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EQ

PEOPLE | TRAVE L | DESI G N | FA SH I ON | STY LE | D ÉCOR

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

®

EQLiving.com

DECEMBER/JANUARY | 2016/2017

AT HOME WITH JILL RAPPAPORT:

TV'S FAVORITE ANIMAL ADVOCATE

DEC/JAN 2016/2017

P LU S :

DISPLAY UNTIL FEB. 8, 2017

B A R N S F O R H OR S E S , B ARN S F OR P E OP LE SIDES AD D LE RID E S AG AIN TO DAY' S G RAN D P RIX S TAR S A S KID S


305.260.9331

info@portuondo-perotti.com portuondo-perotti.com

PORTUONDO PEROTTI ARCHITECTS

At Portuondo Perotti Architects, free-flowing creativity, spatial intelligence and an understanding of techniques both modern and classical combine to create structures that radiate a timeless quality regardless of style. Since first opening its doors in 1986, the firm has left architectural masterpieces in its wake from the Florida Keys to Palm Beach. Led by President and Lead Designer Rafael Portuondo and Vice President Jose Luis Gonzalez Perotti, the firm has become known for its ability to accommodate the ideas, wants, needs and style preferences of its clients. Portuondo, Perotti and their team are experts in classicism, modernism and everything in between, believing that the key to great architecture lies in a balance of past and present, trend and timelessness. “We find beauty in many styles”, Perotti says. “ As architecture evolves, new styles tend to draw inspiration from the past. The most succesful architecture in the modern style derives its fundamentals of proportion from the classical styles”. In addition to their architectural pursuits, the Portuondo Perotti Architects team has spent the past six years building their interior architecture department, enabling them to provide a diversity of services to their clients. When asked to expound upon their creative process, Portuondo and Perotti point to their understanding of the stages of a project as being crucial to achieving the desired end product. “The creative process involves a combination of researching, sketching and ultimately creating”, Portuondo says. “For me, the most interesting part is the curiosity in not knowing what is next. Given the variety of project types, there is an element of the unknown that is exciting”. Dedicating principal involvement from beginning to end, Portuondo Perotti Architects strives to create beautiful, bold and timeless works of art.

CORAL GABLES, FL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLOS DOMENECH

5717 Southwest 8th Street, SuIte 200, Miami, Florida

MIAMI, FL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN HILL

Jose Luis Gonzalez Perotti AIA, Vice President

SARASOTA, FL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIM SARGENT

Rafael Portuondo President and Lead Designer


CORAL GABLES, FL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALONSO & ASSOCIATES

“The essence of architecture lies not in a superficial battle of the latest trend or style, but in a thoughtful search for the clear, proven values of good design”

WELLINGTON, FL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLOS DOMENECH

Rafael Portuondo and Jose Luis Gonzalez Perotti


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES D E CE M B E R | J A NUA RY 2 0 1 6 / 2 0 1 7

ANIMAL ADVOCATE JILL RAPPAPORT

42

TV journalist, author, and renowned animal advocate Jill Rappaport welcomes EQ to the rustic Western-themed cabin in Southampton, New York, that she and her rescue dogs call home.

THE RENEWED APPEAL OF RIDING ASIDE

50

Thanks in part to two English women and Downton Abbey, the gentle art of sidesaddle riding is making a comeback. As Downton Abbey is released to DVD, take a closer look at the elegant sport it helped to put back on the map.

A PERFECT POLO MALLET IS A VERY HIGH GOAL

68

56

BARN DESIGN

86

HORSES IN FASHION

The Old World craftsmanship of Tato’s Custom Mallets draws polo players from around the world to their store in Wellington, Florida. Founder Santiago “Tato” Alvarez and his son have found their niche providing the mallets to some of the sport’s top players.

THE UNINTENDED HISTORIAN

62

James Parker has been photographing America’s top horse shows since 1982. He chats about his role as historian in the equestrian world and some of the people and careers he has witnessed and recorded.

BARN DESIGN: A PORTFOLIO OF BARNS FOR HORSES, AND FOR PEOPLE TOO

68

Seven of America’s premier equestrian architects and builders offer their wisdom, as they provide informative narratives about their favorite projects.

HORSES IN FASHION

86

Photographer Donna DeMari began photographing horses as an excuse to be near them. Today her photos grace Ralph Lauren stores around the world.

6 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017


EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS DECE M B E R | J A NUA RY 2 0 1 6 / 2 0 1 7

16

EQ ESSENTIALS

TRAVEL

12

Coworth Park is a picturesque country house hotel near London with plenty of quintessentially English activities. DECOR

28 26

24

16

Rocking horses double as toys for children and home decor.

28

Elegant Imperial Horse place settings by Julie Wear dinnerware. STYLE

24

Le Vian’s chocolate diamonds shimmer with equestrian accents. FASHION

26

Capes and ponchos are the on-trend choices for beating winter’s chill.

34

LA Saddlery’s Renee Spurge introduces her new EQGirl Riding Collection. FAVORITES

38

Interior designer Douglas Mutch discusses the beautiful Gracie Street Garden at the CP National Horse Show. FOOD/DINING

112

Whip up this healthy egg salad recipe from the Western Horseman Recipe File for the cowboys around your table.

GIVING BACK

38

20

ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Jill Rappaport shot on location with her five rescue dogs in Southampton, New York, by EQ photography director George Kamper.

EDITOR’S NOTE 10 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 113 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 114 Photographer James Parker captures a perfect moment with a litter of Bernese mountain puppies.

8 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

Two generations of the Riggio family dedicate their lives to the causes they believe in. PEOPLE

30

Course designer Nick Granat is making his mark in the sport of show jumping.

110

Margaret Price’s Equine Millworks is a combination of her passion for horses and her family’s tradition of lumberwork. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

93

Fabulous farms and ranches plus expert advice on course building.


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

WELCOME

N

Editor Stephanie Peters (left) with Jill Rappaport and Stanley, one of her five rescue dogs.

ostalgia seems a healthy antidote to the conclusion of a turbulent presidential campaign. Once the country had made its selection and the conflicted dust had settled, a colleague posted on social media, “It’s time to get back to horses.” I couldn’t agree more. I consider moments of wistful reflection on equestrian sport and its ongoing evolution as time well spent, and the value of preserving time-honored traditions, immeasurable. In this issue’s “The Unintended Historian,” photographer James Parker’s images spanning 35 years present a stunning visual documentation of equestrian legends and the young riders following in their footsteps. His photograph of hunterjumper Rodney Jenkins transported me to days spent at the Devon Horse Show with a lemon stick in hand, as I dashed to the grandstands to see him compete. I wasn’t versed in the nuances of the sport, but I knew he was something special. The adorable childhood photos of Mclain Ward, Georgina Bloomberg, Brianne Goutal, and other young riders were particularly fun, having interviewed several of them as adult champions. Parker’s unintended chronicling shows that the events’ backgrounds remain consistent, but the foregrounds keep changing. Riding sidesaddle is enjoying a resurgence of enthusiasm for its elegance and traditional roots. Today’s riders have shed the oppressive moral significance imposed on women during the Victorian era and instead are embracing the excitement, challenge, and Old-World glamour of riding aside. Lady Mary Crawley of Public Broadcasting’s Downton Abbey certainly contributed to the flourishing sidesaddle fan base, but in “The Renewed Appeal of Riding Aside,” you’ll meet key women

10 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

on both sides of the pond who have been integral to the sport’s revival. On a recent visit to the Southampton, New York, home of TV’s animal advocate, Jill Rappaport, the EQLiving team discovered a beautifully imagined Western-cowboy enclave. Inspired by her childhood vacations spent at dude ranches in Tucson, Arizona, Jill has created a unique, country log home filled with vibrant, nod-to-the-West furnishings and designed a smaller rustic cabin that she shares with her menagerie of rescued animals. Once again, our annual barn-design feature dazzles with a portfolio of work representing seven of America’s premier equestrian architects and builders. Along with tours of their favorite projects, they offer valuable wisdom about collaboration with clients, the importance of ventilation and natural light, and keeping a horse’s needs front and center. We also learn a few things about making polo mallets from the skillful craftsmen at Tato’s Custom Mallets in Wellington, Florida, and we are introduced to the alluring equine photographs of Donna DeMari in “Horses in Fashion.” A nostalgic aspect surfaced in several of our features, and, as in other EQ issues, the common thread was serendipitous. I plan to spend a little more time looking at James Parker’s photos. Sadly, the era of printing these captured moments of equestrian life are rapidly fleeting—soon only to be recorded in pixels and stored within the confines of a cell phone. I wish all of you a wonderful holiday season, rich with family, friends, and your savored traditions. Cheers!


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | T R A V E L

COWORTH PARK A picturesque COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL near London, England.

C

oworth Park is a luxurious country-house hotel on the border of Windsor Great Park, south of the town of Windsor, England, that offers high-end British style without stuffiness. Part of the Dorchester Collection of hotels, which includes Hotel Eden in Rome, Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles, and Le Meurice in Paris, it’s an idyllic place for a romantic retreat and a favorite with families seeking a relaxing country break only 45 minutes from London. A subtle color palette lends calmness to the spacious rooms and suites. For Georgian style with an eccentric decorative flair, stay in the Mansion House, or if you prefer a bit more seclusion, opt for the self-contained converted stables and cottages. Join in quintessentially English activities such as tennis, croquet, horse riding, or polo lessons. Head to the spa

Inset photos: The barn, the spa, and pool

for a swim in the inviting indoor pool, work out in the gym, or indulge in a relaxing treatment, such as an aromatherapy massage. Then enjoy a bite to eat and a chilled glass of champagne at the Spatisserie. Restaurant Coworth Park’s best-of-British menu features the finest

12 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

locally sourced seasonal ingredients. Or, if you favor comfort food, sample the Barn’s rustic charm, where diners are welcome to keep their muddy boots on. Coworth Park’s equestrian center is open to both guests and locals of all riding levels. Well-kept and trained horses are available to ride across the 240-acre private estate. Explore the beautiful Berkshire countryside on horseback, or, for those wishing to improve their riding ability, take advantage of Coworth Park’s one-to-one or group lessons in basic riding, dressage, or jumping on your horses or theirs. Coworth Park is also the only hotel in the U.K. with its own polo fields and practice facilities with teaching provided by Guards Polo Academy. Guards Polo has been hosting the sport for almost 60 years. The academy is managed by professional players Ebe Sievwright and Philip Meadows, each with over two decades experience in polo instruction and management. PAGE 113


1929 Franklin 8 Passenger Estate Wagon Full Restoration / POA Warren E. Ajax | weajax@gmail.com | 612.669.0697 Polo Grounds | Paddock | Show


EQ D E C E M B E R / J A N U A R Y

EQ U E S TR I A N

LIVING

EQLiving.com

®

VOLUME 5 NUMBER 6 EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters SENIOR EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rebecca Baldridge, Eric Bull, Donna DeMari, Jessica Grenne, Ali Kelman, Douglas Mutch, Don Rosendale, Renee Spurge, Betsy Stein, Carrie Wirth INTERN Yeting Shen PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle, Lane Press TECHNOLOGY Matt Tarsi PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Curtis Circulation Co. GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net EQ LIVING ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $19.95 | Canada $36.95. SUBSCRIBE AT EQLIVING.COM/SUBSCRIBE OR SEE PAGE 113. To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: eqliving.com/manage-subscription 212-699-3636 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com ©2016. All rights reserved, Wynnwood Media, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are.registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.....

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EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American

Barnes & Noble and newsstand distribution:

Horse Publications. CURTIS CIRCULATION COMPANY

14 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017


SOVEREIGN Tr a d i t i o n a l & Ti m e l e s s

www.MountainHorseUSA.com

Sovereign.MountainHorseUSA.com

For a complete list of Mountain Horse Sovereign stocking dealers


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

ROCK ON Antique or modern, a ROCKING HORSE can add interest to any décor and bring a smile to a child.

ENGLISH ANTIQUE ROCKING HORSE This antique English hand-painted rocking horse from Boone’s Antiques was made in the 1870s from wood, leather, and brass. $395.

10 CHILDREN’S TOYS WORTHY OF THE LIVING ROOM.

FAO SCHWARZ BIG ROCKING HORSE FAO Schwarz is unparalleled for its long history of quality toys. This huge sit-on horse has curved runners to let it gently glide back and forth and a classic look, hand-painted finish, and artistic details. $100.

TEAMSON KIDS CAROUSEL WOODEN ROCKING HORSE This carousel-style rocking horse is the perfect addition to a playroom or nursery. Its sturdy wooden construction makes it a fun and safe toy for kids aged 4 and up. $225.

CRYSTAL ROCKING HORSE Stevenson Brothers have revealed their newest creation: a grey rocking horse hand-embellished by Fernandes Exquisite Creations with over 80,000 Swarovski crystals that shimmer, shine, and sparkle. Price upon request.

VICTORIAN REPRODUCTION WITH WESTERN SADDLE In a timeless style, this piece is based on rocking horses that date from the Victorian era and is hand-carved from mahogany. It is equipped with a Western saddle, which brings together the elegance of the horse with the adventure of the wild West. $4275.

Continued on page 18 16 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017


BEAUTY IS TIMELESS. SO IS A SUPERIOR CONCRETE FENCE.

ď …ď † Superior Concrete Products manufactures and installs premium concrete fences and sound barriers. Our fences have the natural look of wood, brick, and stone - that adds to property value and provides a long lasting barrier against natural elements. Visit ConcreteFence.com to learn more or call 817-277-9255.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

Continued from page 16

HAPPY TRAILS HALEY HORSE ROCKER This soft plush rocking Haley Horse from Happy Trails is made for small children from 2 to 3 years old. It’s hand crafted with a wood core and stands on sturdy wooden rockers. $100.

ICONIC ROCKERS FROM MAISON DEUX Crafted from solid French oak with a soft finish and upholstered with the highest quality fabric made from 100 percent wool, the Iconic Rockers come in different shapes: a cloud, a bowler hat, and a watermelon. Minimalism meets fun with these remarkable rockers. $515.

HIGHLY COLLECTIBLE TOYTOWN REPLICA This limited edition design from Stevenson Brothers is made to be a true replica of Zara Phillips’ horse, Toytown. Made in Chestnut wood from Windsor Great Park and fitted with a silver plaque and miniature dressage saddle, it joins the company’s Royal Rocking Horse Collection and is highly collectible. Price available upon request.

