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Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Annual Report 2010-2011

www.mae.cemr.wvu.edu


MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR JACKY C. PRUCZ

Chair’sMessage

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) is bracing for a period of unprecedented growth, but also unforeseen challenges. We are on the verge of concluding seven national searches for new tenure-track faculty positions at a time when federal funding for research is becoming increasingly scarce. Our growth is the result of both a continuing increase in our undergraduate enrollment and the consistent rise in the level of our research productivity.

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In the 2010-2011 academic year, the MAE Department reached all-time records in numerous metrics of performance measures, ranging from undergraduate enrollment (456) in the area of education, to the total dollar value of new research awards ($15.1 million) and research expenditures ($11.6 million), to the number of peer-reviewed publications (71) in the area of sponsored research. Although attempts to secure new research dollars have intensified in recent months and are likely to remain difficult in the near future, we remain confident that, with the potential to increase the size of our faculty from 30 to 37 by August 2012, we can build on our existing expertise, infrastructure, and momentum to maintain and even enhance our strong reputation and national ranking in sponsored research. We continue to assess the learning outcomes, the effectiveness, and the instructional materials and methods of all the educational programs offered by our Department, both at the undergraduate (BSAE, BSME, Dual BSAE/BSME) and graduate levels (MSAE, MSME, PhD/AE, PhD/ME). These assessments play an essential role not only in the accreditation of our undergraduate programs and the recently completed five-year reviews of our

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

degree programs by the Board of Governors of West Virginia University, but also in our steadfast commitment to continuous improvements in the quality and value of the education that our Department provides at all levels in the basic disciplines of aerospace and mechanical engineering. The feedback received through the self-assessment process from our various constituencies, and especially from our alumni, students, and Visiting Committee members has pointed us toward changes in our undergraduate curricula, which we ought to pursue in our quest to graduate highly capable, skilled, and competitive engineers in the global markets of tomorrow, including: • Integration of the hands-on design experience throughout the curriculum, and • Offering our graduates the flexibility of further in-depth studies in certain fields of specialty in either mechanical or aerospace engineering. As a preliminary step toward more hands-on design integration and more three-dimensional computer-aided design in our undergraduate curricula, we will teach three new design courses for the first time in the 2012-2013 academic year; one course each at the freshman, sophomore, and junior levels. We have also added two new sections to the capstone design course in mechanical engineering, one focused on the SAE formula car competition, and the other on the human-powered vehicle competition. At the core of all our past accomplishments, present successes, and hopes for the future lie our outstanding faculty, staff, and students. It behooves me, therefore, to conclude this message with heartfelt congratulations to the MAE faculty

and students who have won highly prestigious and competitive awards at the local, state, and national levels. We are proud to have Dr. Marcello Napolitano, the 2011 Professor of the Year in the state of West Virginia, as a faculty member in our Department. Dr. Larry Banta received a Fulbright Scholarship to spend one semester at the University of Genoa in Italy, where he will continue his research on advanced fuel cell technology. The “Projects with Industry” section of the capstone design course in mechanical engineering, which has been taught by Professor Kenneth Means since 1997, has been selected as one of only 29 programs for inclusion in the National Academy of Engineering’s Real World Engineering Education publication. Two MAE students, Ed Chambers and Byron Patterson, have won highly competitive graduate fellowships from the National Science Foundation, raising to five the number of MAE students who have won this prestigious fellowship in the last few years. Two other outstanding MAE students, Rob Murphy and Collins Youngblood, have been awarded nationally competitive graduate fellowships from the U.S. Department of Energy, while Derrick Banerjee was recognized through an NSF honorable mention, and a research poster prepared by Sean Belarardo was selected as one of only 74 entries, out of 850 nationwide applications, to be presented on the Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. We hope you will find this report interesting and informative, and you will continue to stay in touch and support our Department in any way you can. Dr. Jacky Prucz Chair Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Annual Report from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

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Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

CONTENTS

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10 17

FEATURES 5 Students 10 Research 16 Alumni 18

Distinguished Alumni

27 Donors ANNUAL REPORT 2010-2011 Publisher / Jacky Prucz jacky.prucz@mail.wvu.edu / 304.293.3131 Production Director / Dave Solley Editor / Mary C. Dillon Contributing Writers Nikki Cannon / Scott Gillespie / Dave Solley

