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SPECIAL GOLD LIST ISSUE

EQ

E Q U E S T R I A N Q U A R T E R LY

FALL 2014 | $6.95 U.S $7.95 CAN

EQ Q U A RT E R LY

EQ G OL D L I S T THE BEST OF EQ UESTRIAN L I FE

MARTHA STEWART FA MILY, FR IENDS, A ND FR IESIA NS IN MA INE

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DISPLAY UNTIL DEC. 2, 2014

AEROSM ITH ’S JO E PERRY AT HO M E IN V E R M O N T

P L US : P EOP L E | STY LE | TRAVEL | FASH I ON | DECO R | A RTS


EQ I N S I D E

Features FAL L | 2014 ISS U E

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D E S I G N I S I N T H E D E TA I L S OF HERMÈS’ USEF RIDING COLLECTION The two artistic directors of a new fashion collection discuss the strategies, concepts, and technicalities of designing apparel for the United States Equestrian Federation.

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A N E W YO R K C I T Y N I G H T TO R E M E M B E R The EQ team was invited to attend a party in New York City this spring, where creativity and whimsy met luxury and style.

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T H E E Q G O L D L I S T: THE BEST OF EQUESTRIAN LIFE See what readers chose as their favorites in a wide range of categories surrounding the equestrian lifestyle, from boots and saddles to riders and shows.

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A N DY S C OT T S C U L P T S M O N U M E N TA L HORSES OF STEEL Scotland’s famous Kelpies are just one of Andy Scott’s incredible steel productions, many of which pay tribute to historic horses.

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M A R T H A S T E WA R T ’ S MAINE ESCAPE When Martha isn’t managing her empire, she is relaxing at her historic Bar Harbor estate, once owned by Edsel Ford.

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 A N A R T I S T ’ S I N S T I N C T S : A N D R E W P O R T WO O D The mixed-media works of artist Andrew Portwood, which draw on the horse as a metaphor, are lively, intuitive, and fascinating.

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Hunting, endurance, dressage, jumpers, driving, or polo, 10 Amazing there’s a horse activity Escapes for Horse for everyone in (and Giraffe) Lovers Woodstock, Vt.

CHINA ST YLE : A RISING INTEREST IN THE E Q U E S T R I A N WO R L D EQ embarks on a partnership with China’s most prestigious equestrian magazine, Horsemanship, with a gallery of equestrian décor, China-style.

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H O R S E S A N D T H E OT H E R WO O D S TO C K A hub of equestrian life in New England, Woodstock, Vt., is a treasure of the Green Mountains.


EQ I N S I D E

Departments FAL L | 2014 ISS U E

10 E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

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FAVO R I T E S Cynthia Paquette, owner and designer of Liza Hennessy, incorporates highquality materials, the spirit of New England, and a lifetime of horsemanship into her fine leather goods.

FA S H I O N O’Shaughnessey’s fall collection is deeply rooted in the tradition and history of equestrian sport.

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ST YLE Grand prix dressage rider, Silvia Rizzo, brings her signature style into a typically conservative discipline.

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H E A LT H Many equestrians swear by the healing power of acupuncture, but the science of why it works is only just beginning to be understood.

34  T H E L I O N ’ S R OA R As part of our Gold List Issue, Peter Leone lists his favorite shows in America, and what makes them extraordinary.

36  S C I E N C E The motion-capture technology used in video games and movies is now being used to study the balance of rider and horse for the development of better saddles.

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T R AV E L Ed Armstrong created Hun-Tre Polo Tours to introduce travelers to polo, its history, and some of the amazing venues around the world including Argentina, London, and India.

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Catherine Pasmore, poised to become one of the nation’s best riders, discusses the origins and goals of her career.

DÉCOR Interior designer Dougie Mutch addresses the question: Are books an ongoing tradition or a dying art?

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FAVO R I T E S

ON THE COVER Martha Stewart at her Skylands retreat in Maine. Photo for EQ by George Kamper.

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EQ updates its list of apps for horse-lovers with a range of useful programs for barnwork, training, and fun.

RESOURCES (Look for

to find the products and services in this issue.)

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BARN DOG Blacksmith Ira Green brings his Blue-Merle Australian Shepherd on his rounds in his farrier’s truck.


Welcome EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

I EQ visits Mar tha Stewart in Seal Harbor, Maine. Left to right: EQ photography director George Kamper, Mar tha Stewar t, EQ editor Stephanie Peters.

