in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” said he has found working with Yale undergraduates to be rewarding, as they often approach their roles in a more cerebral way than students did in his undergraduate program at Villanova University. Still, not all lessons in acting must be carefully thought out. Mulrow added that simply being in the presence of the show’s cast and crew has enabled her to subconsciously absorb tips on technique. “I once saw them reading and rehearsing in the green room and thought at first that they were having a normal conversation,” said Margossian. “It took me a while to realize they were actually doing theater.” “The Seagull” is the first School of Drama show to go up this semester. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

Vegetarian maven launches new cookbook

BY KAT HUANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

Strapped on cash but temporarily rich in vacant space, administrators at the Yale School of Art invited students to play curator in the school’s unused galleries. On Jan. 18, a student-curated exhibit opened at the School of Art’s Green Gallery, featuring works selected by three MFA students at the school. In a time of economic duress, Dean Robert Storr and Associate Dean Sam Messer ART ’82 encouraged curatorial candidates to be creative, guaranteeing them no funding but all the gallery space Green Hall has to offer. The objective of the show, titled “Three Card Monte,” was to give students curatorial experience, force them to be resourceful and learn how to iron out technical issues relating to transport, insurance and installation, Messer said.

Claire’s Corner Copia owner Claire Criscuolo launched her new cookbook, entitled “Welcome to Claire’s: 35 Years of Recipes and Reflections from the Landmark Vegetarian Restaurant,” at a tasty community event Tuesday night. Criscuolo donated the proceeds from the book signing to the New Haven Reads, a nonprofit that provides free access to books and reading tutors.

In a time of economic downfall like this one … production of art doesn’t cease, it is just approached differently. FLORENCIA ESCUDERO ’12 “I hoped that necessity would bring about creativity,” Messer said. As Storr wrote in a Dec. 17 email calling for submissions from students, “You’ve got nothing to lose.” The exhibit comprises three separate MFA-curated shows: “Outside Mediation,” curated by Peter Moran ’12, “Down to the Sunless Sea” by Florencia Escudero ’12, and “Distance of Paradise,” curated by Kristian Henson ’12. Messer said he and Storr stipulated that the students curate work that was not their own, creating shows that promoted artistic community and fostered a dialogue between the choices of the artist and the curator.

We are very fortunate to consider [Claire’s] a partner of New Haven Reads. FIONA BRADFORD Assistant director, New Haven Reads

“Three Card Monte,” now on display at the Yale School of Art’s Green Gallery, comprises three separate shows, each curated by an MFA student.

Henson said his multi-stream video installation “Distance of Paradise” comprises work from friends and past colleagues from the School of Art and his native Los Angeles. The compilation, he said, reflects on the transient nature of Los Angeles, southern California and, more broadly, the American dream. “The economy of L.A. is based upon dreams, prospecting, and movies,” he said. “All movies made about the American dream are made in California.” Ironically, Henson said, California has also become the end of the American dream, the physical end of manifest destiny and the American frontier.

Henson also collaborated locally, with poet Edgar Garcia GRD ’14, who taught a course called “The Island of California” last semester. The set includes a close-up of a local landmark on the 10 Freeway in Santa Monica (a giant, billowing American flag), sunny flythroughs from hit melodrama “The O.C.,” live manipulations with oil and water on a TV screen and a recitation of Garcia’s poetry. “Distance of Paradise” paints both place and dislocation, Henson said, a California that is “equally physical, psychological and imaginary.” Henson said he wanted the “challenge” of multiple screens, and that there

was no better medium to capture the illusion and gaud of Los Angeles and California than old-school, analog film. In the vein of Messer and Storr’s advice to be resourceful without a source of funding, Escudero, a sculpture student, wrote in her project proposal that the restrictions imposed by the current economy have forced artists to seek creative alternatives to their methods. “In a time of economic downfall like this one … the frivolity of art becomes more apparent,” Escudero wrote. “However production of art doesn’t cease, it is just approached differently.”

Escudero said she encouraged the artists in her interactive and multimedia show, “Down to the Sunless Sea,” to reflect on today’s brutal social and political culture through a romantic, minimalist aesthetic. She said her goal was to create a “new wave of romance fueled by the disillusion in technology, progress, race and gender equality.” Escudero’s picks, which occupy the second room of the gallery, include a pungent cluster of dead fish dangling from their tails at the center of a giant pile of sticks. Elsewhere in Escudero’s show, visitors find works featuring an amputated

The new cookbook, which Fiona Bradford, New Haven Reads’ assistant director, said has been on sale for a week, includes 300 recipes for dishes and desserts sold in the iconic Chapel Street café, as well as passages written by Criscuolo about her philosophies on healthy eating and food preparation. In her presentation at the launch event, which was held at the Dixwell-Yale Community Learning Center on Ashmun Street, Criscuolo discussed her vegetarian philosophy before a crowd consisting of community members and affiliates of New Haven Reads. Bradford said Claire’s has supported New Haven Reads prior to the launch event. The restaurant’s “Coins for Causes” program, which collects donations in-house and distributes them to local charitable organizations, has contributed to New Haven Reads in the past. New Haven Reads Executive Director Kirsten Levinsohn added that children of the cafe’s employees have benefited from New Haven Reads tutoring. “We are very fortunate to consider [Claire’s] a partner of New Haven Reads,” Bradford said. “They are very communityoriented.” A second launch event for the cookbook unrelated to New Haven Reads will take place tomorrow night at the Guilford Public Library.

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Barbie doll head attached to a block of faux fur, a video projection of footsteps and a table equipped with materials to make one’s own zine, including a photocopy machine, computer and pens. Messer said that “Three Card Monte” breeds a “guerilla-style of curation,” a tone he said the School of Art hopes to cement into tradition by making the show the first of many more student-curated exhibitions to come. “Three Card Monte” is set to run through Monday, Feb. 6. Contact KAT HUANG at katherine.huang@yale.edu .

SHANA SCHNEIDER

Claire Criscuolo, owner of Claire’s Corner Copia, donated proceeds from her new cookbook to New Haven Reads.

Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE says School of Arch in new exhibit

12:30 P.M., WED. JAN. 25 STUDENT RECITAL The Yale Institute of Sacred Music presents Paul Thomas, an aspiring church musician and a graduate student in organ performance.

BY LIZ RODRIGUEZ-FLORIDO STAFF REPORTER Weeks before hosting a symposium titled “Is Drawing Dead?” the Yale School of Architecture has opened a new exhibit that takes a step back to honor the basics of the craft. Composed of approximately 24 pieces hand-drawn by students last semester, “Visualizing Form” went up Jan. 17 on the third floor of Rudolph Hall. The show runs alongside the symposium taking place Feb. 9-11, which aims to answer the question “What value does drawing still have in architecture?”, said Victor Agran, an architecture professor involved with the symposium. “The answer is complicated, but can also be answered simply — drawing has tremendous value in architecture,” said Agran. Yet while drawing is a fundamental skill for architects, most of the final models students produce in the studios of Rudolph Hall are designed with digital 3-D modeling software, Linda Lee ARC ’13 said in an email. However, she said, drawing is is an essential exercise in the design process. While computer graphics bring projects to a finish, most architects still use sketches to develop their concepts, said Lee, whose work is on display in the exhibit. “Visualizing Form” draws on work from the courses “Processing & Presentation,” “Form and Representation” and “Formal Analysis,” with pieces ranging from geometrical illusions to three-dimensional cutout cityscapes. At the same time, the school’s upcoming symposium will feature three days’ worth of lectures exploring the definition of drawing in the past and present, Agran said. In the age of digital production, he said, the thinking stage is harder to come by and drawing is atool to help it along. Agran said that under the leadership of Dean Robert A.M. Stern, Yale’s School of Architecture has begun to place a heavier emphasis on drawing in the past five years. Though many universities prioritize computer-generated graphics,

Woolsey Hall, 500 College St.

