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sheep festival AND GUIDE One copy free All others 50¢

of the

october9 12 thru

Celebrating Generations Trailing of the Sheep Festival is living history

This time of year, sheep cultures around the Northern Hemisphere bring their animals down from summer pastures in the high country. The annual ritual is often accompanied by celebrations of cultural heritage, food and music. The Wood River Valley’s 18th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival takes place Oct. 9-12, celebrating a region that used to be one of the largest wool-producing areas in the U.S. For more than 150 years, sheep have been a part of Blaine County history. This year, the festival begins a three-year program called “Celebrating Generations,” during which participants will be invited to share stories from the West. Ranching families will be attending from around the West to share their stories and help trail the sheep through the Wood River Valley. Join the fun at the Trailing of the Sheep Festival; it is living history. p h o t o

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

October 8-12 ~ Enjoy a Lambtastic Adventure FRIDAY OCTOBER 10 5pm • Ketchum For the Love of Lamb FREE thanks to

Vintage

Mahoney’s Bar and Grill

ZINC

Seasons Steakhouse

231 ½ N. Leadville Ave. with Chef/owner, Rodrigo Herrera • Lamb Strudel or Indian Lamb Curry • 230 Walnut Ave., with Chef Taite Pearson • Lamb Sliders • Wine tasting featuring the Sawtooth Winery At the nexStage starting at 5:00 pm

350 Bites Per Restaurant Get Yours While They Last

Vote for your favorite bite. Awards at 6:45 pm with Mayor Nina Jonas at the nexStage Theatre

Cornerstone Bar & Grill

2nd Street and Main with Chef Doug Jensen • Lamb Rillette on Soft Polenta •

Cristina’s

2nd Street and East Avenue, with Chef/owner, Cristina Cook • Lamb Meatloaf •

Enoteca

S.V. Road and Main Street, with Chef/owner, Scott Mason • Calabrese Lamb Meatballs with Autumn Cabbage Salad •

Il Naso

5th St. and Washington St., with Chef Kate • Moussaka with Lamb •

Rasberrys at nexStage Theater

1st Street and Main with Chef/owners, Callie and Maeme Rasberry • Italian Style Lamb and Pork Sausage Ragu •

Rominna’s

6th and Washington, with Chef Pier • Lamb Meatballs with Spicy Marinara or Leg of Lamb over Toast Point with Pesto •

Sawtooth Club

231 N. Main St. with Chef/owner, Tom Nickel • Denver Cut Lamb Ribs •

112 S. Main St., Bellevue with owner Shaun Mahoney • Lamb Sliders •

103 S. Main St., Hailey with owners, Marc and Freda • Pulled Lamb Slider with Cole Slaw •

South Valley Pizzeria

SATURDAY OCTOBER 11

108 Elm St., Bellevue with owner Dave Summers • Lamb pizza •

Lamb Feast at the Folklife Fair 11am – 4pm Roberta McKercher Park, Hailey

4-H Leadership Council

Delicious lamb creations are $7ea CK’s Real Food

308 S Main St., Hailey with Chef/owner, Chris Kastner • Lamb Ragu with Polenta •

Dang’s Thai Cuisine Restaurant 310 N. Main St., Hailey with Chef/owner Dang Chanthasuthisombut • Lamb Curry •

diVine

400 S Main, Hailey with owner Sherry Horton • Meatballs with Cheese and Tomato Sauce •

Il Naso

5th St. and Washington St., Ketchum with Chef Kate • Lamb Stew •

Jim Roberts Catering

Available for private parties, or large events. (360) 969-4749 • Smoked Leg of Lamb with Chimichuri & Harrissa •

KB’S Burrito

121 N. Main St., Hailey with Chef/owner Rodolfo Serva • Seco de Cordera, a Peruvian Lamb Stew with Cilantro, Spinach and Basil Sauce OR a Lamb Taco •

Breakfast Burritos, Muffins, • Falls Brand Hotdogs and Sausages on Franz Bakery Buns, Grilled Cheese Sandwiches, Quesadillas, Nachos, Beef Chili, Brownies, Cookies and Beverages • Beer and wine thanks to MillerCoors and Sawtooth Winery

SATURDAY & SUNDAY OCTOBER 11/12 Basque Food at the Sheepdog Trials

Gooding Basque Association Chefs Quigley Canyon • All day • A variety of yummy, traditional Basque dishes will be offered • Beer and wine thanks to MillerCoors and Sawtooth Winery

SUNDAY OCTOBER 12 TOTS Festival BBQ featuring On the Lamb

Irving’s Hill, 4th & Main, Ketchum, 11am-2 pm Lamb Barbecue featuring a variety of delicious recipes Music with Gary & Cindy Braun


Express

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

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Local chefs celebrate the taste of lamb By TONY EVANS Express Staff Writer

Wood River Valley chefs are breaking out their favorite lamb dishes to treat visitors during the Trailing of the Sheep Festival this weekend. “The whole idea is to show people that lamb is absolutely yummy if it is done right,” said festival Executive Director Mary Austin Crofts. “All the lamb that is produced in this country is primarily raised on pasture land in high-country meadows, with no hormones or antibiotics. It is grass fed, free range and highly nutritious—just what Americans are looking for today.” Numerous cooking classes with local chefs have already sold out, but there are many more opportunities to sample the creations of valley chefs. “Thousands of pounds of lamb will be consumed over the weekend,” Crofts said. On Friday, Oct. 10, at 5 p.m., the free For the Love of Lamb restaurant walk will feature local chefs cooking at 10 Ketchum locations. Participants will get a restaurant map and ballot for voting on the best dish at 6:45 p.m. at the nexStage Theatre on Main Street. On Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 11 and 12, at the Championship Sheepdog Trials in Quigley Canyon near Hailey, authentic Basque food will be offered by the Gooding Basque Association, as well as beer and wine.

“Lamb is absolutely yummy if it is done right.” Mary Austin Crofts Festival director

On Saturday at the Sheep Folklife Fair at Roberta McKercher Park in Hailey, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Lamb Feast at the Folklife Fair will feature lamb dishes prepared by the finest Wood River Valley chefs and restaurants, for $7 per plate. Lamb Feast participants are: l CK’s Real Food, with chef/ owner Chris Kastner. l Dang’s Thai Cuisine restauruant, with chef/owner Dang Chanthasuthisombut.