CUSTOM WOODEN ROCKERS BY ROCKERSRANCH RockersRanch is an Etsy store that creates custom, hand-made wooden rockers. The remarkable pieces range from classic horses to dragons, dinosaurs, bulldogs, and squirrels. The rockers offer fun limited only by your imagination. $2800.

18 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

CLASSIC ROCKING HOBBY HORSE This distressed black golden oak Lancaster Harvest is a classic rocking hobby horse, handmade in the Amish country of Pennsylvania. The large, high-quality piece will become an heirloom to be passed down through generations. $430.

PAGE 113


EQ G I V I N G B A C K

A FAMILY AFFAIR

I

t was never a question in my mind when I was growing up; it’s just what we do,” says Louise Riggio on why she has devoted her life to giving back to others. This strong foundation that Louise built within her family was naturally passed down to her daughter, Stephanie Bulger. The two have become influential with nonprofit agencies that inspire them, specifically the Equestrian Aid Foundation and Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center. The mother/daughter duo have many other passions in common too, such as books, travel, and Stephanie’s yearold son, Leo. They also share a deep love for horses and being involved in the equestrian community. Louise and her husband, Len, have had racehorses for years, and from day one they committed to being responsible owners. They always asked, “What happens to these horses when they can no longer race?”  “It is and has always been a priority for my husband and me to make sure that any horse that came from our farm, MeadowView, is never forgotten, even if it moves on to a new owner,” says Louise. “I follow each horse that has left our farm in order to ensure that when its career as a racehorse is over, it still has a wonderful life and perhaps a second career.” Through her desire to help animals and the curiosity to learn of new options for these horses, Louise was introduced to Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center (MMSC). MMSC is a reschooling facility and

showcase for adoptable Thoroughbreds that creates training programs designed to teach each individual horse new skills to prepare for future careers. (See EQLiving, Summer 2014.) Over the years her involvement in the organization has deepened, and she is currently vice president of the board. The goal of reschooling is to find out who a horse is, strengthen its weaknesses to see what can be accomplished in its second career, and find the perfect person to adopt the animal.

also within the equestrian community. The Equestrian Aid Foundation (EAF) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to assisting people from all corners of the horse world who are coping with catastrophic injury, illness, or financial crisis. The EAF’s mission is to help rebuild lives by providing people of all ages, backgrounds, and disciplines with funding for medical, rehabilitative, and essential expenses. (See EQLiving, Spring 2014.) Inspired by the organization’s mission and high regard within the equine community, Stephanie immediately became involved. Over the years she has moved her way up within the organization, becoming board president in 2013. “When recipients of the Equestrian Aid Foundation tell me that we changed their lifes, all I can say is ‘wow,’” Stephanie says. “Seeing what our recipients are able to accomplish thanks to some support—both financial and emotional—from us is awesome and so inspiring. We triumph and suffer right along with the people who apply to us for help. We’re with them through all of their hardships and successes. It’s heart-rending but ultimately such rewarding work.” It is obvious that this is not just a job to her. The mother/daughter pair share a passion for bringing awareness and aid to both people and animals who need it the most. As a new mom, Stephanie hopes to inspire her own son in the same way her mother inspired her—to find a cause he believes in and continue the family’s PAGE 113 legacy of philanthropy. JOHN LABBE

Two generations of the RIGGIO FAMILY dedicate their lives to causes they believe in.

Louise Riggio, her daughter, Stephanie Riggio Bulger, and her grandson, Leo.

Louise shares with her daughter her generous heart and philanthropic endeavors. “My parents always valued hard work and responsibility, and encouraged me to find a passion to really sink my teeth into,” Stephanie explains. “Thanks to the example they set, I dedicate my life to following their model of servant leadership.” Just like her mother, Stephanie found a cause that she was passionate about,

20 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017


AmyCarr.evusa.com

Palm Beach Polo ∙ Isle Brook- Beautifully situated on a double lot, this spacious custom home includes 5 beds and 6.5 baths. Volume ceilings and an open floor plan create an airy living space, perfect for life and entertaining. The back of the home is lined with French doors that lead out to the expansive screened-in patio, which includes a saltwater lap pool with spa. A separate guesthouse has one bedroom, full bathroom, and kitchen. Offered at $2,495,000

Entrada Acres - 3 bed, 2 bath home on a tranquil working farm with a 14-stall barn, a 4-stall barn, 3 wash stalls, and an oversized tack/ storage room. The recently redone ring has mirrors and competition footing. Main house includes a bonus fourth bedroom, while a separate cottage makes a great guest house or grooms’ quarters. Entire property is irrigated, with a separate water system for the house and barn with great drainage. Offered at $1,200,000

Palm Beach Polo ∙ Muirfield - Beautiful concrete floors flow throughout the 3 bed, 3 bath home with vaulted ceilings and tons of natural light. The modern and sleek kitchen is masterfully equipped with all of the bells and whistles, including a breakfast area and French doors leading out to a private patio. A large deck is situated off of the master bedroom and allows for easy access to the green space and lake behind the home. Offered at $695,000

Amy Carr • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-662-0728 Amy.Carr@evusa.com ©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


MattJohnson.evusa.com

Saddle Trail - Private 5 acre home & stable on the south side of Greenbriar. One of the largest parcels in Saddle Trail within true hacking distance to WEF. There is a riding arena, large grass paddocks and 5 stall center-aisle barn with the ability to have up to 20 stalls. The residence boasts marble floors, fireplace, large kitchen with granite counters and a lock off suite with separate entrance & kitchenette. The floor plan is open with beautiful views overlooking the pool and pastures. The subdivision has newly paved streets and bridle paths. A great opportunity close to the world famous Winter Equestrian Festival. Offered at $5,975,000 Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com ©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

The Chocolatier 14k Honey Gold Pendant includes horseshoes encircled by chocolate and vanilla diamonds. $2,997.

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24 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

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PAGE 113


Golden Ocala is absolutely the perfect place to spend my day off after a hectic week of horse showing.

AMANDA STEEGE, GOLDEN OCALA LIFESTYLE AMBASSADOR, PROFESSIONAL RIDER AND TRAINER

THE FUTURE HOME OF WORLD EQUESTRIAN CENTER SOUTH JOIN

TODAY

Become a National Member of Golden Ocala today where boots and breeches are always welcome. World class amenities include a 18-hole championship golf course, six Har-Tru Hydro Grid tennis courts, three exclusive restaurants, state-of-the-art itness center, an Equestrian Center and six miles of picturesque, private riding trails. For more on club beneits or to take advantage of our exclusive

National

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M E M B E R S H I P. G O L D E N O C A L A . C O M • 8 8 8 . 5 5 1 . 0 9 8 3

Homes and Lots Available from Townhomes to Equestrian Estates

fee

waived,


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

WRAPPED UP IN STYLE CAPES AND PONCHOS

are the on-trend choices for beating winter’s chill.

2 1

1, 6. Ellsworth & Ivey Hunting Cape in grey. (Also shown in navy on page 29). Constructed of 90 percent wool, 10 percent cashmere, with suede accents. $346. 2. Hermès red Alamo unisex poncho in cashmere and wool with straps and tassel fasteners in calfskin leather. $1,325. 3. Tan suede-trim wool Boatneck poncho by Ralph Lauren. $698. 4. Hermès Rocabar poncho in blue with leather detail, 90 percent merino wool, 10 percent cashmere, and leather tassel and toggle closure. $1,325. 5. Isabella Bridle poncho by Rönner provides a layer of luxurious warmth in a rich, alpaca blend bridle-motif knit. $229. 6. See (1.) above 7. Ralph Lauren grey Bridle-Patterned wool poncho. A subtle abstract print of sinuous bridles adds a modern equestrian spin. $158. 8. The Sabano poncho in burgundy by Rönner. The 100 percent suede-leather style creates a flattering silhouette. $455. 9. Rayna Ribbed Asymmetric poncho in ivory by Rag & Bone. Features a relaxed fit with mock neckline, button details, and contrast hem. Made of wool, nylon, and spandex. $450. PAGE 113 26 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

PHOTOS COURTESY OF L.V. HARKNESS

TASTEFUL TABLE SETTINGS

JULIE WEAR DINNERWARE

infuses Old-World entertaining with contemporary style.

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nternationally recognized for her masterful Thoroughbred paintings and commissions from some of the most influential owners and breeders in the world of Throroughbred racing, artist Julie Wear has expanded her career to include an extraordinary line of fine porcelain dinnerware for her tableware company, Julie Wear Designs. Julie’s Imperial Horse collection (above) is inspired by 18th-century continental paintings depicting the noble horses of royalty. The exquisite dinnerware presents high-spirited horses caparisoned in regal trappings, including ornamental saddles and bridles, and adorned with tassels. Translated

into a highly sophisticated design, the Imperial Horse pattern, with black ground and burnished-gold accents, makes a bold statement on any table and celebrates the splendor of the magnificent horse. Imperial Horse pattern Dinner plate $96. Salad plate $76. Bread plate $64. Dessert plate $79. Rim soup bowl $79. Charger $118. Charger blank $108. Cup and saucer $92. Sugar bowl $174. Creamer $108. Platter $227. Serving bowl $147. Five-piece place setting (dinner, salad, bread, cup, and saucer) $328. *The horse-bit dinner and charger plates are from the Julie Wear Cheval collection.

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EQ P E O P L E

ON COURSE For NICK GRANAT, show jumping is a matter of course (design). BY CARRIE WIRTH

JAVAN DAHLMAN

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ick Granat’s trademark smile and wry sense of humor have become a fixture at some of North America’s top showjumping events. The up-and-coming course designer is making his mark on the sport with his own sense of creativity and feel for the flow and rhythm of a horse on the track. Nick trained with Marty deLeyer, was a working student for Olympic silver medalist Peter Leone, and became a professional in 2000. He worked supporting the operations for some of the country’s most notable riders. A facet of his job that he always gravitated toward was designing and setting courses. In 2007, Nick was asked to assist legendary course designer Conrad Homfeld at the Hampton Classic. That experience was a revelation. Now he makes his living as a course designer for major events and for private clients during the winter season in Wellington. Inspiration comes from working with the best, and Nick has had the opportunity to work with the sport’s most respected designers. He attended the Aachen School of Course Design, where he studied with Arno Gego and Olaf Petersen Sr. “Right now I think Alan Wade and Uliano Vezzani are at the top,” he said. “Alan recently designed at The American Gold Cup and Hampton Classic. Uliano designed legs of the Longines Global Champions Tour. Steve Stephens has done a lot for the industry by changing jump design—it really brought us to a new level.”

Nick Granat designing at the Ridge Turf Tour in Wellington, Florida.

Some of the great jumping venues were right in Nick’s backyard when he was growing up. Iconic shows like Old Salem, the Hampton Classic, and Ox Ridge are longtime haunts and are now some of his favorite events to course design. Nick is the youngest course designer on the North American League (NARG) approved list. The collaborative experience of course designing is an aspect of the job that he enjoys. He teamed with Chris Kappler and Bobby Murphy to design the course for the ASPCA Maclay

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Finals at the National Horse Show in Lexington, Kentucky, in 2015. “I sat down with Chris at the American Gold Cup, and he went over the type of course that he wanted,” Nick said. “I put it to scale, and Bobby helped with materials and laid it out. It was a great collaboration. It looked great, and it worked out well.” He shared his thoughts about course design and the show jumping. “My first consideration when designing a course is who you are building for,” Nick said. “Is it young jumpers or inexperienced riders, or is it the best in the world? Next, we take into consideration the venue—is it indoors on synthetic footing or in a big open field?” Nick prefers designing for the jumpers, and he really loves the challenge of designing on grass. “On the grass,” he said, “you have to take the terrain into account— where it is uphill or downhill, where there’s an unusable spot—you have to pay attention.” He explained that when the group includes young horses or horses just coming back to competition, he tends to be more generous with the time allowed. “With an open field, there’s so much to work with,” he said. “Aachen is like Disneyland,” he said. “It’s an exciting time for the sport. With international events on the rise in venues like Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, it’s increasing the visibility of show jumping. These events build fans and bring in sponsors. The quality production required is beautiful to look at and great entertainment for the audience. I think it’s fantastic, and I take pride to play a part.” PAGE 113


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CAROL COHEN. SHE’S WALKED IN YOUR BOOTS. More than just a dedicated realestate advisor, Carol Cohen is a fellow equestrian who has personally built and sold two of the area’s most distinguished equestrian estates. She knows real estate from both sides of the fence. Carol is deeply committed to the Wellington equestrian community. A former hunter jumper rider turned FEI-level dressage competitor, Carol is a founding sponsor of the Global Dressage Festival and the inspiration behind the Global Dressage Visionary Awards. Carol knows horses, houses and Wellington! Whether you are interested in purchasing the property of your dreams or listing your current home to serious inquirers, contact Keller Williams real estate advisor, Carol Cohen.

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

A NEW EQGIRL IN TOWN EQLiving’s fashion consultant, Renee Spurge, introduces her EQGIRL RIDING COLLECTION, designed for the confident and fashion-savvy equestrian.