6 P.M., WED. JAN. 25 THE AMULETIC DESIGN OF THE MITHRAIC BULL-WOUNDING SCENE University of Chicago’s Christopher Faraone — the coauthor of Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World (2005), and Animal Sacrifice Revisited: Issues of Violence, Solidarity, and Centrality in a Greek and Roman Religious Practice (2011) — explores the oft-produced image of Hellenized Persian god Mithras wounding a bull. Sterling Divinity Quadrangle, Niebuhr Hall, 409 Prospect St.

4 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26 THE POLITICS OF PLEASURE AND PLAY IN LATINO/A LITERATURE AND PERFORMANCE Albert Laguna, a literature professor at Columbia College of Chicago, discusses the topic of his NYU dissertation, which includes stand-up comedy and dramatic novels as emblems and critiques of transnational identity. Hall of Graduate Studies, 401, 320 York St.

7 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26 “TREE OF LIFE” The award-winning, and much maligned, Terrence Malick film comes to Yale as part of a multidepartment program in “Religion and Film;” come for Brad Pitt, stay for the meaning of it all. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

“CRIMES OF THE HEART” Gabe Greenspan ’14 directs Beth Henley’s classic tragicomedy about three sisters in Mississippi who grapple with their pasts and look toward to the future. Davenport College, Theater, 248 York St.

7 P.M., FRI. JAN. 27 TAIWAN FILM FESTIVAL King Hu’s “Touch of Zen” and Chung Monghong’s “The Fourth Portrait” kick off the five-day festival with a classic martial arts epic and a modern coming-of-age tale, respectively. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

8 P.M., FRI. JAN. 27 OUT OF THE BLUE PRESENTS: JAMS BOND The coed pop/rock a cappella group performs its 24th annual “jam.” William L Harkness Hall, Sudler Hall, 100 Wall St.

3 P.M., SUN. JAN. 29 REFLECTING ON WATER Moses Ballan ’13 offers an hour-long guided tour through the Yale University Art Gallery; expect gushing analysis. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M., MON. JAN. 30 DOUBLE BASS RECITAL The Yale School of Music’s Nahee Song ’12 performs her contrabass — which first enjoyed popularity as a solo instrument in the 1700s — for the general public. William L Harkness Hall, Sudler Hall, 100 Wall St.

The popular restaurant got its name in 1975, when a Yale undergraduate won a yearlong naming contest, receiving a four-serving hot fudge sundae every week for a year.

DRAWING NOT DEAD,

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

8 P.M., THURS. JAN. 26

Claire’s Corner Copia

Yale’s focus on developing drawing skills gives student-architects an additional tool for creative discovery, Alexander Chabla ARC ‘13 said. The “Roman Architecture” seminar, for instance, requires intensive hand-drawing assignments, he said. Chabla’s piece in the student exhibition, a paper relief drawing titled “Precedent Analysis: Richard Galpin,” emerged out of an interrogation of the work of artist Richard Galpin and attempts “to create a new reading of the urban environment” through the pulled in and out fragments of his piece.

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Some actors approach a new show with years of experience under their belts. Others bring to the table a fresh eagerness and a yearning to absorb as much as they can. And sometimes, at Yale, the two types fuse their skills to put together a production larger than the sum of its parts. Jen Mulrow ’14 and Charles Margossian ’15 said they are discovering the uniquely demanding but worthwhile nature of this cooperation as they perform in the Yale School of Drama’s production of “The Seagull,” which went up last night and will run through Saturday. Mulrow said that though she and Margossian hold relatively minor parts, the show’s director, Alexandru Mihail DRA ’12, has given them advice on how to play their roles in ways that add to the production’s impact. One staging decision he made was for the two to portray a happy couple in the background of the play in order to highlight the tensions within the relationships of the main characters.

[Drawing] allows you to use the mistakes you’ve made to see something you wouldn’t see if you simply deleted it.

I wouldn’t say directors and other cast members go out of their way to coddle undergrads.

MATEUS BENARROS ’13

The painstaking process of drawing calls for more “concentration” and “critical analysis,” architecture major Mateus Benarros ’13 said. Even if one erases a line, he said, part of the mark will always remain on the paper. “[Drawing] allows you to use the mistakes you’ve made to see something you wouldn’t see if you simply deleted it, leaving no traces behind,” Benarros said. “The use of computer, the digital approach, works faster and is generally more clear. When using computers, the process almost gets lost, leaving the final composition to speak for the entire project.” The student exhibition coincides with another exhibit at the School of Architecture featuring about 160 paintings, drawings and watercolor works by Italian architect and artist Massimo Scolari. The show, “Representation of Architecture,” focuses on the relationship between drawing and buildings and will run Feb. 6 through May 4.

In ‘Seagull,’ undergrads learn from pros

SAM LASMAN ’12

JOY SHAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

“Visualizing Form,” an exhibit of drawings by School of Architecture students, is on display on the third floor of Rudolph Hall.

Student curators take over Green galleries

Meanwhile, the Drama School school actors are teaching the undergrads a thing or two about loosening up. Mulrow said watching the actors’ rehearsal process has been valuable to her, adding that she has observed graduate students go “offbook” and experiment more freely than undergraduates do. Margossian said this open environment and the other actors’ responsiveness to improvisation has allowed him to become more creative with his own character. Working in close proximity with School of Drama students pushes undergrad actors to redefine their limits, said Sam Lasman ’12, who worked with School of Drama students on the Cabaret production of “Wuthering Heights.”Lasman is a staff columnist for the News. “I wouldn’t say directors and other cast members go out of their way to coddle undergrads,” Lasman said. “On the contrary, you’re really forced to up your ante to match their level.”

At the same time, Mulrow said, learning that acting students feel the same performance anxiety that undergraduates do has been reassuring. Carmen Zilles DRA ’13, who plays Masha in “The Seagull,” said she finds an undergraduate perspective refreshing, having worked with undergraduates on a show called “Rodeo” last November. Undergraduate enthusiasm can help remind “jaded” drama students about how exciting it can be to put up a production, she said. “It’s contagious and really lovely and always reminds me to approach my work that way, with the same openness and excitement and gratefulness at the fact that I get to be involved,” Zilles said. Likewise, Lasman said undergraduates can learn something from the professional work ethic of graduate students in theater. Many college students, he said, treat theater as a diversion from their studies. Mulrow admitted that being involved in “The Seagull” has been a large time commitment for her, but that she was willing to negotiate her college schedule accordingly. “[Graduate theater] is worth it if you’re willing to devote the time to it,” she said. “I haven’t seen my friends a lot, haven’t gone to film screenings, missed a section — you have to be able to [re]distribute your priorities a little bit.” Students in the School of Drama are not the only graduate students Yale College actors encounter on the stage. Drama students are not allowed to participate in undergraduate productions, but this is not the case for actors from Yale’s other graduate and professional programs. Charles Gillespie DIV ’13, a graduate student who acted in last fall’s “Assassins” and will soon star in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” said he has found working with Yale undergraduates to be rewarding, as they often approach their roles in a more cerebral way than students did in his undergraduate program at Villanova University. Still, not all lessons in acting must be carefully thought out. Mulrow added that simply being in the presence of the show’s cast and crew has enabled her to subconsciously absorb tips on technique. “I once saw them reading and rehearsing in the green room and thought at first that they were having a normal conversation,” said Margossian. “It took me a while to realize they were actually doing theater.” “The Seagull” is the first School of Drama show to go up this semester. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

Vegetarian maven launches new cookbook

BY KAT HUANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

Strapped on cash but temporarily rich in vacant space, administrators at the Yale School of Art invited students to play curator in the school’s unused galleries. On Jan. 18, a student-curated exhibit opened at the School of Art’s Green Gallery, featuring works selected by three MFA students at the school. In a time of economic duress, Dean Robert Storr and Associate Dean Sam Messer ART ’82 encouraged curatorial candidates to be creative, guaranteeing them no funding but all the gallery space Green Hall has to offer. The objective of the show, titled “Three Card Monte,” was to give students curatorial experience, force them to be resourceful and learn how to iron out technical issues relating to transport, insurance and installation, Messer said.

