Issuu on Google+

EQ

PEOPL E | T R AV EL | D E S I G N | FA S HI O N | S T Y L E | D É COR

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

®

EQLiving.com

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017

A FOCUS ON

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017

FASHION DOMINIC AN LUXURY TRAVEL DIARY DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL. 8, 2017

GIVE RIDING THE OLD COLLEGE TRY


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES F E B RUA RY | M A RCH 2 0 1 7

A FOCUS ON FASHION

34

EQ Living’s fashion advisor, Renee Spurge, addresses the question of how brand shapes the collections of our featured mix of equestrian fashion brands and takes a look at where they are headed in 2017.

LITTLE KIDS AND THEIR BIG DOGS

44

A new book is lighting up social media with beautiful photographs featuring the heartwarming relationships between children and their large, four-footed companions.

THE FABRIC OF A MAN

52

44

Alessandro Albanese is the consummate Italian designer who brings his rich heritage and understated aesthetic to every custom piece he designs.

LITTLE KIDS AND THEIR BIG DOGS

LUXE LIFE IN PARADISE

68

A FAMILY AFFAIR

58

Join EQ Living’s senior editor as she takes in the tropical luxury of the Dominican Republic’s Eden Roc Cap Cana resort.

A FAMILY AFFAIR

68

Though some of the property is now open to the public, the fabled Rockefeller Estate in Pocantico Hills, New York, was built for privacy.

CHRISTIAN VÖLKERS

80

The Engel & Völkers real estate firm founder talks about his passion for polo and the property business.

GIVING RIDING THE OLD COLLEGE TRY

84

How can students be prepared for the changing landscape of college equestrian sports?

4 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS F E B RUA RY | M A RCH 2 0 1 7

10

EQ ESSENTIALS

DÉCOR

10

Mix and match your equestrian disciplines with Pomegranate table-top and kitchen linens.

18 24

22

STYLE

18

Royal-warrant holder and maker of bespoke hunt caps, Patey Hats blends technology with tradition in its latest endeavor.

22

As winter turns to mud season, be prepared with muck boots. Whether in search of tall or short, you’ll find myriad options that will keep you warm and dry.

24

Grab one of these well-crafted, roomy, and durable weekender bags, and you’re sure to arrive in impeccable style. FAVORITES

112

30

Out of the Wild, a novel by renowned horseman Mark Rashid, is coming to the silver screen. FOOD/DINING

112

Chef Rick Alabaugh of the Golden Ocala Golf & Equestrian Club shares one of his favorite recipes.

PEOPLE

14

ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Cover model is wearing the Waterlily show shirt in taupe, tropical equestrian by Rönner. Sketches are by Colombian artist, Ricardo Montes.

EDITOR’S NOTE 8 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 113 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 114 Wiz is well-known in Wellington as the spokesdog for the Tackeria.

6 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Singer Ki-Juan Minors stood out at the American Equestrian’s Got Talent competition in Wellington, Florida. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

91

Fabulous farms and ranches plus innovative and economical barn lighting. Erratum: The residence at AMA Estancia shown on page 69 of the December 2016 issue was designed by Selldorf Architects. It was included in the barn-design feature to provide the context of the equestrian and club facilities designed by IM/KM and Sustainable Stables.


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

WELCOME

N

o one would describe my wardrobe as colorful. In fact, it is quite lacking in any hue outside the neutral spectrum of black, gray, beige, and white. Stepping outside of my color-comfort zone may, on occasion, include the addition of a jaunty scarf of vibrant hues—unless, of course, a subdued palette seems better suited for the occasion. In full disclosure, I secretly fantasize that festooned could become part of my fashion vernacular, but I just don’t see that happening. For years, an acquaintance of mine was equally reluctant to introduce color into her wardrobe—until she took on the challenge of adding bits of it into her repertoire piece by piece. She timidly posted photos on Instagram donned in a blue-striped dress one day and a vibrant floral skirt the next. Her body language—not exactly convincing— suggested she felt somewhere between delight and dismay. Her personal brand had always been minimal chic, but ultimately she had the power to redefine it. In this issue, EQLiving’s fashion advisor, Renee Spurge, poses the question of what defines a brand’s distinct identity to our mix of equestrian-apparel and accessory designers. In “A Focus on Fashion,” you’ll discover elegant examples of what symbolizes their brands as you leaf through the pages of images showcasing colors, patterns, exquisite cuts, and technical fabrics that give each brand its signature look. Going with this theme, true colors can manifest themselves as something beyond the traditional spectrum and reveal themselves as noble endeavors. In “Family Affair” and “Philanthropy with a Local Focus,” you’ll meet members of the 8 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Rockefeller family who have immersed themselves in its historic legacy of giving back. Custom-apparel designer Alessandro Albanese, whose color and fabric combinations are staggering, shares the fascinating story of how he transitioned from a career in corporate engineering to the glamorous world of equestrian fashion design—with a few challenges along the way. And once again we live vicariously through our senior editor’s travel diary, as she indulges in the lush settings and accommodations of Punta Cana’s Eden Roc Resort in the Dominican Republic. Horses appear to enjoy the good life as well at Los Establos, Cap Cana’s worldclass equestrian venue. We also get a leg up on navigating the college selection process for those looking for a team-riding program and solid academics. The choices available are considerable, thanks in part to the tireless work of Bob Cacchione, the founder of the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association which is celebrating its 50th year. WARM ING UP

While winter still drapes most of the northern regions in a landscape as colorless as my wardrobe palette, nature is in full bloom in the warm climates that extend from Wellington, Florida, to California. The EQ Living team is off for our annual photography excursions to Wellington and Los Angeles, where we have an exciting lineup of events to attend, celebrities and equestrians to meet, and unique stories to share in upcoming 2017 issues.


Golden Ocala is absolutely the perfect place to spend my day off after a hectic week of horse showing.

AMANDA STEEGE, GOLDEN OCALA EQUESTRIAN LIFESTYLE AMBASSADOR, PROFESSIONAL HUNTER RIDER AND TRAINER

WINTERS IN OCALA HAVE NEVER BEEN BETTER W O R L D E Q U E S T R I A N C E N T E R AT G O L D E N O C A L A Now is the time to take advantage of an exclusive opportunity to become a National Member of Golden Ocala where boots and breeches are always welcome. Enjoy world class amenities such as the 18-hole championship golf course, six Har-Tru Hydro Grid tennis courts, state-of-the-art itness center, three exclusive restaurants, an Equestrian Center and six miles of private riding trails. Golden Ocala has a limited number of National Memberships available! Join now to be a part of the future of equestrian sport in Central Florida. Contact Golden Ocala today at 888.551.0983.

J O I N T O D AY ! M E M B E R S H I P. G O L D E N O C A L A . C O M • 8 8 8 . 5 5 1 . 0 9 8 3

Homes and Lots Available from Townhomes to Equestrian Estates


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

STYLE AND DISCIPLINE AT THE TABLE Mix and match your equestrian disciplines with POMEGRANATE table-top and kitchen LINENS. 2

1

3

4

5

6

1. Show jumping linen cocktail napkins. 5 by 5 inches. Set of four. $40. 2. Hunt club cotton tablecloth with hand-drawn fox hunt scene. 55 by 55 inches. $52. 60 by 90 inches. $88. 3. Thoroughbred linen cocktail napkins. 5 by 5 inches. Set of four. $40. 4. Horse bit cotton hand towel. 18 by 28 inches. Set of two. $25.

10 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

5. Jumper cotton hand towel with embroidery detail. 18 by 28 inches. Set of two. $25. 6. Equestrian stripe cotton napkin. 20 by 20 inches. Set of four. $40. 7. Tack room cotton napkin. 20 by 20 inches. Set of four. $40.

PAGE 113

7


EQ F E B R U A R Y / M A R C H 2 0 1 7

EQ U E S TR I A N

DON’T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE!

LIVING

EQLiving.com

®

VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters SENIOR EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen

IAN R T ES NG EQ U L I V I PE O

EQ

EQ UE

m

STR

ing.co

IAN

EQLiv

DE CE

MB ER

/JA NU

ARY

PL E

| 201 6/2

| TR

| D ES AV EL

IG N

SH | FA

IO N

| ST YL

ÉC E | D

OR

®

DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rebecca Baldridge, Rebecca Didier, LA Pomeroy, Renee Spurge, Chancellor Van Pelt, Sue Weakley, Carrie Wirth

017

LIV ING

H W IT OME RT: AT H A PO R A PP JIL L

R IT E FAVO T V 'S A L IM A N O C AT E A DV

INTERN Emily Holowczak

O P LE

S: R PE P LU N S FO BAR A IN SE S , ID S S AG HOR AS K R ID E FO R ARS D LE ST D SA IX SI D E D PR RAN Y 'S G A D O

NS BAR DEC /JAN

T

201

LAY

DISP

IL FEB.

8, 2017

UNT

6/20 17

T R AV E L | DE SIGN | PE OPL E

STYLE | FA SHION | DEC OR

EQU E S TR I A N L I V I N G

®

PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle, Lane Press TECHNOLOGY Matt Tarsi PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Curtis Circulation Co. GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net

eqliving.com

I have included a check for: (USA only; other countries please use website) $36.95 FOR 2 YEARS | 12 ISSUES

SAVE $46*

NEW SUBSCRIPTION

$19.95 FOR 1 YEAR | 6 ISSUES

EQ LIVING ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla.

RENEWAL

NAME

ADDRESS

STATE

CITY

EMAIL (Required for subscription updates and gift giveaways.)

TELEPHONE (Only in case of problems.)

*Off newsstand price. To pay by CREDIT CARD, please go to www.EQliving.com/subscribe

Mail coupon with your check to: EQ LIVING MAGAZINE BOX ONE BROWNSVILLE, VT 05037

ZIP

EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $19.95 | Canada $36.95. SUBSCRIBE AT EQLIVING.COM/SUBSCRIBE To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: eqliving.com/manage-subscription 212-699-3636 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com © 2017 Wynnwood Media LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are.registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.....

Or use your credit card online: EQliving.com/subscribe Scan to subscribe: DON’T MISS AN ISSUE. Get EQ delivered right to your mailbox.

EQ was chosen OVERALL BEST

Scan to SUBSCRIBE or visit eqliving.com/subscribe

EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American

Barnes & Noble and newsstand distribution:

Horse Publications. CURTIS CIRCULATION COMPANY


Indoor Riding Arenas

Old World Skill & Craftsmanship Quality isn’t a goal; it’s a way of life. At B&D Builders, we are committed to excellence in everything we do; from expert engineering to the choice of quality building materials. With an eye for building design and a careful attention to detail, our craftsmen seek to bring you an equine facility that functions well and looks great for many years to come. You can depend on B&D Builders for professional planning, scheduling and management of your project.

Request a quote at 717.687.0292 or by visiting our website at

CustomBarnBuilding.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | P E O P L E

AMERICAN EQUESTRIANS GOT TALENT “

The talented equestrian KI-JUAN MINORS jumps and sings. BY CARRIE WIRTH WITH SUE WEAKLEY

E

questrian professional Ki-Juan Minors emerged as a standout singing talent the first year of American Equestrians Got Talent (AEGT), and he quickly crooned his way into the hearts of the AEGT audiences in Wellington, Florida. A true Renaissance man, he’s been singing—and riding—his entire life. Originally from Bermuda, Minors had the opportunity to compete at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) in Wellington many years back, and he hasn’t missed a season since. He is a hunter-jumper professional and actively trains and competes. Singing is in Minors’ genes, and the Bermudian community became aware of his talent when he opened a show for mega-star Patty Labelle. “My mom was a singer in a girl group in Bermuda,” Minors said. “My sister and I picked it up from her, and we started a group with a very good friend of mine, my sister, and my two cousins. We were called Silhouette, and we got lots of good 14 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

I think my ideal life is horses during the day and singing at night.

feedback and started getting work doing weddings and entertaining. We also had solo projects here and there. When I got to the U.S, I performed whenever I got the chance.” Minors is now a fixture at AEGT performances, and Robert Dover, chef d’equipe of the U.S. Dressage Team, has been a supporter of the singer since he first heard him years ago at an event called Equestrian Idol. Searching for a way to raise funds to benefit U.S. Equestrian’s High Performance Programs, Dover knew that horse people aren’t just one-trick-ponies, and, using the Equestrian Idol blueprint, he created American Equestrians Got Talent. Now in its third year, the nine weekly auditions showcase talented equestrians who croon, strut, and twirl their way toward a grand prize of $10,000 at the AEGT Finale, slated for March 19 at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival show grounds. “When (Dover) decided to put AEGT together, he contacted me,” Minors said. “AEGT brings awareness to the sport. It


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | P E O P L E

brings the community together, gives them something really fun to do, and it shows that there are other things people are good at besides working with horses. When I performed on such a large platform like at the AEGT Finale, I thought that this is something that I can really see myself doing. That lit the flame.” Minors won the second-place prize at the finale the first year. Inspired by his success with AEGT, Minors began to research other options to boost his singing career. On Instagram, he discovered a program called “A Chance to Shine,” founded by Kalenna Harper of Diddy-Dirty Money, a singer-songwriter and record producer associated with Sean Diddy Combs. The Grammy-nominated artist has written songs for Aretha Franklin, Lady Gaga, and Christina Aguilera. Minors submitted his headshot, background, and demo material for an opportunity to land a record deal. “I thought, ‘There’s no way she’s going to look at this,’” he said. “A month later, I got a call back. They said they were interested, and I was accepted.”

M

inors sang the national anthem at the 2015 Rolex Central Park Horse Show. A month later, he met Harper for the first time in Atlanta, and he’s been clearing the jumps toward success ever since. “I just finished my second record with her,” he said. “I’ve created three more songs, and I have plans to go back to her. She’s been awesome. She’s a wonderful coach and

16 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

mentor. Her work ethic is something that I want to emulate.” Currently, Minors is working on his extended play he’s named Triangle after the three main musical-genre influences that make up his sound. “Since I am from Bermuda, I have that Caribbean influence,” Minors said. “I love my oldschool R&B—my love songs. It’s the music I grew up with—the music my mom sang to me as a kid. The third point of the triangle is new-age, uptempo, dance, get-the-kids-moving music.” He added, “If you write your own songs, your music will outlive you. Music is my mark, it’s my legacy.”

H

is first single, “Tropical Baby,” is available for purchase and is playing on internet radio across the country in major cities like New York, Miami, and Chicago. His musical career is now managed by Tony Atlanta and promoted by Crowd Control Music. “Everyone’s question is, ‘Why aren’t you on the big radio stations yet?’ It’s plain and simple. It’s a question just like, ‘Where’s my grand prix horse?’ It’s expensive. That is just the reality,” he said. Minors says that the support from the international equestrian community and the people of Bermuda have opened his eyes to what is possible. He plans to record in Atlanta on Mondays, be back to show on Wednesdays and to compete all 12 weeks of the WEF season—a medley of horses and song that is music to his ears. “I think my ideal life is horses during the day and singing at night,” he said. PAGE 113 “I’ll get there.”


BEAUTY IS TIMELESS. SO IS A SUPERIOR CONCRETE FENCE.

ď …ď † Superior Concrete Products manufactures and installs premium concrete fences and sound barriers. Our fences have the natural look of wood, brick, and stone - that adds to property value and provides a long lasting barrier against natural elements. Visit ConcreteFence.com to learn more or call 817-277-9255.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF PATEY HATS

EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

FIT FOR ROYALS BY REBECCA BALDRIDGE

Royal-warrant holder and maker of bespoke hunt caps, PATEY HATS blends technology with tradition in its latest endeavor.