Visit these Restaurants for Delicious Lamb Specials See restaurant lamb menus online: www.trailingofthesheep.org RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED The Cellar Pub 400 Sun Valley Rd., Ketchum, 208-622-3832 CK’s Real Food 308 S. Main, Hailey, 208-788-1223 for reservations Cristina’s Restaurant and Bakery 520 2nd St. East, Ketchum, 208- 726-4499 for reservations Photo by Dev Khalsa

Delectable lamb dishes will be served at numerous events this weekend up and down the Wood River Valley. divine, with owner Sherry Holman. l il Naso, with chef Sam Turner and chef Kate. l Jim Roberts Catering, with chef/owner Jim Roberts (formerly of Boca). l KB’s, with chef/owner Roldolfo Serva. l Mahoney’s Bar and Grill, with owner Shaun Mahoney. l Seasons Steakhouse, with owners Marc and Freda l South Valley Pizzeria, with owner Dave Summers. On Sunday, the Trailing of the Sheep Parade Barbecue will take place on Irving’s Hill and at Main Street Market in Ketchum after the parade from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This lamb barbecue fundraiser for the festival is donated by board members, Lava Lake Lamb, the American Lamb Board and ranching partners. Music will be played by Gary and Cindy Braun. Catering will be by On the Lamb by Brian and Kathleen Bean, Lava Lake Land & Livestock. The Sawtooth Brewery will share its limited release of Sheepherder Saison beer. In addition to these events, festival-goers can also find many lamb dishes at Lamb DineAround, during which almost every restaurant in the area will serve lamb specialties over the weekend. For details: go to www. trailingofthesheep.org/lamb_ culinary_events.php. l

For the Love of Lamb (participants) Free lamb tastings on Friday, Oct. 10, in Ketchum. l Cornerstone Bar, 211 Main St. l Rominna’s, 580 Washington Ave. l Cristina’s Restaurant & Bakery, 502 Second St. E. l The Sawtooth Club, 231 N. Main St. l Enoteca, 300 N. Main St. l Vintage Restaurant, 231 Leadville Ave. l il Naso, 480 Washington Ave. N. l ZINC (formerly CavaCava), 230 Walnut Ave. l Rasberrys, at nexStage Theatre, First and Main streets (for Lamb Tasting).

Cornerstone Bar & Grill 211 N. Main St., Ketchum, 208-928-7777 for reservations Despo’s – Mexican with Altitude 211 4th St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-3068

Perry’s Restaurant 131 W. 4th St., Ketchum 208-726-7703 for dinner reservations

diVine 400 S. Main, Hailey, 208-788-4422

Pioneer Saloon 308 N. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-3139

Enoteca 300 N. Main St., Ketchum, 208-928-6280 for reservations

Rasberrys 315 S. Main, Hailey, 208-928-7711 411 5th St., Ketchum, 208-726-0606

Globus 131 Washington, Ketchum, 208-725-1301 for reservations The Grill at Knob Hill 960 N. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-8004 for reservations il Naso 480 Washington St., Ketchum, 208-726-7776 for reservations Ketchum Grill 520 East Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-4660 for reservations Louise’s Kitchen 220 East Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-8000 for reservations Michel’s Christiania Restaurant & Olympic Bar 303 Walnut Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-3388 for reservations

Rickshaw 460 Washington Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-8481 Rominna’s 580 Washington St., Ketchum, 208-726-6961 for reservations Sawtooth Club 231 N. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-5233 for reservations Seasons Steakhouse 103 S. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-9999 for reservations Sun Valley Brewing Co. – Restaurant & Bar 202 Main St., Hailey, 208-788-0805 Sushi on Second 260 2nd St., Ketchum, 208-726-5181 for reservations Wise Guy Pizza 121 N. Main, Hailey, 208-788-8688 406 Sun Valley Rd., Ketchum, 208-726-0737 ZINC 280 Walnut Ave., Ketchum, 208-727-1800 for reservations SUN VALLEY RESORT RESTAURANTS The Konditorei Sun Valley Village, 208-622-2235 for reservations The Ram Sun Valley Village, 208-622-2800 for reservations

Check out Festival details: www.trailingofthesheep.org

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Hey ewe!

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Trailing of the Sheep FOR A AUTHENTIC P PERUVIAN LAMB S SPECIALS

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TRAILING G OF THE SHEEP

Photo by Michael Edminster

Some 1,500 sheep are herded down Main Street in Ketchum during the annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival parade.

Sheep parade demonstrates traditional herding methods Rancher John Faulkner’s ewes have traveled across the West By TERRY SMITH Express Staff Writer

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SUNDAY $2 Buds-Bud Lights TUESDAY $2 Coors-Coors Lights $2 Buds-Bud Lights Fireball Shots $3.50 $1.5m $2 Coors-Coors Lights Fireball Shots $3.50 Turnkey MONDAY Ladies Night 208.726.5177 • 208.788.3140 WEDNESDAY $2.50 Well Drinks Realtors Welcome Men’s Night $2.50 Well Drinks

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THURSDAY Bomber Night $4.50 each FRIDAY $2.50 well drinks for Everyone! 4:00 – 8:00 pm

• Hailey, Idaho

SPECIALS

When hundreds of sheep are herded through Ketchum on Sunday, Oct. 12, their journey represents a tradition in the Wood River Valley more than 130 years old. Herds of sheep were first brought to graze in the valley in the 1880s. When the price of silver plummeted and mining operations were curtailed, the sheep industry, because of the abundance of rangeland in the valley, became a major economic staple. According to historian Sandra Hofferber, author of “A Pictorial Early History of the Wood River Valley,” by 1890 the local sheep population exceeded 600,000 animals. With progress came change. As the valley became more populated, as tourism became the major economic staple, and as grazing on public land became more regulated, the sheep population declined to about 15,000 animals per year, grazing on summer grasses and moving out of the valley before cold weather arrives. With the advent of time, agriculture has become more technical and mechanized. However, visitors—estimated at about 10,000—to the annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival parade will get to see it pretty much the way it was done 130 years ago, with a couple of herders, either mounted or driving a horse-drawn camp wagon, a few guard dogs and a band of hundreds of sheep. The band selected for this year’s parade is comprised of about 1,500 ewes. It is one of six bands owned by Faulkner Land and Livestock Co. of Gooding. Prior to the parade through Ketchum, the band is grazed north of Galena Summit in the

Smiley Creek and Alturas Lake areas. They were herded there through late spring and early summer after grazing earlier at Twin Buttes southwest of Hagerman, near Bliss and at Macon Flats near Magic Reservoir. It takes about five days for the animals to be moved from north of Galena to Ketchum. Once

there, the band is typically held near the Ketchum Cemetery until their noon appointment in town. “Usually, we’re there way before they’re ready to come into town,” said Jodie Faulkner, wife of John Faulkner and one of the owners of Faulkner Land and See sheep, next page

Express map by Evelyn Phillips

This map shows the March-through-October route and grazing areas of the Faulkner Land and Livestock Co. sheep band that will be the stars in this year’s Trailing of the Sheep Festival parade.


