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Volume 30 Number 37 • January 12, 2019

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The Weekly News Source for Wyoming’s Ranchers, Farmers and AgriBusiness Community • www.wylr.net

A Look Inside Sen. John Barrasso looks at the importance of utilizing innovation, rather than regulation, to accomplish goals. . . Page 2 Mucosal vaccines provide an important option for cattle producers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 Brian Boner lays out his perspective of this 2019 Wyoming Senate. . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 21 Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station recognized outstanding staff members in midDecember. . . . . . . . . . Page 23

Quick Bits Internet Beef Nielsen has reported that beef saw the biggest change in U.S. sales in the past few years, with almost 11% more pounds sold in 2018 than in 2015. Beef consumption is expected to continue to rise, to 58.8 pounds per person in 2019, 2.8% higher than last year, according to forecasts from the Cattle Site. While 55% of Americans still buy their meat at full-service markets, online meat purchases have jumped from 4% in 2015 to 19% in 2018.

Gordon sees optimism for Wyo in first State of the State Cheyenne – In his first State of the State Address, Gov. Mark Gordon noted a general feeling of excitement from across the state. “I was both inspired and humbled by the wellspring of good energy that this state seems to be feel-

ing right now,” Gordon said. “The state is excited and expecting good things from all of us.” He added, “ I have to say the enthusiasm we have felt over the past couple of days should give us all optimism for our future. We are

a resourceful people in an amazing state at an important time in our state’s history. Let us make the most of it.” Though he has felt the support of the state over the past six years as State Treasurer, Gordon says he was

humbled to give his first State of the State address. “Following close on the heels of an inaugural for only the fourth time in our state’s history, it has been, in fact, 56 years since a newly elected Gov. Hansen gave Please see GOV on page 8

Ladies in leadership

Geis women hold leadership positions at national, state, local level For the first time anyone can remember, the same family of women sits at the helm of the national, state and local cattlewomen chapters, building a legacy of leadership within the family. Gwen Geis, her sister-in-law Bobbie Geis and Gwen’s daughter Kahla Mills have injected their passion for the cattle industry by serving in the organization in any way they can.

“A lot of times, cattlewomen are generational,” Gwen comments, “but to do it at the same time and have three of us from the same family as president of organizations just doesn’t happen very often – if ever.” She continues, “Many times a mother and daughter will serve as county or state president, but most Please see GEIS on page 14

Plague Case A Johnson County pet has been confirmed as the third known cat confirmed with the plague in the state in the past six months, according to a release from the Wyoming Department of Health. The cat lives in Kaycee and is known to go outdoors. Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly for both pets and people.

Sisters in agriculture — Women from the Geis family, including (from left to right) Gwen Geis, Kahla Mills and Bobbie Geis, all hold leadership positions in their respective cattlemen’s organizations. The women, who all enjoy the “sisterhood” felt within these organizations lead together to strengthen the beef industry.

NWSS starts

The National Western Stock Show’s Kick-Off Parade officially started the event on Jan. 10, with over 40 Longhorn cattle walking through the streets of downtown Denver, Colo. The parade, presented this year by Arrow Electronics, started in the 1960s and is a feature of the month-long agriculture industry event.

Producers can use forage testing data to help curate a winter feed plan The implications of winter feeding programs reach far past the disappearance of snow and emergence of fresh spring grass. A properly planned, data backed winter feeding program can assist producers reduce cost and increase breeding viability. Wyoming State Beef Extension Specialist Steve Paisley who studies heifer development and feed management, prioritizes forage quality testing prior to winter feeding season.  “If ranchers have the ability to quality test their forage before the winter they absolutely should,” says Paisley. “By doing this, ranchers can more accurately determine the nutritional needs of the herd so we know how much to feed throughout the winter.” Paisley also notes it is very important for producers to have their feed nitrate tested to reduce possible instances of nitrate poisoning, which can decrease the body score and cause a number of other health issues Please see DATA on page 9

Wolf Spread Hanson joins 'Roundup' team A gray wolf was shot on Jan. 7 outside of northeastern Montana’s Glasgow, hundreds of miles from established wolf packs, according to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP). The female wolf, which weighed about 70 pounds, was legally harvested Monday by a local hunter about a mile southwest of town, which is in Valley County, said Marc Kloker, a FWP spokesman in Glasgow.

Saige Albert photo

Winter feeding plan

A southeast Texas native, Callie Hanson joined the Wyoming Livestock Roundup on Jan. 7 as assistant editor. Dennis Sun, Wyoming Livestock Roundup publisher, comments, “Having just graduated from Texas A&M, we’re excited to have Callie join the Roundup team. We’re Callie Hanson going to enjoy working with her and showing her around the Rocky Mountain Region so she can meet everyone.” Hanson was raised on a commercial cattle operation in southeast Texas. She spent her youth exhibiting goats, swine and certified F1 cattle. She also showed horses in working ranch horse shows. She earned her degree in agricultural communications from Texas A&M University, graduating in December 2018 and moving to Casper to start her new endeavor with the Roundup. Hanson comments, “I’m excited for this fresh start in Wyoming, and I’m looking forward for the opportunity to do exactly what my college experience prepared me to do and what I’m passion about – communicate about the agriculture industry.” Welcome Hanson to the Roundup by e-mailing callie@wylr.net.

Grazing management crucial in drought Torrington – The ultimate goal of livestock grazing management is to take something consumers don’t want to eat and turn it into something they do want to eat – like a thick, juicy steak. John Ritten’s opening remark during a recent presentation garnered more than a few chuckles from around the room, but Ritten reiterated the importance of matching our demand to supply, particularly during drought. The University of Wyoming Ag Economics associate professor and Extension economist was in Torrington recently to discuss long-term strategies for operations during market changes and changes in spring precipitation,during the Southeast

Wyoming Beef Production Convention. His take-home message was simple. “There is no strategy that is 100 percent correct. Producers have to be ready to respond to the market, the weather and the current situation,” Ritten said. “One thing they can bank on is there will be another drought – it is just a matter of when.” Looking at data Sharing a survey conducted amongst Wyoming ranchers about what they do when there is a drought, Ritten was surprised to learn most producers are reactive. The top three answers in the survey were to destock breeding stock, feed through a

periodical

periodical

Please see GRAZE on page 6


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Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

They’ve Gone Too Far We’ve always thought that America has the safest food and we could trust the labeling to be true as there are laws governing what those labels say. But with some good American ingenuity some food companies are From the in the wrong by what they are not Publisher saying. Dennis Sun Some food labels have always stretched the truth with “super foods” or “miracle cures” on the packaging. But some are using trends or fears are taking dishonest marketing to a whole new level. We have heard about genetically modified organisms (GMOs). GMOs are plants that have been genetically modifies to be stored longer, to not produce seeds or just change the plant to make it better for human or animal consumption, among other things. Two-thirds of the American consumers either don’t understand GMOs or don’t want them in their diet, and one third are comfortable with them. I fall under the one-third group. If you like ketchup, tomatoes, seedless watermelon, other vegetables or bread, you most likely have been eating GMOs. But there are a lot of plants that have never been genetically modified. Scientists have proven over and over that GMOs are proven to be safe to eat as their non-GMOs counterparts, yet fear and distrust have tainted GMOs. Unfortunately, that fear and distrust sells. There is even a group, the Non-GMO Project, that bills itself the standard-bearer of the movement against GMOs. Companies will pay the Non-GMO Project for verification, thereby earning the right to use the Non-GMOs Project’s seal of approval on its packaging. This seal, a butterfly perched atop a checkmark, will ensure that this product is worth more to the customer. Therefore, consumers will pay more for it. So far, the Non-GMO Project has stamped over 50,000 products GMO-free, while only a few GMO plant types are commercially available. In other words, the vast majority of the products that are sold at a premium as “GMO free” could not be GMO if they wanted to be because no GMO version exists. This is a case of marketing gone too far. The Non-GMO Project is even stamping some products containing no genes at all as GMO free. Despite none of these products containing any genetic material, they charge consumers more for the peace of mind bought by the butterfly checkmark. One product, a cat litter, charged over three times as much for a box with the seal of approval on it as one that didn’t have the seal on it. Cat litter is a product that has no genes, and there’s no way to use genetic modification to create it. These labels really take advantage of consumers’ fear of GMOs. One report said, “Perhaps in 2019 marketers can grow their margins by verifying that their products have not harmed any unicorns, are free of Bigfoot DNA, were not cursed by a witch and have never made contact with a leprechaun.” It went on to say, “Raising prices based on any of these claims would be as scientifically supported as a ‘GMO-free’ premium.” The really bad part is, we see more and more of this concerning our food every day. It is called marketing.

Wyoming Livestock Roundup Reporting the News by the Code of the West

Wyoming Livestock Roundup (USPS # 005-774) is published weekly by Maverick Press, Inc. P.O. Box 850 • Casper, WY 82602 Periodicals postage paid in Casper, WY Fax: 307-472-1781 • Email: roundup@wylr.net

Phone: 307-234-2700 800-967-1647 • www.wylr.net

DENNIS SUN, Publisher • Cell: 307-262-6132 email: dennis@wylr.net SAIGE ALBERT, Managing Editor • saige@wylr.net CALLIE HANSON, Assistant Editor • callie@wylr.net BEAU PITT, Production Coordinator • beau@wylr.net JODY MICHELENA, Advertising Director • jodym@wylr.net CURT COX, Director of Livestock Field Services • 307-630-4604 • curt@wylr.net CODY NEGRI, Livestock Field Services Representative • 208-697-1093 • cody@wylr.net ANDREA ZINK, Circulation/Accounting Manager • andrea@wylr.net DENISE OLSON, Classified Sales Manager • 307-685-8213 • denise@wylr.net

Subscription Rates: 1 year: $50; 2 years: $75; 3 years: $110 Postmaster: Send address changes to: andrea@wylr.net Wyoming Livestock Roundup • P.O. Box 850 • Casper, WY 82602 Member: Wyoming Stock Growers Association Wyoming Wool Growers Association • Wyoming Farm Bureau Federation Wyoming CattleWomen • Wyoming Horse Council Livestock Publications Council • United States Cattlemen’s Association National Cattlemen’s Beef Association • Fremont County Cattlemen's Association Green River Valley Cattlemen's Association • Wyoming Angus Association Converse County Stock Growers Association • Carbon County Stock Growers Association

This publication is © 2018 by Maverick Press, Inc.

GUEST OPINIONS

Cut Carbon Through Innovation, Not Regulation By Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyoming Leaders from nearly 200 countries met in Katowice, Poland in early December and agreed to rules to carry out the Paris climate accord. Now that the 22,000 delegates have returned home, there are three truths they need to recognize to make actual progress in the hard work of lowering carbon dioxide emissions across the globe. The first is, the climate is changing, and we, collectively, have a responsibility to do something about it. Second, the United States and the world will continue to rely on affordable and abundant fossil fuels, including coal, to power our economies for decades to come. And third, innovation, not new taxes or punishing global agreements, is the ultimate

solution. People across the world are rejecting the idea that carbon taxes and raising the cost of energy is the answer to lowering emissions. In France, the government just suspended a planned fuel tax increase after some of its citizens took to the streets in protest. And in the United States, the results of November elections showed that these plans and other government interventions are just as unpopular. Voters in Washington State rejected the creation of an expensive tax on carbon emissions. In Colorado, a ballot measure to severely restrict drilling was defeated. And in Arizona, voters rejected a mandate to make the

state’s utilities much more dependent on renewable energy by 2030 – regardless of the cost to consumers. All three of these states elected liberal Democrats to Congress on election night. The United States is currently on track to reduce emissions to 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2025, according to one recent analysis. That’s roughly two-thirds of the way to the original United States target under the Paris climate agreement. The nation is leading the way not because of punishing regulations, restrictive laws or carbon taxes but because of innovation and advanced technology, especially in the energy sector. Over the past decade,

American energy-related carbon dioxide emissions have been falling. Technology breakthroughs have led to an American energy renaissance and a growing economy. As our economy has strengthened, we have lowered emissions. While the United States cut its emissions in 2017, global emissions moved in the opposite direction. Emission levels increased in China and India and even rose in the European Union in 2017. Making energy as clean as we can, as fast as we can, without raising costs to consumers will be accomplished through investment, invention and innovation. As chairman of the Please see CUT on page 10


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

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NEWS BRIEFS Junkin to headline WESTI

Reiman to lead WCCA The Wyoming County Commissioners Association (WCCA) named Jerimiah Rieman as the group’s new Executive Director. Rieman brings over a decade of experience in legislative affairs and public policy to the post, with expertise in a wide variety of federal and state issues. “I place great value in the work I have undertaken with Wyoming’s County Commissioners over the past decade. As servants dedicated to the health and safety of their constituents and the care and respect for Wyoming’s lands, each of them has my greatest respect,” said Rieman. “I do not take lightly the faith they have placed in me to lead their association. I look forward to building on the legacy of my predecessors and leading the Wyoming County Commissioners Association to new heights.”  As WCCA executive director, Rieman will represent the state’s county commissioners before the Wyoming State Legislature, work collaboratively with the Wyoming Governor’s office and other state and federal agencies on local government issues and provide outreach and guidance to county leaders across the state. 

CRISPR advances genetics Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at University of California (UC) San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. A description of the new “precision-guided sterile insect technique,” or pgSIT, is published Jan. 8 in the journal Nature Communications. When pgSIT-derived eggs are introduced into targeted populations, the researchers report, only adult sterile males emerge, resulting in a novel, environmentally friendly and relatively low-cost method of controlling pest populations in the future. “CRISPR technology has empowered our team to innovate a new, effective, species-specific, self-limiting, safe and scalable genetic population control technology with remarkable potential to be developed and utilized in a plethora of insect pests and disease vectors,” said Akbari, an assistant professor in UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences.

China to buy ag goods The Trump administration wrapped up the latest round of trade talks in Beijing, noting a commitment by China to buy more U.S. agricultural goods. China and the U.S. concluded three days of talks by midlevel trade officials on Jan. 9, with a cautious sense of optimism that the world’s two biggest economies might be able to reach a deal that ends their trade war. President Donald Trump and President Xi Jinping have given their officials until March 1 to reach an accord on “structural changes” to China’s economy on issues such as the forced transfer of U.S. technology, intellectual-property rights and non-tariff barriers. The talks were the first face-to-face meeting since Trump and Jinping met in Argentina.

DOI Seeks Leader

El Niño grows

The seed that would begin a career helping farm families through personal and financial turmoil was planted the day Andy Junkin stepped off his family’s farm in Canada to attend college. Junkin, owner of Agriculture Strategy of Solon, Iowa, is the keynote speaker and a workshop presenter at WESTI Ag Days Feb. 12-13 in Worland, an annual conference whose themes this year follow agricultural legacy, management and production. Junkin’s stories about how he came to offer his services involve topics not usually in farm or ranch discussions around coffee shop tables or on farm and ranch conference agendas. Rather than commodity outlooks or fuel prices, the gist for his emphasis to create lasting legacies are divorce, suicide attempts and shattered families. Youngquist said WESTI sessions will follow the legacy theme, including estate planning, taxes, management transition resources and communicating about difficult topics. Junkin’s keynote presentation is the morning of Feb. 12, and his workshop is the afternoon of Feb. 13. His workshop is free, but pre-registration is required by calling the Washakie County Extension Office at 307-3473431, said Youngquist. Those who pre-register can get a free workbook.

Trump favored by ag industry To the general public, President Donald Trump ranges from impressive to offensive, but many pork producers believe he is giving agriculture a fair shake. General polls peg President Trump’s approval rating in the low 40s, but the latest Farm Journal Pulse on the president’s approval far surpasses a majority, reaching up to a 76 percent approval rating based on nearly 1,200 responses. Only 21 percent said they disapproved of Trump’s handling of his job as president. Three percent were not sure. The poll is the first in a series to track sentiment on the president’s job performance amongst farmers, ranchers and ag businesses.

Ranchers talk border security The U.S. border with Mexico spans 1,954 miles, and ranchers are on the front lines for most of it. For the past few decades, border enforcement and security has increased to halt illegal immigration and drug smuggling. In 1989, construction on the first major border fence began in San Diego, Calif. stretching 46 miles east. Much of the traffic across the Tucson, Ariz. Corridor of the border is controlled by the Sinaloa Cartel. Jim and Sue estimate more than 200 trails go through their ranch, and all are under the rule of the Sinaloa Cartel. “About 20 miles into the U.S. is controlled by the Sinaloa Cartel. That’s where our ranch is. It’s in no man’s land,” Jim says.

GENEX develops EPD

White House officials have intensified their focus on Rep. Rob Bishop, a Utah Republican, and the Interior Department’s acting chief, David Bernhardt, as possible nominees to lead the agency, Bloomberg reports. Bishop, a nine-term congressman and former high school teacher who has tangled with conservationists over the best way to manage federal lands, has already said he will retire from Congress in 2020. Bishop has spearheaded the movement to transfer national public lands to states.

EPDs, bull photos and more are now available at the touch of a finger in a new app developed by GENEX. “Today, EPDs and indexes are updated more frequently than in the past, and this calls for new methods to share upto-date information with beef producers across the world. That’s why we are introducing the GENEX Beef app,” states Sarah Thorson, GENEX Beef Marketing manager. The GENEX Beef app enables users to view the cooperative’s Angus, Red Angus, Simmental, SimAngus, Hereford and Charolais lineups. Users are able to sort bulls by EPDs or indexes, see bull photos and watch bull videos. “And, this is just the beginning. Watch for additional features to be added soon,” states Thorson. The GENEX Beef app is now available through the Apple App Store, Google Play and Windows store.

The Climate Prediction Center reports El Niño has a 90 percent chance to form and continue through the Northern Hemisphere winter and a 60 percent chance it will continue through spring. An El Niño event generally translates to warmer than normal temperatures in the western U.S., Northern Plains, and Upper Midwest. Above normal precipitation is expected in the South.

Ag barometer shows shift The December 2018 Purdue University/CME Group Ag Economy Barometer came in at 127, which was virtually unchanged from December 2017, when the barometer stood at 126. Compared to a year earlier, an interesting shift in producer perceptions has taken place regarding both current conditions and future expectations. The December 2018 Index of Current Conditions was substantially below a year earlier, registering a year-to-year decline of 30 points. In contrast, the Index of Future Expectations was actually 15 points higher in December 2018 than in December 2017. This divergence in perceptions has been especially notable since last spring, as producers continue to exhibit more confidence in future conditions for their farms in the face of weakening perceptions regarding current economic conditions. Producers’ interest in making large investments in their operations waned in December as the Large Farm Investment Index fell to a reading of 51 – five points below a month earlier but still nine points higher than in September, when it reached its lowest reading of the last three years. The investment index remains well below a year ago, when it reached a reading of 70, suggesting farmers are wary of making substantial farm investments given current financial conditions.

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Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

NEWS1/8 BRIEFS Page

Beef Council launches new website

Wyo. Legislature is optimistic in 2019

WY Livestockefficient Roundup government; diversifying Wyoming’s economy for future generations; and increasing access for Wyoming families to quality educaBlack & tion White and affordable healthcare. “We have an exciting opportunity to work with newly Gov. Gordon and the other Ad “A” – Jan. 14,sworn-in 2019 elected officials on crafting solutions to Wyo-

House and Senate majority leaders expressed optimism about the future of Wyoming while outlining their priorities on the second day of the 2019 General Session. Upon receiving Gov. Mark Gordon’s first State of the State address, leaders of the Majority also pledged their willingness to work with the new administration in executing a shared vision for the state. Leaders of the Republican Majority committed to serving the people of Wyoming through several priorities, including modernizing Wyoming’s tax structure and the state’s fiscal position; delivering a more responsive and

ming’s greatest challenges,” said Senate President Drew Perkins. “Closing the budget deficit by broadening the tax base while lowering the overall tax rate is an important discussion we need to have. It is about changing the tax structure, not increasing the burden on Wyoming residents.”

42nd Annual Bull Sale February 16, 2019

Earlier 2 0 Sale Da 19 te!

11:00 a.m. • CSU ARDEC Facility • Fort Collins, Colo. Selling 35 Age-Advantaged (22-mo. old) Angus & Hereford Bulls and 13 Bred Commercial Black-hided Heifers

We are excited for two big changes this year – · All cattle PAP tested (bulls at 7,500 feet, heifers at 5,200 feet). · Older bulls developed on high mountain pasture last summer

Sale details available at www.csubulls.com For more information, contact: Jason Ahola • 970-491-3312 jason.ahola@colostate.edu • www.csubulls.com

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The Wyoming Beef Council (WBC) launched a new website in conjunction with the new year. The website,  wybeef.com, features Wyoming stories, an extensive recipe collection, nutrition and lifestyle information and a section for cattle producers. “We strive to keep our content, imagery and technology fresh and relevant for consumers and producers on all platforms,” says Ann Wittmann, executive director.  “We’re particularly excited to introduce our nutrition and lifestyle page at a time when peo-

ple tend to focus on health and wellness goals.” The page offers FAQs about beef’s protein, nutrition and the benefits of lean beef in a healthy lifestyle. As millennial trends morph America’s kitchens into a digital space, everything from recipes to nutritional information, to popular diets and cooking tips are researched online. With the 2019 relaunch of their website, WBC continues their goal of providing accurate, attractive, helpful information to this audience through wybeef.com.

Measures protect SNAP Recipients At the direction of President Donald J. Trump, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced a plan to ensure that lowincome Americans have access to the nutrition they need, despite the inability of Congress to pass an appropriations bill that safely secures our borders. The plan provides full benefits for participants in USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for the month of February. When USDA’s funding expired on Dec. 21, SNAP benefits for January were fully funded. States have already received that money and have been distributing it to participants. Since the lapse in appropriations,

USDA has been reviewing options available to the department for funding February benefits without an additional appropriation from Congress. “At President Trump’s direction, we have been working with the administration on this solution. It works and is legally sound. We want to assure states and SNAP recipients who the benefits for February will be provided,” Perdue said.  “Our motto here at USDA has been to ‘Do Right and Feed Everyone.’  With this solution, we’ve got the ‘Feed Everyone’ part handled, and I believe that the plan we’ve constructed takes care of the ‘Do Right’ part as well.”

Trade mitigation funding extended U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue extended the deadline for agricultural producers to apply for payments under the Market Facilitation Program as provided by the trade mitigation program administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). 

The original deadline had been Jan. 15, but farmers have been unable to apply for the program since the lapse in federal funding caused the closure of USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices at the end of business on Dec. 28.


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

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Mucosal vaccines may be more effective in some instances in beef cattle Armed with an understanding of how and when to utilize systemic and nasal vaccines, producers can maximize the efficacy of their vaccine regimes. Nathan Erickson of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine has focused his career research on beef cattle production health and vaccine program optimization. Tailoring to the herd Erickson stresses the importance of understanding the herd’s unique needs and formulating a vaccine program from there.  “When we think about vaccine management, we have to tailor the plan to the needs of the specific herds and disease concerns for the area,” says Erickson. “Blanket generic practices are just not optimal for every herd. They all have unique needs.” “If the herd is annually effected by the same illness at the same time, make sure to vaccinate in a timely manner to minimize issues,” says Erickson. “Vaccinations allow us to be proactive instead of reactive in these scenarios.” Maternal immunity “The first thing producers need to understand is where a calf’s immunity is derived from and how it effects the efficacy of certain types of vaccines,” says Erickson. “A calf’s first immunity is derived from colostrum. A lack of or lowquality colostrum can disrupt the passive transfer of maternal immunity to the calf.” A variety of factors can affect the quality of a cow’s colostrum, says Erickson. Heifers generally have lower quality colostrum, and nutrition or lack thereof can also affect the immune status of the dam and ultimately the

immune status of her neonatal calf. High maternal immunity however can cause diminished responses to the antibodies presented in systemic vaccines, he explains. “The efficacy of systemic and mucosal vaccines is dependent on the immunity of the cow. A well-vaccinated cow will produce higher-quality colostrum, stocked with antibodies to provide her newborn calf with the immunity it needs to fight off various respiratory diseases,” says Erickson, “A systemic vaccine – one that is injected – is not typically as effective for neonatal calves in this scenario as the antibodies passed on in the milk will interfere with the vaccine and cause a diminished response.” Using mucosal vaccinations In the scenario of calves born to cows with higher immunity mucosal vaccines are a more viable option, says Erickson.  “A mucosal vaccine is applied in the nasal cavity. It is able to bypass the maternal antibodies because effects the immune tissue directly in the surface layers of the nasal cavity,” says Erickson.  For calves born to lowerimmunity heifers or those that had to be pulled or bottle fed, systemic vaccines can be more effective than with high immunity calves due to the lack of vaccine interfering antibodies, says Erickson.  “The main priority with high-risk calves should be to get them colostrum as soon as possible, and then we can concern ourselves with proper vaccinations,” he adds. Aside from very young calves with high maternal immunity, there are

For more information or to view the webinar, visit beefresearch.ca/ resources/webinars.cfm.

