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A FORCE FOR POSITIVE CHANGE Educating and Empowering Indigenous Children

YALARI REVIEW 2017


Yalari acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the first inhabitants of this land. We recognise the culture, history, diversity and deep connection to land, waters and territorial seas of Australia. We pay our respects to the Elders, past and present and acknowledge the Yalari office is on Kombumerri country within the lands of the Yugambeh language group of the wider area.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO COUNTRY

Cover photo: The Glennie School Year 8 students, Anna Dingley (right) and Shakita Foster.

Š Yalari Limited 2017. All rights reserved. ACN 113 794 148 | ABN 66 113 794 148 Disclaimer: All efforts have been made to ensure the information contained in this document is accurate at time of printing.


Contents About Yalari Founding Director

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The Yalari Story

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Our Programs of Change

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How is Yalari Different?

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Board of Directors & Governance

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Impact and Outcomes 12 Years of Growing Opportunities

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2017 Highlights

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Stories of Positive Change: Graduate - Kashaunica Stanley

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Stories of Positive Change: Graduate - Kyol Blakeney

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Stories of Positive Change: Graduate - Lyric Hearn

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Stories of Positive Change: Student - Ali Crawshaw-Tomlins

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Financial Report 2017 Financial Snapshot

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Concise Report

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The Power of Community Sponsors and Supporters

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Stories of Positive Change: Yalari Donor - Margy Chatburn

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We Are More Powerful Together: Fundraising & Awareness

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Stories of Positive Change: Corporate Partners - Lipman Karas

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Partner Schools

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Stories of Positive Change: St Peter’s College, Adelaide

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Join Our Community

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Together we are making a difference. Together we are changing Australia. Together we are brothers and sisters of humanity.�

FOUNDING DIRECTOR

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ABOUT YALARI

Welcome TO YALARI

Our 13th year of living our purpose; empowering and educating Indigenous children and young adults from regional, rural and remote communities who are excelling at their respective boarding schools, and our continued support of Yalari Alumni as they venture towards achieving goals in line with their dreams. Thanks so very much for the generosity of so many people who just get on with the job of supporting Yalari and their fellow Australians — the First Australians. I am sincerely grateful for your trust that Yalari is making a difference in the lives of so many wonderful and courageous children who stand tall each and every day because you have cared enough to act with conviction and show kindness for others. Together we are making a difference. Together we are changing Australia. Together we are united. Together we are brothers and sisters of humanity that value each other for our uniqueness and our individuality; so our collective spirits can soar like eagles – with majesty, with beauty, with strength and with honour. Thank you so very much for your valued support throughout 2017.

WAVERLEY STANLEY Founding Director - Yalari

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THE YALARI STORY

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ABOUT YALARI

Empowering Indigenous Children THROUGH EDUCATION

Yalari is a not-for-profit organisation offering secondary education scholarships at leading Australian boarding schools for Indigenous children from regional, rural and remote communities. Founded in 2005 by Indigenous educationalist Waverley Stanley, his wife Llew Mullins and a group of likeminded individuals, Yalari offers boarding school scholarships, student support programs and post-school opportunities. In 2017, there were 173 students on Yalari scholarships nationally and an alumni group of 275 studying at universities, working, undertaking further training or raising families. We believe education is the key to generational change and a brighter future for Indigenous Australians and for our nation as a whole. It is only through the support of generous individuals, companies and organisations that together, we are enacting positive future change through the education and empowerment of Indigenous children.

OUR MISSION

OUR VISION

OUR VALUES

To educate and empower

To provide trusted, quality

Values of respect,

Indigenous children from

educational opportunities

compassion, resilience,

regional, rural and remote

for Indigenous children to

openness and

communities to bring

achieve positive outcomes

inclusiveness underpin our

about generational change.

for themselves and their

approach.

families and make a valuable contribution as Australians.

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ABOUT YALARI

Our Programs OF CHANGE

YALARI’S THREE PROGRAM AREAS ARE DESIGNED TO GIVE STUDENTS THE BEST CHANCE OF SUCCESS AT BOARDING SCHOOL AND THEIR TRANSITION TO LIFE BEYOND SCHOOL The Rosemary Bishop Indigenous Education Scholarship Program All Yalari students are recipients of the Rosemary Bishop Indigenous Education Scholarship. The scholarship program is named after Waverley Stanley’s primary school teacher, Mrs Rosemary Bishop, who was pivotal in helping Waverley gain a scholarship at Toowoomba Grammar School. Each year, up to 50 scholarships are offered to Indigenous children from regional, rural or remote communities who satisfy the selection criteria and are willing to give 100% towards their education. Scholarships include full boarding and tuition costs at one of Yalari’s partner schools. To be eligible, students must be entering their first year of high school. The selection of our scholars is based on: •

Academic effort and school references;

Primary school attendance rates;

Participation in leadership, sport and extracurricular activities at school and in their communities;

Family support to attend boarding school; and

Performance in interviews with Yalari staff and school staff.

Scholarships are reviewed annually and, all being well, continue for a student’s entire secondary education. Pathways Program The Yalari Pathways Program provides a formal structure to support Yalari students and graduates in their transition to higher education, vocational training and employment. This includes:

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Career guidance in Years 11 and 12;

Support accessing tertiary scholarships and postschool opportunities; and

Work experience and mentoring.

Student Development Program Yalari’s unprecedented level of support for all scholarship students is a key strength of our unique model and contributes to our high retention rates. We have a passionate team of professionals throughout Australia who support our students, their families and our partner schools on a daily basis. Opportunities for Yalari students to catch-up with each other, seek support or advice and undertake personal development are offered throughout the year by way of camps and workshops. Some of these include: •

Years 7 and 8 Orientation Camp: Students learn about boarding school life and what to expect.

Year 9 Central Australia Camps: Students focus on team work, relationship building, leadership skills and cultural identity.

Year 10 Pay-It-Forward Program: A Yalari fundraising initiative encouraging students to think creatively and work together, in order to collectively fund a scholarship for another Yalari student.

Year 11 Camp: Students participate in vocational workshops, presentations and special projects. They also gain an insight into university life and participate in leadership, cultural and creative activities in the university lecture halls and theatres.

Year 12 Workshops: Designed to help students identify, assess and develop their post-school plans.

Year 12 Graduation: Celebrating the achievements of the graduates, a formal ceremony is held; followed by a trip to the snow fields.

Biennial Commemorative Walk to Cherbourg: provides an opportunity for our students to experience the qualities of resilience, strength, courage, leadership and endurance in an event that not only takes a strong commitment from them to complete, but also provides the cultural backdrop of those who have gone before them and walked to Cherbourg in 1905.


HOW IS YALARI DIFFERENT? Yalari’s success is largely credited to the key elements and differentiators of our unique model. Choice & opportunity for

Strong relationships and trust

students and their families

are fostered by Yalari, with each

encourages their engagement

student, their family and school,

and commitment for a quality

enabling effective connections

education.

and communication.

