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EQ

PE O PL E | TRAV E L | D E S I GN | FA S H I ON | S T Y L E | DÉ CO R

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

®

EQLiving.com

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016

THE 2016 EQ

GOLD LIST READERS VOTE FOR THE BEST OF EQUESTRIAN LIFE WHERE TO LIVE WHAT TO WEAR WHERE TO GO AUG/SEPT 2016

DISPLAY UNTIL SEPT 6, 2016

FAVORITE PEOPLE, EVENTS, RESTAURANTS, AND MUCH MORE!


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES AU G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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HAND-PAINTED BOOT

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Watch painter Lisa Mair’s process as she hand-paints a boot for champion eventer Lauren Keiffer to auction off for charity.

A FAMILY AFFAIR

EQ’S THIRD ANNUAL GOLD LIST

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See what readers chose as their favorites in a wide range of categories surrounding the equestrian lifestyle, from boots and shows to towns and trucks. A RARE GLIMPSE INTO THE PRIVATE HERMÈS MUSEUM

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A dominant focus of Emile Maurice Hermès’ collection is the golden era of the horse. THE McDONALDS

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Equestrian power couple Bob and Debbie McDonald know the importance of good equipment. A FAMILY AFFAIR

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STARK CONTRASTS

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EQ visits three generations of the equestrian-centric Currey family at their Nashville farm, incuding Christian Currey, founder of FarmVet. REINVENTING WELLNESS

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Hotze Health & Wellness Center in Texas offers consultation and care to help riders keep fit, focused, and in the saddle. THE VIRGINIA GOLD CUP

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Huge crowds gather each spring in wild fashion to celebrate the sport of steeplechase in Virginia. A LIGHT TOUCH

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Dressage rider and makeup artist, Leslie Munsell, embraces the concept that less is more. STARK CONTRASTS

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Photographer Melis Yalvac studies the pride and power of horses. 6 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | AU GU S T/ S EP TEMB ER | 2016


SOVEREIGN Tr a d i t i o n a l & Ti m e l e s s

www.MountainHorseUSA.com

Sovereign.MountainHorseUSA.com

For a complete list of Mountain Horse Sovereign stocking dealers


EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS AU G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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EQ ESSENTIALS

FASHION

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Karen Klopp tells us how to look chic at the Hampton Classic.

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Tory Burch unveils an equestrian-inspired collection.

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FAVORITES

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An excerpt from The Legend of Zippy Chippy: Life Lessons from Horse Racing’s Most Lovable Loser.

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See why Blanton’s bourbon and racehorses go together.

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Just five minutes of yoga before you mount up can help you focus and get more out of your ride. TRAVEL

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Embark on the luxury adventure of the the Dartmoor Derby.

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Visit New York City for the Rolex Central Park Horse Show, an exciting showcase of equestrian sport.

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DÉCOR

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Furnish your home with enduring appeal. STYLE

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Hand-loomed scarves by Pirtti Handwoven.

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38 ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE The annual Gold List issue highlights EQ readers’ favorites in a wide spectrum of equestrian-lifestyle categories.

EDITOR’S NOTE 10 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 105 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 106 Repeat Gold List favorite Danny and Ron’s Rescue has homed over 10,000 dogs and continue to work closely with the equestrian community.

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EQ talks with jewelry designer Catherine Zadeh about her creative vision. FOOD/DINING

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San Diego’s Mille Fleurs shares a favorite recipe for carpaccio.

SCIENCE

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Researchers find a clue to the history of horse domestication in the genes of horses with dun-colored markings. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

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Real estate feature section: fabulous farms and ranches.


Authentic Bank Barns

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EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

WELCOME

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s I sat down during a midJuly heat wave to review this issue and write my letter, I was surrounded by visual references to summer—straw hats, sandals, and chilled glasses of French rosé. But story lead-ins such as when the summer weather fades and as we gallop full speed into the end of summer gave subtle hints that, like it or not, the summer season is regrettably fleeting. Fortunately, these phrases are also indicators of the great lineup of late-summer and early-fall horse shows. Last year’s Gold List favorite, the Menlo Charity Horse Show, and the Hampton Classic help close out the summer, while the American Gold Cup, the Central Park Horse Show, and Dressage at Devon usher us into fall. We also have the added bonus of watching our proud team of equestrians compete for gold at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. A L L THAT GLIT TERS

I wasn’t mining for it, but gold seemed to find its way into many of this issue’s stories. Gold, and its symbolic references, are aglow in this issue. Serendipitous? Yes. Fortuitous? Absolutely. The much-anticipated annual Gold List issue, featuring the best of equestrian life, is finally here. The enthusiasm for and participation in this feature has grown exponentially—so much so that we’ve expanded and redesigned it to accommodate several new categories. The number of votes cast doubled from last year, and even the EQLiving team had spirited competitions as the votes were tallied. Our feature on the Virginia Gold Cup showcases the annual steeplechase in vivid

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detail. Guests sporting a riot of colors, wearing festooned hats, and participating in elaborate tailgating competitions are all part of the time-honored traditions that endure at this historic, sold-out event. We take quite a step back in time during a rare private tour of the Hermès Museum in Paris, where we discovered that the golden era of the horse was the soul of the stunning collection. We round out this issue with a visit to Franklin, Tennessee, to meet three generations of the Currey family, and present a compelling mix of up-and-coming entrepreneurs, fashion and jewelry designers, artists, and innovators that excite and inspire us. M AK ING A DIFFER ENC E

I’m very excited about the philanthropic theme of our upcoming October/ November issue. We will feature special individuals and organizations doing extraordinary work in their communities and the equestrian world, and we’ll highlight charities providing muchneeded aid to people and horses around the world. Reaching beyond ourselves can generate endless possibilities. I look forward to presenting an EQ issue that will inspire people to commit to making a difference. In doing so, it would render the philanthropy issue worth its weight in gold. In the meantime, relax and enjoy the fading days of summer. Pour yourself a fine vin du jour, and savor the pages of this issue of Equestrian Living. Cheers!


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

EFFORTLESS STYLE Chic SUMMER MUST-HAVES for the THE HAMPTON CLASSIC. 6

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1. Wide-brim hat with leather trim in straw. $55. 2. Linen shirt dress with grommets in marine salt. $138. 3. Betty sunglasses in milky brown. $128. 4. Straw market tote in natural. $49.50. 5. Corsica metallic tumbled leather espadrille wedges in pale gold. $118. 6. Perfect shirt in sun-faded ikat in deep lagoon. $88. 7. Toothpick jean in white. $115.

BY KAREN KLOPP

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s we gallop full speed into the end of summer, winding roads and highways carry precious steeds near and far to the season’s competitions. One of the most significant destinations for riders and horse lovers alike is the Hampton Classic held in Bridgehampton, New York. The origins of this historic show date back to the turn of the century, and throughout the years of wars won, fortunes lost, torrential storms, and tyrannical hurricanes, it has become one of the largest and most prestigious hunterjumper shows in America. With its bright

8. Top-knot headband in indigo navy. $24.50. 9. Jack sunglasses in silver navy. $98. 10. Rattan clutch in natural. $88. 11. Sardinia leather eyelet espadrille wedges. $148. 12. Beaded tassel earrings in white. $78. 13. Cotton off-the-shoulder top in lagoon blue stripe. $88. 14. Blue navy off-the-shoulder top in yarn-dyed silk. $178. All available at J. Crew.

white picket fences and sky-blue striped tents, the Classic, as it is simply known today, is reminiscent of a country fair from an earlier time. Add the sophistication of premier international riders and scores of glamorous Hamptons’ notables, and you have a stunning event with endless beauty and excitement, in and out of the ring.   If I am going with a friend to sit in the stands, I wear white jeans and an ikat shirt, a sun hat, and a small tote to hold a program, sunscreen, water, and purchases from the legendary Boutique Garden. The Classic is known for important charity partnerships with local organizations, and when attending a ring-side charity luncheon, a summer shift, wedges, and a sun hat will do nicely. 

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In the evening, when the excitement shifts to the grand-prix ring, add the summer must-have—a pretty, off-theshoulder top, a pair of statement earrings, and a small clutch. If attending isn’t an option, the website HamptonClassic.com provides a marvelous alternative for capturing the spirit of this classic summer PAGE 105. tradition. Karen Klopp, or KK to her friends, is a writer, awardwinning documentary film producer, life-long conservationist, traveler, board member, event chairman, wife, and mother of three. She also founded What2WearWhere.com, a luxury-lifestyle brand and website that helps today’s busy women dress for all of life’s events, sports, and travel.


UNITED BY DETERMINATION AND STRENGTH USA Dressage Champions & Olympic Athletes Adrienne Lyle and Debbie McDonald with Superior Concrete Rail Fence.

True champions are created through hard work and determination. A commitment to excellence produces winners and so it is with precast concrete fencing. Driven by quality and results, our concrete rail fences are as strong as they are beautiful. That’s the reason coach Debbie McDonald and her protegÊ equestrienne Adrienne Lyle at the TYL Dressage Center in Wellington, Florida has partnered with Superior Concrete Products. Through determination, both are dedicated champions in their field.

Visit us now: Elegant.ConcreteFence.com Call us (800) 942-9255


EQ A U G U S T / S E P T E M B E R

EQ U E S TR I A N

LIVING

EQLiving.com

®

VOLUME 5 NUMBER 4 EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve ASSISTANT EDITOR Abigail Googel EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTORS Jamie Fields, Jennifer Johnson, Karen Klopp, Lisa Mair, Virginia Stuart INTERN Yeting Shen PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle, Lane Press TECHNOLOGY Matt Tarsi PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Curtis Circulation Co. GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net EQ ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $19.95 | Canada $36.95. Subscribe at eqliving.com/subscribe or Box One, Brownsville, VT 05037. To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQ, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com ©2016. All rights reserved, Wynnwood Media, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.

Scan to subscribe: DON’T MISS AN ISSUE. Get EQ delivered right to your mailbox.

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EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American

Barnes & Noble and newsstand distribution:

Horse Publications. CURTIS CIRCULATION COMPANY

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Introducing GLANMIRE. Handcraaed in Europe. Our ďŹ rst boot with an adjustable calf.

Shown in Black/Brown. Also available in Walnut.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

TORY BURCH pair beautifully with the clean lines and casual attitude of the designer’s FALL/WINTER 2016 COLLECTION. EQUESTRIAN-INSPIRED MOTIFS

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nspired by a childhood love of horseback riding, Tory Burch’s fall/winter 2016 collection meshes nonchalant street style with classic equestrian motifs and refinement. Coats done in bold jockey-silk patterns are paired with skinny jodhpurs and trapunto-stitch bombers.

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Boots and booties go from the paddock to the runway with horseshoe-shaped heels, spats, and horsehair tassels handcrafted by a Brazilian gaucho. Handbags are unstructured and versatile, ranging from graphic hobos to easy shapes with harness PAGE 105 belts and hooded buckles.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

Tory Burch pebbled leather Small Alastair. $550. “ACCES S O R I ES R EF L EC T THE Tory Burch pebbled leather Alastair. $595.

M O O D, F RO M A CO NVERTI B L E HA R NES S B AG TO B O OTS WI TH R EM OVA B L E S PATS .” - TORY BU RC H

AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 7


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

ZIPPY CHIPPY OK

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He was descended from the greatest RACEHORSES of all time, but he set the record for losing.

Zippy Chippy was the great-greatgrandson of Bold Ruler, who fathered Secretariat, and his family tree included Triple Crown Winner War Admiral, Man o’ War, Northern Dancer, and Native Dancer, who alone sired 295 winning horses with a combined generated income of $183 million. But Zippy’s racing record was 0–100. From his earliest days, Zippy was his own horse. Told to run in one direction, Zippy went the other. He stuck his tongue out at strangers and loped while other horses galloped. He terrorized trainers yet charmed children. Zippy would go on to set his own records in his own way—by always losing. His idiosyncratic story, told in William Thomas’ new biography The Legend of Zippy Chippy (McClelland & Stewart) is excerpted here.

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t the end of Zippy Chippy’s unproductive stint at Boston’s Suffolk Downs, Charles “Bill” Frysinger unloaded his horse after eighteen winless starts, never having met him or even seen him race. By selling his onceprized possession for $2,500, he took a loss of $6,500. Any hopes the new owner, Michael Barbarita, and his trainer, Ralph D’Alessandro, had of turning Zippy into a winner were dashed by two subpar fourth-place finishes at Finger Lakes, so they too disowned the enigmatic gelding. Zippy was being passed around like a bottle of malt liquor on skid row because his bottom line was shrinking, even if his self-esteem was not.

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While his owners were feeling the pinch of expenses not covered by earnings, Zippy Chippy was not feeling their love. “I once had the misfortune of owning that dog” is how Frysinger looked back on those days. Stats men all of them, they were not a bit impressed by Zippy’s endearing personality or his comical behavior of eating the hats of passersby, or goosing backside workers from behind. Zippy once ate a pizza while it was still in the box. By the time this New York–bred fouryear-old racked up twenty losses, he had gone through two owners, three trainers, and eleven jockeys. Generally speaking, a used car will go through fewer owners

and mechanics over that period of time. Many racehorses break down and are summarily retired after such an unpromising start, but Zippy seemed to take losing in stride. Indeed, he loved racing almost as much as he loved his postgame shower and meal. Even in those very early years, Zippy Chippy seemed to assume the Iron Man role. While half of the 37,000 Thoroughbreds foaled each year in North America never even get to race once, Zippy had already answered the call to post twenty times and was chomping at the bit for more. At this point a groom and vagabond named Louis somehow acquired Zippy Chippy. It’s likely Louis bought the horse using Michael Barbarita’s name and license to do the deal or else accepted the horse on a hand-off, in which case no money was involved. The immediate savings in stabling, food, and vet bills are substantial whenever an owner rids himself of a horse not consistently finishing in the money. Louis’ boss at Finger Lakes Racetrack was a horseman named Felix Monserrate, a fifty-two-year-old trainer with a stable of five Thoroughbreds, a few of which he owned himself. A compact, roundfaced, bronze-skinned man, he had come to America from Puerto Rico as a twenty-year-old exercise boy, first galloping Thoroughbreds in South Florida, and later at Belmont Park. He was no stranger to losing; neither Felix nor Finger Lakes was considered the best in the field of racing horses. In Zippy, Felix Continued on page 20

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MODERN RIDING DEMANDS INNOVATION, SAMSHIELD ADDS ELEGANCE & DISTINCTIVENESS Samshield is the result of a mix between the young pro rider’s needs, the young designer’s creative energy and engineer’s technical vision. Samshield’s philosophy is to always propose advanced products in Samshield terms of active and passive security, comfort, hygiene, material and finish quality as well as customization. Helmet: Shadowmatt blue, Flower Swarovski top, chrome blue trim Gloves: V-Skin Swarovski blue Down vest: Limited Edition Swarovski model Sweatshirt: Limited Edition Swarovski model

www.samshield.com ww


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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

ZIPPY CHIPPY

When you look up the word unique in Horse Racing for Dummies, you’ll see just an empty picture frame where Zippy failed to show up for his photo session. saw a lot of himself—not too big, not running in rich circles, but a hard worker and one that didn’t quit. Zippy liked to fool around a lot; Felix liked to tour the backside with a beer. Zippy was not shaken by losing. Felix just loved the life of a horseman. But even Felix had never before come face-to-face with a zero-for-twenty starter. It stands to reason that if you’re a Thoroughbred that runs often enough, you will eventually find yourself in a race in which the other horses are stressed, stiff, sore, in a bad mood, worried about the implications of starting a union, or pissed off about the food being served in the backside buckets. And on that day, odds are you will win. Zippy Chippy was unique in that he was destined to defy those odds. Unique? When you look up the word unique in Horse Racing for Dummies, you’ll see just an empty picture frame where Zippy failed to show up for his photo session that day.

