Beyond the Forests

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BEYOND THE FORESTS THE ARCHITECTURAL JOURNEY OF JHARKHAND




BEYOND THE FORESTS The Architectural Journey of Jharkhand First Edition 2021-2022

Copyright © The Indian Institute of Architects Jharkhand Chapter 2021-2022 101, Prabha Kiran Chuna Bhatta, Kokar Ranchi, Jharkhand-834001 India www.beyondtheforests.in

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the prior permission of the publishers. . Printed at Kailash Paper Conversion, Ranchi Book Design by Xaxa Aman R The book is set in Rightous & Hind Cover image (front): Aerial view of Talsa village, East Singhbhum Cover image (rear): Hills as seen from Hundru Fall, Ranchi a journey through the heartland of Jharkhand 79,714 km2 | 4 years | 1 book


dedicated to the unexplored, a glimpse into its untold history


Research Team

Surin Anila S | Kumar Abhishek | Toppo Ronald | Xaxa Aman R

Transcript

Surin Anila S | Kumar Abhishek

Photography

PictureSpeaks | Kumar Abhishek | Shresth Shikhar | Toppo Ronald | Xaxa Aman R

Projects in ‘A new beginning – Formation of Jharkhand’ chapter

Featured buildings in the last chapter have been shortlisted from invited submissions by various architectural firms practicing in the state. Photographs and descriptions for such projects have been provided by their respective design teams. Such projects are marked with an asterisk (*).

Patrons from IIA Jharkhand Chapter

Barla Amit | Jha Sandeep K | Kumar Anurag | Kumar Arun | Lt. Dr. Biswas D.J. | Minz Apurb | Rehman Zia ur

Industry Partners

www.asianpaints.com

www.alstoneindia.com

DAIKIN www.daikinindia.com

EDEN GREEN TECHNOLOGIES www.edengreen.in

EVEREST SOLAR www.everestind.com

JAQUAR www.jaquar.com


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BEYOND THE FORESTS THE ARCHITECTURAL JOURNEY OF JHARKHAND


BEYOND THE FORESTS The Architectural Journey of Jharkhand

The Indian Institute of Architects, Jharkhand Chapter 2021-2022 . HOW TO USE THE QR CODE IN THIS BOOK You will find a QR Code on the top right corner for all projects in this book. Download a QR Code scanner on your Smartphone. Scan the QR Code on the printed book. Once you scan the code, you will be directed to the exact location of the listed building/ structure. You can navigate with the help of GoogleMaps and visit the hidden gems, still unexplored. Cheers to happy ventures in our homeland. DISCLAIMER Much of Jharkhand’s history is shrouded in myths, folklore and hearsay. The research for the book was limited to much an extent owing to the dearth of academic study on architecture in Jharkhand. Heritage in the state has been long treated with indifference, with least efforts taken in conservation or in documentation of the same. This book is a photographic essay of the architectural legacy in the state, and the text a commentary based on our observations and interpretations, and thus should not be used for academic referencing. Also, the timeline mentioned for the buildings are merely to give an approximate idea of their period. This too should not be taken for further referencing as they have been picked up from miscellaneous sources. The documentation is only preliminary and the beginning of a longer project. This edition might have missed out a few significant buildings, which would hopefully be added further over later publications. Additional details of the featured sites and cross verification of all data shall also be taken up as a continuing process from here on. The authors have put together all their efforts to compile the information to the best of their knowledge, but still wish to apologise in advance if any unintentional erroneous information has been mentioned. The readers are requested to contribute to the documentation if they have verifiable information that could be added to the book. Details can be mailed to bookiiajh@gmail.com. On confirmation, it shall be definitely incorporated in the subsequent editions.