One-on-one support is provided

Strong, productive and respectful

to students through each of our

partnerships with schools,

unique program areas. From

sponsors, donors, volunteers

selection, transition and boarding

and communities who share

duration to personal development,

our values and embrace our

post-school and alumni.

partnership and support model.

IT TAKES A WHOLE COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE A CHILD

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ABOUT YALARI

Board of Directors AND GOVERNANCE

PEOPLE ARE OUR GREATEST ASSET IN OUR ONGOING EFFORTS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN DIVERSE FIELDS BRINGS INVALUABLE SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND COMMITMENT. The management and control of the business and affairs of the organisation are vested in the Board. The Board provides direction, control and accountability for the overall governance, strategy and performance of the organisation. The Board delegates the management of the business and affairs of the organisation to the executive management team who have the power to enact efficient and effective operation of the company on a day-to day-basis. Yalari Alumni Association The Board has established the Yalari Alumni Association as an activity of Yalari with the aim to: • •

Promote and maintain amongst the alumni; and

strong

relationships

Provide further opportunities for Yalari alumni to contribute to the charitable purposes of Yalari and the pursuit of its objectives.

Membership is open to alumni being all individuals (including a past scholar or graduate) who have held a Yalari Scholarship for at least 12 months. The Association is governed by the Terms of Reference adopted by the Board and the achievement of its

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objectives are overseen by the Management Committee, being a committee to the Board appointed by the Board from nominees elected by the membership. Board Committees and Advisory Councils The Board has established the New South Wales Regional Advisory Council to work with Yalari to increase awareness and support for Yalari in the New South Wales region. The Council is established by, and operates under the control and direction of the Board. The members of the inaugural Council are John Campbell (Chairman), Andrew Norman, Rob Sindel and Denise Slocombe.

MARY BOYDELL Chairman (until Oct 2017)

Mary is a chartered accountant with extensive experience in business and as a non-executive director. She has served as Chairman of the Gladstone Area Water Board, Chairman of Uniquest Pty Ltd, Commissioner of the Queensland Water Commission, Chairman of the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation, a Board Member of the CSIRO, and as a Director of Energex Limited, Queensland Bulk Water Supply Authority, South East Queensland Water Corporation Limited, BSES Limited, Burnett Water Pty Ltd and the Australian Trade Commission. She is a former Chairman and Member of the Queensland Regional Council of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia and also maintains a close interest in her family’s business.

BRUCE DAVIDSON Director and Acting Chairman (acting from Oct 2017)

Bruce holds degrees in Law and Commerce from the University of Queensland and was formerly a partner in a leading commercial law firm. He specialised in international business and conducted business development activities throughout Asia. Bruce has spent the last 20 years with Davidson Recruitment and in his current role as the Davidson Group CEO, he leads a talented team across Australia and New Zealand dedicated to enhancing workplace performance for clients. He has also been invited to consult to boards and senior executives, to act as a mentor, and speak on both formal and informal occasions. Bruce has previously held the role of Regional Councillor for Finsia.


Yalari Board of Directors (Left to right): Bruce Davidson, Karen Spiller, Llew Mullins, Waverley Stanley and Mary Boydell.

WAVERLEY STANLEY Founding Director

As a Founding Director of Yalari, Waverley knows about the power of education and has worked tirelessly over the past 12 years to turn his dream of Yalari into a reality. Waverley has worked extensively throughout Queensland as an Indigenous Support Officer for Education Queensland. More recently he has presented and facilitated leadership and education workshops and conferences for Indigenous people throughout Australia. Waverley is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program for 2005-2006 and also a recipient of the prestigious Churchill Fellowship in 2013.

LLEW MULLINS Executive Director

Llew has worked extensively throughout Australia with Indigenous people, coordinating business workshops and managing a mentoring program between corporate business people and Indigenous small business owners. As a Founding Director of Yalari (and the current Managing Director), Llew’s experience in business, financial management and organisation, as well as many years working in the social welfare and counselling areas, has provided the necessary skills to bring Yalari from an idea into a reality.

KAREN SPILLER Director

Karen has had teaching and leadership experience in both girls’ and co-educational Anglican schools for over 30 years. She is the current Principal of John Paul College and the former Principal at St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School, a role she held for 17 years. Karen is the National Chair of the Association of Heads in Independent Schools Australia and has been a member of that Board for ten years and has also held the position of Treasurer. She is Vice President of Independent Schools Queensland, a member of the International Education and Training Advisory Group (IETAG) for the Queensland Government and a Past National President for the Alliance of Girls’ Schools, Australasia. Karen holds both a Masters in Educational Administration and an MBA.

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IMPACT & OUTCOMES...


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

12 Years of Growing OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIGENOUS YOUTH OUR COMMITMENT TO DEVELOPING OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIGENOUS YOUTH HAS SEEN SUCCESS IN DELIVERING MEASURABLE OUTCOMES AND WIDE-SPREAD IMPACT

2005

• Yalari was established on 13 April 2005 by Waverley Stanley, his wife Llew Mullins and a group of like-minded and generous supporters.

• Yalari was assisted with start-up funding supplied by AVCAL (Australian Venture Capital Association Limited) and DEEWR (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations).

2006

• The first three students start boarding school at Toowoomba Grammar School and The Glennie School.

• Yalari’s inaugural fundraising dinner in Sydney raises in excess of $300,000.

2007

• 13 new scholarship recipients start at six different boarding schools around Australia. • The inaugural Yalari Orientation Camp was held at Tallebudgera on the Gold Coast.

• PBI (Public Benevolent Institution) endorsement by the Australian Tax Office. • Yalari raises in excess of $1 million through partnerships, private and corporate donations.

2008

• 25 new students receive Yalari scholarships.

• Vincent Fairfax Foundation becomes Yalari’s first major partner.

2009

• Yalari offers a further 34 students scholarships through its partner schools. • Waverley Stanley is named as Ernst & Young’s Social Entrepreneur of the Year (Nth Region).

• The first Year 9 Central Australia Camps were held. • Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce AC, GovernorGeneral of the Commonwealth of Australia, accepts the patronage of Yalari and attends the annual Brisbane Fundraising Dinner.

2010

• Yalari celebrates its fifth birthday! • The Federal Government awards the administration of part of its Indigenous Youth Leadership Program to Yalari, adding 66 transitioning students and a further nine schools to our program.

• Powderfinger, Australia’s most successful rock band, supports Yalari throughout their ‘Sunsets’ farewell tour of Australia in late 2010. • 17 Yalari students graduate Year 12.

2011

• Yalari offers 50 students scholarships including students from Western Australia for the first time.

• Inaugural Commemorative Walk to Cherbourg.

2012

• Yalari’s head office is devastated by fire.

• The Gold Coast Titans NRL Club generously donate office space at their headquarters in Robina. The Yalari community rallies to get us back on our feet!

2013

• 25 students graduate Year 12.

• Pay It Forward Year 10 Fundraising Initiative begins.