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recently read an enlightening editor’s letter in a magazine that I have long held in high esteem. The editor revealed that, rather than adhering to a preordained editorial plan—abided by at all costs—her magazine’s approach is actually a fluid process that ebbs and flows in response to places, people, or fascinating discoveries leading up to each issue. I always assumed our team at EQ (myself included) was somewhat unorthodox. We are prone to indecision and last-minute serendipity when deciding what goes in each issue. Instead, I realized our editorial strategy is not one of indecisiveness or chaos, but a successful amalgamation of inspiring ideas driven by sheer enthusiasm. It’s been a summer of serendipitous events that presented several people and places that weren’t part of our originally planned editorial content for the fall issue. Adding a last-minute visit to Martha Stewart’s Maine estate would be a prime example. We ran into Martha while attending a stunning Hermès event for an intimate group of 700 people (page 50.) It was our first opportunity to personally thank Martha for welcoming EQ to her Bedford, N.Y., farm last year, and she responded by suggesting we visit her Skylands estate in Seal Harbor, Maine. Rarely saying no to such invitations (or the chance of partaking of freshly baked muffins) we took to the road (page 64.) To some extent, many of us feel we already know some aspect of Martha. Our opportunity to watch her joyful interaction with her grandchildren, friends, and her magnificent Friesian horses presented another dimension of Martha that is rarely witnessed. On page 90, read our in-depth coverage of Woodstock, Vt., and the myriad activities one can enjoy in a saddle, carriage, sleigh, on foot, or at one of the area’s charming inns. Not an equestrian? Leaf peeping is the de rigueur activity in the fall!

Another off-script editorial entry was our interview with Joe Perry of Aerosmith. Who would have expected to find this musician of incredible talent and fame, and his wife Billie, quietly riding their Friesians through the quiet, verdant trails of Vermont? Where we didn’t dare veer off editorial course was with our anticipated first-annual EQ Gold List. We were thrilled with the input, nominations, and votes we received throughout the development of this amazingly fun-to-read list. For now, we are focusing the Gold List on the “best of “ each category, although some of our readers suggested we get feisty and include a Worst List as well. We’ll ponder that idea for the 2015 Gold List, because, as you know, things are never etched in stone. WHAT DEBU TED A ND WHAT ’ S A H EA D

Our new EQ Inner Circle e-newsletter debuted in July. Exciting give-aways and contests are already under way! Visit equestrianquarterly. com for behind-the scenes content and a chance to win a Gianetti Doppiata saddle, elegant Tucci boots, and much more. In our winter issue we will be introducing you to some of the equestrian world’s up-andcoming young riders, and profiling a few who are already at the cusp of becoming A-circuit champions. We’ll be heading south to meet equestrians immersed in the sport of carriage driving, and, quite likely, be making some unplanned visits along the way.


Martha at Skylands, her Seal Harbor, Maine, summer getaway. Skylands was built by Edsel Ford, the son of Henry Ford, in 1925. Martha has maintained the original feel of the barn and carriage house rather than modernizing.

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MARTHA STEWART FA MILY, FRIE ND S , A ND FRIE S IA NS AT SKYL A NDS. BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS GEORGE KAMPER


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eal Harbor, located on Mount Desert Island, is a serene and breathtaking harbor village hugging the rugged coast of Maine and surrounded by Acadia National Park. Long a favorite of the privileged, elegant estates, often referred to as summer cottages, are scattered about this pristine island. Skylands, the Seal Harbor summer getaway for Martha Stewart, is no exception when it comes to understated grace in design. Edsel Ford, the son of Henry Ford, built Skylands in 1925. “They wanted it to be in keeping with the surroundings and designed to be an elegant retreat for the summer months of July and August,” says Martha. “They didn’t want it to be overly fancy. They were looking for refined elegance.” The 35,000 square-foot home, stable, and additional structures on the 63-acre property were designed by architect Duncan Candler, who also remodeled the Rockefeller’s estate just one hilltop over. Jens Jensen’s subtle landscape design exudes an authentic naturalness and serves as a quiet complement to the architecture. Martha has owned the property since 1997 and gives no indication of parting with it anytime soon. Continued on page 108 66 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | FAL L | 2014

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1. There are no lawns on the property, just a zen-like mix of moss-covered ground, boulders, and dense clusters of trees. Martha says that buttermilk helps the moss grow. The gravel in the long pink-granite drive is removed and stored for the winter. 2. Martha’s friend and neighbor from Bedford, N.Y., Muffin Dowdle, joined us. 3. Martha greeted us with a basket of freshlybaked blueberry muffins. 4. Dowdle’s visiting horse, Biscuit. 5. The Friesians enjoy their forest paddock.


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The inviting, airy living room is a rich blend of furnishings, artwork, awards, and family photographs. Clusters of orchids ornament rooms throughout the house.

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Jude demonstrates the smooth efficiency carriage of the carriage turntable, Martha’s sits atop a turntable which isis used which used to torotate rotateheavy heavyvehicles vehicles that that do do not not have haveturning turningcapability. capability.

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1. An Adirondack boat and decoy collection. 2. The chauffer’s and groom’s apartments upstairs were decorated by Martha’s daughter Alexis in the Craftsman style. The downstairs kitchen has the original soapstone sinks, Hotpoint stove, and even the telephone. 3. Fire King jade-green glass dinnerware is in keeping with the period-correct accuracy of the property. 5,6. The barn is in original restored condition and is just as it was in the days the Ford family were the owners.

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Jude demonstrates the smooth efficiency of the carriage turntable, which is used to rotate heavy vehicles that do not have turning capability.