Address West Virginia University Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering PO Box 6106 / Morgantown, WV 26506-6106 www.mae.cemr.wvu.edu Change of Address WVU Foundation / PO Box 1650 Morgantown, WV 26504-1650 Fax: 304.284.4001 / e-mail: info@wvuf.org www.mountaineerconnection.com Copyright Š2012 by the WVU Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Brief excerpts of articles in this publication may be reprinted without a request for permission if MAE Annual Report is acknowledged in print as the source. Contact the editor for permission to reprint entire articles.

StudentProjects

Designer J. Paige Nesbit

West Virginia University is governed by the WVU Board of Governors and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. WVU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution.

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Fiscal Year

2006–2007

2007–2008

2008–2009

2009–2010

2010–2011

28

27

27

29

30

$9,013,481

$9,474,329 $11,879,531 $12,769,000

15,102,501

$10,032,752

$9,945,664 $10,856,842 $11,215,652

11,613,476

No. of Faculty Research Awards Research Expenditures Journal Papers (Jan.-Dec.)

55

Undergraduate Enrollment

53

Ph.D. Enrollment

66 73 80 87 75

Undergraduate Degrees

126 162 130 152 165

M.S. Degrees

43 22 25 19 30

Ph.D. Degrees

12 7 12 11 21

Undergraduate Student Credit Hours

9,900

10,140

11,358

11,861

13,137

Graduate Student Credit Hours

2,315

3,228

3,432

2,952

4,063

236

280

257

273

338

48

45

60

63

81

Undergraduate Course Credit Hours Graduate Course Credit Hours Historic Trends of MAE Sponsored Research in the Last Seven Fiscal Years $16 Million

New Awards

236

250

178

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2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011

Research Awards: $15,102,501

Research Awards 11% 41% 18%

Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines and Emissions Energy Materials Mech Design & Structures Aerodynamics UAV/Controls Defense Systems

6%

Research Expenditures 15% 25% 15% 12% 11% 20%

2010-2011

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded per Faculty Member: 5.5 Faculty Members:

30

Journal Papers Published: 71

Undergraduate Enrollment: 456

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded: 165

17%

MAE Annual Report

$11,613,476 Journal Publications per Faculty Member: 2.36 Research Expenditures:

7%

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65

M.S. Enrollment

2%

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Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

QuickFacts

PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines and Emissions Energy Materials Center for Industrial Research Applications Mech Design & Structures Aerodynamics UAV/Contols Defense Systems

M.S. Enrollment: 87

M.S. Degrees Awarded: 30 Ph.D. Enrollment: 75

Ph.D. Degrees Awarded:

21

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Students Multitasking Junior Leads Pride of West Virginia Katie Demyan is a junior, dual majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineering. When she was 16, she witnessed the Pride of West Virginia, West Virginia University’s marching band, perform for the first time at a band competition she attended with her high school marching band. PHOTO CREDIT LOGAN SNIDER

“It was like nothing I had ever experienced,” said Demyan. “I watched the almost 400 members run onto the field and I knew right then and there that I had to be part of an organization so dedicated to excellence. “As I explored possible majors for myself, I knew the challenge and ability to make a big impact on the world, and practical application of the math and science classes I loved so much made engineering the perfect field for me,” Demyan added. “WVU had a reputation for having an outstanding engineering program, so in addition to all the other positive factors, I knew this was the place for me.” Demyan, a native of Huttonsville, W.Va., currently serves as one of two drum majors of the Pride of West Virginia. She splits much of her time between engineering homework and band rehearsal. In the spring semester, she plays trumpet in WVU’s concert band and is also a member of the Omicron chapter of the national honorary marching band service fraternity, Kappa Kappa Psi, where she serves as secretary. Being a member of the band has taught Demyan many lessons that she takes back and applies in her engineering courses and everyday life. “My professors are constantly stressing that engineers work in teams to accomplish things and I see this dynamic played out in the Pride as well,” Demyan said. “The band relies on a network of student leaders to get things done. As drum major, I work closely with the section and rank leaders to help make sure the marching and musical aspects of our field shows come together.”