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BY RENEE SPURGE

n 2010, I was encouraged to embrace my love for writing and equestrian fashion and start a blog. My goal was to highlight new and innovative brands—particularly those challenging traditional styles and creating exciting clothing for the trendsetters rather than trend followers. This led to my own personal crusade to help these trail-blazing companies through exposure in my store to continue to design outside the rules and beyond the boundaries of the predictable navy and tan. After many years of selling other peoples’ vision, I decided it was time to start designing and manufacturing my own

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1, 2. Grey Marcy breech with teal satin piping and Swarovski bit detail. $249. 3. Marcy show shirt with Italian cotton teal-plaid detail. $99.95

collection: eqgirl. I consider it a collection for, and by, a genuine eqgirl. 2 The eqgirl is an equestrian woman who rides outside the lines, dresses according to her own rules, and is a true, fashion-savvy horsewoman. You will never see her in ratty old T-shirts or baggy breeches. She grooms and flats her horse in her favorite stylish breeches and tops because she takes as much pride in the way she looks as the way she rides. Regardless if she’s 12 or 45 years old, she’s ageless, confident, and downright feisty. The eqgirl riding collection is manufactured in Italy by small, well-established businesses that have


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

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been producing top-quality Italian riding clothing for decades. Since our soft launch at the FEI World Cup Las Vegas in 2015, women with all different shapes and sizes have tried on the eqgirl breeches, and I have yet to see a bad fit. Because the fabric is higher in cotton content than most of the common Schoeller stretch-fabric breeches on the market today, the eqgirl breeches are naturally breathable and firmly hug the body in a more flattering way. The elastin in the fabric still allows that great stretch we have become so accustomed to, but the more durable cotton holds its shape better over time. The wider waistband is cut to perfection, allowing a modified low front and higher rise in the back, which alleviates any gapping at the waistline. The soft-sock bottoms are extremely comfortable under

4. Taupe Angie breech with Italian cotton lavender-plaid pockets. $219. Angie show shirt with matching plaid-collar details. $99.95. 5. Navy Renee breech with white contrast and Swarovski trim. $249. 6. Bordeaux Katelin breech with light grey contrast. $219. 7. I Chase Dreams Not Points fashion tee. $39.95.

riding boots, and the universal length fits the leggy ladies just as well as the petites. The casual show shirt is perfect for jumpers, dressage riders, and the modern hunter/equitation girls. The fabric is very soft, lightweight, breathable, and easy to wash. Inside collars are all made with stylish Italian cotton prints that pair very well with the eqgirl breeches. The hidden zip, while practical and comfortable, gives the appearance of a classic, buttoned-up show shirt. The neck has a slightly lower V at the front for maximum movement and comfort. Finally, the eqgirl chic and sassy T-shirt line aims to make light of the sometimes too serious showscene culture. I teamed up with an old high school friend, who is manufacturing the hip, casual-luxury brand Kinetix in downtown Los Angeles, to produce our high-quality line of tees. The tees are super soft and stretchy with a relaxed fashion fit. They will quickly become your favorite barn tee and an amusing reminder that success and happiness do not come from blue ribbons and championship titles. Happiness comes from our horses, plain and simple. PAGE 113 And clothes—of course clothes. DE CE MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2016/ 2 0 1 7 EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 5


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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

GRACIE STREET GARDEN According to designer DOUGLAS MUTCH, it takes a village to BUILD A GARDEN.

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early seven years ago, my friend and president of the CP National Horse Show, Mason Phelps, asked if I would create some people spaces for the show, which had found its new home in Lexington, Kentucky. He wanted a special space created to replace what had been the traditional black-tie late-night party and post-show breakfast, which had been held for as many years as most can remember in the ballroom of a hotel across the street from the show’s former home at Madison Square Garden. He also wanted an equally inviting and elegant entrance to the show’s ringside Taylor Harris VIP

Club. I was thrilled by the invitation to help carry forward the event’s tradition, and I committed to volunteering my services—to give back to the show-horse community that has supported me and my interior design business for decades. I was equally thrilled and humbled when the National Horse Show elected to name this venue the Gracie Street Garden! Gracie Street is the name of my interior design firm, and garden being added to the venue’s name was a perfect way to tie in the history of Madison Square Garden and honor the many lush gardens adorning Lexington’s horse farms. That first year there were only four or five months to figure out how to pull this

off. I did not want to be thought of as the designer from Palm Beach, showing up in Kentucky to tell them how it’s done. So instead, I chose to reach out to the best Lexington has to offer to showcase the horse show’s history and give it a new face. I believe that “it takes a village,” which has always been my mantra to get things done right. That’s exactly what we did. It is this village of Lexingtonians who have supported my ever-changing vision these last six years to transform a concrete oval arena and exhibition hall into intimate social spaces, making Lexington’s face of the National Horse Show just as special as it was throughout its more than 130-year history. Continued on page 40

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S Continued from page 38

Douglas Mutch and Benjamin Deaton.

For the last two years, I’ve had the pleasure of working with a young Lexington designer, Benjamin Deaton. Ben and I brainstorm new ideas throughout the year and search out the latest shops in town to furnish our venues. Perhaps our biggest challenge has been that nothing is permitted to be attached to the walls. To create the freestanding surrounds for our spaces, we have had the support of Longwood Antique Woods, a Lexington-based business that reclaims and recycles old wood for floors, doors, and more. Much of what they reclaim is salvaged from historic horse barns, tobacco warehouses, and cabins slated for destruction throughout the Bluegrass region. The Longwood team constructed a complete log cabin within our exhibition hall, which became the home of the continually growing photographic history of the National Horse Show. The photos have been framed by our co-chair, Linda Helton, of Cross Gate Gallery.

Original art from Cross Gate, one of the premiere sporting art galleries in the world, adorns the walls of the Taylor Harris Club and the Gracie Street Garden. Cross Gate, located in the Thoroughbred capital of the world, always has a tremendous selection of quality paintings and sculptures, which appeal to all art enthusiasts—but especially to the horsey set. The garden has also become the annual preview for Lexington’s Sporting Art Auction, a collaboration between Keeneland Association and Cross Gate Gallery. The auction is held annually just a few weeks after the National Horse Show in the Keeneland Sales Pavilion. Furnishings from our founding members, Thoroughbred Antique Gallery and Heritage Antiques, set the stage for the wonderful homelike settings that invite all to browse, shop, and lounge when not watching their favorite horses and riders. Other Lexington-based businesses helped us early on in developing our

reputation, including Joseph Hillenmeyer and Associates, Mary Jane Nuckles Interiors, Belle Maison Antiques, Kimbrel Birkman Interiors, and Circa Home. This year, we added a new cutting-edge contemporary furniture and design boutique to our list of founding participants, Haven Home and Garden, whose chic, open-warehouse location is on Lexington’s East Short Street. Now that we have just completed our sixth year, I am blessed to be able to repeat my mantra, “It takes a village!” Not only do these businesses donate their time and services, but so many incredible people in this community lend a hand as well. Whether horse-show management, Kentucky Horse Park staff, or individuals who just love horses, they show up and grab a hammer or bring fresh-cut flowers. Without the community of Lexingtonians who support horse sports, the Gracie Street Garden and Taylor Harris Club could not have become the soul of the National Horse Show that it has become today. PAGE 113

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Clockwise: Jill stops by the barn to give her mare, Happy, a treat. Petey is an American bulldog, CJ a Havanese, and Stanley a standard poodle.

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BY STEPHANIE PETERS | PHOTOS GEORGE KAMPER

A N I M A L A DVO C AT E

JILL RAPPAPORT The intrepid crusader is liberating shelter animals one adoption at a time.

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ike so many of our EQ Living home visits, we were instructed to turn off the main road, pass through the security gate, and follow the long drive until we reached the house or barn. There is always a degree of anticipation about what we will discover at the end of the drive, and it was no different as we navigated our way towards the home of TV journalist, author, and renowned animal advocate Jill Rappaport. We had dipped and pitched our way along an undulating gravel drive into the dense woods of the Town of Southampton, New York. The forested property didn’t resemble anything like the Hamptons we knew, and upon sighting the cluster of Western-themed buildings at the top of the drive, it felt decidedly more like an authentic Westerncowboy enclave—in a tasteful, Ralph Lauren kind of way. It turns out Jill Rappaport is a frustrated cowgirl—a cowgirl with a vision and the skill set to creatively transform imagination into reality. All she needed was a pen and a paper napkin. Jill says, “I’ve always been obsessed with the West. I grew up in Michigan, but as a small child my family would always go to DE CE MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2016/ 2 0 1 7 EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 3


Jill Rappaport is an award-winning animal advocate and best-selling author, known nationwide as a popular, longtime correspondent on NBC-TV. She launched her award-winning Bow to Wow on NBC-TV’s Today Show, a rescue-dog segment that ran for 7 years with a 100 percent adoption record. In 2015, she created, produced, and hosted Best in Shelter with Jill Rappaport, a show focused on the underdogs of the shelter world. She is currently working on Rappaport to the Rescue, an offshoot of Best in Shelter, and recently wrapped up filming Animal Planet’s popular Puppy Bowl. Jill has received coveted awards, including six Genesis Awards from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), considered the Oscars of the animal world; the first Voice for the Animals award from the HSUS; and the president’s Service Awards for Media Excellence from the ASPCA. She has written four books, including the bestselling People We Know, Horses They Love, and has a line of leashes, collars, dog beds, and toys, the sale of which benefits shelter animals.

Tucson, Arizona, for all of our vacations, and we would stay on dude ranches.” She loves the whole Western lifestyle, extolling the appeal of Western riding, Navaho jewelry, cowboy hats, and boots. “I just love that whole feeling, and I tried to accomplish the authentic West with my house.”

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he main house, known as Last Buck Ranch, was actually built in Montana by Pioneer Log Homes, but, Jill explains, “I actually drew it on a napkin. I had different pictures of country houses, and then I would elaborate with additional drawings on notepad paper. I would send the builder all these pieces of paper, and they would just laugh at me because I said, ‘You do thousands of log cabins; I don’t want this to look like a ski lodge. I want it to look like a country log home.’ I think I achieved it, and I’m very proud

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of it. I was involved in every element and did everything from designing to decorating,” Jill beams. The sprawling main house possesses a welcoming roundup of Ralph Lauren’s nod-to-the-West furnishings, rich layers of Western art and iconography, and a light touch of tongue-in-cheek cowboy kitsch. It’s inviting, beautifully crafted— right down to the intricate twig and branch railings—and boldly unique. Jill appreciates the Ralph Lauren aesthetic. She says, “He’s the one designer that has always stayed true to the authentic Americana image. So yes, of course, the house has a lot of Ralph Lauren influence and Ralph Lauren Home furniture, combined with Pendleton, which also does authentic West with beautiful fabrics.” Two particularly unique rooms include a guest room designed to be a cabin within a cabin, which might have been hokey but instead was dreamily


The lush setting of the main house known as the Last Buck Ranch. Right: The cozy Westerninspired cabin that Jill and her five rescue dogs call home; The inviting entrance to the main house.

inviting, and a home theater with originally designed Western leather chairs. “I’m very proud of the house,” Jill smiles, “right down to the napkins.”

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n spite of the Last Buck Ranch’s spacious appeal, Jill prefers to share a smaller cabin on the property, known as the First Buck Cabin, with her five irresistible rescue dogs. Every bit as Western and equally as inviting as the larger house, it seemed that this was the true heart and soul of the property. The cabin has a comfortable, lived-in interior. Rustic tables are lined with books and photos of family, friends, and celebrities from her years working as a TV-entertainment journalist. Cowboy lamps and saddles slung over railings add to the ambience, but Jill claims the natural patina that gives her home its authentic personality comes from sharing it with her animals. “When you have

so many rescue dogs and horses, the hair and scratches all come with the turf, and I love it,” Jill laughs. Within eyesight of her cozy home are the barn and surrounding paddocks. Jill currently has six mature horses that are living a leisurely life. “My horses have the best life in the world,” she says. “They are turned out everyday and get exercised, but they don’t have a job. Their job is to be happy and healthy.” Jill started riding when she was 6 years old. Other than on her visits to dude ranches out West, she rode English. She switched to riding Western after covering her friend Christopher Reeve’s accident for NBC-TV’s Today Show. She was startled by the fact that a relatively low jump could cause such a catastrophic outcome. “I thought, I’m never going to give up riding.” Jill admits, “I love it so much, but I have switched to Western and haven’t switched back, because I’ve had some situations when a horse

spooked or tripped. I have to tell you that sometimes grabbing onto that horn will keep you in the saddle.” Jill rides as often as she can along the trails that run throughout her property. She sighs, “I haven’t been able to ride as much the last few years because I’ve been on the road for my job—literally working 24/7.” A VOICE FOR TH E VOI C EL ESS

Jill Rappaport abides by the adage that if you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life. If that premise is true, it could be said unequivocally that, given her impassioned mission as an animal advocate, she will never work a day in her life. Jill attributes her career shift from entertainment TV to animal advocacy to her beloved dog Jack, whom Jill found wandering along the side of a road. “He was a dog that changed my life,” recalls continued on page 48

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This page: A massive stone fireplace is the focal point of the main cabin’s living room. Opposite, clockwise: Intricate twig-and-branch railings add to the Western flavor of the main house; the light-flooded master bedroom is accented with Navajo blankets and rugs; the dining room boasts a vaulted ceiling and corner fireplace; the kitchen seamlessly blends rustic Western decor with accent lighting and state-of-the-art appliances; the imaginative cabin-within-a-cabin guestroom.


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continued from page 45

Jill. “He was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, which is bone cancer, when he was 11½ years old. He came home limping one day, and I thought maybe he was just a little arthritic, but then I saw a lump on his leg and my heart stopped. We had to amputate his leg, and he had to undergo six months of chemotherapy. “Well, let me tell you, that dog Jack lived another 2½ years, maybe one of the longest cases, according to the doctors. He lived to almost 13½ years old and had the most incredible quality of life,” Jill says. “He changed my life because he never let the loss of a limb stand in the way of living the best life in the world. What an amazing lesson that is for people.”

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ill ended up sharing Jack’s triumphant stories and chronicling his last chemotherapy treatment on the Today Show. She got so many emails from people all over the world saying how touched and inspired they were by Jack’s story. “I went to my boss that day and said, ‘You know what? Celebrities don’t need my help, animals do,” Jill recalls. I really want to switch my job to animal welfare.’ And my boss, Jim Bell, said, ‘Great, you be our pet reporter’ and I said, ‘Really? OK, but can we make it a different title? Pet reporter is nice, but it’s not really summing up the essence of what I want to do. How about animal advocate?’ And that was the day I changed my life and my career forever. Jack became the Ambassa-dog, and it was amazing.” She wrote a book about Jack titled Jack & Jill: A Miracle Dog with a Happy Tail to Tell, and he became the Ambassa-dog for hope and animal cancer. Jill’s popular Bow to Wow TV series that gave shelter dogs makeovers and airtime ran for seven years on the Today Show with a 100 percent adoption rate.