2014

• The Yalari office is relocated to Siganto Drive, Helensvale. • Waverley travels to South Africa for his Winston Churchill Fellowship.

• Yalari Alumni travel to Argentina and Antarctica as part of the ‘Outback to Icecap’.

2015

• Yalari celebrates its 10th Birthday! • Yalari currently has 173 scholars and 137 graduates.

• 28 partner schools. • 28 students graduate Year 12.

2016

• Inaugural Yalari Captaincies • Inaugural Yalari National Volunteer Awards

• 21 students graduate Year 12.

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2017 HIGHLIGHTS

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173

SCHOLARS

SCHOLARS

NEW

TOTAL

GRADUATES

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ANOTHER REWARDING YEAR FOR THE WHOLE YALARI COMMUNITY Year 7 & 8 Orientation Camp

residential college living and university life.

“Winanggaay Nguurrang” or “the camp of thinking and understanding” was held at The Southport School on the Gold Coast in January 2017. The fourday orientation camp prepares students for the transition from primary education to a boarding school environment. In 2017, we welcomed 46 new students into the Yalari scholarship program.

Year 12 Pathways Workshop

Give Happy, Live Happy: Yalari National Volunteer Awards 2017

Year 9 Central Australia Outback Camp

Yalari’s National Volunteer Awards are designed to recognise the outstanding contribution made by our volunteers and their considerable impact on Yalari and in the lives of Indigenous children. The 2017 winners are determined via a nomination process having displayed the characteristics of humility, dedication and contribution. Congratulations to all our 2017 winners: Victoria Nichol (NSW), Ryan Cantrill (Qld), Lisa Steven (Vic) and Natalie Felkl (SA). Year 11 Camp The Yalari Year 11 Camp was held at the University of NSW, Sydney providing students with the opportunity to consider their post-school options while experiencing

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In mid-April, Yalari partners Herbert Smith Freehills hosted two workshops for Yalari’s Year 12 students (Melbourne and Brisbane). The workshops are designed to help students identify, assess and develop their post-school plans.

In June, Yalari’s Year 9 students attended the Central Australia Outback Camp, allowing them to build relationships and leadership skills while connecting with other Indigenous cultures. Year 12 Graduation Yalari’s annual Year 12 Graduation Ceremony was held at The Realm Hotel in Canberra, where 21 Yalari graduates attended their last official Yalari event. Kambala student, Shanelle Smith was named as the 2017 Yalari Valedictorian. The ceremony was followed by a trip to the snowfields.


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

275 TOTAL

ALUMNI Biennial Yalari Commemorative Walk to Cherbourg

2017 Yalari Captains

In late September, more than 80 people including 40 Yalari students completed the six-day, 100km walk from Kilcoy to Cherbourg in Queensland. The Walk is to honour the Indigenous people who were forcibly relocated from Durundur Aboriginal Reserve to Cherbourg in 1905.

In 2017, 16 Yalari scholars from Years 10 to 12 were chosen for the role of Yalari Captain based on qualities such as responsible behaviour, leadership, involvement with their school and Yalari communities, and acting as a role model for other students.

Year 10 “Pay-it Forward” Camp A group of 19 Yalari Year 10 students attended the “Pay-it-forward” Camp at the Gold Coast Recreation Centre, Tallebudgera. The Camp is an integral part of the student support program, enabling students to continue their support of each other and further their preparations as they enter their senior school years. Students are also set a fundraising task: to raise enough money throughout the year to fund a scholarship placement for another Indigenous child. Australian Story In October, Yalari was featured on ABC’s Australian Story, helping raise awareness of the Yalari cause and generated additional funds.

• Lenka Rivers (St Hilda’s School) • Alkira Miller (Great Southern Grammar School, Albany) • Molly Trindall (PLC Armidale) • Kiara Davies (Abbotsleigh) • Grace Haslett (Scotch College, Adelaide) • Lakeycha Farnham (Geelong Grammar School) • Kayla Baker (Kambala) • Johanna Loban (St Margaret’s Anglican Girls’ School) • Sarah-Cait Kirkland (John Paul College) • Keriba Bligh (The Southport School) • Ali Tomlins (St Ignatius’ College Riverview) • Ryan O’Callaghan (St Peter’s College, Adelaide) • Koby Sellings (Geelong Grammar School) • Isaac Burgoyne (Toowoomba Grammar School) • Zarleigh Jones (Calrossy Anglican School) • Toby McGovern-Cubby (Churchie)

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Stories of positive change...

Kashaunica Stanley 2012 YALARI GRADUATE

KASHAUNICA STANLEY GRADUATED FROM THE GLENNIE SCHOOL IN 2012 AND IS PROUD TO BE GIVING BACK TO HER LOCAL COMMUNITY Wow! My Yalari journey was a roller coaster in the

the staff I would have taken a lot longer to adjust to my

beginning. I remember the day my mum told me

new lifestyle. The Yalari students became my family,

about boarding school in Year 7. The thought was so

your home away from home, and it was reassuring

exciting but as the year went on and the deadlines and

to know we all were in the same situation. We could

application dates closed it was so incredibly daunting

always count on the older Yalari girls or reach out to our

to me. I still remember the day Yalari staff came and

other Yalari friends. As I got older and new girls came

interviewed my mum and me at home and I was sick

to school, I began doing what the older girls had done

that day. I was asked why I wanted to go to boarding

for me.

school and I replied, “I don’t want to go!” But my reaction to seeing The Glennie School was breathtaking. I had never seen anything like the school grounds. After being interviewed by the school principal and having a tour, I was so excited. It was like another world. I was accepted into Yalari and to The Glennie School and I was driving with my Nan, Mum and four younger siblings to Toowoomba. My mum spent a good two hours unpacking my room and setting it up for me and made sure I was settling in well. I reassured mum I was ok, and I would be fine, so it was time to say good bye. I smiled and waved as my family drove off. That’s when it hit me hard. I was alone. I went back to my room, packed up in 5 minutes and told the boarding staff I was catching a bus home to Murgon. Needless to say I stayed five years but I still get reminded of that first day!

and I got to know the school and teachers, I started to look forward to school. By the end of Year 9 it was my mum calling me during the week to talk to me. The difference Yalari has made in my life is something I can never find the words to explain and will never stop being grateful for. I was offered a world of opportunities and met many amazing people. My confidence developed and I was able to see things from a whole new and fresh perspective. The leap (or should I say push!) of fate that I took was just what I needed. The opportunity I was given was once in a lifetime. I grew as a person and was able to become independent and find my own footing in the world. Just like all Yalari students, I struggled with the homesickness, feeling lost and alone in the unknown, but at the end of the day we weren’t alone. This is what

The first few months of school were very hard for me

makes Yalari special and different from most programs,

as I was always homesick. Not being close to my family

they want to see you succeed and set you up with the

was a major change and I struggled; not only with being

tools to do so.

away from home but with the school work and finding my way around. If it wasn’t for the older Yalari girls and

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Once I knew help was available with the school work

If it wasn’t for Yalari I wouldn’t have ever imagined


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

I am working as an AOD support worker in Murgon and Cherbourg. I am able to work with all age groups in the community, attend court and try and be a role model. I enjoy providing a service to the community and playing a positive role.” myself taking a Gap year to Canada with the Rotary

the community and playing a positive role. I also attend

Youth Exchange Program and living abroad for a year

most community events and conduct various activities

by myself with my four host families.

to engage the youth as well. I’m hoping to start studying

More recently, with a bunch of the other Yalari scholars

my Bachelor of Social Work in July at university.

and graduates, I was chosen to be one of the VIP medal

Without the support and Yalari team behind me I believe

bearers for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

I wouldn’t have been so sure about myself and what

2018.