Claire’s Corner Copia owner Claire Criscuolo launched her new cookbook, entitled “Welcome to Claire’s: 35 Years of Recipes and Reflections from the Landmark Vegetarian Restaurant,” at a tasty community event Tuesday night. Criscuolo donated the proceeds from the book signing to the New Haven Reads, a nonprofit that provides free access to books and reading tutors.

In a time of economic downfall like this one … production of art doesn’t cease, it is just approached differently. FLORENCIA ESCUDERO ’12 “I hoped that necessity would bring about creativity,” Messer said. As Storr wrote in a Dec. 17 email calling for submissions from students, “You’ve got nothing to lose.” The exhibit comprises three separate MFA-curated shows: “Outside Mediation,” curated by Peter Moran ’12, “Down to the Sunless Sea” by Florencia Escudero ’12, and “Distance of Paradise,” curated by Kristian Henson ’12. Messer said he and Storr stipulated that the students curate work that was not their own, creating shows that promoted artistic community and fostered a dialogue between the choices of the artist and the curator.

We are very fortunate to consider [Claire’s] a partner of New Haven Reads. FIONA BRADFORD Assistant director, New Haven Reads

“Three Card Monte,” now on display at the Yale School of Art’s Green Gallery, comprises three separate shows, each curated by an MFA student.

Henson said his multi-stream video installation “Distance of Paradise” comprises work from friends and past colleagues from the School of Art and his native Los Angeles. The compilation, he said, reflects on the transient nature of Los Angeles, southern California and, more broadly, the American dream. “The economy of L.A. is based upon dreams, prospecting, and movies,” he said. “All movies made about the American dream are made in California.” Ironically, Henson said, California has also become the end of the American dream, the physical end of manifest destiny and the American frontier.

Henson also collaborated locally, with poet Edgar Garcia GRD ’14, who taught a course called “The Island of California” last semester. The set includes a close-up of a local landmark on the 10 Freeway in Santa Monica (a giant, billowing American flag), sunny flythroughs from hit melodrama “The O.C.,” live manipulations with oil and water on a TV screen and a recitation of Garcia’s poetry. “Distance of Paradise” paints both place and dislocation, Henson said, a California that is “equally physical, psychological and imaginary.” Henson said he wanted the “challenge” of multiple screens, and that there

was no better medium to capture the illusion and gaud of Los Angeles and California than old-school, analog film. In the vein of Messer and Storr’s advice to be resourceful without a source of funding, Escudero, a sculpture student, wrote in her project proposal that the restrictions imposed by the current economy have forced artists to seek creative alternatives to their methods. “In a time of economic downfall like this one … the frivolity of art becomes more apparent,” Escudero wrote. “However production of art doesn’t cease, it is just approached differently.”

Escudero said she encouraged the artists in her interactive and multimedia show, “Down to the Sunless Sea,” to reflect on today’s brutal social and political culture through a romantic, minimalist aesthetic. She said her goal was to create a “new wave of romance fueled by the disillusion in technology, progress, race and gender equality.” Escudero’s picks, which occupy the second room of the gallery, include a pungent cluster of dead fish dangling from their tails at the center of a giant pile of sticks. Elsewhere in Escudero’s show, visitors find works featuring an amputated

The new cookbook, which Fiona Bradford, New Haven Reads’ assistant director, said has been on sale for a week, includes 300 recipes for dishes and desserts sold in the iconic Chapel Street café, as well as passages written by Criscuolo about her philosophies on healthy eating and food preparation. In her presentation at the launch event, which was held at the Dixwell-Yale Community Learning Center on Ashmun Street, Criscuolo discussed her vegetarian philosophy before a crowd consisting of community members and affiliates of New Haven Reads. Bradford said Claire’s has supported New Haven Reads prior to the launch event. The restaurant’s “Coins for Causes” program, which collects donations in-house and distributes them to local charitable organizations, has contributed to New Haven Reads in the past. New Haven Reads Executive Director Kirsten Levinsohn added that children of the cafe’s employees have benefited from New Haven Reads tutoring. “We are very fortunate to consider [Claire’s] a partner of New Haven Reads,” Bradford said. “They are very communityoriented.” A second launch event for the cookbook unrelated to New Haven Reads will take place tomorrow night at the Guilford Public Library.

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Barbie doll head attached to a block of faux fur, a video projection of footsteps and a table equipped with materials to make one’s own zine, including a photocopy machine, computer and pens. Messer said that “Three Card Monte” breeds a “guerilla-style of curation,” a tone he said the School of Art hopes to cement into tradition by making the show the first of many more student-curated exhibitions to come. “Three Card Monte” is set to run through Monday, Feb. 6. Contact KAT HUANG at katherine.huang@yale.edu .

SHANA SCHNEIDER

Claire Criscuolo, owner of Claire’s Corner Copia, donated proceeds from her new cookbook to New Haven Reads.

Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T Dow Jones 12,675.75,-0.26% S NASDAQ 2,786.64, +0.09% S Oil $99.27, +0.32%

S

PAGE 10

T

S&P 500 1,314.65, -0.10% 10-yr. Bond 2.06%, +0.00%

T Euro $1.3027, -0.0330%

Obama delivers defiant State of the Union BY BEN FELLER ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAUL LOEB/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington Wednesday night.

WASHINGTON — Declaring the American dream under siege, President Barack Obama delivered a populist challenge Tuesday night to shrink the gap between rich and poor, promising to tax the wealthy more and help jobless Americans get work and hang onto their homes. Seeking reelection and needing results, the president invited Republicans to join him but warned, “I intend to fight.” In an emphatic State of the Union address, Obama said ensuring a fair shot for all Americans is “the defining issue of our time.” He said the economy is finally recovering from a deep and painful recession and he will fight any effort to return to policies that brought it low. “We’ve come too far to turn back now,” he declared. Obama outlined a vastly different vision for fixing the country than the one pressed by the Republicans confronting him in Congress and fighting to take his job in the November election. He pleaded for an active government that ensures economic fairness for everyone, just as his opponents demand that the government back off and let the free market rule. Obama offered steps to help students afford college, a plan for more struggling homeowners to refinance their homes and tax cuts for manufacturers. He threw in politically appealing references to

accountability, including warning universities they will lose federal aid if they don’t stop tuition from soaring. Standing in front of a divided Congress, with bleak hope for much of his legislative agenda this election year, Obama spoke with voters in mind. “We can either settle for a country where a shrinking number of people do really well, while a growing number of Americans barely get by,” Obama said, “or we can restore an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same set of rules.” A rare wave of unity splashed over the House chamber at the start. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, survivor of an assassination attempt one year ago, received sustained applause from her peers and cheers of “Gabby, Gabby, Gabby.” She blew a kiss to the podium. Obama embraced her. Lawmakers leapt to their feet when Obama said near the start of his speech that terrorist leader Osama bin Laden, killed by a raid authorized by the president, will no longer threaten America. At the core of Obama’s address was the improving but deeply wounded economy — the matter still driving Americans’ anxiety and the one likely to determine the next presidency. “The state of our union is getting stronger,” Obama said, calibrating his words as millions remain unemployed. Implicit in his declaration that the American

dream is “within our reach” was the recognition that, after three years of an Obama presidency, the country is not there yet. He spoke of restoring basic goals: owning a home, earning enough to raise a family, putting a little money away for retirement. “We can do this,” Obama said. “I know we can.” He said Americans are convinced that “Washington is broken,” but he also said it wasn’t too late to cooperate on important matters. Republicans were not impressed. They applauded infrequently, though they did cheer when the president quoted “Republican Abraham Lincoln” as saying: “That government should do for people only what they cannot do better by themselves — and no more.” Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, offering the formal GOP response, called Obama’s policies “propoverty” and his tactics divisive. “No feature of the Obama presidency has been sadder than its constant efforts to divide us, to curry favor with some Americans by castigating others,” Daniels said after the president’s address. In a signature swipe at the nation’s growing income gap, Obama called for a new minimum tax rate of at least 30 percent on anyone making over $1 million. Many millionaires — including one of his chief rivals, Republican Mitt Romney — pay a rate less than that because they get most of their income from investments, which are taxed at a lower rate.