“Engineers are fundamentally problem solvers, and as one of the Pride’s drum majors, I’ve become quite good at solving problems along the way,” Demyan said. With a year to go before graduation, Demyan is looking at a variety of career options. She is particularly interested in working with magnetic levitation trains, like those in Germany and China. She sees maglev technology as a way to produce transportation vehicles that don’t harm the environment and can move people quickly and efficiently to their destinations. But if Demyan can’t find work with transportation here on the earth’s surface, her dual major has given her the opportunity to look to the sky.

Students

She stressed the importance of communicating effectively not only musically but verbally with other members of the band and staff and about building rapport with those she leads and works with. Demyan stressed that these skills can be applied to project and lab groups where she often finds herself naturally taking the lead and feeling at ease in many different group dynamics.

KATIE DEMYAN

“I’d love to work for an aerospace company, NASA, or otherwise,” Demyan said.

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Students Patterson Returns from Internship with Air Force Byron Patterson, a senior at West Virginia University and dual major in mechanical and aerospace engineering, returned to Morgantown after completing his internship with the United States Air Force with a renewed sense of purpose. “My future goals were reinforced this past summer and I am very interested in pursuing research for a lifelong job,” said Patterson of his internship working with micro-aerial vehicles (MAVs) at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. “During the summer, I explored a completely new field for me, but despite my unfamiliarity with the subject, I was able to develop a promising design,” said Patterson. “It further substantiated my interest in technical research as a full-time job and that I am able to learn a completely new topic and perform well.” Patterson, whose greatest achievement was the development and application of various compliant mechanisms to MAVs, worked with three designs. Two designs were developed by AFRL researchers and his task was to demonstrate their operation. The third design was entirely developed by a team led by Patterson. It was during the demonstration phase that the design created by Patterson’s team performed better than those of the AFRL researchers. The design will be further pursued by researchers at Wright State University, and will be refined so that it can be used on MAVs. In addition to the design work, Patterson’s work from the summer will result in two publications. BYRON PATTERSON

Despite his accomplishments, Patterson’s one wish was for more time.

Students

“We are truly just beginning to tap the potential of compliant mechanisms, and specifically their application to MAVs,” said Patterson. “If I had more time for on-site research, there are definite design aspects I would have explored. But even though I am absent from the site, I am working in collaboration with researchers at Wright State University on future designs.”

MAE Students Recognized as Top Graduating Seniors Four mechanical and aerospace engineering graduates were among 42 students honored as 2011 top seniors at West Virginia University. Derrick Banerjee, Ryan Coder, Steven Rhodes, and Justin West were recognized during a ceremony held at the Honors Convocation during commencement weekend. Of the four individuals recognized, West was one of eight who received the Order of Augusta, a

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MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

prestigious award given to the top one percent of WVU graduates. Not solely based on academic accomplishments, the Order of Augusta award was created on the 40th anniversary of the WVU Foundation in 1995 and is given in acknowledgment of a student’s well-roundedness, leadership abilities, and experience with internships in their fields. Each year, students submit applications to be reviewed

by the WVU Foundation with the requirement that the applicant must be a spring or summer graduate and hold a 3.8 cumulative grade point average. West’s name was entered into a permanent registry, accessible by any student at anytime, alongside the list of previous winners dating back to the award’s founding in 1995.


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Hoover Summers in England Until his senior year of high school, Andrew Hoover had always planned on attending Marshall University. Both his parents graduated from Marshall, so it seemed the natural course to follow. “I was a fan of the university as a child,” Hoover said. ANDREW HOOVER

It wasn’t until he decided to study engineering that his decision changed. Although he received track and field scholarships to several smaller in-state schools, Hoover decided it was best to focus on school work. The strong reputation of West Virginia University’s engineering college, coupled with multiple academic scholarships, ultimately led to his decision to become a Mountaineer. Hoover, now a senior majoring in mechanical engineering, was given a unique opportunity this past summer. He is the latest of three students who traveled to England to participate in the University of Birmingham’s International Summer Energy School. The partnership with the British university was started by Darran Cairns, a Birmingham graduate and associate professor in WVU’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He, along with Professor Nigel Clark and Dave Solley of the Department, accompanied the students and eight high school science teachers. The group attended daily lectures and broke into teams to design a composite beam. Each group had to come up with an initial design and complete a series of calculations to ensure their beam would pass all the project and testing requirements. Once each team selected their final design by optimizing these calculations, they had to construct the beam using only provided materials. The beams were then tested to determine if their theoretical calculations were accurate in ensuring their design would not fail. But at the end of their 10-day trip, Hoover stayed behind.