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hortly after he took possession of Zippy Chippy and without ever having raced him, Louis decided to relocate from the snow-belt of the Finger Lakes to Florida, where the tracks have palm trees and hand-squeezed juice bars. But before he headed south, Louis had to dispose of his horse. Sadly, a horse who can’t earn enough to pay for his food is dead meat in the racing business. And there’s no

such thing as a pet at a racing stable; even the dog in the barn is there to calm the horses, and the cat earns his keep by catching the mice. When he heard his groom’s plan, the

trainer went berserk. “Kill the Zippy horse!” screamed Felix. “No way, José!” This was both magnanimous of the man as well as an obvious mistake, since, as I mentioned, the groom’s name was Louis. Louis needed $5,000 to purchase a vehicle for the trip. Felix didn’t have $5,000, but he did have an old truck. Thus, the kind of barter deal that usually involves a recently paroled brother-in-law was struck. When it comes to the term horse trading, this swap, a 1988 Ford truck for a horse who avoided the finish line like it was an electric fence, both defines the phrase and serves as its best example. The dirty white truck, which had been used to cart horses all over the

country, had 188,000 miles on it. Zippy, as Felix would find out much later, ran like he had more. “That guy,” recalled Felix, “he push him around and say bad things about him, so yeah, he got the truck and I got a friend.” From this moment on, Zippy Chippy, possibly the most stubborn and cantankerous horse ever to enter a starting gate, would be forever entwined with Felix Monserrate, the most stubborn, patient, and optimistic trainer ever to clean his boots off with a stick. With Zippy Chippy, Felix was accepting the challenge of his life, a baffling but battling no-win wonder. With Felix Monserrate, Zippy was moving from an owner to a family of horse lovers, which included the trainer’s partner, Emily Schoeneman, and their kids, Marisa and Jared. All would go on to spend the rest of their lives on horse farms and the backsides of the racetracks. It’s all they know; it’s all they love.

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he most successful horsemen approach Thoroughbred racing as a business, a tough trade of buying and selling, racing the best and unloading the worst. Remaining emotionally detached from the animals is a given. By contrast, the Monserrates did not deal in racehorses; they doted on them. They cared deeply for their pure-bred racetrack brood, waiting on them hand and hoof. Continued on page 102

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CAROL COHEN. SHE’S WALKED IN YOUR BOOTS. More than just a dedicated realestate advisor, Carol Cohen is a fellow equestrian who has personally built and sold two of the area’s most distinguished equestrian estates. She knows real estate from both sides of the fence. Carol is deeply committed to the Wellington equestrian community. A former hunter jumper rider turned FEI-level dressage competitor, Carol is a founding sponsor of the Global Dressage Festival and the inspiration behind the Global Dressage Visionary Awards. Carol knows horses, houses and Wellington! Whether you are interested in purchasing the property of your dreams or listing your current home to serious inquirers, contact Keller Williams real estate advisor, Carol Cohen.

CarolFCohenkw.com Direct: 561-756-4844 Office: 561-472-1236


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | T R A V E L

THE DARTMOOR DERBY

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An ADVENTUROUS RIDE through the ancient English landscape.

artmoor is a region in southwest England famous for its rugged moors, rivers, bogs, forests, and ancient stone sculptures. Granite tors—large, freestanding rock outcroppings—rise abruptly from the surrounding gentle slopes. The landscape has an otherworldly atmosphere. It evokes a sense of mystery and mysticism, no doubt tied to the area’s deep history. Wild ponies roam the rocky hills, and trails wind through forests and valleys dotted by BronzeAge stone circles and Neolithic tombs. Dartmoor has inspired folklore, art, and literature for centuries, including stories from authors such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. More recently, Stephen Spielberg traveled to Dartmoor to film the 2011 American-British drama, War Horse. “I have never before, in my long and eclectic career, been gifted with such an abundance of natural beauty as I experienced filming War Horse on Dartmoor,” he told the Daily Telegraph. “And, with twoand-a-half weeks of extensive coverage of landscapes and skies, I hardly scratched the surface of the visual opportunities that were offered to me.” Experiencing Dartmoor on horseback is both appropriate and incredible. It is an amazing opportunity to experience the landscape as it has been seen for thousands of years. “It really is the most wonderful riding you can imagine” said eventer Mary King, Olympic silver 22 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

“I have never before, in my long and eclectic career, been gifted with such an abundance of natural beauty as I experienced filming War Horse on Dartmoor.” —Stephen Speilberg

medalist and ambassador of the 2016 Dartmoor England Cross-Country Derby. The derby, run by High Pointe Tours, was the brainchild of Elaine Prior, who sought to create a ride reminiscent of the acclaimed Mongol Derby, the rigorous 1,000-kilometer horseback ride through the steppes of central Asia. Tempered by the chic appeal of African riding safaris, it is not a competition, but a carefully planned ride across the rugged rolling countryside. Accommodations include both luxury holiday cottages and “glamping,” or glamorous camping, at sites built exclusively for the event and offering delicious, locally sourced meals. The seven-day adventure begins at Saddle Tor, a luxe holiday cottage surrounded by granite tors, where riders—who must meet certain criteria of competence in the saddle—enjoy a twohour outing in the Dartmoor countryside on each of the first two days. On the third day, guests move to the Arundel Arms hotel, where they meet their fellow derby riders and prepare to depart. The derby itself is a 100-kilometer trek through Dartmoor National Park. It is not a race, nor does it require any jumping. Still, there is no shortage of adventure. The riders are paired with fit, experienced horses that carry them across rolling trails, rushing streams, and rocky outcrops. The journey ends with a luxurious and much-deserved stay at Bovey Castle. PAGE 105


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

SCULPTURE STOPPERS Racehorses and BLANTON’S Kentucky bourbon go together.

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lanton’s bourbon was the first single-barrel bourbon sold commercially, and it’s a connoisseur favorite. The Whiskey Scout says that “Blanton’s single-barrel bourbon is one of the more delicious bourbons out there. It’s smooth and accessible, a treat for the aficionado as well as the novice. But it’s about the bottle. Or, more significantly, the cork. Blanton’s has one of the most easily recognizable bottles on the shelf, with its hand-grenade shape and horse on top of the cork.”

What you may not know is that the stoppers are not all the same. Beginning in 1999, eight different sculptures were created. Each features a horse and jockey in a different stride and pose that together resemble the stages of a horse during a race. Each stopper has a different letter molded into it. When the stoppers are placed in order, they spell B-L-A-N-T-O-N’-S, and the horseand-jockey poses display eight successive scenes of a horse race, from standing at the gate, to crossing the finish line with a win. PAGE 105. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 2 3


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

HOME FURNISHINGS WITH ENDURING APPEAL EQUESTRIAN EMBELLISHMENTS

have a home in TRADITIONAL and MODERN décor.

Barker & Stonehouse’s Braemar midi sofa from Harris Tweed features an elegant curved shape with hardwood legs and a fully sprung seat and back suspension to ensure maximum comfort. Finished in durable and prestigious Harris Tweed fabric, the sofa exudes style and captures the heritage, quality, and tradition of Britain. Starting at $2,650.

Inspired by an architectural monument, the rustic cherry Circle table is a special piece in the Julie Browning Bova collection for Abner Henry. Exquisite craftsmanship, bent wood, and leather reflect both rustic and modern style. Price upon request.

Combining antiqued leather and canvas, the Charleston Polo Club armchair by Maison Living evokes the relaxed elegance and strength associated with the sport. Authenticity is enriched with stenciled graphics and stud detail. $1,350.

The Selby wing chair by Ethan Allen, with sophisticated, fluid lines and a deep high back, put a modern spin on its sleek silhouette. Available in fabric or leather with nailhead options. Starting at $1699. Companion ottoman starts at $749.

Inspired by the equestrian lifestyle, Julie Browning Bova’s Shire end table for Abner Henry has been style-spotted for its unique use of the iconic bit hardware. Her use of wood, rich finish, and bit embellishment make this versatile for any room. Price upon request. continued on page 26

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R continued from page 24

The two-door Chest on stand is part of Kindel Furniture’s Designer Artist Series. Julie Browning Bova, a designer and an equestrian, added her design of the bridle-bit hardware created especially for this chest. Double pulls ornament the exterior, with a single pull on the interior drawer. Price upon request.

The French modern-inspired Cliff House chair by Ralph Lauren is framed in leather-wrapped steel and features a continuous base. Starting at $7,905.

Ethan Allen’s Parker is a traditional wing chair updated with clean, crisp lines and tapered legs. It has deeper seating—a feature that makes it incredibly comfortable. Choice of cushion fill, leg finish, and optional nailhead trim. Starting at $1,739.

Renewing classic Victorian design with a modern spirit, the Duchess Salon chair by Ralph Lauren achieves a cultivated beauty with a sense of opulence. Starting at $5,760.

Julie Bova’s signature tack references are ever-present in this classic Pacer cocktail tray table for Abner Henry. The traditional use of black lacquer and gold tipping create an heirloom piece. Equestrian details are evident in the removable brass handles. Price upon request.

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

FROM FRANTIC TO FOCUSED Pre-ride YOGA in less than five minutes. BY JAMIE FIELDS

W

e’ve all had that kind of day, racing between work and errands, followed by a fast and furious drive to the barn. We leap out of our cars and tack up our horse in record time. The lesson starts out rushed with a somewhat stiff body, and it never seems to reach what could have been its full potential. It takes us too long to get in sync with our horses, and we waste half our lesson before we can really get to proper work and the fun part. Our horses often feel confused and forced instead of feeling a partnership. So, how do we calm our racing minds and get the most out of our mounted experience? A little yoga may be all we need. Yoga is a combination of practices dating back several thousand years. It includes breathing exercises, physical poses, mindful awareness, and meditation. It improves strength, flexibility, focus, and control. These pre-ride exercises combine a short breathing exercise for centering the body and mind, along with several easy physical poses to make the body supple and prepare for a harmonious experience for both horse and rider.

O N E -M I N U T E MI N D FU L N E SS E X E RC I S E

Meditation involves a shift in consciousness, which can be attained either while moving or in stillness.

SEATED MOUNTAIN POSE Take a quick scan of the body and become aware of your breath. Breath through your nose. Inhale, expanding breath into the belly. Exhale deeply. Repeat three times.

ARMS OVERHEAD Inhale and raise your arms overhead, bringing hands together to touch at the end of the inhalation. Synchronize breath with the movement.

SALUTATION SEAL Exhale and return hands to heart, drawing hands through midline of body. Repeat steps two and three by circling arms overhead and back to heart center for one minute. Stay focused on breath.

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This simple meditation can create an immediate shift in awareness and bring a sense of peacefulness and focus to your ride in only a minute or less. It is based on the Sun Salutation (Surya namaskar), which links the breath with the movement of the arms and can be done seated or standing or even on your horse (provided it is quiet enough). The movement of the arms simulates the upward energy and downward energy that follows our bodies’ natural rhythm. Take a short scan of your body and look for any tension. Sit quietly and connect to your breathing by slowly inhaling and exhaling. Focus your attention on how it feels to have the air flow through your body. Bring your hands to the sides of your legs, palms facing forward. On an inhalation, raise your arms overhead slowly bringing the palms to touch above your head. Synchronize your breath and the movement of your arms so that just at the end of the inhalation, the hands come together in prayer. Then, exhaling, draw your hands down through the midline of the body and open them out to the side so the hands are in their original position at the end of the exhale. Move slowly and mindfully so your movement and breath are in unison. This meditation can be performed seated or standing, with the eyes open or closed. But if the eyes are open, be sure to bring your gaze to your hands as they reach overhead, and then follow Continued on page 30


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S PRE-RIDE YOGA Continued from page 28

COMFORT

&STYLE

COW POSE Sit with feet hip-width apart. Inhale; tip pelvis forward; arch the spine reaching heart forward and up. Draw shoulder blades together. Feel the openness in front of body and length of the spine from tailbone through crown of head.

CAT POSE Exhale; tuck tailbone and round back; draw navel towards the spine. Drop chin to chest, widen upper back. Whole spine should be rounded like a cat’s. Move back and forth between cat and cow poses synchronizing with breath.

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your hands with your gaze as they come down through the midline of your body. Repeat this rhythm for one minute or more if you like. Focus on being present throughout the exercise and coordinating your movement with your breath. Take a moment at the end of the exercise to set a goal for your ride, such as, “My horse and I will move in harmony.” Softly open your eyes and choose one or more of the physical poses shown here depending on what you feel would be most beneficial for you and your horse. Horses are very emotional beings; they can act as a perfect mirror. By taking the time to pause and observe our breath, we can begin to connect on a deeper level to ourselves as well as our equine partners. Just take a deep breath and look into the eyes of your horse. It’s that simple.    JAMIE FIELDS is the owner of Ogden’s Mill Yoga in Hartland, Vermont, and a Yoga Alliance RYT 300 885 E 149th St Bronx, NY 10455 teacher. She teaches a888-473-3386 mindfulness-based, Vinyasa style of yoga and has been practicing since 1998. Also an experimileatruck.com enced eventer, she lives in Vermont with her three dogs, five horses, equestrian daughters Emily and Madlen (the model for the photos), and horse husband, Thatcher Fields.


MARKINGS OF WINNERS SEATED SPINAL TWIST Sit tall. Place right hand behind you and left hand on the outer right thigh. Inhale; press into the right hand and grow taller. On the exhale spiral to right. Take five full breaths this way and then switch to the left side; repeat.

SEATED OUTER HIP OPENER Sitting tall, place the left ankle on the top of the right knee. Flex the toes of the left foot. Place left hand on the left thigh just above the knee and gently press the knee away. Bend forward at hips. Take five deep breaths; switch sides, repeat.

GODDESS POSE Stand with feet 3 feet apart. Point toes out, keep knees bent. Hands on thighs, straighten right arm, press right hand into right thigh, and twist toward the left; bring right shoulder toward left knee. Breathe deeply five times; switch sides.

MileaBuickGMC.com 3211 E Tremont Ave, Bronx, NY 10461 MileaSubaru.com 3201 E Tremont Ave, Bronx, NY 10461 CRESCENT LUNGE Standing feet together; step left foot back three feet, toes pointed ahead. Bend right knee and raise arms. Knee at right angle, pelvis level, press firmly into back foot. Breathe deeply five times. Return to standing to rest, hands at heart center; pause and breathe.

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EQ

SCIENCE

TRACES OF THE PAST Researchers find a clue to the history of HORSE DOMESTICATION in the genes of horses with dun-colored markings.

B

reeders look for distinguishing traits in their horses, like soundness, scope, or bone structure, but in the process of domesticating horses, most have lost some of their original genetics. Researchers have recently unraveled a genetic mystery: what causes the dun pattern in horses’ coats, and why has it been lost in most horses? The results of their study, published in Nature Genetics, reveal new insights into skin and hair biology and horse domestication. The work is an international collaboration led by groups at Uppsala University in Sweden and the Huntsville Institute of Biotechnology in Alabama. Dun horses have a specific coatcolor pattern caused by a dilution gene. Though most people consider a dun horse to have a sandy-yellow color with a dark main and tail, the dun gene can affect the appearance of black, bay, or chestnut horses by lightening the original bodycoat color and showing the underlying base color only in the mane, tail, legs, and some notable markings. These markings include a dark stripe down the middle of the back (known as a dorsal stripe), a tail and mane darker than the body coat, and usually darkness in the face and legs. Most duns show horizontal striping on the back of the forelegs. Some also show a shoulder blade stripe, though this marking is rarer.