M

y head is unusually small. I discovered this fact when I became a rider and then a polo player. When I attempted to buy a hat, my size was never in stock. The issue was driven home when my helmet dropped over my eyes during a critical moment in a polo match. Blinded and hanging precariously from the side of a galloping horse, I cursed my ill-fitting headgear. Then, one May day outside London at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, hope was born anew. I discovered Patey Hats. Although Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth may ride wearing only an Hermès headscarf, she has granted her royal warrant to Patey, maker of bespoke riding hats, top hats, ceremonial hats, and military headwear. The bespoke Patey hunt cap is an icon in the equestrian world. Each cap is built by hand employing a painstaking process

Top: Patey polo helmets; Above: An elegant choice for a countryside hack.

that hat-makers have used for more than 300 years. Patey’s craftsmen use this same traditional approach to make their polo helmets, top hats, and ceremonial headgear. The company’s ceremonial headwear traces its roots to the late 17th century when the Corne family, Huguenots fleeing a repressive French regime, set up shop in what is now Southwark, one of the oldest parts of London. During a recent visit to the Patey factory, I saw firsthand how the company is combining traditional methods with modern technology to meet the needs of today’s equestrians. According to CEO James Bebbington, the traditional bespoke Patey hunt cap is sculpted to the exact size and unique shape of each individual head. This results in a tight and perfect fit and a hat that moves with the rider’s head in the event of a fall, affording greater protection. The challenge, however, is that competition regulations now require helmets continued on page 20

18 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


FEI WORLD CUPtm FINALS OMAHA 2017

MARCH 29 – APRIL 2 CENTURYLINK CENTER | OMAHA, NEBRASKA

THE EQUESTRIAN EVENT OF THE YEAR IS GOING TO BE THE PARTY OF THE YEAR! You won’t want to hear about how great it was and wish you had been there! JOIN 60,000 ATTENDEES FOR AN EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME: 70 OF THE WORLD’S TOP JUMPING AND DRESSAGE HORSES FIVE DAYS OF ACTION-PACKED COMPETITIONS IN A WORLD-CLASS, STATE-OF-THE-ART CONVENTION CENTER FREE HORSE EXPO FEATURING: CLINICS AND DEMOS BY OLYMPIC RIDERS WATCH THE ATHLETES PREPARE IN THE WARM-UP ARENA SHOP YOUR FAVORITE EQUESTRIAN BRANDS AT MORE THAN 150 VENDOR BOOTHS ENJOY LIVE BANDS AND ENTERTAINMENT CHEER ON YOUR FAVORITE CELEBS AT THE PONY GAMES EXPLORE THE FAMILY-FRIENDLY HORSE DISCOVERY ZONE MEET THE HORSES AT THE RUNZA GALLERY OF BREEDS SHOP, EAT, DRINK AND PARTY ‘TIL 11:00 PM THURSDAY – SATURDAY NIGHT!

Don’t miss out on the time of your life. Reserve your place today! For hotel reservations, tickets, event schedules and additional information, visit:

OmahaWorldCup2017.com FOR VIP SEATING CALL 402-930-3079

LO OK F OR EQ U EST R I AN L I VI N G AT T HE OM A HA WOR L D C U P


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

Below: The traditional velvet-covered hunt cap is a beloved icon, but the new Patey PROtector (far right) meets U.K. health and safety standards and is approved for competition wear.

Center: Patey’s conformiture is more than 130 years old.

continued from page 18

to meet safety-certification standards. Certification requires batch testing—a process that for obvious reasons cannot be applied to bespoke hats. Patey addressed this challenge through its recent merger with PROtector, a maker of carbon-fiber safety helmets that meet the highest standards of competition regulation. The result is the Patey PROtector, a helmet with a carbon-fiber, reinforced outer shell and a high-density liner that can withstand significant impact. The new PROtector range of hats holds the SNELL E:2001 accreditation, which is the highest manufacturing safety standard. While the PROtector is an indisputably beautiful helmet, the traditional bespoke Patey remains the sine qua non of riding hats for many, particularly among the hunting set. It takes approximately six weeks to build a hunt cap, explains Ian Harding, studio manager at Patey. The process begins by measuring the client’s head with a 19th-century conformiture, an antique apparatus that looks like the illegitimate offspring of a medieval torture device and a steampunk top hat. When fitted over the head, the conformiture creates a card that denotes the shape and size of the head. This card is then fitted into another antique device called a conformalyn, which expands the

pattern to create a wooden model of the measured head. Helmets are made from goss, or cotton calico, coated with a material called coodle. Traditionally, the coodle was made from crushed beetle shells, urine, and mercury. Next, the goss is ironed on to the block, a painstaking, weeks-long process that requires several rounds of drying

20 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

While Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth rides hatless, Prince Charles sports a Patey of his own. In royal processions, the coachmen, outriders, and many of the military escorts all wear Pateys.

on the block. In earlier times, the ironing process created toxic mercury oxide. Hatters tended to have short careers due to the effect of inhaling the toxic fumes, thus giving rise to the phrase “mad as a hatter,” which stems from the hatmaking trade. Once the hat is completely dry, it’s ready for the hand-finishing process. Patey artisans cover the hat with velvet, hand stitch the lining, and trim the cap with the traditional ribbon on the back. Patey also does an extensive business in military hats and ceremonial hats for the Royal Household. According to Harding, since so much of Patey’s business comes from the government and is funded by taxpayers, the company feels strongly about using all-English materials whenever possible. While there are some materials that can only be sourced abroad, Patey remains mindful of ethical sourcing and recycles unused materials. Whether you’re hunting with the hounds, attending the passing out at Sandhurst, or enjoying a royal procession or the Lord Mayor’s parade, you’re certain to encounter a sea of Patey hats. For fans of traditional English craftsmanship, nothing beats a Patey. After witnessing the work that goes into creating a bespoke hat, I’m looking forward to my next trip to London and getting meaPAGE 113 sured for one of my own.


CURATED EQUESTRIAN LUXURY We are proud to partner with:

Farm House Tack and

The Horse of Course at

The Longines FEI World Cup March 27- April 2 Omaha, Nebraska

www.fabianomitchell.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

WATCH YOUR STEP When winter storms give way to spring’s MUD SEASON be prepared for anything in rugged style. The original L.L. BEAN duck boot is made of tumbled leather for that soft, broken-in feeling and lined with shearling for extra warmth. $209.

ARIAT’S famous performance technology is on display in the Grasmere Pro GTX boots. Designed with a side-lace fit system and superior traction, they are also stirrupfriendly. $379. DUBLIN River Tall Boots are made of waterproof full-grain leather and made to fit in stirrups. These durable, breathable boots feature moisture wicking footbeds. $299.

Glanmire elegant waterproof leather country boots by DUBARRY offer high performance and versatility, ideal for town and country wear. $499.

The OVATION Cora Country boots are rugged chic and German-made with a waterproof and breathable membrane to assure all weather comfort. $143.

Mud is no longer an issue with NOBLE OUTFITTER’S innovative and comfortable waterproof MUDS Cold Front boots, engineered to keep you comfortable and dry. $109. PAGE 113

22 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

GRAB YOUR BAG No matter where you are headed, a stylish, roomy, and durable WEEKENDER BAG will become a favorite travel companion. The GHURKA Cavalier II No.97 khaki twill duffel bag is designed for the adventurous, innovative traveler. The perfect weekend carry-on bag, the Cavalier is handcrafted in sturdy twill and leather with a foldend design for added space and ease of packing. $1,395.

The Chris suede Overnight Duffel bag in sand is made by FRYE for Neiman Marcus. The well-crafted suede and leather bag boasts leather handles and an adjustable shoulder strap. Practical additions include a reinforced leather base and two-way zip-top closure. $598.

The Frankie Tote by GRAF LANTZ in granite and tan was developed as a distinguished and sophisticated tote. The Frankie’s elegant form is one of the most coveted pieces in the Graf Lantz collection. Surprisingly spacious, this oversized tote multi-tasks for an active lifestyle. $425.

11 FLAUNTWORTHY BAGS FOR THE WEEKEND TRAVELER.

The white blaze and dark, seal-bay color of a favorite gelding inspired OUGHTON LIMITED’S Overnight II. Crafted of waxed canvas and trimmed in premium bridle leather and imported, bronze-halter fittings with canvas gussets lend a sportier look. $435.

J.W. HULME CO. offers the Emerson Weekender in canvas and leather, featuring a hardy waxed canvas, which provides an additional layer of protection and durability. While tough as leather, it is also resistant to moisture and dirt and guaranteed to last a lifetime. $895.

continued on page 26 24 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

Sonoma County, California | Offered at $17,000,000 | 568WhiteOak.com

CHU CK L A MP 415.298.6687 | CHARLES.LAMP@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM | CAL BRE 858966

WINE COUNTRY BROKERAGE | 25 EAST NAPA STREET SONOMA, CA

95476 | 707.939.2288 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/NORCAL

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

continued from page 24

The Emerson Weekender in leather by J.W. HULME CO. is an idyllic bag and on point for everyday business and weekend getaways. Shown in tan, saddle-heritage leather with brass hardware, the bag features a main zippered compartment, interior zippered pocket, and a detachable shoulder strap. $825.

The TUCKER TWEED James River carry all in latte and black combination is the perfect style for equestrians on the go. Constructed of saffiano leather with double handles, it easily carries essentials for busy barn days or travel. The roomy interior includes a large zip pocket, pockets for smart phone and key fob, and a tablet compartment with embossed leather logo in the discipline of your choice. $249.

GHURKA’S Larsen bag in truffle is handcrafted in Italy. The suede construction exemplifies the power of detail and quality. The modern, square silhouette with exterior pocket and spacious interior, along with handsome leather finishing, creates a vintage look while maintaining its contemporary style. $1,595.

Known for its heritage of Italian quality, style, and attention to detail, BRIC’S My Safari Cargo Duffle bag in black is made of cotton-flocked PVC and cotton canvas and accented with full-grain leather. Lined with water-resistant nylon, it is a chic and practical choice for the style-savvy traveler. $270. (Sold exclusively at Neiman Marcus).

MCM, the luxury-leather accessories brand Modern Creation München, was born in the spirit of travel in 1976. The Nomad, in Visetos-coated canvas with calf-leather trim and shown in cognac, features rolled-top handles, a removable and adjustable shoulder strap, and two-way zip top. The weekender bag is idyllic for globe trotting or everyday use. $1,280. Le Sud Weekender by CUYANA is constructed of Turkish canvas and vachetta leather. Lined in cotton with plenty of pockets, this piece is practical but still exudes a chic, elevated aesthetic. Finished with glossy gold hardware and shown in black. $250. PAGE 113

26 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


 Grand Prix Village - There’s a 16-stall barn that includes a half-bathroom, two tack rooms, two feed rooms, and wash stations. A one-bedroom grooms’ apartment is on the second floor of the building, and includes a full bathroom and kitchen. Connected to the barn is a full owners’ home with vaulted ceilings and a gourmet kitchen. Offered at $13,950,000

Grand Prix Village - With six-acres of land, an 18-stall center aisle barn, gorgeous lake views, and hacking distance to the Winter Equestrian Festival, this property has everything a discerning equestrian could desire. There’s a spacious owners’ lounge with vaulted ceilings and skylights. Grass Grand Prix field and all weather ring in place. Offered at $12,750,000

Across from Horse Show - 4.5 acre farm boasts solar tunnel lighting, solar panel power, gorgeous bamboo wood Rower & Rub Stalls, Nelson automatic waters, and a luxurious detached owners lounge overlooking the ring. The home has a pool with outdoor kitchen and balcony that overlooks the farm. Offered at $12,750,000

Grand Prix Village - Situated on 3.67 acres of land, the center-aisle barn includes 20-stalls, 2 large tack rooms, 4 wash/grooming stalls, 2 feed rooms, 2 storage rooms, laundry, a full bathroom, and an office. The second-story serves as a luxurious owner’s penthouse. The grounds include a 210’ x 120’ sand ring, and 5 paddocks. Offered at $10,950,000

Palm Beach Point East - Situated on five wellmaintained acres, this property is within hacking distance to the WEF show grounds. The 12-stall center aisle barn includes a one bedroom, one bathroom groom’s apartment and a comfortable tack room with ample storage and laundry. Newly installed 220x130 all weather. Offered at $3,950,000

Grand Prix Village - Situated on 4-acres of lush land, is an amazing 20-stall barn with 4 wash stalls, 2 tack rooms, a laundry room, and a feed room. The owners’ lounge has a beautiful fireplace as the focal point, as well as a kitchen with great room for entertaining and a wonderful view of the 220’ x 120’ competition ring with superior custom footing. Offered at $9,300,000

Saddle Trail - Customizable 30 stall farm with 3bedroom, 3 bathroom pool home on 6.25 acres in Saddle Trail. This superbly designed professional farm is complete with a huge sub-irrigated (Riso System) Ring with Martin Collins CLOPF Footing, grand prix jump field, lounging ring and a 6 horse covered walker. Short hack to WEF showgrounds. Offered at $8,000,000

Las Palmas Equestrian - Stunning 10 or 15 acre equestrian estate in private gated enclave. The property offers a 4Br/4Ba main residence, 2Br/2Ba managers home with two additional staff apartments, totaling 4 bedrooms. The equine amenities offered are a 12 stall stable, jumping arena, grass grand prix or hunter field & large turnouts and room for a covered riding arena. Offered at $8,500,000

Saddle Trail - 30 stall equestrian facility with 5bedroom, 3.5 bath pool home on 6.2 acres in Saddle Trail. Farm is complete with a new Olympic all weather sub-irrigated ring, grass jump field, 6 horse Kraft covered walker and a detached storage garage. Offered at $7,250,000

Carol A. Sollak, P.A. • Phone +1 561-818-9476 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.carolsollak.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Carol.Sollak@evusa.com

©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


MattJohnson.evusa.com



Aspen Glen - Private 15 acre custom designed home with top equestrian facilities. Riding arena with underground watering system, hot walker and round pen. Three grooms apartments and separate ancillary buildings with veterinary / farrier rooms, feed storage and multiple equipment bays. The main residence features cathedral ceilings, fireplace with floor to ceiling stone chimney, wood & marble floors, elevator, screened balconies and infinity pool with private water vistas. Offered at $11,000,000 Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com ©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

OUT OF THE WILD CL

OK

U

and characters and wanted to learn more about them. I self-published the novel then (it was just re-released in 2016 by Trafalgar Square Books), and shortly after that, director and producer Paul Krizan picked it up and asked if I could write a script based on the book. I told him I already had one! Soon after that, our search for financing began.

EQ

O

B

B

How a renowned horseman GIVES HIS IMAGINATION FREE REIN and ends up on the big screen. By Rebecca M. Didier An internationally renowned horseman and clinician, Mark Rashid has, over the years, expanded his influence through his many bestselling books on horses, horse training, and ranch life. Now he has joined forces with a team of actors and producers to bring his first novel, Out of the Wild, to the big screen. With a cast including John Diehl (Pearl Harbor, A Time to Kill), Jean Louisa Kelly (Ant-Man, Uncle Buck), and director Paul Krizan—whose The Story of Us won Best Short Film at the 2011 Charleston International Film Festival— Out of the Wild brings the novel’s intense exploration of human fragility within the day-to-day rituals and hardships of a working ranch in the American West. We recently caught up with Mark and Paul and had a chance to ask them about their experience working together, what it was like making a movie that features more horses than humans, and what they feel the film will bring to mainstream audiences.

Mark, when you wrote the novel Out of the Wild, did you foresee it one day becoming a film? Was it always your intention to bring the story to the big screen, or was it one of life’s happy accidents?

MR: The script actually came first. I was asked to write it some 20 years ago by a producer in Los Angeles, who was looking for original material for her husband’s production company. To make a long story short, they loved the script, but a couple of her husband’s scripts went into production about the same time, so they no longer needed it. A number of other producers, including people at the Hallmark Channel, looked at the script, and there was talk of the movie being made, but something always came up that got in the way. About eight years ago, I decided to write the novel based on the script, mostly because I really liked the story

B

TH N S EE ER W V ET CO

E

Paul, was this film a departure from previous projects? How did you become involved? What appealed to you about the script?

Out of the Wild, the novel the film is based on, is available in paperback from Trafalgar Square Books. Here is a short excerpt: enry had been sitting in a rocking chair, gently rocking back and forth for nearly a half hour when he noticed Jessie walking across the yard toward the corral, where some 50 horses had their heads down and were eating from the piles of hay that were scattered about. He watched as she climbed between the wooden rails of the fence and stood quietly inside the corral. The horses all stopped eating, and one by one slowly made their way over to her. Like the conversation the two of them had earlier in the day, he wasn’t sure what to think about what he was seeing, and he stopped rocking and leaned forward, as if that would somehow give him a better vantage point. Soon, Jessie appeared to have been consumed by the herd as they circled around her, and Henry, becoming concerned for her

H

Continued on page 108 30 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

PK: I got involved with the script when I first met Mark. I was filming a doc-series on Mark’s horse training. At that time I had been looking for scripts to develop. Mark mentioned to me he had written this screenplay called Out of the Wild, and the story intrigued me. It took about three years of development—getting the script to where we were happy and ready to pitch it around and start looking for funding. I think the major thing that appealed to me about the script was the story, and how I could show that story on screen, giving it that look of a 1970s modern Western. It was not so much a departure from other projects as much as it was my first feature-length film. I had shot many short films up to that point. The fact that we shot the film on a super-small budget and did a lot of it ourselves—well, the amount of work that went into it was immense. To be able to create such a visual film with all the horse scenes was a huge undertaking. But I feel like we did a great job. Have you worked with horses on set before? What was challenging about it? Was it rewarding?