Horseshoe Valley Chariot Races

January 26 & 27, 2019

other scenarios in which mucosal vaccinations can be effective.  “It is important to consider mucosal vaccines prior to high risk periods,” says Erickson. “Pre-turnout maternal cows and calves around three months of age as their maternal antibodies begin to wane around that time are also good candidates for these types of vaccinations.” Tips To achieve maximum efficacy using mucosal vaccinations, Erickson recommends following established manufacturer protocols as well as certain in-field practices.  Mucosal vaccines require the use a device known as a cannula in order to deliver the vaccine from the syringe and into the nasal cavity. Erickson recommends following the manufacturer’s protocol of changing the cannula every 10 uses for weaned calves and to use a new cannula for each calf when vaccinating neonatal aged calves.  “Disposing of the cannula accordingly minimizes the risk of spreading harmful diseases among calves,” says Erickson. “Younger calves are especially susceptible to catching illnesses from shared devices such as cannulas and needles.” Erickson also stresses the importance of paying attention to the head position of the calf when administering mucosal vaccinations.  “If possible, we want the calf’s head to be slightly elevated to maximize the amount of contact the vaccine has with the tissue and minimize the amount of

dripping through the nose,” says Erickson. It is also important to keep in mind the timelines of different types of vaccines. While mucosal vaccines work much quicker than the systemic variety, they have a significantly lower time frame of coverage, he explains. “In most cases, a calf given a mucosal vaccine in the neonatal period will need a booster around branding time,” says Erickson. “Some studies also suggest neonatal mucosal vaccinations can act as a primer to systemic vaccinations administered at weaning and result in boosted responses.”  On Dec. 11, Erickson was featured as a webinar speaker for the Beef Cattle Research Council where he described how to effectively utilize mucosal vaccines. Callie Hanson is the assistant editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

Additional Calcutta will be going on during the races. Races are held 3 miles south of Glendo, WY on HWY 319 Gate Entry - $5 for ages 12 and over

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for Sunday races is at 7:00 PM at Micke's Restaurant. Tickets for dinner are $10 for adults, $5 for 12 years and younger, under 3 free. For more information call: Gene Daly - 307-331-1049 Advertising paid by grant from Platte County Lodging & Tourism Tax Joint Powers Board

When used correctly, live and modified-live vaccines can be highly effective in preventing various diseases in cattle. However, proper storage and handling is crucial in preserving the viability of the vaccines. Nathan Erickson of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine stresses the importance of carefully controlling the temperature in which vaccines are stored.  “It is crucial to store these vaccinations in an environment with a constant temperature,” says Erickson. “If storing in vaccinations in the refrigerator, be sure to store them as close to the middle of the fridge as possible, as this is where the temperature is most constant. The door of the fridge and shelves close to the freezer compartment often have fluctuating temperatures that can harm the vaccine.”  It is also extremely important to mix the vaccines carefully. In most cases, a diluent will need to be added to a powder, it is important to avoid vigorously stirring the mixture as this can also compromise the effectiveness of the vaccine.    

University of Wyoming (UW) Extension is offering Annie’s Project this January through March in Powell. Annie’s Project is a five-class program for women in agriculture. Based on the life of a farm woman in Illinois, this series helps empower women in agriculture to be better business partners through networks and by managing and organizing critical information, said Jeremiah Vardiman, UW Extension educator in Powell. The first class, which is two sessions, is Jan. 19 and will focus on communication in a multigenerational operation. Part two is Jan. 26. Class three will focus

on food for profit Feb. 16. The last two classes on Feb. 23 and March 2 are related to ag resource programs and family health and wellbeing. All classes are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Nelson House. Lunch is served at each class. Each session requires a $10 fee at time of registration. Classes are limited to the first 20 participants who register. Those who attend all five classes will receive a soft-shell jacket. To register, go to bit.ly/powellannie  or contact the Powell Extension Office at 307-754-8836 or the Cody Office at 307-527-8560.

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6

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

GRAZE continued from page 1 drought or wean calves early. “Production really matters,” Ritten stated, “but when there is a drought, most people react. ‘We’re in a drought. What do I do now?’” Ritten realizes no one can control the weather, and the weather controls the forage supply. Spring and some winter precipitation are major influences on annual forage production, which can be hard to predict and varies from year to year. “We want to have cows because they make us money, so the challenge is making demand match supply. We can control demand, but supply is less under our control,” he said. After the survey, Ritten said they looked at the responses to drought and compared how those scenarios would hold up through wet and dry periods over years. Destocking Some producers destock their breeding herd when

there is a drought and forage is lacking. Once the drought is over, producers want to rebuild, so they retain their replacement heifers to keep the genetics they have built up. But the problem is they already have less income because they sold some of the factory during the drought, and now, they will have even less income because they kept their replacement heifers, Ritten said. The upside is, liquidating cows during the drought will produce some cash flow, but after the drought, there will be less cash flow to carry producers through since there are less calves and are retained more of them. Feeding through drought Feeding through a drought can be expensive, Ritten continued. Some cows may still be liquidated but maybe not as many. “What generally hap-

pens is, I may be signing more checks on the front than on the back, so I won’t have the inflow of cash during the drought, like the guys who liquidate do,” he explained. “But, when the drought is over, I have calves to market, versus the guy who liquidated and has a lag period to rebuild. As soon as the drought is over, my cows are making money.” Producers also have to be leery of importing forage into their operation during droughts. “We don’t want to bring in hay with cheatgrass or Medusahead,” Ritten stated. Weaning early Producers who choose to wean early will have smaller, lighter calves to market and may not make much money, but they won’t have to sell many cows, Ritten said. Once the calves are pulled, those cows have an opportunity to rebuild body condition and breed back. Post-drought, producers still have their cows, but they generated less income during the drought since the calves

were weaned early. Diversifying Some proactive producers look at diversification as the answer. If they can add a certain number of stockers or yearlings to the operation, they can maintain enough forage for their cows during a drought. “The idea is to not have a monoculture and have one pest come out and take out the corn crop, so to speak,” he explained. Ranchers need to define the full capacity of their operation during an average or normal year and then determine how many cows the ranch could carry during a drought. In this scenario, they can have the number of cows the ranch can carry during a drought and fill out the capacity during normal and wet years with yearlings. Ritten warned producers to consult with an accountant because there could be tax implications if producers reduce their breeding herd numbers. “I would recommend

“Have a good plan and be proactive because there will be a drought again.” – John Ritten, University of Wyoming doing it in stages,” he suggested. Best strategy Ritten said none of the strategies are 100 percent right for every operation. “Basically, Wyoming ranchers typically make more money with calves than yearlings, so weaning early may be more of an option,” he explained. “We also found that if a drought lasts more than two years, feeding no longer beats liquidation.” “If the drought lasts five years, the diversified operation is better because producers can decrease their costs during the drought, and they don’t have to destock, which means less cows to rebuild,” Ritten commented. “The cows can breed back and will be in better condition.” Other factors should be considered. Retaining heifers or buying replacements after a drought can be at the mercy of the price cycle. “What commonly happens is we sell the cows low during a drought and have to pay more after the drought because everyone else is also trying to rebuild,” Ritten

explained. “Those replacements may end up being very expensive.” Expenses The biggest expense in rebuilding may be developing that heifer. “If prices are high, we may want to consider delaying rebuilding until prices are lower,” Ritten suggested. “Waiting to rebuild, if the market is high after a drought, may make sense if we can cash flow it and handle the tax implications.” He added, “If the heifers are at a good price point, maybe we could sell highvalue cows and rebuild in the future if the banker will allow it.” “Anytime we are going into or coming out of a drought, I would strongly recommend talking to the banker. They may have a limit on what we can do. Have a good plan and be proactive because there will be a drought again,” he said. Gayle Smith is a correspondent for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

Supreme Court denies case The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to consider challenges to laws in California and Massachusetts restricting the sale of egg, pork and veal products from animals in confined housing systems. The court was asked to consider challenges from other states contending that the laws interfered with interstate commerce. Attorneys general from 13 states, led by Indiana, asked the Supreme Court to hear the case against the Massachusetts law, while Missouri led the challenge against the California law. California’s law took effect in 2015; the Massachusetts law passed in 2016 and is scheduled to go into effect in 2022. The high court also declined to hear an appeal against a California ban on the sale of foie gras. – Meatingplace


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

7

OBITUARIES

Billy James Shepperson

We welcome obituaries. Obituaries are printed free of charge and can be sent to roundup@wylr.net.

May 18, 1978 – Dec. 27, 2018

Dale B. “Buck” Olson Aug. 9, 1943 – Dec. 31, 2018

Dale “Buck” Olson, 75, of Glenrock passed away Dec. 31. Buck was born to Matt and Ethel Olson on Aug. 9, 1943 in Dickinson, N.D. Buck had two siblings, Roy and Maxine. Buck and his family lived in Killdeer, N.D. for nine years following his birth and ran a rodeo ranch. They then moved to Wisconsin to a dairy farm, as his sister needed medical care at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. Buck and his family then moved to Montana and eventually to Casper. Buck met his wife, Linda Welch, at Natrona County High School. They married in May of 1961. Buck worked as a pressman at the Casper Star Tribune for many of his younger years, but his passion was ranching. In 1974, Buck was

hired as a ranch foreman on a ranch west of Casper. In May of 1985, Buck and Linda moved to the Orchard Ranch outside of Ten Sleep. Some of Buck’s most memorable experiences occurred while managing the Orchard Ranch for 14 wonderful years. Following his employment on the Orchard Ranch, Buck managed the Rome Hill Ranch outside of Ten Sleep, worked for Neil McMurry on the McMurry Ranch in Casper and managed another ranch near Boxelder creek, north of Glenrock. Buck eventually decided he needed to retire from the life he loved so much and became a butcher at Sam’s Club in Casper, where he received accolades for his unrivaled work ethic. Buck and Linda made Glenrock their retirement home. Buck was a devoted and loving husband, as well as the best dad, grandfather, uncle or friend that anyone could ever ask for. He took great pride in his newest great-granddaughter Kimber and made the trip to the hospital to meet her right away. He took babysitting duty very seriously when Kimber was left with him while mom and dad stepped outside to feed his birds. One of his last acts on earth was

kissing Kimber on the cheek. His love and passion for wildlife and ranching made him a real “American cowboy.” Buck was a highly regarded horseman and stockman, training horses and working livestock were tasks he did with loving hands and respect. His true home was in the mountains atop his prized saddle horse Splash. Buck impacted many people positively throughout his life, this world lost an exceptional man. Buck is survived by his wife Linda Olson; children Doug Olson of Casper and Kellie (Scott Budig) OlsonBudig of Evansville; grandchildren Jessie (Jarred) Bower of Glenrock, Clint (Amanda) Atkinson of Lander, Mariah (Kelly) Alger of Gillette and Matt (Gracee) Olson of Uvalde, Texas; numerous great-grandchildren; and several loving extended family. Preceding Buck in death is his son Vern Olson; mother Ethel Olson; sister Maxine Cummings; and father Matt Olson. A memorial will be held June 1 at 1 p.m. at a place to be determined. Services are under the direction of Newcomer Funeral Home in Casper. Visit newcomercasper.com for online condolences.

Ewart “Peewee” Arthur Johnson Feb. 26, 1942 – Jan. 3, 2019

Peewee Johnson passed away on Jan. 3. Ewart “Peewee” Arthur Johnson was born on Feb. 26, 1942 in Lusk to Maurine and Elmer Johnson. Peewee, along with his younger siblings, was raised south of Manville on the Johnson Family Ranch. After he graduated high school in 1960 from Sunrise School, he went to work as a ranch hand for Shorty Milligan, alongside Bebe Reed. Shortly after, the two of them went to work for

Pfisters north of Lusk. In December of 1967, Peewee married Peggy Barr in Jay Em, and from this union, two daughters were welcomed to their world, Kim Johnson in 1968 and Kristy Johnson in 1977. A few years later, Peewee and Peggy divorced. After years of ranching and breaking horses, Peewee had to start jobs of different sorts, such as construction and working for the county. He also decided to go to school for saddle making and leather work. During school, he built his first saddle, and from that schooling, Peewee found a new love of being a Cobbler, repairing boots, saddles, tack and more, he eventually opened his very own Cobbler Shop in Lusk. In 1996, Peewee became a brand inspector for the state of Wyoming, which brought him back to his love of cattle and horses. He would go on to retire from this joy in mid2016.

Along the way, in April of 2000, Peewee joined Doris DeSersa in marriage. They spent many loving years together dancing and spending time with family. Peewee Johnson is preceded in death by his parents; and his wife Doris. His is survived by his daughters Kim Johnson and Kristy (Pete) Dikeman; stepsons Justin, Lance and Travis; sister Gwen McIntosh; brother Lyle (Trixie) Johnson; ex-wife Peggy; grandchildren Annastacia, Natasha, Larissa, Kolton, Aspen and Kody; two great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. A luncheon was held on Jan. 10 at the Niobrara County Fairgrounds. Services followed at 12:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, if desired, memorials may be made to the family. Services are under the direction of Pier Funeral Home in Lusk.

Sheep producers target Lucky Brand Quintin McEwen spotted the tag on a Lucky Brand men’s polyester sweater and decided he had had enough. “Shearless Fleece,” it read next to a picture of a sheep heavy with wool. “Not a single sheep was sheared in the making of this garment.” The sixth-generation sheep farmer in Monkton, Ontario logged on to his farm’s

Facebook page to lash out at Lucky. Not only is shearing not inhumane, he wrote, it helps sheep fend off disease and move around more comfortably. “I am absolutely shocked by your blatant disregard for my industry,” Mr. McEwen wrote in the post, eliciting more than 1,000 comments. – Wall Street Journal

Sergeant Billy James Shepperson departed this life on Dec. 27 at Wyoming Regional Hospital in Cheyenne. Billy was born on May 18, 1978 in Casper during a spring blizzard to Jim and Alice Shepperson, joining his older brother Baxter into the Shepperson household. Billy studied agricultural business at Casper College after graduating from Hot Springs County High School in 1996. In February 2001, Billy enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, attending recruit training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot – San Diego, California. Following initial training, Billy was assigned to the Third Battalion, First Marine Regiment where he served as a rifleman and Scout-Sniper. As part of his service,

Billy attended and successfully graduated from the Marine Corps Scout-Sniper School and deployed overseas three times to include two combat tours to Iraq in 2003 and 2004. Billy’s decorations include the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, three Sea Service Deployment Ribbons, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Medal, Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, Combat Action Ribbon and the Purple Heart. Upon completion of his service in the Marine Corps in 2005, Billy alternated between trips to the Middle East operating in the security sector and spending his time pursuing his true loves of ranching, roping, fishing, hunting, traveling and all things outdoors.  On Dec. 5, 2015, Billy was married to Clare Galpin of Cheltenham, England. Surrounded by friends and family, Billy and Clare celebrated their marriage with a beautiful formal ceremony, officiated by Billy’s life-long friend, Thomas Baker of Cheyenne at Silver Gate, Mont. in August 2016. 

On July 5 2017, Billy and Clare welcomed daughter Alice Rose into their home and threw all their effort into supporting the family ranching operation in Lance Creek. A life as rich as Billy’s and lived as he chose is impossible to capture in words but can be characterized by a lifelong commitment to loud music, accurate guns, fast horses and unforgettable times. He had an unbounded soul, cutting wit and an absolute love for his family, friends and the Corps. He will be greatly missed. Billy is preceded in death by his mother Alice Gibson; grandmother Billie Jean Beaton; grandfather Frank Shepperson; and grandparents Conrad and June Gibson.  Billy is survived by wife Clare; daughter Alice; stepson Matthew; father James L. (Waive) Shepperson; brother Baxter; sister-in-law Regina; niece Naomi; and nephew James. A memorial service was held on Jan. 4 in Douglas on the Wyoming State Fairgrounds. Pier Funeral Home of Lusk is in charge of arrangements. Send online condolences at pierfh.com.


8

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

GOV continued from page 1

his Inaugural Address and his State of the State in the same week,” he commented. Strength in the state Overall, Gordon emphasized, “As I take up my part of the responsibilities that the people of Wyoming have entrusted me with, I am happy to declare the State of Wyoming is strong.” The strength of the state, he continued, comes from its people, its resources and Wyoming’s work ethic. With a full session already started, Gordon said, “I look forward to our work in this session as we grapple with the concerns of our people, the opportunities our state provides, sorting our budget priorities and the other issues that a general session brings forth for discussion.” Fiscal concerns Though 2019 General

Session of the Wyoming Legislature has a much smaller focus on the budget, Gordon commented, “Let me begin by expressing my appreciation to Gov. Mead and his administration for preparing a supplemental budget that speaks to continuing Wyoming’s efforts to diversify our economy while also emphasizing the needs of higher education, local communities, effective government and state infrastructure.” He further recognized instability created by the boom-and-bust cycle Wyoming falls into, further commenting that recent reports have left the state more optimistic at the potential for future prosperity again. As the Consensus Revenue Estimating Group (CREG) met in early Janu-

Keep up on the latest from Gov. Mark Gordon at governor.wy.gov.

ary to review and calibrate October estimates, Gordon said, “Since October, things have changed. Global volatility has increased, and oil and gas prices have declined.” “I believe our best times will come when we assure a reliable and stable fiscal future. It is hard to find a consistent path forward when one chases revenue, hopes for windfall or reacts drastically to downturns,” he emphasized. “It is important that we find a course where ‘steady as she goes’ becomes the watchword.” While responsible savings has helped stabilize downturns, discipline will continue to be important in using, refilling and augmenting savings during times of prosperity. He supports legislation to define the “rainy day” account, or Legislation Stabilization Reserve Account, to invest nearly $2 billion and assure both better returns and additional stability. “Because all of us here run household budgets, we

know there is a beauty in simplicity. Understanding the fact that a little more than one-third of our total portfolio is made up by the Permanent Mineral Trust Fund – this is money which cannot be appropriated, and another third is specific to various education missions, which are also permanent funds,” Gordon commented. “This leaves only one-third for us to work with. We really do not have money to waste.” The best strategy moving forward, he emphasized, is not raising taxes but rather containing expenditure and finding better ways to deliver services and find savings. Education At the top of his priority list is school safety and student health, as well as stable and predictable funding. He also emphasized a need for continuing technical education opportunities. “Over the course of the last couple of years Wyoming, like a lot of states, is suffering from a lack of a

skilled workforce,” Gordon said. He added, “Education is changing. Our economy is changing. Today, more than ever, we need to provide the educational opportunities to enable a nimble workforce to find a job with companies right here in Wyoming.” As a result, Gordon noted he will support efforts to find new ways for high school students and adults to continue and expand their technical education and focus on higher education. He noted support for University of Wyoming (UW) efforts to expand degree programs to reflect the needs of Wyoming’s top industries, saying, “UW is responding to the times and proving to be innovative in its own right.” Local communities “Ultimately though, to make Wyoming stronger, our focus must be on local communities,” Gordon said. Gordan said local police and sheriff’s departments, fire halls and communities must be supported moving into the future. He commented, “I believe the best decisions are made closest to where the impact of those decisions is felt. It is also at the local level where individuals and entrepreneurs can spur new businesses that align with a community’s values and assets. With Gov. Matt Mead leading the charge to provide local funding, Gordon noted

he hopes to continue to move forward and improve access to services provided by the state. In addition, Gordon supports continued access to broadband internet throughout the state and expansion of tele-health networks, along with other technology advancements, to improve quality of life for Wyomingites. “As governor, I will support our hometowns as they chart their own courses into the future,” he said. New leadership Gordon noted engagement in government for individuals is increasingly important, commenting, “For those watching or listening at home, my hat is off to you for being engaged with government. The topics discussed today and bills that will be debated can only get better with citizens’ input.” He noted Wyoming’s advantages, including its status as a headwaters state and its clean air and water and the quality of people in the state, poise it well to succeed into the future. “I cannot do justice to the gratitude and humility I feel to be standing here as governor and governor of the greatest state in the nation,” Gordon said. “God bless Wyoming, and God bless America.” Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

Officials sworn in Wanting to start his term in the people’s house, Gov. Mark Gordon took the oath of office during a short ceremony in the early morning of Jan. 7 in the Rotunda of the Wyoming Capitol, which is closed for restoration. During the 15-minute ceremony, Wyoming Chief Justice Michael K. Davis administered the oath of office to Governor Gordon on the family bible with wife Jennie at his side. “Being sworn in the Capitol, the people’s house, holds special historical significance to me as I represent the entire state of Wyoming as governor, following a long line of pragmatic, effective and strong leaders,” Gordon said. “As treasurer, I was sworn in the Capitol, and it was important to me to have this ceremony with the other constitutional officers in the people’s house. I look forward to the larger ceremony today with my extended family, friends and citizens of Wyoming.” Justice Davis also administered the oath of office to Secretary Edward Buchanan, Auditor Kristi Racines, Treasurer Curt Meier and Superintendent Jillian Balow. In attendance with each elected official were a group of family members. As the Capitol is an active construction zone, the ceremony was limited to a few people due to safety concerns. Most governors in Wyoming’s history have taken the oath in the Capitol.  At 5:50 a.m., all participants rode the Cheyenne trolley to the front of the Capitol, entering the construction site one group at a time via temporary wooden stairs through the main south entrance. The oath of office was administered in the Rotunda, with an American flag draped over the scaffolding.

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Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

9

DATA continued from page 1 “The cost of having forages tested is ultimately justified by the money we save through a well-planned and data-backed feeding plan.” – Steve Paisley, University of Wyoming Extension in ruminants.   Be proactive Being proactive in planning for feeding in the winter will set up the next breeding season for success, says Paisley.  “It is imperative for producers to monitor their cattle’s body condition scores. This is essentially a roadmap telling us how to feed cattle appropriately,” says Paisley. “It is also very beneficial to make a checklist of the types of feeds available and note their quality.”  Paisley also stresses the importance of understanding herd dynamics and feeding appropriately.  If we plan on feeding more than one type of feed throughout the winter it is in the best interest of the herd to alternate the days in which producers feed different types of feed or feeds of varying quality. “Oftentimes, when feeding a low-and-high-quality feed together, more dominant cows in the herd will consume the high-quality feed first and leave only lower-quality feed for less dominant or younger cows in the herd,” says Paisley. “Alternating the days allows for cows to have more equal opportunity to consume high-quality feed.” Future implications An effective winter feed-

ing program also lays the foundation for effective rebreeding in the spring, which is crucial for cow/calf operators.  “A cow’s needs increase by 30 percent as she approaches calving and an additional 30 percent once she has the calf,” says Paisley. “It is important to maintain a cow’s body condition score because it is nearly impossible to put weight on them once they give birth.”  Open winters, such as the one Wyoming is experiencing now, can be deceiving and should not be underestimated, says Paisley.  “Waiting until the winter is in full swing to start feeding can be detrimental to cow’s body condition score as they enter spring breeding season,” says Paisley. “Even if there isn’t snow on the ground cows still aren’t getting the nutrients they need to nurse a calf, and they will go into the spring with a lower body condition score than what is ideal for rebreeding.”  Paisley says, “The cost of having forages and feeds tested is ultimately justified by the money saved through a well-planned and data-backed feeding plan.” Callie Hanson is the assistant editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

For more information on feed testing, visit wyagric.state.wy.us/divisions/ asl/testing#feed. 