“You know, I’ll never forget the best gift I ever got. It was a needlepoint pillow from a very dear friend that says, ‘Be the person your dog thinks you are,’” Jill says. “They look at us like we are the most perfect people in the world and that we can do no wrong. If we could be that person, wouldn’t that be a wonderful world to live in? To be as good as our animals think we are?” “Sadly, people don’t understand how dire the horse situation is,” Jill adds. “Somebody has a big heart, and they open up their homes to dogs and cats, but you have to have a bigger place to open up your heart and home for a horse. The cost is a big factor, and you can’t just put them in an apartment. I remember when I was driving cross-country for my show and seeing horses that people couldn’t afford anymore turned out along the side of the road. It’s just heartbreaking.” Jill is currently working on Rappaport to the Rescue, an offshoot of Best in Shelter with Jill Rappaport, a show she created, produced, and hosted for NBC-TV in 2015. “I will be driving across the country with one of my rescues, and we will be going to various shelters,” explains Jill. “I’m teaming up with the ASPCA, and they’ll be involved with every show.” She likes to feature the underdogs of the shelter world, and Best in Shelter had three sections. “We had ‘Sizzling Seniors’ with Betty White, and that was fabulous, and I had ‘Special Needs’ animals with skier

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Lindsey Vonn. She rescued a dog with a bum knee, the same knee that she had injured skiing, and they both recovered together. And then I had ‘Pits Putting on the Ritz.’ I want to always highlight the bully breeds, which are so misunderstood,” sighs Jill. “I’m going to highlight the underdogs of the shelter world, the so-called lifers who have a harder time getting out, or may never get out, and we are going to find homes for every one of them with celebrity support,” Jill promises. “It’s going to be a really special project. I’ve been working on it for a long time, we’re getting closer to it, and hopefully it will be on in 2017.” “I’ve been obsessed with animals since I could breath. I’m sure my mother would attest to that,” muses Jill. “I always rescued them, and as a child, I always brought home anything I found on the street. I even brought home a mouse one day. I would put up signs for any stray cat or dog. I remember as a little kid with crayons writing ‘Found dog, is this yours?’ in squiggly writing and putting it up at schools.” “I have never, and would never, go to a pet store,” says Jill. “I’ve always rescued, and if I found dogs, I would go through an incredible search to find the owners. If, heaven forbid, no one claimed that animal, then that animal was mine. So I have rescued my whole life, and I have tried to encourage everybody, including my friends, to rescue, and believe me, it has not been easy.” Jill adds, “This is my oxygen. Saving animals is what I was born to do, and I don’t know anything different. It’s what I have to do and what I need to do.” These are words spoken by a woman with sheer determination and runthe-ranch confidence. Her unbridled motivation and proven adoption results will inevitably help to keep tails wagging.


Opposite: The classic red barn is home to Jill’s six rescued horses. This page, clockwise: An Americana wooden flag and vintage copper horse and carriage add character to the smaller First Buck Cabin; CJ enjoys napping in a custom dog bed; shelves are filled with books and photos throughout the smaller cabin; a quintessential cowgirl lamp; the main cabin’s uniquely designed home theater.


© CARNIVAL FILM & TELEVISION LIMITED FOR MASTERPIECE

Actor Michelle Dockery, as Lady Mary on Masterpiece’s Downton Abbey, is poised for the episode’s sidesaddle hunt scene. For those who missed Downton Abbey, it is currently available on DVD and Blu-ray.

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BY DON ROSENDALE WITH REBECCA BALDRIDGE

The Renewed Appeal of

RIDING ASIDE

TODAY, THANKS IN PART TO TWO ENGLISH WOMEN AND DOWNTON ABBEY, THERE ARE MORE SIDESADDLE CLINICS AND WOMEN RIDING ASIDE THAN EVER .

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t was the picture that launched a thousand riding lessons. Lady Mary Crawley astride—or more correctly, aside—a black hunter, gazing from beneath a top hat and veil, her voluminous black apron gracefully swooping toward her mount’s knees. It was, if you will, an Alfred Munnings portrait in pixels.

Women (and the occasional man) have been riding sidesaddle for hundreds of years, but the style began to die out in the 1930s as it became socially acceptable for ladies to be seen riding in breeches. It survived as a huntershow appointment class (points off if that’s not sherry in your flask) and with English riding instructor Roger Philpot, who taught Downton Abbey’s Michelle Dockery to ride aside, as keeper of the flame. But as Philpot observed in London’s Daily Telegraph, “Downton put riding sidesaddle on the map,” reporting that he received a flurry of calls for lessons after each show.

It was two Englishwomen, Philippa Holland and Lady Martha Sitwell, who promoted the interest in riding aside. Sitwell, a close friend of Holland’s and also a sidesaddle enthusiast, began designing bespoke sidesaddle habits. In 2014, Lady Sitwell, together with her sister Clementine de Blank Chappell and son, Conor de Blank, set off on a month-long sidesaddle trek through Mongolia to benefit Mind, a mental health charity. Today, thanks in part to these two women, there are more sidesaddle clinics and women riding aside than ever. And who better to unravel the mysteries of riding aside than Holland and Sitwell?

Arranging a meeting with Holland is complicated by the fact that a call to her cell phone is usually met with “Can’t talk now, I’m on a horse.” On one such occasion, the music of hounds and the huntsman’s horn resounded in the background. Off a horse, Holland proves to be a 30ish and slender 5 foot 10. The conversation jumps between talk of hunt meets recently ridden, her eponymous line of jewelry, and the London social scene. Holland’s been riding since childhood, she explains, but the interest in riding aside blossomed when she dated a young man whose mother was a sidesaddle instructor based in Normandy. Bitten by the sidesaddle bug, Holland crossed the channel regularly for tuition. She and Sitwell met when both took lessons from Philpot. Foregoing university, Holland completed a history of jewelry course at Sotheby's, took a gap year to travel, and ended up buying a variety of gemstones in Jaipur, India. Inspired, she began

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NICO MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY NICO MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Philippa Holland, above, and Lady Martha Sitwell, outfitted in a Sitwell and Whippet riding habit, navigate the Dianas of the Chase steeplechase course.

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designing jewelry. Today, her work employs a special process of coating natural objects such as seeds and leaves to create earrings, brooches, and other pieces. It was four years ago that Holland organized the Dianas of the Chase Cup, a sidesaddle steeplechase race, last run in 1924 across the challenging Quorn hunt country. Sitwell was one of the 14 starters, but admits that she didn’t finish the race. “My horse is not very brave,” she says. However, each rider was awarded a special brooch featuring Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, designed by Holland.

H

olland has also organized the first sidesaddle race on the flat at Wincanton Racecourse in Somerset, England, and twice (riding astride) won the Magnolia Cup, a five-furlong race down the homestretch as part of Glorious Goodwood, a five-day festival of horse racing at Sussex downs, England. She hunts twice a week riding aside, and in her one compromise for safety on the hunting field wears a hunt cap, which she calls a dickie, instead of a top hat and veil. “The hardest part of riding sidesaddle, says Holland, “is getting onto the horse, which is almost impossible without a mounting block or leg up.” The saddle, she explains, has two pommels—one fixed at the top, over which the rider hooks the right leg; and another leaping, at the side, behind which lies the left

VIKI ROSS

Lady Martha Sitwell wearing bespoke Sitwell and Whippet.

leg. Once mounted, Holland promises, “You’re really quite secure.” The left leg goes into a single stirrup, and a spur is worn. What about posting to the trot? “That isn’t a problem,” says Holland. “A horse properly trained for the sidesaddle doesn’t trot but merely walks or canters, or gallops wildly across the hunt field.” And the problem of signaling for the left canter lead, which in English riding is most often done by dropping the right leg behind the girth? “That’s done with the seat,” says Holland, “but with a welltrained sidesaddle horse, you just ‘think about it.’” But a woman properly seated sidesaddle sits with the poker-straight posture of a lady. In many photos, this results in the rider being left behind and jabbing the horse in the mouth over fences. Holland agrees, and it upsets her. “Too many women just want to be at the meet with top hat, makeup, and a veil, and they don’t take the time to learn,” she says. “You should ride sidesaddle or not at all.” The kit for sidesaddle differs in many ways from that appropriate for riding astride. The habit does not include a skirt as commonly supposed, but rather a voluminous apron with buttons down

the back. The rider leaves the apron open when riding so it doesn’t get tangled in the pommel when you fall and then buttoned up for modesty when on foot. Underneath the apron, the rider wears breeches that zip on the side. “The breeches should be the same color as the jacket,” adds Sitwell, “so when you fly over fences and the apron whips out and shows your bum, you match.” “The boot is shorter than a regular riding boot,” comments Holland. “It’s to keep you from tangling in the pommel if you fall,” says Sitwell. “And the whip is long like a dressage whip, but weighted at the end, like a jockey’s bat.” Sitwell, whose Sitwell and Whippet line of riding habits are sewn in Savile Row in central London, says there are differences in hunting coats. “The jacket on a hunting coat for a member of the hunt traditionally has three buttons,” she elaborates, “while the sidesaddle coat is shorter. Therefore, two buttons, or even one, are appropriate.” The color-matched breeches don’t have Velcro closures at the ankle, but rather old-fashioned buttons and buttonholes. The name for her bespoke line, says Sitwell, came to her naturally: “You know, sit well on a horse, and my dog is a whippet.” In later Downton Abbey episodes, Lady Mary, played by English actress Michelle Dockery, rode sidesaddle in tweeds and a bowler, and the extras in the scene were recruited from the Dianas of the Chase cast. That gave rise to speculation that it wasn’t Michelle Dockery cantering across the finish line, but a double.

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“Not so,” says Lord Julian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey. “Michelle did all her own riding, and at the end she became quite good at it.” Although Fellowes is a stickler for historical accuracy—remember the opening credits of Downton, which show the butler measuring the dinner place setting with a ruler?—he admits that there is an error in Lady Mary’s formal hunting attire. He’s offering a personally autographed copy of his new book, Belgravia, to the first reader who identifies the error. While the graceful image of Dockery aside her mount is worthy of a Munnings’ painting comparison, any woman in formal attire riding aside — including the well-kitted Sitwell and Holland—would be equally worthy of PAGE 113 the artist’s brush.

MIDDLEBURG PHOTO

MIDDLEBURG PHOTO

Devon Zebrovious, riding sidesaddle in the Middleburg Hunt’s opening meet at Groveton Farm in Virginia.

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Young sidesaddle rider Hayley Rees and her pony, Miss Scarlet, in Leesburg, Virginia. Holding the bridle is Haley’s grandmother Donna Poe.


ASIDE OR ASTRIDE? An equestrian’s attempt at the gentle art of riding sidesaddle.

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BY REBECCA BALDRIDGE

LELAND NEFF

hile the recent I mounted and swung my leg resurgence of over. The saddle dipped precipiinterest in ridtously toward the ground. Given ing aside might the difference in balance from the be attributed standard saddle, the girth demands to the gracemore tightening once the rider is ful image of Lady Mary Crawley mounted. I picked up the reins, of Downton Abbey mounted for the which seemed particularly long. hunt in sweeping habit, rest assured Devon adds, “Standard reins are that the sight of a lady riding sidetypically 55 to 60 inches long, saddle is not limited to the fields whereas sidesaddle reins are 6 to 10 of Blighty. The International Side inches longer, given the erect posSaddle Organization (ISSO) was ture of the sidesaddle rider.” founded in the U.S. in 1974, while We advanced at a gentle walk the American Sidesaddle Association as I got used to the unfamiliar unites a number of sidesaddle orgasensation. Initially I felt ready to nizations from across the country. topple sideways off my mount, but But perhaps nowhere in the U.S. I slowly began to feel more secure THERE’S NOTHING PRETTIER THAN A is riding aside more enthusiastically as King and I made our stately WELL-TURNED-OUT LADY RIDING SIDESADDLE. embraced than in the Virginia hunt progress around the paddock. country, where Devon Zebrovious (opposite page), co-owner of Wisely, I demurred when asked to try out the seated trot and Cherry Blossom Farm, member of the Middleburg Hunt, and instead enjoyed a mini-lecture on proper turnout. For example, founder of the Sidesaddle Chase Foundation, serves as one of Devon explains, only married women may wear top hats and the sport’s greatest proponents. black habits. In the early 20th century, single women would “I’ve been riding since I was 18 months old and started have worn navy or gray and bowler hats, making it easier to riding sidesaddle at the age of 4,” says Devon. “It’s always felt determine who in the field was available. The sweeping skirt very natural to me.” While she has collected a number of honvanished in the 1870s, replaced first by a breakaway safety ors in the show ring and hunt field for her work with hunter skirt and then, at the turn of the century, by the apron that is jumpers, riding aside and promoting the sport is a particular still worn today. passion. Not only does Devon hunt and show aside, but she Kit Roszko, an ISSO-certified sidesaddle instructor with also teaches the gentle art of riding sidesaddle. It was during more than 25 years of teaching experience, says that a good our initial conversation that I got the notion to go down to rider can often be comfortably cantering aside after one or two Virginia and give riding aside a try. lessons. I am not a good rider. In her view, the greatest chalAnd so, several days later, I found myself at Cherry Blossom lenge to sidesaddle riding is not mastering the actual sport, Farm, a handsome Argentine Thoroughbred named King but finding a well-fitting saddle. regarding me with a dubious gaze as I eyed the unfamiliar sadDespite Devon and Kit’s optimism, I’ll stick to riding dle. Devon explains, “You have to use a mounting block with astride for the time being— unless, of course, I find the perfect a sidesaddle. Mount as you normally would, then just swing habit. After all, there’s nothing prettier than a well-turned-out your leg over.” lady riding sidesaddle. DE CE MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2016/ 2 0 1 7 EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 5


BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS BY GEORGE KAMPER

A PERFECT

POLO MALLET IS A VERY

HIGH GOAL The Old World craftmanship of TATO'S CUSTOM MALLETS

draws players from around the globe.

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alking into Tato’s, a custom polomallet and equipment store in Wellington, Florida, presents a visual wonder. For a non-polo player, it is an intriguing display of colors and textures. But for the polo player—whether a beginner or a high-goal professional—it is a 5,000-squarefoot treasure chest of game-changing options. Santiago Alvarez, familiarly known as Tato, founded the company in 2001 after emigrating from Argentina. Before opening his first 750-square-foot mallet-repair shop, Tato honed his skills making furniture, working in construction, and repairing polo mallets. His son Santi, also named Santiago, joined the company in 2009 and now runs the retail portion of the business, while Tato manages the back-end business and mallet manufacturing. The growing demand for mallet repairs drove Tato’s decision to focus his business on repair and custom mallet making. Santi said, “The reason the business is named Tato’s Custom Mallets was because, at the beginning, my father didn’t have much money to buy an inventory of materials, so he made a lot of stock mallets. But he noticed people would come in and say, ‘Oh I like this cane,’ or ‘Oh I like the handle

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Santiago "Santi" Alvarez (left) and Santiago "Tato" Alvarez.