Contents 01

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT INTRODUCTION

05 07 09 11 13

FIRST IN THE FOREST: THE PRE-HISTORIC AGE Isko Caves Megaliths- Chokahatu Megaliths- Marchadih Megaliths- Bhut Village

15 17 21 25 29

First Settlers Of The Land: Our Indigenous Tribes Munda Settlement Santhali Settlement Oraon Settlement Parvati’s House

33 35 37 41 43 45

Temples In The Forest Khekhparta Temple Tanginath Temple Deori Temple Rajrappa Temple Jain Temples on Parasnath Temples

49 51 53 55 57

THE AGE OF KINGDOMS: MUGHALS & THE NATIVE PROVINCES Pithoria Mosque Teliagarh Fort Baradari Jami Masjid

61 63 65 69 73 75 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 95 97 99 101 103 105 107 111 113 119 121 123 125 129

Akbar Shahi Masjid Singhi Dalan Navratnagarh Palace Complex Navratnagarh Palace Jogi Math Hilltop Citadel Anaam Dham Kapilnath Temple Stepped Well, Navratnagarh Ram Sita Mandir Jagannath Temple Palkot Ruins Palamu Fort Nawagarh Fort New Fort, Palamu Baadam Fort Kaitha Temple Ichhak Temples Bhagwati Math Temple Complex Hawa Mahal, Padma Padma Palace Maluti Temple Saraikela Palace Ichagarh Palace Jagatpal Singh’s Fort Ratu Palace Mahadani Temple, Bero


131 133 135 137 139 143 145 149 153 155 157 159 161 163 165 167 171 173 175 177 179 181 183 185 187

Panch Mandir Handa Mosque Arrival Of The British & The Missionaries Zila School GEL Church, Ranchi Priest’s Quarters Audrey House St. Paul's Cathedral, Ranchi GEL Church, Burju St. Anne’s Church, Sarwada Church of North India, Kamdara Ranchi Club Dighia Church Manresa House St. Xavier’s College Intermediate Section St. Joseph’s Church Church of St. Ignatius, Soso Holy Family Catholic Church St. Mary’s Cathedral, Ranchi St. Mary’s Church, Dhanbad St. Albert’s College St. Anthony’s Church Bishop Westcott Girls’ School Bishop Westcott Boys’ School ISM, Dhanbad

189 191 193 197 199 201 203 205 207 209 211 213 215 217 219 221 223 225 227

Sadar Hospital St. Xavier’s College The Town of Jamshedpur Regal Building St. George’s Church Baptist Church , Beldih St. Mary’s Church, Jamshedpur United Club Kaiser Banglow McCluskieganj St. John’s Church, McCluskiganj Maulana Azad College Gondwana House Chalet House Ramakrishna Mission Vidyapith Tagore Hill Imam Kothi Laxmi Niwas Pani Jahaz Kothi

229 231 235 237 239 241 243 245 247 249 251

India Awakes To Life & Freedom Netarhat School Central Revenue Building BIT, Mesra Ranchi College Ranchi University RIMS XLRI AG Office MECON Headquarters Jahaz Kothi


253 257 259 261 263 267 269 271 273 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293

Yogoda Satsang Ashram RK Mission Temple Russi Modi CFE Sanskriti Museum Tribal Girls Hostel, Kuju St. Joseph’s SS School Holy Angel’s Church Gossner College St. Paul’s Church, Tongo A NEW BEGINNING: FORMATION OF JHARKHAND St. Rita’s Church St. Patrick’s Church Tribal Cultural Centre Bagaicha, ATC Taurian World School Sapphire International School Eyelex Renovation of Sujata Picture Palace Hotel BNR Chanakya Hotel Radisson Blu JSCA Stadium Khelgaon Mega Sports Complex Blessington Heights Panchwati Residency Ishatvam 9 La Vista JD Hi Street Nucleus Mall

294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 316 319

Chapel, St. Xavier’s College Firayalal Nxt Jharkhand Academic Council Birsa Agriculture University Sevalaya, YSS R & R Colony, Urej Sarala Birla Public School Judicial Academy Utsav Vatika Banquet Firayalal Banquet Kalika Temple Chitahi Dham Prabhudarshan Arsh Heights enGENE Lab Suraksha Kendra Bike Center Deepak Thakur House Metarch Studio & Chai Bubble Amigos Lounge REFLECTIONS BY THE RESEARCH TEAM WAY FORWARD INDEX


B

efore the reader dives into the main content of the book, we would like to take the opportunity to thank all those who have helped in bringing this book to shape. This book is a culmination of countless hours of travel and study, and a product of affection from numerous people. Our list of acknowledgements for this vast compilation could easily expand beyond the thickness of this book itself. Every single documented project has its own story, and it could not have been featured if it was not for the people who helped us reach there.