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The barn aisle presents a still life similar to what might have been seen in the 1920s.

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1. The stable walls are cypress wood. 2. The tack room is amazingly simple and perfectly preserved, outfitted with fir floors, original saddle racks, and bridle racks. 3, 4. Original sink and stall hardware. 5. The original nameplates of the Fords’ horses remain in place above the stalls—Please Me, Cheerful, and Chestnut Hal, to name a few. “I wouldn’t dream of taking them down,” says Martha.

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M A RT H A S T E WART

As if on cue, the children showed up to provide a hands-on demonstration of how to rotate the carriage. Martha provided some assistance, but once the process was safely in hand, she stepped back to take some candid photos of her proud turntable wizards. Sitting atop the turntable is a beautiful 1916 Bar Harbor buckboard carriage. Martha quickly shared the story of how she ended up with this exquisite three-three-two carriage. “When I bought this house I got a call from a woman in Bar Harbor and she said ‘Martha, I read that you have carriage horses and I have a 1916 Buckboard in mint condition. Would you like to buy it’? I said, ‘Of course,’ and so I got it from her.”

Continued from page 66 “I was lucky to find this place and keep it,” comments Martha. “So many people tear these places down.” We were eager to wend our way along the pink granite drive to the barn, carriage house, and Martha’s spectacular Friesian horses. No visit with Martha would be complete without one of her signature-baked treats. And there she was, greeting us with a basket of freshly baked blueberry muffins before we embarked on our tour. “I just baked these, and picked the blueberries this morning,” she says.

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he mood was light and festive and we had a rare opportunity to see Martha interacting with her delightful (and ridiculously adorable) grandchildren. Added to the mix of those who joined us were friends, nannies, dogs, and Martha’s welcoming staff. The barn was part of the original estate and shares the same understated and refined design as the other buildings on the property. “It’s a dream come true to have a stable like this,” smiles Martha. “I’ve maintained and restored, rather than remodeled, so it’s pretty much exactly as it was when the Fords were here. Look at this gorgeous iron and brass hardware! This is all cypress wood, and we’ve kept the original wainscoting on the walls,” she adds. The original nameplates of the Fords’ horses remain in place above the stalls—Please Me, Cheerful, and Chestnut Hal, to name a few. “I wouldn’t dream of taking them down,” says Martha. It’s doubtful that Martha’s magnificent Friesian horses, inhabiting the stalls and bearing the names of Rinze and Ramon, minded in the least. Most impressive in the stable and carriagehouse complex was the jaw-dropping, woodfloored garage originally used to house the sizeable collection of Edsel Ford’s carriages. “This place was filled with carriages,” Martha explains. “There were no cars allowed on Mount Desert Island, so the original mode of transportation was horse and carriage,” she says, wryly noting the Edsel Ford irony. “Isn’t it fantastic?” Martha asks as she points to a large turntable built into the floor of the carriage-garage entrance. “You can’t steer these carriages so they have to be rotated and directed into position.”

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Thriving vegetable and flower gardens serve the main house. Betsy Perreten, Martha’s stable manager for 11 years, travels with the horses when they visit Maine.

VISIT MARTHA’S BEAUTIFUL BEDFORD, N.Y., FARM IN THE FALL 2013 ISSUE OF EQ.

he garage, along with the chauffeur’s and groom’s apartments upstairs, pays a glorious homage to Craftsman style. “I’ve kept everything as original as I could,” Martha explains. The downstairs kitchen has the original soapstone sinks, Hotpoint stove, and shelves of Fire King jade-green glass dinnerware. “The kitchen is so great for parties and gatherings,” she adds. We had a lobster roast for the carriage association and had tables arranged all around for 150 people.” Mounted above a doorway is a new Adirondack boat complete with a Skyland’s nameplate. “I did a magazine story about how the Adirondack boat guys make these boats, and they surprised me with one,” Martha laughs. “I just took it out on Echo Lake, and it rode so beautifully.”  We gathered the Friesians and followed a narrow path covered in pine needles toward a small paddock in the woods. “The horses love it up here,” says Martha. It’s cool and breezy.” There are no lawns on the property, just a zenlike mix of moss-covered ground, boulders, and dense clusters of trees. On our visit a wall of fog rolled in, conjuring lush images of Ireland. The children rejoined us as we meandered back to the stable and grounds. They had been busy harvesting carrots in the garden and feeding them to a visiting horse. “They are having the best time here,” smiles Martha. “They have been everywhere on this island!” Martha only gets to spend a couple of weeks in the summer at Skylands and occasional shorter visits throughout the year. It’s obvious why she would want to take full advantage of this idyllic setting perched high above the harbor.


Equestrian Quarterly, Vol 3. Issue 3  

The Fall 2014 issue of Equestrian Quarterly offers EQ's Gold List, a selection of our readers favorites from many categories, as well as an...

Equestrian Quarterly, Vol 3. Issue 3  

The Fall 2014 issue of Equestrian Quarterly offers EQ's Gold List, a selection of our readers favorites from many categories, as well as an...