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YAKIMA VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Catalog 2014-2015

Yakima Campus South Sixteenth Avenue and West Nob Hill Boulevard, Yakima, Washington PO Box 22520 Yakima, WA 98907-2520 509.574.4600 Videophone: 509.574.4973; IP Address: 134.39.160.70 Grandview Campus 500 West Main Street, Grandview, Washington 98930-1284 509.882.7000 TDD 509.882.7065

LOGO

www.yvcc.edu


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TABLE OF CONTENTS Dental Hygiene

Table of Contents Part I: Academic Information

3-58

Digital Media

Message from the President

3

Drama

Board of Trustees

3

Early Childhood Education

Contact Information The College Admissions Veterans’ Status

104

5-6 7-10

Education

105-117

Engineering/CADD

118-124

English

124-127

11-14 14

Registration

15-16

Fees and Expenses

17-19

Geography

20-23

Geology

Veterans’ Program

102 103-104

Economics

Ethnic Studies

Financial Aid

98-102

23

History

104-105

128 129 129-130 130

Student Life

24-25

Humanities

College Resources

26-30

Information Technology

132-136

Mathematics

136-138

Scholarships

30, 169-173

131-132

31-33

Medical Assisting

66-72

Policies

34-35

Medical Billing & Coding

66-72

Student Rights and Responsibilities

36-37

Medical Interpreter

66-72

Academic Rules

38-44

Modern Languages

138-141

Degrees

45-50

Music

141-143

Distribution List

51-53

Nursing

144-147

Special Degrees

54

Nutrition

Restricted Subject Areas for Transfer

55

Pharmacy Technician

Special Degrees

54

Phlebotomy

56

Philosophy

Programs and Services

Bachelor Degrees Professional/Technical Degrees and Certificates

57-58

Photography Physical Education

Part II: Programs & Courses

59-168

148 69-72 68-72 148-149 149 150-152

Physical Science

153

Physics

153

Accounting

60

Agriculture

60-65

Political Science

154-155

Allied Health Technology

66-72

Professional/Technical Education

155-156

American Sign Language

72

Psychology

156-157

Anthropology

73

Radiologic Sciences

157-161

Art

74-75

Reading

161

Astronomy

76

Social Science

161

Audio Production

76

Sociology

162

Automotive Service Technology, Master

76-78

Spanish

162

Biology

78-79

Speech

162

Business Administration

80-83

Student Development

163

Business Technology

84-87

Surgical Technology

Chemical Dependency Studies

88-90

TV/Video Production

Chemistry

90-91

Veterinary Technology

Chican@Studies

92

College Academic Skills

93

Part III: General Information

68-72 163 164-168 174-186

Communication Studies

93-94

Personnel

Criminal Justice

95-99

Awards

97-98

Maps

182-183

Index

184-186

Dental Assisting Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

174-180 181


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Message from the President Choosing a college in which to pursue higher education is a very important decision. This catalog provides information to assist you in determining how the mission, programs, and services provided by Yakima Valley Community College can best prepare you to achieve your educational and career goals. This catalog is a very important tool for your success. It contains valuable information such as policies and procedures, program requirements, and course descriptions. Since it began in 1928, Yakima Valley Community College has focused continually on student success. We value our role in building the future of the Yakima Valley. Our part in that future is tied to the success of every student who enters our doors. You may be enrolled in Yakima, Grandview, one of our many learning centers, or through web-based classes. However and wherever you learn, know that we are committed to providing access, instructional and technological quality, and the support services that will ensure your success. The influence of our college reverberates throughout our community and state in the contributions and accomplishments of our graduates. Whether you have come to us for basic education, developmental needs, language proficiency, job skills, or transfer programs, meeting your needs is our primary mission. YVCC’s excellent faculty and staff, as well as our community partners of the Yakima Valley, will assist you in acquiring the knowledge needed to be a skilled professional or continue your educational journey toward a baccalaureate degree. Sincerely, Linda Kaminski, Ed.D. President

Board of Trustees Mr. Paul McDonald, Ms. Rosalinda Mendoza, Ms. Lisa Parker, Mr. Robert Ozuna, Ms. Patricia Whitefoot

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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Academic Calendar Calendar* Fall Quarter 2014 September 1, 2014 (Monday) September 15-17, 2014 (Monday-Wednesday)

Labor Day - Holiday Faculty Return/Convocation/ Institutional Planning Days September 18-19, 2014 (Thursday-Friday) Faculty Preparation Days September 22, 2014 (Monday) First Day of CLasses October 20, 2014 (Monday) Assesment Work Day - No day Classes November 5, 2014 (Wednesday) Advising Day - No Classes November 11, 2014 (Tuesday) Veterans’ Day - Holiday Observed November 25, 2014 (Tuesday) No night clases November 26-28, 2014 (Wednesday-Friday) Thanksgiving - Holidays December 5, 2014 (Friday) Last Day of Classes December 8-10, 2014 (Monday-Wednesday) Final Exams December 11, 2014 (Thursday) New Student Orientation December 11-12, 2014 (Thursday-Friday) Faculty Preparation Days December 12, 2014 (Friday) Grades Due by 4:00 PM December 15, 2014 - January 2, 2014 (Monday-Friday) Christmas Vacation December 25, 2014 (Thursday) Christmas Day - Holiday Winter Quarter 2015 January 1, 2015 (Thursday) January 5, 2015 (Monday) January 19, 2015 (Monday) February 16, 2015 (Monday) March 13, 2015 (Friday) March 16-18, 2015 (Monday-Wednesday) March 19, 2015 (Thursday) March 19-20, 2015 (Thursday-Friday) March 20, 2015 (Friday) March 23-27, 2015 (Monday-Friday) Spring Quarter 2015 March 30, 2015 (Monday) May 5, 2015 (Tuesday) May 25, 2015 (Monday) June 5, 2015 (Friday) June 8-10, 2015 (Monday-Wednesday) June 11-12, 2015 (Thursday- Friday) June 11, 2015 (Thursday) June 12, 2015 (Friday) Summer Quarter 2014 June 23, 2014 (Monday) July 4, 2014 (Friday August 7, 2014 (Thursday) August 12, 2014 (Tuesday)

New Year’s Day - Holiday Classes Begin Martin Luther King Day - Holiday President’s Day - Holiday Last Day of Classes Final Exams New Student Orientation Faculty Preparation Days Grades Due by 4:00 PM Spring Vacation

Classes Begin Advising Day - No Classes Memorial Day - Holiday Last Day of Classes Final Exams Faculty Preparation Days Commencement Grades Due by 4:00 p.m.

Classes Begin Independence Day - Holiday Last Day of Classes Grades due by 4:00 PM

*Dates are subject to change. Important dates can be found online at www.yvcc.edu/calendar

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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COLLEGE DIRECTORY Yakima Campus All phone numbers are in area code 509 unless otherwise noted.

Advising & Counseling Center 574.4956 edevilleneuve@yvcc.edu Admissions 574.4712 admissions@yvcc.edu Agriculture 882.7007 www.yvcc.edu/agriculture Allied Health 574.4913 www.yvcc.edu/alliedhealthtech Alumni Association 574.1932 American Sign Language 574.4810 Anthropology 574.4808 www.yvcc.edu/anthropology Art 574.4844 www.yvcc.edu/art Arts & Sciences Division 574.4871 Associated Students of YVCC 574.4891 Astronomy 574.4869 Athletics 574.4720 www.goyaks.com Audio Production 573.4956 or 573.5520 Automotive Service Technology 574.6869 www.yvcc.edu/auto Basic Skills, Ellensburg 925.4011 Basic Skills, Grandview 882.7028 Basic Skills, Sunnyside 836.8407 Basic Skills, Toppenish 865.4550 Basic Skills, Yakima 574.6850 Biology 574.4869 Bookstore 574.4625 www.yvccbookstore.com Box Office 574.4750 Business Administration 574.4796 www.yvcc.edu/business Business Office 574.4664 Business Technology 574.4796 www.yvcc.edu/BTECH Career Connection Center 574.4911 Cashier 574.4660 Center of Excellence 574.6863 or 574.3280 CoE@yvcc.edu / www.yvcc.edu/coe Certified Training 574.4911 Chemical Dependency 574.4741 www.yvcc.edu/chemicaldependency Chemistry 574.4869 Chican@ Studies 574.6800 www.yvcc.edu/chican@studies Child Care Services 574.4762 dmgunderson@wa.easterseals.com Communications 574.4686 Community Relations Office 574.6870 Computer Labs, Student Tech Center North 574.4981 Coordinator of Special Populations 574.4973 ajaramillo@yvcc.edu Counseling & Advising Center 574.4956 Criminal Justice 574.4794 www.yvcc.edu/criminaljustice Degree Application Procedures 574.4703 Dental Assisting 574.4956 or 573.5566 Dental Clinic 574.4917 Dental Hygiene 574.4916 www.yvcc.edu/dentalhygiene Disability Support Services 574.4961 dss@yvcc.edu DSS Video Phone 574.4973 DSS IP Address 134.39.160.70

Displaced Homemaker 574.4743 Drama 574.4837 Early Childhood Education 574.4787 or 574.4932 gorgill@yvcc.edu Economics 574.6800 x3226 www.yvcc.edu/economics Education 574.4997/574.4932 eLearning 574.4827 elearning@yvcc.edu Outside Yakima area 1.877.217.9822 Engineering / CADD 574.4752 www.yvcc.edu/engineering English 574.4834 English as a Second Language (ABE) 574.6850 Enrollment Services 574.4700 Ethnic Studies 574.4807 www.yvcc.edu/ethnicstudies Financial Aid 574.6855 yvccfaid@yvcc.edu Fitness Center 574.4720 Foundation, YVCC 574.4645 www.yvcc.edu/foundation GED Exam 574.4738 www.yvcc.edu/testingservices GED Preparation 574.6850 Geography 574.4813 www.yvcc.edu/geography Geology 574.4817 History 574.4882 www.yvcc.edu/history Housing (Student Residence Center) 574.4885 www.yvcc.edu/housing Humanities 574.4834 Human Resource 574.4670 yvcchr@yvcc.edu Information 574.4600 Fax 574.4600 www.yvcc.edu Información en español 574.4615 Information Technology 574.4954 www.yvcc.edu/it International Students 574.4885 www.yvcc.edu/international Jane’s House Early Learning Center 574.4762 dmgunderson@wa.easterseals.com Larson Gallery 574.4875 www.larsongallery.org Learning Centers Ellensburg, Basic Skills/ABE 925.4011 Sunnyside, Basic Skills/ABE 837.9623 Toppenish, Basic Skills/ABE 865.4550 Learning Communities 574.4828 gkoestler@yvcc.edu Library 574.4991 yvcclibrary.us/Yakima Mathematics Center 574.4862 Mathematics 574.4869 Media Services 574.4982 Medical Assisting 574.4913 Medical Billing and Coding 574.4913 Modern Language 574.4810 Music 574.4839 www.yvcc.edu/yvccmusic Music, Performing Ensembles 574.4839 Nursing 574.4902 www.yvcc.edu/nursing Nutrition 574.4946 Perry Technical Institute/ Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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COLLEGE DIRECTORY YVCC Combined Degree 574.4956/453.0374 Pharmacy Technology 574.4913 Philosophy 574.4933 Phlebotomy 574.4913 Physical Education 574.4720 Physical Science 574.4869 Physics 574.4869 Placement Testing 574.4738 www.yvcc.edu/placement Political Science 574.4809 www.yvcc.edu/politicalscience Professional/Technical Education 574.4744 Psychology 574.4962 www.yvcc.edu/psychology Radiologic Sciences 574.4932 www.yvcc.edu/radiologicsciences Reading 574.4997 Registration & Records 574.4700 registration@yvcc.edu Retired & Senior Volunteer 574.1933 Running Start 574.4970 or 574.4971 www.yvcc.edu/runningstart Security/Parking 574.4610 Social Sciences 574.4834 Sociology 574.6800x3151 or 574.4806 www.yvcc.edu/sociology Spanish 574.4826 or 574.4814 Speech 574.4686 Speech Lab 574.4816 Student Activities/Programming 574.4775 Student Life 574.4775 Student Residence Center 574.4885 www.yvcc.edu/housing Surgical Technology 574.4913 Tech Prep 574.4744 Television/Video 574.4956 or 573.5520 Theater 574.4837 Transcripts 574.4601 TRiO Student Support Services 574.4995 Tutoring Center 574.4995 www.yvcc.edu/tutoring Upward Bound 574.6886 www.yvcc.edu/UpwardBound Veterans Office 574.4715 Veterinary Technology 574.4759 or 574.4758 www.yvcc.edu/vettech Videophone 574.4973 IP Address 134.39.160.70 Vineyard & Winery Technology 882.7007 www.yvcc.edu/wine Wellness and Recreation (Fitness Center) 574.4720 WorkFirst 574.4911 Worker Retraining 574.4743 Workforce Education 574.4755 Workforce Education Director 574.4744 Writing Center 574.4829 www.yvcc.edu/owl

Grandview Campus All phone numbers are in area code 509 unless otherwise noted.

Admissions 882.7015 Adult Basic Education 882.7000 Agriculture 882.7007 Allied Health 882.7031 Bookstore 882.7023 Cashier 882.7013 Chican@ Studies 882.7006 Computer Labs 882.7039 or 882.7054 Coordinator Student Services 882.7008 Counseling 882.7042 Disability Support Services 882.7041 English as a Second Language 882.7000 Financial Aid 882.7008 GED Exam 882.7010 GED Preparation 882.7000 General Information 882.7000 FAX 882.7012 www.yvcc.edu/grandview Grandview Library 882.7034 www.yvcc.edu/grandviewlibrary Información en español 882.7000 Information 882.7000 or 574.4600 FAX 882.7012 www.yvcc.edu/grandview Math Center 882.7008 Registration 882.7015 Running Start 882.7008 Sociology 882.7006 TRIO Student Support Services 882.7041 TDD 882.7065 Tutoring Services 574.7008 Winery & Vineyard 882.7007 Writing Center 882.7073

Mailing Addresses Yakima Campus Correspondence should be addressed to the appropriate office at Yakima Valley Community College, PO Box 22520, Yakima, WA 98907-2520.

Grandview Campus Correspondence should be addressed to the appropriate office at 500 West Main Street, Grandview, WA 98930-1284.

Learning Centers Ellensburg Learning Center: PO Box 1174, Ellensburg WA, 98926 Sunnyside Learning Center: 2590 Yakima Valley Highway, Sunnyside WA, 98944 Toppenish Learning Center: 516 West 1st Avenue, Toppenish WA, 98948

Español Para mayores informes en español sobre clases de educación, favor de llamar al centro de enseñanza al Yakima Campus: 574.6850 Grandview Campus: 882.7000

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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THE COLLEGE Yakima Valley Community College (YVCC) is located in south central Washington State and is the third oldest community college in the state. The college has a long tradition of quality in teaching and in its commitment to students. Founded in 1928 as a private two-year college, YVCC became a public junior college under the auspices of the Yakima School District in 1948. In 1967, the Washington State legislature passed the Community College Act, and YVCC became a state community college under the jurisdiction of the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, one of the best community college systems in the nation. The college’s service district is centered in Yakima County, with outreach programs in Kittitas County to the north and Klickitat County in the south. The main campus is located in the city of Yakima and a branch campus is situated 45 miles southeast in the community of Grandview. This district is predominantly rural with an economy focused on agriculture, food processing, and health care industries. YVCC is one of the largest providers of postsecondary education in south central Washington, offering a comprehensive curriculum for transfer to four-year colleges and universities, as well as professional and technical degrees, and basic skills instruction. The college’s capable faculty, support staff and administration focus on maintaining an environment conductive to student success. Effective fall 2014 the college was granted candidacy status at the baccalaureate level. This action by the accrediting body provides the college with the authority to offer bachelor’s degrees. The college will begin to offer a bachelor of applied science in business management degree in fall 2014.

General Information Mission YVCC enriches and enhances individuals and communities by delivering accessible, student-centered education. YVCC addresses the needs of our diverse communities by providing learning opportunities in basic literacy; academic, professional, and technical education; and lifelong learning. (Approved Board of Trustees, August 2008) Core Themes Community: YVCC embraces its role as both a provider of higher education and an employer and actively seeks partnerships to provide opportunities for the economic, social, and cultural development of our external and internal communities. Access: YVCC increases access through programs and services that address diverse challenges, learning styles, goals, and schedules of students in the district. Success: YVCC provides learner-centered environments with a focus on its diverse students, providing a foundation for lifelong learning resulting in student achievement of educational goals through completion of courses, certificates, and degrees. (Approved Board of Trustees, March 2010)

Accreditation and Affiliations The college is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, having been reviewed and reaccredited in 2012. Credits earned in many courses numbered 100 or higher are transferable to other colleges and universities nationwide. In addition to the institution being accredited, several Workforce Education Division programs have earned special accreditation or recognition in their field of specialty. Additional information on this accreditation or recognition may be found in this catalog in the introductory comments for each of the following fields of study: the allied health technologies of medical assisting and surgical technology, automotive service technology, dental hygiene, nursing, radiologic sciences, and veterinary technology. Yakima Valley Community College is affiliated with the American Association of Community Colleges. Further information on YVCC's accreditation can be obtained by contacting the President’s Office. Governance Yakima Valley Community College is governed by a five-member board of trustees consisting of citizens who reside throughout Community College District 16. Board members are appointed by the Governor.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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THE COLLEGE Faculty and Staff There are 114 full-time members of the faculty plus many part-time instructors. The faculty is well qualified by virtue of advanced education, training, and experience. The faculty take pride in teaching, its primary duty, and has distinguished itself by dedicated and capable leadership in education and in the community. In addition to our faculty, there are approximately 24 administrators, 143 classified staff, and 36 exempt professional staff. Source: Human Resource Office.

Learning Options

Students In Fall quarter 2013, YVCC Yakima Campus served over 4,850 students. Of these, 61% were full-time; 35% male; 28% were under 20 years of age, 46% were 20-29, 14% 30-39, and 12% were 40 and over. The average age was 27. Fifty-six percent were students of color with 48% Hispanic. In Fall quarter 2013, YVCC Grandview Campus served over 820 students. Of these, 49% were fulltime; 35% were male; 25% were under 20 years of age, 46% were 20-29, 16% were 30-39, and 13% were 40 and over. The average age was 28. Eighty-four percent were students of color with 82% Hispanic. Source: Office of Institutional Effectiveness. For Grandview Campus student data, reference page 10.

eLearning (online classes via the internet) Yakima Valley Community College offers credit courses through various modes of learning. These courses are designed to allow flexibility for students. The different modes of online delivery are: Completely online classes: Classes do not meet face-to-face at any time. However, the instructor may request students to attend an orientation session. These sessions are rare and in most cases can be delivered in a recorded format for far distance or time restricted students. These courses may require proctored exams. Hybrid: These courses are a combination of online content and face-to-face contact. When looking at the online schedule if there are weekly days listed, these will be the meeting days for the hybrid class. Caution! When using the online schedule, please be aware if you see days listed these are required face-to-face contact day(s) for the class. Enhanced: Face-to-face classes can be enhanced with online content. No class time can be replaced with online time. These classes will often contain syllabus, course materials, notices from your instructor, and possibly grades. You may be required to upload work to your instructor using the LMS or take tests online in this mode.

Advisory Committees YVCC’s advisory committees, comprised of business leaders and community members, are established to advise, assist, and provide support and advocacy for quality professional/technical education. It is through these roles that advisory committees work with instructors and administrators to initiate policies, procedures, and methods that help plan and strengthen educational programs. Agriculture Allied Health Technologies Automotive Service Technology Basic Skills Business Administration Business Technology Chemical Dependency Criminal Justice Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene Early Childhood Education Engineering/CADD Information Technology Institutional Animal Care/Use Nursing Radiologic Sciences Tech Prep Veterinary Technology Vineyard & Winery Technology Workforce Education Division/Worker Retraining

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

YVCC offers four quarters of classes throughout the academic year including fall, winter, spring, and summer on the Yakima and Grandview campuses. The college offers a variety of academic, professional/technical, and community service classes during the day and evening. Courses are also offered in different modes of delivery including face-to-face, online, and hybrid. Community input on course sections that represent the greatest community need is welcomed. Please contact the Arts & Sciences Division or the Workforce Education division for further information.

The current Learning Management System (LMS), in use is Canvas and can be reached by typing: https://yvcc.instructure.com into the address bar of your internet browser. The hardware/software recommendations for a successful online learning experience are: Computer Specifications: Canvas and its hosting infrastructure are designed for maximum compatibility and minimal requirements. Screen Size • Computer or notebook: with a minimum screen resolution of 1024x600. That is the average size of a notebook (most brands). Viewing Canvas on a smaller screen is not recommended. Operating Systems • Windows XP3 or newer • Mac OSX 10.6 and newer • Linux - ChromeOS Mobile OS Native App Support • iOS 5 and newer • Android 2.3 and newer


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THE COLLEGE Computer Speed and Processor • Use a computer 5 years old or newer when possible • 1GB of RAM • 2 GHz processor Internet Speed • Along with compatibility and web standards, Canvas has been carefully crafted to accommodate low bandwidth environments. • Minimum of 512 kbps • Dial up is not recommended but can function poorly • Online courses require access to the Internet, either at home or in one of the open computer labs on campus. Dial-up connections are not recommended. If this is the only access available; plan to spend time in the college’s computer lab. • Screen Readers • The latest versions of JAWS and VoiceOver Course Fees: eLearing courses may have lab fees. Check the course schedule for a list of any fees associated with each class. Exams & Testing: Most online instructors will require proctored exams or tests. Local Yakima and Grandview students are required to use the campus testing labs for any proctored tests. Students outside the local area can petition to use an off campus proctor. The form to request an off campus proctor can be found on the eLearning Web page at: http://www.yvcc.edu/academics/elearning/Pages/TestProctoring.aspx Off-campus proctors cannot be related to the student in any way. Acceptable proctor sites are: other college testing labs, formal testing/ tutor companies, and local libraries. All proctors will be contacted and unacceptable proctors will be denied. eLearning course offerings vary each quarter. Check the class schedule. Students can search by online only or by campus, Yakima or Grandview. For more information on eLearning, please call the eLearning Office at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog or visit: http://www.yvcc.edu/elearning Evening Courses Yakima Valley Community College offers the opportunity for individuals with commitments during the daytime hours to participate in extended degree and certification programs in the evening. Additionally, evening courses offer the opportunity to update or acquire new skills in a variety of employment fields. Community service classes, offered as noncredit, and activities which pertain to special interests and community needs are offered and are financed on a self-support basis.

Learning Communities and Integrated Learning A learning community is a collection of students, instructors, and classes linked by a common idea, theme, or public issue. Such themes could include “Matters of Life and Death” (biology and English), “Magellan to Mozart” (history and music), “Crimewriters, Ink” (criminal justice and composition), “Climate and Calculations” (mathematics and geography), or “Reading, Writing, Ready for College” (reading and developmental writing). The issues could include euthanasia, global warming, or fear of mathematics. “Integrated Learning” may be the result of a learning community assignment, but it also can take place between two disciplines with a common goal, outcome, or experience, such as a case study review (biology and nursing), not linked by a formal “community.” Some say that “reality is integrated,” so our learning should reflect that reality. Advantages • Students in learning communities tend to stay in school. National and local statistics indicate that students in learning communities tend to stay in school. College can be intimidating, especially for first-time, first-generation college students; however, instructors — such as the ones students will meet and get to know well in learning communities — are familiar with how the campus community works and so are better able to answer questions about degree or certificate advising, financial aid, or other college questions. • Get to know your instructors. Depending on the number of classes linked, students will have more contact with their instructors, as many learning communities have both or all instructors and students in the room during both or all classes. And, because most teachers were themselves good college students, learning community instructors can help students learn what it takes to survive a new class, pick a major, or launch a career. • More time with like-minded, supportive students. Very often, the students in learning communities have the same degree goals — nursing, information technology, four-year transfer degrees — in mind when they register. So students will meet like-minded friends who can support each other as long as they take classes at YVCC. They may be in the same classes and may study together quarter after quarter. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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THE COLLEGE Grandview Campus

Hispanic-serving Institution

The Grandview Campus provides comprehensive educational services that are accessible to students in the southern portion of YVCC’s service district. Students from Grandview, Granger, Mabton, Prosser, and Sunnyside take developmental, professional/ technical, and college transfer courses here. The campus serves approximately 1,600 unduplicated students a year. Approximately 85 of these students are high school students in the Running Start program, and 40 percent of students are in Adult Basic Education/English as a Second Language programs. Of students enrolled, 69 percent are female and 80 percent are ethnic minorities. The Grandview Campus offers courses that support a variety of student goals. For example, individuals may enroll in English as a Second Language classes, while others wanting to earn a General Educational Development (GED) certificate can take GED classes and the GED test in Grandview. Furthermore, students can complete a certificate in Phlebotomy as well as one of several Information Technology certificates. Students can also earn transferable Associate in Arts and Associate in Business degrees at the Grandview Campus. Additionally, the campus offers professional/ technical degrees including an Associate of Applied Science degrees in Vineyard Technology, Winery Technology, Medical Assisting, and Medical Billing and Coding. In addition, courses are available that apply to various vocational and transferable degrees on the Yakima Campus in areas such as agriculture, early childhood education, elementary education, allied health, business, criminal justice, and natural sciences. To facilitate the learning of students, the Grandview Campus offers a complete array of student services including advising, financial aid, admission, registration, cashiering, disability support, bookstore, and placement testing services. The campus is also equipped with an open-access computer lab, textual reference materials, online research databases, and tutoring centers. YVCC and the City of Grandview jointly operate a city/college library on the Grandview Campus. Recognizing the obstacles of time and location, the Grandview Campus offers classes during the day and evening to make learning opportunities accessible to working students. Moreover, students may take eLearning courses via interactive television (ITV) and the Internet so they do not have to travel to the Yakima Campus. Please contact Grandview Campus at 509.882.7000 for the most up-to-date information regarding course offerings and services provided. Source: Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

Yakima Valley Community College is designated by the US Department of Education as a Hispanic-serving Institution. A Hispanic-serving Institution (HSI) is defined as a non-profit institution that has at least 25% Hispanic full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment. Beginning in 2002 Valley Community College received the designation along with a Title V grant allowing the college to strengthen the institution for all students and faculty. The college has received additional Title V grants in subsequent years and the funds allow YVCC to focus on projects that range from student support programs to classroom technology. Additional information can be found at www.yvcc.edu.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Non-Discrimination statement Yakima Valley Community College is an Equal Opportunity Employer and operates under an Affirmative Action Plan in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. It is the policy of Yakima Valley Community College to provide a working and learning environment free from discrimination, harassment and retaliation. This policy prohibits conduct that discriminates against individuals based on their race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity, age, marital status, disability, honorably discharged veteran or military status. This policy also prohibits retaliation as a result of an individual filing a report of discrimination or harassment or participating in an investigation of a claim of discrimination or harassment. This policy applies to all programs and facilities, including, but not limited to, admissions, educational programs and employment. Yakima Valley Community College complies with all Washington State anti-discrimination laws (RCW 49.60) and the following federal laws relating to equal opportunity: Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Yakima Valley Community College is committed to providing access, equal opportunity and reasonable accommodation in its services, program, activities, education, and employment for individuals with disabilities. The College will take steps to ensure that the lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in vocational education programs. Coordination of the compliance efforts of Yakima Valley Community College with respect to equal opportunity and disability accommodation regulations is under the direction of the Director of Human Resources, Yakima Valley Community College, 1015 South 16th Avenue, Yakima, Washington, 98902; telephone 509.574.4670. Updated: September 2013


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ADMISSION Yakima Valley Community College is committed to an open-door policy and encourages the use of its postsecondary educational opportunities and services by all U.S. citizens or residents, 18 years of age or older, who are interested in and can profit from college programs. Adults, whether or not they possess a high school diploma, may enroll at the college without regard for their past educational record. The chief criterion is that applicants can benefit from college programs.

General Admission All degree and certificate seeking students, both full-time or part-time, enrolling in credit-bearing classes must complete a general admission application except for Adult Basic Education, English as a Second Language, International Students, Running Start, and Gold Card/Space Available enrollment. Please note: There are admission application deadlines prior to the start of each quarter. Please contact the Admissions Office concerning these deadlines. When applying, the following steps should be followed: 1.

2.

3. 4.

5.

Complete a Community and Technical College Application for Admission, form is available online at the YVCC website (www.yvcc.edu), then mail the required nonrefundable application fee to the Cashiers Office or pay in person at the Cashiers Office in the Deccio Higher Education Center. Complete the placement test. Placement scores are used to place students into appropriate-level courses with the ultimate goal of improving student success in the classroom. Students with concerns about their placement scores should see their assigned advisor or a counselor. Placement test fees are nonrefundable. Submit an official copy of all previous college transcripts to the YVCC Admissions Office. Transcripts must be mailed directly to the college or presented by the student in an officially sealed envelope. Once the above steps have been completed, the student will receive notification and information, when appropriate, about new student orientation and registration. The application for admission is valid for four consecutive quarters (excluding summer quarter). Certain professional /technical programs have Selective Admission processes. There are special admission processes for Basic Skills, International Student Program, Running Start and Underage Student Admission. Please refer to the Selective Admission and Special Admission sections of the catalog. Additional information may also be found on the program websites (www.yvcc.edu).

Former Students Former students who have not attended YVCC for the preceding four quarters (excluding summer quarter) are required to reapply for admission to the college.

Part-Time Students Students enrolling in fewer than 12 credits are required to follow the general admission guidelines if they are pursing a transfer degree or wishing to enroll in a professional/technical program. Students wishing to enroll in English, math, or any course with a placement test score requirement must take the placement test. Students enrolling in 12 or more credits are considered full-time.

Selective Admissions in Professional/Technical Programs Certain professional/technical programs in the Workforce Education Division have additional admission requirements. Admission to YVCC does not guarantee entrance to the following programs. Students must meet the application deadlines and entrance requirements prescribed by the program. Dental Assisting Nursing Pharmacy Technology Dental Hygiene Surgical Technology Phlebotomy Medical Assisting Veterinary Technology Radiologic Sciences Medical Billing and Coding To be considered for programs with selective admissions, please: • Refer to specific program requirements in this catalog. • Contact the department directly for an application packet. • Submit all required paperwork by the program deadlines. • Complete all required prerequisites. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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ADMISSION Special Admission Basic Skills All persons 16 and over are eligible for Basic Skills instruction. All students must complete the registration process to be enrolled. Basic Skills students pay $25.00 tuition each quarter. The primary emphases in Basic Skills are basic reading, writing, math, and English as a Second Language (ESL). Students may learn to understand, speak, read, and write English, prepare for the GED, upgrade skills for success in college, or prepare for entrance into occupational programs or employment. Day and evening Adult Basic Education and ESL classes are offered in many locations throughout the YVCC service district. Questions regarding admission to Basic Skills classes should be directed to the Ellensburg Learning Center, Grandview Campus, Sunnyside Learning Center, Toppenish Learning Center, or the Yakima Campus.

International Student Program Yakima Valley Community College offers a friendly International Student Program, which gives personal attention from the moment of application all the way through to transfer or graduation. We will do what we can to make the student’s time in the United States enjoyable and rewarding; however, we will challenge students to do the best they can and to succeed. Acceptance and admission into the college is based on a thorough review and evaluation of the student’s entire application file. Please allow a minimum of 8 weeks to process the application. Once students have fulfilled all admission requirements, they will receive a letter of acceptance and an INS Form I-20 that they must take to the American embassy or consulate in order to apply for an F-1 visa. The I-20 cannot be sent until all documentation and a $30.00 application fee are received and the student is formally admitted to college. Application Requirements 1.) An official International Student Application Form. 2.) A nonrefundable application fee of $30.00. Current fees are subject to change. 3.) Official copies of transcripts from high schools, national exams, intensive English-language programs, and all colleges or universities attended (translated into English). These must be sent directly to YVCC from the issuing institution or testing center. Students who wish to transfer credit from international institutions must have their international transcripts evaluated through the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers (AACRAO) or the Foundation for International Services (FIS). Contact the International Student Program Office or the admissions Office for more information. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

4.) Evidence of English competency which will allow successful completion of course of study. Please submit at least one of the following (minimum scores or better): • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with minimum scores or 487 (paper-based), or 163 (computer-based) or 57 (Internet-based), or • IELTS (International English Language Test). A minimum scored of 5.0 is required, or • TOEIC (Test of English for International Communications). A minimum score of 850 is required or • STEP/EIKEN (Society for Testing English Proficiency). A minimum score of Pre-1 is required, or • Official verification of successful completion of another nationally-recognized test of English competency, or • Proof of successful completion of an advanced level of English at an approved English language center in the United States with a grade point average of 2.0 or above, or • Successful completion of Central Washington University’s English as a Second Language Program (UESL) program, or • Three (3) credits of college-level English composition from an accredited U.S. College or university with a grade of C (2.0) or better, or • Proof of successful completion of at least 3 years of high school English in the United States. • TOEFL, IELTS, TOEIC, and STEP tests must have been taken within two years immediately preceding the requested quarter of admission. Prospective students applying from abroad must submit official test score reports to the college. Please note that all new students are required to complete a placement test (COMPASS) in English and math after arriving and before they enroll in their first quarter at YVCC. 5.) Washington State law requires full-time students to show proof of immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella. 6.) The financial statement must be completed by a bank official and/or sponsor and submitted with proof of financial ability. You must show assured support for the first year and projected support for the total years needed to complete your degree. Documents should not be more than three months old. Do not send copies or faxes of the financial statement. 7.) International Students are required to purchase or show proof of health insurance for a minimum of nine months (oneacademic year). Once accepted to Yakima Valley Community College, students cannot register for classes until they have purchased or provided proof of medical coverage. Please contact the International Student Program for more details. The college does not have grants, scholarships, loans, or other forms of financial assistance available to international students. On-campus employment is limited, so international students cannot expect to work after arrival. While not required to live on campus, international students are encouraged to do so for the first year in order to share cultures and ideas in a safe, inexpensive, friendly, and informal atmosphere. For further information, please visit our website at www.yvvcc.edu/international.


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ADMISSION Placement Reciprocity Students may use the placement given from another Washington State Community or Technical College’s testing center instead of YVCC’s recommended placement. Students that qualify for placement test reciprocity should complete the Placement Reciprocity Request Form. The form is available from the YVCC website. The form should be submitted to the Registration and Records Office once the official scores from the previous Washington State Community or Technical Collge have been received by YVCC.

Running Start The Running Start Program is a partnership between YVCC and Washington State public high schools. The program offers eligible high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to take classes that satisfy both high school and college credit requirements, get a head start on earning college credits, seek a greater academic challenge, or take courses that are not offered in high school. Students may enroll simultaneously in high school and college classes or solely in college classes. To participate in this program, students must place into collegelevel English and MATH 085 on the YVCC placement test. Students are responsible for their own transportation, college fees, and textbooks. For more information or an application, visit our website (www.yvcc. edu/runningstart) or talk with a high school counselor.

Tech Prep Yakima Valley Community College and the Yakima Valley Tech Prep consortium are pleased to offer direct transcription. We are one of 28 community and technical colleges across the state that has entered into this arrangement with local high schools. Tech Prep students remain enrolled in their high school. When enrolled in a Tech Prep articulated class, students in the class meet the same requirements as students who take the class at the college. At the end of the course, the high school teacher notifies the Tech Prep coordinator at the college of all students who passed the class with a grade of B or higher. Credit is not available to students who earn below a B. In order to receive direct transcription credit for Tech Prep coursework, students must submit a registration form for the classes they have successfully completed. There is no charge for direct transcription credits. For more information, including a current list of articulated classes, please call the Tech Prep coordinator at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

Underage Student Admission Yakima Valley Community College does not desire to replace or duplicate the functions of the local public schools in regard to providing instruction to students under the age of eighteen. For applicants under the age of 16, academic as well as emotional maturity are of particular concern; however, the college does recognize that there are certain circumstances when an underage applicant would benefit from college-level coursework. To respond to the needs of those students, the college has established the following special admissions policy. Students are responsible for tuition, class fees, books, and class supplies.

1. Any applicant not qualifying for admission through regular admissions procedures or qualifying for an established program must request consideration of admittance under the special admissions procedure. 2. Before students can attend class the request for admittance must be reviewed and approved by the Admissions Committee. 3. If the studentis accepted they will receive a welcome/email with instructions on how to proceed with the registration process. 4. A personal interview with the Admissions Committee may be requested at the discretion of the committee. 5. Students admitted under the special admission procedure: Š Will be admitted on a course-by-course basis. Š Will be allowed to register for class if space is available after the class has met at least once or after the third day of the quarter, whichever is later. Š Must have the underage special admissions advisor’s approval before adding or dropping a course. 6. Any student who received probation, suspension, or dismissal status on YVCC transcripts will not be admitted under special admissions. How to Request Admittance under Underage Student Admissions Determine your application track and follow instructions. Audition Based Music or Drama Performance Course 1. After audition, complete Underage Special Admissions application 2. Complete Walk-in Registration Form 3. Complete Supplemental Application/ Registration Form 4. Attach instructor permission/entry code (usually an email) 5. Send all documents together to: Yakima Valley Community College Attn: Underage Special Admissions PO BOX 22520 Yakima, WA 98907 or Drop them off at Registration in the Deccio Higher Education Center 1000 S. 12th Ave. Yakima, WA

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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ADMISSION Academic Based College-level courses such as History, Science, Math, English etc. 1. Complete Underage Special Admissions application no later than two weeks before the start of the quarter 2. Complete Walk-in Registration Form 3. Complete Supplemental Application/ Registration Form 4. Submit a signed release from a school or school district official - (If the student will be leaving high school during the regular school day.) 5. Submit a letter of recommendation from a school representative (teacher, counselor etc.) addressing the student’s ability to participate successfully in an adult learning environment 6. Send all documents together to: Yakima Valley Community College Attn: Underage Special Admissions PO BOX 22520 Yakima, WA 98907 or Drop them off at Registration in the Deccio Higher Education Center 1000 S. 12th Ave. Yakima, WA 7. Dependent upon the courses requested, students may be required to complete the COMPASS test to demonstrate competency and the ability to benefit from college level coursework. Once the application has been reviewed the student will be contacted if the COMPASS test is required.

Veterans’ Status Selected academic programs of study at YVCC are approved by the Higher Education Coordinating Board's State Approving Agency for enrollment of those eligible to receive benefits under Title 38 and Title 10, U.S. Code. The U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs will pay educational benefits to eligible students enrolled in approved programs. Students should contact the Veterans’ Office to complete the application process. Copies of all transcripts from previous colleges must be on file when applying, or only two quarters will be certified. An advance payment, which is sent to the school, may be requested. Benefits for the preceding month are paid directly to the student. The monthly amount is based upon the enrolled credits that count toward the approved program.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

If enrollment status is: • Full time: 12 credits or more • 3/4 time: 9 to 11 credits • 1/2 time: 6 to 8 credits • Less than half time: contact the Veterans’ Office All students receiving veterans’ benefits must maintain adequate progress toward their degree. To verify satisfactory progress, monthly reports of attendance and progress are requested from instructors. VA recipients who fail to maintain minimum standards (2.0 GPA) are subject to academic probation or suspension. This could result in the reduction or cancellation of benefits. Students are responsible for providing necessary information and changes, such as program, credit load, address correction, or any other change that may affect their VA status. Students must contact the Veterans’ Office after registering each quarter. Deployed veterans returning to YVCC within one year after returning from deployment do not need to reapply for admissions. Students must provide the Veterans Affairs Office with a copy of their orders. For additional information and assistance, contact the Veterans’ Affairs Office.


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REGISTRATION New students working toward a degree or certificate are given a date for orientation and registration after completing the college admission placement testing process. When students are placed in courses which reflect their academic skill level, they are more likely to succeed in college. Students may be required to register for a specific set of classes based upon placement results and intended degree or certificate. Students receive notice of specific dates on which they may register prior to the start of the quarter for which they applied. New student registrants must pay tuition and fees in full at the time they register. During the regular academic year, all students are given an opportunity to confer with their advisors, plan their programs for the upcoming quarter, and register in advance. This usually occurs during the eighth or ninth week of the quarter, with tuition and fees due on a specified date prior to the beginning of classes.

How to Register Evening YVCC offers a variety of on-campus evening opportunities for classes, activities, and services to persons who may not be able to pursue day studies. Registration for these classes, activities, or services is conducted by mail, on the web, or in person during assigned registration dates listed in the important dates or during the first two nights of the quarter (except summer) from 4:30-6:00 p.m. in the Registration and Records Office. Full payment must accompany all registrations. Summer There are no applications or appointments needed for summer school. Registration is on a first-come, firstserved basis. Summer school attendance does not ensure admittance to fall quarter. Separate application must be made. Website All full-time and part-time students who have attended YVCC within the last year may register for classes by using the YVCC website. (Go to www.yvcc.edu, click "Student Portal," then “Registration”, then "Add or Drop, Register classes.") This method offers students the convenience of registering in the comfort of their homes or anywhere they have access to a computer connected to the Internet. Students may use a home computer to access the YVCC website. Access to the YVCC website is also available in designated computer labs on campus and at kiosks on the Grandview and Yakima campuses. “Student Portal” allows students to conduct business concerning registration, schedule changes, viewing the class schedule, grades, financial aid, admission application status, and registration appointments.

Academic Blocks Students who have been placed on academic suspension/dismissal or who have outstanding debts to the college, e.g., parking fines, library fines, dormitory charges, or instructional materials due, will not be allowed to register or add/drop until these have been cleared. Nor will official transcripts or diplomas be released until debts are cleared. The Registration and Records Office requires 24 hours to process the release of a block on student records.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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REGISTRATION Changes to Registration Add/Drop Beginning on the first day of the quarter, students must obtain permission from the instructor (the instructor's signature) to add a class. Students may add, drop, or change enrollment sections during the first five days of the quarter; however, permission of the instructor is required. For the first five days of the quarter, students may drop classes from their schedules from the YVCC website or in person. Courses dropped through the 10th day of classes do not appear on the transcript. Courses dropped from the eleventh day to three weeks prior to finals (seventh week of the quarter) will appear on the student’s transcript as a “W”. Students who stop attending classes without officially dropping may receive an “F” or a “V” grade at the discretion of the instructor. Classes concentrated within shorter than tenweek sessions are given deadlines proportionate to the standard length of a quarter. For summer quarter deadlines, consult the class schedule for specific dates. Schedule changes are the responsibility of the student. Failure to change enrollment or withdraw officially constitutes sufficient cause to receive whatever grade the instructor deems appropriate.

before the quarter begins, the automatic registration of students on the waitlist will stop. Once the waitlist is no longer active, students must attend the first day of class and the faculty member will decide whether or not to sign in students regardless of their status on the waitlist. Placing yourself on a waitlist does not count as registered credit. Students receiving funding based on a specific number of credits must pay their tuition to meet their funding requirments or they will be dropped from their classes. Due to high enrollment, students cannot register for different sections of the same course in the same quarter or be on more than four waitlists. The Registration Office edits for these occurrences and will remove students from second class selection. Helpful Hints •

• • •

• Withdrawal from College All students wishing to withdraw from college (drop all courses) during the first five days of the quarter may do so by using the YVCC website or by completing an add/drop/withdrawal form which they must take to the Registration and Records Office for processing. Students who stop attending classes without officially withdrawing may receive an “F” or a “V” grade on their transcripts. For official withdrawals completed during days one through ten, no record will appear on the transcript. The last day for withdrawal from college is the same as that for dropping a course: three weeks prior to the beginning of final exams or as specified for summer quarter or shorter sessions. Withdrawals processed during this period result in “W” grades being entered on the permanent transcript. For additional information, please contact the Registration and Records Office. Students must not assume they will be dropped from a class if they stop attending. Failure to drop a class may result in a “F” grade.

Waitlist When a class has reached maximum enrollment limit, students may place themselves on a waitlist for the class. This won’t guarantee a spot, but if one becomes open the first person on the waitlist will be automatically registered into classes according to their placement on the waitlist. On the Sunday

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Use the Student Portal at www.yvcc.edu to check your waitlist status. Remove yourself from waitlists online or with registration staff from Yakima/Grandview campuses. Remove yourself from classes you no longer want on the waitlist otherwise you may be automatically enrolled. Check the status of your waitlist position on a daily basis. Place yourself on a maximum of four waitlists, don’t register for one section and add yourself to a different section of the same class. If you choose to seek a signature to enroll, you must be in the class the first day it meets. There is no guarantee the instructor will sign you into the class.


17

FEES & EXPENSES Fees & Rates The following rates are in effect for 2014-2015 and are subject to change without notice: • • • • • • • • • •

Application fee: YVCC has a $30 application fee, and, in addition, some specific professional/technical programs may require an application fee. Placement test fee is $20.00 and is nonrefundable. Fees are to be paid at the time of the test. Audit fees are paid at the same rate as regular tuition. International Student Application fee is $30.00 and is required for new international students and those returning after an absence of one or more years. Lab fees vary. Combined service fees are $4.50 per credit with a maximum of $45.00 per quarter. Technology use fee is $4.50 per credit. ELearning fee is $3.00 per credit. Graduation Application fee is $10.00, charged no more than once per academic year for processing a student’s degree and certificate application. YVCC/Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center (YV-Tech) fees are required for all collaborative programs: $715.00 plus additional applicable fees per quarter. YVCC classes are charged regular YVCC per-credit fees.

Registration fees and tuition are to be paid at the time of registration. Students who have not paid by the specified deadline will be dropped from classes. Note: All tuition and fee rates are subject to change without notice.

Tuition Waivers The State Board for Community and Technical Colleges authorizes and the YVCC Board of Trustees approves waivers of tuition and fees for state-supported classes to specific student populations, listed below. These waivers do not apply to contract or self-support courses. The availability of these waivers is determined on an annual basis. Please contact the Enrollment Services Offices at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog for specific information. • • •

Senior citizen/Gold Card/60+ years of age State employee/permanent full- or half-time (20+ hours a week) Veterans, veterans’ dependents and spouses, National Guard, and selected Reservists

Veterans Some veterans may be eligible for government funding or reduced tuition rates. Please contact the Veterans’ Office at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog for specific information.

Debts & Student Financial Obligations Registration is not complete until all tuition and fees have been paid in full and the payment has cleared. Tuition and fees can be paid online using e-check, Visa, and MasterCard (www.yvcc.edu>Student Portal), in person at the cashier’s counter, or by mail. Checks issued to the college for tuition, fees, or any debt and returned unpaid for any reason will constitute nonpayment. A $25.00 fee is assessed on all returned checks. Students will be administratively blocked from making changes to their existing class schedule, registering for or dropping classes, receiving disbursements or requesting official transcripts until the check and fee is paid in full. Yakima Valley Community College reserves the right to withhold official transcripts or block future registration for any student who has delinquent financial obligations to the college. All outstanding amounts resulting from nonpayment or tuition and fees are the responsibility of the student. Withdrawal from school, officially or unofficially, or non-attendance will not cancel any financial obligation already incurred. Additionally, failure to pay all financial obligations may result in debts being turned over to a collection agency. A $25 fee is assessed on all accounts sent to collection. Collection costs, including attorney fees and other charges necessary for the collection of any amount due, will be added to the students account balance. Refer to YVCC Policy and Procedure Manual, section 1.33.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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FEES & EXPENSES Washington State Residency Residency status for tuition and fee purposes is determined by RCW 28B.15.012 et seq. A resident student is one who is (a) financially independent and has a twelve-month bona fide domicile in the state of Washington for other than educational purposes or (b) financially dependent upon parents or legal guardians, one or both of whom maintain a bona fide domicile in the state of Washington. The term “domicile” denotes a person’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. Financial dependence or independence shall be determined by the amount and kind of financial assistance given to a student and whether or not the student has been claimed as a deduction on income tax forms in the year immediately preceding the quarter for which residency is sought. An independent student who comes to Washington and immediately enrolls at an institution of higher education for more than six credit-hours is assumed to be in the state primarily for educational purposes and cannot establish residency until clear proof is provided showing that she has established a permanent, bona fide domicile with concurrent relinquishment of the prior legal residence. Note: A student cannot qualify as a legal resident of Washington for tuition calculation purposes if he possesses a valid out-of-state driver's license, an out-ofstate vehicle registration, or other documents that give evidence of legal residency in another state. Once a student has been classified a nonresident, the classification will remain until the student completes a residency questionnaire and supplies evidence that supports a change in residency status. Application for a change in residency status and all supporting evidence must be submitted to the Admissions Office by the 30th calendar day following the first day of the quarter for which the change is requested. Any questions regarding residency should be directed to the Admissions Office. Persons who have completed three full years in a Washington State high school and those who have earned a GED after three full years of living in Washington State but who do not have official residence in Washington may contact the Admissions Office to determine eligibility for resident tuition.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Active Duty Military and National Guard Active duty military personnel stationed in Washington and their spouses and dependents are considered residents for tuition and fee-paying purposes. Active duty Washington National Guard members are considered residents for tuition and fee-paying purposes; their spouses and dependents are considered residents only if they reside in Washington.

Refund Policy Refunds are made for official withdrawals only, and no refund will be given for an amount of less than $10. No refunds will be given if an instructor withdraws a student after the first week of the quarter. All refunds are determined by a formula based upon when the withdrawal is made relative to the beginning of the class. Attendance or nonattendance is not considered when granting refunds. Complete withdrawal fees are assessed whether or not students actually attend class. There is a fee of $5 for a complete withdrawl of 1-11 credits (part-time), and a fee of $10 for a complete withdrawal of 12 or more credits (fulltime). Students who withdraw from college in accordance with withdrawal regulations are entitled to the following refund: • •

One hundred percent refund for classes canceled or changed by the college. One hundred percent refund (less complete withdrawal fee) for complete withdrawal prior to, and through, the 5th day of classes (4th day of classes for summer quarter). Fifty percent refund (less complete withdrawal fee) for complete withdrawal after the 5th day of classes and through the 20th calendar day after the start of classes (5th through the 14th day for summer quarter). No refund is granted after the 20th calendar day following the start of the quarter (after the 14th day for summer quarter).

Refunds for classes which do not follow the regular college calendar are applied on a timetable (as established above) proportionate to the standard length of a quarter. Also, refunds for lab fees will be in proportion to the regular tuition refund schedule. Allow four to six weeks for a refund to be processed. Any student receiving federal or state financial aid who officially or unofficially withdraws from YVCC will have funds returned to the appropriate financial aid program based on the regulations governing the program. Contact the Financial Aid Office at the phone number in the front of this catalog for details.


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FEES & EXPENSES YAKIMA VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE TUITION AND FEES 2014 - 2015 Academic Year Tuition is set by the Board for Community and Technical Colleges which acts upon legislative authority. Rates are subject to change Washington Resident

Washington Nonresident Waiver

International Nonresident

Per Credit Charges: State Tuition-Operating Fee

85.68

85.68

244.68

State Tuition-Building Fee

10.58

23.58

23.58

Student Activity Fee

10.58

10.58

10.58

YVCC Technology Fee

4.50

4.50

4.50

YVCC ELearning Fee

3.00

3.00

3.00

YVCC Combined Service Fee

4.50

4.50

4.50

118.84

131.84

290.84

118.84

131.84

290.84

Per Credit Total Charges per Credit 1 2

237.68

263.68

581.68

3

356.52

395.52

872.52

4

475.36

527.36

1163.36

5

594.20

659.20

1454.20

6

713.04

791.04

1745.04

7

831.88

922.88

2035.88

8

950.72

1054.72

2326.72

9

1069.56

1186.56

2617.56

10

1188.40

1318.40

2908.40

11

1248.89

1379.58

2973.90

12

1309.38

1440.76

3039.40

13

1369.87

1501.94

3104.90

14

1430.36

1563.12

3170.40

15

1490.85

1624.30

3235.90

16

1551.34

1685.48

3301.40

17

1611.83

1746.66

3366.90

18

1672.32

1807.84

3432.40

103.76

103.76

275.76

Per credit over 18

* Total cost includes state tuition and fees, combined service fees of $4.50 per credit up to a maximum of $45.00, a $4.50 per credit technology fee, and a $3.00 per credit elearning fee. Special course or laboratory fees may apply to certain courses and will result in additional charges. See course materials for more information. A processing fee is deducted from all college withdrawal refunds $5.00 for part-time, $10.00 for full-time. Note: Veterans may be entitled to reduced tuition. Contact the Veterans’ Office for qualifying information. For more information on the 2014-2015 Fees & Expenses see www.yvcc.edu.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


FINANCIAL AID

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Financing a college education is an investment in the future. Federal and state financial aid programs, as well as privately funded scholarships, are designed to provide the additional financial resources required by students who are pursuing an educational program at Yakima Valley Community College but do not have adequate resources to meet the full cost of attendance.

Assistance Programs Need-Based Programs There are three main types of financial aid that may be included in a student’s financial aid award during the year that are based upon financial need: • Grants, which are usually not repaid. • Loans, which are usually deferred while the student is in school, but which must be repaid. • Student employment, for which the student is paid monthly. Yakima Valley Community College participates in the following need-based programs: • Federal Pell Grant, a federal grant program. The student must enroll for at least one credit per quarter. • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, a federal grant program. The student must enroll for at least one credit per quarter. • Washington State Need Grant, a state grant program. The student must be a Washington State resident or meet specific eligibility requirements and be enrolled in at least three credits per quarter. • Washington State College Bound Scholarship for state residents meeting eligibility requirements. • Washington State Passport for Foster Youth Promise Scholarship serving youth in the state foster care system since 2007. • YVCC Tuition Waiver, a state waiver of tuition, and YVCC Grant, a state grant. The student must be a Washington State resident and be enrolled in at least three credits per quarter. • William D. Ford Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, which is funded by the U.S. Treasury. Subsidized loans generally do not accrue interest while the student is enrolled in school. The student must be enrolled in at least six credits. • Work-study, federal or state-funded student employment programs. Jobs will be on campus with payment on a monthly basis. During the summer, a limited number of positions may be available for continuing students who are not attending summer classes. • Other need-based tuition assistance programs may be available to eligible students who are unemployed or moving from public assistance to work. Please call the Career Connection Center or the Financial Aid Office at the phone numbers in the front of this catalog for current programs and requirements. Financial aid grant and loan funds must be used to pay college educational expenses. Financial aid recipients who receive their award after the beginning of the academic term receive their funds within approximately one week of receiving their award letter. First-year, first-time recipients of federal loans do not receive their first loan check until thirty days after the start of the academic quarter. Programs That Are Not Need-Based • William D. Ford Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, which is a loan not based on financial need. Unsubsidized loans accrue interest while the student is in school; borrowers have the option to pay the interest as it accrues. The student must be enrolled in at least six credits. Eligibility Requirements To be eligible to apply for the federal and state financial aid programs, the student applicant must meet the following requirements: • Be a U.S. citizen, national, or a permanent resident. (International students are not eligible.) • Have a high school diploma or the recognized equivalent (GED). • For State Need Grant only, eligible to pay in-state tuition under HB 1079. • Be in an approved college program which is at least one year in length and leads to a degree or certificate.

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FINANCIAL AID Application Procedure To apply for the federal and state financial aid programs available at the college, the student applicant must: 1. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov or, for HB1079 students without social security numbers, complete the Financail Aid (WASFA) at www. readysetgrad.org/wasfa. 2. Apply for admission to the college. 3. Provide any other required documents as requested by the YVCC Financial Aid Office. Documents are due after the request date. Financial aid applicants must reapply each year. A supplemental request form is available every spring quarter for students who wish to request aid for summer quarter. Need Determination All financial aid at YVCC is administered in accordance with nationally established policies. Financial need is determined by comparing the student applicant’s resources (parents’ contribution, if applicable; student earnings, assets, and other income sources), as reflected on the student’s financial aid application forms, with standard costs for attending YVCC. If the standard costs are greater than the student’s available resources, an award package to cover all or part of the difference is offered as long as program funds permit. The financial aid award may be comprised of grants, student employment, and/or loans. YVCC awards grants first and then student employment and loans based on remaining need. Most YVCC financial aid applicants do not have their full needs met because of the lack of sufficient funds from federal and state funding sources. Additional Requirements Once a student receives financial aid funding, there are several additional requirements: • Use all financial aid funds only for expenses related to attendance at YVCC. • Students must keep the Financial Aid Office advised of any changes in enrollment status and changes in their programs of study. • Financial aid funding is limited to 150% of credits required for the academic program including prerequisites. Extension of programs due to changing majors may result in loss of eligibility before completion of the program. • Students receiving financial aid must enroll in courses that apply directly to their course of study. • Students who are considering a 100% withdrawal from classes must speak to someone in the Financial Aid Office before withdrawing in order to be advised of potential repayment of aid, cancellation of future disbursements, and loss of future eligibility. • Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress in their programs or majors. Each quarter, all the courses for which a student is funded must be completed, and the student must earn at least a 2.0 (C) grade point average to maintain satisfactory progress. Failure to do so will result in the student being placed on financial aid warning or experiencing financial aid cancellation.

Direct Loan Program originations are based on 1 to 45 credits (freshman) and 46 credits or more (sophomore) that apply directly to the student's course of study, or 90-135 credit for juniors in BAS programs, or 136 or more credits for seniors in BAS program. Developmental classes are not counted. Students receiving a Federal Direct Loan must complete both entrance and exit counseling online sessions in order to participate in this loan program. Students pursuing a second or subsequent associate degree maybe eligible for State Need Grant after five years have elapsed.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Conditions Satisfactory Progress To maintain satisfactory academic progress, a student must complete all attempted credits,* earn at least a 2.0 quarterly GPA (C average), and meet YVCC's college-wide academic progress standards. * The number of credits you had on the first day of the quarter or on the day your aid was processed, whichever was later. Students who successfully completed less than 100% of attempted credits, but at least 12 credits, are considered to have met satisfactory progress for financial aid purposes. If you do not complete all attempted credits or earn less than a 2.0 quarterly and cumulative GPA, you risk losing your eligibility. Complete details of the current YVCC satisfactory academic progress policy, including definitions of warning, suspension, and dismissal status; examples of the policy; and how to regain eligibility if your aid is suspended are available online at www.yvcc. edu/financialaid or in printed format at the YVCC Financial Aid Office. Unacceptable Grades These grades are unacceptable: I, W, F, N, V, NC, and any academic renewal notations. Noncompletion You may be required to repay a portion of grant funds if you earn only unacceptable grades and/or complete zero credits. A federal formula (or a state formula for state grants) is used to determine if the aid received must be returned or repaid for the period of enrollment. Students who complete at least 60% of the quarter are not required to repay grants received. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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FINANCIAL AID Student Loan Applicants A student loan request cannot be processed for you if you are on suspension or dismissal. Degree Completion Time Limits • You must complete your program of study within 150% of the normal time frame for federal programs and within 125% of the normal time frame for state programs. For example, continuation of federal aid requires that a 90 credit program of study be completed in no more than 135 credits. • Additional time is granted for developmental classes. Up to 45 additional credits may be added for a 90-credit program. • You must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and must demonstrate that you are making progress towardyour degree or you lose eligibility for financial aid.

Washington State Need Grant Program Conditions of Award If you receive this grant, there are five special conditions, listed below, with which you must comply. If you have questions or find that you cannot comply with these conditions, please see the financial aid administrator at the institution you are attending. • You do not owe a refund or repayment on a State Need Grant, a Pell Grant, or a Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, nor are you in default on a loan made, insured, or guaranteed under the Perkins, Federal Direct, or Federal Family Education Loan programs. In addition, you are not in default on a loan made through a state conditional loan or conditional scholarship program. • This grant is awarded to assist in meeting your educational expenses and should you withdraw from classes, repayment of all or a part of the grant may be required. • You can choose to voluntarily make financial contributions to the Washington Student Achievement Council in recognition of this State Need Grant. All voluntary contributions will be used to provide financial assistance to other students. • The offer of a State Need Grant is subject to and conditioned upon the availability of funds. The Washington Student Achievement Council and the institution through which the grant is awarded reserve the right to withdraw, reduce, or modify the grant due to funding limitations or due to changes in circumstances which affect your eligibility for the State Need Grant. • You are not pursuing a degree in theology.

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Refunds Any student receiving federal or state financial aid who officially or unofficially withdraws from YVCC will have funds returned to the appropriate financial aid program based on the regulations governing that program. Students receiving only institutional financial aid will have tuition and fees refunded to the aid program according to the official college refund policy. Additional information may be found on college website, look for “Repayment If You Withdraw or Stop Attending” .

Additional Sources of Assistance Basic Food, Employment and Training Program (BFET) YVCC’s Basic Food, Employment and Training Program (BFET) provides services to Basic Food (Food Stamp) recipients in Washington State. Services may include establishing or maintaining eligibility for Basic Food while in school, eligibility for child care subsidy, and tuition assistance in some cases. Eligible students must be receiving or eligible to receive Basic Food Benefits, be enrolled in a Progessional/Technical program and be a US citizen or Legal Resident. Students who are receiving TANF are not eligible for BFET. Department of Vocational Rehabilitation Persons who are physically handicapped or those who are unemployable for reasons other than disability may be eligible to receive benefits under this program. Information is available in the Financial Aid Office or through the Department of Public Assistance. Early Achievers Opportunity Grant Early Achievers Opportunity Grant provides assistance with tuition, fees and books to qualified students who are enrolled in Early Childhood Education stackable certificates: Initial Certificate, Short Certificate of Specialization, State ECE Certificate or an AA degree in ECE. Eligible students must be currently working in an Early Achievers child care facility (minimum of 10 hours per week or 40 hours per month for at least 3 months). Must be a Washington State resident to qualify. Opportunity Grant Funding Opportunity Grant provides assistance with tuition, fees and books to low-income students who are enrolled in specific, high-demand career pathway programs at Yakima Valley Community College. The approved programs at YVCC include I-BEST (Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training) programs: Nursing Assistant Certificate and Business Technology (BT) certificates. Additional eligible programs include Allied Health, Nursing AAS, Business Technology and Early Childhood Education. Priority funding goes to students who are enrolled in one of the I-BEST programs. Must be a Washington State resident to qualify.


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Veterans YVCC offers certification for educational benefits, benefits counseling, vocational rehabilitation, tutorial services, VA work-study, and referrals. Benefits available to veterans and dependents are: • Chapter 30: Montgomery GI Bill for service beginning July 1, 1985. • Chapter 31: Vocational rehabilitation for veterans with certified service-related disabilities. • Chapter 33: The Post-9/11 GI Bill is for individuals with at least 90 days of aggregate service on or after September 11, 2001, or individuals discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days. You must have received an honorable discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The bill became effective for training on or after August 1, 2009. • Chapter 35: Educational assistance for survivors and dependents of veterans who are either deceased or are 100% disabled due to service-connected causes. • Chapter 1606: Selected Reserve or National Guard. A Notice of Basic Eligibility (NOBE-DD Form 2384) from the guard or reserve unit and a six-year commitment are required. • REAP Chapter 1607: is a benefit that provides educational assistance to members of the reserve components - Selected Reserve (Sel. Res.) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) - who are called or ordered to active service in response to a war or national emergency, as declared by the President or Congress. The “reserve components” consist of Army Reserve, Naval Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Coast Guard Reserve, and the Army National Guard, Army IRR, Air Force IRR and Marine Corps IRR. Students eligible for VA educational benefits must maintain adequate progress toward their degrees. The college’s scholastic standards are used to determine standards of progress. VA recipients who fail to maintain minimum standards are subject to academic probation/ termination. In addition, students’ attendance is monitored by the veterans coordinator. Worker Retraining Funding The Worker Retraining Program provides tuition assistance to individuals who are receiving WA State Unemployment Insurance Benefits, have lost their jobs due to economic changes or are a displaced homemaker and need to change careers in order to re-enter the workforce. Eligible Worker Retraining students may receive tuition assistance and/or funds to cover the cost of books for one quarter toward an approved Workforce Education degree at Yakima Valley Community College. Workfirst Funding Workfirst Financial Aid assists TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) parents in gaining the skills needed to become employed. Workfirst Financial Aid can pay tuition, fees and books toward an approved vocational degree or certificate. Must be currently receiving TANF and meeting all DSHS participation requirements.

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STUDENT LIFE Associated Students of YVCC Student Life seeks interested students to become a part of the Associated Students of YVCC (ASYVCC) community. The ASYVCC Senate, which is composed of a student representative from each recognized club and program, speaks on behalf of students regarding campus policies and procedures. The ASYVCC Student Government has eight officer positions paid by the Associated Students of YVCC. Three are elected, and five are hired. The ASYVCC Student Government coordinates programs and activities and facilitates disbursement of student funds, which exceed $500,000 annually. The ASYVCC Student Government represents YVCC students on state and national levels and teaches leadership, management, and planning skills. Clubs and Student Organizations Yakima Valley Community College has many student clubs and organizations that are an important supplement to academic experiences. Clubs address special student interests, providing community service opportunities throughout YVCC and the Yakima Valley. Students are also encouraged to form new clubs if current clubs do not meet the needs of a particular interest. Contact the Student Life Office about the procedures to form a new club. Hopf Union Building The Hopf Union Building (HUB), located on the Yakima Campus, is an integral part of the educational mission of Yakima Valley Community College and is designed for all members of the college community. Located at the center of the campus, the HUB offers food service, an espresso bar, a student lounge, restrooms, internet access, and meeting rooms. The bookstore and HUB information desk are also located here. The HUB activities focus on creating a sense of community with opportunities for interaction between members of the campus community. These factors are significant in the enhancement of student development. Student Activities and Programming Students at Yakima Valley Community College benefit from much more than classroom learning through the various programs and activities that offer opportunities for active participation or passive enjoyment. The Student Life Office works with students in providing films, speakers, exhibits, debates, recreational activities, dances, concerts, forums, open microphones, club days, cultural events, and other events. These programs and activities are a coordinated effort to supplement and enhance the curriculum at the college.

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STUDENT LIFE Art - Larson Gallery

Musical Performing Ensembles

The Larson Gallery opened in September 1949 as a gift from Adelbert and Rose Larson to the community and Yakima Valley Junior College (now YVCC). John D. Maloney was the architect, as he had designed the Art Deco Larson Building in downtown Yakima. Many of the original elements of the Larson Gallery building are intact. Today the Larson Gallery continues as a unique and dynamic space featuring local, regional, and national artists. The gallery works in partnership with the Larson Gallery Guild and YVCC to bring exciting and innovative exhibits and programs to Yakima. Annual and biennial exhibits include the Central Washington Artists’ Exhibition and the National Juried Photo Exhibition. Larson Gallery exhibitions are augmented by educational activities, lectures, workshops, and tours. The mission of the gallery is to inspire students, artists, and the community, and to complement YVCC classes and activities. The gallery furthers cultural enrichment for the Yakima Valley by connecting with other entities such as The Seasons and the Yakima Valley Museum. Admission to the Larson Gallery is free to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 to 5:00 pm, and Saturday from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm during exhibitions. For more information, visit www.larsongallery.org or call 509.574.4875.

Performing ensembles are viewed as an essential part of college offerings. The Department of Music features both vocal and instrumental groups which perform throughout the academic year. The Concert Choir and the Chamber Singers perform on campus as well as on tours. The YVCC Salsa Band and jazz combos participate in regional festivals and perform throughout the community and state and occasionally tour outside the United States. The music department offers courses that focus on the use of computer technology for composing and recording original music.

Athletics Yakima Valley Community College has successfully competed in intercollegiate athletics since 1928. YVCC has traditionally offered a comprehensive athletic program to accommodate the special interests and talents of as many students as possible. Women's and men's sports programs, providing competitive athletic experiences to coincide with the student's academic experiences, are a high goal at YVCC. The YVCC Yaks have captured conference team titles in as many as three sports in one year. We are proud of the number of athletes who have gone on to successful careers at four-year schools and to professional sports. YVCC is a member of the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges (NWAACC).Intercollegiate athletic programs are offered in baseball, men’s and women’s basketball, softball, volleyball and women’s soccer. Competition primarily comes from schools in Washington and Oregon.

Drama YVCC Playmasters produces two or three full-length productions each year. Additionally, Playmasters supports the development and implementation of student-created theatre pieces; provides internship opportunities for qualified students in areas such as directing, playwriting, and stage management; participates in a range of community outreach efforts; and supports the work of visiting theatre artists. YVCC Playmasters is an active member of the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival Northwest Drama Conference and is affiliated with the American Theatre Association.

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COLLEGE RESOURCES Bookstore The Yakima Valley Community College Bookstore, centrally located in the southeast corner of the Hopf Union Building, is owned and operated by YVCC. A branch of the bookstore also operates at the Grandview Campus. The bookstore provides required and recommended textbooks, a full selection of school supplies, reference materials, and study aids. In addition, general books, snack items, gifts, greeting cards, and imprinted clothing are available. You can purchase your textbooks in the store or online at www.yvccbookstore.com. Textbook Refund/Buy-back • Refunds on textbooks are processed during the first two weeks of each quarter and with a bookstore receipt. Refunds on textbooks during the second week require an original bookstore receipt and a drop slip. The textbooks must be in the original condition including the shrink wrap and codes unopened. • Textbook buy-back is conducted on the Yakima Campus during final exam week of each quarter. No receipt is required. Go to www.yvccbookstore.com for hours of operation and textbook buy-back dates.

Child Care Services Easter Seals Jane’s House Early Learning Center At 1101 South 13th Avenue, Jane’s House serves students, YVCC employees, and community members from 6:30 am to 6:00 pm Please call the phone number listed in the directory at the front of this catalog or email mgunderson@wa.easterseals.com for information. The YVCC Early Learning Center is an inclusive child development center for children of all abilities, run by Easter Seals Washington. The center offers much more than high quality childcare. Our certified preschool teachers offer a carefully planned educational experience designed to meet the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional needs of young children. All students receive a reduced student rate. Bilingual staff members are available, and the center is ADA-accessible.

Computer Labs Student Technology Centers Student Technology Centers are drop-in, instructional-support computer labs. Students may use the centers to complete word processing assignments and other college-related assignments as specifically directed by their instructors. Students may also have Internet access and restricted email rights. Staff is available to provide support for technology applications. Students are required to show a current student ID card to use the computer labs. The technology centers located on the Yakima Campus are in the Deccio Higher Education Center, Rooms C208 and C230 (Student Technology Centers North). The Grandview Student Technology Center is located in L116. Open hours for the centers vary. Please check the YVCC website, or contact the lab directly. Phone numbers are listed at the front of this catalog. Hours may vary during finals week and by quarter, and may be closed on campus holidays.

Cooperative Education Program Cooperative education is a form of education which incorporates real work experience into the curriculum. Students contact the head of the department for which they wish to receive co-op credit. The students can apply classroom theory to their related major work experience, thus enhancing career choices, building human relations skills, and increasing financial potential while earning credits.

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COLLEGE RESOURCES Counseling & Advising Center The Counseling & Advising Center offers various resources designed to assist students to achieve academic success, acquire skills for employment, improve personal well-being, and develop effective skills for interacting in a diverse environment. Counseling services are available at no cost to registered YVCC students. Services available through the Counseling & Advising Center include: • Short-term personal counseling • Transfer information • Decision-making regarding career and life goals • Strategies for dealing with the fear of testing and new situations • Academic counseling • College survival and study skills • Student advocacy • Degree audits The Counseling & Advising Center is located in the Deccio Higher Education Center, Room C164. The phone number is located in the front of this catalog. For information about Grandview Campus counseling services, call the number in the directory in the front of this catalog. Advising The purpose of advising at Yakima Valley Community College is to assist students in making appropriate choices that will help them reach their academic and career goals. Advising is the shared responsibility of the student and the academic advisor. All students are assigned a faculty advisor based on their academic pathway. Students should meet with their advisor each quarter to develop a plan for their education and to ensure that they are on the right track for graduation. Mandatory Advising for New Students All new students will be mandatorily advised until they have successfully completed 30 college level credits. They are assigned an advisor based on their academic pathway. Transfer and Returning Students Transfer and returning students will be mandatorily advised their first quarter and until they have met the 30 credit criteria for new students. Once the requirement has been met they can be released from mandatory advising by their academic advisor. Changing your Major or Program Students who choose to change their major or program must fill out a “Change in Major form”. These forms are located in Registration or the Counseling/Advising Office.

Disability Support Services Yakima Valley Community College is committed to providing access for all students wishing to attend its campuses and complies with Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). As part of this commitment, the college’s Disability Support Services (DSS) program works on an individual basis with qualifying students by providing appropriate classroom accommodations, access to adaptive equipment, and barrier-free facilities.