Sohrai painting at Sanskriti Museum, Hazaribagh

We are immensely grateful to the Executive Committee and Office bearers of the IIA Jharkhand Chapter and the former Architects Association of Jharkhand for not giving up on the dream of completing this book. Particularly Ar. Sandeep K Jha, for his vision to have this project in the first place. A special thanks to Ar. Mayukh Virnave who generously gave his time to read the content, discuss nuances of


Acknowledgement the text, and explain the rationale for specific recommendations. Ar. Achirava Raha was enormously helpful in checking our manuscript during the throes of final drafting. We would also like to thank Dr. Satyaki Sarkar and Dr. Smriti Mishra of Department of Architecture at BIT, Mesra for helping us shortlist the submissions for the last chapter. We owe a debt of gratitude to Ar. Twisha Kumar, as she stood by us and extended her support in completion of the last chapter, coordinating with so many people and compiling the missing data. We would like to thank Ar. Shikhar Shreshth who helped us to get the remaining photographs at the eleventh hour. Mr. Sajid Ameen was another major contributor to the process at the final phase with the final composition of the last chapter. It was a pleasure to have everyone on board. In these four years of research there have been many who helped us in different phases. We take this opportunity to thank them; Ar. Shubhrajeet Dutta for being with us during the inception of this

research. Ar. Ariba Khan and Ar. Amir Nawed for their time and effort in helping us coordinate with different architects. We acknowledge our patrons and industry partners, the work would not have been possible without their financial support; they contributed and encouraged us to start the work, persevere with it and finally to publish it. We are grateful to everyone who gave us detailed information and constructive comments for this entire composition. Lastly, thanks to the people of Jharkhand, especially the ones we met on this journey who made this book eminently more readable and the project more worthwhile. Apologies if we have unintentionally missed out anyone.


A regular day at Navratangarh Palace Complex Sisai Gumla


Introduction

J

harkhand, the 28th state of the country, was carved from Bihar’s bifurcation on the 15th of November, 2000.

Jharkhand, geographically the Chhotanagpur Plateau, is one of the most ancient geological formations in the country. A hilly undulating plateau characterized predominantly by tropical forests. The state has interesting physiography, as it consists of four series of plateaus of different heights. All through history, the region remained untouched in their isolated mountain fastness, walled off from the outside world by chains of wooded hills. It is known to be the pride of the nation because of its mineral richness. As we go through the history of this region we also find remains of various eras. The story of this land has been marked in various books of history narrated by travelers kings and thinkers. Although as a state we still have no such books written to mark these various eras and no significant record of the architectural remains. There are forts and mosques

of the Mughals, palaces and temples of the kings, and various churches and institutions built in the British period. All of these have contributed to the heritage of present-day Jharkhand. Even after 21 years of its formation, this state has had no proper documentation on the past architectural heritage or even the present-day architecture. There was a need to document these heritage structures so that they help us get an architectural vocabulary of the state. This could be developed as a unique interpretation in the modern-day face of Jharkhand. The Jharkhand Chapter of the Indian Institute of Architects took up this project soon after its formation. After travelling across the lengths and breadths of the state and documenting buildings, and the unfortunate delay due to the pandemic, the book is finally here.

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Sites documented



Abstract rock art found on the walls of Isko Caves


First in the Forest The Prehistoric Age The Chhotanagpur Plateau has been witness to the prehistoric man. The rock art found at various places across the state are testament to the above fact. Interestingly, there is another tangible proof of early settlement where we find large grounds of megaliths at various sites in this region. Whether these were burial grounds or had some astronomical or religious significance can be a matter of discussion, but these clearly are proof of historical tribal presence in the land and symbolise their title deeds. Even today, several tribes of Jharkhand erect huge monoliths to mark village entrances or significant events.


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Animals/ abstract forms at Isko Caves


Isko Caves, Isko Hazaribagh

Type of Building

In the densely forested scenic village of Isko, 30 km off Hazaribagh, is the recently discovered rock art dating back to the Meso-Chalcolithic (7000-4000 BCE) age. Cave walls finished in ochres and locally accessible minerals represent domesticated beasts such as bison and buffalo, along with deer, frogs, and turtles.