Nitrate poisoning According to Alberta Agriculture and Forestry (AAF), nitrate poisoning occurs when less toxic nitrates (NO 3) are converted to nitrites (NO 2) by bacteria in the rumen. Nitrate then turns into ammonia, and excessive ammonia is absorbed into the blood and is then passed into the urine. This only occurs when the nitrate breakdown system is in balance with no surplus of nitrites. Nitrate poisoning only occurs when there is an excess level of nitrite in the rumen that cannot be converted fast enough by bacteria in the rumen.  The excess nitrite will combine with hemoglobin to form methemoglobin. While hemoglobin can carry oxygen to body tissue, methemoglobin cannot. An increased level of methemoglobin will eventually cause oxygen starvation.  Chronic nitrate poisoning can cause serious issues with symptoms ranging from decreased appetites to abortions in the first 100 days of pregnancy. Calves born with the condition are often born premature and typically die within the first 24 hours of birth or suffer from convulsions and seizures.  Acute poisoning occurs much more rapidly and animals typically die within hours of ingesting a high nitrate feed. AAF reports animals are typically found in a lying position or dead before any signs can be observed.   Excessive nitrate levels occurs when plants are under stress attributed to extreme weather conditions such as drought or hot winds put plants under water stress and can increase nitrate production. Damage caused by hail or frost can inhibit photosynthesis and also cause excess nitrates.  AAF encourages producers to test their feed to ensure quality and remove any doubt surrounding the possibility of nitrate poisoning.

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Lex Madden: 307-532-1580 Michael Schmitt: 307-532-1776 Chuck Petersen 307-575-4015

www.torringtonlivestock.com

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16TH - YEARLING & CALF SPECIAL FEEDERS K 7 Ranch/Jeff Keetch 300 Blk/Rd hfrs, 600-700#, Weaned 65+days, Hay Fed, Complete Vac. Program, Fancy, From Power Genetics and Sitz Genetics Hibbard Creek Angus 210 Blk Angus Strs Hfrs, 650-750# Weaned since Mid-Oct., Weaned on Silage & Alfalfa, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Brian & Deanna Christensen 150 Red and Blk Angus Strs, 725#, Weaned for 90+ days, Been on a Grow Ration including Bovatec, Two Rounds of Shots Lon Eisenbarth 80 Blk Strs & Hfrs, 650#, Weaned since Oct., Been on Ground Hay & Beet Pulp, Shots @ Birth & Branding Shots, All Natural Patrick Bros. 70 Red Angus Strs, 675-800#, Weaned 100 days, Been on a Grower Ration, Shots at Birth, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Lerwick Bros. 65 Char-x Strs & Hfrs, 725-775#, Weaned since Oct. 1, Been on a Silage Bunk Ration, Branding, Precond & Booster Shots George Ochsner & Sons Inc. 37 Blk/Hereford Strs, 850#, Complete Vac. Program Stuart & Linda McLaen 30 Red Angus Strs, 700-800#, Weaned a 100 days, Been on a Grower Ration, Shots at Birth: Alpha 7, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots PRE-COND. &/OR WEANED CALVES Cobb Cattle Company 420 Fancy Blk Strs, 540-675#, Weaned 60+ days, Running Out on Meadows supplemented with Hay, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Troublesome Valley & Ritschard Cattle Co. 420 Mostly Char-x Hfrs, 650-725#, Weaned, 3 Rounds of Modified Live Vac. Program, Home Raised, High Elev LD Ranch 250 Blk Strs, 470-650#, Weaned 70 days, Running out, 2 Rounds of Complete Modified Live Program, Home Raised DJ Crozier Land & Livestock LLC 210 Blk/Rd Angus/Hereford -x Strs & Hfrs, 580-600#, Weaned, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots, Summered at High Elevation Lisco Ranch LLC 245 Blk Angus Strs & Hfrs, 575-750#, Weaned 90+ days, Been on a Ground Hay & Silage Ration, Branding & Weaning Shots Dan Mahoney 200 Blk Angus Strs & Hfrs, 450-550#, Weaned 75 days, Running out on Pasture supplemented with Grass Hay, Branding & Weaning Shots Plateau Partnership 180 Mx Strs, 525-640#, Weaned 60+ days, Weaned, All Natural, 1-Iron, Branding & Weaning Shots Lazy C Bar Ranch 175 Blk/Bwf Strs, 575-625#, Weaned 75 days, 3 Rounds of Modified Live Vac. Program Duello Cattle Co. 100 Blk/Bwf Strs & Hfrs, 600-700#, Weaned a long time, 2 Rounds of Shots, Home Raised Scott, Ellen & Ned Nelson 90 Red Angus/Char-x Strs & Hfrs, 450-650#, Weaned on Oct. 20, Been on a Light Grower Ration, Branding & Weaning Shots Henry Borchardt 86 Red Angus Strs, 500-600#, Weaned 75 days, Hay Fed, Complete Vac. Program Dennis & Dan Vetter 74 Blk Strs & Hfrs, 500-575#, Weaned 80 days, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Darlene Herman 72 Blk/Bwf few Rd Strs & Hfrs, 525-625#, Weaned 60+ days, Been on a Light Grower Ration, 3 Rounds of Shots Lerwick Bros. 65 Blk Strs & Hfrs, 500-550#, Weaned since Oct. 10, Been on a Feed Ration, Branding & Weaning Shots Carbon Creek Ranch 50 Blk Angus Hfrs, 400-450#, Weaned 45 days, Been on Alfalfa/Hay Mix, Protein/Mineral Supplements, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Doug Dunlap & Wanda Toombs 50 Blk (2 Rd) Strs, 550-600#, Weaned since Oct., Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Craig Oceanak 44 Rd/Blk Strs & Hfrs, 500-650#, Weaned a long time, Been on Alfalfa Hay, Mineral Program, K2 Genetics Curt Bastain 42 Blk Strs & Hfrs, 525-600#, Weaned 65+ days, Been on Ground Hay and Silage, Branding, Pre-cond & Booster Shots Farthing Ranch 40 Mx Strs & Hfrs, 575-675#, Weaned 70+days, Complete Vac. Program, Hay Fed Terry Huntington 40 Mostly Blk/few Red Strs & Hfrs, 600#, Weaned 45+ days, Been on Oat/Alfalfa/grass Hay, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots, Show Quality The George Dale Crozier Family LTP 40 Blk/Bwf Strs & Hfrs, 475=600#, Weaned 75 days, Branding & Weaning Shots, Home Raised, Running at 6100’ Francisco Subia 30 Blk/Bwf Strs & Hfrs 500-650#, Weaned a long time, Been on Ground Hay & Corn, Branding & Precond Shots Gary Aschenbrenner 30 Blk/Bwf/1 Rwf Strs & Hfrs, 600-800#, Weaned a long time, Been on Hay/Silage and 5# of Corn, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots Jerry Huntington 30 Mostly Blk/few Red Strs & Hfrs, 570#, Weaned 45+ days, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots, No Implants, Strs are Knife Cut, Show Quality Ted Bentley 28 Red Angus/Red Angus/Char-x, 600-650#, Weaned in Oct., Full Vaccination Program Levi Sievers 19 Blk Angus/Hereford-x Strs & Hfrs, 450-550#, Weaned 65+ days, Weaned on Corn Silage & Millet Hay, Branding & Precond Shots CALVES Logan Heth 125 Red/Blk Strs & Hfrs, 525#, Branding & Pre-cond. Shots: Nasalgen, 5-way, 7-way, No Implants Matt Howe & PL Ranch 40 Mx Strs & Hfrs, 500#. Complete Vac. Program

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2019 - ALL CLASSES MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 2019 - BRED COW/HEIFER SPECIAL DISPERSALS DJ Crozier Land & Livestock 120 Red Angus Hereford -x (few Blk Angus) Cows, Complete Dispersal of Red Angus Cows, Running Ages, Bred to Blk Angus Bull, CF: March 1, Shots: Ultra Choice 8,Staybred VL5, Dectomax Pour on, Bangs Vac., Home Raised Hibbard Creek Angus 105 Blk Cows, 1200-1225#, Complete Dispersal of their 2’s coming 3 yr olds, Bred to Sav Cowboy, Peakdot Eliminator, Shipwheel Upward Sons (all are moderate weight Blk Bulls), CF: March 20 for 50 days, Shots this fall: Vira Shield 4+VL5, Poured w/Sabre Ultra, Home Raised, No Brands, Cows are out of Vermillion and R. Math Farms Genetics, Moderate Frame, Will make a nice Set of mother cows that are used to working for a living, (Note: They have sold their weaned calves on Cattle Country Video for the last 4 years) YOUNG BRED COWS Rod Vineyard 103 Angus/Angus-x Cows, 2’s coming 3’s, Bred to KG & Powder River Angus Bulls, CF: March/April, Shots: Vira Shield 6 +VL5, Poured with Ivermec 18 Blk Angus Cows, Mx Ages, Bred to Van Newkirk & Middleswarth Hereford Bulls, CF: Feb/March, No Shots this Fall Bred Cows Kallen Kimzey 66 Blk/Bwf/Rd/Rwf Cows, 4 yr olds to 8 yr olds, Bred to Blk Sim. Bulls, CF: May/June Rod Vineyard 18 Blk Angus Cows, Mx Ages, Bred to Van Newkirk & Middleswarth Hereford Bulls, CF: Feb/March, No Shots this Fall BRED HEIFERS R & R 150 Blk, few Bwf Heifers, AI Bred to Ideal 4223, Cleaned up with MR Angus Low Birth Wt Black Bulls, AI CF: 1st week of March, Bull Bred CF: March 25th Cobb Cattle Co. 60 Blk Hfrs, 1000#, Bred to Booth Cherry Creek Blk Angus Bulls, CF: March 1 for 60 days, Shots: Vira Shield VL5, 1st ScourBoss, Poured, Home Raised, High Elevation

SALE RESULTS - MONDAY, JAN 7 - 1522 HD

Frasier Ranch 6 Black Bred Cow-3yr/Mar-April AI Steven & Sue Hays 30 Black Bred Cow-SM/Feb Dalton Keller 7 Black Bred Cow-3yr/Mar-April T & L Livestock 14 Black Bred Cow-3yr/May David & Dottie Rasnake 9 Black Bred Cow-4yr/Feb-Mar Frasier Ranch 7 Black Bred Cow-SM/Mar AI Farthing Ranch Co 11 Black Bred Cow-SM/April T & L Livestock 26 Black Bred Cow-SM/May Jason & Shirley Zumbrunnen 5 Black Bred Cow-SS/Mar-April AI TTT Ranch 5 Black Bred Cow-SM/May Dennis Edwards 20 Black Bred Cow-ST/Mar-April Justin Mook 12 Black Bred Cow-ST/Mar-April Steven & Susan Pokorny 26 Black Bred Cow-ST/Mar-April T & L Livestock 23 Black Bred Cow-SM/May T & L Livestock 25 Black Bred Cow-ST/May Dennis Edwards 9 Black Bred Cow-ST/Mar-April Brushy Creek Ranch 14 Black/Red Bred Cow-3yr/Mar-April Brushy Creek Ranch 6 Black/Red Bred Cow-SM/Mar-April Brushy Creek Ranch 18 Black/Red Bred Cow-SS/Mar-April TM Livestock 27 Black/Red Bred Cow-ST/Mar-April Steven & Susan Hays 11 BWF Bred Cow-SM/Feb Clinton & Jeanette Breeden 7 Hereford Bred Cow-3yr/Mar-April Douglas & Annie Brickman 11 Red Bred Cow-SM/Mar-April Farthing Ranch Co 15 Red Bred Cow-SS/April Clinton & Jeanette Breeden 10 RWF Bred Cow-SM/Mar-April R & R Livestock LLC 10 Black Bred Heifer-Mar AI R & R Livestock LLC 85 Black Bred Heifer-Mar AI Johnson A Bar One Ranch 58 Black Bred Heifer-Feb-Mar Lynn Burtenshaw 20 Black Bred Heifer-Feb Cade & Jenny Carter 7 Black Bred Heifer-Feb R & R Livestock LLC 50 Black Bred Heifer-Mar-April Cade & Jenny Carter 42 Black Bred Heifer-Feb Darren Barkman 9 Black Bred Heifer-Feb-Mar AI Dalton Keller 8 Black Bred Heifer-Feb-Mar AI Matt & Sherry Weber 18 Black Bred Heifer-Mar-April

1359 1500 1218 1222 1467 1372 1464 1280 1369 1450 1283 1298 1254 1386 1402 1146 1346 1320 1337 1212 1727 1242 1070 1438 1339 1031 1050 970 1135 1078 1066 1051 1122 960 868

1400.00H 1385.00H 1375.00H 1350.00H 1320.00H 1285.00H 1150.00H 1150.00H 1050.00H 950.00H 935.00H 910.00H 910.00H 900.00H 875.00H 860.00H 1200.00H 1085.00H 950.00H 875.00H 1385.00H 1260.00H 1385.00H 975.00H 1240.00H 1600.00H 1535.00H 1525.00H 1510.00H 1450.00H 1440.00H 1435.00H 1425.00H 1350.00H 1210.00H

CATTLE COUNTRY VIDEO - JAN 9 - 2796 HD

Frontier Cattle Tim Anderson Traci Bruegger Charlie Needham Kelly Artery Jake Reed Jake Reed Clark Ranch Monaghan Ranch Monaghan Ranch 4 Taylors C & C Cattle C & C Cattle C & C Cattle T & L Livestock T & L Livestock

115 Wnd Strs 120 Wnd Hfrs 100 Wnd Strs 100 Wnd Strs 75 Wnd Hfrs 100 Wnd Strs 84 Wnd Strs 85 Wnd Hfrs 160 Wnd Strs 105 Wnd Hfrs 180 Wnd Strs 80 Wnd Strs 144 Wnd Strs 162 Wnd Hfrs 260 Wnd Strs 232 Wnd Hfrs

490 470 575 595 570 590 640 675 610 575 570 700 800 750 825 750

185.50 C 163.00 C 178.00 C 168.00 C 153.00 C 179.00 C 170.50 C 141.50 C 178.00 C 158.50 C 162.00 C 145.00 C 140.50 C 134.00 C 140.00 C 134.50 C

SALE RESULTS - WEDNESDAY, JAN 9 - 6547 HD

DESENFANTS, DOUGLAS 30 BLACK STEER GIVENS, GUY & HOLLI 90 BLACK STEER FALLS RANCH 328 BLACK STEER FALLS RANCH 192 BLACK STEER JOHNSON, WILLIAM R 20 BLACK STEER DESENFANTS, DOUGLAS 65 BLACK STEER ADAMS, PAUL 50 BLACK STEER DESENFANTS, GREG 23 BLACK STEER BUCKHAULTS COW CO. 134 BLACK STEER FALLS RANCH LIMITED 35 BLACK STEER BUCKHAULTS COW CO. 124 BLACK STEER JOHNSON, WILLIAM 12 BLACK STEER JACOBSEN, WADE W. 6 BLACK/STEER BROKEN DIPPER LLC 8 MIXED STEER EVANS, KEVIN 36 MIXED STEER SHERROD, DON 76 RED STEER SHERROD, DAVID 74 RED STEER EPLER, HARRY L 6 BLACK STEER WALKER, DAVID 2 BLACK STEER WOODS, WILLARD 3 BLACK STEER TRAVNICEK, BARRY 16 BLACK STEER IRVINE RANCH 10 BLACK STEER JOHNSON, WILLIAM 7 BLACK STEER IRVINE RANCH 36 BLACK STEER WOODS, WILLARD 33 BLACK STEER VON FORELL HERF 44 BLACK/STEER GOODRICH, VIOLA S 23 BLACK/STEER HERMAN LIVESTOCK 56 BLACK/STEER C & C LIVESTOCK 36 RED STEER TTT RANCH 194 BLACK HEIFER HAGER, DYLAN G. 56 BLACK HEIFER DESENFANTS, GREG 37 BLACK HEIFER STEBEN, RANDY & TY 57 BLACK HEIFER ADAMS, PAUL 20 BLACK HEIFER TTT RANCH 29 BLACK HEIFER HAYS, STEVEN 18 BLACK HEIFER KANNO, MICHAEL 13 BLACK/HEIFER T & L LIVESTOCK 23 BLACK HEIFER JANKOVSKY, JAMES D 18 BLACK HEIFER WOODS, WILLARD 22 BLACK HEIFER TRAVNICEK, BARRY 24 BLACK HEIFER WHEELER LAND 32 BLACK HEIFER HASKINS, T. FLINT 20 BLACK HEIFER CLARK, LEVI 10 BLACK HEIFER BROW, JAMES & SHARON 42 BLACK HEIFER JOHNSON, DAVID 26 BLACK HEIFER MCNEES LIVESTOCK LLC22 BLACK/HEIFER GRAY RANCH LIMITED 22 CHAROLHEIFER

639 627 688 772 664 741 725 705 801 841 891 768 997 558 758 720 866 380 372 416 465 458 588 536 502 519 541 657 515 721 623 671 762 825 738 764 688 434 448 405 533 536 574 563 601 612 509 525

168.00 C 165.00 C 164.25 C 155.75 C 155.50 C 155.25 C 153.75 C 151.75 C 150.75 C 149.00 C 148.25 C 144.50 C 122.00 C 167.00 C 149.00 C 156.25 C 146. 00 C 222.00 C 219.00 C 215.00 C 207.00 C 204.00 C 168.00 C 198.00 C 187.50 C 189.00 C 174.50 C 153.75 C 189.00 C 148.75 C 147.00 C 145.00 C 139.75 C 138.75 C 138.00 C 137.50 C 135.50 C 182.00 C 179.00 C 179.00 C 163.00 C 160.50 C 154.00 C 151.00 C 150.00 C 146.00 C 165.00 C 156.50 C

High Plains Hay Exchange

Hay for Sale

Direct Seller to Buyer Sales Contact Thorpe Thompson 308-430-0248

www.highplainshay.com

(307) 532-3333 - www.torringtonlivestock.com TORRINGTON LIVESTOCK AREA REPS Cody Thompson - Lusk, WY 307-334-3388 or 307-340-0150 * Ty Thompson – Lusk, WY 307-340-0770 Zach Johnson Lingle, WY –307-575-2171 Jeff Ward – Laramie, WY 307-399-9863 Tam Staman – Crawford, NE 308-631-8513 Artie Johnson - Lusk, WY 307-216-0117 Lander Nicodemus – Cheyenne, WY 307-421-8141 * Danny Nicodemus – Cheyenne, WY 307-632-4325 Chris Williams - Greybull, WY 307-272-4567 Nolan Brott - Lusk, WY 307-216-0033


10

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

tive commodities and even direct air capture of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere also hold keys to major emission reductions. We have made meaningful progress on bipartisan legislation to help researchers engaged in cutting-edge carbon capture and utilization technologies. The legislation supports efforts to find profitable uses for the captured carbon dioxide. The legislation will also simplify the process for building carbon dioxide pipelines, so we can safely move the

CUT continued from page 2 Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, I am working across party lines to support the development of new technologies that will further decrease America’s carbon emissions. Nuclear energy is produced with zero carbon emissions. It has been a source of clean, affordable and reliable power for decades. Nuclear energy provides more than twice the global electricity of wind power and more than

five times the amount of solar energy. Washington needs to make it simpler for innovators who are building state-of-the-art nuclear reactors. These advancements in nuclear energy will create jobs, lower costs and contribute to America’s energy security without additional carbon emissions. Groundbreaking new research in the area of carbon utilization to turn emissions into produc-

Your source for polled outcross genetics. Unique pedigrees throughout the entire offering.

2019 Efficiency Expert RANGE RAISED

CATTLE SALE Friday, February 1, 2019 At the Ranch 7 miles east of Idaho Falls on Sunnyside Rd

SELLING 91 BULLS

Sound | Easy Keeping | Range Raised | Coming 2 yr old | Born Mar/Apr 75 Polled Herefords | 16 South Devons (14 black, 9 red) 18 Bred Polled Hereford Heifers | 3 South Devon Bred Heifers

ElkingtonPolledHerefords.com Keith 208-523-2286 Brent 208-523-6461 Layne 208-681-0765 5080 E. Sunnyside Rd, Idaho Falls, ID 83406 | ephrbulls@hotmail.com Sale Catalog on website & Facebook Elkington Polled Herefords

Sale will be broadcast on

gas to where it is needed. A leading commercial use of captured carbon dioxide is a process called enhanced oil recovery. By injecting carbon dioxide into an otherwise unproductive well, oil can be economically extracted. This is good for the environment and the economy – producing more American energy and sequestering carbon dioxide underground. In addition to being used for enhanced oil recovery, carbon has the potential to be repurposed in building materials,

medical supplies and manufactured goods. Citizens around the world will continue to reject climate policies that cost them personally, either by direct taxation or by undermining the competitiveness of their own economies. The sooner the world’s leaders accept this reality, the sooner we will be able to put new and lasting solutions in place. Sen. John Barrasso was an orthopedic surgeon before joining the Senate in 2007. In addition to heading the Environment and Public Works

Committee, he is a member of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

Sen. John Barrasso

Court rules again BLM in horse case On Jan. 9, the U.S. District for the District of Wyoming handed a victory to the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWCH) and wildlife photographers Carol Walker and Kimerlee Curyl, ruling in favor of a lawsuit suit to stop the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from rounding up hundreds of wild horses in a helicopter capture operation in southwestern Wyoming. The lawsuit charged BLM with violating three federal laws by rounding up hundreds more horses than previously disclosed by excluding foals and weanlings from its official count of horses removed from the range. The Court agreed with AWHC, explicitly noting, “The question is whether BLM’s approach to the 2017 excess determination was a deviation from prior practices. The answer is clearly yes.”

Therefore, the court found that this roundup decision was arbitrary and capricious and “without observance of the procedures required by law.” The court then vacated the roundup decision and remanded it to the agency for further proceedings consistent with the decision. AWHC has led a years-long legal battle against over the BLM’s plan to eradicate wild horses from a 2 million-acre area of public and private land known as the Wyoming checkerboard at the request of the Rock Springs Grazing Association (RSGA). RSGA owns or leases the private land blocks in the checkerboard and views wild horses as competition for taxpayer subsidized livestock grazing on public lands. It’s the third time the organization has filed suit to challenge BLM’s actions in this area.

WEAVER RANCH 34th ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

Monday, February 18, 2019 12:30 p.m. at the ranch north of Fort Collins, Colo.

90 COMING 2-YEAR-OLD BULLS Registered Black Angus

PAP testing since 1991 at an elevation of 7500' BVD, Fertility, Trich Tested and Carcass Ultrasounded

Featuring Sons of These & Other Weaver Ranch Bulls CED

BW

WW

YW

M

$EN

MRB

REA

FT

Sinclair Net Present Value

Sire

+13

-1.9

+41

+71

+25

+11.52

+.65

+.38

+.049

TC Thunder 805

+13

-1.5

+39

+75

+23

+9.32

+.64

+.35

+.011

Weavers Final Answer 3100

+9

-1.2

+29

+60

+18

+12.58

+.40

+.02

+.026

Over 59 years of selecting for:

Easy Calving, Carcass Quality & Disposition Susan & Mourine Weaver Sheldon Emerson

3000 West Co. Rd. 70 • Ft. Collins, CO 80524

(970) 568-3898

Visitors Always Welcome Cattle may be seen at any time!!!