Videophone YVCC offers deaf and hard of hearing students Vp technology to replace TTY services. The Vp connects users to an interpreter relay service that enables them to call any phone number and communicate effectively. Yakima Campus has a Vp in the Deccio Higher Education Center, Room C138, that deaf and hard-of-hearing students can access. There will be a Vp at Grandview Campus in the near future. For more information, call the coordinator for special populations at the number listed in the front of this catalog.

Library and Media Services Raymond Library and the Media Center are located in Raymond Hall. The library, housed on the first floor, provides services for students, including a wide variety of print resources specifically selected to support the college curriculum. The library collection includes over 45,000 books, several newspapers, periodical subscriptions, and online access to several thousand full-text periodicals. The library and media center collections can be accessed through a webdelivered catalog found on the library homepage, yvcclibrary.us/Yakima. The library/media center homepage also includes links to course-related resources, web resources, and several subscription databases covering academic disciplines taught at YVCC that are only available to enrolled YVCC students or to individuals physically in Raymond Library. The library also provides ASK US!, a 24 hour service to submit reference questions via email or live chat sessions. Reference service and instruction are available. During the three main quarters, the library presents various workshops designed to assist students with using the library and its services more effectively. Books and periodical articles not available in the YVCC library may generally be borrowed via interlibrary loan from another library. The library has wireless printing, color or black and white printing from all the library computers, and both black and white and color photocopiers. Students may also scan documents, then fax, e-mail or save them to a USB drive. There is a paper punch, stapler, paper cutter, and other tools to help complete projects and papers. Media Services, located on the second floor of Raymond Hall, has a wide range of services designed to support student learning, including the ability to stream any video or DVD owned by the college to any network computer on either the Yakima or Grandview campuses. Lapatops may be borrowed by currently enrolled students. The second floor also has a large study room, several small group study rooms (keys may be checked out in the media center), wireless access, and the library classroom.

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COLLEGE RESOURCES Grandview Library Grandview Library, situated on the YVCC Campus, is a joint partnership of YVCC and the city of Grandview serving the community, faculty, staff and currently enrolled students of YVCC. The library contains over 40,000 items for all ages and scholarly volumes specifically selected to support the college curriculum, online access to several thousand full text periodicals, print periodicals and 5 current newspapers. A wide variety of popular and documentary videos and DVDs are available for check out, as are a selection of music CD’s and books on CD. Downloadable popular music, audio and e-books are available through the library’s website at www.yvcc.edu/grandviewlibrary. Staff is available to assist with questions regarding e-media and use of personal e-readers. Use your Grandview Library card and password to access the Library’s website to check your library account, search the catalog and the databases; download music, audio-books, and e-books; renew your items and place holds. Interlibrary loan may be available for materials not owned by the library. The library has 25 computer workstations available, as well as, WiFi capability, 2 study rooms which seat up to 6 and a Program Room which seats 32. A copy machine/printer is available for black and white printing. The library houses the Blance McLane Cook Art Library which contains art works and a collection of books that were bequeathed to the library. The collection continues to grow due to monies left in trust. This trust also sponsors an annual art scholarship of at least $2,000.00 Reference help is always available, as are tours and orientations with sufficient notice. Organized tours for both students and community groups are available by reservation and can be tailored to fit the needs of the requestor. Due to the unique nature of the library, there are children’s events and activities throughout the year and a monthly adult book discussion group hosted by the Friends of Grandview Library.

Mathematics Center The math centers, located on the first floor of Glenn Anthon Hall in room 101 on the Yakima Campus and in L102 at Grandview Campus, provide drop-in instructional support for classes from arithmetic through calculus. Math Department instructors and instructional technicians provide individualized assistance to address students’ questions about topics from their mathematics courses as well as other mathematics-related courses. Help is also provided through computer/CD instruction focusing on concept development and guided practice. Resources such as calculators, textbooks, manipulatives, math-related materials, and supplemental written materials are available to students in the study areas of the center. Hours are posted at the center each quarter. For further information, check online at www.yvcc.edu/mathcenter or call the phone number in the front of this catalog.

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Security YVCC security is responsible for the enforcement of college policy, rules, regulations and local, state and federal laws on the YVCC Campus. This includes tracking, monitoring and providing crime statistics required by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act of 1998, which are made available in the campus security office in Palmer Hall. Crime statistics are also available on the security website: www.yvcc.edu/security Accidents, Auto, and Personal Injury All accidents occurring on campus must be reported and documented immediately to campus security. Alcohol and Drugs Yakima Valley Community College enforces the DrugFree Workplace Act of 1988. Campus Closures In the event that YVCC cancels classes due to an emergency situation or weather condition, the college’s Emergency Preparedness Planning Team will take steps to inform the college community. Students and employees can: • Listen to local media outlets including television and radio stations in Yakima and Tri-Cities for information on college closures. Be sure to listen for clarification on whether the closure is for Yakima or Grandview campuses and whether only day classes or if evening classes are also affected. Evening students, please check the website in the late afternoon, as the status of the closure may change. • View updated information on the college website: www.yvcc.edu/alerts and Flash Alert Newswire website: www.schoolreport.org • Receive email/text messages through YVCC’s notification system, RAVE. RAVE will automatically send YVCC students and employees who have an email on file with the college an email alert. You have the option to change your preferences and add your cellphone number to receive a text message. The college will active your RAVE account during your first quarter as a YVCC student or employee, you are then responsible to manage the account by updating your contact information. For more details, visit www.yvcc.edu/alerts Unless otherwise notified, the college will resume regular business hours the following day. Information on YVCC’s Emergency Preparedness Planning can be found online at www.yvcc.edu/security


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COLLEGE RESOURCES Lost and Found The campus Lost and Found is located in the Security Office in Palmer Hall. Parking • Citations Citations may be paid at the Cashier’s Office in the Deccio Higher Education Center. To appeal a ticket, contact the Security Office. • Paid Parking Individuals choosing to park in one of the college’s many paid parking lots will be required to pay all parking fees with exact change only. All-Day parking permits are valid in all YVCC pay lots and must be displayed face-up on the dash to be valid. • Student Parking Students must apply for parking permits online at: www.yvcc.edu/parkingpermits , using the “parking permits” link at the left hand column of the page. You will be directed to Campus Tools where you will need to sign-up for an account if you have not already done so. Vehicle information will be required in order to obtain your parking permit. Once the application has been submitted, students can pick up their permit in the Security Office in Palmer Hall (X101) or in Sundquist Hall (S160). While you are on this application of the Security website, please take time to familiarize yourself with the parking map and associated parking rules to avoid getting a parking citation. • Visitors and Guests Campus visitors and guests must receive a visitor permit from their YVCC Host. Visitor permits are valid only in the visitor parking lot located in front of Prior Hall and must be placed face-up on the dash to be valid.

Student Residence Center/ Housing Most college students find that the postive experience of learning to live with others enriches their lives. Your residence hall experience can prove to be as valuable as your academic experience. The Student Residence Center (SRC) provides a safe living community for students at a competitive price. The residence hall is located on campus and is within a short walking distance to classes, the library, and other campus and recreational facilities.

Tutoring Center Tutoring is available in small group, drop-in, direct one-on-one, and online peer tutoring formats. The tutoring center on the Yakima Campus is located in the Raymond Hall Building, room R202. Tutoring services are also available in Grandview. Part-time employment is available for students who qualify as tutors. Students who are interested are encouraged to visit the tutoring center for information regarding academic help or employment. Hours are posted at the center each quarter. For more information, check online at www.yvcc.edu/tutoring or call the phone number in the front of this catalog.

Services Security staff can help with minor emergencies such as jumpstarting a car or retrieving keys from non-power locks. Limited service is also available for vehicles with power locks. Lock your car and place anything of value out of sight or locked in the trunk. If you should experience a theft on campus, report it immediately to the Security Office. As in any public place, do not leave personal belongings unattended.

Speech Lab The speech lab, located in Prior 210B on the Yakima Campus, provides a non-judgmental environment to help students use various audio and visual media to prepare and practice oral presentations and other communication skills such as American Sign Language. The lab is open Monday through Friday. For more information, call the phone number in the front of this catalog.

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COLLEGE RESOURCES Wellness and Recreation Fitness Center & Weight Room Students, faculty, and staff have access to the fitness center, weight room, and gymnasium in Sherar Gymnasium for recreational and leisure time activity. Lockers are available, an exercise dress code is enforced, and participants have access to professional staff in the development of a personal fitness/wellness program. The results of a physical fitness screening exam may require a participant to obtain a physician’s permission to use the fitness center. Each person using the fitness center and weight room must register for a credit or noncredit class and pay a quarterly lab fee. The money generated with this fee is used to maintain current equipment, to purchase new equipment, and for staffing. Grading for credit classes is based on the total hours of exercise time accumulated during the quarter. The fitness center includes circuit workout equipment as well as cardiovascular machines including treadmills, elliptical machines, recumbent and stationary bicycles. It also has room for stretching and abdominal work. Although the fitness center accommodates the workout needs of the physically active, a primary focus of the center is to target first-time exercisers who want to improve their health. The weight room features free weights and contains a variety of equipment, including cable cross over, bench press, leg press, pec/lat machine, barbells, 5 to 75 pound dumbbell sets, squat racks, bench press stations and a Smith machine. In addition, there is universal equipment featuring cable cross over, lateral pull, seated row, and triceps extension. The YVCC fitness center is open during fall, winter, and spring quarters. Hours are posted outside the fitness center. For more information, call the athletic director.

Writing Center The writing centers, located on the first floor of Glenn Anthon Hall in room G125 on the Yakima Campus and in L101 at the Grandview Campus, provide YVCC students oneto-one assistance with their writing projects for any course, academic or vocational. Writing consultants meet with students to read, listen, talk about ideas, and help students assess the strengths and weaknesses of their writing. Consultants also can suggest strategies for generating ideas, planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Students who use the writing center should bring a copy of their assignment with them and any corresponding notes, drafts, and portable storage devices. Current hours for both locations are listed on the website at www.yvcc.edu/owl. For further information, call the phone number in the front of this catalog.

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Online Writing Center The Online Writing Center allows YVCC students to receive feedback on their writing projects outside the hours of the writing centers. Through the site, students may submit drafts or ask writing-related questions. Consultants will then email students a response, usually within 48 hours. Visit www.yvcc.edu/owl.

YVCC foundation scholarships & awards Since its inception in 1977 the Yakima Valley Community College (YVCC) Foundation’s purpose has been to provide student scholarships and support the college. The Foundation board is made up of alumni, business, civic, and professional leaders. The YVCC Foundation administers and awards scholarship funds from several different donors. For a complete list of scholarships and their criteria, reference pages 169-173. Applications for the YVCC Foundation scholarships are available each year beginning the first day of winter quarter and are due on March 15. The application can be found online at www.yvcc.edu/scholarships. The Foundation staff will match recipients to the appropriate scholarship(s). Scholarships are presented at the annual awards ceremony held in June. To learn more about the YVCC Foundation or to become a donor, contact the Foundation Office at 509.574.4645.


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Basic Skills Basic Skills instruction is provided to adults 16 or older. Entrance testing is used to determine placement levels. Instruction is individualized, computer assisted, and takes place in small classroom groups. Main areas of study are basic reading, writing, math, and English as a Second Language. Students are helped with basic literacy improvement and/or with GED preparation and transition to college classes. Adult English as a Second Language Literacy is for non- or limited English-speaking adults who want to learn English. Classes combine listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Day and evening classes, ABE labs, and online classes are offered. Students pay $25.00 tuition each quarter. Students should contact one of the locations listed below for admission and information. Phone numbers for these locations can be found in the directory at the front of this catalog. Ellensburg, 401 East Mountain View Grandview Campus, 500 West Main Street Sunnyside, 2590 Yakima Valley Highway, Suite 3 Toppenish, 516 West First Avenue Yakima Campus, Sundquist Hall, 1105 S 15th Ave

Career Connection Center The diversity of programs comprising the Career Connection Center is committed to serving the dynamic needs of Workforce Education Division students. By streamlining financial and human resources, the Career Connection Center provides a single point of entry for worker retraining students, displaced homemakers, certified training participants, WorkFirst clients, and other service-seeking individuals. Students or potential enrollees may access career guidance information, education assistance, and other YVCC resources and community services. Certified Training Programs Certified training programs may be available through the Career Connection Center. Please call the phone numbers listed in the front of this catalog for more information.

Community Service Courses As a service to the communities of the Yakima Valley, Yakima Valley Community College offers a limited selection of self-supported courses and workshops to address special interests. Self-supported courses do not receive funding from the State of Washington, and depend solely on the fee charged to participating students. Community service courses and workshops may be offered in a variety of fields, including but not limited to recreation, conversational languages, music, business and financial planning, and other interest areas. The community service courses or workshops offered will vary depending on interest, instructor availability, and availability of appropriate facilities. Community service courses do not offer credit, and may not be used to satisfy degree or certificate requirements. Community service courses or workshops are listed in the class schedule, or you may contact the division offices for information about current offerings. Information on current Community Service courses or workshops can be found in the current class schedule, through division offices, or at www.yvcc. edu/continuingeducation .

Displaced Homemakers The Displaced Homemaker Program offers free services to those students who are eligible. The Displaced Homemaker Program at YVCC is designed to meet specific needs of anyone attempting to make the difficult transition from home and financial dependency to the workplace and financial independence. The training and services offered provide a supportive environment designed to enhance and build self-esteem, confidence, and marketable skills. The Displaced Homemaker Program can help students understand their needs, develop confidence, identify their work-related skills, explore education and career options, make decisions and set goals, develop effective learning and study techniques, and learn computer basics. The courses are offered for college transfer-level credit. For more information, call the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

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PROGRAMS & SERVICES General Education Development GED Preparation Adults 16 and older who want to prepare for the GED (General Education Development) test are pretested at the Adult Basic Education centers. Pretesting determines readiness and areas for additional preparation. Students are aided through individualized or classroom studies to prepare for taking the GED test. Students enrolled in Basic Skills courses pay $25.00 tuition each quarter. Students may contact the nearest center for information. GED Examination GED testing is offered at both Yakima and Grandview campuses. Visit our website (see directory) for specific information regarding GED testing.

High School Diploma Pathways to a High School Diploma (SHB 1758) Before Age 21 Access the local school district or online public schools to gain a high school diploma. Current or former Running Start students who complete an associate degree of any type at a Washington state community or technical college may request a high school diploma issued through the community or technical college. Running Start students must contact the Running Start Office for more information. After Age 21 Complete the GED exam and obtain your GED or enroll at a community or technical college in Washington State and complete an associate degree of any type, and then request a high school diploma issued through the community or technical college.

Honors Program YVCC’s Honors Program creates opportunites across diverse disciplines for intellectually motivated students to challenge themselves. A wide range of classes will be offered with honors options for Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. At least one course will be offered with an honors option in each of the following programs during the 2013-2014 school year: • American Sign Language • Anthropology • Art • Biology • Chemistry • Economics • Geography • History • Mathematics • Philosophy • Political Science • Psychology

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Students wishing to pursue their intellectual and academic passions, work closely with a faculty mentor in guided research opportunities, and participate in a community of scholars. Scholars at YVCC will be asked by the YVCC’s Honors Program to: • Complete an application, which includes eligibility for college-level mathematics and ENGL& 101, current grade point average of 3.3, statement of intent, and letters of recommendation; and • Negotiate an honors contract with an honors instructor, which will establish the agreed upon terms for earning honors credit. As a community college, YVCC serves a diverse student body. The Honors Program recognizes this diversity and allows for faculty to sponsor promising students who may not meet all of the eligibility requirements. Note that the program is still in its infancy, so particulars will be revised as new issues arise and participation increases. For more information, contact Dr. Heidi Shaw at hshaw@yvcc.edu or 509.574.4812.

Retired & Senior Volunteer Program The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) of Yakima County is part of the National Senior Service Corps administered by the Corporation for National Service. RSVP provides older Americans, age 55+, an opportunity to remain involved in their community through meaningful volunteer activity. At the same time, RSVP seeks to provide vital volunteer services for our community. RSVP volunteers provide hundreds of community services through participating stations (non-profit agencies, schools and government programs). Volunteers may continue in their professional fields while volunteering or choose an assignment for the challenge it offers. Whatever a person’s skill, experience, interest or goals, they can be put to good use for the benefit of the community. RSVP of Yakima County has been sponsored by Yakima Valley Community College(YVCC) for almost 15 years. YVCC’s commitment to “community” is demonstrated by providing opportunities for economic, social, and cultural development through this volunteer program. Students may contact RSVP of Yakima County for information on current volunteer opportunities. RSVP is located at 120 South 3rd Street, Suite 200B, Yakima or call 509.574.1933 for more information.


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PROGRAMS & SERVICES

2

TRIO Programs

Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center

Upward Bound and Student Support Services (SSS) assist lowincome, first-generation college students and students with disabilities in overcoming class, social, academic, and cultural barriers to higher education. TRIO programs are funded entirely by the U.S. Department of Education.

In a collaborative agreement between YVCC and YV-Tech, students from both schools can complete YV-Tech training and additional YVCC classes to earn a certificate or a two-year degree from YVCC. Articulated programs include dental assisting (certificate program), automotive service technology, radio broadcasting and TV/video production.

TRIO Student Support Services TRIO Student Support Services provides a structured firstyear experience that makes transition into college easier. The program also provides tutoring, counseling, and other support services that help students achieve their degrees. For more information, visit www. yvcc.edu/TRIOSSS Upward Bound Upward Bound is a precollege program that offers counseling, tutoring, and learning skills classes to support the educational efforts of students from Sunnyside, Granger, Toppenish, and Wapato high schools. Upward Bound also offers a five-week, residential summer college experience. For more information, visit www.yvcc.edu/upwardbound.

Worker Retraining The Worker Retraining Program provides training assistance for unemployed, dislocated workers whose lives are in transition from low or obsolete skills to marketable, employable skills for future work opportunities. Services range from short-term to long-term vocational program opportunities. Dislocated workers, individuals on unemployment, or workers facing imminent layoffs in the Yakima Valley may qualify for Worker Retraining funds. Individuals must meet the following criteria: • Currently receive, or are eligible to receive, Washington State unemployment benefits • Have exhausted Washington State unemployment benefits within the past 24 months, or • Are a dislocated worker • Are a displaced homemaker For more information, please call Worker Retraining at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

WorkFirst The WorkFirst team at YVCC believes in the Washington State goal for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients “A job, a better job, a better life.” The goal of WorkFirst is to help TANF parents learn skills intended to help them seek jobs, exit welfare, and lift their families out of poverty. For eligibility criteria and further information, please call WorkFirst at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

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POLICIES Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are designed to eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. As a recipient of such funds, YVCC is bound to ADA guidelines. Specifically, no student shall, on the basis of his/her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subject to discrimination under any college policies, programs, or activities.

Catalog Guidelines: Subject to Change Every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information contained in this catalog. Students are advised, however, that such information is subject to change without notice, and advisors should, therefore, be consulted on a regular basis for current information. Catalogs, class schedules, fee schedules, etc., are not to be considered as binding contracts between YVCC and students. The college and its divisions reserve the right at any time to make changes in any regulations or requirements governing instruction in and graduation from the college and its various divisions. Changes shall take effect whenever the proper authorities determine and shall apply not only to prospective students but also to those who are currently enrolled at the college. Except as other conditions permit, the college will make every reasonable effort to ensure that students currently enrolled in programs and making normal progress toward completion of any requirements will have the opportunity to complete any program which is to be discontinued.

Disclosure Requirements and Campus Security Campus crime data and safety policies can be obtained from the Security Office in Palmer Hall. Information on participation rates, financing, and graduation rates for athletics can be obtained from the YVCC Athletic Department in Sherar Gym. Data on college graduation and transfer-out rates can be obtained from the Enrollment Services Office in the Deccio Higher Education Center.

Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 Yakima Valley Community College complies with Public Law 100-690, providing information and following policies for the purpose of preventing and addressing alcohol and drug abuse. It is the goal of YVCC to adhere to federal regulations and provide a drug-free environment. YVCC is dedicated to maintaining a drug-free campus for students and employees. The following sites are a few of many which detail the significant health risks that can result from drug and alcohol abuse: • Washington State DSHS: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/dbhr/ • National Institute on Drug Abuse: http://www.drugabuse.gov/students-young-adults • The Center for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/

YVCC policy WAC 132P-33-170 prohibits students from: • • •

Possessing, consuming, or furnishing alcoholic beverages on college-owned or controlled property or at college-sponsored or supervised functions where prohibited by law. Disorderly conduct, including disorderly conduct resulting from drunkenness. Using, possessing, furnishing, or selling any narcotic or dangerous drug as those terms are used in Washington statutes, except when the use of possession of a drug is specifically prescribed as medication by an authorized medical doctor or dentist.

These behaviors are prohibited on campus and in all off-campus locations where classes seminars, workshops, meetings, and college related activities are offered. Information about federal and state drug laws are available from the applicable authorities. Some sources available on the internet include Washington State Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 69.50 and title 21 of the federal United States Code (USC). Community Resources: YVCC students with questions and concerns relating to alcohol or drug problems

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POLICIES are encouraged to contact the YVCC Counseling & Advising Center. Employees are encouraged to seek information and assistance from recognized community professionals. The following community resources are available to provide help with drug or alcohol problems: Alcohol and Drug Help Line: 1.800.562.1240; Alcoholics Anonymous: 509.453.7680 (Yakima), 509.735.4086 (Grandview). A complete list of community alcohol and drug treatment facilities can be found in the yellow pages of the telephone directory listed under “Alcoholism Information and Treatment” and “Drug Abuse Information and Treatment.”

Student Identifier Numbers The Washington State Legislature passed a bill that requires Washington State colleges and universities to discontinue the use of Social Security Numbers (SSN) to identify students and their records. The law is intended to add additional protections to student privacy, student identity, and student records. A student identifier (SID) has been assigned to students whose SSN was used as their primary identifier. The new SID is required whenever students access the YVCC website or when they request services on campus. The SID will also appear on class rosters and other college documents and records. The SSN is not used as the primary student identifier. The SSN is stored confidentially in the student’s records and can only be used for necessary purposes such as financial aid, financial aid-related verifications, Hope Scholarships, transcripts, workforce or unemployment data matching, and other legitimate uses as authorized under the Privacy Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-579, Section 7). In response to state Senate Bill 5463, the college has modified how SIDs are assigned to new students. The purpose of the change is to move forward a common SID across the system, where students eventually have one single SID regardless of which and how many colleges in the system they attend.

Tobacco Use Policy Use of tobacco products is prohibited at Yakima Valley Community College except in designated areas. Reference campus maps. In accordance with state laws and regulations, tobacco products in any form, shall not be permitted except in designated areas. Because there is increasing evidence that use of tobacco creates a danger to public health, and in order to protect the public’s safety and welfare, the declared purpose of this regulation is to prohibit the use of tobacco products in certain places which are used by and open to the public. “Tobacco” as used in this policy shall include products such as chewing tobacco or the smoking or carrying of any kind of lighted pipe, cigar or cigarette. The adjective “public” as used in this policy shall mean any place used by and open to the general public, regardless of whether such place is owned by private persons, the State of Washington, or counties and municipalities of the State of Washington.

Social Security Number Disclosure A student’s social security number is confidential, and, under authority of the federal Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA), the college will protect it from unauthorized use and disclosure. In compliance with state and federal requirements, disclosure may be authorized for the purposes of state and federal financial aid, American Opportunity/Lifetime Learning tax credits, academic transcripts, assessment, or accountability research.

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STUDENT RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES Admission to the college carries with it the expectation that students will conduct themselves as responsible members of the college community, that they will comply with the rules and regulations of the college, maintain high standards of integrity and honesty, respect the rights, privileges, and property of other members of the college community, and will not interfere with legitimate college affairs.

The Code The document, Code of Students Rights and Responsibilities, is available in the Enrollment Services Office on the Yakima Campus and in the Student Services Office at the Grandview Campus. It describes student rights and responsibilities and the policies and procedures which govern students at YVCC, including any disputes involving the college, its faculty or staff, and the student. The code also describes violations, procedures, and sanctions. The most current document is available at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/

Academic Dishonesty Plagiarism: Buying, copying, borrowing, or otherwise plagiarizing another's images, ideas, evidence, examples, opinions, or other original products or documents from published, unpublished, or electronic sources for the purpose of deceiving an instructor as to the product's origin. Plagiarism is "the wrongful act of taking the product of another person's mind and presenting it as one's own" (MLS Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 4th Edition, p. 26). Plagiarism occurs when an author fails to give credit for someone else's words, someone else's examples, someone else's ideas or opinions, statistics or other facts compiled by someone else, evidence or testimony taken from someone else's argument, or an image from another artist. YVCC recognizes two types of plagiarism: intentional and unintentional. Intentional plagiarism is the dishonest act of appropriating another's ideas, words, facts, opinions, or images with the intent to deceive others about the document's origin. Any student found to have committed intentional plagiarism shall be subject to disciplinary actions provided for in the code for "Procedures and Summary Suspension Rules." Students may also commit plagiarism without the intent to deceive. A student's intent to deceive shall be taken into account when instructors evaluate an act of plagiarism. All forms of plagiarism which an instructor determines to be unintentional should be treated as instructional problems to be handled within the student-instructor relationship with the instructor following, but not limited by, the following penalty guidelines: • Student must resubmit the assignment after instruction, but before an agreed-upon due date. • Student can receive a lowered grade on the assignment, including F. • Student can be advised to seek aid from the Writing Center or Tutoring Center as a condition for receiving a grade or resubmitting an assignment. The instructor need not take formal disciplinary action for unintentional plagiarism.

Children in College Activities According to state law, preteen children are not permitted to be on campus, and only registered students and authorized college staff and volunteers may participate in field trips, retreats, or other collegeauthorized travel activities. See WAC 132P-40-001 on http://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac.

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STUDENT RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES Financial Obligations

Student Participation in Governance

The student debt policy is in effect to promote fair treatment of students who are in debt to the college and to provide an accurate and systematic procedure for collecting these debts. The college intends to provide an atmosphere of support while developing a sense of responsibility in students who have incurred debts to the college. Students who have any debt reported to the registrar from any college department or operational unit will have their registration blocked and transcripts withheld until the debt is cleared or arrangements for payment are approved. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure his/her account is kept current. Students may check their balance online through the My Online Services, Class Schedule page for the exact amount of tuition and fees due. YVCC does not mail statements of account. Registration, online or in person, obligates students for payment of all tuition and class fees. Non-attendance does not relieve students of their academic and financial obligations; official withdrawal procedures must be followed.

As members of the college community, students will be free, individually and collectively, to express their views on college policy and on matters of general interest to the student body. The ASYVCC Constitution and the college's administrative procedures provide clear channels for student participation in the formulation and application of institutional policies regarding academic and student affairs. Individuals affected by a policy shall have a representative voice in the formulation of that policy.

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Obtaining Information on Requirements The student has the right to seek academic advice when planning a course of study; however, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to read the catalog; check the requirements for his/her degree, certificate, or graduation; contact any schools to which transfer is anticipated. All degree seeking students are issued a course catalog during New Student Orientation. The course catalog can also be viewed online at www.yvcc.edu under Resources. The student should become familiar with the catalog and the admission, registration, and academic requirements contained within. YVCC occasionally hosts Transfer Fairs that are attended by four-year colleges and universities. This is an opportunity for students to discuss transferring with representatives from those colleges and universities. It is also advised to visit the other college and university’s websites for more information. YVCC provides abundant reference materials for the student and faculty adviser to use, but the final responsibility rests with the student.

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ACADEMIC RULES Academic Progress Standards & Procedures Purpose Yakima Valley Community College is committed to the educational success of students. The college recognizes that individual student success requires a clear educational goal, careful course selection, and a substantial commitment of student time and effort. In support of student success, the college provides programs and services to assist students with their educational choices and their learning processes. The college has the additional obligation to support and require academic progress for enrolled students. This is essential both for the well-being of the student and for the responsible management of the public higher education resources. Standards In order to maintain satisfactory progress while enrolled at YVCC, students are expected to maintain a grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a quarterly and a cumulative basis. Financial aid students must successfully complete all of the credits for which they are awarded financial aid and must earn at least a 2.0 quarterly GPA to maintain satisfactory progress. Specific details of the financial aid satisfactory progress requirements are available online at www.yvcc.edu/financialaid or in printed format at the Financial Aid Office. Students may not always be able to maintain these academic standards, so the college provides the following rules, supports, and procedures: Determining an Academic Plan All new degree-seeking students must establish that they are prepared to succeed in their chosen educational program. Upon completion of 30 college-level credits, students who have not declared a program or major area of study will be required to meet with their advisor to prepare a degree audit and declare a major. Commitment to Academic Goals Upon completion of 60 credits toward the transfer associate degree or an associate of applied science degree, students must apply for graduation. Certificate students must apply for graduation one or two quarters prior to graduation, depending on the certificate requirements. This timeline is intended to allow sufficient time for necessary adjustments to a student's course schedule and to better support timely program completion. Students will receive a postcard reminding them to apply for graduation. Academic Probation Students will be placed on academic probation when their GPA falls below the minimum standard of 2.00. The assignment of 10 or more credits of V grades in any quarter results in the student being placed on academic probation. Academic Suspension Students who have been placed on academic probation and who fail during the next quarter to make satisfactory progress shall be suspended for one academic quarter. Students placed on academic suspension will be notified by mail and may appeal by the deadline stated in their suspension letter. Students who do not appeal will be dropped from their classes (tuition will be refunded, if warranted) and will be required to meet with their advisor and complete a degree audit as a condition of re-enrollment. Students will be blocked from registration until evidence of their degree audit is submitted to the Registration Office. Academic Dismissal Students who return from prior suspension and fail to earn a minimum 2.0 GPA for the quarter shall be dismissed from the college, subject to appeal. If dismissal is upheld, the student will not be eligible to return until the fourth quarter following the dismissal. Students will be blocked from registration until evidence of their degree audit is submitted to the Registration Office.

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ACADEMIC RULES Academic Renewal Policy In order to encourage students who may not have been successful during their previous college work, YVCC has established an academic renewal policy. Students who return after an absence of at least a year, and who subsequently pass two quarters of work (at least 12 credits each quarter) with a 2.0 GPA or better, may petition the Registrar and Director for Enrollment Services to implement the academic renewal policy. If the petition is accepted, grades for the quarter chosen, and all quarters prior to the one chosen, will be changed to “No Credit.” All courses previously taken remain on the transcript, but the grade point average is adjusted. Courses subject to this policy will not count toward completion of the student's program of study. Students who wish to rescind this policy must petition to the Registrar. The policy may be used only once, and students must be enrolled at the time the policy is implemented. No other college work is subject to the provisions of this policy.

Attendance Class attendance is required at the discretion of the instructor. Regular class attendance is encouraged and expected. No absences, whether approved by the college for participation in college-sponsored activities or necessitated by sickness or other personal emergency, relieve the student of responsibility for work assigned for the class during an absence. The student is responsible for arranging makeup work with instructors. Faculty members may submit an administrative withdrawal whenever a student misses two consecutive class sessions and does not contact the instructor. No refund is given after the first week of the quarter. A grade of “F” may be assigned by the instructor if a student does not follow the prescribed procedures for withdrawing from a course or from the college. Students must be officially enrolled in a course to attend class.

Confidentiality Release of Student Information Yakima Valley Community College, in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) 34 CFR, Part 99, has designated the following items as Directory Information: name; telephone number; date and place of birth; photographs; email addresses; major field of study; eligibility for and participation in officially recognized activities, organizations and sports; weight and height of members of athletic teams; dates of attendance (quarters in attendance); enrollment status (number of credits enrolled in for a quarter at YVCC); degrees and awards received; and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. YVCC may disclose any of the above-listed items without the student’s prior written consent unless the Registration and Records Office is notified in writing to the contrary. Once a student has designated a confidential classification, it will not be removed until the student submits a signed authorization requesting that it be removed. Some of the effects of the student's decision to request confidential status may have an adverse effect. Friends or

relatives trying to reach the student will not be able to do so through the college; information that someone is a student here will be suppressed, so that if a loan company, a prospective employer, family members, etc., inquire about a student, they will be informed that we have no record of the student attending here. All other student academic information is considered confidential and will not be released, with certain exceptions as stated in 34 CFR, Part 99, without the student’s written permission. Students must appear in person in the Registration and Records Office with photo identification and must submit their written consent for the release of other academic information. Student Privacy Rights Under FERPA The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) 34 CFR, Part 99, affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights are: • The right to inspect and review the student’s education records. • The right to request the amendment of any of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. • The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. See “Directory Information” in this catalog. • The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA. More detailed information about each of these rights is contained in the YVCC Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook. For more information on these rights, contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or visit this U.S. Department of Education website, www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/index.html.

Evaluation of Transfer Credit The decision to grant transfer credit is based upon several factors, chief among which is accreditation. For transfer purposes, YVCC recognizes as fully accredited only those institutions that have received accreditation by one of the following associations: New England Association of Schools Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Western Association of Schools and Colleges

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ACADEMIC RULES Students who wish to transfer credit from international institutions must have their international transcripts evaluated through the AACRAO International Education Services or the Foundation for International Services (FIS). Contact the International Students Program Office or the Admissions Office for more information. Regardless of institutional accreditation, YVCC does not grant credit for religion or theology courses that are sectarian in nature. Credit for professional/technical oriented courses is at the discretion of the department or division chairperson of the applicable program. Individual courses, grades, and grade points for transfer credit will not appear on the transcript nor will they be included in the cumulative grade point averages on the transcript. Only the total number of acceptable credits will be posted on the student’s YVCC transcript upon graduation; however, courses and grades used to satisfy degree requirements will be used in calculating grade point averages for the established graduation grade point standards. Students should consult the "Honors and High Honors at Graduation" section of the catalog for information on the use of grades in transfer credit courses in the calculation of honors.

Final Examinations Final examinations are scheduled during the final week of each quarter. As a matter of college policy, individual students are not permitted to take early final examinations. If a student must be absent from a regular final examination and has a valid excuse, the student may be given a special examination with the permission of the instructor and the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. Permission slips to request an early final may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. In courses where final examinations are not an appropriate measure of the work, an instructor may elect not to give an examination.

Grades A student must earn a grade of "C" or better in prerequisite courses, unless otherwise noted. Contact the program advisor immediately if there are any questions. Errors and Changes Students who believe that an error may have been made in the grade received in a course should contact the instructor immediately. If the instructor is not available, contact the dean for that division. Grade changes for grades other than “I” will not be accepted beyond one year. Grade Point Average (GPA) Grade points serve as a means of objectively stating a given level of scholarship or mastery of tasks. A point value is assigned for each grade. A complete list of these grade point values appears in this catalog. The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points by the total number of graded (A-F) credit hours. The grade points for a particular course are Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

determined by multiplying the grade point value of the letter grade times the number of credits. For example, a three-credit course with a grade of B has nine grade points. I, N, S, V, W, CR/NC, and * grades are not included in the calculation of the grade point average. Grade Reports Grades are available to students each quarter, one week after grades are due. Grades can be obtained by any of the following means: • Use the student Online Services Center in the Registration and Records Office or the Hopf Student Union Building. • Go to the YVCC Internet address at www.yvcc. edu, click "Student Portal" then “Registration”, then "Unofficial Transcript." • Visit the Registration and Records Office, show photo ID, and obtain an unofficial copy of the transcript. • Write the Registration and Records Office and request a copy. Include signature, student identification number, and mailing address. Transcripts An official transcript is a copy of the student’s academic record bearing the school’s seal and the signature of the registrar. Official transcripts are released to the student or third parties at the student’s written request. There is a 72-hour turnaround time for official transcripts. A fee of $1.00 per copy will be charged for transcript requests of 10 or more. Unofficial transcripts for advising purposes are furnished to the student upon request and with photo identification. Students may obtain them by visiting our website or by using the Online Services Center in the Registration and Records Office or in the Hopf Student Union Building. Confidentiality of Grades While YVCC recognizes the legitimate interest of parents and guardians to consult with the professional staff about the academic and personal well-being of their sons and daughters, parents will not be furnished grade reports or transcripts without written permission from the student. Likewise, the spouse of a married student, regardless of the student’s age, will be given such information only with the written consent of the student. Students must appear in person in the Registration and Records Office with photo identification and must submit their written consent for the release of their grades. (See "Release of Student Information").


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ACADEMIC RULES Grading Symbols Grades of A through D, S, and CR are considered passing grades; however, some degree programs may have restrictions on the use of the D, S, and CR grades. These grades may not be acceptable in meeting general or major requirements at some transfer institutions. The grade A is the highest possible grade, and grades below D are considered failing. Plus (+) or minus (-) signs are used to indicate grades that fall above or below the letter grades, but grades of A+ and D- are not used. Additional information regarding other grades used is provided below. For purposes of calculating grade points and averages, the grade point values are as in the following chart. Grade Description

A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D F CR I N NC R S V W *

Gradepoint

Excellent

Above Average

Average

Below Average Failure Credit or Progress Incomplete Audit No Credit Repeat Satisfactory Unofficial/Administrative Withdrawal Official Withdrawal No Grade Reported

4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

CR/NC - Credit/No Credit Generally for use by the nursing and English departments. CR indicates credit will be granted to nursing students or, for English students, where progress was shown. English students who receive a grade of CR in sub-100-level English courses have indicated progress was made in the course; however, a grade of S must be earned before they can progress to the next level of English. NC indicates no credit will be granted. Grades of CR/NC are not included in the grade point average calculation. I - Incomplete An incomplete grade (I) indicates that work is satisfactory as far as completed. It permits the student to complete the remaining work within five weeks of the following term if the student is registered or, if the student is not registered, within one calendar year. The I grade may be given in cases where a student has been in attendance and done satisfactory work up to a time near the end of the quarter but is unable to complete all work by the close of the quarter due to illness or other extenuating circumstances. Submission of I grades must be accompanied by a signed Incomplete Grade Card indicating what work is to be completed. The Incomplete Grade Card also requires the instructor to provide the grade a student should

receive if the work is not completed within one year. I grades are not included in the GPA calculation. N- Audit Students may receive an audit grade (N) without instructor approval by indicating the audit category at the time of registration or by changing to audit during the designated add period. Students seeking an audit after the designated add period must meet with their instructor for approval. The instructor must sign their approval on an add/drop form before the Registration and Records Office can process the request. Auditing students are exempt from examinations and do not receive college credit; however, the instructor may require reasonable attendance and class participation. N grades are not included in the GPA calculation. The Student must meet all prerequisites for a class in order to audit the class. P/F - Pass/Fail YVCC does not use the P grade. See S (satisfactory) grade. R - Repeat The repeat (R) designation indicates that a student has repeated a YVCC course. Students must file a Repeat Card in the Registration and Records Office so that the grade point can be adjusted upon course completion. I, N, W, and V grades have no grade point value; therefore, no repeat cards are necessary when repeating a course for which a student received such a grade. All courses taken and all grades earned in compliance with the YVCC High-Demand Course Repeat Rule will appear on the student's transcript. For all repeated courses, the higher grade forgives the lower grade and replaces it in GPA computations; however, the lower grades will remain on the transcript but will not be used to compute the YVCC cumulative GPA. Grades received in violation of the YVCC HighDemand Course Repeat Rule will not be used in GPA computations and will not appear on the student's transcript. See the complete text of the rule in this catalog or on the web at www.yvcc.edu. S - Satisfactory The S grade indicates a satisfactory level of performance (C grade minimum) by the student. It is considered a passing grade but is not included in the GPA calculation. This grade may be used in certain instances where A-F grading is deemed inappropriate. Instructor permission required. V - Unofficial Withdrawal An unofficial withdrawal (V) may be assigned by an instructor at the end of a quarter if the student has not officially withdrawn from a course. Submission of a V grade must include the last date the student participated in class or was otherwise engaged in an academically related activity, such as by contributing to an online discussion or initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course-related question. Each instructor must determine if it is appropriate to assign a V. A grade of F may be assigned by the instructor Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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ACADEMIC RULES if a student does not follow the prescribed procedures for withdrawing from a course or from the college. The assignment of 10 or more credits of V grades in any quarter results in the student being placed on academic probation. V - Administrative Withdrawal An administrative withdrawal may also be assigned by an instructor during the quarter if the student has two or more consecutive unexcused absences. Submission of V grades must include the last date the student participated in class or was otherwise engaged in an academically related activity, such as by contributing to an online discussion or initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course-related question. Instructors who wish to withdraw students for lack of attendance at any time prior to the designated withdrawal deadline for the quarter may notify the Registration and Records Office after the second missed class meeting. Students administratively withdrawn from a course will not be eligible for tuition refunds after the first week of the quarter. W - Official Withdrawal An official withdrawal (W) will be assigned if a student drops a course or withdraws from the college after the first 10 days of the quarter (or as specified for shorter sessions). A grade of F or V may be assigned by the instructor if a student does not follow the prescribed procedures for withdrawing from a course or from the college. W grades are not included in the GPA calculation.

* - No Grade

The asterisk (*) is recorded on the permanent transcript when no grade is submitted by the instructor. The asterisk will remain on the transcript until an official Grade Change Card is submitted to the Registration and Records Office by the instructor. The asterisk is not included in the GPA calculation.

Repeating a Class State board policy permits only two repeats in addition to the original enrollment, except for certain performance classes. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule which explains more stringent guidelines for repeating courses that are in high demand. High Demand Course Repeat Rule General Rule The YVCC High Demand Course Repeat Rule was developed to provide students with fair access to high demand classes. It allows students to repeat courses. In high demand circumstances, a course can be taken twice (once initially and once repeated). All letter grades earned, A through F as well as I, V, or W grades, will be reported on a student’s transcript. This course repeat rule applies to courses with wait lists which are identified by the departments as high demand. YVCC departments reserve the right to establish program course repeat rules which may be more stringent than this college-wide High Demand Course Repeat Rule.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Student Responsibility It is the student’s responsibility to understand and adhere to this and all college rules. Students who are discovered to have violated this policy will be administratively dropped from classes. A student repeating a course is responsible for completing a course repeat card, which may be obtained in the Registration and Records Office, requesting that their GPA be recalculated. Violations Students will not receive credit for courses taken in violation of this college High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Related grades will not be used in computing GPAs, and the course will not appear on the student’s transcript. GPA Applications All courses taken and all grades earned in compliance with the guidelines of this policy will appear on the student’s transcript. The higher grade forgives the lower grade and replaces it in GPA computations. The lower grade will remain on the transcript but will not be used to compute the YVCC cumulative GPA. Grades received in violation of this rule will not be used in GPA computations and will not appear on the student’s transcript. A student transferring to another college should check that school’s course repeat policy. It may differ from this repeat rule. Exemptions The YVCC High Demand Course Repeat Rule does not apply to the following courses: • Courses with numbers below 100 (e.g., ENGL 090T) • Foreign language classes • Studio art, metalsmithing, design, and painting classes • Non-high demand courses (as defined by departments) • Courses designed to be repeated, for example: performance courses (e.g., music, physical education), seminar courses where content changes quarter to quarter, Math Center and Writing Center courses, or other courses designed for multiple quarter enrollment Waivers In extraordinary circumstances, and upon receipt of an acceptable plan of study, the Faculty member teaching the class, area dean, or the Vice President of Instruction and Student Services may provide written authorization to the Office of Amissions to waive this rule for a student.

Honor Roll Each quarter the college recognizes outstanding academic achievement by placing students on the President’s List or the Dean’s List. Each of the students who meets the criteria for these designations will receive a letter and a certificate acknowledging this award. A notation of the award will also be placed on the student’s permanent transcript.


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ACADEMIC RULES President’s List To receive the President’s List designation, a student must earn both of the following: • A quarterly grade point average of 3.85 or higher. • A minimum of 12 graded credits (S & CR grades not included). Dean’s List To receive the Dean’s List designation, a student must earn both of the following: • A quarterly grade point average of 3.40 to 3.84. • A minimum of 12 graded credits (S & CR grades not included). Part-time Students The college is aware that some of our part-time students have also achieved significant academic success while balancing full-time jobs, family responsibilities, and college studies. Part-time students are eligible each time they complete 12 credits at YVCC and their GPA falls within the designated list for the quarter. Dean’s List and President’s List notations will be posted on the transcript for the quarter in which the 12 credits are completed at YVCC . Part-time students need to notify the Registration and Records Office each time they qualify.

Prior Learning Assessment Yakima Valley Community college currently awards college credit for Advanced Placement, DSST, USAFI, CLEP, and International Baccalaureate examinations. Credits are also awarded through Course Challenge and Technical Preparation classes. Military training and experience may also be assessed based upon evaluation of an official Joint Service Transcript. Qualified faculty approves the appropriate course placement. No more than 45 credits of (PLA) credit will be awarded and no more than 25% of the program may be based upon credits granted using an experiential learning methodology, such as portfolio review. Credit will be awarded after the students complete one quarter at YVCC and only for courses within the institution’s regular curricular offerings. Prior Learning Assessment is a means of determining whether or not the knowledge, skills, and abilities student has gained through prior learning match the knowledge, skills, and abilities a student would gain by completing a specific course. Please contact the registrar at 509-574-4702 for the most current information on Prior Learning Assessment.

Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement Program is a testing program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). It is a special, college-level, learning experience for high school students, which can take the form of an honors class, a strong regular course, a tutorial, or an independent study. High school students who have participated in the Advanced Placement Program during high school or have developed an equivalent background through self-initiative may take tests offered by the College Board each year during the month of May, and scores will be reported to three colleges of the student’s choice. The student must have successfully completed one quarter at YVCC before advanced placement credit will be placed on the transcript. Scores in computer science, economics, and music may also be submitted and will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Course Equivalent Key Yakima Valley Community College grants credit for scores of 3 or higher in Advanced Placement exams as follows: If You Score

In This Area of Study

You Will Receive In These These Credits Courses

3 4 5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3 4 5 3-4 5 3-5 3 4 5 3 4 5 3-5 3-5 3-4 5 3-4 5 3-4 5

Art History Art History Art History Biology Calculus AB Calculus BC Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry English Lang/Comp English Lang/Comp English Lit/Comp French French French German German German Geography Govern & Politics History European History European History US History US Physics Physics

5 10 15 5 5 10 5 5 5 5 10 5 5 10 15 5 10 15 5 5 5 10 5 10 5 15

3-4 5

Physics B Physics B

5 15

3-5 3 4 5 3-5

Psychology Spanish Spanish Spanish Statistics

5 5 10 15 5

ART 280 ART 280, 281 ART 280, 281, 282 BIOL 109 MATH& 151 MATH& 151, 152 CHEM 100 CHEM 109/110 CHEM& 141/151 ENGL& 101 ENGL& 101, 102 ENGL& 101 FREN 101 FREN 101, 102 FREN 101,102,103 GERM 101 GERM 101, 102 GERM101,102,103 GEOG& 200 POLS& 202 HIST& 117 HIST& 117, 118 HIST& 136 HIST& 136, 137 PHYS 115/125 PHYS 115/125, 116/126,117/127 PHYS 115/125 PHYS 115/125, 116/126,117/127 PSYC& 100 SPAN 101 SPAN 101, 102 SPAN 101,102,103 BA 256

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ACADEMIC RULES IB Credit and Placement Students with a score below 3 must take the placement test for math course placement Score of 3 or 4 can be placed in MATH& 141 or take the placement test to attempt to get a higher placement. • Score of 5 can get 5 credits for MATH& 142 and placement into MATH& 151 • Score of 6 or 7 can get 5 credits for MATH& 151 and placement into MATH& 152 College Level Examination Program/DANTES College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations are based on undergraduate courses offered during the first two years of college study. They are developed by college instructors for the purpose of awarding college credit. Like endof-course examinations, CLEP exams demand comprehensive subject knowledge. Both CLEP subject and general examinations yield credit at YVCC when satisfactory performance levels are reached. CLEP tests are available in over 50 college subjects. YVCC accepts CLEP as follows: • Examinations are accepted for credit equivalent to not more than one introductory course offering of five credits or less for each examination completed successfully, with the exception of level 2 language examinations for which 10 credits are granted. • Examination scores must be at the 50th percentile or greater. Level 2 language scores must be at the following percentiles or greater: French, 59; German, 60; and Spanish, 63. • DSST (formerly known as DANTES) and USAFI examinations (CLEP administered in the Armed Forces) are acceptable on the same basis as prescribed for CLEP, as is the IB (International Baccalaureate) exam. • Total credits obtained through all alternative (non-class) methods are limited to 45. • Students must successfully complete one quarter at YVCC before CLEP credits will be placed on their transcript.

Course Challenge Under guidelines approved by each department, current students may challenge courses in which they believe they have substantial prior learning. This policy is meant to provide department faculty with a way to grant credit in appropriate courses to students who demonstrate mastery of the course outcomes. The policy for course challenge is outlined below. • Students may only challenge a course or courses for which they have not received college credit at any accredited institution. • The student must be enrolled in at least one course at YVCC during the quarter a course is challenged; however, the student cannot be enrolled in the course to be challenged. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

• •

• •

• • •

The student should review degree requirements in this catalog to determine limits on using courses with S grades. Credits earned by the challenge process do not count toward the residency requirement. See “Degree Requirements” in this catalog. The course being challenged must be offered during the quarter in which it is being challenged unless otherwise specified by the department. Department faculty will determine which, if any, of their courses may be challenged. Any full-time YVCC instructor, with the signature of the department head on the course challenge form, may administer challenge examinations in accordance with departmental policy. In the event that a full-time instructor is not available, the department head, in consultation with the dean, may request that an adjunct faculty member administer a challenge exam. A course may be challenged only once. Challenge examinations must be given prior to the day grades are due each quarter. Credits earned will be recorded on the transcript with an S grade. A student must have a prior YVCC transcript to challenge a course. An unsuccessful challenge will not be posted.

Course Challenge Process 1. 2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

Obtain a course challenge form from the Registration and Records Office. Meet with the department head of the class to be challenged. The department head will help determine if the class is available for challenge and must sign the course challenge form before the student can proceed to the next step. Pay the cashier a nonrefundable, $25.00 per credit examination and transcription fee. See the designated instructor to schedule the examination date. Upon successful completion of the course challenge, the instructor must sign the course challenge form. Students failing the challenge test will not be given a grade, and no reference will be placed on the transcript. Proceed to the dean of the department for an approval signature. Take the completed course challenge form to the Registration and Records Office. The course will be posted to the transcript with a grade of S at the end of the quarter.


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DEGREES General ducation Requirements: In order to meet general requirements, all candidates for degrees from Yakima Valley Community College must have: A minimum of 90 quarter credits; some professional/technical degrees require more A cumulative college-level grade point average of 2.0 or higher at YVCC A minimum of 24 credits completed at YVCC Exception Petition While candidates are expected to comply with all degree requirements, a student may request an exception if there are extenuating circumstances which warrant consideration. The review process is initiated by the student’s submission of a written petition to the Registration and Records Office outlining the exception requested and stating the reasons for the request. The petition should be submitted with the degree application two quarters before the student plans to graduate. The Registrar & Director of Enrollment Services, in consultation with the Dean of Student Services, will review the petition. The student will receive written notification of the decision. YVCC Student Learning Outcomes The college faculty recognizes two institutional student learning outcomes, Analytical Reasoning and Communications, that are integral to the mission of YVCC. The faculty continues to consider these outcomes and how they apply across the divisions.

General Education Requirements A substantial core of general education is regarded as an essential component of all instructional programs. In order to meet general requirements, all candidates for degrees from Yakima Valley Community College must have:  A minimum of 90 quarter credits; some professional/technical degrees require more.  A cumulative college-level grade point average of 2.0 or higher at YVCC  A minimum of 30 credits completed at YVCC General Education in Transfer Degrees General education in the transfer degrees introduces students to the content and methodology of the major areas of knowledge—the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. The faculty has identified and adopted two fundamental abilities essential to lifelong learning that are assessed in courses across the degree. • Analytical Reasoning is the ability to consider an issue, idea, or concept systematically and assess the component parts and their application. • Communication includes the delivery and reception of ideas. Six other abilities reflect skills and values which the faculty consider important to being an educated person. Historical perspective, research, aesthetic literacy, service learning, problem solving, and crosscultural global perspective are practiced within various courses of the general education curriculum. General Education Requirements for Applied Science Professional/Technical Degrees and Certificates (45+ credits) In order to be awarded an applied science degree or certificate, students must complete courses covering three core competency distribution areas: computation, communication, and human relations. Specific courses are required that will fulfill these competencies. The curriculum in professional/technical areas is competency based and has been developed to meet industry-wide skills standards.

Honors at Graduation Graduates with exceptional academic qualifications who are completing an associate degree or a certificate requiring 45 or more credits may graduate from YVCC with honors or high honors. The designations are based on the cumulative college-level grade point average. Calculations are based only on YVCC coursework numbered 100 and above, whether or not the coursework is required by a particular program. Courses numbered 099 or below are not considered. Because the honors/high honors designations are granted by YVCC, transfer credits are not used in calculating Grade Point Averages (GPA). Eligibility is limited to qualifying graduates who have completed at least 30 credits at YVCC. Classes taken during spring quarter will not be included in GPA calculations since grades will not have been posted before the time of commencement. To receive the honors designation, students must earn a YVCC college level GPA of 3.40 to 3.84. To receive the high honors designation, students must earn a 3.85 or higher college-level GPA. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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DEGREES Reciprocity Agreement

3.

Washington community and technical colleges (CTCs) offer reciprocity to students who are transferring within the CTC system and are pursuing a Direct Transfer Agreement degree or the Associate in Science, Transfer degree. Students who completed an individual course that met distribution degree requirements or fulfilled entire areas of their degree requirements at one college will be considered to have met those same requirements, if they plan to complete the same degree, when they transfer to another community or technical college in Washington. The degree requirements include communication skills, quantitative skills, or one or more distribution area requirements. Students must initiate the review process and must be prepared to provide necessary documentation.

For additional information concerning the reciprocity agreement, contact the credentials evaluator in the Registration Office.

Reciprocity Procedures Students who transfer from another community or technical college to YVCC may be eligible for reciprocity if they have: • Applied for admission to YVCC • Completed an individual course at the other college that meets the communication, quantitative, or distribution area requirement or completed entire areas of their degree requirements for the same degree at the other college (communication, humanities, etc.) • Maintained a cumulative, college-level GPA of 2.0 or better at the other college • Met the other college's residency requirement (minimum number of credits required to earn their degree) • Continued to pursue the same academic transfer degree at YVCC • Met YVCC prerequisite, general education, and graduation requirements • Provided all necessary documentation to YVCC (a reciprocity agreement request form is located in the Registration Office). Upon receipt of the completed form and official transcripts from the other college, YVCC agrees to consider that the distribution area requirements have been met upon evaluating the student's transcript. Transfer Credits Under the Reciprocity Agreement 1. 2.

Request an official copy of your transcript from the other college be sent to YVCC for evaluation. Obtain a copy of the evaluation results from the Registration Office. Review the results of your transfer evaluation. If you think that reciprocity applies to you, complete and mail the reciprocity agreement request form (obtain the form from the Registration Office) to the registrar's office at the other college.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

The other college will complete the form and send it back to the YVCC Registration Office. A copy will then be mailed to you. The reciprocity agreement request form must be attached to your YVCC graduation application. It is also required that you inform your advisor of the agreement in order to ensure proper advising concerning your educational goals.

Specification of Catalog Year Students may elect to graduate under the official printed catalog in force at the time they first entered YVCC, provided they remain continuously enrolled (continuous enrollment is defined as attending a minimum of two quarters out of each academic year) and the lapsed time does not exceed five years. They may also choose to graduate under the official printed catalog in force at the time they apply for graduation.


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DEGREE INFORMATION Transfer Degrees Yakima Valley Community College offers the Associate in Arts & Science DTA. The Associate in Business DTA degree ensures satisfaction of lower division general education (or core) requirements and lower division business requirements at the state baccalaureate institutions. Students who earn any of these degrees will normally be prepared to transfer to Washington colleges and universities with junior standing, having met most lower-division general education requirements subject to the provisos listed in the InterCollege Relations Committee (ICRC) Handbook. The handbook is available at www.washingtoncouncil.org or in the YVCC Counseling and Advising Center. The college endorses the Policy on Inter-College Transfer among Washington public colleges and universities, which was approved by the Higher Education Coordinating Board in February, 1986. YVCC offers an Associate in Science Transfer, Track 1 or Track 2 degree. Special advising is required.

Degrees Offered The Associate in Arts & Science DTA, the Associate in Business DTA, and the Associate in Science Transfer degree are designed for students intending to transfer to a four-year college or university. These degrees are all part of the ICRC transfer agreement and offer several options depending on the student's area of interest. Senior institutions in Washington that honor these agreements are listed below under “Transfer Information.”  Associate in Arts & Science DTA  Associate in Business DTA  Associate in Science Transfer, Track 1 or 2 The Associate of Applied Science, Transfer degree is offered through the Workforce Education Division. For additional information, reference Professional/Technical Degrees and Certificates.

General Information Students who plan to transfer from YVCC to another college or university should work closely with a faculty advisor and study the following information: • At the time of transfer, students will be expected to meet the entrance requirements of the institutions to which they are transferring. The transferability of courses taken at YVCC is determined by the institution to which the student transfers. Other institutions accept most YVCC distribution courses. • Electives should be chosen carefully from courses numbered 100 or above and according to the guidelines found in the electives section for each degree. Students should work closely with faculty advisors before attempting to transfer professional/technical courses. • A student may earn a total of more than 90 credits at YVCC, but the total number of credits accepted for transfer is determined by the institution to which the student transfers. • Courses numbered below 100 will not normally transfer to a baccalaureate institution. To complete the transfer process to a senior institution, students are advised to follow these procedures: 1.

2. 3. 4.

Review a current catalog of the institution to which they wish to transfer to and obtain current information regarding admission procedures and specific major requirements. Study the entrance requirements and suggested first- and second-year level courses in the major field of interest. Institutions differ in their treatment of credits received. Discuss with a YVCC counselor or advisor about transfer needs. Transfer guide sheets for senior institutions are available on most websites for specific colleges. Confer, either by letter or personal interview, with an admissions officer at the senior institution for information about curriculum and transfer regulations. Check carefully a quarter or two before transferring to be sure that all requirements will be met and all regulations are observed to the satisfaction of the senior institution.

Last minute changes in a student’s major field of study or choice of senior institution may create transfer problems. Such changes should be made only after consultation with advisors.

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DEGREE INFORMATION Degree Application Procedures for Transfer All candidates for an associate degree must submit a degree application for approval. Students are required to submit their applications once they have completed a total of 60 credits. This is intended to allow sufficient time for meaningful adjustments to a student’s course schedule in order to better support timely program completion. Follow these steps to apply:

Transfer-back Policy It is sometimes in the best interest of students to transfer to a baccalaureate-granting institution before satisfying the requirements for a transferable associate degree at YVCC. Therefore, students who have completed a minimum of 30 credits at YVCC may complete YVCC's requirements for a transferable associate degree at another accredited institution of higher learning if the courses being applied are deemed to be equivalent to YVCC’s course requirements.

1.

Transfer Rights & Responsibilities

2.

3. 4.

Obtain the appropriate degree application from the Registration and Records Office. Make an appointment with assigned advisor and complete all information requested on the application. Obtain necessary signatures. Take the completed application to the Cashier’s Office, pay the $10 graduation fee, and return the application marked “PAID” to the Registration and Records Office.

Students will be notified, in writing, if the degree application cannot be approved as submitted. To apply for a high school diploma (SHB 1758) by earning an associate degree, see “Pathways to a High School Diploma” section of the catalog.

Senior Institutions These senior institutions honor the ICRC transfer agreement: Bastyr College Central Washington University Cornish College of the Arts Eastern Washington University Gonzaga University Heritage University Northwest University Pacific Lutheran University Saint Martin's University Seattle Pacific University Seattle University The Evergreen State College University of Washington Washington State University Western Washington University Whitworth University Students wishing to enter institutions not listed above should confer with a counselor or advisor as early as possible so that appropriate course equivalencies at YVCC can be accurately selected. Most of the schools listed have some specific requirements which can be met at YVCC but are not required in our AA degrees. Check with an advisor early in your academic career to find out about additional requirements of your chosen transfer institution.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

Student Rights & Responsibilities Students have the right to fair and equitable treatment by the colleges and universities of Washington as outlined in the guidelines below. 1.

Students have the right to clear, accurate, and current information about their transfer admission requirements, transfer admission deadlines, degree requirements, and transfer policies that include course equivalencies. 2. Transfer and direct-entry students have the right to expect comparable standards for regular admission to programs and comparable program requirements. 3. Students have the right to seek clarification regarding their transfer evaluation and may request the reconsideration of any aspect of that evaluation. In response, the college will follow established practices and processes for reviewing its transfer credit decisions. 4. Students who encounter other transfer difficulties have the right to seek resolution. Each institution will have a defined process for resolution that is published and readily available to students. 5. Students have the responsibility to complete all materials required for admission and to submit the application on or before the published deadlines. 6. Students have the responsibility to plan their course of study by referring to the specific published degree requirements of the college or academic program in which they intend to earn a bachelor’s degree. 7. When a student changes a major or degree program, the student assumes full responsibility for meeting the new requirements. College & University Rights & Responsibilities Colleges and universities have the right and authority to determine program requirements and course offerings in accordance with their institutional mission and to communicate and publish these requirements and course offerings to students and the public. 1.

2.

Colleges and universities have the responsibility to provide clear, accurate, and current information about their transfer admission requirements, transfer admission deadlines, degree requirements, and transfer policies that include course equivalencies. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to answer students’ questions about transfer issues and provide students with opportunities for appropriate follow-up.


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DEGREE INFORMATION 3.

4.

Colleges and universities have the responsibility to provide comparable standards for transfer and direct-entry students for regular admission to programs. Transfer and direct-entry students must satisfy comparable program requirements. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to communicate admission and transfer-related decisions to students in writing (electronic or paper) and include information about student transfer rights and responsibilities.

Direct Transfer Agreement Degrees

General Electives (10-12 credits)

Select 10-12 credits from 100-level or above courses. These may include additional Core Electives as well as courses from the Restricted List.

Associate in Business Requirements A. Basic Requirements: 15 Credits A minimum 2.0 GPA is required in each of the following groups. No S grades allowed. Group A (10 credits)

Required - ENGL& 101 and ENGL 102

Associate in Arts Degree Requirements

Group B (5 credits)

A. Basic Requirements: 18-20 Credits A minimum 2.0 GPA is required in each of the following groups. No S grades allowed.

Required - MATH 111* *Note: This degree must include the math sequence of MATH 111 and MATH& 148.

Group A (10 credits)

ENGL& 101, ENGL 102 Group B (5 credits)

MATH 107, 111, 220, 264 or MATH& 107, 132, 141, 142, 146, 148, 151, 152, 153, 254 PHIL& 120 ( previously PHIL& 106) Group C (3-5 credits)

CAS 106 CMST 140 CMST& 101, 210, or 220 ENGL 203 B. Distribution Requirements: 45 Credits A 2.0 GPA is required in each of the following distribution areas and no more than five credits of S grades can be used in each. No more than 10 credits from any one subject area are allowed. Humanities (15 credits)

Select 15 credits in three different subject areas from the approved humanities distribution list. These credits may include a maximum of five credits in skill performance courses, which are underlined in the approved distribution list, and a maximum of five credits of 100-level foreign language or 100-level American Sign Language. Natural Science/Math (15 credits)

Select 15 credits in three different subject areas from the approved distribution list. Choices must include at least one of the laboratory courses which are underlined in the approved distribution list. Social Science (15 credits)

Select 15 credits in three different subject areas from the approved distribution list. C. Electives (25-29 Credits) Core Electives (15-17 credits)

15-17 credits of electives should be chosen carefully from the distribution of courses listed in Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning (Group B) and Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences from the approved distribution list. A minimum 2.0 GPA is required in this distribution area.

B. Distribution Requirements: 45 Credits A 2.0 GPA is required in each of the following areas, and no more than five credits of S grades can be used in each. No more than 10 credits from any one subject area are allowed. Humanities (15 credits)

Select 15 credits in three subject areas from the approved humanities distribution list. These credits may include a maximum of five credits in skill performance courses, which are indicated by (P) in the approved distribution list, and a maximum of five credits of 100-level foreign language or American Sign Language. Natural Science/Math (15 credits)

Required - MATH 148 * and select 10 credits in two additional subject areas from the approved distribution list. Choices must include at least one of the laboratory courses, which are indicated by (L) on the approved distribution list. * Note: This degree must include the math sequence, MATH 111 and MATH&148. Social Science (15 credits)

Required - ECON& 201 and 202 and select 5 credits from an additional discipline from the approved distribution list. C. Business Core (25 Credits) No S grades allowed in the business core. All business option degrees must include the 25-credit business major core: ACCT& 201, 202, 203, BUS& 201, and BA 256. D. Elective (5 credits) Select an additional five credits from courses numbered 100 or above. Note: Many universities and colleges have computer course requirements for admission to the business major. See your advisor to determine if a computer course is recommended as the elective.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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DEGREE INFORMATION Associate in Science Degree, Transfer

Degree Requirements

Note: Special advising is required for this degree. Yakima Valley Community College offers the Associate in Science Transfer degree for students who are interested in pursuing a bachelor's degree in track 1 (biology, biochemistry, or chemistry) or track 2 (physics, engineering, or computer science [information technology]) at a baccalaureate institution. Students completing the Associate in Science degree will receive the same priority consideration for admission to the baccalaureate institution as those students completing the direct transfer agreement and will be given junior status by the receiving institution. Students with this degree do not, however, meet the general education requirements of the receiving institution. Therefore, students will be required to complete the general education requirements or general university requirements during the junior and senior year. This degree is appropriate for a student who has a strong commitment to majoring in one of the sciences and who is ready to enter MATH& 151 (Calculus) and ENGL& 101. Completion of this degree will prepare the transfer student for upper division study in the sciences; however, it does not guarantee admission to the major. Course sequences should be completed at one institution. For example, the physics sequence or chemistry sequence should be completed at one school. Advising is a critical element for students pursuing the Associate in Science Transfer degree in order to determine exactly which courses are included in each of the categories. Students are responsible for checking specific requirements of the baccalaureate institution. Students interested in pursuing this degree should contact the Admissions Office directly for referral to Associate in Science Transfer degree advisors. Options The Associate in Science Transfer degree has two tracks: Track 1 (biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and geology) and Track 2 (engineering, computer science [information technology], and physics).

A. Communications (5 credits) ENGL& 101

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

B. Mathematics (15 credits) MATH& 151, 152, 153, or MATH& 146 (Track 1) MATH& 151, 152, 153, or MATH 220 (Track 2) C. Humanities and Social Science (15 credits) Five credits of humanities and five credits of social science are needed from the approved distribution list. Five additional credits of either humanities or social science are also required. D. Major Requirements (60 credits) To be determined by the specific degree the student is pursuing.


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DISTRIBUTION LIST Distribution List Codes Note: Italicized courses are acceptable for distribution but are no longer offered for instruction. (L) = Lab Course (P) = Performance Course + = HIST& 116, 117, and 209 may be used for humanities or social science distribution, but not for both. # = Credit cannot be given for both ECON 213 and HIST 213, ECON 205 and GEOG 205, or PSYCH 230 and SOC 230. DRAMA 202 DRAMA 203 DRAMA 204 DRAMA 205 DRAMA 282

Humanities Only 5 credits of 100-level modern language (ASL, French, German, or Spanish) may be used for humanities distribution. American Sign Language ASL 101 ASL 102 ASL 103

5 5 5

Art Appreciation Design I Design II (P) Drawing I Drawing II (P) Drawing III (P) Beginning Watercolor (P) Intermediate Watercolor (P) Western Traditions of Art Non-Western Traditions of Art Functional Pottery (P) Clay I: Handbuilding (P) Clay II: Intermediate Wheel (P) Advanced Clay (P) Painting I (P) Painting II (P) Painting III (P) Art History I Art History II Art History III Asian Art History

5 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 5 5 5 4 4 2 4 4 4 5 5 5 3

Chican@ Studies CHST 120

Chican@s Art & Culture

5

Communication Studies CMST& 101 CMST 115 CMST 130 CMST 135 CMST 140 CMST& 210 CMST& 220 CMST 280

Introduction to Communication Newswriting Oral Interpretation Readers’ Theater Feature Writing Interpersonal Communication Introduction to Public Speaking Intercultural Communication

5 5 3 1 3 5 5 5

Introduction to Theatre Rehearse/Performance Tech (P) Introduction to Cinema National Cinemas Acting Beginning (P) Acting Intermediate (P) Acting Advanced (P) Stage Makeup (P) Basic Stagecraft/Theater (P) Contemporary Theater

5 2 3 5 3 4 4 3 4 3

Drama DRMA& 101 DRAMA 115 DRAMA 150 DRAMA 161 DRAMA 180 DRAMA 181 DRAMA 182 DRAMA 188 DRAMA 189 DRAMA 201

5 5 5 5 4

English

American Sign Language I American Sign Language II American Sign Language III

Art ART& 100 ART 101 ART 102 ART 104 ART 105 ART 107 ART 111 ART 112 ART 121 ART 122 ART 201 ART 202 ART 203 ART 205 ART 210 ART 211 ART 212 ART 280 ART 281 ART 282 ART 283

Theater History I Theater History II Theater History III 19th Century Drama Acting Seminar Advanced (P)

ENGL 130 ENGL 131 ENGL 132 ENGL 135 ENGL 136 ENGL 137 ENGL 138 ENGL 140 ENGL 141 ENGL 144 ENGL 145 ENGL 150 ENGL 170 ENGL 171 ENGL 201 ENGL 202 ENGL 203 ENGL 205 ENGL 209 ENGL 212 ENGL 220 ENGL 221 ENGL 222 ENGL 264 ENGL 265 ENGL 266 ENGL 270 ENGL 271 ENGL 275

Writers and Ideas I Writers and Ideas II Writers and Ideas III Introduction to Fiction Introduction to Plays Introduction to Poetry Introduction to Novel Science Fiction The Mystery Novel Literature of Pacific NW & West Introduction to Native American Literature Women in Literature Student Literary Journal I Student Literary Journal II Creative Writing I Creative Writing II The Research Paper Poetry Workshop Introduction to Mythology Survey Latin American Fiction Survey American Literature to 1870 Survey American Literature 1870 to 1945 Survey American Literature 1945 to Present English Lit: Begin to 1660 English Lit: 1660 to 1832 English Lit: 1832 to Present Introduction to Shakespeare Shakespeare in Ashland The Bible as Literature

2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3-5 3-5 3 3 3 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 5

Ethnic Studies ETHS 103 ETHS 120 ETHS 203

Media, Art & American Ethnicity African American Experience Ethnic Storytelling

5 3 3

History HIST& 116 HIST& 117 HIST 208 HIST 209

Western Civilization I + Western Civilization II + Roman Civilization Greek Civilization +

5 5 5 5

Introduction to Humanities I Introduction to Humanities II Introduction to Humanities III American Pop Culture I American Pop Culture II American Pop Culture III Critical Thinking Significant Figures in World Civilization

3 3 3 2 2 2 5 2

Humanities HUM 102 HUM 103 HUM 104 HUM 111 HUM 112 HUM 113 HUM 120 HUM 270

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DISTRIBUTION LIST Music MUS 100 MUS 101 MUS 102 MUS 103 MUS 104 MUSC& 105 MUS 116 MUS 117 MUS 119 MUS 130 MUS 133 MUS 149 MUS 218 MUS 224 MUS 225 MUS 226

Music Fundamentals Ear Training I Music Theory I Ear Training II Music Theory II Music Appreciation History of Rock and Roll World Music History of Jazz College Chorus (P) Chamber Singers (P) Jazz Ensemble (P) Music of 20th Century Music History I Music History II Music History III

3 2 3 2 2 5 5 3 5 3 2 2 5 3 3 3

Introduction to Philosophy Existential Group World Philosophy Introduction to Ethics Philosophy of Religion

5 2 5 5 5

Philosophy PHIL& 101 PHIL 150 PHIL 167 PHIL 215 PHIL 220

Photography PHOTO 101 PHOTO 102 PHOTO 103

Photography I (P) Photography II Digital Photography (P)

3 3 5

Political Science POLS 201

Introduction to Political Theory

5

Spanish I First Year Spanish II First Year Spanish III First Year Spanish I Second Year Spanish II Second Year Spanish III Second Year Second Year Spanish for Prof Speaking Second Year Spanish for Academic Writing Second Year Spanish for Academic Reading

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Spanish SPAN 101 SPAN 102 SPAN 103 SPAN 201 SPAN 202 SPAN 203 SPAN 231 SPAN 232 SPAN 233

5

Anthropology ANTH& 205

Biological Anthropology

5

Survey of Astronomy

5

Survey of Biology Environmental Science (L) Biology for Nonmajors with Lab (L) Introduction to Plant Science (L) General Biology (L) Marine Biology (L) Biology for Majors I (L) Biology for Majors II (L) General Botany (L) Biology for Majors III (L) Natural History Yakima Valley

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3

Astronomy ASTR& 100

Biology BIOL& 100 BIOL 102 BIOL 105 BIOL 107 BIOL 109 BIOL 140 BIOL 201 BIOL 211 BIOL 220 BIOL 221 BIOL 225

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

5 5 5

Chemistry CHEM 100 Introduction to Chemistry CHEM 109/110 Principles of Chemistry (L) CHEM& 141 General Chemistry I CHEM& 142 General Chemistry II CHEM& 143 General Chemistry III CHEM& 151 General Chemistry I Lab (L) CHEM& 152 General Chemistry II Lab (L) CHEM& 153 General Chemistry III Lab (L) CHEM 209/210 Introduction to Organic/Biochem (L) CHEM& 241 Organic Chemistry I Lecture CHEM& 242 Organic Chemistry II Lecture CHEM& 243 Organic Chemistry III Lecture CHEM& 251 Organic Chemistry I Lab (L) CHEM& 252 Organic Chemistry II Lab (L)

5 5 3 3 3 2 2 2 5 4 3 3 3 3

Geography GEOG 102

Physical Geography

5

Introduction Physical Geology (L) Historical Geology (L) Geology National Parks (L) Glacial Geology Glacier & Climate Change Geology of Pacific Northwest (L)

5 5 5 3 5 5

Math in Society Algebra Applied to Bus/Econ Precalculus I Precalculus II Introduction to Stats Business Calculus Calculus I Calculus II Calculus III

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Nutrition

5

Introduction to Logic

5

Geology GEOL& 101 GEOL& 103 GEOL& 115 GEOL 155 GEOL 206 GEOL& 208

Math MATH& 107 MATH 111 MATH& 141 MATH&142 MATH& 146 MATH& 148 MATH& 151 MATH& 152 MATH& 153

Nutrition NUTR 101 PHIL &120

Agriculture Introduction to Plant Science (L)

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (L) Human Anatomy & Physiology II (L) Microbiology (L)

Philosophy

Natural Sciences/Math AGSCI 101

BIOL 230 BIOL 231 BIOL 232

Physical Science PHSCI 101 Physical Science Survey I 5 (Physical Science 101 may be used for Chemistry or Physics distribution but not for both.) PHSCI 102 Physical Science Survey II 5 (Physical Science 102 may be used for Chemistry or Physics distribution but not for both.) PHSCI 112 Physical Science Survey II with Lab (L) 5

Physics PHYS 100 PHYS 115/125 PHYS 116/126 PHYS 117/127 PHYS 211/221 PHYS 212/222 PHYS 213/223

Introduction to Physics General Physics I (L) General Physics II (L) General Physics III (L) Engineering Physics I (L) Engineering Physics II (L) Engineering Physics III (L)

5 5 5 5 5 5 5


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DISTRIBUTION LIST Social Sciences Anthropology ANTH& 100 ANTH 110 ANTH& 204 ANTH& 206 ANTH& 217

Survey of Anthropology Mayas & Aztecs Archaeology Cultural Anthropology Plateau Native Peoples

5 3 5 5 2

Chican@ Studies CHST 112 CHST 115 CHST 220

Chican@ Exp. in Contemporary Society La Chicana Chican@ Community Study

Electives Electives should be chosen carefully from courses numbered 100 or above. A maximum of 15 credits may be taken from the Restricted Course List (see index). Co-op Credits A maximum of 15 co-op credits is allowed.