The walls feature abstract geometric forms which need interpretation. Inhabitant ‘Ganju’ and ‘Kurmi’ tribes have taken up this rock painting tradition and painted their homes. Apart from Isko, rock art has also been discovered at other places such as Raham, Satpahar and Thethangi.

Prehistoric Shelter

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Stretch of the cave walls


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Rural settlement and paddy fields near Gumla


First settlers of the land Our Indigenous Tribes

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Jharkhand is home to 32 tribes, all having their own language and cultures. Tribes are known to have been settling in this region over the last four thousand years, probably even earlier. The wooded hilly terrain of the state created a safe cocoon for tribes to peacefully grow and evolve without any external disturbances through a major period in history. The architecture, planning and construction techniques although appearing primitive, are unique, when compared to rest of the surrounding regions.

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Menhirs at the village periphery at Balo


Munda Settlement, Balo Murhu

Type of Building

Village settlement

The Mundas are among the original settlers of Chhotanagpur region. They constitute most of the tribal population in Jharkhand. The language spoken by them is Mundari, belonging to the Austro-Asiatic language family. The tribe has been nomadic hunters for most of history and has recently turned to settled cultivation in the last few centuries. This indicates an impact on the primitive housing typology and spatial organization of Munda villages. Houses are separate single-room mud cottages, with a circumbulatory space around the room. The rooms are short of proper light and ventilation because of small-sized fenestrations and serve as storage spaces. A group of independent units is organized around an open court where most of the daytime activities take place. These courtyards are linked to other yards which organically develop as newer houses are built over generations. The interconnected courts act as the pathway in this settlement. The spatial arrangement of the village is organic. An understanding of order is established with a connection from the ‘Sarna Sthal’, the sacred grove, to the ‘Akhara’, the ceremonial ground. The passage is the major procession route for festivals and serves as the main road for the village. Megaliths often mark the entrance of the village. The construction technology differs region to region depending on the available materials. Walls are constructed in layered rubble masonry,

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with roofs of bamboo rafters and purlins, covered with the thatch or baked terracotta tiles. The windows and doors have wooden shutters, frames, and lintels. Cob walls can be seen in areas with unavailability of stone. A mud platform along the plinth, of the houses, is used as seating. The floors and the walls are hand plastered with mud mixed with available oxides to add colour.

A typical batten window

Villagers sitting on pinda (raised plinth around the house)

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Aerial view of Balo village


The forests of Jharkhand have been witness to pilgrims and travellers through history, who would travel from Puri in Odisha and Tampralipti in Bengal to Gaya and Varanasi, Chaitanya Mahaprabhu being among the most notable. Buddhism and Jainism also saw their initial growth in this region. One would randomly find ancient ruins and statuaries dotted across the length and breadth of the state. Although here exists a culture where every few decades, additions are made to old temples, which makes it very difficult to trace their actual history.

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Scattered temple ruins along the roadside, Chandil


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TEMPLES IN THE FOREST


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Temple shrine atop the hill


Khekhparta Temple, Lohardaga

Detail of the stone carving

Type of Building Religious

A flight of stone steps leads to a lone humble shrine atop the hill in the Khekparta village, devoted to Lord Shiva. The structure is built in the ‘Rekha deul’ style of the Kalinga school of temple architecture. Constructed of the local boulders, apparently derived from the hill itself, the place of worship has been built without any additional foundation. There is a narrow 1 m high doorway that leads into the inner sanctum or the ‘garbhagriha’. The temple is planned in ‘triratha’, i.e., three facets are noticeable from each cardinal direction. An ‘amlaka’ crowns the ‘shikhara’, taking the structure’s peak to about 4 meters. The details on the elevation appear similar to the temples of the late Gupta period. It is one of the rare examples of pre-Islamic Hindu buildings in the Chhotanagpur plateau.