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

11

Celebration-worthy Beef By Miranda Reiman

Do you have a deepfreeze full of beef? That’s why beef marketing campaigns are not directed at you. You raise it, you likely eat it more than most, but you are not the ones foodservice professionals and retailers are trying to convince to reach for your wallet. Chances are, you’ll eat beef regardless of what they’re doing in New York City or Austin or San Francisco. “Foodie” trends are not your thing. Many reading this column live on a country road, miles and miles from their closest grocery store or steakhouse. Many of you stop at a retail meat counter far less often than you see your preacher, but you have sta-

ple beef entrees you enjoy at home. I’m not judging. That’s me, too. But I think it’s important to remember, there’s a big world out there, and people a little further down the supply chain make a living as ambassadors for your product. Every so often, I get to spend some time with the crowd we are trying to touch so they can better reach the consumer. I get to watch their first reaction to new – and sometimes pretty “out there” – ideas, and I see them as jazzed up about selling this product as we are about creating it. Recently, I was at a conference where they were discussing everything from the business of selling beef,

including the best practices for aging and pricing considerations, to the creativity of it, with things like new fabrication methods and cooking techniques. It was part data and facts, part artistry and intuition. It was really fun to watch. In the past year, I’ve seen chefs doing things with beef that I never could have imagined – roasting an entire side of beef on the beach, bringing a cocktail smoker tableside to deliver a chuck roll and grilled cheese sandwich that comes out with a cloud of mystique. It’s fun to see beef marketers in action. Their energy and enthusiasm is inspiring, but it really drives home a central point for me. What we do in the beef community is spe-

cial. I don’t see people that motivated to create and imagine with chicken. It’s just a hunch, but I think most chefs are far more excited to see calving season on the ranch than where most other food begins. I find that a bit of a distinctive burden, too. We can’t expect a premium and then show up at the

table as simply a chicken alternative. Especially not when we are three times the price of poultry and twice as expensive as pork. On the other hand, we can’t cut corners and costs as if grade doesn’t matter because that road won’t take you to a market that pays for your business or way of life. We must be able to deliver on this idea that what we deliver is celebration-worthy,

every night of the week. It’s for the “ooohs” and “ahhhs” and “wows.” That’s on you. It starts with the decisions you make at the ranch level to make it happen. The marketing teams will take it from there. Next time in Black Ink®, Nicole Lane Erceg will reflect on the holidays. Questions? E-mail mreiman@certifiedangusbeef.com.

The best protein — With the price of beef standing far above the price of its competing protein, Miranda Reiman notes producers must make sure to produce the highest quality product, ensuring consumers receive a satisfying product every time they cook beef. If producers do everything they can to make sure beef is “celebration worthy,” marketing teams can take the next step to make sure consumers buy the product. Certified Angus Beef photo

Wyo-Utah Ag Days set for late Jan. Wyoming-Utah Ag Days are Jan. 30-31 at the Roundhouse in Evanston. Sessions both days are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. “With many different breakout sessions to choose from, there is a lot to learn,” said Bridger Feuz, University of Wyoming Extension educator based in Uinta County. The program is in collaboration with Utah State University Cooperative Extension. Jan. 30 sessions include beef quality assurance, body condition scoring, cheat grass, riparian grazing, using control burns to improve rangeland dominated by sagebrush, the economic value of winter forages, ATV use in agriculture and a bovine viral diarrhea discussion. Feuz, Extension livestock marketing

specialist, will forecast the market outlook during the first lunch, and John Madany will discuss the book “Defending Beef – The Case for Sustainable Meat Production,” by Nicolette Hahn Niman during lunch on Jan. 31. Jan. 31 sessions include ag legacies, the small acre water guide, conservation techniques to increase grazing potential and natural resources, common mistakes in pasture management, sheep management strategies, cull cow marking and a meat cutting demonstration. Participants can attend any or all of the sessions but must RSVP to be included in the lunch sessions, said Feuz. To reserve a meal for the lunch sessions, call 307-783-0570 by 9 a.m. Jan. 28 and leave a message, said Feuz.

40 YEARLING BULLS 10 REGISTERED YEARLING HEIFERS

K ed Angus Annual Winter Bull & Female Sale 2 R Functional, January 31, 2019 ~Two-Year-old IrIsh Black Bulls~

Fertile, Efficient...

At the K2 Sale Facility, Slater Road, Wheatland WY & online with DV Auction

FEBRUARY 16, 2019 1pm-5pm

Showing 25 Two-Year-Old Irish Black Sale Bulls, for sale private treaty.

Nielsen Feedlot 6 miles East of Fallon, MT Will Nielsen (406) 486-5434 Wade Nielsen (406) 989-1034.

www.irishblackbeef.com

Come join us!

View sale cattle, enjoy donuts, coffee & visiting, starting at 9 a.m. Lunch at noon Sale starts at 1 p.m.

Jason & Kim Cullen Goertz Wheatland, WY 307-331-2917 kcullen@wyoming.com

k2redangus.com


12

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

Getting on track: Understanding financial performance

In previous installments we highlighted the first two courses in the Getting On Track series – covering the importance of keeping basic records and financial statements – and how they help business managers identify and address risk. The courses describe not only how to start organizing and tracking necessary production and financial records, but also how to build on those to prepare detailed financial statements for further analysis. Knowing what to do with or how to interpret the information in these documents is often not easy for many farm and ranch managers. The third course in the Getting on Track series, Understanding Financial Performance, helps rural business owners and managers correctly evaluate financial data through ratio and index analysis,

FOR MORE INFORMATION Production agriculture is inherently risky; current market conditions suggest identifying and accounting for risk in operations is vitally important. RightRisk.org is a premier risk management educational resource for producers and includes the three Getting on Track courses, highlighting the importance of financial record keeping and analysis. To access any course, including the Getting on Track: Understanding Financial Performance course, visit RightRisk.org

sometimes referred to as benchmarking. This type of analysis can also be done with production measures such as yield performance, pounds weaned per exposed female, or tons harvested per acre-foot of water applied. Financial analysis can help identify weak areas or risk in a business and can compare performance over time to make decisions and address problems before they become severe. Understanding financial performance can help calibrate expectations of a manager and a lender and address concerns they may have. The financial performance course follows the example producers highlighted in the previous two courses and demonstrates the practical aspects of financial analysis and determining financial performance. Five categories of financial measurement are outlined in detail: liquidity, solvency, profitability, financial efficiency, and repayment capacity.

Liquidity and Solvency

Liquidity measures the ability of a business to meet current financial obligations without disrupting normal business operations. The three main ratios for measuring liquidity include the current ratio, the working capital ratio, and the working capital/gross revenues ratio (Table 1). These ratios are calculated using information found on a balance sheet. The current ratio is calculated as current assets divided by current liabilities. Anything below 1.0 indicates possible problems meeting obligations and may be addressed by restructuring expenses. Working capital can be calculated by subtracting current liabilities from current assets, showing the current capacity available to meet upcoming obligations.

and select the “Courses” tab on the menu bar. RightRisk.org offers numerous courses and user-friendly tools to assist risk management planning and education. Check the Risk Analytics

Table 1. Liquidity Ratio Benchmarks

toolbox that contains over 30 interactive tools addressing a wide range of risk management topics such as enterprise

Working capital

budgeting, machinery costs, and more. Other Courses from RightRisk.org: • Enterprise Risk Analysis • Evaluating Risk Strategies • Feasibility of Alternative Enterprises • Getting on Track (3) • Lasting Legacy (2) • Management Succession (3) • Risk Scenario Planning • Taxes for Agriculture

Liquidity Benchmarks

Low

Moderate

High

Current ratio

> 1.5

1.0 - 1.5

< 1.0

The appropriate level will vary primarily due to farm size, inventory levels, and accounts receivable.

Possible actions for improvement: Increase sales, decrease short-term debt and other financial obligations, restructure debt to better reflect current assets, evaluate a marketing plan to better time cash inflows and outflows.

Solvency refers to the ability of a business to meet long-term obligations and ability to withstand financial adversity. Solvency is measured by the debt/asset ratio, the equity/asset ratio, and the debt/equity ratio. Information for these ratios is also found on the balance sheet. As with liquidity ratios, solvency measures can be compared over time or to industry benchmarks. For example, a debt/asset ratio greater

than 0.7 generally indicates a high debt load and room for improvement.

Profitability and Financial Efficiency

Profitability refers to the ability of a business to generate more revenue than expenses over a period of time. The course outlines five measures of profitability, including rate of return on assets (ROA), rate of return on equity (ROE), operating profit margin, net farm income, and earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. Data for these are on the income statement, statement of owner equity, and the book value balance sheet. Rate of return on assets and rate of return on equity are two particularly important measures, describing earnings compared to the value of total assets and owner equity, respectively. While benchmarks for these measures are somewhat subjective, depending on the business examined, but generally an ROA of less than 0.01 or an ROE of less than 0.05 are cause for concern. Low performance may be addressed by reducing operating expenses and owner withdrawals or by restructuring and reducing debt. Financial efficiency measures help identify whether the physical assets of a business are being used in a profitable manner. The five measures covered in the course include asset turnover, operating expense, interest expense, depreciation expense, and net farm income from operations. As with the profitability measures, what makes a financial efficiency ratio good or bad depends on the type and scope of the operation.

Repayment Capacity

The ability of a borrower to repay farm debt from farm and non-farm sources is also an important measure of financial performance. The course outlines the important indexes for measuring repayment capacity, including capital debt repayment capacity and the term debt/capital lease coverage ratio. Capital debt repayment capacity describes the funds available to cover debt and/or lease payments or make alternative investments. These indexes help a potential borrower be prepared when meeting with a lender, as well as addressing long-term financing needs or opportunities.

Next Steps …

The Getting on Track course covers many different financial ratios and indexes. Users should remember the point of calculating these financial measures is to understand how the farm or ranch business is performing. Secondarily, they can be used to create a plan for improving that performance into the future. continued next page


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

13

January 2019

UW EXTENSION | AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE | USDA | RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY

Livestock handling tips to help prevent ranch ATV accidents Agriculture has always been dangerous. When horses were predominately used, there were more horse accidents. With an increasing number of people using ATVs to move livestock, we now have more ATV-associated accidents. There were three fatalities in 2016 involving 20 injury crashes, according to the Wyoming Department of Transportation’s Wyoming’s Report on Traffic Crashes for 2016. Most everyone knows someone who has had a bad accident or has been involved in an ATV accident themselves. While not every accident is preventable, there certainly are things we can learn and teach our children to be safer when using ATVs.

Start with improving stockmanship practices

I like to think of ATVs as tools for handling livestock. Used properly, they can be very handy. Used improperly, they can be overpowering and dangerous. You may be able to get the job done by forcing livestock to do what you want, but this causes stress on livestock and could cause a dangerous situation for yourself – a four-wheeler is no match with a 2,000-pound bull. A well-trained stock dog also can be an excellent tool when moving cows, especially in rough country.

Use the animal’s natural instincts and behavior to get the job done instead of using force. Learn about animal flight zones, applying pressure and release, point-of-balance, and start applying these principles every time you handle livestock. Consider attending a low-stress, livestock handling program or school (also see http://bit.ly/handlinglivestock). Even if you feel you are a top hand, you might learn something that makes a difference on your operation. I think stockmanship is like playing a musical instrument: there is always room for improvement, and there usually is someone out there better than you. Learn from them if you can.

Have the right frame of mind when moving livestock

Many people enjoy moving cows, but oftentimes it gets treated as a job that needs to get done as quickly as possible to get back to other important work on a ranch. If we have this mindset and things don’t go as planned, tempers often flare, and we go back to using force. Plan and set aside plenty of time to get your livestock moved. If for some reason it isn’t working today, come up with another plan and try again tomorrow.

Work livestock slow and the job will be done faster

Many ATV accidents happen because drivers are going too fast and focused solely on livestock and not the terrain. A misconception is we need to be more active (riding hard and fast, hollering, pushing, etc.) to get cattle to work faster. The more distractions there are, the harder it is for livestock to process what you want them to do. Communicate effectively with your livestock (use their natural behavior and position yourself correctly) and always be aware of terrain when using an ATV.

Use the right tools when moving livestock

I’m not debating whether or not horses are better than ATVs for moving livestock. If comfortable riding a horse, there are many instances a horse can be more practical than an ATV. However, in some instances, ATVs may be a better option. Get off the ATV and walk if necessary. A cow down in the bottom of a ravine is not worth yours or anyone else’s life. Too many accidents happen when we think we can get away with something we think will save us a little time.

Blake Hauptman is a University of Wyoming Extension educator based in Crook County and also serving northeast Wyoming. He can be reached at (307) 283-1192 or at bhauptma@uwyo.edu.

Financial Performance, continued

This can be done by comparing financial performance over a multi-year period, as well as monitoring those measures as the year unfolds. In this way, monitoring financial performance allows a manager to stay ahead of potential problems before they become business-threatening and be better prepared to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. James Sedman is a consultant to the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics in the University of Wyoming College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and John Hewlett is a farm and ranch management specialist in the department. Hewlett may be reached at (307) 766-2166 or hewlett@uwyo.edu.


14

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

SALE REPORTS

GEIS continued from page 1

Northern Livestock Video Auction Diamond Ring Sale Jan. 7-8, 2019 • Billings, Mont. 68,000 head

Diamond Ring/ Miles City sold 777 head of steers weighing 875 pounds for $141, 693 head of steers weighing 925 pounds for $138 and 378 head of steers weighing 950 pounds for $138.50 from Miles City, Mont. Bullseye Ranch sold 600 head of steers weighing 850 pounds for $151.25 from Billings, Mont. Middle Creek Farms sold 139 head of steers weighing 1,000 pounds for $138.50 and 135 head of heifers weighing 925 pounds for $134.75 from Bozeman, Mont. Hjelvik Ranch sold 68 head of replacement heif-

ers weighing 720 pounds for $152 from Billings, Mont. Lane Ranch sold 120 head of steers weighing 500 pounds for $195.50 and 220 head of heifers weighing 475 pounds for $181.50 from Livingston, Mont. Ridenour Land and Cattle LTD sold 225 head of steers weighing 750 pounds for $158.50 from Mullen, Neb. Vinton, Tim and Lori sold 350 head of steers weighing 765 pounds for $159.50 from Whitman, Neb. Pankratz, Sarese sold 90 head of steers weighing 735 pounds for $159.50 from Malta, Mont. Pankratz, Sarese sold 85 head of heifers weighing

670 pounds for $144 from Malta, Mont. Berg, Jon and Connie sold 100 head of steers weighing 650 pounds for $173 and 90 head of heifers weighing 595 pounds for $155.50 from Billings, Mont. Anchor Ranch LP sold 150 head of steers weighing 715 pounds for $167 from Billings, Mont. Plymale Bros. sold 65 head of heifers weighing 740 pounds for $157 and 65 head of heifers weighing 740 pounds for $152 from Townsend, Mont. For complete sale results, go to northernlivestockvideo.com. Northern’s next video auction will be the Early Summer Special to be held June 27-28, with a consignment deadline of June 7.

“American National CattleWomen, Wyoming CattleWomen, Campbell County CattleWomen and the other local organizations are membershipbased. We’re here to work for our members, and we do that best when everyone gets involved.” – Gwen Geis, ANCW often that’s over a span of 10 or 20 years. We’re doing it all at the same time.” All three women are proud to represent the cattle industry as strong ranch women, and they hope to provide an impact in their state, community and at home on the ranch. While Gwen serves as American National CattleWomen (ANCW) president, Kahla is the Wyoming CattleWomen president, and Bobbie is at the head of the Campbell County CattleWomen. Becoming a cattlewoman “I have always been committed to cattlewomen,” says Gwen. “I have been a member of

Booth’s Cherry Creek Angus Annual ‘Progress Through Performance’ Bull Sale

Sale Date: Thursday, February 14, 2019 At the ranch in Veteran, WY • Lunch: Noon • Sale Time: 1 p.m.

SELLING 170 FALL AND YEARLING BULLS Including 20 Fall Born Sim/Angus, Red Angus and Charolais Bulls

ALL OF THE FALL ANGUS BULLS WERE PAP TESTED AT 8,000’ BY DR. TIM HOLT

Selling These Outstanding Prospects: Cherry Crk Hickok E91 S

Cherry Crk Rockmount E95 S

Lot 2

Lot 3

PAP 35

Mill Bar Hickok 7242 x K C F Bennett Absolute Reg. #19173326 DOB: 8/3/2017 • Actual BW: 73 lbs • Adj 205: 777 CED:+9 BW:+2.0 WW:+68 YW:+111 M:+22 $B:150.48

PAP 45

Stevenson Rockmount x Connealy Counselor Reg. #19171404 DOB: 8/12/2017 • Actual BW: 75 lbs • Adj 205: 794 CED:+12 BW:+0.4 WW:+68 YW:+119 M:+18 $B:137.69

Cherry Crk Pay Raise E115 M

Shawn 307-534-5865 boothangus@scottsbluff.net Lindsy 307-532-1830 Kacey 307-532-1532 Lot 10

PAP 37

ICC Pay Raise 4886 x KM Broken Bow 002 Reg. #19173428 DOB: 8/19/2017 • Actual BW: 76 lbs • Adj 205: 777 CED:+0 BW:+2.6 WW:+70 YW:+125 M:+26 $B:175.43

www.boothscherrycreekranch.com

the local and state organizations since I was in high school.” The more she got involved at the state level, Gwen began to attend national conventions and events, as well, creating a positive role model for her daughter and sister-in-law both. As she got involved, Gwen says, “I started to drag Bobbie and Kahla with me to these different events, and they became more and more involved. They went with me to state and regional cattlewomen events.” When she was elected ANCW president, Gwen noted that she focused on sharing her story as a ranch woman and cattle raiser. “I have been humbled and honored that the women across this country have given me the opportunity to be a spokesperson for cattlewomen everywhere,” she continues. Over the past year, Gwen has enjoyed traveling across from coast-to-coast, visiting different operations and different states. “We’re all working for the same goal of producing a quality, sustainable, healthy product that the consumer wants,” she comments. “Whether we do that by raising 10 head or 10,000, we’re trying to tell our individual stories as women.” Learning leadership Bobbie and Kahla agree that Gwen was their inspiration and driving force that started their passion for the cattlewomen, and when Gwen joined ANCW’s leadership, they stepped up to lead, as well. “My mom has always been an inspiration for me, and she pushed me to be involved, which was great,” says Kahla, who was elected president of Wyoming CattleWomen in 2017. “I knew I wanted to get involved after watching her.” Both Bobbie and Kahla note that they were at first hesitatant to take over the lead of their organizations. When Kahla was elected as president of the Wyoming CattleWomen, she was nervous about her ability to lead but decided to accept the role to take responsibility for the future of Wyoming’s cattle industry and emphasize the strong role of women in that industry. “I was pretty hesitant

to be president of Campbell County CattleWomen,” says Bobbie, “but I knew there were great women who were active members of the organization and they would support me along the way.” Advocacy effort “As I’ve grown in this leadership role, I’ve seen how the consumer responds to women as they tell their stories,” Gwen notes. “Both Bobbie and Kahla have a great ability to tell their story in their own way.” Gwen notes Bobbie’s educational background has poised her to excel in sharing the beef story. Starting at the local level, Bobbie says advocacy is an important part of the work that Campbell County CattleWomen does. “Each year, we have an ag expo that bring third graders to learn more about the ag industry,” she describes, noting the event is a way for school children to learn about the industry in a hands-on fashion. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s fun to do, as well.” Kahla notes sharing the beef story at the state level is also important, but the state does it in a different way, focused more on programs like the beef ambassador program. “Kahla’s a rancher herself,” explains Gwen. “She learned the different aspects of why we did what we did while she was growing up. Now, she’s ventured out on her own with her husband, and she’s raising her family on the ranch. She tells those stories, which is important.” Gwen adds, “A lot of young people don’t see other young women stepping into a leadership role. Kahla’s ability to step into this role and lead has been a very proud moment for me.” Lessons in leadership As they look at what they have learned by serving as cattlewomen, Gwen, Kahla and Bobbie all note that women in agriculture should take the time – whatever time that is – to get involved. “We may not always think we have time to do a lot, but even just paying dues and contributing as a member at large, on conference calls or anything else can mean so much,” Gwen says. “ANCW, Wyoming CattleWomen, Campbell County CattleWomen and the other local organizations are membershipbased. We’re here to work for our members, and we do that best when everyone gets involved.” Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

Learn more about the work of the American National CattleWomen at ancw.org. Get involved in the Wyoming Cattlewomen by visiting wyocattlewomen.org


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

15

It’s the Pitts by Lee Pitts

Be Nice People the world over use their fingers to communicate, mostly in rude ways. Hip teenagers and Italians couldn’t communicate if they had to wear mittens or a catcher’s glove. The problem is this “finger talk” is not universal the world over. In America, the “okay” sign means everything is hunky dory, while in Germany, Russia and Brazil it’s on par with giving someone the finger. In Japan, it means that you want change, preferably in coin, and in France, it means that you are worthless and quite possibly a drunk. And that’s definitely not “okay!” If you travel a wide circle, you’d be well advised to keep your hands in your pockets – and don’t say anything either. I’ve previously written about the time in Australia when I asked who everyone was rooting for, not realizing that “rooting” is the “f” word down under. Many years ago, American Jim Courier committed an even bigger blooper when he said of a player on worldwide television, “There’s two guys in the locker room rooting loudly for her.” Constantly staring at someone is the norm in the Middle East, and it’s a compliment to a pretty girl in America, but do it on a New York subway, and you’ll get a knife in your gizzard from a gang banger. And remember that sign from your childhood where an uncle would pretend to take your nose off and he’d show it to you between his fingers? Do that in many parts of Latin American, and you’ll get your nose knocked off for real – except in Brazil where it means good luck. In America, if you turn your glass over on the bar it can mean you’re through drinking. Do the same thing in an Australian pub, and it’s a challenge that you can lick anyone in the place in a fist fight. While you’re in Australia, do like I did and just drink from the bottle. You don’t have to travel overseas to get in trouble by making the wrong gesture or saying the wrong thing. Many of the gestures people make in big cities are misunderstood by us country folks. For example, if you’re at a sporting event in New York city and grab your throat with both hands, it’s a sign that a team or player is “choking.” The same sign when seen in a small town cafe is an alarm that you’re gagging on a tater tot and need someone to perform the Heimlich maneuver on you. On mean urban streets and NBA basketball courts, you’ll see young men engage in highly orchestrated “handshakes.” They’ll hook the ends of their fingers, twist

their wrists, tickle their palms, do a 360 degree turn in the air, do a few high-fives and finally finish off with a

hard bumping of fists. But can you picture two farmers in the coffee shop saying howdy that way? It’s the same thing with those air kisses you see the Kardashian sisters blowing in Hollywood. I guarantee that if a lady greets an old crusty cattleman by fake kissing him on both cheeks, he’ll think she can’t see or has bad aim. If you rudely honk your car horn in the big city, it means get the heck out of the

way or watch where you’re going, you jerk, whereas the honking of a horn in the country is more apt to be a sign to the cows that their dinner is now being served. It could also mean the local high school football team won again, someone just got married or the brakes are out in my truck and, pardon me, but I’m coming through. In the country, where lawyers are outnumbered by cowboys and urban folks

“Hip teenagers and Italians couldn’t communicate if they had to wear mittens or a catcher’s glove.” – Lee Pitts only stop if they have car trouble or hit a cow, if you see a finger raised above the steering wheel it’s probably a sign of friendliness, not hatred. We know not to tailgate or we’ll get a face full of bumper when the friendly old cuss in front stops suddenly to talk to

his neighbor. We don’t go in for a lot of touchy-feely stuff with strangers either, and we’d advise any urbanite who gets lost out our way not to pet the car alarm in the back of the pickup or you may not have any fingers left to communicate with.

14th Annual Production Sale

Look to the future with SELLING 180 BULLS • 150 2 COMING 3 YEAR OLD COWS 650 BRED HEIFERS • 50 8-10 YEAR OLD COWS 200 BANGS VACCINATED HEIFER CALVES

JANUARY 26, 2019 • 12:30 PM

WESTERN LIVESTOCK AUCTION – GREAT FALLS, MT BOBCAT RAMPAGE E28

BOBCAT HOT LOTTO E243

Lot 103

Lot 61

Reg: +18880244

Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 x Connealy Danny Boy CED BW WW YW MK CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $YG $B +1 +4.1 +65 +111 +22 +48 +.56 +.85 -.008 +49.80 +73.96 +40.53 +7.35 +152.41

BOBCAT NATURAL E232

Reg: 19180798

BSF Hot Lotto 1401 x WK Bobcat CED BW WW YW MK CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $YG $B +8 +2.3 +79 +132 +25 +59 +.56 +.42 +.022 +75.62 +97.52 +32.47 -.71 +160.89

BOBCAT POWDER KEG F6

Lot 60

Lot 10

Reg: 19174845

Mytty Natural x WK Bobcat CED BW WW YW MK CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $YG $B +16 +1.0 +71 +127 +22 +56 +.18 +.52 +.051 +66.95 +86.41 +13.42 -2.04 +129.48

Reg: +19179296

HF Powder Keg 71C x Musgrave Big Sky CED BW WW YW MK CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $YG $B +2 +3.4 +83 +139 +29 +69 +.27 +.83 -.021 +78.48 +120.84 +25.85 +5.46 +180.87

US COME SEE SS W N E H T AT 1515 N E P , R IN DENVE LLS U B ESE WHERE TH AY L P IS D N WILL BE O

1-866-616-5035 to Pre-Register 1-406-245-0889 www.cattleusa.com

Our females will take you down the right road Bryan Ratzburg: (406) 937-5858 Cell: (406) 788-3272 | Ernie Ratzburg: Cell: (406) 788-3244 265 Bobcat Angus Loop • Galata, Montana 59444

bobcatangus@northerntel.net • www.bobcatangus.com


16

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

CALENDAR

Jan. 24 Jan. 24

Submit your events to: Editor, Wyoming Livestock Roundup, P.O. Box 850, Casper, WY, 82602, or e-mail to roundup@wylr.net.