The pale hair color of dun horses once provided camouflage in the wild. Today’s modern domestic horses are often bred over many generations to be more conspicuous, more beautiful, shinier, or, simply, unique. “Dun is clearly one of the most interesting coat-color variants in domestic animals because it does not just change the color but the color pattern, too,” said Leif Andersson, whose group led the genetic analysis. “We were curious to understand the underlying molecular mechanism of why dun pigment dilution did not affect all parts of the body.” The research team started by analyzing the distribution of pigment in individual hairs. “Unlike the hair of most well-studied mammals, the diluted colored hairs from dun horses are not evenly pigmented all around. They have a section of intense pigmentation along the length of the hair on the side that faces out from the body of the horse, while the rest of the hair has more or less no pigment,” explained Freyja Imsland, the lead author for the genetic analysis and a

32 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

doctoral student in Andersson’s group. The hairs from the dark areas of dun horses are, in contrast, intensely pigmented all around each individual hair. In spite of scientists having studied hair pigmentation in detail for a very long time, this kind of pigmentation is new to science and unlike pigmentation seen in rodents, primates, and carnivores. Genetic analysis and DNA sequencing revealed that dun versus non-dun color is determined by a single gene that codes for the T-box3 (TBX3) transcription factor. In humans, inactivation of the TBX3 gene causes a set of birth defects known as Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome, but in horses these mutations affect only the growing hair. To understand how the gene affects hair color, the researchers measured its distribution in individual hairs relative to other molecules previously known to regulate pigmentation. The group speculates that the TBX3 gene could help to explain zebra stripes. The region of the body where the gene is expressed may account for the stripe pattern, whereas the part of the hair where it is expressed may account for color intensity. The results of the study indicate that the dun horse-color variant we see most often today likely occurred after domestication, as learned from comparing modern horse DNA with DNA from a horse that lived about 43,000 years ago.


WI N N I NG doesn’t happen by

A C C I D E N T.

The show pen. How many hours did you put in the saddle to make it here? How many hours polishing not only your tack, but also your skills? Sweating every detail. So, ask yourself, do your horse’s insides match his outside? Does he have the stomach to win? Time for a gut check. TheStomachToWin.com When administered for 8 or 28 days, just one dose a day of ULCERGARD is proven to effectively prevent performance-robbing equine stomach ulcers in horses exposed to stressful conditions.

Save on your next purchase and take rewards to the MAX. www.max.merial.com ®ULCERGARD is a registered trademark, and ™MAX, Merial Awards Xpress is a trademark, of Merial. ©2016 Merial, Inc., Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. EQUIUGD1425-M (08/15)

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: ULCERGARD can be used in horses that weigh at least 600 pounds. Safety in pregnant mares has not been determined.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

HANDMADE WARMTH creates HAND-LOOMED SCARVES inspired by color and movement.

PIRTTI HANDWOVEN

MARTYN THOMPSON

W

hen summer weather fades and you reach back into your closet for warmer clothes, do you feel inspired by your scarves? Do you know how they were made? Anne-Marie Kavulla began her career as a dancer. In her work with choreography, she found that a dance could be enhanced with the right balance of fabric, pattern, and color. Though she had always enjoyed knitting, a skill she learned from her grandmother, she hadn’t expected it to influence her career. “I have been a lifelong knitter and lover of yarn,” said Anne-Marie. “Exploring another skill set was a way to explore more materials and creative ideas.” It was just around the time that she acquired a weaving loom that she had

DAVID RINELLA

DAVID RINELLA

BY JILL NOVOTNY

Above: Handwoven scarves with a focus on fluid movement and subtle colors. Below: Designer and weaver, Anne-Marie Kavulla.

34 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

her first child. “Knowing that parenting was going to take up the majority of my time, I wanted something that would help me stay creative and give me purpose with learning this new craft,” she explained. And so her company was born. “Starting Pirtti Handwoven gave me a place to focus my creative efforts with just enough pressure to keep producing work,” she said. Anne-Marie uses traditional methods and a strong focus on color and movement to produce a luxurious cloth that is made entirely by hand. “All of my scarves are designed and woven by me in my home studio. I am part performance art and part product!” she exclaimed. “The process of handweaving is as much of the story as the scarf itself.” As handmade clothing has become


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

DAVID RINELLA MARTYN THOMPSON

word for ocean. My family moved to San Francisco for two years. I was so inspired by the cold fog and the Pacific ocean, so I wove a scarf that depicted the deep cold blue and the push of the fog. More recently, I wove a series of scarves inspired by flowers just past their prime. A flower that has started to wilt has a fascinating intensity and mood.” By connecting her experience and inspiration directly to her creations through her hands, she has brought a new level of warmth and beauty to her scarves. “My designs are rarely flat color,” says Anne-Marie. “I love colors that push and melt. I have always been intrigued by the subjective nature of color and how dimensional it is. Each scarf is an experiPAGE 105 ment in blending colors."

MARTYN THOMPSON

increasingly rare, there has been a growing desire on the part of consumers to know more about the source and process of their clothing’s production. Companies have begun to rethink their production methods, but there is still a separation of design and production in most of the fashion industry. “Each scarf has a unique element that comes from the human hand,” continued Anne-Marie. “Although I may produce a series of scarves with the same pattern and color scheme, each inch of fabric carries my mood, physical strength, and time. In a world of mass-produced items, I see my work as a reminder of how our clothes are made and who makes them.” As for her designs, Anne-Marie refers to herself as a color junkie. “I certainly research color trends and watch what people are wearing,” she said. “Beyond that, once I’ve narrowed my focus on what my next project will be, I start focusing on color stories from a personal place. For instance, one of my favorite scarves was called Valatameri, the Finnish

Left: Handwoven scarf with a rich palette of black, aubergine, and warm grey, Anne-Marie Kavulla’s studio, Anne-Marie weaving on her LeClerc floor loom.

AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 5


AUTUMN IN NEW YORK CITY

36 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

KIT HOUGHTON

eptember is a beautiful time to visit New York City— and especially Central Park. Your Big Apple to-do list probably includes Broadway shows, fine restaurants, and world-class shopping. Add in the Rolex Central Park Horse Show on September 21-25, with its full schedule of exciting and entertaining equestrian sport. Held in Wollman Rink in the park, the multidiscipline event features U.S. Open competition for show jumping, dressage, hunters, and Arabians. Competition gets underway on Wednesday, September 21, featuring the U.S. Open Arabian Horse Show with a mix of in-hand/halter and performance classes. Some of the world’s top show jumpers will compete under the impressive New York City skyline on Thursday in the U.S. Open U25 FEI Grand Prix and the puissance and in Friday’s highlight

ASHLEY NEUHOF

S

The ROLEX CENTRAL PARK HORSE SHOW returns to the Big Apple.

Above: Daniel Bluman, Isabell Werth

event, the $216,000 Grand Prix CSI 3*, presented by Rolex. The elegant sport of dressage will take center stage in Central Park on Friday afternoon with the U.S. Open Dressage Grand Prix, as well as Saturday night in the mesmerizing U.S. Open CDI Freestyles set to music. The hunter schedule includes pony, junior/amateur, and professional hunter competition in the U.S. Open Duchossois Cup on Saturday afternoon. Sunday in Wollman Rink will feature an exciting schedule of matinee performances for family day, with free general admission. More news, including the scheduled matinee performances, will be announced soon. A portion of ticket sales will benefit a lengthy list of New York as well as equestrian based, charities. Find out more information at PAGE 105 centralparkhorseshow.com

KIT HOUGHTON

EQ E S S E N T I A L S | T R A V E L


DISTINCTIVE SANTA BARBARA PROPERTIES

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

SLEEK SIMPLICITY Jewelry designer CATHERINE ZADEH has a strong vision and an UNDERSTATED

TOUCH. 3

1

Catherine Zadeh, the founder of Zadeh New York, is a uniquely talented and highly successful jewelry designer based in New York City. Born in Iran and schooled in Paris, her sophisticated aesthetic is influenced by architecture, art, nature, life, and the beauty of the equestrian lifestyle. Her jewelry is carried by Bergdorf Goodman, Barneys New York, and several high-end specialty stores. Her designs have been worn by celebrities and featured in magazines such as Departures, GQ, and Town and Country. She has recently gained a dedicated following within the equestrian community, catching the eyes of riders Daniel Bluman, Victoria Colvin, Brianne Goutal, and Mavis Spencer.

We had the opportunity to meet with Catherine at her New York City studio and were eager to learn more about the sources of her creativity, her design aesthetic, and her foray into the world of equestrian lifestyle. 38 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

Your work has an architectural quality. Is architecture a consistent source of inspiration? 2 1. Hand-carved buffalo horn bracelets, available in yellow, white, and rose gold. 2. Kara weave rings in 18k yellow, white, and rose gold. 3.18k gold Hampton pendant. Catherine Zadeh

Architecture is a continual source of inspiration to me, but I am also inspired by both modern and contemporary art, as well as the organic shapes found in nature.   How much does your time living in Paris influence your approach to design?

I lived in Paris from the age of 6 to 24. Those 18 years gave me a deep understanding of sophistication and a real sense of authenticity. The most stylish women I observed there were the ones who did not follow trends. Their effortless way of carrying themselves inspired me. Sometimes it was the juxtaposition of carrying an Hermès bag while wearing something casual, such as a T-shirt, or a pair of torn jeans with a great pair of heels. That kind of mix is more continued 0n page 40


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

Hand-carved buffalo horn Jane pendant with diamonds and 18k gold.

continued from page 38

heirloom pieces that I hope will be treasured for years to come.  

common now, but back then it was sort of an unexpected way of dressing. These women also had a way of using their outfits as a canvas for their wonderful accessories. It spoke to their unique personal style and was all about the right piece on the right woman. When I design my pieces, I want to create something that translates effortlessly from day to evening and adds the right amount of flair without being overwhelming.   

What is it about horses that inspire you creatively?

Do you enjoy designing commissioned pieces?

I love being commissioned to design one-of-a-kind pieces for my clients. It can be challenging, but it is also exhilarating. Each piece begins with a very personal dialogue and ends in a piece that truly reflects their personality and aesthetic. I always love seeing the expression on their faces when I present the final piece. Although I admit that sometimes I feel a bit pained to part with my creations.   Have you had to say no to design requests if they didn’t fit your design aesthetic?

My private clients generally come to me for my specific aesthetic. I have a very strong vision, but I love to hear what the client is envisioning. It’s always a conversation and collaboration. Often, they will bring me a special stone that they want incorporated into the piece or have an idea based on a design of mine that they have seen. How would you describe the perfect Zadeh New York client?

The perfect Zadeh client is someone with a refined sense of style who appreciates something distinctive—an individual with a love of great design who yearns to find something unique yet exquisitely fabricated.

I work not only in gold, diamonds, and precious stones, but also with organic materials like sustainable water buffalo horn, ebony wood, parachute cord, and vegetable ivory. The mix really speaks to modern sophistication. It isn’t about a traditional shape or specific carat count. What’s really chic is something that expresses a unique sensibility. My jewelry is not precious in a sense that it should be hidden away in a safe. They are statement pieces, but still feel effortless. I want them to be worn day after day and become part of the life story of the person wearing them. They are truly modern

40 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

Horses are magnificent creatures. I absolutely love their power, elegance, and strength. I am also totally fascinated by the equestrian lifestyle. I find the elements so timeless, beautiful, and chic. I think it goes back to when I was growing up in Paris. Many of my friends rode, and I was just so inspired by the beauty of it all. When you are immersed in that world, there are so many things that really excite the mind and stay with you. It is in everything from the shape of a stirrup, which I have incorporated into many of my designs, to the way the reins hang.  The pulley system I developed for my pendants, for instance, was something that was influenced by draw reins. It is something simple and effortless, but allows the wearers to choose how to position the pendant and where it falls on their body. And I love layering several great pieces together to make a really personal statement. For me, something about it also evokes the feeling of the equipment hanging in a tack room. I participate as a vendor at both the Hampton Classic in Bridgehampton, New York, and the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, Florida, each season, which I love because it allows me not only to be immersed in the scene, but also to interact with so many fascinating PAGE 105 people.


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Winter Warmth: The Five Best Horse Towns to Escape the Snow

John O’Hurley Find out where Seinfeld’s J. Peterman relaxes with his dogs

Candace Bushnell: From Sex and the City to a Farm in the Country

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JUNE/JULY 2016

DO N ’ T DRE AD W IN TE R. E M B RAC E IT!

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8 SNOWY ESCAPES FOR HORSE LOVERS

AMAZING ESCAPES FOR HORSE LOVERS COUNTRY STAR CHARLIE DANIELS

OF HORSE RACING AMERICA’S COTSWOLDS

11/19/15 10:29 AM

DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 10, 2014 DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 1, 2016

EXCLUSIVE GEORGE MORRIS BOOK EXCERPT DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 1, 2016

PLUS: PARIS SHOW JUMPING FASCINATING COUPLES J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 6

PLUS: TRAVEL | PEOPLE | ST Y LE | FA SH IO N | D E C O R | A RT S

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F E B R U A RR YY / M / A MRACRHC H2 021061 6

WINTER 2015\2016

P LUS: SP R I N G FA SHI O N F O R E C A ST DISPLAY UNTIL FEB 1, 2016

AMAZING WEDDINGS

DRESSAGE STAR AND ENTREPRENEUR CHARLOTTE JORST

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6

JANE SEYMOUR HOLLYWOOD AND HORSES

THE HIGH-SPEED WORLD

DISPLAY UNTIL JULY 10, 2016

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Facebook: EquestrianLivingMagazine | Instagram @eqliving | Twitter @eqliving FE B RUA RY/M A RCH | 201 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 5


BY LISA MAIR

THE MAKING OF

I

was digging through a closet one day when I came across a mismatched old riding boot. I had no idea where its mate was, and I had been playing with the idea of painting a riding boot, just for kicks. So I did, and when I posted its picture on Instagram, champion eventer Lauren Kieffer got wind of it and liked it. She contacted me and asked if I would paint one of her old boots. I said I’d be happy to, and then I suggested

that we could auction it off as a fundraiser. She loved the idea and asked that Brooke USA, the American branch of the world’s largest international equine-welfare charity, be the benefactor. Days later, Kieffer’s boots arrived in the mail. When I opened the box, I found a pair of beautifully made Italian riding boots with Lauren’s name stamped on the inside. The leather was soft and shiny. Lauren had said these were her old boots, but they looked pretty darn good to me. The worst part of painting these boots was knowing that I was making them unusable

Lauren Kieffer’s name had been stamped on the inside of the boot.

Lisa uses harsh cleaners and a scrub sponge to remove wax, polish, and oils from the boot’s surface.

LAUREN KIEFFER’S PAINTED BOOT

The original sketch.

The boot as it arrived in the shipping box.

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in the future. I had to strip everything off that beautiful leather so that the paint would stick. This boot was so soft I had to stuff it to get it to stand up on its own. I sketched a design of what I had envisioned for this project and sent it off to Lauren for her approval. She loved it. I immediately went to work drawing the design on the boot and painting it. At press time, Lauren Kieffer was off to compete for the U.S. eventing team at the Olympics in Rio. The auction ends in early August. All proceeds will go to Brooke USA’s Give a Donkey a Drink fundPAGE 105 raising drive.

She applies a base coat of paint.

Artist LISA MAIR is a throwback to earlier times. From her house/studio in Vermont, she creates paintings as they would have been made hundreds of years ago–one painstakingly slow step at a time. She has created countless works that have made their way all over North America. They can be found in private homes, historic museums, and publications such as The Boston Globe Magazine, Country Living, Old House Journal, The Miami Herald, and The Washington Post. Recently she has enjoyed working on boots and saddles (right), as well as her usual wall murals and floorcloths. Visit Lisa’s studio in EQ magazine, Spring 2013.

She draws the design onto the boot and applies the first washes.

Finally, Lisa paints in the details.

The painting of Lauren and Patrick is finished and the decorative top and foot are added.

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THE 2016 EQ

GOLD LIST READERS VOTE FOR THE BEST OF EQUESTRIAN LIFE.

T

his year, the third annual EQ Gold List had thousands more votes than previous years. This spring, readers were invited to nominate their favorites in various equestrian-centric

categories. Asking readers for nominations ensures that lesser-known local favorites are included. From these nominees, we created the final ballot. Some of the winners were the expected, while others were surprising. Whether you agree or disagree with the winning selections, we’re sure you’ll find the results interesting.

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F AV O R I T E TA L L B O O T S

● New York-based VOGEL custom boots is a family company in its fourth generation of bootmaking. It repeatedly tops the Gold List for its fine range of tall boots for all types of riding and different levels of formality.