5 5 5

Communication Studies CMST& 102

Introduction to Mass Media

5

Micro Economics Macro Economics Economic Geography # Economic History #

5 5 5 5

Economics ECON& 201 ECON& 202 ECON 205 ECON 213

Ethnic Studies ETHS 101 ETHS 145

American Ethnic Minorities US Indian Relations

5 3

World Regional Geography Human Geography Economic Geography #

5 5 5

Western Civilization I + Western Civilization II + Western Civilization III U.S. History I U.S. History II U.S. History 1945 to Present Greek Civilization + Economic History # Pacific Northwest History History of Latin America History of Mexico

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Geography GEOG 101 GEOG & 200 GEOG 205

History HIST& 116 HIST& 117 HIST& 118 HIST& 136 HIST& 137 HIST 205 HIST 209 HIST 213 HIST& 214 HIST 270 HIST 275

Political Science POLS 100 POLS 100W POLS& 101 POLS& 202 POLS& 203 POLS 205

Contemporary World Problems Contemporary World Problems Intro Political Science American Government International Relations State & Local Government

3 5 5 5 5 5

General Psychology Lifespan Psychology Fundamentals of Psychological Research Human Life-Span Development I Abnormal Psychology Social Psychology

5 5 5 5 5 5

Intro to Sociology Social Problems Sociology of Sex/Gender Social Psychology Marriage & Family

5 5 5 5 5

Psychology PSYC& 100 PSYC& 200 PSYCH 209 PSYCH 213 PSYC& 220 PSYCH 230

Sociology SOC& 101 SOC& 201 SOC 210 SOC 230 SOC 250

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54

SPECIAL DEGREES Degrees Offered  

Associate Degree in General Studies Associate Degree in Technology - Servicemen’s Opportunity College

Associate Degree in General Studies Requirements The general studies degree is designed to allow maximum flexibility in attaining a degree for those with broad needs and experiences. It is not meant to be a transferable degree, although individual courses may transfer to four-year colleges and universities. A. Communication Skills (8 credits) Required: ENGL& 101; other communication courses: 3 credits B. Distribution Credits (30 credits) Since no specific list is designated for these courses, students may include a wider range of courses in the following areas than is found in the approved distribution list. Humanities (10 credits) Select from at least two subject areas. Natural Science/Math (10 credits) Select from at least two subject areas. Social Sciences (10 credits) Select from at least two subject areas. C. Electives: (52 credits) Total for Degree: 90 Credits See “General Education Requirements” section of the catalog for additional requirements. Associate Degree in Technology: Servicemen’s Opportunity College Yakima Valley Community College is one of more than 400 institutions that make up the network of Servicemen’s Opportunity College (SOC). The SOCAD program at YVCC enables a service person stationed virtually anywhere in the United States and at many posts overseas to take college-level courses and progress steadily toward a degree. Active-duty personnel are able to make full use of their military education and experiences in planning their academic and professional careers. The associate degree in technology is designed exclusively for military participants. It assists senior, professional, military personnel in achieving promotional points and early retirement. SOCAD is a two-year program (90 quarter hours required) that enables warrant officers and noncommissioned officers to earn credit largely from military experiences. A minimum of four college classes (18 quarter hours of credit total) may be all that is required for completion by warrant officers and senior noncommissioned officers. The balance of 72 quarter hours of credit may be granted from MOS (Mode of Service) experience, service schools, prior college courses, or other YVCC courses (18 credits minimum required at YVCC). This degree is not designed as a college academic transfer degree. Military personnel interested in a college transfer degree may contact the Counseling Center at YVCC for further information. YVCC courses required ENGL 090T, 095, or ENGL&101 (5 credits) CMST& 220 (5 credits) Social science/natural science (5 credits) Electives (5 credits)

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


RESTRICTED SUBJECT AREAS FOR TRANSFER

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InterCollege Relations Commission, Associate Degree Courses List, Part II (May 1995) The following list is intended to provide Washington community colleges with information regarding restrictions on the transferability of courses taken in fulfillment of associate degree requirements. Please note: This list represents an intercollege agreement and is not meant to reflect the transfer policy of any individual institution. It is the understanding of the representatives of participating baccalaureate colleges that associate degrees meeting the ICRC guidelines would ordinarily include no more than 15 credits in subjects on this list unless a special agreement had been arranged with the particular receiving institution. * In these subjects, the introductory survey courses are acceptable. Accounting * (Only Principles I, II, III are transferable) Adult Basic Education Aeronautics/Aviation Administration of Justice * (Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement, Police Science, Corrections) Agriculture * Air Conditioning/Heating/ Refrigeration Aircraft Repair Allied Health Program American Institute of Banking (AIB) Animal Technology Appliance Repair Technician Applied Linguistics Architectural Auto Mechanics Avionics Banking and Finance Barbering Biomedical Equipment Boat Building Business and Office Technician Career Planning/Exploration Carpentry/Construction Methods Chemical Dependency Childcare Chiropractic Clothing and Apparel Commercial Design Communications (Radio, TV, Film) Computer Information Systems Computer Repair Consumer Education Cooking and Baking Cooperative Work Experience, Field Experience (Only practicum in Teacher Education is transferable) Cosmetology Counseling Psychology Court Reporting Culinary Arts (Cooking, Baking) Custodial Training, Maintenance Data Processing (Courses in technical data processing/ data entry, personal computer use and software packages and their applications are not acceptable. For acceptable courses in Computer Science, see the Associate Degree Course List Part I.) Dental Assistant Dental Hygiene Diagnostic Ultrasound Technology Diesel Mechanics Dietician Diving Technology

Drafting Early Childhood Education * Education * Electronics Emergency Medical Technician Engineering Technology English as a Second Language Engineering Technology Environmental Technology Equine Sciences ESL (Courses that are preparation in English) Family Life Farm and Industrial Machinery Maintenance Ferrier/Horseshoeing Fashion Design and Merchandising Fire Science Fisheries * Fisheries Technology Fitness Technology Floristry * Food Service Forest Technology Forestry General Studies Gerontology Assistant Graphics Reproduction (Only introductory survey course in graphic arts is transferable.) Hazardous Materials Health (First Aid) Health Technologies (Radiology, Biomedical Photography) Histotechnology Home Economics (Restricted except courses in the scientific study of nutrition) Horology Horticulture Hospitality Hotel/Motel Management Human Resources Human Services (Counseling, gerontology, community health advocate, etc) * Independent Study Industrial Relations, Industrial Sciences Instructional Assistant Instrumentation and Control Interior Design and Merchandising Interpreter Training Journalism Keypunch Operator, Data Entry Labor Relations and Studies (Restricted except labor history and economics courses) Landscaping Leadership Skills Legal Studies

Leisure Services Library Skills, Library Technician Life Skills Machining, Machine Shop Marine Technology Marketing * Mechanics Media Technology Medical Technology Microcomputers Mid-Management Military Science (Lower division) Nanny Natural Resources Needle Trades Technology Nondestructive Testing Nuclear Technician Nursing/Nurse Aid Nursing Home Administration Occupational Education Oceanography Technology Office Occupations, Skills and Technology Ophthalmic Dispensing and Technology Optometric Technician Paralegal Paraprofessional programs Parent Education Parks and Recreation * Peer Counseling and Advising Personal Development and Human Relations Pharmacy Assisting Photographic Equipment Technician Physical Therapy Assisting Practical Nursing Preschool and Parenting Procurement/Purchasing Professional Development Public Works Technician Pulp and Paper Manufacture Technology Quality Control Radio and Television Technology Radiologic Technology Reading Real Estate Recreation/Leisure Parks * Rehabilitation Replacement Parts Respiratory/Inhalation Therapy Restaurant Management Retail Management Saddlemaking Sales Satellite Communications Secretarial Studies Security Small Business Management

Social Sciences (Restricted except some courses listed under this title which have academic content) Social Services * Soils Special Education Stationary Steam Engineering Student Government Study Skills (Including speed reading, note-taking, time management, test-taking, “skimming and scanning,” and other college survival skills) Substance Abuse Supermarket Supervision Surgical Surveying Technology programs Auto Parts Telecommunications Tourism and Travel Transportation Upholstery Veterinary Assistant Vision Care Vocational Education Waste Water Water Science Technology Welding Wildlife Management Workshops and Mini-courses * See the associate degree course list, Part I for exceptions. The full ICRC Handbook is available in the YVCC Counseling & Advising Center or at www.washingtoncouncil.org. Since 1995, the following colleges have subscribed to the Intercollege Relations Commission Guidelines: Bastyr University Central Washington University Cornish Institute Eastern Washington University Gonzaga University Heritage University Northwest College Pacific Lutheran University Seattle Pacific University City University Seattle University The Evergreen State College Saint Martin’s College University of Washington Washington State University Western Washington University Whitworth College

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BACHELOR DEGREES Degrees Offered 

Bachelor of Applied Science in Business Management

Bachelor of Applied Science in Business Management The Bachelor of Applied Science in Business Management (BAS) program at Yakima Valley Community College is designed for prospective students who have earned an Associate of Applied Science, Associate in Arts DTA, or Associate in Business DTA and need a pathway to a bachelor’s degree. This pathway combines lower-division technical and transfer courses with upper-division credits in Business Management resulting in an application-oriented four-year degree. The BAS in Business Management caters to working adults. Classes meet in the evenings one time per week for two hours and seats are available in Yakima and Grandview. Continued instruction and student interaction takes place online. Full-time students, those taking 15 credits per quarter, can finish the program in two years once pre-requisites have been met. Currently, courses are scheduled to be offered during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters beginning Fall 2014. This program is also open for part-time enrollment. While admission into the BAS in Business Management is competitive, all interested and qualified individuals are encouraged to apply. For admission and selection information, go to www.yvcc.edu/bachelors. For more information, call 509.574.4797 or email bachelors@yvcc.edu.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


PROFESSIONAL/TECHNICAL DEGREES & CERTIFICATES

57

Degrees & Certificates Offered Associate of Applied Science Associate of Applied Science, Transfer  YVCC/Perry Technical Institute Combined Certificate of Achievement Associate of Applied Science Degree The Associate of Applied Science degree is designed to provide competencies related to the workplace; it is not designed as a transfer degree. Students wishing to transfer applied science degree credits will not be automatically accepted as a junior at four-year colleges and universities; however, since some individual courses taken under this degree plan are transferable, students wishing to transfer with this degree are likely to receive some advanced-standing credit after their transcript is individually evaluated by the receiving institution. This degree may be awarded upon completion of a prescribed program. In order to be awarded an applied science degree or certificate, students must complete courses covering three core competency distribution areas: computation, communication, and human relations. Specific courses are required that will fulfill these competencies. The curriculum in professional/technical areas is competencybased and has been developed to meet industry-wide skills standards. For specific degree requirements, please refer to the "General Education Requirements" section and the appropriate program of study section of this catalog. The following degrees are offered:

Administrative Assistant Agribusiness Audio Production -YV Tech Automotive Service Technology Accounting Bilingual Administrative Office Assistant Bilingual Legal Office Assistant Bilingual Medical Office Assistant Bilingual Office Applications Business Management Business Management, Entrepreneurship Spec Business Management, Marketing Spec Chemical Dependency Studies

Civil Engineering Technology Construction Design Criminal Justice Dental Hygiene Early Childhood Education ECE Preschool Sped Option Electrical Technology - Perry Tech Food Technology Heating, Vent, A/C & Refrigeration - Perry Tech Information Technology General IT Network Administrator IT General Support Specialist Instrument & Industrial Auto Tech - Perry Tech Legal Office Assistant

Machine Technology - Perry Tech Medical Assisting Medical Billing & Coding Medical Office Assistant Nursing Para-educator Production/Pest Management Radiologic Sciences Surgical Technology Technology (SOCAD) TV Production/Broadcast - YV-Tech Veterinary Technology Vineyard Technology Winery Technology

Associate of Applied Science, Transfer The Associate of Applied Science, Transfer is built upon the technical courses required for job preparation but also includes a collegelevel general education component. Courses are designed for the dual purpose of immediate employment and as preparation for the junior year in a bachelor’s degree commonly described as the Bachelor of Applied Science. YVCC and Perry Technical Institute Combined Degree Program The combined degree program provides students the opportunity to obtain specialized training at Perry Technical Institute together with specific YVCC coursework that will better prepare students for their jobs and provide them with advancement opportunities. Students may complete their YVCC coursework before, during, or after their Perry Technical Institute training. Depending on the program, students will complete 27 YVCC credits. On successful completion of both the Perry Technical Institute training and YVCC classes, students will earn an Associate of Applied Science in Electrical Technology; Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Technology; Instrumentation and Industrial Automation Technology; or Machine Technology. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


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Certificates of Achievement The certificate programs offered at YVCC include a wide range of subjects and require varying lengths of time for completion. The specific requirements for each certificate are given in the program descriptions section of this catalog. Certificates of Achievement will be issued upon successful completion of the prescribed certificate programs with a 2.0 or higher grade point average in the courses required for that certificate. Certificate applications may be obtained from the Registration and Records Office. In addition to specific certificate programs, YVCC may also award the community college certificate to any student who completes 90 credits at the college. Persons interested in receiving this Certificate of Achievement, which recognizes two years of completed work at the institution, may request the certification application from the Registration and Records Office in the Deccio Higher Education Center. Award of the certificate is by approval of the registrar. Certificates of Achievement Offered Access Accounting Clerk Advanced Arc/Gas/Welding Animal Science Technology Beginning Arc/Gas Welding Beginning Word Processor Bilingual Office Assistant Business Accounting Business Management Business Marketing Chemical Dependency Studies Chican@ Studies Chican@ Studies Special Option CISCO Inter-networking Communications Call Taker Community College Computed Tomography Correctional Crime Scene Investigation Customer Service I & II Customer Service Training Certificate I & II Dental Assisting: YV Tech Drafting ECE Childcare Assistant ECE Childcare Provider ECE Preschool Special Education Instructional Para-Educator ECE Initial Certificate Short Certificate of Specialization: • ECE Administration • ECE Family Child Care • ECE General • ECE Infant-Toddler Care • ECE School-Age Care • ECE State Certificate Ethnic Studies Excel Forklift Operation Gateways to Technology

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

General Office Assistant High School Diploma, YVCC Hospitality Careers Information Technology Computer User Information Technology General Information Technology Office Suite Intermediate Arc/Gas/Welding Introduction to Office Technology Legal Receptionist Machining Technology Managing & Maintaining the PC Medical Assisting Medical Billing and Coding Medical Interpreter - Spanish/English Medical Receptionist Medical Terminology Medical Transcriptionist Native American Option Native American Specialist Nursing Assistant Office Clerk Office Skills I & II Office Worker 1A, 1B, & 1C Para-Educator Pharmacy Technician Phlebotomy Police Clerk/Support Specialist PowerPoint Practical Nursing Receptionist Records Management Retail Management Surgical Technology Tree Fruit Production Vineyard Technology Welding Wine Sales Winery Technology Word Processing


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COURSES Prerequisites This section of the catalog identifies what the specific prerequisites, if any, are for each course. Course prerequisites are requirements that students must meet before they can enroll in a particular course. A student must earn a grade of C (2.0) or higher in prerequisite courses, unless otherwise noted, or unless the student receives the department chair’s written approval for the class or program. Students are required to complete the prerequisites for a course before they can enroll in that class. As students register for classes, the system will check their student records for prerequisite requirements. If these requirements are found in the record, the student will be registered in the class, but if they are not found, the system will not allow registration for that course. For information about departmental policies regarding prerequisites, contact the appropriate dean’s office.

Course Numbering The numbers from 0-99 designate developmental courses and certain professional/technical classes. These classes are not college level. Classes numbered from 100-299 are college-level and generally transferable to baccalaureate degree programs. Courses numbered 099, 199, or 299 designate independent study and field experience classes. Courses numbered 098, 198, or 298 designate experimental or exploratory classes. Cooperative field experience (co-op) courses are assigned the 190 and 290 numbered series. Community service courses are numbered with 076 and are not awarded credit. Courses listed in this catalog constitute the most recent record of the total academic program of the college. Listing does not mean that all courses are offered every quarter or every year. Consult the class schedule for specific course offerings.

Common Course Numbering Washington’s community and technical colleges want to make it easier for students to transfer credits among the state’s 34 community and technical colleges. YVCC has moved to a common course numbering system, which will mean that the same course will be titled and numbered in a similar way at every community and technical college in the state. There are a number of changes in course names and numbers for YVCC. The changes should help you know that a course you have taken at one Washington college is the same at another, and the course will transfer easily. Common courses are identified by an “&” following the department abbreviation. Transfer courses that are not identified as common will still transfer under the Direct Transfer Agreement as in the past. Please direct any questions to the Registrar in the Enrollment Services Office at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

Definitions and Codes Co-requisite: These are one or more courses that must be taken together in the same quarter. For example, a lecture and lab in Chemistry. Cross-disciplined courses: Courses in two different disciplines that have the same course description and credits. Credit cannot be given for both courses.

Associate Degree Distribution Codes BR CM HM HM (P) NS NS (L) QU SS

Basic Requirements Communications Humanities Humanities Performance Natural Science Lab Science Quantitative Social Science

Quarter Offered Codes F S SR W O

Fall Quarter Spring Quarter Summer Quarter Winter Quarter Occasionally

Core Competency Codes ‹Computation z Communication „ Human Relations

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015


60 Accounting See also “Business Administration” Courses ACCT& 201: Principles of Accounting I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introduction to the theory and practice of accounting, including financial statements. ACCT& 202: Principles of Accounting II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Depreciation, payroll taxes, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 ACCT& 203: Principles of Accounting III 5 Cr Quarters: W, S, SR ACCT& 203 introduces students to the procedures and techniques with which managers use accounting information to make decisions. The course includes departmental and cost accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 and 202

Agriculture The mission of the Agriculture Program is to serve as a partner with the diverse agriculture industry to provide students with the attitudes, abilities, and problem-solving capabilities to meet career responsibilities and lead agriculture into the future. As the number one employer in central Washington, the agriculture industry offers exciting and challenging career opportunities.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Develop skills needed to meet various agriculture career responsibilities. • Enter entry level jobs in the agriculture industry or meet additional responsibilities in current positions. • Transfer successfully into articulated programs.

Careers Agricultural production, processing, and marketing activities in our agriculturally diverse geographic area are supported by many enterprises which conduct activities in research, marketing, technical advising, input supply, regulatory compliance, storage, packing, processing, production, and animal health and care. Firms working in one or more of these activity areas require employees who can implement solutions to practical problems using existing and new technology and with concern for safety and environmental protection. YVCC’s Agriculture Department degrees and certificates provide students with the necessary skills and abilities that employers desire. Salaries and benefits in entry-level positions vary but have remained competitive. Advancement in the various career fields remains open and attainable. Agribusiness Program: Students completing the program should be able to apply business management and agriculture production principles to the management and operation of agribusiness firms. Food Technology Program: Students will be able to apply effective production, processing, and preservation methods to maintain food product quality from harvest through consumer purchase. Tree Fruit Production Program: Degree offered in partnership with Wenatchee Valley College. Career opportunities include horticulturists, integrated pest management specialists, production managers, and processing managers. Vineyard Technology Program: Hands-on training will be provided in all aspects of vineyard operations with a broad knowledge of viticulture and applied sciences. Winery Technology Program: Students will learn appropriate winemaking principles from fermentation to bottling with experience in the tasting room and management. For more information on current employment trends, check with the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degrees The Agriculture Department degrees are designed for students to develop skills to enhance employment opportunities in the agriculture industry or to prepare students for transfer into baccalaureate degree programs at other institutions. YVCC’s Agriculture Department offers the following associate of applied science degrees and options: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Agribusiness Food Technology Tree Fruit Production Vineyard Technology Winery Technology

The Agriculture Department also offers an Associate in Applied Science Transfer (AAS-T) degree, for students wishing to transfer to a four-year institution. Information on this degree can be found at www.yvcc.edu/ag. Agribusiness This degree is offered jointly between the business and agriculture departments. Students will develop an understanding of basic business management and agriculture production principles. They can apply these principles and skills to the management and operation of agribusiness firms. Examples of career opportunities include crop production managers, sales representatives, farmers and ranchers, agribusiness managers and owners, and record-keeping specialists. Required Courses ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I AG 101 Introduction to Agriculture AG 125 Safety and Labor Management AG 220 Current Ag Issues and Trends AGECN 201 Economics in Agriculture AGECN 210 Farm Management AGSCI 101 Introduction to Plant Science AGSCI 201 Soils AGSCI 130 Introduction to Animal Science or AGSCI 211, Fruit Science BA 115 Business Math ‹ BA 138 Written Bus Communication z BA 180 Consumer Financial Planning BA 220 Human Relations Workplace „ BUS& 101 Introduction to Business BT 101 Begin Keyboarding or BT 160, Word Processing Short Course ECON& 202 Macro Economics IT 100 Introduction to Computers IT 102 Windows IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction Electives * Total Degree Credits

Credits 5 1 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 5 5 2 5 3 2 2 20 96-98

Tree Fruit Production YVCC offers a new Tree Fruit Production degree in partnership with Wenatchee Valley College. Students take classes at YVCC along with classes from WVC via distance learning. With successful completion of this program, students earn an Associate of Technical Science degree from Wenatchee Valley College without having to travel from the Yakima Valley. Career opportunities include horticulturists, integrated pest management specialists production managers, and processing managers. For more information on the program of study contact the Agriculture Department. Vineyard Technology This degree emphasizes the development of grape production principles with specialization in the integrated management of insect, disease, and weed pests. Examples of career opportunities include grape production manager, crew supervisor, technical advisor, and production crew worker. Program and Curriculum Guide Fall Year 1 AG 120 Introduction to Washington Wines AGSCI 101 Introduction to Plant Science AGSCI 135 General Viticulture MATH 085 Beginning Algebra (or higher) Winter Year 1 AG 125 Safety & Labor Management „ AGSCI 131 Washington’s Terroir CHEM 100 Introduction to Chemistry ELECTIVE Elective Spring Year 1 AGSCI 112 Essentials of Winemaking CHEM 109 Principles of Chemistry Lecture CHEM 110 Principles of Chemistry Lab BA 138 Written Business Communication z Summer Year 1 AG 190 ** Co-op Work Experience AGSCI 233 Summer Viticulture Fall Year 2 WGMT 112 Irrigation (taken at WWCC) AGSCI 212 Winemaking BA 115 Business Math ‹ Winter Year 2 AGECN 210 Farm Management AGSCI 201 Soils AGSCI 213 Integrated Pest Management AGSCI 234 Winter Viticulture Spring Year 2 AGSCI 214 Sustainable Agriculture AGSCI 235 Vineyard Management ELECTIVE Elective Total Degree Credits

Credits 2 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 4 1 5 2 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 2 5 5 5 99

* 20 credits can be from the following disciplines: AG, AGECN, AGSCI, BA, BIOL, CHEM, IT, MATH, or SPAN.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Winery Technology This degree provides students with an understanding of principles and application of technology associated with wine production. Students will have the opportunity to learn about wine making using appropriate production, processing, sanitation, preservation, and safety methods. Students will also apply methods to evaluate grape and wine quality. Examples of careers in this area include technician, quality control specialist, wine maker assistant, retail salesperson, and plant operation supervisor and worker. Program and Curriculum Guide Term One AG 120 Introduction to Washington Wines AGSCI 101 Introduction to Plant Science AGSCI 135 General Viticulture MATH 085 Beginning Algebra (or higher) Term Two AG 125 Safety & Labor Management „ AGSCI 131 Washington’s Terroir BA 138 Written Business Communication z CHEM 100 Introduction to Chemistry Term Three AGSCI 112 Essentials of Winemaking BA 115 Business Math ‹ BIOL 105 Biology for Nonmajors CHEM 109 Principles of Chemistry Lecture CHEM 110 Principles of Chemistry Lab Term Four AG 190 ** Co-op Work Experience AGSCI 202 Winery Operations I AGSCI 212 Wine making Elective Term Five AGECN 212 Winery Management AGSCI 203 Winery Operations II AGSCI 255 Advanced Winemaking Elective Term Six AGSCI 204 Winery Operations III AGSCI 235 Vineyard Management AGSCI 240 Winery Compliance AGSCI 245 Wine Sensory Total Degree Credits

Credits 2 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 4 1 4 3 5 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 2 3 99

**The work experience can be taken in the fall, winter, spring, or summer quarters.

Certificates The following certificates are designed to provide students with a concentration of courses in a specific technical area. The certificates may be suitable for students who wish to increase their knowledge and skills in a particular area. All courses taken for the certificates would apply toward the related associate degree programs. Certificate in Tree Fruit Production AG 125 AGECN 210 AGSCI 101 AGSCI 201 AGSCI 220 AGSCI 211 IT 100

Safety & Labor Management Farm Management Plant Science Soils Current Ag Issues Fruit Science Introduction to Computers Approved electives Total Credits

5 5 5 5 3 5 3 10 41

Certificate in Winery Technology AG 120 AG 125 AGSCI 101 AGSCI 112 AGSCI 135 AGSCI 212 * AGSCI 235 * AGSCI 240 * AGSCI 245 * AGSCI 255 * CHEM 100

Introduction to Washington Wines Safety & Labor Management Introduction to Plant Science Essentials of Winemaking General Viticulture Winemaking Vineyard Management Winery Compliance Wine Sensory Advanced Winemaking Introduction to Chemistry Total Credits

2 5 5 3 3 5 5 2 3 5 5 43

* Courses normally taken in year two. Certificate in Vineyard Technology AG 120 AG 125 AGSCI 101 AGSCI 112 AGSCI 135 AGSCI 201 * AGECN 210 * AGSCI 212 * AGSCI 235 * CHEM 100

Introduction to Washington Wines Safety & Labor Management Introduction to Plant Science Essentials of Winemaking General Viticulture Soils Farm Management Winemaking Vineyard Management Introduction to Chemistry Total Credits

2 5 5 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 43

* Courses normally taken in year two. Certificate in Wine Sales AG 120 AGSCI 112 AGSCI 131 BA 156 BA 275

Introduction to Washington Wines Essentials of Winemaking Washington’s Terroir Marketing Wine Marketing Total Credits

2 3 3 5 5 18

Courses AG 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. AG 080: Practical Farm Management I 2 Cr Quarters: F This course is designed to provide an introduction to the development of business goals, establishment and use of record-keeping systems, and preparation and analysis of financial reports to help individuals more effectively manage agricultural crop and livestock production enterprises. AG 085: Practical Farm Management II 2 Cr Quarters: F This course reviews methods used to develop cash flow, enterprise, and partial and whole farm budgets. Additional topics include the development of farm safety plans, a discussion of the management of labor resources, and a review of risk management techniques appropriate for crop and livestock production enterprises. Prerequisite: AG 080 AG 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in agriculture.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


AG 101: Introduction to Agriculture 1 Cr Quarters: F Agriculture represents the single largest industry in the United States with many diverse career opportunities. The various sub-sectors that complete the agriculture industry will be discussed. Students will explore various job and career opportunities through observation, interviews, computer searches, and guest speaker presentations. AG 110: Agriculture Club 1 Cr Quarters: F The YVCC Agriculture Club is a member of the state and national Postsecondary Agriculture Student Organization. Students may receive one credit for participation in club activities, provided they prepare for and participate in at least one interview contest at the fall competition for the state organization. Preparation includes writing a resume and a letter of application as well as completing an application form. AG 120: Introduction to Washington Wines 2 Cr Quarters: F, W A course of study designed to introduce the participants to the art of knowing wine as part of human tradition and culture. There will be an overview of the Washington grape and wine industry, including an introduction to terminology, a summary of Washington grape production areas, types of wines produced, and the basics of wine evaluation. AG 121: Wine Selection and Serving 2 Cr Quarters: O This course presents an overview of appropriate wine serving techniques and guidelines for selecting wines that effectively enhance foods and occasions. AG 125: Safety & Labor Management 5 Cr Quarters: W The process of setting up an effective safety management program will be presented in accordance with employee safety and labor regulations relating to on-farm production and agribusiness environments. There will be practical emphasis on the development of leadership and human relations skills for successful interpersonal relationships. This course will also provide principles for the safe and environmentally responsible use of agricultural chemicals as a component of an integrated pest management system. AG 130: Wine Basics I Winemaking 2 Cr Quarters: O An introductory overview of winemaking, including a review of procedures, equipment requirements, and techniques for winemaking. AG 131: Wine Basics II Wine Quality Evaluation 2 Cr Quarters: O Students will be introduced to the use of visual, smell, and taste sensory processes to evaluate wine quality. AG 132: Wine Basics III Grape Growing 2 Cr Quarters:O Students will obtain a general overview of grapevine establishment and cultural methods used for grape growing. AG 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor AG 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor AG 220: Current Agriculture Issues & Trends 3 Cr Quarters: W-Odd Years Introduces students to important issues and trends that are occurring in agriculture. It presents important regulatory, environmental, economic, and public issues and examines how they are effecting changes and trends in production agriculture, agribusiness, agricultural research, and government policy.

AG 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Agricultural Economics AGECN 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in agricultural economics. AGECN 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor AGECN 201: Economics in Agriculture 5 Cr Quarters: F The introduction of microeconomics principles with application to agriculture. The importance of agriculture in our economy and the general organization of agriculture are presented. Students will examine input and production, supply and demand, and marketing principles. The principles will be used to develop practical, managerial, decisionmaking skills. AGECN 210: Farm Management 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is a study of the principles for profitable management of farms, ranches, and other business firms related to agriculture. Discussed are methods for developing financial statements and using them to measure performance and efficiency of agricultural production enterprises. The importance of using budget development, investment analysis techniques, various sources of capital, and risk management skills for effective farm management decisions are also emphasized. AGECN 212: Winery Management 5 Cr Quarters: S There are over 50 wineries of diverse size in the Yakima Valley, and the number of wineries continues to increase. Students will have the opportunity to review economic and management principles and apply them for effective and efficient business and operational planning and winery management.

Agricultural Science AGSCI 101: Introduction to Plant Science 5 Cr Quarters: F An introductory course presenting principles of anatomy, morphology, physiology, and growth of crop plants. The effects of environmental conditions, cultural practices, and management techniques on plant growth, development, yield, and quality are discussed. Students are introduced to important crops of Washington as well as principles of their production, propagation, and quality evaluation. This course is cross disciplined. Credit cannot be given for both AGSCI 101 and BIOL 107. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Distribution: NS (L) AGSCI 110: Irrigation Principles 5 Cr Quarters: O Methods and practices of irrigation used in crop production in Central Washington. Principles of soil and plant water relationships and irrigation system design will be introduced. The issues of water sources, consumption amounts, and water quality along with their effects on water management decisions will be presented. AGSCI 112: Essentials of Winemaking 3 Cr Quarters: S Introductory level enology course that will give an overview of the elements of viticulture and vinification involved in quality wine production. Topics will include fermentation, winery operations, roles of equipment, and technology.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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AGSCI 130: Introduction to Animal Science 5 Cr Quarters: F Introduction to the breeds and breed types of typical farm animals. The course will provide a general introduction to reproduction, care, and feeding or common agricultural animals with consideration of problems related to the local area. This course includes 4 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Placement testing eligibility for ENGL 095 and ENGL 081T or higher

AGSCI 205: Weed Science 5 Cr Quarters: O An introductory weed science course presenting principles of weed identification, biology, and management. Cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical control methods will be incorporated in order to develop integrated weed management strategies for use on annual and perennial crops of Central and Eastern Washington. Herbicide classification and modes of action will be presented. Recommended: AGSCI 101

AGSCI 131: Terroir 3 Cr Quarters: W This course will focus on defining the concept of terroir and what makes Washington unique in the world of wine. The geologic history of Washington and its effect on the formation of soil will be discussed with comparisons to the great wine grape-growing areas of the world.

AGSCI 210: Vegetable/Row Crop Production 5 Cr Quarters: O Principles for successful production, fertility management, handling, and storage of important vegetable and row crops of Central Washington. Appropriate propagation techniques and methods of crop improvement will be introduced.

AGSCI 135: General Viticulture Grape Growing 3 Cr Quarters: F An introduction to the science and cultivation of growing grapes, including history, biology, climate, vineyard management practices, common pests and diseases, and establishment and training practices. Also included is a general overview of grape quality as it related to harvest.

AGSCI 211: Introductory Fruit Science 5 Cr Quarters: O Practices, methods, and techniques of deciduous tree fruit production. Specific topics will include orchard location, varieties of trees, propagation, production management, and the effect of environment on tree fruit growth and development.

AGSCI 170: Elementary Food Science 5 Cr Quarters: O A discussion of the interrelationship between people and their food supply with broad coverage of food products, food technology methods, and food safety issues. AGSCI 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in agricultural science. AGSCI 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Independent study/field experience in agricultural science. AGSCI 201: Soils 5 Cr Quarters: W Life on earth is dependent upon soils. Effective management of soils is needed to protect this natural resource and at the same time produce food and biomass to support societies. Students will develop an understanding of soil formation and the basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Students will examine factors that influence soil quality and how to manage soils considering important issues such as soil fertility and nutrient management, soil erosion, soil pollution, and land use planning. AGSCI 202: Winery Operations I 3 Cr Quarters: F Wine grape crush and post-fermentation processing practices and the principles and techniques involved in the production of premium table wine will be explored. This will include application in a winery setting with appropriate equipment, sanitation, and safety methods. Prerequisite: AGSCI 112 or permission of instructor AGSCI 203: Winery Operations II 3 Cr Quarters: W Wine processing techniques involved in the operation of a wine cellar are emphasized. The focus is on wine transfer techniques, additions, filtrations, blending, topping, and other winery operations. Wine analyses are also practiced. Prerequisite: AGSCI 112 or permission of instructor AGSCI 204: Winery Operations III 3 Cr Quarters: S Emphasis is on routine wine processing practices that occur during the spring prior to bottling. This hands-on experience will include barrel care and maintenance, blending exercises, quality control methods, and bottling practices. Prerequisite: AGSCI 112 or permission of instructor

AGSCI 212: Winemaking 5 Cr Quarters: F The science of winemaking involves the application of microbiology, chemistry, sensory phenomena, engineering, and other disciplines to create a quality product. This course will address the procedures, equipment, and techniques used for making quality wine. Recommended: AGSCI 101 and AGSCI 120 AGSCI 213: Integrated Pest Management 5 Cr Quarters: W This online course will introduce the philosophy, ecological foundation, and strategies and tactics of plant and animal pest management. Principles and practices of integrated chemical, cultural, and biological controls and issues related to pesticides and the environment will be emphasized. The information in this course will address management issues related to common, expected pest problems as well as minor pest problems. Recommended: AGSCI 101 AGSCI 214: Sustainable Agriculture 5 Cr Quarters: S Students will be introduced to the concepts of how sustainable practices have a major impact on modern Agriculture. The biological, environmental and social factors involved in organic food production are covered, as well as the concept of alternative practices. AGSCI 215: Applied Plant Pathology 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to the classification, symptoms, epidemiology, and control of plant diseases of tree fruits and other important crops of Central Washington. Recommended: AGSCI 101 AGSCI 220: Applied Entomology 5 Cr Quarters: O A general introduction to anatomy, classification, and control of important insect pests of tree fruits and other important crops of Central Washington. Components of effective integrated insect management programs will be presented. AGSCI 221: Wine Quality and Consumer Education 5 Cr Quarters: O This course will review characteristics used to assess wine quality and will provide guidelines for selecting and serving appropriate wines to accompany diverse menus and occasions. Principles of wine marketing and consumer sales from beverage or grocery stores, restaurants, and tasting rooms will be discussed. Recommended: AGSCI 120

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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3

AGSCI 222: Packing and Storage of Horticultural Crops 5 Cr Quarters: O The design, organization, logistics, and management of packing and storage facilities will be discussed. Principles of refrigeration and regularand controlled-atmosphere storage will be presented with emphasis on application of the technology for effective management of postharvest crop quality. Students will be introduced to the operation and control of packing line components.

AGSCI 255: Advanced Winemaking 5 Cr Quarters: W Winemaking is a complex process. This course will explore fermentation techniques in detail and review important post-fermentation treatments. Wine spoilage will be discussed. There will be a detailed review of the chemical constituents in grapes and wine. Appellation control laws and adulteration concerns will also be addressed. Prerequisite: AGSCI 212

AGSCI 225: Food Quality Assurance 5 Cr Quarters: O An overview of the role of quality assurance in producing a safe food supply. Students will be introduced to the methodology and design of quality assurance programs for analyzing microbial and chemical hazards and identifying physical factors associated with food quality. Recommended: AGSCI 170

AGSCI 260: Postharvest Physiology 5 Cr Quarters: O Description of the postharvest processes occurring in fruits and vegetables, including respiration, physical and chemical changes, and moisture loss and their relation to storage longevity and quality of commodities. Management of postharvest decay and disease development will be discussed.

AGSCI 233: Summer Viticulture 3 Cr

Quarters: SR

This course will concentrate on vineyard management techniques from fruit set to harvest that relate to canopy management and fruit quality. Students will be introduced to how to monitor and control populations of grapevine pests and beneficial insects. Crop estimation and adjustments will also be covered. Prerequisite: AGSCI 135 or instructor approval AGSCI 234: Winter Viticulture 2 Cr Quarters: W This course will focus on vineyard management techniques from postharvest to budburst. Students will be introduced to principles and practical aspects of carbohydrate reserve formation and utilization, post-harvest irrigation, fertilization, cold weather protection, cold damage assessment, pruning, and other vineyard practices. Prerequisite: AGSCI 135. AGSCI 235: Vineyard Management 5 Cr Quarters: S Vineyard Management involves integrating appropriate production strategies with the science of premium grape growing. This course is designed to educate students about establishing and maintaining a healthy commercial wine grape vineyard. Management issues related to production of high quality grapes as part of the winemaking process will be addressed. Prerequisite: AGSCI 135. AGSCI 238: Horse/Horsemanship 3 Cr A basic study of light horses.

Quarters: S

AGSCI 240: Winery Compliance 2 Cr Quarters: S Emphasis will be on the methods and practices to develop a good winery safety plan. Focus will also include tracking, monitoring, and recording wine additions and losses to remain in compliance with state and federal agencies. AGSCI 245: Wine Sensory 3 Cr Quarters: S Introduction to the principles of sensory and chemical characteristics in wines. Students will obtain knowledge of wine sensory terminology and will learn wine faults and how to recognize them. The components of a wine will be evaluated, including appearance, aroma, and flavor. AGSCI 250: Plant Propagation 5 Cr Quarters: O Plant propagation techniques are used to multiply selected plants and preserve their essential genetic characteristics. Plant propagation is essential to the success of production agriculture and ornamental horticulture. The class will review the concepts of sexual and asexual plant propagation and specifically address principles and techniques of propagation by seed and cuttings. Also addressed will be principles and techniques in micro-propagation and propagation by budding, grafting, and layering. Recommended: AGSCI 101 Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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66 Allied Health Technology The Allied Health Technology Department provides career and enrichment coursework and clinical experiences in order to build the knowledge, skills, and competencies for providing care for people of all ages in a variety of medical professions. The different areas of study offered include: Medical Assisting, Medical Billing and Coding, Medical Interpreter, Pharmacy Technician, Phlebotomy, and Surgical Technology. Each program has different admission criteria, coursework, and degree options, ranging from introductory classes and certificates to associate of applied science degrees focused on a specific area of study. The majority of courses in Allied Health Technology are offered through an online format. Clinical laboratory practice and clinical externship is required in some program courses.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Utilize well-defined professional skills to perform basic procedures common to the various health care careers • Recognize the importance of effective communication between health care professionals and their patients • Describe strategies to modify health care interactions to meet the needs of a culturally diverse community

Medical Assisting Program Overview Combining convenient online instruction, laboratory simulations, and supervised clinical practice, the YVCC Medical Assisting Certificate of Completion program prepares students for a career as a medical assistant. Instruction includes core courses essential to health care professionals as well as specialty courses in medical assisting. Simulations of patient examination rooms, a laboratory, and a front office reception and business area in the allied health laboratory allow for hands-on practice of essential psychomotor skills. Clinical practice in local physician's offices and clinics provides actual experiences to prepare students for entry-level positions as a medical assistant. The YVCC Medical Assisting Certificate of Completion program is 66 credits in length. Students may complete the course of study in four quarters of full-time attendance. Parttime study is also available. A program application is required, with thirty students accepted annually by use of a competitive point system. Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate will receive a Certificate in Medical Assisting. The Yakima Valley Community College Medical Assisting Certificate of Completion program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, 1361 Park St., Clearwater, FL 33756; 727.210.1350. The optional Associate of Applied Science degree in Medical Assisting requires the student to complete 28 additional credits for a total of 94 credits. Prerequisite Courses BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding IT 105 Computer Literacy Core Courses

Credits 5 3

AH 105 AH 108 AH 110 AH 119 AH 120 AH 155 AHBC 101 AHBC 102 PTECH 115 PTECH 120

Introduction to Pharmacology 3 Comm & Legal Concepts in Health Care „ 5 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 Medical Terminology 5 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 Introduction to Medical Coding 3 Introduction to Medical Billing 2 Applied Mathematics II ‹ 3 Technical Writing z 5 Total Core Courses Credits 38 Clinical Procedures Courses AHMA 115 Clinical Procedures 10 Includes assisting with a physical exam, asepsis, measurement of body functions, assisting with surgeries and wound care, activity, sensory systems and neurological exams, medication administration, medical laboratory, phlebotomy, cardiac and respiratory procedures, digestive procedures and nutrition, urinary and reproductive system procedures. AHMA 145 Office Emergencies 1 Administrative Procedures Courses AHMA 125 Administrative Procedures 5 Includes scheduling and managing appointments, medical records, supply inventory, accounting principles, and business equipment and facility management. Practicum Courses AHMA 201 Externship 7 AHMA 202 Externship Seminar 1 AHMA 203 Certification Examination Preparation 4 Total Program Credits 66

Associate of Applied Science Degree Option Medical assisting students may complete the following requirements to obtain an Associate of Applied Science degree. Natural Science Social Science Electives

Minimum of 5 credits Minimum of 5 credits 18 credits, with no more than 3 credits to come from physical education, drama, art, and music combined. Total Credits Associate Degree Option 94

Medical Billing & Coding Program Overview Combining convenient online instruction, laboratory simulations, and supervised practice, the YVCC Medical Billing and Coding Program prepares students for a career as a billing and coding specialist. Instruction includes core courses essential to health care professionals as well as specialty courses in medical billing and coding. Simulation of a front office reception and business area in the allied health laboratory allows for realistic practice. Supervised practice in local physician's offices, hospitals, and clinics provides actual experiences to prepare students for entrylevel positions as billing and coding specialists. The Medical Billing and Coding Certificate program, totaling 69 credits, may be completed on a full-time basis during four quarters of study, with part-time options for study also available. The end point of the certificate program will be supervised practice in a community facility. The 106-credit Associate of Applied Science degree in Medical Billing and Coding will add coding content particular to the hospital and clinical settings as well as education to prepare a student for the clinical and supervisory roles. A program application is required for both program options, with twenty students accepted annually by use of a competitive point system.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Prerequisite Courses Credits BT 101 Introduction to Keyboarding 5 IT 105 Computer Literacy 3 Core Courses AH 105 Introduction to Pharmacology 3 AH 108 Comm & Legal Concepts in Health Care „ 5 AH 110 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 AH 120 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 AHBC 101 Introduction to Medical Coding 3 AHBC 102 Introduction to Medical Billing 2 BA 115 Business Math ‹ 5 PTECH 120 Technical Writing z 5 Total Core Courses Credits 40 Program-Specific Courses AHBC 121 Health Care Reimbursement Issues I 3 AHBC 122 Health Care Reimbursement Issues II 3 AHBC 131 ICD-9-CM Coding 2 AHBC 132 CPT/HCPCS Coding 4 AHBC 133 ICD-10-CM Coding 3 Administrative Procedures Courses AHMA 125 Administrative Procedures 4 Includes scheduling and managing appointments, medical records, accounting principles, and business equipment and facility management. Practicum Courses AHBC 201 Coding Professional Practice 5 AHBC 203 CPC Examination Review 5 Total Program Credits 69

Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Billing & Coding The community board advising the Medical Billing and Coding Program has suggested the following coursework for the Associate of Applied Science degree in Medical Billing and Coding. All Associate of Applied Science degree in Medical Billing and Coding candidates will complete the 69 credits specified in the medical billing and coding certificate program followed by 36 additional credits. Courses ACCT& 201 AHBC 218 AHBC 220 AHBC 224

Credits Principles of Accounting I 5 Health Care Reimbursement III 4 Advanced Coding 5 Billing Compliance Issues 3 20 elective credits to be selected in conjunction with the academic advisor 20 Total Program Credits 106

Pharmacy Technician Program Overview Combining convenient online instruction, laboratory simulations, and supervised clinical practice, the YVCC Pharmacy Technician Program prepares students for a career as a pharmacy technician. Instruction includes core courses essential to health care professionals as well as specialty courses in pharmacy technology. A simulation of a pharmacy drug preparation area in the allied health laboratory allows for hands-on practice of essential psychomotor skills. Clinical practice in hospitals and retail pharmacies provide actual experiences to prepare students for entry-level positions in a variety of pharmacy settings. The YVCC Pharmacy Technician Program is 62 credits in length. Students may complete the course of study in four quarters of full-time attendance. Limited part-time study is also available. A program application is required, with ten students accepted annually by use of a competitive point system. Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate will receive a Certificate in Pharmacy Technician Studies. Prerequisite Courses Credits BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding 5 IT 105 Computer Literacy 3 Core Courses AH 105 Introduction to Pharmacology 3 AH 108 Comm & Legal Concepts in Health Care „ 5 AH 110 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 AH 120 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 PTECH 115 Applied Mathematics II ‹ 3 PTECH 120 Technical Writing z 5 Total Core Credits 33 Pharmaceutical Procedures Courses AHMA 115 Clinical Procedures (Asepsis) 1 Program-Specific Courses AHPT 125 Pharmacy Tech Skills I 4 AHPT 140 Pharmacy Law 1 AHPT 170 Pharmacy Tech Skills II 5 AHPT 175 Pharmacy Tech Skills III 6 Practicum Courses AHPT 201 Pharmacy Externship 8 AHPT 203 Pharmacy Technician Review 4 Total Program Credits 62

Medical Interpreter Medical interpretation is a complex skill. Designed for the Spanish/English bilingual student, the YVCC Medical Interpreter Program teaches the framework to understand the role of medical interpreter, the professional criteria to respond to a variety of interpreting situations, and the concrete skills to allow the interpreter to provide effective interpretation and cultural advocacy. The curriculum uses participatory training techniques, such as role play, to include the student in an active learning process. The Medical Interpreter Program is a short-term certificate program. The certificate will include the following coursework. Certificate AH 119 AHMI 101

Medical Terminology Spanish Medical Interpreter Total

Credits 5 5 10

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Phlebotomy Admission and Requirements A limited number of student positions are available. Interested students may pick up an application at the Allied Health Department or an application can be mailed to them. A high school diploma or GED certificate and proof of the first Hepatitis B dose must be returned with completed application for acceptance. Upon acceptance into the YVCC Phlebotomy program, students will be required to provide documentation of immunizations: 2 doses MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) or proof of immunity by titer, 2 doses of Varicella (chichen pox) or documentation from a physician of disease or proof of immunity by titer, 1 dose Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap), 3 doses Hepatitis B, a tuberculosis (TB) PPD skin test (if no documented negative skin test within last 12 months a 2-step PPD is required), and current year seasonal flu shot. Current healthcare provider CPR/First Aid card and a 7-hour HIV/Blood Bourne Pathogens certificate is required. Program of Study - Fall Quarter Courses AH 170 Phlebotomy Essentials AH 171 Phlebotomy Essentials Lab Winter Quarter AH 172 Phlebotomy Clinical Experience Total Credits

Credits 4 1 2-4 7-9

Surgical Technology Program Overview The YVCC Surgical Technology Program is 96 credits in length. Students may complete the course of study in seven quarters of full-time attendance. Limited part-time study is also available, and must be scheduled with a program advisor. Instruction includes core courses essential to health care professionals as well as specialty courses in surgical technology. Simulation of an operating room within the laboratory provides hands on practice in skills necessary to become a part of the surgical team. End-point courses include clinical rotations in surgery departments located around the Yakima Valley. Prerequisite Courses Credits BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding 5 IT 105 Computer Literacy 3 Core Courses AH 105 Introduction to Pharmacology 3 AH 108 Comm & Legal Concepts in Health Care „ 5 AH 110 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 AH 120 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 PTECH 115 Applied Mathematics II ‹ 3 PTECH 120 Technical Writing z 5 Total Core Credits 33 Clinical Procedures Courses AHST 104 Surgical Equipment & Biomedical Safety 3 AHST 106 Asepsis & Infection Control in Surgery 4 AHST 112 Instrumentation Identification/Set Up 5 AHST 125 Surgical Competencies I 5 AHST 135 Surgical Competencies II 5 AHST 150 Surgical Interventions/Procedures 10 AHST 155 Surgical Pharmacology 5 Total Procedures Credits 37

Practicum Courses AHST 201 Operating Room Clinical I AHST 202 Operating Room Seminar I AHST 210 Operating Room Clinical II AHST 211 Operating Room Seminar II AHST 220 Preparing for Board Certification I AHST 221 Preparing for Board Certification II Total Practicum Credits Total Program Credits

9 2 9 2 2 2 26 96

Courses AH 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This class is offered as a self-support, community service, non-credit course. AH 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in allied health. AH 105: Introduction to Pharmacology 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Introduction to Pharmacology presents a beginning description of topics pertaining to the understanding of the medication order, terminology used in prescribing medications, legislation relating to drugs, drug references, drug classifications, and forms of drugs. Prerequisite: IT 105, BT 101, and PTECH 115 required for Medical Assisting, Surgical Technology, and Pharmacy Technician students AH 108: Communication & Legal Concepts in Health Care 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is designed to assist health care professionals to better understand and meet the needs and expectations of culturally diverse patient populations. Topics discussed will include communication in the medical setting, medical legal and ethical considerations, and culturally-appropriate health care strategies. Students will be introduced to factors that affect health care interactions, such as cultural background, developmental stage, grief, stress level, legal requirements, and ethical dilemmas. Prerequisite: BT 101 and IT 105 AH 110: Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is an integration of basic structures and functions of the human body with disease processes that can affect body systems. This is the first of two Human Body in Health and Disease classes and includes an introduction to cellular function as well as the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, sensory, and digestive systems. Included are the diagnostic tests, treatments, and possible prognoses for common disease processes that can affect each of these systems. Prerequisite: IT 105 and BT 101 AH 119: Medical Terminology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This online course is designed to teach the language of medicine to those who are pursuing an administrative office or clinical career in a medical-related or legal profession. Pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of the most commonly used medical terms will be covered. Anatomy and physiology medical terminology are covered for each body system. Practical application of words and abbreviations in operative reports, consultation, and examinations will be addressed.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


AH 120: Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is an integration of basic structures and functions of the human body with disease processes that can affect body systems. This is the second of two Human Body in Health and Disease classes and includes a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system; hemodynamics; the heart, circulation and blood vessels; immunity and the lymphatic system; and the respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Included are common diagnostic tests, treatments, pharmacological agents, and possible prognoses for common disease processes that can affect each of these systems. Prerequisite: IT 105, BT 101 and AH 110 AH 155: First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course will meet all Washington State requirements for First Aid, CPR, and Blood-Borne Pathogen training. The course is intended for any individual who desires certification at the Health Care Provider level in the above topics. AH 170: Phlebotomy 4 Cr Quarters: F Phlebotomy is the collection of a sample of blood in order to perform laboratory testing. This course will teach entry-level phlebotomy skills, including venipuncture by syringe, vacutainer, and butterfly methods and capillary punctures of the heel and finger. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the course, copy of high school diploma or GED certificate submitted with the application, and concurrent enrollment in AH 171 AH 171: Phlebotomy Lab 1 Cr Quarters: F Phlebotomy is the collection of a sample of blood in order to perform laboratory testing. Students will practice entry-level phlebotomy skills, including venipuncture by syringe, vacutainer, and butterfly methods and capillary punctures of the heel and finger. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the course, copy of high school diploma or GED certificate submitted with the application, and concurrent enrollment in AH 170 AH 172: Phlebotomy Clinical Experience 2 or 4 Cr Quarters: W Phlebotomy Clinical Experience is a class in the mastery of phlebotomy techniques while working with patients in the hospital lab and clinic setting. Students will spend 60 hours in clinical labs and successfully draw 50 patients in order to complete the two-credit option. Students will spend 120 hours and successfully draw 100 patients in order to complete the four-credit option. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AH 170 and AH 171 AH 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Allied Health AHLTH 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. AHLTH 098: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in allied health.

Quarters: O

Medical Assistant AHMA 115: Clinical Procedures Variable Cr Quarters: F, S This variable credit course provides a theoretical foundation and handson practice of basic patient exam techniques and procedures commonly performed in the physician's office, clinic, or hospital. The role of each allied health technology specialty in relation to these procedures is emphasized. Prerequisite: Acceptance into an Allied Health Technology program AHMA 125: Administrative Procedures 4-5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This variable credit course provides theoretical foundation and hands-on practice of administrative procedures commonly used in the physician's office, clinic, or hospital. The role of each allied health technology specialty in relation to these procedures is emphasized. Prerequisite: Acceptance to an Allied Health Technology program AHMA 145: Office Emergencies for Medical Assistants 1 Cr Quarters: F, S This course provides an introduction to medical emergencies that may occur in the medical office or clinic setting. The medical assisting student will learn to respond to emergency situations effectively and use procedural guidelines while operating within their scope of practice. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Assistant program AHMA 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in allied health medical assistant. AHMA 201: Medical Assist Externship 7 Cr Quarters: W, SR During this course, the student will be placed in a clinic or medical office to perform, under the guidance of a preceptor, the medical and administrative skills learned while completing the medical assisting curriculum. Prerequisite: Completion of all required Medical Assisting courses AHMA 202: Medical Assisting Externship Seminar 1 Cr Quarters: W, SR This seminar meets once a week for those students enrolled in AHMA 201 or AHMA 205. Students will discuss the week's experiential activities performed in the clinical setting. Legal and ethical issues will be reviewed. Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and receive input from the instructor and other students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AHMA 201 or AHMA 205 AHMA 203: Certification Examination Prep 4 Cr Quarters: W,SR This course will systematically lead the student through a review of program topics, and impart updated information on topics from the curriculum that may be included in a national certification exam. Students will learn the preparation and test-taking techniques required to complete a certification type exam. The course end point will be to complete a national certification exam, either the CMA or RMA. Prerequisite: AHMA 115 and concurrent enrollment in AHMA 201 and AHMA 202 AHMA 205: Combined Externship 7 Cr Quarters: W,SR This course is designed for students who are pursuing a certificate and/ or degree in both the Medical Assisting and Medical Billing and Coding programs simultaneously. Students will be placed in a medical facility to practice the skills they have learned throughout the Medical Assisting and Medical Billing and Coding curricula. Under the guidance of a preceptor, the student will perform billing, coding, administrative, and clinical duties. Students are required to complete a 10-hour orientation followed by 100 hours performing billing, coding, and administrative functions and 100 hours performing clinical duties in the externship facility. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Assisting and Medical Billing and Coding programs and concurrent enrollment in AHMA 202

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Medical Billing and Coding AHBC 101: Introduction to Medical Coding 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Provides a basic introduction to the medical coding procedures used to obtain reimbursement for medical procedures and examination services. Topics will include the proper application of CPT and ICD-9-CM, and HCPCD coding and introduction to ICD-10-CM. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Billing and Coding, Medical Assisting, or Medical Office Assistant programs or permission of instructor AHBC 102: Introduction to Medical Billing 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An introduction to accurate billing procedures in the medical office. Topics will include health care insurance, preparation of an insurance claim form to receive reimbursement for a patient encounter, applying third party payer guidelines, and collection procedures. This course provides basic information to begin understanding the billing systems used in a medical office. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the medical billing and coding, medical assisting, or medical office assistant programs or permission of instructor AHBC 121: Health Care Reimbursement Issues I 3 Cr Quarters: W The study of health care reimbursement issues in acute and alternate health care. This course will include information about prospective payment systems for acute and alternate health care facilities, insurance programs, and managed care. Prerequisite: AHBC 102 or permission of instructor AHBC 122: Health Care Reimbursement Issues II 3 Cr Quarters: W The study of health care reimbursement issues in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Federal, state, and private health insurance plans, including managed care plans, will be studied as well as the cycle of health insurance claims. Included are health insurance terminology standard in a hospital billing department and legal issues relating to reimbursement processing. The following topics will be studied and discussed: UB-92 billing forms, DRG (diagnostic related groups), Correct Coding Initiative, billing and coding compliance issues, and collections. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the medical billing and coding program, AHBC 102, and AHBC 121 or permission of instructor AHBC 131: ICD-9-CM Coding 2 Cr Quarters: W The study of ICD-9-CM coding principles, including coding practice using actual patient records and abstracts, and introduction to ICD-10-CM. Prerequisite: AHBC 101 and AH 119 or permission of instructor AHBC 132: CPT/HCPCS Coding 4 Cr Quarters: W The study and practice of coding principles according to the CPT and HCPCS coding systems. Also included is instruction in the assignment of appropriate modifiers to CPT and HCPCS codes that are dependent upon the health care environment, e.g., physician’s office or hospital outpatient department. Prerequisite: AHBC 102 and AH 119 or permission of instructor AHBC 133: ICD-10-CM Coding 3 Cr Quarters: F,W,S During this course, the medical coding student will study ICD-10-CM (Volume 1 and 2). ICD-10-CM is the diagnostic coding system which will replace ICD-9-CM. Students will study the coding principles and guidelines. They will apply that knowledge to assign the ICD-10-CM code(s). Prerequisite: AHBC 101, AH 119, AHBC 131 or permission of instructor

AHBC 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in allied health billing and coding. AHBC 201: Coding Professional Practice 5 Cr Quarters: S, SR During this course, the Medical Billing and Coding student will be placed in either a medical office, long-term care facility, hospital, or an online externship program. They will practice the skills they have learned throughout the Medical Billing and Coding curriculum. Students will complete additional applications of billing and coding procedures that will be taught and tested in campus seminars and internet-based modules. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Medical Billing and Coding certificate classes: AHBC 121, AHBC 122, AHBC 131, AHBC 132, and AHMA 125 AHBC 203: CPC Examination Review 5 Cr Quarters: S, SR This course is designed to assist students to prepare for the outpatient (physician-based) certification exam administered by the American Academy of Professional Coders, required to acquire the credentials of Certified Professional Coder (CPC). Topics discussed will include anatomy, medical terminology and pathophysiology, health care reimbursement issues, CPT coding, ICD-9-CM coding, and HCPCS coding. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AHBC 201 or permission of instructor AHBC 218: Health Care Reimbursement Issues III 4 Cr Quarters: F This course provides an in-depth study of health care reimbursement issues to prepare students to obtain reimbursement for examinations and procedures performed in the physician’s office, ambulatory surgical center, emergency room, and hospital. The student will gain an appreciation of the importance of accuracy in billing practices. Fraud and abuse concerns will be addressed as well as procedures to assist in the identification of improper billing practices. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AHBC 122 and AHBC 132 or permission of instructor AHBC 220: Advanced Coding 5 Cr Quarters: F The study of CPT, ICD-9-CM (Volumes 1, 2, and 3), HCPCS coding principles in the physician’s office and hospital settings. Students practice coding from source documents such as operative reports and patient medical records. Implications of DRGs (diagnostic related groupings) and APGs (ambulatory patient groups) and their relationships to coding assignment for reimbursement are explored. Students apply theoretical concepts to problem-solve coding situations. Students will study the impact of ICD-10-CM coding on medical facilities and the changes that will go into effect with the ICD-10-CM coding. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Billing and Coding Program, AHBC 122, AHBC 131, and AHBC 132 or permission of instructor AHBC 224: Medical Billing & Compliance Issues 3 Cr Quarters: F Medical record documentation and billing practices are under new guidelines and strict penalties. This course teaches the skills to perform an accurate and complete assessment of medical office coding and reimbursement practices to ensure compliance with insurance carriers and government agencies. Concepts regarding use of the medical record as an audit tool to demonstrate that the services provided were necessary and reasonable will be discussed. Included will be auditing procedures to ensure reimbursement compliance in the medical office. Prerequisite: AHBC 122 and AHBC 132 or permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Medical Interpreter AHMI 101: Spanish Medical Interpreter 5 Cr Quarters: F, S This course teaches the Spanish translations for the most common biomedical terms used during the patient-provider encounter. Direct translation of medical terms, explanatory phrases when no direct linguistic translation exists, and colloquial terms will be covered. Also included is instruction in the special linguistic skill that is required of interpreters for supporting the triad relationship of patient-interpreterclinician while reinforcing the patient-clinician bond. Prerequisite: Bilingual Spanish/English

Pharmacy Technician AHPT 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies 10 Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in Allied Health Pharmacy Technician. AHPT 125: Pharmacy Technician Skills I 4 Cr Quarters: F This course teaches beginning pharmacy technician skills, including pharmacy math skills, common pharmacy abbreviations, drug dosage forms and routes of administration, pharmacy references, prescriptions, drug orders, and introduces the 100 most commonly prescribed medications. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician program AHPT 140: Pharmacy Law 1 Cr Quarters: F This course provides an overview of pharmacy law and how it relates to the pharmacy technician. Some of the more influential laws regulating the practice of pharmacy will be discussed as well as the requirements for fulling prescriptions and medication orders. Eight hours of this course will be devoted to Washington State pharmacy law, with the remainder of the course to cover Federal law. Prerequisite: IT 105, BT 104, and acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician Program AHPT 170: Pharmacy Technician Skills II 5 Cr Quarters: W This course covers commonly used pharmacy procedures including computer skills, labeling, insurance, billing, formularies, materials management systems, evaluating and processing medication orders and prescriptions, and the top 200 most commonly prescribed medications. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician program and successful completion of AHPT 125 and AHPT 140 AHPT 175: Pharmacy Technician Skills III 6 Cr Quarters: W This course teaches sterile and non-sterile compounding skills. Included are the pharmaceutical skills of repackaging; preparation of medications in various forms; use and maintenance of compounding equipment; documentation; packaging and labeling of compounded medications; procurement of compounding supplies; storage; preparation, administration, and distribution of drugs and supplies to patients in the hospital; intravenous admixtures; and unit dose preparation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician program and successful completion of AHPT 125 and AHPT 140 AHPT 201: Pharmacy Externship 8 Cr Quarters: S The goal of the pharmacy externship course is to provide student exposure to community-based practice to develop competence as a pharmacy technician. Students will be assigned to a retail and/or hospital pharmacy to practice pharmacy technician skills under the supervision of a facility-designated preceptor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician program and completion of all required Allied Health core courses and Pharmacy Technician courses; concurrent enrollment in AHPT 203

AHPT 203: Pharmacy Technician Review 4 Cr Quarters: S This course is designed as a capstone to the pharmacy technician student's program of study. It will systematically lead the student through a review of program topics and impart updated information on topics that may be included in the final comprehensive program examination as well as in the national certification exam. Strategies to prepare for the exams, including test-taking techniques, will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Pharmacy Technician program and completion of all required Allied Health core courses and Pharmacy Technician courses; concurrent enrollment in AHPT 201

Surgical Technology AHST 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies 10 Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in Allied Health Surgical Technology. AHST 104: Surgical Equipment & Biomedical Safety 3 Cr Quarters: F This course explores the surgical technologist's role with regard to equipment and supplies utilized within the operating room. Topics covered include electrical, fire, biological, and chemical hazards in the operative area, properties of physics, surgical department designs, and physical components of the surgical suite. Students will identify common equipment and supplies by type, name, and function and will demonstrate proper care and handling. Students will apply principles of robotics to safe patient care and will examine support services and regulatory agencies with regard to their role in patient safety. Prerequisite: Current enrollment within the Surgical Technology program AHST 106: Asepsis & Infection Control in Surgery 5 Cr Quarters: W This course explores the impact of microbiology and asepsis on the practice of sterile technique and infection control in the operating room. Topics covered include cell structure and function, classification of organisms, immune responses, infectious processes, microbial growth and aseptic techniques, immunology, bacteriology, pathogens of body fluids and systems, virology, parasitology, mycology, and wound healing with relation to how these affect surgical practice. Prerequisite: Admittance into and current enrollment within the Surgical Technology program AHST 112: Instrument Identification & Set Up 5 Cr Quarters: F This course explores the surgical technologist's role with regard to instrumentation utilized within the operating room to provide quality patient care. Students will identify basic instruments by name, classification, and function. Students will demonstrate proper care, handling, and assembly of instruments and will apply the knowledge of instruments of surgical procedures. Prerequisite: Current enrollment within the Surgical Technology program AHST 125: Surgical Competencies I 5 Cr Quarters: F The first of two surgical competency courses, this course explores the surgical technologist’s role in caring for the surgical patient. Topics include preoperative patient routines, proper patient identification, surgical consents, review of the patient chart, care of patient possessions, patient care the evening and morning of surgery, methods of patient transportation, establishing the sterile field, room setup, the surgical scrub, gowning and gloving, assisting other team members, patient catheterization, skin preparation, positioning and draping the patient, preparation of the patient for anesthesia, and monitoring the sterile field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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AHST 135: Surgical Competencies II 5 Cr Quarters: W The second of two surgical competency courses, the course explores the surgical technologist's role in caring for the surgical patient in an intraoperative and post-operative setting . Topics include intra-operative and post-operative case management, monitoring the patient during surgery, methods of homeostasis and blood replacement, emergency situations, specimen collection and care, tissue approximation, wound management, post-anesthesia recover, surgical documentation, contamination and disinfection, reprocessing of instruments, sterile storage and distribution, instrument wrapping and labeling, issues related to death and dying, discharge planning, and health and wellness. Prerequisite: AHST 125 and acceptance into the Surgical Technology program AHST 150: Surgical Interventions & Procedures 10 Cr Quarters: W This course explores the surgical technologist's role in diagnostic and surgical interventions. Students will determine which diagnostic procedures require surgical intervention and will explore general, obstetric and gynecologic, ophthalmic, otorhinolaryngologic, oral and maxillofacial, plastic and reconstructive, genitourinary, orthopedic, cardiothoracic, and peripheral vascular surgeries, as well as neurosurgery. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program AHST 155: Surgical Pharmacology 5 Cr Quarters: F Explores the surgical technologist's role in pharmacology and anesthesia. Topics include terminology, action, use and modes of administration of drugs and anesthetic agents, side effects and contradictions, factors that influence anesthesia selection, identification of monitoring devices; complications related to anesthesia and possible interventions; transfer of drugs from non-sterile to sterile areas, and care and precaution in identifying drugs and solutions in the operating room. Prerequisite: Admittance into and current enrollment within the Surgical Technology program AHST 201: Operating Room Clinical I 9 Cr Quarters: S The Operating Room Clinical I course is designed to provide the student with exposure to community based practice in order to develop competence as an entry-level surgical technologist. Students are assigned to a surgical suite to practice all skills related to the surgical technologist within the perioperative setting under the supervision of a facility-designated preceptor. Emphasis will be placed on the surgical technologist in the scrub role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program; successful completion of AHST 150 and concurrent enrollment in AHST 202 and AHST 220

AHST 211: Operating Room Seminar II 2 Cr Quarters: SR Students in this course will meet once a week with a surgical technology instructor to discuss progress and solve problems in clinical-related issues. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program and completion of all required Allied Health core courses and Surgical Technology courses with a grade of C (2.0) or better; concurrent enrollment in AHST 210 and AHST 221 AHST 220: Preparing for Board Certification 2 Cr Quarters: S The first of two courses that will prepare the surgical technology student to successfully participate in the National Board Certification Examination. The course will review all subjects relating to surgical technology with an emphasis on test-taking strategies and skills. Topics covered will include medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, microbiology and infection control, pharmacology and anesthesia, biomedical science and technology, the surgical patient and the surgical environment, wound management and asepsis, instrumentation and equipment, case preparation, and the professional aspects of surgical technology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program and prior or concurrent enrollment in AHST 201 and AHST 202 AHST 221 Preparing for Board Certification II 2 Cr Quarters: S The second of two courses that will prepare the surgical technology student to successfully participate in the National Board Certification Examination. The course will review concepts relating to surgical technology including surgery in all specialities with an emphasis on test-taking strategies and skills. Topics covered will include general, obstetric, gynecologic, genitourinary, head and neck, plastic and reconstructive, orthopedic, neurologic, ophthalmic, thoracic, cardiac, and vascular surgery. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program and concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of AHMA 210 and AHST 211

American Sign Language See “Modern Languages.�

AHST 202: Operating Room Seminar I 2 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will meet once a week with a surgical technology instructor to discuss progress and solve problems in clinical-related issues. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program and completion of all required allied health core courses and surgical technology courses with a grade of C (2.0) or better; concurrent enrollment in AHST 201 and 220 AHST 210: Operating Room Clinical II 9 Cr Quarters: SR During this second of two clinical rotations, students will continue the practice of the surgical scrub role under the supervision of a facilitydesignated preceptor. Students will be expected to show progression towards autonomous performance of surgical technology functions as well as increased competency in more complex surgical cases. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology program; successful completion of AHST 201 and concurrent enrollment in AHST 211 and AHST 221

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Anthropology Through its various subdisciplines, anthropology provides a holistic approach to studying humans as cultural and biological animals. The anthropology courses taught at YVCC offer students an opportunity to develop a solid grounding in the discipline. Students choosing to pursue a degree in anthropology should follow a program leading to the associate in arts degree and then transfer to a college or university that offers anthropology as a major.

