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EQ

E Q U E S TR I A N THE PREMIER MAGAZINE

EQ

E Q U E S T R I A N Q U A R T E R LY

SPRING 2015

$6.95 | $7.95 CAN

OF COUNTRY LIFE

Q U A R T E R L Y

AT HOME WITH POLO STAR AND MODEL

NIC ROLDAN

SPRING 2015

DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 1, 2015

LANDSCAPE DESIGN EQUESTRIAN TRAVEL THE SPORT OF EVENTING

P L US : V IS IT S OUTHE RN PI NES | PEOPLE | STY LE | FASH IO N | DE C O R | A RTS


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ILIRJAN XHIXHA Born in Durrës in 1964. Personal, collective, national and international exhibitions. Private

Collections:

ALBANIA, ITALY,

Public Art Works: –MILANO/ EPTA CONSORS –NOVARTA/BANK OF INTRA –STRESSA –TESTA DI CAVALLO (NO) –SAN PIETRO MOSEZZO (NO) –MARANELLO/CAVALLO DELLA FERRARI

Education:

The Academy of

U.S.A., GREECE, AUSTRIA,

Fine Arts of Brera, Milan.

NETHERLANDS,

–Degree in Sculpture 2003

GERMANY, FRANCE, ENGLAND, TURKEY,

–Degree in Painting 1998

JAPAN, SWITZERLAND, AND CROATIA.

PAINTER AND SCULPTOR www.xhixhailirjan.it

ilirjanxhixa@alice.it


ANDY SCOTT equine sculptor

USA studio opening 2015

steel sculptures from 10ft to 100ft commission enquiries please contact: hanneke@scottsculptures.co.uk

www.scottsculptures.co.uk www.thekelpies.co.uk


Fine

Gifts

Bridal

Registry

Interior

Design

Corporate

Trophies

DRESSAGE COLLECTION available at

531 WEST SHORT STREET

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

866-225-7474

www.lvharkness.com


EQ I N S I D E

Features SPR ING | 2015 IS SUE

34 

AT H O M E W I T H N I C R O L DA N EQ’s Director of Photography George Kamper visits America’s top polo player at the home he designed himself in Wellington.

42 

SPRING AHEAD Spring has arrived, and with it comes a bounty of equestrian fashion lines to suit every taste.

46

LIFE IN THE L ANDSCAPE Behind the bucolic views, comfortable living spaces, and practical design of beautiful farms is the expert knowledge of landscape architects.

56 

EVENTING This growing sport that combines several disciplines into one definitive test of horse and rider is thrilling and spectacular.

62 

B U C K DAV I D S O N Second-generation eventing champion Buck Davidson is a legend of the sport, as well as a humble and generous role model.

64

 A M A Z I N G E S C A P E S F O R H O R S E LOV E R S This year’s list includes a wide variety of destinations from exotic to elegant, and is bound to stir up your appetite for adventure.

72

A V I S I T TO TA N Q U E V E R D E R A N C H Join EQ’s Deputy Editor on an unforgettable trip to the nation’s largest dude ranch in Arizona, where she experienced a way of life quite different from her own.

74

G A L L E RY: TA N Q U E V E R D E A stunning inside look at Tanque Verde Ranch and the old west through the lens of George Kamper, EQ’s Director of Photography.

64

Seven great destinations for horse lovers: We’ve done the leg work, all you need to do is pack!

82

SOUTHERN PINES An historic town in North Carolina offers a moderate climate, beautiful golf courses, and a bustling cultural hub that revolves around equestrian activity.


A CONCRETE FENCE IS BEAUTIFUL AND BOLD SUPERIOR CONCRETE FENCES

Beauty is a powerful statement. With Superior Rail™ fences, you can protect your property with the elegance of natural-looking wood that’s constructed of durable, reinforced precast concrete. Which means your fence will stand the test of time without losing its original beauty.

The Beauty of Wood, The Stength of Concrete.

Visit Elegant.ConcreteFence.com or call 817-277-9255.


EQ I N S I D E

Departments SPR ING | 2015 IS SUE

12

ST YLE Whether you accent your wardrobe with glamour, or tie your look together with elegance, no outfit is complete without the right belt.

10 E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

20

G I V I N G B AC K Villa Chardonnay offers comfort and care to hundreds of horses and other animals that have suffered neglect or abuse.

28

24

H E A LT H

PEOPLE

A thorough study on the science of footing reveals the huge number of complex choices that must be made when choosing the right surface for an equestrian arena.

Since her time at Graceland, Priscilla Presley has always loved horses. Today she works to end the cruel practice of soring Tennessee Walking Horses.

94

RESOURCES (Look for

to find the products and services in this issue.)

98

30

DINING Author, chef, and traveller Dawn Harris Brown shares recipes from around the equestrian world in her book Stable to Table.

22

SCIENCE Could a vaccine for cancer be around the corner? Two new drugs are now being tested to treat equine melanoma.

ON THE COVER Nic Roldan, one of the world’s top polo players, is shot on location in Wellington, Florida, by EQ Photography Director George Kamper.

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BARN DOGS Meet Penny and Violet, the pride and joy of Equestrian Aid Foundation president Stephanie Riggio Bulger.


Welcome EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

George also photographed this issue’s cover and the feature story on Nic Roldan, one of the world’s best polo players. He captured Nic at his new home, fully relaxed and utterly authentic. Photographer and director Juan Lamarca shot behind-the-scenes images of George in action during the shoot: equestrianquarterly. com/nic-roldan.

JUAN LAMARCA

EN JOY TH E VI EW

Photographer Juan Lamarca captures EQ Photography Director George Kamper shooting Nic Roldan on location in Wellington, Florida. Photography assistant (center) Felipe Petino. Not shown, Leslie Munsell, men’s groomer.

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s I paged through this issue before it went to press, I found myself being grateful for the amazing images by EQ photography director, George Kamper. His work has enriched the pages of this magazine since its inception four years ago, and it’s a large part of what sets EQ visually apart. You may recall his award-winning photo feature showing Le Saut Hermès in Paris or Lyle Lovett in Texas. Once again, I was awestruck when I reached George’s gallery of photographs taken at Tanque Verde, a guest ranch in Tucson, Arizona (page 74). There is something profound about this genre of his work. I asked him to explain why the West is so inspiring, and he mused, “I suppose it’s a combination of the color palette, the light, and the vast openness. I’ve lived in cities my entire life, so it’s a huge visual treat to be in such beautiful open territory.” He added, “I also admire the life of cowboys and the connection they have with their horses. It’s kind of like the connection I have with my Harley on a road trip.” To see George’s complete cowboy gallery, visit equestrianquarterly. com/cowboys.

Being attuned to our surroundings can provide an endless source of inspiration. We just may not always know why. Our panel of landscape architects and designers shed insight into the understated magic and ingenuity that goes into designing a functional and beautiful landscape. Their designs navigate us from point to point, keep our horses safe, and honor the natural rhythm of the land (page 46). Another view, this time from a speeding horse courageously galloping along miles of an eventing cross-country course, can be both exhilarating and terrifying. Learn about this exciting sport (page 56). If longleaf pines, acres in which to ride, and a full-range of equestrian disciplines sound like your desired landscape, Southern Pines will be a place to explore (page 82). This year’s snowy winter has been relentless and challenging to even the most stalwart of northerners. One way to help us cope was to research and assemble our annual list of “Amazing Escapes for Horse Lovers” (page 64). We’ve done the leg work; now all you need to do is make a selection and pack. Please join us in the next issue to learn about the centuries-old discipline of dressage, savor a portfolio of jaw-dropping farms and ranches, and visit Virginia horse country, where the landscape will be in full bloom.


EQ S T Y L E

TAKE IT UP A NOTCH Choosing the PERFECT BELT to polish your look will be A CINCH with the variety of stylish options available. Quick Release Belt by Hardy and Parsons. Handmade in England in bridle-butt leather. Strap in red with black edging, red stitching, and brass buckle and keeper. 1.5 inches wide. Available to order with brass or pewter fittings in 10 different leather and thread colors. 24 to 52 inches. $250.

Calfskin Loop Belt by Ralph Lauren. This chic belt makes a bold statement. Handsomely crafted in Italy from smooth, supple calfskin with an equestrian-inspired loop-buckle closure. Black or tan. $595. Hand-embroidered Argentinian polo belts by Gaucho. Dragoons (top) made of brown saddle leather. Finequality stitching in maroon, green, and yellow. $52. Meribel capybara belt made of suede-finished, capybara leather. Fine-quality stitching in green and navy. $55. Both available in five sizes, in standard width of 35mm.

Ludlow Belt by Hardy and Parsons. Handmade in England in bridle-butt leather. Strap in chestnut with black edging and brass fittings. Fastening mechanism resembles horse bits.1.5" wide. Available in brass or nickel fittings in 10 different leather and thread colors. Sizes 24 to 52 inches. $195.

Reversible calf leather belt by Dimacci in red/navy combination with removable, Dimacci gold-plated, stainless-steel buckle. Sizes:105cm, 95cm 85cm. $148.50.

Bleeker story patch belt in mahogany by Coach. Edge-painted for an artisanal look, and finished with a custom buckle, this handcrafted leather belt features an iconic Coach story patch. Also available in fawn. Width 32mm. $125.

Continued on page 14

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EQ S T Y L E Continued from page 12

TAKE IT UP A NOTCH Hoof Pick Belt by Hardy and Parsons. Handmade in England in bridle-butt strap and keeper in black. Black edging and stitching with nickel buckle. Fastening hook attaches to different slots on the belt. Available to order with brass or nickel fittings in 10 different leather and thread colors. 24 to 52 inches. $250.

Lexington Padded Deluxe Belt by Clever with Leather. Premium quality oneinch bridle with supple, chap’s leathers. Padded keeper and fancy stitching add fur ther refinement. A pair of mini snaffle bits and stirrup-iron inspired buckle completes this sumptuous look. 1.5 inches wide. Available in other colors (see stack below). $89.

Hillo Belt by Animo. This braided-nylon stretchy belt is finished with an Animo logo buckle. Available in white with grey, grey with grey, and grey with orange combinations. $299. Women’s Studded Rhinestone Concho Belt by Nocona is made with scalloped, alligator-print leather and enhanced with metal studding, rhinestones, and round conchos. Removable three-piece rhinestone buckle. $85.

Spur Belt in glazed cognac by Freedmans. This elegant belt is an eye catcher. Glazed Italian bridle leather with a solid-brass spur buckle. Available in brown with brass buckle or black with chrome buckle. 1.75 inches wide. $149.

Deux Chevaux Pony Belt in black with silver. Pony is loosely based on American artist Robert Indiana’s iconic LOVE pieces. The Pony Belt is designed to be unisex and ageless. Available in 14-karat gold satin or rhodium finish. Five choices of reversible leather straps. 1.5 inches wide. Available in additional colors. $248. PAGE 94

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DE Equestrian Quarterly 4.1.15_Pru DE 2/20/15 4:53 PM Page 1

EQ S P R I N G 2 0 1 5 MANHATTAN | BROOKLYN | QUEENS | LONG ISLAND | THE HAMPTONS | THE NORTH FORK | RIVERDALE | WESTCHESTER/PUTNAM | FLORIDA © 2015 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. 26 POPHAM ROAD, SCARSDALE, NY 10583. 914.723.6800

EQUESTRIAN

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Q U A R T E R L Y VOLUME 4 NUMBER 1

EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters DEPUTY EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITORS AT LARGE Georgina Bloomberg and Ann Leary

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Ridgefield, CT | Price Upon Request | Turn-key, one-of-a-kind, Olympic caliber equestrian estate 1 ¼ hours from NYC, Double H Farm has successfully nurtured Olympic level riders and horses with its perfected equestrian amenities including: a 3 ½ acre Grand Prix derby field, over-sized outdoor riding ring, indoor riding ring, state-of-theart stables and groom’s quarters.The three homes, published, include the main residence, over 14,500 sf with 100 mile westerly views over the entire compound. Web# DE08404

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South Salem, NY | Price Upon Request | Located less than an hour from NYC, JT Farm has a ‘story-book setting‘. The 5-bedroom house sits at the top of the hill overlooking its 52 acres of fenced grass paddocks with run-in sheds abutting the Pound Ridge Reservation with 4,500 acres of riding/hiking trails. Indoor and outdoor riding rings, a grand prix field with natural jumps, 4 barns with over 40 stalls, a cottage and groom’s apartments are just a sampling of the many amenities. Available 3 ways. Web# 4433615

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Bedford, NY | Price Upon Request | Where dreams come true. A rare opportunity to own an amazing equestrian estate/farm on 42 phenomenal acres of fields – just 45 minutes to New York City. Circa 1830, the renovated residence has an exceptional provenance with 8 fireplaces, vintage barn beams throughout, newly renovated baths and charm everywhere. Newly renovated 2-bedroom, 2-bath cottage, pool plus stateof-the-art stable, riding ring and secluded trails around the property. Web# 4439514 ®

DESIGN MANAGER Mar y A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve ASSISTANT EDITOR Abigail Googel EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTORS Stephanie Riggio Bulger, Dawn Harris Brown, Alexandra Lynch, Holly Matt, Priscilla Presley, Renee Spurge, Betsy Stein INTERN Stella Chia PUBLISHER C . W. Medinger GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS: EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR, Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@equestrianquar terly.com EAST-COAST SALES DIRECTOR, Linda Andersen, 978-807-7640, andersen@equestrianquar terly.com SOUTHEAST, Christian Palmer, 612-618-8216, palmer@equestrianquar terly.com MIDWEST, Dick Holcomb, 770-740-7120, dickholc@bellsouth.net WEST, Rodney Brooks, 510-695-5254, brooks@equestrianquar terly.com CONSULTANT George Fuller NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Cur tis Circulation Co. EQ ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Katja Eilders, FEI Master German Classical Dressage Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Los Angeles, Calif. Renee Spurge, LA Saddler y, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY is published four times yearly and is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and available for home deliver y for $18.95/$33.50 Canada. Subscribe at equestrianquar terly.com/subscribe or EQ, Box One, Brownsville, VT 05037. To purchase past issues or for a list of newsstands offering EQ, visit www.equestrianquar terly.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: www.equestrianquar terly.com/manage-subscription Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor : info @ equestrianquar terly.com WYNNWOOD MEDIA LLC 41 East 11th Street, 11th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10003 © 2015. All rights reser ved, Wynnwood Media, LLC . No por tion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Quar terly and EQ are registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.

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EQ was chosen OVERALL BEST EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American Horse Publications.