● Established over 50 years ago in New York City by master craftsman Jose Der, DER-DAU built its reputation using the traditional techniques of master leather artisans to make custom boots for some of the industry’s top riders.

● Gold List voters chose ARIAT as their favorite tall boot. Ariat says the company builds its boots for the sport, with the goal that its product “supports the highest level of performance possible.”

F AV O R I T E E Q U E S T R I A N - S T Y L E L E AT H E R G O O D S

● Celebrating its 75th anniversary, COACH is the original American answer to the fine leather goods of Europe. Its line of fine bags, wallets, and belts evokes an effortless New York style while defining modern luxury.

● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner

PERRY CORRELL/SHUTTERSTOCK

● The timeless and elegant

leather goods from HERMÈS are among the finest in the world. Expert craftsmanship, superior leathers, and a rich equestrian heritage make them a repeat winner of this category.

● RALPH LAUREN has repeatedly topped the Gold List for its clothing, and this year EQ readers voted for its leather goods as well. Ralph Lauren handbags offer a wide variety of styles for any occasion, from fun fringed suede cross-body bags to elegant leather totes and briefcases, and weekendgetaway bags.

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THE 2016 EQ

GOLD LIST

F AV O R I T E E V E N T I N G R I D E R S

Olympian Charlotte Dujardin continues to dominate the sport, having earned nearly every title and award possible. Other favorites include three-timeOlympian Steffen Peters and U.S. chef d’équipe of the U.S. dressage team, Robert Dover.

All three favorite eventers are accomplished Olympians. Boyd Martin is at the top of his sport, Karen O’Connor competed in the Olympics five times, and Phillip Dutton competed for his home country of Australia before representing the U.S.

● CHARLOTTE DUJARDIN

● BOYD MARTIN

SUSAN STICKLE

Equestrian Living voters enjoy A DIVERSE MIX OF DISCIPLINES, as evidenced by their choices of riders and events. This year’s favorites range from major events to small local competitions, and from well-established stars to young up-and comers. The horse world offers something for everyone.

F AV O R I T E D R E S S A G E R I D E R S

VOTER RIDING DISCIPLINES 11. Other disciplines 10. Fox Hunting

STEFFAN PETERS

9. Driving

● STEFFEN PETERS

● KAREN O’CONNOR

● ROBERT DOVER

● PHILLIP DUTTON

8. Breeds (Arabian, Etc.) 7. Western/Reining 6. Racing 5. Polo 4. Trail Riding 3. Eventing JENNI AUTRY

2. Dressage 1. Hunter Jumper

F AV O R I T E R E I N I N G R I D E R S

F AV O R I T E P O L O P L AY E R S

Readers chose Olympic team members Beezie Madden and McLain Ward as their favorite show jumpers. Crowd favorite 24-year-old Jessica Springsteen has Olympic aspirations as well.

Tim McQuay has been an industry trailblazer for over 35 years, earning prize money on an astounding 229 different horses. McQuay’s daughter, Mandy, and her husband, Tom McCutcheon, are the power couple in the sport.

Nacho Figueras is a renowned polo player, model, family man, and entrepreneur. Nic Roldan is one of the best Americans players in the sport, and Sunny Hale is at the top of the fast-growing sport of women’s polo.

● BEEZIE MADDEN

● TIM McQUAY

JENNIFER WOOD

● MANDY & TOM McCUTCHEON

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JAUN LAMARCA

● NIC ROLDAN

● SUNNY HALE

BILL BARBOSA

● JESSICA SPRINGSTEEN

● McLAIN WARD

● NACHO FIGUERAS

GEORGE KAMPER

CARRIE WIRTH

F AV O R I T E J U M P E R R I D E R S


F AV O R I T E E Q U E S T R I A N C E L E B R I T I E S

● Readers chose American actor and environmentalist ROBERT REDFORD as their favorite celebrity, no doubt for his work to protect wild horses and to end horse slaughter. The 76-year-old has starred in many equine movies, including the Horse Whisperer. ● GEORGINA BLOOMBERG

● JESSICA SPRINGSTEEN

JAGUAR/SHUTTERSTOCK

● ROBERT REDFORD

● GEORGINA BLOOMBERG has seen a great success in her show-jumping career as well as in her many philanthropic works. ● JESSICA SPRINGSTEEN is a notable crossover in our Gold List, as both a favorite rider and a favorite celebrity.

F AV O R I T E B R A N D S F O R E N G L I S H S H O W C L O T H E S

● Three-time winner TAILORED SPORTSMAN’S iconic English breeches epitomize classic equestrian style. The timeless quality of its fashion makes them the only choice for many discerning riders. ● PIKEUR has made repeated appearances on the Gold List and is one of Germany’s finest

TAILORED SPORTSMAN

● PIKEUR

equestrian-apparel brands. With a foundation in dressage wear, Pikeur has gained traction across many disciplines. ● ARIAT’S English show clothes are comfortable and high-tech, developed as equipment for performance athletes in the equestrian sport.

● ARIAT

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F AV O R I T E P L A C E S T O L I V E W I T H YO U R H O R S E S

● LEXINGTON

Where is the best place to live with your horses? Readers voted, and the winners are:

PEITER ESTERSOHN/MONACELLI PRESS

● The city of LEXINGTON, Kentucky, is often called the Horse Capital of the World. Home of the Kentucky Horse Park, a truly unique facility dedicated to a variety of equestrian sports, it has become a mecca for horse lovers. The town combines history and southern gentility with a surprisingly contemporary flair. The endless pastures of the Bluegrass State have been home to racing Thoroughbreds for centuries, and horses from every other equestrian discipline have joined them. ● Warm sun and a relaxed lifestyle make OCALA a winter favorite for horse lovers, but readers chose it for year-round living as well. With over 1,200 horse farms, the area is a bastion of equestrians of all disciplines. “Ocala is the home of southern hospitality,” says combined-driving international champion Chester Webber (below), an Ocala native. “Unlike much of Florida, Ocala’s roots are southern, with magnificent live-oak trees, sweet tea, and warm hospitality.” ● MIDDLEBURG is an idyllic village in Virginia hunt country. The close-knit community is full of interesting people, many of whom are working hard to preserve the area and its rich tradition of equestrian sport. The cozy main street offers interesting shopping alongside the historic Red Fox Inn. Runner-up favorite places to live include WELLINGTON, Florida, and SOUTHERN PINES, North Carolina. See page 55 for readers’ favorite places to spend the summer or winter.

F A V O R I T E R E A LT O R S

● OCALA

● MIDDLEBURG

● Kirkpatrick & Co., Kentucky ● Martha Jolicoeur, Florida ● Robert Ross, Florida

● ZACH DAVIS/KIRKPATRICK

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● ROBERT ROSS

FED FOX INN

GEORGE KAMPER FOR EQ LIVING

● MARTHA JOLICOEUR


F AV O R I T E F A S H I O N B R A N D S W I T H E Q U E S T R I A N S T Y L E For years, equestrian style has been an inspiration to designers of both street wear and high fashion. Equestrian details such as buckles or bits can add a chic elegance to any wardrobe. ● Voters this year chose ARIAT’S clothing as their favorite brand for equestrian-style street wear. Its comfortable, durable, and fashionable clothes in both English and Western styles are easy to wear straight from the barn to almost anywhere your day may take you. ● Another long-time favorite for EQ readers is RALPH LAUREN, a designer that has long mastered the art of seamlessly integrating equestrian style into everyday clothing. His evocative equestrian style encompasses the rich textures of rustic western ranches, stately English manors, and exhilarating hunts, with riders decked out in requisite tall boots and tweeds. ● BARBOUR also rated highly and is a favorite of equestrians for its classic, on-point look that defines the essence of true British style. A favorite of Kate Middleton, the brand is a perfect blend of practical and stylish.

● ARIAT

● RALPH LAUREN

● BARBOUR

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F AV O R I T E H A N G O U T S | E A S T

● A repeat winner, DUDLEY’S ON SHORT in Lexington, Kentucky, is a favorite local eatery and a favorite of the equestrian community.

● OLI’S FASHION CUISINE is a favorite in Wellington, Florida, among equestrians. People go to see and be seen while enjoying modern food in a tantalizing atmosphere.

F AV O R I T E PA D D O C K B O O T S

● Voters chose ARIAT as their favorite paddock boot for the third year in a row. Not only are the boots stylish and comfortable, but Ariat views riders as athletes and their boots as important equipment.

● The Cork country boots from DUBARRY are both versatile in style and highly practical. With Gore-Tex technology, these waterproof ankle boots are comfortable, durable, and look great teamed with jeans and a tweed jacket.

● ASHTEN’S in Southern Pines, North Carolina, is a unique, farm-totable American restaurant, offering a cozy yet elegant setting where equestrians gather after a great day of riding.

F AV O R I T E F I E L D B O O T S

● Italian bootmaker PARLANTI crafts its boots entirely by hand in meticulous detail. Its paddock boots are made from genuine calfskin in ready-towear sizes, or they can be custom sized.

● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner

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● ARIAT’S field boots are comfortable, durable, and stylish.

● New York-based VOGEL makes boots that conform to the foot and remain in place in the stirrup.

● Family-owned DER-DAU handcrafts custom field boots for top equestrians, often accented for personalized style.


F AV O R I T E H A N G O U T S | W E S T

● Maybe not as fancy as some other winners, HITS competitors and readers voted IN-N-OUT Burger of Indio, California, No. 1 for tasty food and horse talk.

● (tie) BUCK’S of Woodside, California, is known for its wild decor. It’s also a popular hangout for both equestrians and Silicon Valley venture capitalists, who have made many major deals here.

F AV O R I T E W E S T E R N B O O T S

● It is a rare distinction for one bootmaker to be chosen as a favorite for both English and Western boots. With attention to detail and quality construction, ARIAT has become the benchmark in the boots and apparel industry.

● With over 130 years of history, Texan bootmaker LUCCHESE makes high-quality and beautifully detailed western boots that have become a part of American culture.

● (tie) JAKE’S of Del Mar, California, is known for its cuisine and amazing ocean views. As you enjoy a lobster sandwich or hula pie, the ocean waves splash just outside the floor-to-ceiling windows.

F AV O R I T E W E T W E AT H E R B O O T S

● TONY LAMA boots have been a symbol of the American west since 1911. The company makes quality, comfortable boots with iconic style to wear in the fields or out on the town.

● HUNTER boots (Wellies) are a staple of the equestrian lifestyle. They keep you dry, and Hunter offers a huge selection of styles and prints.

● DUBARRY boots are famously built to withstand even the most extreme weather,with cozy and chic waterproof style.

● Freeport, Maine, icon L.L.BEAN is loved for its quality, customer service, and lifetime guarantee.

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● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner

F AV O R I T E TA C K S H O P S

● With its 31 stores nation-

● The TACK ROOM of

wide and a ubiquitous catalog,, DOVER is America’s dominant tackshop.

Camden, South Carolina, began in the back of a pickup truck and has grown to a 30,000-squarefoot shop that is popular with shoppers local and nationwide.

● HADFIELD’S, based in Wellington, Florida, is well respected around the horse show world, and their mobile units are a show favorite.

F AV O R I T E S A D D L E S A N D H E L M E T S

● Voters chose CHARLES OWEN as their favorite helmet for the second year in a row. The helmets, handcrafted in Great Britain, offer designs that are flattering and comfortable—not to mention potentially life-saving.

● CWD saddles are favored by riders such as Scott Brash, McLain Ward, Kent Farrington, and Kelley Farmer. The saddles feature a three-point girthing system and wide panels that offer close contact between horse and rider.

● BUTET offers advanced design concepts combined with the finest materials, handcrafted by Frederic Butet Sellier in Samur, France. Its saddles are covered with the highest quality calfskin available for superior comfort and grip.

● DEVOUCOUX produces over 3,000 unique saddles based on 13 basic models. World-class riders, including Olympic medalist Norman Dello Joio, use Devoucoux saddles. ● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner

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● GPA is known for its innovation and cutting edge technology. Leaders in the industry, it influences style and safety of riders throughout several disciplines.

● Inspired by premium motorcycle helmet technology, SAMSHIELD helmets are made of materials designed for comfort and safety, including a polycarbonate shell, shape-memory comfort foam, and an adjustable inner layer for perfect fit.


FAVO R I T E D R E S S AG E E V E N T S

● WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

● LEXINGTON, KY.

FAVO R I T E E V E N T I N G E V E N T S

● For the third year running, voters chose the ROLEX

● DEVON, PENNA.

● ROLEX 3-DAY EVENT

● The ADEQUAN GLOBAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL took the top spot in voting for the top dressage venue this year. Held in Wellington, it is one of the world’s largest and lasts throughout the winter season. ● The U.S. DRESSAGE FINALS takes place at the Kentucky Horse Park each November. The national head-to-head competition showcases competitors in adult amateur and open divisions, at training level through grand prix. ● DRESSAGE AT DEVON, Pennsylvania, is one of the highest-rated international dressage competitions. It’s a favorite show for competitors and visitors alike. ● AIKEN, S.C.

● WELLINGTON, FLA.

KENTUCKY THREE-DAY EVENT as their favorite. The competition level is equal to that of the Olympic Games, and only the upper echelon of competitors are to be found at this prestigious show. ● Many readers preferred the year-round eventing available in AIKEN, South Carolina, which hosts the U.S. Eventing team’s winter training sessions. ● Others chose Florida’s new WELLINGTON EVENTING SHOWCASE. This year, the course went directly through the VIP tent.

FAVO R I T E H U N T E R - J U M P E R E V E N T S

● SPRUCE MEADOWS

● MENLO

MEG BANKS

● WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL

● It comes as no surprise that the WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL held in Wellington, Florida’s was voted favorite. The 500-acre, 12-week international competition boasts over $8 million in prizes and some of the world’s top competitors. ● SPRUCE MEADOWS in Calgary, Alberta, also topped the list for its high level competition in a clean, green, and welcoming environment that is a competitors’ favorite. ● Last year’s winner, MENLO CHARITY HORSE SHOW, held each August in California, is widely recognized for both its philanthropic mission and its elegance.

FAVO R I T E R E I N I N G E V E N T S

● The NATIONAL REINING BREEDER’S CLASSIC

● NATIONAL REINING FINALS

● QUARTER HORSE

● FUTURITY

in Katy, Texas, pays out purses of over $1 million each year in April, and it was chosen by voters as their favorite event for this exciting sport. ● Currently in its 50th year, the ALL AMERICAN QUARTER HORSE CONGRESS in Ohio is the world’s largest single-breed show, boasting over 17,000 entries. ● Rounding out the top three, the NATIONAL REINING HORSE ASSOCIATION welcomes elite competitors from all over the world to its futurity show in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

FAVO R I T E P O LO V E N U E

● INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB PALM BEACH

● AIKEN POLO

● SANTA BARBARA POLO ● The Sport of Kings is played throughout the world, but our readers favored watching a match at the INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB PALM BEACH in Wellington, Florida, where chic polo fans gather to enjoy world-class cuisine in the sunshine. ● The AIKEN POLO CLUB in South Carolina held its first match on Whitney Field in 1882, and in the ensuing years it has become a winter playground for many of America’s polo legends. ● Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Southern California foothills, the SANTA BARBARA POLO CLUB is a truly special place to enjoy a chukker.

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F AV O R I T E C A R B R A N D S Equestrian Living Gold List voters appreciate luxury, performance, and comfort in their choice of cars. Range Rover was the top choice.

F AV O R I T E A I R L I N E S International Routes

● American ● Virgin Atlantic ● Emirates

● (tie) BMW and MERCEDES are popular German brands of luxury cars. Both have earned a reputation for building high-quality, powerful, and well-designed cars. Voters appreciate that these brands rate well for reliability and safety while offering the best of technological innovation and luxury.

● RANGE ROVERS are synonymous with rugged luxury and an English horse-country style. Built by Land Rover, the line is now in its fourth generation and has expanded to include three models: the Range Rover, the Range Rover Evoque, and the Range Rover Sport.