Courses ANTH& 100: Survey of Anthropology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W An introduction to cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology and linguistics. The primary focus is on how anthropologists know what they know and the importance and applications of that knowledge. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

ANTH& 217: Plateau Native Peoples 2 Cr Quarters: O Using text-based discussion, video presentations, and visits to the museum and/or cultural center, the course provides a comprehensive overview of the lifeways, beliefs, and experiences of the original inhabitants of this area (the Mid-Columbia region). Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and MATH 085 Distribution: SS ANTH 240: Youth Subcultures 4 Cr Quarters: S The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with methodologies and models of analysis appropriate for studying youth subcultures. Focusing on the origins, styles, and histories of the mod, skinhead, hippie, punk and goth subcultures, particular attention is paid to the popular contention that youth subcultures represent a response to various historic, social, economic, and generational circumstances. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101

ANTH 110: Mayas and Aztecs 3 Cr Quarters: O A course that introduces students to the basics of archaeological methodology and explores the Pre-Colombian civilizations of Mexico and Central America including the Olmecs, Mayas, and Aztecs. Distribution: SS ANTH 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in anthropology.

Quarters: O

ANTH 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ANTH& 204: Archaeology 5 Cr Quarters: O This course offers an introduction to contemporary and historic archaeological approaches, both theoretical and practical. It provides a general background to world prehistory, with special emphasis on the Americas. This course provides the trends and general practice of cultural resources management in the United States, and provides a basic understanding of archaeological preservation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS ANTH& 205: Biological Anthropology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This class offers an introduction to the biological development of Homo sapiens. It explores our place in nature, studying our relationship to other primates, our biological and cultural adaptations, and development through time. Attention is given to the principles and mechanics of evolution and to the methods of physical/biological anthropology. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: NS ANTH& 206: Cultural Anthropology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Examines human societies from a cross-cultural perspective. Special attention is paid to the form and function of major cultural institutions, including subsistence and economic systems, marriage, family and kinship systems, religion and magic, and myth and ritual. Students will also explore questions concerning status, gender, basic personality development, language, reality construction, the mechanisms and effects of culture change, the importance of cultural relativism, and the nature of anthropological investigation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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74 Art Art is both a mirror and a shaper of the individual, society, and culture. Art is a fundamental human experience and behavior that crosses all boundaries. The Department of Visual Arts (DoVA) fosters an awareness of the making of art, the interpretation of art, the understanding of art across cultures and time, and the relevance of art to daily experience. Students are exposed to the vocabulary and craft of art through the department's various classes. Stress is given to the development of technical skills and the communication of concepts and expression within traditional and contemporary issues, techniques, and technologies. DoVA prepares and displays artwork from its offerings in an exhibit at the YVCC Larson Gallery during May of each academic year. Note: Permission to enroll in studio classes that require a prerequisite that has not been met can only be given by DoVA faculty members and only with a portfolio review of pertinent work. Some scheduling conflicts with studio classes may be resolved in consultation with the art instructors.

Art Transfer YVCC does not offer a degree or certificate in visual art. Students considering the visual arts as a major or minor at a four-year transfer academy or university should consult with art faculty about planning their curriculum at YVCC. For those interested in pursuing a standard associate in arts degree with a visual arts emphasis, the following courses are strongly recommended within the humanities and elective distribution areas. Humanities Courses ART& 100 Art Appreciation* ART 101 Design I PHOTO 103 Digital Photography

Credits 5 4 5

* HUM 102/103/104 may be substituted for one or both of these classes. Electives/Core Electives Credits ART 102 Design II 4 ART 104 Drawing I 4 ART 105 Drawing II 4 or ART 107: Drawing II Concentration area credits (two classes: clay, painting, drawing, metalsmithing, or photo) 8

Courses ART& 100: Art Appreciation 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introductory course in visual art incorporating lectures, demonstrations, and active learning projects. Students will gain an awareness of the creative process, the various roles of art, and ways of viewing and responding to artworks. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL 095 Distribution: HM ART 101: Design I 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Introduction to the development of two-dimensional design processes. Emphasis is on the art elements (line, shape, value, space, texture, color) and visual problem-solving. Distribution: HM

ART 102: Design II 4 Cr Quarters: W, S Continuation of the development of two-dimensional design processes. Emphasis is on art principles (e.g. emphasis, unity, variety, rhythm, etc.) and visual problem-solving. Distribution: HP

ART 104: Drawing I Quarters: F, W, S, SR 4 Cr Beginning drawing. Introduction to the basics of drawing as an extension of visual understanding. Emphasis is given to the handling of various materials, development of skills and ideas, and the creation of successful compositions. Attention is given to perception of form, shading, and working with line and tone. Distribution: HM ART 105: Drawing II 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Intermediate drawing. Continuation of elements and principles from beginning drawing, with greater emphasis on the development of personal visual statements as well as a more in-depth understanding of the materials and concepts of visual communication. Prerequisite: ART 104 Distribution: HP ART 107: Drawing III 4 Cr Quarters: S Life drawing, an intensive, drawing-based introduction to the form of the human figure through the use of various drawing strategies and techniques. The class gives the student an understanding of the human figure as an aesthetic object, as a vehicle of personal expression, and as an image of historic and cultural importance. Prerequisite: ART 104 Distribution: HP ART 121: Western Traditions of Art 5 Cr Quarters: O This course is an introduction to the art history of the Western tradition beginning with the Sumerians and extending to the present. The significant art and artists within each of the major Western historical periods will be examined, including Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, and Post-Modern. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 or completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 Distribution: HM ART 122: Non-Western Traditions of Art 5 Cr Quarters: O This course is an introduction to the art history of the non-western tradition beginning with the Egyptians and extending to the present. The significant art and artists within each of the major non-western cultures will be examined, including Africa, Oceania, the Americas, India, Islam, Southeast Asia, China, and Japan. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 or completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 Distribution: HM ART 150: Introduction to Clay 4 Cr Quarters: F, S A broad introduction to basic ceramic techniques and materials. Students will develop fundamental forming and surface techniques including essential skills for the potter’s wheel, coil and slab construction, and various decorative and glazed surfaces. Distribution: HP

ART 165: Metalsmithing I 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An introduction to the design and construction of metal objects stressing fundamentals of working with nonferrous metals. Techniques of sawing, soldering, piercing, cabochon stone setting, and rolling mill texturing are required. Students will demonstrate their ability in the above techniques by completing a minimum of two pieces of jewelry.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ART 166: Metalsmithing II 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Continuation of basic, nonferrous, metalworking techniques as encompassed in Metalsmithing I. In addition, the definition of wearable art is expanded to include a narrative point of view. Introduction of found objects and cold connection techniques. Sketches and individual discussion with students will determine specific objectives of each design and each project. Students will demonstrate their ability in the above techniques by completing a minimum of two pieces of jewelry. Prerequisite: ART 165 ART 167: Metalsmithing III 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Continuation of basic, nonferrous, metalworking techniques as encompassed in Metalsmithing I and II, plus the introduction of lost-wax casting. Simple mold-making techniques and a variety of waxworking techniques will be introduced. Optional project is a small enamel object to be incorporated into a larger design. Design considerations will be discussed individually and in small groups. Students will demonstrate their ability in the above techniques by completing a minimum of two pieces of jewelry. Prerequisite: ART 166 ART 190, 191: Co-op Field Experience I, II Variable Cr Quarters: O Field work experience in a specific art-related discipline. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Portfolio review, workplace placement ART 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in art.

Quarters: O

ART 199, 299: Individual Study in Studio Art Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S Independent projects in studio work. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and prior studio class ART 201: Functional Pottery 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An introduction to fundamental skills for the potter's wheel, basic firing processes, and functional glazing techniques. Includes basic functional and visual design in utilitarian pottery. Distribution: HP ART 202: Clay I: Handbuilding 4 Cr Quarters: W Exploration of three dimensional form in clay using pinch, coil, slab, and simple molded construction with a variety of surface treatments. Emphasis on creativity and sculptural form. Distribution: HP ART 203: Clay II: Intermediate Wheelthrowing 4 Cr Quarters: W, S Advanced technique and form on the potter's wheel with emphasis on craftsmanship and development of a personal sense of direction in skill and artistry; also an introduction to glaze mixing and the principles of kiln firing. Prerequisite: ART 201 Distribution: HP ART 204: Clay II: Intermediate Handbuilding 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students learn and explore advanced hand-building techniques for sculptural ceramic art with an emphasis on craftsmanship and development of a personal sense of direction in skill and artistry. Students will refine surface decorating and glazing techniques and be introduced to principles of kiln firing. Prerequisite: ART 202 with a C or better Distribution: HP

ART 205: Advanced Clay 2 Cr Quarters: O Exploration of a personal direction in clay for experienced students who are not yet prepared to work independently. Instruction on the wheel or in handbuilding involving in-class and arranged work time. Emphasis on artistic content, stylistic maturity, and craftsmanship. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 203 or permission of instructor Distribution: HP ART 210: Painting I 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Beginning painting. Introduction to the techniques, philosophies, and various approaches to easel painting in either oil or acrylic. Subject matter ranges from perceptual still lives to abstract paintings. Recommended: ART 104 Distribution: HP ART 211: Painting II 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Intermediate painting. Continuation of emphases from beginning painting with introduction of more varied techniques, philosophies, and approaches, stressing the development of pictorial concepts and personal development. Prerequisite: ART 210 Distribution: HP ART 212: Painting III 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Advanced painting. Individual creative approach is stressed, allowing students to select or devise a style of painting based upon experience in previous painting classes. Prerequisite: ART 211 Distribution: HP ART 280: Art History I 5 Cr Quarters: O Ancient to medieval. The development of western visual expression in painting, sculpture, architecture, and related art forms from its prehistoric beginnings through Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, and Roman cultures (c. 1500 BCE to 530 CE). Lecture. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ART 281: Art History II 5 Cr Quarters: O Medieval to late Renaissance. The development of western visual expression in painting, sculpture, architecture, and related art forms from the Early Christian period through the Byzantine, Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Late Renaissance developments (c. 530 CE to 1600 CE). Lecture. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ART 282: Art History III 5 Cr Quarters: O Baroque to post-modern. The development of Western visual expression in painting, sculpture, architecture, and related art forms from the Baroque period through Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic, Impressionist, Expressionist, Cubist, Abstract Expressionist, and Post-Modern developments (c. 1600 CE to present). Lecture. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ART 283: Asian Art History 5 Cr Quarters: W A survey of the prominent styles of India, China, Southeast Asia, and Japan from the earliest artifacts to the development of Buddhist Art, ca. 3000 BCE to 1000 CE. This course explores the exchange and adaptation of artistic elements between Asian cultures and the effect of introduced religions on indigenous subjects and symbolism. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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76 Astronomy Courses ASTR& 100: Survey of Astronomy 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR For the student who wants to gain a familiarity with the universe, solar system, characteristics and motions of stars, nebulae and galaxies, time systems, and celestial coordination. Distribution: NS

Audio Production See “Digital Media�

Automotive Service Technology, Master The Master Automotive Service Technology (MAST) Program provides a quality, easily-accessible education, utilizing theory, design, application, and live work to prepare students for entry-level employment as dynamic, high-tech automotive technicians. Students are encouraged to reach their highest potential for development of skills and professional integrity. The ability to think and reason, troubleshoot problems in a sequential order, and cooperate with coworkers is an integral part of the curriculum. Diagnostic procedures in transmission, emission, fuel, ignition, and electronic systems are also part of the curriculum, and students practice skills on late-model vehicles. Technological advances in the automotive field require a highly skilled repair technician. The YVCC MAST Program offers training in all areas of automotive diagnostics and repair with emphasis on electronic and computer-integrated systems found on today's automobiles. Students will train in a large modern facility with state-of-the-art equipment, and all instructors are Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified. The Master Automotive Service Technology program requires a minimum of two years to complete. Enrollment is open to those who qualify at the beginning of fall, winter, and spring quarters of each academic year. An Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded upon successful completion of the program with a minimum GPA of 2.0. The MAST Program has been evaluated and certified at the highest level of and by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) and is an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Master Training Program.

Program Outcomes Students who successfully complete the automotive technology program will be able to gain employment within the automotive industry. Students can qualify for position as service technicians with new car dealerships, independent repair facilities, franchise operations as well as government and fleet repair facilities. Students can also qualify for positions with sale of automotive parts and service equipment. Opportunities exist at the manufacture level for technical support, training, and operations of new car dealerships.

Careers Graduates will be prepared for entry-level employment, and students will be prepared to take the national ASE certification tests in all eight certification areas. Career opportunities in the automotive repair industry are better than ever, as there is a shortage of qualified automotive technicians. Competent, highly trained, and motivated automotive service technology students are in demand. For more information on current employment trends, check with the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is available at the following websites: www. access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


The YVCC Automotive Service Technology program has a collaborative program with the Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center. High school students can take one or two years of classes during their high school years. An extra year of YVCC classes is required to meet the degree requirements to graduate with an associate of applied science degree. See a YV-Tech or YVCC advisor for more information.

Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degree in Automotive Service Technology Required Courses Credits AST 111 Engine Repair Lecture 8 AST 112 Engine Repair Lab 8 AST 121 Electrical/Electronic Systems Lecture 8 AST 122 Electrical/Electronic Systems Lab 8 AST 131 Steering/Suspension Systems Lecture 4 AST 132 Steering/Suspension Systems Lab 4 AST 141 Brake Systems Lecture 4 AST 142 Brake Systems Lab 4 AST 211 Engine Perf I: Ignition & Computer Systems Lec 8 AST 212 Engine Perf II: Ignition & Computer Systems Lab 8 AST 221 Engine Perf II: Hybrid/Diesel Lecture 2 AST 222 Engine Perf II: Hybrid/Diesel Lab 2 AST 231 Heating & Air Conditioning Lecture 4 AST 232 Heating & Air Conditioning Lab 4 AST 241 Automatic Transmissions & Transaxles Lecture 6 AST 242 Automatic Transmissions & Transaxles Lab 6 AST 251 Manual Transmissions/Transaxles Lecture 4 AST 252 Manual Transmissions/Transaxles Lab 4 2 BA 220 Human Relations in the Workplace „ PTECH 115 Applied Mathematics ‹ 3 or MATH& 107, 141 or MATH 111 5 BA 138 Written Business Communications z or ENGL& 101, English Composition I or PTECH 120, Technical Writing 5 Total Degree Credits 106-108

Courses AST 111: Engine Repair Lecture 8 Cr Quarters: F This course is a study of the theory, design, and operation of gasoline engines. Students will learn proper diagnosis, removal, and service procedures for cylinder heads and short blocks. Service and repair of the lubrication and cooling systems will be discussed. Students will create a personalized engine diagnostic strategy and a generic outline of engine removal and installation. AST 112: Engine Repair Lab 8 Cr Quarters: F This course allows students to practice engine diagnostic and repair procedures for internal combustion engines. Students will remove, disassemble, and repair internal engine components. All common engine machining processes and repair procedures will be practiced. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 111 AST 121: Electrical & Electronic Systems Lecture 8 Cr Quarters: W Students in this course will learn automotive electrical and electronic computer principles and fundamentals including wiring diagrams, circuits, analog and electronic instrumentation, and electrical and computer-controlled accessories.

AST 122: Electrical & Electronic Systems Lab 8 Cr Quarters: W This course allows students to apply and practice electrical and computer system theory, diagnostic analysis, and repair procedures learned in AST 121. Students will practice electrical diagnostics of lighting circuits, analog instrumentation, indicator lights and warning devices, electrical and computer-controlled accessories, and electronic instrumentation on simulators, bench units, and live vehicles. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 121 AST 131: Suspension & Steering Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will study front and rear suspension and steering system design and operation. They will also learn alignment geometry and dynamics related to computerized four-wheel alignment systems as well as tire construction, design, and grading. AST 132: Suspension & Steering Lab 4 Cr Quarters: S This course allows students to practice steering and suspension system and alignment geometry diagnostic and repair procedures learned in AST 131. Students will remove, disassemble, and repair steering and suspension components and perform four-wheel alignments on modern, computerized equipment. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 131 AST 141: Brake Systems Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will study theory, design, and operation of brake systems. They will learn hydraulic operations, disc and drum brake system combinations, ABS modes of operation, and ABS diagnostics using modern diagnostic equipment. AST 142: Brake Systems Lab 4 Cr Quarters: S This course allows students to apply and practice brake system theory, diagnostic analysis, and repair procedures learned in AST 141. They will remove, disassemble, and repair disc and drum brake components as well as ABS hydraulic, electrical, and electronic components. Students will also perform diagnostic procedures, including machining and rebuilding of hydraulic and mechanical components. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 141 AST 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S Prerequisite: Permission of instructor AST 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in automotive service technology. AST 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor AST 211: Engine Performance I: Lecture 8 Cr Quarters: F Students will understand the principles, operations, and diagnostic techniques of the modern automotive computer-controlled gasoline engine systems. The students will understand identification, diagnosis, and repair of the automotive powertrain systems including fuel delivery and fuel injection, ignition, and the electronic control systems. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 212 AST 212: Engine Performance I: Lab Var Cr Quarters: F In this lab, students will apply the theory and operations presenting in AST 211. The student will identify, diagnose, and repair problems associated with the computer-controlled automotive powertrain, its systems, and components. These systems include fuel delivery, fuel injection, ignition, and electronic control. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 211

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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78

AST 221: Engine Performance II: Fuels and Emissions Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: W Students will learn the theory, principles of operation, and diagnostic procedures of automotive emission systems. This course will also introduce students to diesel systems, alternative fuels, and alternative powertrains/hybrids. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 222 AST 222: Engine Performance II: Fuels and Emissions Lab Var Cr Quarters: W Students in this course will demonstrate the operations and diagnosis of fuels and emission components using a practical application. Students will perform these applications in a shop environment using information presented in AST 221. This course will also introduce the student to diesel and hybrid technology, diagnostics, service, and repair. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 221 AST 231: Heating & Air Conditioning Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: S This course is a study of the basic theory of air conditioning, system circuits, system diagnosis, and service procedures. Students will learn proper recovery, handling, storage, and recycling of R-12 and R-134a systems, and will be trained and may become EPA certified in A/C systems handling and storage. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 AST 232: Heating & Air Conditioning Lab 4 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will learn the basic diagnostic, service, and repair procedures for air conditioning system circuits. They will practice on bench test systems and "live" vehicles using dual stage recovery systems and electronic hand-held test equipment. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 231 AST 241: Automatic Transmissions & Transaxles Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: W Students in this course will learn the operating principles of the automatic transmission and transaxle and their application in automobiles. Subassemblies, component, hydraulics, electronics, and diagnosis of the modern automatic transmission will be taught. Allwheel and four-wheel drive systems are included in this course. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 242 AST 242: Automatic Transmissions & Transaxles Lab Variable Cr Quarters: W Students in this lab course will apply theory and operation introduced in AST 241 to inspect, perform maintenance, diagnose, test, and repair modern electronically controlled automatic transmissions and transaxles. This course will also include the application of theory, diagnosis, inspection, service, and repair of all-wheel and four-wheel drive systems. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 241 AST 251: Manual Transmissions & Transaxles Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will learn the principles and operation of manual transmissions, clutches, manual transaxles, and drivelines as well as rear axle systems. They will calculate ratios, torque, and RPM of transmission gears and final drive gear set and trace power flow through the gears. Prerequisite: AST 121/122 and concurrent enrollment in AST 252 AST 252: Manual Transmissions & Transaxles Lab 4 Cr Quarters: S Students in this course will diagnose and repair manual transmission/ transaxles, clutches, drive axles/lines, and differentials. They will calculate ratios, torque, and RPM of transmission gears and final drive gear set and trace power flow through the gears. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AST 251 AST 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Biology The Biology program provides fundamental courses preparing students for careers in allied health as well as transfer to other institutions in the life sciences. Most biology courses require lecture, laboratory work, and discussion groups. The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges defines applied learning/laboratory modes of instruction as follows: “Conduct of the instruction is continually under the direct supervision of the instructor. This mode includes learning activities in laboratories, clinics, or workplaces where students receive hands-on learning experience continually supervised by the instructor. Work is normally completed in the learning environment, but may include out-of-class assignments.� Transfer Biology courses with lab may be evaluated to determine if they meet the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges definition of applied learning/laboratory mode of instruction. Laboratory credit will only be given if the course included adequate hours of hands-on learning under continual and direct supervision of an instructor.

Courses BIOL 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Workshops, short courses, and individual study in biology. BIOL 102: Environmental Biology 5 Cr Quarters: O This is an introductory environmental science course intended for nonmajors. The course emphasizes the scientific method, principles of ecology, diversity of life, and current natural resource issues. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 105: Biology for Nonmajors with Lab 5 Cr Quarters: O A basic course with lab in biological sciences with an emphasis on current issues, trends, and applications concerning biological concepts. This course is intended for nonmajors and will not serve as a prerequisite for other biology courses. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 107: Introduction to Plant Science 5 Cr Quarters: F An introductory course presenting principles of anatomy, morphology, physiology, and growth of plants. The effects of environmental conditions, cultural practices, and management techniques on plant growth, development, yield, and quality are discussed. Students are introduced to important crops of Washington as well as varying plant propagation and quality evaluation principles. This course is cross disciplined. Credit cannot be given for both BIOL 107 and AGSCI 101. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 109: General Biology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An introductory course integrating the fundamental concepts of biology, including basic chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and energy transfers. The course is primarily for students intending to continue in dental hygiene, nursing, radiologic sciences, or veterinary technology but is not a course for biology majors. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: NS (L)

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


BIOL 116: Head & Neck Anatomy 3 Cr Quarters: F Broad survey of human head and neck anatomy with special emphasis on the oral cavity. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Dental Hygiene program BIOL 117: Oral Histology/Embryology 4 Cr Quarters: W This course is for dental hygiene students only. The study of the development and microscopic structure of the tissue in the oral cavity. Prerequisite: BIOL 230, BIOL 231, BIOL 232, and admission to the Dental Hygiene program BIOL 140: Marine Biology 5 Cr Quarters: S An introductory course with lab with an emphasis on current issues, trends, and applications concerning marine biology. Includes a survey of marine life and marine ecosystems. This course is intended for nonmajors and will not serve as a prerequisite for other biology courses. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 190: Co-op Field Experience I Variable Cr Quarters: O Cooperative education integrates the students’ classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. The students’ education is shared between employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. BIOL 200: Bridge to Biology for Majors 2 Cr Quarters: F This course is intended for students who have taken BIOL 109 and who wish to take the Biology Majors sequence (BIOL 211 and BIOL 221). This two-credit course covers photosynthesis, and population/genetics/ evolution (topics covered in BIOL 201, but not in BIOL 109) and prepares student to enter BIOL 211 without having to take BIOL 201. Prerequisite: BIOL 109 with a C+ (2.3) or better BIOL 201: Biology for Majors I 5 Cr Quarters: F This course is intended for transfer biology majors and is the first in a three-quarter sequence. The topics covered are the nature of biological science, evolution, energy transfer, ecology, cellular reproduction, and genetics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101; completion or concurrent enrollment in CHEM& 141/151 (preferred) or completion or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 109/110 and permission of instructor Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 211: Biology for Majors II 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is intended for transfer biology majors and is the second in a three-course sequence. The topics covered are phylogenetics and the origin of life, the major lineages of life, and the genetic basis of development. Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following biology pathways: BIOL 201 or BIOL 109 and BIOL 200 AND completion of or concurrent enrollment in one of the following chemistry pathways CHEM& 142/152 or CHEM 209/210 Distribution: NS (L)

BIOL 221: Biology for Majors III 5 Cr Quarters: S This course is intended for transfer biology majors and is the third in a three-course sequence. The topics covered are animal and plant anatomy and physiology, the relationship between form and function, and the relationship between an organism and its environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 211 and completion of CHEM& 142/152 or CHEM 209/210 Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 225: Natural History of the Yakima Valley 3 Cr Quarters: O A survey of the geology, botany, zoology, and anthropology of the Yakima area. Distribution: NS BIOL 229: Anatomy & Physiology Prep Class 2 Cr Quarters: O This course is intended to prepare students for the anatomy and physiology courses BIOL 230 and 231 by teaching effective study skills, reviewing important biological concepts, and familiarizing students with basic histology, anatomy, and physiology. It is not a prerequisite for BIOL 230 but is intended to improve student success in BIOL 230. Prerequisite: Current enrollment in or completion of BIOL 109 BIOL 230: Human Anatomy & Physiology I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Basic human anatomy and physiology covering histology and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. This course is intended for students intending to continue in dental hygiene, nursing, radiologic sciences, or veterinary technology. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: BIOL 109 or BIOL 201 with a grade of C+ (2.3) or better Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 231: Human Anatomy & Physiology II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Basic human anatomy and physiology covering the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This course is intended for students intending to continue in dental hygiene, nursing, or radiologic sciences. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: BIOL 230 with a grade of C (2.0) or better Distribution: NS (L) BIOL 232: Microbiology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An overview of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa), including their structure, how they grow, how they are classified, how they cause disease, and how they are transmitted and maintained in the human population and the environment. This course is intended for students intending to continue in dental hygiene or nursing. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or one year of high school chemistry and BIOL 231 all with a grade of C (2.0) or better Distribution: NS (L)

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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80 Business Administration Through business and professional partnerships and studentcentered education, the Business Department provides career and enrichment opportunities to equip students with skills, abilities, and extended learning for the changing work environment. The department is comprised of three specific areas: Business Administration, Business Technology, and Information Technology. The Business Administration Program is designed to equip students with basic knowledge and skills for transferring to a four-year college, entering the business workforce, or updating workplace skills. Students can select courses from a variety of business programs: accounting, business management, business office technology, and information technology. Since the Business Department offers many choices, be sure to check each program for its degree options.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Communicate effectively and efficiently, applying interpersonal and cultural awareness to business settings • Utilize critical thinking skills to analyze and problem solve in business situations • Apply quantitative reasoning to solve accounting and financial problems that occur in business • Identify and apply ethical principles as they relate to contemporary business organizations • Identify and apply information tools and resources within organizations • Explain core marketing principles and their use in managerial decision making and developing business strategy • Understand and apply basic legal business concepts within the environment of how business is conducted

Careers Since business and its administration are the heartbeat of industry, retail sales, education, and manufacturing, career opportunities are excellent. Salaries in entry-level positions remain very competitive. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degrees YVCC’s Business Administration Department offers these Associate of Applied Science degrees: Business Administration Accounting Agribusiness Business Management, Marketing Specialty Business Management, Entrepreneurship Speciality

Full-time students are generally able to complete a degree in approximately two years. Although many of the courses listed in these degrees are transferable, the degrees themselves are not intended to transfer. Degrees are awarded upon completion of required degree courses with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students intending to major in business and transfer to a four-year institution should pursue the Associate in Business DTA degree (see “Degrees Offered” section). Students are strongly encouraged to contact business administration advisors for more detailed information. Note: Students are strongly advised to have word processing skills for the BA classes. While not required, it is the student's responsibility to apply correct keyboarding skills and written communication formats. Accounting The accounting degree option is designed to prepare students for entry-level accounting positions as full-charge bookkeepers, accounting assistants, and accounting clerks. This program offers instruction in accounting principles combined with a general college education. Instruction in computers, office machines, communications, and other related subjects is provided as part of the program. Required Classes ACCT& 201 ACCT& 202 ACCT& 203 BA 115 BA 137 BA 138 BA 154 BA 160 BA 180 BA 225 BA 260 BT 140 BUS& 101 BUS& 201 ECON& 101 IT 100 IT 102 IT 111 IT 221 ELECTIVE

Credits Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Principles of Accounting III Business Math ‹ Payroll/Tax Accounting Written Business Communication z Computerized Accounting Supervision Techniques Consumer Financial Planning Career Management „ Principles of Income Tax I Electronic Business Math Applications Introduction to Business Business Law Survey of Economics Introduction to Computers Windows Spreadsheets Introduction Spreadsheets Advanced Elective Total Credits

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 4 5 91

Agribusiness This degree option is offered jointly with the Agriculture Department. Students will develop an understanding of basic business management and agriculture production principles which they can apply to management and operation of agribusiness firms. For more information on this Associate of Applied Science degree, see the Agriculture Department listings. Business Management The Business Management degree is designed to give students a basic background in business and an opportunity to specialize in the area of marketing, if desired. In consultation with a business administration program advisor, students will develop an individual training plan for the business management degree. The degree includes a 75-credit core plus 15 credits either from the marketing specialty, the entrepreneurship speciality, or from the approved electives list.* Check the YVCC website for more information on available classes.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Required Classes for Business Core Credits ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I 5 ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II 5 ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III 5 BA 115 Business Math ‹ 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication z 5 BA 139 Technical Writing & Presentations 5 BA 156 Marketing 5 BA 158 Principles of Management 5 BA 160 Supervision Techniques 5 BA 205 Small Business Management 5 BA 225 Career Management „ 5 BUS& 101 Introduction to Business 5 BUS& 201 Business Law 5 ECON& 101 Survey of Economics 5 IT 100 Introduction to Computers 3 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 Total Core 75 Plus 15 credits of approved electives. Total Credits 90 Specialty: Entrepreneurship BA 105 Entrepreneurship 5 BA 137 Payroll/Tax Accounting 5 BA 259 Fundamentals of E-Commerce 5 Total Specialties Credits 15 Specialty: Marketing BA 159 Sales Management 5 BA 170 Introduction to Advertising 5 BA 259 Fundamentals of E-commerce 5 Total Specialties Credits 15 *Approved Electives for AAS degrees: Any BA, BUS&, and IT courses; BT 101, BT 140; CMST 103, CMST 280; CMST& 101, CMST& 102, CMST& 210, CMST& 220; ECON& 201, ECON& 202

Certificates Students can obtain certificates in specialized areas of business including accounting, accounting clerk, management, marketing, customer service, retail management, and wine sales. Certificates are intended to assist students who plan to enter the job market after only three or four quarters. Certificates are also available in Business Technology and Information Technology. See those sections for a complete list. Accounting Courses ACCT& 201 ACCT& 202 ACCT& 203 BA 115 BA 137 BA 138 BA 225 BA 260 BT 140 BUS& 201 ECON& 101 T 100 IT 102 IT 111

Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Principles of Accounting III Business Math ‹ Payroll Written Business Communication z Career Management „ Principles of Income Tax Electronic Business Math Applications Business Law Survey of Economics Introduction to Computers Windows Spreadsheets Introduction Total Credits

Credits 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 62

Accounting Clerk ACCT& 201 BA 115 BT 140 IT 100

Principles of Accounting I Business Math ‹ Electronic Business Math Applications Introduction to Computers Total Credits

5 5 5 3 18

Management BA 115 BA 138 BA 158 BA 160 BA 205 BA 225 BUS& 201 IT 100 IT 102 IT 111 IT 221

Business Math ‹ Written Business Communication z Principles of Management Supervision Techniques Small Business Management Career Management „ Business Law Introduction to Computers Windows Spreadsheets Introduction Advanced Spreadsheets Total Credits

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 4 46

Business Math ‹ Written Business Communication z Marketing Sales Management Supervision Techniques Introduction to Advertising Career Management „ Fundamentals of E-Commerce Introduction to Computers Windows PowerPoint Total Credits

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 47

Marketing BA 115 BA 138 BA 156 BA 159 BA 160 BA 170 BA 225 BA 259 IT 100 IT 102 IT 120

Retail Management ACCT& 201 BA 115 BA 138 BA 156 BA 157 BA 158 BA 161 BA 220 CMST& 101 IT 100

Principles of Accounting I Business Math ‹ Written Business Communication z Marketing Retail Management Principles of Management Human Resource Management Human Relations in the Workplace „ Introduction to Communication Introduction to Computers Total Credits

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 5 3 45

Courses Accounting ACCT& 201: Principles of Accounting I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introduction to the theory and practice of accounting, including financial statements. ACCT& 202: Principles of Accounting II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Depreciation, payroll taxes, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 ACCT& 203: Principles of Accounting III 5 Cr Quarters: W, S, SR ACCT& 203 introduces students to the procedures and techniques with which managers use accounting information to make decisions. The course includes departmental and cost accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 and ACCT& 202

Business Administration BA 075: Pre-Business Math 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An introduction to the study of business mathematics. Topics include integers, fractions, decimals, percents and percentages, equations, invoices, trade discounts, cash discounts, and markups and markdowns. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 049T or MATH 050

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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BA 076: Community Service 0 Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: F, W, S

BA 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor BUS& 101: Introduction to Business 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This survey course covers the basics of business formation, industry terminology, operations, internal functions, conflict management, social responsibility, ethics, and corporate culture. BA 105: Entrepreneurship 5 Cr Quarters: O This course is designed to introduce students to the field of entrepreneurship. Students will explore the definition of entrepreneurship and study some of the common characteristics of entrepreneurs. In addition to learning what entrepreneurs should accomplish before the organization is formed, students will identify and discover their own entrepreneurial ability. BA 115: Business Math 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Provides students with a comprehensive study of business mathematics. Topics include solving business equations, markups and markdowns, payroll, simple interest, promissory notes, compound interest, present value, annuities, consumer and business credit, mortgages, financial statements and ratios, inventory, depreciation, and taxes. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 085 or completion of BA 075 BA 117: Customer Service 3 Cr Quarters: O This course explores the essentials of professionalism in the field of customer service. Topics include the history of the customer service profession, models of service delivery, positive verbal and nonverbal communication, active listening, behavioral styles, and the use of technology in the profession. BA 118: Customer Service II 3 Cr Quarters: O This course is a continuation of BA 117 and explores the essentials of professionalism in the field of customer service. Topics include communication, difficult situations, customer diversity, stress management, time management, customer loyalty, service breakdowns, and the future of the profession. Prerequisite: BA 117 BA 119: Success in Sales 3 Cr Quarters: O This course will explore the concepts of selling and marketing as a factor in the distribution of goods and services with particular focus on the profession of call center sales and customer service. Prerequisite: BA 117 BA 137: Payroll/Tax Accounting 5 Cr Quarters: S To acquaint the student with basic payroll systems, accounting methods used in computing wages, and timekeeping systems. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or permission of instructor BA 138: Written Business Communication 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students in this course will learn basic techniques and approaches for writing effective business documents. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL 095 or higher

BA 139: Technical Writing and Presentations 5 Cr Quarters: S An advanced workshop for technical writing, applying the principles covered in BA 138, specifically to technical presentations for nontechnical audiences. The course focuses on writing styles appropriate for user manuals as well as oral presentations, and offers training in platform skills, audiovisual technologies, and other strategies needed to make technical information understood by business managers, end-users, and the public. Prerequisite: BA 138 and IT 100 BA 154: Computerized Accounting 5 Cr Quarters: F A computerized approach to accounting systems (service and merchandising), accounts receivable, accounts payable, general ledger, payroll, and inventory. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 BA 156: Marketing 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Covers marketing and business activities concerned with the planning of product, place, promotion, and distribution of goods and services. Fundamental principles and business cases are combined so that the students may understand more clearly the functioning of marketing in our economy and the movement of goods and services from the producer to the consumer. BA 157: Retail Management 5 Cr Quarters: S The principles and practices of retailing will be discussed. Specific topics covered will include types of traditional and non-traditional retail outlets, franchising, policies, store location, layout, organization, buying and selling functions, pricing, profit planning, staffing, and controlling. BA 158: Principles of Management 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Modern management theory and practice are emphasized. Topics include contemporary management roles and responsibilities, including goal-setting, planning, organizing, directing, staffing, delegating, motivating, controlling, and evaluating. BA 159: Sales Management 5 Cr Quarters: S Covers selling as a factor in the distribution of goods and services, analysis of customers and their wants, getting and holding customers, and wholesale and direct-selling principles and practices. BA 160: Supervision Techniques 5 Cr Quarters: W, SR This course will examine the professional responsibilities of supervisors and managers in business and industry. Decision-making and communication efforts related to organizational productivity and employee motivation are emphasized. BA 161: Human Resources Management 5 Cr Quarters: W The principles, methods, and procedures of personnel activities are discussed. Topic areas include job analysis, description, specifications, and classification as well as employee turnover, recruitment, selection, testing, placement, promotion, and transfer. Also discussed are wage policies, labor management relations, equal employment opportunities, and flexible work scheduling. BA 170: Introduction to Advertising 5 Cr Quarters: S A comprehensive introduction to the principles of advertising. Concepts covered will include the role of advertising in the economy, its influence on society, and characteristics and use of various media. Also included are the appropriate strategies used to plan and create an effective advertising campaign.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


BA 180: Consumer Financial Planning 5 Cr Quarters: S The course focuses on personal money management and consumer financial education. Topics are budgets, loans and consumer credit, bank services, life and casualty insurance, home purchase and financing, income tax preparation, savings and investments, and consumer purchases. Students not pursuing a degree or certificate may enroll in the course on a pass/fail basis. BA 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative eduction integrates the student’s classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The student’s education, therefore, is shared between the employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor BA 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in business administration. BUS& 201: Business Law 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is a study of the American legal system as it pertains to business transactions. Topics include formation and performance of contracts, sales, business entities, real property, agency, employer/ employee relations, and legal responsibilities. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a minimum of 24 college-level credits, 2.0 GPA or better, or permission of instructor BA 205: Small Business Management 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is for students who either have already started a business or who intend to work for a small business. The course pulls together concepts of marketing, operations, and financial management for small businesses. It will be based on current research, theory, and practice. Materials will be presented from a "how-to" perspective, with many practical examples and applications from the business world.

BA 260: Principles of Income Tax 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is an introduction to the U.S. federal income taxation of individuals. Stress is placed on the U.S. tax structure and tax reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or permission of instructor BA 270: Business Ethics 3 Cr Quarters: F, S An examination of the ethical challenges facing individuals and businesses in modern society. The course will use case studies of professionals working in various areas of business as well as the moral reasoning of ethics. BA 275: Wine Marketing 5 Cr Quarters: W Provides a study of wine marketing and sales from the perspective of the Washington State wine industry. The course examines industry standards and emerging trends relating to wine packaging, promotion, pricing, and distribution. Emphasizes strategic branding, consumer behavior, and marketing plans for wineries and wine products. Prerequisite: BA 156 is recommended. BA 280: Fundamentals of Investing 3 Cr Quarters: O This course is intended to provide students with the fundamental knowledge necessary for making wise investment decisions. Topics covered include how free markets work; stocks and bonds; economic indicators; diversification, asset allocation, risk, and time; tax-deferred investing; and sources of financial information. BA 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The student’s education, therefore, is shared between the employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

BA 220: Human Relations in the Workplace 2 Cr Quarters: W, S This course explores how the employment requirements of business, agribusiness, and industry influence the education and training of individuals. Professional expectations in the workplace, career and life goals, and the balance of work-life issues within a formal organization are emphasized. BA 225: Career Management 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course explores areas of personal and professional development crucial for success in the student's selected career fields. Topics include developing confidence, effective communication, analyzing strengths and weaknesses, goal setting, managing time, working within a team setting, working through conflict, and the employment seeking process. BA 256: Statistics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This introductory course applies descriptive and inferential statistical methods and probability theory to common business and economic situations. The development of analytical problem-solving skills is also emphasized. Prerequisite: Math 094 or 095 or permission of instructor BA 259: Fundamentals of E-Commerce 5 Cr Quarters: F The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools and technologies needed for electronic commerce. Business opportunities, challenges, and strategies for use of the information superhighway will be explored. Electronic commerce technology will be introduced. Prerequisite: Competency in the Windows environment and Internet basics Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

83


84 Business Technology The Business Technology (BT) Program provides an interactive business and professional partnership to enhance studentcentered education for career office opportunities that match business needs to student outcomes. Program faculty members constantly update curriculum and course offerings to meet student and industry needs. Bilingual degrees are also available. Most classes are offered daily in the classroom or in a combination of online and classroom; a few are offered entirely online. The objective of the Business Technology (BT) Program is to prepare students to enter various office positions. The BT Program offers the following associate of applied science degrees: Administrative Assistant Bilingual Administrative Office Assistant Legal Office Assistant Bilingual Legal Office Assistant Medical Office Assistant Bilingual Medical Office Assistant While obtaining one of these degrees, students will learn the following skills: typing, ten-key electronic math, word processing, filing, office procedures, spelling, and English grammar. Teamwork, critical thinking, problem solving, and human relations are a focus of the program and are integrated into the curriculum. Certificates are also available that lead toward employment and can be a pathway to one of the BT Associate of Applied Science degrees. Current certificates available include: Bilingual Office Assistant (70 Credits) General Office Assistant (65 Credits) Legal Receptionist (15 Credits) Medical Receptionist (15 Credits) To obtain a certificate or degree, students must earn at least a Cin all required classes. The degree or certificate will be awarded if the overall GPA for the required classes is a 2.0 (C) or higher. Courses taken outside the degree or certificate requirements are not considered in the 2.0 (C) GPA or C- requirements. Additionally, students must complete the keyboarding competency of 45 wpm (words per minute) for five minutes with four or fewer errors in order to be awarded an Applied Science degree in BT. Students who do not meet the keyboarding competency will be eligible for a BT certificate. Certificate applicants do not need to meet this keyboarding competency. Students may take BT 103 twice in order to met their competency. All BT degree and certificate students should complete BT 100 before enrolling in their 21st credit toward a BT degree or certificate. Students should be aware that legal and medical offices often require criminal background checks.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to: • Type by touch • Use the 10-key appropriately to solve a variety of businessrelated math calculations

• • •

Use Microsoft Word to prepare various documents to include correspondence, mail merge, tables, charts, and reports Use the Microsoft Office Suite to complete a variety of office tasks Compose and transcribe basic business correspondence using appropriate business English and spelling Demonstrate routine office procedures such as filing, answering the phone and taking messages, greeting customers, and customer service Apply appropriate soft skills related to teamwork, critical thinking, problem solving, and human relations

Degrees Administrative Assistant The Administrative Assistant degree option is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of office settings such as insurance offices, educational services, government offices, or privately owned businesses. Required Courses Credits ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BA 158 Principles of Management 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5 BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications 5 BT 170 Integrated Business Applications I 5 BT 260 Word Processing 5 BT 270 Integrated Business Applications II 5 BT 272 Office Procedures 5 BT 273 Transcription & Document Processing 5 BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 BT 290-293 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 IT 221 Spreadsheets Advanced 4 IT 222 Outlook 2 Approved Electives 5 Total Degree Credits 93

Bilingual Administrative Office Assistant The Bilingual Administrative Office Assistant Degree is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of bilingual office settings such as insurance offices, educational services, government offices, or privately owned businesses. Required Courses ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I BA 138 Written Business Communication BA 158 Principles of Management or READ 105 Critical Reading BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* BT 130 Basic Business Essentials BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications BT 170 Integrated Business Applications I BT 260 Word Processing BT 270 Integrated Business Applications II BT 272 Office Procedures BT 273 Transcription & Document Processing

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

5 5 5 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5


BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 BT 290-293 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 IT 222 Outlook 2 Native Spanish Speakers SPAN 231 Second-Year Spanish for Professional Speaking 5 SPAN 232 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Writing 5 SPAN 233 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Reading 5 Native English Speakers SPAN 201 Spanish I Second Year** 5 SPAN 202 Spanish II Second Year** 5 SPAN 203 Spanish III Second Year** 5 Total Degree Credits 99

BT 272 Office Procedures 5 BT 273 Transcription & Document Processing 5 BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 BT 290-293 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 Native Spanish Speakers SPAN 231 Second-Year Spanish for Professional Speaking 5 SPAN 232 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Writing 5 SPAN 233 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Reading 5 Native English Speakers SPAN 201 Spanish I Second Year** 5 SPAN 202 Spanish II Second Year** 5 SPAN 203 Spanish III Second Year** 5 Total Degree Credits 107

Bilingual Legal Office Assistant Required Courses Credits ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5 BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications 5 BT 170 Integrated Business Applications I 5 BT 250 Legal Office Technology 5 BT 251 Legal Office Procedures 5 BT 260 Word Processing 5 BT 270 Integrated Business Applications II 5 BT 273 Transcription & Document Processing 5 BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 BT 290-293 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 BUS& 201 Business Law 5 IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 Native Spanish Speakers SPAN 231 Second-Year Spanish for Professional Speaking 5 SPAN 232 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Writing 5 SPAN 233 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Reading 5 Native English Speakers SPAN 201 Spanish I Second Year** 5 SPAN 202 Spanish II Second Year** 5 SPAN 203 Spanish III Second Year** 5 Total Degree Credits 107

Legal Office Assistant The Legal Office Assistant Degree is designed to prepare students to work in a variety of legal settings such as law firms, real estate or government offices, as well as the court system. Required Courses Credits ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5 BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications 5 BT 170 Integrated Business Applications I 5 BT 250 Legal Office Technology 5 BT 251 Legal Office Procedures 5 BT 260 Word Processing 5 BT 270 Integrated Business Applications II 5 BT 273 Transcription & Document Processing 5 BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 BT 290-293 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 BUS& 201 Business Law 5 CJ& 110 Criminal Law 5 or CJ 111: Criminal Evidence IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 IT 222 Outlook 2 Total Degree Credits 99

Bilingual Medical Office Assistant The Bilingual Medical Office Assistant Degree is designed to prepare students for a variety of bilingual careers in the medical field such as medical offices, clinics, and hospitals. Required Courses Credits AH 110 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 AH 120 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 AHBC 101 Introduction to Medical Coding 2 AHBC 102 Introduction to Medical Billing 2 AHBC 121 Health Care Reimbursement Issues I 3 AHBC 133 ICD-10-CM Coding 3 BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5 BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications 5 BT 170 Integrated Business Applications I 5 BT 260 Word Processing 5

Medical Office Assistant The Medical Office Assistant Degree is designed to prepare students for careers in the medical field working in medical offices, clinics, and hospitals. Required Courses Credits AH 110 Human Body in Health & Disease I 5 AH 119 Medical Terminology 5 AH 120 Human Body in Health & Disease II 5 AHBC 101 Introduction to Medical Coding 2 AHBC 102 Introduction to Medical Billing 2 AHBC 121 Health Care Reimbursement Issues I 3 AHBC 133 ICD-10-CM Coding 3 BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

85


86

BT 140 BT 170 BT 260 BT 270 BT 272 BT 273 BT 274 BT 290-293 IT 102 IT 111 IT 115 IT 120 IT 222

Electronic Business Math Applications 5 Integrated Business Applications I 5 Word Processing 5 Integrated Business Applications II 5 Office Procedures 5 Transcription & Document Processing 5 Office Dynamics 5 Advanced Co-op Field Experience 2 Windows 2 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 Database Introduction 2 PowerPoint 2 Outlook 2 Total Degree Credits 99 *BT 103 is required for students who do not meet the keyboarding competency (45 wpm/5 min./4 or fewer errors) in BT 102. Students may take the class twice. If the competency is still not met after taking the class twice, students will be eligible for a Certificate in General Office instead of the Associate of Applied Science Degree. **These courses are currently unavailable at YVCC . At the time of printing, these classes are available at Lower Columbia Community College. Check WAOL for current information and see your BT advisor. ***Students must complete BT 100 before enrolling in their 21st credit toward a BT degree or certificate.

Certificates Bilingual Office Assistant BA 138 Written Business Communication 5 BT 100 Introduction to Business Technology*** 2 BT 102 Intermediate Keyboarding 5 BT 130 Basic Business Essentials 5 BT 131 Office Reference Procedures I 5 BT 132 Office Reference Procedures II 5 BT 140 Electronic Business Math Applications 5 BT 260 Word Processing 5 BT 272 Office Procedures 5 BT 274 Office Dynamics 5 IT 102 Windows 2 IT 111 Spreadsheets Introduction 2 IT 115 Database Introduction 2 IT 120 PowerPoint 2 Native Spanish Speakers SPAN 231 Second-Year Spanish for Professional Speaking 5 SPAN 232 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Writing 5 SPAN 233 Second-Year Spanish for Academic Reading 5 Native English Speakers SPAN 201 Spanish I Second Year** 5 SPAN 202 Spanish II Second Year** 5 SPAN 203 Spanish III Second Year** 5 Total Credits 70

General Office Assistant ACCT& 201 BA 138 BT 100 BT 102 BT 130 BT 131 BT 132 BT 140 BT 260 BT 272 BT 273 BT 274 IT 102 IT 111 IT 115 IT 120

Principles of Accounting I Written Business Communication Introduction to Business Technology*** Intermediate Keyboarding Basic Business Essentials Office Reference Procedures I Office Reference Procedures II Electronic Business Math Applications Word Processing Office Procedures Transcription & Document Processing Office Dynamics Windows Spreadsheets Introduction Database Introduction PowerPoint Total Credits

5 5 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 2 2 2 65

Legal Receptionist BT 102 BT 131 BT 250

Intermediate Keyboarding Office Reference Procedures I Law Office Technology Total Credits

5 5 5 15

Medical Receptionist AH 119 BT 101 BT 131

Medical Terminology Beginning Keyboarding Office Reference Procedures I Total Credits

5 5 5 15

Courses BT 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in business technology. BT 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor BT 100: Introduction to Business Technology 2 Cr Quarters: F, W Students will be introduced to a variety of Business Technology career topics that will be covered in more depth through various required courses. These topics include: skill requirements, diversity and sensitivity, business ethics, wardrobe development, work ethic, and oral and written communication requirements. BT 101: Beginning Keyboarding 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students will learn the keyboard by touch; learn to key basic documents; and develop speed, accuracy, and production keyboarding using documents and word processing software. BT 102: Intermediate Keyboarding* 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will be prepared in the development of speed, accuracy, and production keyboarding using proper keyboarding and word processing techniques. (BT 103 is required for BT degree candidates who do not meet the keyboarding competency (45 wpm/5 min./4 or fewer errors) in BT 102. Students may take the class twice. If the competency is still not met after taking the class twice, students will be eligible for a Certificate in General Office instead of the Associate of Applied Science Degree.) Prerequisite: BT 101 with a grade of C- (1.7) or better or high school equivalent BT 103: Keyboarding Competency 3 Cr

Quarters: F, W, S

Students will be prepared in the development of keyboarding speed and accuracy. BT 102 with a grade of C- (1.7) or better or equivalent. BT 121: Human Relations 4 Cr Quarters: O Students will study personnel management, teamwork, leadership, and the link between human relations skills and communications skills. BT 122: Ten-Key Calculator 2 Cr Quarters: O This course provides a thorough review of basic arithmetic operations, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division for electronic calculators. Students will develop ten-key, touch method techniques for operating calculators and will complete numerous application problems.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


BT 123: Recordkeeping 5 Cr Quarters: O Students will learn principles and procedures of payroll, accounts receivable, and accounts payable to include control, methods, and systems of recordkeeping management. Prerequisite: BT 122 BT 124: Office Applications 5 Cr Quarters: O Students will learn proper punctuation, communication methods, and written language skills to use in job search as they prepare their resumes, cover letters, and thank-you letters. They will practice interview techniques as well as the correct responses to interview questions. Practice will be provided in telephone etiquette and filing practices employees will need in a productive business office. Prerequisite: BT 127 BT 125: Learning the Keyboard 2 Cr Quarters: O Students will learn the keyboard and work to improve speed and accuracy by touch using document-processing software. BT 126: Keyboarding Document Format 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will be prepared in the development of language arts skills and appropriate formatting to effectively communicate with keyed business documents. They will continue improvement of speed and accuracy.. Prerequisite: BT 125 BT 127: Intermediate Keyboarding I* 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will receive practice in the development of keyboarding speed, accuracy, and production formatting of documents using document and word-processing software. Prerequisite: BT 126 BT 128: Intermediate Keyboarding II* 2 Cr Quarters: O Students will continue to develop keyboarding speed and accuracy and develop more advanced formatting of documents using document and word processing software. Prerequisite: BT 127 BT 130: Basic Business Essentials 5 Cr Quarters: F, W Students will be introduced to business vocabulary and mores to help become proficient in using terminology and pronunciation prevalent in business offices. Emphasis will include speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 090T and recommended completion of or concurrent enrollment in BT 101 BT 131: Office Reference Procedures I 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Students will practice using various resources to produce correct business documents. This course will cover correct usage of commas, semi-colons, colons, hyphens, capitalization, and numbers. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 and recommended completion of or concurrent enrollment in BT 101 BT 132: Office Reference Procedures II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W Students will continue to use various resources to correctly produce and file business documents. Documents will be produced through multiple phases: composing, editing, proofreading, mailing, filing, and retrieving. Students are expected to apply the rules and processes presented in BT 131. Prerequisite: BT 131 with a grade of C- (1.7) or better and completion of BT 101 or equivalent

BT 140: Electronic Business Math Applications 5 Cr Quarters: F, S This course provides a thorough review of basic arithmetic (fundamental operations, multiplication and division, estimation, special functions and operations with electronic calculators, the metric system, and business and consumer economics application problems for electronic calculators), careful introductions to principles, self-assessments and branching instructions, guidelines for operating calculators, and numerous application problems. Prerequisite: BA 075 with a grade of C (2.0) or better or equivalent YVCC placement BT 160: Word Processing Short Course 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students will learn to create, save, and modify files and to produce attractive documents while at the same time learning how this word processing software works. Recommended: BT 101 or equivalent is recommended BT 161: Word Processing Completion Course 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will master the beginning features and commands of Microsoft Word to perform word processing projects on a job. Students will build on the skills learned in the Introduction to Word Processing class (BT 160) as they create tables and charts, apply styles, and complete mail merge documents. Prerequisite: BT 160 with a grade of C- (1.7) or better BT 170: Integrated Business Applications I 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Integrated Business Applications I uses Microsoft Office applications: word processing, spreadsheets, database, electronic presentations, e-mail, fax, internet, and the web to prepare students for the projectbased activities of Integrated Business Applications II. Prerequisite: BT 102, BT 260, IT 111, IT 115, and IT 120 BT 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative education integrates the student’s classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The student’s education, therefore, is shared between the employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor BT 250: Legal Office Technology 5 Cr Quarters: W Students will prepare various legal documents using the appropriate legal procedures, legal terminology, and technologies prevalent in legal offices. Students will be using two word processing software applications. Students will strive to reach and retain a production keyboarding speed of 55 words per minute with four or fewer errors on a five-minute timed write. Prerequisite: BT 102, BT131 BT 251: Legal Office Procedures 5 Cr Quarters: S Students will prepare various legal documents while applying procedures used in the legal office today. Students will also apply correct legal terminology while conducting legal research. Prerequisite: BT 250 BT 260: Word Processing 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will master the use of beginning features and commands of Microsoft Word that will be needed to perform word processing projects on a job. Prerequisite: BT 101 with a grade of C (2.0) or better or equivalent

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

87


88

BT 270: Integrated Business Applications II 5 Cr Quarters: F, S This course consists of project-based, in-basket activities using advanced integrated Microsoft Office software. Students are expected to complete a variety of simulated office activities to demonstrate comprehension of use of Microsoft Office applications. Prerequisite: BT 170 and either BT 131 or BA 138 BT 272: Office Procedures 5 Cr Quarters: W Students will apply procedures for scheduling, making travel arrangements, telephone etiquette, inter-office relations, and customer relations for the office. Students will develop organizational skills, work habits, and human relations as they prepare for office positions. Prerequisite: BT 102, BT 132, and IT 111 BT 273: Transcription and Document Processing 5 Cr Quarters: F, W Students will obtain the necessary skills to apply the correct document processing feature and format when transcribing a variety of office documents. Students will also strengthen their grammar and punctuation usage skills. Prerequisite: BT 102, BT 131 BT 274: Office Dynamics 5 Cr Quarters S This course explores areas of personal and professional development helpful for career success. Topics include the employment-seeking process; discovering values, directions, and goals; analyzing personal strengths and weaknesses; managing time; developing confidence; fitting into an organization; managing finances; and dealing with office politics. Prerequisite: BT 102, BT 130, BT 132 all with a grade of C- (1.7) or better BT 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: O Cooperative education integrates the student’s classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The student’s education, therefore, is shared between the employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Chemical Dependency Studies The Chemical Dependency Studies Department is committed to serving a diverse community of students. The department values and emphasizes student-centered learning as well as lifelong learning and fosters community partnerships. The Chemical Dependency (CD) Studies Program is committed to preparing a diverse population of students to work in the field of chemical dependency counseling. The program values and emphasizes student-centered learning, fosters community partnerships, and is dedicated to offering essential skills to empower students for successful professional career placement. The program offers two courses of study, an Associate of Applied Science degree in Chemical Dependency Studies and a certificate program for persons who already have a minimum of either a two-year degree or 35 college credits.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Begin training in the workforce as interns in the chemical dependency field. • Communicate effectively, applying interpersonal skills and cultural awareness to addiction treatment settings. • Utilize well-defined professional skills to perform basic procedures and approaches to help patients heal. • Understand and communicate the history and evolution of the addiction treatment field. • Utilize and refer to community resources available to those suffering from chemical addiction. Careers Students may start working in the field, completing the experience component, prior to completing the educational component for certification as a Chemical Dependency Professional. Graduates from the Chemical Dependency Studies Program at YVCC should be prepared to meet Washington State's educational requirements for Department of Health certification as Chemical Dependency Professionals. Career options include employment in alcohol and drug treatment facilities, hospitals, correctional institutions, employee assistance programs, other community socialservice agencies, and as school counselors.

Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degree Required Courses Credits CD 160 Survey of Chemical Dependency 5 CD 170 CD and Health 2 CD 180 Co-occurring Disorders in CD Counseling 2 CD 250 Youth CD Assess and Counseling 5 CD 260 CD and the Family 3 CD 261 Physio Actions of Alcohol & Drugs 3 CD 262 CD and the Law 3 CD 263 Case Manage and Recordkeeping 4 CD 264 Ethics for CD Counselors 3 CD 270 CD Counseling Techniques 5 CD 271 Group Process in CD Treatment 5 CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking z 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I 5 ENGL 102 English Composition II 5 Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ETHS 101 BA 115 PSYC& 100 PSYCH 200

American Ethnic Minorities „ Business Math ‹ General Psychology Lifespan Psychology Total Required Credits Total Electives Total Credits

5 5 5 5 75 15 90

Certificates Certificate in Chemical Dependency Studies Persons eligible for this certificate must complete all of the following courses and have already earned a minimum of a two-year degree or have earned an additional 35 college-level credits. Required Courses Credits CD 160 Survey of Chemical Dependency 5 CD 170 CD and Health 2 CD 180 Co-occurring Disorders in CD Counseling 2 CD 250 Youth CD Assess & Counseling 5 CD 260 CD and the Family 3 CD 261 Physio Actions of Alcohol & Drugs 3 CD 262 CD and the Law 3 CD 263 Case Manage and Recordkeeping 4 CD 264 Ethics for CD Counselors 3 CD 270 CD Counseling Techniques 5 CD 271 Group Process in CD Treatment 5 ETHS 101 American Ethnic Minorities 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 PSYCH 200 Lifespan Psychology 5 Total Credits 55

Admission Program Standards All persons admitted to the Chemical Dependency Studies Program or taking courses in the program are expected to comply with the following standards: 1. Abstinence from the misuse of alcohol and other chemical substances. 2. No alcohol or other drug use (except drugs prescribed by a physician) immediately prior to attendance in CD studies program classes or assignments. 3. Persons in recovery from addiction must remain free of alcohol and other drugs (except those drugs prescribed by a physician) at all times. Department of Health Certification Certification as a Chemical Dependency Professional by the Department of Health is threefold. Persons must meet an educational requirement, an experience requirement, and must pass an exam administered by the Department of Health. This process is governed by law, specifically, Chapter 246-811 of the Washington State Administrative Code (WAC). Graduates from the Chemical Dependency Studies Program at YVCC will meet Washington State's educational requirements for Department of Health certification as a Chemical Dependency Professional. The experience component of the WAC requires persons to work under the supervision of a certified Chemical Dependency Professional. The number of hours required during the experience component is dependent upon one's level of formal education. The experience component is not completed at YVCC, nor is it part of the curriculum of the Chemical Dependency Studies Program.

Washington State Background Check Employers may require a Washington State background check as a condition of employment. Information received as a result of the background check may determine employment eligibility.

Courses CD 160: Survey of Chemical Dependency 5 Cr Quarters: F A basic survey course covering the history of addiction treatment and recovery in America. Coursework will cover the evolution of addiction treatment with emphasis on current research and treatment methodology. CD 170: Chemical Dependency and Health 2 Cr Quarters: W A survey of health issues of particular interest to the chemical dependency professional. Basic information about various infectious and noninfectious diseases will be discussed. Topics will include HIV/ AIDS, TB, hepatitis, FAS/FAE Syndrome, and others. CD 180: Co-occurring Disorders in CD Counseling 2 Cr Quarters: F A course to help chemical dependency professionals effectively meet the diverse and complex needs of clients who are Mentally Ill and Chemically Abusing (MICA). Mental health diagnosis, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criteria, medications, referral, and community resources will be reviewed. Emphasis will be on how to work collaboratively with other health-care professionals. CD 250: Youth CD Assessment & Counseling 5 Cr Quarters: SR This course is a basic review of adolescent chemical use and dependency. Assessment tools and counseling techniques specific to youth will be explored. Areas of focus will include the impact substance use has on adolescent development, maladaptive stress responses, low frustration tolerances, and compulsive disorders. CD 260: Chemical Dependency & Family 3 Cr Quarters: S An in-depth look at the effects of chemical dependency on both the individual and the family. The development of unhealthy behavioral patterns in the family will be studied as well as how family members seek to cope and prevent destruction of the family. Treatment options will be examined. CD 261: Physiological Actions of Alcohol and Drugs 3 Cr Quarters: F This course explores Addiction Disorders including but not limited to: substance use and behavioral addictions, the history and classification of psychoactive substances, the physical and psychological effects of psychoactive substances, the progression of addiction disorder, physiology of the brain as it relates to addictions, the complexity of co-occurring disorders and in-depth discussions of behavioral health treatment models. CD 262: Chemical Dependency & Law 3 Cr Quarters: S A survey course covering historical and social antecedents and laws from the earliest known times to the present as they relate to chemical dependency. Current laws and regulations applicable to the field of chemical dependency treatment will be studied, including an overview of DUI-deferred prosecution, drug courts, and an analysis of privacy and confidentiality regulations.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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CD 263: Case Management & Record Keeping 4 Cr Quarters: W Students will practice the necessary skills for and become familiar with the professional tools for documentation and record-keeping activities in a chemical dependency treatment facility. The principles of treatment planning of the American Society of Addiction Patient Placement Criteria will be examined. Prerequisite: CD 160 or permission of program advisor

Chemistry

CD 264: Chemical Dependency Ethics 3 Cr Quarters: W Teaches the student to understand health care ethics and the skills that support ethical practice among chemical dependency professionals. Violations of ethical practice are characterized by the potential for misuse of power and influence. Utilizing lectures, role playing, and guest speakers, students will establish parameters of behavior that promote the responsible use of leadership.

Courses

CD 270: Chemical Dependency Counseling Techniques 5 Cr Quarters: S A course to provide persons with an opportunity to learn basic chemical dependency interviewing and counseling skills. Prerequisite: CD 160 or permission of program advisor CD 271: Group Process in Chemical Dependency Training 5 Cr Quarters: SR Techniques used for basic alcoholism and drug addiction counseling will be presented and demonstrated. These skills will involve the elements of a counseling relationship, the problem-solving process, crisis intervention, and approaches unique to addiction counseling. Prerequisite: CD 270 CD 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in chemical dependency.

Chemical substances are the very building blocks of life, and, as such, the study of chemistry provides insight into most scientific areas of study. Courses at YVCC are designed to support study in allied health fields, as well as provide a foundation for further study in chemistry.

CHEM 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CHEM 100: Introduction to Chemistry 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Designed to acquaint the non-science major with chemical principles and serve as the prerequisite for those students wishing to continue with CHEM 109 or CHEM& 141, but who have not had high school chemistry. CHEM 100 is a one-quarter introduction to chemistry. The instruction methods include lecture, small group discussion, and presentation. 5 lecture hours, no lab. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: MATH 084 or 085 or YVCC placement into MATH 095 or above Distribution: NS CHEM 109: Principles of Chemistry Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S CHEM 110: Principles of Chemistry Lab 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S A one-quarter survey of the principles of general chemistry including scientific method, atomic structure, chemical bonding, periodic properties, physical states of matter, solutions, acids/bases, and nuclear chemistry. The instruction methods consist of lecture, small group discussion, class presentation, and individual and team experiments. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or one year of high school chemistry and MATH 085 or placement into MATH 095 Distribution: NS (L) CHEM& 141: General Chemistry I Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: F, W CHEM& 151: General Chemistry I Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F, W The first quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The topics include the atomic nature of matter, atomic structure and subatomic particles, quantum concepts, the electromagnetic spectrum, the periodic table and periodic trends, types of bonding, Lewis structures, molecular geometry, hybridization, molecular orbitals, and chemical equations. The instruction methods consist of lecture, small group discussion and problem solving, and class presentation during three one-hour lecture sessions per week. Students must register for both CHEM& 141 and CHEM& 151. Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or one year of high school chemistry and concurrent enrollment in MATH 095 or YVCC placement into MATH& 141 Distribution: NS (L) CHEM& 142: General Chemistry II Lecture 3 Cr

Quarters: W, S

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


CHEM& 152: General Chemistry II Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W, S The second quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The topics include solutions, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and acid-bases. The instruction methods consist of lecture, occasional small-group work, individual and team experiments during three onehour lecture sessions and two two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Students must register for both CHEM& 142 and CHEM& 152. Prerequisite: CHEM& 141 and 151 or equivalent Distribution: NS (L)

CHEM& 243: Organic Chemistry III Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: S Organic chemistry for the student majoring in science or whose career path requires organic chemistry. This is part three of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry. This course will cover functional group transformations, additions, elimination and substitution, and oxidation/ reduction reactions as well as spectroscopic techniques. Chemistry of carbonyl compounds, conjugated and aromatic compounds, amines, and heterocycles as well as a variety of biomolecules will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM& 242 Distribution: NS

CHEM& 143: General Chemistry III Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: F, S, SR The third quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. Topics include electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, descriptive chemistry of the elements, and complex formation. The instruction methods include lecture and occasional small-group work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 142 and 152 or equivalent Distribution: NS CHEM& 153: General Chemistry III Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F, S, SR The lab portion of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. Topics include descriptive chemistry of the elements, complex formation, semi-micro qualitative analysis for common cations, and quantitative analysis by colorimetric titration. Instruction methods include small-group work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 142 and 152 or equivalent Distribution: NS (L)

CHEM& 251: Organic Chemistry I Lab 3 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to accompany the second quarter of the three quarter sequence in organic chemistry for majors. Students taking this course will gain skills and knowledge from working with appropriate glassware and instrumentation used in organic chemistry. Students will perform basic experiments in melting point determination, separation and purification of chemical components, preparation of organic substances, and identification of chemicals using spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM& 241 or concurrent enrollment in CHEM& 242 Distribution: NS (L)

CHEM 190: Co-op Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Cooperative education integrates the student's classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. The student's education is shared between employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty.

CHEM& 252: Organic Chemistry II Lab 3 Cr Quarters: S This course builds upon the laboratory experiences from CHEM& 251. The student will gain enhanced experience in synthetic methods on an individual basis and in a group environment. Students will plan, implement, acquire data/observations, and critically analyze their laboratory results. A variety of purification and spectroscopic techniques will be used during the course. Prerequisite: CHEM& 241, CHEM& 242, and CHEM& 243 (concurrent enrollment is acceptable) and completion of CHEM& 251 Distribution: NS (L)

CHEM 209: Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S CHEM 210: Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry Lab 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is a one-quarter survey of organic chemistry with an introduction to metabolic pathways. The instruction methods include lecture, small-group discussion, class presentation, and individual and team experiments. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. See the High Demand Course Repeat Rule. Students must register for both CHEM 209 and CHEM 210. Prerequisite: CHEM 109/110 or equivalent or CHEM& 142/152 Distribution: NS (L) CHEM& 241: Organic Chemistry I Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: F Organic chemistry for the student majoring in science or whose career path requires organic chemistry. This is part one of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry. Subjects covered will be an introduction to organic structures; nomenclature; stereo chemistry; and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Prerequisite: CHEM& 143 and 153 Distribution: NS CHEM& 242: Organic Chemistry II Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: W Organic chemistry for the student majoring in science or whose career path requires organic chemistry. This is part two of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry. This course will cover functional group transformations, additions, elimination and substitution, and oxidation/ reduction reactions as well as spectroscopic techniques. Chemistry of alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, and carbonyl compounds will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHEM& 241 Distribution: NS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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92 Chican@ Studies Please note that the symbol “@” represents the education industry standard, replacing “a/o.” Chican@ Studies (CHST) Program focuses on the history, contributions, and contemporary experiences of people of predominantly Mexican heritage in the U.S. It is an interdisciplinary academic field which bridges traditional academic boundaries by drawing from areas of scholarly inquiry such as history, sociology, political science, arts & humanities, education, literature, and women's studies. Intensive community involvement and the training of future leaders are also emphasized. Students may complete courses to meet YVCC distribution requirements in the social sciences and the humanities or to obtain an Associate in Arts degree with a focus in Chican@ studies. New courses in this program will continually be developed. Check with an advisor periodically for new course and transfer information.

CHST 220: Chican@ Community Studies 5 Cr Quarters: O This course is a seminar that introduces students to contemporary political, social and cultural ideologies, theories and methods for conducting Chican@ Studies community research. Students will review and analyze various quality of life indicators of Chican@ communities in the United States. They will have the option to perform either library or field research project about Chican@s in the Northwest, especially the Chican@/Mexican@ population in the Yakima Valley. Study of community formation and leadership development as these intersect with race, class, and gender issues will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHST 112, CHST 115, SOC& 101, POLS& 101, PSYC& 100, ANTH& 206, or HIST& 214 with a grade of C or better. Distribution: SS

Courses CHST 112: Chican@ Experience in Contemporary Society 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course examines contemporary, Chican@ and Latin@ experiences in the U.S. within a socioeconomic, political, cultural, and historical context. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a broader knowledge of the forces that shape the lives of Mexican- and other Latin@- descended peoples in U.S. society. The course will highlight Chican@ history, the role of women, workers, the elite, the middle classes, trans-nationalism and their interaction in the development of the Chican@/Latin@ community. Includes the importance of social activism and social change in understanding contemporary issues in the Chican@/Latin@ community. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS CHST 115: La Chicana 5 Cr Quarters: O This course introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches to investigating the role and status of Chicanas/Mexicanas in contemporary U.S. society. The course will use scholarship reflecting Chicana social, intellectual, historical, and artistic achievements with special emphasis on their historical role; the political, economic, and social institutions that have affected their status; and their contributions to society and their community. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS CHST 120: Chican@s Art & Culture 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Assesses the folklore and cultural development of the Chican@ community. Opportunity will be provided for intensive study of the literary, cultural, and artistic achievements of the Chican@. Distribution: HM CHST 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in Chican@ studies. CHST 199: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


College Academic Skills

Communication Studies

Courses

Mass Communication

CAS 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in college academic skills.

Today’s methods of mass communicating information through the print and electronic media require developing proficiency in the traditional skills of written and visual presentations as well as exploring new techniques and new media. The impact of 24-hour cable news, satellite radio, web-based newsletters, web newspapers, and global systems requires today’s Mass Communication major to be both specifically and broadly educated. Courses at YVCC offer the future media employee opportunities to meet these needs while completing an associate of arts degree. The majority of these courses directly transfer to most senior institutions.