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2015

KENTUCKY REINING CUP April 24-25

Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington Held during the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event

Tickets on sale now! KentuckyReining.com

2014 World Championship Freestyle Reining winner Dan James riding Smart Little Elan (AQHA). Photo credit: Waltenberry


EQ G I V I N G B A C K

Villa Chardonnay BY ALEXANDRA LYNCH

T

A California safe haven that offers the last hope for UNWANTED HORSES.

heir journey began with a horse that captured the beauty and richness of a glass of chardonnay. Injured and afraid, sweet Chardonnay was on her way to slaughter. After they stumbled across her story online, animal lovers Monika Kerber and Louise Gardner knew they had to save the beautiful creature from a gruesome end. Chardonnay became the inspiration for what has become one of the largest and most reputable equine sanctuaries on the West Coast. Founded in 2004 by Kerber and Gardner, equine safe-haven Villa Chardonnay has grown exponentially and now cares for an incredible 140 abandoned horses, as well as a menagerie that includes 8 rescued donkeys, 3 rescued goats, 3 turkeys, over 40 homeless cats, and 13 rescued dogs.

battered and worn to be useful to most, leaving them destined for a bitter end at the slaughterhouse. Villa Chardonnay gives a forever home to horses with cancer, blindness, Cushing’s disease, or other serious physical ailments that have no other options. Despite the endless hours it requires, Kerber and Gardner make it their mission to provide these deserving animals with the love and care they were never offered. “It is a wonderful environment for these animals to spend the rest of their days,” Goglanian said. “Villa Chardonnay’s concern is never whether they can turn a profit. Their only concern is to rescue the animals and provide them with remarkable care.” G OA L TO B E SEL F- SU STA I NI NG

ABRAM GOGLANIAN

E V E RY A N I M AL IS DIFFERENT

“They really get to know each and every animal,” Villa Chardonnay volunteer Denise Goglanian said. “They let horses that don’t like to be in closed quarters roam in the fields unbothered, and they notice each and every horse’s needs and preferences. It is a true testament to how much time they spend with their horses.” Though many abandoned horses are healthy and able to be adopted to homes as lesson mounts or show ponies, a great number are too

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In an effort to support more neglected animals, Villa Chardonnay has started a capital campaign to urgently gather funds to move their animal sanctuary to a self-sustaining facility in southern California, where they will continue to help animals in need, grow their own hay, and preserve land. “Having a larger property where we could grow most of our alfalfa hay would help tremendously with our monthly costs,” Kerber said. “It would also give our horses more room to run and enjoy themselves.” Villa Chardonnay’s new location will allow the sanctuary to provide a forever home to even more abused and deserving creatures.

Top: Villa Chardonnay co-founder Monika Kerber and Pedro. Above: Happy residents at the sanctuary.

PAGE 94


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EQ S C I E N C E

Closer to a Cure New cancer vaccines are being tested to TREAT MELANOMA in horses.

E

quine melanomas are a wellknown issue, especially in gray horses. Because of their particular skin pigmentation, these horses often develop skin tumors as they age, normally after age 5. In gray horses 15 years and older, 80 percent show melanomas of some kind. These tumors, found most often on and under the tail, can grow to become large and problematic in a number of ways. Though they are not considered as dangerous as the melanomas that present themselves in humans, the tumors can become infected or bleed, block airways and bowels, and in some cases spread to other organs and eventually cause death. U N T I L N OW, ONLY SURGERY

Currently, the most widely accepted method for control of equine melanoma is removal through surgery, by laser, or with cautery. Though this method is effective, it does nothing to stop the growth of new tumors, nor does it protect against any tumors that are not identified visually. In some cases of malignancy, tumors have advanced beyond treatment by the time they are visible enough to demand treatment. A vaccine called Oncept has been tested and thus far proven very successful in the treatment of melanomas in horses. It is the first USDAlicensed therapeutic vaccine that has been used to treat dogs with oral melanoma, which is considered an aggressive form of cancer. Researchers saw the potential to extend the use

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BY JILL NOVOTNY

80 PERCENT OF GRAY HORSES 15 YEARS AND OLDER SHOW MELANOMAS OF SOME KIND.

of this drug to horses and have already seen promising results. A study at Lincoln Memorial University on the benefits of Oncept in treating equine melanoma reported, “Virtually every horse has demonstrated substantial improvement following treatment. In some cases, benefit has been seen as early as two weeks after initiation.” More recently, a Floridabased biological firm called Morphogenesis has developed ImmuneFx, a vaccine that aims to train the immune system to fight these cancerous cells without attacking other body tissue. In an ongoing study, the vaccine has already been shown to treat over 20 types of cancers in dogs and cats. Many of these are considered more dangerous than melanoma in horses. The study will analyze the effects of administering increasing doses of the treatment to 30 horses and is expected to last a year. POSIT IVE RES U LTS

For some horses, the treatment appears to be able to stop the growth of the tumors and for others it can even shrink or eliminate them. Still, 25 percent of the horses studied had no response. At this point, no side effects of any kind have been detected. If the trials are successful, Morphogenesis will apply to the USDA for a license to sell the vaccine to veterinarians and horse owners for the treatment of equine melanoma. Even more exciting, further into the future, trials are planned to test the vaccine’s use against melanomas in humans.


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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: ULCERGARD can be used in horses that weigh at least 600 pounds. Safety in pregnant mares has not been determined.


EQ P E O P L E

A PERSONAL LETTER FROM

Priscilla Presley

Priscilla Presley asked to write a heart-felt letter to our readers about

I

have always loved animals, but my passion for horses all started when Elvis surprised me with a 4-yearold black quarter horse named Domino for Christmas in 1967. I would ride every day, with Elvis watching from his upstairs office window at Graceland. Soon after that, we visited a beautiful farm in Collierville, Tennessee, where the owner, George Lennox, showed Elvis his grand-champion Tennessee walking horse, Carbon Copy. Elvis thought he was the most beautiful horse he’d ever seen, and we both fell in love with the breed. Bear was the first Tennessee walking horse Elvis owned. The last was Ebony’s Double, purchased in 1975. Although he never competed, a special retirement ceremony was held for Ebony’s Double at the industry’s biggest 24 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

Tennessee-walking-horse soring.

event, the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration. I presented a trophy on behalf of Graceland. While I had a deep appreciation for the horses’ beauty and grace, I must admit that Elvis and I didn’t know much about what went on behind the scenes in the Tennessee walking horse show world. We naively believed that the exaggerated, high-stepping gait was the way the horses naturally moved. It wasn’t until years later that I would find out the truth. What I learned was that trainers use an array of terribly cruel methods to force the horses to perform what’s known as the “big lick” gait. The practice, called “soring,” involves putting caustic chemicals on a horse’s legs to burn them and using other pain-inducing devices to cause the horse to lift its step to Continued on page 26


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EQ P E O P L E

Continued from page 24

A PERSONAL LETTER FROM

PHOTOS: PETE MAROVICH

Priscilla Presley

an exaggerated height—all to win a blue ribbon, a silver tray, money, or, mostly, ego. In short, sored horses spend their show careers in excruciating pain—all so their trainers can gain an unfair advantage in the show ring. nce I became aware of this cruelty, I was horrified and embarrassed to be associated with the industry. I still own Tennessee walking horses and knew that I had to speak up on their behalf. The first thing I did was request that the Graceland trophy be returned by the Celebration. Then I traveled to Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress to pass legislation to protect horses from soring. The Prevent All Soring Tactics Act would bolster the existing Horse Protection Act of 1970, which made it illegal for trainers to transport or show sored horses. The PAST Act would ban soring outright as well as outlaw the devices involved in soring and increase the penalties, which still remain little more than the cost of doing business. Although the PAST Act did not pass through Congress last year, it gained the cosponsorship of the majority of both houses—an

O

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Above left: Presley met with House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) on Capitol Hill last year as she lobbied lawmakers for the horse protections bill Prevent All Soring Tactics Act. Above right: Presley with Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC) discussing the PAST Act.

The Prevent All Soring Tactics Act (PAST) would ban soring outright, as well as outlaw the devices involved in soring and increase the penalties, which remain little more than the cost of doing business.

unusual feat for any piece of federal legislation. I will continue to push legislators to make this bill a priority in the new session. It’s critical for the protection of the horses I hold so dear.

F

or the past six years, the Graceland stables have been a haven to rescued horses. We have a Tennessee walking horse who has scars on his legs—likely from soring. Our horse manager tends to his legs, making sure he is not in any pain. We have another horse that was rescued the day before he would have been slaughtered. While the big-lick industry has cast an ugly shadow over the entire breed, we must remember that the Tennessee walking horse’s original gait—the natural running walk—is revered by many who treat their horses humanely, and it is something to celebrate. I want to see soring become a part of Tennessee’s past, not this breed. Walking horses are a captivating symbol of our state—just as Graceland and Elvis continue to be. Priscilla Presley


unique equestrian Properties offered by

ExclusivE opportunity

Zacara Farm

Newly completed, largest and most unique world-class equestrian opportunity. Fully equipped compound on 102.8 acres located within prestigious Wellington Preserve. Perfectly sited for easy access to Winter Equestrian Festival and International Polo club. • Staff QuarterS: 6 self-contained living staff quarters. Each of 1,917 sq. ft. quarters has fully equipped kitchen, laundry and 4 en-suite bedrooms, all climate controlled. • GueSt HouSe: 3BR/2BA, 2 fireplaces, full kitchen and laundry, with courtyard overlooking fields. • BarnS: 120 stalls within 5 self-contained barns. 24' wide paved aisles, 5 climate controlled tack rooms, vet room, full laundry and storage. • fieldS: 2 regulation polo fields, 1 - 10.7 acre Stick and Ball field encircled with Andrew Bowen Safe Exercise Track. All fields sodded with Celebration Bermuda and state-of-the-art underground irrigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32 million

undeveloped adjacent 41.14 acres are also available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300,000/acre

13304 Indian mound road • Wellington, FL 33414 • 561.795.9777 • southfieldsre.com


EQ H E A L T H

Find Your Footing An extensive new study from the FEI on footings shows their effect on THE HEALTH OF SPORT HORSES. BY JILL NOVOTNY

M

SARA C ARTER |FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

any riders only notice footing when it is too deep, too dusty, or too hard. But there is much more to the science of arena surfaces than preventing obvious problems. The right footing will not only make your ride more comfortable; it can also increase your horse’s longevity and improve its performance. With the ever-increasing number of options available, choosing a footing can be challenging. Fortunately, the FEI’s “Equine Surfaces White Paper,” released in 2014, is an extensive study on footings and their effects on sport horses’ health. F O U R Y E A R S OF WORK

The study is the result of four years’ work and the collaboration of the world’s leading equine research teams. It is widely recognized as the definitive document on the topic, created to help riders, trainers, farm owners, show producers, and arena builders decide which surface will best suit their needs. The focus of the study is the interaction of the arena’s surfaces with the health of horses within each of the seven FEI disciplines. The paper brings together the latest data and published scientific papers on arena and turf surfaces and the effects these have on horses in training and in competition. It also outlines advancements in technology for installation and maintenance, infinite combinations of materials, and improved research on the biomechanics and physiology of a horse’s stride. All of this information is collected so as to help equestrians find the most appropriate surface for their arenas to maximize equine performance while minimizing the risk of injury. 28 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

Obviously, what is required of the surface beneath the feet of a grand-prix jumper is different from the footing for a barrel racer. The paper delves into the mechanics of speed, turning, grip, impact, joints, and muscles. Each motion of the leg and foot is divided into phases and analyzed in detail, investigating the movements performed during different types of horse sports and the physical characteristics of the surface that might be beneficial or harmful to each. IMPORTANT TO AL L R IDER S

While it may seem like a subject of interest only to professionals, proper footing is important for all riders, from the beginner dressage rider to the high-level show jumper. It is also important to consider what makes a particular situation unique, from typical weather, environmental demands, size, and levelness, to the budget and timeframe. Both preparing the site before construction and planning maintenance for the arena later are equally important to deciding on the surface composition. The paper outlines several best practices for watering and maintenance while emphasizing drainage issues

and other environmental concerns. The paper also aims to guide future progress in providing suitable surfaces for sport horses by encouraging more research and a standardization of practices and measurements. The subject is rich with data, and the complexity of the research is enormous. There are a huge number of interrelated factors, from the weather’s effect on materials to the age, training schedule, and shoes of a specific horse. It is a highly sophisticated field of research that may never be considered complete. L ARGES T STU DY

“The ‘Equine Surfaces White Paper’ is the biggest international collaboration of its kind and is vital to understanding how surfaces work in order to reduce injury risks to horses,” said John McEwen, FEI first vice president and chair of the FEI veterinary committee. “Now, thanks to scientific research and extensive support and partnership between welfare charities and horse sport, we can fully understand how the right surfaces, with the necessary preparation and ongoing maintenance, can extend the working lives of sport horses and produce the best performances.” Clearly, the study is more complex than a simple recommendation for footing choice based on discipline or preference. Curious what surface you should be riding on? Take a look for yourself; the study is available free online. Read more at tinyurl.com/fei-whitepaper


ONE POWERFUL FORCE OF NUTRITION. You are in it to win it. And with ProForce® premium horse feed, you can count on advanced nutrition that delivers championship-caliber results. Each unique formula combines worldclass science, research and technology for unprecedented levels of performance, stamina and recovery. And with features like prebiotics and probiotics, high fat, guaranteed amino acids and organic trace minerals, you can trust Nutrena® to give your horse the focused power to finish (and stay) on top.

ProForceFeed.com © 2014 Cargill, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


EQ D I N I N G

Recipes from the Road author of STABLE TO TABLE, shares her culinary triumphs and tales of an equestrian’s wanderlust.

DAWN HARRIS BROWN,

D

Carolina’s kitchen. I somehow managed to balance my passion for cooking, academics, art, and riding. I attended classes at the university in the morning, cooked with Carolina at noon, and rode my sidesaddle at a nearby riding stable in the afternoon. I eventually moved to Andalusia in southern Spain and lived there for 3 1/2 years. Every day during the tomatogrowing season we would have Gazpacho Andaluz. We lived in the small town of Morón de la Frontera, where gazpacho

DAWN HARRIS BROWN

PA E L L A AU RORA

30 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

SJOERT PEGGE

uring my college years I attended the University of Madrid and studied art. I lived in a Spanish household and became interested in Spanish cuisine from Carolina, the family’s cook. The bacalhau and flan recipes in Stable to Table are from

Some of the finest Andalusian horses and Spanish riding schools are in the small town of Jerez de la Frontera.

was the basic fare of Andalusian peasants. Tourists and upper classes soon decided the fabulous tastes should come out of the fields and into the restaurants. While in Andalusia I had an opportunity to join friends on a distance ride to the coastal town of Zahara de los Atunes. We rode for 10 days covering 20 to 25 miles a day. We rode through the “white towns” of Andalusia, where residents picked asparagus in mountain meadows, past bull ranches, and on to the beaches along the coast. Seafood was in order when we arrived at our destination. A coastal bar boasted the best paella! I told the owner that I was on a “best paella” quest. Let the culinary battle begin! My “Paella Aurora” (my name in Spanish) is in the Spanish chapter of the cookbook and has been adapted for the home Continued on page 32 chef.


EQ D I N I N G

Recipes from the Road

PA E L L A AU RORA

GAZ PACHO ANDAL U Z

1 dozen fresh or canned clams or mussels 2 pounds large shrimp (with shells and heads) ¼ cup olive oil 2 chicken breasts ½ pound pork loin, cubed 1 pound chorizo sausage, sliced ½ pound medium shrimp, peeled 2 cups onion, chopped ½ cup bell pepper, chopped 3 cloves garlic ½ cup celery, chopped 1 bay leaf 3 cups white rice (or packaged yellow saffron rice) 2 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped (or 1 can diced tomatoes) 6 cups chicken broth, heated ½ teaspoon saffron (if using white rice) 2 teaspoons salt black pepper to taste ½ teaspoon paprika 1 cup green peas, cooked 3 jars sliced pimentos

4 large (ripe) tomatoes, peeled ½ cup green bell pepper, chopped 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped ½ cup onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic 2 slices bread, crusts removed 4 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons salt 5 tablespoons sherry vinegar 1 to 2 cups water

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Cut the peeled tomatoes into chunks and put them in a blender or food processor. Add the peppers, cucumber, onion, and garlic. Puree all together and add the bread. Slowly add the oil until incorporated. Add the salt and vinegar; taste and correct the seasonings. Stir in the cold water. Chill the gazpacho until ready to serve. Serves 6-8 Serve with small bowls of chopped tomatoes, onions, peppers, cucumbers, toasted bread croutons, and diced and chopped eggs. A hot Spanish Andalusian summer means cold gazpacho! Dawn Harris Brown was born into a ranching family in Texas. Her first culinary influences were barbeque and Mexican food. After majoring in art at the University of Madrid, she spent another 3½ years in southern Spain. Food became her art form. She attended cooking schools in France, England, Morocco, the United States, Canada, Southeast Asia, and Australia. When not hunting her 12 lurchers or foxhunting, she is cooking for friends and family. She has written two books: Stable to Table and Parties & Ponies Children’s Menu Cookbook. Dawn has two children, and three grandchildren and lives with her husband on a farm in Folsom, Louisiana.