Domestic Routes

● Delta ● Southwest ● JetBlue F AV O R I T E D O G R E S C U E S

● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner ● For the third year in a row, EQ voters chose DANNY & RON’S RESCUE as their favorite dog rescue. The organization has close ties to the equestrian industry, finding homes for thousands of dogs from their booths at various horse shows. The no-kill rescue was founded in 2005, after thousands of animals were left homeless after Hurricane Katrina. (See page 106 for more.)

● NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE is the world’s largest no-kill rescue and adoption organization. They have saved the lives of over one million dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens at risk of euthanasia.

● BEST FRIENDS operates the nation’s largest sanctuary for homeless animals. It provides adoption, spay or neuter services, and educational programs and manages a nationwide network of animal shelters.

F AV O R I T E B A R N D O G S Dogs and horses go together. It certainly seems that most horse lovers have a dog or two (or three). Equestrian Living’s Barn Dog column is one of EQ’s most popular features.

SHUTTERSTOCK

● Small enough

● Which breed? Who knows. RESCUES and adopted dogs won this category by a wide margin.

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to travel easily but with a big-dog attitude, the JACK RUSSELL terrier is playful and intelligent.

● Short and lovable, the WELSH CORGI is a favorite with horse people as well as the Queen of England.


F AV O R I T E T R U C K B R A N D S Truck owners can have strongly held loyalties to their favorite brand. Sales figures echo Gold List voters, with Ford trucks being America’s overall best-selling vehicle.

● The DODGE RAM is the fastest-growing truck brand in America. U.S. News & World Report named the 2015 Ram 1500 “the best full-size truck for the money,” while Ram heavy-duty trucks offer best-in-class diesel towing. ● CHEVROLET’S Colorado was selected the 2016 Truck of the Year by Motor Trend, which called it “far and away the most fuel-efficient mid-size truck on the market.” ● The FORD F-150 has been America’s best-selling pickup truck for 39 consecutive years. It rates highly for durability, safety, comfort, and power.

F AV O R I T E T R A I L E R S

● Featherlight ● 4-Star ● Kingston

F AV O R I T E H O R S E R E S C U E S

● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner ● CANTER USA is the largest source for offtrack race horses. In its nearly 20-year history, it has transitioned over 20,000 Thoroughbreds, many of which are now excelling in new careers in the show ring, eventing, cross-country, polo, or dressage, or simply enjoying the pleasures of trail riding.

F AV O R I T E P L A C E S T O L I V E I N T H E W I N T E R

● AIKEN, S.C.

● OCALA, FLA.

THE BOOK LLC

● WELLINGTON, FLA.

F AV O R I T E P L A C E S T O L I V E I N T H E S U M M E R Many great equestrian communities are too steamy in the summer months, while others are just right for enjoying the sunshine. ● The small town of WOODSTOCK, Vermont, is the favorite place to live in the summer. The area offers a cool summer climate, seemingly endless network of trails, and a wonderful equestrian community. Other choices were favorites for year-round-living winners were ● LEXINGTON and ● MIDDLEBURG.

● WOODSTOCK, VT.

● NEW VOCATIONS Racehorse Adoption Program was founded in 1992 to offer retiring racehorses a safe haven, rehabilitation, and continued education through placement in experienced, caring homes.

As cool winds begin to blow, many equestrians head for warmer climates, where they can continue enjoying their horses. ● Voters favored WELLINGTON for winter warmth and the world-class competitions held there each year. ● In second place, readers chose AIKEN for its comfortable climate, rich history, and close-knit equestrian community. The soft footing there never freezes, making it an ideal choice for wintering riders. ● Others preferred OCALA for its southern charm, wonderfully relaxed atmosphere, and community of top riders and drivers.

● LEXINTON, KY.

PEITER ESTERSOHN/MONACELLI PRESS

● MAKER’S MARK SECRETARIAT CENTER’S premier reschooling facility showcases adoptable Thoroughbreds at the world-famous Kentucky Horse Park, where horses experience a one-of-a-kind education and emerge to become ambassadors for racehorses in new careers.

● MIDDLEBURG, VA.

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A RARE GLIMPSE INTO THE PRIVATE HERMÈS MUSEUM A dominant focus of Emile Maurice Hermès’ collection is the GOLDEN ERA OF THE HORSE.

BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS BY GEORGE KAMPER

Top: Ornately tooled boots. Below: One of the museum’s newer rooms filled with custom saddles, antique carriages, paintings, and elaborate harnesses.


Clockwise from upper left: Austrian 19thcentury glass-encased carriage made of painted wood, silk, leather, horsehair, and brass. Detail of the original Faubourg’s lift, decorated with a double H medallion for Hermès and Hollande, the maiden name of Emile’s wife. Chilean spurs, with a large rowel, circa 19th century. A praxinoscope made in 2003 by Yanos, a French artist.

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everal floors above the buzz and activity of the flagship store on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris and distanced from the intoxicating wafts of leather and the clinking of saddle-makers a flight below, is the hidden heart of Hermès’ equestrian heritage and ingenuity, the private Hermès Museum. The museum is often referred to as the family collection, which seems a more fitting tribute to the timeless design and innovative foundation that lies at the core of Hermès goods. “It’s the soul of the company that you find here,” explains Stéphane Laverrière, the museum’s conservator and our knowledgeable guide. As we cross the threshold, the space feels both worlds and eras away from today’s frenetic pace. Yet the carefully selected mix of curiosities and artifacts is alive, relevant, and brimming with creative inspiration for Hermès designers, who often visit to sketch and create. An invitation to the museum is a rare opportunity, and, should you be offered the chance to visit, readily accept. Knowing that visitors such as Grace Kelly, Andy Warhol, Marlene Dietrich, and the Duchess of Windsor also once roamed the softly lit rooms, adds a certain je ne sais quoi to the tour. The museum’s interior walls are lined with oak paneling. Its herringbonepatterned wood flooring lightly creaks as guests meander through the series of rooms filled with items that dazzle, intrigue, and, at times, mystify. Five years ago, a new grouping of rooms was seamlessly added to the original museum, which still includes Emile Hermès’ office. Emile Maurice Hermès, grandson of Hermès founder Thierry Hermès, began

collecting at the age of 12. His interests were centered on innovation and the combination of form and function. But his dominant focus was the golden era of the horse. Emile traveled extensively, evidenced by the museum’s spectrum of items from Europe, Asia, Africa, India, and the Americas. There are 17th-century books of German equitation engravings, French military saddles, and an 18th-century carved Chinese saddle with lacquer work, as well as bejeweled and velvet saddles for warriors and royalty. Saddles from Tibet, Mexico, and the Middle East are displayed along with organized cases of harnesses, stirrups, spurs, and sundry equestrian accoutrements. One of the more fascinating stories is about a trip Emile took in 1914 to North America to buy leather for the French cavalry. He had a car to travel around in—a Cadillac with a cloth top that closed with a zipper. Emile returned with examples of American zippers and adapted them for handbags, luggage, and clothing. He acquired a patent of operation in France and obtained exclusivity for a while. It is said that the Duke of Windsor wore an Hermès zipped leather jacket to play golf.

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As we wend our way among the myriad treasures, Stéphane reminds us to be aware of Emile’s keen focus on beauty and function, and how the collection of elegantly designed accessories, tack, and apparel is subtly integrated into today’s Hermès products. For example, along with one of the first Hermès handbags, made at the beginning of the 1920s called sac pour auto, what appears to be a simple wooden cane hides a green silk parasol inside. Purses contain secret compartments. A small hat disguises a cigarette box and ashtray, and wooden travelers’ cases hold dental tools, sewing kits, and empty compartments for messages. Hermès’ success in merging treasured designs from the past and the brand’s equestrian heritage with new techniques and concepts is visible in many Hermès items today. Beautiful 17th-century engravings inspire jewelry with elaborate rein motifs, vintage leather dog-collars are reflected in the hugely popular Collier de Chien bracelets, and an elegant sidesaddle riding suit once worn by Julie Hermès, Emile’s wife, was the inspiration for Hermès’ original women’s ready-towear. Today modern, comfortable fabrics are woven into the brand’s sport and equestrian apparel and enjoyed by both everyday, active persons and high-performance competitors. After being immersed in the fascinating Hermès collection and taking in all Stéphane Laverrière had to say, we found ourselves admiring the company’s depth and continuity. Long after we left the museum, we had the persistent feeling that we could no longer say just where Hermes’ past ends and where its present begins.


Opposite: Detail of a vintage rocking horse, which belonged to the Hermès family. This page, clockwise from upper left: The mechanical horse, or tricycle, of the Imperial Prince, son of the emperor Napolean III; an Italian painted wooden scale model of a luxury carriage, circa 1820-1825; an elegant sidesaddle riding suit; a library that offers inspiration for Hermès designers; an intricately stitched leather sidesaddle made by Hermès in the 1850s; vintage horse and carriage. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 9


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THE McDONALDS

A Winning Dressage Combination Even the right fencing plays a role in creating champions. BY VIRGINIA STUART

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hen it comes to dressage, Bob and Debbie McDonald know a thing or two about picking winners. Known as the “First Lady of American Dressage,” Debbie, age 61, is an accomplished Olympian with a track record few can match. Trained by her 69-year-old husband Bob, a recognized equestrian coach, Debbie competed in the hunter jumpers for a number of years until she was sidelined by a serious injury in the 1980s. Realizing that her jumping career was over, Debbie made the switch to a less dangerous equestrian sport—dressage. A risky career move, McDonald was required to put in an unprecedented amount of retraining, discipline, attention to detail, and rehabilitation as she allowed her body to heal—not to mention the challenge of finding a mount that was willing to learn the trust and communication skills necessary to deliver a champion dressage performance. Little did the McDonalds realize that this shift in strategy would catapult Debbie and an unknown German horse named Brentina into the winner’s circle. The combination of the petite blonde

Above: TYL Dressage, a state-of-the-art Olympic dressage training center, located in Wellington, Florida. Opposite: Debbie McDonald.

with the spirited mount was a partnership of unprecedented success in the dressage ring. After numerous successful showings in the U.S., this pairing resulted in two gold medals during the 1999 Pan American Games—one for team competition and a second for individual dressage performance. H ONORS POUR IN

Named Equestrian of the Year in 1999 by the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF), McDonald was also recognized as the Female Equestrian Athlete of the Year shortly thereafter by the U.S. Olympic Committee. In 2003, McDonald became the first American rider to win the Dressage World Cup, and the pair later placed third at the 2005 World Cup. At the World Equestrian Games, her equestrian team won silver and bronze medals in both 2002 and 2006. During the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, the pair won

a bronze medal for their team, and were ranked fourth individually for their performance. Debbie McDonald wasn’t the only partner of the famed dressage team to be recognized. Known as one of the most successful dressage horses in the U.S., Brentina was named 2005 Farnam/Platform USEF Horse of the Year in 2005. After a long and successful dressage career, Brentina was officially retired during the 2009 Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) World Cup Dressage Finals in Las Vegas. GIV ING BACK TO T H E SPORT

After Brentina’s retirement, the McDonalds thought they would take it easy and made the move into semiretirement, but that didn’t last too long. The couple’s love for horses and training students kept them busy, and on January 22, 2010, Debbie McDonald was named the developing dressage coach for the USEF. Today, Debbie and Bob stay busy training, while she also works to identify and develop talent for the next generation of U.S. dressage team champions. Splitting their time between their homes in Hailey, Idaho, where they train and teach riders on Peggy and E. Parry Thomas’s River Grove Farm in AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 1


Sun Valley, and in Wellington, Florida, at Kylee Lourie’s TYL Dressage, the McDonalds now have the best of both worlds. They spend the spring and summer months training riders in Idaho to escape the Florida heat. During the fall and winter, they return to Florida to train some of the world’s top equestrian talent. THE C HA MP I ON FO RMU L A

The McDonalds have a simple approach to developing champion horses and riders. The first step is to develop a trusted partnership. “Trust is the basis of the most successful work trainers and riders do,” said Debbie. “The whole point is to get away from being rough by taking the time to build trust. It doesn’t take aggression to get this done.” Bob added, “Developing the bond between horse and rider is like physics. Everything resists. The key to developing a champion

Top: The TYL Dressage Training Pavilion. Above: Superior 3-Rail precast concrete fence surrounds the 10-acre TYL Dressage training facility.

pairing is to find the right combination of techniques to teach the horse and rider to work together as a seamless unit, using empathy and gentle persuasion as the primary tools to gain and build trust.” In addition to trust, winning requires persistence, patience and practice to develop the mindset and performance of a winner. No detail is overlooked. The

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McDonalds not only study the temperament of the rider and the horse, but they also take into account details that others may ignore—such as the fit of the saddle, the horse’s grooming, vet care, food, bedding, stall, even the grass and type of fencing used in the pasture. Each part plays an important role, and contributes in some way to create the winning combination that makes champions out of horses and riders. THE RIGHT FACILI T I ES At TYL Dressage, Bob McDonald was

charged with taking a barn on a 10-acre property and transforming it into a state-of the-art facility designed to train members of the U.S. Olympic Team and other top riders from around the world. “Both people and horses perform at their peak when they have the proper training, good equipment to work with,


S U P E RI O R CON CR E T E P RO D U C T S

Available in three sizes:

SU PERIOR RA I L™ A FENC E FOR CH A MP I O NS

U N I T I N G B RAWN W ITH B E AUT Y F O R A WIN N IN G CO MB INAT ION . Unique, reliable and maintenance-free, Superior Rail is manufactured from steel reinforced precast concrete posts and rails. Attractive in design and appearance, concrete fences enhance property values, while maintaining a natural-looking wood texture for decades to come. ▪ Impervious to damage from weather and insects, the Superior Rail pattern is molded from rough cut cedar to duplicate the look and feel of wood timber. ▪ Available in 12 color options, pigments are integrated into the posts and rails during the manufacturing process which means no painting—EVER. ▪ Posts are spaced 8 feet apart and embedded in concrete piers which are firmly anchored in the ground with rebar reinforcement

Superior 2-Rail is 3’ high works well for decorative borders

▪ Decorative rail fences are reinforced with steel rebar for added strength and durability.

Superior 3-Rail is 4’ high is popular for equestrian fencing

“At Superior Concrete Products, we believe a great fence makes great neighbors.” Todd Sternfeld, CEO

Superior 4-Rail is 5’ high heavy-duty livestock fencing for farmers and ranchers

and know what is expected of them,” said Bob. “We spared no expense in creating an environment that help them excel. No detail has been overlooked—even down to the selection of the proper fencing used to surround the facility.” “Considering the humidity in Florida, precast concrete was the only viable fence option, because we want to spend our time training not supervising the repair and replacement of rotted or damaged wood rails and posts,” he added. “We chose to install a Superior 3-rail precast concrete fence because it looks natural—just like wood, and it is completely maintenance free. “In fact, when people first see the fence, they can’t believe it isn’t real wood,” he added. “We believe if you’re serious about creating an environment that fosters healthy competition and a winning spirit it takes the best equipment available. So why not select a champion fence for champion riders?”

FENCING PARTNERS

To help with the installation, the McDonalds turned to Todd Sternfeld, CEO of Superior Concrete Products. As a pioneer with more than 30 years’ experience in the decorative precast concrete industry Todd noted, “Superior Rail fencing is the only decorative rail fencing on the market that is impervious to the effects of the sun, wind, rain, and weather while delivering a lifetime of dependable service freeing owners of costly and time consuming maintenance.” E NJOY ING LIFE

When the McDonalds aren’t training, supporting causes to protect horses and other equines, or attending fund-raising efforts, they are often found at home enjoying the company of a yellow lab and a jack-a-poo in their Wellington, Florida, Polo Club home. Surrounded by antiques, a comfortable leather sofa, houndstooth chairs and horse memorabilia of all kinds, the couple reflects

on a full and rich life dedicated to the sports they love. “Our lives center around horses,” said Debbie. “Not only is it our livelihood, but it is our passion,” Bob continued. “We’ve always believed that you need to follow your heart, do what you love to the best of your ability, and have fun while you are doing it. Looking back, I think we’ve achieved our goal.” PAGE 105

TO LEARN MORE about precast concrete

fencing go to concretefence.com or call Todd Sternfeld at (817) 277-9255. For questions about the rail fence at TYL Dressage, contact Bob or Debbie McDonald at (208) 720-3915. INTERESTED IN EQUINE WELFARE?