Money talk dominating Romney, Gingrich contest BY STEVE PEOPLES ASSOCIATED PRESS TAMPA, Fla. — Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich’s fight for Florida and the states beyond stayed at a high boil Tuesday as Romney released tax returns showing annual income topping $20 million — including a now-closed Swiss bank account — and Gingrich insisted his highpaid consulting work for a mortgage giant that contributed to the housing crisis didn’t include lobbying. After a night of mutual sniping in a debate, the two leading GOP presidential candidates tried to turn the arguments over their various business dealings to his own advantage. Romney’s release of two years’ worth of tax documents, showing him at an elite level even among the nation’s richest one percent, kept the focus on the two men’s money and how they earned it. Romney’s income put him in the top 0.006 percent of Americans, according to Internal Revenue Service data from 2009, the most recent year available. His net worth has been estimated as high as $250 million. As the former Massachusetts governor relented to pressure and released more than 500

pages of tax documents, Gingrich kept up the heat, saying Romney was “outrageously dishonest” for accusing him of influence peddling for government-backed mortgage giant Freddie Mac. “I don’t own any Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac stock. He does, so presumably he was getting richer,” Gingrich told Fox News on Tuesday. The specter of well-off Gingrich and wealthier Romney feuding over money matters pleased Rick Santorum, who lags in polls for next Tuesday’s Florida primary but hopes to benefit from the dust-up as the race moves on. He told MSNBC, “The other two candidates have some severe flaws.” Striking out in two directions, Romney planned to offer advance criticism of President Barack Obama’s Tuesday night State of the Union address, then focus on Florida’s housing woes in an event sure to again highlight Gingrich’s $25,000 monthly retainer from Freddie Mac. The former House speaker said Romney’s charges were ironic, given that it was revealed after Monday’s debate that Romney himself was an investor in both Freddie Mac and its sister entity, Fannie Mae. Gingrich, a candidate once left

for dead, stood before thousands in a U.S. flag-draped airport hangar in Sarasota brimming with confidence about his chances of winning the GOP nomination. He barely mentioned Romney in two events, though he went hard at Obama as the president prepared for his big speech. Gingrich said Obama should stop blaming his Republican predecessor for the country’s economic woes. “This is the fourth year of his presidency. He needs to get over it,” Gingrich said. “A friend of mine says, `He has shifted from Yes We Can to Why We Couldn’t.’” Gingrich’s campaign also announced it had pulled in $2 million, mostly online, since winning the South Carolina primary on Saturday. Gingrich planned to pad his campaign account with a series of fundraisers this week. Records released by Romney’s campaign show he closed a bank account in Switzerland in 2010, as he was entering the presidential race. He also kept money in the Cayman Islands, another spot popular with investors sheltering their income from U.S. taxes. But Benjamin Ginsberg, the Romney campaign’s legal counsel, said Romney didn’t use any aggressive tax strategies to help reduce or defer his tax income.

CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney campaigns in front of a foreclosed home in Lehigh Acres, Fla., Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012.

Long lines to bid farewell to Paterno BY GENARO ARMAS ASSOCIATED PRESS STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Decked out in Penn State hats and jackets, students and townspeople stood in a line more than a quarter-mile long Tuesday to pay their respects to Joe Paterno, the coach who for nearly a half century was the face of their university. Mourners waited for hours along a main campus artery for the chance to file past Paterno’s closed brown casket at the campus spiritual center during a public viewing session. Some departed crying. All were moved. “He was my hero. He was my hero. I had to come,” said a sobbing Gloria Spicer, who was a freshman in 1966 when Paterno started his first season as head coach at Penn State. The 85-yearold Paterno, the winningest coach in major college football history, died Sunday of lung cancer. He had been fired just days before learning of his diagnosis in November. “He was a teacher to me,”

Spicer said. “He taught me to be a better person and a better teacher.” Spicer and others walked slowly past the undraped casket which had an “honor guard” of two Penn State players — one past and one present. Six feet away, a stylized, black-andwhite photo of a smiling Paterno, arms crossed in front of his chest, sat on an easel. Large windows bathed the white-walled hall in light on an overcast afternoon. Some of Paterno’s family attends church services there. Members of the public were preceded by the Paterno family — the coach’s son, Scott, was seen at the gathering — along with current and former players. The current Nittany Lions wore dark suits and arrived in three blue Penn State buses, the same ones that once carried Paterno and the team to games at Beaver Stadium on fall Saturdays. Among the former players was Mike McQueary. As a graduate assistant to Paterno in 2002, he went to the coach saying he

had witnessed former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky assaulting a boy in the shower at the Penn State football building. Paterno relayed that to his bosses — including the head of campus police — but university trustees felt he should have done more, and it played into their decision to oust the longtime coach on Nov. 9. That came four days after Sandusky was arrested on multiple child sex-abuse counts.

His legacy is still going to be filled with the great things that he did. Look at this place. It’s like he’s part of your life. TOM SHERMAN 1969 Penn State graduate Dressed in a blue coat and tie with a white shirt, the school colors, McQueary was among thou-

sands of expected mourners at an event that was to stretch late into Tuesday night. One current and one former team member will stand guard over the casket for the duration of the public viewing, athletic department spokesman Jeff Nelson said. “Going in there, waiting two hours in line, it was worth every second of it,” Penn State junior Rob Gressinger said. “It helps in the grieving process for everybody and I hope the rest of the people that are waiting in line longer than I did, get to experience the same thing.” Earlier Tuesday, a line of explayers stretched around the corner and down the block. Among the mourners was former Penn State and Pittsburgh Steelers great Franco Harris. Others there included NFL receivers Deon Butler and Jordan Norwood, Norwood’s father and Baylor assistant coach Brian Norwood and former quarterback Daryll Clark. The event marked the first of three days of public mourning as the Penn State community in

State College and beyond said goodbye to the man who led the Nittany Lions to 409 wins over 46 years and raised the national profile of the school. There is another public viewing Wednesday at Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, and after that, Paterno’s family will hold a private funeral and procession through State College. On Thursday, the school’s basketball arena will be the site of a public service called “A Memorial for Joe.” Tickets were quickly snapped up for the event, even though there was a two-per-person limit for those ordering. Former players began arriving shortly after members of Paterno’s last team filed in. Some players hugged, and new Penn State coach Bill O’Brien shook hands with others at the curb outside the center. Penn State linebacker Khairi Fortt recalled his coach’s lessons. “He said the most important thing for us was to keep the Penn State tradition going,” the sophomore from Stamford, Conn., said after leaving the viewing.

Scott Paterno has said that despite the turmoil surrounding his termination from the school, Joe Paterno remained peaceful and upbeat in his final days and still loved Penn State. Bitterness over Paterno’s dismissal has turned up in many forms, from online postings to a rewritten newspaper headline placed next to Paterno’s statue at the football stadium blaming the trustees for his death. A headline that read “FIRED” was crossed out and made to read, “Killed by Trustees.” Lanny Davis, lawyer for the school’s board, said threats have been made against the trustees. Scott Paterno, however, stressed that his father did not die with a broken heart and did not harbor resentment toward Penn State. “His legacy is still going to be filled with the great things that he did. Look at this place,” 1969 Penn State graduate Tom Sherman said before tearing up. “It’s like he’s part of your life. I admire that guy so much.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Mostly sunny, with a high near 42. West wind between 7 and 14 mph.

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

High of 41, low of 38.

High of 49, low of 31.