DAWN HARRIS BROWN

1. Clean fresh clams (or mussels) and steam them open. Discard any that do not open. 2. On a baking sheet, lay the large shrimp (with shells and heads) in one layer and drizzle with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Roast at 450°F for 5 minutes or until shrimp are pink and a little crisp. Remove and save for garnish on top of the finished paella. 3. Brown the chicken, pork, and sausage in a large heavy skillet. Add the medium peeled shrimp for 1 minute. Set all meats aside. 4. Add the onion, peppers, garlic, celery, and bay leaf to the oil. Sauté until soft but not brown. Add the rice until the grains are somewhat opaque, stirring constantly so it does not stick. Add the tomatoes and chicken broth along with the saffron, salt, pepper, and paprika. Return all the meats to the pan and stir until combined. 5. Cover and put into a 350°F oven for about 20 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Remove from oven and stir in the peas and one jar of pimentos. Let sit for 10 minutes before pouring mixture into a large paella pan. 6. Decorate top with the clams or mussels, large shrimp, and strips of red pimento. Hollow out a fresh red pepper and fill it with shrimp (tails inside and heads on the outside). Alternate shrimp and pimentos around the pan. Slice lemons for squeezing on the served paella. Presentation is as important as the taste!

DAWN HARRIS BROWN

Continued from page 30

Stable to Table A menu cookbook with recipes from around the equestrian world. By Dawn Harris Brown with Rachel Chotin Lincoln

PAGE 94


Nic’s new home was jointly designed by Nic and his mother, Dagmar Roldan. Nic says, “Working with my mom is always a blast because we are always thinking of ideas outside the box. Our style integrates contemporary with modern and antique mixtures.” Dagmar adds, “I grew up in Europe with great architecture and art around me, which gave me a lot of inspiration. I always integrate art, books, and personal things in my designs. Nic has great taste and ideas, and it is a lot of fun for me to work with my son on his projects.”


THE POLO STAR AND MODEL INVITES EQ TO VISIT HIS NEW HOME.

NIC ROLDAN

PHOTOGRAPHY FOR EQ BY GEORGE KAMPER

N

ic Roldan is one of the world’s best polo players. He was born in Argentina and raised in Wellington, Florida. As an eightgoal, third-generation polo player, he consistently tops the American standings. Nic grew up surrounded by the sport, as son of Raul Roldan, a professional who played with the Sultan of Brunei. Raul moved the family from Buenos Aires to the polo hub in Florida when Nic was 2 years old. Nic recently completed a new home in Wellington, and he invited EQ to come for a visit. He is a natural design talent and worked together with his mother, Dagmar Roldan, an interior designer. Dagmar told EQ, “Nic has great taste Continued on page 41 SPR ING | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 35


P

ass through the entrance gate of Live Oak Stud in Ocala, Florida, and accept the fact that you’ve entered into a place of wonder. Continue driving along acres of shaded lanes that twist and turn past manicured lawns, reflection ponds, majestic oak trees laden with Spanish moss, and you’ll understand why the combined-driving champion has chosen this mesmerizing setting as his base of operation. Chester’s family has been at the 4,700-acre farm just over 45 years. “We’re a real horse family,” Chester said. “My sister and I host the Live Oak International Show together, and she also was chairman of the board of the Washington International Horse Show. My niece rode on a few tours for the U.S. team this summer, and my wife shows jumpers up to the grand prix level.” Chester’s mother, Charlotte Colket Weber, a devoted equestrian, also maintains a home on the property. There are 300 horses at Live Oak Farm, many of which are Charlotte’s Thoroughbreds. She was headed to the Breeders

Above: Chester at the 2014 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in Normandy, France.  Left: The “green-to- green” Live Oak driving and jumper show. Opposite, above: With Jamaica. Weber says, “I went to see the horse with Michael Freund in 2001. Jamaica was in a feedlot going to slaughter, but he had ringworm, so they needed to get him out.The owner heard that he could drive, so they looked for someone to take him. The man who took him saw the horse’s ability and called me. Jamaica was all-discipline Horse of the Year in 2008, and has four national championships. He was with me at my first WEG in 2002, and the world championships in 2004, and 2006 Aachen. Now he lives a well-earned, relaxed life in the field. He is a Breyer Horse, and he has his own Facebook page.” Opposite, right: As we drove to the field to visit Jamaica, Chester stopped to rescue a turtle crossing the road.


Dagmar Roldan says, “We love designing with metal and concrete. Our colors are white, gray, brown, and black. Simple designs with great impact and personality. A mixture of old and new. Modern, but comfortable.”

38 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | WI N T ER 2014 | 2015

Live Oak Stud is a Spanish-mossdraped, 4,700-acre paradise, This page: the new home that Chester and his wife, My, recently completed on the property. Opposite, upper right: Chester’s small, cozy, and amazingly neat barn. Young driver, Jacob Arnold, works for Chester and competes on his own. (see page 58)


WINTER 2 0 1 4 | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 39


Above left: The exterior of the home gives little clue to the visual excitement within. Above: Nic and his father, fellow polo player Raul Roldan.

Continued from page 35 and ideas, and it is a lot of fun for me to work with my son on his projects.” “Working with my mom is always a blast,” Nic added, “because we are always thinking of ideas outside the box. Our style integrates contemporary with modern and antique mixtures.” Today, Nic travels the world for about half the year to play matches from Dubai and Santa Barbara to Australia and South Africa. His career includes everything from a modeling contract with Piaget to hosting post-match soirees in Aspen. The life of a professional polo player is unique; the dangerous action of the game is contrasted by a glamorous lifestyle of modeling and celebrity.  “The owners do it because they love the sport and horses, but they also love what it brings—the dinners and cocktail parties,” Nic told the UK’s Daily Mail last year. “So as an athlete, you have to be very sociable. I love it. It’s always come naturally for me.”

T

hough Nic enjoys the lifestyle that comes with polo, he is as much sportsman as model. In a profile in The New York Times, he is described as the sport’s “most potent combination of athletic ability and good looks.” Nic jump-started his career when he played for the winning team in the U.S. Open in 1998 at just 15 years old. “Polo has been in my family for many generations,” he said. “Sports were always in my blood.” As a player, Nic is excited to see the sport grow and gain traction outside of its perceived status as a playtime for the elite. “Polo is captivating corporate companies, lifestyle brands and television networks,” he says. “There’s no limit to the game of polo. It’s an amazing sport. It’s intense, fast, and beautiful to watch.”


EQ F A S H I O N

SPRING AHEAD

DELIGHT IN THIS SEASON’S LIGHT, BRIGHT, AND CLASSIC BLACK-AND-WHITE. BY RENEE SPURGE OWNER | LA SADDLERY

I

f you happen to be an avid lover of poetry as I am, you will know that springtime is one of the most widely written about seasons of the year. With spring comes the promise of new and exciting beginnings, the inevitable temptation of budding romances, and of course the unpre-

dictability of weather! OK that one is not too poetic, but changing

weather is definitely one of the driving forces behind the variety of outerwear in the spring equestrian collections. While barely there, zip-up jackets and featherweight vests are de rigueur in my neck of the woods, northern and East Coast style mavens will still require a few extra layers or ultra-chic rain gear. But as the afternoon sun begins to linger, our layers begin to fade into winter’s memory. This spring unveils a garden of feminine-cut blouses with lace and ruffle details, stunning black-andwhite silhouettes with touches of colored piping, and breeches in earthy tones of tan and hunter green. Burgundy will continue to blossom in this year’s show coat lineup, as well as beautiful shades of blue and teal. Street wear to barn wear will also be in full bloom with sassy plaid shirts, tack-inspired belts and bracelets, and creamy leather totes and modern backpacks. We will also see a rejuvenation of classic cotton shirts and timeless silk equestrian prints. This season is the time to put the preppy back into our equestrian wardrobe. Bling is last year; this spring it’s all about the pretty. PAGE 94 42 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015


EQ F A S H I O N

Clockwise from upper left page: Firenze Backpack by Noel Asmar. Italian leather with drawstring closure. 15" x 11" x 3.5". $368. Novelty Summer Scarf by Atelierbits. Equestrian-inspired print with leather scarf cuff. $150. All Weather Rider by Noel Asmar. Gold accents, adjustable hood, and front and back skirt unveil behind hidden-zipper gusset. $340. Noel Asmar Oxford Show Shirt in punch features a magnetic collar closure and white collar and cuffs. $148. Dare to Love Ruby Bag by Âme Moi. Cow leather with lambskin lining. Embroidered silk and leather exterior. Accented with semi-precious stones and horse-mane pendant. $1,920. Rönner’s Winifred Dress in cotton-voile jockey print with 3/4 sleeve and open-cap shoulder. $350. The Weekender Bag by Noel Asmar. Italian leather with patent accents and locking-close buckle. 10.5" x 19.5" x 10". $580. Razzapura Show Jackets in flexible fabrics, designed for comfort and style. Mens $400. Womens $415. Noel Asmar Chantilly Show Jacket in black. Features black faux leather piping along pocket and collar. Angled pockets create a slimming effect. $398. Rönner’s Montpelier Silk Satin Scarf printed in vintage gold and blue. 90 x 90cm. $154. The City Jacket in punch by Noel Asmar. Flattering fit with front zipper and magnetic-placket closure. $260.


EQ F A S H I O N

SPRING AHEAD

Clockwise from upper left: Noel Asmar Dressage Shadbelly in black with black paisley points. Tailored with curved waist for flattering fit. Interchangeable points allow personalization. $480. La Piccolina Silver Red Bag by Âme Moi. Cow leather with lambskin lining. Embroidered silk and leather exterior. Accented with semi-precious stones and horse-mane pendant. $2,200. Active Jacket by Goode Rider in smoke. The perfect streamlined riding jacket with reflective fabric on zipper and cuffs. Rönner’s Montpelier Silk Satin Scarf printed in vintage blue and green. 90 x 90cm. $154. Goode Rider’s Iconic Breech in white. Mid-rise fit. Shown with Noble Show Shirt in stay-cool fabric. Silk, Tetbury Tunic in stirrup print by Rönner. 3/4 sleeve with deep V-neck. $500.

44 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015


EQ F A S H I O N

Clockwise from upper left: Sportek Jacket by Goode Rider. Stay cool on warm summer days in this sporty, zip-up 3/4 sleeve jacket. Shown with Pro Rider Breech. Sarm Hippique’s modern classic Elisa Show Shirt. Flattering, slim fit in long or short sleeve. Le Fash White Soho City Breech. Available with matching gold rivets on pockets. $195. Navy Check Sport Show Shirt $195. Rust Noho City Breech. $328. Ocean Plaid Open Placket Show Shirt. $195. The City Breech™ Collection provides four-way stretch and UV Block. Higher spandex content and slightly higher cut front and back panels create a slimming effect. Linda Jacket by Equiline. Modern and sportive Italian-designed, made with highly breathable microfiber and embellished with a flag on zipper pockets. $275. Evan Jacket is highly breathable with a modern design. Italian flag-enriched zippered pocket. High elasticity of the fabric ensures ideal fit and maximum movement. $285. Viva Backpack by Atelierbits combines raw-cut leather and traditional craftsmanship with modern design. Custom-solid hardware and horse-bridle inspired clasp closure. $529. Montego city-white breech by Kentucky boasts a flattering, modern cut with contrasting zippers (shown in apple). $347.


LANDSCAPE DESIGN MASTERCLASS

LIFE IN THE LANDSCAPE C H OR E O G RA PH ING N AT UR E W ITH F OR M AN D FUNCT ION .

L

andscape architects and designers are the quiet innovators and artists behind magic-making in the gardens, fields, and forests that surround beautiful farms and ranches. We feel a sense of place in a carefully designed environment, be it an intimate space dense with verdant offerings, or acres of subtly swaying grasses lulling us into quiet bliss. But behind the bucolic views lies the expert knowledge of designers

honoring the land, preserving its resources, and enhancing its natural undulating rhythm. Without us realizing it, their designs direct our gazes in twists and turns and outward toward distant vanishing points. They lead us unconsciously to explore and wander. EQ has assembled some of America’s top landscape designers and architects to share their secrets. Meet the esteemed panel on the next page.

BY STEPHANIE PETERS

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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DALE FISHER NEIL LANDINO

JON CARLOFTIS FINE GARDENS

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

HELEN NORMAN

Opposite page: Sky Pencil Hollies and a pergola add vertical interest. This page, top to bottom: Small shrubs visually connect spaces; garden doors and arches are favored transition techinques.

NEIL LANDINO

JON CARLOFTIS FINE GARDENS

SP R I N G | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 47


Top: Stormwater’s path through the site and check-dams of Millcreek Ranch in Texas. Center: A central pathway runs through the garden, pool, and distant field in Millbrook, New York. Bottom: Rainwater fountain and shade structure at a community concert hall in Marfa, Texas.

Jon Carloftis: Hopefully, we get involved as early as possible in order to understand what the architect is trying to achieve. Our job is to connect his or her buildings together by our use of driveways, walkways, and plantings. In reality, we are trying to glorify their buildings with our plantings. We totally understand that the garden is the accessory to the real show. BILL TIMMERMAN

TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

How closely do you work with the project architect? How early in the planning stages do you begin collaborating?

Janice Parker: We work very closely with the architects and engineers—

right from the beginning of the project. Most of our projects are initiated by architect referrals. It’s one of the best ways to collaborate and be part of a creative and innovative team and process. As we all work together to develop the schematic design, we can balance the utility and functionality of the site as well as define the design discipline and required magic. Laurel Roberts: It is very important to have a master plan that takes into account the landscaping early in the project. Christine Ten Eyck: As early as possible! It is best for us to be involved

in the conceptual building placement/site planning.

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

NEIL LANDINO

Morgan Wheelock: Sometimes I am the architect. The landscape archi-

TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

tect almost always does the siting. Every site is different, and every owner and farm manager is different. Each kind of farm requires varying fencing, plantings, and exposure. It’s about farm roads and fences and what will minimize conflicts between vehicles and horses being led. The purpose of Lane’s End Farm, a Thoroughbred horse farm in Kentucky, is to raise and sell horses at top dollar. The owner’s goal is to visually communicate through the landscape that the horses are getting the very best care. Even hedge heights in the sale’s show ring enforce the salability of the horse. Is environmental sustainability a primary focus in your overall design? Do you assess the long- and short-term impact of design decisions?  What are some of the challenges posed? How do you use water conservation and indigenous plants in your designs? Carloftis: We are very focused on creating environments that are good for

the earth. The use of chemicals are avoided by choosing plants that don’t require heavy fertilizing or spraying for insects or diseases. Obviously, native plants make sense, but we aren’t exclusive to that. Knowing what plants work well is invaluable information. We also incorporate permeable concrete pavers that allow plants to grow in between yet are acceptable for driving. And rain gardens near parking areas are planted to filter oil and gasoline that leak from vehicles. Wade Graham: Especially in California, low-water requirements are

crucial for plants. I use California native or other Mediterranean-climate plants, which have the advantage of also being mostly maintenance-free and encouraging pollinators. I try to minimize trimming and mowing— substituting meadows for lawns, for example—and ban leaf blowers from the garden except for the hard surfaces. CHRISTINE TEN EYCK

Parker: Sustainability in landscapes is integral to doing good landscape

48 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P RING | 2015

architecture. Sustainable means the capacity to endure, and we all want that in our natural and built environments. Whether we are working on new homes, pools, or renovations, the goal is to make the right choices both aesthetically and functionally. Everything matters.