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on this mallet, but it’s not the right size,’ so he decided to take orders and make custom mallets tailored exactly for the client.” Neither Tato nor Santi play polo, but over the years they have garnered a solid reputation for making highquality mallets. “We might handle about 80 percent of the Wellington market, and we work with a lot of the top players around the world,” Santi explained. “Many of them are starting to order mallets from us and taking them back to Argentina.” Initially Tato’s clients were the local polo players and grooms. Unlike other polo shops that catered to only the well-known, upper echelon of polo players, Tato serviced anyone who came in. “He wasn’t from polo so everyone was treated equally, and he made the best mallets he could,” smiled Santi. “Gradually some of the less-accomplished clientele were asked by top players, ‘Where’d you get that mallet…that’s pretty good,’ and so it started like that.” The shop’s inventory has expanded to include polo boots, belts, buckles, bits, tack, and an assortment of leather goods. They also carry classic and traditional polo helmets that they have made in Argentina to their specifications. A MA L L E T-M AK ING PRIM ER

Mallets are the primary focus of Tato’s, and they are constructed with precision on the premises. The most important element of mallet making is the mallet cane, which is crafted from manau, a member of the rattan family typically harvested in Southeast Asia. The cigar-shaped mallet head, made of very dense and durable tipa wood, is another key component. Each of these parts undergoes elaborate steps of sorting, curing, seasoning, drying, and expert selection before being shipped to Tato’s. During a demonstration of the mallet-manufacturing process at Tato’s, Santi points out rows of raw canes. “We order them longer—with the root—on purpose so we can have more selection. We first cut it down to about 60 inches with a trim root. My father makes the decision where to cut it,” Santi said. “He’s the one who knows exactly what our clientele looks for. Once it’s cut, we clean the cane and trim the

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knots and the root. Then it’s ready for straightening, which is done over an open flame. That open flame softens the cane, and it becomes very rubbery. You can literally get it to any position you like, and it’s all done by hand and eye.” The length of the mallet depends on the horse and the height of the player. “There are some players, regardless of the horse they’re riding, that always use 53-inch mallets, which are most common,” explained Santi. “In Central America and certain countries where they might have smaller horses, they use 49-, 50-, or 51-inch mallets.” Balance and flexibility are essential to a quality mallet. Once the cane is straightened and tapered, it is ready to receive the head and handle. The handles are made of wood and shaped by hand to fit the thicker end of the cane. The head is positioned on the thinner end of the cane, which focuses the greater flexibility at the bottom. “We have to test each cane individually for an appropriate head weight,” said Santi. “Depending on the size and weight of the head, you can achieve different flexibilities. My father literally hand picks every cane for every customer.” S T E E P E D I N T R A DI T I ON

Occasionally players want to come in and see the cane in mid-production. “It’s an ever-evolving thing,” mused Santi. “Players always want to try something different. In golf or tennis there is always a new racket or golf club. In polo, we are working with rustic materials, but if somebody doesn’t play well, they blame it on the mallet. They want to change something. If their arm hurts they want to go lighter.” There are some quality mallets on the market made of high-tech composites, but most players haven’t accepted them. Santi explained, “Argentina dominates the sport as far as players, trends, and things like that. What ends up happening is the players around the world want to use what the top Argentinian players are using. That’s equipment, horses, saddles, and the whole thing. So it’s very tough to get a top player who’s grown up with and used this type of mallet their entire life to switch to something new.” From a Tato's Mallets business perspective, it comes down to market size. “Polo is a very tiny industry, and if you have to spend millions on research and development to build a better head or a better cane, we’d never see a return on the investment.” Santi smiled, “We’re not going to sell millions of units; we’re talking thousands.” Tato’s has come to the conclusion that each player has his or her own specifications, requirements, and idiosyncrasies. Ultimately, they admit, the best polo mallet is the one a player feels most comfortable with when they play. PAGE 113 DE CE MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2016/2 0 1 7 EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 1


Carol Hofmann Thompson and Judy Richter

Mclain Ward

Brianne Goutal

THE UNINTENDED HISTORIAN

James Parker (left) has been photographing America’s top horse shows since 1982. Horses and their people have been his only subject. Since 2009, he and his crew have focused on producing The Book for hundreds of clients. Below, he chats with his long-time friend, Equestrian Living’s Betsy Stein.

BETSY STEIN: I think it’s fair to say you’ve become the unintended historian of the horse-show world. It’s interesting to look at the evolution of horse-show photography. What effect has the move from film to digital and video had on recording the history of horse shows? JAMES PARKER: The state of the show photographer and the concept that shows will not have photographers in the very near future are relevant. Our answer to the digital world has been to create a product known as The Book. We photograph our clients during their competitive rounds, but more

importantly, we try to record the story of the relationship between the client and their horses and friends. Clients hire us to follow them on the circuit, and we create a coffee-table book with a metal cover embossed with a chosen picture. Our emphasis is now also on private clients, where they get all the individual photos that they would as a Book client, but they pay a smaller fee. Some people don’t want a book; they just want great photos. For practical reasons, we are sadly close to giving up shooting general exhibitors and only photographing our clients at the shows. We just

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don’t sell enough general photos any more to justify the work required. I’m sure people don’t think of the photographer as documenting history as long as they get the pictures that they want. The reality is that, in the near future, they won’t get quality photos, and that is a disaster for the history of our sport. Personally, I really treasure the old photos I have taken, and I enjoy posting and sharing them. There is a small group of people who really enjoy the historical photos, but sadly, younger riders don’t seem to care. Many have never heard of Rodney Jenkins or Michael Matz. I keep the memory-lane pages on my


Bill Steinkraus

Bruce Duchossois

Georgina Bloomberg and Katie Davidson

Frank Madden

Conrad Homfeld, Peter Wylde

David Distler and Sprout, his Corgi

Gordon Wright

Rodney Jenkins

Joe Fargis


Greg Best

Emerson Burr

Honey Craven

Blake Alder and Bert DeNemethy

Kenny Wheeler and Tommy Serio

Leslie Burr Howard

Reed Kessler

Jimmy Lee and Timmy Kees

Harry deLeyer


Georgina Bloomberg

website mostly because I enjoy them, and I hope others will too. But, going forward there might not be any history recorded other than on iPhones. BETSY: Because people have gotten so comfortable with social media and carrying images on their smart phones, I don’t think people are aware of what they are about to lose. It would be a shame if the days of walking into homes and tack rooms covered wall-to-wall with photos of people and horses were past.

Hardin, Liza, and Ned Towell

JAMES: Horsemen like Jimmy Lee and the Wheelers have been buying photos forever, and their home and barn walls are covered with photos—now mostly older photos. My guess is that one in five orders we process now are for digital downloads only—no prints. Those images will probably not be seen in the future except by the buyer and perhaps their Facebook friends. Today you are more likely to see one huge poster in a hallway. They can be quite stunning and weren’t possible to do nicely

before digital printing, but that one picture only tells one story. BETSY: I love picture-filled tack room walls. You can’t visit without asking the host about the people and the horses in the photos and hearing stories about them. How fun it is to see among a wall of pictures, say, Mclain Ward as a little guy riding a pony at a local show on the wall next to a photo of him and Sapphire!

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George Morris

My favorite images of yours are the candid shots around show grounds. They also document the venues, and it is interesting to see how much they have changed. JAMES: I have been going to some shows like Lake Placid, Wellington, Hamptons, Devon, and Old Salem for more than 35 years. The change and growth is remarkable, with the addition of grandstands, food courts, multiple rings, and grand prix fields. At Old Salem, for example, photos over the years have shown small yellow and white party tents become two-story temporary ringside buildings. Looking at pictures over the years, you can also see there has been a real change in the jumps. They have evolved from gates or

Murray, Terri, and Reed Kessler

post-and-rail oxers with simple decorations into beautifully designed major constructions, with opportunities for sponsors to advertise. They also change the look of the photographs, and the change is well documented over the years though pictures. At Lake Placid, the mountains in the background don’t change, of course, and are always fun to shoot against. And there’s certainly something special about having Devon’s blue “Where Champions Meet” sign behind a rider and knowing all of the wonderful horses and riders that have been photographed with that backdrop. The backgrounds are consistent, but the foregrounds change, and they’ll keep continuing to change. PAGE 113

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Ralph and Heather Caristo


Nick Dello Joio

Michael Matz

Lee McKeever

Ronnie Mutch

Katie Prudent, George Morris, and Frank Chapot

Lauren Hough

Eugene “Seaweed” Johnson

Rodney Jenkins and Jeffrey Wells

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BARN DESIGN A PORTFOLIO OF BARNS FOR HORSES, AND FOR PEOPLE, TOO.

A

t Equestrian Living magazine, we regularly visit some amazing eques-

trian facilities. They range from cozy farms to over-the-top luxury barns that would be called mansions if they were homes for people rather than horses. But, as we noted in our popular feature in the Summer 2013 issue, “Let There Be Light,”* building a successful equestrian facility requires both art and science. Seven of America’s premier equestrian architects and builders tell us how they work with clients and show us around a favorite project. *eqliving.com/let-there-be-light-barn-design-masterclass/

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DESIGN

EQUESTRIAN CENTER AT RESERVA ECOLOGICA PANAMAES Location: Panama AMA Estancia designed by Selldorf Architects Equestrian Center by IM/KM Architecture Equestrian Consultants: Sustainable Stables

KRISTIN MORALES of IM/KM Architecture and Planning and CLAY NELSON of Sustainable Stables collaborated on creating the equestrian facilities at this environmentally sustainable resort. Tell us about the resort. IM/KM KRISTIN MORALES:

AMA Estancia is a private-villa rental with six luxurious suites and numerous indoor and outdoor living spaces on the coast of the Azuero Peninsula. The 17,000-square-foot villa sits on oceanfront cliffs overlooking the Pacific coastline. Situated on Reserva Ecologica Panamaes, a 1,200-acre forest reserve, the property is highly secluded, but still accessible—a 40-minute flight from Panama City. How did you get this project? IM/KM: We’ve been working

with clients in this remote region since 2008. Several of our clients joined together to develop Reserva Ecologica Panamaes, a union of their properties to preserve tropical forest. Our clients are seasoned Erratum: The residence at AMA Estancia shown in this feature was designed by Selldorf Architects. It was included in this feature to provide the context of the Equestrian and Club Facilities designed by IM/KM and Sustainable Stables. Credit to Selldorf Architects was not included in the print edition published Dec 2016.

riders from around the world, and their preferred method of exploring the reserve was on horseback. We began to search for an expert in sustainable equestrian planning and design, which led us to Sustainable Stables (SS), who collaborated on the stables and equestrian facilities. What are the horse facilities for visiting equestrians? SS/CLAY NELSON: The stables

feature an open courtyard framed by two shed-row barns. One of the barns includes a tack room and two stalls used mainly for injuries and lay-ups; the other barn has an open-air shelter/run-in connected to a large paddock. This design was chosen to allow for the horses to be kept together as a herd rather than separated in individual stalls and to take advantage of natural light and fresh, tropical air. IM/KM: Visiting equestrians can also enjoy the lounge, which includes luxurious showers, changing rooms, and a bar in a thatched-hut pavilion. How did you begin the design? IM/KM: Site selection was first and

foremost. We chose a location that had large old-growth trees to shade

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EQ B A R N

the facilities and was adjacent to land that had been previously clear-cut as pasture, so we would not have to destroy any forest. The site is adjacent to a lake and a creek, where water can be readily available. Bringing Sustainable Stables into the design process for the equestrian facilities was critical to the conceptual development of the barn structures. As a result, the design reflects the social nature of horses. They are allowed their natural inclination to herd, and they can choose from a series of three grazing pastures or a shaded area that offers a cool place to drink water all day. SS/CN: The clients initially envisioned a traditional center-aisle barn. Considering the warm, tropical climate and the focus on the natural beauty of the Panamanian landscape, we encouraged them to consider a more open, courtyardstyle shed-row barn that worked with their existing design concepts. We also focused on how the design of the barn would integrate with the paddock, pastures, and other facilities as a whole in terms of location, function, and aesthetics. While the barn is often the heart of an equestrian facility, it only functions well when it’s integrated with the overall site layout. What are the special challenges to this type of terrain and climate? IM/KM: Poor soil quality, lack of

water in the dry season, an abundance of water in the rainy season, poor site access, and wildlife. To conserve water, we use low-flow fixtures and cisterns. To account for poor soil, we worked with SS to restore and support the growth of pasture grasses to feed the herd. How is the project environmentally friendly? SS/CN: One example of sustain-

compost not only horse manure, but also food waste from the estate. The compost system was designed by 02Compost and uses forced air from a solar-powered blower to speed up the composting process. IM/KM: The buildings were oriented to minimize direct sun exposures and to locate doors and openings in the path of prevailing winds. In addition to the roof shading of the terraces, the existing old-growth trees, landscaping, and interior courtyards connecting interior and exterior rooms help cool the area. Eight years in, we have planted 60 hectares of new forest and over 60,000 trees—a 60 percent increase in forest-cover regeneration. Restoring the biological corridors has brought wildlife diversity back to our forests. Eleven endangered species have been seen on the reserve. You are likely to see howler monkeys, iguanas, deer, sea turtles, migrating humpback whales, and many more resident species. How did creating a home for horses affect your design? SS/CN:This is a great question.