Express

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

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WHEN YOU’RE HAVING AS MUCH FUN AS YOUR DOG, YOU’RE DOING SOMETHING RIGHT.

Photo by Kat Smith

CHAMPION SHEEPDOGS TO STRUT THEIR STUFF Spectators can watch the incredible skills of 50 of the best sheepherding dogs from around the West on Saturday, Oct. 11, and Sunday, Oct. 12, during the Championship Sheepdog Trials, from dawn until dusk at Quigley Canyon field, just east of Hailey (take Fox Acres Road and follow the signs). Admission is $3 each at the gate; children under 12 get in free. Dogs are welcome but must be on a leash at all times. For more information, go to www. trailingofthesheep.org.

Trunk Show — Fri. Sat. Sun. $15 OFF EACH MTN. KHAKIS PURCHASE OF $75 OR MORE 10% OFF ALL CLOTHING & FOOTWEAR ALL WOOL ITEMS 10% OFF

SHEEP Sheep trucked to warmer climates for winter sheep. Akbash are a large, lean, white animal, with males standing up Livestock. Once through Ketchum, the to 34 inches tall and weighing up band is herded south to Hailey, to 120 pounds. “We’ve had them for years,” through Croy Canyon and south Faulkner said. “They’re not atagain to the Dietrich area. From the Dietrich area, tack dogs. If you walked by them, the animals, along with other they wouldn’t attack you, but Faulkner bands, will be loaded they wouldn’t let you in to get the on trucks and hauled for winter sheep.” Bringing the band through grazing to either Blythe, Calif., or Ketchum is a norPoston, Ariz. mal routine for the The bands are Faulkners. Particitrucked back to Idaho pating in the parade, in March to begin however, adds a little grazing again in the more time to the jourHagerman and Bliss ney, but Faulkner said area before being “we love doing it.” herded again to the Faulkner said Wood River Valley. she and sheep ranchLambs are typiers were skeptical of cally born beginning the “trailing of the in late December and sheep” concept when they stay with the it was masterminded ewes until about July, 18 years ago by John when they are reand Diane Peavey, moved. At that time, Jodie Faulkner sheep ranchers who rams are brought to Faulkner Land and live northeast of the flock, about one Livestock Co. Carey. per every hundred “We didn’t ewes, for breeding. While on rangelands, the think anyone would come, but sheep are protected by Akbash it turned out that a lot of people guard dogs, a breed that originat- wanted to come,” Faulkner said. ed in western Turkey to protect “They seem to love seeing them. livestock from wolves and other Anytime you can share with anyone how an agriculture operation predators. Faulkner said there are typi- goes, it is a tremendous thing.” cally three dogs per band of 1,500 Terry Smith: tsmith@mtexpress.com Continued from previous page

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

2014 Trailing of the Sheepdog Trials

MEET THE CHAMPIONS

trailing of the sheep

ca l e n da r * All Fiber Class registration online.

Wednesday, October 8 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Cooking with Lamb: il Naso Restaurant, Ketchum –$50. SOLD OUT

Thursday, October 9 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Cooking with Lamb, Michel’s Christiania, Ketchum –$50. SOLD OUT 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Cooking with Lamb, CK’s Real Food, Hailey. $50. SOLD OUT

“I am a Champion – I am the Wizard”

I am black and white, 6-years old, male and I am a Border Collie. I am now ranked #13 in the United States. My job in life is to be fast, focused and to herd sheep – and yes, I do love my job! I especially love herding FLAT TOP SHEEP COMPANY’S wild sheep! Come out to see me and all my other champion friends. We love your support. It’s a great way to spend the day with your family.

Trailing of the Sheepdog Trials National Point Qualifier October 11-12, 2014 – Dawn to Dusk • Quigley Canyon, Hailey, Idaho Sponsor a dog • Come see the Champions work • $3.00 entry Dogs on a leash Kids under 12 and over 80 are Free www.trailingofthesheep.org

Delicious grass-fed lamb from Idaho’s beautiful Pioneer Mountains, shipped to your door, year-round.

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Reception with wine and cheese 5:00 p.m. presentation, How American Wool got into the Olympics: Sheepskin Coat Factory, Ketchum. Free. Dan and Jeanne Carver will share the Imperial Stock Ranch story and the excitement of working with Ralph Lauren and their hopes and dreams for the future. See the new line of Imperial Yarn clothing at the store. 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Knitted Flowers*, Instructor: Patricia Hirsch-Lirk, Sun Valley Needle Arts, Ketchum. $55. Learn to knit charming dimensional flowers to accessorize a favorite hat, jacket, handbag or backpack. Basic knitting skills required. 6:00 p.m. Basque Sheepherders - The End of an Era, Community Library, Ketchum, Free. Professor Kent McAdoo and Cathy McAdoo share their first-hand experience of living for 13 months in northern Nevada with Basque herders in the early 1970s. Through a photograph-illustrated presentation, they describe each season in sheep camp, from lambing to summer range, the fall trail, winter range on the desert, and trailing back to the lambing area in spring.