Planning enduring landscapes is about creating beauty within the natural constraints of the site. This is done by having respect for the natural world. During the process of construction, there is destruction and degradation of a site. This used to keep me up nights! I have learned that if you respect and pay attention to the natural world, it will repay you in bountiful ways. Give nature respect and a chance to repair itself, and you have remarkable results. It is a serious responsibility to create with nature, but one that becomes intuitive with true respect. This is why, in all aspects of our design work, we work with nature to create an enhanced landscape that has true value for our client’s intimate domestic lives as well as for the environment. It is a balancing act, and we very carefully consider the long- and short-term impacts of our design on the environment. Ten Eyck: A primary focus of our design ethic is being true to the region

in which our projects are located. We love using local hardscape materials and indigenous or tough plants to create and sculpt outdoor space. Using materials that are local creates an authentic and more environmentally sustainable project. We believe in saving every drop of water we can and also highlighting the path of rainwater through our sites. Sometimes we gather water for irrigation reuse in cisterns, and sometimes it is as simple as slowing down rainwater as it traverses a property. It may be an organic or very architectural design element through the site. Is water run-off and storage considered? What methods do you use to incorporate functional design such as storm and water management into the visual design? Are there new technologies or

systems that you have considered in land planning for storm and water management that you had not formerly? Graham: Yes. Where possible, I encourage clients to do the full suite of

water conservation measures: storm water capture in tanks or cisterns, grey water reuse, and drip irrigation. Parker: We are constantly learning and examining new approaches to storm-water management and drainage—both are key factors in the success of every project. Keeping water on the site in as many ways as possible is the goal and creates true sustainability. Best management practices for storm-water management and drainage are being updated and then adapted to most town building and environmental codes, rules, and regulations. It is crucial for landscape architects to stay educated and aware of all environmental concerns, for long-term success and for shortterm permitting processes. Ten Eyck: We have always used above-ground cisterns in the past and

are now using some that are underground. We also collect and store airconditioning condensate for irrigation and even for water features­. The beauty of this is that you get it when you need it—in the summer when humidity levels are high. Wheelock: The abundance and quality of grass in fields and paddocks are important to health and growth rate for horses. In dry periods, when ground water is scarce and expensive, turf requires irrigation. We always design farms with several ponds, which collect and store water for irrigation use in dry periods. Catchment and reuse is the rule.

OU R E X P E RTS

JON CARLOFTIS is an award-winning garden designer, garden writer, television guest, author, and lecturer. Jon is the owner of the Rockcastle River Trading Company, a popular home and garden store located on his family’s proper ty in Livingston, Kentucky. The beautiful gardens designed by Jon that surround the Carloftis home and store have been featured in BMW Magazine, Country Home, Garden & Gun, Outdoor Rooms, and Southern Living. Jon is the author of Beautiful Gardens of Kentucky, Beyond the Windowsill, and First a Garden.

WADE GRAHAM is a landscape designer, historian, and writer based in Los Angeles. He holds a doctorate in American history and teaches urbanism and environmental policy in the School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He is the author of American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to Our Backyards: What Our Gardens Tell Us About Who We Are (HarperCollins).

JANICE PARKER Since creating Janice Parker Landscape Architects in 1984, Janice has cultivated the firm to one of national prominence. The firm has received many awards, including the 2012 Palladio for Landscape Architecture and multiple Innovation in Design Awards from Connecticut Cottages and Gardens. She has par ticipated in New York City’s Million Trees Project; and has been featured in leading publications, including The New York Times, Architectural Digest, Metropolitan Home, Interior Design, and Vogue.

LAUREL ROBERTS Laurel is the daughter of horse whisperer Monty Rober ts and his wife, Pat. Her interest in hor ticulture began while working at and managing the Rober ts’ Flag Is Up Farm in the Santa Ynez Valley of California—eventually assuming management of the ground’s crews. She went on to study hor ticulture at California Polytechnic and has since designed horsehealthy barns, arenas, and farms around the country.

CHRISTINE TEN EYCK moved from Texas to Arizona in 1985, where she established a thriving landscape architectural practice emphasizing regional residential, hospitality, and public projects. In 2007 she returned to Texas and star ted the Austin studio. With a mission of connecting urban dwellers with nature and with one another, her firm creates transformative landscapes that celebrate the beauty of the Southwest. Her firm’s work has been internationally recognized for its simple, rugged beauty and utility.

MORGAN DIX WHEELOCK was educated at Harvard College and the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where he earned a Master of Landscape Architecture degree. He founded Morgan Wheelock Landscape Architects in 1976. With offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Palm Beach, Florida, his practice is worldwide, ranging from residential gardens to urban design, botanical gardens, and institutional campuses.

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TERRY MOORE

TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

TERRY MOORE

Above: Shade pavilion by Lake|Flato architects is set off by grasses and a reflective pool. Below: Trees and the movement of grasses give structure to the landscape.

TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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One cannot place drain inlets in fields, as these would be harmful to a horse. Therefore, when necessary, they are placed outside of fences close to roads to intercept rain runoff and direct the flow to the storage ponds. Standing water is to be avoided in fields and paddocks even though most horses love to roll in the mud. On a Thoroughbred farm the horse’s appearance is critical for future owners to admire throughout the year. Problems of standing water are usually handled by redesigning the field to avoid those wet areas, or, more often, planting those areas with shade trees and enclosing them with fencing, creating tree pens. Permeable pavements are a popular new technique for excavating water and recharging subsoil. On Thoroughbred farms there are relatively few parking lots but many roads. Catchment and redirection of water are more effective and less problematic than permeable pavements.

and herbs, which bring a garden or landscape into harmony with the seasons. Parker: In all aspects of our design work, we are working with nature to

create an enhanced landscape that has true value for our client’s intimate domestic life as well as for the environment. It is a balancing act, and we consider this aspect of the design and the future of the design very carefully. It is crucial that we are creating points of interest and beauty that shine through in every season. Interesting paving patterns and textured stone, materials with dimensionality, are ideal ways to achieve this goal. Not to be overshadowed by the hardscape, a well-thought-out planting plan can easily breathe life and color into the landscape, even during the dead of winter. Ten Eyck: The hardscape and the trees are the main organizing forces

Can you tell us about the unique challenges of designing the landscape for a horse farm?

that help give structure to the landscape. Grasses give movement. Water is the ever-changing mirror in our gardens.  

Wheelock: The health and well-being of the horse is first and foremost. Homes are frequently integrated into farm facilities such as barns, Consequently, designing a horse farm is a case where function is followed arenas, and pastures. What landscape design devices help to create by aesthetic. For example, we always place fence posts on the outside of a cohesive look? Or do you feel that cohesion is not necessary the fence to prevent injury. Building because the functions are so curved fences prevents scared horses Before and after images of Ten Eyck’s Texas Ranch different? from running into corners. The landscape project. Graham: Yes. All of the structures placement of paddocks is critical and on a property ought to feel part determined by gender and behavof a cohesive whole. Even if their ior. You want to separate the mares architectural styles are different, the from the stallions and have the colts landscape can sew them together nowhere near the mares. Planting into a coherent fabric. heavy evergreens between paddocks creates an effective secondary visual Roberts: I like to be able to see barrier. out through the property from the It’s essential to know that the barnyard into most of the turnouts, placement of the barn is critical to but backing them up with hedges to a horse’s health. If it’s positioned keep the horses safe. too low, the fog rolls in and creates Ten Eyck: Restoring native grassmoldy conditions. If it’s too high, CHRISTINE TEN EYCK lands and better defining vehicular it’s subject to windy conditions. You circulation has helped our ranches have a more cohesive feel. Many want to orient the barn across the prevailing wind to create air movetimes ranch vehicles seem to have the run of the place, so we try to help ment. A novice breeder will always face the barn doors into the wind, organize the ranch roads and auto courts in an intentional way instead which can be deadly to a horse’s respiratory health. of letting them evolve haphazardly. In one project it was a combination Placement of the barn in relation to the sun is also an important conof creating a plinth around the home with a small retaining wall, while sideration. Studies have shown that one hour of sunlight a day in a mare’s restoring the grassland and organizing the vehicular movement through stall will result in a bigger foal. You want to orient the barn so stalls will the site.    have adequate exposure to the sun. What are some ways you ensure the continued visual appeal of the landscape through the various seasons? Carloftis: Our thoughts are always to design the garden in the winter

months when the landscape is at its most barren state. In the summer, it’s easy to get swayed by all the flowers, which in fact are really the bonus of a well-structured design. Graham: We take full advantage of the many plants in our palette that

flower throughout the year, but also introduce seasonal elements: plants that are deciduous, that color in the fall—even in coastal California— and most importantly, agriculture, that is fruit and nut trees, vegetables

Obviously you consider enhancing views. Can you explain some examples of how you have done this? Is it a goal of a landscape architect to unify the environment and architecture? What are some design techniques that you have used to accomplish this? Carloftis: Creating vistas with trees is an easy technique. Great views

need to be exalted, while ugly views need to be masked. Hedges are another easy way to visually connect buildings and spaces. Continuity of hardscape and plant materials can pull a landscape together visually. Also, creating a focal point to lead the person from place to place so they know where to go is an age-old technique that accomplishes the connecting of the buildings. Continured on page 54 SPR ING | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 51


DALE FISHER

JON CARLOFTIS FINE GARDENS

This page, above: A beautiful formal garden at Mt. Brilliant Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. Below: The intricate planning of paddocks, fences, and permanent structures of Lane’s End Farm. Opposite: Curved fences, grass-jointed paths, sky-pencil hollies, hedges, and border gardens are functional and visually appealing.

MORGAN WHEELOCK INCORPORATED

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NEIL LANDINO

MORGAN WHEELOCK DALE FISHER

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

NEIL LANDINO

MORGAN WHEELOCK INCORPORATED

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

JON CARLOFTIS FINE GARDENS

NEIL LANDINO

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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Graham: Framing and editing views are fundamental considerations.

Sometimes a view is too big, or needs to be held back until a visitor has passed through other portions of the space. Sometimes small or close views need to be isolated and framed to increase their interest and give depth and perspective. Choreographing the way and sequence of people’s experience of space, inside and outside, is part of the garden art. Parker: The inspiration for the garden comes from the site, the architecture, and the client—all of these pieces must be considered carefully when planning a design. I want people outdoors, in the natural environment. We want to make the magic that draws them out and keeps them there—and happier outside than anywhere else. The secret is to discover the essence of the garden the client wants to create as well as the true character of the site. This understanding should then physically, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally infuse every aspect of the garden design. It will be the style of the garden. I look to find ways to use graceful arcs and well-proportioned axial connections to create a blend of the indoor spaces and the larger outdoors—with a focused simplicity. Do you see architecture differently from the way architects see it?   Carloftis: Probably, because we are trained differently. Unless you really

Wheelock: Landscape architects see buildings as an event in a fluid movement of the landscape.

TERRY MOORE

know plant material, the world looks green instead of knowing the different textures. I must say that every successful landscape has a knowledgeable plantsman on board. This takes it to a higher level.

What are the design challenges and rewards of designing large expansive vistas or small, intimate An uncluttered, expansive vista. spaces? How do you transition from intimate spaces to wide vistas? Are there typical or special techniques that you use? Carloftis: Since I started my business in New York City 25 years ago,

dealing only with small spaces has been my company’s forte. Every home or farm has these small spaces somewhere to deal with, so it’s a matter of working off the buildings to make it work both visually and physically. As for transitioning, we like to close you in, perhaps an allée or archway, then open you up by having negative, wide-open space, over and over again in the landscape, because it plays with ones emotions. This is how drama is made in the garden. Graham: Yes. Trade secrets. But here are two rules of thumb: a space or

a view can appear to be too big under certain circumstances, and wants to be modulated. The smaller the space, the trickier it is to get right. Courtyards, for example, are like jewelry; they have to have just the right amount going on in them, and no more. Parker: Every element of a design matters–edges and transitions, cor-

ners, intersections, plants, scents, sounds, and importantly, the quality of the light. It is a goal to have a sense of focused simplicity and a care for site-specific, distinctive detailing. In large and small spaces human needs are the same–spaces must be comfortable, welcoming, and invite interaction and communication. Seating and gathering areas in large and small spaces either work—or they don’t. There is a wealth of knowledge and 54 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

studies on the ways that people use space, and the most successful spaces all share common threads. On a domestic level, we always consider the furniture placement and the lighting—key elements to be analyzed at the beginning of a design. Ten Eyck: Expansive vistas: Don’t clutter it up and try to do too much. Work with the horizon lines. Intimate spaces are tricky—every foot counts and scale is everything. Typically when we work on projects, we create a series of thresholds and rooms that have different scales depending on the situation. The rewards from working on expansive or intimate spaces are when the client that you are designing for and with is happy and spends many precious life moments in those spaces with the people they love. Wheelock: Most techniques are intuitive. It’s about sensing what feels right. Listen carefully and then don’t listen. Look at the land and visualize how you can preserve the fluidity of the property while meeting the land’s needs and the owner’s needs. There is a theme to the rhythm and movement and it’s always changing. Do you typically look at historic precedent in the specific property or the area on which to build your design concept? In other words, if you found an old stone foundation of a former barn or residence, do you look for ways to preserve its historic context in some way or would you prefer to remove and recycle the material in some more useful way? Graham: Always. Context is everything, even for a Frank Gehry building. Landscape is what weaves disparate objects—buildings—into the common fabric of our cities and communities, and it must be attuned to time as well as place. Parker: I have observed that the historical farmer’s shaping of the land is

pragmatic, yet often results in a disciplined beauty. Our design intent is to honor that ideal and use the client’s expectations, the varied land, and existing materials to respond in individual and unique ways that protect the integrity of the land and materials. My personal preference is typically to restore whatever existing historical features I can and integrate them into the updated design–as long as by doing so I can remain within the established goals of the individual project. What specific design concerns are factored into adhering to extreme water restrictions in the West? Ten Eyck: I try to explain to clients that are used to emerald-green plantings that a tough, drought-tolerant landscape is a landscape of harsh beauty. There are times when it is lush and green but other times when it is more beige and purple and gray–and this is beautiful in its strength. The architectural geometry of plants that have learned to adapt to intense climates is beautiful. I also put an emphasis on shade and trees near the places where my clients will be spending time. Shelter and cooling shade from trees gives structure and a ceiling to the landscape. Water elements are important for people in arid climates for psychological cooling, so we try to design these to look as good empty as full during drought restrictions. PAGE 94


WADE GRAHAM

CHRISTOPHER HIRSHEIMER

JON CARLOFTIS FINE GARDENS

More and more designers are creating seamless transitions from indoor living spaces

WADE GRAHAM LANDSCAPE STUDIO TERRY MOORE

NEIL LANDINO

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

to inviting outdoor environments. Luxury gourmet kitchens and high-end furnishings once confined to home interiors are now considered an integral aspect of the exterior garden environment. Landscape architect Janice Parker says, COURTESY OF SUB ZERO

“I want people outdoors, in the natural environment. We want to make the magic that draws them out and keeps them there— happier outside than anywhere else.” TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

NEIL LANDINO

JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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sport, a test of horsemanship unlike that of any other discipline. Often called the triathlon of equestrian sports, horse trials include three separate rounds of competition. Horse and rider demonstrate finesse in the dressage arena, boundless courage on the cross-country course, and incredible athleticism during stadium jumping. Horses and riders of the highest levels of eventing are the equestrian world’s most well-rounded athletes. BY BETSY STEIN

THREE-PHASE EVENTS are steeped in a rich history and born of utility. Once a comprehensive cavalry test, the sport was added to the Olympics in 1912. Today, eventing is the only high-risk Olympic sport where men and women of all ages compete without separate divisions. It is growing rapidly as riders from other disciplines are drawn to attempt the thrilling sport that offers the definitive measure of horsemanship. The United States Eventing Association (USEA) is the national organization dedicated to the education and development of horses and riders in the sport and has approximately 14,000 members across the country and around the world. It recognizes 260 competitions nationwide. Of these, very few are given the highest rating by the Concours Complet International (CCI). CCI**** (four-star) competitions include the Olympics, the FEI World Equestrian Games and six annual horse trials held each year in Britain, Australia, Germany, the Unites States, and France. In addition, many beginner, youth, and amateur levels are available around the country at local venues and through organizations such as Pony Club, 4-H, and the Intercollegiate Eventing Program. Motivated to undertake the ultimate horse competition? Tempted by the hair-raising action of cross-country riding? Maybe you can find your stride with eventing. Three-phase horse trials take place over a one- to three-day period:

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1.