MIDWESTERN NERD AT YALE BY ERAN MOORE REA

ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 3:30 PM Dale Jamieson Talk and Discussion: Animal Ethics. Dale Jamieson, director of environmental studies and professor of philosophy at New York University, will lead this event. Jamieson is a contemporary pioneer of animal ethics. He will be giving a short talk followed by an open discussion. The event will be hosted by the Yale Animal Welfare Alliance and the Yale Philosophy Review. Branford College (74 High St.), Trumbull Room. 8:00 PM “Improvised Shakespeare.” The Purple Crayon will perform a new Shakespearean play. Tenative location: Ezra Stiles College (19 Tower Parkway), Crescent Theater. Final location TBA. 9:00 PM Lunar New Year Celebration. All-you-can-eat Chinese food and performances by Pentatonic, Phoenix Dance Troupe and Wushu. Hosted by Chinese Undergraduate Students at Yale (CUSY). Free admission . Ezra Stiles College (19 Tower Parkway), Dining Hall.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27 7:00 PM “Touch of Zen.” Directed by King Hu. Part of the Taiwan Film Festival. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium. 8:00 PM Out of the Blue presents: Jams Bond. Come see your favorite MI6 agents save the day in typical Bond fashion. Featuring new arrangements by artists including Beyoncé, Kelly Clarkson and Sara Bareilles. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Sudler Hall.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

7:00 PM The Sword and the Screen: The Japanese Period Film 1915-1960. Rare Samuria Films from the collection of the National Film Center, Tokyo. Second screening in a series of 5 sessions: “The Kuroda Affair” (1955, Uchida Tomu, 108 minutes) and “The Blind Menace” (1960, Mori Kazuo, 91 minutes). Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Kid’s summer spot 5 Ain’t it the truth 9 Melville’s Billy 13 Craft seen at many a 1-Across 14 Banned apple treatment 15 Current about 16 “Family Matters” nerd 17 __ dry eye in the house 18 Hindu music style 19 Outdo other guests seeking a party drink? 22 Hotel annex? 23 Carson’s latenight predecessor 24 Thurmond who was a senator for 47 years 26 Fancy neckwear 29 Bay Area airport letters 31 Lux. locale 32 Pitcher of milk? 34 Size up 36 Order one so-so ice cream drink? 39 Throw in the direction of 40 __ one’s game: performing below par 41 Bribe 42 Slice of history 44 Hardly silk purse material, in an idiom 48 Building brick 50 Bearing 52 Unnamed degree 53 Activate a dispenser for a fruit drink? 57 Civil rights icon Parks 58 “You bet, señora!” 59 Rye fungus 60 A very long time 61 Lobe adornment 62 Slasher’s title hangout, in film: Abbr. 63 Schools of whales 64 Pops the question 65 H.S. junior’s exam

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By Nancy Salomon

DOWN 1 Job, and then some 2 Asian capital on a peninsula 3 Champagne brand 4 Assail (with), as snowballs 5 Classic film with dancing hippos 6 Hawaiian hi or bye 7 Works a wedding 8 Catch 9 Too well-done 10 Where not to be paddleless? 11 Whence a front yard growl 12 It may be used to ID a perp 13 Like dice, shapewise 20 Chooses 21 G.I. entertainment 25 Robinson of song 27 November honorees 28 Support group for kids of substance abusers 30 Scam that’s “pulled”

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33 Hamburger’s article 35 Without 36 All set 37 Championed, as a cause 38 Fruit used as a vitamin C supplement 39 Airport safety org. 43 Prenatal tests, for short 45 Baffling problem

1/25/12

46 Not marked up 47 Classic role for Clark 49 Military bigwigs 51 “Everything’s fine” 54 Worker protection agcy. 55 Cherokee maker 56 www addresses 57 50 Cent’s genre

9 1

7 2 6 2 9 8 3 3 8 5 6 8 7 1 9 7 8 7 9 2 4 1


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

AROUND THE IVIES

1,860

Number of dollars by which Cornell’s tuition spiked for the fall of 2012. The university’s Board of Trustees approved a tuition hike announced Monday, bringing the total cost of attendance to $57,041.

T H E C O L U M B I A S P E C TAT O R

Younger alumni boost fundraising BY MARGARET MATTES SENIOR STAFF WRITER Columbia College exceeded its fundraising goal by nearly 8 percent in the 2010-2011 fiscal year, raking in $15.6 million and drawing in more donations than ever from younger alumni. The growth represents a 3.2 percent increase from the previous year, during which $15.1 million was collected. The reports for this current fiscal year—since July 2011—are also looking promising, according to Allen Rosso, the executive director of the Columbia College Fund. Compared to last year’s numbers at this time, the fund is ahead by 800 donors and $400,000. That increase is largely due to a rise in participation, not to growth in the average gift size, Rosso said, and is particularly noticeable among younger alumni, especially those who graduated 10 to 15 years ago. In the last fiscal year, about 400 gifts were made by alumni in that age bracket. This year, the number already stands at around 770 gifts. “Within the last 10 years, what we’re seeing is more satisfaction with the Columbia experience. It’s always been a top school, but schools go through periods when they are hotter than others, and right now, we’re a hot school,” Rosso said. “The type of students we’re attracting are staying more involved in that community, and I think they’re having a better experience while they’re here.” Another possible explanation, according to Rosso, is the increased growth and involvement of the Young Alumni Fund Development Council, a group of graduates from the last 10 years who advise the College on fundraising strategies for recent graduates. “One of the things that they’ve helped us do is refine why alumni want to give back. No one can explain that better to us than actually talking to alumni,” Rosso said.

Ganesh Betanabhatla, CC ’06 and cochair of the YA F D C , said that COLUMBIA he believes much of this increase is due to better messaging on the part of the Fund office to the younger population. “I think now the communication from the alumni office has been much more tailored towards the young alumni message,” he said. “The underlying message has been much clearer … which is that the fund is seeking participation, instead of really trying to tell people how much money is the right amount of money.” But the increased giving is not reserved to this cadre of alumni. Ira Malin, CC ’75 and co-chair of the College Fund, credited the office’s new efforts in direct response programming, which includes writing personal salutations in emails and asking individuals for specific amounts of money. Rosso, who was hired last October after working in development at the University of Chicago and Vanderbilt University, helped design Columbia College Interim Dean James Valentini’s “3, 2, 1” plan—a challenge to seniors to donate to their alma mater for three years post-graduation and to tell two friends about the plan. The “3, 2, 1” plan also addresses one of the main challenges that Rosso said he faces: getting alumni to become involved early, since, once an individual contributes, they are much more likely to give in subsequent years. “We have been much clearer with the message that we are trying to create a culture or habit of giving among young alumni population,” Betanabhatla said. “Regardless of what the amount is, if you get people in the habit of giving from their first year out, they continue to feel a sense of loyalty, a sense that giving is

AYELET PEARL/THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR

Allen Rosso, executive director of the Columbia College Fund, is pleased with this year’s 3.2 percent increase in donations. what they should be doing.” Valentini “is generating some energy about what it really means to give back and being part of the community … and I think there’s enthusiasm for that. With alumni that I meet with, across the board, anyone that has had the chance to meet Dean Valentini walks away energized, and I would include

myself in that camp,” Rosso said. An initiative in which alumni in each class personally reach out to their former classmates has also proved successful, Malin said. “It’s very powerful because I think when alumni are approached by their peers, it’s a much warmer interaction,” he said.

Betanabhatla noted that in recent years, the program has not only included more alumni, but has also done a better job of training those alumni to fundraise effectively. For Rosso, this recent success speaks to the long-term increase in funds raised by the College. “The exciting thing for us right now is that the Colum-

bia Annual Fund has been bucking a lot of national trends,” Rosso said. “With the ’08-’09 downturn, a lot of schools saw the amount of money coming into the school drop significantly, and now they’re seeing those dollars come back towards the end of last year and this year. We’ve had consistent growth all the way through.”