Friday, October 10 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. The Imperial Stock Ranch Wool Marketing Journey from commodity to product, Sawtooth Botanical Garden, south of Ketchum. Free. Dan and Jeanne Carver, Imperial Stock Ranch. When the American commodity market for wool collapsed in 1999, Dan and Jeanne changed their entire thinking, and together, are changing the future of American wool and finding sustainability for their historic ranch. 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Dyeing Yarns for Knitters & Weavers*, Instructor, Lonna Alexander-Steele, $65. Sawtooth Botanical Garden, south of Ketchum. Using Acid Dyes, this class will focus on techniques used to produce a variety of graduated color, variegated color, rainbow dyed and spotted yarns. Cost includes materials. 10:30 a.m. – 4:40 p.m. Hand Wool Appliqued Table Runner*, Instructor: Susan Coons, $50 plus kit. The Sun Valley Fabric Granary, Hailey. Make a 17” x 58” quilted wool table runner to celebrate our Valley’s history with sheep. Working from a kit, instructional time will be focused on construction techniques. Kit is an additional $50.

www.lavalakelamb.com

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Cooking with Lamb, Chef Jim Roberts at the Wood River Sustainability Center, Hailey. $50. SOLD OUT 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Nuno Felt Scarf*, Instructor: Deb Gelet, $95. Sawtooth Botanical Garden, south of Ketchum. Learn the magic of Nuno Felting by creating your own scarf under the guidance of a professional felt artist. No experience in felting is necessary. Cost includes materials. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Shibori Dyeing*, Instructor: Lonna Alexander-Steele, $65 Sawtooth Botanical Garden, south of

WELCOME BAAAACK

TRAILING SHEEP of the

see me heeps & o C r S ift ou ed g irs m en the souv

jane’s artifacts cards // gifts // balloons // wrapping // art supplies arts // crafts // papers // office // party

Same Hailey location: 106 South Main, Hailey • 788-0848

Ketchum Shibori is a Japanese term for methods of dyeing cloth by binding, stitching, folding, twisting, and compressing. Cost includes materials. 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Wild Hair Hats!*, Instructor: Susie Wilson, $60. Sun Valley Center, Hailey. Learn how to knit long, curly wool locks into a hat base to make a creative, unique hat with “curly” hair. (This class is for knitters beyond the beginner stage. Students must be able to knit, purl, increase, and decrease.) Cost includes locks for ‘hair’ and other materials. 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Dyeing Yarn with Natural Plant Dyes. Part One*, Instructor: Bonnie Barcus, $90 (For both Part One and Part Two). Wood River Sustainability Center, Hailey. Two part class. Using plant materials that are readily available in our area, students will learn how dyes and mordants create color on wool. Cost includes materials. 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Cooking with Lamb Sawtooth Club, Ketchum. $50. SOLD OUT 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Western Folklife Center Exhibit and Storytelling, Community Library, Ketchum. Free. Enjoy a sheep ranching exhibit and hear from Idaho sheep ranchers as they share stories, images and expressive materials reflecting the history, cultures, perspectives, hopes and challenges of contemporary sheep ranchers. Free. 5:00 p.m. For the Love of Lamb, Downtown Ketchum, Taste your way around Ketchum in search of the best Lamb Baaa-ites. Start at any one of the participating restaurants. Free. 6:45 p.m. Best Baaa-ites Awards, NexStage Theatre, Ketchum. Free. Ketchum Mayor, Nina Jonas will present the awards and welcome guests. 7:00 p.m. Sheep Tales Gathering - An Evening with Hank Vogler, NexStage Theatre, Ketchum. $20. Tickets online. Join Hank Vogler, an outspoken Nevada sheep rancher who shares his deep love for ranching through stories sprinkled with humor. He will be joined by John Faulkner, Lee Jarvis, Mick Carlson and Maria Onaidia and family. This will be an opportunity to hear the living history of the west.

Saturday, October 11 Championship Sheepdog Trials: Dawn until dusk, Quigley Canyon field. Take Fox Acres Road and follow the signs. $3 each at the gate, children under 12 free. Enjoy watching the incredible skills of 50 of the best sheepherding dogs from around the West. These amazingly talented Border Collies always bring words of astonishment from all viewers along with great photo opportunities. Bring lawn chairs. Dogs are welcome but must be on a leash at all times. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Quilt Show, Hailey Armory, Hailey (Next to the Folklife Fair), Free. You will not want to miss our first quilt show in partnership with the 5Bee Quilters Guild of Blaine County. 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Drop Spindle Spinning*, Instructor: Jennifer Green, $50. Hailey Armory, Hailey (Next to the Folklife Fair) Students will learn basic fiber preparation, drafting, spinning, and winding on. No experience necessary. Cost includes materials. 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Felted Soap*, Instructor: Brandy Vernay, $35. Hailey Armory, Hailey (Next to the Folklife Fair). Using natural colored Alpaca, sheep fibers and wool, students will be guided towards completing the processes to make this project. Cost includes materials. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Simple Wool Dyeing and Felting, Instructor: Elizabeth ‘Liz’ McCabe, $75. Hailey Armory, Hailey (Next See calendar, next page


Express

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. ZIONS BANK Sheep Folklife Fair, Roberta McKercher Park, Hailey. Traditional dance, fiber festival, classes, folk art, music, food and demonstrations. Peruvian musicians and dancers, Oinkari Basque dancers, Boise Highlanders, bagpipers ,drummers and dancers, Polish Highlanders of Chicago, musicians and dancers, Hot Club of Cowtown special performance, Sheep shearing demonstrations, Sheep wagon displays, Spinning and weaving demonstrations, Children’s activities, Wool and craft artisans, Quilt Show. Children’s Fiber Classes, A host of new children’s fiber classes are being offered at the Folklife Fair this year. Some classes are free, some are $5. The amazing Plein Air Painters of Idaho will be painting the scenes. You will get to vote as they paint in a “Quick Draw” competition. 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Lamb Feast at the Folklife Fair, Join the finest chefs in the Wood River Valley for a variety of scrumptious lamb delicacies. This year, there will be small plate tastings. $7 per plate. Food by: CK’s Real Food, Dang’s Thai Cuisine Restaurant, diVine, il Naso, Jim Roberts Catering, KB’s Burrito, Mahoney’s Bar and Grill, Seasons Steakhouse, South Valley Pizzeria and a special food booth with kid friendly lunches in partnership with Blaine County 4-H Leader’s Council. Sheepherder’s Ball with the Hot Club of Cowtown, 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Dinner Show, $75 SOLD OUT. Late performance 9:00 p.m.– 10:30 p.m. $25. NexStage Theatre, Ketchum. Tickets online or at the door. Join the Hot Club of Cowtown direct from Austin, Texas, and around the globe as they heat up the Sun Valley music scene with their hot jazz and western swing.