A central design philosophy of Sustainable Stables is to respect horses’ natural desire to be part of a herd and allow for freedom of movement with access to high-quality hay and grass forage. Our design borrows from a concept called the Equicentral System, where horses are kept together as a herd in a central paddock with access to shelter and water, which connects to a series of pastures for rotational grazing. It is becoming quite popular in England and Australia, and we have implemented it on many of our projects in the U.S. IM/KM: We are eternally grateful for the education Sustainable Stables gave us about horses and their natural inclination to work together. We love this concept and how it is reflected in the facility.

ability is the compost system to

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DESIGN


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DESIGN

PEGASO FARM Location: Mettawa, Illinois Architect: Blackburn Architects, Washington, D.C. JOHN BLACKBURN, of Blackburn Architects, talks about meeting a client’s design requests while dealing with a difficult climate. Did the owners have any special requests? JOHN BLACKBURN: From the

beginning, the client, a longtime Midwest resident, stated his design preference for the Prairiestyle architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright. He lived in a historic Prairie-style residence, and he was clear that the typical barn, with tall, steep roof, cupolas, dormers, and cross-bracing on barn doors, was not for him. Because the client developed and manufactured floor mats for cars, he was aware of the product’s tendency to release harmful chemical gasses. He decided to expand into

producing equine, interlocking rubber brick and mats for stalls and used the Pegaso Farm barn as a prototype. He created a product that is better engineered and healthier, both for animals and the humans who work around them. What’s more, the new mats are much lighter than traditional stall mats, making it easier for the workers who have to clean and haul them in and out of stalls. Mats, in my opinion, need to be removed annually, so the stall can be cleaned and sterilized; lighter mats are much more convenient. Every barn design is unique due to site differences, climate,

and client operational and design preferences. Pegaso is a prime example of how we responded to the needs of the horse, the site, and the client. It was also a challange because of the low-slope roof, which is critical to the Frank Lloyd Wright Prairie style. Did the low roofs of this style and cold climate cause difficulties with your well-known ventilation technique? JB: With the property located

on 24 acres just a few miles from Lake Michigan, issues of snow, ice, and winter winds, both from the lake to the east and also from the

northwest, drove our design, which included the barn, indoor and outdoor arenas, service and storage buildings, and owner and staff residences. Though we ended up siting the barn perpendicular to the prevailing summer breeze, as we most always do, in this case to mitigate the Midwest’s hot, humid summers, we decided that, based on the region’s omnipresent winds, we could actually forego a steep roof pitch without compromising the natural ventilation germane to our designs. This project was unlike any we’d done before, because a

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low-slope roof does not facilitate the chimney or Bernoulli effects (See tinyurl.com/blackburn-eq) that draw air and humidity up and out. This, in turn, affects horses’ sensitive respiratory systems, as typical barn allergens and pathogens are less likely to be removed from the barn in a consistent, natural manner. We positioned the barn for the prevailing summer breezes, but we also used the enclosed area on the northwest side of the barn to protect it from the prevailing cold winter winds. After all, Chicago is famous for its winds. We also added operable louvers along the eaves of the roof, so the wind could blow above the horses yet ventilate out the harmful humidity. Placing the enclosed arena close to the barn on the northwest side helped the Bernoulli principle, and the high louvers and continuous skylight helped the chimney affect. To collect natural light and

establish ventilation, a continuous ridge skylight was used down the barn’s center aisle, although this was relatively flat to maintain the design by paralleling the roof. The direction of the sloped roofs allows for snow to dump at the back of the building. This was most critical in the indoor arena building, which had one single slope. This allowed the snow to fall on the side of the

DESIGN

building without doors. We also added heated concrete floors in the common areas and provided recessed pocket doors at strategic points to permit closing off stalls from other areas of the barn. How should an owner work with an architect/builder? JB: I recommend that the owner,

architect, and builder work closely together as a team throughout

Healthy Stables by Design is a beautiful coffee-table book highlighting the work and philosophy of John Blackburn. All profits from the sale of the book are donated to horse charities.

construction. Having a good builder, and especially a good supervisor, on the job every day is critical. I also recommend that the architect make periodic visits to the site to observe the progress of the project and to ensure that the builder is following the design intent expressed in the drawings. For Pegaso Farm, balancing the client’s desires for an atypical Prairie-style barn in a climate of extreme weather conditions— without sacrificing the health and safety of horses—was a challenge, but one that we believe we met. In doing so, we included three essential elements for any successful equestrian project: a balance of the goals of owner, the demands of the site, and the needs of the horses—without sacrificing any of these to design.

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SHAKER ROUND BARN Location: Northvale, New Jersey Builder: B&D Builders, Paradise, Pennsylvania

A conversation with DANIEL GLICK, who, together with partner Ben Esh, owns equestrian builder B&D Barns. What are some advantages of round or octagonal barns? DANIEL GLICK: The advantages

are mostly ventilation and natural light. Also, the horses can see each other, so they tend to be happier. Round barns date to the 18th and early 19th centuries. George Washington designed and built a 16-sided threshing barn at his Dogue Run Farm in Fairfax County, Virginia, in 1793. The first truly round barn in North America was constructed in 1826 at Hancock Shaker Village. Did you know that round barns are

considered one of the most efficient barn styles? The fascination with round barns continues today. This 54-foot-diameter, octagonal eight-stall horse barn was built using the old Hancock Shaker concept to improve efficiency and provide maximum ventilation using Dutch doors and a large cupola in the center of the structure. How was this design developed? DG: There was a very intense

one-and-a-half year process, where we modeled the entire

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building, site, and things down to every last tree in 3-D. The owners gave us a basic floor plan, and then we massaged that to work with the existing topography of the site. The triple-barn design was to allow them to put horses in quarantine if needed. We have found that it is best if the owner and builder work out the floor plan and basic design functions together. That was the case with this barn. Then the architect helped with code issues. Because this project was

located in a very historic area, there were some really tough regulations to work through. We were part of a seven-person permit team that took about two years to get permit approval. How did B&D Builders begin as a business? DG: As partners, Ben Esh and

I grew up in the same neighborhood; we attended school together and traded homing pigeons as 11-year-old entrepreneurs. Ben went on to marry

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one of my cousins. We began the business in 2000 when we were 20 years old, and we were ready for something new after spending our teenage years in a shop building small garden sheds. The occasional large garden shed got us out of the shop, and we discovered that this is what we really liked doing. Today, we have four company-owned work crews, an in-house design staff, three full-time project managers, and a custom millwork shop.

Can you tell us about how you work with clients? How far from Pennsylvania do you build? DG: We design with a very

hands-on approach. It’s best if the client comes to our office to see what we have to offer, then, on the second trip, we go to the client’s property to get the feeling of how everything lays out. The farthest from home we have built is Wyoming, but that was unusual. Typically we are within four hours of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. PAGE 113


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HOW HOLLY MATT WORKS WITH HER CLIENTS A conversation with HOLLY MATT, an equestrian architect in Southern Pines, North Carolina, on the design process.

have that information. But we can also help you in the development of goals that fit your budget. Then you can compare apples to apples when you talk to different builders. The most disappointing scenario is going ahead and not having a realistic idea of what your dream will cost. It’s worth the time to look into various project examples to get a feel for costs. An equestrian architect or builder can show you projects they have done and help give you an idea of cost and how the process works.

How have your barn designs changed over recent years? HOLLY MATT: Horse people are

really starting to understand that optimal ventilation and natural light are paramount to a successful barn that supports their horses at all levels. I don’t have to push too hard anymore to keep those items first and foremost in the priorities list. They understand how it affects their overall working environment as well as keeping the horses’ needs front and center.  Efficiency comes from a floor plan that fits the land it’s on. You can still use a pre-engineered barn and fit it to your site, but you have to work with someone to help customize the kit, so that it works well.

Can you take us through your design process with a typical client?

What environmentally-friendly features do you include in your designs? HM: Natural light from sky light-

ing keeps you from needing to turn the lights on during the day in most working conditions. Then, if you add ventilation with the skylights, you have covered two energy-saving points. We use insulating skylight material from Kalwal, which gives you great light spread and very good protection from heat gain/loss. Solar cells on a barn roof can cut your energy costs to zero if you size it correctly. Your return on the initial investment will depend on your energy company’s buy-back rates and your state’s tax incentives, but we are talking about one to three years. Not a bad investment to hedge against rising energy cost. As far as green materials to use in the barn, recycled rubber pavers are great, as are waterproof tiles made from fly ash called Eco-Cem. You can use them on wash-stall

walls for horses and floors for tackrooms; they are beautiful and cost efficient. My favorite cost savers are LED lamps replacing old fluorescent fixtures. They are the best and an easy upgrade. How does climate affect your designs? HM: Whether it’s the sun, wind,

cold or hot temperatures, or high or low humidity, every good barn layout will be influenced by these issues. If they don’t answer them well, you and your horses will be uncomfortable. There are rules of thumb for each climate region, but each site has its own challenges as to sun/ wind exposure and topography. For instance, courtyards—my favorite design element—face south in

the cold regions and north in the warm regions, because you want to capture the sun exposure in the cold climes and shield yourself from them in the hot climes. Sun exposure and prevailing winds are two of the most important factors for helping the barn keep a healthy environment. How should an owner work with an architect/ builder to get the best result? HM: The most certain

way to get a well-built project is to do your homework first. You must have your goals, priorities, and budget—yes, budget—set before you talk to a barn designer or builder. To properly evaluate your needs, we have to

We start our process with clients by discussing their needs and forming what we call a program. This helps prioritize the things the client wants to achieve and puts a squarefoot number to the areas. We discuss wish lists and farm goals and make a pattern. If the client already has a site chosen, we walk the land with them to get a feel for the fit. If they have not chosen a site, we can help advise as to the location that is best for their goals. If it’s an existing farm, we help consider the best path for redesign. Schematic design is fancy word for the first ideas. We do this in a charrette-type format, which means we all sit down and scheme. We take all the information, land/zoning

requirements, and budget, and envision. After all the fun, we translate that into a 3-D model on the actual site topography. Then revise and Continued on page 110

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WESTVIEW FARMS Location: Northvale, New Jersey Builder: King Construction, New Holland, Pennsylvania

A conversation with GEORGIA HICKEY, an equine-facilities designer at King Construction. She is also a long-time horse breeder.

DESIGN

How is this farm used? GEORGIA HICKEY: Westview

Farms, in Pawling, New York, and Ocala, Florida, is one of the largest breeders of Peruvian Paso horses. It is primarily used as a training facility for their young stock and as a place to showcase sale horses. It is also used as a broodmare/foal facility, although most of the broodmares are in Ocala. How was the design developed? Did the owners have any special

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needs or requests that were accomodated? GH: This facility needed to serve

multiple functions with the emphasis on training and show prep. We needed two apartments, one for a trainer and his family, the other for grooms. On this project, the site was existing, and the design had to accommodate all the necessary stalls, support services, living quarters, arena, and hospitality spaces within a confined footprint.


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The design was developed to provide a spacious, well-lit environment for both horses and humans, with support areas that enhance convenience and reduce labor and an exterior aesthetic that would complement the residence.  And, above all, the owner wanted to keep the maintenance to a minimum. We used Hardi cement-based siding throughout the facility; the trim is composite. All of the lighting is energy saving and/or LED. The climate-controlled

spaces have radiant-floor heat, which is extremely energy efficient. Instead of cedar, we used structural aluminum and/or steel for the Dutch doors and aisle-end doors, all powder-coat painted for longevity and low maintenance.  The cupolas are cedar with Hardi cladding and copper roofs.   Huge operating windows and skylights in the arena greatly reduce the need for using the arena lights, and they bring in the sun on winter days to help warm the riding space. 

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How have your designs changed over recent years? GH: Because I am a horseperson,

the safety and comfort of the horses has always been my primary focus, so an abundance of natural light, air exchange, and cross ventilation has played a key role in my design work right from the beginning.   I’m a strong proponent of placing horse stalls on outside walls with Dutch doors; this gives horses the best opportunity for natural light

and ventilation and decreases boredom because they have an outside view. It’s also critically important if horses need to be evacuated quickly.   We place full-length steel screens inside our windowed Dutch doors, allowing both top and bottom to be opened for maximum light and air flow. In addition, we often include a small ventilation window that can be used in the winter when the Dutch doors must remain

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closed. Just cracking the small window improves air exchange tremendously and cuts down on the condensation that can form in a cold barn. I always include hard-wired fans in every horse stall and in the wash and grooming stalls. This creates air movement and air exchange and helps to keep wet wash areas drier. The use of ventilation shafts, especially in larger barns, is very important to the barn’s environment. They evacuate warm, stale air out of the barn in the summer and can be used periodically in winter to keep the environment fresh and dry.   Over the years, newer materials and products have allowed us to create barns that are easier to

maintain, more weather resistant and more environmentally friendly. How did cold, snowy winters and hot summers affect the design? GH: On this project, we had a

pre-determined footprint that was limited by the size and terrain of the site, but there were still some good options open, such as locating the arena on the north side to block some of the worst winter wind from the barn.   In the barn, there are aisles and cross aisles facing north, east, south, and west, which take advantage of prevailing breezes from all directions in the summer.  In addition, all the Dutch doors can be fully opened; they face east, west

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and north and provide additional air movement. The fans push the air through the barn, which helps cool the space, while the ventilation shafts exhaust the hot air and humidity or condensate.   The barn has deep overhangs to mitigate the heat and glare of the sun in the summer and to keep rain and snow away from the sides of the barn.   The barn wings are fully lofted, so the hay and bedding act as insulation to help to keep the barn space warmer. This also affords the time- and labor-saving convenience of hay drops into the stalls. How should an owner work with an architect/builder to get the best result?

GH: First, it’s important to work

with a design person who is a specialist in horse facilities. Most architects and builders are not.  Specialists will save time, money, and a potential disappointment because they can give important guidance on the floor plan—which is the most critical part of the design— and available materials, components, and fittings, as well as all the adjunct needs like manure handling and paddock layout.   A good working partnership is always possible. If you want to use your architect, then allow the specialist to work out the barn’s floor plan, inner workings and requirements, and have the architect develop the exterior design. PAGE 113


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FRENCH COUNTRY ESTATE Location: Wellington, Florida Architect: In-Site Design Group, Hollywood, Florida

A conversation with owner MARIE STUDD and architect ANNIE CARRUTHERS of In-Site Design Group. Tell us about the project. How was the design developed? ANNIE CARRUTHERS: It’s a

four-acre, French-Country-inspired estate in the gated community of Southfields in Wellington, Florida.