EVENTS Jan. 11-16 Jan. 12-27 Jan. 18-20 Jan. 19 Jan. 22 Jan. 22-24 Jan. 23 Jan. 23-26 Jan. 26 Jan. 26

Jan. 26-27 Jan. 28 – Feb. 2

American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention and IDEAg Trade Show, New Orleans, La. For more information, visit fb.org. National Western Stock Show, Denver, Colo. Visit nationalwestern. com for more information. Wyoming Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers Conference “Classic Traditions, New Solutions,” Sheridan. Visit wyfb.org for more information. Sandhills Cattle Association Ranch Tour, Stapleton, Neb. Preregister or learn more by calling 402-376-2310. Respirator Fit Testing, Casper, Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center. Contact University of Wyoming Extension at 307-837-2956 for more information. Pesticide Applicator Training, Casper, Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center. For more information or to register, visit bit.ly/wyo-pesticide-2019. CattleFax Trends+ Cow/Calf Webinar, 5:30 p.m. Register for the free workshop at cattlefax.com. American Sheep Industry Annual Convention, New Orleans, La. For more information, visit sheepusa.org. Afternoon of Cowboy Poetry, Hulett, Hulett Community Center, 2 p.m. For tickets or more information, contact Barbara Willey at 307290-2913 or Bill Willey at 307-290-2869. Fremont County Cattlemen’s Association Annual Meeting and Banquet, Lander, The Inn at Lander, 6 p.m. For tickets, call Jim Hellyer at 307-330-5622, Bryan Hamilton at 307-349-2096, Joe Crofts at 307-840-4357, Matt Root at 307-840-2970, Annette Bregar at 307-349-0785 or Reg Phillips at 307-450-8840. Horseshoe Valley Chariot Races, Glendo. For more information, call Gene Daly at 307-331-1049. 35th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Elko, Nev. Visit nationalcowboypoetrygathering.com.

SALES Jan. 19 Jan. 21 Jan. 22 Jan. 23

LIVESTOCK AUCTION LLC

January 10, 2019 - 1,791 Head Feeders $4 to $5 Higher HEIFERS Horton, Duane - Otto 14 MXD Hfrs, avg. 804# .....................$13100 HEIFER CALVES Gifford Ranch LLC - Basin 25 Blk Hfrs, avg. 432# .........................$16700 37 Blk Hfrs, avg. 512# .........................$15900 Dale Lyman Ranch, Inc. - Ten Sleep 57 BWF Hfrs, avg. 487# ......................$16600 14 BWF Hfrs, avg. 524# ......................$15700 Coble, Steve - Burlington 8 RWF Hfrs, avg. 593# ........................$16500 26 BWF Hfrs, avg. 533# ......................$15600 16 BWF Hfrs, avg. 552# ......................$15300 34 BWF Hfrs, avg. 639# ......................$13950 David, Lyle & Wesley - Pavillion 16 Blk Hfrs, avg. 450# .........................$16100 Hoyt, Mark - Basin 46 Blk Hfrs, avg. 540# .........................$15550 Shultz, Marshal - Otto 22 Blk Hfrs, avg. 541# .........................$15350 13 Blk Hfrs, avg. 627# .........................$13850 Schiffer Investments Inc. - Buffalo 24 BWF Hfrs, avg. 542# ......................$15150 Diamond E Properties - Thermopolis 36 BWF Hfrs, avg. 579# ......................$14700 Brewster Ranch - Ten Sleep 18 BWF Hfrs, avg. 564# ......................$14500 51 BWF Hfrs, avg. 648# ......................$13850 Red Canyon Ranch Partners - Shell 33 Blk Hfrs, avg. 656# .........................$14000 4 Blk Hfrs, avg. 740# ...........................$13800 Russell Land & Livestock - Basin 26 Blk Hfrs, avg. 638# .........................$13950 Stuckey, Rob & Kathy - Worland 18 Blk Hfrs, avg. 724# .........................$13600 Unruh, Wade - Burlington 13 BWF Hfrs, avg. 678# ......................$13550 STEER CALVES Darling, Chanse - Hyattville 3 Blk Strs, avg. 383# ...........................$21400 Horton, Duane - Otto 12 Blk Strs, avg. 343# .........................$21400 18 Blk Strs, avg. 481# .........................$19500 10 Blk Strs, avg. 598# .........................$16300 Gifford Ranch LLC - Basin 10 Blk Strs, avg. 391# .........................$20500 23 BWF Strs, avg. 493# ......................$18700 Dale Lyman Ranch, Inc. - Ten Sleep 10 BWF Strs, avg. 450# ......................$20300 12 BWF Strs, avg. 627# ......................$15800 Schwede, Walter - Manderson 5 BWF Strs, avg. 475#.........................$18900

Jan. 26 Jan. 26 Jan. 28 Jan. 31 Feb. 1 Feb. 1 Feb. 1 Feb. 2

POSTCARD from the Past

Compiled by Dick Perue rrichardperue@gmail.com

2019 Another Chapter in Life

Redland Angus Annual Production Sale, Buffalo Livestock Auction, Buffalo, 307-347-2270, 307-250-1548, redlandangus.com Van Newkirk Herefords Bull and Female Sale, at the ranch, Oshkosh, Neb., 308-778-6049, 308-778-6230, vannewkirkherefords.com Ken Haas Angus 38th Annual Right Combination Bull Sale, at the ranch, LaGrange, 307-834-2356, kenhaasangus.com National Western Stock Show Commercial Female Show & Sale, in the yards, Denver, Colo., 970-396-7521, nationalwestern.com

Big horn Basin

Jan. 26

Marcy Cattle Company and Marcy Livestock 58th Annual Angus Bull Sale, Gordon Livestock Auction, Gordon, Neb., 308-430-2005, 308-638-7587, marcycattlecompany.com Valley Video Hay Markets, LLC, 888-935-3633, 308-235-5386, valleyvideohay.com Little Goose Ranch Second Annual Production Sale, Buffalo Livestock Auction, Buffalo, 307-751-2472, 307-751-1535, 307-751-6737, 307-751-5793, littlegooseranch.com Bobcat Angus 14th Annual Production Sale, Western Livestock Auction, Great Falls, Mont., 406-937-5858, 406-698-4159, bobcatangus.com Jauer Dependable Genetics 42nd Annual Angus Bred Female and Bull Sale, at the ranch, Hinton, Iowa, 712-253-0125, 712-253-8710, jauerangus.com Bullis Creek Ranch “Generation of Predictability 19” Spring Production Bull Sale, Burwell Livestock Market, Burwell, Neb., 402376-4465, bulliscreek.com K2 Red Angus Winter Bull and Female Sale, K2 Sale Facility, Wheatland, 307-331-2917, k2redangus.com McConnell Angus Annual Bull and Female Sale, at the ranch, Dix, Neb., 308-235-5187, 308-230-0430, 970-215-3204, mcconnellangus. com TJS Red Angus 11th Annual "Red Truck" Sale, Buffalo Livestock Auction, Buffalo, 406-639-9112, tjsredangus.com Elkington Polled Herefords Annual Production Sale, at the ranch, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 208-523-2286, 208-521-1774, 208-681-0765, elkingtonpolledherefords.com Upstream Ranch Annual Production Sale, at the ranch, Taylor, Neb., 308-214-0719, 308-214-0679, upstreamcattle.com

Worland, WY

Sale Barn: 307-347-9201 Danny Vigil: 307-388-0781 Shultz, Marshal - Otto 21 Blk Strs, avg. 495# .........................$18700 17 Blk Strs, avg. 663# .........................$15400 ZE Ranch Co. - Meeteetse 5 BWF Strs, avg. 492#.........................$18300 David, Lyle & Wesley - Pavillion 13 BWF Strs, avg. 493# ......................$18300 12 Blk Strs, avg. 670# .........................$14900 Mills, Irene - Burlington 4 BWF Strs, avg. 499#.........................$18300 McIntosh, Dale - Burlington 1 BWF Str, 525# ..................................$18150 11 Blk Strs, avg. 645# ..........................$15200 Wiechmann, Jason - Ten Sleep 11 Blk Strs, avg. 560# ..........................$17500 Coble, Steve - Burlington 63 BWF Str, avg. 571# .........................$1680 Red Canyon Ranch Partners - Shell 26 Blk Strs, avg. 591# .........................$16650 24 BWF Strs, avg. 764# ......................$14600 21 Blk Strs, avg. 796# .........................$14225 Diamond E Properties - Thermopolis 13 BWF Strs, avg. 559# ......................$16400 11 BWF Strs, avg. 738# .......................$14750 Schiffer Investments Inc. - Buffalo 33 BWF Strs, avg. 586# ......................$16350 Brewster Ranch - Ten Sleep 33 BWF Strs, avg. 585# ......................$16150 ZE Ranch Co. - Meeteetse 10 BWF Strs, avg. 609# ......................$16100 19 BWF Strs, avg. 711# .......................$14950 Johnstone, Casey - Ten Sleep 34 BWF Strs, avg. 682# ......................$15000 20 BWF Strs, avg. 764# ......................$14500 10 BWF Strs, avg. 752# ......................$14500 10 BWF Strs, avg. 740# ......................$14500 Redland, Mark Richard - Ten Sleep 37 Blk Strs, avg. 705# .........................$14725 May, Russell - Basin 6 Red Strs, avg. 741# ..........................$14700 Unruh, Wade - Burlington 11 Mxed Strs, avg. 727# ......................$14600 Crawford, Jodie - Worland 4 Mxed Strs, avg. 779# ........................$14000

“Years Merely Life’s Chapters” reads the headline for the New Year’s editorial in the Dec. 25, 1919 issue of the local newspaper. The sub-head adds, “Offer Opportunity for Each of Us to Write Therein a Record Better Than the Preceding.” Although a few weeks late, wisdom provided from that editorial follows: The coming year lies spread like the white plain that sweeps from the roadside to the distant forest where the gray squirrels are making tracks in the light snow. On this white sheet, a little record may be written, not a full life story but merely a brief chapter or two, like the chapters of squirrel life that may be read by one who today ventures into the white forest. It is a great mystery that lies ahead, a treasure house of endless possibilities. The span of a man’s life is short, shorter in absolute measurement than the span of a year. For

each year, when October fades into November, has wrought completeness. No human life can bring completeness. It cannot bring completeness of knowledge or completeness of happiness or completeness of good works. The best man can do, in his poor, limited way, is to glean as much wisdom and win as much happiness and do as much good as the number of his days permits. When the human October fades, it may thus be rich and peaceful and without the scars of stormy days or the blight of wasted days and without undue regret that what should have been seen and known and done has not been seen and known and done. A years’ completeness is but a twelvemonth. Our human incompleteness covers many 12 months. How fortunate that each dawning year means a new opportunity to live and learn. Again and again, we may take up the thread and advance toward the goal of apprehension. We may study

• Upcoming Sales • Jan. 17 - Bred Cow Special w/ All Class Cattle, Sheep & Goat Jan. 24 - Feeder Special w/ All Class Cattle Jan. 31 - All Class Cattle Feb. 7 - Replacement Special Feb. 14 - Bred Cow Special w/ Weigh-Up Special Feb. 21 - All Class Cattle, Sheep & Goat Feb. 22 - Horse Sale

Jan. 17, 2019 Consignments Alan Paxton – 50 Angus & Angus crossbred heifers, All Bred to KM Broken Bow, cleaned up with Hoover Dam Bulls, CF March 1-45 days, have had all breeding shots, good program. Irvin Bader – 17 Black bred heifers, home raised, high elevation, complete dispersion, CF March. Marcus Anthun – 5 Black Baldy bred heifers. 9 Black Baldy 3-year-olds. 24 Black & Black Baldy 4- to 9-year-olds, CF March and April. Bruce Thorgood – 9 Black bred cows, CF March and April. 3 Steers. Jan. 24, 2019 Consignments Larry Bentley – 85 Black mixed calves, 450-550#, weaned, two rounds of shots.

New fun – Happily welcoming in the new year of 1919 with a brand-new tricycle was this girl at a south-central Carbon County ranch. Photo from the Yoakum/Pilot family photo album in the Bob Martin/Dick Perue collection, Historical Reproductions by Perue

God’s works and year by year come nearer to an appreciation of them. We can never fully appreciate them, for our minds are finite, and they are infinite. But each succeeding year is a new opportunity. It offers the perfection of completeness, and by even a partial comprehension of its fullness we may move toward fulfillment of the measure of our lives. “I am not afraid,” said Thoreau, “that I shall exaggerate the value and significance of life, but that I shall not be up to the occasion which it is. I shall be sorry to remember that I was there, but noticed nothing remarkable – not so much us a prince in disguise, lived in the golden age a hired man, visited Olympus even, and fell asleep after dinner and did not hear the conversation of the gods.” One who loves only artificiality, who does not note the excellence of the world he has been set to rule, proves himself unworthy of his heritage, and is punished by bitter unrest. His life lacks the boon of contentment which includes all boons. There are, or course, the few whose mental scope is too narrow for self-measurement. They do not even know that they are discontented and may enjoy life as the ox enjoys life. They are fortunate. The unfortunate man is the one who has, even dimly, an understanding that the world is good and beautiful and that he is failing to reap the richness that is rightly his. The coming year is indeed a great mystery, full of possibilities. . . so writes Bishop H.C. Potter in the Dec. 25, 1919 issue of “The Saratoga Sun.” We are told that the first day – or the second week – of the New Year is an appropriate time to form good resolutions, and we promise to continue that resolve in our next “Postcard.” Wishing you all a healthy, prosperous and Happy New Year for 2019!


Volume 30 No. 37 â&#x20AC;˘ January 12, 2019

17

MARKETS

LIVE CATTLE FUTURES SETT PRICE

Month

Compiled from USDA Market News Service information and other sources

Location Volume PAYS 1-9

1677

Centennial

UnUnder 400

400-500

157.50

143-154

500-600

Steers Heifers

168-170 141-143

600-700

700-800

Over 800

Sltr Bull Sltr Cows

146-156 112-140

133-139.50

136-137

51.50-67.50 41-48

195 164.50-183

191-200 160-174

174-193.50 145-166

157-172.50 141-162

149-158

Riverton 1-8 5714

210-224 141-181

171-215 144.50-175

167.50-194 135.50-161.50

148-175 131-141

148.25-151.50 136.50-141

143.72

60-70 47-58

Torrington 1-9 8586

211-232 68-182

187-213 161-182

160-198 138-171

145-173 141-150

144.50-158 131-148.75

122-150.75 118

65-78 61-65

199 171

196.50 161

167-183 144-159.25

146.50-164 145.50-159

152-156.50

138.50

Big Horn Basin 1-10 1791

205-214

183-203 161-167

161.50-181.50 145-165

149.50-161 135.50-140

140-149.50 136-138

131

Billings 1-10 4671

185 169-181

168-209 154-175

157-187.50 144-165

146-167.50 133-150

132-150.50 130-142.50

132-145.50 131

55-66.50 42-49

38.50-74 42-79.50

$850-$1700

St. Onge 1-4

Stock Cows Pairs

PAYS

Volume

Feeder Lambs

Slaughter Lambs

Slaughter Ewes

Stock Ewes

764

St. Onge

916

This Week

146.53 144.45 145.23 145.70 150.05

146.75 145.08 145.68 145.93 150.00

Change +0.22 +0.63 +0.45 +0.23 -0.05

SETT PRICE

Month

Week Prev

This Week

5.14 5.20 5.27 5.37

5.14 5.20 5.24 5.33

MARCH MAY JULY SEPTEMBER

Change NC NC -0.03 -0.04

$710

CORN FUTURES SETT PRICE

Month Slaughter Bucks

Week Prev

This Week

3.80 3.87 3.95 3.97

3.76 3.84 3.92 3.95

MARCH MAY JULY SEPTEMBER

No Report

Centennial

Week Prev

WHEAT FUTURES

$825-$1600

56.50-71

+1.65 +0.53 +0.60 -0.08 +0.30

SETT PRICE

JANUARY MARCH APRIL MAY AUGUST

WEEKLY SHEEP AUCTIONS Auction

124.88 125.93 117.38 114.20 116.05

Change

FEEDER CATTLE FUTURES Month

68-73 54-62.50

Belle Fourche 1-10

123.23 125.40 116.78 114.28 115.75

$725-$850

No Report

Crawford 1-4 6300

This Week

FEBRUARY APRIL JUNE AUGUST OCTOBER

FOR THE WEEK ENDING January 11, 2019 WEEKLY CATTLE AUCTIONS

Week Prev

Change -0.04 -0.03 -0.03 -0.02

OATS FUTURES 110-255 132-210

Dry Edible Beans Daily Grower Bids Region Bids Change ND/MN 21.00-22.00 Steady NE CO/WY/W NE 21.00 Steady Black ND/MN 26.00 Steady Great Northern NE CO/WY/W NE 21.00-23.00 Steady Navy ND/MN 21.00-22.00 Steady Light Red Kidneys ND/MN 34.00-35.00 Steady NE CO/WY/W NE 35.00 Steady Grower: Delivered elevator thresher run in 100 lb bags. Source: USDA-CO Dept of Ag Market News Service, Greeley, CO

Beans Pinto

WEEKLY NATIONAL GRAIN MARKET REVIEW Compared to last week, cash bids for wheat, corn, and soybeans were mostly lower while sorghum bids were mixed. Grain futures closed lower yesterday. Markets may have been pressured by a lack of fresh news and some sell-off in the grain market. Export sales and shipment numbers remain uncertain as the government shutdown rolls into its 20th day. Wheat was 4 3/4 cents lower to 28 3/4 cents higher. Corn was 50 1/2 cents lower to 2 1/4 cents higher. Sorghum was 7 cents lower to 2 cents higher. Soybeans were steady to 19 cents lower. WHEAT: Kansas City US No 1 Hard Red Winter, ordinary protein rail bid was 4 3/4 cents lower from 6.08 3/4-6.23 3/4 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 Soft Red winter rail bid was not quoted. St. Louis truck US No 2 Soft Red Winter terminal bid was steady to 1 cent lower from 5.42-5.48 per bushel. Minneapolis and Duluth US No 1 Dark Northern Spring, 14.0 to 14.5 percent protein rail, was 8 3/4 to 28 3/4 cents higher from 6.69-6.94 per bushel. Portland US Soft White wheat rail was steady from 6.15-6.35 per bushel. CORN: Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1/4 to 2 1/4 cents higher from 3.91-3.97 3/4 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 3 1/2 to 9 1/2 cents lower from 3.66 1/4-3.72 1/4 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 Yellow Corn was 7 cents lower from 3.55-3.56 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 3 1/2 cents lower from 3.41 1/4-3.56 1/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 3 1/2 cents lower from 3.61 1/4-3.64 1/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow corn rail was 50 1/2 cents lower at 3.17 1/4 per bushel. OATS AND BARLEY: US 2 or Better oats, rail bid to arrive at Minneapolis 20 day was 2 1/4 to 4 1/4 cents higher from 3.02 3/43.52 3/4 per bushel. US No 3 or better rail malting Barley, 70 percent or better plump out of Minneapolis was not quoted. Portland US 2 Barley, unit trains and Barges-export was not quoted. SORGHUM: US No 2 yellow truck, Kansas City was 6 cents lower to 2 cents higher from 5.83-6.00 per cwt. Texas High Plains US No 2 yellow sorghum (prices paid or bid to the farmer, fob elevator) was 4 to 7 cents lower from 6.18-6.71 per cwt. OILSEEDS: Minneapolis Yellow truck soybeans were 11 cents lower at 8.25 3/4 per bushel. Illinois Processors US No 1 Yellow truck soybeans were steady from 8.72 3/4- 8.89 3/4 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 Yellow truck soybeans were 6 to 19 cents lower from 8.48 3/4-8.61 3/4 per bushel. Illinois 48 percent soybean meal, processor rail bid was steady from 316.70-318.70 per bushel. Central Illinois Crude Soybean oil processor bid was steady from 27.68-28.18 per cwt. Source: USDA-MO Dept of Ag Market News Service, St Joseph, MO Mountain Area and Western U.S. Direct Sheep Report (CO, WY, MT, NE, SD, ND, UT, NV, ID, WA, OR, AZ and CA) Receipts: 0 Last Week: 0 Last Year: 0 Compared to a week ago: There were no confirmed trades reported this week. Feeder lambs sell FOB with an overnight stand or equivalent 3-4 percent shrink unless otherwise noted. The state identified is the state of origin. Prices quoted per cwt. Current delivery unless otherwise noted. Source: USDA- CO Dept of Ag Market News Service, Greeley, CO National Wool Review Domestic wool trading on a clean basis was inactive this week. There were no confirmed trades reported. Prices reflect trades FOB warehouse in original bag or square pack, bellies out, some graded, and 76 mm or longer. No allowance made for coring, freight or handling fees at the warehouse level to reflect net grower prices (*) indicates new prices this week. (NA) represents microns not normally available in this region. Wools shorter than 75 mm typically

50-97.50

52-95

52-63.50

60

discounted .10-.20 clean. Classed and skirted wools usually trade at a .10-.20 premium to original bag prices. Domestic wool trading on a greasy basis was at a standstill this week. There were no confirmed trades reported. All trades reported on a weighted average. Domestic wool tags are delivered to buyer and reported on a greasy basis: Number 1 tags: .60-.70, Number 2 tags: .50-.60, Number 3 tags: .40-.50. In Australia this week, the Eastern Market Indicator was up 48 at 1910 cents per Kg clean from the sale a week ago. A total of 47,593 bales were offered with sales of 93.0 percent. The Australian exchange rate was stronger by .0049 at .7179 percent of the U.S. dollar. Australian wool prices are quoted delivered Charleston, South Carolina. The current freight rate is .15 cents per pound clean. Schlumberger Dry formula is used for yield determination. The 75-85 percent of Australia price range can be used as an estimated value of clean domestic prices FOB the warehouse and gross producer. These are estimated domestic values and may vary depending on current market conditions, yield, strength, length, colored fiber content, poly contamination, and other quality factors. Clean Del Price Change from 75-85 Percent Micron US Grade in U.S. Dollars Previous Sale of Australia 18 80s 8.05 + .08 6.03-6.84 19 70-80s 7.62 + .10 5.71-6.48 20 64-70s 7.47 + .16 5.60-6.35 21 64s 7.38 + .18 5.53-6.27 22 62s 7.33 + .11 5.50-6.23 23 60-62s 7.01 + .04 5.35-6.06 24 60s ---------------25 58s 4.89 + .19 3.67-4.15 26 56-58s 4.30 + .16 3.22-3.65 28 54s 3.06 + .09 2.29-2.60 30 50s 2.45 + .03 1.84-2.08 32 46-48s 1.74 + .10 1.30-1.48 Merino Clippings 3.99 + .10 2.99-3.39 Eastern Market Indicator was up 48 at 1910 cents per kg clean. Australian exchange rate was stronger by .0049 at .7179 percent of the U.S. dollar. Source: USDA- CO Dept of Ag Market News Service, Greeley, CO Wyoming Hay Summary Compared to last week all reported forages sold steady. Buyer inquiry was moderate to good mostly from out of state buyers. Bulk of the hay is exported out of the state with a lot of the small squares going back to the Eastern states of the U.S.A. to horse owners and operators of smaller livestock operations. Some areas of the state have been cold with some snow and other areas have been dry and seasonal temperatures prevailing. Most areas have reported decent snowpack. Hoping that the accumulation will have enough runoff to fill irrigation holding ponds for summer use. All prices are dollars per ton FOB the field or hay barn unless otherwise noted. Eastern Wyoming Alfalfa: Good large squares 155.00-160.00. Good large rounds 140.00-145.00. Cornstalk bales in large squares 60.00-80.00. Suncured alfalfa pellets 15 percent protein 240.00. Central and Western Wyoming Alfalfa: Premium large squares 150.00; Fair large squares 130.00150.00. Premium small squares 200.00-225.00. Alfalfa/Orchard Grass: Premium large squares 150.00-190.00; Premium small squares 225.00. Orchard grass: Good large squares 140.00; Premium small squares 200.00-225.00. Certified weed seed free alfalfa cubes bulk 230.00-240.00, bagged 280.00. Source: USDA WY Dept of Ag Market News Service, Torrington, WY Nebraska Hay Summary Compared to last week alfalfa hay sold fully steady. Grass hay and ground and delivered hay sold steady. Dehy pellets steady in the East sold steady with the Platte valley trading steady to 10.00 higher. Demand remains very good for Dehy pellets across the state with supply getting very tight. Demand for grinding hay and ground hay was good from feedlots. Some areas of the state snow has melted and cattle are out grazing with ranchers not having to supplement as much feed as previous week. There is a chance of rain/snow mix over this weekend. If there is a large accumulation of moisture cattlemen will have to start supplementing feed again that will dwindle supplies of reserve hay. It appears most potential buyers will procure hay on an as needed basis, not stock piling large quantities. A lot of talk about