PHOTOS BY HOLLY MATT

EVENTING

In many ways eventing is the most complete horse

DRESSAGE

The dressage phase begins every eventing competition. The purpose of the dressage test is to demonstrate the level of communication between the horse and rider. Due to the demands of the sport, the three-day event horse is extremely fit, and only strong and tactful riders possess the skills needed to harness and direct that energy into a performance that is both polished and powerful. This phase is a demonstration of the horse’s and rider’s ability to perform a series of prescribed classical movements on the flat in an enclosed arena. It requires precision, smoothness, suppleness, and complete obedience. Ideally, the horse appears to perform the test’s movements on its own accord, working in harmony with its rider. The test is scored on each

movement, as in figure skating, with the overall harmony and precision of the test taken into consideration. Dressage tests are updated every three to four years and are written by the United States Equestrian Federation. The CCI 1-4* tests are written by the FEI. Preliminary level and below are performed in a small (20 by 40 meters) arena while preliminary level test C and above are ridden in a standard (20 by 60 meters) arena. Each movement in the dressage test is given a score between 0 and 10. In addition, there are four collective marks: gaits, impulsion, submission, and rider, which are scored the same way. All the judge’s marks are added together, and any penalty points for errors in the test are deducted.


2.

CROSS-COUNTRY

The second phase, crosscountry, involves the horse and rider galloping over natural terrain, jumping a variety of fixed obstacles along the way. The cross-country test typically takes place on the second day of competition. The purpose of this test is to prove the speed, endurance, and jumping ability of the horse over varied terrain and obstacles. The horse must be brave and trust the rider, and the rider must use knowledge of pace in order to expend only as much of the horse’s energy as necessary if they expect

to finish well.The cross-country course covers approximately two to four miles, along which are 24 to 36 fixed and solid obstacles. This phase is ridden at a gallop, with exact speed requirements depending on the level of competition. The aim of each rider is to complete the course on time and with as few penalties as possible. Penalties can be accrued through jumping errors (refusals, run-outs, and circles) or by exceeding the optimum time allowed.

3.

SHOW JUMPING

The third and final phase is show jumping, where horse and rider jump a series of stadium fences in an enclosed arena. A show-jumping course comprises a series of colored fences usually made of lightweight rails that are easily knocked down. This final phase tests the stamina and recovery of the horse after the endurance phase and shows that it is fit enough to continue work. The FEI rule book states, “The test on the third day is not an ordinary show jumping competition…The sole objective

is to demonstrate that, on the day after a severe test of endurance, the horses have retained the suppleness, energy and obedience necessary for them to continue in service.” The show-jumping course requires very exact riding; it consists of between 12 and 15 obstacles, which normally include at least one combination, two spread fences, and, in some cases, a ditch. As with a normal showjumping class, penalties result from knocking rails from the jumps, as well as exceeding the time allowed.

The OVERALL SCORES for eventing are cumulative, the penalties are added together from all three phases, and the rider with the lowest score (fewest penalty points) at the end of the competition is named the winner.

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obstacles. Many three-day events are famous for their amazing and creative jump designs, which push the boundaries of precision and courage for riders on course. The growth of the sport has led to an increased number of events for riders of all levels, from beginner to worldclass. This cross section of the most prestigious venues in the United States attracts riders from around the world and offers a spectacular experience for rider and spectator.

MICHELLE DUNN

MICHELLE DUNN

HOLLY MATT

THE EVENTS

Eventing venues have a wide variety of terrain and

FEATURED: ROLEX KENTUCKY THREE-DAY EVENT LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

hen you think of eventing, one name comes to mind: Rolex. It’s America’s only four-star, three-day event, and it’s a favorite. An amazing 74 percent of EQ Gold List voters chose it best. What is now the Rolex Kentucky began in 1978 as the World ThreeDay Event Championships, when they were held for the first time in the United States at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. The individual world champion Bruce Davidson (see page 62) retained his world title riding Might Tango, and the Canadians were the winners of the team gold medal. In 1981 Rolex Watch U.S.A. became the title sponsor, and the longrunning event was christened by the name it is known to this day. At the April event, dressage is held on Thursday and Friday in the breathtaking outdoor stadium. Spectators enjoy the grace and elegance

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of dressage as competitors trot their way through the first phase of competition.  The second phase, cross-country, is the highlight of eventing. Saturday is the crowd favorite and most exciting day of Rolex Kentucky when thousands gather to watch horses and riders up close, as they gallop over four miles of challenging terrain—at speeds up to 25 mph—while negotiating remarkable obstacles, water hazards, banks, and ditches. Jumping, the final phase, brings energy and precision back to the outdoor stadium on Sunday. Spectators from across the globe witness the world’s finest horses and riders test their athletic ability, conditioning, and training as they soar over obstacles. And let’s not forget the shopping. Visitors taking a break from the action can visit Barbour, Nike, Rebecca Ray, and many other quality shops.


SHERRY STEWART

BROMONT HORSE TRIALS LAC BROME, QUEBEC, CANADA

GALWAY DOWNS INTERNATIONAL TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA

PLANTATION FIELD HORSE TRIALS UNIONVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA

romont CCI*** is the only world-class event in the world to be run on a former Olympic site, and it will remain an exceptional challenge for event riders looking to measure their skills on a true international venue. For visitors, Bromont is a destination event. The event itself offers VIP amenities, and the park is just one kilometer from the charming village of Bromont, renowned for its restaurants, comfor table accommodations, and famous Quebecois “joie de vivre”. Still the only CCI*** FEI event in Canada, Bromont ranks as one of the very top equestrian events of its type in Nor th America. After great reviews and due to its immediate popularity, Bromont will continue to offer a CIC*** division first introduced last year. The Jaguar Land Rover Bromont CCI*** Three Day Event will also continue to offer one-, two-, and three-star levels.

alway Downs International Horse Trials welcomes top-level riders and horses from across the United States, Canada, and Europe during the last week of October each year. Their 240-acre facility at Galway Downs in California wine country features fine local cuisine, a vendor village, live music, beer and wine tasting, and top competition throughout the weekend. Riders can compete in international divisions from the CCI* to the CCI***. “At Galway Downs, we are excited to bring spectators, competitors, and the surrounding community a world-class event, along with enter tainment and fun for the whole family. We are proud to host thousands of competitors each year, from children at their first event to Olympians,” says Galway Down organizer, Rober t Kellerhouse.

ocated in the fields of Pennsylvania known for steeplechasing and fox hunting, eventing is making a name for itself at the Plantation Field Horse Trials. If you’re on the East Coast and are looking for the ultimate equestrian weekend, visit one of the most exciting and competitive CIC international events around. The course, located in old farm country, is home to Plantation Field, where old stone walls and architecture have been repurposed and incorporated into this prestigious event. Athletes from around the globe compete in this premier event, and some take part in the bareback jumping competition in which some riders compete over fences six feet high. There is something for everyone, with rides and activities for kids, over 50 shops, tailgating, and live music.

REBECCA FARM HORSE TRIALS KALISPELL, MONTANA

RICHLAND PARK HORSE TRIALS RICHLAND, MICHIGAN

WELLINGTON EVENTING SHOWCASE WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

ince its start in 2002, the event at Rebecca Farm has become one of the largest events of its kind, and a USEF- and USEA-recognized gold cup series and a FEI World Cup Eventing Competition. The grounds have been redesigned by Scottish equestrian Ian Stark and include a four-mile cross-country course that features over 150 obstacles and four water complexes. This year will mark the four th annual CCI*** held at Rebecca Farm. “My mother, Rebecca Broussard, was a visionary in the world of equestrian eventing,” says Sarah Broussard, organizer of the event at Rebecca Farm. “Her vision for the event was to help riders in the West compete on the world stage and create an event where developing riders could compete alongside the best in the world.”

ovice through advanced courses featuring two water complexes, a sunken road, and a ditch complex attract riders to the annual Richland Park Horse Trials held on a private 380-acre farm in Michigan. Owners Bob and Kay Willmar th are thrilled to have riders and spectators enjoy what they had always dreamed of putting together, a three-phase equestrian event, which now offers CCI** and CCI*** courses. “The lower-level competitors are so thrilled and excited to be stabled next to the elite of eventing. Imagine riding against and with the Olympic and World Game riders,” said Bob Willmar th.

he first-ever $50,000 Wellington Eventing Showcase took place this winter at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center. This unique event was held over two days in January, normally considered the off-season for eventers on the East Coast. The invitational format drew top riders from the U.S. and Canada, as well as from Australia and New Zealand. The event coincided with the early days of the Winter Equestrian Festival, the country’s longest and largest annual show-jumping event. The new venue and high prize amount promise to draw new and larger attention to the sport.

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of many other equestrian disciplines, including finesse, precision, and dauntlessness. The comprehensive competition draws riders to the sport, each hoping to prove their well-rounded talent and horsemanship. The accomplished leaders of the sport are now training a new generation of eventers who have already begun to amaze fans and win big. WILLIAM FOX-PITT PROUDLY REPRESENTING GREAT BRITAIN illiam Fox-Pitt star ted eventing at age 15. He was encouraged by his parents, both of whom completed Badminton and Burghley, and he represented Britain throughout his teens. Fox-Pitt was the first British rider to become eventing’s world number one—a distinction he achieved in 2002, 2009, 2010, and again in 2014— and is the only rider to have won five out of the six CCI****’s worldwide. William, his wife, Alice Plunkett, and their three children, Oliver, Thomas, and Chloe, live with three lurchers (Turtle, Molly, and Poppy), a cat (Puddypuds), a lizard, a rabbit, two pigs, and a menagerie of rarebreed chickens. Wood Lane Stables, their 28-stall, state-of-the-ar t training center in Dorset, England, is home to Fox-Pitt Eventing.

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COMPETITORS

Horse trials offer challenges that combine skills required

LAUREN KIEFFER A RISING TALENT t age 27, Lauren Kieffer is ranked 25th on the FEI Leaderboard and has earned the title of 2014 USEA Leading Lady Rider. Kieffer was born and raised in southern Illinois and competed in local hunter-jumper and 4-H shows for many years. She began training at Susannah Landsdale’s eventing barn and competed her own horses, as well as other horses in training throughout high school. In 2005, Lauren’s talent, positive attitude, and commitment to her sport earned her an opportunity to begin training and working for Olympians Karen and David O’Connor in Virginia and Florida. (See opposite page.) During her time with the O’Connor event team, Lauren has matured into a horsewoman, trainer, and competitor. Over the past six years, she has gone from working student to full-time employee to running her own business.

BEN RADVANYI

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BOYD MARTIN AN AMERICAN COMES HOME oyd Mar tin relocated to the United States from Australia in 2007 to pursue his dream of competing in international three-day eventing. As the son of an American citizen, he has always enjoyed dual citizenship, and in 2009 he officially began representing the United States in international competition. Boyd was the top-finishing U.S. rider at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2014 and member of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Eventing Team. In January, Boyd and Trading Aces, his 2004 Irish Sport Horse gelding, proved to be unbeatable at the first-ever $50,000 Wellington Eventing Showcase at the Palm Beach Equestrian Center (photo at right). Boyd and his wife, grand prix dressage rider, Silva, own and operate their training business from Cochranville, Pennsylvania.

FLICKR | SMUDGE 9000

HOLLY MATT

SHANNON BRINKMAN

SUSAN STICKLE

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DAVID AND KAREN O’CONNOR LEADERS IN THE SPORT

BUCK DAVIDSON THE AMBASSADOR OF EVENTING

ZARA PHILLIPS A ROYAL RIDER

avid John O’Connor represented the U.S. in two Olympic Games on the three-day eventing team. After his retirement from competition in 2004, David has held top coaching roles for both the U.S. and Canadian national eventing teams, and he was president of the United States Equestrian Federation from 2004 to 2012. In 2009, he was inducted to the United States Eventing Association Hall of Fame.Two of his horses have been granted the same honor. Karen Lende O’Connor began competing internationally in the late 1970s. Her first major placing came at the Badminton CCI**** on March Brown in 1979, and she went on to compete in five Olympic Games. O’Connor Equestrian operates out of The Plains, Virginia, in the summer and Ocala, Florida, in the winter.

uck Davidson has been in the saddle since an early age. While he may be known as the son of eventing legend Bruce Davidson, Buck is very successful in his own right. His many accomplishments on and off a horse make him an outstanding athlete, horseman, competitor, trainer, coach, and clinician. He has represented the United States as a member of the team competing at the Pan American Games and World Equestrian Games, and was shortlisted for two Olympic games.  Buck was named one of the top five U.S. riders for four years, and he has ranked in the top 10 of the world. He won the Pinnacle Trophy at the Rolex Kentucky ThreeDay Event twice. Buck runs a training and competition facility during the winter in Ocala, Florida, and the summers in Riegelsville, Pennsylvania. (See feature on the following page.)

ara Phillips, the second-eldest grandchild of Queen Elizabeth II, is the second child of Princess Anne and her first husband, Captain Mark Phillips. In 2006, she was voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year, after winning the Eventing World Championship in Aachen, Germany. She was also appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire in 2007 for her services to equestrianism. Though Zara had been announced as a member of the British team for the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, her horse, Toytown, suffered an injury in training that required her to withdraw. This was her second attempt at participating in the Olympics, after a similar unfortunate situation before the Olympics in 2004. Finally, as a member of the Great Britain eventing team, she won a silver medal at the 2012 London Olympics, where she was presented the medal by her mother.

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COMPETITORS

STOCKIMAGE SERVICES.COM

Above: Buck Davidson on Reggie, competing at the 2014 Rolex. Below: Bruce Davidson and his son, Buck.

FEATURED: BRUCE “BUCK” DAVIDSON JR. (SEE PREVIOUS PAGE)

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ridden with such notables as Andrew Nicholson and Mark Todd. “My dad was a role model, but Andrew was always big for me because of his work ethic and sheer determination. I’ve been so lucky to have these people in my life.”