CAS 105: Freshman Seminar 2 Cr Quarters: O An academic class designed to improve the success of first-year students. Taught by faculty representing a variety of disciplines, the course examines factors known to improve the likelihood of success among first-year students. Freshman Seminar explores the dynamics that pertain to student retention, critical thinking, and enriched learning. Credit will not be granted for both CAS 105 and CAS 106. CAS 106: College Seminar 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An academic class designed to improve the success of first-year students. Taught by faculty representing a variety of disciplines, the course examines factors known to improve the likelihood of success among first-year students. First-quarter college students only. Distribution: CM CAS 120: Supplemental Instruction 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Instructional support offered for students who are enrolled in courses taught by instructors who participate in the YVCC Supplemental Instruction Program. Enrollees for Supplemental Instruction (SI) can also include those who have successfully finished such courses and have been hired as SI leaders. This course will familiarize students with different learning styles, study skills, and the Socratic method of questioning. Students will model the group dynamics approach during the SI sessions as opposed to the lecture method of lesson presentation. Diversity in learning, studying, and processing styles will be recognized and fostered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CAS 158: Introduction to eLearning 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A survey course designed to orient new and prospective students to eLearning. This course addresses the factors and skills necessary for successful completion of online Internet classes. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 CAS 180: Library Literacy in the 21st Century 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course develops a framework for research in the online environment and helps students to build skills and techniques for success as an online learner. Through a quarter-long research project on a global issue, participants will examine various strategies for locating, evaluating, and applying information resources in the research process with attention to information issues like intellectual property, censorship, and freedom of information. This is an online class. A computer with Internet access and Microsoft Word is required as well as basic computer skills such as emailing and word processing. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 CAS 190, 191: Co-op Field Experience I, II Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

CAS 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CAS 210: Introduction to Internet & Educational Technology 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This is a two-credit introductory course to learn about the World Wide Web and to use PowerPoint as a presentation tool. Theory will be provided in lecture, and skills will be applied in independent laboratory practice and classroom demonstration.

Speech Communication Speech Communication courses are designed to teach and to allow students to practice the skills and understanding necessary to communicate effectively one-on-one, in small groups, and in public speaking, while using digital technologies for PowerPoint business presentations. Courses are designed for majors and for all wishing to improve their personal and professional communication skills or to gain personal enhancement. These skills are consistently listed as those thought by employers to be among the most important qualities for hiring and success in advancement and promotion.

Courses Mass Communication CMST& 102: Introduction to Mass Media 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A survey of mass communications—newspapers, broadcasting, cinema, and magazines. Emphasis on structure, content, audiences, effects, and social setting. Distribution: SS CMST 115: Newswriting 5 Cr Quarters: O This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of news gathering and writing, the credibility of information, news judgment, libel law, and basic methods of researching and writing. Students also will learn to use traditional and online and other cyber sources to obtain and sift information for the purpose of writing news articles and reports, specifically, for publication in an online periodical. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM CMST 140: Feature Writing 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Nonfiction article writing, techniques of writing, manuscript preparation, and selling techniques. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or permission of instructor Distribution: CM or HM CMST 190, 191: Co-op Field Experience I, II Variable Cr Quarters: O Cooperative education integrates the students’ classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CMST 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in communications.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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CMST 202: Intro to Social Media & Online Communication 5 Cr Quarters: F This course surveys uses, effects, and impact of online communication through social media including study of a variety of popular social media sites and blogs. Topics include the history of the social media industry, its uses, and effects of social media in social movements, politics, news, business, and our personal lives. Student will learn to write effectively for the use of online communication. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101

Speech Communication CMST 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, non-credit course. CMST 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Speech courses may be prepared and offered to meet specialized communication needs of students and community groups. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CMST& 101: Introduction to Communication 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S,SR This course emphasizes and provides experience in applying the basic principles of human perception and communication in five areas: interpersonal, small group, public speaking, mass communication, and technological speech communication. Students will study and increase their understanding and skills in audience and occasion analysis, developing subject and purpose through critical thinking and gathering and organizing material. Students will learn and apply communication and cross-cultural and global perspective skills with special emphasis on interpersonal and small group and audience-centered communication. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 Distribution: Either CM or HM, but not both CMST 103: Workplace Communications 3 Cr Quarters: O This is a communications course designed to meet the needs of career-minded students. The course will include assignments in diversity-awareness, listening, conflict-resolution, teamwork, and mock interviewing, combined with various presentations to showcase learning. CMST 141: Effective Listening 2 Cr Quarters: O The course is designed to acquaint students with their listening behaviors and habits as well as provide avenues for improvement of listening abilities and maintenance of effective listening skills. CMST& 210: Interpersonal Communication 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This vital career skills course helps students communicate successfully in interpersonal relationships whether they find themselves in business or medical fields or with family and friends. Students will learn and practice communication skills such as perception checking, paraphrasing, nondefensive communication, and conflict resolution. These new skills will enable students to succeed with colleagues and customers and help improve their personal relationships. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 Distribution: Either CM or HM, but not both

CMST& 220: Public Speaking 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Surveys the basic principles of communicating in the public format of human communication. The course emphasizes researching, organizing, presenting, and analyzing speech presentations. Students will study verbal and nonverbal elements of communication as well as audience analysis, topic and purpose development, outlines, source citation, and style and delivery. Major speeches include informative and persuasive speeches as well as a presentation concerning a historical or contemporary sociopolitical issue. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 Distribution: Either CM or HM, but not both CMST& 230: Small Group Communication 3 Cr Quarters: O A course concerned with improving the student’s ability to participate effectively in small groups. Emphasis is on the nature of communicating in groups, the development of effective techniques for interaction and methods of removing roadblocks to communication. CMST 250: Advanced Public Speaking 3 Cr Quarters: O An advanced course in the use of techniques for persuasion and the use of ethos, audience emotions, and logic in dealing with audiences in varied speech-communication settings. Prerequisite: CMST& 101 or permission of instructor CMST 280: Intercultural Communication 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is designed to give a theoretical understanding of the process and role of communication when faced with cultural plurality. Provides a background of classical theories in intercultural communication and in interdisciplinary areas of cultural studies and gender studies. Discussions focus on the changing cultural terrain in the United States and on the globalization of mass or popular culture as it influences other parts of the world. Distribution: HM Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095

Sign Communication See “Modern Languages”

Computer Science See "Information Technology"

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Criminal Justice As a pathway to dynamic professional careers and continuing education for lifelong learning, the Criminal Justice Program promotes collaboration and innovative teamwork, critical thinking, problem-solving, and community involvement in public service. The Criminal Justice Program exists for the preparation of students for employment as law enforcement officers, corrections/detention officers, private security officers, and many other positions within the criminal justice profession.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Compete for entry level positions in the criminal justice field • Analyze the criminal justice system recognizing its impact on our lives and in a global community • Utilize critical thinking skills and apply them in various criminal justice settings • Communicate and collaborate within teams to accomplish tasks in a professional manner • Communicate within the discipline using words and phrases specific to criminal justice • Utilize and demonstrate problem solving skills • Identify attributes of successful criminal justice professionals Students from the Criminal Justice Program have been hired as trooper cadets with the Washington State Patrol; as local law enforcement officers in many cities; as well as deputy sheriffs in many counties; as corrections officers at the local and state levels and as detention officers. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Science degree in Criminal Justice, students will be prepared to compete for entry-level employment in criminal justice positions including law enforcement, institutional corrections, police support personnel, and loss prevention. Students are cautioned that career opportunities in the criminal justice field might be limited by criminal convictions, physical requirements, medical history, drug or alcohol use, or other bona fide occupational qualifications or disqualifiers established and determined by employers. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is available at the following websites: www.wa.gov/careerguide or www.wa.gov/esd/lmea.

Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice The Associate of Applied Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed for students who intend to enter the job market upon completion of the two-year degree. Courses within the program assist students in the development of occupationally specific abilities with emphasis on interpersonal skills, group dynamics, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The purpose of the program is to meet the needs of criminal justice employers by preparing students for the challenges of working in a dynamic profession.

Members of the Criminal Justice Advisory Committee represent a variety of employment positions within the profession, including law enforcement, the courts, institutional corrections, community corrections, and private sector employment, as well as local, state, and federal government. Recommendations and information from the Advisory Committee aid in preparing students for employment. Students who pursue four-year degrees are encouraged to obtain a transfer degree from YVCC. Criminal Justice courses should be used to fulfill AA degree elective requirements. Many colleges and universities accept YVCC's Criminal Justice courses as part of their degree programs. Students who will be transferring are advised to refer to the Associate in Arts distribution requirements in this catalog and to consult the requirements of the transfer institution. Required Courses BA 115 Business Math ‹ CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ& 105 Introduction to Corrections CJ& 106 Juvenile Justice CJ& 110 Criminal Law CJ 111 Criminal Evidence CJ& 112 Criminology CJ 190-193, 290-293 Co-op Field Experience CJ 203 Criminal Investigations CJ 204 Arrest, Search and Seizure CJ 210 Administration and Supervision CJ 212 Criminal Justice Technical Writing CJ 214 CJ Professional Development„ ENGL& 101 English Composition I z ETHS 101 American Ethnic Minorities IT 100 Introduction to Computers SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology Electives * Total Credits

Credits 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 5 5 3 5 18 96

* Students choose 18 credits from the following courses in at least three different disciplines: AH 155; BIOL 100; BT 101; CHEM 100; CJ 121, 220; CJ& 240; CAS 106; ENGL 102; HIST 275; IT 101, 102, 104, 111, 115, 120, 124; PHIL& 101, 106; PHOTO 101, 102; PE 180, 181, 182, 184; POLS& 101, 202, PLSCI 205; PSYC& 100, PSYCH 220; READ 105; SOC 110; SPAN 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203; and CMST& 101, 210, 220; CMST 141

Certificates Communications/Call Taker Certificate The Communications/Call Taker Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete the following course work with a 2.0 or better GPA. Required Courses Credits CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 5 CJ 214 Professional Development 2 BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding 5 IT 100 Introduction to Computers 3 AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 Total Credits 17

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Correctional Certificate Students can obtain a certificate in a specialized area of corrections. The Correctional Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete the following coursework with a 2.0 GPA or better. Required Courses CJ& 105 Introduction to Corrections CJ 190,191,192,193 Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV or CJ 214 Professional Development CJ 121 Offender Populations CJ 212 Technical Writing CJ 220 Correctional Law PE 180,181,182,183: Wellness Life I, II, III, IV Total Credits

Credits 5 2 2 3 5 1 18

CJ& 110: Criminal Law 5 Cr Quarters: W, S This course is designed to introduce the student to the history, concepts, theory, and specifics of criminal law. This includes specific crimes, the laws of Washington, and what elements are needed for formal charges and conviction. CJ 111: Criminal Evidence 5 Cr Quarters: F, W This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the rules of criminal evidence and how these rules apply to the criminal trial process. Some of the subjects to be covered are defining the types of evidence, when evidence is admissible, specific procedures for the use of evidence, and how evidence has an impact on one’s constitutional rights. Major court decisions and their impact will be evaluated.

Crime Scene Investigation Certificate Students can obtain a certificate in a specialized area of investigations. The Crime Science Investigation Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete the following coursework with a 2.0 GPA or better.

CJ& 112: Criminology 5 Cr Quarters: F, S This course explores the crime problem, its context, and the causes of crime. Major theories of causation will be examined, taking into consideration new developments in the field of criminology.

Required Courses CJ 111 Criminal Evidence CJ 203 Criminal Investigation CJ 212 Technical Writing CJ& 240 Introduction to Forensic Science Total Credits

CJ 121: Offender Populations 2 Cr Quarters: S This course focuses on the offender and the offender's conduct within the correctional setting. Special emphasis is on dealing with offender manipulation of correctional employees.

Credits 5 5 3 5 18

Police Clerk/Support Specialist Certificate The Police Clerk/Support Specialist Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete the following course work with a 2.0 or better GPA. Required Courses CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ& 110 Criminal Law BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding IT 100 Introduction to Computers Total Credits

Credits 5 5 5 3 18

Courses CJ& 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice 5 Cr Quarters: F, W Introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of the major players in the system, i.e. law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Course covers the philosophy and history of the criminal justice system; identifying types of crime and how it is measured; organization and jurisdiction of the agencies in the system; and the administration of the justice process, from the commission of a crime until final disposition. CJ& 105: Introduction to Corrections 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of the corrections system in the United States. Students will examine the role of corrections as it evolved as a system, its philosophy, and society's attempt to control crime and its structure. Contemporary issues and alternatives to corrections will be explored. CJ& 106: Juvenile Justice 5 Cr Quarters: W, S An examination of the juvenile justice system emphasizing the role that the family, school, courts, law enforcement, corrections, and the broader community play in the life of a juvenile. The historical and philosophical developments of the juvenile justice system will be covered.

CJ 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative education integrates students’ classroom studies with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. The students’ education, therefore, is shared between employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CJ 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in criminal justice. CJ 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor CJ 203: Criminal Investigation 5 Cr Quarters: F Establishes the actual workings of criminal investigations from the basic report to the finished investigation. Reports, case organization, crime scene processing, interviewing, and case management are a few of the subjects covered in this course. Prerequisite: CJ 111 or permission of instructor CJ 204: Arrest Search & Seizure 5 Cr Quarters: S This course covers the nature and extent of the individual rights guaranteed by the U. S. Constitution with emphasis on the Fourth Amendment, which constitutes the heart of the law of criminal procedure. Students will be able to apply the law of arrest, search, and seizure to particular fact situations, identifying the individual's rights in issue and how it comes into conflict with law enforcement functions. Prerequisite: CJ 111 or permission of instructor CJ 210: Administration & Supervision 5 Cr Quarters: W Examines police organizations and the effects of administration on first-line supervision through organizational structures, budget, training, and communication. The student will learn to appreciate the authority and responsibilities allocated to first-level supervisors for achieving the organizational philosophy, vision, and mission.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

3


CJ 212: Criminal Justice Technical Writing 3 Cr Quarters: S Offers a team-teaching approach to technical writing for law enforcement, community corrections, and security officers. Emphasis will be placed on writing documents that will be acceptable in the criminal justice system.

4

CJ 214: Criminal Justice Professional Development 2 Cr Quarters: S This course explores the requirements in criminal justice employment and related fields. It offers the student the opportunity to develop skills required in the workplace, including human relations, communication, career choices, testing, attributes of successful candidates, selling yourself on paper, preparing for getting or not getting the job, jobseeking strategies, and interviewing. CJ 220: Correctional Law 5 Cr Quarters: S This course examines the law in the correctional setting with emphasis on prisoner's rights and the legal obligations of correctional officers. CJ& 240: Introduction to Forensic Science 5 Cr Quarters: W Introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of forensic science and the role of forensic scientists in criminal justice. Students will be exposed to the many different specialty areas of forensic science and learn the basic applications used in crime scene investigation Prerequisite: CJ 111 and CJ 203 CJ 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

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Dental Assisting Dental Assisting is a collaborative program with the Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center. Students completing this one-year certificate program will train for a wide variety of dental office functions.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Obtain entry-level employment as chair-side Dental Assistants. • Obtain entry-level employment as Dental Hygiene Assistants. • Communicate effectively, applying interpersonal skills and cultural awareness to interact with dental patients, other dental health care professionals, and the various outside agencies involved in the field of dentistry. • Utilize well defined professional skills to assist the dentist in the delivery of optimum dental treatment to patients, while maintaining a safe and infection-free environment. • Understand and practice high ethical standards and the HIPPA laws required to protect patient personal health information and maintain professional confidentiality. • Utilize professional skills to promote excellent oral health and hygiene to both dental patients and to the community.

Careers Upon completion, dental assisting students should be prepared to pass the Dental Assisting National Board’s Infection Control Exam and the Radiation Health Safety Exam. Besides classes at YV-Tech, students complete YVCC courses required for all certificate programs. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is also available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Certificate Courses Fall Quarter DA 101 PTECH 115 Winter Quarter BA 138 DA 102 Spring Quarter DA 103 IT 102 Summer Quarter DA 193

Credits Dental Assisting I Applied Mathematics II ‹

8 3

Written Business Communication z Dental Assisting II

5 8

Dental Assisting III Windows

8 2

Co-op Field Experience

5

Courses DA 101: Dental Assisting I 8 Cr Quarters: F The student will become oriented to the profession of dentistry; identify and describe the structures, development, system and functions of the human body, the head and neck and oral cavity; measure and record patient vital signs; chart oral conditions and restorations; identify diseases of concern to dentistry and how they are transmitted and prevented in a clinical environment. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 075 Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


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DA 102: Dental Assisting II 8 Cr Quarters: W The student will continue to build upon the basic dental sciences covered in DA 101, by learning infection control in the clinical environment, hazard communication, dental radiography, alginate impressions and study models, dental instruments and tray set-ups, and beginning chair-side dental assisting. Prerequisite: DA 101 with a minimum grade of C+ (2.3) and permission of instructor DA 103: Dental Assisting III 8 Cr Quarters: S The student will continue applying and practicing knowledge and skills learned in DA 102, by gaining knowledge and skill with dental anesthetics, dental materials, preventative dentistry, operative and cosmetic dentistry, pediatric dentistry and fixed and removable prosthdontics. Prerequisite: DA 101 and 1DA 02 with a minimum grade of C+ (2.3) and permission of instructor DA 193: Dental Assisting Co-op Field Experience IV 5 Cr Quarters: O The dental assisting program is a four-quarter program designed to prepare the student for entry-level employment as chair-side dental assistant. During the summer quarter, the student will receive on-thejob training by participating in the dental assistant internship program. The student will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained and to practice the skills acquired during the previous three quarters in a real dental office environment. Prerequisite: DA 101, DA 102, and DA 103 all with a minimum grade of C+ (2.3) and permission of instructor

Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene is the science and practice of the recognition, treatment, and prevention of oral diseases. The dental hygienist is a preventive oral health professional who has graduated from an accredited dental hygiene program in an institution of higher education; is licensed in dental hygiene; and provides educational, clinical research, administrative, and therapeutic services supporting total health through the promotion of optimal oral health. In practice, dental hygienists integrate the roles of clinician, educator, advocate, manager, and researcher to prevent oral diseases and promote health. The dental hygiene curriculum includes general education, biomedical sciences, dental sciences, and dental hygiene sciences. Dental hygienists work in private dental hygiene offices; private dental offices; hospitals; managed care organizations; federal, state, and municipal health facilities; long-term care facilities; nursing homes; correctional facilities; and schools. The graduate will be prepared for the full scope of dental hygiene practice including professionalism and patient care as well as health promotion and disease prevention. The curriculum in the Dental Hygiene program consists of six quarters of professional education and clinical experience preceded by a demanding program of prerequisite courses. An Associate of Applied Science Degree in Dental Hygiene is earned upon graduation. The Yakima Valley Community College program in Dental Hygiene is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and has been granted the accreditation status of “Approval without Reporting Requirements.” The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at (312)440-4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678. The Commission’s web address is: http://www/ada/org/100.aspx.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be: • Prepared for the full scope of dental hygiene practice in Washington State. • Able to conduct professional activities and develop professional relationships in responsible ways. • Able to make appropriate decisions and actions as health care providers guided by ethical principles and core values. • Eligible to take the Western Regional Examination Boards and upon successful completion, to apply for licensing in the 15 western regional participating states, including Washington State, and for other regional and state licensing.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Careers The profession of dental hygiene is an excellent career choice for both women and men. Upon completion of the program, the entry-level dental hygiene graduate will be prepared for the full scope of dental hygiene practice in Washington State. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is also available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Admission Selection Procedure A limited number of student positions are available in the Dental Hygiene Program. To be eligible for selection consideration, eight prerequisite courses (to include five math/science courses) must be completed by the end of winter quarter of the year of application. Subsequent to program application, selection is based on cumulative GPA in dental hygiene prerequisite courses (historically, above a 3.5 GPA), number of prerequisite courses completed, dental experience and education, ability in a second language, and appropriate standardized tests. Dental Hygiene students must possess skills essential to performing dental hygiene functions as outlined in the dental hygiene application information packet. The selection process is reviewed each year. For up to date selection information, refer to the current dental hygiene application information packet or to the website at www.yvcc. edu/dentalhygiene. Supplemental information is available in the Dental Hygiene Department. Admission Requirements Completion of prerequisite courses does not guarantee admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. Application forms and all required records listed below must be postmarked by the first Friday in February for an applicant to be considered for fall entry. Each applicant must meet all college admissions requirements, as well as all college policies and procedures. The following prerequisite course requirements have been established: Required Prerequisite College Courses BIOL 230 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 5 Note: BIOL 109 is required for BIOL 230 BIOL 231 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 5 BIOL 232 Microbiology 5 CHEM 109/110 Principles of Chemistry Theory w/ Lab 5 Note: CHEM 100 is required for CHEM 109/110 if no high school Chemistry was taken. CHEM 209/210 Introduction to Organic Biochem w/ Lab 5 CMST& 101 Introduction to Communication„ CMST& 210, Interpersonal Communications„ or or CMST 280, Intercultural Communication or CMST& 220, Introduction to Public Speaking 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I z 5 ENGL 102 English Composition II z 5 MATH& 146 Statistics ‹ 5 NUTR 101 Human Nutrition 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology„ 5 SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology„ or ANTH& 206, Cultural Anthropology 5

A 2.5 cumulative grade point average must be achieved in the prerequisite courses. Applicants must receive a minimum of 2.0 in each prerequisite course (Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit grades are not acceptable). All prerequisite courses must be completed prior to entry into the Dental Hygiene Program. Retakes of prerequisite dental hygiene courses are limited. The following courses must have been completed within five years of entrance into the program: CHEM 109 and 110, 209 and 210; BIOL 230, 231, 232; and NUTR 101 Documents Required • Official college transcript(s) in duplicate • Official high school transcript or GED certificate • Dental Hygiene Program Application • A completed prerequisite course plan form • Work experience and/or observation forms • Specific standardized test as required by the department • Second language verification, (Alta Test) if applicable • Other documents supporting application are optional • $25 Dental Hygiene Application fee (nonrefundable) After acceptance into the program, the student must submit evidence of good health indicated by: • Physical examination by a licensed physician • Professional eye examination meeting specified essential skills • Tuberculin test or chest x-ray • Hepatitis B vaccination • An investigative background check is required.

Degree Associate of Applied Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Academic and clinical courses must be passed with a minimum of 1.7 (C-) GPA and completed in consecutive sequence. (Exception: one D [1.0] may be earned in one clinical course.) A cumulative 2.5 GPA or above is required to continue in the curriculum and to graduate from the program. Graduates will earn an Associate of Applied Science degree in Dental Hygiene. Suggested Program of Study First Year - Fall Credits BIOL 116 Head & Neck Anatomy 3 DH 150 Dental Anatomy 3 DH 156A Safety & Infection Control I 3 DH 157A DH Fundamentals I Theory 4 DH 157B DH Fundamentals I Lab 3 DH 174 Preventive Dentistry 2 DH 178 Anesthesiology/Dental Emergency 2 Total Credits 20 First Year - Winter BIOL 117 Oral Histology/Embryology 4 DH 153 Oral Roentgenology 4 DH 158A DH Fundamentals II Theory 4 DH 158B DH Fundamentals II Lab 4 DH 171 Dental Materials/Restorative Dentistry I 3 DH 177 General Pathology 2 DH 271 Nitrous Oxide Analgesia 2 Total Credits 23

Courses listed are course numbers offered at YVCC. Courses from other colleges which appear to be equivalent may be accepted with approval. Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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100

First Year - Spring DH 154 Clinical Roentgenology 2 DH 159 Dental Hygiene Theory 3 DH 160 Clinical Dental Hygiene 4 DH 165 Restorative Dentistry II 4 DH 173 Pharmacology 2 DH 176 Introduction to Periodontics 2 DH 273 Anesthesiology 4 Total Credits 21 Second Year - Fall DH 156B Safety & Infection Control II 3 DH 200 Second Year Seminar I 1 DH 270 Oral Pathology 2 DH 279 Advanced Periodontics I 2 DH 284 Restorative Dentistry III 4 DH 295 DH Practice I 8 Total Credits 20 Second Year - Winter DH 201 Second Year Seminar II 1 DH 276 Introduction to Perio Seminar 1 DH 280 Advanced Periodontics II 2 DH 281 Ethical Decisions and Professional 1 Responsibility in Dental Hygiene DH 282 Community Dental Health 3 DH 286 Restorative Clinic I 4 DH 296 DH Practice II 8 Total Credits 20 Second Year - Spring DH 202 Second Year Seminar III 1 DH 277 Periodontology Seminar 2 DH 283 Ldrshp & Research in Comm Health Dentistry 2 DH 289 Restorative Clinic II 2 DH 297 DH Practice III 8 Total Credits 15 Total Program Credits 119

Courses Registration in dental hygiene courses requires acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. All dental hygiene courses are sequential. Satisfactory performance in each course is a prerequisite for registration in subsequent courses within the dental hygiene curriculum. DH 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, non-credit course. DH 150: Dental Anatomy/Restorative Dentistry I 3 Cr Quarters: F This course encompasses the study of tooth morphology involved with the maxillary and mandibular arches. Extensive, detailed material is presented on primary and permanent dentition, tissues of the teeth, dental formulas, dental anomalies, and descriptive terminology. Content relates to the practical application of knowledge during lab sessions and serves as a critical foundation for subsequent restorative and traditional courses. DH 153: Oral Roentgenology 4 Cr Quarters: W Theory and practical application of the fundamentals of intra-oral and radiographic technique. Includes exposing, processing, and interpreting dental radiographs. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum

DH 154: Clinical Roentgenology 2 Cr Quarters: S This course applies the knowledge and skills learned in DH 153 to clinical patients. Emphasis on refinement of exposure techniques and interpretive skills. Seminar presentation by group. Prerequisite: First two quarters of Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 156A: Safety & Infection Control I 3 Cr Quarters: F An introductory didactic and clinical course providing the student with current safety and infection control information and techniques used in the clinical practice of dental hygiene. Prerequisite: First quarter enrollment as a first-year student DH 156B: Safety & Infection Control II 3 Cr Quarters: F A yearly review of the didactic and clinical safety and infection control course providing the student with current safety and infection control information and techniques used in the clinical practice of dental hygiene. Prerequisite: Completion of the first-year curriculum for the second-year student DH 157A: Dental Hygiene Fundamentals I: Theory 4 Cr Quarters: F An introductory lecture course to provide the student with information used in the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Each student is expected to recall and apply pertinent didactic information for application in laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Hygiene program and concurrent enrollment in DH 157B DH 157B: Dental Hygiene Fundamentals I: Lab 3 Cr Quarters: F An introductory laboratory course to provide the student with techniques used in the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Each student is expected to recall pertinent didactic information and apply it to laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Hygiene program and concurrent enrollment in DH 157A DH 158A: Dental Hygiene Fundamentals II: Theory 4 Cr Quarters: W The second of six lecture courses to provide the student with additional information, skills for comprehensive patient examination, and fundamental instrumentation techniques necessary for the detection and removal of calculus. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 158B: Dental Hygiene Fundamentals II: Lab 4 Cr Quarters: W The second of six laboratory courses to provide the student with additional techniques for comprehensive patient examination and fundamental instrumentation techniques necessary for the detection and removal of calculus. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 159: Dental Hygiene Theory 3 Cr Quarters: S A lecture course to provide the student with information used in the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Each student is expected to recall and apply pertinent didactic information for application in laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: Completion of the first two quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


DH 160: Dental Hygiene Clinic 4 Cr Quarters: S Clinical course in dental hygiene designed to provide the first-year student with learning experiences, enabling treatment of clinical patients. Prerequisite: Completion of the first two quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 165: Restorative Dentistry II 4 Cr Quarters: S This course presents working knowledge and restorative techniques involved in the placement of more complex amalgam and composite restorations. Prerequisite: DH 150 and DH 171 DH 171: Dental Materials/Restorative Dentistry I 3 Cr Quarters: W A course designed to provide the didactic, clinical knowledge and the practical skills associated with the selection and application of dental materials involved in both traditional procedures and restorative expanded functions along with the working knowledge and restorative techniques involved in the placement of amalgam and composite restorations. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 173: Pharmacology 2 Cr Quarters: W This course provides the student an understanding of drug groups, mechanisms of action, dosage, indications for use, adverse effects, toxicology, and drug interactions. Drugs that may have a direct impact on dental hygiene practice and the dental hygienist’s responsibility for pre-screening, managing, and educating the patient are emphasized. Prerequisite: Completion of the second quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 174: Preventive Dental Health 2 Cr Quarters: F This course includes the study of facts, concepts, and procedures enabling the student to create a prevention-oriented outlook. Oral physiotherapy aids, techniques and products, fluorides, nutrition, plaque, saliva, and patient motivation will be studied to gain a preventive philosophy for the Dental Hygiene student. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Hygiene program DH 176: Introduction to Periodontology 2 Cr Quarters: S The first of a series of didactic courses designed to provide the student with background knowledge of periodontal disease, including detailed anatomy of the periodontium, microbiological and etiological factors, and systemic influences in periodontal disease. Prerequisite: Completion of the first two quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 177: General Pathology 2 Cr Quarters: S The consideration of disease as a disruption of normal physiologic processes is a focus of this course. The body’s responses to a variety of pathological stressors are examined, and the role of the dental hygienist in assessing and intervening for clients with various disease processes is emphasized. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene program DH 178: Anesthesiology/Dental Emergency 2 Cr Quarters: F A lecture course consisting of subject matter dealing with pain, preanesthetic considerations, local anesthetic solutions, vasoconstrictors, and dental emergencies. The course is designed to assure maximum safety to student partners and to patients in the delivery of local anesthetics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Hygiene program

DH 200: Second-Year Seminar I 1 Cr Quarters: F DH 200 is the first in a series of three second-year seminar courses. The weekly seminar course is designed to provide the secondyear Dental Hygiene student time to address the clinical schedule, review and analyze clinical principles, facilitate student/faculty/staff communication, and review current literature. Prerequisite: Completion of the first three quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 201: Second-Year Seminar II 1 Cr Quarters: W DH 201 is the second in a series of three second-year seminar courses. The weekly seminar course is designed to provide the secondyear Dental Hygiene student time to address the clinical schedule, review and analyze clinical principles, facilitate student/faculty/staff communication, and review current literature. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 202: Second-Year Seminar III 1 Cr Quarters: S DH 202 is the third in a series of three second-year seminar courses. The weekly seminar course is designed to provide the secondyear Dental Hygiene student time to address the clinical schedule, review and analyze clinical principles, facilitate student/faculty/staff communication, and review current literature. Prerequisite: Completion of the first five quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 270: Oral Pathology 2 Cr Quarters: F The study of oral disease and oral manifestations of systemic disease. Course content provides the dental hygiene student with a basic foundation for clinical pathologic correlations and referral of oral disease. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 271: Nitrous Oxide Analgesia 2 Cr Quarters: W Introducing nitrous oxide sedation and analgesia in order to prepare dental hygienist students for the performance of their legal function, which is administration of nitrous oxide while under the supervision of a dentist. Prerequisite: Completion of the first quarter of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 273: Clinical Anesthesiology 4 Cr Quarters: S A lecture, laboratory, and clinical course introducing the administration of local anesthesia. This course consists of techniques used in the administration of local anesthetics in dentistry and anatomic relationships of the head and neck. Prerequisite: Completion of the first two quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 276: Introduction to Perio Seminar 1 Cr Quarters: W Study of advanced periodontics for comprehensive care and management of patients who exhibit moderate to severe periodontal disease. Includes periodontal prognosis, consideration of treatment planning for periodontal treatment modalities, referral of periodontal pathology, and supportive periodontal therapy. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

101


102

DH 277: Periodontology Seminar 2 Cr Quarters: S A seminar course facilitated by a dental hygienist and a periodontist/ implant specialist. After completion of initial therapy, the student will prepare a case work-up and write an analogous research paper for one of two required periodontal seminar-type patients. Oral presentations will be included in the periodontal seminar course. Prerequisite: Completion of the first five quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 279: Advanced Periodontics I 2 Cr Quarters: F DH 279 is the first in a series of four advanced periodontics courses. The didactic course includes information related to powerscalers, antimicrobials, occlusion, bone loss patterns, advanced dental hygiene therapeutic concepts, and other information relevant to the study of advanced periodontics. Prerequisite: Completion of the first three quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 280: Advanced Periodontics II 2 Cr Quarters: W A didactic course designed to facilitate understanding of advanced concepts related to periodontal pathology. Includes the study of various gingival and periodontal infections, gingival curettage, root morphology, and advanced instrumentation techniques. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 281: Ethical Decisions and Professional Responsibility in Dental Hygiene 1 Cr Quarters: W Study of the principles of ethical reasoning, ethical decision making, and professional responsibility as they pertain to the academic environment, research, patient care, and dental hygiene practice management. Includes a review of the laws and state practice acts which guide judgement and action of the dental hygienist. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 282: Community Dental Health 3 Cr Quarters: W Community Dental Health provides insight into the opportunities for dental hygienists to work in community settings and public health. This course supplies information regarding the principles of public health programming through classroom and field experience. Through presentation in the field and participation in a community service event, the student will be made aware of dental needs in the community, broaden skills as a planner and educator to serve these needs, and develop dedication to promotion of total health through the prevention of oral disease. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 283: Leadership & Research in Community Health Dentistry 2 Cr Quarters: S A lecture course introducing leadership and the research process in advanced community health dentistry. This course includes an introduction to the research process and application of community dental health principles with an emphasis on evidence based practices. Prerequisite: Completion of the first five quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 284: Restorative Dentistry III 4 Cr Quarters: F The course provides further working knowledge and restorative techniques involved with amalgam and composite restorations, as well as the introduction of other tooth-colored restoratives and complex bonded amalgams. Prerequisite: Completion of the first three quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum

DH 286: Restorative Clinic I 4 Cr Quarters: W The course is comprised of clinical sessions with patients and laboratory dentoform experiences designed to facilitate the student's knowledge of various restorative materials and procedures with further development and refinement of manipulative skills. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 289: Restorative Dentistry Clinic II 2 Cr Quarters: S The course encompasses clinical restorative sessions with patients which facilitate and further enhance the student's knowledge of various restorative materials, procedures, and development of manipulative skills with added experience in special predodontic sessions. Prerequisite: Completion of the first five quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 295: Dental Hygiene Practice I 8 Cr Quarters: F First course in a series of three clinical courses designed to provide learning experiences enabling the student to achieve clinical competence in assessing, implementing, and evaluating treatment for the prevention and control of oral disease, thereby facilitating oral wellness. Prerequisite: Completion of the first three quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 296: Dental Hygiene Practice II 8 Cr Quarters: W Second course in a series of three clinical courses designed to provide learning experiences enabling the student to achieve clinical competence in assessing, implementing, and evaluating treatment for the prevention and control of oral disease, thereby facilitating oral wellness. Prerequisite: Completion of the first four quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum DH 297: Dental Hygiene Practice III 8 Cr Quarters: S Third course in a series of three clinical courses designed to provide learning experiences enabling the student to achieve clinical competence in assessing, implementing, and evaluating treatment for the prevention and control of oral disease, thereby facilitating oral wellness. Prerequisite: Completion of the first five quarters of the Dental Hygiene curriculum

Digital Media Digital Media is a collaborative program with the Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center. The program is equipped with up-to-date equipment and facilities. At the time of printing of this catalog, the degree and program content was under development. For more up-todate information, contact the Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center Digital Media office at 509.573.5520.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Drama Drama is a two-year transfer program designed for theatre majors and nonmajors alike. Courses focus on performance, production, and general appreciation of theatre as a major fine art and as a major channel of cultural communication. Three main stage productions from a range of genres, including musicals, the classics, and experimental theatre, are prepared and performed each year. There are also opportunities for faculty-mentored, student-directed productions in our "black box" theatre. The program meets the proposed accreditation standards of the American Theatre Association. The department is an active member of the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival and the Association for Theatre in Higher Education.

Drama Transfer Drama transfer students should follow the requirements of the associate in arts degree with faculty advisement.

Courses DRAMA 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. DRAMA 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor DRMA& 101: Introduction to Theatre 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S DRMA& 101 is an examination of the dramatic arts from the classical era to present day. Key works from specific eras of theatre are used to increase students’ awareness of the role of drama in our culture and society and to serve as a basis for creating and performing collaborative pieces for public viewing. The goal of the course is to expose students to common processes involved in creating live theatre and to make them more informed and appreciative consumers of theatrical events. Designed for the theatre newcomer and the serious theatre student in mind. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095. Distribution: HM DRAMA 115: Rehearsal/Performance Technology 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Acting in plays for public performance and the preparation of acting roles to the best degree possible in theatre tradition. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Distribution: HP DRAMA 116: Theater Production 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Laboratory courses in technical theatre for students participating in drama productions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor DRAMA 150: Introduction to Cinema 3 Cr Quarters: W A general survey of film, including the history, techniques, and types of film as a means of artistic, aesthetic, and creative expression. Thirtyminute lecture periods followed by the showing of major milestones in the development of film art. Distribution: HM

DRAMA 161: National Cinemas 5 Cr Quarters: F An in-depth look at classics from the cinematic production of various nations and an examination of the cultural milieu from which the films arose. Includes a selection of films by a variety of directors and covers the silent era to more modern productions. Country chosen varies by quarter. May be repeated twice for credit. Distribution: HM DRAMA 180: Acting Beginning 3 Cr Quarters: F, W Theory and practice of the fundamentals of acting based on the principles of Stanislavski and Boal. Emphasis on self-exploration of the voice, body, mind, and imagination in order to develop expressiveness and an approach to creating roles for performance. Exploration through exercises, improvisations, monologues, partner scenes, and group scenes. Distribution: HP DRAMA 181: Acting Intermediate 4 Cr Quarters: S A continuation of the theory and practice of the fundamentals of acting through a physical approach to character. Development of vocal, physical, and emotional skills through improvisation, solo and scene work, and application. Prerequisite: DRAMA 180 or permission of instructor Distribution: HP DRAMA 182: Acting Advanced 4 Cr Quarters: S Analysis and study of the Stanislavski method and theory applied directly to play text analysis, scenes, and productions. Prerequisite: DRAMA 181; CMST 130 recommended Distribution: HP DRAMA 184: Playwriting 4 Cr Quarters: F At the center of the playwriting course is class time, where student pieces are given readings and then extensively critiqued. The course is structured to help the playwright produce work in a variety of styles. The first part of the course will help students to develop the original voice of the playwright through a combination of in-class work, assignments, and class texts. The second part of the class will focus on developing staging readings and production of the plays written, selected, directed, and performed by the students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 DRAMA 188: Stage Makeup 3 Cr Quarters: W Basic theories, techniques, and equipment of stage makeup. Course emphasis is upon practical application of theories through in-class laboratory work. Distribution: HP DRAMA 189: Basic Stagecraft/Theater 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Basic course in craft of scenery construction and painting, set design, lighting, and decoration. Practical application of techniques studied. Distribution: HP DRAMA 190: Co-op Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

DRAMA 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in drama.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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DRAMA 201: Contemporary Theater 3 Cr Quarters: O A study of the dramatic changes in the theatre from 1959 to the present. Focus on radical theatre artists and groups (Living Theatre), performance art, contemporary plays, and Augusto Boal's Theatre of the Oppressed. Distribution: HM DRAMA 202: Theater History I 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of the origins of western drama and analysis of dramatic literature of Greek, Roman and Asian theatre. Drama of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Seneca, and Noh included. Distribution: HM DRAMA 203: Theater History II 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of the rise of modern drama from Roman tradition through the Renaissance. Traditions of the social eras and the literature of the times are covered. Drama of Seneca, Moliere, and Shakespeare included. Distribution: HM DRAMA 204: Theater History III 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of the traditions of the 19th and 20th century western societies which gave rise to modernism in drama. Literature of Ibsen, Strindberg, O’Neil, and Brecht included. Distribution: HM DRAMA 205: 19th Century American Drama 5 Cr Quarters: O Survey of the American theatre in the 19th century. A study of the theatre traditions dominant in the USA during the 19th and 20th centuries. Traditions, styles, concepts of dramatic structure, and plays of the 100 years preceding O’Neil will be discussed. The center of the course will be the actual production of one such play in the style and tradition of the time. Distribution: HM DRAMA 282: Acting Seminar Advanced 4 Cr Quarters: O Advanced exercises in improvisation and character development with emphasis on styles and movement applicable to Realism and Expressionism. Distribution: HP

Early Childhood Education See "Education"

Economics Economics is the study of how people and their social systems use scarce resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. The study of economics has become particularly relevant for understanding the financial, political, and social changes taking place daily in our modern world. Courses taught at YVCC are designed to provide introductory-level exposure to economic theory and practice relevant for degree-seeking and transfer students, as well as for members of business and the community as a whole.

Courses ECON 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Workshops, short courses, and individual study in economics. ECON 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in economics. ECON 101: Introduction to Economics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course introduces students to the study of Economics. Students will explore the most common principles associated with microeconomics and macroeconomics, the main fields of economics. These principles may include supply and demand, factors of production, economic growth, competitive models, unemployment, inflation,and economic policy. Students will utilize these principles to examine economic issues found in current economic events, and apply economic reasoning to understand our federal, state, and local economies. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 or successful completion of BA 138 with a C (2.0) or better and eligibility for MATH 085 or successful completion of BA 115 with a C (2.0) or better Distribution: SS ECON& 201: Micro Economics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course focuses on the micro economic principles of the market system and allocating scarce resources. Introductory economic topics involving consumers and producers will be covered, like supply and demand, efficiency, elasticity, utility, pricing and profitability, and market models relating to various levels of firm and industry competition. Other issues studied include economic growth and output productivity, the four factors of production, the market for resources and labor, and externalities. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 or successful completion of BA 138 and eligibility for MATH 085 or successful completion of BA 115 Distribution: SS ECON& 202: Macro Economics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course examines the organization of and issues surrounding the modern U.S. macro economy. The concepts explored include the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. Other topics will include an introduction to the historical development of macro economic thought, government economic intervention through fiscal policy, and the roles of the Federal Reserve Banking system, and monetary policy. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 or successful completion of BA 138 and eligibility for MATH 085 or successful completion of BA 115 Distribution: SS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ECON 205: Economic Geography 5 Cr Quarters: S An introduction to the spatial patterns of economic activity on both a regional and global scale. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties, the distribution of resources and wealth, and the resulting inequalities and tensions. Topics include trade development; resource extraction; agriculture, manufacturing, and service sector economies; transportation; communication; and environmental impact. Credit cannot be given for both GEOG 205 and ECON 205. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS ECON 213: Economic History 5 Cr Quarters: W An introduction to the methods of economic interaction from antiquity to the present. This course offers a comprehensive world survey, emphasizing important economic events—such as the invention of currency, the Industrial Revolution, and the development of economic thoughts—to include major economic thinkers and their contribution to the understanding of economic processes. Credit cannot be given for both HIST 213 and ECON 213. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Education The Education Department provides career and enrichment coursework and field experiences that build knowledge, skills, and competencies for providing education and care for children and families. The Education Department is comprised of several different areas of study: Early Childhood Education (ECE), School-Age Education, Reading, Special Education, Child Development Associate (CDA) prep coursework, and STARS training. Several programs of study are offered: Early Childhood Education, Education, Paraprofessional, Early Childhood EducationChildren’s Studies, and Special Education Instructional Assistant. Each program has different admission criteria, coursework, and degree options, ranging from inquiry/introductory classes and field experiences to transfer degrees focused on teacher preparation and children studies related careers. The Early Childhood Education (ECE) program at YVCC is part of the Early Achiever Program which includes the ECE State certificates. The ECE program believes that the needs of young children are best met by teachers and caregivers who are trained with a blend of classroom theory, interactive learning communities, and competency-based laboratory experiences, assignments, and projects. All training is based on the Washington State Core Competencies for early care and education professionals and NAEYC standards (National Association for Education of Young Children). Students learn through the course content and methods of study how critical the first five years of life are for child development. Learning activities for the child must be developmentally appropriate for the age and stage of development, while meeting the needs of the whole child physically, socially, emotionally, and cognitively. The child must be guided in developing independence, self-control, cooperation, and positive self-concept in a safe, healthy, and multi-cultural learning environment where staff and family members play a critical role in the learning process. Upon successful completion of the program, the student will have demonstrated competency in the Washington State Competencies for early childhood professionals, school age professionals, or paraprofessionals. The students should be prepared for entry-level employment in the area for which the certificate or degree has been earned.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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106

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Graduates will be able to question, research, search for meaning, and develop ideas that lead to action and critical thought in education based upon the Washington State Core Competencies for Education and Early Childhood Professionals. • Graduates will demonstrate a knowledge of diverse culture, ideas, and experiences and be able to examine their own attitudes and assumptions in order to work effectively and emphatically in a multicultural classroom. • Graduates will be able to apply essential concepts, inquiry tools, approaches, strategies to build curriculum which stimulates learning in children. • Graduates will promote child development and learning by using and articulating their understanding of children’s needs to create healthy respectful, supportive and learning environments that are challenging and exciting.

Careers Childcare, school-age care, preschool assistants, preschool teachers, parent educators, paraprofessionals, and elementary school teachers are in high demand throughout Washington State and the Yakima Valley. Employers include public and private childcare centers, preschools, K-8 schools, and child/ family service organizations. In addition, many students operate their own home childcare businesses. Students are cautioned that career options in education might be limited by criminal convictions, physical requirements, history of drug or alcohol use, or other bona fide occupational qualifications determined by employers. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is also available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com.

Degrees Associate in Arts Degree The Education Department recommends that a student planning to transfer to a four-year university or college to pursue a degree in K-12 education, early childhood education, or children studies earn an Associate in Arts degree. While earning the associate in arts degree, the student should take required coursework for teacher preparation and/or basic studies. Additional courses may be fully articulated with the transfer institution. Since requirements vary by fouryear institution, please see an education advisor to ensure that courses taken will meet requirements. For additional information on teacher preparation programs, go to www. teachwashington.org. All students planning to transfer to a four-year institution for teacher preparation must pass the WEST-B basic skills test prior to admission to a four-year education program. It is advisable to take the test before April if fall admission will be sought. For information about the test, to download a study guide, or to sign up for the test, visit www.nesinc.com.

Children Studies and Human Development Degree Students planning to transfer to a four-year university or college to earn a degree in Children Studies or Human Development are advised to earn an Associate in Arts degree. It is recommended that students concentrate humanities and social science distribution courses in sociology and psychology courses that focus on family and human development and that they take elective credit for the degree from Early Childhood Education course offerings. Associate of Applied Science Degrees YVCC's Education Department offers AAS degrees in ECE, ECE with a Preschool Special Education option, AAS-T Children’s Studies, and AAS Paraprofessional preparation. Students should be able to earn a degree in two years of full-time enrollment. Although many of the courses listed in these degrees are transferable, the degrees themselves are not intended to transfer. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Education Students who earn an AAS degree in ECE meet the requirements for the associate in arts degree and ECE Certificate/State Credential. As the student progresses through the degree requirements, s/he will be awarded the ECE Initial Certificate, the ECE Short Certificate of Specialization and the ECE State Certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information. Required Coursework, effective Fall Quarter 2012 Basic Requirement Courses Credits ENGL& 101 English Composition Iz 5 PTECH 116 Applied Math II for Early Childhood Ed‹ 5 or 100-level Math or above Humanities Courses CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications„ 5 Additional 5 credits from distribution list 5 Natural Science Courses 5 credits required 5 BIOL 105 or NUTR 101 recommended Social Science Courses 10 credits required 10 PSYC& 100, PSYCH 213, ANTH& 206, SOC& 101, or SOC 250 recommended Professional/Technical Core Required for Early Child Ed Courses ECED& 100 Child Care Basics 3 ECED& 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 ECED 105 Child Abuse/Neglect 2 ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 107 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 5 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 120 Practicum-Nurturing Relationships 2 ECED& 132 Infants & Toddlers-Nurturing Care or ECED 155: Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance 3 ECED& 134 Family Child Care or EDUC& 136: School Age Care or ECED& 139: Admin. of Early Learning Prgms. 3 ECED 156 Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance Practicum 1 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED 160 Preschool Instructional Asst. Practicum 2 ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children 3 ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development 3 ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment 3 ECED 206 Professionalism and Portfolio 1 ECED 260 Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum 4

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


EDUC& 115 EDUC& 130 EDUC& 150 READ 105

Child Development Guiding Behavior Child, Family, and Community Critical Reading or PTECH 104: Technical Reading SPED course (at least one): SPED 200, 201, or 202 Total Degree Credits

5 3 3 5 5 105

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all required courses in order to receive this degree. Associate of Applied Sciences Degree in Early Childhood Education with a Preschool Special Education Option The Associate of Applied Science degree in Early Childhood Education with a Preschool Special Education Option is designed to provide students with two areas of concentration: early childhood education and preschool special education. As the student progresses through the degree, they are awarded an ECE Initial Certificate, an ECE Short Certificate of Specialization, an ECE State Certificate, and an ECE Special Education Instructional Assistant Certificate. Required Coursework Basic Requirements Courses Credits ENGL& 101 English Composition Iz 5 PTECH 116 Applied Math II for Early Childhood Ed ‹ 5 or 100-level Math or above Humanities Courses CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications„ 5 Early Childhood Education Courses ECED& 100 Child Care Basics 3 ECED & 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 ECED 105 Child Abuse/Neglect 2 ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 107 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 5 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 120 Practicum-Nurturing Relationships 2 ECED& 132 Infants & Toddlers Nurturing Care or ECED 155: Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance 3 ECED& 134 Family Child Care or EDUC& 136: School Age Care or ECED& 139: Admin. of Early Learning Prgrms. 3 ECED 156 Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance Practicum 1 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED 160 Preschool Instructional Asst. Practicum 2 ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children 3 ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development 3 ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment 3 ECED 206 Professionalism and Portfolio 1 ECED 260 Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum 4 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior 3 EDUC& 150 Child, Family, and Community 3 READ 105 Critical Reading or PTECH 104: Technical Reading 5 Special Education Courses SPED 200 Intro. to Exceptionality in Early Childhood Ed. 5 SPED 201 Intervention Strategies for Infants & Toddlers 5 SPED 202 Inclusion in Early Childhood Education 5 Electives ECED 201 Issues & Trends 3 Additional 5 credits ECED /EDUC courses above 100 level or as approved by department. 5 Total Degree Credits 102

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all required courses in order to receive this degree.

Associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree in Early Childhood Education - Transfer to Eastern Washington University The curriculum of this interdisciplinary program provides a strong holistic background in the study of children from birth to 18. Theory and practice from the disciplines of sociology, psychology, and education form the basis for this integrated curriculum. Children’s studies courses provide foundational and global perspectives of children and childhood. A choice of concentration areas, which culminate in a capstone experience and a senior portfolio, allows students to connect effectively with specific career opportunities. In conjunction with Eastern Washington University. Required Coursework for Completion at YVCC Basic Requirements Courses Credits ENGL& 101 English Composition Iz 5 MATH& 107 Math and Society ‹ 5 Humanities Courses CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications„ 5 Natural Science Courses BIOL 105 Fundamental Biology w/Lab for Non-Majors 5 Social Science Courses SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 Early Childhood Education Courses ECED & 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 ECED 105 Child Abuse/Neglect 2 ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 107 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 5 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 120 Practicum-Nurturing Relationships 2 ECED& 132 Infants & Toddlers Nurturing Care or ECED 155: Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance 3 ECED 156 Infant/Toddler Curric. & Guidance Practicum 1 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED 160 Preschool Instructional Asst. Practicum 2 ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children 3 ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development 3 ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment 3 ECED 206 Professionalism and Portfolio 1 ECED 260 Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum 4 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior 3 EDUC& 150 Child, Family, and Community 3 READ 105 Critical Reading or PTECH 104: Technical Reading 5 SPED Course (at least one) SPED 200, 201, 202 5 5 Elective credits (ECED Courses) 5 Total Degree Credits 99

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all required courses in order to receive this degree. Associate of Applied Sciences Degree in Para-Educator Preparation Training The Para-Educator degree and/or certificate program prepares graduates for employment as assistant teachers in public and private schools. The curriculum is based on the Washington State Core Competencies for Para-Educators and the Washington State Skill Standards for Para-Educators. Students who complete the Para-Educator training are well prepared to support the learning of the diverse student population in inclusive educational settings. AAS for Para-Educator, Fall 2009 Entrance Basic Skills ENGL& 101 English Composition Iz

Credits 5

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

107


108

Natural Science NUTR 101 Human Nutrition Social Science PSYC& 100 General Psychology Required Professional/Technical Core Courses AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding EDUC 101 Application of Critical Reading & Thinking in Children's Literature for Professionals EDUC 102 Parent Community & Volunteers„ EDUC 103 Guiding Behavior: School-Age Child EDUC 201 Development of the School-Age Child or ECED 101 Preschool Child Development EDUC 202 Educational Linguistics EDUC 210 Introduction to Becoming a Teacher EDUC 250 Public School Practicum PTECH 116 Applied Math II for Early Childhood Ed ‹ SPED 200 Intro. to Exceptionality in Early Childhood Ed. Electives ECED 105 Child Abuse & Neglect READ 105 Critical Reading Additional 18 credits ECED or EDUC courses above 100 level or as approved by department. Total Credits

5 5 2 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 2 5 18 90

The Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) in Elementary (K-8) & Special Education Double Major This program, in collaboration with Central Washington University (CWU), offers a baccalaureate degree in elementary education with a secondary endorsement in TESL. It provides a course of study for persons desiring to teach children in kindergarten through eighth grade in public and private schools. This program is unique in that the outstanding instructional strengths of two institutions are brought together to provide students a rare opportunity to experience learning at its best in the classroom and in the field. All classes are held on the YVCC campus in Yakima. Students first complete an Associate in Arts degree with Education Emphasis at YVCC. Admittance into the YVCC program does not ensure admittance into the teacher education program at CWU. Students must meet entrance requirements to the CWU program, which includes an associate degree. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor or on the CWU website (www.cwu.edu) to get the latest information. WEST-B Information While working for the associate degree requirements, students must also prepare for and take the WEST-B test. This test is mandated for admission to all teacher preparation programs in the state of Washington. It is advisable to take this test before April if fall quarter admission will be sought. For information about the test, to download a study guide, or to sign up for the test, visit www.nesinc.com. Students must apply to CWU and the Teacher Preparation Program separately by April 1 for fall quarter admission. Entrance requirements include at least a 3.0 grade point average for the last 45 graded credits, all required applications and fees, admission to CWU and the Teacher Preparation Program, successful completion of the WEST-B test, all required letters of support, and other items as required each year. Under the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA), students are only admitted to CWU in the fall at the Yakima Campus, and these students stay together for the two years of teacher preparation. To download application materials for CWU,

go to www.cwu.edu. To access information about CWU's teacher preparation program, go to www.cwu.edu/~cert. Students who complete the DTA program can apply to teach in the state of Washington with endorsements in elementary education (K-8) and TESL. The courses are offered by the collaborating institutions: Yakima Valley Community College and Central Washington University. All classes are held on the YVCC campus. Yakima Valley Community College provides basic coursework in the areas of science, communication, math, and entry-level education. CWU provides a strong professional education sequence, an upper-division elementary curriculum, TESL curriculum, and student teaching. Admission to either of the two institutions does not guarantee admission to the program. Associate in Arts Degree, Transfer to CWU - Yakima Campus K-8 Teaching Certificate & Special Education Double Major This program is a joint effort between YVCC and CWU to provide coursework for earning a Baccalaureate degree in Elementary Education Special Education on the Yakima Campus. It provides a course of study for persons desiring to teach children in kindergarten through eighth grade in public schools. Students take specific coursework while earning a transfer Associate in Arts degree from YVCC. Courses must appear on the YVCC course distribution list to meet requirements. CWU requires a 3.0 for admittance in the Education Program. Articulation - CWU Basic Requirements: 18 Credits Group A * ENGL& 101 English Composition I z * ENGL 102 English Composition II

5 5

Group B * MATH& 132 Mathematics for Elementary Education 2 ‹ 5 Communication Requirement: 3-5 Credits Humanities: 15 Credits CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication (recommended)„ 5 Natural Sciences : 15 Credits One course must be a lab science Social Sciences: 15 Credits * PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 Electives: 25-27 Credits Core Electives: 15-17 Credits Select from the distribution of courses listed in Quantitative/ Symbolic Reasoning, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences *PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology 5 EDUC 111 Careers in Education/Early Childhood 2 Note: Prerequisite for ALL ECED and EDUC courses is EDUC 111 General Electives: 10-12 Credits Any college level courses numbered over 100. These may include additional Core Electives as well as courses from the Restricted List. *EDUC 210 Introduction to Becoming a Teacher 5 *EDUC 201 Developmental School-Age Child 4 *EDUC 250 Public School Practicum 4 *MATH& 131 Mathematics for Elementary Education 1 5 (Prerequisite to MATH& 132) READ 105 Critical Reading (highly recommended) 5 Total Credits 93

All Education courses must have a C (2.0) or better. * Required courses for entrance into the CWU program.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Associate in Arts - DTA, Transfer to CWU - CWU Campus Only BA in Education: Early Childhood Education This part-time program is geared toward individuals who are seeking greater professional development in Early Childhood Education and are working with birth to preschool-age children. This bachelor degree satisfies stipulations of the Head Start Reauthorization Act of 2007 that at least 50% of Head Start teachers have a baccalaureate degree in early childhood education by September of 2013. (Note: This program does not lead to K-12 teacher certification.) Students take specific coursework while earning a transfer Associate in Arts degree from YVCC. Courses must appear on the YVCC course distribution list to meet requirements.

Transfer candidates who do not have an AA/DTA, may need additional coursework before admission to the Teacher Eduction Program. These additional courses may be taken at the Toppenish campus or through another accredited college or university. Students must also attempt the WEST-B Test as part of their requirements for admission to teacher preparation programs in the state of Washington. Students are encouraged to work with YVCC and a Heritage University advisor in developing a transfer plan.

Articulation - CWU Basic Requirements: 18 Credits

Group B: MATH& 132 Mathematics for Elementary Education 2 Communication Requirement: 3 - 5 credits Humanities: 15 Credits HIST& 117 Western Civilization II (Recommended) Natural Sciences : 15 Credits

Group A * ENGL& 101 English Composition I z * ENGL 102 English Composition II

5 5

Group B Any course meeting Group B distribution

5

Group C Any course meeting Group C distribution 3 Humanities: 20 Credits CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication (recommended)„ 5 Natural Sciences : 15 Credits

One course must be a lab science. Social Sciences: 20 Credits

The following courses are recommended but not required. PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology 5 PSYCH 213 Human Lifespan Development I 5 Required Electives: 32 Credits * ECED& 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 * EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 * ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 * ECED 160 Preschool Instructional Assistant Practicum 2 Additional 15 Elective credits Total Credits 105

* Required courses for entrance into the CWU program. All early childhood education courses must have a C (2.0) or better grade, and the four required elective classes listed above must have been taken within the last 10 years to be accepted by YVCC. Additional elective credits must be in over 100-level courses, preferably early childhood courses or from the distribution list. Students must transfer 105 credits from YVCC for entrance into this program. Students must have at least 75 upper-division credits to graduate from CWU. Students with more than four classes left to finish their DTA will not be able to enroll at CWU until they are within at least four classes of finishing the DTA. Associate in Arts - DTA, Transfer to Heritage University - BA in Teacher Education Program YVCC students transferring to Heritage University are encouraged to earn an Associate of Arts degree with a Direct Transfer Agreement (AA/DTA). Earning this degree assures you have completed the required courses to enroll in education courses at Heritage University first semester.

Articulation - Heritage University Basic Requirements: 15 Credits Group A ENGL& 101 English Composition I z ENGL 102 English Composition II

5 5 5

5

One course must be a lab science - Heritage recommends two lab sciences (1 life science and 1 physical science). Social Sciences: 15 Credits

The following courses are recommended but not required. HIST& 136 US History I 5 HIST& 137 US History II 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 Core Electives: 15 - 17 Credits (from distribution list) General Electives: 10 - 12 Credits (college-level courses over 100) MATH & 131 Mathematics for Elementary Education 1 5 (prerequisite for MATH& 132) READ 105 Critical Reading 5 (not required, but highly recommended) Any ECED Class is recommended by Heritage Elementary Education

The following courses are recommended but not required. EDUC 201 EDUC 202

Development of School Age Child Educational Linguistics Total Credits

5 5 90

All coursework must have a C (2.0) or better grade with a minimum accumulative 2.6 GPA. WEST-B Recommendations (www.est.nesinc.com) Recommend candidates take WEST-B writing test after ENGL 102 Recommend candidates take WEST-B math test after upper-division math course Recommend candidates take WEST-B reading test after READ 105

Associate of Arts-DTA , Transfer to Heritage University - BA in Early Childhood Studies Program YVCC students transferring to Heritage University are encouraged to earn an Associate of Arts Degree with a Direct Transfer Agreement (AA/DTA). Earning this degree assures you have completed the required courses to enroll in education courses at Heritage University first semester. Transfer candidates who do not have an AA/DTA, may need additional coursework before admission to the Early Childhood Studies Program. These additional courses may be taken at the Toppenish campus or through another accredited college or university. Students are encouraged to work with their community college and a Heritage Education advisor in developing a transfer plan.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

109


110

Articulation - Heritage University Basic Requirements: 18 Credits Group A ENGL& 101 ENGL 102

English Composition I English Composition II

Group B MATH& 107 Math in Society Communication Requirement: 3 - 5 Credits Humanities: 15 Credits HIST& 117 Western Civilization II (Recommended) Natural Sciences : 15 Credits

Students intending to transfer without earning the Associate in Arts degree will need a physical science and biological science course in this distribution area. 5 5 5

5

One course must be a lab science - Heritage recommends two lab sciences. Social Sciences: 15 Credits

The following courses are recommended but not required. HIST& 136 US History I 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 Core Electives: 15 - 17 Credits PSYCH 213 Human Lifespan I 5 General Electives: 10 - 12 Credits (college-level courses over 100) ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED& 107 Health, Nutrition, and Safety 5 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED& 180 Language & Literacy Development 3 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 READ 105 Critical Reading 5 All coursework must have a C (2.0) or better grade with a minimum accumulative 2.6 GPA.

Articulation Agreements with WSU: AA BA in Human Development: General Human Development This program is a joint effort between YVCC and WSU to provide coursework for earning a Baccalaureate Degree in General Human Development. Students take specific coursework while earning a transfer Associate in Arts degree from YVCC. Courses must appear on the YVCC course distribution list to meet requirements. This articulation agreement is currently under revision. Please see Education advisor for current information.

BA in Human Development: Preschool through Third Grade Certification (P-3) This program is a joint effort between YVCC and WSU to provide coursework for earning a baccalaureate degree in Human Development. Students take specific coursework while earning a transfer associate in arts degree from YVCC. Courses must appear on the YVCC course distribution list to meet requirements. Articulation - WSU

Some WSU coursework after transfer must be taken at the Pullman campus. Basic Requirements :18 Credits Group A ENGL& 101 ENGL 102

English Composition I z English Composition II

5 5

Group B ** MATH& 132 Mathematics for Elementary Education 2 ‹ 5 Group C Any course meeting Group C distribution Humanities: 15 Credits ** CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications „ ENGL 203 The Research Paper Natural Sciences: 15 Credits

3 5 3

BIOL 105 Biology for Nonmajors (recommended) ASTR& 100 Survey of Astronomy (suggested) NUTR 101 Human Nutrition (highly recommended) Social Sciences: 15 Credits ** HIST& 136 or 137 US History I or II PSYC& 100 General Psychology Electives: 19 Credits ** MATH& 131 Mathematics for Elementary Education 1

5 5 5 5 5 5

Note: Students are allowed to transfer 90 credits (60 semester credits). Therefore, 12 credits of the following will count toward transfer. ECED 202 ECED 260 ECED& 160 ECED& 190 EDUC& 115

Educational Linguistics Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum Curriculum Development Observation & Assessment Child Development Total Credits

3 4 5 3 5 98

** Must be taken to apply for certification into the P-3 Certificate program. A minimum 2.7 GPA is required for application for certification in the P-3 program. A minimum 2.5 GPA is required for all ECE courses listed above that will transfer to WSU to satisfy the human development degree requirements. WSU indicates the following: "The P-3 option is a selective degree option and transfer to the WSU department under this agreement does not qualify the student to be accepted into the P-3 degree option nor imply acceptance by the College of Education." Articulation Agreement with WSU: AAS BA in Human Development, General Human Development This program is a joint effort between YVCC and WSU to provide coursework for earning a baccalaureate degree in general human development. Students take specific coursework at YVCC while earning an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Education. The classes below will fulfill part of the AAS degree and transfer to WSU as part of the required coursework toward a Bachelor of Arts in Human Development. This articulation agreement is currently under revision. Please see Education advisor for current information.

BA in Human Development , Preschool through Third Grade Certification This program is a joint effort between YVCC and WSU to provide coursework for earning a baccalaureate degree in human development, preschool through third grade certification. Students take specific coursework at YVCC toward earning an Associate of Applied Science degree in Early Childhood Education. The classes below will fulfill part of the AAS degree and transfer to WSU as part of the required coursework toward a Bachelor of Arts in Human Development, Preschool through Third Grade Certification. Students wishing to transfer to WSU do not need to earn the AAS at YVCC in order to transfer.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Articulation - WSU

WSU coursework after transfer must be taken at Pullman. General Requirements Credits BIOL 105 or GEOL 120/121 5 CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication 5 ENGL& 101 English Composition I z 5 ENGL 203 The Research Paper 5 HIST& 136 or 137 US History I or II 5 MATH& 131 Mathematics for Elementary Education 1 5 ** MATH& 132 Mathematics for Elementary Education 2 ‹ 5 ** MUS 100 Music Fundamentals 5 ** PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 From Group C Distribution List 3 Early Childhood Education Courses That Apply to Human Development Credits ECED 202 Methods in Guidance & Discipline 3 ECED 260 Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum 4 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED& 190 Observation & Assessment 3 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 Total Credits 68

Required Courses Credits Initial State Certificate plus: Early Childhood Ed (General) EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior 3 -ORInfants and Toddlers ECED& 132 Infants & Toddlers-Nurturing Care 3 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 -ORSchool Age Care EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 EDUC& 136 School Age Care 3 -ORFamily Child Care ECED& 134 Family Child Care 3 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 -ORAdministration ECED& 139 Administration of Early Learning Programs 3 EDUC& 115 Child Development 5 Total Credits 20

** Courses must be taken to apply for certification into the P-3 certificate program. A minimum 2.7 GPA is required for application for certification in the P-3 program. A minimum 2.5 GPA is required for all ECED courses listed above that will transfer to WSU to satisfy the human development degree requirements. WSU indicates the following: "The P-3 option is a selective degree option and transfer to the WSU department under this agreement does not qualify the student to be accepted into the P-3 degree option nor imply acceptance by the College of Education."

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses in order to be awarded the certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information.

Certificates

State Early Childhood Education Certificate

Criminal History Information Prior to enrolling in a practicum course, criminal history information will be requested of students enrolling in the education program practicums. Information obtained from this inquiry will be treated confidentially and will be considered in determining the student’s eligibility to complete clinical competencies. Inability to participate in clinical experience due to information obtained from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS criminal history and background inquiry may result in a student’s inability to satisfactorily complete program degree requirements. For more specific information, contact the program coordinator.

Required Courses Credits Initial & General Certificates plus 24 credits from the following: English 100, 101, or above 5 Math Quantitative/Computational above 100 or designated “Q/SR” 5 ECED& 160 Curriculum Development 5 ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children 3 ECED& 180 Language & Literacy 3 ECED& 190 Observation & Assessment 3 EDUC& 150 Child, Family & Community or EDUC& 130: Guiding Behavior 3 Total Credits 47

ECED Initial State Certificate Required Courses Credits ECED& 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 ECED& 107 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 5 ECED& 120 Practicum-Nurturing Relationships 2 Total Credits 12

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses in order to be awarded the certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information. Short State Certificate of Specialization

ECED Preschool Special Education Instructional Assistant Required Courses Credits SPED 200 Intro to Exceptionality in Early Childhood Ed 5 SPED 201 Intervention Strategies for Infants & Toddlers 5 SPED 202 Inclusion in Early Childhood Education 5 Total Credits 15

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses in order to be awarded the certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information.

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses in order to be awarded the certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information. Childcare Provider Required Courses Credits AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED 109 Health for Preschool Teachers 1 ECED& 100 Child Care Basics 3 ECED& 180 Language & Literacy Development 3 Total Credits 13

If student can show a First Aid/CPR/Blood-borne card, AH 155 will be waived. Childcare Assistant Required Courses Credits AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 ECED 106 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 ECED 107 Science for Preschool Teachers 2

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

111


112

ECED 170

ECED 172

Child Dvlp. Assoc. I Preschool or ECED: 171 Child Dvlp. Assoc. I Infant/Toddler or ECED 174: Chld. Dvlp. Assoc. I Fmly. Chld Prvdr. 5 Child Dvlp. Assoc. II Preschool or ECED 173: Child Dvlp. Assoc. II Infnt/Tddlr or ECED 175: Chld. Dvlp. Assoc. II Fmly Chld Prvdr. 5 Total Credits 19

If student can show a First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne card, AH 155 will be waived. Para-Educator Required Para-Educator Core Courses Credits AH 155 First Aid/CPR/Blood-Borne Pathogen Training 2 BT 101 Beginning Keyboarding 5 EDUC 101 Application of Critical Reading & Thinking in Children’s Literature for Professionals 5 EDUC 102 Parent Community & Volunteers 5 EDUC 103 Guiding Behavior: School-age Child 5 EDUC 201 Development of the School-Age Child 4 or ECED 101: Preschool Child Development EDUC 202 Educational Linguistics 5 EDUC 210 Introduction to Becoming a Teacher 5 EDUC 250 Public School Practicum 4 PTECH 116 Applied Math II for Early Childhood Ed 5 SPED 200 Intro. to Exceptionality in Early Childhood Ed. 5 Required Electives Credits ECED 105 Child Abuse & Neglect 2 ENGL& 101 English Composition I 5 NUTR 101 Human Nutrition 5 PSYC& 100 General Psychology 5 READ 105 Critical Reading 5 Over 100-level EDUC/ECED course or course from distribution list 4 Total Credits 76 Related instruction as required by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges.

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses in order to receive a certificate. Students who earn an AAS degree for para-educator meet the requirements for the associate in arts degree and for the para-educator certificate. Be sure to check with an Education Department advisor to get the latest information. Child Development Associate (CDA) Training Students complete two courses in early childhood education before being assessed for the CDA credential. They take either the preschool CDA track (ECED 170 and 172), the infant/ toddler CDA track (ECED 171 and 173), or the family childcare CDA track (ECED 174/175). Students may take both the preschool and the infant/ toddler CDA tracks, but not concurrently. It is the students' responsibility to follow through with the assessment process. Required Courses Credits ECED 170 Child Dvlp. Assoc. I Preschool 5 ECED 171 Child Dvlp. Assoc. I Infant/Toddler 5 -ORECED 172 Child Dvlp. Assoc. II Preschool 5 ECED 173 Child Dvlp. Assoc. II Infant/Toddler 5 -ORECED 174 Child Dvlp. Assoc. I Family Care Provider 5 ECED 175 Child Dvlp. Assoc. II Family Care Provider 5 Total Credits 10

CDA Renewal: Any ECED course (3 credits every 5 years to stay current).

STARS Training Washington State Training & Registry System Child care providers in homes, centers, and after-school programs must take the 20-hour basic training requirement and a variety of other courses that fulfill the 10-hour continuing education requirement. Courses for the 10-hour STARS requirement include the following: Courses ECED 105 ECED 106 ECED 107 ECED 109 ECED 111 ECED 112 ECED 113 ECED 114 ECED 116 ECED 117 ECED& 100 ECED& 132 ECED&139 ECED& 160 ECED& 180

Credits Child Abuse & Neglect 2 Math for Preschool Teachers 2 Science for Preschool Teachers 2 Health for Preschool Teachers 1 Curriculum for Child Care 1 Plan Ed para Cuidado Información 1 (Spanish version of ECED 111) Managing Difficult Behaviors 1 Brain Development & Young Child 1 Kindergarten Readiness 1 School-Age Care 1 Child Care Basics 3 Infants & Toddlers Nurturing Care 3 Administration of Early Learning Programs 3 Curriculum Development 5 Language & Literacy Development 3

New courses are in development. Consult the current schedule for offerings. Any of the ECED courses at YVCC may count toward the required STARS 10-hour yearly training requirement.