SETT PRICE

Month

Week Prev

This Week

2.78 2.79 2.82 2.72

2.89 2.84 2.84 2.76

MARCH MAY JULY SEPTEMBER

Change +0.11 +0.05 +0.02 +0.04

SOYBEAN FUTURES SETT PRICE

Month

Week Prev

This Week

9.00 9.13 9.25 9.37

8.95 9.07 9.20 9.32

JANUARY MARCH MAY JULY

Change -0.05 -0.06 -0.05 -0.05

CUTOUT VALUES CUTOUT VALUES Primal Rib Primal Chuck Primal Round Primal Loin

This Week

Prior Week

Last Year

215.29 353.53 175.69 174.80 280.88

212.25 353.15 173.75 172.73 274.34

204.30 316.17 171.41 174.98 267.42

5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE Live Steer Live Heifer Dressed Steer Dressed Heifer

This Week

Prior Week

Last Year

122.55 122.50 194.64 194.73

122.52 122.36 194.25 193.30

121.16 121.95 193.83 194.11

trying to bale cornstalks when the weather shapes up. All sales are dollars per ton FOB the field or hay barn, unless otherwise noted. Eastern/Central Nebraska Alfalfa: Good large rounds 100.00-115.00; Fair large rounds 72.5087.50. Grass Hay: Premium large rounds 100.00-105.00; Good large rounds 85.00-90.00; Fair large rounds 65.00-75.00. Premium small squares 160.00-170.00. Cornstalk bales 60.00-65.00, few at 70.00. Cane in large rounds 80.00. Sudex in large rounds 65.00. Dehy Alfalfa pellets 17 percent protein 280.00-290.00. Platte Valley area of Nebraska Alfalfa: Good round bales 100.00-110.00. Cornstalk bales 60.0065.00. Ground and delivered alfalfa 140.00-145.00. Ground and delivered alfalfa-stubble mix 130.00-135.00. Ground and delivered cornstalks 95.00-110.00. Dehy Alfalfa pellets 17 percent protein 230.00. Western Nebraska Alfalfa: Premium large squares 175.00-180.00; Good large squares 150.00-160.00; Fair large squares 135.00-140.00. Good large rounds 130.00-145.00. Alfalfa/Orchard Grass: Good to Premium large squares 180.00-200.00. Straw in large square bales 90.00. Ground and delivered alfalfa 150.00-155.00. Source: USDA NE Dept of Ag Market News Service, Kearney, NE

The latest markets data can be found by visiting USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agricultural Marketing Service at https://www.ams.usda.gov/market-news


2 18

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

CLASSIFIEDS

Cattle

307-234-2700 • 1-800-967-1647 • Fax: 307-472-1781 • E-mail: jodym@wylr.net or denise@wylr.net Website: www.wylr.net. Weekly Deadline: Wednesday, 12:00 p.m.

Notices

Notices

NOTICE BLM PERMITTEES Applications for range improvement funds for the Washakie Resource Area will be received by Keith Hamilton, secretarytreasurer of the Worland District State Grazing Board, PO Box 9, Hyattville, WY 82428. All applications must be postmarked no later than Feb. 4, 2019 or brought to the meeting. BLM may provide $250 additional funding for reservoir rehab. BLM approval is required for all applications on BLM land. Also, we welcome your attendance at the Public Board Meeting, 11 AM at The Brass Plum in Worland on Feb. 7, 2019. NOTICE: Publication in this newspaper does not guarantee the legitimacy of any offer or solicitation. Take reasonable steps to evaluate an offer before you send money or provide personal/financial information to an advertiser. If you have questions or believe you have been the victim of fraud, contact the Wyoming Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Unit, 123 Capitol Building, Cheyenne, WY 82002, 800-438-5799, 307-7777874..................................TFN

Events AFTERNOON OF COWBOY POETRY, SAT., JAN. 26, 2 P.M. at the Hulett Community Center, Hulett, WY. Tickets $10 in advance, $15 at the door. For tickets and further information, call Barbara Willey, 307-290-2913 or Bill Willey, 307-290-2869, 605569-4307 ...................... 1/19 THE SANDHILLS CATTLE ASSOCIATION WILL HOST THIS YEAR’S RANCH TOUR ON SAT., JAN. 19 IN THE STAPLETON, NE AREA: We will be visiting Berger Herdmaster Genetics, Lincoln County Feedyard (where the EP&C cattle are being fed), and we will end the day at Starr Ranch. Contact the SCA to pre-register 402-3762310..................................1/12

Help Wanted FARM HAND NEEDED: Must know how to run equipment, put up hay, irrigate crop rows and mechanic work. References required. For more information, call 307-754-5864 .............1/12 DEVILS TOWER FOREST PRODUCTS INC., A LUMBER MANUFACTURER IN HULETT, WY IS ACCEPTING applications for experienced electrician and maintenance, both skilled and unskilled sawmill and planer, boiler/kiln for day and night shift positions. Benefit package includes: Company paid medical and dental insurance (including dependents), life insurance, company-matching 401(k), safety incentives, holiday pay, paid vacation and sign on bonus. Mandatory employment and random drug testing is conducted EOE. Starting wage DOE plus production bonus. Online applications are available at www.neimanenterprises.com. E-mail applications to joeo@ dtfp.net or fax to 307-4675418. Contact Joe Ortner at 307-467-5252 with additional questions ........................... 2/2 MID-AMERICA FEED YARD LOCATED NEAR OHIOWA, SOUTHEASTERN NEBRASKA IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO HIRE FULL-TIME PEN RIDERS: Skilled horsemanship and feedyard or ranch experience preferred. Pay based on experience. Comprehensive benefits include family health and dental, 401(k), life insurance benefits, sick and vacation pay. Five days a week, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. with rotating weekends and rotating holidays = 3 on 3 off. Applicants are required to furnish their own horses and tack. Drug and background tests required. E-mail resumes or application requests to barb@ midamerica-feedyard.com or call 402-295-2216 ................ 2/2

WIGGINS FEEDYARD, LLC HIRING FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE: Some experience required. Call Sue Wiggins, 308-2621140 or 308-279-0924, e-mail sswiggins@wigginsfeedyard. com, 10077 US 385, Bridgeport, NE 69336, references with phone numbers ......1/12 DAIRY CALF OPERATIONS MANAGER: Bottle calf operations. Dairy and calf handling experience is a plus. Full-time employee. High school education or GED required. Some experience required. Yuma County Dairy, LLC, 970-848-2842, yumacountydairy@gmail.com, 8798 Co. Rd. 39, Yuma, CO 80759 .... 2/2 EASTERN NEBRASKA COW/CALF, FARMING AND SMALL FEEDLOT OPERATION looking for a full-time employee. Wages based on experience and references. 402-276-0733 ................. 2/2

Situation Wanted LOOKING FOR RANCH POSITION: 20+ years experience. All locations considered. Calving and yearling experience. References on request. Will consider any western states. Available immediately. Call 307-2505518, leave message .......1/12

Services

Financial Services AGRI-ONE FINANCIAL: Farm/ ranch and all commercial loans. RATES AS LOW AS 3.5%. We have been helping with all aspects of agricultural, commercial financing and management for years. LET US HELP YOU on a consulting level with management to increase profitability, deal with and fix credit problems and on all your financing needs. WE CARE AND HAVE WORKING PROGRAMS designed for the farmer/rancher and not the banker. Please call Steve, 303-773-3545 or check out our website: www.agrionefinancial.com. I will come to you and get the job done!! ........................................ 1/19

Auctions

Torrington Livestock Markets

307-532-3333 www.torringtonlivestock.com Brands REGISTERED WYOMING BRAND: RRC, LJH, also registered earmarks. Horse irons included. Renewed to Jan. 2025. $2,500 OBO. For more information, call 307-575-5572 (cell) or 307-837-0179 (home), if no answer please leave message ................................ 1/12

FIND IT IN THE ROUNDUP CLASSIFIEDS Services

Solar Water Pumping Systems Water Well Services • Well & Pipeline Design Submersible Pump Specialist Scott Blakeley, Owner ppr@pronghornpump.com www.pronghornpump.com

(307) 436-8513 • Cell: (307) 267-1022

PROVIDING INNOVATIVE

DESIGN-BUILD SOLUTIONS. Expanding on our years of experience in natural resource and agriculture engineering, WURX is a quality focused construction company. Our expertise and creative approach provide solutions for your construction needs.

LAND DEVELOPMENT•IRRIGATION INFRASTRUCTURE CROPS & WATERSHEDS•STREAMS & PONDS AGRICULTURE IMPROVEMENTS•WILDLIFE HABITAT CIVIL SITE DEVELOPMENT•ROADS & UTILITIES OIL & GAS•DAMS & RESERVOIRS Visit us online at wurx.us for more information and to learn how we can complete your project.

Request A Quote: 307-877-7570 | info@wurx.us

BUILT ON GRIT

PROUDLY SERVING WYOMING’S

PRIVATE LANDOWNERS. We have the experience to take your vision and make it reality; from due diligence to construction, management, and permitting ultimately ownership transition. We work with all types of properties including production agriculture, farms, cattle ranches, equestrian estates, ranchettes and sporting ranches.

PUMP STATIONS•STREAMS & PONDS•MASTER PLANNING DESIGN/BUILD•IRRIGATION•LIVE WATER•SURVEY VINEYARDS•WATER DEVELOPMENT•WATER RIGHTS ENVIRONMENTAL & COMPLIANCE

Visit us online at westernhce.com for more information and to learn how we can help make your next project a reality.

Request A Quote: 307-215-7430 | info@westernhce.com

Dogs

Cattle

“GENERATIONS OF PREDICABILITY 19” SPRING PRODUCTION BULL SALE

January 28, 2019

1:30 p.m. CST

Burwell Livestock Market – Burwell, Nebraska Selling 75 Age Advantaged Coming 2 Year Old Bulls and 25 Registered Bred Heifers Red Angus – Limousin – LimFlex

Bullis Creek Ranch • bulliscreek.com • 402-376-4465 AKC LAB PUPPIES: All colors available, whites, blacks, yellows, light reds and light chocolates. Excellent hunters, family companions. Full AKC registration. Shots, wormed, dewclaws removed. All puppies are cute but it’s what they grow into that counts. Not all Labs are the same. Proud to own!! Been raising quality AKC Labradors for 20-plus years. Look at the rest but buy the best. Both parents on site for viewing. Will sell quickly!! $200 deposit, picking order is when the deposit is received. Doug Altman, Mitchell, S.D. Call/ text 605-999-7149, click the our lab tab on the website for pictures www.southdakotayellowlabs.com .......... 1/19 FAMILY/RANCH RAISED PUPPIES: Mom is Border Collie/Queensland Heeler, dad is 20 lbs. purebred Toy Australian Shepherd. Males and females. Shots/wormings, house raised, socialized. Beautiful colors. Pups are 1/2 Toy Aussie 1/4 Heeler and 1/4 Border Collie. Approximate adult weight 2535 lbs. ALSO, sweet Border Collie/Kelpie cross male pup, born Aug. 29, 2018. Puppy packages included. For more information, prices and delivery options, call 406-686-9996. To view photos, go to www.wylr. net in the classifieds ....... 1/12 BORDER COLLIE/HANGIN’ TREE PUPS OUT OF WORKING PARENTS: Both parents on site. Pups are 8 weeks old Jan. 16. Four males and 4 females. Had first shots. Call Mike Rodgers 307-258-8630 leave message................. 2/2 GREAT PYRENEES/KANGAL MIX PUPPIES from working parents born and raised with sheep. Available Jan. 11. For more information, contact Dave, 719-469-2234 or Mary, 719-469-2233 ................. 1/26

350 SECOND CALF 3-YEAROLD COWS FOR SALE, (All calved as 2-year-olds). 95% black/BWF, bred to high-altitude PAP tested bulls. Raised and bred. Calved and summered in southeast Utah and in southwest Colorado at 7,000-9,000 feet elevation. Start calving Feb. 20 for approximately 60 days. ALSO, 60 head May-June calvers, currently in Kimball, NE. Call Charles, 435-459-1848 or Byron, 308-235-8536 .......1/26

Angus

BEEF AND SHEEP CARCASS ULTRASOUND TECHNICIAN ERIC GEVING

UGC/NSIP/CPEC-CERTIFIED

17 years experience. Contact anytime to schedule your spring work gevingeric@gmail.com (307)272-4763

WINTERING COWS/BRED HEIFERS & FEEDING CALVES

with Calving Cows / Heifers as an option November - April Pasture & Lots Used Southwest of Hayes, SD (17mi. N. Midland)

Call or Message Robert at 605-685-5141 HIGH-QUALITY SOUTH DEVON/ANGUS YEARLING BULLS: 35 yearling bulls on test and for sale private treaty. Composites and purebreds. Red and black, moderate. Semen tested and ultrasound data. ALSO, look for Fall bulls at Midland Bull Test. Guaranteed. Delivery available. For more information please call 801-391-8989, www.thompsoncattle.com ................... 1/12

BLACK ANGUS YEARLING BULLS FOR SALE: From excellent herd. Call 307-7545864 ............................. 1/12 250 BLACK ANGUS BRED HEIFERS: South Dakota origin, OCVD, exposed to proven LBW Black Angus bulls for 45 days. Start calving Feb. 1, 2019. References available. Please call 785-394-1955 (cell), 785-394-2374 (home) or 785-731-5067 ........... 1/19

Clay Creek Angus Jim & Lori French 3334 Rd 14 Greybull, WY 82426 307-762-3541 • www.claycreek.net

Registered Yearling and Two-Year-Old Bulls by Popular Sires: S A V Bismarck, Rito 707, S A V Resource, Connealy Spur, Connealy Countdown and Coleman Charlo Along with: Registered Replacement Yearling & Bred Heifers

Second Annual Production Sale

January 26, 2019 • 1 p.m. www.littlegooseranch.com

Buffalo Livestock Auction

Sires include: SAV Platinum 0010, SAV Renown 3439 Coleman Charlo 3212, Coleman Doc 2261, SAV Seedstock 4838 Coleman Maverick 5322, SAV West River 2066, SAV Deep Cut 6851 For more information contact: Ed Meredith 307-751-2472 • Chad Bradshaw 307-751-1535 Justin McKenzie 307-751-6737 • Shop 307-673-0049 • Jake Townsend 307-751-5793 228 Little Goose Canyon Road, County Road 77, Big Horn, WY 82833

PUREBRED ENGLISH SHEPHERD PUPPIES: Born Sept. 14, 2018. Out of working farm dogs. Up to date on shots and wormed. Great family and working dogs. $400. Call Lucita Davidson, 520-345-4105 ..................................... 1/12

Cattle

Angus

Ken Haas Angus

FOR SALE

SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA RETIREMENT DISPERSION: 200 HEAD of registered Angus females for sale. 125 HEAD of bred cows, 8 years and under. AI’d to Bubs Southern Charm, S Chisum, Baldridge Bronc. Start calving Feb. 25, 2019. 15 HEAD of fancy AI bred heifers. AI’d to MCR Horizon. Start calving Feb. 14, 2019. 30 HEAD of 2018 replacement heifer calves. 30 HEAD of aged bred females. On a complete vaccination program. Call 406-745-2782 or 970-3967302 ...............................1/12

Ken H

33 Years of P

“Right Comb

70 Registered & Commercial Angus Heifer Calves Born Feb - April

FOR SALE: 280 registered and commercial Black Angus BRED heifers for sale. Due to start calving after March 1. Bred to Connealy In Focus 4925 sons with “sleep all night” low birthweights. Available first come, first serve. Delivery and volume discounts available!! MILLER ANGUS FARMS, Estelline, S.D. Call Kody, 605-690-1997 ..... 1/26

First Ti 55 Calving Ease B

40 Registered Bred Heifers AI to Angus Bulls Calve Feb and March

Ke 4766 State Hwy 151 Annual Bull Sale Phone • (3 January 22nd at the Ranch Herefords www.kenh Contact 40 Mixed Aged Registered Angus Cows Bred Angus Calve April and May

Ken Haas 307-834-2356 LaGrange, WY

230 ANGUS BRED HEIFERS: Start calving Feb. 10. ALSO, 250 3-year-olds, start calving March 10. 307-850-8981................... 2/2 YEARLING ANGUS BULLS: These bulls are grown, not fattened, will get out and cover cows. Many will work on heifers. BUY NOW AND WE WILL DELIVER THEM IN APRIL! Call Joe Buseman 605-351-1535 ................ 2/2

Red Angus

REGISTERED RED ANGUS BULLS. Raised on pasture, not feedlot. Top quality genetics. 307-921-9301 .....................2/2

50 Miles North 25 HEREFORD COWS: Three to 6 years old. Good, big-framed cows. Start calving March 25 for 40 days. Ultrasounded Dec. 1. Bang vaccinated, ID’d and poured. Bred to Black and Red Angus bulls. Located near Torrington. Delivery available. $1,450. 308-641-0636 ......1/26

E-mail your ad to denise@wylr.net


2-year-old registered Limousin Bulls

Wyoming Volume 30Livestock No. 37 • Roundup January 12, 2019

Herefords

3 19

Herefords

Durbin Creek Ranch

Bull Sale Feb. 28, 2019 • Worland

100 coming-2-year-old Elite Range Ready Hereford Bulls 300 F1 Baldy Females Select Group of Ranch Geldings

Wyatt Agar (307) 867-2404 • DurbinCreekRanch.com

Limousin

2-year-old 2-year-old registered 2-year-old registered Limousin Bulls registered

Limousin Bulls Bulls Limousin

Pasture Wanted PASTURE WANTED FOR 200 PAIRS: Starting June 2019. Central or eastern Wyoming. Call 307-334-3627 ............1/12

Ranch Lease Wanted WANTED RANCH TO LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY!! Looking for a good place to raise our children and continue improving our cattle herd. Owner financing possible. Open to options. Call Roy and leave a message, 580-817-1123 or 580-817-1124 .................. 1/12 YOUNG, HARD WORKING FAMILY SEEKING LEASE OPPORTUNITY IN MONTANA OR WYOMING FOR 300-500 COW/ CALF PAIRS: We own cattle and are interested in establishing a long-term agreement with the right individual. Please call 406-600-0245 for more information ....................................1/19

Wagyu WAGYU: Japanese word for profit in beef production. Calving ease, improved carcass quality, maximum heterosis. BULLS FOR SALE, CSC LIVESTOCK, 307-655-9395 ...................1/12

Dairy Cattle 31/2-YEAR-OLD AYERSHIRE MILK COW calved Aug. 13, 2018, has bull calf at side; THREE-YEAR-OLD Guernsey Brown Swiss calved Aug. 12, 2018, currently milking by hand 31/2 gallons a day and 7-YEAROLD Holstein Brown Swiss due to calve Jan. 24, 2019. Call 307358-9323 ............................2/2

Family & Nurse Cows SEVERAL HEIFERS FOR SALE: Will calve March-end of April. Brown Swiss, Brown Swiss cross and Guernsey/ Shorthorn. All bred to 3/4 Guernsey 1/4 Jersey bull. Bangs vaccinated, prebreeding shots, wormed with Safeguard wormer, have been poured. Will be TB tested. Very gentle. For more information, call Larry Carlson 605-2246100, Pierre, S.D. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds.................. 2/2

Pasture Wanted YEARLING PASTURE WANTED for 2,500 head steers/spayed heifers for the 2019 summer grazing season. Take all or part, smaller places okay. Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska preferred. Will pay top dollar!! Call or text Jon, 831-240-5795 ................. 2/2 WANTED: Pasture for yearlings for 2019 season. Flexibility on class and head count. References available. Maddux Cattle Company, 308-3945574 or 308-350-1133 ..... 2/2

DO YOU WANT TO RETIRE, HAVE A STEADY INCOME AND KNOW YOUR LAND IS IN GOOD HANDS? My wife and I are young, quality Wyoming natives and ranchers. We live near Lusk, WY and believe we have the skills to ranch anywhere in the state. We are looking for a winter ranch in or near Wyoming to lease. We have summer range, livestock, equipment and quality experience. We have good references and are interested in honest business relationships only, where we can work together to find the best situation for mutual benefit. We are believers in top-notch range management and livestock stewardship. WSGA members, Ranching for Profit alumni, lifelong ranchers. Even if you aren’t sure, please give us a call and we would be happy to see if we can help you!! Please call Sage and Faith Askin, 307351-4875 ..........................3/16

Hay & Feed HAY & STRAW FOR SALE All 3x3s. Excellent quality and clean. Put up dry, analysis available. Forage barley hay under seeded with alfalfa, barley straw, wheat straw, bean straw. Thermopolis, WY Call 307-921-1864 or 307-921-1825

PREMIUM EAR CORN FOR SALE Excellent winter supplement. Grinding available. Semi load delivery available (approximately 25 tons). 5 ton minimum for pickup. RG Ranch, Burlington, WY Call Erik 307-272-8357 GREAT 2018 HAY: First, second and third cutting alfalfa, grass, grass/alfalfa mix, millet and oat hay. Round, large and medium square bales. Delivery available. Call for pricing, 701690-8116.............................2/2 1,200 TONS GRASS HAY FOR SALE: 3x4x8 square bales, 1,125 lbs. ALSO, small square bales, grass hay, 80 lbs. Asking $200/ton. Delivery available. Southwest Wyoming. Call Kelly Foianini 307-780-7027 ..... 2/16 LARGE, ROUND ALFALFA HAY BALES FOR SALE: First and second cutting, net wrapped. $90-$140/ton. Call Josh, 605-220-4617 ...........2/2 300 TONS second cutting alfalfa, $125/ton; 200 TONS first cutting alfalfa, $110/ton; 150 TONS grass mix, 40% alfalfa, $100/ton. All hay no rain, baled on dew, net wrap, 1,400-1,500 lbs. 120 miles north of Gillette, WY. Call or text 406-672-4809 or call 406-554-3037...........2/2 ALFALFA HAY: First and second cutting, large (4x4x8) squares. Roundup ready, clean, under cover, no rain damage, quarantine released. Meeteetse, WY. For more information, call Gerry, 831-359-3637 .......... 2/2 2018 FIRST CUTTING ALFALFA/GRASS MIX, oat hay and second cutting alfalfa hay. Near Rapid City, S.D. Call 605-7875373 or 605-786-3272 ........2/2 HAY FOR SALE: Round bales, mid-square bales. Grass hay or alfalfa. 605-842-3125........1/12

Horses

BRIGHT CERTIFIED BARLEY STRAW: 3x3 bales, Farson, WY. Call 307-350-0350.....1/19

PERCHERON TEAM OF GRADE MARES: Started in harness, coming 2 years old. ALSO, 2018 registered fillies and stud colt. Bismarck, N.D., 701-226-3412 .....................2/2

APPROXIMATELY 200 TONS OF CERTIFIED WEED-FREE ALFALFA HAY: 3x4x8 bales, $150/ton. Call 307-754-2304, leave message .................1/26