THE DARTMOUTH

T H E C O R N E L L D A I LY S U N

Univ. seeks to grow green efforts

Tuition spike approved

BY KRISTIN YU STAFF WRITER The Office of Sustainability, previously known as the Sustainability Initiative, is currently involved in a number of projects that range from the overarching sustainability strategic planning process to smaller scale projects around campus, according to sustainability director Rosi Kerr ’98. These projects are in accordance with College President Jim Yong Kim’s desire to make Dartmouth the “greenest of the Ivies,” biology professor David Peart said. The sustainability strategic planning process, not to be confused with the College’s larger strategic planning process, intends to improve Dartmouth’s sustainability. The sustainability strategic planning process will merge with the strategic planning process in June, Kerr said. The Dartmouth recycling program is the oldest in the nation, and zero-sort recycling has been in place on campus since 2010, according to Kerr. Dartmouth currently diverts 36 percent of all waste from landfills and is making progress toward its goal of diverting 40 percent of campus waste by 2015. The Office of Sustainability is also working on energy efficiency projects in buildings around campus, according to Kerr. “We have achieved an efficiency increase of 10 percent from 2005 levels, and we are also making progress toward our publicly-stated greenhouse gases goal to reduce 30 percent of emissions from their 2005 levels by 2030.” Kerr said. “We also have several benchmark goals along the way.” The Office of Sustainability will continue to work with student organizations in order to meet their long-term sustainability goals, Kerr said. Student sustainability organizations are doing their part to further integrate sustainability into the Dartmouth culture and experience, she said. Student initiatives include improving recycling rates, reducing the use of bottled water, improving the sustainability of on-campus dining, reducing bicycle waste around campus and increasing the

visibility of sustainability in the Greek system, she said. Although the Office of Sustainability will continue to support these DARTMOUTH student organizations, it is shifting its focus from individual projects to molding future leaders in the field of sustainability. “We have made progress toward our sustainability goals, and it was all a result of the efforts of really passionate, incredible people across campus,” Kerr said. “We are now shifting from the efforts of individuals to supporting the efforts of students and the College as an institution as they decide that they want to lead in sustainability.”

Sustainability’s core values are important for improving your lifestyle, whether or not you’re tied to environmental aspects. JENNA MUSCO ’11 The College also aims to create sustainability leaders through the sustainability minor program, introduced last fall. Student inquiry about the minor has increased since its inception, and enrollment in the classes required for the minor has also increased, according to Jenna Musco ’11, a sustainability minor communications assistant. At least 50 students attended a Sustainability in the Curriculum workshop earlier this month, which Musco said indicates a growing interest in sustainability. “Sustainability’s core values are important for improving your lifestyle, whether or not you’re tied to environmental aspects,” Musco said. “The more students learn about that and hear that message, the easier it will be to make a cultural shift.”

The working group that created the minor program also designed the Sustainability Solutions Cafe discussion series, according to George Thorman ’11, research assistant to environmental sciences professor Anne Kapuscinski. The Sustainability Solutions Cafe was inspired by the World Cafe group discussion format, which uses small, separated group round-table discussions to formulate possible solutions to challenges, Thorman said. The first cafe, titled “Taking Sustainability Literally,” will be held on Friday, Feb. 3 and will focus on sustainability in business, Thorman said. Mark McElroy, author of “Corporate Sustainability Management,” and Jed Davis ’83 Th ’85, Cabot Creamery director of sustainability, will speak about their experiences with sustainability in the business world, according to Thorman. Future cafe speakers may be nominated by students and professors in order to encourage Dartmouth community members to become more engaged with environmental issues, Thorman said. “Sustainability is a lot broader than environmental sustainability, financial sustainability, living better lives that are more fulfilling and with societal value,” Kerr said. “It’s holistic, and there’s a lot going on.” The interdisciplinary aspect of sustainability justifies the reasoning for its offering as a minor and not a major, Peart said. Peart co-chairs the working studies committee with Kapuscinsk and teaches Science for Sustainable Systems, a class that counts toward the sustainability minor. “The big picture in terms of sustainability for students in a place like Dartmouth, with its emphasis on a liberal arts education, and for faculty that are scholars and teachers in the world is that we need to have a sense of history about the way the world is changing,” he said. “The vision for the minor is that we attract students from a wide range of disciplines that are interested in sustainability who can incorporate the ideas of sustainability and its problems and solutions into their own disciplines and professions.”

BY LIZ CAMUTI STAFF WRITER The Board of Trustees approved a $1,860 increase in the cost of tuition for the fall of 2012 on Friday, the University said Monday. The overall cost of tuition, room and board, and other mandatory fees for undergraduate students in the endowed colleges — the College of Architecture, Art and Planning; the College of Arts and Sciences; the School of Hotel Administration; and the College of Engineering — will increase 4.4 percent to $57,041. Next year’s new rates follow an increase of 4.8 percent in 2011 and a 4.5 percent increase in 2010 for the endowed colleges. Following the trend of at least the past three academic years, the tuition increase for in-state students in Cornell’s contract colleges — the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; the College of Human Ecology; and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations — will exceed that of students in the endowed colleges. The tuition for New York state residents enrolled in Cornell’s statutory colleges will increase by 7.4 percent, to $27,045 from $25,185. For out-of-state students in the statutory colleges, tuition will rise by 4.5 percent, to $43,185 from $41,325. Student activities fees for all undergraduates will increase by 5.6 percent, to $228, as recommended by the Student Assembly. The University also announced a four percent increase in average fees for housing and dining, from $13,104 to $13,628. The undergraduate tuition hike will increase Cornell’s oper-

CORNELL

ating budget by 1.4 percent, according to Elmira Mangum, vice president for planning

and budget. “We are trying to maintain quality and a competitive position,” Mangum said. “Part of our operating philosophy was that we would not take on additional costs without additional revenue to provide services and enrich programs to meet the needs of students.” Tuition hikes continue to outpace the rate of inflation, which is currently 3.4 percent. The inflation rate has steadily increased from 1.5 percent in 2010 and three percent in 2011. “The cost of utilities, information technology, security, research and salaries of faculty and staff have risen with the inflation rate,” Mangum said. However, she said that it is normal for tuition to increase at a higher rate than inflation. “Higher education tuition is usually two to three percent above inflation because the economy that is associated with a university is heavily focused on salaries, benefits and people costs,” Magnum said. “The consumer price index is a much broader index; on a college campus the market set is a little smaller.” While the rate of inflation has caused the cost of a Cornell education to increase, the University’s commitment to financial aid has not faltered, Mangum said. Half of this year’s tuition increase will go toward providing more students with financial aid.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS Squash maintains win streak SQUASH FROM PAGE 14 tain Ryan Dowd ’12 said. “Brown was important to us because it was a league match, so it was important that we play well.” After playing six matches within a week before Brown, the men’s team was happy to have a bit of a break with a team it could easily beat, Dowd said. The team won all nine matches in its lineup. Because Brown was not one of Yale’s toughest competitors and because a few players in Yale’s top nine had minor injuries, head coach David Talbott decided to substitute three underclassmen into the bottom half of the lineup. Charlie Wyatt ’14 at No.7, Joseph Roberts ’15 at No. 8 and Eric Caine ’14 at No. 9 all proved themselves in these spots and won their sets 3–1, 3–0 and 3–0 respectively. Joseph’s brother John Roberts ’12 also had an excellent day. Roberts swept his No. 4 match Tuesday afternoon, and earlier in the day was named the Harrow Sports College Squash Player of the week for his match-winning finish against Trinity’s Johan Detter. Roberts holds a record of 9–2 so

far this season. “I manged to win 3–0, but … it was a strong performance across the board, and a number of guys produced the same result,” Roberts said.