I wanted. It’s always hard stepping into the unknown

Today, six years after graduating, I am working as an Alcohol & Other Drugs (AOD) support worker for Lives Lived Well in Murgon and Cherbourg. I am able to work

but I believe everything happens for a reason. Yalari is a force to be reckoned with and is changing the lives of not only the scholars but also their families.

with all age groups in the community, attend court and try and be a role model. I enjoy providing a service to

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Stories of positive change...

Kyol Blakeney

2011 YALARI GRADUATE KYOL GRADUATED FROM SCOTS COLLEGE SYDNEY IN 2011 AND REFLECTS UPON HIS TRANSFORMATIVE JOURNEY In 2006 Yalari knocked on my door. Waverley, Llew, and

opportunity and it must not be wasted. For the next five

their cameraman, Matt, visited my house, had a bit of

years every part of me would be dedicated to making

a yarn with my mother and myself and told me they

that a reality. It helps to have a supportive family behind

would help me follow my dreams. I didn’t quite know

you. After all, it takes a whole community to educate

what those dreams were at that time. I thought I wanted

a child. I insisted on being the best person I could be.

to be a politician to help make a change in what I saw

Don’t get me wrong, I failed plenty of times. That’s

around me. At that point, it didn’t really matter to me

when my teachers told me that now was the time to

anyway. Here were a few people walking into my life at

learn from those failures. I believe a good learner takes

the age of twelve offering the chance to go to boarding

risks and reflects on what they do. My school, was

school in the big city. “Yeah right”, I thought. “Just tell

a big part of that philosophy. Sometimes it wasn’t

them what you reckon is best and how you feel about

an uplifting occurrence that brought this realisation

the world around you.”

forward. Sometimes my experiences weren’t the best

It’s funny when you think of all the things you pass off in a flippant manner without giving a second thought. What was even funnier was the look on my mother’s face when they called back a few months later to tell her I would be on my way to Sydney. Her son was leaving at the ripe old age of thirteen. It was something we would all have to become accustomed to.

understand where you’re coming from and that some never will. In all honesty, what do you expect when you mix a low socioeconomic black-fulla with upper class white people? What my school gave me was an insight into how the big world outside of my small-town bubble works. It taught me how to think of the possibilities for my people to achieve their dreams and what they needed

I attended the 2007 Orientation Camp in Queensland

to do it. It gave me the tools to fight for the rights of my

and began my schooling at The Scots College, Sydney

people (in a completely opposite world to them). This

from 2007, graduating in 2011. Kissing my mother

happened at about the same time that I realised that it’s

goodbye on the first day was extremely difficult but

not the politicians who grow up and make a difference.

I was the oldest of my siblings and had to set an

Most of the time, they haven’t really grown up. I realised

example. I could also see how much it hurt my mother

that real change comes from the grassroots level. From

so I refused to show my sadness. Holding back tears

having boots on the ground. From standing with your

I acted excited and ready, as if I knew exactly what I

mob. From leading by example. From being a part of a

was doing. The truth was that I had no idea where

community that comes together. It was the moment I

I was or what I was doing. I watched her drive away,

realised what my real dream was.

feeling alone and small. There was nobody I could talk to, nothing I could do, nowhere else I should have been. Just on that spot. In that moment. I couldn’t find my way home even if I really wanted to.

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and I had to learn the hard way that not everybody will

For five years I led, performed, spoke, challenged, fell, got back up, and grew. Then my world really opened up. I was on my way to The University of Sydney. I thought I was at the top of my game until I relived all

After wallowing in my own self-pity for a while, I

of these experiences once again. I studied late at night,

remembered my family telling me that this was an

connected with mob from all around the state and wider


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

I studied late at night, connected with mob from all around the state and wider country, and challenged the system I was a part of again and again.” country, and challenged the system I was a part of

point, I look around my primary school classroom and

again and again. I noticed that there are limited places

realise that I am finally living my real dream. My dream of

for my people in education, not just in school, but at a

empowering other young people to be the best they can

tertiary level as well. For six years my new uni mob and

be. To think and live in a loving and accepting society

I fought for stronger recognition, acknowledgement

they will one day inherit and shape for themselves. I

and opportunity. It could not have been done without

see my dream walk into my door each morning ready to

those who came before me but it is not over either. We

learn and greet me with “Good morning, Mr Blakeney.”

led marches, headed committees, became organised, became passionate, and demanded black rights, reparations, and acknowledgement on behalf of our

And to think it all started with a knock on the door in 2006.

Elders and community. Our flags fly in that hallowed place of critical thought and academia because of us. Besides, I got a degree our of it too—a Bachelor of Education. But there is still more to do. As I sit here writing and reflecting on my life up to this

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Stories of positive change...

Lyric Hearn

2016 YALARI GRADUATE CANBERRA GIRLS GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATE AND YALARI ALUMNA, LYRIC HEARN EXPLAINS HOW HER EDUCATION HAS ALSO HELPED HER FAMILY I am a proud Gureng-Gureng woman who is lucky

the Yalari scholarship never really ends. Not only do I

enough to have many places to call home. I’ve lived

benefit from it everyday but my family does too.

in various places all along the coast of Queensland, attended boarding school in Canberra (which I’m proud to say is also my home). Currently home is Barunga, a community in the Northern Territory, 45 minutes outside of Katherine. I’m working full-time and preparing to enrol in university and study a Bachelor of Secondary Education via distance education. From the first day of my Yalari Scholarship and starting at Canberra Girls Grammar School (CGGS), right up to the moment where I finally started taking serious steps towards tertiary education a couple of months ago, there have been challenges, change of plans and failures along the way. This is not unique and is just a part of what we have to deal with in life. What is unique is the special support you get from family and friends

income as possible. I was able to secure employment right away based purely on the fact that I had a Year 12 Certificate with a private school name attached to it. I believe my education has helped with not only becoming an effective employee but also instilling highly desirable work ethics. My sister is due to graduate next year and without an extra employed member of my family university would have definitely been a struggle for my sister. So not only has my Yalari scholarship given me a wonderful education and a whole community that I now call my family, it’s helped put my sister through university and hopefully in the not too distant future myself as well.

that is forged from those hard moments. That is what

I often reflect on one of Waverley Stanley’s favourite

I’m most proud of.

quotes, ‘it takes a whole community to educate a child’

I have accomplishments that I’m grateful to have experienced such as being chosen as a member for The Indigenous Youth Parliament, being the Student

and I’ve always thanked, and will continue to be grateful to, the organisations, businesses and benefactors of my scholarship.