Sunday, October 12 Championship Sheepdog Trials: Dawn until dusk, Quigley Canyon field. Take Fox Acres Road and follow the signs. $3 each at the gate, children under 12 free. Enjoy watching the incredible skills of 50 of the best sheepherding dogs from around the West. Bring lawn chairs. Dogs are welcome but must be on a leash at all times. 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Photography Workshop, Across from Ketchum Post Office, $25. Join Michael Edminster and Jack Williams and they will take you to find the sheep in the hills getting ready to join the Parade and share photography tips and lessons about getting the best sheep shots. This will be a memorable experience. We’ll carpool. 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. History of Sheepherding in the Wood River Valley, Ketchum/ Sun Valley Visitor Center/Starbucks, Sun Valley Road. Free. Local Historians, Ivan Swaner, Jerry Seiffert, and Idaho rancher, John Peavey, will discuss the history of the area, share stories and answer questions. 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Trailing of the Sheep Parade Barbecue, Irving’s Hill, Main Street, Ketchum. Authentic lamb barbecue fundraiser offered by On the Lamb and Board members of Trailing of the Sheep Festival, Lava Lake Lamb and local producers. Music by Gary and Cindy Braun. Sawtooth Brewery will be pouring their finest craft beers. Water, wine and soft drinks also available. 12:00 noon Trailing of the Sheep Parade, Main Street, Ketchum. The weekend highlight! Watch 1,500 sheep trailing down Ketchum’s Main Street with sheep ranching family members and herders. The parade also includes Footlight Dance Centre dancers, Peruvian musicians and dancers, Oinkari Basque dancers, the Boise Highlanders, Polish Highlanders and sheep wagons. (NO DOGS PLEASE.) 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Sheepherder Hike and Stories, Ketchum Forest Service Park, $10 bus ride. Enjoy a guided hike through area aspen groves north of Ketchum to view sheepherder tree carvings, a disappearing western art form. Ride the Sheep Shuttle to the Sheepherder Hike for $10. Local historian, Ivan Swaner and third generation sheep rancher and former Senator, John Peavey, will share stories and answer questions about the history and traditions of sheep ranching life. 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Make a Wool Pillow*, Instructor: Susan Coons. $35 plus kit. The Sun Valley Fabric Granary, Hailey. Kits will be available for $25. This is enough to make 3 small pillows although only one will be completed in class. 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Needle Felted Animals*, Instructor: Jane Jaqua, $65, includes kit and materials. Sun Valley Needle Arts, Ketchum. This class has been a favorite for Fiber Festival students over the years. As well as offering the ‘sheep’, they will also offer the charming owls and fox. Kits are available at Sun Valley Needle Arts.

Parade Etiquette The mix of wary animals and curious spectators is always an adventure. Help make the experience fun and successful by following important parade etiquette: l No dogs are allowed at the parade for the sake of the sheep and the safety of spectators. Please leave your dog at home or in the car. l Don’t jump into the middle of the sheep—even for that perfect photograph. It will frighten the sheep. l Don’t walk through the sheep. Stay behind them. l Do look for a volunteer or Faulkner family member if you spot a problem. l Always follow the advice and instructions of volunteers and parade officials. They are there for your safety and the safety of the sheep. l Do bring children but keep them with you at all times. l Do take pictures but only from the side of the parade route. Stay on the sidewalks. l If you want to join in the walk, join in at the end.

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Bringing fun to the valley for over 36 years

to the Folklife Fair). A fun process involving Kool-Aid and wool, students will learn to dye fiber and felt it for many uses including coasters, tablemats, and scarves. Cost includes materials. 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon Dyeing Yarn with Natural Plant Dyes. Part Two*, Instructor: Bonnie Barcus, Wood River Sustainability Center, Hailey. Using plant materials that are readily available in our area, students will learn how dyes and mordants create color on wool.

Who’s in the Parade? Hilarie Neely and dancers from the Footlight Dance Centre carry signs to identify parade participants. l Color guard—Boy Scout Troop No. 192, Ketchum with Scout leader Chuck Williamson. l A riderless horse in memory of Bud Purdy, Blaine County rancher and conservation pioneer. His grandchildren and their children lead the horse representing the third and fourth generations of the Purdy family. l Antique authentic sheep camp owned by Shirley and Gordon Rock of the Wood River Valley. Driven by Dell Magnum of Blackfoot, Idaho, with his team. Rusty is a red roan Belgium and Lucy is a red and white North American spotted draft. l Generations of Basque young people. The Goitiandia, Onaindia and Inchausti families are all represented here. Their great grandfathers and grandmothers came from Spain to herd sheep. Here we have daughters, nieces, nephews and cousins of some of Blaine County’s founding families. l The Oinkari Basque Dancers and musicians of Boise honor the contributions of the Basque people to the sheep industry and Idaho. They studied music and dance in Spain, maintaining the Basque tradition and honoring their rich culture. l Alan Laudert/Lucero Sheep Camp pulled by Laura Sluder and Blue Sage Farm team of Belgians named Lisa and Lorna. l Rudy and Misty, two black Peruvian Paso horses, ridden by Steve Riccabona and Grady Burnett. The Peruvian Pasos were bred and used in Peru by ranchers who had to travel many miles each day to work their ranche—and they wanted to ride in comfort. Peruvian Pasos are naturally gaited and walk significantly faster than the American quarter horse. l Peruvian dancers and musicians of the Wood River Valley, former sheepherders, represent the contributions of the Peruvians to sheep ranching in the West. l Girl Scouts of the Silver Sage become a flock of sheep for the Trailing of the Sheep celebration. l City of Hailey Sheep Camp pulled by Shelby Hansen and her team of Belgian horses, named Duke and Robin. l The Polish Highlanders of North America present the folk music and dance of their families, shepherds from the Tatra Mountains of southern Poland since the fifth century. Now living in Chicago, the group keeps its distinct identity and traditions to pass on to their children. l Rodney Jones and his sheep camp from McCammon, Idaho, pulled by his team of Percherons, Doc and Cap. l Boise Highlanders bagpipers, drummers and dancers honor the Scottish families that were among the first to run sheep in Idaho. As always, they lead the sheep through the Festival Parade. l J2 Brown Sheep Camp pulled with Mike Swainston’s team of mules named Rose and Becky. l Darby Northcott and her pet sheep help lead the sheep with the Faulkner family and sheep ranching friends. l Father Ken Brannon, rector of St. Thomas Episcopal Church, blesses the sheep. l THE SHEEP—A band of 1,500 sheep from Faulkner Land & Livestock. These ewes have traveled about 1,000 miles to be here today. l

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Trailing of Sheep Festival

FIBER FEST 2014

Fiber Classes for All Abilities

Knitted Flowers • Dyeing Yarns for Knitters & Weavers• Needle Felted Miniature Sheep • Hand Appliqued Wool Table Runner • Nuno Felted Scarf• Shibori Dyeing • Drop Spindle Spinning • Dyeing Yarn with Natural Plant Dyes • Felted Soap & more For details and registration visit our website www.trailingofthesheep.org

Classes for kids Saturday, October 11 at the Folklife Fair

Photo by Tim Tower

Woven Bowl • Felted Pumpkins • Loomed Flowers Woven Spider Web & more

The Oinkari Basque Dancers perform at the annual Folklife Fair in Hailey, part of the Trailing of the Sheep Festival.