Hoover worked with the School of Metallurgy and Materials under the supervision of Stephen Kukureka. He received special guidance from the department’s research technician, Frank Biddlestone. He studied polymer characterization techniques while Biddlestone trained him to use differential scanning calorimetry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and rheometry.

Students

A student at the University of Birmingham allowed Hoover to stay in his apartment for the duration of his visit. The apartment was located on one of the main roads through town and was just a short walk to campus. Fully furnished, complete with bedding, kitchen supplies, and other household items, the hospitable renters even checked in on him to ensure everything about the apartment was suitable.

He was assigned a special project that emphasized the design element of his mechanical engineering background. Hoover had to design a component that could be used as a holding tray for samples in a fretting test machine, used to conduct tribology studies, already in use on campus. But not all of his time in England was spent working. On his down time, Hoover was able to visit many historic sites in Europe, including Warwick Castle; the Royal Shakespeare Theatre; and the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. He was even able to catch the last day of competition at Wimbledon.

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Students MAE Team Wins Governor’s Cup On March 16, 2011, Peter D. Gall, visiting professor and instructor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and his design team received the Governor’s Cup award in Charleston, W.Va. The award was presented by West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin. Gall and his design team, the “Awesome Astronauts,” received the award for placing first in the state’s Real World Design Challenge. The Challenge, which is open to all high school students in the state, challenged teams to design a wing for a transport aircraft capable of efficiently cruising at Mach 0.79 at 36,000 feet cruising altitude. The wing not only needed to be efficiently designed, it needed to be thoroughly analyzed using various software programs. The team, which included Andy Thomas, Cody Legge, and Ryen Reidel, handpicked Gall to be their coach and mentor. “Dr. Gall has an incredible background,” said Thomas. “As an experienced former airline pilot, a former NASA engineer, and a college professor, he has a wealth of knowledge pertaining to aircraft design. In addition to his invaluable experience, he was always very helpful, accommodating, and easy to work with. It made the challenge a truly enjoyable experience.”

StudentsAccomplishments

Student Accomplishments COLLEGE and DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS

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Fernando and Isabella Angelelli Engineering Scholarship Kattie Riggs

CNG/Dominion Engineering Scholarship Peter Januszkiewicz

Chester A. Arents Scholarship Edward Chambers Clinton Smith

Charles C. Copenhaver Scholarship Nickolas Brown Matthew Robinson

Bjornson Scholarship Alan Didion Logan Holshey Andrew Hoover Larry Nichols Harry Shaffer

Jerome B. Fanucci Scholarship David George Nicholas Mariani Rex Persinger Zachary Seamon Eric Smithberger

Carl H. Cather Scholarship Dustin Frohnapfel Justin West

Hanson, Inc. Scholarship Jerry Mason Zachary Santer David George

Harold M. Cather Scholarship Benjamin Province

Lucy B. Johnston Scholarship Nickolas Brown

Statler College Engineering Scholarship Kattie Riggs William S. Clapper Scholarship Steven Rhodes Justin West

MAE Annual Report

Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation Scholarship Enmanuel Madera Darius Reynolds

2010-2011

Kirkland Scholarship Peter Januszkiewicz Robert Sykes Jon Stephan Taylor C. Binford Sims Memorial Scholarship Skye Baber Westmoreland-Sprague Scholarship Fund Andrew Hoover Donald T. Worrell Scholarship Evan Ford John L. Loth Scholarship Matthew Milanese Lentz/Shrout Scholarship David George Mark James Zachary Santer Lemuel S. and Mary I. Menear Scholarship Kevin Luo