Guest Speaker for Yalari’s 10 Year Anniversary in

It’s all the staff from those organisations, all the people

Sydney, being voted 2018 Young Citizen of the Year for

who utilise those businesses and the families of the

Barunga and now currently a member of the Northern

benefactors who are also a part of our community.

Territory Youth Round Table. None of it would have

They are all helping raise, educate and uplift each Yalari

been possible if it wasn’t for the support of Yalari and

student so they may reach their full potential in life.

CGGS. From the years at boarding school and the years later, the value of being able to attend CGGS through

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The year I graduated, my family needed as much


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

I have accomplishments that I’m grateful to have experienced such as being chosen as a member for The Indigenous Youth Parliament, being the Student Guest Speaker for Yalari’s 10 Year Anniversary in Sydney, being voted 2018 Young Citizen of the Year for Barunga and now currently a member of the Northern Territory Youth Round Table but none of it would have been possible if it weren’t for the support of Yalari and CGGS.”

21


Stories of positive change...

Ali Crawshaw-Tomlins

YEAR 11 - ST IGNATIUS’ COLLEGE, RIVERVIEW ALI SHARES HIS PERSONAL STORY OF HOW YALARI HAS HELPED CHANGED THE DIRECTION OF HIS LIFE My name is Ali Crawshaw-Tomlins. I’m from Darwin,

where sadly it’s rare to see another blackfulla outside

Northern Territory and I’m a proud Gurinji, Jawyon,

of school. I was homesick, the work was difficult, I got

Walpiri and Arrente man.

teased for my stutter and the way I talked.

I would like to tell you about some of my life experiences

So, yes. It was hard.

and how Yalari has changed my pathway in life. When you think about your childhood what do you remember? Everyone has formative experiences that define the person they are. Good or bad, everyone has a story. But it is not just the life you are born into that shapes you. What you do to make a change defines who you will become. I grew up in a community where domesticviolence, drug abuse, alcohol abuse and criminal activity was considered normal. I want to tell you how my life has changed because of the opportunity I was most fortunate to have. This opportunity, and this change, could not have happened without my mum and the team at Yalari. To be completely genuine, if Yalari didn’t exist I could imagine myself not going to school and perhaps ending up in jail. This isn’t because I’m a bad person; it’s because of the environment I was in.

house. Friends that I now consider my brothers.   My mum was the reason I even applied for Yalari and there was not one night I didn’t call her. I’d be on the phone begging to come home. And sometimes she would just hang up. My mum comes from a long line of strong independent women, and even for her it was one of the hardest things to let her eldest son go off to boarding school. Mum is the reason I toughed it out, along with the support of Yalari and Yalari’s Student Support Officers. I can’t thank them all enough for their support through my years at the college… and especially through my younger years. Yalari has been instrumental in enabling me to change my life dramatically. They have also helped change the lives of many other young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids all around Australia. Yalari has opened up

Was it hard making this change? Yes it was. I remember

many opportunities and pathways to my future that I

coming to Saint Ignatius’ College Riverview not even

never would have imagined, if I had stayed back home.

knowing how to pronounce the school’s name properly, because my education level was something like 3 years behind everyone else’s.

22

But as the weeks went by I made friends in the boarding

When I finish school in 2018, I want to take a break to spend time on my dad’s country in central Australia. I then want to attend university but I’m not quite sure what

It was hard coming from a place where I had seen my

I want to study yet. Luckily I go to a school where going

countrymen everywhere to the north-shore of Sydney

to Uni is a real possibility for me now.


IMPACT AND OUTCOMES

To be completely genuine, if Yalari didn’t exist I could imagine myself not going back to school and perhaps ending up in jail.”

When I had my interview at Riverview something that

I will forever be grateful for the life-changing opportunity

Mr Hogan, the principal at the time, said to my mum

Yalari gave me. And I’ll forever be grateful to the people

really stuck with me. It was something along the lines

who believed in Yalari and made it happen.

of, “I’m not concerned with what career paths the boys might take after school. All I want them to be is good, loving, supportive fathers to their kids.” I may not be sure what job I want yet but I’m positive I will do something that will give my children a better childhood than my own. Yalari has helped make that possible.

23


FINANCIAL REPORT

24

Yalari Year 11 scholar and Geelong Grammar School student, Lakeycha Farnham


FINANCIAL REPORT

Strength in Numbers 2017 FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT

YALARI ACHIEVES EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT SERVICE DELIVERY THROUGH SOUND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN BUSINESS PROCESSES Financial information for the year ended and as at 31 December 2017 is set out on pages 26 to 27: •

The Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income;

Statement of Financial Position;

Statement of Changes in Equity; and

Statement of Cashflows.

Yalari’s statutory Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017 has been filed with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC) and is also available on our website.

Scholarships & Student Support

78.82%

Funds spent on educating and empowering Indigenous children through scholarships, student support activities and student camps.

$4.687M $505K $753K

Business Services

8.5%

Funds spent on operating and business costs for head office activities including premises rental and utilities, stationery, computers, vehicles and amenities.

Fundraising Operations & Events

12.68%

Expenditure on fundraising activities for generation of further funds.

25


Statement of Profit or Loss and other Comprehensive Income For the year ended 31 December 2017

Dec 2017

Dec 2016

$

$

Revenue

6,188,758

6,577,161

Program Expenditure Scholarships

(3,441,618)

(3,273,213)

Student Support

(745,474)

(724,729)

Student Events

(226,414)

(229,444)

Pathway

(273,712)

(239,339)

Events - Fundraising

(309,617)

(307,361)

Fundraising Operations

(444,217)

(417,687)

Business Services

(505,419)

(580,317)

Total Expenditure

(5,946,471)

(5,772,090)

Profit for the Year

242,287

805,071

Other Comprehensive Income

-

-

Items of other comprehensive income

-

-

Income tax on other items of comprehensive income

-

-

242,287

805,071

Dec 2017

Dec 2016

$

$

6,843,543

7,150,928

474,352

339,031

Total comprehensive income attributed to members Statement of Financial Position As at 31 December 2017 Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Inventories Other assets Total Current Assets

-

-

93,595

128,827

7,411,490

7,618,786

100,765

101,625

Non - Current Assets Property, plant and equipment Total Non - Current Assets

100,765

101,625

7,512,255

7,720,411

217,918

202,934

5,293

2,046

153,162

136,716

Deferred revenue

1,502,947

1,980,971

Total Current Liabilities

1,879,320

2,322,667

6,172

13,268

Total Assets Current Liabilities Trade and other payables Other financial liabilities Provisions