KENTUCKY EQUINE RESEARCH

hen talking to Buck Davidson about his success, the constant theme is how humble and modest he is. He is quick to say how lucky he has been, and how grateful he is to his hardworking team and the wonderful owners behind him. In an interview with Eventing Nation, Buck said, “I am super lucky that I get to do for a job what most people do for a hobby, and people trust me with their horses.” The only thing he ever seems to take credit for is working hard, but even then he says, “I love what I do and the people I work with. We’re like a big family, so it really doesn’t seem like work to me.” He credits the coaches he has had over the years for teaching him not only to ride, but also other life lessons, like his work ethic. “So much in the sport is up to chance, the only thing I can really control is how hard I work, so I put everything I have into it, and so far it seems to have worked for me.” When talking about mentors, he first mentions his father, Bruce Davidson, the two-time Olympic event rider. Buck also has

And Buck certainly does work hard. Leading his team of 60 horses, he may ride as many as 15 at one event. His team travels around the county to compete at various events that he chooses carefully to meet the needs of the horses and his students. His goal is always to offer a positive experience for everyone involved. Watching Team BDJ arrive at an event is an impressive sight. An entourage of gleam-

ing white tractor-trailers and matching pickup trucks roll up, and working students and grooms jump out. They all know their tasks and work together, and before you know it, the horses are happily munching hay in their stalls. No story about Buck would be complete without mentioning his relationship with his top horse, Carl and Cassie Segal’s Ballynoe Castle RM, an Irish sport horse gelding, known as Reggie in the barn. The horse had impressed a friend of Buck’s when he saw him as a 5-year-old in Ireland, but Buck almost passed on him because of a poor flexion test at the initial vetting. Luckily, instinct told him to have the horse re-examined by Brendan Furlong, head vet for the U.S. Eventing Team. Fortunately, Furlong approved the purchase of the horse, and he went on to earn the title of the highest-scoring event horse in the country. Buck has ridden Reggie throughout his career from the preliminary level onward. He completed his first three-star competition in 2008 and has won top placings at numerous national and international competitions. He says, “Everyone thinks his or her horse is perfect, but


THE SOURCE FOR EVENTING HORSES Whether you are at a four-star event or an event at a local horse park, if you look at the roster of horses competing in any division, you are certain to see the prefix Fernhill in front of some of the names. This means these horses have been carefully selected, trained, or bred at the Fernhill yard in Kilkenny in southeastern Ireland. The owner, Carol Gee, took a few minutes to speak with EQ. What traits of Irish sport horses make them so suited for eventers? The Irish spor t horse (ISH) is renowned for its incredible temperament and rideability. They are a very tough and sound breed. Sometimes they are late to mature, but they have long careers, often eventing into their 20s. They can suit a great variety of riders, and those that do not make it to the top level are suitable for the amateur.  Do you deal exclusively with them? I sell mainly ISH for all the reasons stated above. However I will buy a horse anywhere if I see a nice one! Fernhill Urco that was second in Rolex was a horse I bought in Por tugal.  Above: Buck, Reggie, and Kathleen Blauth-Murray at her wedding.

Reggie IS nearly perfect. He is beautifully put together, talented, willing, and like a big pet dog, but he is all business at competitions. He’s a real professional. He knows when it’s game time, and he gets in his zone. Reggie gives his best effort every time out. I often say to myself midcourse, ‘I can’t believe I get to ride this horse!’” Buck also wants us to know how lucky he is to have Kathleen Blauth-Murray working with him to take care of Reggie. Kathleen rode Reggie down the aisle on her wedding day, and the horse calmly stood with Buck while she exchanged her vows. Buck feels strongly about giving back to the sport. Between competitions he travels the country to do clinics with aspiring riders and to attend smaller venues. Buck also shares a love and admiration of animals, from the horses he trains to his sidekick Jack Russell terrier. He serves on the board of FlyPups, a non-profit that is dedicated to transporting dogs to nonkill shelters where they can be prepared for adoption. It is clear that the sport of eventing is fortunate to have Buck as its ambassador.

How did you get started doing this? I rode from a very young age. My mother bought me ponies to keep me out of trouble. My father was amazing and spent all his spare time with us on the road. It was an expensive spor t, so we sold ponies to fund it. I just kept doing that until it eventually grew into Fernhill Spor t Horses. Where do you find them? Do you breed? I buy from many of the same breeders year after year. They have learned what I like and I have gotten to know the bloodlines that suit my job. We used to breed; my Mother loved the young stock. However, I learned early on that you can buy what you like, but you have to take what comes out when you breed. So I buy most of my horses as youngsters 3 or 4 years old. I have spotters all over Ireland that call me on a regular basis when they see something they know I’ll like. What do you look for in a horse? When I am looking for an event horse, attitude and temperament are very impor tant. I like to see a horse with purpose. One that marches out of his stall and is interested in his surroundings. Then, of course, they have to have three good paces, uphill confirmation, and a sharp front end when jumping. I like to see two crosses of Thoroughbred in the pedigree. 

Where are your customers? From all corners of the globe. Last year Fernhill expor ted horses to China, Sweden, Germany, Russia, Portugal, Belgium, and Poland. However the majority of our horses go to the U.S. and Italy. Irish horses are really well suited to American clients, and they easily adapt to a variety of climates.  How do you match customers to horses when you have never met them? A lot of my business these days is from repeat clients, so that’s easy. Over the years I have learned what suits each client or trainer.  With video and the internet these days, I can soon build a picture of what new clients are looking for, but we have such a variety of horses in the barn we usually have something to suit everyone.  How does it feel when you see the roster at big events with so many Fernhill horses entered? Extremely exciting! I love to open my email on a Monday morning and read messages and see photos from all over the world about my horses’ achievements the previous weekend. There is a new rule now that requires anyone registering a horse with a prefix or suffix to pay an additional fee, so this could change the look of the scoreboard a bit.  Do you have any suggestions for someone interested in coming to try your horses? We can pick up anyone at the airpor t and bring them to Fernhill. Car rental is inexpensive in Ireland for those who want to see a bit of the countryside, or I can organize a trip for them to see some Irish sights. We have an abundance of hotels in and around the city. The Kilkenny River Cour t is a beautiful hotel overlooking the castle. The Lyrath Estate has a lovely spa. Also not far is the renowned Mount Juliette Hotel, golf club, and spa for those that want to be a little indulgent.

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MOROCCO SEE PAGE 68

AMAZING ESC APES

ITALY SEE PAGE 70


SCOTLAND SEE PAGE 67

F O R H O R S E L OV E R S E Q’S S EC O N D A NN UA L T R AV E L FEATUR E: F RO M M A R R A K ECH TO MON TA NA , F RO M D E C AD E N T TO ROUG H IN G IT.

ARIZONA SEE PAGE 72


T H E I N N AT D O S B R I S A S , T E X A S

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he Inn at Dos Brisas, tucked quietly between Houston and Austin, Texas, amidst 313 acres of rolling hill country, welcomes guests in impeccable style. Once a family ranch retreat, it has evolved into a highly esteemed, all-inclusive, five-star luxury resort. Its charming character and seamless blend of sumptuous surroundings and rustic flavor makes Dos Brisas an irresistible destination. The inn is an idyllic choice for guests looking for a quiet escape or an action-packed getaway. Visitors with an equestrian experience in mind will be thrilled with the range of options. Guided trail-rides throughout the ranch grounds are a popular choice for guests with basic riding experience, and romantic carriage rides, punctuated with picnic lunches and wine, speak to those looking for a way to unwind. B R I N G YO U R HORSE

The resort is now home to the second largest privately owned indoor riding arena in Texas and is available to guests and the public. Private and group lessons are offered as well as boarding for those traveling with their horses.

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SUMPTUOUS SETTINGS AND RUSTIC FLAVOR ARE A WINNING BLEND.

For more relaxing pursuits, an additional array of recreational choices await. Golf, biking, tennis, and clay shooting embody the sporting side of the resort. After an exhilarating day of athletic endeavors, you’ll want to schedule time to reward yourself with a soothing spa treatment by the private plunge pool. For an urban-themed day trip, consider taking a short drive to Houston to explore the plethora of cultural venues, museums, and upscale shopping. FIV E-STAR RESTAU RA NT

Unique to this intimate resort is the on-site Forbes fivestar rated restaurant—the only restaurant in Texas to have earned this award. Delectable ingredients cultivated on acres of the resort’s organic farmland yield innovative culinary creations overlaid with a hint of Texas flair. Your inner oenophile is bound to be indulged by the staggering wine collection that awaits your sampling. At the end of the day, guests can retreat to a private hacienda or casita outfitted in ultimate luxury. Dos Brisas embraces the indoor-outdoor experience, and each room features French doors that open onto a private patio and the PAGE 94 tranquil views beyond.


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he Gleneagles Hotel, resting high atop the pinnacle of grand bastions, exudes old world charm and flawless attention to detail. This five-star hotel in Perthshire, Scotland, surrounded by 850 acres of beautiful countryside, offers an unparalleled escape for the discerning traveler and anyone who loves the great outdoors. Golfers consider Scotland synonymous with the sport, and Gleneagle’s three championship golf courses—regarded among the best in the world—offer avid players a winning blend of beauty and challenge. Other outdoor skills can be tested in falconry, archery, off-road driving, and gun-dog school. Children are invited to enjoy a multitude of sports, games, and even a spy school. A R I D E R ’ S D R EAM

This destination is above all a horse-rider’s dream. The equestrian school, complete with fully accredited coaches, offers lessons in every discipline of horsemanship from beginner to expert, and all takes place at the on-site, 50-acre facility. Introduction to polo is available along with carriage-driving packages for those who would rather drive than ride. Although grand in style, each of the luxury accommodations has an individual personality more typical of an intimate hotel. A day of venturing off the grounds should be set aside for excursions to nearby castles and palaces, or through the Dalwhinnie Distillery where tours include a range of single malts paired with artisanal chocolates from the Highland Chocolatier. What a perfect way to indulge in local tradiPAGE 94 tions!

A TIMELESS ELEGANCE GREETS THE DISCERNING TRAVELER.

G L E N E AG L E S , S C OT L A N D


SELMAN MARRAKECH, MOROCCO

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arrakech, a city that enchants visitors with culture, history and magic, is known for the vibrant maze of markets that line the narrow streets of the Moroccan Medina. Souks, with their riotous displays of carpets, tapestries, baskets, and exotic spices, tempt shoppers from around the world. Just minutes from this bustling hub of one of Africa’s busiest cities is Selman Marrakech, a five-star luxury hotel renowned for its refined atmosphere and flawless blend of modern lifestyle and Moroccan tradition. At the foot of the Atlas Mountains, what once seemed like a mirage is now a distinct palace of alluring Moorish charm. Selman Marrakech is a family-owned business that reflects their unique combination of passions for horses and the hospitality industry. “Just as palaces showcase pieces of art, we have decided to go for a live installation of the most beautiful breed of horse in the world, the Arabian Thoroughbred, which is an integral part of our history and culture,” said owner Abdellam Bennani Smires. Bennani Smires entrusted the design of the hotel and onpremises horse farm to famous French architect and interior designer, Jacques Garcia.

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WHAT WAS ONCE MERELY A MIRAGE IS NOW A PALACE OF ALLURING CHARM.

“We wanted to create a place to be and live and to generate a unique experience, whose soul is part of the history and heritage of Morocco,” added Bennani Smires. The hotel offers guests a variety of sumptuous accommodations and amenities, including superior and deluxe rooms, generous suites, and one- and two-bedroom Riads complete with private gardens, pools, and butler service. Favorites among the guests are the private alcoves and terraces that create a sense of utter privacy and escape. The Garcia-designed stables boast 16 stalls, four outdoor paddocks, and a garden for private events. “I wanted to offer people the chance to gain access and to share this otherwiseclosed equitation world,” said Bennani Smires. Be sure to reserve restorative time at the hotel’s Henri Chenot signature spa after a full day of exploring. It offers some of the most innovative approaches to well-being in the region. There are several restaurants and bars throughout the hotel, serving French, Asian, Mediterranean, Moroccan, and international cuisine. If you are traveling with children, “Selman Kids” offers a program that treats children to magical moments of fun and PAGE 94 learning.


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ontana is undeniably a rider’s paradise. Its wide-open views, sagebrush hillsides, and alpine peaks against azure skies are best seen on horseback. Located in Philipsburg, Montana, halfway between Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, the Ranch at Rock Creek experience combines adventure with the spirit of play. Travelers can thoroughly immerse themselves in the culture of western Montana rather than observe it through the slats of a corral. Hosted by knowledgeable guides, adventurers of all levels of expertise can traverse mountains, ranchland, and wildflower meadows in the extensive outdoor activities program that includes horseback riding, target shooting, fly fishing, hiking, mountain biking, and a ropes course. The Ranch at Rock Creek isn’t a nose-to-tail property. With 6,600 acres to explore and miles of trails to enjoy, there is ample room to spread out. Trail rides vary based on rider ability. Novice riders may prefer shorter excursions, while more advanced riders should plan to take advantage of half or full days of the ultimate Western riding experience. For equestrians looking to gain

TRY MONTANA “GLAMPING” IN AN UPSCALE, STREAM-SIDE CABIN.

skills in reining, cutting, roping, and more from National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) professionals, look into the five-day horsemanship clinic offered May 13-17, 2015. Contact welcome@theranchatrockcreek.com for additional information. Part of the five-star luxury experience is to have all the necessary accoutrements for an authentic western-style adventure at your fingertips. The resort’s rod and gun club can outfit even the slickest of city dwellers with cowboy hats, boots, riding helmets, and more. Evening tours of the ranch can be enjoyed from an original Wells Fargo stagecoach or on a sleigh ride pulled by Percherons through pristine winter snow. The ranch offers guests myriad luxurious accommodations, including Granite Lodge rooms, authentic log cabins, and unique private homes. The definitive Montana “glamping” experience can be enjoyed in one of the delightful canvas cabins situated along the property’s trout stream. Each accommodation at this relaxed haven is as distinctive as it is magnificent, just like the Montana PAGE 94 landscape.

T H E R A N C H AT R O C K C R E E K , M O N TA N A

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A guest takes in the view of the village from the infinity pool. Top right: Exploring the estate on horseback is idyllic. Below: Il Borro wines age to perfection.

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I L B O R R O, T U S C A N Y

nter the gates to Il Borro and you will be pleasantly transported into another world. The estate and medieval village of Il Borro, weathered by time and historic events, has been fully restored to its former glory and now shines like a jewel in a Tuscan crown. At the core of this stunning preservation is the Ferragamo family, known for its luxury-leather empire. Earlier dynasties such as the Medicis and the Savoys have also taken turns safeguarding the Il Borro domain. The 700-acre estate in the heart of Tuscany is surrounded by natural beauty. Olive trees, vineyards, and cypresscovered hillsides all contribute to the iconic image of the province. Il Borro, in the center of the Chianti region, takes claim to the first recorded Chianti production. With great pride the Ferragamos operate a thriving wine-making business that turns out award-winning varietals. Equestrians can enjoy trail riding through the enchanting landscape or taking a leisurely carriage ride through Chianti. Tennis, golf, and biking are also ideal options for soaking in the gorgeous backdrop. Museum tours and trips to observe local artisans at work are available, along with visits to Florence, Sienna, and other nearby medieval villages. 70 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

THE FERRAGAMO FAMILY HAS RESTORED IL BORRO TO ITS FORMER GLORY.