PK: This was the first time I have ever Continued on page 32


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

BORN LEADERS

OUT OF THE WILD continued from page 30

worked with any kind of animal, let alone horses. I love horses, though, and with Mark doing a lot of the training himself, we mostly had a great experience. I was worried about having a tight shooting schedule and working with the horses. I wasn’t sure if we could do the shots in the limited time we had, but Mark did such a good job that only on a few occasions did we have to move on to another shot. I think the most rewarding thing is to see how beautiful these horses look on film. They are such amazing and smart animals. To be honest, they just felt like other actors on set. Mark, you spent many long hours on the set handling the horse scenes, and most of the horses in the film are your own. Did you find the intensity of filming affected your ability to interact with your horses the way you usually do?

MileaBuickGMC.com 3211 E Tremont Ave, Bronx, NY 10461

MileaSubaru.com 3201 E Tremont Ave, Bronx, NY 10461

347-748-1441 32 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

MR: The two biggest obstacles during filming were the weather and the lack of time to prepare the horses for what they would ultimately be doing in any given scene. Shooting in the desert, the average temperature on set was around 110 degrees when we filmed the horse scenes, and we had limited shade to get the horses or ourselves under. We always made sure the horses had plenty of water, and we parked the horse trailers in such a way that they would cast shadows that we could get the horses in during breaks. Having written the script, I had an idea about what the horses would need to do during certain scenes; however, Paul always had a specific idea of how the horse needed to move, where his mark was—where he needed to begin a scene and where he needed to end the scene— and how he needed to act. Then, while the crew set up for the actual filming of the scene, I would work with the horse to get him to do what the scene required. This was almost always done with the horse at liberty, loose in the pen, and I usually only had between 10 and 20 minutes to achieve the desired response from the horse. In some cases, I had to come up with specific cues that neither the horse nor I had ever used before, then teach the horse


the cue that meant that I needed him to move a certain way, or a certain speed, or to stop in a certain orientation to the camera, or in a certain place in the pen. Because we were using our own horses for all the main roles in the film, and several of them are used every day for our work in clinics or on the ranch, the actual communication/training part was fairly easy and straightforward. In fact, we never had to reshoot a scene due to a horse missing his mark or not doing what was needed. For me it was an opportunity to spend time with our horses doing something with them that was just a little out of the ordinary. When production wrapped, we loaded them in the trailer, and three days later, we went right back to doing clinics as if nothing had happened.

Top: Mark Rashid and director Paul Krizan. Opposite: Actor John Diehl as Henry. Photographs by Stefan Angele for Out of the Wild.

Paul, what is one scene in particular from Out of the Wild that stayed with you, even after you wrapped and moved on to your next project? Can you tell us a little about what it was like to film that scene?

PK: One scene that really sticks out to me is when the main character, Henry, is in the pen, on the ground, crying, and Tico, the main horse character, walks up to him to comfort him. It really shows the beauty in the relationship between the two and what they both have been through and overcome. Filming that scene was one of the more intense scenes to film. John Diehl—the actor portraying Henry—had to really connect in himself at that moment. You could hear a pin drop on set. And it was as if the horse really felt what John was feeling as he connected with the character of Henry.

Mark, the scenes of the wild horses and Tico’s perspective are incredibly evocative. Have you spent much time with wild-horse herds? How did your personal experience impact your writing of these parts of the book? Continued on page 108

SHOW STOPPERS

New • Pre-Owned • Parts • Finance

844-OK-MILEA • mileatruck.com Visit our Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn locations. Coming Soon: Westchester location. 33 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | F E B RUARY /MARC H | 2 0 1 7


A FOCUS ON

FASHION

E

very now and then, a brand suf-

fers an identity crisis. Perhaps it has fallen out of favor with a new way of thinking, been dismissed by a younger generation, taken a misguided modern approach, or it is

simply struggling to find a voice that sets it apart. At Equestrian Living, we have been fortunate to have discovered, and worked with, numerous brands that not only have well-founded identities, but also continue to strengthen their vision with each passing season. From whimsical to nostalgic, simple to extravagant, earthy to magical, each designer’s past, present, and future archetypes come through in their collections.

See RĂśnner shoes and silk scarf on pages 42, 43.

34 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

BY RENEE SPURGE | LA SADDLERY


WINSTON

Winston Equestrian's mid-blue with camel Devon Hunt Coat in a stretchy wool blend. $749.

Our brand is rooted in the nostalgia of classic hunt seat fashion, from its luxurious European fabrics to its earthy colors and textures. Winston represents a modern woman who is conservative in her style but sophisticated and sexy in the fit of her apparel. –Winston Equestrian

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 5


Rönner represents elegant, timeless, and unique

Winston Equestrian's dark gray with camel Devon Hunt Coat in a stretchy wool blend. $749.

designs for horse and country-living enthusiasts that epitomize effortless and classic style for everyday living. –Carin Rönner

O WINSTON

Winston Equestrian's misty rose Milan V-neck sweater with light gray patches, in cotton blend. $169.

36 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

ne of the many components of a brand’s identity is the fabric it chooses to use in its designs. For the past several years, technical fabrics have been on the rise in equestrian fashion, so much so that even once strictly Pytchley-minded riders are buying hunt coats made out of mesh. Indeed, there are many brands that are embracing modern versions of tried and true natural fabrics. Winston Equestrian, with its lightweight, sleek, and fitted coats, is changing the way people think about wool as being passé in the jumping arena. Winston remains true to its polished aesthetic in 2017, and its new pieces reinforce its representation of “a modern woman who is conservative in her style but sophisticated and sexy in the fit of her apparel.” For example, Winston’s new blue Devon Hunt Coat (page 35) puts a classic and elegant twist on the blatantly bright-blue tech coats that have flooded the market over the past two years. Similarly, Rönner continues to embrace silky-stretch cottons for its signature equine prints and buttery alpaca blends for the stunning knits in its collection. This year, while it has turned to some more athletic fabrics for the Rönner Sport line, the company’s distinctive prints and feminine cuts set it apart from the sometimes flat and all too common look of sun shirts and tech tops. The Dianella show shirt (opposite) is a clear snapshot of a Rönner woman who “epitomizes effortless and classic style for everyday living.”


RĂ–NNER

Dianella sporty, training show-shirt in gray mini-horse and gray-gingham details. $199. Classic buttondown Carla shirt in coral snaffle pattern. Floral contrast at collar, placket, and cuffs. $220.

Marigold blouse in taupe tropical equestrian pattern. Printed mix of cotton and silk. $220.

Lantana shirt in blue gingham. Contrasting placket cover with carousel embroidery. $249.


EQUILINE

EQUILINE

A selection of some of the best competition apparel items from the upcoming Spring/ Summer 2017 Equiline collection.

Alma quilted, fitted outerwear jacket in navy. $350. Shown with the Luisa cotton-blend T-shirt with equestrian accents in gray base and varied accent colors. $95.

Janis nylon windbreaker in coral red and navy. $345. Shown with Tammy breeches in navy with red accents. $398.

Rear view of the white/red Panda show shirt highlighting its unique mesh cutout for ultimate breathability. $239. 38 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


The most important thing that we offer is that every single piece is one of a kind. The brand was built from the need to stand out in the arena, and that is what we are now

On the more extreme end of this anti-tech revolution is Winning Couture (WC), whose pieces magically transport us to a time when equestrian fashion was about making a statement. A vibrant mixture of textures and colors, this brand stands out because of its deep roots in our sport’s history. Choose to customize your look with WC, and the company guarantees “there will never be another one like it once you own it.” It’s the ultimate way to declare your individual identity in the arena. While fabrics and materials are fashion’s building blocks, design and fit create the overall attitude of a brand. Equiline has mastered its identity as a true luxury equestrian brand with glamorous trims, rich color stories, and masterfully tailored show coats and sportswear.

Dark navy and tan coat with white windowpane. Tone-on-tone striped white cotton shirt with one-of-a-kind rust and blue silk collar and cuffs. (See below for pricing).

L

ikewise, brands like Goode Rider have cornered the market in everyday riding fashion with their consistent use of “beautiful, streamlined silhouettes that are extremely figure flattering for all shapes and sizes.” Lively color palettes and playful use of stripes and geometric prints denote Goode Rider garments as immediately distinct. And Ariat, no stranger to design for broad appeal, offers collections that are “clean and minimalistic for a modern feel of pared-back utility.” When it comes to accessorizing your fashion identity, expect some stand-out pieces from brands that have mastered channeling an equestrian spirit through their artisanal manipulation of leather and

Navy with white and red plaid riding coat, accented with contrasting silk collar. Paired with a red, white, and blue striped shirt with matching coat-collar accent. Custom coats from $1,100 to $1,400. Custom shirts from $350 to $400.

WINNING COUTURE

known for. –Winning Couture


GOODE RIDER

Boyfriend shirt in orchid gingham. Inverted rear pleat, shirttail hem, patch pockets, and metal buttons. $85.

Super seamless shirt in heather gray. $89. Shown with Jean Rider KP black denim. $159.

Goode Rider is a lifestyle brand. Our brand identity will always

Ideal show tank in black print. $45. Shown with Pro Rider full seat breech in black. $169.

be beautiful, streamlined silhouettes that are extremely figure flattering for all shapes and sizes while always implementing the latest fashion trends and innovative fabrics. –Lorna Goode


ARIAT PHOTOS ARIAT INTE RNATIONAL

Marquis show shirt in white. $99.95. Olympia Acclaim regular rise full-seat breech in navy/skyway. $239.95. Team stampede scarf in navy/red. $34.95.

We consider our designs "accessible aspirations" offering style, quality, and technology at a price that makes sense. The styling lines are clean and minimalistic for a modern feel of pared-back utility. –Ariat

hardware. Both AtelierCG and Vincent Peach successfully marry the hard and soft to create rich and unique equestrian accessory centerpieces. Cindy Gellerson, owner of AtelierCG, uses supple, raw leather and everyday horse hardware, embracing her inner-bohemian equine princess, while Vincent uses pearls and pavé to compliment his chic, casual, equestrian-lifestyle look. We also applaud Karina Brez’s stunning “wearable art” for her commitment to bringing iconic equestrian images to life in her impressive body of work.

T

here is no shortage of must-have handbags to conjure romantic images of a day at the races or brunch on the polo field. Burberry has been at the forefront of equestrian-fashion brands for many years, and it is no wonder its Bridle Bag is nothing short of drool-worthy gorgeous. Frye and Luca’s Boutique have produced two of the best bucket bags to hit the market this year. Both have a simple, sleek look that pairs well with any spring ensemble. The Ottavia bag by Luca’s Boutique (page 42) takes the look one step further, with its beautiful embossed homage to centuries-old equine tradition. We believe 2017 will be a year of exploration and evolution in both the world at large and, of course, in fashion. For fashion is, in essence, a part of our inner voice, an expression of our lifestyles as well as our individual personalities and even our values.

Cotton Ramiro navy sweater. $49.95. Liberty shirt in multi-color poplin print. $99.95. Five-pocket, lowrise, knee-patch breech in woodland. $109.95. One Rail woven belt in gray. $49.95.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 1


FASHION ACCESSORIES

My love for the equestrian world inspired some of my original designs with an unparalleled attention to detail. Using only the finest diamonds and gemstones, I create wearable art. –Karina Brez

The Ottavia custom-made, equestrianinspired bag by Luca’s Boutique is handmade in Italy of saddle leather. Allow four to six weeks for delivery. $1,950.

Luca's Boutique is a true artisan Italian brand creating handcrafted

Karina Brez Huggable Hooves bracelet in 18-karat rose gold and diamonds. Also available in white and yellow gold. Starting price $6,500.

Horse LUV earrings in 18-karat rose gold and diamonds by Karina Brez. Also available in white and yellow gold. $1,500.

products with each client’s passions and desires in mind. Our bags are made entirely in Italy and highly valued for their impeccable detail and innovative design—all constructed with materials of the highest standards. –Luca Papini

Mimosa Carousel slipper in hunter green by Rönner. Handcrafted and finished with leather sole. $289.

Rönner Tropical Equestrian bag in blue-tropical canvas and honeyleather combination. $329.

42 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Harness Bucket bag in red by Frye. Smooth, full-grain leather with suede lining and antiquedmetal hardware lend polish to this bag. $398.


Vincent Peach Eternity necklace with freshwater pearls. Premium leather cord can be worn at 17 or 36 inches. $825.

Appaloosa bracelet with horse bit by AtelierCG. Constructed of mixed metal and Dakota leather. Finished with bar closure. $195. Handcrafted Sabino messenger bag in Dakota leather with English reins strap by AtelierCG. $684. The AtelierCG Collection is an equestrian-inspired lifestyle brand

Vincent Peach Equestrian double-wrap bridle bracelet in brown. Accented with sterling silver bit and Tahitian pearl. $412.

for the cosmopolitan and independent individual. I create accessories that carry a statement of simplicity and raw elegance with traditional craftsmanship and finished with a modern design. -Atelier CG

What defines the Vincent Peach brand is not only the quality of materials that we create with—pearls, leathers, and diamonds—but the quality of our customers and their lifestyle. We create jewelry that will travel along your journey, whether it be a polo match or a dip in the ocean; there is no limit to how you can wear our pieces. –Vincent Peach

Tropical equestrian 100 percent silk scarf in blue by Rönner. $189.

The Bridle Bag in tan by Burberry is a new, softly structured bag for men and women. Equestrian inspired, it references British saddlery designs. Price upon request.

PAGE 113 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 3


44 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


GA L L ERY

LITTLE KIDS AND THEIR

BIG DOGS

P

In time for the Westminster Kennel Club show, new hardcover book and social-media sensation Little Kids and Their Big Dogs celebrates the special bond between children and super-sized canines.

hotographed by Russian photographer Andy Seliverstoff, all the subjects in the book are show dogs like the ones featured at the famous competition in New York’s Madison Square Garden. But the dogs in Little Kids and Their Big Dogs are beautiful on the inside, too, as evidenced by their interactions with children who are just a fraction of their enormous size. “The main goal of my photo shoots wasn’t just to create beautiful pictures, but to capture the interaction between the children and the animals,” says Seliverstoff, 58, who never anticipated the impact his photographs would have. His photo site gets an average half-million visits per day, and his Instagram followers have surged to more than 40,000. “This state of endless joy and mutual confidence,” he adds, “has become the central idea of the book.” Seliverstoff says Little Kids and Their Big Dogs started off as a fluke. “When good friends asked me to photograph their 2-yearold daughter, they showed up at the park with their Great Dane in tow,” he explains. “I was blown away by the relationship between little

Alice and gigantic Sean, so I decided to incorporate him into the shoot.” When Seliverstoff posted those and similar photos on Facebook, they immediately went viral, and his project was born. Little Kids and Their Big Dogs features some familiar dogs, such as the Great Dane, Newfoundland, and Saint Bernard. It also contains photographs of rare breeds as well, including the Komondor, a Hungarian herding dog whose dredlocked fur resembles a mop; the bracco Italiano, a versatile hunting dog that is little-known outside its native Italy; and the Moscow watchdog, a guardian breed developed around Russia’s capital city from Saint Bernard crosses. Other breeds featured are the Alaskan Malamute, black Russian terrier, Briard, dogue de Bordeaux, great Pyrenees, Irish wolfhound, Leonberger, Rhodesian ridgeback, and Tibetan mastiff. A greeting-card line and 2018 calendar are in the offing, and Seliverstoff is already at work on a second book, due in late 2018. “In the end, I hope the book conveys this important message: Love for dogs and children makes people kinder,” Seliverstoff says. PAGE 113

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 5


46 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 9


50 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 1


Alessandro Albanese 52 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS JONAS MATYASSY

THE FABRIC OF A MAN Alessandro Albanese is the consummate Italian designer who remains true to his roots and understated aesthetic.

I

noticed the impeccable work of Alessandro Albanese long before I met him. It was during a business lunch, where I sat across from a fashionable colleague wearing an exquisitely tailored jacket with an equestrian cut. We went our separate ways, but the cut, flawless fit, and quality of the jacket made such an

impression on me that I Googled the physical description of the logo on the pocket and discovered Italian equestrianapparel designer Alessandro Albanese.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 3


Alessandro collaborates with his clients throughout the custom, tailor-made process. He is meticulous in his selection of fabrics, measurements, and multiple fittings.

54 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


“It’s very difficult to go from designing a blazer to a riding coat. You can’t go to a traditional tailor to design a riding coat. It’s impossible.”