Fig 36: Open Court

Statuary at the foot of the temple

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THE AGE OF KINGDOMS

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MUGHALS & THE NATIVE PROVINCES The Mughals had an influence across all geographies in the country. “Jharkhand”, as the region was first named in their records, could not remain untouched for long. Apart from some initial construction activity in the north eastern part of the state, there were no direct architectural commissions. Although a major impact was after the imprisonment of the local Nagvanshi king by Emperor Jahangir. Having spent twelve years in prison in Gwalior, the Nagvanshi Raja Durjan Sal returned home with aspirations to build monumental palaces and temples and collect taxes and maintain an army. The Nagvanshi dynasty known to be 2000 years old is central to Jharkhand’s history. Meanwhile the Ramgarh Raj family also grew to prominence. In the north west the Chero dynasty had its influence. Towards recent history, princely states and zamindari states gained importance, such as Saraikela and Kharsawan.


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Ruins on the banks of River Ganges, Rajmahal


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Aerial view of the Teliagarh fort ruins


Teliagarh Fort, Sahibgunj Year Unknown

Placed on the cliff overlooking the Ganges was this noble fort, now in ruins. It was known as the Gateway of Bengal, claiming that Teli Zamindar was the one who built this fort which is named after him. It remains to indicate that there were magnificent arches. The fort was built of stone and brick. There only remains the external wall of the fort where the black colour stone was used.

Built by

Teli Zamindar

Type of Building

Fort

During the early 20th Century, a stone pillar with figures of the Buddha, covered on its four sides, was discovered at the southwestern corner of the fort. It is now worshipped by the local tribes. This fort was raised at such a place that for anyone to enter the Chotanagpur region, they had to cross this pass, and hence was used as a position to secure the area for the then ruler.

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Fig 4: Monolithic stone pillar

Elevation of the fort remains


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The arrival of the British and Missionaries marked the next major milestone on Jharkhand’s history. Missions from different churches arrived from all over Europe, and worked for the emancipation of the tribes, imparting modern education and spreading the religion. The British brought with them government and administrative institutions. The newly developing towns or ‘hill stations’ of Jharkhand began to attract outsiders for their pleasant weather. Another major development during this period was the discovery of iron and coal. The inaccessible forest land which lay undisturbed for years, suddenly began to undergo major urbanization, with the coming of highways and railways. Not to forget, this period began to see the first uprising revolts from the tribal, most famously of Bhagwaan Birsa Munda.

ARRIVAL OF

THE BRITISH & THE MISSIONAR


RIES

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Birds eye view of the Sarwada church


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Flanking bell tower of the church


GEL Christ Church, Ranchi 1845 AD

Built by

The German Mission

Type of Building Religious

Lancet window

On 18th November 1851, the foundation stone of the Gothic building, popularly recognized as the Gossner Evangelical Lutheran church on the then Ranchi Chaibasa Road, was laid. Pastor Herzog oversaw the construction of the church, which took four years to finish. This church, consecrated at Christmas 1855, was called Christ Church. This was the first Christian church built in Chhotanagpur, which has a capacity of 500 people. The Christ Church is one of the most prominent landmark buildings in Ranchi. The foundation stone was laid in the year 1851 by the German Missionaries. Built during the 19th Century, the church stood in great magnificence with a simple geometrical form. The walls are supported by buttresses, with a front porch having two lancet windows in the neo-gothic style of architecture. At the entrance is the church bell housed in a tower. A stair goes to the first floor of the bell tower, where the pipe organ for the church service is placed on a balcony. The structure has a modest rectangular-shaped plan, with a semi-circular altar and lancet windows. The church has unique combined columns of an octagon and circular shape. The roof rests on the wooden truss in the form of pointed arches. The interior is simple but elegant. During the Indian rebellion of 1857, the missionaries had to flee their stations. Meanwhile, Ranchi was plundered by sepoys who sought to destroy

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Top view of the church


the building, and four cannonballs fired. One cannonball hit on the tower wall, which is still noticeable to this day. This church continues as a witness to the growth of the city Ranchi.