The grounds, which include a 12-stall barn, paddocks, and riding arena, are defined by water features, tropical plantings and a trainer’s apartment. Since the owner is from England and often

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travels to Europe, we developed the design by having many meetings, both online and in real time. Wellington has a humid, wet climate. How did climate affect the design? AC: Basically, the priority is good

ventilation in the barn, lower windows with higher rails. The orientation of the barn is critical to face prevailing winds and allow for minimum direct sunlight. We use high R-value insulation on the air-conditioned spaces and a radiant barrier on the roof. This helps with the heat gain. The barn has shutters and impact windows

that allow the building to be closed when not in use during the off season. This is important because of the impact of hurricanes, which can occur when the owner is out of town.

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How should an owner work with an architect/builder to get the best result? MARIE STUDD: I’d say, listen to

suggestions, have both the architect and builder in on discussions together. Some concepts don’t

always work in reality. But in the end, remember whose house it is, and who will be living there. AC: It is absolutely important to listen to your client, because they have ideas on how day-to-day the barn functions best. I offer suggestions, including the latest technology, systems, and considerations for equipment and other elements. I also spend time with barn managers to understand the daily workings and schedule of the staff, grooms, and owner. I want to understand how the horses circulate, exercise, and are groomed. PAGE 113


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AN ANTIQUE BARN FOR LIVING Location: Near Dallas, Texas Builder: Heritage Barns, Texas and Montana

Heritage Barns owner KEVIN DURKIN talks about how he restores antique barns.

Tell us about this barn. KEVIN DURKIN: It’s an upstate

New York barn from the Mohawk Valley, built around 1820, that’s now located southeast of Dallas, Texas. Originally, the owner wanted something with garage space downstairs

and an apartment above. His wife wasn’t keen on the project, but when it was done, she loved it so much that she wanted to finish off the garage space downstairs and made it into a living space.

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How many restored barns have you done? How far are they from Texas? KD: About 350. China is the most

Do you ship all the barns back to Texas? Isn’t that expensive? KD: Shipping is a small fraction of

distant. We recently did a project in Tibet that’s one barn from Vermont and three from New York. They are now guest houses on a tea plantation.

the cost. We ship to Texas or to our office in Big Timber, Montana; we also do restoration there. A New York barn might come to Texas, get restored, and then go back to New York and be put up.

Where do you find most of the old barns? KD: New England, New York, up

What makes for a good antique barn frame? KD: Well, there are good barns

the Hudson Valley, and towards Buffalo. The architecture in the Hudson Valley and Erie Canal is the most diverse architecture in America. Now, it is a very depressed area, so there are a lot of buildings there that are unused.

and bad barns. During the 1800s, buildings changed radically in quality. It was the industrial revolution, so the machine age was changing how things were built. In the early 1800s you had hand-crafted buildings—hand hewn, with an ax and a saw. By the end of the century, they were cranking out buildings


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with sawmills. Craftsmanship really died at that point in America in a lot of ways, because the industrial revolution eliminated the crafted way we did things. So we look for pre-industrial buildings. How do you disassemble and reconstruct them? KD: It takes some vision to take

an old barn and see what it can become. We document it, do a history of it, photograph it, video it, we draw it, measure it carefully, and get exact plans for it. And then we take it apart piece by piece. You start at the top and work your way down. It’s dangerous; barns can collapse. You go in carefully with harnesses on, and you slowly take them down. You number all the parts, load up, and take them back.

frame to it. For example, this barn was sided with stone. We price barn frames by the square foot of the footprint, and they can be anywhere from $40 to $80 per square foot of the first floor. It depends on the age and size of the barn and how rare it is. No two old barns are the same.

The original upstate New York barn before restoration. Then when it’s sold, we restore it, and we’ll fumigate it, which is very important so you don’t have a finished, beautiful home that has beetles in it or something else, which would really be a big problem.

beams exposed on the inside, so you build another whole envelope of a wall on the outside. And we usually use insulated panels or spray foam. That means that they’re super-insulated, super-efficient buildings.

How do you insulate the building without losing character? KD: We’re insulating them on the

How do the prices compare to new construction? KD: It’s like new, custom home-

outside. You want all the beautiful

building and then adding a barn

Who are your customers? KD: I think people today are really

looking for character in a building and are also looking for something that’s timeless, something permanent or lasting. For a lot of folks, it’s not their first home. Some people come to us with architects, and sometimes our architects on staff do all the design work, but people usually come with a pretty good idea of what they want. PAGE 113

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BY DONNA DEMARI

HORSES IN FASHION Images by photographer Donna DeMari grace Ralph Lauren stores around the world.

I

didn’t plan on being a photographer. I originally wanted to be a writer and was a student at the University of Maryland when I signed up for a course in photojournalism, but that was never to be. As the old story goes, I fell in love with a musician, ran away with the band, and taught myself how to use the old Nikon I had purchased for school. Months later, I found myself living in a loft on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, and I decided that I wanted to be a fashion photographer. I first began taking photographs of horses when I lived and worked in Paris. I would often spend time alone wandering the beautiful stables in the Bois du Boulogne. My motivation had little to do with creating images but instead was a heartfelt need to be close to horses. My camera gave me that excuse. It would be more than a decade before I would actually process the film that I had tucked away in a shoebox. Those singular images that I had taken without much thought are perhaps my best work. They were the basis for my very first exhibition, my book Eros & Equus, and the foundation of my present equine photography. Continued on page 92

DeMari’s photographs in the display windows of the Ralph Lauren shop in Southampton, N.Y.

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Continued from page 87

During the 15 years that I lived and worked in Europe, I had little hope that I would ever own a horse of my own. My fashion-photography work took me around the world, and I was devoted to a career that I adored. But in 1995 I made a decision to return to the U.S. and soon became a country girl living in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. Within a year I had found my extraordinary horse, Zwen, a magnificent 16.3-hands Dutch warmblood more special than any horse I had ever dreamed of. He was strong, powerful, and fast, and by all rights I should never have stayed on his back. But he took incredible care of me, and I learned to be a good rider. Our great love for and trust in each other resulted in a perfect partnership. I lost him two years ago at the remarkable age of 31 and a half. My relationship with Ralph Lauren began about six years ago, when I received an email asking me to make a formal presentation of my work. Someone at Ralph Lauren had seen one of my horse images in a fashion magazine, which led them to me. The work I presented

Donna DeMari and Zwen.

consisted mostly of the images I shot while living in Paris. The meeting was a huge success, and it kick-started my equine career. It was the beginning of a cherished relationship with wonderful and gracious people. I adore working with them. My photographs decorate the walls of Ralph Lauren stores in almost every country in the world. The stores also sell signededition prints. Little did I know that my strolls through the stables in France would one day lead to an unexpected career in equestrian photography. It was never a goal of mine to become an equine photographer—it was solely my passion for horses that led me to this new area of my work. Having spent most of my life shooting fashion, it is hard not to approach

every job with the eye and sensibility of a fashion photographer. So when I approach an equine commission, it is important for me to have an understanding of the owners as well as their prized horses. I strive to capture the elements of the horse that are most representative of who it is. I want each owner to have not only a beautiful piece of art, but one that defines and truly captures the intimate essence of the animal. I also request the owners be a part of the process and enjoy the moment. We always have fun, and I learn so much more about each horse as I pay attention to the interaction and loving attention that comes from my clients interacting with their horses. We laugh and play and create together. I prefer to shoot in low light, which gives my images a softer and more mysterious feel. With horses, this entails shooting in indoor arenas, stables, wash stalls, and barn breezeways. Because each subject and location is different, I need to figure out in very short amount of time what will work and how I can best accomplish it. It’s a challenge I enjoy. PAGE 113

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T H E F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM E Q U E ST R I A N L I V I N G

EQ U E STR IAN EQLiving.com

PRO PERTI ES DECEMBER/JANUARY | 2016/2017

MAGNIFICENT WELLINGTON EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

A WINTER EQUESTRIAN RE TRE AT AWAITS IN WELLINGTON , FLORIDA PAGE 86

®


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MAGNIFICENT WELLINGTON EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

B

uilt in 2014, this gated Wellington farm and custom estate is the perfect place to call home for the discerning equine enthusiast wishing to be within hacking distance of the Winter Equestrian Festival. Located in the coveted equestrian community of Paddock Park 2, both horse and rider will enjoy the haven that is this residence. Paddock Park is located in the village of Wellington, which is perfectly nestled in the opulent Palm Beach area. During the harsh winter months, the equestrianloving residents enjoy the mecca of pristine lawns and white sand year-round.

This spacious four-bedroom, 4.5 bath estate was built to impress from the moment you walk through the well appointed front entrance. As you enter the home, you are immediately greeted with a breathtaking view of the expansive backyard, offering a marble pool deck, full summer kitchen, and an exquisite heated pool and jacuzzi—all perfect for entertaining. Guests will enjoy the detached one-bedroom, one-bath guest cottage with an exceptional full kitchen and living area. The lavish estate features impact glass and fireplaces throughout, as well as a superb gourmet kitchen with

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one-of-a-kind granite countertops and a chef’s prep island. The kitchen, which opens up to the extended great room, also provides an ample view of the pool and outdoor entertainment area. An equestrian’s dream, the seven-stall center-aisle barn is furnished with a tack room, wash stall, feed, and laundry room, a sand ring, and plenty of paddocks. A separate building provides additional storage and golf cart parking. $3,789,000. Offered By MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR 561-797-8040 martha@marthasproperties.com www.marthasproperties.com


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KiamaLise Herres

WRE/Bellevue Commons, Inc 206.679.5322 kiama@windermere.com EnchantingHomesandFarms.com

Aimee Mills

WRE/Southeast, Inc 206.909.9655 aimee@windermere.com aimee-mills.com

Lynette Thomas

WRE/Mill Creek, Inc 425.953.4090 lynette@windermere.com lynettethomas.com

Sara Vowels

WRE/Bellevue Commons, Inc 206.276.8990 saravowels@windermere.com saravowels.withwre.com

Elise Miller

WRE/Southeast, Inc. 425.442.3090 elisem@windermere.com elisem.withwre.com

Ashley Farrington

WRE/Woodinville, HLC 425.890.0025 afarrington@windermere.com ashleyfarrington.com

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MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR

SOUTHFIELDS EQUESTRIAN ESTATE Offering easy access to bridle paths, this home is within hacking distance of IPC and all WEF show grounds. The property boasts an immaculate 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath home including guest cottage, 12-stall courtyard barn with 8 paddocks, and a lovely pool. $5,900,000.

Professional Equestrian Facility

This fabulous 15-acre property includes a large covered arena complete with GGT footing, an outdoor GGT all-weather arena, 42 stalls, 18 spacious paddocks, walker, and round pen. The 3 bedroom/2.5 bath main home and 1 bedroom/1 bath, and numerous staff quarters overlook a beautiful lake with a sunset view. $9,000,000.

Newly Renovated in Palm Beach Polo

Don’t miss the opportunity to own this impeccably renovated and decorated bungalow with water views. Completely remodeled, this well-appointed 2 bedroom, 2 bath bungalow boasts new wood floors, a new kitchen, and all-new baths. Guest cottage features an additional bedroom and bathroom. $765,000.

PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICE FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY. 96 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


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Exquisite Equestrian Club Home This incredibly spacious home will delight the most discerning buyers. A brick paved driveway leads to this elegant 5 bedroom/4.5 bath home, situated in the distinguished Equestrian Club. From the home’s fenced backyard one can enjoy a view of the polo fields at IPC. The residence is outfitted with neutral decor, high ceilings, an outdoor pool, and a newly-updated kitchen. $890,000.

Palm Beach Point Estate On this sprawling 5.77 acre lot in Palm Beach Point, within hacking distance from WEF, could soon be a new 12-stall show barn. The main house boasts 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, marble floors, and a cherry gourmet kitchen. Permitting and site work have begun, and your new barn with the finest amenities can be ready for next season should you choose to move forward with it. $2,750,000.

Palm Beach Polo Club Bungalow With both IPC and the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center close by, this newly-renovated home falls nothing short of phenomenal. The property is complete with a 1 bedroom/1 bath guest cottage and a 3 bedroom/2.5 bath main home, in which everything is new, including impact windows and doors, custom-built kitchen and cathedral wood ceilings. $765,000.

Polo Island Home The polo enthusiast is sure to delight in this well-priced home in Palm Beach Polo. With over 2,100 square feet under air, this 3 bedroom, 3 full bath residence features new wood flooring, a new HVAC unit as of 2016, and updated kitchen and bathrooms. Truly a turn-key solution, offering full furnishings and accordion shutters. $409,000.

Renovated Saddle Trail Park Home This single-family home features marvelous renovations with land to spare for a barn and ring. The community offers miles of bridle paths to be enjoyed. This incredible 3 bedroom/2 bath home features brand new kitchen and baths, impact glass, wood floors, and a stunning pool with built-in spa. $1,650,000.

Martha W. Jolicoeur, PA marthasproperties.com martha@marthasproperties.com

561 797 8040

11199 Polo Club Road Wellington, FL 33414

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E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

USING YOUR LAND Build a CROSS-COUNTRY SCHOOLING COURSE at home.

EBT EQUINE CONSTRUCTION PHOTOS

BY ERIC BULL

I

f you have the space for it, a schooling course at home can be a great asset to your training program. After deciding that you have enough room, the challenge is that you need multiple fences to really get the job done. Usually the best solution is to install a few permanent features and then add some portables so that you can mix things up to ask different questions in your training. A simple ditch, a simple water crossing, and a few small portables of different sizes—beginner/novice through training or preliminary—are a good start. You’ll need fences different shapes, too: a table, a rolltop, an oxer, something with a cutout underneath it (which often catch

Eric T. Bull grew up riding and eventing in New York and Connecticut. Based in Scottsville, Virginia, his company, ETB Equine Construction, specializes in building attractive and safe cross-country obstacles and stadium jumps for venues such as Fitch’s Corner, Millbrook, New York; the Middleburg Horse Trials, Virginia; and more than 28 others. Here, Eric discusses building your own course at home.