Homer P. Nutter Scholarship Timothy Jackson Jennifer Williams Ragland-Bowers Scholarship Skye Baber Lloyd B. Selby Scholarship Matthew Boots Seltzer/Ulrich Scholarship Bradley Cox Jessica Lankford Lydia McDowell Matthew Schmidt MAE Department Scholarship Andrew Rhodes Matthew Schmidt

WVU Achievement Scholarship Lucas Behrens Luke Bowman Joseph Bright Jeffrey Conrad Joseph Hawley Christopher Heim Ryan Helmic Seth Hipkins Bryan Layfield Michael Nussbaum Christine O’Brien Byron Patterson Garrett Rinker Nathaniel Roberts David Terris Daniel Whitlow Mark Wroblewski WVU Excellence Scholarship Derrick Banerjee Zachary Cohen Rebecca Durham Cody Hood Luke Mastrorilli James Reil Timothy Schmidt


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

External Scholarships and Awards HOMELAND SECURITY SCHOLARSHIP Byron Patterson The program is designed to encourage students studying in disciplines relative to national security, especially math, science, social and behavior sciences, and technology. The program extends generous scholarships to both undergraduate- and graduate-level students in eligible degrees of study. Undergrads earn up to $9,000 each academic year and grad students may earn more than $20,000 per academic year. The very nature of these awards makes them extremely competitive. Only about 100 scholarships are given each year across the country, which means only the best of the best will be chosen.

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS SCHOLARSHIP Andrew Garrett The mission of the Society of American Military Engineers is to promote and facilitate engineering support for national security by developing and enhancing relationships and competencies among uniformed services, public and private sector engineers, and related professionals.

Jessica Lankford The National Consortium for Measurement and Signature Intelligence Research Scholarship grants are disbursed by the National Science Foundation. These awards are designed to encourage promising students in the science to pursue careers in the intelligence field.

Robert Murphy The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education provides well-rounded laboratory experiences that expand graduate students’ expertise beyond the traditional university setting.

DOE UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

MAE DEPARTMENT OUTSTANDING SENIORS Derrick Banerjee Ryan Coder Steven Rhodes Justin West Established in 1995 to signify the 40th anniversary of the WVU Foundation, the Outstanding Seniors award recognizes students for their contributions and achievements in scholarship, leadership, and service.

Robert Murphy

ORDER OF AUGUSTA

The University Turbine Systems research (UTSR) Program began in 1992, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s major development program in gas turbines. The UTSR consortium includes leading gas turbine original equipment manufacturers and users and gas turbine component manufacturers. These companies comprise are the host sites for graduate students from UTSR universities placed for summer assignments (fellows).

The Order of Augusta is the University’s most prestigious student honor and further recognizes the students’ superior scholarship, demonstrated leadership, and record of community and public service. The award is named for its historical significance in the state. Augusta was among the original names considered by the Legislature when the state seceded from Virginia in 1863.

WVU EPSCOR STEM FELLOWSHIP Fritz Campo These fellowships are designed to attract, support, and retain talented graduate students in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. Priority is given to students incorporating nanoscale science into their research related to energy, security, and cancer.

AMELIA EARHART FELLOWSHIP Kerri Phillips The Amelia Earhart Fellowship program helps talented women, pursuing advanced studies in the typically male-dominated fields of aerospace-related sciences and engineering, achieve their educational goals. The Fellowship enables these women to invest in state-ofthe-art computers to conduct their research, purchase expensive books and resource materials, and participate in specialized studies around the globe. Amelia Earhart Fellows have gone on to become astronauts, aerospace engineers, astronomers, professors, geologists, business owners, heads of companies, even Secretary of the U.S. Air Force.

Justin West

DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP BY THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF GRADUATE EDUCATION AND LIFE Adi Adumitroaie Support during the development of the written dissertation is critical to the timely completion of students’ graduate programs of study. The Dissertation Fellowship Program provides selected students with fellowship support of $5,000 during the last semester of their programs of study to allow them focused time to complete the writing of their dissertation. These one-semester fellowships are awarded to Ph.D. or other terminal degree-seeking students in the last semester of their program based on academic merit and demonstrated progress in their research, scholarship, or creative activities.