A

n interview followed, and I discovered a talented, passionate, and charismatic man with just the right balance of self-assurance and humility. He was happily immersed in the equestrian world, but it wasn’t always that way. Alessandro grew up in Turin, Italy, and embodies much of what one considers quintessentially Italian. More succinctly, he can put on a T-shirt and jeans and make them transcendent. He sees beauty everywhere—in architecture, art, fashion, and the exquisite craftsmanship and attention to detail that is rooted in Italy’s design heritage. He was an engineer for the first 10 years of his business career. “I was working as a project manager designing cars, aircraft, and that kind of thing, but it wasn’t my real destiny,” said Alessandro. “Envision this person who goes to his office every day, week after week. It’s dark when you go into the office in the morning and dark when you go home—you rarely see sunlight. This was my life for 10 years.” But quite unexpectedly, an opportunity was presented to Alessandro while he was on a beach holiday in Italy. He met a man who wanted to expand his line of equestrian riding boots outside of Italy. He was en route to a horse show in

France, but he didn’t speak the language, so he invited Alessandro, who was fluent in French, to go with him. It was there that he got his first glimpse into the equestrian world. “Imagine how I suddenly jumped into this horse show in a beautiful location, with nice people all around. I was in France, out in the open, fresh air, and I thought—this is business? This is just having fun,” Alessandro laughed. “Every night I was in a nice hotel and restaurant in Paris or Monte Carlo. It felt more like a holiday than working.” Alessandro kept his day job but started selling his friend’s riding boots during weekends. He discovered local horse shows around Milan, Genoa, and Torino—focusing most of his efforts in northwest Italy. He quickly realized how much he enjoyed the lifestyle and took six months to research what kind of business he could develop within the equestrian world. He looked into the market to see what was missing. “No one was doing a nice, Italian, tailor-made riding coat—no one,” recalled Alessandro. Most of the coats were off the rack. There were some German, British, and French brands, but no one was doing Italian tailor-made. “We have an unbelievable tradition in Italy about clothing. My father is a tailor and has been all his life. I grew up between a sewing machine and my dad

cutting fabric, with my mother alongside helping,” he added. He made a sketch of his first jacket after buying sample riding jackets in the market and studying them. He went to a tailor to make his sample and emphasized the importance of movement in a riding coat. “My dad helped me, but he is an expert in men’s suits, which have nothing to do with a riding coat,” explained Alessandro. “It’s very difficult to go from designing a blazer to a riding coat. You can’t go to a traditional tailor to design a riding coat. It’s impossible.” In May 1998, he took his first jacket sample to the small booth showing his friend’s riding boots and promoted his tailor-made jacket. Over the next few months, Alessandro designed a logo and put a company together. That September, he went to the World Equestrian Games in Rome and introduced his jackets to the world. “That’s where everything started,” explained Alessandro. “It all happened so fast. I already had a solid base of French customers, so I went back to France, then to Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and Spain. I quickly found agents all over Europe and Japan, but not in America until 10 years ago.” He began tailoring coats all over the world with the help of his agents. He then started designing shirts, breeches, sweaters, winter and summer jackets, and sweatshirts. “Some people don’t want to wait for custom shirts and breeches, so I started designing ready-to-wear collections,” he said. “For 17 years, I did a summer and winter collection, and I began to hire people to help me.” Eventually, he made his way to the U.S. after considerable persuading by Americans he had met in Europe. “I couldn’t figure out why the American business wasn’t taking off,” Alessandro admitted. “I had an agent, but business wasn’t the best, so 10 years ago I went to Florida by myself for two weeks. I sold more coats than my agent did in one year. The next year, I decided to do FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 5


Left: Alessandro’s exquisite detailing and personalized labeling on a riding coat for Portuguese show jumper Luciana Diniz. Below: Luciana Diniz with Alessandro after winning the grand prix at the Longines Global Champions Tour in Rome, Italy.

everything myself. At that point, my English wasn’t that good, and it was incredibly challenging. I had no contacts or sources for setting up at the horse shows. I had to go to the port to pick up the shipping container. I was driving the truck, collecting the items, setting up the displays, while designing and selling.” With a degree of pride and measured candor, Alessandro took a moment to reflect on what he accomplished in a relatively short period of time. “Eighteen years ago, I started with zero money. Zero means nothing,” mused Alessandro. “Today it would not be possible. It would take too long. I invested the money from every jacket I sold to buy something else. I was slowly building something. I financed myself, and it was not easy. The business was my life for 24/7. I put aside my private life for a long time because I wanted to make it.” Most would agree that by now he has made it. He said, “I’ve dressed single riders from almost every country, Olympic teams, and national-team riders for Italy, France, Ukraine, Denmark, Qatar, Emirates, Australia, America, Canada, Japan, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and many more.”

T H E AM ERICAN M ARK ET

Alessandro started to grow his business in the U.S. year after year. Initially traveling to Florida in the winter, he began to expand his reach to horse shows up and down the East Coast, in Kentucky, and eventually California. But then the U.S. market started to change—a lot. “I had profoundly changed the way riders dressed at U.S. horse shows by introducing tight and fitted polo-shirts, breeches, and real tailor-made jackets. This was a big revolution for the U.S. market. Then, strong competition arrived on the scene with big capital, and within five to six years, every Italian equestrianapparel brand was at WEF,” explained Alessandro, referring to the Winter Equestrian Festival held in Wellington, Florida. “The mentality changed with

56 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

new washable jackets, and personally I can say, with a big loss of style. It significantly affected the elegance and tradition of such a regal sport. Ultimately, I stayed true to my approach that elegance is timeless.” Over the years, Alessandro sold his jackets to many of the sport’s premier riders, but he couldn’t, and didn’t want to, compete with big-brand endorsements. “Most of the riders came back to me to buy my clothes at the end of their professional sponsor contracts,” Alessandro admitted. “They said I have the best jackets.” TURNING POINT

The industry was changing, and Alessandro realized it was time to critically assess his business. “The moment came when I knew I had to change something,” Alessandro said. “I had no private life. So, I sold the brand. I sold Alessandro Albanese. It was very difficult emotionally. It felt like selling your own child. It was painful because it was my name. Lidia Nagy, my partner and better half, which I call her, was incredibly helpful. She taught me that maybe something better would come from something so difficult.”


Alessandro took a six-month break before continuing with something he had started years ago but never had enough time to dedicate to—making men’s and women’s blazers, suits, and shirts. A number of his customers were equestrians who also wanted everyday jackets or suits. He said, “I started to gain insight and positive responses from clients. This was traditional tailoring with precise measurements, fabric swatches, samples, and multiple fittings.”

O

ut of respect for the business sale, Alessandro took a one-year break before developing his tailoring line. “First, I started with tailormade suits, and then I came out with a cashmere line,” he shared. “But most of my customers were equestrians, and I started to get a lot of requests via phone calls, emails, and social media, to make them custom-tailored riding coats. They were looking for me, not for my brand.” Alessandro added, “It was a bit like going back to the past, creating riding coats again, but this time with 20 more years of experience. I’ve gone to a more technical, super-light, stretch, breathable wool, and I have 70 different color options. Add in the piping and collar variations and the choices are limitless. Imagine choosing a riding coat with all of these options!” Previously, Alessandro’s jackets were sold through agents and shops. “Now, I know every person I design a jacket for. People know me, and I know them,” he smiled. “I only do private tailoring. I don’t have a pop-up shop. My exclusive customers, which include U.S. ambassadors and Los Angeles movie industry people, are discerning people who are looking for something more than a simple coat. They are style savvy and appreciate elegant design. What I offer them is a unique experience, where we

Above: Canadian Olympic gold medalist Eric Lamaze wearing a team jacket by Alessandro. Below: A tailored riding coat by Alessandro in super-light stretch wool­—the lightest material on the market­for a riding coat.

discuss the kind of clothes that will not only look nice on them, but will also reflect their personality.” In an effort to guarantee the highest quality standards, Alessandro has limited the number of garments he produces each year, and identifies each piece with a production serial number. The turn-around time for his custom riding jacket is four to five weeks, at an average price of $1,400, and six to-seven weeks for a suit or a dress, with prices dependent on the garment and fabric. Alessandro’s new logo, ALE (pronounced al-lay), is his nickname. It’s what his parents and friends from home call him. “I’m very happy because I do what I love without too much rush and pressure. I get more inspiration and ideas. I was traveling so much before, and now I have time for myself and for my family. I have a quality to my life, and I can offer a better level of service. I even consult for others who had been my competitors in the past,” laughed Alessandro. He claims there is no one doing what he is doing in the equestrian market today—designing and making a traditional riding coat, with modern, technical materials and completely tailor-made in Italy. The fabrics are from the same supplier he has used for the last 20 years, and his tailor goes back just as long. “They both are from the days when I packed my inventory in a garage,” he smiled. Alessandro now lives with Lidia and their daughter, Aurora Leticia, in Budapest, Hungary, and Wellington, Florida, as well as Italy, to which he returns every month to personally oversee the quality of each piece produced for ALE. While his business continues to take him all over the world, his Italian heritage still weaves its way into every piece he creates. “When you live in Italy, you are surrounded by extraordinary beauty. It’s my culture. It’s who I am,” admitted Alessandro. “When you grow up with these visually rich surroundings, and have a degree of ambition and passion, anyPAGE 113 thing is possible. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 7


A DOMINCAN REPUBLIC TRAVEL DIARY BY JILL NOVOTNY

LUXE LIFE IN PARADISE Punta Cana’s EDEN ROC RESORT offers European luxury in a tropical paradise.

W

hen I first stepped outside the baggage claim with my luggage in tow, the warm, thick air of the Caribbean surprised me. The palm-leaf roof of the open building rustled in the tropical breeze, and I met a man holding a sign with my name. In the car, I fanned myself with my notebook as we sped through the lush, green landscape, passing riders on bicycles holding baskets of fruit. The thick Continued on page 62

58 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 9


An infinity pool is steps above the beach.

EDEN ROC PHOTOS

The renovated beach club is a unique private beach featuring swimming, shopping, and first-class dining.


34 luxury accommodations range in size from one-room suites to villas that sleep 10.

The Koko Kids Club offers children ages 4 to 12 daycare, contests, games, scavenger hunts, crafts, and Koko’s mini spa. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 1


Continued from page 58

foliage on the roadsides blocked any view I might have, and I settled on counting palm trees. When we finally passed through a gate into Cap Cana, I expected to pull up to the hotel imminently, but we continued on, past fountains, golf carts on paths, and signs pointing to enticing places like Fisherman’s Beach and the marina. I swiveled to catch glimpses down each road as we passed, but I couldn’t see their destinations as they extended off into more greenery. den Roc is part of the Relais & Châteaux collection of boutique hotels located in 60 countries around the world. Milan-based architect Marina Nova designed Eden Roc to be the Dominican Republic’s most luxurious beach resort, with a vision of creating a community of luxury suites that combine Mediterranean architecture with a tropical twist. Eden Roc is one of several resorts within a property

E

62 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Clockwise from upper left: A worldclass demonstration of paso fino gaits in front of the clubhouse; the entryway to Los Establos; Olympiclevel dressage training on the fields of Los Establos; the stables house highlevel horses of every discipline.

development called Cap Cana in Punta Cana, a small city on the Dominican Republic’s easternmost point. We finally arrived at the resort and pulled to a stop beneath a chandelier hanging over the entrance. I was handed an umbrella-festooned drink and whisked off to tour the tropical property. We zipped around from site to site in a golf cart, and I met warm and friendly hosts and managers at each stop. We pulled into a golf-cart-sized parking spot in front of an island-blue stucco house that would be my home. As I entered, I heard the sound of waves lapping on a beach and saw the resort’s welcome video on the TV, as well as the room’s high ceilings stretching above a canopied bed. I quickly kicked off my sneakers and tore off my sweater before continuing my exploration of the accommodations. The bathroom and its huge coral-stone tub were framed by a large glass window overlooking a walled patio offering a remarkable combination of openness and


privacy. I stepped into the spacious rain shower and opened a large window, feeling like I had created an outdoor shower. But then, I looked outside into the patio and smiled when I saw an actual outdoor shower. At the back of the building I saw my private, turquoise infinity pool that reflected the palm trees surrounding it. I hadn’t even set my suitcase down before I unzipped it for my swimsuit. I spent a few quiet moments floating—refreshed, content, and alone. HE AV E N I S A PR I VAT E B E ACH

Later, I donned a light dress, hopped in my golf cart, and headed down the road to a late lunch at Eden Roc’s private beach. A large, triangular canopy shed its cool shade over the beach club’s open lobby. Sparkling swimming pools covered the wide terrace, separated only by a strip of patio that acted as a bridge. Playing chldren and ukulele strummers surrounded smaller pools that led down to the beach.

R

esisting the urge to plunge into my second swimming pool within my first hour on the island, I walked on toward the beach. Soft white sand lay ahead, interrupted only by palm trees and cabanas wrapped in white curtains. At the beachside restaurant La Palapa, I enjoyed an assortment of sushi as I watched the blue-green water lapping along the rocks not 10 feet from my table. Soon, the shadows lengthened, the beach cleared of sunbathers and swimmers, and the staff set about shifting from day to night. A soccer ball rolled by, chased by a small boy who apologized in Spanish. Silhouetted in front of the red sunset, I watched him skillfully dribble it back to his waiting opponent, a lifeguard who had just ended his shift. Continued on page 66

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 3


64 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 5


Continued from page 63

After breakfast the next morning, I headed to Solaya Spa. Exotic tropical scents filled my room, and a massage cleared my mind. Afterwards, when I stepped back outside to my golf cart, I smiled knowingly at a couple passing by. They returned my smile with a look that said, “I know, right?” LO S E S TA B LOS

Next, it was time to trade in my sundress for jeans and paddock boots. I climbed aboard a van to the nearby stables, which I imagined as a shed-row of stalls around a dusty riding ring. But as I stepped off the van in front of Los Establos, I admit I was surprised. I could see a huge indoor arena and manicured polo fields extending out into the distance. A tile pathway descended between modern buildings, escorted down the slope by flowing streams and fountains on either side. Wood-plank pathways crossed the streams to connect the buildings. I followed a path to the tack shop, an elegant boutique evoking images of Ralph Lauren on New York’s Madison Avenue. An adjoining clubhouse included the high-end Cavalier Steakhouse and a gameroom with billiard tables and other activities. Outside, the porch deck was perfect for watching polo matches, Olympic dressage practice, or a master paso fino demonstration—all of which we saw. os Establos is a world-class venue, offering seven equestrian disciplines on 30,000 acres, including the highest levels of show jumping, dressage, polo, eventing, racing, rodeo, and paso finos. The facility, which was completed less than a year ago, has already hosted high-level events in several disciplines. I joined Joan Fernandez, the facility director, for lunch and learned about his experiences with horses as a child. He offered to saddle up a horse for me, and, of course, I accepted. He sent me off with Nico, and we took

L

Juliana Cordobes Sadala is the resort’s sales and marketing manager.

a long ride around the perimeter of the polo fields. My rusty Spanish and Nico’s limited English were sufficient to learn all sorts of interesting tidbits about the facilities, the islands, and his lifetime of work with horses. Los Establos facilities are available to resort guests and are open to the public for lunch at the clubhouse or for spectators at any of the events held throughout the year. The development project is still in its early stages, but soon the facility will be surrounded by a community of homes with views of the polo fields and close access to the equestrian facilities. T ROPICAL ADV ENTURES

When I returned to my suite for one final night, it was time to dress for dinner. I joined the resort’s executive director, Stefano Baratelli, and executive chef Gianluca Re Fraschini at La Palapa for a tasting menu of the dishes planned for the resort’s newly renovated beach club. Our waiter brought course after course of various seafoods in inventive combinations and savory dishes of all kinds, while Fraschini spoke about his travels, his work as a chef in Paris and Geneva, and his roots in Tuscany. After dinner, Baratelli offered to drive us back to the main resort lobby in his golf cart, and we continued our conversation as we drove up the hill. Baratelli swerved suddenly in the dark. I

66 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

gasped and asked about the huge crab I had just seen in the road and that, luckily, he had narrowly avoided. Both men laughed. “Yes, we’ll say it was a crab,” they chuckled. After some insistence on my part—which I came to regret—they admitted that the coconut-sized creature in the road was, in fact, a tarantula. I sat with eyes wide, scanning the ground ahead as we zoomed up the dark road. “They’re really nothing to worry about,” they assured me. he next morning I packed my luggage and had time for one more last-minute adventure. Cap Cana’s Scape Park, a kind of natural theme park, offers all kinds of tours and experiences such as eco-tours of caves, waterfalls, and cenotes, (deep natural pools) like Hoyo Azul, a hidden cavern filled with astonishingly turquoise waters. The park also offers boating, more horseback riding, caving, and exhibits about the Taino indians, their rituals, and the flora and fauna of the area. I could have gladly joined in any of these activities, but I opted instead for the zipline adventure. Our charismatic group leader soon had the rag-tag group of nervous tourists yelling enthusiastically during the safety briefing, and we climbed an intimidating staircase up to the first zipline. After leaning out over the edge and flying high over the forest, I was hooked. For two hours, we zoomed from one cliff ledge to another, taking in breathtaking views of Los Establos, Eden Roc, and all of Cap Cana. Before I knew it, I was back at the resort to retrieve my bags and head to the airport. I stepped into my suite one last time and thought, “I still have a couple of minutes!” So I jumped into my private pool one last time, then dried my hair and dressed in one frenzied motion. As I made my goodbyes to the staff and felt more like I was travelling away than going back home. PAGE 113

T


PHOTOS JILL NOVOTNY

The decor of each guest room on the huge property is hand-selected by owner Nadine Lipson.