Help Debbie McDonald, ambassador of BrookUSA, save the lives of abused horses, mules and donkeys, by visiting brookusa.org to learn more. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 3


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A FAMILY AFFAIR

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Three generations of Curreys at home on their Nashville farm. he Curreys, their homes, families, barns, and horses share a 275-acre farm in Franklin, Tennessee, about 12 miles from downtown Nashville. The Currey family has long and strong roots in the area. Robert Brownlee Currey, born in 1777, was the first mayor of Nashville. When Equestrian Living visited earlier this year, we were met at the barn by Christian Currey along with several dogs lounging in the lazy heat. Christian competed for the U.S. in the 1985 and 1986 world cups and was part of the 1985 nations cup winning team at Aachen, Germany. He is also a horse breeder and the founder of FarmVet, a source of animal health products and supplies. “This place is pretty damn unique,” he said, sweeping his arm across the vast vista. “We’re a dying breed—a big farm in a metropolitan area.

BY CHANCELLOR VAN PELT MAJOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGE KAMPER Christian, Kathryn, Samuel, and Charlotte Currey in their kitchen in Franklin, Tennessee. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 5


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We were probably the only family that had four homebreds at the Hampton Classic last year.

Left: Christian and horses in the barn; the tack room; the log cabin headquarters of FarmVet. Opposite: Fenced paddocks and training facilities at the farm.

“The farm was originally a livestock operation, but we converted it to a horse farm,” continued Christian, as he wandered the barn and proudly introduced each horse. “We were probably the only family that had four homebreds at the Hampton Classic last year, which was a lot of fun. We have a total of seven horses competing right now. They are all Thoroughbred crosses except for one. I have a sweet spot for Thoroughbreds. We couldn’t leave our American heritage,” he laughed. “We have bred about 20 horses here. All of them come from the lines of Galoubet, Tulula, and Touch of Class.” Touch of Class, ridden by Joe Fargis, won both the individual and team gold medals in show jumping at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. At one stall, Christian paused and said, “Over here is Touch of Class’ second or third grandson, and he does junior hunters. We really love him; he’s very much a character, very unique, and my 66 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2016

16-year-old daughter shows him. A real gem to have in the barn. Over here,” he continued, “this is a pure racehorse, Hardy. He’s a project. We don’t know what he’s going to do, but he came from the racetrack, and he was a good horse. Michael Matz and the Moran family were kind enough to let us see what his next job is. He’s 100 percent Thoroughbred, so I’m very excited about starting him. Here’s another racehorse, Mawhinney, named after the Marine sniper Chuck Mawhinney, who basically started the Marine’s sniper school. I like to name all my Thoroughbreds after snipers.” The barn is quite spacious, and Christian explained, “Since this was a cattle barn, it was all open, and I left it open so the stalls could be bigger. I certainly wouldn’t call it a showpiece, but the horses love it because they have open air flow, communication, and really big stalls. They’re all either 12-by-12 or 12-by-14 feet.” Continued on page 71


ROBERT HANSEN

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Both pages: The Franklin, Tennessee, home of Christian’s parents, Agneta and Brownlee Currey. At right, a portrait of Robert Brownlee Currey, the first mayor of Nashville. Lower left, Agneta Currey.

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I was injured, but I couldn’t stop riding. It’s in my blood. Continued from page 52

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The Currey family has long and strong roots in the area.

In 2000, Christian turned his passion for horses into a booming business—an equine-related enterprise called FarmVet that has grown to be a leading source for 50,000 animal health products and supplies. FarmVet is headquartered in a picturesque, renovated log cabin in Franklin, Tennessee. Christian, his wife Kathryn, and their children share a 1970s ranch-style home that they elegantly redid in 1997. Christian balanced baby Margaret on his shoulder as he offered a tour. The home was alive with the sounds of children playing, and it was obvious he and Kathryn were relaxed and loving parents. A short distance away on the property is the home of Christian’s father Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. and his wife,

Above: Brownlee O. Currey, Jr., chairman of the board of the U.S. Equestrian Team Foundation. Opposite: Kathryn and Christian Currey’s home. Bottom left, Christian with baby Margaret Hampton Currey.

Agneta. A co-founder of Equitable Securities, Brownlee is the chairman of the board of the U.S. Equestrian Team Foundation and a trustee for over 30 years. Agneta, originally from Sweden, worked with designer Anthony Hail to infuse Scandinavian flavor into the home’s elegant décor. The residence has the traditional feel of a Southern mansion. Surprisingly, the house was built in the 1950s, but it feels much older. The buildings look onto a lushly shaded courtyard and face an ancient log cabin that was moved to the property by a previous owner. As we watched the horses graze and the children scamper and play it seemed quite likely that the farm will be home to many more generations of Curreys.

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Hotze Health & Wellness Center has a natural approach to keeping equestrians FIT, FOCUSED, AND IN THE SADDLE for a very long time.

REINVENTING WELLNESS BY JENNIFER JOHNSON

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s equestrians, we all have goals that we hope to achieve, whether in the show ring or on a casual trail ride. We want to be the healthiest version of ourselves so that we can live our best life for our families, our friends, and, of course, our horses. In spite of how much we strive for peak fitness, it is inevitable that at some point we will feel the effects of persistent illness and the aches and pains of aging. Many riders think they have to compromise their passion for riding because they are getting older; however, this couldn’t be further from the truth. There is a natural way to ensure

bodies react to it with symptoms that include fatigue, exhaustion, insomnia, weight gain, migraines, brain fog, depression, hot flashes, muscle and joint pain, and, most distressful to athletes, lack of strength and stamina. Fortunately, Hotze Health & Wellness Center has a natural, effective solution—replenishing their hormones. The ivy-covered entrance to Hotze Health & Wellness Center in Houston, Texas.

optimum health and vitality throughout your life. Women usually notice the effects of aging for good reason—the cyclical nature of their hormones. As hormones decline and fall out of balance, their

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LIFE OUT OF BAL A NC E

Aging is not the only precursor to the symptoms of hormonal imbalance. Living in an estrogen environment filled with chemicals is one culprit. Many women typically experience an imbalance in their hormone levels at certain trigger points during their lifetime. Puberty, after


childbirth, discontinuing birth control pills, and post-tubal ligation or hysterectomy may all be times of hormonal imbalance in women’s lives.

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ainstream medicine would have everyone believe there are only two options: surgery or prescription drugs, which are typically counterfeit hormones such as Premarin or Prempro. These actually worsen the problem and have side effects. Not only that, many horsewomen refuse to support Premarin because of how it is collected. It is derived from pregnant mare urine, (hence the name), and the horses are held captive with restricted movement throughout their pregnancies. In the case of many young active women experiencing cyclical problems, doctors tell them that their symptoms can only be resolved with birth control pills. There is another way—one that works with the body rather than against it. Unfortunately, few physicians mention that bioidentical hormones for women might be the answer to their symptoms, thus leaving women with no real solution to their health problems. One of the biggest frustrations that women experience with their symptoms

M OOD SWINGS WERE RUINING PAM ’ S LIFE .

Pam had terrible PMS. She experienced irritable moods, brain fog, weight gain, and migraines, and her body constantly hurt. She wanted to sleep all the time and felt as though her body was shutting down. Her doctor prescribed birth control pills and anti-depressants, which made her feel worse. Once she decided to replenish her hormones, she was able to regain her energy and drive. She has written over eight books and feels better than she ever felt before.

Steven F. Hotze, M.D., founder and CEO of Hotze Health & Wellness Center.

is not getting the right help from their doctor. They are told their symptoms are a part of aging and they have to live with them. For an athlete, this is an unacceptable response. Mainstream doctors typically prescribe drugs for each symptom a woman describes, such as sleeping pills, anti-anxiety medications, and antidepressants. None of these drugs solve the underlying cause of the problem— hormonal imbalance. Why would anyone take a prescription drug when they could simply replace the lacking hormone or hormones? A NATURAL AN D PERSONALIZ ED A PPROAC H

Hotze Health & Wellness Center offers hope. From the first phone contact with a wellness consultant, you instantly realize they understand what you are going through and know how to help. This alone provides immediate comfort and confidence that you are on the right track to get the quality care you need and the healthy regimen that will keep you in the saddle for years to come. Upon arriving at the Hotze Health & Wellness Center in Houston, Texas, the first thing you’ll notice are the colorful flowers and pristine landscaping that surround the ivy-covered building. As you enter through the wood-paneled doors, you immediately realize that you

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Patients are warmly greeted and escorted into an inviting and soothing environment.

“WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF SEEING HOTZE, I DID MY FIRST HALF IRONMAN TRIATHLON, AND WITHIN A YEAR AND A HALF, I’VE DONE FIVE MARATHONS AND TWO HALF IRONMANS.”—PAM H.

are in a special place. The concierge warmly greets you by name and escorts you to the reception room. The soothing music, elegant furnishings, and refreshments served on fine china are amenities more in keeping with a Ritz-Carlton than a doctor’s office. This is the way it should be—medical care in an environment boasting extraordinary hospitality and guest service. Forget about wrinkled scrubs and drab white coats. Physicians and nurses wear professional business suits in deference to their clientele and, more importantly, deliver first-class medical care by listening to you. At Hotze Health & Wellness Center you are not a number; instead, you are an honored guest. The common-sense approach by the physicians at Hotze Health & Wellness Center is geared toward addressing the body as a whole. Rather than offering quick fixes for individual symptoms, their comprehensive treatment gets to

R E STOR E D V I TA L I T Y

After her hysterectomy, Janae became a different person. She suffered from fatigue, yet she couldn’t sleep, couldn’t think straight, and had no memory. She was completely miserable. After replenishing and balancing her hormones, she was able to resolve all of these negative symptoms. Now that Janae has her energy back, she is able to train and show her dog Rex in competitions. “We came up through the ranks together. Now he’s a preferred master-agility champion,” Janae said, adding that this was something she could not have achieved if she hadn’t gotten her health back.

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the root cause of problems commonly associated with aging. By replenishing and restoring balance with bioidentical hormones (hormones molecularly identical to the body’s naturally occurring hormones), natural thyroid supplementation, proper nutrition, and immune support, the results can be life changing. Just as each person is made with unique fingerprints, they are also individually designed with optimal hormone levels. Hotze Health & Wellness Center works with each person to find their optimal dose until their symptoms are resolved.

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iven today’s complexities of navigating insurance and pharmaceutical companies, most doctors no longer practice the oldfashioned art of medicine, which is an in-depth conversation about your symptoms and how they affect your


“IN MY MID-30S, I WAS IRRITABLE ALL THE TIME. I WAS MOODY. I WAS DEPRESSED. I WAS SO TIRED I COULD BARELY GO TO WORK. I WOULD HAVE TO TAKE A NAP EVERY DAY AT LUNCHTIME JUST TO MAKE IT THROUGH THE REST OF THE DAY. THAT’S HOW BAD I’D GOTTEN. I DID GET MY LIFE BACK, PLUS, MY HUSBAND GOT HIS WIFE BACK!” —WENDY

life. Instead, doctors often spend as little as five minutes with a patient. Rather than hearing all of one’s concerns and symptoms, they pull out their prescription pads and rush the patient out the door. At Hotze Health & Wellness Center, doctors make it a point to listen, really listen. Listening is critical to how they treat their guests, and this helps the doctors get to the root cause of health symptoms. They invest quality time with each guest to ensure a thorough evaluation, which includes a consultation with a vitamin consultant and pharmacist. With a provider always on call and nurses available by phone to assist with any questions, the medical team is always there to partner with you along your journey to health, wellness, and regaining a peak level of fitness. L I V I N G T HE GOOD L I FE

they become older is not what they have done; it is what they haven’t done. And often, health deterioration is one of their biggest obstacles to doing more. We should never settle for a life that is less, and we should never give up our passion for riding.

In March 2005, Dr. Hotze released his first book, Hormones, Health, and Happiness. His best-selling book, Hypoythyroidism, Health & Happiness, was released in June 2013.

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questrians take many precautions to ensure they’re safe, taking great care and investing in the best equipment, and the same should be said of their health. Optimizing your health is the best way to increase stamina and endurance in and out of the saddle. Without good health, it is difficult to enjoy a good quality of life. Hotze Health & Wellness Center is privileged to have helped over 30,000 individuals on their path to optiPAGE 105 mal health.

We all want to live life to the fullest. The number one regret that people have when AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 5


STORY AND PHOTOS BY BETSY STEIN

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T HE

V IRGIN I A

century ago, horse racing was the sport of

morning dress for men and hats for women. We’ve all seen Kate

the affluent. Spectators from high society

Middleton, Queen Elizabeth, or Princess Beatrice in their finery at

took to horse-racing events as opportuni-

Ascot. In America, this British fashion tradition continues at races

ties to showcase their wealth and status

such as the Kentucky Derby and at smaller events attended by

with fashionable outfits. As hats were fad-

the cream of local society­—like the Virginia Gold Cup.

ing from mainstream style, they continued

In Virginia, steeple chasing has been a tradition since early

to be de rigueur at racing events modeled after European-style

Colonial times. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are

races such as the Royal Ascot, which still mandates full formal

said to have met in a sporting race over fences, and organized

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G OLD

CUP

steeplechase races have run in the state since 1844. In 1922, sportsmen at the Fauquier Club in Warrenton,

colorful and fashionable outfits. Hats are a main topic of conversation, and the hat contest

Virginia, decided to organize a four-mile race between flags over

at the winner’s circle is a highlight of the day. Tailgating is also a

the natural walls and fences of the local hunt country. This was

time-honored tradition, and many add fine foods and wines to

the first Virginia Gold Cup.

the day by participating in the tailgate contest.

Today, the Gold Cup is a celebrated event in the community.

If you visit Virginia next spring, enjoy the Gold Cup. It is a

It takes place before a sell-out crowd of over 50,000 people and

great way to welcome the season and enjoy a fun outing—for

is well known for its elaborate tailgate picnics, extreme hats, and

both racing fans and fashionistas.

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A LIGHT TOUCH and makeup artist LESLIE MUNSELL embraces the concept that less is more.

DRESSAGE RIDER

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE KAMPER

e first met Leslie Munsell at an Equestrian Living photoshoot in Wellington, Florida. It was an ambitious shoot for a gatefold cover featuring many of the top dressage riders, owners, and trainers. That day, Leslie, tall and regal, was wearing her makeup-artist hat rather than her alternate headgear of choice—a riding helmet. It was her job to give the gathering of 18 dressage professionals a natural polish for the photo. We witnessed firsthand the ease with which she interacted with her dressage colleagues, as she enhanced each rider with a light touch. She was in her element, confidently doing what she does best. Leslie is a business owner as well, and many of the makeup products she was using at the shoot were from her company,

This page and opposite: Leslie enjoys a training session with her horse, Nabucco.

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Beauty for Real. We learned that, in addition to excelling as an equestrian and makeup artist, she was also an up-and-coming entrepreneur. A RENEWED PASSION

Leslie’s equestrian pursuits have had considerable interruptions. The challenge of balancing a business career with riding is a common theme for so many riders, and her dual-career demands are no different. She began riding as a child on a farm in Minnesota. “My grandfather was a horseman, and he encouraged all of his grandkids to ride. We were lucky enough to spend long days riding and playing with our horses,” Leslie said. “I rode all through school and into college. Then I began working and stopped riding for 30 years.” continued on page 99


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STARK CONTRA STS Photographer MELIS YALVAC captures the pride and power of horses.


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A S HO RT INTERVIEW WITH ME LIS YALVAC .

DARIO SONATORE

How did you become involved in photography?