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Scan the QR Code above to experience Jamshedpur in 3D | P.C. Google Earth


The Town of Jamshedpur Planners

Julian Kennedy and Axel Sahlin Col. Frederick Charles Temple Major P.G.W. Stoke Otto Keonigsberger

Type of Settlement Colonial

The story of the architectural heritage of Jharkhand is incomplete without acknowledging the contribution of Jamshedji Tata and the succeeding generations of the Tata family. Apart from the significant contribution to the region’s economy, something equally noteworthy is the creation of the town of Jamshedpura model town that is the perfect case of sustainable industrial development. Tata had a clear idea that along with a steel factory, a great planned township should also come up with all modern facilities from playfields, social clubs to places of worship. An American named Julian Kennedy got the job of town planning, followed by Otto Koenigsberger, the reputed German architect for landscape design. With the commencement of steel production in 1912, the city promptly attracted people from all across India and the world. The city’s most iconic building is Regal Mansion, or Bharucha Mansion, built in 1935, which used to be the first home of Parsis, who came to Jamshedpur for work. In 1940, the first organised hotel named Boulevard Hotel was set up by John D’costa. Tata Main Hospital, the oldest hospital of

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the city, had come up in 1908, five years before its first production of steel. The architectural style of the buildings of Jamshedpur in its initial years resonated strongly with the prevalent neo-gothic and neo-baroque style in Bombay, reflective of the patronage from the Parsi community.

Gradually, a cosmopolitan culture developed here with social clubs, hotels, cafés, sports grounds, churches and libraries. Some of the iconic clubs like United Club, Beldih Club, Golmuri Club etc. are still active with their colonial club houses aptly decorated with their vintage furniture.

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Birds eye view of the Regal Building overlooking Gopal Maidan | P.C. Regal Cafe


Churches also came up for the growing Christian population, the oldest one being St George Church, was built in 1916. The Beldih Church (1923) and the St. Mary’s Church (1926) are also architecturally notable. The town has been consistently keeping up the

global trends in architecture. The latest in this line is the Centre for Excellence, an art gallery and the archival museum of Tata history.

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India saw the light to freedom and began to take her first steps towards development and modernization. The Chhotanagpur plateau, the then region of south Bihar was an important resource to be tapped into. Industries, dams, mining and power projects began. It also started to develop as a knowledge centre with several schools and colleges of national importance getting built. The new government buildings departed from the heavy colonial architectural style to the new international modern style. Experiments began with concrete, and architects started to look towards cost effectiveness and regional inspirations. It was an era of self-discovering an identity, not just for the state but for the country as a whole. .

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IND LI


DIA AWAKES TO IFE & FREEDOM .

33

Colonnaded corridor at Netarhat Residential School


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Main building from the central lawn


Netarhat School, Netarhat 1954 AD

Built by

Netarhat was a British camp at first, which soon became a summer retreat during that time and is still known as the ‘Queen of Chotanagpur’. This Residential School was opened on 15th November, 1954 at Netarhat. Mr. Frederick Gordon Pearce, the founder of the Indian Public School Movement, played an important role in establishing Netarhat school. With his help, the Bihar Government planned to set up a public residential school in the state. Mr. Frederick Gordon Pearce worked on the detailed plan of

the Netarhat School along with Jagadish Chandra Mather and Sachidanand Sinha. This school building was a revivalist attempt into the gurukul school of thought post-independence. The building complex is arranged with a circular garden, similar to an 'aangan'. The main block is the focal point from the gate and various department blocks. Verandahs with wooden columns & sloping roofs with terracotta tiles give a very local appearance which goes very well with the pine trees.

Frederick Gordon Pearce

Type of Building

Educational

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Curved road leading to the main building


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Aerial view of the campus


Bird's eye view of the campus

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A NEW BEGINNING

FORMATION OF JHARKHAND .

38

Aerial view of Vidhan Sabha Complex | P.C. Ankush Kasera


After years of demand for a separate state, Jharkhand finally bifurcated from Bihar on 15th November 2000 on the birth anniversary of the revolutionary Bhagwaan Birsa Munda and Ranchi became the state capital. All of the large towns saw development in the government institutions and thus mass influx of people and rapid urbanization. The building byelaws got updated and the real estate sector was hence encouraged to build denser and higher. People were now more exposed to national and international trends, and the aspiration started to reflect on the architectural style as well. Architects from all over began to get invited to design contemporary landmarks in the cities. New cladding materials became more and more common, driven by market demand. An impatient rush of capital has been changing the city skylines faster than ever before.