Saddles & Tack COWBOY SPECIAL!! New 16” Courts Ranch Roper, sale price $1,695 (was $2,095). Buy a Wyoming Traders wool vest and receive a $25 credit towards a silk scarf. Save up to 20% on all boots and Twisted X shoes. Check out our website www. mosssaddlesbootsandtack. com for more specials!! Shop Moss Saddles, Boots and Tack, 4648 West Yellowstone Highway, Casper, WY; 307-4721872. Our family serving yours for over 40 years!! .............. 2/2 SADDLES, TACK, HATS AND ROPES: ALSO, Wrangler jeans and shirts - Twisted X driving mocs - Kenetrek boots - Canyon sporting goods. Friend us on Facebook. White Horse Country Store, Thermopolis, WY, 877-864-3047 ............TFN

Hay & Feed GOOD CLEAN OAT HAY: Big round bales, located in Mitchell, NE. 308-765-2206 ..............2/2

HAY FOR SALE: 800 tons of first and second cutting alfalfa. Cody, WY area. Call 307-8991898..................................1/26 ALFALFA FOR SALE: First cutting RFV 160, protein 20.45%, second cutting RFV 160, protein 19.33%, third cutting RFV 189, protein 21.5%. ALSO, Willow Creek forage wheat and two row barley forage. Large round bales, net wrap. Delivery available. Call 605-456-3438 ...1/26 1,500 TONS ALFALFA MIX HAY: First, second and third cutting. 4x4x8 and 3x4x8 squares delivered. Call 307267-6833......................... 1/26 350 TONS HAY: 4x4x8 big squares, grass hay $125/ton; mixed hay $145/ton. Since 1987. Trucking available, semi load lots. Call Ivan, 307-7563222..................................1/26 WYOMING SUGAR COMPANY: Sugarbeet pulp available for cattle feed. Call Myron, 307431-2564 ..........................1/26 LARGE SQUARE BALES ALFALFA HAY: 72 premium second cutting, no rain. 90 third cutting. Jim McDonald, 307-856-1802, Riverton, WY ..................... 1/12

Hay & Feed PREMIUM BEEF CATTLE HAY FOR SALE: Netwrapped, large rounds, good green hay. 150 tons first cutting, 16% protein. ALSO, 100 tons second cutting, 18% protein. Lab test reports available. Price negotiable on market. Will participate in transportation costs, one way, maximum 150 miles. Scale on premises. Johnson County, Buffalo, WY. Contact 307-2170386 ............................. 1/12 HAY FOR SALE BY DELIVERY ONLY!! ALFALFA, GRASS AND MILLET HAY, round bales. ALSO, alfalfa in large square bales. Call for delivered price in Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, Colorado, Nebraska areas and more! 307-575-1008 ..... 1/19 VALLEY VIDEO HAY MARKETS, LLC: Wyoming and western Nebraska hay available. Call Barry McRea, 888935-3633. www.valleyvideohay.com ....................... 1/19 GRASS, ALFALFA/GRASS MIX AND STRAIGHT ALFALFA HAY FOR SALE: Big round bales. ALSO, sudangrass hay. Will deliver in semi loads. Larry Shavlik, 605830-8023 ...................... 1/19 CLEAN BRIGHT STRAW: Small squares, $3/bale. ALSO, excellent quality OATS AND WHEAT. Greybull, WY area. Call 307-762-3878, leave a message........... 1/12

Vehicles & Trailers

Cowboy Specials of the Week

2015 F350 Super Duty Lariat diesel, 4x4, 114,000 miles $43,500 • $38,500

2016 Ram 2500 Laramie Cummins, 4x4, 117,000 miles $43,650 • $36,900 Financing & Warranty Available Cowboy Truck & Auto 1279 N. Main St. Sheridan, WY 82801 435-890-707 cowboytruckandauto.com

Equipment

Equipment FOR SALE: John Deere 714A and John Deere 716A chuckwagons with John Deere running gears and bunk feeding extensions, been shedded, excellent condition; H&S 7+4 16’ chuckwagon with tandem running gear; John Deere 444C pay loader; 1981 International tandem grain truck, 466 diesel engine, 5+ 2 speed, 18’ Rugby box and scissor hoist, runs great; Demco 325 bushel gravity wagon with 12 ton gear; Vermeer BP7000 bale processor with Highline 7 bale carrier; Rust 15’x29’ 8 rail stack mover, tandem axles; Krause 34.5’ rock flex disc with 3 bar mulcher; CIH 4300 34’ field cultivator with 5 bar mulcher. All in very nice condition!! Call 605-999-5482 ...............1/12 FOR SALE: 1954 International 350 utility tractor with loader, grapple fork and blade, $4,750. ALSO, 1959 JI Case Model 411B tractor with loader and torque converter, $3,750. Call 605-381-2445 ...................1/12 EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: Submersible pumps 20-40 HP ranging in GPM, complete generators, trailer mounted trash pumps, 3” and 4” polyline, trucks and various other equipment. For more information and pricing on any items, please call 307-273-9591, Farson, WY ..........................................1/19

BOLINGER INC. 307-684-5515, Buffalo, WY • www.bolingerinc.net Hydra-Bed Bale Beds 30 Series in Stock Reliable and Easy to operate Remote Options Available

ALFALFA/GRASS FIRST AND SECOND CUTTING (100+ tons), Willow Creek (200+ tons), in large, netwrapped round bales, $90/ton. Rapelje, MT area. For more information, call 701-541-6280 or 406-663-2191 .............1/12 MEADOW HAY: Round bales, excellent condition, $150/ton. Call 307-640-6269 or 307-6300949, LaGrange, WY ......1/12 HAY FOR SALE: Alfalfa, Willow Creek, triticale, hay/barley/oats/ peas forage mix, CRP grass, alfalfa/grass mix. Big round bales, Available quantities vary, located in Broadview, MT. Contact Travis, 406-670-3054............... 3/2

Vehicles & Trailers 2011 S650 BOBCAT SKIDSTEER: Glass cab, heat, new 72” bucket, 2 speed, auxiliary hydraulics, 4,500 hours, excellent shape, $25,000; 642B BOBCAT SKIDSTEER LOADER, 35 HP gas Mitsubishi engine, under 400 hours, weighs 3,700 lbs. Lifts 1,000 lbs. Excellent tires, good seat, everything is very tight, starts excellent in cold weather, 54” bucket. Excellent condition, $11,500. NEW SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS: Buckets, 78" $1,000, 84" $1,200 and 96" $1,300, made in America. 72” brush grapple, dual cylinder, heavy duty, $2,800. 66” brush grapple, single cylinder, heavy duty, $2,500. Hydraulic clamp tree/fence post puller, single cylinder, heavy duty, $950; NEW HEAVY DUTY snow blades, 7' $1,300 and 9' $1,400; 1986 FREIGHTLINER, day cab, 400 Cummins, 9 speed tranny, 428,000 miles, second owner truck, $10,500; NEW NORSTAR standard dually flatbed with LED lights, 5th wheel ball and receiver hitch, $2,300. Trades welcome. Call Brad, 307-921-1825. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds ...............................1/26 1991 KENWORTH T600 60 series with 1987 BEALL 40’ belly dump trailer. Very good condition, ready to work. 1978 CHEVROLET TITAN, Cummins, 10 speed, in very good shape. Call 406-860-5448 ...................1/19 2001 GMC C6500: 3126 Caterpillar engine, auto transmission, spring suspension, 18’ flatbed with Harsh hydraulic tilt, 109,679 miles. Nice truck. $15,000. Call for more details, 307-262-8930. To view photos go to www.wylr. net in the classifieds .........1/26 FACTORY DIRECT PRICING ON Merritt, Wilson, Travalong, Exiss, Jackson and GR Trailers!!! Call Prime Rate Motors at 307-674-6677 or visit us online at www.primeratemotors. com for information or a free quote!!! ............................. 1/19

**Also specializing in Bolinger flatbeds and custom trailers** EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: Krone Big M windrower; CIH MX285 tractor; John Deere 4840 tractor; John Deere 893 corn head; Wishek 842 disk; John Deere 930 sunflower header; Wilson stepdeck trailer; Load King bellydump trailer; Wilson livestock trailer; Kenworth T600 grain truck; Two Pete 379 sleeper trucks; Ford fuel truck; Commercial bellydump trailer. Call 406-2541254 .................................. 2/2 1989 LINK BELT HTC 835: 101’ BOOM, 29’ JIB, virgin rubber, 8.2L Detroit, new cable, new scale, out riggers. This crane is in A-1 condition, very clean. We have purchased a larger cane and need room. We are serious and will look at any offer, $49,000. Call 320761-5834.To view photos go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds .................................. 2/2 8N FORD TRACTOR with Dual loader, 3 pt., blade included, plug in heater, tires great, solid tractor, $4,250; 1953 MASSEY HARRIS 44 TRACTOR, wide front, new paint, great condition, $4,000; AW JOHN DEERE TRACTOR, 3 pt., needs arms, runs and drives great, rubber is good, has duckbill front end, electric start, $3,250; MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE G, nice older tractor. Has rebuilt mag, new front tires, sounds and drives great. Carburetor was just rebuilt, electric start, new battery and cables, good rear tires, $3,750; IH 510 GRAIN DRILL/PLANTER: Like brand new, it's a double disk with inside scrappers, 7” spacing, alfalfa seeder, rubber press wheels, hydraulic raise and lower, paint is original, perfect for it's age, $6,500; NEW HYDRAULIC 8’ and 9’ 3 pt. blades, quick hitch ready, heavy duty for 50 HP or bigger tractor. 8’ $3,250 and 9’ $3,500; NEW 8’ OFFSET DISC, heavy duty, $5,500; IH 145 PLOW field ready, 4 bottom in the furrow, many new wear parts and ready to work, $6,250. Trades welcome. Call Brad, 307-921-1825. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds ................. 2/2

WANTED!!! Ford, Dodge or Chevy COE STUBNOSE TRUCK, 1930s-1950s Restored or unrestored. Please call 605290-3208 ..........................1/12 EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: FlexiCoil 5000 air drill 3450 Cart 39’ 12” paired row, double shoot rubber packers, $20,000 • FlexiCoil 5000 air drill 2340 Cart 39’ 12” paired row, double shoot steel packers, $19,000 • FlexiCoil 67XL sprayer, 100’, $2,500 • 1999 John Deere 9610 combine, 2,807 threshing hours, big topper, 300-bushel, dual tires, $35,000 • 1993 John Deere 9600 combine, 3,016 threshing hours, 4,241 engine hours, dual tires, $30,000, comes with 30’ auger header • John Deere 936D draper header, $15,000 • Notch 10-12 bale carrier, $2,750 • John Deere 24’ disc, $2,500 • Sitrex MK V rake 14-wheel, $6,000 • International swather, pull type 30’, pick up guards, excellent shape, $6,250. Call 605580-5886 ..........................1/26 LONG-TERM EQUIPMENT FINANCING: All types, private lenders, family-owned, 40-year-old firm. C.H. Brown Co., Wheatland, WY, 800-9877814 ................................ TFN

Turn the page for more ADS


20

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

Livestock Equipment

Livestock Equipment

Hunting & Fishing

HISTORIC 3 BEDROOM 1,900 SQ. FT. RANCH HOUSE ON 23 ACRES: Seven miles east of Broadus, MT with rental of 900 sq. ft. Includes outbuildings, 20’x32’ shop and garage. $275,000 OBO. Call 406-6727230 or e-mail nnsampson@ gmail.com. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds ....................................2/9

JAN. 17-20: PETSKA FUR WILL BE BUYING ALL DEER/ELK HIDES, ANTLERS AND FUR, IN THE FOLLOWING WYOMING TOWNS AND LOCATIONS: JAN. 17: Orin Junction 8-8:15 a.m., truck stop; Douglas 9:159:20 a.m., Douglas Feed (drive thru); Bill 9:50-10:05 a.m., Bill’s Store (drive thru); Wright 10:5011:10 a.m., Exxon Big D on S. 387; Newcastle 12:20-1 p.m., Voelker’s Body Shop; Upton 2:15-2:30 p.m., Joe’s Grocery Store parking lot; Moorcroft 3:10-3:30 p.m., The Coffee Cup; Gillette 4:00-4:30 p.m., T&T Guns and Ammo; Gillette 4:40-5:15 p.m., Rocky Mountain Sports. JAN. 18: Gillette 7:307:45 a.m., Rocky Mountain Sports; Kaycee 9:45-10:05 a.m., Sinclair Station; Sheridan 11:30 a.m.-12 p.m., Quick Sak (stop across street at Walmart); Buffalo 1-1:30 p.m., Good 2 Go; Ten Sleep 3:153:30 p.m., Pony Express; Worland 4:10-4:40 p.m., Co-op One Stop; Basin 5:30-5:40 p.m., Overland Express Mart (drive thru); Greybull 5:50-6:10 p.m., Overland Express Mart. JAN. 19: Lovell 7:45-8 a.m., Good 2 Go Convenience Store (or by appt.); Powell 8:30-8:50 a.m., Linton’s Big R; Cody 9:30-10:15 a.m., Nature’s Design Taxidermy; Meeteetse 11:30-11:45 a.m., Elk Horn Bar; Thermopolis 1-1:30 p.m., High Country Traders; Shoshoni 2:10-2:30 p.m., Powder Horn Bait; Riverton 3-4 p.m., Vic’s Body Shop (behind the Dollar Tree); Lander 4:45-5:15 p.m., Lander Mills. JAN. 20: Jeffrey City 8-8:15 a.m., Split Rock Cafe; Muddy Gap 8:45-9 a.m., 3 Fork Station (drive thru); Alcova 9:4510 a.m., Sloane’s General Store (drive thru); Casper 11-11:45 a.m., Wagner Outdoor Sports; Glenrock 12:30-12:50 p.m., east exit on I-25; Douglas 1:45-2:15 p.m., Douglas Feed; Orin Junction 2:35-2:45 p.m., truck stop; Lusk 3:40-4 p.m., Decker’s Grocery. For more information, call Greg 308-750-0700, Lathan, 308-730-1834 or visit www. petskafur.net ..................... 1/12

Check out wylr.net 25 HIQUAL GRAIN BUNKS: 11‘ 6” long with bump connectors. Excellent condition, $475/ each. 307-738-2682 ...........2/2 HEARTLAND TANKS AND SUPPLY: Rubber tire tanks sizes from 6’-13’. Full loads can be delivered. Guaranteed quality. Call 605-730-0550 or e-mail randy@heartlandtanks.com. Check out our website www. heartlandtanks.com. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds ...................1/12 WINDBREAK-SHADE SCREEN-VISUAL BARRIER-ON WORKING CORRALS AND ARENAS: Save feed $$$!! Less work, less stress! Use on panels in fields, working facilities, round pens, hay barns, kennels, patio or garden. Call Sutherland Industries, 800753-8277 or visit www.sutherlandindustries.com.........3/16

Irrigation

Irrigation

Irrigation Systems

The choice is simple.

Good time management is essential to farming success. That’s why more farmers are turning to T-L center pivot irrigation systems. Hydrostatically powered, T-L’s simple design gives you the low maintenance time, cost, safety and reliability to let you manage your farm instead of calling electricians or replacing gearboxes. Simplify your complex world and make irrigation easier on you.

Easier On You.

Big Horn Truck and Equipment

Manderson, WY rairdenjlw@tritel.net • 800-770-6280

Equipment Restoration

Property for Sale

Mobile Homes

DBL TREE TRACTOR RESTORATION LLC: Tractors, stock trailers and flatbeds, total repair, sandblast and paint. Please call Mike, 406-930-0720 .........1/12

FOR SALE: 140+ acre farm near Pavilion, WY. Great winter pasture, live water in all 3 pastures. Good soils. New seeding of RR alfalfa and grass/alfalfa. Modest 3 bedroom house, garage, loafing shed, corrals and mature trees. Generates 10K a year off oil and gas lease and house rental. Asking $4,950/acre. Call or text 307-7276142 or 307-727-8132 .......... 1/26

NEED A GUEST HOUSE? 2014 newly remodeled Friendship Home of Minnesota/northern advantage package 16x80, $49,500. Must be moved. Four bedroom, 3 bath, includes appliances, new carpet and new paint. ALSO, 2012 Friendship Home of Minnesota/northern advantage package 16x80, $45,000. Five bedroom, 2 bath, appliances, new carpet and some new vinyl. Located in Chugwater, WY. Call 307-3318949, 307-331-8781 or 307-4223502 leave message ...........1/26

Heating Equipment ELIMINATE ● RISING ● FUEL COSTS: Clean, safe and efficient wood heat. Central Boiler Classic and E-Classic Outdoor Wood Furnace; heats multiple buildings with only 1 furnace, 25-year warranty available. Heat with wood, no splitting! Available in dual fuel ready models. www.CentralBoiler.com. WE ALSO HAVE whole house pellet/corn/biomass furnaces. Load once per month with hopper. www. Maximheat.com. A-1 Heating Systems. Instant rebates may apply! Call today! 307742-4442. To view photos, go to www.wylr.net in the classifieds ............................. TFN

Fencing LODGEPOLE PRODUCTS 307-742-6992 SERVING AGRI-BUSINESSES SINCE 1975!! Treated posts, corral poles, buck-and-rail, western rail, fence stays, rough-sawn lumber, bedding. SEE US at w w w. l o d g e p o l e p r o d u c t s . com and click our “Picking A Fence Post” tab to see why folks choose our posts!! TFN

Lumber ROUGH CUT LUMBER AND SAWMILL SERVICES: Custom cut pine, $0.95 per board foot. Sawmill services, $75 set up and $0.45 per board foot. Call 970-698-2055 or e-mail contact@truereclaimed.com for more information .......... 1/12

Pipe OILFIELD PIPE: RPJ Enterprises, Inc. Used for fencing, cattle guards, etc. ALL sizes!! ALSO, cut and notch posts!! Delivery available. Pierce, CO. Call 970-324-4580, e-mail rpjenergy@gmail.com................. 6/22 PIPE FOR SALE: 2 3/8 heavy wall, 2 7/8 reg and heavy wall, 3/4, 7/8 and 1” rods, 4” drill pipe, 4 1/2 casing, 7” casing and guardrail. ALSO have 50,000’ of PVC water line pipe. Can ship to most locations. Please call Ron at 406425-3100 ...................... 1/19

NEW LISTING!! 160 acres, 100 farmed and leased for $32/acre. Nice 4 bedroom, 1 bath home. Barn, corrals, numerous outbuildings. $525,000. Additional land available for purchase. Located on Molt Rd. north of Billings, MT; ROCK CREEK HEREFORD RANCH: 200 acres, 60 acres irrigated. Highway location. $1,100,000; SPRINGWATER RANCH: This 267+ acre ranch is located in a year-round trout stream with beautiful views of the Beartooth Mountains. 160+ acres hay meadows with 60+ acres irrigated. A spacious 2,600 sq. ft. home with a second plus shop and barn. Price reduced to $900,000!!! Located between Red Lodge and Roscoe, MT. Sidwell Land & Cattle Co., Richard Sidwell, 406-861-4426, 406-322-4425 or e-mail sidwell@sidwell-land. com......................................... 2/2 10 ACRE PROPERTY: Great value with 100’x225’ indoor arena plus a lovely 4 bedroom, 3 bath home. Only 1 mile south of Torrington, WY on Hwy. 85. Fantastic opportunity for private or commercial equestrian clinics, ropings, self boarding with indoor and outdoor riding. Includes pasture paddocks with shelters. $555,000 Reduced! Now $535,500. SCOTTSBLUFF, NE: Top producing silt loam soils. 236 acres total. 173 acre pivot and 25 acre gravity. Ditch and well water. Amazing yields. Live winter water for livestock. Cash lease. $725,000. Casey Essert at Empire Realty at 307-534-2222 or 1-888-340FARM. More listings available at www.buyaranch.com .............................................TFN GOSHEN COUNTY: 80 acres. Excellent improvements. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home, shop, heat 7 cooled leisure space connected to shop. Barn with steel corrals. $395,000. VETERAN, WY 518 ACRES TOTAL: 118 acres deeded plus 400 acres Wyoming State Grazing lease. 2004 Zimmatic 7 tower pivot. Excellent combination of sub-irrigated grass, hard grass, irrigated grass and tall brush for calf protection. $405,000 Reduced! Now $370,000. Casey Essert at Empire Realty at 307-534-2222 or 1-888-340FARM. More listings available at www.buyaranch.com .............................................TFN

Mineral Rights

Property for Sale

Buildings

Simmental

Mineral Rights

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WANT TO PURCHASE mineral and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201................. 10/26

Roof Coatings TANK COATINGS ROOF COATINGS Available for METAL, composition shingles or tar roofs. Long lasting and easy to apply. We also manufacture tank coatings for concrete, rock, steel, galvanized or mobile tanks.

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Simmental

Saturday, March 16, 2019

1 p.m. • Centennial Livestock Auction Fort Collins, CO

Selling 120 Bulls with Nuts, Butts, and Guts!

Bulls are PAP Tested

Hunting & Fishing JAN. 20-23: PETSKA FUR WILL BE BUYING ALL DEER/ELK HIDES, ANTLERS AND FUR, IN THE FOLLOWING TOWNS AND LOCATIONS: JAN. 20: Ft. Bridger 5:15 p.m., Cash Store. JAN. 21: Evanston 8-8:15 a.m., Prairie Inn; Kemmerer 9:15-9:30 a.m., Ham’s Fork Station/Sinclair; Cokeville 10:15-10:30 a.m., Flying J Truck Stop; Afton 11:30 a.m.-12 p.m., Gardeners Country Village; Thayne 12:30 p.m., Farmer’s Feed (drive thru); Alpine 1-1:30 p.m., Tack & Treasure Gun Shop; Hoback Jct. 2-2:15 p.m., Hoback Market/Exxon; Bondurant 3 p.m., Elkhorn Bar and Grill (drive thru); Pinedale 4:14-5:15 p.m., Gannett Sports; JAN. 22: Big Piney 8-8:15 a.m. Midway Mall; La Barge 8:459 a.m., All American Fuel; Fontenelle 9:45 a.m., Fontenelle Store (drive thru); Green River 11-11:15 a.m., under viaduct by Wild Horse Saloon; Rock Springs 11:45 a.m.12:15 p.m., WY Wool Warehouse; Wamsutter 1:40 p.m., Wamsutter Conoco (drive thru); Rawlins 2:40-3 p.m., Trails West Meat Processing; Saratoga 3:45-4 p.m., Saratoga Feed & Grain; Medicine Bow 5 p.m., JB’s (drive thru); Rock River 5:30 p.m., Rancher’s Supply (drive thru); JAN. 23: Laramie 8-8:30 a.m., West Laramie Fly Shop; Ft. Collins, CO 10-10:30 a.m., Gannett Ridge Hunting Equipment. For more information, call Marty, 308-8704887 or visit www.petskafur. net .................................1/12

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WyoLotto makes another transfer On Jan. 4, WyoLotto transferred $2.8 million to the state of Wyoming as part of our quarterly transfer. The organization said, “That’s double our last transfer and the largest transfer to the state to date. This transfer is on the heels of two Wyomingites winning the $3.3 million

Jauer Dependable Genetics

Cowboy Draw jackpot, so it’s an exciting time for our players and our state.”  The transfer was made to the State Treasurer’s Office, which then distributes those dollars to Wyoming’s cities, towns and counties. Each community decides how to spend those dollars locally.