Non-Current Liabilities Provisions Total Non-Current Liabilities

6,172

13,268

Total Liabilities

1,885,492

2,335,935

Net Assets

5,626,763

5,384,476

Retained earnings

5,418,286

5,281,531

Endowment Fund

20 8,47 7

102,945

5,626,763

5,384,476

Equity

26

Total Equity


FINANCIAL REPORT

Statement of Changes in Equity As at 31 December 2017

Dec 2017

Dec 2016

$

$

Balance at the beginning of the year

5,281,531

4,579,405

Profit for the year

$242,287

$805,071

-

-

Retained Earnings

Other comprehensive income for the year Transfers to Endowment Fund

105,532

102,945

Balance at the end of the year

5,418,286

5,281,531

Endowment Fund Balance at the beginning of the year

102,945

-

Transfers from Retained Earnings

105,532

102,945

Balance at the end of the year

208,477

102,945

5,626,763

5,384,476

Dec 2017

Dec 2016

$

$

5,581,334

6,075,578

(6,047,389)

(5,904,165)

-

-

(466,055)

171,413

176,854

208,015

Total Equity Balance at the end of the year Statement of Cashflows For the year ended 31 December 2017 Cash flow from operating activities Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and employees Interest paid Net cash generated by operating activities Cash flow from investing activities Interest received Payments for property, plant and equipment

(21,431)

(8,646)

Net cash generated from investing activities

155,423

199,369

Cash flow from financing activities Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

-

-

Net cash flow from financing activities

-

-

(310,632)

370,782

Net Increase in cash and cash equivalents Cash at the beginning of the year Cash at the end of the year

7,148,882

6,778,100

6,838,250

7,148,882

27


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

28

Yalari Supporter, Dan Pittorino


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Sponsors and Supporters

IT TAKES A WHOLE COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE A CHILD THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS AND SUPPORTERS WHO SHARE IN YALARI’S DREAM OF CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIGENOUS CHILDREN Yalari’s partners, donors and sponsors make a tangible difference and bring about positive, sustainable change for Indigenous children by empowering them through education. 2017 has been a remarkable year for Yalari and its students and this is only possible due to generosity and support of like-minded individuals, companies and organisations. Since Yalari first began, the goodwill and financial contributions of Yalari supporters has been vital to the success of the organisation. We are dedicated to ensuring our partners and sponsors are involved in the journey of their sponsorship. Communication and teamwork are key indicators for Yalari and an integral part of our successes in delivering positive outcomes to both the Yalari students and our long-term stakeholders.

Proudly supported/funded by the Australian Government

29


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Sponsors and Supporters

IT TAKES A WHOLE COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE A CHILD THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS AND SUPPORTERS WHO SHARE IN YALARI’S DREAM OF CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIGENOUS CHILDREN Alan and Liz Hay

Jane Gamble

Allyson Stubbe

Johanne Brown

Amanda Flynn Memorial Scholarship

J & B Hay Philanthropic Foundation

Amelia Eliza Holland Trust

Jennifer Maidment

Andrew Keayes

Jordan Family Charitable Trust

Anthony Miller

Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Diversity Foundation

Arthur Earle Youth Foundation Australian Communities Foundation (RO Fund)

30

Judith Musgrave Family Foundation

Bagot Gjergja Foundation

Leroy & Joy Brauer Charitable Trust

Blackwood Foundation

Lucy Godlee

Bridget Pembroke (O’Hare)

Luke Sullivan

Bryan Foundation

Mia Foundation

Campbell Edwards Trust

Naphtali Family Foundation

Cavpower

Paul and Judy Williams

Cody Foundation

Peta Seymour Foundation

Claire Nontapan Smith

Rod Pearse

Colin and Leree Roden

Rory Robertson

Croxley Foundation

Rosey Kids Foundation

Dan Pittorino

Sarah Brockhoff

David Lyle

Sarah Darling

Doug Hall Foundation

Scrimshaw Family Foundation

Estate of Late Anthony Tyson

Stan & Maureen Duke Foundation

Fiona and Richard East

Steve and Di McCready

Gailey Lazarus Foundation

Richard Oliver AO

Gillian Johnson

Tony Jackson

Geoffrey Davies AO

Thyne Reid Foundation

Grosvenor Foundation

Trevor and Jan Olsen

H & J Davies Foundation

Vicki Hanman


Stories of positive change...

My Connection A DONOR STORY

LONG-TERM YALARI DONOR, MARGY CHATBURN SHARES HER PASSION AND MOTIVATION FOR SUPPORTING INDIGENOUS EDUCATION IN AUSTRALIA.

I studied at The University of Queensland in the late 1970s and moved to Sydney for employment in early 1980. I returned to a very different Brisbane in 1995 and have enjoyed its lifestyle ever since. Having worked in the not-for-profit sector for almost twenty years, I have always been committed to the causes of the organisations of which I’ve been a part. After a decade in the education sector I am convinced of the transformative power of education and support it both professionally and financially. I first became aware of Yalari, and Waverley, when he was featured in an episode of Message Stick— an Australian television series on the ABC about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lifestyles, culture and issues—in 2006. The program caught my interest and I was very impressed with Waverley and what he was aiming to do. It stayed in my memory. When I began working in an Advancement role in the tertiary education sector in 2008, I had the opportunity to attend a conference where Waverley was both a keynote speaker and a presenter. I heard him speak and also attended his presentation. I was blown away and that afternoon I went home to sign up as a regular donor to Yalari. The video that Waverley showed during his presentation at the conference all those years ago resonated with me. It featured young Indigenous people sharing their dreams

of what they could achieve and the belief that these dreams could become a reality. I hope that more people come to appreciate the difference culturally-appropriate and empowering education can make to young Indigenous lives. I would like to see an Australian education system that encourages Indigenous children to “think big” and have pride in their Aboriginality rather than one that can cause a loss of identity and culture. I believe it has to be based on respect and partnership, consultation and community ownership. Community support has been a crucial element in the Yalari story. It was heartening to see the 2017 episode of Australian Story that focussed on Waverley and Llew and what they have achieved, and are still achieving, through Yalari. I feel that my continuing support, along with that of many others, is helping them go from strength to strength. “A rising tide raises all boats” is something I firmly believe and that with the sustained success of Yalari students across Australia will come greater understanding, appreciation and support for what can be achieved through education. The success stories of these students can be told and retold and hopefully they will become positive role models for many in the Australian community, great examples of what can happen when you think big and are encouraged to follow your dreams. Bring it on.

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THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

We are more powerful together FUNDRAISING AND AWARENESS

YALARI IS FUNDED PRIMARILY BY THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF OUR SUPPORTERS THROUGH FINANCIAL DONATIONS, VOLUNTEERING OR IN-KIND SUPPORT

Workplace Giving Donations

$40,356

We are grateful to the companies and individuals who choose to support Yalari through workplace giving. • • • • • • • • • •

Alliance Airlines CrownBet Davidson Recruitment Deloitte Ernst & Young Herbert Smith Freehills Medibank Private National Australia Bank Price Waterhouse Coopers Australia Suncorp Group

Yalari’s Pay-It-Forward Initiative

$20,000

The Year 10 students were asked to think creatively in order to raised enough money to cover a scholarship for another Indigenous child.