Scholarships Awards

NATIONAL CONSORTIUM FOR MEASUREMENT AND SIGNATURE INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP

DOE OAK RIDGE INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND EDUCATION FELLOWSHIP

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RESEARCH

WVU Engine Emission Experts Largest Grocery Chain

Research

West Virginia University engine emission experts were in California helping part of the largest grocery store chain in America convert its delivery trucks into greener energy consumers.

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MAE Annual Report

2010-2011


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Help Part of America’s “Get Green” Ralphs Supermarkets, a California-centered division of the Kroger Company, wanted to pursue a greener energy footprint by using cleaner fuels and engines to power an extensive fleet of delivery vehicles that dot the highways from Los Angeles’ freeways to the country roads of the California mountains. The company was researching the transition of half its truck fleet to less polluting compressed natural gas (CNG). Ralphs leadership looked to WVU’s Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions (CAFEE) to help turn those green plans into green reality. The CAFEE experts were in the neighborhood anyway. With a cross-country road trip from Morgantown to Riverside, Calif., behind them—and having become the first university-based research team to measure heavy-duty emissions compliance for 2,500 consecutive miles—CAFEE scientists were anxious to tackle the Ralphs Grocery challenge and put some of the results of their trans-continental experiments to good use. “The cross-country trip generated valuable real-time emissions data over a wide range of operating conditions, from flat roads in the midwest through the high altitudes of the Rocky Mountains, including 11,000 feet at Loveland Pass,” said Arvind Thiruvengadam, a Ph.D. candidate in charge of data collection on the trip.

The five-day research trip included a stop at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Denver. It was sponsored by the South Coast California Air Quality Management District, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Once in California, CAFEE scientists set up shop at Ralphs massive distribution center in Riverside and established a staging ground for CAFEE’s mobile emissions laboratory.

“Ralphs has been a great research partner for many years,” said Dan Carder, CAFEE director. “The company’s commitment to improving fuel economy among its fleet of vehicles is unparalleled and its generous lending of its Riverside distribution center, an ideal location for our type of research, helped our engineers and scientists tremendously.” WVU is nationally known for its expertise in measuring engine emissions because it is home not only to a highly trained cadre of experts, but also the only mobile heavy-duty chassis dynamometer in the United States, which allows it to visit sites where vehicles are being used in real-world situations. In the event that non-compliance is identified, CAFEE works with engine, vehicle, and exhaust after treatment systems manufacturers in order to design and fabricate retrofit solutions to meet compliance. That means peace of mind for Ralphs if its growing fleet of green vehicles passes the WVU tests, and a growing collection of important engine emissions data for future conversions at various sites across America. “With a huge thrust in natural gas vehicles in California, the current project provided an excellent comparison of the benefits of advanced natural gas vehicles over older model year diesel vehicles,” said Thiruvengadam. “The comparative emissions data will help enable fleet owners such as Ralphs to have a better knowledge of the real-world emissions of their various heavy-duty vehicles.” Results will be shared with both the California Air Resource Board and South Coast Air Quality Management District, which will provide a better understanding of the effectiveness of current regulations for exhaust emissions. CAFEE has become a national leader in applied and fundamental research in heavy-duty engine emissions that, among other achievements, helps fuel suppliers and vehicle manufacturers to make better products that comply with complex and changing federal requirements and helps U.S. cities improve air quality while maintaining a realistic handle on technology costs.

Research

“It was great to see how our mobile laboratory systems reacted to different atmospheric pressures at different elevations,” said Thiruvengadam. “The primary objective was to study the effect of road grade on emissions from advanced heavy-duty diesel engines, but we took the opportunity to collect as much seed data as possible for various other potential research endeavors.”

While at the Ralphs facility, WVU scientists chassis-tested heavy-duty vehicles to ensure the engines were compliant with emissions regulations by collecting and examining emissions data from diesel, CNG, and dualfuel engines.