The interiors of Los Establos offer club members and visitors a range of stylish and luxurious spaces for activities and spectating. The reception barn welcomes guests to the resort’s village.

PAWS UP PHOTO

A “pop-up” banquet awaited us out on the range.

Fires burn in stone firepits, where guests can warm up or just relax. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 7


A FAMILY AFFAIR

T

The ROCKEFELLER ESTATE was built not for show, but for privacy and escape. Although portions are now open to the public, the family retains private areas.

The Rockefeller family estate at goal of Kykuit was the opposite—family Pocantico Hills in New York is a fabled privacy. place. Anchored by Kykuit, or the Big Today, much of the grounds are open House, as the Rockefeller children called to the public, and the Big House was it, the 3,400-acre property boasts garrecently opened as well. But the family’s dens, pools, and miles of carriage roads. private Playhouse, almost three times Kykuit (pronounced KY-kut) is a the size of the Big House, still remains Dutch word meaning off-limits to visitors. Built high point or lookout, in 1924 as the family’s recand it is a fitting name reation center, it includes for the magnificent indoor and outdoor pools property that sits atop and tennis courts, the fama hill with a 50-mile ily’s golf course (with only view of the Hudson 12 members), bowling River—from West lanes, lounges, and even an Point to the north and ice-cream parlor. Among Young Mary Louise Pierson with her pony at Pocantico New York City to the the list of well-known Hills, New York. south. guests—the Beatles. The mansion, which Also three times the size was built between 1906 and 1913, was of the mansion, the Coach Barn houses a meant to serve as an escape from New conference center that has hosted many York City life. It may seem unlikely to U.S. presidents and world leaders as well consider a 40-room house cozy, but it as the horse-drawn carriage collection of is definitely much more intimate than David Rockefeller. (See Mr. Rockefeller’s the vast mansions of Newport, Rhode Roads in the Winter 2014 issue of EQ.) After John D. Rockefeller Jr. died, Island. Those structures were built to Nelson, who later became governor of showcase their owners’ wealth, but the 68 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

PHOTOS: MARY LOUISE PIERSON BY CHANCELLOR VAN PELT


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 9


New York and U.S. vice president, moved into Kykuit. With Nelson, his mother Abby, and other family members being major forces in the art world (for example, Abby and two friends founded New York’s Museum of Modern Art), it comes as no surprise that the grounds are graced with more than 120 outdoor sculptures with works by Picasso,  Brâncuși, Arp, Calder, Giacometti, Moore, Nevelson, and Noguchi. The art gallery in the house includes art ranging from Chinese ceramics dating from 200 B.C. through modern works, all from Nelson Rockefeller’s private collection. In 1978, Nelson spoke with Charles Osgood on CBS Sunday Morning to discuss his passion for art. Rockefeller said, “I really think people more and more want beautiful things around them. It has a kind of civilizing effect.” And, as Osgood added, “What could be more civilized than using a helicopter to situate your favorite sculptures on the front lawn?” Family lore tells the story of how a Henry Moore sculpture made a surprise landing in the golf game of Nelson’s brother, David Rockefeller, then chairman of Chase Manhattan Bank. Nelson’s granddaughter, Mary Louise Pierson, told Osgood, “All of a sudden, a huge helicopter shows up with a crate carrying a sculpture, and their golf balls go everywhere. It did cause somewhat of a family ruckus, and David really did think (Nelson) might have done it as a joke.” Pierson, an artist/photographer, and her mother, writer Ann Rockefeller Roberts, have collaborated on a book, The Rockefeller Family Home—Kykuit, which offers a history of the estate as well as images of places not seen by the public. She recalls how the book came about. “When my grandfather Nelson died in 1979, I was not prepared for the impact his death would have on my family and me. With the property being donated 70 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

I

“It was my way of both holding on to and letting go of the past.”

to the National Trust, there were rumors that the area would become off-limits to the family. Being able to come to Kykuit as a child and roam around at will, with all the sculptures, gardens, and trails as my playground, was a great privilege. I soon began my own personal crusade to photograph all that would be lost to me. It was my way of both holding on to and letting go of the past. The more photographs I took, the harder it was to stop. I became determined to capture everything. “Family members began encouraging me to compile my photographs into a book, and the perfect person to help in this endeavor was my mother. I loved her writing and knew that she would be able to weave the history of the estate into a wonderful text.” National Trust tours are available with reservations May through midNovember. The tours visit the main rooms of the six-story stone house and continue on through the expansive, terraced gardens containing Nelson A. Rockefeller’s exceptional collection of 20th-century sculpture. Also included are the underground art galleries, with Governor Rockefeller’s Picasso tapestries, and the cavernous Coach Barn, with its collections of the family’s classic automobiles and horse-drawn carriages. The property also includes the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, a nonprofit farm and educational center designed to demonstrate, teach, and promote sustainable, community-based food production, and the world-renowned Blue Hill restaurant. A highlight for equestrians and carriage drivers is the 55-mile system of carriage roads built by John D. Rockefeller Jr. Designed to complement the landscape, the carriage roads, many of which are accessible to the public, allow visitors to experience and enjoy the natural wonders of the area. They wind through wetlands, woodlands, and fields, and past streams, rivers, and lakes.


ROBERT HANSEN

Opposite: Among the 120 outdoor sculptures are Lippincott II by James Rosati, Knife Edge by Henry Moore, and Spiny by Alexander Calder. This page: The indoor pool in the Playhouse; the rear of the Big House.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 1


Designed in the style of Normandy, the Playhouse is the family recreation center.

The Rockefeller Family Home: Kykuit, by Ann Rockefeller Roberts, with photographs by Mary Louise Pierson.

72 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Built in 1908, the Orangerie was the winter home of palms and citrus trees.


The Coach Barn houses the carriage collection as well as the Pocantico Conference Center; the tack room stores English, Western, and ladies’ sidesaddles.

In the 1960s, Nelson converted basement corridors into galleries that house works by Warhol, Picasso, Chagall, and others. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 3


74 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


BY CHANCELLOR VAN PELT

PHILANTHROPY LOCAL FOCUS WITH A

R

RACHEL AND GEORGE GUMINA

follow the smaller-is-better approach in continuing the family’s legacy of philanthropy.

Equestrian Living recently visited George and Rachel Gumina at their home on the Rockefeller family estate in Pocantico, New York. Rachel is the granddaughter of Nelson Rockefeller. Besides Rockefeller Center and a New York City Christmas tree, the name Rockefeller is probably most associated with philanthropy. The majority of the family fortune has been spent not on luxury living, but on philanthropic deeds such as establishing Rockefeller University and the University of Chicago and supporting 75 other colleges. The family conserved Colonial Williamsburg, founded New York’s Museum of Modern Art, and purchased and donated land that became the site of the United Nations headquarters and Acadia, Grand Teton national parks and some 20 other parks. PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERS George and Rachel outside their barn.

The Guminas’ cozy, inviting home and intimate horse barn are modest in

comparison to the grandeur of Kykuit, the stately family mansion just up the hill. Unassuming in their demeanor and lifestyle, George and Rachel follow the smaller-is-better approach in continuing the family’s legacy of philanthropy. Says Rachel, “I always remember what my aunt Peggy told me. She said, ‘The best way to make your donations count is to support smaller, local organizations, where you can get involved personally. They have the least overhead and administrative costs, and the money does the most good.’” George founded the philanthropy office for Greenburgh, New York, 21 years ago. Greenburgh includes towns ranging from the very affluent to those with large homeless populations. He also works with El Centro Hispano, an organization that supports 6,000 clients through 25 programs, ranging from finding housing and jobs and promoting English literacy, to weekly food distribution. George explains why he chose El Continued on page 78 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 5


George with Lulu, a rescue, and Rachel with Stripes.

ROBERT HANSEN

The Gumina’s house was designed about 14 years ago by architect John Cohen, who lives nearby.

76 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


The small barn is home to three horses: Nordstrom, a 21-year-old Trakehner; Shogun, an Irish sport horse that was an eventer; and Teddy, a 7-year-old Saddlebred they recently rescued.

ida. Rossini in Flor George riding

Rachel on Stoc kholm, son Seba stian on Fanny, and Geo rge on Rossini.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 7


Continued from page 75

Centro. “In my schooling, we learned the words of President Kennedy, ‘A country must be judged by how it treats the neediest,’” George says, “That ideal is exemplified by El Centro Hispano, and I am proud to be part of its mission.” At about the same time he founded the philanthropy office, he also formed the Friends of the Rockefeller State Park Preserve to benefit and help maintain the park. George is a strong believer in public/ private partnerships as the way to get things accomplished. He’s also hands-on. For 17 years, he taught computer science and served as a mentor to juvenile prisoners at the Woodfield Cottage Maximum Security facility. Rachel is hands-on as well, focusing her efforts on women’s issues and animal welfare. She works at both the SPCA of Westchester County, New York, and the Paws Crossed rescue, where she rehabilitates and trains the most difficult dogs. “I’ve worked my way up from a puppy trainer to working with hyper and aggressive dogs,” she says. “The SPCA honored me as volunteer of the year while I was working on my dog-training degree and my degree from Animal Behavior College, plus I was getting more and more experience from helping at the shelters. I also mentor people and train them to handle dogs. I feel that, when rescuing animals, you touch so many different types of people, because it’s not just about rescuing the animals, it’s about rescuing people, teaching people compassion, and teaching humans to be humane.” TH E HO RS E C ON N E CT I ON

Both Rachel and George began riding horses at around age 5—Rachel on her ponies Honeycomb and Mistletoe on the estate and George in Pelham Bay in New York City. They actually found each other through horses. George laughs and says, “I met Rachel when she was my groom at Beach Hill Farm in nearby Pleasantville.”

78 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

I

“I met Rachel when she was my groom.”

And why was a Rockefeller his groom? “I boarded a horse there,” George explains, “and Rachel wanted to buy the barn. Uncle David’s wife, Peggy, said, ‘Don’t you buy it unless you go work there first and see the whole operation under cover.’ So that’s what she did. She was my groom to begin with, and luckily she listened to Aunt Peggy and didn’t buy the place, because, in hindsight, it would have been a nightmare caring for 60 horses.” Their current barn is much smaller. It’s home to three horses: Nordstrom, a 21-year-old Trakehner; Shogun, an Irish sport horse that was an eventer; and Teddy, a 7-year-old Saddlebred they recently rescued. Rachel says she loves riding, but she was never driven to compete. “When you get me in the ring at an event, I get too nervous,” she chuckles. However, George had a successful 10-year run of competition, including winning the Prix-St.-George level in dressage, and then moved on to threeday eventing. “About 18 years ago,” he recalls, “when I decided I wanted to ride competitively, I asked Debbie Wiedmaier, my uncle and aunt’s trainer, to find me a ready-made grand-prix horse. She found Rossini, who was on the Danish Olympic team, so I got to the top quickly, because he was so push-button.” About 9 or 10 other Rockefeller relatives have homes on the estate, and many keep their horses there too. And an idyllic place it is for both people and horses with 3,500 acres that are filled with green pastures and miles of groomed trails and carriage roads. When asked why the couple quickly moved back to Pocantico after living in Vermont for a short period, they laugh together, “We just don’t think we’re built for that much rural. We like the countryside here, where it’s beautiful. It’s on the edge of the preserve, and we love having New York City only 20 minutes away.”


ROBERT HANSEN

The Guminas recreated a kitchen they loved that was in their previous home in Vermont. George notes, “What’s fun to us is that the house is made up of bits and pieces of different homes we love and places we have visited.”

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 9


TOM SOLO

80 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


According to

CHRISTIAN VÖLKERS,

the property business, like polo, is all about team spirit, dynamism, and the right strategy.

C

hristian Völkers discovered his passion for the game of polo 20 years ago through his friend Thomas Winter, who is regarded as Germany’s top polo player. But well before the birth of that passion and after studying business management, he founded the Engel & Völkers real-estate agency with Dirk Engel in 1977. In a Swiss magazine interview with Dr. Gisela Schütte, Völkers explained when he decided to take the established firm to the next level, “In 1986, after the unexpected death of my partner, Dirk, I had to decide whether I was going to continue running our real estate agency as we had done, or whether I was going to develop the company as an international brand. First,” he said, “we opened offices in Hamburg, then throughout the rest of Germany, and little by little elsewhere across Europe. Back then, while everybody else had their eyes on banking and IT, we were focusing on the ERWIN WINDMALLER

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 1


STUART PEARCE

82 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


real-estate business, which at the time was very local in orientation, with many small offices and a limited reach.” Völkers has since grown the firm into one of the world’s leading companies, specializing in premium real estate, yachts, and aircraft. Engel & Völkers now has over 700 locations in 32 countries and a staff of around 8,500. With his love of polo, Völkers particularly enjoys the challenge on the playing field, but the sport is also tied to his business. He speaks often of the synergies that come from the contacts with business partners and friends during the games. o, to someone with his drive, the only a logical next step was to create a polo school. Together with his friends, Thomas Winter and Rackham Schröder, Völkers decided to found a professional polo academy. Land Rover quickly became a partner, and the Engel & Völkers+Land Rover Polo School was born with locations in Hamburg and Berlin, ERWIN WINDMALLER Germany; Majorca, Spain; and the polo mecca of Argentina. The school’s lead trainer, Christopher Kirsch, has been passionate about polo since he was a child. His father, also a polo player, got his son involved in the sport when Christopher was only 6

years old. Kirsch is highly successful at an international level, and he and his team reached fifth place in the European Championships in 2008. In 2005, he

S

received the highest-trainer status from the Hurlingham Polo Association and is thereby qualified to train players as an international coach. Völkers divides his time between a historic carriage house in Hamburg,

Germany, and his 500-year-old estate, Son Coll, in Port d’es Canonge, Spain, on Majorca’s southwest coast and far removed from busy tourist areas. Son Coll features picturesque views and a vineyard that has been producing wine for over two decades. The polo school is also located at the estate, where, in the company of dogs, sheep, donkeys, and rabbits, polo is taught on an expansive playing field by first-class professional teachers and played on superbly trained Argentinian polo ponies. Son Coll is also the location of the annual Engel & Völkers Polo Cup, an event that brings together toplevel polo teams to compete for the championship title. Völkers traditionally climbs into the saddle for all three days of play. The guest list includes high-profile names from the worlds of entertainment, culture, business, and sport, as well as representatives from Engel & Völkers worldwide. Attendees are asked to dress in all white and are treated to an exclusive dinner party featuring wine produced by the estate’s vineyard. “It is an absolute pleasure to be able to share my great passion for polo with friends and associates from around the world. And I am equally pleased that interest in the polo cup is growing year by year, both within the polo scene and beyond,” said Völkers. PAGE 113 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 3


T

GIVE RIDING

he end of high school is a time of transition, Equestrian Association (NCEA) team might not. If the college decisions, and uncertainty. Most students are doesn’t offer the discipline you grew up perfecting, it might understandably overwhelmed by the task of be an opportunity to try a new one altogether, perhaps polo or choosing a future, but many riders are certain of eventing. one thing: they will find a way to continue folAn increasing number of programs offer a growing range lowing their passion for equestrian sports. of options to college riders. The largest option by far, the Of course, the college search should focus first on the qualIntercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) is available at nearly 400 schools nationwide in both Western and hunt-seat ity of the education. Endless options can be distilled by asking divisions ranging from beginner to a few questions before beginning elite. The NCEA is an affiliate of the the search; What kind of education NCAA and offers the highest level of am I looking for? Do I know what varsity competition for Western and kind of career I want? Would I like a hunt-seat riders. A growing number big university or do I prefer smaller of programs represent other disciclasses and a tighter community? plines, including the Intercollegiate After answering these basic quesPolo Association (IPA), the tions and shortening your potential Intercollegiate Dressage Association list, it can be helpful to search (IDA), and Intercollegiate Eventing online, to speak to collegiate riders, Program (IEP). and to find out everything you can Read more about riding at school in the Spring 2013 issue. Because many of these programs about different schools and their offer students the opportunity to equestrian programs. Finally, it is ride school-supplied horses, the costs of participating are not paramount to visit the institutions you select, to meet students, nearly as prohibitive as most other equestrian opportunities. sit in on classes, and to visit with the equestrian team to decide With the level playing field created by catch-riding, competiif it is a good fit. tors in intercollegiate riding programs are often required to It’s important to remember that riding in college can take showcase an even higher level of competence. any number of forms. There are a wide variety of programs One of the most valuable and exciting aspects of riding in and disciplines available. Some institutions have facilities on college is the opportunity for riders to participate as part of a campus and others offer riding at barns off-campus. Some colteam. Unlike most other types of horseback riding, intercolleleges emphasize and subsidize their riding programs, and others giate team competition is a chance to make lifelong friends, find treat it as a small club sport. Don’t be discouraged if the college support, and to be a part of something bigger than yourself. of your dreams doesn’t offer exactly the program you might Many student riders find it very rewarding to not only do their have expected. A small and tight-knit team might offer benbest in the ring, but to give leg ups and pep talks that matter efits a highly competitive National Collegeate just as much.