Thanks to our local partners Sun Valley Needle Arts Sun Valley Fabric Granary Trailing of the Sheep Festival • ZIONS BANK Sheep Folklife Fair Saturday, October 11 Roberta McKercher Park • Hailey • 10 am – 4 pm

Flock to the Folklife Fair Food, festivities and fiber are all part of a special day in Hailey By AMY BUSEK Express Staff Writer

Trailing of the Sheep DINNER SPECIALS OPEN 7am Daily Dinners Tues – Fri until 8pm Sat. Sun. Mon. until 5pm LAVA LAKE LAMB STEW:

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Lean sirloin, pork sausage, and Lava Lake Lamb drizzled with a tomato BBQ sauce and served with Idaho red garlic mashed potatoes and sautéed garden fresh vegetables. $15

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Those who have time to attend only one event during the Trailing of the Sheep Festival should consider making it the Sheep Folklife Fair. OK, maybe work in the actual sheep trailing parade through Ketchum on Main Street, too, but the growing popularity of the fair and abundance of cut-rate lamb delicacies makes it a must-see. Traditional dances, a fiber festival, classes, folk art, music, food and demonstrations are included in the day’s activities. This will be the 18th annual event. The fair is on Saturday, Oct. 11, at Roberta McKercher Park in Hailey from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Of the 19,000 people who attended Trailing of the Sheep in 2013, 6,000 attended the Folklife Fair, according to event Executive Director Mary Austin Crofts. The Austin, Texas,-based band “Hot Club of Cowtown” was met with rave reviews at last year’s festival, so “a couple of local cowboys” helped Crofts and her team finance them for a second year. Crofts described the trio as a hot jazz and Western swing group. A variety of cultural dancing and musical groups with ties to herding traditions will celebrate the sheepherding history of the Wood River Valley and beyond. Idaho has one of the largest Basque populations in the country. Immigration from Europe peaked in the early 19th century, with some newcomers following the gold rush in the Western part of the United States. They settled into the Western states as sheepherders and restaurateurs in the 1920s. In 1929, sheep outnumbered people in Idaho by 7 to 1. Today, there are far fewer Basques in Idaho, but their cultural presence remains. The Oinkari Basque Dancers of Boise have been performing since 1960. Their name is derived from the Basque language of Euskera and means dancer, or “one who does with his feet.” The group’s website describes its style as “a whirl of flying feet, snapping fingers, ancient music and shouts of exhortation, a thrilling

combination of precision and enthusiasm.” All the dancers are of Basque descent and many speak Euskara. Peruvians make up the majority of Idaho’s shepherds today. The state has the ninth largest sheep production in the United States, with over 250,000 animals. The U.S. Department of Labor allows Peruvians to live here to manage those herds on three-year contracts. Dancing is a touchstone in Peruvian culture—their costumes feature a rainbow of colors, and lively music accompanies their performances. The Boise Highlanders make up the Scottish performers and feature a range of instruments. The Scots established “sheep empires” in the 1800s throughout the western part of the country. They were known for creating successful new crossbreeds of sheep and amassing huge tracts of land to ranch. Idaho has one of the highest numbers of ScottishAmericans in the country and, in large part, that is due to the sheepherding legacy. The Polish Highlanders are flying in from Chicago for their 12th year at the festival. Though Polish-Americans might not have local sheepherding traditions, the practice is part of their culture. The Tatra Mountains in Poland have deep roots in sheepherding, and the Chicago dancers aim to celebrate that tradition with other sheepherding cultures. “[The dances] are a multicultural experience that you don’t get here [often],” Crofts said. The sheep business has various secondary uses. Soap, for one. There are nearly 60 vendors who’ve signed up for spots at the fair. The only requirement? Items of a sheep-like nature must be for sale. “Even as every vendor accepted is required to sell handcrafted items made from wool or of a ‘sheep nature’—the designs and colors, patterns and products are as unique as the individuals who create them,” said Sheila Kelley, Folklife Fair director. Vendors may also offer alpaca, rabbit and goat blends. Kelley said some merchants are selling soaps made of lanolin or sheep’s

milk and rubs/vinaigrettes meant to accompany lamb dishes. Lark’s Meadow Farm, a popular dairy farm out of Rexburg, will offer its sheep cheese. The fair’s returning vendors show an unwavering commitment to the one-day event, Kelley said. They drive to the valley mostly from Oregon, Montana, Utah and Wyoming, as well as from within the state. Vendors will often rent motel rooms the night before, she said, to show up with their wares early Saturday morning. “Some come only to our fair, taking the year to create what they bring to sell,” she said. “If they don’t raise the animal, they get the wool from family or friends. They can tell you where the wool came from and probably the name of the sheep.” There are always the folks who come just for the food. The lamb feast at the Folklife Fair features 10 local chefs creating lamb dishes, all for $7 a plate. Described as “small plate tastings,” the dishes will be available for purchase between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Events at the Sheep Folklife Fair Peruvian musicians and dancers. l Oinkari Basque Dancers. l Boise Highlanders, bagpipers, drummers and dancers. l Polish Highlanders of Chicago, musicians and dancers. l Hot Club of Cowtown performance. l Sheep shearing demonstrations. l Sheep wagon displays. l Spinning and weaving demonstration. l Children’s activities. l Wool and craft artisans. l Quilt show. l Plein Air Painters of Idaho. l $7 lamb feast featuring 10 local chefs. l Beverages from MillerCoors and the Sawtooth Winery. l


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TRAILING OF THE SHEEP SPECIALS Photo by Dominique Etcheverry

Kathy Etcheverry’s quilt will be raffled at the first quilt show during the Trailing of the Sheep Festival this weekend.