Admission Entrance Requirements: Students must meet the course prerequisites before enrolling. All students entering any field of study in Education or Early Childhood Education must take EDUC 111: Careers in Education & Early Childhood Education. This can be taken prior to or concurrently with any EDUC or ECED course.. For further information, request the information packet from the Education Department. Criminal History Information Prior to enrolling in a practicum course, criminal history information will be requested of students enrolling in the education program practicums. Information obtained from this inquiry will be treated confidentially and will be considered in determining the student's eligibility to complete clinical competencies. Inability to participate in clinical experience due to information obtained from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS criminal history and background inquiry may result in a student's inability to satisfactorily complete program degree requirements. For more specific information, contact the program coordinator at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

Courses Includes early childhood education, education track for K-8, school-age care, para-educator, and special education courses.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Early Childhood Education ECED 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in early childhood education. ECED& 100: Child Care Basics 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is designed to meet the STARS 30-hour basic training outcomes for early childhood and school age professionals recognized in the MERIT system. Topics: child growth/development, cultural competency, guidance, and health/safety/nutrition. ECED 105: Child Abuse & Neglect 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course will assist the participant in the development of skills for working with children from abusive or neglectful home environments. Using theory, research, and practice, participants will understand, recognize, and assess child abuse and neglect issues and become aware of prevention programs currently available and how these can be implemented in the classroom. ECED& 105: Introduction to Early Childhood Education 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Explore the foundations of early childhood education. Examine theories defining the field, issues and trends, best practices, and program models. Observe children, professionals, and programs in action. ECED 106: Math for Preschool Teachers 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is the math section of a series of early childhood courses designed to give discipline content and teaching methodology to preschool teachers to expand their knowledge and application of math concepts.

ECED 113: Managing Difficult Behavior 1 Cr Quarters: W This course will provide a basic understanding of guidance and discipline in the context of normally-developing children from birth to five years of age. The course will emphasize the National Association for the Education of Young Children's code of ethics in developing strategies to manage difficult behaviors. ECED 114: Brain Development in Young Child 1 Cr Quarters: S This course analyzes current research that demonstrates how children's earliest experiences and relationships make a significant difference in the way their brains develop. ECED 116: Kindergarten Readiness 1 Cr Quarters: F This course is designed to focus on the skills that help prepare children for a successful entry into kindergarten. Included are techniques and strategies to use when working with children, keeping in mind developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Standards, and school district recommendations. This course also meets the ten-hour professional development requirement for STARS training. ECED 117: School-age Care for Child Care Providers 1 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to focus on developmentally appropriate care for school-age children. It will include techniques and strategies to use when working with school-age children, keeping in mind developmentally and culturally appropriate practices, the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Standards, and school district recommendations. This course also meets the ten-hour professional development for STARS training.

ECED 107: Science for Preschool Teachers 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is the science section of a series of early childhood courses designed to give discipline content and teaching methodology to preschool teachers to expand their knowledge and application of science.

ECED 118: Multicultural Preschool Literature 1 Cr Quarters: F, S This course is designed from a constructionist framework. The students will preview and work with multicultural literature that is intended for preschoolers and discover a multitude of ways to incorporate literature into the preschool classroom.

ECED& 107: Health, Safety, and Nutrition 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. Recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting , and available community resources.

ECED& 120: Practicum-Focus on Relationships & Communication 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR In an early learning setting, apply best practice for engaging in nurturing relationships with children. Focus on keeping children healthy and safe while promoting growth and development.

ECED 109: Health for Preschool Teachers 2 Cr Quarters: F This course explores the health issues of the preschool child. The areas on which this class focuses are health forms and policies, communicable diseases, medication and safety, child abuse, dental, and other concerns. Referral services in Central Washington are explored. ECED 111: Curriculum for Childcare 1 Cr Quarters: O This course will provide a brief and basic overview of typical child development from birth to five years while integrating developmentallyappropriate curriculum for children. It will emphasize the Washington State Core Competencies in creating curriculum for children. ECED 112: Plan Educacion para Cuidado Infantil 1 Cr Quarters: O Esta clase proverá un breve y básico resumen del desarrollo de niños, de nacimiento hasta cinco años de edad, integrando un plan de estudios apropiado para el desarrollo de niños. Esta clase dará énfasis a los requisitos esenciales de aprendizaje académico del estado de Washington, creando un plan de estudios para niños. Este curso tambien es enseñado en el idioma inglés como el curso designado ECED 111.

ECED 130: Module I: Creating Community Among Adults 1 Cr Quarters: O Early childhood education professionals, working with children aged birth to eight years and their families, will learn about the importance of adult relationships in child care settings. ECED 131: Module II: Building a Caring Community with Children 1 Cr Quarters: O This course is designed to help participants identify and build skill in providing positive relationship-based care. ECED 132: Module III: Building Quality Relations with Families 1 Cr Quarters: O This module is designed to help caregivers explore ways to form culturally responsive partnerships with families and parents. Participants will learn positive communication skills, how to manage conflicts, ways to assess and meet needs of the parents in their programs, and will consider how culture impacts identity and relationships. ECED& 132: Infants & Toddlers-Nurturing Care 3 Cr Quarters: F, W Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

113


114

ECED& 134: Family Child Care 3 Cr Quarters: S Learn the basics of home/family child care program management. Topics include: licensing requirements; business management; relationship building; health, safety, and nutrition; guiding behavior; and promoting growth and development. ECED& 139: Administration of Early Learning Programs 3 Cr Quarters: S Develop administrative skills required to develop, open, operate, manage, and assess early childhood education and care programs. Explore techniques and resources available for Washington State licensing and National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standard compliance. ECED 140: Module I: Understanding Behaviors & Building Relationships with Children 1 Cr Quarters: O This module is structured around understanding behaviors and building relationships with children. ECED 141: Module II: The Encouraging Classroom 1 Cr Quarters: O This module is focused on using the environment to support children's positive behavior, developmentally appropriate guidance practices, guidance vs. punishment, and involving families to support children's social and emotional growth. ECED 142: Module III: Positive Guidance 1 Cr Quarters: O This module focuses on positive communication and direct guidance techniques to support children's social and emotional development and strategies for specific challenging behaviors. ECED 155: Infant/Toddler Curriculum and Guidance 3 Cr Quarters: W This course focuses on the role of the care giver who develops curriculum for a learning environment where care and learning are inseparable. Students have the opportunity to plan multicultural, inclusive curriculum to meet the needs of infants and toddlers in all areas of development. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 or eligibility for READ 105 ECED 156: Infant/Toddler Curriculum and Guidance Practicum 1 Cr Quarters: W, S This practicum offers the student an opportunity to observe and interact with infants and toddlers in a supervised and licensed childcare setting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in ECED 104 and permission of instructor ECED 157: Module I: Infant/Toddler Caregiving 1 Cr Quarters: O Supporting healthy social and emotional development. Early care and education professionals will learn about the emerging language of the young child, fostering secure caregiver-child relationships, and the importance of culturally-responsive partnerships with families. ECED 158: Module II: Infant/Toddler Caregiving 1 Cr Quarters: O Encouraging healthy physical development. Early care and education professionals will learn about the components of quality infant/toddler care. The course will focus on caregiving practices to support healthy and safe environments with support for sensorimotor exploration. Participants will explore ways to partner with families about sleeping issues and feeding interactions to support the healthy development of the young child. ECED 159: Module III: Infant/Toddler Caregiving 1 Cr Quarters: O Responsive learning environments. Caregivers will explore how to create safe, nurturing, and engaging environments to support culturallyresponsive early learning as well as brain and language development in the earliest years.

ECED 160: Preschool Instructional Assistant Practicum 2 Cr Quarters: W, S Students observe and interact with young children in approved ECED settings. The emphasis is on professional team behavior and reflection on the characteristics of young children and their learning environments. Students participate in and direct early childhood activities with individuals and groups of young children. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in ECED 101 and permission of instructor ECED& 160: Curriculum Development 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Investigate learning theory, program planning, and tools for curriculum development promoting language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills, and growth in young children (birth-age 8). ECED 165: Language and Literacy Development, Module I Literacy and the Young Child 1 Cr Quarters: O This course will focus early care and education professionals and, in the first module, will identify literacy behaviors and discuss the value of early literacy learning. Children’s literature will be examined, including the study of genre. Students will discuss criteria for book selection, including the use of multicultural books. Literacy will be defined through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Students will learn professional techniques to promote learning in each stage of development from infancy through age eight. ECED 166: Language and Literacy Development, Module II Environment, Curriculum, and Literacy 1 Cr Quarters: O This course will focus on both the importance of a language-rich physical environment and the role of adults in supporting and promoting literacy skills. Students will learn the importance of talking, singing, and telling stories with infants and toddlers and how to use language skills and stories as children develop proficiency in reading and writing. Read-aloud strategies, including dialogic techniques, will be demonstrated and discussed. Students will identify observable literacy behaviors for assessment purposes, learn to use assessment to inform teaching, and share strategies for documenting progress. ECED 167: Language and Literacy Development, Module III Developing a Literacy Program 1 Cr Quarters: O This course will focus on both the importance of a language-rich physical environment and the role of adults in supporting and promoting literacy skills. Students will learn the importance of talking, singing, and telling stories with infants and toddlers and how to use language skills and stories as children develop proficiency in reading and writing. Read-aloud strategies, including dialogic techniques, will be demonstrated and discussed. Students will identify observable literacy behaviors for assessment purposes, learn to use assessment to inform teaching, and share strategies for documenting progress. ECED 170: Child Development Associate I Preschool 5 Cr Quarters: W This course fulfills the first half of the educational component requirement of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition for obtaining national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credentials. Students desiring CDA credentials are assessed, using the CDA national competency standards for preschool, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals I (to establish a safe, healthy learning environment) and II (to advance physical and intellectual competence) and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals I, II, and III. ECED& 170: Environments for Young Children 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Design, evaluate, and improve indoor and outdoor environments which ensure quality learning, nurturing, experiences, and optimize the development of young children.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ECED 171: Child Development Associate I Infant/Toddler 5 Cr Quarters: W This course fulfills the first half of the educational component requirement of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition for obtaining national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credentials. Students desiring CDA credentials are assessed, using the CDA national competency standards for infant/toddler, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals I (to establish a safe, healthy learning environment) and II (to advance physical and intellectual competence) and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals I and II. ECED 172: Child Development Associate II Preschool 5 Cr Quarters: S This course fulfills the second half of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition's requirement for the educational component in qualifying for obtaining a national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Students desiring a CDA credential are assessed using the CDA national competency standards in preschool, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals III, IV, V, and VI: to support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance; to establish positive and productive relationships with families; to ensure a well-run, purposeful program responsive to participant needs; and to maintain a commitment to professionalism and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals III, IV, V, and VI. Prerequisite: ECED 170 ECED 173: Child Development Associate II Infant/Toddler 5 Cr Quarters: S This course fulfills the second half of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition's requirement for the educational component in qualifying for obtaining a national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Students desiring a CDA credential are assessed using the CDA national competency standards in infant/toddler, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals III, IV, V, and VI: to support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance; to establish positive and productive relationships with families; to ensure a well-run, purposeful program responsive to participant needs; and to maintain a commitment to professionalism and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals III, IV, V, and VI. Prerequisite: ECED 171 ECED 174: Child Develop Associate I Family Child Care Provider 5 Cr Quarters: W This course fulfills the first half of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition's requirement for the educational component in qualifying to apply for obtaining a national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Students desiring a CDA credential are assessed using the CDA national competency standards in family child care, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals I and II: to establish a safe, healthy learning environment; to advance physical and intellectual competence; and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals I and II. Prerequisite: ECED 170

ECED 175: Child Develop Associate II Family Child Care Provider 5 Cr Quarters: S This course fulfills the second half of the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition's requirement for the educational component in qualifying to apply for obtaining a national professional Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Students desiring a CDA credential are assessed using the CDA national competency standards in family child care, which include the criteria used to evaluate a caregiver's performance with children and families. This class will cover Competency Goals III, IV, V, and VI: to support social and emotional development and to provide guidance; to establish positive and productive relationships with families; to ensure a well-run, purposeful program responsive to participant needs; and to maintain a commitment to professionalism and the collection and organization of a resource file for CDA Goals III, IV, V, and VI. Prerequisite: ECED 174 ECED 176: CDA Assessment Preparation 1 Cr Quarters: S This course is a follow-up to the preparatory 10-credit coursework required for the CDA credential. This course will prepare the student for the direct assessment process which includes an applications process, an oral and written assessment by the Council for Professional Recognition, a verification visit from a council representative, and review of the required professional resource file. Prerequisite: ECED 170/171 or ECED 172/173 or ECED 174/175 ECED 180: Module I: Program Administration 1 Cr Quarters: O This module emphasizes the technical knowledge necessary to develop and maintain a quality early care and education program. It focuses on planning, developing, and managing a center, and on meeting licensing and accreditation regulations and guidelines. ECED& 180: Language and Literacy Development 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Develop teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development at each developmental stage (birth-age eight) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading. ECED 181: Module II: Operation of Children's Programs 1 Cr Quarters: O This module focuses on the operation of children's programs in early learning centers. It addresses the grouping of children, creating developmentally appropriate curriculum that is relevant for children for birth through age eight, and implementing a food program. ECED 182: Module III: Staffing and Professional Development 1 Cr Quarters: O This module addresses issues of staff recruitment, retention, support, and supervision that will lay a foundation for positive personnel management. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are also examined. ECED 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: O Students are required to make application for the class, be approved, and contract with their employer for college credit. Students will submit biweekly reports on the training process experienced throughout the quarter. An employer evaluation, appraising the student's progress, will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ECED& 190: Observation and Assessment 3 Cr Quarters: F, W Collect and record observation of and assessment data in order to plan for and support the child, the family, the group, and the community. Practice reflection techniques, summarizing conclusions, and communicating findings.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

115


116

ECED 199: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

ECED 201: Issues & Trends in Early Childhood Education 3 Cr Quarters: O This course will focus on current issues that impact early childhood education. The topics will include multicultural education and issues, including diversity and anti-bias curriculum; special-needs children (education) and inclusion; family systems today; and child abuse/ violence. Emphasis will be placed on the current issues and trends in each area as well as resources available to ECED professionals. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 or eligibility for READ 105 ECED 206: Professionalism & Portfolio 1 Cr Quarters: S Focuses on the development of a professional portfolio that demonstrates the student's achievement of skill standards in the field of early childhood education. Work samples from ECED courses are selected, along with other supporting documents, and arranged professionally in a portfolio. The student reflects upon personal achievement of skill standards and presents the portfolio to a panel of early childhood education professionals. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ECED 260: Vocational Preschool Teacher Practicum 4 Cr Quarters: W, S Students in this course apply knowledge of developmentally and culturally appropriate guidance and teaching techniques with preschool-age children. They plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and behavioral plans in early childhood settings. Students work as part of a teaching staff in an approved early childhood practicum site. Prerequisite: ECED 100, ECED 120, ECED 150, and ECED 160 and permission of instructor ECED 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: O This class creates a bridge between real work experiences and the college education curriculum. Co-op links the student's academic program with career goals and interests. It extends the classroom and provides an educational experience that meets the various interests, needs, and abilities of the student. Students receive academic credit ranging from one to ten credits, and, in most cases, a salary from an employer. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Education EDUC 050: Introduction to Paraprofessional Mathematics Part I 2 Cr Quarters: W This course provides paraprofessionals a learning community in which to explore and develop strategies for improving their mathematical abilities, enabling them to assist students more effectively in their assigned classrooms. Prerequisite: Employed in P-14 educational setting EDUC 075: Critical Reading/Writing for the Paraprofessional 3 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to assist paraprofessionals in passing the reading and writing sections of the state paraprofessional test and/or to improve their literacy skills for college-level coursework that could eventually lead to a two- or four-year college degree. EDUC 101: Application of Critical Reading & Thinking in Children's Literature for Paraprofessionals 5 Cr Quarters: F Designed to teach paraprofessionals strategies in assisting students in becoming more critical readers of and thinkers about children's literature. The strategies will support the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements for each grade level represented by the literature for the grade level for the paraprofessional working in that classroom. Prerequisite: Eligibility for READ 105

EDUC 102: Parent Community & Volunteers 5 Cr Quarters: W This course will assist the participant in the development of skills for working with children, youth, their families, and the community. Using theory, research, and practice, participants will understand, recognize, and assess the importance, value, and benefits of the collaboration of parents, communities, teachers, and volunteers working together to apply the elements of an effective learning environment for optimal learning for children. Students will gain an understanding of the value of providing educational and support services to all children, youth, and their families in a diverse community. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 or eligibility for READ 105 EDUC 103: Guiding Behavior: School-Age Child 5 Cr Quarters: S This course examines the principles and theories that promote social competence, including how to develop effective methods of communication, group management, positive guidance techniques, facilitation of conflict resolutions, social skill building, life skills, problem solving, the role of culture in guidance, observation techniques, and the building of meaningful relationships. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 090T or eligibility for READ 105 EDUC& 115: Child Development 5 Cr Quarters: O Build a functional understanding of the foundation of child development, prenatal to early adolescence. Observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross-cultural and global perspectives. EDUC 111: Careers in Education/Early Childhood 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course explores the foundation of careers in education and early childhood education. Students will explore the different state and federal requirements in a variety of career options within these fields of study. It will assure that students choose and begin a seamless and clear education pathway towards certificates and/or degrees of their choice. EDUC 117: Multicultural Children's Literature 1 Cr Quarters: F This is a STARS class and is intended to offer readers, childcare providers, elementary school teachers, and parents an invitation to explore literature that presents and encourages a window to the diverse world we and the children we know live in. By looking at child readiness and materials available, we will work, explore, evaluate, and delight in the literature that brings the word and the world to life for our young. EDUC& 130: Guiding Behavior 3 Cr Quarters: F Examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences. EDUC& 136: School-Age Care 3 Cr Quarters: F, S Develop skills to provide developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant activities and care, specifically: preparing the environment, implementing curriculum, building relationships, guiding academic/ social skill development, and community outreach. EDUC& 150: Child, Family, and Community 3 Cr Quarters: O Students working with children ages birth to eight years and their families will learn how to integrate the family and community contexts in which a child develops. The students will learn how to explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


EDUC 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Educ. in P-14 Settings I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: S This course creates a bridge between real work experience in educational settings (para-educators, tutors, volunteers) and the student's program of study. The work environment offers opportunities for acquiring technical knowledge, knowledge of current practices, experience, and career clarification. This course offers academic support and advising, work-related resources, and professional development opportunities. The link between the two experiences is the quarterly training plan in which goals and objectives for professional development are identified. Biweekly reporting forms prompt students to consider employment training opportunities as part of ongoing education both for the job and for future employment. Prerequisite: Employed or volunteering in P-14 educational setting EDUC 201: Development of the School-Age Child 4 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is designed to give students a brief overview of the developmentally appropriate characteristics of children from birth to four years old. It will give students a more in-depth study of the development of school-age children from five to 14 years old. Students will study theorists and researchers and their theories of how children develop and learn during the school-age years. The course will also give an overview of the influence of culture in the development of the child, family systems, and basic nutrition. Students will take a more in-depth look at pinpointing special needs and at-risk children. This course will also provide students with an awareness of how the role of play is important in the development and learning of a child. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 or eligibility for ENGL& 101 or eligibility for READ 105

Special Education SPED 200: Introduction to Exceptionality in Early Childhood Ed 5 Cr Quarters: F This course provides an introduction to normal and exceptional development, including causes and categories of disabilities and delays, the IFSP/IEP process, and an overview of the legislation behind early intervention and the prevention of delays and disabilities in young children. SPED 201: Intervention Strategies for Infants & Toddlers 5 Cr Quarters: W This course provides an overview of intervention strategies for infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities or developmental delays and for children who are at risk for developing delays and/or disabilities. A team approach to intervention strategies is emphasized. SPED 202: Inclusion in Early Childhood Education 5 Cr Quarters: S This course provides an overview of including children with developmental disabilities or delays in early childhood settings. The course provides students with strategies and techniques that will help them develop partnerships with parents; design, create, and adapt environments that support children with disabilities in early childhood settings; and develop their own philosophy on inclusion in early childhood. SPED 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

EDUC 202: Educational Linguistics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is designed from a constructionist framework, emphasizing learning and language acquisition using a Vygotskian approach to aid in the teaching of reading in the K-8 grades in schools. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or eligibility for READ 105 EDUC 210: Introduction to Becoming a Teacher 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is designed for students interested in the field of education. It provides an overview of education in America, covering the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. Students will study current issues and trends in curriculum, instructional strategies, teaching as a profession, local concerns, and the future of education. They will also study a teacher's role and function in the school, the characteristics of a good teacher, and preparation for professional competencies and certification. Opportunities are provided for observation and integration of information as it relates to K-12 education. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 or eligibility for ENGL& 101 EDUC 250: Public School Practicum 4 Cr Quarters: W, S This course was designed for students wishing to enter the field of education. Students will become more pedagogically diverse as they receive a hands-on approach to education while working directly with teachers, administrators, para-educators, clerical personnel, students, and parents. Students will learn the importance of teaching in a variety of environments that include changing cultures, increasing numbers of children living in poverty and facing health problems, homelessness, disrupted family lives, and increasing language diversity. This class is based on the constructivist learning model and philosophy. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL& 101, successful completion of EDUC 210, and permission of instructor EDUC 290, 291, 292, 293: Adv. Co-op Education Variable Cr Quarters: O See description for EDUC 190. Prerequisite: Employed or volunteering in P-14 educational setting

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

117


118 Engineering/CADD The Engineering Program offers two different Associate of Applied Science degrees, Construction Design/CADD Technology and Civil Engineering Technology. The Associate in Science Degree, Track 2 is also offered for engineering transfer students and two certificates, Drafting and Machining Technology are available for all engineering students.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Ability to apply current knowledge and applications of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology. • Ability to identify, formulate, analyze and solve technical and engineering problems. • Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. • Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams. • Ability to communicate knowledge in written and oral form.

Careers Employment opportunities for engineering transfer students who complete their bachelor’s degrees include all aspects of design and manufacturing. Students can choose from a wide variety of engineering disciplines, including: aeronautical, civil, environmental, mechanical, materials, electrical, and others. Engineering technology students learn skills intended to help them seek jobs within the construction and manufacturing industries. Many local, state, and federal agencies that are responsible for our public infrastructures employ our graduates. Present trends indicate that the prospect for future employment is very bright in any field of engineering or engineering technology.

Degrees YVCC's Engineering Department offers these degrees:  



Associate of Applied Science in Construction Design Associate of Applied Science in Civil Engineering Technology Associate of Applied Science in Aerospace Machining Technology Associate in Science, Track 2 (engineering transfer degree)

Associate of Applied Science Degrees AAS, Construction Design YVCC offers an Associate of Applied Science degree in Construction Design. In this program, students will demonstrate professional-level skills on AutoCAD. They will also learn many skills essential to the light construction trade. Many CAD courses use a drawing studio format, and students create portfolios of their work as a basic course or program goal. With this degree students will be highly competitive with respect to job placement in the construction design field. Required Courses BA 138 Written Business Communication z or PTECH 120, Technical Writing or ENGL& 101, English Composition I ENGR 101 Project Management „ ENGR 104 Engineering Graphics

Credits 5

5 5

ENGR 110 CAD I 3 ENGR 111 Mechanical CAD 3 ENGR 112 3-D CAD 3 ENGR 115 Blueprint Reading & Drafting Standards 2 ENGR 118 Microstation 2D 4 ENGR 132 Problem Analysis 5 *ENGR 190, 191, 192, 193 Co-op Field Experience 4 ENGR 200 Plane Survey 3 ENGR 222 Regulatory Forms 2 *ENGR 230, 231, 232 Engineering Design Project 5 ENGR 251 Estimates & Costs 4 ENGR 260 Soils & Foundations 4 ENGR 263 Structures 4 ENGR 266 Advanced Surveying 2 ENGR 267 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 2 ENGR 268 AutoCAD Civil 3D 4 ENGR 282 Building Code 3 ENGR 283 Building Systems 3 ENGR 287 Microstation 3D 3 ENGR 286 Structural CAD 4 MATH& 141 Precalculus I ‹ 5 MATH& 142 Precalculus II 5 PHYS 115 General Physics I Lecture 3 PHYS 125 General Physics I Lab 2 PHYS 116 General Physics II Lecture 3 PHYS 126 General Physics II Lab 2 **IT Elective 3 Total Credits 108 * Choose 9 credits from ENGR 230, 231 , 232 or ENGR 190, 191, 192, 193 ** Choose 3 credits from the following Information Technology credits IT 100, 111, 115, 221.

AAS, Civil Engineering Technology The Civil Engineering Technology Program is designed for persons planning to enter the engineering profession at the technician level. The program is designed with input from a local engineering advisory board in order to best meet the needs of community employers. Technicians at YVCC learn specialized skills that include plan-reading, surveying, computer drafting, materials testing, estimating, scheduling, and using engineering design software. Promising careers exist with municipal, state, and federal agencies, engineering and construction firms, public utilities, and local manufacturers. Required Courses Credits BA 138 Written Business Communication z 5 or PTECH 120, Technical Writing or ENGL& 101, English Composition I ENGR 101 Project Management „ 5 ENGR 104 Engineering Graphics 5 ENGR 110 CAD I 3 ENGR 111 Mechanical CAD 3 ENGR 112 3-D CAD 3 ENGR 115 Blueprint Reading & Drafting Standards 2 ENGR 118 Microstation 2D 4 ENGR 132 Problem Analysis 5 *ENGR 190, 191, 192, 193 Co-op Field Experience 5 ENGR 200 Plane Survey 3 ENGR 210 Applied Hydraulics 5 ENGR 220 Environmental Engineer Tech 5 ENGR 222 Regulatory Forms 2 *ENGR 230, 231, 232 Engineering Design Project 5 ENGR 251 Estimates & Costs 4 ENGR 260 Soils & Foundations 4 ENGR 262 Roadway Construction & Design 3 ENGR 263 Structures 4 ENGR 266 Advanced Surveying 2 ENGR 267 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 2 ENGR 268 AutoCAD Civil 3D 4 ENGR 277 InRoads 2

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


MATH& 141 PHYS 115 PHYS 116 PHYS 125 PHYS 126 **IT Elective

Precalculus I ‹ General Physics I Lecture General Physics II Lecture General Physics I Lab General Physics II Lab

5 3 3 2 2 4 Total Credits 104 * Choose 10 credits from ENGR 230, 231, 232 or ENGR 190, 191, 192, 193 ** Choose 4 credits from the following Information Technology credits IT 100, 111, 115, 221 and ENGR 287.

AAS, Aerospace Machining Technology First Year - Fall ENGR 116 ENGR 117 ENGR 120 ENGR 140

Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades I Mathematics for Machine Trades I Machining & CNC Technology - Lecture I Machining & CNC Technology - Lab I Total Credits

5 5 5 5 20

First Year - Winter ENGR 126 Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades II 5 ENGR 127 Mathematics for Machine Trades II 5 ENGR 121 Machining & CNC Technology - Lecture II 5 ENGR 141 Machining & CNC Technology - Lab II 5 Total Credits 20 First Year - Spring ENGR 111 Mechancial CAD (Intro to Solidworks) 3 ENGR 122 MasterCAM 5 ENGR 123 Catia V5 3 ENGR 142 Machining & CNC Technology - Lab III 5 Total Credits 16 First Year - Summer PTECH 120 Technical Writing 5 or BA 138: Written Business Communications or ENGL& 101: English Composition I Total Credits 5 Second Year - Fall ENGR 101 Project Management 5 ENGR 212 Inspection & Metrology 5 ENGR 213 Quality Control (AS9100 & ISO Standards) 5 ENGR 110 AutoCAD 3 Total Credits 18 Second Year - Winter ENGR 240 CNC Mill I 5 ENGR 241 CNC Lathe I 5 ENGR 242 CNC Tooling & Setup 5 Total Credits 15 Second Year - Spring ENGR 271 Advanced Machining CNC Lathe 5 ENGR 272 Advanced Machining CNC Mill 5 ENGR 192 Co-op Field Experience III 5 or ENGR 232: Engineering Project Design Total Credits 15 Total Credits for Certificate 109

Associate in Science Degree, Track 2 To begin the two-year engineering transfer emphasis program at YVCC, students should have completed the following courses or their equivalencies in high school: mathematics through precalculus, one year of chemistry, one physics course, two years of foreign language, and four years of English composition. Students who have not completed the courses listed above should take the following necessary equivalent preparation courses before beginning the transfer program:

Courses CHEM 100 ENGL 095 MATH& 141 MATH& 142 PHYS 115/125

Introduction to Chemistry Reviewing English Essentials II Precalculus I Precalculus II General Physics I w/lab

Credits 5 5 5 5 5

YVCC's Engineering Department offers an Associate of Science, Track 2, which serves those students intending to complete the required coursework for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering programs at Washington State University, University of Washington, or similar programs at other universities. This Associate of Science, Track 2, contains a concentration of coursework in math, physics, chemistry, and engineering. Students in the Associate of Science, Track 2, are expected to follow the curriculum outlined below, which parallels the first two years of study for several engineering disciplines at four-year institutions. Upon completion of the Associate of Science, Track 2, students should be able to enter with junior standing the following programs: mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial engineering, materials engineering, and environmental engineering. Courses First Year - Fall CHEM& 141 CHEM& 151 ENGL& 101 MATH& 151 ENGR 100

Credits General Chemistry I General Chemistry I Lab English Composition Iz Calculus I ‹ Introduction to Engineering & Design Total Credits

First Year - Winter CHEM& 142 General Chemistry II Lecture CHEM& 152 General Chemistry II Lab MATH& 152 Calculus II ‹ Social Science Elective Humanities Elective „ Total Credits First Year - Spring CHEM& 143 General Chemistry III CHEM& 153 General Chemistry III Lab IT 174 C++ Introduction ENGR 108 Engineering Graphics & CAD I MATH& 153 Calculus III ‹ Total Credits First Year - Summer ECON& 202 Macro Economics Communication Elective Humanities Elective Total Credits Second Year - Fall ENGR 114 Engineering CAD & Visualization ENGR& 214 Statics MATH& 254 Calculus IV ‹ PHYS 211 Engineering Physics I Lecture PHYS 221 Engineering Physics I Lab Total Credits Second Year - Winter ENGR& 215 Dynamics MATH 220 Linear Algebra ‹ PHYS 212 Engineering Physics II Lecture PHYS 222 Engineering Physics II Lab Humanities Elective Total Credits

3 2 5 5 2 17 3 2 5 5 3 18 3 2 5 3 5 18 5 5 4 14 4 5 5 3 2 19 5 5 3 2 3 18

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

119


120

Second Year - Spring ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials MATH 264 Differential Equations ‹ PHYS 213 Engineering Physics III Lecture PHYS 223 Engineering Physics III Lab Total Credits

5 5 3 2 15

In view of varying, transferable coursework requirements, students in the transfer emphasis program are strongly urged to be in close contact with their advisor throughout their stay at YVCC. YVCC Classes and WSU Equivalents CHEM& 141/151, 142/152, 143/153: CHEM 105L, 106L ECON& 202: ECON 102 ENGR 108, 109: ME 103 ENGR& 214, 215, 225: CE 211, 212, 215 ENGL& 101: ENGL 101 IT 174: CPT 251 MATH& 151, 152. 153: MATH 171, 172 MATH 220, 254, 264: MATH 220, 273, 315 PHYS 211/221, 212/222, & 213/223: PHYS 201L, 202L YVCC Classes and UW Equivalents CHEM& 141/151, 142/152: CHEM 140/141, 150/151 CHEM& 143/153: CHEM 160/161 ECON& 202: ECON 201 ENGR& 214, 215, 225: AA 210, ME 230, CIV-E 220 ENGL& 101: ENGL 131 MATH& 151, 152: MATH 124, 125 MATH 220, 254, 264: MATH 308, 1XX (3), & 2XX (4) PHYS 211/221, 212/222, 213/223: PHYS 121, 122, 123, 131, 132, 133 Bachelor of Science in Engineering at YVCC & WSUTC Yakima Valley Community College and WSU Tri-Cities offer an exciting program for students interested in earning a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (ME), Electrical Engineering (EE) or Civil Engineering (CE). This program would allow an engineering transfer student, upon enrollment at YVCC, to receive priority registration at WSUTC. Priority registration assures ME students access to and enrollment in a bachelor’s of science engineering program. The BS degree would be awarded by WSUTC upon completion. Students who choose this option follow the Associate of Science, Track 2, program at YVCC. The second half of the program is taken at WSUTC where courses, laboratories, and research experience provide students with instruction specific to their engineering disciplines. Students who opt for this program will receive benefits that include: z z z z z z

Joint advising with YVCC and WSUTC Free transcript transfer Unique scholarship opportunities Consideration for a transfer achievement award (hundreds of dollars toward tuition at WSUTC) Significant savings in overall educational costs Priority consideration for AWAR internships

Please contact the Engineering Department for more information at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog.

Certificates Drafting The one-year drafting certificate program provides entrylevel skills in the area of manual and computer-aided drafting. The program focuses on specific occupational skills and is suited for persons who find it hard to attend college for two years to acquire employable skills. The credits earned through this program can be applied to the associate in applied science degree requirements for civil engineering or computer drafting. The first-year classes are to be taken for the certificate. Note: The one-year drafting certificate program is the first year of the AAS construction design and civil engineering technology degrees. Required Courses Credits BA 138 Written Business Communication z 5 or PTECH 120 Technical Writing or ENGL& 101 English Composition I ENGR 101 Project Management 5 ENGR 104 Engineering Graphics I 5 ENGR 110 CAD I 3 ENGR 111 Mechanical CAD 3 ENGR 112 3-D CAD 3 ENGR 115 Blueprint Reading & Drafting Standards 2 ENGR 118 CAD Engineering Design 4 ENGR 132 Problem Analysis 5 ENGR 200 Plane Surveying 3 ENGR 222 Regulatory Forms 2 ENGR 251 Estimates & Costs 4 MATH 095 Intermediate Algebra 5 Total Credits for Certificate 49

CNC Operator Certificate The Machining Technology Certificate prepares qualified individuals for entry into the job market as a Machinist. Instruction covers programming and basic set-up and operation of manual & CNC machines, blueprint reading, shop mathematics, machine tool theory, and inspection. Students will be involved in the production and machining of aerospace/industry parts. Instruction will also include the use and care of a wide variety of measuring devices used in the machining profession. Requirement: Must be eligible for MATH 075 First Quarter ENGR 116 Mathematics for Machine Trades I ENGR 117 Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades I ENGR 120 Machining & CNC Technology - Lecture I ENGR 140 Machining & CNC Technology - Lab I Total Credits First Quarter Second Quarter ENGR 126 Mathematics for Machine Trades II ENGR 127 Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades II ENGR 121 Machining & CNC Technology - Lecture II ENGR 141 Machining & CNC Technology - Lab II Total Credits Second Quarter Third Quarter ENGR 111 Mechanical CAD (Intro to Solidworks) ENGR 122 MasterCAM ENGR 123 Catia V5 ENGR 142 Machining & CNC Technoloy - Lab III Total Credits Third Quarter

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

5 5 5 5 20 5 5 5 5 20 3 5 3 5 16


Summer Quarter ENGR 101 Project Management (Human Relations) 5 PTECH 120 Technical Writing 5 or BA 138: Written Business Communications or ENGL& 101: English Composition I Total Credits Summer Quarter 10 Total Credits for Certificate 66

Courses ENGR 098, 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in engineering. ENGR 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Workshops, short courses, and individual study in engineering. ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering and Design 2 Cr Quarters: F, S This introductory course examines many facets of the engineering profession. Students will be introduced to engineering design processes and challenged to use their creative and analytical reasoning abilities to solve hands-on problems related to the different engineering disciplines. ENGR 101: Project Management 5 Cr Quarters: F This course is a comprehensive overview of engineering project management. It will emphasize the fundamental principles of contracts, plan reading, resource management, and human relations in the engineering workplace. ENGR 104: Engineering Graphics 5 Cr Quarters: F Fundamentals of orthographic projection, including auxiliary views and oblique drawings. Graphically represent points, lines, planes, and sloids to describe real or imagined technical devices or objects. Prerequisite: Plane geometry in high school or permission of instructor ENGR 108: Engineering Graphics and CAD I 3 Cr Quarters: S This course emphasizes the fundamental principles of orthographic projection, freehand sketching, lettering, and dimensioning and scales. The theories of related views, sections, pictorial drawings, and descriptive geometry are included. Students are introduced to computer-aided and designed drafting. This course is intended for individuals who are in the engineering transfer program. Prerequisite: High school plane geometry, MATH& 141, MATH&142, or equivalent ENGR 109: Engineering Graphics and CAD II 3 Cr Quarters: F This course is a continuation of ENGR 108 with the enhancement of AutoCAD system production. Students will gain experience in the 3D capabilities of AutoCAD. Students are also required to complete a set of technical working drawings for an architectural, civil, mechanical, or electrical project, with emphasis on CAD technique. This course is intended for individuals who are in the engineering transfer program. Prerequisite: ENGR 108 ENGR 110: CAD I 3 Cr Quarters: F, W In introductory CAD, students create two-dimensional drawings on the computer and study entity creation, editing, saving, and plotting. Drawing studio format; portfolio creation based on stated objectives.

ENGR 111: Mechanical CAD 3 Cr Quarters: S Students learn the essentials of mechanical drafting using a CAD software. Basic and geometric tolerances, layouts and detailing standards are discussed. Prerequisite: ENGR 110 ENGR 112: 3D CAD 3 Cr Quarters: S The student would learn advanced AutoCAD drafting commands, would create 3D models by extrusion, wireframes, 3D surfaces and AME solids. Prerequisite: ENGR 110 with a B (3.0) or better ENGR& 114: Engineering Computer-Aided Design & Visualization 4 Cr Quarters: F During this course, the students learn 3-D solid modeling, parts, engineering drawings and assemblies; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. They will learn 3-D visualization, computational analysis of parts and assemblies. Prerequisite: MATH& 151 ENGR 115: Blueprint Reading & Drafting Standards 2 Cr Quarters: W This is an introductory class to be able to read blueprints and understand construction terminologies from building plans. Understanding the basic drafting standards in engineering drawings. ENGR 116: Mathematics for Machine Technology I 5 Cr Quarters: F This is the first part of a two-part course using mathematics in a practical and applied way to solve engineering problems; particularly problems that are encountered in the machine trade profession. Arithmetic, algebra, and geometry will be covered. Prerequisite: MATH 050 or permission of instructor. ENGR 117: Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades I 5 Cr Quarters: F This is an introductory class to be able to read blueprints and understand machine trade terminologies from mechanical drawings. This is the first part of a two-part series. ENGR 118: Microstation 2D 4 Cr Quarters: W Students will learn and apply basic CADD (Computer Aided Drafting and Design) fundamentals. They will learn the functions and capabilities of Bentley’s MicroStation. Prerequisite: ENGR 110 ENGR 120: Machining & CNC Technology I - Lecture 5 Cr Quarters: F This is the first part of a two-part lecture series on machining and CNC technology. This course provides the basic understanding, usage, and safety procedures for conventional lathes and milling machines. It introduces CNC machine programming. Prerequisite: Concurrently enrolled in ENGR 140 ENGR 121: Machining & CNC Technology II - Lecture 5 Cr Quarters: W This is the second part of a two-part lecture series on machining and CNC technology. This course provides an advanced understanding of usage and safety procedures for conventional lathes, milling machines, and CNC machine. Prerequisite: ENGR 120, ENGR 140, and concurrently enrolled in ENGR 131

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

121


122

ENGR 122: MasterCam 5 Cr Quarters: S This course is designed to introduce students to computer-aided manufacturing using MasterCam for 2, 3, and 4 axis machining. This will include wireframe creation and tool path generation for CNC machining. Prerequisite: ENGR 121 and ENGR 141 ENGR 123: CATIA 3 Cr Quarters: S Students learn the fundamentals of 2-D and 3-D orthographic projection drawing on the latest version of CATIA program. Students will learn how to draw to scale and print out their work (color or B/W). The class is taught in a drawing studio format, and portfolio creation is a key component of the course. The goal is that by the end of the quarter, students will know how to create accurately and efficiently any 2-D and 3-D drawing. ENGR 126: Mathematics for Machine Technology II 5 Cr Quarters: W This is the second part of a two-part course using mathematics in a practical and applied way to solve engineering problems; particularly problems that are encountered in the machine trade profession. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry will be covered. Prerequisite: ENGR 116 or permission of instructor ENGR 127: Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades II 5 Cr Quarters: W This is an advanced class to be able to read blueprints and understand machine trade terminologies from mechanical drawings. This is the second part of a two-part series. Prerequisite: ENGR 117 or permission of instructor ENGR 132: Problem Analysis 5 Cr Quarters: W The student will solve engineering problems by analyzing data and finding solutions using geometry, trigonometry, and algebra; present solutions in a written format that may include the use of models, graphs, and drawings; and use statistical analysis to interpret data and ensure accuracy. Prerequisite: MATH 095 or permission of instructor ENGR 140: Machining & CNC Technology I - Lab 5 Cr Quarters: F This is the first part of a two-part laboratory series on machining and CNC technology. This course provides the basic hands-on operation and safety procedures for conventional lathes and milling machines. It also introduces CNC machine programming. Prerequisite: Concurrently enrolled in ENGR 120 ENGR 141: Machining & CNC Technology II - Lab 5 Cr Quarters: W This is the second part of a two-part laboratory series on machining and CNC technology. This course provides an advanced hands-on operation and safety procedures for conventional lathes, milling machines, and CNC machine programming. Prerequisite: ENGR 120, ENGR 140, and concurrently enrolled in ENGR 121 ENGR 142: Machining & CNC Technology III 5 Cr Quarters: S This course is designed to allow students to develop manual and CNC machining skills required for advanced manufacturing success as well as produce a finished project suggested by the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGR 121 and ENGR 141

ENGR 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: O On-the-job training experiences with the engineering faculty assisting the student in analyzing, applying, and instituting engineering theory through actual practice. Variable credit is determined by the number of hours a student works per week. A minimum of one student-instructor contact hour is required per week. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ENGR 200: Plane Survey 3 Cr Quarters: S A classic course in the fundamentals of surveying. The students would learn the theory of surveying; the use and care of surveying instruments; measurement of distances, elevation, and directions; and determination of land and area. Prerequisite: ENGR 132 or permission of instructor ENGR 210: Applied Hydraulics 5 Cr Quarters: F This is a classic course in water mechanics. The principles of laminar and turbulent flow, open channel and closed conduit flow, and hydraulic equipment are emphasized. The course is designed for the engineering student who is in the CET program. Classes will be a combination of lecture, discussion, field trips, and various sample exercises. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 ENGR 212: Inspection & Metrology 5 Cr Quarters: F This course focuses on the science and skill of measuring and inspection. Students will learn to measure size, position, form, surface finish, and orientation. Students will understand the application of a variety of measuring instruments such as micrometers, calipers, gages, PCMM, and CMM. Students will learn the methods and instruments used to effectively inspect parts in the shop. Instructors will reinforce the theory and technique of accuracy, precision, and repeatability to help students develop an uncompromising attitude for good measuring technique. Prerequisite: ENGR 126, ENGR 127, and ENGR 121 ENGR 213: Quality Control 5 Cr Quarters: F Students will acquire a comprehensive understanding of total quality management as dictated in AS9100 and ISO specifications. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and utilize standardization documentation. Prerequisite: ENGR 142 ENGR& 214: Statics 5 Cr Quarters: F Classic course in engineering statics using vector algebra. Twodimensional and three-dimensional space forms, resultants, equivalent force systems, moments, couples, analysis of structures, members, and centroids, as well as equilibrium, friction, and moment of inertia. Prerequisite: MATH& 152 (may be taken concurrently) or permission of instructor ENGR& 215: Dynamics 5 Cr Quarters: W A general treatment of dynamics in particles of rigid bodies using vector analysis, icinematics, and kinetics. Momentum and energy principles for particles and rigid bodies are studied. Prerequisite: ENGR& 214

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ENGR 220: Environmental Engineering Technology 5 Cr Quarters: F Principles of collection and distribution of water, including pumps and pumping stations, techniques in water treatment, principles of sewage collection, types of sewer pipes, sewage treatment processes and types of plants, influent and effluent analysis, and review of industrial wastes. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or permission of instructor ENGR 222: Regulatory Forms for Construction 2 Cr Quarters: W This course introduces students to many of the regulatory forms required for nonresidential building projects. Documents for study include SEPA, JARPA, EIS, Stormwater General, 20 CFR 1926 OSHA forms, and county building permits. ENGR& 225: Mechanics of Materials 5 Cr Quarters: S An introduction to the mechanics of solids, strain and deformation, stress-strain relationships, torsion, and stresses due to bending. Prerequisite: ENGR& 214 ENGR 230, 231, 232: Engineering Design Project 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will prepare specifications for a real engineering project. This course is intended to give second-year engineering technology and construction design students an opportunity to use their abilities in project conception and design with the aid of CAD, surveying equipment, and other engineering tools. ENGR 235: CNC Mill 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to build skills and knowledge in Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) milling. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to program, set up, and operate a CNC milling machine. Prerequisite: ENGR 142 ENGR 241: CNC Lathe 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to build skills and knowledge in Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) milling. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to program, set up, and operate a CNC milling machine. Prerequisite: ENGR 142 ENGR 242: CNC Tooling & Set Up 5 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to provide Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) machine tool set up, workholding, and operation. Theory will be practical in nature and relate directly to shop-based applications. CNC Lathe and Mill operations will be stressed; however, the theory and concepts will be applicable to various CNC machine tools as well as manual machines. Prerequisite: ENGR 142 ENGR 251: Estimates and Costs 4 Cr Quarters: W Preparing quantity and cost estimates from plans for engineering projects. The class studies current costs of common construction materials, earthwork, and excavation costs. Critical Path Method (CPM) of planning and scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH 085 ENGR 260: Soils and Foundations 4 Cr Quarters: W Weight/volume relationships, index properties, bearing strengths of various soils, types and use of soils, as well as settlement and compaction, footings and retaining structures, lab equipment, and interpretation of soil tests. Prerequisite: MATH& 141

ENGR 262: Roadway Design and Construction 3 Cr Quarters: S Construction materials, soils, drainage and fills as well as grading and preparation of roadway subgrade. Design and construction of roadway surfaces, including asphalt and concrete, and safety in design. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 ENGR 263: Basic Structural Design 4 Cr Quarters: W This course will include design and construction of roadway surfaces including asphalt and concrete. This course introduces students to construction materials, drainage and fills, as well as grading and preparation of roadway subgrade. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or permission of instructor ENGR 266: Advanced Surveying 2 Cr Quarters: S This course provides an advanced understanding of surveying, measuring distances, elevations, and directions using a total surveying station. Students learn construction staking and surveying of plots and land. Prerequisite: ENGR 200 or permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in ENGR 268 ENGR 267: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 2 Cr Quarters: S Introduction to GIS and its relationship to the surveying field. Study will include assessing, querying, editing, and classifying spatial data; analyzing spatial relationships; and presenting information through chart and map layout creation. Prerequisite: ENGR 200 or permission of instructor ENGR 268: AutoCAD Civil 3D 4 Cr Quarters: S Students learn the essentials of AutoCAD Civil 3D software which enables them to deliver higher-quality transportation, land developments, and environmental engineering projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 110 and ENGR 200 ENGR 270: Advanced Machining CNC Lathe 5 Cr Quarters: S This course is designed to build skill and knowledge in CNC. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to program, set up, and operate CNC equipment. Students will work on projects using the CNC to practice the concepts taught in class. Prerequisite: ENGR 241 ENGR 272: Advanced Machining CNC Mill 5 Cr Quarters:S This course is designed to build skill and knowledge in CNC. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to program, set up, and operate CNC equipment. Students will work on projects using the CNC to practice the concepts taught in class. Prerequisite: ENGR 235 ENGR 277: InRoads 2 Cr Quarters: S Students will learn and apply basic roadway geometric fundamentals. Students will also learn the functionality and capabilities of Bentley’s InRoads CAD program to design roadways. Prerequisite: ENGR 118 or permission of instructor ENGR 282: Building Code 3 Cr Quarters: W A study of the International Building Code and local building codes as they pertain to residential and light commercial construction. Prerequisite: ENGR 101 or permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

123


124

ENGR 283: Building Systems 3 Cr Quarters: S An introduction to the design and drawing of service systems in residential and light commercial construction. Systems that will be studied include plumbing, HVAC, electrical and electronic, fire suppression, and intercommunication. Students will use AutoCAD to complete system drawings. Prerequisite: ENGR 101 and ENGR 110 ENGR 286: Structural CAD 4 Cr Quarters: F Students will learn structural terminology, design requirements, and documentation procedures to produce shop and erection drawings. They will gain a comprehensive understanding of major building materials and construction methods for commercial structures. Prerequisite: ENGR 112 or permission of instructor ENGR 287: Microstation 3-D 3 Cr Quarters: S Students will apply 3-D CADD (Computer Aided Drafting & Design) fundamentals using Microstation CAD program. Prerequisite: ENGR 118

English The mission of the English Department is to help students develop the habits of writers, readers, and critical thinkers as well as further their interest in reading and writing as a way of learning about themselves and the world. Most YVCC students will take college composition courses ranging from ENGL 090T, Reviewing English Essentials I, to ENGL 102, English Composition II. Most transfer degrees require completion of ENGL& 101 and ENGL 102 with a C (2.0) or better in both courses. YVCC placement scores determine initial placement in composition courses. Since a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking is necessary for student success, students who place in ENGL 090T generally must complete ENGL 090T and 095 before entering ENGL& 101. Consult with an advisor for placement in the composition series and for specific degree requirements. To become more competent college writers, students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university often take ENGL 203, The Research Paper, which also satisfies three credits of basic requirements.

Other English Courses In addition to the composition courses, YVCC offers a range of creative writing and literature survey courses, taught by the department’s writers and its literature experts. Students who wish to enroll in a 100-level literature course must be eligible for ENGL& 101. Students who wish to enroll in a 200-level literature course must have completed ENGL& 101. Consult the list of courses below for any other prerequisites.

Writing Centers at YVCC To support student success in writing for any discipline, the English Department houses two writing centers, one on the Yakima Campus in Glenn Anthon in G125, and one on Grandview’s Campus in L117. Student-centered facilities, the writing centers are writing communities with consultants trained to help YVCC students with any aspect of writing, from gathering ideas to finalizing a paper or other writing projects. Research shows that regular use of writing center services helps to improve student performance on writing assignments. Students also can earn credit for meeting with consultants weekly or for working as peer consultants. Current hours for the Writing Centers in Yakima and Grandview are listed on the Writing Center website, www. yvcc.edu/owl.

English Placement Policy Students are placed in the English sequence by YVCC testing. Those students placed in ENGL 090T and ENGL 095 earn grades of S, CR, or NC, with a few students continuing to earn an I, V, or W. Students in these courses are required to earn a grade of S in order to advance to the next class. Information about the English Department policy on retesting is available at the YVCC Testing Center in the Deccio Higher Education Center. Once a student enters the composition sequence, s/he may not retest.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Courses ENGL 080: Composing on Computers 2 Cr Quarters: O English 080 is a two-credit course that can stand alone or be linked to an existing developmental writing course (ENGL 090T or ENGL 095). Students will learn the basics of composing with the use of software— such as Inspiration, Writing About Reading, and CommonSpace —which is specific to writing classes, and a word processing package such as Microsoft Word. Students will learn how composing on computers significantly enhances the writing process as they brainstorm, exchange drafts for online peer critique sessions, confer with each other online, and work together and with the instructor to revise their work using the Screenwriter. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ENGL 081T: Reading-Writing in the Disciplines 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students in this transitional course will learn strategies for reading and responding to a variety of printed materials, particularly those used in college courses. Strategies emphasized include identifying main ideas and supporting details; analyzing materials for the author’s purpose; participating in seminars about assigned readings; summarizing brief passages and longer works, such as journal articles; including citations and references; avoiding plagiarism; predicting and responding to quiz and/or test questions; and adjusting strategies to the type of materials to be read. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL 081T, CASAS scores of 236 or above ENGL 085: Writing Workshop 1-2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S The writing center workshop is designed to guide students through writing assignments and related work from any or all classes. Students in the workshop will get individual assistance from writing consultants at the Writing Center and will be coached in the process approach to writing. Strategies for gathering ideas, drafting, organizing, revising, and editing their work will be emphasized, as well as how to view grammatical “errors” as opportunities to learn. The workshop also offers guidance in critical reading strategies and, in general, provides a place where students may ask questions about academic language. Note: Students may be referred to this course by an instructor. ENGL 090T: Reviewing English Essentials I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Through well-defined and structured activities, students in this transitional course produce unified, coherent, short, typed compositions following standard conventions of formatting, spelling, punctuation, and grammar. They will base their writing on readings from basic texts enhanced by active participation in class discussions. A grade of S in ENGL 090T is required to enter ENGL 095. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 090T. For ABE transition students, a minimum CASAS reading score of 236 or above and a score of 4 or above on a rubcric writing task ENGL 095: Reviewing English Essentials II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students in ENGL 095 will practice writing as a process. Through this process, they will learn to write clear, unified, coherent essays following conventions of written English. They also will develop their critical thinking through reading, writing, and discussion. They will support their ideas with evidence and will be introduced to MLA documentation. A grade of S in ENGL 095 is required to enter ENGL& 101. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL 095 or ENGL 090T with a grade of S

ENGL 099, 198, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ENGL& 101: English Composition I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR In the first of two college-level courses, ENGL& 101 students will learn to write clear, unified, coherent, and well-developed essays of increasing complexity. Through reading, writing, and discussion, students will learn to critically examine their own assumptions and opinions and to consider the facts and reasoning of others. Students will learn to use Modern Language Association conventions of language, format, and documentation accurately. Students must earn a C or better in ENGL& 101 to enroll in the second college-level composition course, ENGL 102. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 095 with a grade of S Distribution: CM ENGL 102: English Composition II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR The second of two college-level courses, ENGL 102 will continue to require clear, unified, coherent, and well-developed essays of increasing complexity. While consideration of audience is an inherent part of the writing required in ENGL& 101, students in ENGL 102 will learn to consider more explicitly the role the audience plays when they write. In seeking to gain credibility with their audience and to persuade others to their points of view, students will write extended arguments. Through reading, writing, and discussion, students will continue to examine their own assumptions and opinions and to consider the facts and reasoning of others. In their writing they will bring to bear a variety of texts to support their arguments as they learn basic research techniques and the documentation conventions of the Modern Language Association or comparable style sheets from other disciplines. Extended research, the province of ENGL 203, will not be required. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 with a grade of C (2.0) or better Distribution: CM ENGL 120: Basic Grammar 3 Cr Quarters: O This course is a concentrated study of English grammar and usage. It will also review fundamentals of sentence structure, punctuation, spelling, and other basic principles of effective writing. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 ENGL 130, 131, 132: Writers and Ideas I, II, III 2 Cr Quarters: O Students will read and interpret novels, short stories, poems, plays, and literary nonfiction. The subject matter may represent all five genres or may focus on the works of one or more writers. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 135: Introduction to Short Fiction 3 Cr Quarters: O Reading and analyzing representative short stories and/or novellas. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 136: Introduction to Plays 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will read plays with different themes, styles, and voices; they will learn about the different genres within dramatic literature. They also will explore background material, including the elements and the history of drama. Attendance of live performances will be required when possible. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 137: Introduction to Poetry 3 Cr Quarters: O The course introduces students to critical methods of reading and evaluating poetry of a wide variety of form, subject, and mood. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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ENGL 138: Introduction to Novel 3 Cr Reading and analyzing novels. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Quarters: O

ENGL 140: Science Fiction 3 Cr Quarters: O Exploration of major novels by contemporary authors such as Cherryh, LeGuin, and Dick. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 141: The Mystery Novel 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will read, discuss, and write about the mystery genre either as a general overview, which would include detective, spy, and other types of mystery forms; or the course may focus on one or two writers such as Agatha Christie, P.D. James, Elizabeth George, John LeCarre, or Elmore Leonard, for example. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 144: Literature of Pacific Northwest and West 3 Cr Quarters: O Writing of the Pacific Northwest and West will be studied. This writing may be studied against the background of early myths of the frontier, early European and U.S. expeditions, regional 19th century history, Hollywood legend, and the origins of literary regionalism. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 145: Introduction to Native American Literature 3 Cr Quarters: O An examination of Native American history, myth, and legend with readings and discussion of contemporary Native American authors. The integration of traditional material with contemporary concerns and the crucial role of storytelling in the preservation and revitalization of Native American cultures are explored. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 150: Women in Literature 3 Cr Quarters: O An examination of works by and about women with a concentration on comparative examination of themes and character development. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 160, 161, 162: English Portfolio Generation & Manage 1 Cr Quarters: O Designed for classes in which students maintain written records of their progress in a selected area of study. Students will be required to keep all their written assignments for a quarter, to write short assessments of each written assignment, and to write a more comprehensive selfassessment at the end of the quarter. In addition, they will meet with the portfolio management instructor two to three times a quarter to discuss their writing. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 ENGL 170: Prism: Student Literary Journal I Variable 3-5 Cr Quarters: O By reading and examining the creative works of YVCC students, class members in both Yakima and Grandview will collaborate to develop aesthetic standards for evaluating literature and art submitted for inclusion in YVCC’s annual student literary journal. Using these standards, class members will select poems, stories, essays, photographs, and works of art for publication, perform desktop publishing of the journal, and generally take full responsibility for all aspects of publishing and publicizing the journal. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

ENGL 171: Prism: Student Literary Journal II Variable 3-5 Cr See description for ENGL 170. Prerequisite: ENGL 170 Distribution: HM

Quarters: O

ENGL 185: Writing Consultant Variable 1-3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S The writing consultant course is designed to give students who enjoy writing or are anticipating careers as teachers or writers a chance to share their interest and knowledge about writing with their peers in the YVCC writing centers. Students in the consulting course will be coached in the process approach to writing. They will learn how to conduct successful consultations, offer constructive feedback, and determine the effectiveness of tutoring strategies. Consultants will meet individually with student writers who drop in during their free time or schedule appointments. Note: This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B+ in ENGL& 101 and writing center director permission ENGL 201: Creative Writing I 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will be introduced to the craft of creative writing in one or more of the following areas: the short story, the novel, creative nonfiction, or poetry. They will study published works in one or more of these areas, and they will complete writing assignments that deal with the elements and techniques particular to each form. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 202: Creative Writing II 3 Cr Quarters: O Students may continue their study of creative writing by enrolling in ENGL 202. This course may be taught concurrently with English 201. Prerequisite: ENGL 201 Distribution: HM ENGL 203: The Research Paper 3 Cr Quarters: O Students will learn basic research methods and write one or more documented essays and an extended research paper. They will be introduced to the library and electronic sources, bibliography, and documentation conventions of the Modern Language Association as well as learn to apply various rhetorical principles to their writing. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: CM or HM, but not both ENGL 205: Poetry Workshop 2 Cr Quarters: O In a workshop format, students will study the aesthetics and techniques of poetry in order to create original poems. This is a course for anyone who wants to learn about poetry from a poet’s perspective. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 209: Introduction to Mythology 5 Cr Quarters: O A general survey of world mythology, of myths from many cultures, their literary adaptation, and their influence on cultural and social norms. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


ENGL 212: Survey of Latin American Literature 5 Cr Quarters: O Survey of representative works from Latin America in translation, including the colonial and neocolonial legacies as reflected in authors of diverse race, gender, and political orientation. Survey may include such authors as de las Casas, Inez de la Cruz, Palma, Quiroga, Sarmiento, Machado, Vargas Llosa, Rulfo, Borges, Cortazar, Neruda, Garcia Marquez, and Allende. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 220: Survey of American Literature: Beginnings to 1870 5 Cr Quarters: O Major American writing and thinking from the Puritan and Colonial periods through the American Renaissance and the beginnings of realism. Representative works of writers of diverse cultural backgrounds will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 221: Survey of American Literature: 1870 to 1945 5 Cr Quarters: O Survey of the major writers of the Realist, Naturalist, Modernist, and contemporary periods, such as Twain, James, Crane, Chopin, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, O’Connor, Stein, and Porter. Representative works of writers of diverse cultural backgrounds will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

ENGL 271: Shakespeare in Ashland 3 Cr Quarters: O A study and viewing of the Elizabethan plays currently in performance at Ashland, Oregon. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 275: The Bible as Literature 5 Cr Quarters: O ENGL 275 addresses the literary artistry, cultural significance, and historical references in the Bible. The approach may be chronological, by genre, and/or by theme. The material will be analyzed and evaluated for its sociological, psychological, philosophical, spiritual, and crosscultural/global influence. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

English as a Second Language See “English Language Learners” under Modern Languages.

ENGL 222: Survey of American Literature: 1945 to Present 5 Cr Quarters: O Survey of the major writers and literary movements after World War II. Emphasis is on the developing multicultural, multi-ethnic, and feminist movements in the United States but also includes Beat and counterculture movements, deconstructionist thinking, and their resulting styles. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 264: English Literature: Begin to 1660 5 Cr Quarters: O Significant works, including Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and selections from the Canterbury Tales and Paradise Lost are read and discussed in their literary, historical, and social contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 265: English Literature: 1660 to 1832 5 Cr Quarters: O Major authors of this period, including Dryden, Swift, Pope, Boswell, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley, are read and discussed in their literary, historical, and social contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 266: English Literature: 1832 to Present 5 Cr Quarters: O Major authors of this period, which may include Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Mill, Hardy, Hopkins, Shaw, Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, and Eliot, are read and discussed in their literary, historical, and social contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM ENGL 270: Introduction to Shakespeare 5 Cr Quarters: O A study of selected history plays, tragedies, and comedies to enhance students’ comprehension of the plots, characters, and themes of Shakespeare’s plays. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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128 Ethnic Studies See also "Chican@ Studies" Ethnic Studies focuses on the historical and contemporary experiences of people of color in the United States, including Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic/Latin@s, and Asian Americans. Emphasis is placed on their achievements and contributions to American society as well as on their roles within the complex dynamics of racial and ethnic relations. Introductory ethnic studies courses are offered, as are more specialized courses focusing on one ethnic group or a specific topic. In addition, students of all levels are encouraged to pursue independent study and research under the guidance of the ethnic studies faculty. Ethnic studies courses provide new and different perspectives on American society, making them an appropriate and necessary addition to any course of study.

Courses ETHS 101: American Ethnic Minorities 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An in-depth study of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Hispanic American people. Students explore the role of the early immigration of women, elderly, gays, teens, and other minority groups to the United States. Includes examination of their cultures, traditions, customs, language, and contemporary status. The collaborative methodology encourages students to question, discuss, and debate past and current issues and to challenge myths and stereotypes of minorities. The course seeks to engage students in an intellectual journey intended to foster respect for all cultures and peoples. Distribution: SS ETHS 103: Media, Art, & American Ethnicity 5 Cr Quarters: W Considers the treatment of race and ethnicity in film, television, and the visual arts. The course will take a critical approach to the study of the mass media as art forms, as political and social commentaries, and as representations of ethnic America. Distribution: HM ETHS 105: Ethnic Women 3 Cr Quarters: O Addresses the unique experience of the woman of color in historical and contemporary context. This will include analysis of their economic, social, legal, and political condition as well as their relation to both the ethnic and women's movements. Special focus will be placed on the intersection of race, class, and gender as the basis for social inequality and oppression. ETHS 107: Race & Ethnic Relations 2 Cr Quarters: O Explores the complex dynamics of race and ethnicity in America through examination of the treatment of minorities in dominant American society. This course will examine concrete examples of the ethnic experience, including topics such as racism, prejudice, legal discrimination, affirmative action, hate crimes, and violence. It is designed to sensitize students to the minority experience. ETHS 120: African American Experience 3 Cr Quarters: S Studies the historical, cultural, literary, and artistic achievements of Americans of African descent. Course will examine the dynamics of slavery, white racism, and stratification to offer a comprehensive introduction to the study of African American life. Distribution: HM

ETHS 145: US/Indian Relations 3 Cr Quarters: W Provides a comprehensive overview of the unique legal and political status of American Indians. This course will describe and explain that status, first by surveying its historical origins, and then by examining pertinent modern laws and some practical impact of those laws. Distribution: SS ETHS 180: Ethnic Cultures I 2 Cr Quarters: O This course gives students the opportunity for cross-cultural experience and comparative studies while learning about and interacting with ethnic communities. The focus is on the cultures of Native Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans. The class is conducted in a seminar format with an interdisciplinary approach. It will emphasize cross-cultural research, and students will produce a project based on independent investigation. ETHS 181: Ethnic Cultures II 3 Cr Quarters: O This course is based on the same format as ETHS 180, but, in addition, this course will include direct involvement with community service. ETHS 185: Field Experience 1 Cr Quarters: O This course will provide all students the opportunity to participate in ethnic student organizations, develop leadership skills, and present cross-cultural events for campus and community. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ETHS 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in ethnic studies.

Quarters: O

ETHS 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Allows students to complete research on a special topic relating to ethnic studies chosen in consultation with a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ETHS 200: Ethnic Curriculum 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to ethnic studies curricula. The course will focus upon innovative teaching methodologies as well as strategies for teaching ethnic content and integrating those unique perspectives into current curricula. ETHS 203: Ethnic Storytelling 3 Cr Quarters: O An in-depth study of ethnic storytelling. The course focuses on the genesis of storytelling as well as the methods, techniques, and strategies of unique storytellers. Students will compare the myths, legends, fables, and oral traditions of ethnic peoples globally and examine the ways stories have traditionally been used to develop moral character. Distribution: HM

Foreign Language See "Modern Languages"

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Geography

Geology

Geography is an integrative discipline that unites the physical and social sciences in the study of people, places, and the environment. Major themes geographers explore are the interaction of human and natural environments, movement, and regions. Geography studies the where-and-why factors that shape our world and our lives in spatial terms.

A basic group of geology courses is offered so that students may gain an understanding of the earth’s surfaces and interior, and the processes which have changed Earth through time. Courses are taught for students who wish to satisfy natural science requirements, to explore the field for future study, or to learn for personal enrichment.

Courses

Courses

GEOG 101: World Regional Geography 5 Cr Quarters: F An introduction to the earth's major geographic regions, their cultural, economic, and physical characteristics, and the interactions between regions. Includes an emphasis on locations of significant places. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

GEOL 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

GEOG 102: Physical Geography 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to the principal components of the earth’s natural systems of landforms, weather and climate, vegetation, and soils, as well as their interrelationships. Factors affecting the worldwide distribution of these components are stressed. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: NS GEOG& 200: Human Geography 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to the study of human cultural features (such as population, resources use, and language), their distribution, and their interaction with each other and the natural environment. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS GEOG 205: Economic Geography 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to the spatial patterns of economic activity on both a regional and global scale. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties, the distribution of resources and wealth, and the resulting inequalities and tensions. Topics include trade, development, resource extraction, agriculture, manufacturing, and service sector economies, transportation, communication, and environmental impact. Credit cannot be given for both GEOG 205 and ECON 205. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

GEOL& 101: Introduction to Physical Geology 5 Cr Quarters: W The study of the earth as a whole; its origin, structure, composition, and history; and the nature of the processes that have given rise to its present state. Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or YVCC placement into ENGL& 101 and MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 085 Distribution: NS (L) GEOL& 103: Historical Geology 5 Cr Quarters: S An introduction to the history of the earth including its origin, development of interior and crustal structures, changes in climate and surface environments, and the evolution of life forms. Emphasis is given to how the history of Earth is revealed in the rock record. Prerequisite: GEOL& 101, GEOL& 115, or GEOL& 208 Distribution: NS (L) GEOL& 115: Geology National Parks 5 Cr Quarters: F A study of selected U.S. and Canadian national parks which showcases the tectonic and gradational evolution of North America. The focus of the course will be on geologic exposures shaped principally by plate tectonic forces and by water, wind and glacial erosion. Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or YVCC placement into ENGL& 101; MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 085 Distribution: NS (L) GEOL 155: Glacial Geology 3 Cr Quarters: O Characteristics and effects of modern and ancient glaciers and Earth’s Ice Ages will be studied, along with global climatic change, ice formation and movement, and glacial erosional and depositional features. Weekend field trips to observe active glaciation and Washington’s Pleistocene legacy will be a part of the class. Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or YVCC placement into ENGL& 101; MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 085 Distribution: NS GEOL 206: Glaciers and Climate Change 5 Cr Quarters: F In this course students will examine characteristics and effects of modern and ancient glaciation, and learn about ice formation and movement, glacial erosion and depositional features, and periglacial landscapes. Particular focus will be directed to investigate Earth’s Ice Ages and the origins of natural and anthropogenic climate change. Students will participate in field trip activities where they will observe active glaciation and assess evidence for Washington’s Ice Age history. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 084 or MATH 085 Distribution: NS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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GEOL& 208: Geology Pacific NW 5 Cr Quarters: F Geology of the Pacific Northwest is the study of the physical and historical geology of the state of Washington and surrounding region. Students will gain familiarity with earth materials common to the Pacific Northwest and learn about the tectonic and gradational processes that shaped our region. Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or YVCC placement into ENGL& 101; MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 085 Distribution: NS (L)

History The historian analyzes human events and social/political organizations, attempting to establish an accurate perspective of the past. History provides us with an identity. It allows us to place current events into a perspective which gives us a sense of context and sequence. The patterns of civilizations can be discerned. History courses are taught at YVCC by instructors who are known for their knowledge and provocative presentations.

Courses HIST 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. HIST 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor HIST& 116: Western Civilization I 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of European and Near Eastern history from the earliest Mediterranean civilizations through Medieval Europe. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: Either SS or HM, but not both HIST& 117: Western Civilization II 5 Cr Quarters: O Political, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe from the Renaissance to 1815. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: Either SS or HM, but not both HIST& 118: Western Civilization III 5 Cr Quarters: S Political, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe from 1815 through the post-World War II era. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS HIST& 136: U.S. History I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States from pre-colonial exploration through Civil War. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS HIST& 137: U.S. History II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States since the Civil War. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS HIST 190: Co-op Field Experience 4 Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

HIST 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in history.

Quarters: O

HIST 205: US History 1945 to Present 5 Cr Quarters: F, W The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States from 1945 to the present with special emphasis on the Cold War era. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


HIST 208: Roman Civilization 5 Cr Quarters: O Historical survey of Roman civilization from its origins through the Republic, Empire, and the rise of Rome's successors. With a time frame of 800 BCE to 600 CE, this class will emphasize the political, social, and cultural transformation of the Roman world and how this society became an integral part of Western civilization. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: HM HIST 209: Greek Civilization 5 Cr Quarters: O Historical survey of ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to the Hellenic and Hellenistic eras. The course will provide a chronology of key events with emphasis on analyzing the evolution of Greek culture. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: Either HM or SS, but not both HIST 213: Economic History 5 Cr Quarters: O An introduction to the methods of economic interaction from antiquity to the present. This course offers a comprehensive world survey, emphasizing important economic events—such as the invention of currency, the Industrial Revolution, and the development of economic thought—to include major economic thinkers and their contribution to the understanding of economic processes. Credit cannot be given for both HIST 213 and ECON 213. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS HIST& 214: Pacific Northwest History 5 Cr Quarters: F Although emphasis is placed on historical chronology and development pertaining to Pacific Northwest history, a sweeping view of the politics, geography, economy, and cultural exchanges of the region is examined from its earliest inhabitants to contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Humanities Humanities is the study of the major ideas in Western thought concerning people and their culture, society, and place in the universe expressed through the visual arts, literature, philosophy, and religion. The degree distribution requirement in the humanities course list includes specific courses listed here as well as courses listed in art, drama, English, ethnic studies, foreign languages (French, German and Spanish), history, music, philosophy, and speech. To select courses for humanities distribution, the student should also refer to these other disciplines in this catalog.