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Index 247

AG Office

282

Eyelex

Akbar Shahi Masjid

303

Firayalal Banquet

313

Amigos Lounge

295

Firayalal Nxt

79

Anaam Dham

153

GEL Church, Burju

307

Arsh Heights

139

GEL Church, Ranchi

145

Audrey House

215

Gondwana House

99

Baadam Fort

271

Gossner College

279

Bagaicha, ATC

133

Handa Mosque

201

Baptist Church , Beldih

107

Hawa Mahal, Padma

61

55

Baradari

75

Hilltop Citadel

105

Bhagwati Math Temple Complex

269

Holy Angel’s Church

310

Bike Center

173

Holy Family Catholic Church

297

Birsa Agriculture University

284

Hotel BNR Chanakya

185

Bishop Westcott Boys’ School

285

Hotel Radisson Blu

183

Bishop Westcott Girls’ School

121

Ichagarh Palace

237

BIT, Mesra

103

Ichhak Temples

288

Blessington Heights

223

Imam Kothi

235

Central Revenue Building

290

Ishatvam 9

217

Chalet House

7

Isko Caves

294

Chapel, St. Xavier’s College

305

Chitahi Dham

157 171

187

ISM, Dhanbad

87

Jagannath Temple

Church of North India, Kamdara

123

Jagatpal Singh’s Fort

Church of St. Ignatius, Soso

251

Jahaz Kothi

311

Deepak Thakur House

45

Jain Temples on Parasnath Temples

41

Deori Temple

57

Jami Masjid

161

Dighia Church

292

JD Hi Street

enGENE Lab

296

Jharkhand Academic Council

308

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Jogi Math

91

Palamu Fort

286

JSCA Stadium

89

Palkot Ruins

301

Judicial Academy

131

Panch Mandir

207

Kaiser Banglow

289

Panchwati Residency

101

Kaitha Temple

227

Pani Jahaz Kothi

304

Kalika Temple

29

Parvati’s House

81

Kapilnath Temple

51

Pithoria Mosque

35

Khekhparta Temple

73

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306

Prabhudarshan

287

Khelgaon Mega Sports Complex

143

Priest’s Quarters

291

La Vista

299

R & R Colony, Urej

225

Laxmi Niwas

43

Rajrappa Temple

129

Mahadani Temple, Bero

85

Ram Sita Mandir

113

Maluti Temple

219

Ramakrishna Mission Vidyapith

163

Manresa House

159

Ranchi Club

213

Maulana Azad College

239

Ranchi College

209

McCluskieganj

241

Ranchi University

249

MECON Headquarters

125

Ratu Palace

13

Megaliths- Bhut Village

197

Regal Building

9

Megaliths- Chokahatu

283

Renovation of Sujata Picture Palace

11

Megaliths- Marchadih

243

RIMS

Metarch Studio & Chai Bubble

257

RK Mission Temple

17

Munda Settlement

259

Russi Modi CFE

69

Navratnagarh Palace

189

Sadar Hospital

65

Navratnagarh Palace Complex

261

Sanskriti Museum

95

Nawagarh Fort

21

231

Netarhat School

281

Sapphire International School

New Fort, Palamu

119

Saraikela Palace

312

97

Santhali Settlement

Nucleus Mall

300

Sarala Birla Public School

25

Oraon Settlement

298

Sevalaya, YSS

111

Padma Palace

63

Singhi Dalan

293


179

St. Albert’s College

155

St. Anne’s Church, Sarwada

181

St. Anthony’s Church

199

St. George’s Church

211

St. John’s Church, McCluskiganj

167

St. Joseph’s Church

267

St. Joseph’s SS School

175

St. Mary’s Cathedral, Ranchi

177

St. Mary’s Church, Dhanbad

203

St. Mary’s Church, Jamshedpur

277

St. Patrick’s Church

149

St. Paul's Cathedral, Ranchi

273

St. Paul’s Church, Tongo

276

St. Rita’s Church

191

St. Xavier’s College

165

St. Xavier’s College Intermediate Section

83

Stepped Well, Navratnagarh

309

Suraksha Kendra

221

Tagore Hill

37 280

Tanginath Temple Taurian World School

53

Teliagarh Fort

193

The Town of Jamshedpur

278

Tribal Cultural Centre

263

Tribal Girls Hostel, Kuju

205

United Club

302

Utsav Vatika Banquet

245

XLRI

253

Yogoda Satsang Ashram

137

Zila School

.

43


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