Virtually every riding discipline is available at school. Here is a sampling. Disciplines Teams

Gender

2012 Top Colleges

84 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWEET BRIA R COLLEGE

BY JILL JILL NOVOTNY NOVOTNY BY


ERIN ECKERT

THE OLD COLLEGE TRY

The Mt. Holyoke College Equestrian Team

The Maryland Polo Club Interscholastic Team

R I DI N G F OR E V ERYO NE IHSA Intercollegiate Horse Show Association

NCEA National Collegiate Equestrian Association

IDA Intercollegiate Dressage Association

ANRC American National Riding Commission

Polo National Intercollegiate Polo

USEA U.S. Eventing Association Intercollegiate Program

English/Western

English/Western

Dressage

Eventing/English

Polo

Eventing

400+ college teams

22 college teams

53 college teams

80 college teams

39 college teams

44 college teams

Co-ed

Women only

Co-ed

Co-ed

Men, women

Co-ed

English: Savannah College of Art, Mt. Holyoke Western: St. Andrews, Berry

Auburn, Univ. of Georgia

Emory & Henry, Averett, Johnson & Wales

Centenary, Savannah College of Art

Men: Harvard, Cornell, Texas Tech Women: UConn, Harvard, Colorado State

University of Georgia, Clemson

The Clemson University Eventing Team

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 5


THE IHSA CELEBRATES

WITH LA POMEROY

4 2

1

3

10

9

8

JUDGES AND OTHER GRE ATS WHO SHAPED INTERCOLLEGIATE RIDING

Y

ou could say it all began with a Shetland pony named Tiny whose influence was anything but insignificant to Robert E. “Bob” Cacchione as a boy growing up in Rye, New York. By the time Bob graduated from ponies to hunters under the tutelage of Secor Farm’s Wayne Carroll and enrolled at Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU)-Teaneck to study business administration, the brash freshman’s horse fever burned too deep to ignore. By 1967, with the guidance of FDU-Madison English professor Jack Fritz (soon to be influential in founding AHSA, USDF, USEA, USET and USPC), they united a handful of colleges in the New Jersey/

Bob Cacchione, founder of the IHSA.

New York area that had riding programs and access to horses. The intention was to making riding accessible to any student, regardless of skill or finances, and run shows where students competed individually and on teams representing their schools. Over the next 50 years, the big idea spurred by a little pony evolved into a national organization serving more than

86 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

400 institutions and 10,000 riders: the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association (IHSA). Bob simultaneously studied at FDUTeaneck, coached its riding team, and earned extraordinary recognition for his efforts, when, at age 18, FDU named him its youngest-ever faculty member. Yet no less remarkable was how providence smiled between semesters while he was working as ringmaster of nearby shows. At the in-gates he met the greats of their day. “It was the right place, right time,” Bob says. The same might be said of the photos he has shared from his personal archives, capturing the enthusiasm these great horsemen had for the IHSA and their willingness to serve as IHSA’s first judges, clinicians, and competitors.


50 YEARS 5

7

6

11

13 12

Photos from Bob Cacchione’s personal collection along with some of his memories: 1. IHSA riding clinic at Hunterdon College with George Morris and Bob Cacchione (1974). “A clinic with George, even back then, filled its gallery. Everyone wanted to go to his IHSA-only clinic.” 2. Cacchione, Stony Brook College coach George Lukemire, and Harry de Leyer (center) in 2000. De Leyer, the trainer made famous by The New York Times bestsellers and films about the $80 plow horse named Snowman who became his show jumping champion, was just another proud grandfather cheering for one of his 19 grandchildren, who had qualified for the 2000 IHSA Nationals in Georgia. 3. George Morris and Richard Shrake, IHSA Nationals judges (1994). “George and Richard were an interesting pair as judges, but I can say that everyone got along.” 4. Hugh J.B. Cassidy III, SUNY-Stony Brook (1971). Hugh created the IHSA Alumni Association and won its first yearend award. 5. Judy Richter of Coker Farm with Bob Cacchione (1993). “Judy judged the 1986 Nationals at Mount Holyoke College in

Massachusetts. She’s always been a big IHSA supporter. I saw her recently, and she came up and said, ‘Bob, keep doing those great things with those young riders.’ That means a lot coming from her.” 6. Jack Fritz and Cacchione at the IHSA Nationals at West Texas A&M (1994). After more than 30 years together, first as professor and student, and then as horse industry peers, Cacchione proudly recalls when IHSA showed Fritz its appreciation, “We gave him the Pioneer Award as a highly regarded influencer within the horse show community. He co-founded IHSA, as coach for FDU-Madison, while I coached FDU-Teaneck.” 7. IHSA jumping clinic with Bertalan de Nemethy and USET riders (from left) Dennis Murphy, Buddy Brown, and Robert Ridland, Gladstone, N.J. (1975). 8. Mary Chapot judging IHSA nationals (1977) and Wendy Chapot judging an IHSA show (1998). “I met Frank Chapot while I was a ringmaster. He was part of the Ronnie Mutch, Victor Hugo Vidal crowd that came to the shows, and when I asked him if he’d judge our second Nationals, he said yes. That’s when I met Mary and the girls, Wendy and Laura, and

Mary judged the fourth IHSA nationals.” 9. Susie Hume and R. Scot Evans, IHSA nationals hunt-seat judges with Cacchione (2000). “They’ve both done incredible jobs judging Nationals and know an invitation is open to come back again any time! Scot’s credentials have always made him a valuable judge. I first met him at a dinner party in New Jersey hosted by Kim Tudor at her cottage near the Team’s headquarters. She invited me, and there he was, and already a big-time judge and college clinician, so I asked if he’d judge IHSA.” 10. Cacchione and Ralph Gillis of Centenary College (1978). The following year at the nationals (not shown, 1979), “U.S. Vice President Fritz and Eleanor Mondale’s daughter had qualified in hunt seat, so they flew in on Air Force Two to Mid-Tennessee State University for the show. At a reception the night before, coach Gills had a fatal heart attack, leaving the team without a coach until coaches Jane Flynn (Penn State), George Lukemire (Stony Brook), and Joan Johnson stepped up to help the grieving team while continuing to coach their own teams.” In a true storybook ending, Centenary rallied to win their second consecutive IHSA

collegiate cup team title in honor of their late coach. 11. Victor Hugo Vidal judging an IHSA show at Secor Farms (1969). “Early IHSA shows had judges as good as the top shows, because I ringmastered so much that I saw trainers like Victor Hugo Vidal on a regular basis. So all I would do is ask, ‘Will you judge my show?’ and remarkably, they’d say, ‘Yes.’ What I will never forget to appreciate is how every one of these guys, including Victor, gave me a discount on their fees, which was very helpful for IHSA.” 12. West Point coach Colonel Balla, FDUMadison coach Jack Fritz, Cacchione, and USET coach and IHSA judge, and Bertalan de Nemethy. 13. Ronnie Mutch (1983). “I’d been asking Ronnie to judge our nationals for years but he always had a lot of students and a busy show schedule in May. But every time I saw him, would ask again. In 1983, we got him as our hunt-seat judge, and he did an incredible job.” Mutch was integral in partnering Miller’s Harness Company with IHSA to underwrite its coveted Collegiate Cup High Point Hunt Seat Team title at nationals.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 7


GETTING A LEG UP How did you become interested in a career in equestrian recruitment?

Equestrian Living chats with WENDY WILLS , the owner and director of College Equestrian Consulting in College Station, Texas. Wills offers students and their families support to build the communication with coaches that is needed to gain a place on increasingly competitive college equestrian rosters.

I became involved in 2003 when my daughter, who was a senior in high school at the time, decided that she wanted to ride in college. I knew absolutely nothing about college equestrian, nor did any of our friends, coaches, or contacts. My daughter had been involved in 4-H and in the Appaloosa circuit for years, and even in those circles, college equestrian was a mystery. We all knew it was out there, but at the time—close to 15 years ago now—there was some information on the “what,” what schools had teams, what the IHSA was, but there was no information on the “how.” So I got started in this business because I was that mom that was completely overwhelmed and lost, and I had no idea where to get any help. In the end, my daughter was successful. She got recruited to Texas A&M, but it was really baptism by fire. What is the process when a student comes to you for help in being recruited to a college?

F

irst, we produce portfolios for students. Every high-school equestrian, whether they’re interested in the IHSA or the NCEA, at minimum needs to have a portfolio that includes their videos, their equestrian resume, and an academic bio. All coaches are initially going to want to see those materials to be able to evaluate a prospect. So, the biggest thing we do is to help and advise students on how to create those materials. We select and edit videos, and we create a package. From there, students can take these materials and start contacting coaches on their own and be self-directed in the process. Or they can work with us to guide and advise them

88 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

through it. Those services are where we can really help students and families the most. There are so many questions and strict rules in the NCEA that can be difficult to navigate, like when you’re allowed to begin contacting a coach. NCEA coaches receive upwards of five or six hundred inquiries per year from prospective students who are interested in being recruited. In the end maybe 150 girls get signed to a team. How do you stand out? How do you get a coach’s interest? How do you find an advantage in the sea of applicants? This is where we can help. For club sports, which include many IHSA teams and other college riding associations, like those for polo, saddle seat, and eventing, you can only make a team after you’re enrolled. There’s not nearly as much legwork to do. So, when you begin your search it is important to ask what kind of riding you’d like to do in college and whether you want to be recruited or to join a club team.

NCEA coaches receive upwards of five or six hundred inquiries per year from prospective students that are interested in being recruited. Is it true that recruitment only happens for the NCEA, and not for the IHSA? I’m so glad you’ve asked that because that is the general perception about the IHSA, but it is incorrect. There are varsity IHSA teams that are fully funded by the university and have full-time coaches. Those schools do recruit.


So, an IHSA coach could influence your chances of being accepted to one of those colleges? Very much so. There aren’t a lot of IHSA varsity teams. There are currently about 40. They don’t recruit to the extent that the NCEA does. It’s possible to get a full ride to an NCEA university, and that has happened in the IHSA, but it’s unlikely. But there are financial opportunities for high-school equestrians getting recruited to the IHSA. How do you know which colleges have varsity IHSA teams? You search through 400 websites to find out. You spend a lot of time and do a lot of research. Generally speaking, there are plenty of opportunities for IHSA recruitment. What trends are you seeing?

T

he truth is that what I see is—whether it’s in hunter jumper, Western, reining, or IDA—the talent pool is getting bigger and bigger. Part of that might be the IEA, which is allowing a lot of high-school equestrians access to competition. I think it is probably a big factor in the growth that I keep seeing year after year. Not only that, the talent level is getting higher and higher, and consequently, the competition, particularly in the NCEA and at the open level in the IHSA, is getting stiffer and stiffer. Unfortunately, the number of teams is not expanding proportionally. In fact, we’ve recently lost a couple of teams from the NCEA. On the NCEA side especially, another other trend that I’m seeing is that recruitment is happening earlier

and earlier. By early in your junior year, you’ve already got to be engaged with as coach. You’ve already had to have started the process, made those videos, have those materials, and sent them out. Then you can spend that year building a relationship with those coaches, going out and visiting these places and meeting with coaches. Why do you think the number of teams hasn’t increased to meet the rising demand? I don’t see a lack of interest in equestrian, but I think not being able to achieve full status with the NCAA, not being able to break that magic number of 40 teams,

They might have the talent, but it’s too late. Nothing breaks my heart more than needing to tell parents that their child has the skill, but that we’ve missed the window. has been a deterrent to athletic directors that might be on the edge of considering transitioning their equestrian program from a club to a varsity sport. And I’m hopeful that if we get to that 40 teams, we’d see a real shift in athletic directors becoming more agreeable to transitioning to varsity. At the end of the day, it’s always about money. It’s also important to note, though, the importance of Title IV to the discussion. If a college has a varsity women’s sport and they drop it, they’re required to replace those athletic opportunities for women. In the case of Kansas State, when they dropped equestrian, they were able to start a women’s soccer team. Most

other universities already have women’s soccer, and therefore it would be more difficult for them to drop their equestrian teams, because it would be nearly impossible to replace those opportunities. Equestrian teams at the NCEA level have large rosters, and when you have 45 to 50 women, that is a serious consideration for athletic directors in meeting their Title IV compliance. What should a student considering college equestrian know? I think the most important thing is to understand that for high-school equestrians that are interested in riding in college, the responsibility is on them. This is all about being proactive. Equestrian sports often have very small budgets and a small staff. They don’t have a recruiting staff, and they don’t have much of an opportunity to travel the country and look for talent. As a result, if you want to get recruited, it is up to you. It’s very important to start early and to plan ahead. As I mentioned, the process should really start before your junior year of high school. A year ago, if a student had called me in the fall of their junior year, I would have said, “Okay, I’m comfortable that we have time.” Today, I don’t feel comfortable starting in junior year. I highly recommend that if kids are serious, particularly about recruitment for the NCEA or IHSA that they start the process in their sophomore year. I can’t tell you how many calls I receive about a student in the beginning of their senior year, and they say I’d really like to be recruited to an equestrian team. They might have the talent, but it’s too late. Nothing breaks my heart more than needing to tell a parent that their child has the skill, but that we’ve missed the window. PAGE 113

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 9


TEAMWORK TO SAVE TEAMS

I

Smith College Equestrian Center

t came as a surprise when the Smith College athletic department announced the fall closing of its oncampus equestrian facility and the end of its varsity program. The Seven Sisters institution in Massachusetts has been a successful member of the IHSA for many years, and the equestrian team had continually achieved Smith’s highest varsity-team GPA. Neither the team nor Sue Payne, Smith’s equestrian coach for over 35 years, was given notice or even an explanation. “Students, parents, alumnae, friends, and colleagues are supporting our goal to maintain the facility and the riding program,” explained Judy Richter, a rider, judge, author, clinician, and Smith alumna. “We are incredibly frustrated with the administration,” wrote Carla Geiersbach, chair of the Save Smith Equestrian steering committee and alumna of the class of 1990. “One of the biggest problems with the administration’s decision is the concern among the alumnae and donor community,” added Tegan Kossowicz, a graduate of the class of 1988. “Generous gifts built the indoor-riding arena in the 1980s. In the 90s, the stable was renovated and an addition was added through a generous gift from the Johnson family, after their daughter, Christiane, died tragically in a train accident. In recent years, alumnae gifts upgraded the footing and added a viewing room. If the riding

Sweet Briar College

facility is closed, donors and alumnae will view this action as a betrayal of their intent, calling into question the college’s commitment to the wishes of donors who make future contributions.” “Smith’s equestrian center is a tremendous asset for students, the college, and the entire community, and to throw it all away is inexplicable,” said Jess Peláez, who graduated in 2005. SU C CESS AT SWEET BRIAR

Smith’s closure of its equestrian facility echoes a larger decision by Sweet Briar College in 2015 to completely close the college because of financial pressures. The 114-year-old women’s college in Virginia, best-known for its equestrian program, was scheduled to shut down permanently until a vocal and organized group of students and alumnae gathered to fight the decision through legal action, fundraising, and publicity. Save Sweet Briar raised $28.5 million in 110 days. Now, the college has recordhigh student admissions levels. “There’s a sense of trust that has been restored throughout Sweet Briar,” student body president, Katie Craig, told the Huffington Post last May. The survival of Sweet Briar offers Smithies a glimpse of hope. While financial problems for Sweet Briar may have raised questions about the relevance and viability of women’s colleges, the reaction has demonstrated their worth.