Beneficiary Fundraising

$18,587

Thank you to the many individuals and businesses who hosted beneficiary fundraising events on behalf of Yalari.

Yalari Database Subscribers

Yalari Fundraising Dinners

$507,197

In 2017, Yalari hosted fundraising dinners in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide. At each dinner, attendees learned about Yalari through inspirational story-telling and genuine experiences. These events also gave Yalari the opportunity to showcase the many wonderful outcomes achieved by the Yalari students.

32

9,000

We keep our database subscribers informed and up-todate via email and post, with publications including Yalari News our quarterly publication. Social Media Followers

3,452


2017 Volunteer Contribution

$246,846

Yalari’s 231 active volunteers contributed a remarkable 7075 hours in 2017. Volunteer Queensland’s current wage rate used to calculate the economic value of volunteering is $34.89 per hour. General Donations and Regular Giving

$764,000

Amount raised in general donations, regular giving and parent contributions.

Individuals

sponsoring children

36

Foundations

sponsoring children

24

Companies

sponsoring children

15

Friends

sponsoring children

48

33


Stories of positive change...

Corporate Partners LIPMAN KARAS

WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP TO EDUCATE AND EMPOWER INDIGENOUS CHILDREN

Since 2012 Lipman Karas has supported Yalari’s vision of bringing generational change for Indigenous Australians by improving access to first-class education for Indigenous youth. Lipman Karas is an international legal practice with a focus on complex commercial disputes. Established in Adelaide in 2004 by Skip Lipman and Jason Karas, the firm has expanded to include offices in London and Hong Kong. Lipman Karas is committed to engaging with and contributing to the local communities in which it works. Supporting educational and other programs focused on indigenous youth and culture is a strong focus of these efforts. The firm’s relationship with Yalari provides an opportunity for team members to engage directly with the programs that they support. Lipman Karas’ relationship with Yalari continues to grow in strength and in 2018, is providing financial support for five Yalari students. In addition to financial support, Lipman Karas works with Yalari to complement the students’ experience and involvement in the local

34

community by organizing visits to important cultural events and opportunities to engage with the Lipman Karas team, including being part of the firm’s team for the annual City to Bay fun run. Several Lipman Karas team members tutor Yalari students. Lipman Karas has supported Yalari students with fundraising activities for the Pay-It-Forward initiative and members of our team have volunteered their time to support the annual Adelaide Yalari fundraising dinner. Lipman Karas has also hosted breakfasts for Yalari’s Adelaide supporter group. Lipman Karas is committed to its relationship with Yalari and continuing its financial and in-kind support, and looks forward to observing the impact of Yalari’s scholarship program on the lives of the students, their families and the wider community.


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Yalari Adelaide Dinner 2017

Lipman Karas strongly supports the role of education in providing equal opportunities to all Australians. Yalari provides opportunities and experiences to indigenous youth to determine their own future, and potentially enhance the lives of their families and wider community. We hope that with Yalari’s knowledge and guidance, our involvement will support upcoming generations.� Julia Dreosti Principal, Lipman Karas Head, Lipman Karas Community Portfolio

35


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Partner Schools

WORKING TOGETHER FOR POSITIVE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES STRONG AND PRODUCTIVE PARTNERSHIPS WITH EACH OF OUR 27 PARTNER SCHOOLS ARE A CORNERSTONE OF OUR SUCCESS. When Yalari selects a school as a partner, our aim is to ensure our scholars are placed in the care of dedicated education professionals, where they will not only learn but will be supported and thrive. Each of our current partner schools across Australia has been carefully selected, ensuring they are caring and culturally sensitive to our students and their families. The support from the broader school communities, including parents and other students, help us welcome our students into school life and is a valued addition to our relationship with the school itself. ADELAIDE Scotch College, Adelaide St Peter’s College, Adelaide NEW SOUTH WALES Abbotsleigh, Sydney Calrossy Anglican School Kambala, Sydney Kinross Wolaroi School Presbyterian Ladies College, Armidale Shore - Sydney Church of England Grammar School St Ignatius’ College Riverview, Sydney The Armidale School The Scots College, Sydney VICTORIA Geelong Grammar School Methodist Ladies’ College, Melbourne St Catherine’s School, Melbourne

36

QUEENSLAND Churchie - Anglican Church Grammar School, Brisbane John Paul College, Brisbane Scots PGC Warwick St Augustine’s College, Cairns St Hilda’s School, Gold Coast St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School, Brisbane The Glennie School, Toowoomba The Southport School, Gold Coast Toowoomba Grammar School WESTERN AUSTRALIA Great Southern Grammar School, Albany Scotch College Perth Methodist Ladies’ College, Claremont ACT Canberra Girls’ Grammar School


John Paul College students with Principal, Mr Norm Kerley

Yalari provides excellent support for its students and Waverley is a brilliant role model and a dynamic, motivated spokesperson — not just for the Indigenous and not just for Yalari — but for anyone who has the opportunity to listen to his powerful messages.” - Mr Kerley

Great Southern Grammar School Principal, Mr Mark Sawle with Alkira Miller

Geelong Grammar School students with Vice-Principal, Charlie Scudamore

St Hilda’s students with school staff and Principal , Dr Julie Wilson Reynolds (front middle)

37


Leading the Way

ST PETER’S COLLEGE, ADELAIDE MR RAY PEARSON, HEAD OF BOARDING AT ST PETER’S COLLEGE, ADELAIDE

St Peter’s College Adelaide is now in its ninth year as a partner school with Yalari. As Head of Boarding, I am responsible for the care and support of the near 100 young men who are boarders with us here on college. I have an ongoing association with Yalari which began in 2007 when I started my career in boarding at Toowoomba Grammar School. Since this time, I have had the privilege of seeing the program grow. Not only does Yalari provide students with the opportunity to attend the best schools in Australia, the best schools in Australia become even better by having Yalari students attend. St Peter’s College has eight Yalari students enrolled at the School. In collaboration with our Deputy Headmaster, Ben Hanisch and Indigenous Coordinator, Frances Zubreckyj we look to provide a supportive environment for all of our indigenous students as valued and integral members of our community. We set high expectations for our Yalari students and encourage them to set lofty goals while providing the support required to help them achieve. Recently, the school has prioritized the care for our indigenous students through time and budget allocations for our Indigenous Coordinator and an investment into gaining a stronger understanding of our boys and better supporting their individual needs. In this role, Frances has outstandingly led initiatives to place greater emphasis on the celebration and awareness of National Reconciliation Week, NAIDOC Week and National Sorry Day. In addition, fundraising for ‘Close the Gap’ and the Yalari ‘Pay-itForward’ initiatives have successfully taken pride of place in the School under her leadership. It is important to us as a School community that the Yalari boys are proud of their culture and are recognized for the sacrifices they make to attend boarding school. Recently, the school commissioned a trip for me as Head of Boarding to travel to Derby, WA to meet with our most remote Indigenous boys and families. I gained a valuable insight into the challenges faced by these young men with the long distance they need to travel and the separation