Featuring 240 Head:

 35 Elite Bred Cows - Including several donor quality cows  12 Fall Bred Cows with Calves at Side  142 Black, Red, & Baldy Commercial Bred Heifers  51 Two Year Old Maternal/Grass-Type Bulls

42nd Annual Bred Female & Bull Sale Jan. 26 • 1 pm At the Ranch Hinton, IA

Lot 1 Jauer Front Page 5083 19

www.jauerangus.com

Maternally Efficient “Real World” Angus Genetics

• Kurt (712) 253-8710 • Doug (712) 253-0125 doug@jauerangus.com


Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

21

Boner looks at Senate ag priorities

Brian Boner

Cheyenne – In his first term as chairman of the Senate Agriculture, State and Public Lands and Water Resources Committee, Sen. Brian Boner of Douglas says he’s excited about the work the Wyoming Legislature and the Ag Committee are embarking on. “This year is a general session, so I hope we can focus on policy issues and keep the fighting over the budget to a minimum,” Boner comments. “There is a lot of volatility in the stock market and in the price of oil, but I hope we can work on a lot of policy issues during this session.” Boner notes that, with his background as a sheep and cattle producer, he strongly supports the agriculture industry. He also has a background in energy,

since his family’s ranching operation sits in the southern end of the Powder River Basin. “We have to deal with all sorts of energy development – oil, gas and wind energy,” he comments. Boner says, “I hope my experience helps provide a balanced perspective and will serve me well as we go through this session.” Among the top issues facing the agriculture committee specifically, Boner says a handful of bills passed during the interim session that will be beneficial to the state. “We have two bills about pursuing land swaps with the federal government,” he says. “Right now, we have school sections that are landlocked, and that means we can’t really develop the resources on those parcels because federal policies aren’t friendly for economic activity.” “If we swap those isolated parcels for gaining ownership of federal lands that are similarly isolated amongst state lands, perhaps in areas where there is also economic activity opportunities, it could be a good revenue boost for our schools,” Boner explains. “This is going to be a pretty important bill for the ag committee.” Additionally, Boner

Perdue selects CBB Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue has appointed 35 members to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board. Producers and importers newly appointed to serve three-year terms, including Irvin J. Petsch from Meridan. Additionally, Wallace Schulthess of Woodruff, Utah was appointed to the board. The board is authorized by the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985 and has 99 members, all of whom are beef producers or importers of cattle, beef or beef products. The board is authorized by the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985. For more information on the members of the board or their work, visit beefboard.org.

says challenges with the fire suppression account also spurred a bill to help make more funds available to meet obligations for fighting devastating fires in the future. “We’re also working on a bill for the Wyoming Livestock Board that would give county sheriff’s more resources for livestock enforcement,” he explains. “We eliminated nearly all of our livestock enforcement positions and expect county sheriffs to pick up the slack, but we’re looking to fund those obligations, too.” Boner says Wyomingites can look for agendas for Senate Ag Committee meetings, which are slated for Tuesdays upon adjournment of the session. Agendas for each meeting are available at wyoleg.gov. Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at saige@wylr. net.

LETTERS

Submit your letters to: Editor, Wyoming Livestock Roundup, P.O. Box 850, Casper, WY, 82602, or e-mail to roundup@wylr.net. We reserve the right to edit letters. It is the policy of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup that we do not print letters attacking individuals, groups or organizations within the Wyoming agricultural community.

This letter was written in response to an article on prairie dog control, published in the Wyoming Livestock Roundup Volume 30, Issue 32, published on Dec. 7. To the Editor: Goshen County Weed and Pest (GCWP) would like to stress the importance of reading and following the application instructions provided on the product label. The article has caused confusion regarding proper application methods of anticoagulants and fumigants. The anticoagulants mentioned, Rozol and Kaput, need to be placed six inches below ground. No amount of these products should be placed outside the burrow. Poison oats, a fumigant, are placed on the soil surface.

Further, the figures presented regarding prairie dog population increases and decreases in cattle gain were intended to be used with the words “may” and “can” rather than “will.” Colonization rates of 20 percent will not necessarily cause a six percent decrease in cattle gains. It “may” cause that amount of decrease dependent on several factors including environmental conditions, stocking rate, and vegetation type. For more information on these figures, read “Are livestock weight gains affected by black-tailed prairie dogs,” by Justin Derner, available at naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/16676/PDF. Finally, the article misrepresents the breadth of topics covered during the “Profit Pulverizing Pests” presenta-

tion at the 2018 Southeast Wyoming Beef Production Convention on Nov. 20. Prairie dogs were merely one pest in the line-up of horn flies, Dalmatian toadflax, horseweed and grasshoppers. Certain information in this particular article regarding prairie dog habitat and certain control methods were covered in detail two years ago at the 2016 Southeast Wyoming Beef Production Convention. We welcome questions regarding other pests affecting livestock producers as our scope goes beyond prairie dogs. Sincerely, Goshen County Weed and Pest gocoweeds@gmail.com 307-532-3713

Bulls Born & Raised Where Corn Don’t Grow!

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SELLING 135 YEARLING ANGUS BULLS

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22

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

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Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

23

Agricultural Experiment Station employees honored for exceptional work Laramie – Outstanding staff and faculty members were recognized during the University of Wyoming (UW) College of Agriculture and Natural Resources annual employee recognition program. On Dec. 18, Interim Dean Bret Hess presented outstanding staff awards to Rebecca Ashley, histotechnologist in veterinary sciences; Kerry Casper, academic advising manager, academic student programs; and Mark Davidson, computer support specialist in veterinary sciences. Each recipient received $500. Teaching award The Lawrence Meeboer Classroom Teaching Award recipient is selected by students and receives a $500 award. Derek Scasta

from ecosystem science and management received the award. Also nominated were Chris Bastian and Vardges Hovhannisyan, both in agricultural and applied economics; and Jeff Beck and Karen Vaughan, both in ecosystem science and management. Outstanding educator John Hewlett, senior Extension educator in agricultural and applied economics, and Urszula Norton, associate professor in the Department of Plant Sciences, received Outstanding Educator Awards. Nominations are peerreviewed, and the winner receives a $2,500 award. This was established by an anonymous donor to bring special recognition to classroom and Exten-

sion educators within the college. Other nominees were Steve Paisley, interim Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) director and associate professor for animal science, and Vicki Hayman, extension nutrition and food safety educator. Recognized by colleagues The manager of the Wyoming Seed Certification Service was also recognized by the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment

Station (WAES) for his work with producers and the state. Mike Moore, based at the Powell Research and Extension (R&E) Center, received the Kathleen Bartoncelj WAES staff award during the event. Seed certification is conducted under the direction of the WAES and University of Wyoming Extension with the cooperation of the Wyoming Crop Improvement Association. The service assures seed quality and is based at the

Powell R&E Center. “Many of the comments about Mike mentioned how he is always going beyond the call of duty for the service and farmers in general,” said Hess, interim dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and director of research. An example of his dedication, noted one nominator, is when Moore and his wife had a “date” inspecting fields on the Fourth of July. The award is named in

honor of retired staff member Kathleen Bartoncelj. Recipients exemplify dedication to service and display exemplary employee conduct. WAES is the research office within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Saige Albert, managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup, compiled this article from multiple University of Wyoming press releases. Send comments to roundup@ wylr.net.

SECOND ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE January 26, 2019 • 1 p.m.

Get the latest information from University of Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Stations at uwyo.edu/ uwexpstn.

Buffalo Livestock Auction

Selling 50 Yearling Angus Bulls and 18 Commercial Heifers, Including:

Teaching influence – Derek Scasta (center) received the Lawrence Meeboer Classroom Teaching Award. Students choose the award. Scasta is flanked by Warrie Means (left) director of the Office of Academic and Student Programs, and Bret Hess, interim dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (right). Photo courtesy of UW

Lot 1 LGR Renown 8017 • AAA# 19128015 CED: +7 BW: -.1 WW: +70 YW: +124 M: +30 SC: +.21 DOC: +26 CW: +50 Marb: +.44 RE: +.78 $W: +76.96 $B: +142.74

Lot 6 LGR Renown 8060 • AAA# 19128011

CED: +6 BW: +0.8 WW: +70 YW: +121 M: +27 SC: +.27 DOC: +23 CW: +49 Marb: +.21 RE: +.66 $W: +67.87 $B: +121.14 Also Selling 18 Fancy Bangs Vaccinated Open Commercial Heifers, Including, A Special Feature Youth Donation Heifer.

Seed certification – Wyoming Seed Certification Manager Mike Moore was recognized for his work with producers and the state. He received the Kathleen Bartoncelji WAES Staff Award on Dec. 18. Photo courtesy of UW

Education award – John Hewlett, University of Wyoming Extension farm and ranch management specialist, was presented an Outstanding Educator Award. Photo courtesy of UW

Lot 4 LGR Charlo 8080 • AAA# 19128044

CED: -2 BW: +3.8 WW: +63 YW: +103 M: +27 SC: +1.83 DOC: +16 CW: +38 Marb: +.43 RE: +.22 $W: +63.13 $B: +103.59

Donation Heifer Drawing to be held on sale day for juniors attending the sale on this 2/24/18 heifer calf sired by SAV Seedstock 4838 right from the heart of our replacements! Reg# 19128028

Sires Include: SAV Platinum 0010 • SAV Renown 3439 • Coleman Charlo 3212 • Coleman Doc 2261 SAV Seedstock 4838 • Coleman Maverick 5322 • SAV West River 2066 • SAV Deep Cut 6851

Outstanding educator – Urszula Norton (center) received an Outstanding Educator Award. With Norton is Warrie Means (left) director of the Office of Academic and Student Programs, and Bret Hess, interim dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (right). Photo courtesy of UW

For more information contact: Ed Meredith 307-751-2472 • Chad Bradshaw 307-751-1535 Justin McKenzie 307-751-6737 • Jake Townsend 307-751-5793 Shop 307-673-0049 228 Little Goose Canyon Road, County Road 77 • Big Horn, WY 82833

www.littlegooseranch.com

John Andras • 406-670-5074


24

Volume 30 No. 37 • January 12, 2019

RIVERTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION Market Report for January 4 & 8, 2019 • 5,714 Head Sold Representative Sales COWS FORT BRIDGER 1 Cow, 1020# ................................... $58.00 RIVERTON 3 Cow, 1271# ................................... $56.00 8 Cow, 1105# ................................... $55.50 FARSON 1 Cow, 1385# ................................... $53.00 8 Cow, 1390# ................................... $52.50 RIVERTON 6 Cow, 1211# ................................... $52.00 5 Cow, 1551# ................................... $51.50 5 Cow, 1280# ................................... $49.00 PAVILLION 4 Cow, 1428# ................................... $47.00 BULLS ARAPAHOE 1 Bull, 1910# .................................... $70.00 DANIEL 2 Bull, 1892# .................................... $67.00 SHOSHONI 1 Bull, 1720# .................................... $65.50 ARAPAHOE 1 Bull, 2205# .................................... $65.00 KAYCEE 2 Bull, 2105# .................................... $60.00 HEIFERETTES FARSON 7 Heiferette, 883# ............................ $99.00 RIVERTON 2 Heiferette, 872# ............................ $97.00 FARSON 1 Heiferette, 935# ............................ $95.00 RAWLINS 3 Heiferette, 926# ............................ $90.00 FORT BRIDGER 8 Heiferette, 923# ............................ $88.00 RIVERTON 2 Heiferette, 1237# .......................... $85.00 STEERS RIVERTON 7 Steer, 346#.................................. $224.00 LANDER 40 Steer, 389#.................................. $218.00 BIG PINEY 21 Steer, 449#.................................. $215.00 RIVERTON 8 Steer, 452#.................................. $206.00 BIG PINEY 107 Steer, 496#.................................. $201.25 RIVERTON 105 Steer, 483#.................................. $195.00 KINNEAR 5 Steer, 514#.................................. $194.00 LANDER 51 Steer, 539#.................................. $192.00 BIG PINEY 30 Steer, 528#.................................. $190.50 FARSON 100 Steer, 544#.................................. $184.50 BIG PINEY 14 Steer, 580#.................................. $181.00 RIVERTON 90 Steer, 586#.................................. $177.50 TENSLEEP 30 Steer, 589#.................................. $176.00 PAVILLION 38 Steer, 615#.................................. $175.00 6 Steer, 628#.................................. $173.00 TENSLEEP 131 Steer, 648#.................................. $169.50 RIVERTON 43 Steer, 667#.................................. $160.00 PAVILLION 16 Steer, 685#.................................. $158.00 POWELL 74 Steer, 698#.................................. $152.00 RIVERTON 15 Steer, 720#.................................. $151.50 PAVILLION 31 Steer, 799#.................................. $149.50 RIVERTON 135 Steer, 744#.................................. $148.25 20 Steer, 808#.................................. $143.75 HEIFERS LANDER 39 Heifer, 357#................................. $181.00 BIG PINEY 54 Heifer, 385#................................. $175.50 26 Heifer, 439#................................. $175.00 106 Heifer, 450#................................. $174.75 52 Heifer, 457#................................. $174.00 14 Heifer, 492#................................. $169.00 RIVERTON 15 Heifer, 499#................................. $167.00 KINNEAR 12 Heifer, 497#................................. $166.50

RIVERTON 80 Heifer, 538#................................. $161.50 FARSON 42 Heifer, 543#................................. $159.50 BIG PINEY 20 Heifer, 547#................................. $159.00 BURLINGTON 20 Heifer, 561#................................. $156.00 KINNEAR 21 Heifer, 571#................................. $153.00 LANDER 4 Heifer, 590#................................. $147.00 RIVERTON 77 Heifer, 596#................................. $145.00 156 Heifer, 593#................................. $142.50 24 Heifer, 730#................................. $141.00 SHOSHONI 8 Heifer, 679#................................. $139.00 POWELL 12 Heifer, 710#................................. $136.50

TUESDAY, JANUARY 15 BRED COW SALE • START TIME 8:00 AM W/ WEIGH UPS, BREDS @ NOON BRED HEIFERS Fox Ranches - 200 Blk Angus Bred Hfrs 1,0001,050#. Bred to LBW Artzen Ang bulls to start calving 2/20. Bulls pulled at 60 days. Hfrs all originated out of Vermillion Ranch’s Spring sale. Cattle run at 10,000 ft. Fancy! Fleur de Lis Cattle Co - 100 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs 1,000-1,100#. Bred to Reyes LBW Blk Ang bulls to start calving 3/1 for 45 days (Pulled bulls). Rec Virashield 6 VL5, Multimin, wormed & poured. Big stout fancy Bred Heifers. Bred to reputation bulls! Alan Paxton - 45 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs. AI Bred to KM Broken Bow (5/19) & cleaned up with sons of Hoover Dam to start calving 2/24 for 45 days (Pulled bulls). Rec Pinkeye Shield XT4, Vista Once SQ & poured w/ Ivermectin this Spring; Scours Bovine Pillshield Plus C & poured @ Preg test. Fancy Bred heifers! Roby McNeel - 26 BWF & RWF Ang Hfrs. Bred to Teichert Blk Ang bulls to start calving 3/20. Rec Vision 8 & Virashield 6 VL5 & poured this Fall. Fancy, high desert! Ruby Ranch - 25 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs 9501,000#. Bred to LBW Lucky 7 Blk Ang bulls to calve March-April. Run over 8,000 ft. Fancy heifers! Griffin Hash Knife - 19 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs. Bred to LWB Wagler Angus & Bill Platt bulls to start calving March 12th. (Ultrasounded by Dr. Townsend). Rec Vision 7 VL5 FP last Spring & poured @ Preg check. High quality, high desert. Ryan & Dillon Hedges - 5 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs. Bred to proven LBW Connealy Blk Ang bulls to calve March/April. Comp vacc & poured. T & T Cattle - 4 Bred Hfrs (3 Red Angus, 1 Blk Ang). Bred to Reg Red Ang bulls to calve MarchApril. BRED COWS Kelly Wilcox - 300 Hereford & HerefordX 3-8 Yr old Bred cows. Bred to Red Ang & Hereford bulls to calve March/April. High desert. Dispersion. Brandon & Lindsey Haun - 120 Blk Ang & AngX 3 Yr-ST Bred cows. Bred to Sim/Angus Composite bulls (Low % Sim, Tuelle Cattle Co bulls) to start calving 3/10. Calves averaged 580 lbs 10/10/18. Run @ 8,000 ft elevation. Rec Virashield 6VL5, 7-way w/ Somnus & poured @ Fall Preg check. Complete dispersal of proven, great performing cows! Tyler Sorch - 70 Blk 3-5 Yr old Bred cows. Bred to calving ease Registered Blk Ang bulls to start calving March 1st. Have been on complete mineral program & poured. Run @ 8,000 ft. Fancy, high elevation cows! Hopkins Hamilton - 25 Blk Ang & AngX ST Bred cows. Bred to calve March/April. 30 Blk Ang & AngX Running Age Bred cows. Bred to calve May/June. All bred to HD Dunn & Vermillion Blk Ang bulls. Reputation, high desert cows.

Early Consignments Jess Lohmiller - 44 Blk & BWF ST Bred cows. Bred to Hereford bulls to start calving 4/1. Steed Canyon - 40 ST Red Angus Bred cows. Bred to Loosli & Six Iron Red Angus bulls to calve March/April. Fancy! Armada Ranch - 36 Blk ST Bred cows. Bred to High quality Blk Ang bulls to calve April/May. High desert cows! Zeller Ranch - 30 Blk Running Age-ST Bred cows. Bred to Blk Ang bulls to calve March/April. Sarah Faith Ranch - 29 Running Age Blk Bred cows. Bred to Blk Ang bulls to calve in May. Comp vacc in Fall & poured. Gavin & Anna Shurtleff - 25 Blk & Red 3-6 Yr Old Bred cows. Bred to Leachman bulls to calve May/June. Choice, high desert cows. Ronnie Givens - 25 Blk ST Bred cows. Bred to Redland Blk Ang bulls to calve March/April. Fancy! Skylark Cattle Co - 25 Blk Ang & AngX ST Bred cows. Bred to Blk Ang bulls to calve March/April. Ryan & Dillon Hedges - 20 3-6 Yr Old Blk & Red Bred cows. Bred to Connealy LBW Ang bulls to calve March/April. Comp vacc & poured. Frank Ranch - 18 Blk Ang 3-6 Yr old Bred cows. Bred to SO Cattle Co bulls to calve April-May. Run @ elevation. Fancy! Jim Yoder - 15 Blk 3-6 Yr old Bred cows. Bred to SO Cattle Co & P/T Blk Ang bulls to calve April/ May. Rees Ready - 6 Blk SM-ST Bred cows. Bred to Blk bulls to start calving March 20th. T & T Cattle - 3 Red Angus ST Bred cows. Bred to Reg Red Angus bulls to calve March-April. Elayna Hedges - 2 Registered 4 & 5 Yr old Hereford Bred cows. Bred to Domino Hereford Bull & cleaned up with LBW Connealy Angus bull to calve March/April. Complete dispersion. Comp vacc & poured. OPEN COWS Lazy T - 73 open cows Steed Canyon - 1 load of open Red Angus cows Bob Nicol - 40 open cows Gavin & Anna Shurtleff - 25 open young cows & Heiferettes Armada Ranch - 12 open cows

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22 CALF SPECIAL • START TIME 8:00 AM LOT LOADS @ 10:00 AM Fraughton Ranch - 450 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 550-650#. Rec Vista Once SQ & 8-way @ Branding & Weaning (11/15 Weaned & poured). High elevation, powerful, great performers! HD Ranch - 400 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 425475#. Rec Bovishield Gold 5 & 7-way @ Branding & Weaning (10/15). Knife cut. High elevation. Paintrock Blk Ang sired. Hay fed, green, fancy! Mark & Amanda Huffstetler - 220 Blk Ang & AngX Strs 600-700# 130 Blk Ang & AngX Hfrs 600-650#. Rec Vista Once & 7-way @ Branding & Weaning & poured. 90 day wean. Hay fed, high desert calves! Steed Canyon Cattle Co - 320 Red Ang Strs & Hfrs 450-550#. Rec Bovishield Gold One shot, 7-way w/ Somnus, Nasalgen & poured. Over 60 days weaned. Running out on meadow & hay fed. Sired by Loosli & Six Iron Red Ang bulls. Age & Source verified w/ Red Angus tags. 100% All Natural. Hfrs are Replacement quality. Green & extra fancy! Dustin Eaton - 170 Blk Ang & AngX Strs 550-600# 90 Blk Ang & AngX Hfrs. Rec Vista Once SQ & Vision 8 w/ Somnus this Spring & Fall & poured. No implants. Comp mineral program. Hay fed, fancy, high desert! Jim Eaton - 250 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 550650#. Rec Vista Once SQ & Vision 8 w/ Somnus this Spring & Fall & poured. No implants. Comp mineral program. Hay fed, fancy, high desert! Steve Mines - 120 Blk Ang & AngX Strs 575-625# 80 Blk Ang & AngX Hfrs 525-575#. Rec Vista 5 & 8-way @ Branding & Precon (10/20). Poured w/

Ivomec. Weaned 11/1. Hay fed. Reputation, high desert calves! Tim Tolton - 150 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 525625#. Rec Virashield 6 & 8-way (Spring & Fall). Hfrs are Bangs vacc. Long time weaned. Hay fed, high elevation, choice calves! Stan Horton & Sons - 79 Blk Ang & AngX Strs 650# 60 Blk Ang & AngX Hfrs 600#. Rec Pyramid 5 & Vision 7 w/ Somnus @ Branding & Weaning (No implants). Hfrs are Bangs vacc. Choice, long time weaned calves! 100% Blk Ang sired. Lyman Ranch - 90 Blk Ang Strs 550-625#. Rec Bovishield Gold Plus, 7-way & Poured. Over 75 days weaned Sired by performance tested high gaining Connealy & Schaff Blk Ang bulls. Bunk broke. Reputation, proven high elevation performers. Kelly Wilcox - 84 Red Angus/HerefordX Strs & Hfrs 500#. Comp vacc. Long time weaned. Diamond X Ranch - 80 Blk Strs 525-575#. Rec Titanium 5, Nasalgen & 7-way @ Branding; Titanium 5 w/ Pasteurella, 7-way w/ Somnus & Ivomec @ Weaning. Weaned 45 days. Fancy! C & D Livestock - 80 Blk Strs & Hfrs 425-500#. Comp vacc @ Branding & Weaning. Long time weaned. Big Sandy Ranch/S3 Livestock - 50 Red Ang & Red AngX Strs 600-700#. Comp vacc @ Branding & Vision 7 & Titanium 5 @ Precon (10/25). 70 day wean. Bunk broke. Tim Wiberg - 40 Blk & Red Angus Strs & Hfrs 550600#. Comp vacc & poured. Comp mineral program. 60 day wean. Hanks Family Ranch - 30 Blk Strs & Hfrs 400450#. Comp vacc. Long time weaned. Darrell & Bonnie Leonhardt - 20 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 650-750#. No implants. Comp vacc. Fancy! Tony & Cindy Spriggs - 20 Blk Ang Strs & Hfrs 550-650#. Rec Vista 5, Vision 7 w/ Somnus, Once PMH, Safeguard & poured. Over 60 days weaned. Betty Whitt - 20 Blk Strs & Hfrs 700#. Rec 7-way @ Branding. Long time weaned. Hay fed. Lyman Clark - 20 Blk Strs & Hfrs. Rec two rounds of shots. Weaned since the beginning of Nov. Fancy! Bob Nicol - 20 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 550#. Comp vacc @ Branding. 100% sired by SO Cattle Co Blk Ang bulls. Choice, high desert calves! Ryan & Dillon Hedges - 10 Blk Ang & AngX Strs & Hfrs 500-600#. Comp vacc.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 BRED COW SALE W/ SHEEP & HORSES START TIME 8:00 AM W/ SHEEP Fleur de Lis Cattle Co - 60 Blk Ang & AngX Bred Hfrs 1,000-1,100#. Bred to Reyes LBW Blk Ang bulls to start calving 3/1 for 45 days (Pulled bulls). Rec Virashield 6 VL5, Multimin, wormed & poured. Big stout fancy Bred Heifers. Bred to reputation bulls! Lyman Ranch Co - 120 Blk Ang ST Bred cows (1,350#). Bred to Connealy & Schaff Blk Ang bulls to start calving 3/1. One brand, high elevation. Big country, reputation cows!! 10 Running Age Blk Bred cows

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 CALF SPECIAL • START TIME 8:00 AM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 BRED COW SALE W/ JENSEN ANGUS BULL SALE (1:00 PM) START TIME 8:00 AM Jensen Angus - 70 Blk Ang 2 Yr Old Bulls. PAP, Fertility & Trich tested. High quality, high mountain Blk Angus bulls.

Contact: Riverton Livestock Auction (307) 856-2209 • Jeff Brown (307) 850-4193 • Tom Linn (307) 728-8519 • Mark Winter (580) 747-9436 • www.rivertonlivestock.com • Also watch our live cattle auction at www.cattleusa.com

1490 South 8th Street East • Riverton, WY 82501 • (307) 856-2209

January 12, 2019  

January 12, 2019

January 12, 2019  

January 12, 2019

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