Turning beds and telling tales Trailing of the Sheep Festival to host first quilt fair and her husband, Steve, own Etcheverry Sheep Sheds, one of the last local Basque sheep Quilts are more than cheery ranches in Idaho. Steve inherited patterns and the equivalent of a the Rupert sheep business from his father, Jean Pierre. The Etchfabric hug: They tell stories. The 5Bee Quilters Guild, a lo- everrys sell their wool to Pendlecal organization, is featuring its ton Woolen Mills and their lambs handcrafted quilts at the Trail- through Mountain States Co-op. ing of the Sheep Festival’s first Kathy’s quilt features four Quilt Show on Saturday, Oct. 11, sheep bordered by pink and red at the Hailey Armory, next to the flowers. She spent more than Folklife Fair at Roberta McK- $200 on materials for the quilt, ercher Park in Hailey from 10 and “countless hours” of labor went into the project, according a.m. to 4 p.m. A growing trend at quilt shows to Trailing of the Sheep Festival is the “bed turning” ceremony. Executive Director Mary Austin The local quilters guild is hold- Crofts. ing its own turning event, one “Her work is exceptional,” at 11 a.m. and one at 2 p.m. The Crofts said. “You must see it up guild will make a bed with layers close to appreciate all the deof quilts and proceed to turn back tailed work.” the quilts layer by layer to tell Crofts said including a quilt show in the annual October festistories about each piece of work. val brings an added The work and level of talent to craftsmanship that the festivities. She goes into quilt-makviews the 5Bee Quiling delves into the ters’ creations as personal experiencworks of art. es of the creator. It’s “Quilting has befun for experienced come one of the most quilters, because popular American they understand activities for people the work that goes who are skilled in into each creation. sewing and design,” Yet it’s also fun for she said. “It’s benon-quilters who come a huge, huge are curious about business around the fabric artwork and U.S. In Blaine Counthe meaning behind Mary Austin Crofts ty, we have some of specific designs and Festival director the most talented patterns. The 5Bee Quilters Guild is in- quilters.” volved in numerous community A Pendleton blanket, a coat events. The group hosted a quilt rack, a birdhouse and restaurant raffle at this year’s Northern vouchers are among the raffle Rockies Music Festival in Hailey prizes. Tickets are $5 each or five and holds regular meetings for for $20. They will be for sale at the festival merchandising and enthusiasts. The show includes a raffle information tables. with a handful of prizes. The To get involved with the 5Bee most coveted raffle prize will be Quilters Guild, send an email to a sheep-themed quilt created by 5beequiltersguild@gmail.com. Kathy Etcheverry. Etcheverry Amy Busek: abusek@mtexpress.com

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Alberto Uranga came from Basque country to tend sheep Finance entrepreneur looks back on adventures By TONY EVANS Express Staff Writer

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Basque sheepherders have been a part of Idaho history for several generations. Alberto Uranga, 69, came to the United States to tend sheep in 1968 from the Basque fishing village of Mutriku in northern Spain. For three years, he led flocks of ewes through high desert and mountains of southern Idaho. Today, Uranga is a successful finance entrepreneur in Ketchum, and the primary sponsor of the Friday afternoon “Love of Lamb” tasting tour of Ketchum restaurants. The son of a tuna boat captain, Uranga was inspired by John Wayne movies to quit his job selling canned tuna, for a life of adventure in the Wild West. “I did not speak a word of English when I arrived here. I had heard about California, Kansas and North and South Dakota from John Wayne movies, but I had never heard of Utah or Idaho,” he said. Uranga and a friend arrived near Gooding, Idaho, to work at Ralph Faulkner’s ranch. His new job was a far cry from driving a sales route and staying in hotels. From late March until early June, he lived in a sheep wagon, making camp, and cooking as he and his partner drove the flock northward toward the Wood River Valley. “Sheepherding was definitely harder back then. There were no cell phones in case of emergencies. It was lonely, but I think it made me stronger mentally,” Uranga said. At Croy Canyon, east of Hailey, the wagon was abandoned each summer for three months of horse packing, northward through roadless mountains west of the Sun Valley ski resort. On two occasions, Uranga’s camp was attacked by aggressive bears. His partner shot one of the bears with a .30-30 Winchester rifle. In the spring of 1969, Uranga was tending the flock on a high mesa above the Snake River near Hagerman when he saw a small animal scurry into a hole. He reached into the hole and pulled out a small coyote pup. He fed it milk as the flock moved northward. “He started sleeping with the sheep dogs and came to see me in the mornings,” Uranga said. Over the next five months, the sheep were led northward to Baker Creek in the Smoky Mountains. “The first day we woke up at Baker Lake, the coyote was gone. Nature had called. He divorced me,” Uranga said with a wistful smile. Seven years and several jobs later, Uranga returned to Spain, only this time as a U.S. citizen. For 10 years, he taught noncredit investing classes at the College of Southern Idaho. He is the founding principal of Lasaii (previously Uranga & Associates), and has been involved in

Express photo by Roland Lane

Alberto Uranga owns a successful finance company in Ketchum. He arrived in Idaho in 1968 to tend sheep, not speaking a word of English. the financial services industry since 1984. Lassaii has clients in 37 states and four countries. In his spare time, Uranga serves on numerous non-profit boards in the area, enjoys time with his two children, and is an

avid snowshoer. Twice each year, he returns to the Basque region of northern Spain. “I was made to be an entrepreneur, and to walk through the wide open doors of America,” he said.

“It was lonely, but I think it made me stronger mentally.” Alberto Uranga Basque native

‘Celebrating Generations’ “Our family ranches are disappearing as surely as the carrier pigeon, with less fanfare than the leopard frog. There are fewer grandparents each year, fewer ranch kids who can afford to stay, or want to. Life is not always kind out here. But families, working together, learn who they are, what kind of men and women they will be, determined by the hardships, and the joy, of living here. Every decision has a consequence, every mistake its price.” —“Fifty Miles from Home” by Carolyn Dufurrena In 2014 the Trailing of the sheep Festival begins a three-year program called “Celebrating Generations,” to gather stories from several generations of ranching families in order to preserve memories of Western sheep ranching. “We sent invitations to ranching families around the West,” said Festival Director Mary Austin Crofts. “I know of 50 people who are coming to town.” The program will be kicked off on the opening night of the festival with an evening of storytelling featuring Hank Vogler, an outspoken Nevada sheep rancher who shares his deep love for ranching through stories sprinkled with humor. Vogler will tell stories on Friday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. at the nexStage Theatre in Ketchum. The cost is $20. Tickets are available online at www. trailingofthesheep.org. For details on how to participate in the three-year “Celebrating Generations” program, go to www.trailingofthesheep.org/celebrating_generations.php.