Accommodations are a perfect synthesis of contemporary design and traditional Tuscan style and run the gamut from beautifully appointed suites to exclusive villas and farmhouses in the heart of Il Borro’s countryside. Meals are meant to be savored in Italy, and the resort celebrates this culinary heritage by offering a unique range of modern Tuscan cuisine, light fare, and informal bistro meals, all served in inviting cosmopolitan settings. The spa, complete with an infinity pool overlooking the estate, offers myriad treatments and programs tailored to each guest. This is truly a calm oasis in an incredibly seductive environment. A variety of private culinary and wine-touring day trips can be readily arranged for visitors. Traveling throughout the region is a great way to fully experience a slice of authentic Tuscan culture and cuisine. Full-day wine tours to choice vineyards in nearby regions will offer discussions about wine production and the art of identifying the nuances of various Tuscan wines. Tuscany also produces some of the finest cheeses and olive oils in Italy. Stopping at a local osteria to engage in conversation and sample these earthly delights will certainly be PAGE 94 time well spent.


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xploring the world may be fun, but don’t your horses deserve a getaway too? You can bring your horses with you to the 400-acre Grand Oaks Resort near Ocala, in the heart of Florida’s horse country. You’ll have a comfy private cottage, and they’ll have their own barn and paddocks. Although some guests bring 20 horses, the average guest travels with 2 to 6. Many of the 29 cottages have been designed so you can look directly into the attached cozy barns from your bedroom and check on your horses. The cottages range from one to six bedrooms, and some offer separate accommodations for grooms. For horse people who prefer to travel in luxury RVs with their animals, the resort offers 45 premium slips. Horse boarding options include self-board, full-board, and groom rentals. Grand Oaks shares the lush, moss-draped grounds with the Florida Carriage Museum, one of the world’s largest

Above: Tom Warriner, Grand Oaks general manager, takes EQ editor Stephanie Peters for a drive. Below, one of the private cottages that include its own barn, paddock, and fenced patio that keeps your dogs nearby.

collections that is open to the public. (See the EQ Winter 2014 issue.) The resort was originally a go-to destination for carriage drivers. Now under the ownership of Tom Golisano, the billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist, the property is becoming a tropical escape for equestrians of all disciplines. With over $3 million invested in footing and irrigation alone, there are facilities for dressage, reining, polo, racing, and hunter jumper shows. A 54,000-square-foot indoor arena with flexible footing, as well as outdoor arenas, cross-country and jump courses, and polo fields have just been added. Besides the numerous nearby golf courses and the attractions of the Ocala area, there is an on-site salon, spa, Orvis outfitter, bar, and restaurant just a short stroll or ride away. Stay for a week or stay for months, because Grand Oaks Resort is an equestrian destination unlike any other. PAGE 94

G R A N D OA K S R E S O RT, F L O R I DA

MANY GUESTS STAY MONTHS AT A TIME. IT BECOMES THEIR HOME AWAY FROM HOME.

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A PERSONAL

T R AV E L D I A RY

TA N Q U E V E R D E , A R I Z O N A

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THE EQ TEAM TAKES A CITY SLICKER’S ESCAPE TO A TUCSON, ARIZONA, RANCH.

BY JILL NOVOTNY PHOTOS BY GEORGE KAMPER

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live in Brooklyn, New York, and ran the New York City Marathon the day before flying to visit Tanque Verde ranch in Tucson, Arizona. The marathon is a unique experience. It summarizes the intensity of New York and life here: overwhelming, energizing, diverse, crowded, and highly competitive. It’s intense enough to walk the streets on a normal day; to run them with crowds of thousands is an amazing experience. A day later, when I stepped off the plane in Arizona and hobbled down the steps to baggage claim, I was met by Jeff, who welcomed me warmly and began a fascinating lecture describing the culture, history, environment, and vegetation of the area and that lasted the 40-minute shuttle-van ride. Because it was dark, he pulled over to shine the headlights on various plants and trees. I arrived at the ranch later than the others, and it seemed quieter and darker than any place I could remember. I was definitely not in New York City anymore.

Below: George Kamper and Jill Novotny

A M ERICA’S LARGEST

Tanque Verde is the nation’s largest working dude ranch. It is nestled among the Rincon Mountains of Arizona and bordered on two sides by Saguaro National Park. The ranch spans 640 acres dotted with ponds and crisscrossed by a huge network of trails. There are currently about 150 horses that are herded into corrals each morning and saddled up for guests to ride. In the last 175 years, the ranch has been an important landmark for the area. It changed owners only three times. The first owner, Don Emilio Carrillo, bought the ranch in 1856, just after the land was transferred to the U.S. from Mexico. In 1904, it was raided by bandits, and Carrillo was hung from a beam in what is the card room at the ranch today. Cattleman Jim Converse bought the ranch from Carrillo’s son and built the present day ramada in the 1920s to welcome eastern visitors. During a bar-room brawl, Converse accidentally shot a Mexican cowboy. His troubles with the law led him to sell the ranch to Brownie Cote. Brownie’s son Bob and his wife, Rita, are around the ranch nearly every day and are well-known to ranch guests. I awoke the next morning as the sun rose on the chilly desert and joined George Kamper, EQ’s photography director, for a hearty breakfast before our first ride. We entered Continued on page 90 SP R I N G | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 73


TANQUE VERDE GALLERY

EQ’s photography director, GEORGE KAMPER,

The West has long fascinated George, who has

and deputy editor, Jill Novotny, recently spent a few

assembled a gallery of his favorite “cowboy” images

days at Tanque Verde, a guest ranch in Tucson, Arizona.

from this trip. You can also see his full cowboy

(See page 72.)

gallery (that includes his visit with Lyle Lovett last year in Texas and an excursion to a ranch in Moab, Utah) at tinyurl.com/EQ-cowboys

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HORSES

HOLLY MATT

WA R M T H

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GOLF

COURTESY PINEHURST RESORT

SOUTHERN PINES S

outhern Pines, in the heart of the North Carolina Sandhills, is a prime destination for horse people and golfers alike. Equestrians are drawn to the soft, sandy footing and the large, welcoming, and diverse horse community. Golfers revere neighboring Pinehurst. In fact, golfers are as numerous as horses, with 43 courses within a 15-mile radius. And everyone appreciates the temperate winter weather with typical January days in the 60s.

WITH HOLLY MATT AND CARLY NEILSON

At the heart of the equestrian community is the 4,000acre Walthour-Moss Foundation (WMF), with its beautiful, signature longleaf pines. According to Stephen Later, the chairman of the foundation, “WMF is a defiant remnant of the longleaf pine forests and savannas that once dominated our country’s southeastern coast. It’s a place to escape quotidian concerns and find acres in which to ride and sense the Continued on page 85


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sights and sounds that greeted travelers, from Siouan Indians to Highland Scots, in centuries past.” Adding to the draw of Southern Pines is the 250-acre Carolina Horse Park, which holds events attracting international-caliber competitors in hunter jumper, dressage, eventing, and combined driving. Horse people who come to visit enjoy 192 permanent stalls, 6 championship-level cross-country courses, show rings, trails, a derby field, and a steeplechase track that hosts the annual Stoneybrook Steeplechase.

Opposite 1. The grounds of the 250-acre Carolina Horse Park. 2. The exciting Stoneybrook Steeplechase. 3. The very active Moore County Hounds hunt and conserve the Southern Pines area. 4. Will Faudree competing in a three-phase event. 5. Combined driving competition at the Carolina Horse Park. 6. Jumpers compete at the Carolina Horse Park. Below: The Walthor Moss Foundation is the local favorite place for a hack and one of Southern Pines’ main draws for equestrians.

world. Vermont eventer Gayle Davis recently purchased a small winter getaway there and says, “I had been traveling to Southern Pines during the cold New England winters since 2006. I recently bought a tiny farm right across the street from my coach, Denny Emerson. What a fun area to ride, take advantage of the climate, and enjoy all the great restaurants and shops! I don’t think you can match the area for beauty, small-town friendliness, and horse activities.”

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CAROLINE YOUNG

he area draws full-time residents as n its inaugural year, 2014, the Carolina well. Dr. Jim Hamilton of SouthInternational built a world-class eventing ern Pines Equine recalls making venue, and they are setting the bar even the town his home, “After 20 higher in 2015. There will be increased years in the horse world in New numbers of competitors, prize money York and Ohio that didn’t allow much time to upwards of $75,000, and a generous dose raise a family, we started the hunt for a horse of southern hospitality for owners, sponsors, community that needed what I had to offer and patrons, riders, volat the same time prounteers, and grooms. vided a good family The USEF network environment. Southwill be producing a ern Pines provided all live and on-demand that and more.” video production of Hamilton adds, the international com“In a way I had come petition. home again. Here was For more than a a town that revolved century, Southern around the horse—a Pines has been home thread that bound the to the Moore County community together. Hounds, the oldest It was the diversity of fox hunt in North equestrians that drew Carolina. Witness the me to this town— blessing of the hounds hunter jumpers, on Thanksgiving eventers, combined morning, when the drivers, coaching, hunt holds its opening dressage, western meet. pleasure, and endurResident and top ance riders. It has equestrian architect been my home ever SOUTHERN PINES, NC Holly Matt elaborates, “This is horse since and has thankfully provided me the country like none other in the sense of unique opportunity to do what I love in access on horseback or carriage. You can the best of environments.” $$ ride out of your barn for hours, visit your The town’s magnolia- and azalea-lined 50 31 $350K– $2M 89 69 9 MOS. neighbors, ride to town, ride through streets are always buzzing with activity. AV E R AG E AV E R AG E MONTHS OF DINING, AVERAGE thousands of acres in the foundation, train It’s sprinkled with an array of shops, anJ A N UA RY J U LY DAY COMFORTABLE A RT S , H O R S E FA R M DAY RIDING C U LT U R E PRICE with top trainers, all without getting tique stores, restaurants, and parks. Comin a trailer. And the footing is the best HORSINESS mitted business owners work together to RALEIGH INDEX around.” She finds the location a plus as keep the village vibrant. Chef/owner of 1 well, “It’s an easy drive to top shows up Ashten’s Restaurant Ashley Van Camp CHARLOTTE and down the coast, and it has a train SOUTHERN notes, “We are so lucky to have such a PINES P O P U L AT I O N 13,500 station right in the middle of downtown. viable downtown. We all work to protect RALEIGH, 59 MI. N E A R E S T A I R P O RT You can get to New York or Miami! Very it and nurture it.” 1. The Weather Channel; 2. EQ Editors; 3. Realtor.com; 4. EQ Editors. civilized.” Country Bookshop owner Kimberly Southern Pines horse country hosts some Douglas Taws agrees, “Southern Pines might of the best trainers and breeders in the be the most cosmopolitan small town you 1

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could ever stumble upon. The restaurants rival those in any foodie city. You’ll see horse-drawn carriages drive through town all year long, but the spectacular sight is the carriage parade hosted every year by the Moore County Driving Club. In the fall the entire town gathers on cold, early Thanksgiving morning (with hot coffee and spicy bloody marys) for the Blessing of the Hounds. First Friday was started by three friends who wanted to be able to listen to great music in a setting where their kids could run around and play. Now it is a destination event for six months of the year and draws hundreds of people.” The Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities is the cultural center of Southern Pines. Originally, Weymouth was the 1,200acre estate of the James Boyd family, named for its resemblance to Weymouth, England. Boyd was also a poet and writer. He and his wife, Katharine, entertained literary guests such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, and Sherwood Anderson.

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hen asked about the differences between SOuthern Pines and neighboring Pinehurst, Abigail Dowd, executive director of the Weymouth Center, recalls a letter that Boyd wrote in 1927 to the Raleigh News and Observer attempting to correct an error they made in a story: “Dear Sir, At a single stroke, your powerful newspaper has... ruined my reputation. Although for nearly thirty years I have been a citizen of Southern Pines, you

describe me as coming from Pinehurst. The difference is immense. Pinehurst is a resort visited by golfers; Southern Pines is a town inhabited by foxhunters...You can, therefore, conceive my grief at your misapprehension. Especially when I tell you I am a foxhunter, and that all foxhunters are ex-officio Nature’s noblemen... Golf, on the other hand, is merely the most expensive and depressing form of pedestrianism. It renders its victims on the one hand gloomy and self-pitying, and, on the other, tediously and interminably loquacious. I know of no other practice, except the purchase and consumption of bad liquor, wherein good money can be spent for so pitiable a result...” There may still be a friendly rivalry between the two adjoining towns, but many families include both equestrians and golfers, and the area offers the best for both. As to her own feelings for Southern Pines, Abigail Dowd says, “Southern Pines is a unique oasis of culture and natural beauty. Its vibrant downtown is reminiscent of a New England village set within an urban forest and surrounded by beautiful longleaf pines. There are few places that offer the charm of a small town with so many impressive cultural arts offerings. I sometimes say that Southern Pines is what New England would be if it had grown up in

Above: The Pinehurst resort clubhouse. Opposite: 1. Chef Warren and 2. some of the restaurant’s delicious offerings. 3. Dr. Jim Hamilton of Southern Pines Equine. 4, 5. Walthor Moss Foundation chairman Steven Later and executive director Landon Russell. 6. Pinehurst’s Holly Inn. 7. Ashten’s restaurant chef/ owner, Ashley Van Camp. 8. Ashten’s welcoming entrance. 9. Linda McVicker moved to Southern Pines from Wisconsin in 1998. 10. Equestrian architect Holly Matt designs farms throughout America from her base in Southern Pines. (see “Let there be Light Barn Design” in the Summer 2013 EQ) 11, 12. Abigail Dowd, executive director of the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities.

the South.”   Country Bookshop owner Kimberly Douglas Taws sums it up well, “The worst thing about Southern Pines is that there are too many fun things to do!” PAGE 94

E Q V I S I T S S O UTHERN PINES in Southern Pines, the Jefferson Inn is a busy, bustling place, with a lively crowd and music on the weekends. WHERE TO EAT The Sly Fox Pub is a real English pub with a great beer selection. Ashten’s is the hangout spot for the local horse crowd. The chef is also its owner, Ashley Van Camp, who says, “Our style is traditional but with a twist. We love to take classics and play with them.” The menu is globally inspired with Japanese, Italian, English, and Indian food, just to name

PINEHURST, SP ABERDEEN CVB

WHERE TO STAY There are a range of hotels and inns in both neighboring towns. Pinehurst has the famous Pinehurst Resort, which includes the Carolina Hotel and Holly Inn. The Holly is more cozy, and the Carolina is famous for its huge porch and rocking chairs. The resort offers clay tennis courts, spa services, and, of course, the best golf in the nation. Offering the only downtown accommodations

a few. Chef Warren’s is located on the shady side of Broad Street and crowned with a blue awning hung with baskets of kitchen herbs and colorful flowers. The interior is modeled after a classic Parisian bistro. Chef Warren is internationally recognized for his wild game preparations as well as the quality of his fish offerings. Also visit 195 for its great food in a great space. Try the curry. AND MORE Some others of note include: Southern Whey, offering gourmet cheeses and meats; The Country Bookstore, a local favorite; and Hot Asana Yoga, a community institution.