38

they have from their family and community while away at boarding school. Sharing this information with the academic staff has increased the level of understanding and care we can provide these students. We are blessed to have these wonderful young men attend our School and understand the importance in developing as professionals to continue to provide the best possible care and support for them. This is an ongoing process that requires collaboration with other schools, engagement with communities and investment in professional development for frontline staff who provide the care for these students. As a school we are committed to these areas and are benefiting through building closer relationships with other schools, developing a strong skill set in supporting indigenous students and ensuring that the boys in the program gain from the experience. I am proud of the partnership St Peter’s College has with Yalari and this is largely due to the ongoing support of our Headmaster, Mr Tim Browning and the operational work of our Deputy Headmaster Mr Ben Hanisch. I am confident that the Yalari experience is of immense benefit to the students involved. Whether they pursue further study or qualifications after school, return to their communities or travel Australia or the world, they leave with life experience, exposure to different cultures and a strong old scholars’ network that will continue to be there for them long after their school days are done.


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Year 12 student Tye Bedford and Mr Ray Pearson

Not only does Yalari provide students with the opportunity to attend the best schools in Australia, the best schools in Australia become even better by having Yalari students attend.�

39


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY

Join our Community AND ENABLE INDIGENOUS CHILDREN TO DREAM BIG AND ACHIEVE

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO SUPPORT YALARI BY VISITING VISIT WWW.YALARI.ORG.

SPONSORING A SCHOLARSHIP IN-KIND DONATIONS Make a donation of goods or services in support of Yalari events or operations.

REGULAR GIVING Set up a regular giving arrangement which suits your situation.

Supporting the Rosemary Bishop Indigenous Education Scholarship program awarding scholarships to Indigenous children for their secondary schooling at one of our partner schools.

SPONSOR STUDENT SUPPORT Students are in need of text books, school uniforms, compulsory excursions and camps etc. SPONSORING A STUDENT CAMP OR YALARI EVENT

WORKPLACE GIVING Arranged through your employer, your pre-tax donation will go towards empowering Indigenous children through education to bring about generational change.

VOLUNTEERING Volunteering roles range from one-off events to long-term commitments.

ONE-OFF DONATIONS Make a one-off, tax-deductible donation to Yalari.

Yalari hosts several events throughout the year including student support camps, fundraising activities and corporate events. We highly value the commitment of each Yalari partner and customise sponsorships to be mutually beneficial. Sponsoring one of our events provides you with a unique and exciting opportunity to connect with the Yalari community, build brand awareness and show your support for an important cause. CONTRIBUTE TO YALARI’S ENDOWMENT FUND Be part of the long-term vision of Yalari by contributing to the Yalari Endowment Fund. LEAVE A BEQUEST Become part of a very special group of Yalari supporters who have chosen to leave a gift to Yalari in their Will.


Aaliyah Blackaby

Felicity Hodges

Kiara Sutton

Ryan O’Callaghan

Adan Taat

Geoffrey Swan

Kiirra Bligh

Ryan See Kee

Aidan Bestwick

Georgia Dennison

Klaudia Farnham

Sarah-Cait Kirkland

Aidan Finn

Grace Haslett

Kobi Hall

Scott Taat

Aidan Scrutton

Haley Hunt

Koby Sellings

Seferina Whap

Alana Sharpley

Holly Austin

Lachlan Toovey

Shahleena Martin

Alanah Tompkins

Holly Coffison

Lahkai Councillor

Shakita Foster

Ali Crawshaw-Tomlins

Hunter Lawson

Lakeycha Farnham

Shanelle Smith

Alkira Miller

Imani Austin

Lakotta Miller

Shauna Dhagapan

Angel Miller

Indira Laifoo

Lena-Jade Cochrane

Shelley Hunt

Angelina Tatt

Isaac Burgoyne

Lenka Rivers

Shuaib Rhodes-Swain

Anna Dingley

Isabella O’Hara

Liam Saunders

Sienna Lincoln

Anna Robinson

Jacob Burgoyne

Mackenzie Hyde

Sopheena Toovey

Ardu Cubillo

Jada Davui

Makayla Clark

Sophia Mene

Aubrey Faull

Jade Jolliffe

Marcus Paterson

Sophie Oakeshott

Beau Kendall

Jaimee Ladyman

Mareeya Pigram

Summah Bedford-McGinty

Bella Griffiths

Jalu Donovan

Mariah Lennard

Tahlia See

Braydon Mundy

Jamika Kelly-Wirth

Marlley McNamara

Taleyah Hippi

TOGETHER, WE ARE CREATING POSITIVE CHANGE Brooke Brown

Jasmine Glass

Matao Bonney

Tathra Lowe

Brooke Fuller

Jaycee Sellings

Megan Fields

Tenika Roe

Bryoni Marshall

Jayda Craigie

Mibulgurrdoo Yanner

Tex Garstone

Caleb Laifoo

Jemmah Ronsen

Moigida Loban

Thalia Saunders

Calvin Hunter

Jermaine Harrison

Molly Trindall

Toby McGovern-Cubby

Carnett Brumby

Jessie Dahlstrom

Monique Laurie

Tori-Lee Cain

Cassandra Peris

Johanna Loban

Nadia Seriat

Tramaine Laterre

Chelsea Edwards

John Baxter

Nina Pigram

Troy Brown

Chenille Nona-Yellub

Jondayah Martin

Noah Allan

Tye Bedford

Cheree Whymann

Kaci Loban

Noah Smith

Tyeena Pang

Cheyanne Baker

Kaleesha Cain

Norah Hegedus

Tyeka Ferguson O’Shea

Connor McGovern Cubby

Kayla Baker

Quilon Councillor

Tyesha Armstrong

Damon Germon

Kayla Harrison

Racy Lawton

Tyler Slater

Darcie Sexton

Kayla Jackson

Ramiyah Tamu

Tyran Petrie

Darcy Palmer

Kealey Griffiths

Ratu Davui

Tyrese Carr-White

Declan Harry

Keely-Che Cain

Reece Eades

Tyrese Idai

Deklan King

Kelvin Howard

Reghan Bayles

Willem Smith

Dylan Baker

Kenny Jacks

Renekka Narkle

Yarryn Lewington

Eli-Blake Gillon

Keriba Bligh

Rhiannon Revell-Blair

Zainel Bin Busu

Elyne Tighe

Khiaecia Milgate

Ricky Crawshaw-Tomlins

Zamahl Bin Busu

Esther Knowles

Kiana Williams

Rishad Cook-Sabatino

Zanna Palmer

Ezekiel Billy

Kiara Davies

Ryan Brown

Zarleigh Jones


Educating Indigenous Children

ÂŽ

Yalari Limited | PO Box 1355, Oxenford Qld 4210 | Ph: 07 5665 8688 | F: 07 5665 8611 | info@yalari.org

www.yalari.org

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Yalari Review 2017  
Yalari Review 2017