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young horses out on course). Keep in mind that while portable jumps are just that, portable, dragging them around every time you want to ask a new question, is, in reality, inconvenient. Well-built fences that are lightweight enough that you don’t need superhuman strength (or a tractor) to move them every time you want to change something are important when considering what types of portables you want. We’ve found that a lot of people who are trying to get young horses going confidently are starting to see corners, skinnies, wedges, and brush at preliminary and even at training level. All of those types of questions can be introduced in a small, easy fashion. Continued on page 104


EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

This estate’s prime location in the sought-after gated Southfields section makes it a standout among all others. Located within hacking distance of all 3 horse show venues, the property includes a main house with 4BR/4.5BA including guest cottage. Every window offers spectacular views of the farm and horses. A 64-foot marble hallway leads to a luxurious master suite where amenities include a large sauna. Near the 1 BR/1BA guest cottage is a 12-stall courtyard barn, complete with 8 paddocks, a mirrored dressage arena with GGT footing and viewing pergola. Custom finishes, equine-inspired sculptures and a pool round out this exceptional home for the serious equestrian.

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

10 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Grand Prix Village - There’s a 16-stall barn that includes a half-bathroom, two tack rooms, two feed rooms, and wash stations. A one-bedroom grooms’ apartment is on the second floor of the building, and includes a full bathroom and kitchen. Connected to the barn is a full owners’ home with vaulted ceilings and a gourmet kitchen. Offered at $13,950,000

Grand Prix Village - With six-acres of land, an 18-stall center aisle barn, gorgeous lake views, and hacking distance to the Winter Equestrian Festival, this property has everything a discerning equestrian could desire. There’s a spacious owners’ lounge with vaulted ceilings and skylights. Grass Grand Prix field and all weather ring in place. Offered at $12,750,000

Across from Horse Show - 4.5 acre farm boasts solar tunnel lighting, solar panel power, gorgeous bamboo wood Rower & Rub Stalls, Nelson automatic waters, and a luxurious detached owners lounge overlooking the ring. The home has a pool with outdoor kitchen and balcony that overlooks the farm. Offered at $12,750,000

Grand Prix Village - Newly constr ucted 20-stall equestrian facility with spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom owner’s quarters upstairs and amazing kitchen with topof-the-line appliances. Downstairs viewing room opens to the riding arena. Full bathroom and office with plenty of storage, 4 wash stalls, laundry, tack and feed rooms. Offered at $10,900,000

Palm Beach Point East - Situated on five wellmaintained acres, this property is within hacking distance to the WEF show grounds. The 12-stall center aisle barn includes a one bedroom, one bathroom groom’s apartment and a comfortable tack room with ample storage and laundry. Newly installed 220x130 all weather. Offered at $3,950,000

Grand Prix Village - Situated on 4-acres of lush land, is an amazing 20-stall barn with 4 wash stalls, 2 tack rooms, a laundry room, and a feed room. The owners’ lounge has a beautiful fireplace as the focal point, as well as a kitchen with great room for entertaining and a wonderful view of the 220’ x 120’ competition ring with superior custom footing. Offered at $9,300,000

Saddle Trail - Customizable 30 stall farm with 3bedroom, 3 bathroom pool home on 6.25 acres in Saddle Trail. This superbly designed professional farm is complete with a huge sub-irrigated (Riso System) Ring with Martin Collins CLOPF Footing, grand prix jump field, lounging ring and a 6 horse covered walker. Short hack to WEF showgrounds. Offered at $8,000,000

Las Palmas Equestrian - Stunning 10 or 15 acre equestrian estate in private gated enclave. The property offers a 4Br/4Ba main residence, 2Br/2Ba managers home with two additional staff apartments, totaling 4 bedrooms. The equine amenities offered are a 12 stall stable, jumping arena, grass grand prix or hunter field & large turnouts and room for a covered riding arena. Offered at $8,500,000

Saddle Trail - 30 stall equestrian facility with 5bedroom, 3.5 bath pool home on 6.2 acres in Saddle Trail. Farm is complete with a new Olympic all weather sub-irrigated ring, grass jump field, 6 horse Kraft covered walker and a detached storage garage. Offered at $7,250,000

Carol A. Sollak, P.A. • Phone +1 561-818-9476 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.carolsollak.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Carol.Sollak@evusa.com

©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and | E Q UEverified. | OC | 2016 S T R I AEngel N L&I Völkers V IN Gand TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER are should10 be2independently its independent License Partners Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

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EEQQUUEESSTTRRI A I ANN PPRROOPPEERT RTI EI ESS

CROSS-COUNTRY SCHOOLING COURSE

While it can seem somewhat daunting to buy all the jumps it might take to get a horse through the levels, when you break it down to its simplest form, it doesn’t take as much as you might think. The whole thing is actually quite simple when you do it properly: the progression of the levels really makes sense, and there are simple ways to look at how to prepare your horse to move up through the levels, one question at a time. Another way to break it apart is to separate the course into its simpler components. A cross-country course consists of galloping fences and combinations. As

JUMP SIZES Beginner Novice maximum height is 2 feet, 7 in. Novice maximum height is 2 feet, 11 inches Training maximum height is 3 feet, 3 inches Preliminary maximum height is 3 feet, 7 inches Intermediate maximum height is 3 feet, 9 inches Advanced maximum height is 3 feet, 11 inches

10 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | D ECEMB ER/NJ AN UARY OC TOB ER/ OVEMB ER| |2016/ 20162017

EBT EQUINE CONSTRUCTION PHOTO

Continued from page 98

the levels go up, the number of combinations increases, and the complexity of the questions increases. You can build all these combinations simply and build your horse’s confidence in the process. For instance, you can build a ditch, then create a ditch and rails, a coffin— and whatever else you can think of that involves a ditch—using a combination of portable cross-country jumps, standards, and rails. With a little imagination, you can school multiple questions effectively. And of course, when there are no constraints on space and budget, the only PAGE 113 limit is your imagination.


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

The Maya Group Sp e c i a l i z i n g i n E q u e s t r i a n R e a l E s tat e

15725 SUNSET LANE Palm Beach Point | 16.7 acres | 20 Stalls | Covered Arena | Outdoor Arena | Grand Prix Derby Field | Over 5,000 sq. ft. 5-bedroom, 6-bathroom pool house. PRICE UPON REQUEST

V I S I T M y We l l i n g t o n Fa r m . c o m F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N A N D N E W L I S T I N G S

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

RODOLFO MAYA

954.588.8882 RMAYA@IPRE.COM MYWELLINGTONFARM.COM

LOXAHATCHEE GROVES “C” ROAD

Highly functional new construction on 10 acres with 48 stalls, 24 wash/groom stalls within 2 separate barns, 2 separate arenas 240 x 140. Boasts a viewing lounge with a full kitchen, 4BR/2BA guest quarters upstairs and 2.1BA down stairs. A great wrap around covered sitting loggia ideal for BBQ and outdoor churrasco grilling is situated between the 2 arenas for the equestrian enthusiast to enjoy and entertain! 10 paddocks and room for more, space for a GP Grass field. A 3BR/2BA private house ideal for staff. $3,300,000

15835 IMPERIAL POINT

Palm Beach Point- 4BR/4BA with pool, short hacking distance to WEF, 8-stall barn plus apartment, all weather 230' x 140' arena.

$3,900,000 | AVAILABLE FOR SEASONAL RENTAL

PALM BEACH POLO CLUB 5BR /6.1BA contemporary residence in Palm Beach Polo. Fully renovated with marble floors in all living areas. Overlooks lake and golf course. $4,500,000

CYPRESS ISLAND New construction in progress; will be ready for 3rd quarter of 2017. 6,858 A/C sq. ft.; 8,492 total sq. ft. $5,900,000 OFFICIAL SPONSOR OF THE 2017 WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

STUNNING MIDWEST ESTATE

CENTRAL MISSOURI -- 4BR luxury home with new 12-stall barn, indoor arena, permanent round pen and add’l outbuildings on 50 cross-fenced acres. Just minutes from Univ of MO equine hospital, convenient to St. Louis and KC airports, and an easy drive to the National Equestrian Center (StL), KY Horse Park, etc. Perfect for breeding or training. $949,999 Add’l equestrian properties of all sizes available for your consideration.

BETSY WOODRUFF | STACEY SWALLA, REALTORS® | 573-823-5680 | 573-446-6767 | woodruff-group.com 10 8 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


EQ B A R N

BARN DESIGN | HOLLY MATT

DESIGN

Continued from page 77

revise, until all the needs meet the goals and budget. Next comes the design development, which is simply refining the design that we have all chosen from the discovery process into a schematic design. We look at all the aspects of the site and program. Corridors, roads and adequate safety egress, sun exposure, prevailing winds, site topography, and drainage are a few of the issues that help shape the design refinements. Once we have a structural intent in place, we can play with exterior materials to define the style and feel. Then we get out

the calculator and see where we are budget-wise once the interior finish levels are determined, color

palettes chosen, and stall equipment bidded. Construction documents are

an important phase; they confirm the design and are a contract from which you can build. This is where we get input from our team of experts on structural and mechanical issues. It takes a good team to do it correctly the first time. We constantly test details in the model to make sure they work before they are built. Finally, comes construction, the fun part if you have all your ducks in a row. Time is lost and money wasted if you haven’t done your homework ahead of time. Enjoy the process, it’s a wonderful journey. PAGE 113

EQ P E O P L E

A PASSED-DOWN PASSION FOR WOOD

KATHY RUSSELL

W

hen we were young, the world was our oyster, and we could not wait to explore. When someone would ask, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” common answers included being president, a famous actor, an athlete, doctor, teacher—and the list goes on. One’s life journey and dreams usually take twists and turns far away from the career chosen long ago. As a first-grader, Margaret Price was asked this question, too. But years later, she actually followed her dream and passion: running a lumber yard. Margaret grew up learning the lumber industry at her father’s lumber yard, Ridgefield Supply, in Connecticut. “My mom and dad would bring me in for annual inventory, sit me down with nails, and tell me to count them,” said Margaret. “I grew up with the lumber yard as my playground. I knew that I wanted it to always remain my playground.” While working at the lumber yard, Margaret developed her love for the horse

BY ALI KELMAN AND JESSICA GRENNE

world. She began taking riding lessons, and, like most little girls, quickly fell in love with horses. Two years ago, after a 16-year hiatus from equine pursuits, Margaret got back into riding and realized the timing was right to finally blend her passion for lumber with her love of all things equestrian. “I was talking to a friend of mine about the two things that I love—lumber and horses,” said Margaret. “I came

11 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

to the realization that the equestrian world was in need of my expertise in lumber and material science, or what I call building science. I have the knowledge and ability to explain to those in the equestrian world why certain products for building or renovating their farms are safer and better for their horses. I founded Equine Millwork to assist horse owners in building and maintaining farms that are good for their horses and good for them.” Margaret is driven by her passion for hard work. “It’s a combination of loving what I do for a living; my two sons, Mark and Paul, who push me to succeed; and my love for horses,” explained Margaret. “I spent 16 years out of the horse world, and I truly didn’t realize how much I missed it until I got back in the saddle again. I work with a great group of people and every day, when the clock strikes noon, they ask me if it is time for me to go to the barn and ride. “Always follow the unconventional dream. It’s a lot more fun,” said Margaret. PAGE 113


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COWBOY COOKIN’ F L AVO

LOC

L

R

A

This healthy EGG SALAD RECIPE is bursting with color and flavor.

T UN CO ITES E RS OR H O FAV

RY

The orseman H Western pe File Reci

oking

Co y-Style Cowbo t its Best a

MEXICAN EGG SALAD Ingredients

R

ecipe contributors to The Western Horseman Recipe File, Cowboy-Style Cooking at its Best, are wellknown horsemen and -women from across the industry, award-winning chuckwagon cooks, or Western Horseman magazine readers. The book contains 130 mouth-watering recipes for appetizers and snacks, salads, side dishes, main courses, desserts, and more. Ingredients, often pantry staples, create classic comfort foods, ranch-style meals, or lighter fare, and many dishes cook as well in a Dutch oven over a campfire as they do in your kitchen. No matter if you’re a chuck-wagon cook, a ranch wife feeding a crew, or a foodie fond of cowboy cuisine, The Western Horseman Recipe File includes a smorgasbord of delicious dishes fit for the cowboys and cowgirls around your table.

1 dozen hard-boiled eggs, grated 1½ cups sharp cheddar cheese, grated 4 ribs celery, chopped 5 green onions, chopped 2 fresh jalapenos, chopped ½ green bell pepper, chopped ½ red bell pepper, chopped 1 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin, or comino 1 teaspoon chili powder Salt and pepper to taste Juice of one fresh lime

PREPARATION 1. Combine first seven ingredients in a bowl and toss lightly. 2. Combine remaining ingredients in a separate bowl and mix

well. 3. Pour the mayonnaise mixture over the egg mixture and

blend well. Cover and refrigerate overnight to blend flavors. SERVING SUGGESTION

Serve on a bed of lettuce leaves and top with avocado slices. Tip: You also can serve this egg salad on bread or crackers, or even stuff it in a tomato. —Robert Boyd, Trent, Texas PAGE 113

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EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

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EQ B A R N D O G S

HORSE SHOW BERNERS A FAMOUS PHOTO of Bernese mountain puppies.

BY BETSY STEIN

A

fter a long day of taking pictures at horse shows, you might see photographer James Parker (see page 62) and riders, grooms, or spectators strolling the show grounds with Bernese mountain dogs. This trend began in the late 1980s when Leslie Burr Howard’s then-head groom, Kate Madigan, began breeding “Berners,” and the puppies quickly became fixtures in the horse-show world. The photo of eight puppies (above) in the back of an SUV is one of Parker’s bestloved photographs. When it re-appeared on Facebook a few moths ago, over 250 comments were posted in a few

James Parker.

11 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | D ECEMB ER/ J AN UARY | 2016/ 2017

hours by people who recalled fond memories of the picture, and they shared stories of the puppies. Madigan posted, “That was the first litter from my well-loved dog, Shea. I am still breeding future generations.” That’s why, along with the many lucky, adopted rescue dogs, you often see Berners around the show circuit. James Parker explained, “I was picking up my new dog from Kate, and the puppies were all asleep in the back of her Ford Explorer. When we took the mother out of the truck, one by one the puppies woke up and peeked out.” As for capturing the photo, Parker added, “It’s better to be lucky than smart.”


Hermès Allegro jumping saddle flat seat

SUPER SOX, LILLIE KEENAN AND THEIR HERMÈS ALLEGRO SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR

Dec/Jan 2016/17  

In the December/January issue, EQ visits Jill Rappaport at her home in Southampton, NY. Also, take a look back in time thanks to James Parke...

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