Courses HUM 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor HUM 102: Introduction to Humanities I 5 Cr Quarters: F Society, arts and ideas of Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia; Classical Greece, Rome and China; and European and Asian Medieval cultures, ca. 4000 BCE - 1400 CD. There are three essay assignments which may require extra-curricular attendance. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 Distribution: HM HUM 103: Introduction to Humanities II 5 Cr Quarters: W Society, arts and ideas of the Renaissance, Baroque and Enlightenment periods of Europe, and concurrent developments in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, ca. 1400 - 1800 CE. There are three essay assignments which may require extra-curricular attendance. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 Distribution: HM

HIST 270: History of Latin America 5 Cr Quarters: O An examination of Latin America's history and culture from the colonization era to recent times. Some focus on rich resources, chronic poverty, and the role of the U.S. in the hemisphere. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

HUM 104: Introduction to Humanities III 5 Cr Quarters: F, S Society, arts, and ideas in the Early Modern, Modern, and Post-Modern periods of the 19th through 20th centuries in the West and concurrent developments in Asia and Africa. There are three essay assignments which may require extra-curricular attendance. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 095 Distribution: HM

HIST 275: History of Mexico 5 Cr Quarters: O An examination of Mexican history from its indigenous roots through conquest and colonization to independence, the revolution, and some contemporary challenges. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

HUM 111: American Pop Culture I 2 Cr Quarters: F An examination of the political, cultural, and social development of American popular culture from colonial times to the present. An exploration of our distinctive popular culture through its icons, activities, and rituals. Distribution: HM HUM 112: American Pop Culture II 2 Cr Quarters: W, S An irreverent examination of the art and business of pleasing the American mass audience through its pop culture forms—comics, art, cinema, best sellers, magazines, music, and television. Distribution: HM HUM 113: American Pop Culture III 2 Cr Quarters: S An examination of the cultural and sociological factors responsible for what American life may be in the 21st century; an examination of American life tomorrow. Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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132

HUM 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in humanities. HUM 270: Significant Figures in World Civilization 2 Cr Quarters: O This course will introduce students to a variety of people who have made significant contributions to humanity. Figures presented will vary by instructor and represent cultural, historical, political, and social perspectives. Distribution: HM

Information Technology Yakima Valley Community College offers exciting information technology degree programs. Our modern facility offers several computer classrooms, one hardware classroom, and one network classroom. Practical development is stressed in information technology classes as students are presented with strategies for applying their studies to present and future needs of technology-related careers. The faculty is committed to delivering excellent instruction, and the college is dedicated to providing students with the tools to succeed. For more information contact the department website at www.yvcc.edu/it.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Apply current industry practices and standards to business challenges and opportunities. • Communicate effectively and efficiently with peers and clients. • Utilize critical thinking skills to troubleshoot technological problems and apply solutions.

Careers Information technology is a broad area with many career opportunities. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer. com.

Degrees The Information Technology Program offers four associate of applied science degrees: • General Degree • Support Specialist • Network Administrator Please contact the Information Technology Program at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog for the most current curriculum information. Information technology degree candidates must complete a 59-credit core which includes courses that present the concepts of theory, history, software, Internet, networking, hardware, programming, human relations, computation, communications, and ethics/law. The core helps students determine which degree they want to work toward and presents a solid foundation in the information technology discipline. Students then select a degree option which totals at least 90 credits upon degree completion. Degrees are awarded upon completion of the required degree courses with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Required Courses for IT Core Credits BA 115 Business Math ‹ 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication z 5 BA 225 Career Management „ 5 BUS& 201 Business Law -ORBA 259 Fundamentals of E-Commerce 5 BT 160 Word Processing Short Course 2 IT 101 Introduction to Information Technology 5 IT 103 Operating Systems 5 IT 104 Internet Essentials 3 IT 110 Computer Programming Introduction 5 IT 111 Spreadsheet Introduction 2 Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


IT 115 Database Introduction IT 120 PowerPoint IT 140 Network Fundamentals IT 160 Managing & Maintaining the PC IT 161 Computer Room Maintenance I IT 190/191/192/193 Co-op Field Experience Total Core Credits

2 2 5 5 1 2 59

In addition to these core requirements, students must have demonstrated proficiency in the following areas: • Math proficiency is required and may be fulfilled by either completing BA 075 with a “C” or better or YVCC placement to Math 085 or above. • Keyboarding proficiency is required and may be fulfilled by completing BT 101 or passing the keyboarding proficiency test administered by the Information Technology Department. For more information, contact an IT advisor. • Experience and proficiency with current Microsoft Windows operating system is highly recommended for all IT courses. Enroll in IT 102: Windows, 2 credits, if you do not have this experience. General Degree For the general degree, students, with assistance from an IT advisor, will complete the information technology core as well as courses (100-level and above) from the departments listed below to total at least 90 credits. The general degree allows students to get a solid background in IT and also to supplement their degrees with courses in other interests or skills necessary for their intended occupations. Students can take up to 10 credits from arts and sciences classes and can choose additional electives from Agriculture, Business, Business technology, Criminal Justice, Engineering, and Information Technology. Network Administrator This degree enables students to install, administer, configure, and troubleshoot networks. This curriculum helps prepare students for industry recognized Cisco, CompTIA, and Microsoft certifications. Required Courses IT 141 IT 143 IT 144 IT 145 IT 146 IT 149 IT 243 IT 244 IT 249

IT Core System Virtualization Cisco I Cisco II Advanced Microsoft Windows Windows Server Windows PowerShell Scripting Cisco III Cisco IV Network Security Total Credits

Credits 59 3 5 5 5 5 2 4 5 5 98

Support Specialist The IT Support Specialist degree includes curriculum that helps prepare students for CompTIA and Microsoft certifications and provides opportunities for developing a strong IT knowledge base necessary for those in the support specialist degree. The curriculum includes hardware and software installations, end-user support, and troubleshooting skills.

Required Courses

Credits IT Core 57 *BT 260 Word Processing 5 IT 124 Publisher or IT 184, InDesign 3 IT 143 Cisco I 5 IT 145 Advanced Microsoft Windows 5 IT 221 Spreadsheets Advanced 4 IT 222 Outlook 2 IT 225 Database Advanced 4 IT 226 Systems Support: Software Applications 3 IT 227 Software Install & Troubleshooting 2 IT 260 Advanced Managing & Maintaining PC 5 Total Credits 95 * Support Specialist students are required to complete BT 260 instead of BT 160 listed in the core courses.

Certificates Courses listed below may have prerequisites. Please consult the course descriptions. Managing & Maintaining the PC IT 160 IT 260

Managing & Maintaining the PC Advanced Managing & Maintaining PC Total Credits

5 5 10

Access IT 115 IT 225

Database Introduction Database Advanced Total Credits

2 4 6

Cisco Internetworking IT 143 IT 144 IT 243 IT 244

Cisco I Cisco II Cisco III Cisco IV Total Credits

5 5 4 5 19

Excel IT 111 IT 221

Spreadsheet Introduction Spreadsheet Advanced Total Credits

2 4 6

IT Computer User BA 115 BA 138 BT 101 BT 260 IT 100 IT 102 IT 104 IT 111 IT 115 IT 120 IT 124 IT 221 IT 225

Business Math ‹ Written Business Communication or ENGL& 101: English Composition I Beginning Keyboarding (or pass competency test) Word Processing Introduction to Computers Windows Internet Essentials Spreadsheet Introduction Database Introduction PowerPoint Publisher Spreadsheet Advanced Database Advanced Total Credits

5 5 5 5 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 4 4 45

IT General Completion of this certificate will enable students to seek employment and/or continue with an information technology degree as most of the classes required for the certificate comprise the information technology core requirements. Required Courses Credits BA 115 Business Math ‹ 5 BA 138 Written Business Communication z 5 BA 220 Human Relations in Workplace „ 2 BUS& 201 Business Law or BA 259: Fundamentals of E-Commerce 5 BT 160 Word Processing Short Course 3 IT 101 Introduction to Information Technology 5 IT 103 Operating Systems 5

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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134

IT 104 IT 110 IT 111 IT 115 IT 120 IT 140 IT 160 IT 161

Internet Essentials Computer Programming Introduction Spreadsheets Introduction Database Introduction PowerPoint Network Fundamentals Managing & Maintaining the PC Computer Room Maintenance I Total Credits

3 5 2 2 2 5 5 1 55

In addition to the core requirements, students must have demonstrated proficiency in the following areas: z

z

z

Math proficiency is required and may be fulfilled by either completing BA 075 with a “C� or better or YVCC placement to Math 085 or above. Keyboarding proficiency is required and may be fulfilled by completing BT 101 or passing the keyboarding test administered by the Information Technology Department. For more information, contact an IT advisor. Experience and proficiency with Microsoft Windows operating system is highly recommended for all IT courses. Enroll in IT 102: Windows, 2 credits, if you do not have this experience.

Office Suite BT 260 IT 111 IT 115 IT 120 IT 221 IT 225

Word Processing Spreadsheets Introduction Database Introduction PowerPoint Spreadsheets Advanced Database Advanced Total Credits

5 2 2 2 4 4 19

Courses IT 090: Basic Computer Skills 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S A computer literacy course that will help the student identify basic computer components and develop computer skills using word processing, spreadsheet and presentation graphic software. Students will acquire experience in use of the Internet. IT 100: Introduction to Computers 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A computer literacy course that will help the student identify basic computer components and develop computer skills using word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphic software. Students will acquire experience in use of the Internet. IT 101: Introduction to Information Technology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is a survey course that covers most aspects of information technology. It includes how computers work, different types of computers, functions of applications, input and data storage devices, different operating systems, ethics, data communications, and systems analysis and design. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 102: Windows 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course introduces the student to the Windows operating system, working with the Windows desktop, using and managing programs, managing files and folders, and working with the Control Panel. IT 103: Computer Operating Systems 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will install and explore the design, utilities, and configuration of multiple operating systems while learning how each system works with specific hardware components. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent

IT 104: Internet Essentials 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introduces students to the basic concepts of the Internet including history, searching, browsing, email, downloading, chat, management, and Web page development. IT 105: Computer Literacy 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This is an entry-level computer literacy course designed to introduce basic computer skills and concepts in word processing, Windows, the Internet, and Angel online classroom software. IT 110: Computer Programming Introduction 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An introductory course to teach students the fundamentals of computer programming techniques using Visual Basic. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 111: Spreadsheets Introduction 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Specific examples of beginning spreadsheet setups, as well as spreadsheet use, will be covered in detail. IT 115: Database Introduction 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course covers the use of databases in the small business environment including how data can be organized and sorted in a computer for updating forms and reports. IT 120: PowerPoint 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students will learn how to effectively communicate information and ideas utilizing Microsoft PowerPoint. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 124: Publisher 3 Cr Quarters: F This course introduces students to layout and design of information to be published using a computer. Included is the design of several types of desktop publications such as stationary, business cards, flyers, posters, banners, announcements, advertisements, letterheads, newsletters, postcards, and mailing labels. An introduction to basic layout and design principles is also included in this class. Students will study marketing techniques and design principles used by graphic artists and publishers in the layout of desktop materials. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 130: Web Page Authoring HTML 4 Cr Quarters: O Students will be provided with an introduction to Web page formats, functions, and design techniques including an overview of techniques used to manage collections of related Web pages. IT 135: Photoshop 4 Cr Quarters: F, S This course covers the use of digital imaging techniques to create bitmapped or raster images for use in print, multimedia, or web design. Photo editing and color correction tools will be used to enhance digital images and to create special effects using Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 140: Network Fundamentals 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course introduces networking concepts including the knowledge and skills common to industry standards, terminology, planning, implementation, and troubleshooting. This course has been designed to help prepare the student for the CompTIA + Certification. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


IT 141: System Virtualization 3 Cr Quarters: W This course will introduce the students to the concepts of system virtualization. Current industry standards and trends in system virtualization will be emphasized. Prerequisite: IT 103 or permission of instructor IT 143: Cisco I 5 Cr Quarters: S The first of four courses to prepare the students for Cisco CCNA certification. This course will focus on the OSI model, networking components and technologies, basic network design and IP addressing, including subnetting. Prerequisite: IT 140 IT 144: Cisco II 5 Cr Quarters: F This is the second of four courses to prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This course will focus on IP routing, router configurations and routing protocols. Prerequisite: IT 143 and permission of instructor IT 145: Advanced Microsoft Windows 5 Cr Quarters: F Implement, administer, and troubleshoot Microsoft Windows as a desktop operating system in any network environment. Prerequisite: IT 103 IT 146: Windows Server 5 Cr Quarters: W Students implement and administer Windows Server networking, file, and print services. Prerequisite: IT 103 and IT 140. IT 149: Windows PowerShell Scripting 2 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to introduce the students to scripting with Windows PowerShell. The students will acquire hands on experience with script building and system management using Windows PowerShell. IT 160: Managing & Maintaining the PC 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students will safely demonstrate the ability to install and configure hardware and software in a Windows environment, optimize system performance, and troubleshoot problems with software and hardware installation/configuration. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent IT 161: Computer Room Maintenance I 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Through instructor-led demonstration and lecture, students will learn to perform routine and preventive computer maintenance. Students will maintain a log book of their assignments. IT 174: Introduction to C++ 5 Cr Quarters: S Students will learn the fundamental features of the C and C++ languages and apply them to develop solutions to business problems. Basic computer science programming concepts of correctness, maintainability, and efficiency will be emphasized . Prerequisite: MATH 095 or YVCC placement into MATH& 107 Distribution: QU IT 184: InDesign 3 Cr Quarters: S Adobe InDesign is a software program designed to integrate text and graphics from many sources into newsletters, brochures, color catalogs, and magazines with maximum precision and control. In this course, the student will be expected to learn and explore the basic functions and applications of Adobe InDesign. Prerequisite: Recommended IT 102 or equivalent experience

IT 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I, II, III, IV Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative education integrates the students’ classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The students’ education, therefore, is shared between employer supervisors and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor IT 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in information technology. IT 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor IT 221: Spreadsheets Advanced 4 Cr Quarters: W This course provides students with advanced knowledge of spreadsheets, graphs, charts, and functions. Prerequisite: IT 111 or equivalent IT 222: Outlook 2 Cr Quarters: S This course teaches the many functions available from productivity software, including email, calendars, contact lists, task lists, journals, meeting requests, and notes. IT 225: Database Advanced 4 Cr Quarters: S This course will acquaint students with the proper procedures to create, query, and maintain databases suitable for coursework, professional purposes, and personal use. Prerequisite: IT 115 or equivalent IT 226: End-User and System Support 3 Cr Quarters: W For the Software Support Specialist degree. Prepares students to train and support end users in a variety of organizational settings. Includes techniques for developing and delivering training as well as strategies to provide ongoing technical support. Emphasis is on solving users’ problems by means of needs analysis, troubleshooting, and interaction with users. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits or equivalent work experience and concurrent enrollment in IT 227 IT 227: Software Installation & Troubleshooting 2 Cr Quarters: W This course includes how to correctly configure software, how to install software, and a discussion of compatibility issues. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits or equivalent work experience and concurrent enrollment in IT 226 IT 230: Java 5 Cr Quarters: F Java has become the de facto standard for cross-platform applications and programming on the World Wide Web and is commonly used to create graphical user interfaces. This course teaches students the fundamentals of programming using Java programming language. Prerequisite: MATH 095 with C or better or YVCC placement into MATH& 107 and IT 110 with a grade of C (2.0) or permission of instructor Distribution: QU IT 231: Illustrator 4 Cr Quarters: W This course will work with Adobe Illustrator, an industry standard illustration program for print, multimedia, and online graphics. Provides students the opportunity to use Illustrator's software program to create vector graphics for print, multimedia, and the Web. Students should have a working knowledge of computers, file management, and the Windows operating system. Prerequisite: IT 102 or equivalent

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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136

IT 233: Dreamweaver 3 Cr Quarters: O An introductory course exploring concepts and techniques of conceptualizing, designing, and developing integrated, interactive websites using Macromedia Dreamweaver software. Prerequisite: IT 104

Mathematics

IT 234: JavaScript 3 Cr Quarters: O JavaScript is a semi-object-oriented scripting language used for creating dynamic, interactive content for HTML pages. This course explores the development on webpages of graphical user interfaces and interactive processing using JavaScript. Prerequisite: IT 130

Courses

IT 243: Cisco III 4 Cr Quarters: W This is the third of four courses to prepare the students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This course will focus on LAN switching, VLAN’s, fault-tolerant LAN design and STP. Prerequisite: IT 144 IT 244: Cisco IV 5 Cr Quarters: S This is the last of four courses to prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This class focuses on WAN technologies and access lists management. Prerequisite: IT 243 IT 248: Exchange Server 4 Cr Quarters: O This course introduces students to the real-world challenge of installing, configuring, and administering an exchange server. Prerequisite: IT 243, IT 146, or permission of instructor IT 290, 291, 292, 293: Co-op Field Experience V, VI, VII, VIII Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative education integrates the students’ classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate periods of college study with extended employment periods in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, social services, and the professions. The students’ education, therefore, is shared between employer supervisors and YVCC faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

All students needing to take mathematics at YVCC are required to be evaluated through the YVCC placement process before enrolling in a mathematics course.

MATH 049C: Accelerated Number Sense 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S A self-paced course designed for students placing below MATH 050 on the COMPASS test and with placement into ENGL 090T. Students review fundamentals of whole numbers and integers with computation and problem solving. Students taking this course must be able to access computer labs on campus, or personal computers connected to the Internet, outside of the scheduled meetings in the computer classroom. Students receiving a S grade in this course may enroll in MATH 050 or MATH 050C. Students are allowed to repeat this course only once. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into MATH 049T and YVCC placement into ENGL 090T or above High Demand Course policy applies: students are allowed to repeat this course only once. MATH 050: Arithmetic 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A basic course with applications in the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and signed numbers. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into MATH 050 High Demand Course policy applies: students are allowed to repeat this course only once. MATH 050C: Accelerated Arithmetic 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S A self-paced course in arithmetic with applications in the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and signed numbers. Students taking this course must be able to access computer labs on campus, or personal computers connected to the Internet, outside of the scheduled meetings in the computer classroom. Prerequisite: MATH 049C with a grade of S High Demand Course policy applies: students are allowed to repeat this course only once. MATH 075: Pre-Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A transition course from arithmetic to beginning algebra. Content includes ratios, proportions, percents and their applications, measurements in the metric and English systems with applications, basic algebraic manipulations, and an introduction to geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 050 with a grade of C (2.0) or better, or MATH 050C with a grade of S, or YVCC placement into MATH 075 MATH 084: Algebra I: Introductory Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is a course in introductory algebra for students with little or no background in algebra. Topics include properties of real numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations, linear inequalities, polynomials, properties of exponents, scientific notation, and an introduction to graphing. Prerequisite: MATH 075 or placement into MATH 084 MATH 085: Beginning Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An introductory algebra course in which students will solve equations and applications, analyze and graph linear equations, and simplify and factor polynomials. Prerequisite: MATH 075 or placement into MATH 085

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


MATH 091: Algebra II: Elementary Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is a continuation of MATH 084. Topics include graphing, systems of linear equations in two variables, radicals, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 084 or MATH 085 MATH 092: Basic Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This is a course designed for students with previous experience in algebra and who intend to take MATH& 107. Topics include properties of real numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations, linear inequalities, properties of exponents, scientific notation, and graphic linear and exponential functions. Prerequisite: MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 084 or MATH 085 MATH 094: Algebra III: Intermediate Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is a continuation of MATH 091. Topics include graphing, radicals, and quadratic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 091 MATH 095: Intermediate Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR A course in algebraic methods, including polynomials, exponents, and radicals; solving first- and second-degree equations; solving linear inequalities; and graphing and finding equations of functions. Prerequisite: MATH 085 with a grade of C or better or YVCC placement into MATH 095 MATH& 107: Math in Society 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR For students who need quantitative skills or natural science distribution credit and are either not taking additional math courses or are interested in the topics of the course as a supplement to their math studies. The course provides an introduction to and some exploration of the following areas: finance, probability, statistics, and modeling (with graphing). Prerequisite: MATH 091, MATH 092, MATH 094, MATH 095, or YVCC placement into MATH& 107 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH 111: Algebra Applied to Business/Economics 5 Cr Quarters: F, W This course covers algebraic functions, graphs, and processes applied to business and economics. Topics covered include applications and problem-solving using systems of equations, amtrices, linear programming, simplex method, and finance mathematics. Functions used are polynomials, exponetials, logarithmics, and rationals. A TI graphing calculator (83/84) is required for this class. Prerequisite: MATH 094 or MATH 095 with a grade of C or better or YVCC placement into MATH 111 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 131: Mathematics for Elementary Education 1 5 Cr Quarters: F, W A course for prospective teachers focusing on the mathematics underlying modern elementary school math curricula. Topics include deductive reasoning, set theory, whole numbers, fractions, decimals and their operations, and proportion and percentage. Emphasizes deep conceptual understanding, problem solving, and communication of mathematical ideas. Prerequisite: MATH 094 or MATH 095 with a grade of C+ (2.7) or better or YVCC placement into MATH& 141; students must have a basic understanding of algebra MATH& 132: Mathematics for Elementary Education 2 5 Cr Quarters: W, S A course for prospective teachers focusing on the mathematics underlying modern elementary school math curricula. Topics include geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics. Emphasizes deep conceptual understanding, problem solving, and communication of mathematical ideas. Prerequisite: MATH& 131 with a grade of C (2.0) or better Distribution: QU

MATH& 141: Precalculus I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Precalculus I is the first of a two-quarter sequence that prepares students to study calculus. Topics studied include nonlinear equations and system, nonlinear inequalities, polynomial, rational, piece-wise, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and conics. Credit will be granted for either Quantitative Basic requirements or Natural Science distribution, but not both. A graphing calculator is required for this class. The calculator should be equivalent to the TI-84+ or TI-npsire (not CAS). Prerequisite: MATH 094 or MATH 095 with a grade of B- or better or YVCC placement into MATH& 141 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 142: Precalculus II 5 Cr (Formerly MATH 105) Quarters: F, W, S, SR Precalculus II is the second quarter of the precalculus sequence. Topics studied in this course include definitions and properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, identities, right triangle trigonometry, law of sines, law of cosines, polar coordinates, complex numbers, vectors, and parametric equations. Credit will be granted for either Quantitative Basic requirements or Natural Science distribution, but not both. A graphic calculator is required for this class. The calculator should be equivalent to the TI-84+ or TI-nspire (not CAS). Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or YVCC placement into MATH& 142 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 146: Introduction to Stats 5 Cr Quarters: F, W S, SR This course presents a connected introduction to probability and statistics using statistical inference as its frame. The course covers distribution of measurements, probability distributions, the binomial and normal probability distributions, sample estimation, and tests of hypotheses. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MATH 094 or MATH 095 with a grade of C or better or YVCC placement into MATH& 146 Distribution: Either NS or QU, but not both MATH& 148: Business Calculus 5 Cr Quarters: W, S Derivatives and integrals of polynomial, rational, exponetial, and logarithmic functions with applications to business, economics, and social sciences. A TI graphing calculator (83/84) is required for this class. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or MATH 111 with a grade of C or better Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 151: Calculus I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Function, derivatives of functions, and applications of the derivative. A graphing calculator (not a CAS or symbolic calculator) is required for this class. Prerequisite: YVCC placement into MATH& 151 or completing MATH& 142 with a grade of C or better Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 152: Calculus II 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S A course in methods and applications of integration. Improper integrals are also studied. The purchase of a graphing calculator (TI-83/83+, TI-84, or TI-86) is required for this class. Students intending to take CHEM& 141/151 or PHYS 211/221 will be required to buy a TI-86. Prerequisite: MATH& 151 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both MATH& 153: Calculus III 5 Cr Quarters: W, S Parametric equations, differential equations, vectors in the plane and space, polar coordinates, analytic geometry of three dimensions, and infinite series. The purchase of a graphing calculator (TI-83/83+, TI-84, or TI-86) is required for this class. Students intending to take CHEM& 141/151 or PHYS 211/221 will be required to buy a TI-86. Prerequisite: MATH& 152 Distribution: Either QU or NS, but not both

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

137


138

MATH 190: Co-op Field Experience I 4 Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

MATH 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MATH 220: Linear Algebra 5 Cr Quarters: W Systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalue theory, linear transformations, orthogonality, quadratic forms, determinants, and applications. The purchase of a graphing calculator (TI-83/83+, TI-84, or TI-86) is required for this class. Students intending to take CHEM& 141/151 or PHYS 211/221 will be required to buy a TI-86. Prerequisite: MATH& 151 Distribution: QU MATH& 254: Calculus IV 5 Cr Quarters: O The fourth quarter of the calculus sequence. Topics include limits and continuity for functions of more than one variable, partial differentiation and applications, directional derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, divergence, curl, Green’s Theorem, and Stoke’s Theorem. A graphing calculator is required for this class. The calculator should be equivalent to the TI-84+ or TI-nspire (not CAS). Prerequisite: MATH& 153 with a grade of C or better. Distribution: QU MATH 264: Differential Equations 5 Cr Quarters: S Elementary techniques applied to ordinary differential equations with emphasis on the linear differential equation. The purchase of a graphing calculator (TI-83/83+, TI-84, or TI-86) is required for this class. Students intending to take CHEM& 141/151 or PHYS 211/221 will be required to buy a TI-86. Prerequisite: MATH& 153; MATH 220 recommended Distribution: QU

Modern Languages Notes for all Modern Languages: • Only five credits of 100-level modern language (American Sign Language, French, German, or Spanish) may be used for humanities distribution. • Second-year courses are not limited to only five credits for humanities distribution. • These courses may also count toward a student’s major or minor at a four-year institution. • A modern language minor consists of approximately 47 credits, and 15 of those credits can be taken at YVCC. Students who are unsure of placement level after meeting with an advisor should discuss their placement with a modern language instructor. If interested in more accurately determining placement, students may take a language placement test in the computer lab located in the Deccio Higher Education Center, Room 208 (with the exception of ASL). The Modern Language Department does not award credit by placement testing. Students earn credit only through successful completion of courses. American Sign Language The goal of the modern language courses is to enable the students to interact successfully with native signers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis. It is advisable to begin the modern language 101 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in ASL in fulfillment of the requirement at many four-year colleges or universities. Course Placement Students may generally be placed in ASL courses as outlined by the following: • ASL 101: No experience to one year of high school ASL • ASL 102: Two or more years of high school ASL • ASL 103: Three or more years of high school ASL ELL - English Language Learning The goal of the English Language Learning courses is to enable the students to interact successfully with native speakers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis. It is advisable, although not required, that the student begin the ELL 090 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in ELL. Course Placement Open to all students whose first language is not English and who have learned English outside of the home environment. Student must be able to speak English with a certain degree of accuracy and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. Students may be required to take a placement test given by the instructor to determine their language level. Students may be placed in these ELL courses in no particular order: • ELL 090: Listening & Speaking in an Academic Setting • ELL 091: Research & Writing in an Academic Setting • ELL 092: Reading & Interpretation in an Academic Setting

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Spanish The goal of the modern language courses is to enable the students to interact successfully with native speakers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis. The conversation courses differ from the academic courses primarily in breadth. They are usually taught in the evenings and typically meet twice a week. It is advisable to begin the modern language 101 or 201 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in Spanish in fulfillment of the requirement at many four-year college or universities. Course Placement Students may generally be placed in Spanish courses as outlined by the following: • Spanish 101: No Spanish to one year of high school Spanish • Spanish 102: Two or more years of high school Spanish • Spanish 103: Three or more years of high school Spanish • Spanish 201: Four or more years of high school Spanish Please note: Spanish classes are not open to native speakers of Spanish (heritage speakers). Courses for native speakers are listed under SPAN 231, 232, and 233. Spanish for Native Speakers The goal of these classes is to provide language learning opportunities for heritage Spanish speakers. The courses are designed to enhance and strengthen students’ speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills as well as develop strong cultural pride and awareness of the Hispanic world. Course Placement Students may generally be placed in these Spanish courses in no particular order. • Spanish 231: Second-year Spanish for Professional Speaking • Spanish 232: Second-year Spanish for Academic Writing • Spanish 233: Second-year Spanish for Reading

Courses American Sign Language ASL 101: American Sign Language I 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S The course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of American Sign Language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Deaf. This course will enable the students to participate in short conversations and use limited memorized material. Basic vocabulary, sign formation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on active expressive and receptive communication in ASL. Distribution: HM ASL 102: American Sign Language II 5 Cr Quarters: W, S The course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of American Sign Language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Dear. This course will enable the students to participate in conversations of greater length and us memorized material to combine phrases and sentences. Additional vocabulary, sign formation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on active expressive and receptive communication in ASL. Prerequisite: A passing grade in ASL 101 or proven proficiency at that level Distribution: HM

ASL 103: American Sign Language III 5 Cr Quarters: S The course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of American Sign Language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Deaf. This course will enable the students to participate in conversations of greater length and use memorized material to create narratives. Additional vocabulary, sign formation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on active expressive and receptive communication in ASL. Prerequisite: A passing grade in ASL 102 or proven proficiency at that level Distribution: HM

English Language Learning ELL 090: Listening and Speaking in Academic Setting 5 Cr Quarters: O This course offers non-native speakers of English opportunities to study standard English in an academic setting. The course allows the students to reactivate the English they have learned previously and to further develop their target language skills and abilities, to learn more about the target language and cultures, to acquire English literacy and academic skills, and to enhance and further both their career and their educational opportunities. The emphasis, however, will be on oral academic English. Prerequisite: This course is open to those students whose first language is not English and who have learned English outside the home environment. They must be able to speak English with a certain degree of accuracy and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. They will be required to take a listening/speaking and grammar placement examination given by the instructor. ELL 091: Research and Writing in Academic Setting 5 Cr Quarters: O This course offers non-native speakers of English opportunities to study standard English in an academic setting. The course allows the students to reactivate the English they have learned previously and to further develop their target language skills and abilities, to learn more about the target language and cultures, to acquire English literacy and academic skills, and to enhance and further both their career and their educational opportunities. The emphasis, however, will be on written English. Prerequisite: This course is open to those students whose first language is not English and who have learned English outside the home environment. They must be able to speak English with a certain degree of accuracy and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. They will be required to take a writing and grammar placement examination given by the instructor. ELL 092: Reading and Interpretation in Academic Setting 5 Cr Quarters: O This course offers non-native speakers of English opportunities to study standard English in an academic setting. The course allows the students to reactivate the English they have learned previously and to further develop their target language skills and abilities, to learn more about the target language and cultures, to acquire English literacy and academic skills, and to enhance and further both their career and their educational opportunities. The emphasis, however, will be on reading and interpreting academic English. Prerequisite: This course is open to those students whose first language is not English and who have learned English outside the home environment. They must be able to speak English with a certain degree of accuracy and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. They will be required to take a reading and grammar placement examination given by the instructor.

Spanish SPAN 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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SPAN 101: Spanish I First Year 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the students to participate in short conversations and/or use limited memorized material. Basic vocabulary, fundamentals of pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Distribution: HM SPAN 102: Spanish II First Year 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the student to participate in conversations of greater length and/or use memorized material to combine phrases and sentences. Additional vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 101, placement test, or comparable competency Distribution: HM SPAN 103: Spanish III First Year 5 Cr Quarters: S This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the student to participate in short narratives and/or use memorized material to create short paragraphs. Additional vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 102, placement test, or comparable competency Distribution: HM SPAN 111: Conversational Spanish I First Year 3 Cr Quarters: O This course will acquaint participants with some Hispanic cultural patterns and basic Spanish pronunciation. Students will also learn a basic speaking vocabulary related to everyday situations. SPAN 112: Conversational Spanish II First Year 3 Cr See description for SPAN 111. Prerequisite: SPAN 111 or comparable competency SPAN 113: Conversational Span III First Year 3 Cr See description for SPAN 111. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or comparable competency

Quarters: O

Quarters: O

SPAN 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

SPAN 201: Spanish I Second Year 5 Cr Quarters: O This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the students to make up their own sentences, not limited to very familiar or memorized material. Additional vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 103, two or more years of high school Spanish, a placement test, or comparable competency; native speakers normally qualify for second-year courses Distribution: HM SPAN 202: Spanish II Second Year 5 Cr Quarters: O This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the students to deal with complications in such situations on might encounter in living in the target culture. Additional vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 201, three or more years of high school Spanish, a placement test, or comparable competency; native speakers normally qualify for second-year courses Distribution: HM SPAN 203: Spanish III Second Year 5 Cr Quarters: O This course will develop the language skills necessary for functional proficiency and creative use of the Spanish language. Using a communicative, interactive, and task-based approach, the student will explore the language, people, and culture of the Spanish-speaking communities. This course will enable the students to hypothesize, to support opinions, persuade, describe in detail and narrate in detail with precision. Additional vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures will be covered. The emphasis, however, will be on oral comprehension and spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, three or more years of high school Spanish, a placement test, or comparable competency; native speakers normally qualify for second-year courses Distribution: HM

Spanish for Heritage Learners SPAN 231: Second-Year Spanish for Professional Speaking 5 Cr Quarters: F This course offers Spanish heritage learners opportunities to study standard Spanish in an academic setting. The course allows students to reactivate the Spanish they have learned previously and to develop it further, to learn more about their language and cultural heritage, to acquire Spanish literacy and academic skills, to enhance career opportunities, and to fulfill college language admission requirements. The emphasis, however, will be on oral, academic Spanish. Prerequisite: Students must have been raised in a Spanish-speaking home, speak Spanish with a certain degree of accuracy, and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


SPAN 232: Second-Year Spanish for Academic Writing 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course offers Spanish heritage learners opportunities to study standard Spanish in an academic setting. The course allows students to reactivate the Spanish they have learned previously and to develop it further, to learn more about their language and cultural heritage, to acquire Spanish literacy and academic skills, to enhance career opportunities, and to fulfill college language admission requirements. The emphasis, however, will be on written, academic Spanish. Prerequisite: Students must have been raised in a Spanish-speaking home, speak Spanish with a certain degree of accuracy, and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. Distribution: HM SPAN 233: Second-Year Spanish for Academic Reading 5 Cr Quarters: W, S This course offers Spanish heritage learners opportunities to study standard Spanish in an academic setting. The course allows students to reactivate the Spanish they have learned previously and to develop it further, to learn more about their language and cultural heritage, to acquire Spanish literacy and academic skills, to enhance career opportunities, and to fulfill college language admission requirements. The emphasis, however, will be on written, academic Spanish. Prerequisite: Students must have been raised in a Spanish-speaking home, speak Spanish with a certain degree of accuracy, and be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations. Distribution: HM

Music Yakima Valley Community College has long been recognized as having a cutting-edge music program for music majors and non-majors. Some of the courses include classes in music theory, music composition, computer music, history, and literature. Private lessons are also available in voice, piano, and the major instruments. In addition, the department’s performing groups include Concert Choir, Salsa Band, Jazz Ensemble, Chamber Singers, jazz combos, Sax Quartet, and Guitar Ensemble. These groups perform and tour locally, regionally, and internationally and have also received numerous awards from major festivals. YVCC music groups have performed recently in China, Denmark, England, Italy, and Poland. The department also releases a quarterly music collection online featuring original music composed by YVCC students (YVCC Create Music Project). Please visit us on the website for more information about YVCC music at www.yvcc.edu/yvccmusic.

Applied Music: Class Instruction Applied Music: Class instruction courses (MUS 107, 108, and 113) are primarily for beginning students whether music majors or non-majors. All applied music courses, including ensembles, may be repeated for credit.

Applied Music: Private Instruction The Applied Music: Private instruction courses are MUS 150, 160, 162, 165, 170, 180, 185, and 195. They are open to any YVCC student. Lessons on instruments not offered by YVCC music staff may be arranged with qualified off-campus instructors and authorized for college credit by the staff at a cost of $200 per credit, payable to the instructor. This fee is in addition to the tuition fee payable to the college. Lessons for instrumental instruction are arranged through the instrumental director and for voice and piano through the director of choral activities. Students will take one half-hour lesson per week (one credit) at the discretion of the instructor. Music majors should do extended work in two applied music areas, not necessarily concurrently, while enrolled at YVCC. Jury performances in each applied field are required at the end of each quarter. Performances are for music faculty or in recitals. All applied music courses, including ensembles, may be repeated for credit.

Music History & Appreciation The music history and appreciation courses are MUSC& 105, MUS 116, 117, 119, 218, 224, 225, and 226.

Music Theory The music theory sequence (MUS 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 201, 202, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, and 212) is required of all music majors.

Performance The performance courses are MUS 130, 133, 142, 149, 220, and 298.

Courses MUS 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. Requires an audition. Extra time to be arranged. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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MUS 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 100: Music Fundamentals 3 Cr Quarters: S Basic musical terms, notation, scales, and rhythm. Primarily for nonmajors. MUS 107: Beginning Piano is recommended as a supplement to this course. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Distribution: HM MUS 101: Ear Training I 2 Cr Quarters: F Ear training, interval singing, and melodic dictation. Required of music majors and minors. This class is linked to MUS 102. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Distribution: HM MUS 102: Music Theory I 3 Cr Quarters: F First in a series of six theory courses offered. Study of major and minor scales, major and minor key signatures, perfect and major intervals, and basic elements of rhythm. This class is linked to MUS 101. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Distribution: HM MUS 103: Ear Training II 2 Cr Quarters: W Continuation of Ear Training I. Interval and melodic singing as well as melodic dictation. Required of music majors and minors. This class is linked to MUS 104. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 101 Distribution: HM MUS 104: Music Theory II 2 Cr Quarters: W Continuation of Music Theory I. Study of triads, seventh chords, rhythmic division, and grouping of the beat. This class is linked to MUS 103. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 102 Distribution: HM MUS 105: Ear Training III 2 Cr Quarters: S Continuation of Ear Training II includes rhythmic reading. Required of music majors and minors. This class is linked to MUS 106. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 103 and MUS 104 MUSC& 105: Music Appreciation 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Designed to guide non-majors, through listening skills, into an awareness of the elements of music and historical periods and to stimulate a broader understanding of music as an art. Distribution: HM MUS 106: Music Theory III 3 Cr Quarters: S Continuation of Music Theory II. Study of figured bass procedures, diatonic chord functions, and rules of harmonic progression. This class is linked to MUS 105. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 104

MUS 107: Beginning Piano 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Class instruction primarily for beginning students. May be repeated for credit. MUS 108: Intermediate Piano 2 Cr Advancement of piano skills. Prerequisite: MUS 107 or previous piano training

Quarters: W

MUS 113: Beginning Guitar 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Group meetings to study basic beginning techniques. May be repeated for credit. MUS 116: History of Rock and Roll 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This class is a survey of the history of rock music from the earliest evolution of Black American influence to music styles of the 1980s. Class discussions will highlight the connections between American popular culture and stylistic trends in rock music. Distribution: HM MUS 117: Music of the World 3 Cr Quarters: W This course will be a survey of music from cultures throughout the world, emphasizing musical style from non-western European sources. It will emphasize musical literature and styles not covered in MUSC& 105 and MUS 119. Distribution: HM MUS 119: History of Jazz 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Evolution of the jazz art form in America. Study of important artists and works, style periods, musical elements, and social contexts as well as the development of musical listening skills. Group projects and final paper required. Distribution: HM MUS 130: College Chorus 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Preparation and performance of choral literature. Public performance required. Concert tours, performance with orchestra, other choirs, or musical ensembles may be required. May be repeated. Distribution: HP MUS 133: Chamber Singers 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Select vocal performing group by audition. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 130 and by audition Distribution: HP MUS 142: Ensemble Small Group 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Exploration, preparation, and performance of jazz and classical chamber ensemble concepts and literature. Heavy emphasis on acquiring improvisational skills. Regular public performances and concert tours. Audition required. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Approval of the director MUS 149: Jazz Ensemble 2 Cr Quarters: O Preparation and performance of jazz ensemble literature. Regular concert tours and performances with guest artists at the local, regional, and national level. Additional sectional rehearsals are required on a weekly basis. Audition required. May be repeated. Extra time to be arranged. Prerequisite: Approval of the director Distribution: HP

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


MUS 150: Woodwind Private 1-2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Students studying in their principal area of concentration will take one, one-hour lesson per week (2 credits). Students studying in a secondary or minor area will take one, half-hour lesson per week (1 credit). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 160: Piano Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 162: Guitar Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 165: Percussion Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 170: Voice Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 180: Violin/Viola Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 185: Cello/Bass Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor MUS 195: Brass Private 1-2 Cr See description for MUS 150. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MUS 208: Music Theory IV 3 Cr Quarters: F Continuation of Music Theory III. Study of basic part writing procedures and analysis techniques for diatonic triads and dominant seventh chords. This course is linked to MUS 207. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 106

Quarters: F, W, S

Quarters: F, W, S

Quarters: W, S

Quarters: F, W, S

Quarters: F, W, S

Quarters: W, S

Quarters: W, S

MUS 201: Music Composition I 3 Cr Quarters: W The practical study of beginning music composition. Emphasis is placed on melody expansion, various harmonies, figurations, rhythm, and simple rounded binary form. Extensive written work combining the five basic elements, concluding with a two- to three-minute composition for piano, voice and piano, or piano and other acoustic instrument. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 101 and MUS 102 or permission of instructor MUS 202: Music Composition II 3 Cr Quarters: S The practical, advanced study of music composition. Emphasis is placed on further creation of melody, harmony, and forms. From variation to serialism and textural composition. Extensive composition in each area concluding with a two- to four-minute work for chorus, piano, solo voice, or instrument and piano or combination. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 201 or permission of instructor MUS 207: Ear Training IV 2 Cr Quarters: F A continuation of Ear Training III. Required of music majors. Emphasizes four-part harmonic dictation. Intermediate work in rhythmic reading and dictation. This course is linked to MUS 208. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 105 and MUS 106

MUS 209: Ear Training V 2 Cr Quarters: W Continuation of Ear Training IV and required of music majors. Four-part harmonic dictation including modulation to closely related keys, nonharmonic tones, and seventh chords. This class is linked to MUS 210. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 207 MUS 210: Music Theory V 3 Cr Quarters: W Continuation of Music Theory IV. Study of part writing procedures for diatonic seventh chords, secondary dominant chords, and secondary leading tone chords. Introduction to common modulation techniques. This class is linked to MUS 209. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 208 MUS 211: Ear Training VI 2 Cr Quarters: S Continuation of Ear Training V including adding altered chords and modulations to distant keys. This class is linked to MUS 212. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 209 MUS 212: Music Theory VI 3 Cr Quarters: S Continuation of Music Theory V. Study of advanced modulation techniques and part writing procedures for altered chords. This class is linked to MUS 211. You must register for both courses for a total of 5 credits. The music theory sequence is required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 210 MUS 218: Music of the 20th Century 5 Cr Quarters: F Music of the 20th century studies the music created during the 20th century from Impressionism to, and including, computer composition. Other styles are surrealism, aleatoric music, texture composition, neoromanticism, jazz, third stream, pop, and fusion. Distribution: HM MUS 224: Music History I 3 Cr Quarters: F Study of the traditional periods of music history. Emphasis on musical styles of the medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and twentieth-century composers. Primarily for music majors. Distribution: HM MUS 225: Music History II 3 Cr See description for MUS 224. Distribution: HM MUS 226: Music History III 3 Cr See description for MUS 224. Distribution: HM MUS 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Experimental/exploratory studies in music.

Quarters: W

Quarters: S

Quarters: O

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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144 Nursing Careers Career opportunities are available as a licensed practical nurse or as a registered nurse. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is also available at the following websites: www.access.wa.gov or www.workforceexplorer.com and through the Washington Center for Nursing at www.wacenterfornursing.org.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of the Nursing Program the student will pass the State Licensing Exam and be prepared for entry-level practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse or Registered Nurse.

Program Options Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing The YVCC Associate of Applied Science degree in Nursing (ADN) program is six quarters in length. In addition, most students complete a year or more of required and supporting courses prior to program entry. The ADN program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission and approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission. Students who successfully complete the six quarters of the program are eligible to take the licensure exam for registered nursing (RN). Practical Nursing Option Students who successfully complete the first four quarters of the program are eligible to take the national licensing exam for practical nursing (LPN). The practical nursing option is approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission.

Location The six-quarter ADN program is offered in Yakima on the YVCC campus. The clinical portion of the program is offered at various health care agencies throughout the YVCC service district.

Program Requirements The following courses must be completed before acceptance to the Nursing Program. Courses taken at other institutions and/or online must meet equivalency requirements at Yakima Valley Community College. Any science course taken online must have a lab component with an instructor on site and supervising the lab, in order to meet equivalency at YVCC. Students who have taken advanced placement courses in high school must verify credit with the appropriate department at YVCC. Any course awarded a “P” or “S” will be given a “C” value for GPA calculations on application. Required Courses:

• • • •

CHEM 109 (4 Cr) - Principles of Chemistry Lecture CHEM 110 (1 Cr) - Principles of Chemistry Lab (taken congruently with CHEM 109) BA 256 (5 Cr) - Statistics or MATH& 146 (5 Cr) Introduction to Stats BIOL 109 (5 Cr) - General Biology (not used in GPA calculations)

• • • • • •

BIOL 230 (5 Cr) - Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 231 (5 Cr) - Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 232 (5 Cr) - Microbiology ENGL& 101 or ENGL 102 (5 Cr) - English Composition I or English Composition II PSYC& 100 (5 Cr) - General Psychology PSYC& 200 (5 Cr) - Lifespan Psychology

Required Supporting Classes:

• Five credits of humanities electives taken from those approved for distribution credits in the YVCC catalog. • Five credits of social science electives taken from those approved for distribution credits in the YVCC catalog. These five credits are in addition to PSYC& 100 and PSYC& 200. Grades A minimum grade of C must be achieved in all required prerequisite and supporting courses with a cumulative GPA of 2.5. Students must maintain a minimum of a 2.0 grade point in each nursing course throughout the program. Although supporting courses may be taken any time prior to program completion, due to the high number of applicants, admission to the program is based on a prioritization policy. Please refer to the Nursing Program website (www.yvcc.edu/nursing) for information regarding this policy.

Application and Admission Application Process The most current information about the Nursing Program is available on the college website at www.yvcc.edu/nursing. Students must be accepted for general admission to the college before application to the Nursing Program will be considered. When notice is received of acceptance into the college, it does not mean the student has been accepted into the Nursing Program. A separate acceptance letter will be received from the Nursing Department. Transcripts Two official transcripts of all courses taken at other colleges must be submitted to the college. One set must be sent to the Nursing Program and one to the Admissions Office. The applicant is solely responsible for obtaining transcripts for YVCC files. No application will be reviewed until all transcripts have been supplied and evaluated. Please allow 4 weeks for official transcript evaluation. Application Deadlines It is the student's responsibility to verify that all records, including name, address, telephone and email contact changes, have been received in the Nursing Office prior to the deadline date for application evaluation. Application deadline information is available at www.yvcc.edu/nursing. Admissions Criteria Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in all required or supportive coursework. In addition, any grade below C (2.0) will not be accepted in any course taken. The Nursing Program prioritizes students for admission when there are more students than spaces available. Information regarding prioritization is available on the nursing website (www.yvcc.edu/nursing).

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Transfer of Nursing Coursework Acceptance of nursing coursework taken in another nursing program is done on a case by case basis. Please contact the Nursing Program directly at 509-574-4902 for more information. Students applying to the Nursing Program who have previously taken any coursework in another nursing program must supply transcripts and any other program performance indicators as requested, before the application can be considered. Based on the information obtained, a student may be admitted, admitted with conditions, or denied admission. In addition, a letter from the director of the previous nursing program stating that the student left the program in good standing must be provided from that program’s nursing director. This documentation must be mailed to the YVCC Nursing Program. Students who fail to disclose attendance and/or unsatisfactory work in another nursing program may be subject to immediate dismissal from the YVCC Nursing program if the information becomes available while they are enrolled.

Additional Course Requirements

Additional Requirements

All of the above courses are required for eligibility to take the NCLEX-PN licensure examination.

Immunizations and CPR Students are required to complete their CPR certification and immunizations prior to program entry. Please refer to the program’s web site (www.yvcc.edu/nursing) for the most up to date information regarding immunization and CPR requirements. Clinical Course Information Clinical hours are generally scheduled between 6:00 a.m. and 11:30 p.m. Clinical may rotate from day to evening shift. Some nights and weekends may be scheduled in order to gain specific experiences. Students must provide their own transportation. Travel may be required to outlying clinical sites. Students must abide by the policies stated in the Nursing Student Handbook related to matters of academic standards, integrity, attendance, behavior, and dress as it pertains to clinical rotations. Background Check Information Criminal history background information and drug screening is required of students applying to the nursing program. Information obtained from the background check and/ or drug screen will be considered in determining student eligibility to enter the program and/or complete clinical courses. Inability to participate in clinical experiences due to information obtained from the criminal history background check and/or drug screen, may result in the student’s inability to satisfactorily complete program degree requirements. Questions regarding this policy should be directed to the Nursing Program Coordinator who can be reached at 509-5744909.

The Nursing Department recommends that students complete all supporting courses before entering the nursing program. Required Supporting Courses Credits Humanities electives from approved distribution courses 5 Social Science electives from approved distribution courses 5 Total Elective Credits 10 Quarter #1 NRSE 110 Nursing I: Theory 6 NRSE 111 Nursing I: Practice 6 Total Credits (must be completed to enter second quarter) 12 Quarter #2 NRSE 120 Nursing II: Theory 6 NRSE 121 Nursing II: Practice 6 Total Credits (must be completed to enter third quarter) 12 Quarter #3 NRSE 130 Nursing III: Theory 6 NRSE 131 Nursing III: Practice 6 Total Credits (must be completed to enter fourth quarter) 12 Quarter #4 NRSE 210 Nursing IV: Theory NRSE 211 Nursing IV: Practice Total Credits (must be completed to enter fifth quarter)

6 6 12

Registered Nurse Option

Requisites: Completion of practical nurse option as indicated above. Quarter #5 NRSE 220 NRSE 221 NRSE 228

Nursing V: Theory Nursing V: Practice Legal & Professional Issues of the Registered Nurse Total Credits (must be completed to enter sixth quarter) Quarter #6 NRSE 230 Nursing VI: Theory NRSE 231 Nursing VI: Practice NRSE 238 Profession of Nursing Total Credits Total Program Credits

5 6 1 12 5 6 1 12 72

All of the above courses are required for eligibility to take the NCLEX-RN licensure examination.

Courses Please contact the Nursing Department for the most up-todate information. NRSE 100: Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC) Theory 10 Cr Quarters: W, S This course consists of 100 theory hours covering the following content areas: First Aid/CPR, HIV/AIDS, bloodborne pathogens, and basic technical nursing assistance skills. It is designed to prepare students to demonstrate competencies in the following areas: medical terminology, computer literacy, mathematical principles, basic care skills, infection control, and safety and emergency procedures. Students practice effective communication (oral, reading, writing) and interpersonal skills as well as workplace skills. In addition, students will demonstrate understanding of rules and regulations pertaining to Washington State NAC requirements. Prerequisite: Students must achieve a minimum score of 221 on the CASAS reading test and/or a minimum score of 58 on the COMPASS reading test and possess the ability to read, write, and comprehend the English language. In addition, all students must successfully pass a Washington State Patrol criminal history background check

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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146

NRSE 101: Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC) Practice 4 Cr Quarters: W, S This course is designed to prepare students for safe, effective care of the resident in the clinical setting. Throughout the duration of this hands-on experience, the student will expand their knowledge in the following areas: medical terminology, basic technical skills, mental health and social service needs, rights and independence promotion, infection control, and safety and emergency procedures. Students will exhibit knowledge of the rules and regulations pertaining to Washington State NAC requirements as well as practice effective communication and interpersonal skills and job preparation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of NRSE 100 theory course. In addition, all students must pass a Washington State Patrol criminal history background check, a Department of Social and Health Services background check, and be up-to-date in all required immunizations NRSE 102: Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC) Test Preparation 1 Cr Quarters: W, S This course is designed to prepare students for the state nursing assistant certification exam by providing lab practice in skills prior to testing. Prerequisite: Successful completion of NRSE 100 and NRSE 101 or permission of instructor NRSE 110: Nursing I Theory 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is the beginning theoretical course in the associate degree sequence. It includes the foundations needed for basic nursing practice and more advanced study in the program. Students are introduced to the concepts of person, health, environment, and nursing. The nursing process is presented as the primary mechanism for providing care. Therapeutic communication techniques are studied as well as introductory knowledge in pharmacology. The components of a complete multidimensional health assessment are presented. The focus is on the well individual and normal physiologic functioning. Additional concepts basic to nursing practice are addressed including safety, nutrition, lifespan, health teaching, culture, leadership, and ethical and legal aspects of practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing program NRSE 111: Nursing I Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This is the beginning clinical course in the associate degree sequence. This course provides for the clinical application of basic nursing concepts studied in the concurrent theoretical course (NRSE 110). Opportunities are provided for campus laboratory practice of selected nursing skills. The course also includes clinical experience in caring for adult patients in long-term care settings with an emphasis on the use of nursing process to promote adaptation and wellness. Beginning application of the concepts of lifespan, communication, legal and ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are included. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of NRSE 110 NRSE 120: Nursing II Theory 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This theory course examines nursing care of selected clients throughout the lifespan experiencing multi-dimensional alterations originating from surgery, uncontrolled cell growth, alterations in the female reproductive system, sexually transmitted infections, and alterations in the integument. Adaptations with normal pregnancy, childbirth, and the newborn are examined as well as common alterations. Nursing process serves as the organizing framework for study and delivery of nursing care. The concepts of lifespan, communication, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are integrated throughout as means of promoting adaptation and wellness. Prerequisite: NRSE 110 , NRSE 111, BIOL 231

NRSE 121: Nursing II Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course provides clinical application for the theoretical concepts in nursing care of clients experiencing surgery, pregnancy, and childbirth: the normal newborn and in-patient hospitalization. Clinical experiences include caring for selected clients in acute care and ambulatory care settings using the nursing process to promote adaptation and wellness. Application of the concepts of lifespan, communication, leadership, health teaching, pharmacology, nutrition, ethical/legal issues, pediatrics, safety, and culture are included. Prerequisite: NRSE 110, NRSE 111, and concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion of NRSE 120 NRSE 130: Nursing III Theory 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This theory course examines nursing care of selected individuals throughout the lifespan experiencing multidimensional alterations in the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, male reproductive, hematologic, and immune systems. The nursing process serves as the organizing framework for study and delivery of nursing care. The concepts of communication, lifespan, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are integrated throughout as means of promoting adaptation and wellness. Prerequisite: NRSE 120 and NRSE 121 both with a grade of C or better NRSE 131: Nursing III Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course provides clinical application of theoretical concepts in nursing care of adult and pediatric patients experiencing multidimensional alterations originating from the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, hematological, and immune systems. Opportunities for campus laboratory and simulation laboratory practice of selected skills are furnished. The course also includes clinical experiences in caring for selected clients in ambulatory and acute care with an emphasis on the use of nursing process to promote adaptation and wellness. The concepts of communication, lifespan, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are included. Prerequisite: NRSE 120 , NRSE 121, and concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of NRSE 130. NRSE 210: Nursing IV Theory 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This theory course examines nursing care of selected individuals throughout the lifespan who are experiencing multidimensional alterations in the musculoskeletal, neurological, endocrine (thyroid and endocrine pancreas), and gastrointestinal systems. The nursing process serves as the organizing framework for the study and delivery of nursing care. The concepts of lifespan, communication, leadership, health teaching, pharmacology, nutrition, legal/ ethical issues, safety, and culture are integrated throughout as a means of promoting adaptation and wellness. Prerequisite: NRSE 130 and NRSE 131 both with a grade of C or better NRSE 211: Nursing IV Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This clinical course provides clinical application of theoretical concepts in nursing care of adults and children in acute and outpatient settings. The course is focused on multidimensional alterations originating from the musculoskeletal, neurological, sensory, endocrine (thyroid and endocrine pancreas), and gastrointestinal systems. Opportunities are provided for classroom or campus laboratory practice of selected skills. The course includes clinical experience in caring for selected adult and pediatric clients with an emphasis on the use of nursing process to develop individualized nursing care plans for patients across the lifespan. The concepts of lifespan, communication, leadership, safety, health teaching, pharmacology, nutrition, legal/ethical issues, and culture is included. Prerequisite: NRSE 130, NRSE 131, and concurrent enrollment in or satisfactory completion of NRSE 210

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


NRSE 220: Nursing V Theory 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This theory course examines nursing care of selected individuals throughout the lifespan who are experiencing complex alterations in wellness across multiple systems. In addition to medical-surgical care, the care of patients experiencing a high-risk pregnancy and high-risk newborns is described. Nursing care of patients with alterations in pediatrics is also discussed. The nursing process serves as the organizing framework for study and delivery of nursing care. The concepts of communication, lifespan, legal and ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are integrated throughout as means of promoting adaption and wellness. Prerequisite: NRSE 210 and NRSE 211 both with a grade of C or better and permission of instructor. NOTE: Permission of instructor is required to withdraw from course. NRSE 221: Nursing V Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This clinical course provides application of theoretical concepts in the nursing care of patients in acute and ambulatory care settings. The focus of the acute care experience is on the care of patients with complex health alterations in wellness. Clinical experiences in caring for intrapartum patients and pediatric patients are also offered. Opportunities for campus laboratory practice of selected skills are furnished. The course emphasizes the use of the nursing process to develop individualized nursing care plans for patients across the lifespan. The concepts of lifespan, communication, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are included. Prerequisite: NRSE 210 , NRSE 211, and concurrent enrollment in or previous completion of NRSE 220

NRSE 231: Nursing VI Practice 6 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This clinical course provides clinical application of theoretical concepts in the nursing care of individuals who are experiencing multi-dimensional health alterations. Clinical experiences include acute inpatient mental health and a precepted clinical practicum. The course emphasizes the use of the nursing process to develop individualized nursing care plans for patients across the lifespan. The concepts of communication, lifespan, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are included. Prerequisite: NRSE 220 and NRSE 221 both with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in or previous completion of NRSE 230. NRSE 238: Profession of Nursing 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course provides an overview of nursing as a profession. Topics discussed include the nurse’s role in resource management, nursing ethics and advocacy, quality, and preparation for the NCLEX exam-entry into practice and employment. The concepts of communication, legal and ethical systems, leadership, and safety are integrated throughout as means of understanding the role of nursing within society and within the health care system. Prerequisite: NRSE 220, NRSE 221, and NRSE 228 all with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of NRSE 230

NRSE 228: Legal & Professional Issues of the Registered Nurse 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course provides an overview of the role of the registered nurse in coordinating patient care. Topics discussed include legal aspects of nursing practice, delegation of care, quality improvement, professional communication, and conflict management. The concepts of communication, legal/ethical issues, leadership, and safety are integrated throughout as a means of promoting effective patient care. Prerequisite: NRSE 210 and NRSE 211 both with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion of NRSE 220 NRSE 230: Nursing VI Theory 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This theory course examines nursing care of selected individuals throughout the lifespan experiencing multi-dimensional alterations in the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, neurological, immune, and endocrine systems as well as care of patients experiencing mental health problems. The nursing process serves as the organizing framework for study and delivery of nursing care. Curricular threads of lifespan, communication, legal/ethical issues, pharmacology, nutrition, leadership, safety, health teaching, and culture are integrated throughout as means of promoting adaption and wellness. Prerequisite: NRSE 220, NRSE 221, and NRSE 228 all with a grade of C or better and permission of instructor Note: Permission of instructor is required to withdraw from this course.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

147


148 Nutrition The Nutrition Program emphasizes understanding the “whole food,� guiding students through a study of food, its individual components, how it affects the human body, and how it interacts with other foods. Our focus is to provide students with nutrition education that merges the science of nutrition with a broader view of wellness, community, and the environment. The nutrition courses help prepare students for careers in dietetics, family and consumer science, and allied health, as well as to transfer to other institutions to pursue undergraduate degrees.

Philosophy Course offerings in philosophy are intended for transfer students as well as for those wanting personal enrichment. Courses stress the cultivation of personal and interpersonal expression of ideas through critical and constructive reading, writing, listening, speaking, and observing. The program also organizes film and discussion events, conference attendance, participation in essay competitions, and community involvement.

Courses Courses NUTR 101: Human Nutrition 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Nutrition is a science based on principles of chemistry and molecular biology. This course will study how nutrients can be made applicable to one's lifestyle: the changes in the life cycle from pregnancy through the later years, preventive health care, energy balance and weight management, and identification of reliable nutrition information. Distribution: NS NUTR 104: Winning Sports Nutrition 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course contains current information on the fundamentals of sports nutrition. These fundamentals include how nutrients work in the body for optimal sports performance. NUTR 106: Nutrition/Lifestyle/Consumer Choices 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Explores relationships between disease risk factors and stress as well as exercise and diet. The class targets strategies to live a healthier lifestyle and make wise consumer choices. Emphasis is on helping students apply the information to their own lives. NUTR 201: Nutrition in the Life Cycle 3 Cr Quarters: O This course explores the nutrient needs and key nutritional concerns at each stage of the life cycle including prenatal and maternal, infant, preschool and school-age child, adolescent, adult, and older adult. Key nutritional concerns such as growth and development, food behaviors, eating disorders, nutrition in athletics, preventive health, as well as weight control will be addressed. Prerequisite: NUTR 101 or concurrent enrollment

Pharmacy Technician See "Allied Health Technologies Program."

PHIL& 101: Introduction to Philosophy 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introduction to Philosophy exposes students to major tools, problems, and domains of philosophy. Students engage in the activity of philosophizing through the use of historical and contemporary reading. Questions addressed include: Are my beliefs all a matter of opinion? What is reality? What is truth? Does God exist? Am I free? Does science give us knowledge? Distribution: HM PHIL& 120: Introduction to Logic 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students of Introduction to Logic examine validity, soundness, inference, necessity, implication, and other concepts central to standard reasoning processes. Examination of the nature of formal arguments including propositional (sentence) logic and predicate logic (quantificational logic) are stressed. Prerequisite: MATH 094 or MATH 095 Distribution: For the AA degree, credit will be granted for either QU or NS, but not both. PHIL 150: Existential Group 2 Cr Quarters: O An intensive, experiential course that explores, on both a personal and impersonal level, how themes in the writings of existentialist philosophers such as Beckett, Buber, Camus, de Beauvoir, Dostoyevsky, Kafka, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Nietzsche, and Sartre pertain to the lifestyles, attitudes, and actions of class participants. The course entails interacting in a group format and making presentations. The group interactions are often interpersonal encounters rather than ones involving only abstract discussion. Attendance and weekly reading and writing assignments are all required. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy and permission of instructor Distribution: HM PHIL 167: World Philosophy 5 Cr Quarters: O Students explore three to five living philosophies no more than one of which has found primary expression in Europe. Thematic comparisons and contrasts will be included; for example, the nature of reality and the nature of the self in its social setting. Representative philosophies include African, American Indian, Buddhist, Confucian, and Taoist. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 095 desirable; college-level reading and writing Distribution: HM

Phlebotomy See "Allied Health Technologies Program."

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


PHIL 215: Introduction to Ethics 5 Cr Quarters: F Introduction to Ethics assesses the underlying models that inform morally relevant behavior. Some issues addressed include the nature of value claims, moral relativism and skepticism, morality and well-being, moral responsibility, ethics and science, ethics and religion, and the connections, if any, between theory and daily living. Distribution: HM

Photography

PHIL 220: Philosophy of Religion 5 Cr Quarters: W This course analyzes issues basic to understanding religion, such as the problem of evil and theodicies, free will and divine foreknowledge, arguments for/against the existence of God, and the relationship between faith and reason. It will also examine major world religions such as Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or permission of instructor Distribution: HM

Courses

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Photography courses are structured for the novice as well as those with some darkroom experience. Beginners should enroll in Photography 100 (non-darkroom) or Photography 101 (darkroom). Students with photographic experience should consult the instructor for advanced placement.

PHOTO 100: Photography Basics 3 Cr Quarters: F, S A basic introduction to photography—cameras, equipment, film, basic shooting problems, and techniques. Non-darkroom. PHOTO 101: Photography I 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Introductory photo course including equipment, shooting, black-andwhite developing, and printing. Distribution: HP PHOTO 102: Photography II 3 Cr Quarters: O Photography as a medium of artistic expression. Photographic equipment, processes, controls, and shooting techniques. Extra time to be arranged. Prerequisite: PHOTO 101 or permission of instructor Distribution: HM PHOTO 103: Digital Photography 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S An introduction to digital camera operation, image manipulation software, visualization skills, expressive sensitivity, and quality printing. Emphasis is on the elements and principles of photographic composition, ethical issues, aesthetic vocabulary, and the study of how images communicate. Includes lecture, supervised lab, and group critiques. Students must provide a digital camera with operable controls (eg. F-stop, shutter speed). Distribution: HM PHOTO 190, 191: Co-op Field Experience I, II Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

PHOTO 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Projects in photography determined by instructor and student. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


150 Physical Education The courses in Physical Education provide students with the knowledge, awareness, and physical activity skills necessary to meet their desired personal state of “wellness�. The student will learn to make educated and responsible decisions when faced with a variety of lifestyle choices.

Courses PE 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This noncredit course is offered to allow students, staff, faculty, and community members to use the YAK Fitness/Wellness Center. PE 130: Weight Training Beginning 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This introductory course provides a foundation of knowledge and skill to acquaint students with the proper fundamentals, technique, and safety in resistance training and alternative exercises to develop muscle endurance and strength. It will provide an opportunity for the creation of individualized training program that allows the student to meet personal, fitness, and health goals. PE 132: Weight Training Advanced 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is a continuation of resistance training which will enhance and include advanced techniques for strengthening and building endurance. Each student will be responsible for creating and performing an individualized program as well as for a commitment to increasing active participation time in the YAK Fitness/Wellness Center. PE 180: Wellness for Life I 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course is designed for the student who wants to take responsibility for lifestyle changes for wellness through developing personal goals, appraising fitness levels, and applying positive behavioral changes through active fitness program design and self-awareness activities. PE 181: Wellness for Life II 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Introduces students to the intermediate challenge of wellness concepts which enhance physical, mental, and emotional well-being with emphasis on personal commitment and responsibility for positive lifestyle change. Prerequisite: PE 180

Physical Education, Men’s PEM 143: Basketball Fundamentals Men 2 Cr Quarters: F Entry- to intermediate-level basketball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEM 145: Baseball Fundamentals Men 2 Cr Quarters: F Entry- to intermediate-level baseball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure the safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEM 153: Basketball Theory Men 3 Cr Quarters: F A study of the fundamental skills of basketball as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, administration, and other related problems facing the prospective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that the students are preparing for coaching. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEM 155: Baseball Theory Men 3 Cr Quarters: W A study of the fundamental skills of baseball as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, administration, and other related problems facing the prospective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that the students are preparing for coaching. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEM 163: Techniques of Basketball I Men 2 Cr Quarters: W Advances basketball skills and techniques course which meets on a daily basis during Winter quarter only; basketball rules and interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PE 182: Wellness for Life III 1 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This course continues to expand the student's physical and mental well-being through positive lifestyle change with the development of a diversified, advanced fitness program. Prerequisite: PE 181

PEM 165: Baseball Techniques Men 2 Cr Quarters: S Baseball skills and technique class which meets on a daily basis during Spring quarter only. Organized and officiated contests are played on a regular basis. Flexible schedule is necessary since class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Closed enrollment, signature required

PE 184: Fast Track Wellness for Life 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S This entry-level course instructs students to develop a fitness or active activity program to meet personal goals and move toward greater awareness of a student's human potential for life-long health, self-care and sensitivity to the environment. Assignments and fitness center lab hours are structured to study physical fitness, goal setting, basic nutritional components, self-behavior change tactics, cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility.

PEM 243: Basketball Fundamentals II Men 2 Cr Quarters: F Intermediate- to advanced-level basketball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Prerequisite: A first meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the student; permission of instructor

PE 199: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in physical education.

PEM 245: Baseball Fundamentals II Men 2 Cr Quarters: F Intermediate- to advanced-level baseball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Prerequisite: A first meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the student; permission of instructor.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


PEM 253: Basketball Theory II Men 3 Cr Quarters: F Application of coaching related to various basketball fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the basketball coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEM 153 and permission of instructor PEM 255: Baseball Theory II Men 3 Cr Quarters: W Application of coaching related to various baseball fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the baseball coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEM 155 and permission of instructor PEM 263: Basketball Techniques II Men 2 Cr Quarters: W Advanced basketball skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Winter quarter only; basketball rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developing athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized basketball and permission of instructor PEM 265: Baseball Techniques II Men 2 Cr Quarters: S Advanced baseball skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Spring quarter only; baseball rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developing athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized baseball and permission of instructor

Physical Education, Women’s PEW 143: Basketball Fundamentals Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Entry- to intermediate-level basketball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 144: Soccer Fundamentals Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Entry- to intermediate-level soccer skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skill coordination is possessed in order to ensure the safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 146: Softball Fundamentals Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Entry- to intermediate-level softball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure the safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PEW 148: Volleyball Fundamentals Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Entry- to intermediate-level volleyball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Skill instruction includes serving, passing, hitting, and offensive and defensive positioning. A first-meeting skills test is conducted to ensure entrylevel skill coordination is possessed in order to ensure the safety of the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 153: Basketball Theory Women 3 Cr Quarters: F A study of the fundamental skills of basketball as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, administration, and other related problems facing the prospective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that the students are preparing for coaching. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 154: Soccer Theory Women 3 Cr Quarters: F A study of coaching soccer and the fundamental skills for soccer as well as the offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, the administration, and other related problems facing the perspective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that the students are preparing for coaching-related opportunities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 156: Softball Theory Women 3 Cr Quarters: W A study of the fundamental skills of softball as well as offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, administration, and other related problems facing the prospective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that the students are preparing for coaching. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 158: Volleyball Theory Women 3 Cr Quarters: F Study of the fundamental skills, rules, and history of volleyball as well as the offensive and defensive strategies. Attention is given to the rules of the game, administration, and other related problems facing the prospective coach. The approach throughout is from the viewpoint that students are preparing for coaching. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 163: Basketball Techniques Women 2 Cr Quarters: W A basketball skills and techniques course which studies the game of basketball, game plans, rules interpretation, and application techniques. Organized and officiated contests are played on a regular basis. A flexible schedule is necessary since the class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 164: Soccer Techniques Women 2 Cr Quarters: F A soccer skills and techniques class which meets on a daily basis. Organized and officiated contests are played on a regular basis. A flexible schedule is necessary since the class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PEW 166: Softball Techniques Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Softball skills and technique class which meets on a daily basis during Spring quarter only. Organized and officiated contests are played on a regular basis. Flexible schedule is necessary since class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Closed enrollment, permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

151


152

PEW 168: Volleyball Techniques Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Advanced volleyball skills and technique class which meets on a daily basis during Fall quarter only. Volleyball rules interpretation and application. Organized and officiated contests are played on a regular basis. Flexible schedule is necessary since class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, signature required; high school or club program experience in organized volleyball PEW 243: Basketball Fundamentals II Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Intermediate- to advanced-level basketball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Prerequisite: First meeting skill test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the students; permission of instructor PEW 244: Soccer Fundamentals II Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Intermediate- to advanced-level soccer skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Prerequisite: First meeting skill test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the students; permission of instructor PEW 248: Volleyball Fundamentals II Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Intermediate- to advanced-level volleyball skills class stressing the basic fundamentals of the game. Emphasis is placed on individual skill development as opposed to team play or competition. Prerequisite: First meeting skill test is conducted to ensure entry-level skills and coordination are possessed in order to ensure safety of the students; permission of instructor PEW 253: Basketball Theory II Women 3 Cr Quarters: F Application of coaching related to various basketball fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the basketball coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEW 153 and permission of instructor PEW 254: Soccer Theory II Women 3 Cr Quarters: F Application of coaching related to various soccer fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the soccer coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEW 154 and permission of instructor

PEW 263: Basketball Techniques II Women 2 Cr Quarters: W Advanced basketball skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Winter quarter only; basketball rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developmental athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized basketball and permission of instructor PEW 264: Soccer Techniques II Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Advanced soccer skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Fall quarter only; soccer rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developmental athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized soccer and permission of instructor PEW 266: Softball Techniques II Women 2 Cr Quarters: S Advanced softball skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Spring quarter only; softball rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developmental athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized softball and permission of instructor PEW 268: Volleyball Techniques II Women 2 Cr Quarters: F Advanced volleyball skills and techniques course that meets on a daily basis during Fall quarter only; volleyball rules, their interpretation and application; organized and officiated contests on a regular basis. The student will participate in an organized, educational community service event to assist in instructing developmental athletes’ techniques and skills. Flexible schedule is necessary as class meets daily, some evenings, and weekends. Prerequisite: High school or summer program experience in organized volleyball and permission of instructor

PEW 256: Softball Theory II Women 3 Cr Quarters: W Application of coaching related to various softball fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the softball coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEW 156 and permission of instructor PEW 258: Volleyball Theory II Women 3 Cr Quarters: F Application of coaching related to various volleyball fundamental skills, developing offensive and defensive strategies, and enforcing the game rules. The administrative duties of the volleyball coach will be studied and applied through community service learning. Prerequisite: PEW 158 and permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


153

Physical Science

Physics

Physical science courses are intended as an introduction for non-science majors to the four main physical sciences: physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geology. Physical Science I covers physics and chemistry, while Physical Science II covers astronomy, atmospheric science, and geology.