The key is not getting ahead of ourselves and just working hard one day at a time. DAVID TALBOTT Head coach, squash Although Brown is not as tenacious a foe as giants such as No. 1 Trinity, whom the Elis faced earlier in the week, Roberts said the team held its focus. Conference matches are necessary to secure the Ivy title, he added, and should never be taken lightly. The women’s team was also coming off a tiring week, with five matches in six days. Nevertheless, the team swept Brown 9–0 without dropping a single game. Talbott shifted the lineup by one spot

for the bottom five, which allowed Aly Kerr ’12 to step in at No. 9. Just as Wyatt, Roberts and Caine had accomplished earlier, Kerr held her own in the new spot. She swept her opponent 3–0. Talbott said the aim for both teams is to take the Ivy League titles and to follow with first-place finishes in the College Squash Association National Team Championships. “The key is not getting ahead of ourselves and just working hard one day at a time,” Talbott said. “Both the men and women have done a good job with this focus in mind, so we just need to stick to our game plan, which has worked all season.” Both teams have less than five regular-season matches left to prepare for Team Nationals, which will take place in February. The women’s team will go on the road to compete against No. 4 Princeton on Feb. 4, and the men’s team will take on No. 14 Navy at the Halsey Field House International Squash Courts in Annapolis this Saturday. Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu

Ivy sports prove competitive JANES FROM PAGE 14 The Tigers dropped a game to Cornell early in their conference campaign, a big blow to their hopes for an Ivy League title, but the Bulldogs still have a shot. If the Elis can run the table and knock off Harvard, the selection committee would have trouble omitting the nationally-ranked Crimson from its 65-team field just because Yale took the automatic bid. Rarely do conferences outside the Big XII, Big Ten, Pac-12, ACC and Big East gain multiple bids. Those that do are high-level mid-majors, just beyond the top level of the collegiate game and often nearly just as respected as the power conferences. If the Bulldogs could knock off Harvard for a title (Note: the two play in one of the most highly-anticipated Yale basketball games in years this Friday night at John J. Lee Amphitheater), the Bulldogs would be in a position to get the conference multiple bids — and major respect. Given the league’s competitiveness with top-tier schools over the past few years (see Cornell’s 2010 Sweet Sixteen run), it seems the Ivy League certainly deserves this chance. Yet however many Ivy League schools are in the tourney, for one of them to make it past the first round only would be considered an achievement. An upset is the best an Ivy League school can often hope for against power conference schools in the major sports. The NCAA recognizes this, and has therefore divided Division I football into the Bowl and Championship series to give smaller schools a chance to compete — a chance the Ivy League takes away from its schools as athletics officials cite the strain postseason play puts on academic commitments.

IVY SPORTS TEAMS MIGHT NOT GET AS MUCH RECOGNITION AS OTHER COLLEGE TEAMS, BUT THEY DESERVE THE SAME RESPECT. So while you might be excited by the occasional Ivy League appearance on the ESPN Bottom Line, it’s nearly impossible for these teams to make a consistent mark there. For that reason, Ivy League athletics are often dismissed as weaker even than even those mid-major athletic departments that gain prominence every few years with magical runs in the NCAA basketball tournament. But just because they can’t make pushes in the bigmoney sports year in and year out does not mean Ivy League athletic departments are at a lower tier than, say, the Creightons, Ball States or Akrons of the world. It’s understandable that Division I

athletic departments are often judged by their success in the big sports because of the attention they accrue. But they shouldn’t be. According to a 2011 USA Today article, “Only 22 of 228 Division I public schools generated enough money from media rights contracts, ticket sales, donations and other sources (not including allocated revenue from institutional or government support or student fees) to cover their expenses.” In other words, less than 10 percent of Division I schools are making a profit big enough to sustain athletics. Now, with that information, whether or not the investment in athletics is a smart one in itself comes into question. But this is a question for another day. (Rest assured, it’s a question I’ll answer another time.) But it also makes you wonder why those big-money sports are what we look at to judge success. Why is a school that wins three national titles a year, one in football, one in volleyball and one in women’s track and field, any more respectable than one such as Yale that can win a men’s squash, women’s crew and sailing title? We have nationallyranked swimmers, tennis players, runners and golfers, a nationally-ranked men’s lacrosse and ice hockey team and two baseball alumni in the major leagues. The NFL’s not out of reach for our football players, and our basketball players are representing their countries at the U-20 World Championships. And they do it all in an academic climate infinitely less forgiving than those bigger, more prominent, personal-tutor-laden athletic departments. I’m not saying that Yale athletics and, for example, Ohio State athletics are on the same level. But I encourage you to understand the odds our competitive big-time sports like hockey and basketball have to overcome just to compete as they do, while appreciating the fact that lesser known sports are not just winning conference titles, but national ones. Ivy League teams are ranked in the top twenty in men’s and women’s lacrosse, men’s and women’s hockey, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer and a variety of other relatively high-profile sports. For the same reason, it is impressive that other sports are competing with the nation’s top conferences across the board. The fact that lower-profile sports are winning national titles gives Yale athletics, and the Ivy League more broadly, an athletic depth that should merit national respect. Cool: Butler and George Mason can be really good every once in a while at a sport people happen to watch. We’re good at a wide variety of sports that people should watch (and don’t) year in and year out. We’re national championship contenders in the sports people don’t think about, competitive underdogs in the sports they do and we do it all with no scholarships and grueling academic demands — that should be the bottom line that gains respect for Ivy League athletics, whether we make the ESPN version on a consistent basis or not. Contact CHELSEA JANES at chelsea.janes@yale.edu .

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s squash team, which coasted past Brown on Tuesday, has four matches left before it takes on No. 1 Harvard. The Crimson beat Yale in the Ivy Scrimmage at the beginning of the season.

Elis hit the slopes SNOWBOARD FROM PAGE 14 meet of the season this weekend at the Clarkson Invitational in Lake Placid, N.Y. “It’s really fun to travel off campus and meet new people,” Peterson said. “It’s great exercise and it’s a really great way to spend the weekend.” Though the Alpine ski team is also a part of the USCSA, it is a separate group from the Nordic ski team. While the Nordic team competes in cross-country skiing events, the Alpine team specializes in two downhill racing events, slalom and giant slalom. The Alpine team also travels off campus to practice at ski resorts. To prepare for competitions, the team drives 45 minutes to Mount Southington, a ski resort in Plantsville, Conn., nearly every Tuesday to train with the University of Connecticut’s alpine team. Last weekend, the team travelled to Vermont to compete in the Middle-

bury College Snow Bowl. At the Bowl, the women’s team took first place while the men’s team finished third, men’s captain Christopher Murray ’13 said. “In our conference, we’ve done at well,” Murray said. “[Skiing] is a common interest that we all share. It brings us together.” Of the three winter sports teams, the snowboarding team is the newest: it was only established last year. Koh Kazama ’12 decided to begin the club after being disappointed to find no snowboarding team upon his arrival at Yale. This year, seven to 10 members of the team have been making the threehour drive up to Okemo Mountain Resort in Vermont every weekend to practice, team member Molly Emerson ’13 said. Because the snowboarding team is not as established as the ski teams on campus, it has not yet begun competing, though members hope to begin participating in boardercross and

half-pipe competitions in the future. Still, the unseasonably warm winter has hindered the team’s progress, as some of the boardercross runs at ski resorts are not yet open due to a lack of snow. “This winter has been really bad for ski resorts because it hasn’t been snowing and it’s really warm,” Kazama said. “Even up in Vermont none of the mountains are fully open yet, they’ve still got some closed trails. Usually by January all mountains are fully open.” Though the snow conditions have prevented the team from entering competitions so far, members such as Emerson simply relish the chance to be able to snowboard on a regular basis. “It just makes me happy that we get the opportunity to do something fun and different outside of New Haven and get out of the Yale bubble,” Emerson said. “I really like going out into the real world and having fun outdoors for a complete weekend.”

Hockey suffers another defeat

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s hockey team, here playing Princeton, suffered its twentieth loss of the season at Brown Tuesday night. WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 14 Forward Lauren Davis ’12 said each game produces more scoring opportunities for the Bulldogs, but she added that the team needs to start capitalizing on those occasions if it is going to start winning games. The Bulldogs could not even the score in the remainder of the first period and went into the second down 1–0. And unfortunately for the Bulldogs, the first period was high point. Forward Paige Decker ’14 said the team “really struggled” in the second period, during which the Bears outshot the Blue and White 25–9. Ladiges stopped 24 of those shots, but Brown slipped one past her on a power play at 12:48. Yale managed

to pick up its game at the end of the second period, scoring with less than one minute remaining to finish the period down 2–1. But the Bulldogs fell further behind in the third period. The Bears kicked off scoring for the period at 7:35 and added to this run on a power play at 14:58. Yale could not close the three-goal gap in the remainder of the game. Overall, Ladiges made 41 saves, but Yale was outshot 45–25. In their last game against Brown, the Bulldogs were outshot by a smaller margin, 30–26, but the game still ended with the same score. “We’re devoting the rest of the season to our senior players,” forward Danielle Moncion ’13 said. “They have done so much for the program,

and they deserve our best effort every shift.” There are eight more conference games left before the conference playoffs. Despite the team’s losing streak, Decker said, the Bulldogs are excited for their upcoming rivalry matches. This weekend’s matches against Harvard and Dartmouth will take place at Ingalls Rink at 7 p.m. Friday and 4 p.m. Saturday. On the return trip from the game, there were no phone calls that derailled the trip, but the team watched Ridley Scott’s film “Gladiator.” for motivation. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .


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NBA N.Y. Knicks 111 Charlotte 78

NHL N.Y. Rangers 3 Winnipeg 0

SPORTS MEN’S BASKETBALL HARVARD-YALE TICKETS GO ON SALE FRIDAY Harvard and Yale are expected to finish first and second in the Ivy League this season. Student tickets to watch the rivals clash will be available on a firstcome, first-served basis at Ray Tompkins House starting Friday at 9 p.m.

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SOCCER Mirandes 2 Espanyol 1

NHL Washington 5 Boston 3

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JOHN ROBERTS ’12 ROBERTS NAMED PLAYER OF THE WEEK Harrow Sports named Roberts College Squash Player of the Week for his defeat of Trinity’s Johan Detter on Jan. 18. That win clinched Yale’s 5–4 victory over the Bantams, who had not lost in an NCAArecord 252 games.

SPORT Orlando 102 Indiana 83

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

I think we are starting to play better collectively. We really gave it to Brown in the first period and for parts of third. HEATHER GRANT ’12 DEFENSE, W. HOCKEY YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

CHELSEA JANES

Hitting the slopes

Ivy athletics deserve respect It’s time Ivy League athletics got its due. The reason the (small) percentage of Yalies who care about sports fell in love with hockey over the past few years is that it was our best shot at national relevance. In most sports, it takes an Ivy League title to get a berth in the NCAA tournament and the accompanying chance on a national stage. Once a team has a bid, it takes a miracle to move on in a tournament loaded with schools unhindered by Ivy League scholarship and schedulie restrictions, as well as by crippling university policies. Given those impediments, Yale hockey’s success over the past few years is beyond impressive. But it’s getting harder for Ivy League schools to sustain their position in the upper echelon of a sport they once considered a stronghold: as of this week’s USCHO.com rankings, only one Ivy League school, Cornell, was in the nation’s top 20. With power conferences such as the Big Ten making stronger commitments to hockey (the Big Ten Hockey conference begins play in the 2013-14 season with six schools, including college hockey newcomer Penn State), Ivy League hockey will have to bank on its tradition to overcome an increasing recruiting disadvantage. While Ancient Eight hockey may be headed for more challenging years, Ivy League basketball is on the up-and-up. Harvard has been ranked in the top 25 for much of this season. This gives some grounds to argue that the Ivy League could be a two-bid league for the NCAA tournament. Traditionally, only the Ivy League champion makes the tournament, as the Ivy conference itself is considered too weak for a team other than the champion to merit consideration for an at-large bid. But Princeton has wins over the Big East’s Rutgers and the Atlantic Coast Conference’s Florida State, and Yale pushed ACC foe Wake Forest to the brink in a two-point loss in late December. SEE JANES PAGE 13

KOH KAZAMA

Yale’s club snowboarding team wants to begin competiting in boarder-cross and half-pipe competitions this season. BY MARIA GUARDADO STAFF REPORTER The Elm City isn’t exactly a ski or snowboard enthusiast’s haven. With no easily accessible ski resorts near campus, it can be difficult for avid skiers and snowboarders to engage in these popular winter pastimes. But members of Yale’s Alpine and Nordic ski teams and snowboarding team still find time to hit the slopes, even if they must travel significant distances to do so. The Nordic ski team is a part of the United States Collegiate Ski and Snowboard Association and typically competes against other college club ski teams in about five

weekend meets during January and February. At competitions, team members compete in 10-kilometer cross-country races in either classic or skate skiing. Classic races are confined to a track and emphasize endurance, whereas skate skiing focuses on speed. “New Haven doesn’t really have ski trails that are groomed for skiing, so they aren’t prepared or packed down,” said Nathaniel Knapp ’14, co-captain of the Nordic ski team. “When there is snow it is possible to go skiing, but it really isn’t the best way to train because there just aren’t a lot of places to go skiing.” Because New Haven lacks the proper terrain, during the season the

Elis continue to dominate BY ADLON ADAMS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As expected, the No. 2 Yale men’s and women’s squash teams continued to dominate college squash Tuesday. Each team added an easy win to their perfect records.

On Tuesday evening, the women’s hockey team, currently ranked last in the ECAC, was on its way to a match against Brown in Providence, R.I., and to what would be its twentieth loss of the season. Then head coach Joakim Flygh received an urgent phone call and the bus postponed its journey to drop him off at a train station.

SEE SQUASH PAGE 13

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

John Roberts ’12 won his No. 4 match 3–0 against Brown as Yale, still hot after stopping Trinity last week, rolled to a sweep of the Bears .

STAT OF THE DAY 0

cross-country ski trails has not kept the Nordic ski team from producing successful skiers. Last year, the women’s team qualified for the USCSA Nationals after finishing second at the regional tournament. Despite that performance, the Elis were unable to make the trip to Sun Valley, Idaho because of high travel costs. Though the team was scheduled to kick off its season last weekend at the Army Invitational in Vermont, it was unable to make the drive due to — of all things — the first major snowfall of the year. Instead, the team will compete in its first SEE SNOWBOARD PAGE 13

Hockey losing streak continues BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER

SQUASH The men’s team travelled to Providence, R.I. and defeated the No. 16 Brown Bears in a crushing victory of 9–0. The win brought the Bulldogs’ season record to 10–0. Later in the day, the women’s team also travelled to Providence and secured a victory against No. 11 Brown 9–0, improving their undefeated record to 11-0. “We were a little bit tired having played six matches in seven days, but ready to go,” men’s team cap-

team occasionally drives one hour to Winding Trails, a ski resort in Farmington, Conn., which has crosscountry ski trails. Still, members of the team also find alternative ways to train that do not require snow. These methods include rollerskiing, an exercise involving the use of poles and very short skis with wheels, and, when there is snow, backcountry skiing around East Rock Park. “You get a lot of weird looks from people in New Haven,” team captain Sonja Peterson ’14 said of rollerskiing. “The problem is there are no brakes, so it can be a little exciting with [traffic].” But limited access to proper

Flygh’s wife had just gone into labor. Flygh would miss the game in order to support his wife, Angela Flygh, a former ice hockey player for Harvard, and soon-to-be first child. But the excitement of the bus ride over did not continue onto the ice. With or without its coach, the team’s results followed a familiar pattern as it suffered its 14th consecutive loss.

For the second time in three weeks, Brown (7–7–7, 4–6–4 ECAC) bested the Bulldogs (1–20–0, 1–13–0 ECAC) by a score of 4–1. The Bulldogs last played Brown at Ingalls Rink on Jan. 4 – with the exact same result. Yale finished a series of three away, conference games last night and will return to Ingalls this weekend to take on Harvard and Dartmouth. The Elis go into these matches with only one win under their belts. “It was another disappointing loss,” defender Heather Grant ’12 said. “However, I think we are starting to play better collectively. We really gave it to Brown in the first period and for parts of the third.” Outshooting Brown 13–11, Yale played a strong first period. The Bears did not get a shot on goalie Genny Ladiges ’12 until nearly four minutes into the game, by which time Yale had four shots on Brown. But despite the early discrepancy in shots on goal, the Bears managed to score first, at 8:24. SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 13

THE NUMBER OF GAMES THE NO. 2 WOMEN’S SQUASH TEAM LOST AGAINST BROWN TUESDAY. The undefeated Elis had a perfect match against the No. 11 Bears, winning every game of every set. Yale has won nine of its 11 matches this season by 9–0 margins.


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