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Continued from page 73

A PERSONAL

T R AV E L D I A RY

TA N Q U E V E R D E , A R I Z O N A a door marked Wranglers Room, and I felt nostalgic for the summer camps of my childhood. We were assigned horses that would be ours for the rest of the trip. I mounted my horse, Red, a rather lazy, steady fellow with an unhurried manner. We set out to a ring, where we English riders learned the Western way to hold the reins and practiced trotting around. When each of us had satisfied the ride leader, we took an easy trail ride through narrow, sandy trails. It looked like the riding at the ranch would be simple group trail rides, slow and relaxing. It wasn’t until later in the ride that I first caught wind of a “lope test.” The phrase was repeated in whispers, until I finally asked one of the other riders about it. She had been coming to the ranch since she was a child and spoke of the tradition with reverence. The lope test, she explained, is the highest level of riding offered at the ranch. Each rider is asked to perform several maneuvers, including a lope, the Western version of a canter. T I M E F O R T H E SPA

When I dismounted, my marathon-weary legs had gone from rubbery and sore to wooden and aching, so I decided to pass on the planned hiking trip for something more therapeutic. An outdoor yoga class sounded perfect. Much like the rest of the ranch, the class was unpretentious but excellent. After an hour of stretching and breathing deeply at the foot of the dramatic Saguaro Hills, I was ready to mount up again. Next on the itinerary was the sunset ride. The landscape opened up, the shrubs turned to sparse cacti, and huge, rocky mountains spread out ahead of us. I sat back into the wide, Western saddle and allowed Red to take me up the 90 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S P R I N G 2015

slight incline to the foot of the hill. “Is anyone afraid of heights?” yelled our guide. Smiling, I expected her to be joking about a hill or an overlook. Instead, we scrambled up and down banks and ledges that I would never have attempted on my Warmblood back home. I was impressed. This was not your average trail ride. I tried my best to stay out of Red’s way as he adeptly pulled me up and over rocks and around each cactus and ditch. I caught glances of wildlife like hares and cactus wrens and remembered what a friend from the Southwest had told me: “If it doesn’t bite, scratch, or sting, then it’s not from Arizona.” As the blue moonlight pushed the last redness to the edges of the sky and darkness arrived, the group’s chatting stopped, replaced with silence. Was everyone else feeling my sense of adventure that bordered on nervousness? Thirty-five minutes later, we returned to the stable under a bright full moon. As soon as our feet were back on the ground, we made for the Dog House Saloon, the ranch’s on-site bar. The simple, square room was alive with conversation. I ordered their signature homemade Prickly Pear Margarita, and we all chatted excitedly about the day’s adventures. TH E L O P E TES T

The next morning, we headed out early for the lope test. I wobbled to the stable like a cartoon cowboy, unable to bend my saddle-sore legs. I feared that the combination of my useless legs and my lazy horse might spell failure in my test. As we lined up on the stable porch, we were told that we were not going to ride the horses we had been riding so far for the test. Murmurs of dissatisfaction spread over the Continued on page 92


Southfields • Wellington, FL

On 3.7 acres and a short hack to either WEF or GDF, this property is perfect for anyone looking for something spectacular. Four large bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and an open living area with a gourmet kitchen offer plenty of space for entertaining and relaxing. The backyard includes a large, screened-in patio with an outdoor kitchen and fireplace, and a swimming pool with hot tub and 100ft lap pool, all of which overlook the wonderful 200' x 130' Rizzo ring. Offered at $6,700,000

Situated on 2.94-acres within the gates of the quiet and cozy Southfields neighborhood is this wonderful property. This home is move-in ready and has four bedrooms and five bathrooms. The kitchen is open and airy and flows into the rest of the house beautifully. Brand new cement and wood floors throughout majority of the home. The large master suite overlooks the lovely outdoor living space and saltwater pool. Offered at $5,250,000

The property has 2.8 acres of land that holds a main house, a guest cottage, a 7-stall barn, large paddocks, a sand ring, and a backyard paradise. The main house is 2Br and 3Ba, with a tranquil backyard that has a pool, outdoor fireplace, and plenty of room for entertaining. The guest cottage has a living area with kitchenette, 1Br, and 1Ba. Offered at $3,900,000

This beautiful 5+ acre property is perfectly situated adjacent to the Palm Beach Equine Clinic. Located within the lovely Southfields neighborhood, this barn is a quick hack to the Global Dressage Festival and the Winter Equestrian Festival. This facility is well-equipped with two, two bedroom, two bathroom apartments, three tack rooms, and three feed rooms. The grounds have 11 paddocks and a round pen. Offered at $3,750,000

Amy Carr • Phone +1 561-662-0728 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.amycarr.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Amy.Carr@evusa.com

©2015 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


Continued from page 90

A PERSONAL

T R AV E L D I A RY

TA N Q U E V E R D E , A R I Z O N A group, but I was glad. There is nothing like a steady and trustworthy horse, but in my condition I was quite ready for one with pep in his step. I mounted the unfamiliar Uno and joined the lineup as we crossed the paddock. The gates swung wildly in the wind, and the hay was picked up and thrown around as if by invisible vandals. I could already feel my horse’s hind end bouncing restlessly as I asked him to halt. I squinted, cowboy style, as my face was coated with a thick layer of dust, and volunteered to go first. At my first motion, my horse leapt into the lope. I spent the four or five strides along the length of the ring learning to steer with one hand and finding my balance in my long stirrups. “And brake!” shouted the wrangler through the wind, and I sat into a halt. Amazingly, I was one of two riders to pass the lope test, and the only one to continue on for a lope ride, which was much like the other trail rides but at a fast gait. Because it was only me and the wrangler, it was easy to settle into a pace and enjoy the ride. Along the way, a few pieces of trash had gathered along the trail, obviously a result of the extreme wind. The rugged cowboy easily jumped off his horse and picked up each piece of trash. I decided then that I loved this place. We picked up a lope down the sandy trails of Saguaro National Park. It was one of the most delightful experiences I can remember on horseback. That night, we walked a path to the cottonwood grove, a stunningly picturesque corner of the ranch where a weekly barbecue dinner is held. A guitar player strummed country tunes next to the bar, where

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we ordered local beers and filled our plates with hearty food right off the huge grill. By the morning of our last day, the routine was already familiar. We arrived at the stables ready for our morning ride and wistfully snapped photos of the warm desert we would be leaving in just a few hours. Our ride took us through a whole new terrain, sandy and open, and ended at an old homestead, where we found an old covered wagon with a sign that read “Bob’s Famous Old West Pancakes.” Famous Bob (photo at left) filled our plates with blueberry pancakes, eggs, and bacon. The picnic tables, covered in checkered tablecloths, were filled by guests of all ages. I overheard a conversation between a family from Brooklyn visiting for a second time and a couple who had returned to the ranch for each of the 33 years they had been married. WA RMTH I S L U X U RY

The uniqueness of Tanque Verde made the experience a luxury. But instead of a luxury resort, it was more like a family gathering—comfortable and unceremonious. Above all, it was a strikingly warm place, which no doubt accounts for the huge percentage of returning clientele. It is a place that feels familiar the instant you arrive. The rich green lawns and waterfall by the pool are opulent and beautiful, but luxury is not the aim. Tanque Verde is a highend resort built on authenticity, history, and warmth. As I exited the airplane and walked slowly down the corridors into the terminal at LaGuardia Airport, I looked down at my dusty cowboy boots and considered speeding up my steps to the usual New York City pace. But my saddle-sore legs would simply not allow it, and I walked on at my own


Are you considering calling Florida home? •

Designed by Blackburn Architects

Two barns with a total of 24 stalls

Sand arena and riding fields

Multiple amenities

Two waterfront homes

Centrally located close to Tampa, Ocala and Orlando

$4,500,000

For additional information on this extraordinary property or to market your home, contact Kimberly Wilson. 813.810.0042 kimberlywilson.premiersothebysrealty.com kimberly.wilson@sothebysrealty.com

Sotheby’s International Realty® and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. Equal Housing Opportunity. Property information herein is derived from various sources including but not limited to county records and the multiple listing service, and may include approximations. All information is deemed accurate.

WALKER’S TRAINING

LASTS A LIFETIME THE ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL is a private, independent boarding and day school for girls in grades 6-12. For over 100 years, The Ethel Walker School has been empowering our students to lead their lives with integrity, confidence, courage, and conviction. We also teach riders to take their performance to the highest level possible in one of the best equestrian programs in the nation. In every discipline, academic or athletic, Walker’s training is a value that endures. Visit ethelwalker.org or contact us at 860.408.4200.

Register now for our

SUMMER RIDING

EXPERIENCE

Simsbury, Connecticut Photo of Hillary Rheinheimer, Head Trainer


EQ R E S O U R C E S

Where to Find It Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

STYLE Page 12 Belts Animo usanimo.com Clever with leather cleverwithleather.com Coach coach.com Deux Chevaux deuxchevauxproducts.com Dimacci dimacci.com Freedmans freedmanharness.com Gaucho Belts gauchobelts.co.uk Hardy & Parsons hardyandparsons.co.uk Nocona bootbarn.com Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com GIVING BACK Page 20 Villa Chardonnay VillaChardonnay.org DINING Page 30 Stable to Table Browncroft Publishing Company browncroftpublishing.com

Equiline equiline.it Goode Rider gooderider.com Kentucky kentucky-reitmode.de Le Fash lefashny.com Noel Asmar noelasmar.com Razzapura razzapura.it Rönner ronnerdesign.com Sarm Hippique sarmhippique.it LANDSCAPE DESIGN Page 46 Jon Carloftis Fine Gardens joncarloftis.com Wade Graham Landscape Studio, LLC grahamstudio.net Janice Parker Landscape Architects janiceparker.com Laurel Roberts Equine Design and Consulting hotstable.com Ten Eyck Landscape Architects teneyckla.com

FASHION Page 42

Morgan Wheelock, Inc. Landscape Architects morganwheelock.com

LA Saddlery lasaddlery.com

EVENTING Page 56

Âme Moi amemoi.com

United States Eventing Association useventing.com

Atelierbits atelierbits.com

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Bromont 450-266-0316 bromontcci.com

Grand Oaks Resort 352-750-5500 thegrandoaks.com

Ashten’s 910-246-3510 ashtens.com

Plantation Field 610-347-2024 plantationfieldhorsetrials. com

SOUTHERN PINES Page 82

Southern Whey 910-692-6329 southernwhey.tumblr.com

Rebecca Farm 406-253-4666 rebeccafarm.org Richland Park 269-629-5532 richlandpark.com Rolex Kentucky ThreeDay Event 859-233-2362 rk3de.org TRAVEL Page 64 The Inn at Dos Brisas 979-277-7750 dosbrisas.com Gleneagles, Scotland Auchterarder Perthshire Scotland PH3 1NF gleneagles.com Tanque Verde Ranch 800-234-3833 800-234-3833 dude@tvgr.com tanqueverderanch.com Selman Marrakech Hotel +212 524 45 96 00 17 KM 5, Route D’Amizmiz selman-marrakech.com The Ranch at Rock Creek 877-786-1545 theranchatrockcreek.com Il Borro +39 055 977053 Località Borro 1 Arezzo, Italy ilborro.it

Pinehurst Golf Course 844-889-1077 pinehurst.com Carolina Hotel pinehurst.com/ accommodations/ the-carolina-hotel Holly Inn pinehurst.com/ accommodations/ the-holly-inn Jefferson Inn 910-692-9911 jeffersoninnsouthernpines. com

Sly Fox Pub 910-725-1621 theslyfoxpub.com 195 910-692-7110 195pinehurstdining.com Chef Warrens 910-692-5240 215 chefwarrensbistro.com Carolina Horse Park 910-875-2074 carolinahorsepark.com Moore County Hounds 910-692-6889

Pegasus Design Group Holly Matt, Architect 303-748-5114 pegasusdesigngroup.com The Country Bookstore 910-692-2037 thecountrybookshop.biz Sweat&Soul Hot Asana Yoga 910-692-9642 hotasanastudio. liveeditaurora.com Walthor Moss Foundation 910-695-7811 Vass, NC 28394 walthour-moss.org Weymouth Center 910-692-6261 weymouthcenter.org


The United States Equestrian Team Foundation Gl adstone • New Jerse y • United States

Supporting Athletes • Promoting International Excellence Building for the Future

Photos by Rebecca Walton / Phelps Media Group, SusanJStickle.com, Sarah Miller for MacMillan Photography

Please help our Now you can donate online!

United States Equestrian Teams Continue to Achieve Competitive Excellence

(908) 234-1251 www.uset.org


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EQ B A R N D O G S

Opposites Attract Violet and Penny, the two lapdogs of STEPHANIE RIGGIO BULGER, president of the Equestrian Aid Foundation, couldn’t be more different.

M

y two dogs, Violet and Penny, are my baby girls. They travel with me wherever I go, from New York City to the farm on Long Island, down to Wellington, and everywhere in between. Yet as much time as they spend together, they could not be more different. Violet is a papillon who became part of my family over 10 years ago, so we essentially have grown up together. I adopted her as a puppy, and she was incredibly wild. The only way that I could tire her out enough to fall asleep at night was to run with her. No matter what time I came home, I would take off my heels and lace up my sneakers, put on her leash, and off we’d go. We were quite the spectacle in the neighborhood! Now she is a little princess who loves nothing more than perching on her pillows. She can be a bit wary of new people—and sometimes even new dogs—but she is extremely attached to her loved ones. Violet does not enjoy being held or cuddled, but she can be rough and tumble. She enjoys running on the beach and in the snow, and she used to even climb over the jumps at the farm. My husband, Mike, and I rescued Penny from Danny and Ron’s Rescue (see the feature on Danny and Ron in EQ Summer 2013). She was a stray found in Palm Beach County and dumped at a kill shelter before Danny and Ron

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Unlike her aloof sister, Violet, Penny is a total love. My biggest fear is that she will one day go home with a deliveryman just so that she can sit in his lap.

saved her. We saw her picture on Facebook and immediately fell in love and adopted her the very next morning. We think that she’s about 3 years old, and a DNA test showed that she’s a Yorkie-Pomeranian, but we still like to refer to her as our street dog. Unlike her aloof sister, Violet, Penny is a total love and simply cannot get close enough to the people she cares about. She often burrows into my lap or even sits on my head while watching television, which is very sweet but can sometimes make working a bit difficult! She loves to play, and if her puppydog eyes don’t convince you to play fetch with her, she will throw and chase toys by herself. My biggest fear is that she will one day go home with a deliveryman just so that she can sit in his lap. She definitely lacks the “stranger-danger” instinct! We are expecting our first two-legged child, and I’m excited to see how Violet and Penny will take to being big sisters. Stephanie Riggio Bulger, a lifelong rider, is president of the Equestrian Aid Foundation, an organization that provides grant-based assistance to horsemen and equine-related professionals suffering from illness or catastrophic injuries. She took over from longtime president R. Scot Evans after he stepped down last March. See our article on The Equestrian Aid Foundation in the Spring 2014 issue.


C U S TO M M A D E TO M A K E A S TAT E M E N T

Shop the Christine A. Moore Millinery Collection Private Appointments Schedule an appointment with Christine to design a custom Derby hat, April 1-2. Call (859) 288-4236.

trunk show Christine A. Moore Millinery, April 3-4.

Keeneland Gift Shop

4201 VERSAILLES ROAD LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

Shop online at KEENELANDSHOP.COM Anisha hat by Christine A. Moore, dress by Sail to Sable. Modeled by Ramsey Carpenter, Miss Kentucky 2014


HERMÈS CAVALE, JUMPING WITH FREEDOM Both technical and athletic, the new Hermès Cavale saddle was designed for top level show jumping with the help of our partner rider, Simon Delestre. With its wide gullet, angled foam-injected panels, and its seamless medium-deep seat, Hermès Cavale combines balance, comfort for horse and rider, and close contact riding. It offers an innovative answer to the search for the perfect feel over fences. Hermes.com

Official USEF riding apparel supplier

Equestrian Quarterly, Vol 4. Issue 1  
Equestrian Quarterly, Vol 4. Issue 1