90 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

“The ‘white glove’ image many people have of women’s colleges is utterly divorced from reality,” wrote Elizabeth Kiss, chair of the Women’s College Coalition board of directors. “As a sector, U.S. women’s colleges are cutting-edge models of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic inclusion and success.” VARSITY EQUEST R I A N

The equestrian teams give riders a chance to participate in college athletics and be recognized. They also offer non-riders a chance to try a sport that otherwise may be cost prohibitive. When California’s Fresno State decided to add a varsity sport in the 90s, Athletics Director, Al Bohl, took a chance on riding. “We add it, and—boom—all of a sudden we had 100 kids on the team,” he told USA Today. “How we recruited was just answering the phone, so many people wanted to be on it.” Now, it is up to people like Smith riders to demonstrate the value of equestrian sports for a college and its students. Geiersbach wrote on the Save Smith Equestrian website, “I still ride almost every day. I’m not sure how many varsity field hockey or lacrosse players are still competing 25 years after graduating, but I know lots of riders who are.” The fight to save Smith’s equestrian center and varsity team is evolving quickly. Keep up to date and sign the petition here: savesmithequestrian.com


T H E F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM E Q U E ST R I A N L I V I N G

EQ U E STR IAN EQLiving.com

PRO PERTI ES FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017

JUPITER, FLORIDA EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

PAG E 92

®


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

JUPITER, FLORIDA EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

S

ituated on 50 acres in the secured gated community of Ranch Colony in Jupiter, the YZ Ranch is one of the most incredible equestrian estates in all of South Florida. Ranch Colony is a fabulous 2,000 acre gated community complete with a private airport community, an equestrian community, and three golf courses, including the world renowned Dye Preserve Golf Club. Ranch Colony is surrounded by over 20,000 accessible acres of nature preserves and horse trails, which makes it ideal for equestrian enthusiasts. YZ Ranch is a unique property offering first class equestrian facilities and grounds in an exclusive and natural private setting.  The property consists of three structures, a main house, a guest house, and a stable.  All three structures were built to

| 2016 92 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | OC FEB TOB RUARY ER//N MARCH OVEMB|ER 2017

exceed Miami/Dade hurricane specifications and safety using impact glass doors and windows, reinforced rebar concrete roofs, walls, and floors, electric rollup hurricane shutters, and two commercial Caterpillar generators. The main house offers 5 bedrooms, 5 full baths, and 3 half baths with a total of 11,986 +/- interior living space. The main house features a heated saltwater pool, a chef’s kitchen, a temperature controlled 1,000 bottle wine room, a large walk-in fire proof vault, a ground floor master, a third floor observation lounge, and terrace with incredible views of the four-acre private lake and grounds. The guest house offers two bedrooms, three full baths and is complete with a kitchen, a den, and laundry facility.  There is also a staff lounge and a four bay garage with a shop area. The


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

ROBERT STEIN

PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS: –50 Acre Equestrian Estate –Fully Equipped 8 Stall Barn –Remote Operated Property Entry Security Gate –Video Security throughout Property –Pier on the 4-acre Private Bass Lake –Loggia with Retractable Screen –Elevator –Crestron Smart Home –Fully Appointed Summer Kitchen –Reverse Osmosis Drinking Systems –3 ¾ Car Air Conditioned Garage in Main House –20 to 50 Additional Adjacent Acres Available

stable has a one bedroom, one bath apartment on the second floor with a full kitchen, a den and a laundry room. On the first floor there are eight horse stalls with two large wash racks and two large grooming stalls with an automatic fly spray system. There is also an air conditioned tack room, laundry room, and feed room, and a 12 x 32 ft. hay/shavings room. These unparalleled equestrian facilities include the fully equipped eight stall stable, a large riding and jumping arena which could also be perfectly suited for dressage. The property also features eight turnout paddocks, three concrete turn-out sheds, and beautiful on site riding trails which gracefully wind through the many cypress and pine trees and pass by the Dye Preserve Golf Club. $19,900,000

TODD PETER 561.281.0031 todd.peter@sothebyshomes.com FRANCES PETER 561.273.6128 frances.peter@sothebyshomes.com francesandtodd.com

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 3


E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

LED LIGHTING FOR BARNS Innovative and economical lighting from AMBERWAY EQUINE. BY CARRIE WIRTH

T

he typical scenario for lighting the interiors of horse barns is simply to install overhead lighting and call it a day, but for high-end facilities that house the top horses in sport, lighting is a greater concern. “You have to think about the ability to see the horse closely when the horse is being groomed, with light from the side and not just from above,” said Brian Lynch, owner of Amberway Equine, a company that outfits and installs equestrian facilities with state-of-the-art products for the comfort, safety, and aesthetics of horses and their handlers. “Another important aspect of lighting is being able to see them in their stalls. For night check, you don’t want to shock or disturb them by turning on a bank of overhead lights, but you still want to have a good look at them.” Amberway Equine’s clients are equestrian facility architects and builders and some of the top names in show jumping, racing, breeding, dressage, and polo. Outfitting facilities that house elite equine athletes is their specialty. Lynch was recently hired by T&R

Development to finish off a spec barn in the exclusive Mallet Hill neighborhood in Wellington, Florida. The project included installation of a stall comfort system, rubber pavers for the aisles, a Miele equine laundry, Cool Barn fans, and a lighting system. “It was a great project because T&R founders Teddy Vlock and Rob Gray really have the horse in mind,” Lynch said. “They are not just flipping a property. Their goal is to create the ideal environment for equine athletes. They gave me carte blanche to do what I thought would be best. “For the lighting in the grooming and wash stalls we added LED lighting inset

94 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | OC FEB TOB RUARY ER//N MARCH OVEMB2017 ER | 2016

flush into the wall and covered in clear, durable plastic,” he said. “This lighting is really functional and safe. There is nothing protruding, and there are no outlets, so spraying water on it is safe. A horse can kick the wall, and it’s no problem.” For the stall lighting, Lynch did something that he believes has never been done before. He added LED lighting to the partitions with a control for each stall. LED lighting is considered the safest possible lighting choice because it is cool, energy-efficient, and carries the lowest fire-hazard risk. “We installed 3000 Kelvin LED lighting for a warm, amber look,” Lynch said. “The result is both aesthetically pleasing and functional. The owner can light up all the stalls to showcase the barn, or it works perfectly for night check. The horses can remain at rest, and the barn manager can see the horses to make sure everything is OK.” Lynch bases his company out of Midway, Kentucky, but spends the entire winter season in Wellington and has a design center on the Winter Equestrian PAGE 113 Festival showgrounds.


EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

Steeple ChaSe Farm - Wellington, Fl

10 Acres | 24 Stalls | 11 Padocks | All-Weather Arena | $6,950,000

palm beaCh polo - Wellington, Fl

4 Bedrooms | 4.5 Bathrooms | Golf Course Views | $2,350,000

Equestrian Sotheby’s - Official Sponsor -

grindStone Farm - Wellington, Fl

6.3 Acres | 17 Stalls | 3 Tack Rooms | 6 Paddocks | $10,999,999

r anCh Colony - Jupiter, Fl

50 Acres | 5 Bedrooms | 5 Full / 3 Half Baths | 8-Stall Barn | $19,900,000

david WelleS, p.a. OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 5

561.313.9123 | dWelleS@equeStrianSir.Com | bit.do/davidWelleS


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR FARMS AND ESTATES

RENOVATED SADDLE TRAIL PARK HOME. This single-family home features marvelous renovations with land to spare for a barn and ring. The community offers miles of bridle paths to be enjoyed. This incredible 3 bedroom, 2 bath home features brand new kitchen and baths, impact glass, wood floors, a stunning pool with built-in spa and marble flooring. $1,650,000

PROFESSIONAL EQUESTRIAN FACILITY. This fabulous 15acre property includes a large covered arena complete with GGT footing, an outdoor GGT all-weather arena, 42 stalls, 18 spacious paddocks, walker, and round pen. The 3 bedroom/2.5 bath main home and 1 bedroom/1 bath, and numerous staff quarters overlook a beautiful lake with sunset view. $9,000,000

SOUTHFIELDS EQUESTRIAN ESTATE. Location, location, location. Offering easy access to bridle paths, this home is within hacking distance of IPC and all WEF show grounds. The property boasts an immaculate 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath home, including guest cottage, 12-stall courtyard barn with 8 paddocks, regulation dressage arena, and a lovely pool. $5,900,000

AERO CLUB. Treat yourself to the finest living the Aero Club has to offer. This stately 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom home is located directly on the runway. With over 5,500 feet under air, this immaculate residence is perfect for those wishing to fly their private jet or helicopter to Wellington for the winter season. $1,695,000

Martha W. Jolicoeur, PA

marthasproperties.com | martha@marthasproperties.com 11199 Polo Club Road, Wellington, FL 33414 | E Q UE 96 797 STRIAN 561 8040

L I V I N G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHASPROPERTIES.COM WELLINGTON, FL

PALM BEACH POINT ESTATE. On this sprawling 5.77 acre lot in Palm Beach Point, within hacking distance from WEF, could soon be a new 12-stall show barn. The main house boasts 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, marble floors, and a cherry gourmet kitchen. Permitting and site work is approved. Purchase now and your barn can be ready for next season. Reduced to a great price! $2,500,000

AERO CLUB. This 4 bedroom, 3 bath Mediterranean-style home features granite kitchen countertops, a fireplace, enormous new airplane hangar, new garage and outdoor pool with spa. The home is adjacent to a private 4,000 foot paved runway and is a short drive away from WEF show grounds. Perfect for those who want to fly in for the winter season. $1,299,000

OAK TREE VILLAS. Truly a turnkey property for the upcoming season, this second-floor 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom residence features an open and airy floor plan. Boasting tranquil views of the Dunes golf course’s 14th hole, the home provides easy access to show grounds and all the amenities Palm Beach Polo Golf & Country Club has to offer. $449,500

WINDSOME FARM ESTATES. Long regarded as one of the most prestigious equestrian estates in Wellington, Windsome Farm Estates has been redeveloped into four of the finest 10-acre lots the area has to offer. Phase one has been completed, and site plans are approved. Don’t miss the endless possibilities. Newly priced. $3,600,000

1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 7


www.BarbaraVisions.com

E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Robert Ross, P.A. 561.758.6185 Robsross@aol.com www.RobertRealtyGroup.com Equestrian Properties, Residential, Land, Luxury Homes, Investment Properties, Commercial, International & Rentals.

Equestrian Way - Saddle Trail Location! Location! Location! Lovely farm on the show side of Greenbriar with plenty of room for riders, barn mates, and staff. The 1.97-acre Equestrian Estate is complete with an 8-stall barn, 3 wash stalls, sand ring, and a sep. 2BR/1BA barn apartment. Call Robert or Luis at 561.385.2383. Offered at $2,900,000

Southfields - Wellington, FL

Grand Prix Village

This estate’s prime location in the sought after gated Southfields section make it a standout among all others. Located within hacking distance of all 3 horse show venues, the property boasts a main house with 4BR/4.5BA including a 1BR/1BA guest cottage. A 64-foot marble hallway leads to a luxurious master suite w/ sauna. Every window offers spectacular views of the farm and the 12-stall courtyard barn, complete with 8 paddocks, a mirrored dressage arena and viewing lounge. Custom finishes, equine inspired sculptures and a pool round out this exceptional property for the serious equestrian. Offered at $5,900,000

This World-Class Facility on the largest parcel of land and stables available for purchase in Grand Prix Village. Just a few minutes hack from the Winter Equestrian Festival show grounds with over 60 stalls, 14 paddocks, hot walker, treadmill, lunging area, and both a hunter arena as well as an oversized jumping arena theS finest footing The is fully | E Q UE | 2016hedged and fenced for privacy and tranquility for you and your horses. Ample housing includes an 98 with TRIAN L I V I Navailable. G | OC TOB ER/ property N OVEMB ER owners apt, managers apt, riders apt, and multiple grooms apts. This is a one-of-a-kind opportunity rarely available in the horse show capital of the world. Price upon request.


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

#1 Individual agent Keller Williams South Florida Region 2014 #2 Individual agent Keller Williams South Florida Region 2015 #1 Individual agent Keller Williams Wellington-2014, 2015, & 2016 #7 Agent Keller Williams North America in 2016 (over 100,000 agents)

Saddle Trail - Rolling Rock & Wellington Trace Fantastic investment opportunity a short hack to the show with the only covered arena in Saddle Trail. Your options are endless with these 3 adjoining parcels. Purchase the entire 7.06 acres w/ house, 4 arenas, 14 paddocks and 35 + stalls for $3,945,000 or any combination below suited to your equestrian dream: A. 2.17 acres w/house, 4 stall barn and paddocks for $1,095,000. B. 4.74 acres w/house, 4 stall barn, paddocks, and 3 arenas for $2,310,000. C. 4.89 acres w/ 30 plus stall barn, 4 arenas, paddocks for $2,850,000. D. 2.32 acres w/30 plus stall barn, 1 arena, paddocks for $1,635,000.

Homeland

Nestled in the heart of Homeland lie two adjoining 5-acre farms making it a 10-acre hidden treasure. Enjoy the tranquil Florida pine-shaded paddocks or ride through the extensive charming trails. Bring the entire family and team for season as this farm has two homes and a 12-stall barn. Offered at $2,850,000

Palm Beach Little Ranches

Professionally landscaped and meticulously maintained, this recently renovated, fully fenced 4.9-acre dressage farm is the second largest boarding barn in the area with a loyal following of competitive dressage riders and trainers. Offered at $1,950,000

Bel Aire in Palm Beach Polo Club

True contemporary design, completely remodeled in 2016. The master suite, which opens out to the pool area also features oversized his & her closets and spa marble bath with soaking tub. Elevator up to the second floor to your junior master suite, ensuite guest bedrooms, and open loft area. The floor to ceiling windows OC TOB R/NOVE MB relaxing E R | 20 1 6in| EQ I V I NG .CO M | 99 showcase the expansive golf course, pool area and mature tropical landscaping. The outdoor space is ideal forEguests and theLFlorida sunshine. Offered at $3,400,000


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

TOUR EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES ACROSS AMERICA

®

AMERICA’S FINEST EQUESTRIAN REAL ESTATE LUXEQUESTRIAN.COM ® 10 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Bald Rock Estates - Sapphire, NC Exquisite Equestrian Estate On 10.37 acres, this estate features a 4-stall barn, pasture, and grotto-style pool. Bald Rock offers riding trails which adjoin the trails into Pisgah National Forest. This 5 BR, 6½ BA lodge enjoys one of WNC’s most spectacular settings and views. Impeccable attention to detail includes paneled great room with massive stone fireplace, a chef ’s kitchen, outdoor kitchen and covered porch with fireplace. $3,900,000. MLS 3234296

Art Fisher, Broker 10 Park Place West | Brevard, NC 28712 (828) 883-9895 ArtFisher@FisherRealtyNC.com FisherRealtyNC.com OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 1


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

10 2 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 3


GEORGE KAMPER

A LONG ST R I DE B E YO N D T H E E XP EC TE D Email Marketing

Planning and strategy

Social Media

Public Relations

Websites

Marketing

Graphic Design

Branding

Video Production

Event Promotions

Podcasts

Press Center Management

Sponsorship Support Product Launches Book Tours

SUE WEAKLEY

EQ M E D I A The full-service media agency with an equestrian focus EQmedia.agency J UN E / J ULY | 2016 | E Q LIV IN G .C O M | 612-209-0310

25


WESTERN

APRIL 18–22, 2017 NIGHT of the HORSE Saturday, April 22 • 7pm

HUNTER/JUMPER

DRESSAGE

APRIL 27–30, 2017 EVENING of MUSICAL FREESTYLES Saturday, April 29 • 7pm

MAY 2–7, 2017

$100,000 GRAND PRIX of DEL MAR Saturday, May 6 • 6:45pm

For tickets call 858-792-4252 D e l M a r, C A | f a c e b o o k . c o m / d e l m a r n a t i o n a l

| delmarnational.com


LO OK F OR EQ U EST R I A N L I VI N G AT T H E PALM B E AC H SE R IE S


B

CL

U

EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

EQ

OK

B

OUT OF THE WILD

O

continued from page 33

MR: I have been working with and training mustangs since the mid-1980s. I have also had the opportunity to observe wild horse bands all throughout the West, including Colorado, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nevada, and Oregon, as well as overseas in England— on the moors and in the New Forest. Paul, what do you think makes this film stand apart from other movies about horses and the West?

apart from other horse movies in a couple of ways—not only the story but the way we tried to present the story. I really wanted to make a film that would help even non-horsepeople see the beauty in the horses and the humans and their relationships. It’s a gritty movie about beaten up characters that find themselves together—you see the beauty in this. And although it is a Western, it is more of a rancher film, I like to say. You have

elements of the West but with a modern story.

their strength. Of course Henry had no concept of what she was doing, or why. He had always loved horses, as most stockmen do, and had even had pretty special relationships with a couple of them during his lifetime. But mostly, horses were tools to get a job done, and in some cases, just a necessary evil. So of course as he watched Jessie disappear in the mass of horse bodies that surrounded her, he was concerned. It was easy to get hurt around horses, especially that many all at once. All it would take is one of them kicking at another and missing, and just like that somebody’d be hauling her off to the hospital. Instinctively he started heading for the porch steps but stopped when a few of the horses moved just enough for him to see Jessie’s head and shoulders, and the smile on her face. He saw her talking to each horse as she pet the head, or neck, or shoulder, and the horses all responded quietly to her touch. Jessie moved slowly through the herd, and talked to each one as she made gentle contact with them, “Hello Fancy. Dakota, how are you? Well, there’s Zephyr. I haven’t seen you in a month. Amigo, how are you today?” Dust rose from under the horse’s feet as they moved in a slow circle around her, and the setting sun gave the entire scene

a crimson hue Henry had never seen before. He continued to watch for several minutes almost in awe at the relationship Jessie had with her horses, and it was only after she had made contact with each one that she made her way back through the herd, climbed through the fence, and walked slowly back the way she had come. As soon as Jessie was out of sight, Henry stepped off the porch and nonchalantly made his way over to the pen she had just vacated. He stood outside the corral for several seconds, looked in every direction to make sure nobody was watching, then climbed through the fence and in with the horses. He stood in the same spot Jessie had when the horses first approached and waited for them to respond. The horses barely acknowledged his presence, and then turned their backs to him and walked away as if he wasn’t even there. “I’ll be damned,” he said to himself. He turned and looked in the direction Jessie went when she left the pen, and wondered what kind of magic she used on the herd. He looked back at the horses, and found they had dispersed all over the pen and gone back to eating the piles of hay scattered on the ground. “How the hell’d she do that?”