Photographer Melis Yalvac was born in Gronau, Germany, in 1984, lived in Turkey for a short period, and currently lives in Milan, Italy. She graduated with a degree in architecture from Politecnico de Milano. After working in the publishing industry for three years, she decided to dedicate her life to photography. Melis’ horses emerge from dusty backgrounds like images from distant memories and give the viewer a sense of the proud and authentic nature of the animals she photographs. She has worked with renowned Italian and international photographers, and her work has been published in numerous books and luxury magazines.

I started printing in the dark room for my aunt, who is a photographer in Amsterdam. I was on vacation at her house. She taught me to keep busy because I probably was too annoying to have around.

improve as a rider. I’ve also learned a lot about horse ethology. I need to speak their language in order to direct them from a distance while they pose for me. Are you an equestrian?

Yes. I am currently a dressage rider and hope to reach a high-performance level someday. I’m working on it.

Do you come from a creative family?

Yes, I definitely do. We are a big family made up of architects, painters, singers, ballet dancers, and cooks. What initially drew you to horses as subjects for your photographs?

I thought that horse photography at that time didn’t do justice to these animals. I wanted to represent them in a different light, to be a messenger of power and pride. They are the best subjects to describe a human being. I know it sounds absurd, but when you ride, horses mirror who you are. All of your emotions, fears, and joys are displayed by the horse. I try to represent these emotions and human characteristics by using horses in my photography. What have you learned about horses through your work?

A lot. First of all, I’ve learned a great deal about human society and how to be a fair, humble, and sensitive person. I’ve learned a lot of things to help me

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Your work is very evocative. Is that an essential element to your images?

That’s what I try to achieve. As I said, my aim is to show emotions. I really have to feel something inside when I look at my pictures, and the best compliment I can receive is that people who look at my photographs feel something, too. Are you drawn to any particular breeds?

Definitely Lusitanos. But I like to photograph all kinds of horses. When do you know you have captured the true essence of your subject?

Horses best express themselves in the first 10 minutes of the shoot. Typically after that the energy is gone. That is the time I have to do everything. But as I said before, it’s more about capturing myself. I just have to tailor my way to express emotions on the horse I’m shooting. I cannot expect explosive power from a shy and calm horse, can I? PAGE 105


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A M E R I C A’ S F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

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AU G U S T / S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6

FOREST HALL AN ICONIC EQUESTRIAN ESTATE IN WOODSTOCK , VERMONT SEE PAGE 88


I ANN PPRROOPPEERT RTI EI ESS EEQQUUEESSTTRRI A

FOREST HALL An iconic WOODSTOCK, VERMONT, landmark once owned by Frederick Billings, president of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

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uilt in 1850, Forest Hall was completely restored by the current owners and is in pristine condition. No detail was left untouched. The result is a rich blend of land, structure, location, and history that brings together all the best that Woodstock has to offer. The estate includes a 3-story residence with 6 bedrooms and 6 bathrooms, a 3-story carriage barn, a “coachman’s cottage” serving as a guesthouse with 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, and a bunk house/cabin, all on 32+/- acres. The land is located on both sides of Old River Road with approximately 20.6 +/- acres on the house side and 11.41+/- to

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the south with 1,200+ feet of Ottauquechee river frontage. Bridle paths and carriage roads pass throughout. From the high point, known as “Rockledge,” you can look south across the village to Mt. Tom and the National Park and see the forested hillsides that Frederick Billings planted as part of his reforestation conservation efforts. Several neighboring properties are conserved. As a village farm, Forest Hall is ideally located in walking distance to the center of Woodstock, yet it is situated on a rise with enough acreage to be completely private and peaceful. Never before on the open market, Forest Hall is a distinguished opportunity to own one of the finest properties in New England.


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...Entertain by hosting an annual fox hunt breakfast on the graceful front porch or celebrating the holidays with family and friends.

...Ride and drive, be it by horseback, carriage, or sleigh. Forest Hall is an idyllic equestrian gateway on 32+/- acres with 25 acres of fenced pasture and two miles of maintained bridle paths and carriage roads doubling as horse-drawn sleigh and ski trails.

...Relax by taking in the view atop the private oasis called Rockledge or casting a fly along 1,200 feet of Ottauquechee River frontage. Set on a rise, this iconic village farm is ideally located in walking distance to Woodstock village, “the prettiest little town in America,” and only a short hack to miles of carriage roads in the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park.

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elebrate the lifestyle and location of this one-of-a kind offering that was never before on the open market. Surrounded by “natural beauty, environmental quality, heritage, culture, recreation, and civic vitality,” these are the virtues that Laurence S. Rockefeller said “have the power to lift the human spirit.” These are the qualities that define and distinguish Forest Hall as one of the finest properties in New England. $5,000,000

Exclusively Offered By LandVest CHRIS LANG, Broker, Project Manager clang@LandVest.com cell 802-274-4048 www.foresthall.landvest.com LandVest, Inc. | Four the Green | Woodstock, VT 05091 | 802-457-4977 JUNE /JULY | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 9


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LIVING WITH SOLAR After six years of GOING SOLAR, what does a farm owner have to say? BY STEPHANIE PETERS

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t’s easy to imagine driving by Willow Lake Farm, a quiet spot in suburban Whitemarsh Township 15 miles north of Philadelphia, without giving it much thought. The split-rail fence surrounding the property permits a limited view of pastures dotted with grazing horses and stables, revealing only a hint of the splendor that exists just beyond the welcoming entrance gates. Willow Lake Farm is owned by Ellen Lea, whose family has lived on the property since 1934. The sprawling farm’s architecture is a graceful blend of original 18th-century structures—including the 1713 main house—with 21st-century enhancements.

A 2010 VISIT

When we first visited the farm six years ago, we quickly realized that this is a special, idyllic oasis in the center of bustling, dense suburbs. There were

Above center: Ellen Lea.

Thoroughbred racehorses coexisting with a colorful menagerie of other animals. Guinea hens dashed by, spotted feathers blurred by their hectic pace. Vibrant roosters announced their presence and confidently paraded a new clutch of chicks past a rescued cat that lived in harmony with this eclectic mix. On the far edge of the property, beehives hummed with the activity of honey production. At the time of our 2010 visit, the farm’s first solar panels had just been installed, and Ellen Lea lit up as she described her 10-year journey of research, discovery, and evaluation in pursuit of converting the farm to solar power. Once the availability, capability, and cost of the technology had caught up with her vision, she made the decision to move forward with the installation. “It was time to stop talking about it and start doing something about it,” she said. When asked if she felt that she was Continued on page 96

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MattJohnson.evusa.com

Saddle Trail - Private 5 acre home & stable on the south side of Greenbriar. One of the largest parcels in Saddle Trail within true hacking distance to WEF. There is a riding arena, large grass paddocks and 5 stall center-aisle barn with the ability to have up to 20 stalls. The residence boasts marble floors, fireplace, large kitchen with granite counters and a lock off suite with separate entrance & kitchenette. The floor plan is open with beautiful views overlooking the pool and pastures. A great opportunity close to the world famous Winter Equestrian Festival. Offered at $5,975,000

Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com ©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should92 be independently Engel | E Q UE Sverified. TRIAN L I&VVölkers I N G |and J UitsNindependent E/ J U LY | License 2016 Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


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Grand Prix Village - There’s a 16-stall barn that includes a half-bathroom, two tack rooms, two feed rooms, and wash stations. A one-bedroom grooms’ apartment is on the second floor of the building, and includes a full bathroom and kitchen. Connected to the barn is a full owners’ home with vaulted ceilings and a gourmet kitchen. Offered at $13,950,000

Grand Prix Village - With six-acres of land, an 18-stall center aisle barn, gorgeous lake views, and hacking distance to the Winter Equestrian Festival, this property has everything a discerning equestrian could desire. There’s a spacious owners’ lounge with vaulted ceilings and skylights. Grass Grand Prix field and all weather ring in place. Offered at $12,750,000

Across from Horse Show - 4.5 acre farm boasts solar tunnel lighting, solar panel power, gorgeous bamboo wood Rower & Rub Stalls, Nelson automatic waters, and a luxurious detached owners lounge overlooking the ring. The home has a pool with outdoor kitchen and balcony that overlooks the farm. Offered at $12,750,000

Grand Prix Village - Newly constr ucted 20-stall equestrian facility with spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom owner’s quarters upstairs and amazing kitchen with topof-the-line appliances. Downstairs viewing room opens to the riding arena. Full bathroom and office with plenty of storage, 4 wash stalls, laundry, tack and feed rooms. Offered at $10,900,000

Grand Prix Village - Situated on 4-acres of lush land, is an amazing 20-stall barn with 4 wash stalls, 2 tack rooms, a laundry room, and a feed room. The owners’ lounge has a beautiful fireplace as the focal point, as well as a kitchen with great room for entertaining and a wonderful view of the 220’ x 120’ competition ring with superior custom footing. Offered at $11,900,000

Palm Beach Point - 5 bedroom, 6 bathroom masterpiece with state-of-the-art amenities, soaring ceilings, and spectacular architecture. The 11-acre compound boasts a first class equestrian facility designed by a renowned equestrian. Magnificent 14stall barn with grooms’ quarters, professional ring with all-weather footing, and 10-oversized paddocks. Offered at $11,500,000

Saddle Trail - Customizable 30 stall farm with 3bedroom, 3 bathroom pool home on 6.25 acres in Saddle Trail. This superbly designed professional farm is complete with a huge sub-irrigated (Riso System) Ring with Martin Collins CLOPF Footing, grand prix jump field, lounging ring and a 6 horse covered walker. Short hack to WEF showgrounds. Offered at $8,000,000

Las Palmas Equestrian - Stunning 10 or 15 acre equestrian estate in private gated enclave. The property offers a 4Br/4Ba main residence, 2Br/2Ba managers home with two additional staff apartments, totaling 4 bedrooms. The equine amenities offered are a 12 stall stable, jumping arena, grass grand prix or hunter field & large turnouts and room for a covered riding arena. Offered at $8,500,000

Saddle Trail - 30 stall equestrian facility with 5bedroom, 3.5 bath pool home on 6.2 acres in Saddle Trail. Farm is complete with a new Olympic all weather sub-irrigated ring, grass jump field, 6 horse Kraft covered walker and a detached storage garage. Offered at $7,250,000

Carol A. Sollak, P.A. • Phone +1 561-818-9476 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.carolsollak.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Carol.Sollak@evusa.com

©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 3


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STUNNING MIDWEST ESTATE

CENTRAL MISSOURI -- 4BR luxury home with new 12-stall barn, indoor arena, permanent round pen and add’l outbuildings on 50 cross-fenced acres. Just minutes from Univ of MO equine hospital, convenient to St. Louis and KC airports, and an easy drive to the National Equestrian Center (StL), KY Horse Park, etc. Perfect for breeding or training. $999,999 Add’l equestrian properties of all sizes available for your consideration.

BETSY WOODRUFF | STACEY SWALLA, REALTORS® | 573-823-5680 | 573-446-6767 | woodruff-group.com

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Continued from page 90

blazing a trail for other horse farms to convert to solar energy, she admitted that she hoped so. Since then, a neighboring farm has installed some solar panels and is looking into expanding. Another neighbor is also considering converting to solar. AFTER SIX YEARS

Now, six years later, we revisited Ellen to see how living with her solar installation has worked out. She couldn’t be more thrilled. “I have solar hot water for the house and solar electric for both the barns and house,” she says. “The hot water is working very well, and I have as much hot water as I can ever use—even when I have a houseful of company.” As for the electricity, she adds, “I sell the excess that I generate to the grid to reduce or erase my other meters on the property. Everything is on the grid, and the solar installation covers the bills of the barn and most of the other meters in the summer months and about 80 percent in the winter.” Solar also powers a pair of main pumps that move fresh water from the wells to the house, farm, and pastures.

The horses enjoy the benefit of troughs filled with a constant flow of fresh water drawn from the earth. We asked Ellen what she would have done differently, and what she would suggest to other farm owners. She notes, “In hindsight, I would have investigated lots more installers to learn as much as I could upfront, but I probably would have gone with the same one. Because the price of panels and installation has come down considerably, I would recommend solar for any barn owner—if only as an assist with electric bills. Start small and add as you can afford it. Once the initial set up is there, it is not difficult or expensive to add on to your system.” A LOVE FOR THE LAND

It is readily apparent that Ellen’s decision to convert to alternative energy was driven by much more than financial benefit. She has a deep-seated desire to preserve the environment, open land, and

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the long-standing family traditions she has experienced and continues to enjoy at Willow Lake Farm. She has donated more than a hundred acres of the farm to the Wissahickon Valley Watershed Association, a local organization committed to protecting and enhancing open land. While the encroachment of development is apparent, those who occupy Willow Lake Farm and the other graceful horse properties in the area are still able to enjoy preserved open spaces that are available for hunts and casual rides. Ellen can reach neighboring farms on horseback by utilizing a series of interlinked trails, and a small fair-weather drag hunt still exists. The thundering hooves must remind Ellen of her early days, when she whipped for the Whitemarsh Hounds. She assumed this role primarily to keep up with her mother, who served as their field master for many years. Now, thanks to the energy of the sun, no longer do flickering kerosene lanterns and candles light the rooms, but at Willow Lake there lingers the splendid echo of gracious gatherings and timehonored traditions of years ago.


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PA L M B E A C H

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WELLINGTON

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PA L M B E A C H G A R D E N S

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D E L R AY B E A C H

14471 EQUESTRIAN WAY Saddle Trail This extremely well designed professional equine facility has it all. Perfectly situated on 4+ acres with a state-of-the-art 15 stall barn, 210’ x 160’ riding ring, 140’ x 115’ grass field, 6 paddocks, 6 horse Kraft walker and gated access to Bridle path. Two fully appointed staff apartments. Everything a discerning equestrian could desire with 5 bedrooms, 6 full baths, and a theatre room. $8,750,000. Furnishings available.

150 F ROAD Loxahatchee A very private horse farm on 17.34 acres with a fully irrigated polo field and sand tract plus plenty paddocks and places to hack the horses with trails easily accessed across the street. 48 stalls (20 in the main barn and 28 in the tent), as well as separate feed room, tack room, grooming stalls, bathroom, washer/ dryer and grooms apartment. Potential for business use as also zoned commercially. Minutes to WEF and IPC. Owner financing available. $3,654,000

To find the right place, you need the right partner. James Pefanis | 561-704-0213 | jpefanis@fitegroup.com JUNE /JULY | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 7


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Discover our premier North Carolina mountain property in Cashiers. Let our mountain community be your secure sanctuary in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Divide is located adjacent to the 6700-acre preserve, Panthertown National Forest, and the prestigious Bald Rock community along the Eastern Continental Divide. Ownership in The Divide entitles residents to year-round amenities with Sapphire Valley Resort, managed equestrian facilities, including stables and pastures, and the miles of trails through Bald Rock and Panthertown National Forest for hikers, horseback riders, mountain bikers, and nature lovers. At 4000+’ elevation, The Divide offers pleasant summer temperatures for horse and rider alike. Our mountain property presents all the best North Carolina and the Blue Ridge Mountains can offer. Each lot takes advantage of its mountain features, be it bold streams, cascading falls, grand mountain views or the simple beauty of a Blue Ridge mountain wilderness.