Physics is the fundamental science. All other sciences and technologies can find their roots in physics. Physics principles are logical and simple and yet far-reaching in their application. Currently a single-quarter introductory physics course and two different physics sequences are offered.

Courses

Introduction to Physics

PHSCI 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: O This class is offered as a self-support, community service, non-credit course.

The introductory physics course is a good beginning science course while the general physics and engineering physics courses give strong backgrounds in classical physics (i.e. mechanics, energy, work, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and waves).

PHSCI 101: Physical Science Survey I 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of elementary physics and chemistry designed for students taking no further courses in these subjects. PHSCI 101 may be used either for chemistry or physics distribution but not for both. Prerequisite: MATH 084 or 085 or placement into MATH 095 or above Distribution: NS PHSCI 102: Physical Science Survey II 5 Cr Quarters: O A survey of physical and historical geology, meteorology, and astronomy designed for students taking no further courses in the physical sciences. PHSCI 102 may be used either for geology or astronomy distribution but not for both. Prerequisite: ENGL 090T or YVCC placement into ENGL 095 Distribution: NS PHSCI 112: Physical Science Survey II with Lab 5 Cr Quarters: W, S A survey of basic astronomy, atmospheric science, and physical geology with lab, designed for students taking no further courses in the physical sciences. PHSCI 112 may be used for distribution for either astronomy or physical geography but not for both. Prerequisite: ENGL 090T or YVCC placement into ENGL 095 and MATH 075 or YVCC placement into MATH 085 Distribution: NS (L) PHSCI 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Short courses, seminars, and individual study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

General Physics I, II, III General Physics I, II, and III are noncalculus-based, intended for non-science majors and some allied health majors; however, these courses are a solid preparation for engineering and science majors with no previous experience with physics. These courses can be used by the transfer student to satisfy a general or noncalculus-based physics requirement at a university.

Engineering Physics I, II, III Engineering Physics I, II, and III are calculus-based, intended for the mathematics, physics, chemistry, or engineering major transfer student. Most premed majors also use this sequence. The sequence of subjects is essentially the same as the general physics sequence, but the topics are considered from a more rigorous mathematical viewpoint. The lab content of Engineering Physics is similar to General Physics, but the mechanics of the labs (data collection and analysis) are very different. These courses can be used by the transfer student to satisfy an engineering or calculus-based physics requirement at a university.

Courses PHYS 099, 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Workshops, short courses, and individual study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PHYS 100: Introduction to Physics 5 Cr Quarters: SR Introduction to Physics is a survey course designed to introduce and enhance a student's understanding of elementary physics. This course emphasizes a more conceptual and less mathematical approach to physics. Topics include mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and special topics. While primarily designed for the non-science major (i.e., students in the arts, humanities, and social sciences), this is an excellent beginning science course for any student. Prerequisite: MATH 084 or MATH 085 or YVCC placement into MATH 095 or above Distribution: NS PHYS 115: General Physics I Lecture 3 Cr

Quarters: F, S

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


154

PHYS 125: General Physics I Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F, S The overriding theme is classical mechanics. Topics include vectors, velocity, acceleration, work, energy, momentum, statics and equilibrium, and Newton’s laws of motion. A graphing calculator is required. For nonengineering majors and general science majors. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or permission of instructor; PHYS 115/125 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L) PHYS 116: General Physics II Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: W PHYS 126: General Physics II Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W Topics include fluids, waves, sound, heat, and thermodynamics. There is also a brief detour into the area of modern physics. A graphing calculator is required. For non-engineering majors and general science majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 115/125 or permission of instructor; PHYS 116/126 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L) PHYS 211: General Physics III Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: S PHYS 127: General Physics III Lab 2 Cr Quarters: S Topics include electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics, and (more) modern physics. A graphing calculator is required. For non-engineering majors and general science majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 116/126 or permission of instructor; PHYS 117/127 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L) PHYS 211: Engineering Physics I Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: F PHYS 221: Engineering Physics I Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F Classical mechanics at the calculus level. Typical topics include vectors, displacement, velocity, acceleration, work, energy, momentum, statics and equilibrium, and Newton’s laws of motion. A graphing calculator is required. For engineering and physical science (physics or chemistry) majors. Prerequisite: One year of high school physics or PHYS 115/125 and MATH& 151 or permission of instructor; PHYS 211/221 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L) PHYS 212: Engineering Physics II Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: W PHYS 222: Engineering Physics II Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W Topics include fluids, waves, sound, heat, and thermodynamics. There is a brief detour into the area of modern physics. A graphing calculator is required. For engineering and physical science (physics or chemistry) majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 211 and PHYS 221 and MATH& 152 or permission of instructor; PHYS 212 and PHYS 222 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L) PHYS 213: Engineering Physics III Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: S PHYS 223: Engineering Physics III Lab 2 Cr Quarters: S Topics include electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics, and (more) modern physics. A graphing calculator is required. For engineering and physical science (physics or chemistry) majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 212/222 or permission of instructor; PHYS 213/223 must be taken concurrently Distribution: NS (L)

Political Science Political science is the study of government and public policy and of the political behavior of individuals and groups. Political science uses both humanistic and scientific methods of analysis to examine individual and group behaviors and outcomes at the local, state, national, and international levels of politics (source: American Political Science Association). The Political Science program at YVCC offers most of the fundamental courses in the discipline that prepare students for a declared major or minor in political science at a four-year college or university. Political science courses at YVCC also contribute toward general education requirements necessary for a bachelor’s degree in any liberal arts discipline.

Courses POLS 099: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

POLS 100: Contemporary World Problems 3 Cr Quarters: O This course examines current global political, social, economic, and environmental issues. Each quarter will address slightly different topics depending on the global situation. The course will not necessarily be region or country specific, but organized around global problems such as the environment, economic development, weapons proliferation, trade, nationalism, and human rights. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS POLS 100W: Contemporary World Problems 5 Cr Quarters: F This course examines current global political, social, economic, and environmental issues. Each quarter will address slightly different topics depending on the global situation. The course will not necessarily be region or country specific, but organized around global problems such as the environment, economic development, weapons proliferation, trade, nationalism, and human rights. Students will choose a particular global problem and investigate it in depth. They will learn how to write a research paper appropriate for political science and the social sciences in general. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS POLS& 101: Introduction to Political Science 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An introduction to the basic theories, concepts, and methods associated with an examination of political institutions, processes of political decision-making, and the sociocultural context that produces political choices. This course introduces students to the major subfields and methodologies of the discipline. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS POLS 201: Introduction to Political Theory 5 Cr Quarters: O This course is an introduction to the philosophical basis of political thought and activity. Political theorists ask fundamental questions about politics and seek to derive answers to these questions. The course is organized around several key concepts such as justice, liberty, equality, the ethical community, individual rights, and citizenship. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 Distribution: HM

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


POLS& 202: American Government 5 Cr Quarters: W, S An examination of the American political process and the institutions of the national government as well as an analysis of the United States' political system from an evaluative perspective. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS POLS& 203: International Relations 5 Cr Quarters: W An introduction to the study of international relations. The course examines methods and theories of inquiry, the causes of conflict and the conditions for cooperation at the global level, the nature of interstate relations, and the causes of change in the structure of international politics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS POLS 205: State and Local Government 5 Cr Quarters: O An examination of the political process, institutions, functions, and structure of state and local government in the United States. Special emphasis is given to Washington State government. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Professional/ Technical Education Worker Retraining The Worker Retraining Program provides training assistance for unemployed, dislocated workers whose lives are in transition from low or obsolete skills to marketable, employable skills for future work opportunities. Services range from short-term to long-term professional/technical program opportunities.

Gateway to Technologies Many unemployed workers begin their retraining in this innovative transition program which assists unemployed workers in making informed vocational choices and increasing the likelihood of success in college programs and their future workplace. The one-quarter program is offered in Yakima every quarter. The 18-credit curriculum combines Technical Math I (PTECH 075), Basic Computer Skills (IT 090), Introduction to Computers (IT 100), Learning Skills (SD 120), and Professional/ Technical Career Exploration (PTECH 101). Other special projects in Worker Retraining include Introduction to Office Technology.

Courses PTECH 065: Customer Service 0 Cr Quarters: F, W, S Emphasis is given to problem solving, interpersonal skills, diversity, effective communication, ethics, and teamwork. The class offers integrated basic skills and English as a Second Language. This class is for approved WorkFirst students. See a WorkFirst advisor for more information. PTECH 067: Forklift Training 0 Cr Quarters: S Upon completion of the five-week training, the student will test to become an OSHA-compliant lift truck operator. Integrated basic skills are offered with this training. This class is for approved WorkFirst students. See a WorkFirst advisor for more information. PTECH 075: Applied Arithmetic 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is designed to meet the mathematical needs of students in vocational and technical programs. It is an integrated presentation of topics in arithmetic, geometry, and basic algebra skills required for practical, world-of-work problems. PTECH 098, 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O WorkFirst pre-employment truck driver training for TANF students. PTECH 099: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PTECH 104: Technical Reading 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students in this course will learn the definitions, distinct features and diverse skills for reading technical writing. They will learn how technical materials, books, resources, charts, communications, etc. are organized and they will become familiar with the terminology used in technical writing. They will learn to apply critical reading skills for analyzing technical materials and will practice the specific reading skills on the books and materials in the specific WED degrees. Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

155


156

PTECH 115: Applied Mathematics II 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course includes mathematical applications for specific professional/ technical programs. The content may include the following topics: ratio, proportion, metric conversion, and scientific notation as well as roots, geometry, statistics, solution of equations, functions, polynomials, and formulas. Prerequisite: Coded in a professional/technical program in which PTECH 115 is required and eligibility for MATH 075 PTECH 116: Applied Mathematics II for Early Childhood Ed 5 Cr Quarters: S This course includes mathematical applications for early childhood educators. Concepts include math sense and problem-solving for whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, proportions, charts and graphs, geometry, and specific preschool topics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in an Early Childhood or Para-educator Degree or Certificate program and one of the following: completion of MATH 075, eligibility for MATH 085, or permission of instructor PTECH 120: Technical Writing 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students in this course will learn the definition, distinct features, and diverse applications of technical writing. They will also practice and learn the specific characteristics of technical writing: subject, audience, organization, style, tone, and other special features. Various technical writing formats such as business communications, informative reports, analytical and persuasive briefs, and research proposals will be practiced and learned. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and completion of IT 100 or IT 105 and BT 101 or BT 104

Psychology Yakima Valley Community College offers a core of basic psychology courses which will provide a sound introduction to the discipline. Psychology is the science of human behavior and experience and includes perspectives examining abnormal behavior, the biological bases of behavior, social interaction, and cognitive processes. These psychology courses are offered for general education, personal enrichment, and for students pursuing a career in psychology or related fields. They serve as prerequisites for several campus programs.

Courses PSYC& 100: General Psychology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR An introduction to the science of human behavior and experience, including fundamental perspectives as well as behavioral and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS PSYCH 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in psychology. PSYCH 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor PSYC& 200: Lifespan Psychology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Lifespan Psychology provides a survey of the scientific study of physical, cognitive, and emotional development and social changes that take place throughout the human lifespan. Students will explore the interaction between genetic and environmental influences on human development. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 Distribution: SS PSYCH 209: Fundamentals of Psychological Research 5 Cr Quarters: O This course addresses basic experimental and non-experimental research designs and strategies and provides both lecture and laboratory experiences. Topics include hypothesis testing, interpretation of statistics, searching and evaluating research literature, fundamentals of scientific writing, research strategies, and ethical issues in research. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 and eligibility for MATH 095 Distribution: SS PSYCH 212: Human Life-span Develop for CD Professionals 5 Cr Quarters: W An interdisciplinary, multi-cultural investigation of the entire human lifespan from conception through the dying process and death. Designed for those in the chemical dependency field. Open to chemical dependency students only. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 PSYC& 220: Abnormal Psychology 5 Cr Quarters: W, S An introduction to the etiology, diagnosis, classification, and manifestations of psychopathology as well as recommended treatment modalities and prognosis. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101, eligibility for MATH 085, and PSYC& 100 Distribution: SS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


PSYCH 230: Social Psychology 5 Cr Quarters: F Social psychology is the scientific study of the ways in which people’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior are influenced by the real or imagined presence of others. Topics include self-concept, self-serving biases, selfdeception, aggression, loving and liking, social influence, conformity, obedience, attitude formation, and attitude change. This course is crossdisciplined. Credit cannot be given for both PSYCH 230 and SOC 230. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 or SOC& 101 Distribution: SS

Radiologic Sciences The Radiologic Sciences Program is a sequence of courses that fulfills the educational objectives established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and competencies outlined by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. The program commences in June each year. The program is accredited through YVCC by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. A radiologic technologist is like a photographer. They take pictures or images of internal organs or structures within a person's body. The technologist produces images using ionizing radiation, film, and computers, etc. An integral job responsibility is patient care. While producing images, human touch and patient safety are critical. Technologists will be faced with the entire spectrum of patient types: healthy people needing routine physical procedures, trauma victims, the critically or terminally ill, the elderly, etc.

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Be proficient at performing entry-level job skills. • Be prepared to take the national examination offered by the American Registry of the Radiologic Technologists.

Careers Upon successful completion of the 24-month program, students are granted an Associate of Applied Sciences degree in Radiologic Technology (AAS) and are eligible to apply to take the national registry examination offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Radiologic technologists seek employment in hospitals, clinics, and physician offices. With additional training and/or college coursework, graduates are eligible for CT, MRI radiation therapy, ultrasound, administration, and education. For more information on current employment trends, contact the Washington State Employment Security Department Job Service Center at 800.215.1617. Information is also available at the following websites: www.wa.gov/ careerguide or www.wa.gov/esd/lmea.

Degree Associate of Applied Science Degree in Radiologic Technology All radiologic technology courses may be taken only in sequence or by special permission of the program coordinator. A letter grade of C (2.0) or better must be received in the courses required for the Associate of Applied Science degree in Radiologic Technology. Summer Quarter Credits RT 116 Radiographic Communications „z 2 RT 110 Introduction to Radiology „ 3 RT 117 AIDS/HIV/CPR 1 Total Credits 6 Fall Quarter BIOL 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 RT 111 Introduction to Clinical Experience „z 1 RT 120 Image Acquisition Theory I 3 RT 121 Image Acquisition Lab I 1 RT 130 Radiologic Positioning I Theory 3 RT 131 Radiologic Positioning I Lab 2 RT 140 Radiology Patient Care Theory „z 2 Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

157


158

RT 141 Winter Quarter RT 122 RT 123 RT 132 RT 133 RT 150 Spring Quarter RT 134 RT 135 RT 136 RT 151

Radiology Patient Care Lab Total Credits

1 18

Image Acquisition Theory II ‹ Image Acquisition Lab II Radiologic Positioning II Theory Radiologic Positioning II Lab Clinic Practicum I „z Total Credits

3 1 3 2 6 15

Radiologic Positioning III Theory Radiologic Positioning III Lab Radiographic Procedures „z Clinic Practicum II „z Total Credits

2 2 4 6 14

Summer Quarter RT 250 Clinic Practicum III „z Total Credits Fall Quarter RT 230 Pathology & Advanced Procedures I RT 240 Radiation Biology „‹ RT 251 Clinic Practicum IV „z Total Credits Winter Quarter RT 220 Quality Management Theory RT 231 Pathology & Advanced Procedures II RT 252 Clinic Practicum V „z RT 259 Professional Prep Total Credits Spring Quarter RT 232 Pathology & Advanced Procedures III RT 246 Radiation Physics ‹ RT 253 Clinic Practicum VI „z RT 260 Registry Review Total Credits Total Program Credits

13 13 3 3 13 19 2 4 11 1 18 2 5 7 2 16 119

Admission Requirements • •

Completion of college courses with a cumulative GPA of 2.7. Completion of the following program prerequisites with a letter grade of C (2.0) or better. It is acceptable to repeat a course in order to receive the required GPA; however, a student will not be considered eligible for selection if s/ he failed to receive a 2.0 on a second attempt or needed to repeat three or more of the prerequisites. A student has the option to submit a letter of appeal if extenuating circumstances influenced unsatisfactory grade(s). Š BIOL 109 * (requires a C+ or better) Š CHEM 100 * (or one year of high school chemistry) Š ENGL& 102 Š AH 119 * Š MATH 095 * Š CMST& 101 or CMST& 220 Š BIOL 230 * Š BIOL 231 *

* These courses must have been taken within the past five years. The following may be taken and completed by winter quarter during the first year of the program: Š CMST& 101 or CMST& 220 Š BIOL 231 • Candidate must meet general admission requirements of YVCC. • Applicants' files must be complete by March 1.

Criminal History Information Criminal history and drug screening information will be requested of students enrolling in Radiologic Science. Information obtained from this inquiry will be treated confidentially and will be considered in determining the students' eligibility to complete clinical competencies. Inability to participate in clinical experience due to information obtained from the background check or drug screen will result in a student's inability to satisfactorily complete program degree requirements or to take the examination offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. For more specific information, contact the program coordinator. Selection Procedure The application deadline is March 1. See the program application packet for specific criteria. Final selection of applicants is based on the following: college GPA, completion of and GPA in program prerequisite, essay, visitation, volunteer hours, and previous application to the Radiologic Science Program. Applicants who accumulate enough points toward selection will be scheduled for an interview, which will determine final selection. Notification of status—acceptance, conditional acceptance, alternate, or rejection—will be sent to the candidate by May 30. Students who are accepted into the Radiologic Science Program must meet current immunization requirements. The Radiologic Science Program does not discriminate on the basis of age, marital status, sex, race, color, creed, national origin, the presence of any physical or sensory handicap, or being a disabled or Vietnam-era veteran.

Clinical Assignments Clinical Assignment Scheduling Since clinical experience is a required portion of the educational program which builds skills, monetary reimbursement is not given for the time spent during the students’ clinical assignments. Students are assigned to a variety of shifts on a one-month rotational basis. Schedules are posted quarterly. Clinical Education Centers • Klickitat Valley Hospital • Sunnyside Community Hospital • Toppenish Community Hospital • Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center • Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital

Certificate CT Certificate Program The CT certificate program is an extension program offered to the radiologic technology graduate by application process. This two-quarter program consists of online delivery of academic classes and supervised clinical practicum in a CT scan department. Upon completion of this two-quarter program, students will have the classroom knowledge and the clinical competencies to prepare them to apply for the CT certification test offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. The CT certificate program begins fall quarter. For technologists currently working in CT scan, clinical practicum may be waived. (See the program coordinator for exceptions.) Applications are accepted beginning March 1 for the year applying. For more information, contact the Radiologic Science Program.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Fall Quarter RT 270 RT 272 RT 273 Winter Quarter RT 276 RT 278 RT 279

CT Physics & Quality Assurance Cross Sectional Anatomy & Pathology I CT Clinical Practicum I Cross Sectional Anatomy & Pathology II CT Special Procedures CT Clinical Practicum II Total Certificate Credits

Credits 4 2 7 Credits 4 2 7 26

Courses Registration in radiologic science courses requires acceptance into the Radiologic Science Program. RT 110: Introduction to Radiography 3 Cr Quarters: SR This course is designed to orient the beginning radiology student to the field of diagnostic imaging. Students will reflect on historical events in radiography and explore advanced imaging fields. Medical ethics and legal issues will be studied. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 111: Introduction to Clinical Experience 1 Cr Quarters: F This course provides opportunities for students to acquaint themselves with the clinical education centers and policies specific to clinical education. The content of this course includes becoming familiar with and completing competency testing on specific hospital radiographic equipment as well as film and darkroom procedures. Prerequisite: Admittance to the Radiologic Science program and completion of RT 117 with a grade of S RT 116: RT Communications 2 Cr Quarters: SR This course assists students to develop skills and knowledge about multicultural communication in a radiologic imaging/medical environment. Focus is on cultural ethnicity and interaction with patients at medical facilities, Spanish verbal communication, and radiologic terminology. Prerequisite: Admittance to the Radiologic Science Program RT 117: HIV/AIDS/CPR for Radiographers 1 Cr Quarters: SR This course meets the requirements for AIDS/HIV education as stated in WAC 246-12-260. Also included is CPR for the radiographer. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 120: Image Acquisition Theory I 3 Cr Quarters: F This course is designed to teach the student basic technical principles and mathematical calculations of image production. The student will also obtain a basic knowledge of how x-radiation is produced and used in diagnostic medical radiography and what radiation safety measures can be taken to minimize exposure. Prerequisite: MATH 095 and admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 121: Image Acquisition Lab I 1 Cr Quarters: F This course includes orientation to radiographic equipment and application of prime exposure factors, geometric factors, density, and contrast in the laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 122: Image Acquisition Theory II 3 Cr Quarters: W Course content includes the principles of digital radiography, computed radiography, radiographic film, automatic processing, grids, screens, and beam restriction. Prerequisite: RT 120 or permission of instructor

RT 123: Image Acquisition Lab II 1 Cr Quarters: W Students will perform laboratory experiments to discover principles of automatic processing, sensitometry, and the use of radiographic accessories. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 130: Radiologic Positioning Theory I 3 Cr Quarters: F Course emphasis is placed on radiographic protocols for the chest, upper extremities, abdomen, sternum, ribs, and IVU. Images will be analyzed for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 131: Radiologic Positioning I Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F Protocols for the chest, upper extremities, abdomen, sternum, ribs, and IVU will be practiced in a laboratory setting. Images will be produced and evaluated for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 132: Radiologic Positioning Theory II 3 Cr Quarters: W Course emphasis is placed on radiographic protocols for the lower extremities and vertebral column. Images will be analyzed for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 133: Radiographic Positioning II Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W Protocols for the lower extremities and the vertebral column will be practiced in a laboratory setting. Images will be produced and evaluated for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 134: Radiographic Position Theory III Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: S Course emphasis is placed on radiographic protocols for the alimentary tract and cranium to include skull, sinuses, facial bones, nasal bones, mandible, zygomas, and TMJs. Images will be analyzed for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 135: Radiographic Positioning III Lab 2 Cr Quarters: S Protocols for the vertebral column, alimentary tract, and cranium to include skull, sinuses, facial bones, nasal bones, mandible, zygomas, and TMJs will be practiced in a laboratory setting. Images will be produced and evaluated for proper demonstration of anatomy and diagnostic quality. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 136: Radiographic Procedures 4 Cr Quarters: S This course is designed to acquaint the student with imaging considerations for the trauma, surgical, pediatric, and geriatric patient. Appropriate terminology, pathology, patient care, technical changes, and positioning variants will be explored. The student will learn pathology procedures and cross-sectional imaging for the skeletal system. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor RT 140: Radiology Patient Care Theory 2 Cr Quarters: F This course is designed to teach the radiology student basic principles of patient care. The student will obtain basic knowledge of patient interaction, patient history, transport, emergency situations, basic laboratory tests, medical/surgical asepsis, venipuncture, contrast media administration, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacology. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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160

RT 141: Radiology Patient Care Lab 1 Cr Quarters: F This course provides the student with practical training in the area of patient care using the principles and theory learned in RT 140. Upon completion of this course, the student will have had the opportunity to practice and role play emergency situations, patient transfer, immobilization and body mechanic techniques, venipuncture, standard infection precautions, contrast administration, and medical/surgical asepsis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 150: Clinical Practicum I 6 Cr Quarters: W Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with first-year academic courses. Prerequisite: Completion of RT 111 with a grade of S, RT 140, and RT 141 RT 151: Clinical Practicum II 6 Cr Quarters: S Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with previously-learned academics. Prerequisite: Completion of RT 150 or permission of instructor. RT 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

RT 199: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

RT 220: Radiographic Quality Management 2 Cr Quarters: F This course explores equipment testing parameters for digital and film imaging systems. It provides instruction about components of x-ray generators, JCAHO government regulations and the requirements of a quality management program. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 230: Pathology & Advanced Procedures I 3 Cr Quarters: F This course provides the student opportunities to acquaint themselves with anatomy, physiology, pathology, imaging, and advanced patient care procedures involving respiratory and digestive systems. Crosssectional anatomy and laboratory tests for these systems will be addressed. Tomography, CT Scan, MRI and Ultrasound will be studied. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program RT 231: Pathology & Advanced Procedures II 4 Cr Quarters: W This course provides the student opportunities to acquaint themselves with anatomy, physiology, pathology, imaging, and advanced patient care procedures involving urinary, hematopoietic, circulatory/ lymphatic, central nervous systems, and neoplasia. Cross-sectional anatomy and laboratory tests for these systems will be addressed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor RT 232: Pathology & Advanced Procedures III 2 Cr Quarters: S This course provides students opportunities to acquaint themselves with anatomy, physiology, pathology, imaging, and advanced patient care procedures involving endocrine and male and female reproductive systems. Cross-sectional anatomy and laboratory tests for these systems will be addressed. Sensory organs and genetics will also be studied. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor

RT 240: Radiation Biology 3 Cr Quarters: W The study of radiation's effects on the body and how to use radiation protection for technologists, staff, patients, and the community. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor RT 246: Radiographic Physics 5 Cr Quarters: S This course introduces the student to basic physics concepts with special emphasis on the physics of electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetism and how they are applied to radiologic science. Prerequisite: RT 120 or permission of instructor RT 250: Clinical Practicum III 13 Cr Quarters: SR Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with first-year academic courses. Clinical assignments include forty hours of experience per week throughout the quarter. Prerequisite: Completion of RT 151 or permission of instructor RT 251: Clinical Practicum IV 13 Cr Quarters: F Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with previously-learned academics. Prerequisite: Completion of RT 250 or permission of instructor RT 252: Clinical Practicum V 11 Cr Quarters: W Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with previously-learned academics. Prerequisite: Completion of RT 251 or permission of instructor RT 253: Clinical Practicum VI 7 Cr Quarters: S Students are assigned clinical experience in a radiology department to practice educational objectives that correlate with previously-learned academics. Prerequisite: RT 252 or permission of instructor RT 259: Professional Preparation 1 Cr Quarters: W In preparation for a career in radiology, students in this course will learn licensure and certification requirements as well as investigate career advancement opportunities. They will also practice employment strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor. RT 260: Registry Review 2 Cr Quarters: S This course provides a review of program content to assist the student in preparation for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program or permission of instructor RT 270: CT Physics & Quality Assurance 4 Cr Quarters: F This course is designed to provide the academic instruction regarding CT scan equipment principles and operation. Equipment physics, image acquisition and image processing will be included as well as quality assurance testing. Prerequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiography program or permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

5


6

RT 272: Cross Sectional Anatomy & Pathology I 2 Cr Quarters: F This course presents information related to CT scanning of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Sectional anatomy, pathology, and scanning techniques will be discussed. Prerequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiography program or permission of instructor RT 273: CT Clinical Practicum I Variable Cr Quarters: F Students are assigned to clinical practicum in a CT scan department to practice clinical objectives as defined by the ARRT. Prerequisite: Admission to the CT Certificate program or permission of instructor RT 276: Cross Sectional Anatomy and Pathology II 4 Cr Quarters: W This course presents information related to CT scanning of the head, neck, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal system. Sectional anatomy, pathology, and scanning techniques will be discussed. Prerequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiography program or permission of instructor RT 278: CT Special Procedures 2 Cr Quarters: W This course is designed to provide the academic instruction regarding CT advanced procedure exams. Instruction on contrast administration and reactions, radiation protection, pediatric CT, 3-D imaging, cardiac and angiographic exams, radiation treatment planning, PET CT, patient care, and biopsy/drain procedures will be discussed. Prerequisite: Admittance to the CT Scan program or permission of instructor RT 279: CT Clinical Practicum II Variable Cr Quarters: W Students are assigned to clinical practicum in a CT scan department to practice clinical objectives as defined by the ARRT. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RT 273 or permission of instructor

Reading Course READ 105: Critical Reading 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Students develop skills in thinking and reading in the cognitive domain resulting in increased comprehension and expanded problem-solving skills in reading. The students will develop skills in questioning, analyzing, synthesizing and applying information while learning to evaluate and communicate about assumptions, assertions, arguments, and definitions found in written materials.

Social Science Social Science courses provide the perspective of more than one of the following disciplines: Anthropology, Chican@ Studies, Economics, Ethnic Studies, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.

Course SOSCI 100: Introduction to Social Science 4 Cr Quarters: O The purpose of this course is to prepare students for inquiry into the social sciences. It will examine the language, logic, and methods of the social science distribution courses and will expose students to the types of questions posed by the various disciplines. It will emphasize practicing academic skills and learning the basic concepts and methodology necessary for successful study of these disciplines. Recommended: Eligibility for MATH 075, ENGL 095, and ENGL 081T

Sign Language See "Modern Languages."

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Sociology Sociology is the systematic analysis of the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists study social interaction, social structure, and social change. Contemporary American society is the focus, but comparative and historical perspectives are included. The college offers basic courses that introduce the student to the fundamental principles, theories, and approaches of the discipline.

SOC 250: Marriage & Family 5 Cr Quarters: S This course focuses on the family as a social institution. It involves analysis of intimate and family relationships across the lifespan and in traditional and alternative family forms. Emphasis is on the modern American family, but historical and cross-cultural comparisons are addressed. Topics include changing family patterns and roles, love, courtship, marital success and dissolution, child-rearing, and family stress. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS

Courses SOC& 101: Introduction to Sociology 5 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This introductory course in sociology provides a survey of the discipline and a foundation for other sociology and related social science courses. Significant concepts and theories are introduced along with the basics of social research. Topics include culture, social stratification, deviance, social change, and social institutions such as the family and education. Although the main emphasis is on contemporary American society, comparative and historical perspectives are included. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 or successful completion of BA 075 Distribution: SS

Spanish See “Modern Languages”

Special Education See "Education"

SOC 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor SOC& 201: Social Problems 5 Cr Quarters: W This course focuses on the sociological concepts and methods employed in the analysis of contemporary social problems such as poverty, crime, substance abuse, divorce, and racial and ethnic conflict. The course includes the analysis of global, national, and local problems and considers possible solutions. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 or successful completion of BA 075 Distribution: SS

Speech See “Communication Studies.”

SOC 210: Sociology of Sex & Gender 5 Cr Quarters: W, S This course is a multicultural exploration of the roles of women and men in historical and contemporary societies. Issues relating to social institutions, social roles, mobility, sexuality, and family will be explored. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL& 101 and eligibility for MATH 085 Distribution: SS SOC 230: Social Psychology 5 Cr Quarters: F Social psychology is the scientific study of the ways in which people’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior are influenced by the real or imagined presence of others. Topics include self-concept, self-serving biases, self-deception, aggression, loving and liking, social influence, conformity, obedience, attitude formation, and attitude change. This course is cross-disciplined. Credit cannot be given for both PSYCH 230 and SOC 230. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 or SOC& 101 Distribution: SS

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Student Development Courses SD 075: Navigating for Success in Higher Education 3 Cr Quarters: O This course is for first-year YVCC students who are required to take developmental-level coursework in order to place into college classes. The focus is on developing the knowledge and skills needed to chart a pathway for continuing one’s education in face-to-face and eLearning environments with the support of one’s peers. Topics of study include college culture and related vocabulary, career and academic goalsetting, education planning, learning and interacting styles, and taking advantage of academic support services. SD 104: Career and Life Planning Variable Cr Quarters: O This course is designed to help students make an initial career/life plan based upon reflection on their skills, interests, and values as they pertain to the worlds of work, education, and leisure. The course will give students essential tools useful in making similar plans in the future. This course differs from SD 105: Career Planning, in that this course is more closely tailored to individual students by offering continual enrollment and requiring independent study. SD 104 allows students to choose how deeply they wish to cover this topic. Prerequisite: Placement in ENGL 095 is strongly advised SD 105: Career Planning 3 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This course is designed to help students make an initial career/life plan based upon their skills, interests, and values as they pertain to the world of work, education, and leisure. The course gives students the essential tools useful in making similar decisions in the future. Prerequisite: Reading and writing at the English 095 level are strongly advised SD 111: Specific Learning Skills 2 Cr Quarters: SR This course is part of a link and will always be linked with a content course. The student development portion of the link focuses on the skills and abilities needed for success in the content course. Through classroom instruction, students demonstrate application of the following skills within specific course content: note taking, test taking, effective study group process, use of supplemental instructional materials, analysis of assessment results, time management, and content-related assignment skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the linked content-area course

SD 140: Winning at College 5 Cr Quarters: SR A course for students entering college who want an overview of what college is all about, e.g., college admissions; programs; degree requirements; college transfer information; financial aid; scholarship search; learning style, personality and career interest assessments; time management; listening skills; note taking; test taking; memory techniques; and career information. Prerequisite: Ability to read and write at high school level SD 190, 191: Co-op Field Experience I, II Variable Cr Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Quarters: O

SD 198: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory studies in student development.

Surgical Technology See "Allied Health Technologies Program."

TV/Video Production See “Digital Media.”

SD 112: Specific Learning Skills 2 Cr Quarters: F See SD 111 for course description. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the linked content-area course SD 113: Specific Learning Skills 2 Cr Quarters: W See SD 111 for course description. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the linked content-area course SD 114: Specific Learning Skills 2 Cr Quarters: S See SD 111 for course description. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the linked content-area course SD 120: Learning Skills 2 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Through leader presentations and group participation, students develop an understanding of barriers to efficient study and practice means by which to improve their academic performance. Covered are such issues as student management of learning, time management, how to take exams and class notes, improve listening and text reading, and set goals for achievement. Appropriate for all levels of ability.

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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Veterinary Technology The mission of the Veterinary Technology Program is to attract, educate, and graduate highly competent individuals who are prepared to make a positive impact in their employment areas through excellent patient care, interpersonal communication, and economic skills. The Veterinary Technology Program is a two-year course of study leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree in Veterinary Technology. Successful completion of the program should provide the graduate with the credentials and information for successful completion of the national and state board examinations leading to licensing as a veterinary technician. YVCC’s Veterinary Technology Program is staffed by clinically-experienced, licensed veterinarians and veterinary technicians. Facilities include small animal wards, and the horses are housed at an off-campus facility. Other privately-owned, off-site, large-animal facilities will be used as well. The program is fully accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

Program Outcomes Upon successful completion of this program the student should be able to: • Possess the credentials and basic information for successful completion of the National and State Board examinations leading to licensure as a Veterinary Technician. • Bring desirable interpersonal skills and patient care abilities to the workplace.

Careers Veterinary technicians are an integral part of the animal health care team, assisting veterinarians and biological scientists in their work. Licensed veterinary technicians are employed in a variety of situations. These include private veterinary practices, universities, veterinary schools, wildlife rehabilitation centers, pharmaceutical firms, research facilities, zoos, animal feed companies, diagnostic laboratories, the government and military, and humane shelters. YVCC’s program provides training for students in the following areas: restraint and nursing of pets, horses, food animals, exotic and laboratory animals; clinical laboratory procedures; surgical assisting; dental, anesthesia, and radiology techniques; medication administration; and use of routine hospital equipment. Coursework will also cover various business aspects of veterinary practice such as client communications, medical record keeping, inventory control, computer technology, and veterinary ethics.

Applications should be received by May 10 to be considered for the following fall quarter. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will have been given the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge needed for employment within the exciting field of veterinary medicine. Prerequisites • High school diploma or GED. • One year of high school biology or BIOL 109 at YVCC (or its equivalent) with a grade of C (2.0) or better, taken within the last 5 years. • One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 100 at YVCC (or its equivalent) with a grade of C (2.0) or better, taken within the last 5 years. • Math COMPASS placement scores (within the last 12 months) indicating eligibility for Intermediate Algebra (YVCC’s Math 095) or equivalent coursework. • English COMPASS placement scores (within the last 12 months) indicating eligibility for ENGL& 101 or equivalent coursework. • Reading COMPASS placement scores (within the last 12 months) indicating eligibility for college-level reading or equivalent coursework. Additional Requirements • Fifty (50) hours of clinical observation or work experience with a veterinarian within the last three years. This may be paid or volunteer and does not include time working on your own animals. • Three (3) completed reference forms. One must be from the veterinarian with whom experience was gained. Application Process Students should contact the Veterinary Technology Department by phone at the phone number listed in the front of this catalog, by email (swedam@yvcc.edu or kdenome@yvcc.edu), or by mail (Veterinary Technology Program, YVCC, PO Box 22520, Yakima, WA 98907-2520) to obtain a copy of the Veterinary Technology Application Packet. A copy may be downloaded from the YVCC website at www.yvcc.edu/vettech as well. In addition to more specific program information, this guide contains application for admission to the Veterinary Technology Program. A criminal history background check will be performed upon admission into the program. Students must be accepted for general admission to the college to be considered for the Veterinary Technology Program. When notice has been received of acceptance into the college, it does not mean the student has been accepted into the Veterinary Technology Program. A separate letter will be received regarding acceptance or nonacceptance from the Veterinary Technology Department.

Admission YVCC’s Veterinary Technology Program starts a class of students each fall. Admission is based on completion of program prerequisites including high school and/ or college coursework, letter of recommendations plus veterinarian clinic observation or veterinary work experience. Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


Transcripts • Request an official transcript from each high school attended. Send the transcripts to the Veterinary Technology Program. • Request two (2) official transcripts from each college attended. One copy should be sent to the YVCC Admission Office and the other sent to the Veterinary Technology Office. There is a request for transcript of credits form in the Veterinary Technology Application Packet which can be used for this purpose. The applicant is solely responsible for obtaining transcripts for YVCC files. No acceptance evaluation can be made until these transcript have been supplied. Support Courses The curriculum for the Veterinary Technology Program is listed below. Students are encouraged but not required to take any of the credits of support courses before entering the program. Otherwise, the courses will be included in the program of study. Any credits to be considered for the degree must have been completed within the last 5 years with a grade of C- (1.7) or better. Students with older coursework holding a degree or advanced-level coursework will have their transcripts evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Support Courses AGSCI 130 Introduction to Animal Science BA 138 Written Business Communication z  or ENGL& 101: English Composition I or PTECH 120: Technical Writing IT 100 Introduction to Computers -ORBT 101 Beginning Keyboarding CHEM 109 Principles of Chemistry Lecture CHEM 110 Principles of Chemistry Lab VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology VET 110 Veterinary Medical Dosages VET 152 Safety & OSHA VET 154 Professional Development Total Credits

Credits 5

5 3 5 4 1 2 3 2 2 27-29

Degrees Associate of Applied Science Degree in Vet Tech Program of Study First Year - Fall Credits AGSCI 130 Introduction to Animal Science 5 IT 100 Introduction to Computers 3 VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology 2 VET 114 Animal A & P Lecture 3 VET 115 Animal A & P Lab 3 VET 118 Veterinary Medical Terminology 3 Total Credits 19 First Year - Winter CHEM 109 Principles of Chemistry Lecture 4 CHEM 110 Principles of Chemistry Lab 1 VET 103 Animal Care Lab I 1 VET 110 Medical Dosages ‹ 3 VET 120 Clinical Practices I Lecture 2 VET 121 Clinical Practices I Lab 2 VET 152 Safety & OSHA „ 2 VET 164 Surgical Nursing I Lecture 1 VET 165 Surgical Nursing I Lab 1 VET 170 Small Animal Nutrition 2 Total Credits 19 First Year - Spring VET 104 Animal Care Lab II 1 VET 124 Livestock/Equine Medicine Lecture 2 VET 125 Livestock/Equine Medicine Lab 1 VET 130 Parasitology & Clinical Pathology Lecture 3 VET 131 Parasitology & Clinical Pathology Lab 2

VET 160 VET 161 VET 172 VET 222 VET 223

Clinical Practices II Lecture Clinical Practices II Lab Small Animal Therapeutic Nutrition Radiology Lecture Radiology Lab Total Credits

Second Year - Fall BA 138 Written Business Communication z  or ENGL& 101: English Composition I or PTECH 120: Technical Writing VET 105 Animal Care Lab III VET 154 Professional Development VET 204 Hematology Lecture VET 205 Hematology Lab VET 213 Sterile Techniques VET 224 Lab Principles Lecture VET 225 Lab Principles Lab VET 236 Anesthesia Lecture VET 237 Anesthesia Lab Total Credits Second Year - Winter VET 201 Public Health VET 208 Veterinary Office Procedures VET 230 Animal Disease & Microbiology Lecture VET 231 Animal Disease & Microbiology Lab VET 234 Pharmacology VET 238 Critical Care Lecture VET 239 Surgery Lab Total Credits Second Year - Spring VET 240 Veterinary Clinical Experience VET 244 Special Topics Seminar Total Credits Total Program Credits

2 2 2 3 1 19

5 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 19 3 3 4 3 3 1 2 19 10 2 12 107

Courses VET 076: Community Service 0 Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR This class is offered as a self-support, community service, noncredit course. VET 101: Introduction to Veterinary Technology 2 Cr Quarters: F This course reviews the role of veterinary technicians in animal health, medical ethics, tasks that can be legally performed, and career opportunities. VET 103: Animal Care Lab I 1 Cr Quarters: W Students will develop skills in animal care including animal restraint, feeding, physical examination, and cleanliness of the kennel facility. Students will apply guidelines and requirements specified by veterinarians and regulatory agencies. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 118, or permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in VET 120/121 VET 104: Animal Care Lab II 1 Cr Quarters: S Students will develop skills in animal care including animal restraint, feeding, physical examination, and cleanliness of the kennel facility. Students will apply guidelines and requirements specified by veterinarians and regulatory agencies. This course is a continuation of VET 103. Prerequisite: VET 103, VET 120/121, VET 170, and concurrent enrollment in VET 124/125

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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VET 105: Animal Care Lab III 1 Cr Quarters: F Students will develop skills in animal care including animal restraint, feeding, physical examination, and cleanliness of the kennel facility. Students will apply guidelines and requirements specified by veterinarians and regulatory agencies. This course is a continuation of VET 104. Prerequisite: VET 104 and VET 160/161 VET 110: Veterinary Medical Dosages 3 Cr Quarters: W Application of practical math needed to learn dosage and calculation of medicines used in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to prescription abbreviations, routes of drug administration, the metric system, drug labels, types of drug preparations, and the equipment used to measure doses. Prerequisite: MATH 084 or MATH 085 or YVCC placement into MATH 091 or MATH 095 or permission of instructor VET 114: Animal Anatomy & Physiology Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: F This course is a systems approach to animal anatomy and physiology, with emphasis on practical function and application. Comparative anatomy and physiology of common species will be presented. This course is concurrent with VET 115. Prerequisite: Entrance into the Veterinary Technology program or permission of instructor and program coordinator VET 115: Animal Anatomy & Physiology Lab 3 Cr Quarters: F This laboratory course is a systems approach to animal anatomy and physiology with emphasis on practical function and application. Comparative anatomy and physiology of several domestic species will be presented. This course is concurrent with VET 114. Prerequisite: Entrance into the Veterinary Technology program or permission of instructor and program coordinator VET 118: Veterinary Medical Terminology 3 Cr Quarters: F This course will provide a systems approach to understanding the basic foundation of the language of veterinary medicine. Students will learn to recognize, understand, and use common components of terms, allowing dissection of words for comprehension and structuring of words for use. This course is best taken in conjunction with VET 114 and VET 115 to allow practical application of the terminology learned. Prerequisite: Entrance into the Veterinary Technology program or permission of instructor and program coordinator VET 120: Clinical Practices I Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: W This course will help students develop practical veterinary technician skills. Students will learn basic animal behavior and restraint, physical examination techniques, basic and therapeutic grooming, and veterinary office protocol and examination room procedures, including medical records. This course is concurrent with VET 121. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 118, or permission of instructor VET 121: Clinical Practices I Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W This course will help students develop practical veterinary technician skills. Students will apply the principles of basic animal behavior and restraint, physical examination, basic and therapeutic grooming, and bandage and splint applications. This class is concurrent with VET 120. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 118, or permission of instructor VET 124: Livestock and Equine Medicine Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: S This course will cover practical aspects of livestock and equine nursing skills plus use of humane and safe restraint techniques. Specific skills will include medicating orally and parenterally, performing venipuncture, bandaging, and prepping for various procedures and surgeries. Class is concurrent with VET 104 and 125. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 120/121, or permission of instructor

VET 125: Livestock and Equine Medicine Lab 1 Cr Quarters: S This course will cover practical aspects of livestock and equine nursing skills plus use of humane and safe restraint techniques. Specific skills will be developed for oral and parenteral medication administration, venipuncture, bandaging, and prepping for various procedures and surgeries. Class is concurrent with VET 104 and 124. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 120/121, or permission of instructor VET 130: Parasitology & Clinical Pathology Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: S Students will gain an understanding of animal parasites and be introduced to urinalysis in this class. Concurrent enrollment in VET 131 is required. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 120/121, and VET 150 or permission of instructor VET 131: Parasitology & Clinical Pathology Lab 2 Cr Quarters: S Students will identify gross and microscopic stages of common animal parasites using standard laboratory tests. Students will also be introduced to the steps of urinalysis. Concurrent enrollment in VET 130 is required. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 120/121, and VET 150 or permission of instructor VET 142: Veterinary Module for Medical Terminology 1 Cr Quarters: W, S, SR This course will provide independent study over veterinary-specific medical terminology. When coupled with successful completion of AH 119 (a human-oriented course), this course will substitute for VET 118 for the Veterinary Technology program. Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology program or permission of instructor and program coordinator VET 152: Safety & OSHA 2 Cr Quarters: W The components of an effective safety management program will be explored in accordance with state and federal employee safety regulations relating to veterinary medicine. Prerequisite: VET 101 or permission of instructor VET 154: Professional Development 2 Cr Quarters: F This course will explore practical application of professional development, personnel and financial management, and client interactions skills. History taking, communications, establishing rapport, and utilization of public relations skills will be included. Prerequisite: VET 101 or permission of instructor VET 160: Clinical Practices II Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: S This course explores veterinary technician nursing skills such as injections, IV catheter placement, blood collection, advanced enteral techniques, urinary catheter placement, cystocentesis. It also provides information on fluid therapy, care of recumbent and geriatric patients, physical therapy, and neonatal care. Prerequisite: VET 110, VET 114/115, and VET 120/121 or permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in VET 161 VET 161: Clinical Practices II Lab 2 Cr Quarters: S This course will allow students to practice veterinary technician smallanimal nursing skills such as injections, IV catheter placement, blood collection, advanced enteral techniques, and cystocentesis. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 120/121, and VET 150 all with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor and concurrently enrolled in VET 160

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


VET 164: Surgical Nursing Lecture 1 Cr Quarters: W Development of veterinary surgical assistant skills will be covered including surgical preparations and assisting, aseptic technique, care and use of surgical instrumentation and equipment, plus maintenance of the surgical suite. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 118 or permission of instructor and concurrently enrolled in VET 164

VET 205: Veterinary Hematology Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F This class will familiarize students with common procedures in veterinary hematology. Students will identify blood cell types from various species, learn techniques for measuring important blood values, and identify blood parasites. Coagulation and pre-transfusion tests will be performed. Class must be taken concurrently with VET 204, VET 224, and VET 225. Prerequisite: VET 130/131 and VET 160/161

VET 165: Surgical Nursing Lab 1 Cr Quarters: W Practical development of veterinary surgical assistant skills will be covered including surgical preparations and the role as the non-sterile assistant, aseptic technique, care and use of surgical instrumentation and equipment, plus maintenance of the surgical suite. Prerequisite: VET 114/115, VET 118 or permission of instructor and concurrently enrolled in VET 164

VET 208: Veterinary Office Procedures 3 Cr Quarters: W Students will learn procedures for scheduling, inventory, telephone etiquette, interoffice and client relations, financial records, and electronic communications in the veterinary office. Use of veterinary specific software will be covered. Prerequisite: IT 100 or equivalent or permission of instructor VET 222: Radiology Lecture 3 Cr Quarters: S This course provides theoretical application of veterinary radiographic imaging to include image production, radiation protection, film processing, radiographic analysis, quality assurance, and contrast media studies. This class is concurrent with VET 223. Prerequisite: VET 120/121 or permission of instructor and program coordinator

VET 170: Small Animal Nutrition 2 Cr Quarters: W This is an introductory course for students accepted into the Veterinary Technology program including identification and function of nutrients, understanding pet food labels and applications for wellness, and life stage and therapeutic nutrition (prescription foods) for dogs and cats. The course will be an asynchronous, interactive Internet course with simultaneous audio in the classroom. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the veterinary technology program or permission of instructor VET 172: Small Animal Therapeutic Nutrition 2 Cr Quarters: S This course is a continuation of the introductory course VET 170 for students accepted into the Veterinary Technology program. The continuation provides information on nutrition recommendations for key nutritional factors in specific disease categories. The course will be an asynchronous, interactive Internet course with simultaneous audio in the classroom. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Veterinary Technology program or permission of instructor and VET 170 VET 190, 191, 192, 193: Co-op Field Experience I Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Prerequisite: Permission of instructor VET 198, 298: Experimental/Exploratory Studies Variable Cr Quarters: O Experimental/exploratory study in veterinary technology VET 199, 299: Independent Study/Field Experience Variable Cr Quarters: O Prerequisite: Permission of instructor VET 201: Public Health 3 Cr Quarters: W This course will cover principles and procedures that must be followed by veterinary technicians to promote and maintain public health and sanitation and to prevent the spread of disease. The role of the technician in prevention and recognition of zoonotic diseases and occupational health hazards, with an emphasis on client education, will be covered. Class is concurrent with VET 230/231. Prerequisite: VET 101, VET 130/131, or permission of instructor VET 204: Veterinary Hematology Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: F This class will familiarize students with the basic terms and principles of veterinary hematology. Students will learn types of blood cells and species differences pertaining to the blood. The essentials of blood transfusion will be reviewed, and students will learn about blood parasites. Class must be taken concurrently with VET 205, VET 224, and VET 225. Prerequisite: VET 130/131 and VET 160/161

VET 223: Radiology Lab 1 Cr Quarters: S This course provides laboratory experience in radiographing animals using radiation safety measures, processing film, analyzing radiographs, participating in contrast media studies, and performing quality control tests. This class is concurrent with VET 222. Prerequisite: VET 120/121 or permission of instructor and program coordinator VET 224: Lab Principles Lecture 1 Cr Quarters: F Students will gain an understanding of a variety of laboratory tests commonly used in veterinary practice. Principles of cytologic identification will be discussed. Class must be taken concurrently with VET 225, VET 204, and VET 205. Prerequisite: VET 130/131 and VET 160/161 or permission of instructor VET 225: Lab Principles Lab 2 Cr Quarters: F Students will perform a variety of laboratory tests commonly used in veterinary clinics and will relate the results to patient cases. Cytology skills will be developed. Class must be taken concurrently with VET 224 and VET 204/205. Prerequisite: VET 130/131 and VET 160/161 or permission of the instructor VET 230: Animal Diseases & Microbiology Lecture 4 Cr Quarters: W This course is an overview of animal diseases and microbiology, incorporating concepts of pathology. Common diseases of multiple animal species will be examined including those involved in dentistry. Class is concurrent with VET 231, and VET 239. Prerequisite: VET 130/131, VET 210/211, VET 224/225 and VET 234 or permission of instructor VET 231: Animal Diseases & Microbiology Lab 3 Cr Quarters: W Students will learn and perform microbiological procedures and dental prophylaxis. The course is the lab to accompany VET 230 and must be taken concurrently with VET 220, VET 221, and VET 230. Prerequisite: VET 130/131, VET 210/211, VET 224/225, and VET 234 or permission of instructor

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2013-2014 year only, and all courses are subject to change.

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VET 234: Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians 3 Cr Quarters: W Summary of general types and groups of drugs as well as the proper preparation of medication and vaccines. Students will be able to explain drug medications and to differentiate between normal and abnormal responses of animals to medications. Students will calculate dosages for common medications of large and small animals. Prerequisite: CHEM 109/110, VET 110, VET 114/115, and VET 130/131 or permission of instructor

VET 244: Special Topics Seminar 2 Cr Quarters: S This course is a review of current literature and important disciplinespecific and public issues related to the practice of veterinary medicine. The sessions will be instructor led involving lecture, review, and interactive discussions interspersed with formal student presentations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses required by the Veterinary Technology program and an accumulative GPA of 2.0 or better or permission of the instructor and the program coordinator

VET 236: Anesthesia Lecture 2 Cr Quarters: F Students will receive training in the use and monitoring of general and local anesthesia. Pain management techniques, anesthetic agents, and variations between animal species will be included. Prerequisite: VET 160, VET 161, VET 164, VET 165 or permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in VET 237

VET 290, 291, 292, 293: Co-op Field Experience I Variable Cr Quarters: F, W, S, SR Cooperative education integrates the students’ classroom study with work experience in cooperating employer organizations. Students usually alternate college study with employment periods in appropriate fields related to veterinary medicine or supporting industry. The students’ education, therefore, is shared between the employer, supervisors, and YVCC faculty.

VET 237: Anesthesia Lab 1 Cr Quarters: F Students will receive training in the use and monitoring of general anesthesia. Utilization and maintenance of inhalent anesthesia equipment and various patient monitoring devices will be covered. Prerequisite: VET 160, VET 161, VET 164, VET 165 or permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in VET 236 VET 238: Critical Care Lecture 1 Cr Quarters: W This course will cover the essentials of veterinary emergency and critical care including monitoring and treatment of the critical veterinary patient, emergency procedures, triage, and CPR. Prerequisite: VET 204/205, VET 213, VET 224/225, and VET 236/237 or permission of instructor VET 239: Surgery Lab 2 Cr Quarters: W Students will learn and perform anesthesia and monitoring of such during surgery and other medical procedures. Anesthesia and monitoring equipment use and maintenance will be included. Prerequisite: VET 204/205, VET 213, VET 224/225, and VET 236/237 or permission of instructor VET 240: Veterinary Clinical Experience 10 Cr Quarters: S Work experience under the supervision of a veterinarian and/or licensed veterinary technician. Emphasis is on the practical application of skills acquired during the program and performed by veterinary technicians. The course is intended to provide a broad exposure to veterinary medicine, surgery, and office procedures. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses required by the Veterinary Technology program except VET 244 and an accumulative GPA of 2.0 or better or permission of the instructor and the program coordinator

Common Course Numbers include the symbol (&) and are used at all Washington community and technical colleges to identify equivalent courses. Quarters listed are for the 2014-2015 year only, and all courses are subject to change.


YVCC FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS

ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIP Awarded by the Yakima Valley Community College administrators.

IKE & JOE ANDERSON Granted to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is seeking an AA in agriculture or agriculture-related fields. The student must be a graduate of a Lower Valley high school and must demonstrate academic achievement and financial need. The selection is made by the Agriculture Department.

DOROTHY L. AIKEN Awarded to a first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at Grandview Campus who may transfer to the Yakima Campus in her second year, who is pursuing an AA degree, and who demonstrated academic achievement and financial need.

PAUL M. & GENEVIEVE ANDERSON MEMORIAL For outstanding YVCC students transferring to a four-year university and majoring in political science or history. If no one qualifies, it may be awarded by Paul and Genevieve Anderson in memory of Paul’s parents.

ALLARD SISTERS Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is seeking an AA degree in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies and who shows academic achievement.

S. I. ANTHON Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC after completing the first year. Award based on his academic work and demonstrated responsibility in all aspects of her life. The student must have demonstrated leadership, friendliness, and influence for good among his fellow students.

TERRY ABEYTA Awarded to a Native American student who is enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC.

JAMES C. ALLARD Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is seeking an AA degree in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies and who shows academic achievement. RUTH & CLAYTON ALLARD Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is seeking an AA degree in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies and who shows academic achievement. ROBERT J. & HOPE ALLAN Awarded annually to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC during either their first or second year. The student must be seeking an AA degree. The student shall demonstrate financial need and be a graduate of Naches High School. ALTRUSA CLUB - ROBERTSON Awarded to a female student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is coping with difficult situations in such a way that she shows promise of fulfilling her educational goals. The student should show potential for success in school or training, show an ability for growth, possess ambition and initiative, and demonstrate financial need as well as potential for success. The scholarship is awarded by the Altrusa Club. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC and working toward an AA in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies. The student must demonstrate achievement, either academic, professional, or through life experience, and financial need. Preference given to family members of YVCC alumni.

J. S. APPLEGATE For students who demonstrate that they have the ability to maintain average or better grades and have a strong desire to become a school teacher. For students that plan to attend a four-year college or university majoring in education after completing two years at YVCC. ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF YVCC DISABLED STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP FUND Awarded to disabled students who have a financial need. Available for first or second year, full-time (12 credits) students who are seeking a degree in any major. The scholarship shall be awarded for one year based on maintaining satisfactory academic standing each quarter. BERNAL C. BACA Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) Hispanic student at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree, working toward a degree in counseling or political science. The student must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Financial need is considered. ELIZABETH BANNISTER TRUST Granted to a first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits). Selection is made by the YVCC Foundation.

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MARCY BARNES MEMORIAL A scholarship awarded to students enrolled in the Radiologic Science Program who have demonstrated academic and clinical achievement as well as leadership skills. The recipient will be selected with input from a committee of the radiologic science program. GAR BARNETT (HORTICULTURE) Granted to a returning student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and who is seeking a degree in horticulture. Selection is made by the Agriculture Department. CATHERINE MAY BEDELL A scholarship awarded to a returning woman or displaced homemaker who is enrolled full-time (12 credits), working toward an associate of arts and science degree, and is able to demonstrate financial need. HAROLD & MARJORY BERGEN MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is seeking a degree in nursing. Academic achievement (3.0 GPA) is a consideration. WINFIELD BOYD Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC and majoring in accounting. ROY BROWN Awarded by the Athletic Department to a returning full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC who has shown talent in baseball or basketball. Financial need and academic ability also considered. RUTH BROWN Available to a returning full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC who has shown a talent in the arts, including painting, music, or some phase of family and consumer sciences. Financial need and academic ability also a consideration. RUTH BUOY Awarded to an older, returning, female student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC. The student must be seeking an AA in arts and science, technical areas, or general studies and must demonstrate academic achievement and financial need. NORMAN & NELLIE BYRD Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC and determined on the basis of academic achievement. The student must be seeking an AA in agriculture. The selection is made by the Agriculture Department.

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170 ELIZABETH C. CAMPBELL MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC seeking a business degree with special interest in sales and marketing. Financial need and academic achievement are also considered. DR. KELLY CASEY MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC seeking a Chemistry degree. CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEE-KOCH AWARD Awarded to the classified employee of the year. COMBINED FUND Awarded to a first or second year student in general studies. DONALD CONNOR MEMORIAL DALTON FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC. The student must be a high school graduate, preferable from Wapato or Toppenish High School, and seeking an AA in agriculture. SHIELA DAVIDSON MEMORIAL Awarded to a student entering the Chemical Dependency Program who is recommended by the department program coordinator. Academic achievement and financial need are also considered. G. THOMAS DOHN Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student attending YVCC. The student must be working toward an AA in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies and demonstrate academic achievement with a 3.0 GPA from high school. JOHN E. DOWNING Awarded to a returning student, enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who has completed one year of the Radiologic Sciences Program at YVCC. The student must have demonstrated academic and clinical achievement as well as leadership skills while attending the program. MER EDMONDSON Awarded by the YVCC Athletic Department to men or women enrolled full-time (12 credits) in basketball and tennis. ELLIOTT FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree in math or science and who has achieved a 3.0 GPA. Student must demonstrate financial need.

SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS MARY ESTEP Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and studying music, piano, or voice. KINGSLEY & JEANNE FAIRCHILD Awarded to a first or second year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and seeking an AA degree. ERNEST & GENEVIEVE FALK Awarded to a first or second year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and who demonstrates academic achievement. ADA ANDERSON GALLUCCI Granted to a returning student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is from the Yakima Valley and demonstrates good academic qualities and character. COL. ALFRED (RET) AND GENEVIEVE GALLUCCI Awarded to students enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and majoring in a program which will prepare her to enter a technical career after graduating from YVCC.

ANTONIO & CATHERINE GALLUCCI Granted to a needy East Valley High School graduate to attend YVCC full-time (12 credits). Selection made by East Valley High School. MARY GALLUCCI Granted to a student from the Yakima Valley who will be enrolled full-time (12 credits) and who demonstrates good academic abilities and character. FRANK GAYMAN MEMORIAL Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and majoring in journalism. The scholarship is determined by the Yakima Herald-Republic and the YVCC Foundation. GILBERT ORCHARDS Awarded to a first- or second-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and studying geology or agriculture. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher from high school or while attending YVCC. DELORES GOODMAN Awarded to a high school senior of African American descent graduating from a Yakima Valley high school who will be attending YVCC full-time (12 credits). The students should be preparing to go on to a four-year institution or majoring in a program which will prepare the student to enter a technical career after graduating from YVCC. JOHN W. GRIFFITH, AGRICULTURAL Granted to a second-year student enrolled fulltime (12 credits) at YVCC and studying agriculture.

Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

LOUISE GRIFFITH, BUSINESS Awarded to a female first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) and seeking an associate degree in business while demonstrating academic achievement and financial need. MARIE & WILL HACKETT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is seeking a degree in nursing or agriculture. Academic achievement is a consideration. FRANK & MELBA HAGEL FAMILY Full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC seeking AA degree in a technical area or general studies. Must demonstrate academic achievement. WILBERT HANSEN FUND Awarded to a first- or second-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and interested in a career in agriculture, with preference for those interested in the tree fruit business. Selection is based on academic achievement, recommendation from former teachers, and involvement in activities. JULIE HARRIS Awarded to students in the Dental Hygiene Program. Must show academic achievement. YOSHIO HATA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC. Recipient is determined by the YVCC Foundation directors. CHET & MARY HATFIELD Granted to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who demonstrates academic achievement with a GPA of at least 3.0 and also shows financial need. ELLIE HEFFERNAN Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who has completed one to two years at YVCC and is seeking an AA degree in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies. She has made a positive contribution to the lives of students at YVCC through extracurricular activities. Recipients are selected with consultation from the Student Life Coordinator. HERMAN & JULIA HOPF Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC or transferring to a four-year college after having attended for two years and graduated from YVCC. Academic achievement and desire to complete work for a bachelor’s degree are basic criteria.


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SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS JANE HUNTZICKER Awarded to students enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC with a GPA of 3.0 or higher at the college and intending to major in family and consumer sciences education, early childhood education, or teaching of family and consumer sciences. This scholarship is transferable to a fouryear university. INLAND FRUIT Granted to a second-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC majoring in agriculture, and transferring to Washington State University. DON & HELEN JEWETT HELEN JEWETT WALT & HELEN JEWETT-SHIELDS Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must be pursuing an AA degree and demonstrate academic achievement from high school or college with a 3.0 or higher GPA. The student must also demonstrate financial need. LYLE JOHNSON - APPLE VALLEY KIWANIS Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student seeking a degree in agriculture who demonstrates academic achievement with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Financial need considered. JERRY & LINDA KAMINSKI Awarded to a music student. PEGGY KELLER MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student seeking a degree at YVCC. Student must demonstrate academic achievement with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. DON KEITH MEMORIAL Awarded by the YVCC Athletic Department. Primary attention to excellence in athletics. CATHERINE PRIOR KING Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who is enrolled at YVCC. The scholarship is based on academic achievement and financial need. KOCH MEMORIAL Awarded to a student in the Business Technology Program. ROBERT M. LEADON AWARD Awarded to a YVCC faculty member based on nomination by peers, students, and community.

HAZEL M. LELAND Awarded to a female returning student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC. The student must demonstrate academic achievement with a GPA of 3.0 or higher and intend to major in physical education, health education, or biological science. Courses taken must be transferable to a four-year institution in the state of Washington. Financial need not a criterion. JEROME LEWIS Awarded to full-time (12 credits) students. Academic achievement and financial need considered. MEL LEWIS Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is pursuing an AA degree and who has demonstrated academic achievement. Financial need is not a criterion. DONNA (BROOKE) LINSE SCHOLARSHIP Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is seeking an AA in arts and sciences, technical areas, or general studies. She must demonstrate academic achievement and financial need. The scholarship shall not be awarded to an acquaintance of the donor or to a member of the donor’s extended family. EVERETT LOGAN JR MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student. The student must demonstrate academic achievement. KATHRYN MANN MEMORIAL Awarded to a nursing student. The student must demonstrate academic achievement. MILTON L. MARTIN MEMORIAL Awarded annually to a first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC. The student must be a graduate of either Eisenhower or Davis high schools who has demonstrated outstanding scholastic abilities, participated in school activities, and shown evidence of leadership capabilities. Student must have a desire to attend a four-year college. Financial need not a criterion. RICHARD MARVIN MEMORIAL Awarded to a returning second-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC. Academic excellence in college courses is required. The scholarship is for majors in biology, botany, zoology, nursing, or dental hygiene. MICHAEL S. MATTHEWS MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must show academic achievement with a GPA of 2.8 or higher from high school or college.

GEORGE McCULLOCH MEMORIAL Awarded to a second-year dental hygiene student. The student must demonstrate academic achievement. ELPHA McDONALD Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must show academic achievement. EUGENE McPHERSON Awarded to a student athlete. GEORGE MESHKE Awarded to a student enrolled in drama. RAY E. MUNSON/SUNDOWN M RANCH Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student seeking an AA degree or certification in the Chemical Dependency Program. Students must be alumni of Sundown M Ranch, having successfully completed one of its treatment programs. The student must demonstrate academic achievement. JAMES G. NEWBILL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC with a high school GPA of 3.0 or a college GPA of at least 2.5. The student must have completed two quarters with one or more 100-level or above courses. NORTH YAKIMA CONSERVATION DISTRICT Awarded to a second-year student enrolled fulltime (12 credits) at YVCC whose course of study is natural resources and who has a GPA of 3.0 or higher during their first year at YVCC. BOYD OLOFSON COMPANY Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must be majoring in business with an emphasis on accounting. DARYL & SHERRIE PARKER - ATHLETICS BEVERLY PARNELL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a YVCC student who has completed 30 credits and may continue at YVCC or transfer to a four-year university. The student must be seeking a degree with a math or math education emphasis and must demonstrate academic achievement (3.0 or higher GPA). DELMAR PEARSON Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must be seeking an AA in agriculture or business-related fields. The student must have demonstrated academic achievement with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher from high school or college. Financial need not a criterion.

MILDRED McBRIDE Awarded to a second-year student pursuing an AA degree in technical or general studies. The student must demonstrate academic achievement.

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172 ERWINA B. PETERSON Granted to a student enrolled at YVCC who is a family and consumer sciences major with a GPA of 2.5 or higher of a related field such as education, health, sciences etc. ANNA & ELIZABETH PETTIGREW Awarded to first and second year students enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and based on financial need, scholarship, and leadership potential. TOM PIER MEMORIAL Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC pursuing an AA degree in arts and sciences, medical, dental, or general studies. The student must also show academic achievement. FRED & DOROTHY PLATH Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. Recipient is determined by the YVCC Foundation director. CLEMENTINE J. PRIOR Granted to a student at the end of their second year at YVCC to assist the student in attending a four-year institution. This is a science scholarship to be given to a student majoring in chemistry or bacteriology. The award is based on academic excellence. ELIZABETH PRIOR MEMORIAL Awarded to a woman over 26 years of age who graduated from high school, is entirely or largely self-supporting, is preparing to go on to a fouryear college, and is majoring in a program which will prepare her to enter a technical career after graduating from YVCC. The scholarship is awarded in memory of Elizabeth Prior by Dorothy Prior. Elizabeth Prior was the first president of Yakima Valley Community College. MARTHA & ARCHIE PRIOR Awarded to a YVCC student who is transferring to a four-year institution. CHARLES RABUNG MEMORIAL A tuition grant awarded to an incoming first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and who is participating in basketball and/or baseball. The scholarship is renewable for the second year at YVCC. The student must demonstrate academic achievement and reasonable financial need and show qualities of sportsmanship, citizenship, and good character. The selection is made by the YVCC Athletic Department. GLENN & CHERRY RASMUSSEN Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree and who has demonstrated academic achievement with a GPA of 3.0 or higher from high school and college. The student should be a first or second year student who has participated in varsity basketball in high school and is planning on trying to make or return to the varsity basketball team at YVCC. Financial need is not a criterion. Yakima Valley Community College, 2014-2015

SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS FRED REDMON Awarded to a male student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree and who has demonstrated academic achievement by maintaining a GPA of 2.0 or greater. The student should also demonstrate qualities of leadership, friendliness, and influence for the common good among fellow students. The student should also be participating in varsity athletics. The selection is made by the Athletic Department. JOHN REDMOND FAMILY Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is working toward an academic degree with a strong interest in poetry or literature. The student shall demonstrate scholarship, good citizenship, responsibility in academic work, and a positive attitude toward succeeding in their academic career. Financial need is not a criterion. ALBERT RING MEMORIAL Granted at the end of the first year to a YVCC student enrolled full-time (12 credits) who is returning for his second year. The student should be an English major and have an excellent academic record. The scholarship award is made to a physically handicapped student having academic promise and demonstrating financial need. MRS W. W. (GRACE) ROBERTSON Awarded to a returning student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree and who has demonstrated responsibility in their academic work with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. The student can be either a man or woman and shall have outstanding English records in the first-year class. The student must be returning to YVCC. Financial need is not a criterion. CHARLES ROOS Awarded annually to students enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC or any four-year institution after the student has transferred or graduated from YVCC. The student must have exhibited academic excellence by achieving a GPA of 3.0 or higher and be working toward a degree in business or economics or a related course of study. Financial need is not a criterion. WILLIAM RUSSELL Awarded to a first- or second-year student attending YVCC. The student must show academic achievement. DAVID & ALMA SCHOESSLER Awarded to returning students enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC with a need to meet the cost of tuition in their second year at YVCC. Two scholarships are awarded, one to a business administration major with excellence in accounting courses and one to a student with a strong interest in history or literature. Both students must be in the upper 10 percent of their class.

DALE F. SCHMIDT - SOUTH WEST ROTARY Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student who has completed one full academic year at YVCC. The student must be seeking an AA degree in business, be recommended by the Business Department and show academic achievement. LUCILLE WEBER SCHREINER Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is majoring in a health occupation field (nursing, dental hygiene, radiologic technology, etc.). The award is determined by the health occupation departments. Financial need is a criterion. STANLEY SERAFIN Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC who is seeking an AA degree and who is deaf or hard of hearing. BURT G. SHELBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is a graduate of Grandview High School. The student must show academic achievement with a 2.5 to 3.5 GPA. GLEN SHERAR Athletic scholarship which is awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC and who has an interest in athletics. Selection is made by the Athletic Department. JOHN SHERMAN TRUST Granted to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC who is seeking a degree in engineering. EUGENE & GWEN SHIELDS Awarded to a first or second year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) who is working toward an AA degree. The student must be an employee or a sibling of an employee of the Shields companies. The students must maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Financial need is a criterion. WILLIAM R. SHIELDS Awarded to an employee of Shields companies. An employee must be enrolled in 5.0 credits or more per quarter, and a member of an immediate family. Must be enrolled full-time (12 credits) or more per quarter. The student must be seeking an AA degree, or employees and their spouses may be seeking continuing education credits. The student must maintain a 2.5 GPA while attending YVCC. DR. HARLOW & REPRESENTATIVE MARY SKINNER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student at YVCC seeking a degree. The student must demonstrate academic achievement. Financial need is a consideration. MARY HUNTZICKER SNYDER Awarded to a full-time (12 credits) student enrolled at YVCC. The student must be in the upper 20% of the graduating class, maintaining a 3.0 GPA after two quarters at YVCC, and planning to major in education.


SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS SOROPTOMIST To an enrolled full-time (12 credits) female student enrolled at YVCC who is in either her first or second year, has been employed, and is seeking to further her education and develop additional learning and skills for future employment. She shall demonstrate a financial need. The award is determined by Soroptomist International of Yakima.

RALPH SUNDQUIST Awarded to an entering first-year student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and who is a graduate of a Yakima or Selah high school; also for renewals for returning sophomores who will attend YVCC. Qualifying students must rank in the upper 10 percent of their class. Students must possess qualities of leadership, friendliness, and influence for good among fellow students.

MARGARET SPLAWN Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and majoring in history or political science.

TAYER MEMORIAL Awarded to a student enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and who is a Selah High School graduate. Special preference for students majoring in English or the arts. Financial need is not a criterion but the student must have a recommendation from teachers and demonstrate academic responsibility.

JESSIE P. STALEY Awarded to a student transferring after her second year at YVCC to WSU. The student must be enrolled full-time (12 credits) at YVCC and be majoring in business administration. Financial need and academic a