PK: I believe Out of the Wild stands

BOOK EXCERPT continued from page 30

safety, got to his feet to get a better look at what was going on. If Jessie could have seen the worry on Henry’s face, or if she would have even known he was watching, she would have laughed. This was something Jessie had been doing with the horses since she was a little girl. It worried her parents at first, too, seeing their little girl all by herself in a pen full of (at the time) wild horses, and them milling around her to a point where she disappeared. They had warned the young Jessie about going in with all the horses, and at 10 years old, even threatened punishment if they caught her doing it again. But it didn’t stop her, and eventually they realized what she already knew: the horses weren’t going to hurt her. Even back then, anytime things got to be a little too much for her, she would go spend time with the horses and before long, her worries would fade like the last note of an old song. There had even been times back when she lived in the city when she longed for her herd, even for just a minute or two, when she could stand amongst them and draw from

10 8 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

Anticipation for the release of Out of the Wild is building. When and where will people be able to see the film?

MR/PK: We are in the process of entering the movie in film festivals and waiting for responses. We have a couple distributors interested. We will let everyone know when the movie gets distributed.

PAGE 113


PIN OAK MARCH 22 - APRIL 2

2017

BE PART OF THE TRADITION G R E AT S O U T H W E S T E Q U E S T R I A N C E N T E R , K AT Y, T E X A S TO BENEFIT

OVER $600,000 IN PRIZE MONEY USEF PREMIER RATED USHJA 5-STAR JUMPER SHOW BOTH WEEKS WCHR RECOGNITION BOTH WEEKS

WEEK I TITLE SPONSOR

WEEK II TITLE SPONSOR

pinoak.org | 4 GRAND PRIXS WITH OVER $110,000 IN PRIZE MONEY

$80,000 IN USHJA INTERNATIONAL HUNTER DERBY MONEY | $20,000 25 & UNDER GRAND PRIX | $5,000 U25 WELCOME STAKE $30,000 IN USHJA NATIONAL HUNTER DERBY MONEY | $10,000 IN USHJA PRE-GREEN INCENTIVE MONEY $5,000 IN PRE-GREEN SUPER SERIES MONEY | $20,000 WELCOME STAKE MONEY | PRIZE LIST ONLINE AT PINOAK.ORG SUPPORTED BY BRIAN BRADLEY, MD MEMORIAL FUND

THE

HILDEBRAND FUND

MEDIA PARTNER


PHOTO: KRISTIN LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

2017 SHOW SCHEDULE

SAVE THE DATE

SANTA BARBARA SURFSIDE CLASSIC

HUNTINGTON BEACH SUMMER CLASSIC

SANTA BARBARA SUNSHINE CLASSIC

FLINTRIDGE AUTUMN CLASSIC

Feb 22 - 26, Santa Barbara, CA

March 1 - 5, Santa Barbara, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA WELCOME CLASSIC

March 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA ZINFANDEL CLASSIC

March 15 - 19, Paso Robles, CA

August 10 - 13, Huntington Beach, CA Sept 28 - Oct 1, La Cañada Flintridge, CA

SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL WELCOME WEEK

Sept 27 - Oct 1, Rancho Murieta, CA

SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL WORLD CUP WEEK October 4 - 8, Rancho Murieta, CA

LA EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL WELCOME WEEK

96TH ANNUAL FLINTRIDGE HORSE SHOW

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL WORLD CUP WEEK

DEL MAR NATIONAL

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL SEASON FINALE

April 20 - 23, Burbank, CA

April 27 - 30, La Cañada Flintridge, CA May 2 - 7, Del Mar, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA MEMORIAL DAY CLASSIC

May 24 - 28, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CLASSIC May 31 - June 4, Paso Robles, CA

HUNTINGTON BEACH SURF CLASSIC

October 11 - 15, Del Mar, CA

October 18 - 22, Del Mar, CA

October 25 - 29, Del Mar, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FALL CLASSIC

November 1 - 5, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OAK TREE CLASSIC

November 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA

July 6 - 9, Huntington Beach, CA

LOOK F OR EQ U EST R I A N LI VI N G AT WEST PA L M E VE N TS

WWW.WESTPALMSEVENTS.COM


EQ EQ EE SS SS EE N N TT II AA LL SS || D D II N N II N NG G

A TASTE OF OCALA F L AVO

LOC

L

R

A

Chef RICK ALABAUGH of the GOLDEN OCALA GOLF & EQUESTRIAN CLUB shares one of his favorite recipes.

TR UN CO TES SE ORI R H O FAV

Y

SUN-DRIED TOMATO RISOTTO Ingredients (Serving Size: 6) 1 ounce of sun-dried tomatoes 1 cup of water 2 ½ cups of chicken broth 1 cup of finely chopped onions 1 garlic clove—minced 4 tablespoons of olive oil 1 cup of arborio rice ¼ cup of freshly grated parmesan cheese 1 teaspoon of chopped parsley 1. In a small sauce pan, simmer the tomatoes in the water for 1 minute and chop them. In a sauce pan, combine the reserved cooking liquid and the broth. Bring the liquid to a simmer. 2. In a large sauce pan, cook the onion and the garlic in the oil over moderately low heat. Stir well until they are softened. Add the rice and stir until each grain is coated with oil. Stir in the tomatoes and add 1/2 cup of the simmering liquid until the liquid is absorbed. Continue to add the liquid 1/2 cup at a time. Stir constantly and let each portion be absorbed before adding the next unit. Cook until the rice is tender, but still al dente. (The rice should take about 17 minutes to become al dente). 3. Stir in the parmesan salt and pepper to taste. Top with parsley.

11 2 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

MISO-MARINATED PISTACHIO-CRUSTED SEA BASS BEURRE BLANC Ingredients (Serving Size: 6) ¼ cup of chopped shallots 1 cup of Mirin (Sweet Japanese rice wine) ¾ cup of white miso ½ cup of sake ¼ cup of sugar 6–6-ounce Sea Bass fillets (About 1 inch thick) 1 cup of dry white wine 6 garlic cloves—chopped 1 bay leaf ½ teaspoon of whole black peppercorns 1 cup of whipped cream 6 tablespoons of unsalted butter at room temperature 2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons of eel sauce 1 cup of pistachios—ground fine in a food processor Preparation 1. Whisk Mirin, white miso, sake, eel sauce, and sugar in a mixing bowl to combine. Add sea bass. Make sure the marinade covers the fish and refrigerate for 6 hours. 2. Boil white wine, chopped shallots, chopped garlic, bay leaf, and black peppercorns in a heavy, large sauce pan until reduced to ¾ cup (about 5 minutes). 3. Add whipped cream and boil until reduced to 1 cup (about 7 minutes). Strain into medium sauce pan, pressing on solids. Place over low heat. Add unsalted butter—1 tablespoon at a time—whisking until melted before adding more. Remove from heat. Whisk in fresh lemon juice. Season sauce to taste with salt and pepper. Cover to keep warm. 4. Preheat oven to 4500F. Remove from marinade. Transfer to prepared oil-rimmed baking sheet. Bake about 10 minutes or internal temperature of about 1550F. 5. Preheat broiler. Top seabass with pistachio dust. Cover evenly. Broil fish until well browned on top and opaque in the center—watching closely to avoid burning (about 2 minutes). 6. Place sun-dried tomato risotto in the middle of the plate. Lay seabass on top and spoon sauce on the seabass and around the plate. Rick Alabaugh, executive chef at Golden Ocala Golf & Equestrian Club received his formal culinary training at the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia. He then owned his own restaurant, the River Bar and Grill, in Birmingham, Alabama. Since being in Ocala, he has earned the title of Iron Chef of Ocala and winner of Culinary Combat. He has made the Best of the Best list as best chef for several years and has also been featured in many magazine and newspaper articles. PAGE 113


Milea > Ads > Equestrian Living Magazine > 06_June (0628_hpv_ShintoFarm_138111.indd) Walter / 4c / 4" x 10.125" EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

DÉCOR Page 10 Linens Pomegranate pomegranateinc.com PEOPLE Page 14 Ki-Juan Minors facebook.com/AmericanEquestriansGotTalent cdbaby.com/m/cd/kijuanminors HATS Page 18 Patey Hats pateyhats.com MUCK BOOTS Page 22 Ariat ariat.com Dublin dublinclothing .com L.L. Bean llbean.com Dubarry dubarry.us Noble Outfitters nobleoutfitters.com Ovation equestriancollections.com WEEKENDER BAGS Page 24 Bric’s bricstore.com neimanmarcus.com Cuyana Cuyana.com Frye neimanmarcus.com Ghurka ghurka.com Graf Lantz graf-lantz.com J. W. Hulme Co. jwhulmeco.com MCM neimanmarcus.com

Oughton Limited oughtonlimited.com Tucker Tweed tuckertweed.com FAVORITES Page 30 Out of the Wild Trafalgar Square Book horseandriderbooks.com FASHION Page 34 Ariat ariat.com AtelierCG ateliercg.com Burberry burberry.com Equiline equilineamerica.com Frye thefryecompany.com Goode Rider gooderider.com Karina Brez karinabrez.com Luca’s Boutique lucas.boutique.com Rönner rönnerdesign.com Vincent Peach vincentpeach.com Winning Couture winningcouture.com Winston Equestrian winston-equestrian.com GALLERY Page 44 Little Kids and their Big Dogs By Andy Seliverstoff Revodana Publishing, 2017 greatdane.photography.com ALBANESE Page 52 ale.tailormade@gmail.com USA +1 561-818-1050 EU +39 3356947896

TRAVEL Page 58 Eden Roc Resort Cap Cana, Dominican Republic edenroccapcana.com Los Establos losestablos.com.do VÖLKERS Page 80 Engel & Völkers engelvolkers.com COLLEGE RIDING Page 84 IHSA ihsainc.com NCEA collegiateequestrian.com IDA teamdressage.com ANRC anrc.org/anrc-intercollegiatechampionships IEA rideiea.org USEA useventing.com/membership/ intercollegiate Wendy Wills College Equestrian Consulting collegeequestrianconsulting. com

NOW OPEN SHINTO FARM Shinto Farm/CB Dressage is Bedford Hill’s premier state-ofthe-art dressage facility on 18 stunning acres. It has a history of horsemanship passed down through five generations of dedicated equestrians. Shinto Farm is amateur-friendly and offers boarding, training and sales, as well as professionally-taught dressage clinics throughout the year. We take competitors to FEI competitions as well as regional & national championships.

BARN LIGHTING Page 94 Amberway Equine amberwayequine.com DINING Page 112 Golden Ocala Golf & Equestrian Club goldenocala.com/dining BARN DOG Page 114 The Tackeria tackeria.com

Trainer Michelle Winsett Dinneen riding Krafty. Training staff also includes Courtney Bolender and Trish Helmer. Krafty owned by Carol Samaras; photo by Jason Banister

SHINTO FARM/CB DRESSAGE DON'T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE! EQLIVING.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Dressage Horses For Sale or Lease Lessons – Full Training 145 Broad Brook Road, Bedford Hills, NY 10507 845-797-4419 | cbwalkerstables.com

FE B RUA RY/M A RCH | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 1 3


EQ B A R N D O G S

WORKING CANINE TO FIVE Wellington’s well-known WIZ is the Tackeria’s Spokesdog

W

iz looks right down the lens of the camera as if to say, “Don’t hate me because I’m handsome.” He is The Tackeria’s popular social media spokesdog. His job is to lend his good looks to sell various equestrian and dog products. If he could talk, he’d tell you that he enjoys posing with dog treats the most. The Tackeria is at the epicenter of Wellington, Florida, located between the home of the Winter Equestrian Festival and the Adequan Global Dressage Festival and not far from International Polo Club Palm Beach. The store is a cornerstone of the community and a bustling meeting place for hunter jumper, dressage, and polo enthusiasts and professionals. The Tackeria is owned by Tony Coppola, the country’s most recognized polo announcer and a respected horseman. Tony’s family is involved in the business, including manger and nephew, Lou Cuthbertson, son Matthew Coppola, a four-goal professional polo player, Matthew’s mother Jesse Coppola who manages all the social media and, of course, Wiz. “For months Matthew asked, ‘Mom, may I have a dog?’” Jesse said. ‘I said, ‘No!’ We had three dogs at the time.” When Matthew was in California playing polo, he by-passed his mother and asked his father, and Tony gave him the thumbs-up to get the dog. “He found Border Collie puppies on Craigslist,” Jesse said. “I still said, ‘No, no, no! You’re not getting a dog.’ The next thing I know, he’s sending me photos of Wiz.”

BY CARRIE WIRTH

Top: Matt and Wiz. Above: Wiz was constantly destroying things until he got a job he loved.

Matt met the Craigslist seller andmade the deal for the dog. Back home in Wellington, Matthew’s puppy kept growing and growing and growing. Wiz was no purebred. It was as if he was part

11 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017

horse. It turned out the Border Collie was actually a Border Collie/Great Dane mix. “When Matt went to Argentina for the season, Wiz was stuck with me,” Jesse said. “The reason he started coming to work with me is because he ate my house.” Bored at home, Wiz ate Jesse’s carpet, two sofas, two upholstered chairs. He opened and spread 25 bags of charcoal in the lounge at their barn. He destroyed Jesse’s holiday decorations. Wiz was the Tasmanian devil of dogs. It was clear. Wiz had to have a job. Jesse started posing him for Tackeria photo shoots and started a Facebook and Instagram campaign called, Wiz’s Pick of the Week. With thousands of followers, people started to recognize Wiz all over town. Now everyone in Wellington seems to know Wiz by name. “Tony thought using Wiz for marketing was the dumbest thing ever,” she said. “Now customers visit The Tackeria just to see Wiz. I had a gentleman come in and say, ‘I want to meet the dog that’s on Instagram.’ I love telling Tony, ‘See, we were right!’” At the store Wiz makes his rounds and visits all the employees and zeroes in on the location of every cookie jar. He’s learned that a sad look or a clever trick will earn a coveted cookie. The employees can’t resist his canine cuteness and happily oblige. He loves his job and seems to understand exactly what he’s told to do on camera. He enjoys performing and he’ll hold a pose forever. Jesse says that she could put him in a bucket and he’d stay there. He earns every biscuit.


Hermès Allegro jumping saddle flat seat

SUPER SOX, LILLIE KEENAN AND THEIR HERMÈS ALLEGRO SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR


Equestrian Living Feb/Mar 2017