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But the passion remained, and Leslie began riding again nine years ago. “I have a friend who introduced me to dressage, and he invited me to ride with him,” she smiled. “I really had no clue, but I quickly fell in love with the beauty of it and began riding regularly from then on.” Leslie’s partner in the ring is her horse Nabucco, a KWPN (Studbook of the Royal Dutch Sport Horse) gelding that she bought eight years ago when she returned to riding. Leslie told us, “He’s a terrific partner. He has mostly been patient, and together we’ve learned a lot.“ Goals are important to Leslie— for herself and Nabucco. “I wanted to get my silver medal riding all of the tests on Nabbuco before he retired,” she explained. “We got a 60.5 percent and a 64 percent on our first weekend out riding Prix St. Georges, which was a welcome surprise and really fantastic. Now I plan to ride him for another year to improve those scores. Of course, I’ll be looking for a young horse to start again, and the ultimate would be to ride grand prix.” E N T RE P RE N E U R I A L SKI L L S

Leslie has also set high goals for herself in the business arena. After working as a makeup artist for film and photography, she launched her own product line, Beauty for Real. “I’ve been a makeup artist for more than 25 years, and I have a background in product development and marketing,” Leslie said. “I’d been consulting for other brands, and five years ago I decided to jump in and go out on my own.” For years, Leslie heard women talk about how overwhelmed they were by the quantity of makeup and skin-care products that were available, and once they did buy, they weren’t sure how to use them. She’s simplified the process by expertly curating a limited selection of well-designed, high-performance formulas that help women look their best

Above: One of many high-performance products in the Beauty for Real collection. Below: Leslie applying makeup on location.

with minimal time and effort. Leslie explained, “It’s beauty simplified for smart, busy, and active women.” Leslie would like to be remembered as someone who helps empower women. When asked what she considered a great source of empowerment, she replied, “Feeling confident in your appearance is a boost in overall well-being. I know people react to me more positively when I put a bit of effort into my appearance. I love to help women embrace their own individual beauty.” Of course, running a business is demanding and challenging, but Leslie told us about some of the rewards. “I definitely have the entrepreneurial spirit. It’s really satisfying to bring an idea to fruition and have people use, and love, the products,” she said. “The most challenging part is getting the products known in the marketplace and into women’s hands.” Over the years, she’s had the opportunity to work as a makeup artist for a

plethora of glossy magazines, as well as top models, actresses, and musicians. Never too timid to ask for interesting details, Equestrian Living asked Leslie if she’d share a few. “One of my most memorable jobs was going to Europe with MTV,” she laughed. “We shot Shakira in Versailles, France, Mariah Carey in London, and Green Day in Norway, all within four days. I especially love working with sports stars. Living in Miami, I work regularly with Serena and Venus Williams, and my favorite, Dwyane Wade.” “Shooting for Equestrian Living with one of my favorite photographers, George Kamper, is always fun,” Leslie added. “I especially enjoyed the dressage fold-out cover shoot last year. It was more exciting meeting the world cup and Olympic riders than any other celebrities!” TIM E M ANAGEM ENT

Juggling the demands of managing a cosmetic line and working towards the goal of riding grand prix requires discipline and incredible support. “I’m lucky in that I have a husband and a great staff who understand and encourage my passion for riding,” Leslie explained. “Unless I’m traveling, I ride each weekend day and at least twice during the week. It means putting riding on my schedule and lots of early mornings or late evenings. I find it works if I stay really focused and manage my time.” And, if by chance Leslie gives herself some added time to kick back and try something new, she would like to revisit reining. “As a kid, we rode Western, and I had a ride on some good reining horses. I’d love to do that again. We also used to move cattle from pasture to pasture on horses—real fun cowboy stuff,” she laughed. Leslie has definitely found her stride as an aspiring dressage rider, a strategic business owner, and as an artist committed to empowering women and bringing PAGE 105 beauty to life. AUGUST /SE PT E MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 9


EQ EQ ESSENTIALS | DINING

THE LIGHTER SIDE OF FRENCH

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San Diego’s MILLE FLEURS offers French-California cuisine.

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favorite of the horse community in the San Diego area, Mille Fleurs serves what it calls French-California cuisine for special occasions. Located in the village of Rancho Santa Fe, the restaurant was named one of the 25 best restaurants in the country by Food & Wine magazine. The chef, Martin Woesle (above), was honored as one of America’s great regional chefs by the James Beard Foundation, and Bryan Miller of The New York Times said that Woesle is a “classicist with a contemporary style and innovative touch.” We asked Woesle to share his favorite recipe with Equestrian Living readers.

TUNA AND SALMON CARPACCIO Ingredients ½ pound sashimi grade tuna ¾ pound fresh salmon fillet 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice 2 finely diced shallots 2 teaspoons finely diced fresh ginger Black sea salt Freshly ground white pepper 4 tablespoons crème fraiche ½ ounce trout roe ½ ounce wasabi caviar Small bunch fresh watercress A few onion sprouts

PREPARATION 1. Brush some olive oil onto the plate. 2. Slice the tuna and salmon, arrange it flat on

the olive oil. 3. In a small bowl, mix rest of olive oil, lemon juice, shallots, and ginger together. 4. Coat the tuna and salmon with the mixture using a spoon. 5. Season with black sea salt and freshy ground pepper. 6. Make dots of crème fraiche on the tuna and salmon. 7. Place trout roe and wasabi caviar on the crème fraiche. 8. Garnish with fresh watercress and a few tiny onion sprouts.  SERVING SUGGESTION

Place the prepared tuna and salmon carpaccio in the refrigerator for 15 minutes before serving. During that time, prepare freshly toasted or grilled crostini from a thinly sliced sourdough baguette. WINE PAIRING SUGGESTION

Champagne PAGE 105

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the las vegas national horse show,csi 4 *-w

mark your calendar now! November 15–20, 2016


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“Better not love a horse” was the mantra of trainers and owners who had seen their horses sold, traded, injured, shipped off to stud farms, and euthanized on the track. After waving goodbye to his groom and his van, Felix went into the barn as the new and proud owner of Zippy Chippy, a horse that had nowhere to go but up. By way of offering his opinion of the trade, the horse immediately bit him. Just like that. Not exactly the “Felix, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship” kind of moment you see in movies. But it was memorable; Felix still has the scar on his back today.

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elix figured Zippy Chippy’s problem resulted from a personality clash between the horse and his previous trainers. Zippy didn’t much care for the training sessions, which were hard and frequent. Consequently, when he got mad, which for this horse was his normal temperament, he would simply ignore the trainer. During his perfect stretch of no wins in twenty outings, Zippy had earned the reputation of a badass racehorse, difficult to handle and impossible to motivate. Yet with those doe-like eyes and a penchant for finding trouble in the unlikeliest places, to those who knew him and worked with him, Zippy Chippy had become a lovable scamp. Just for kicks, when he had nothing better to do, Zippy would beat the hell out of his stall and boot his water bucket around like it was a soccer ball. His favorite trick was to snatch anything from the hands and heads of handlers walking by his stall and then to return them partly chewed. Even the backsiders who kept a healthy distance from him admired this character of comedy begrudgingly. Although they remained

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alert while working with him, they had not a clue as to what he might do next. As Thoroughbreds go, Zippy had become a scoundrel of professional proportions. A life-of-the-party kind of horse, he would have looked good running a race with a lampshade on his head. In the serious business of racing horses, Zippy Chippy seemed to be honing his skills and relishing his role as the track clown. Felix was certain he could change all that. Emily wasn’t so sure. “I mean, just look at him,” she said. “He’s a miserable, ugly-looking horse, and he’s poopy brown in color.” In fairness, the horse is quite unremarkable to look at, blotchy brown from stockings to mane, with a tail to match. Only a white marking on his forehead the size of a silver dollar gives any relief to his dark dullness.“He looks like a donkey with those big ears. He’s got a big butt and a little neck. He’s just homely.” Okay, okay, okay, Emily— so he looks more like Had the Biscuit than Seabiscuit—we get the picture. (Note: One thing you will not see at the end of this book is a footnote revealing that Emily Schoeneman eventually left the horse racing business and went into public relations.)

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mily still shakes her head at the thought that Felix would take on the role of owner and trainer of a horse that was frustrating and failing race fans everywhere, a horse that was dropping from A-list tracks to second-rate ovals faster than...well, faster than just about every horse he ever raced against. But Felix had earned the reputation of a Father Flanagan figure around Finger Lakes: a soft-hearted, humane man, a loyal friend, an absolute believer in a sport full of skeptics. “Felix always believed he could turn Zippy Chippy into a star someday,” Emily said with great wonder.

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elix, like the other owners before him, had obviously been dazzled by Zippy’s aristocratic roots. Blinded by the possibility of success this horse had inherited and oddly enamored by their new and awkward relationship, Felix was unaware that he was crossing a line trainers clearly drew in the dirt of racetracks everywhere. They bred, trained, and raced horses for money and, just maybe, fame. Period. This unwritten law was so clearly embraced by trainers it hardly needed posting. NO PETS ALLOWED! Emily, of course, would come to love Zippy Chippy as much as Felix­—that is, as much as Felix loved the horse, and, as a matter of fact, still does. They both do. It’s complicated. But nobody loved that horse more than little Marisa, their daughter with the big eyes and a heart devoted to abandoned animals. While most little girls were getting sticky with Betty Crocker’s Easy-Bake Oven, Marisa was taking care of horses 16 hands high and 20 times her weight. “Zippy was really my horse,” she said. “They just didn’t know that yet.” And although it would take a few more bite marks, a couple of bruises shaped like a horse hoof, and a career record full of zeros, one day Zippy Chippy would be a star. It’s hard to understand what the man saw in the horse, especially when the man was always running around the barn two strides ahead of the horse, which was quite often trying to kill him. The fact that Felix Monserrate was still alive at the end of Zippy Chippy’s career is a major victory in and of itself. But what a ride it was between the horse trade and the transformation of Zippy Chippy to a high-stakes winner in the end. PAGE 105.


PHOTO: DAVID BUCHAN

2016


EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services. FASHION Page 12 Karen Klopp What2wearwhere.com J.Crew Jcrew.com Page 16 Tory Burch toryburch.com FAVORITES Page 18 The Legend of Zippy Chippy by William Thomas Published 2016 by McClelland & Stewart amazon.com TRAVEL Page 22 Dartmoor Derby High Pointe Tours highpointetours.com FAVORITES Page 23 Blanton’s blantonsbourbon.com DÉCOR Page 24 Maison Living maisonliving.com.au Abner Henry Fine Furniture abnerhenry.com Kindel kindelfurniture.com Ralph Lauren Home ralphlaurenhome.com Barker and Stonehouse barkerandstonehouse.co.uk Ethan Allen ethanallen.com STYLE Page 34 Pirtti Handwoven pirttihandwoven.com TRAVEL Page 36 Central Park Horse Show centralparkhorseshow.com STYLE Page 38 Zadeh New York zadehny.com

LISA MAIR Page 42 CanvasWorks Designs canvasworksdesigns.com GOLD LIST Page 44 Ariat ariat.com Vogel vogelboots.com Der-Dau derdau.com Hermès usa.hermes.com Coach coach.com Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com Tailored Sportsman thetailoredsportsman.com Pikeur pikeur.de Barbour barbour.com Dudley’s on Short Lexington, KY dudleysrestaurant.com Oli’s Fashion Cuisine Wellington, FL olisfashioncuisine.com Ashten’s Southern Pines, NC ashtens.com Buck’s Woodside, CA bucksofwoodside.com Jake’s Del Mar, CA jakesdelmar.com Dubarry dubarry.us Parlanti parlanti.com Lucchese lucchese.com Tony Lama tonylama.com Hunter Boots us.hunterboots.com LL Bean llbean.com Dover Saddlery dover.com The Tack Room Camden, SC tackroomonline.com Hadfield’s Royal Palm Beach, FL hadfieldssaddlery.com CDW cwdsellier.com

Butet butet.fr/en Devoucoux devoucoux.com Charles Owen charlesowen.com GPA Helmets gpa-sport.com/en Samshield samshield.com/en Featherlite fthr.com 4 Star Trailers 4startrailers.com Kingston kingstontrailers.com North Shore Animal League animalleague.org Best Friends bestfriends.org Makers Mark Secretariat Center secretariatcenter.org CANTER canterusa.org New Vocations horseadoption.com

GRAND OPENING NEW FACILITY SUMMER 2016

SHINTO FARM

Shinto Farm/CB Dressage is Bedford Hill’s premier stateof-the-art dressage facility on 18 stunning acres. It has a history of horsemanship passed down through five generations of dedicated equestrians. Shinto Farm is amateurfriendly and offers boarding, training and sales, as well as professionally-taught dressage clinics throughout the year. We take competitors to FEI competitions as well as regional & national championships.

THE McDONALDS Page 60 Superior Concrete concretefence.com WELLNESS Page 72 Hotze Health & Wellness Center hotzehwc.com LESLIE MUNSELL Page 78 Beauty for Real beautyforreal.com GALLERY Page 80 Melis Yalvac melisyalvac.com DINING Page 100 Mille Fleurs millefleurs.com BARN DOGS Page 106 Danny & Ron’s Rescue dannyandronsrescue.com

Trainer Michelle Winsett Dinneen riding Krafty.

Training staff also includes Courtney Bolender and Trish Helmer. Krafty owned by Carol Samaras; photo by Jason Banister

SHINTO FARM/CB DRESSAGE Dressage Horses For Sale or Lease • Lessons • Full Training 145 Broad Brook Road, Bedford Hills, NY 10507

845-206-1845 | www.shintofarm@aol.com AUGUST /SE PT E MB E R | 2 0 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 5


EQ B A R N D O G S

DANNY & RON The three-time EQ Gold List winner for favorite DOG RESCUE has rescued almost 10,000 dogs in need. BY JILL NOVOTNY

D

anny & Ron’s Rescue (D&RR) has won the vote in the EQ Gold List as readers’ favorite dog rescue every year since this feature began. Tack rooms at hunter-jumper shows used to be inhabited by fancy purebred dogs. Now you’ll most likely see a motley assortment of mixed-breed canines, many proudly sporting Danny & Ron’s Rescue bandanas. It is also not unusual to see a golf cart with the D&RR logo cruising the show grounds or parked by the schooling areas, being driven by volunteers and teeming with dogs looking for homes. Danny Robertshaw and Ron Danta were well known in the horse world long before they started rescuing dogs. Together they operate Beaver River Farm in South Carolina and have trained or ridden many successful show hunters over the years. They serve as judges and committee members for the U.S. Hunter Jumper Association and the U.S. Equestrian Federation. Aside from rescuing abused, abandoned, and starving dogs, they are passionate about educating the public about the importance of spaying, neutering, housing, and caring for dogs and opposing puppy mills and dog fighting. They also provide medical help for those who cannot afford vet bills and would otherwise not be able to keep their

Danny Robertshaw and Ron Danta

pets—in many cases elderly owners, to whom the companionship of their dogs is very important. Danny and Ron began in the early 1990s visiting a local shelter and pulling dogs from the euthanasia list. After Hurricane Katrina, the need grew, and by 2008 D&RR was officially created as a 501c3 non-profit organization based in Camden, South Carolina, and Wellington, Florida. Once rescued, every dog is brought to live with Danny and Ron in their private home or on their farm. That way they get to know each dog personally and can better plan every dog’s rehabilitation treatment and placement. At this writing, over 58 dogs reside in their home, and 20 larger-breed dogs are enjoying

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life on their 45-acre farm, all awaiting new families. To date almost 10,000 dogs have been placed in new homes thanks to Danny and Ron. The dogs live as a pack, and, according to Ron, “They work it out among themselves.” Confident dogs help shy ones, and resident dogs teach new ones the routines. Each dog gets an assigned eating space in a different room. They learn where and when they are fed and that they can’t be food aggressive. “Needless to say, there are a lot of vacuuming and cleaning chores that go with keeping all the dogs in the house,” Ron laughed. When asked how they do it all, they answered in unison, “Teamwork!” Danny continued, “Our team is made of six full time employees responsible for the care, feeding, and training of the dogs on a daily basis, plus, just keeping the house clean is a huge task. We hired our executive director, Kim Tudor, in 2012, and she has helped us to become better organized. As a result we have been able to place more dogs in the right homes.” According to Kim, “Approximately 90 percent of Danny and Ron’s dogs are adopted, thanks to our strong presence on Facebook and other social media. Most find a new home with friends and families within the horse world. There is really nothing to compare with the joy of seeing so many Danny-and-Ron dogs PAGE 105 happy in their new lives.”


Hermès Cavale jumping saddle medium-deep seat

HERMÈS RYAN, SIMON DELESTRE AND THEIR HERMÈS CAVALE SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR.

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