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Trunk Show October 10 - 12 10AM - 5PM Photo courtesy of Imperial Stock Ranch

U.S. Olympians wear Ralph Lauren sweaters made from American wool during the opening ceremonies of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia.

Ranch family spins a good yarn American wool was on parade at Sochi Olympics By GREG MOORE Express Staff Writer

The Imperial Stock Ranch is a family-owned ranch on more than 32,000 acres in the central Oregon desert. Under the leadership of owners Dan and Jeanne Carver, the ranch produces a wide variety of all-natural products—hand-crafted meats, wool, yarn and apparel.  For about 130 years, the ranch sold its harvests, including wool, as commodities. But the 1990s witnessed dramatic shifts in the sheep industry. Industrialization and consolidation impacted the processing and pricing of lamb in the food sector. Globalization shook up the markets for raw wool, and the textile processing and manufacturing infrastructure in America experienced a huge decline. Thousands of U.S. sheep producers went out of business at the end of the 1990s. By 1999, the Imperial Stock Ranch found itself unable to sell the raw wool harvest through traditional channels.  “Fifteen years ago, all I heard was wool had no value anymore,” Jeanne Carver told the online style magazine A Continuous Lean. “People weren’t wearing wool that much. It was out of favor. Newer high-tech performance fabrics and recycled plastics had flooded the markets. In addition, it seemed everything was made offshore.” The Carvers set out to prove that you don’t have to cross an ocean to make clothing. And so Imperial Yarn was born. Similar to the farm-to-fork “slow food” movement that reconnects us to our food, the Carvers are leading a ranch-to-runway “slow wear” movement that reconnects us to the source of the fibers that we wear, and the animals that provide it.  Once a year, the ranch harvests the soft, versatile wool from its Columbia sheep and begins the process of transforming it into a wide selection of fibers and yarns. Imperial Yarn operates out of the historic Hinton House at the ranch headquarters, offering yarns to knitters, weavers and fiber artists in a natural array of hues, textures and weights. Their fibers began to attract

attention. In July 2012, Jeanne Carver received a surprise phone call from a representative from clothing manufacturer Ralph Lauren. In late December, the company placed a production order.  “We didn’t know through this whole process what the yarn was being used for,” Carver told A Continuous Lean. “It was simply a ‘special project’ for one of their teams.” Eventually, in 2013, they learned what the special project was—sweaters to be worn by the U.S. Winter Olympic Team at Sochi, Russia. Ralph Lauren had promised that all the clothing it provided to the team would be made in America. “I’m getting more and more inquiries from designers and apparel companies who want to make things here in the U.S.,” Carver said. “It’s important, however, to ask a lot of questions. It’s not always clear what “American made” yarns are composed of. In many cases, it’s foreign-sourced fiber that’s been dyed offshore, then brought here and spun. “The bottom line to all this is the consumer. If the consumer demands traceability and support for U.S. raw materials and manufacturing, they will effect a positive change in investment in infrastructure needed again to grow manufacturing in this country.”

Wool producer will give two presentations Dan and Jeanne Carver will speak about their experiences during two occasions at the Trailing of the Sheep Festival: l Thursday, Oct. 9, from 4-6 p.m. at the Sheepskin Coat Factory in Ketchum in a talk titled “How American Wool Got Into the Olympics.” l Friday Oct. 10, from 8-9 a.m. at the Sawtooth Botanical Garden south of Ketchum in a talk titled “The Imperial Stock Ranch Wool Marketing Journey.”

500 N Main Street Ketchum 208.726.5282 www.silver-creek.com/events

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A Stranger Wants To Be You

“Thank you for providing solutions to my company.”

By Tracy Groll

As a parent, I’m concerned about how identity thieves are targeting young people like my four children. It may surprise you to learn that adults ages 20 to 29 are most commonly affected by identity theft, according to the Federal Trade Commission. In our modern online world — where young people are sharing their names and birthdates through social media channels like Facebook — it is easier than ever for crooks to gain information they can use to buy a home or car or open a credit card account, or even get a driver’s license or a job. So why are young adults the most common target? Perhaps it’s because this age group is inexperienced at managing money and may be less inclined to reconcile their checkbook and notice discrepancies. They also use social media frequently — a favorite hunting ground for identity thieves. During the months of October and November, Zions bankers throughout Idaho are visiting students in grades 7 to 12, teaching lessons about identity theft in support of National Get Smart About Credit Day. They will be sharing the following tips, which are useful to consumers of all ages who want to be proactive in ghting identity theft: 1. Don’t reveal sensitive or personal information on social networking sites and make sure your children do the same. 2. Put a passcode on all phones, tablets and other devices. According to Javelin Strategy

and Research, more than half (62 percent) of smartphone users do not passcode protect their mobile devices, and an unprotected phone or tablet can be a gold mine to identity thieves. 3. Don’t ever provide your Social Security number or account information to someone who contacts you online or on the phone, even if they sound legitimate. 4. When shopping online, make sure your browser’s padlock or key icon is active. Also look for an “s” after the “http” to be sure the website is secure. 5. Enroll in mobile fraud alert programs that your bank may offer to warn of suspicious activity on your accounts. 6. Order a free credit report every year by visiting www. annualcreditreport.com. Look for suspicious activity and notify the credit reporting agency of any issues. 7. Report suspected fraud to your bank as soon as possible.

Grant Petersen — CEO, BRONCO MOTORS

Grant Peterson uses Zions Bank’s time and money-saving products to help his business run more efficiently. “Zions Commercial Card program gives us the ability to manage our expenses and see what’s going on with our various employees and managers. And the ability for us to get the information when we need it is unprecedented.”

Identity theft continues to top the Federal Trade Commission’s national ranking of consumer complaints, and Americans reported losing more than $1.6 billion to fraud overall in 2013. With this level of risk, it pays to take steps to protect your identity. Tracy Groll is Area President for the Wood River Valley for Zions Bank, which operates full-service nancial centers at 291 Washington Ave. in Ketchum and 111 N. 1st Ave., Ste. 1H in Hailey.

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To hear the rest of his story, visit zionsbank.com/thankyou.

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Idaho Mountain Express Trailing of the Sheep Special Section