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RESEARCH

Liu Wins R&D 100 for SOFC Research

LIU

Researchers from West Virginia University, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, earned an award known around the world as the “Oscar of Innovation” for their work on a technology that could vastly improve the performance of solid oxide fuel cells as a new source of clean electricity. R&D Magazine named the work one of the “100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year.” Previous R&D 100 Award winners include such innovations as HDTV and the automated teller machine. Xingbo Liu, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering in WVU’s Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, was the principal investigator and co-developed the technology with NETL colleagues and funding. He was assisted by his former Ph.D. student Junwei Wu. Liu explained that the new product could make solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) viable for the first time by preventing the corrosion of the interconnects that are a critical part of the technology. “Compared with other coating methods, our electroplating has significant advantages in terms of cost, ease of manufacturing, and capability of coating complex shapes,” Liu said. “Not only have we published several high-impact academic papers, we are working with our industrial partners to utilize our coating in the SOFC stacks produced by the world’s leading SOFC manufacturers.

Research

“The resulting increase in solid oxide fuel cell stack life-time will decrease the cost of electricity produced, which will ultimately benefit the consumer,” Liu said.

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NETL researchers on the project included Christopher Johnson, who was a research scientist in the Energy System and Dynamics Division and now serves as project manager in Vehicle Technologies Division, and Randall Gemmen, who was a group leader and now serves as division director of the Energy System and Dynamics Division. In 2009, WVU teamed up with a private sector company, Faraday Technology, Inc., of Clayton, Ohio, and received U.S. Department of Energy technology transfer funding to improve the coating performance and to scale-up the coating for industrial-size interconnects making it available for commercial use. Faraday team members included principal scientists Heather McGrabb and Timothy Hall.

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

MAE Airplanes on Display at Air Heritage Museum Two airplanes that played an important role in research conducted in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering are now on display at the Air Heritage Museum in Beaver Falls, Pa. The 1959 Cessna 150 dual-fuel aircraft that led to the Morgantown Municipal Airport being designated a “clean airport” and the circulation control aircraft, developed with funding from the Office of Naval Research, were part of research conducted by John Loth. Loth came to West Virginia University in 1967 after spending five years at the University of Illinois; he received his doctorate from the University of Toronto in 1962. The WVU Cessna 150 became the first in-flight convertible dualfuel aircraft, as certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. The left wing tank of the WVU Cessna 150 was filled with ethanol (E95) and the right wing with avgas (100LL). A three-way fuel valve on the floor was used to select the fuel type. To do this in-flight required the ethanol fuel flow rate to increase by 50 percent. As a result, a separate ethanol fuel pump was installed, which discharged directly into the intake manifold via a spray nozzle. Its development contributed to the Morgantown Municipal Airport being designated a “clean airport” on August 28, 1996, only the second city in the United States to receive this honor from the Department of Energy.

Flight testing started on April 10, 1974, and continued for several weeks with professional test pilot Shawn Roberts. The aircraft was able to land at approximately 30 knots in less than 500 feet. Circulation control bleed air was supplied by a separate jet engine contained in the fuselage. The flaps on the aircraft were uniquely designed to deploy for takeoff and landing and retract for highspeed flight. The advantages of the system were a high lift-to-power ratio and near-level aircraft attitude at all speeds allowing greater visibility for the pilot. Video of these flights are available on YouTube at WVU Circulation Control Aircraft.avi.

Outreach

In 1974, technician Lee Metheny and his team completed building the world’s first circulation control technology demonstrator aircraft with the WVU model B wing. The aircraft was the first aircraft totally designed and built in West Virginia. The aircraft used circulation control to increase the short takeoff and landing capabilities.

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FACULTY & STAFF AWARDS

PERHINSCHI

Statler College Outstanding Advisor Award

This award was originally created by students seeking a way to recognize teachers who made significant contributions to their lives and education. The College continues this tradition by recognizing faculty that make major contributions to the teaching mission and provide outstanding classroom experiences to their students.

The College recognizes the importance of advising in the success of our students. The Outstanding Advisor Award recognizes excellence and continuous improvement in the area of undergraduate advising.

NAPOLITANO

FacultyAwards

SIVANERI

Statler College Outstanding Teacher Award

Mario Perhinschi

14

BANTA

Statler College Advisor of the Year Award

Larry Banta Nithi Sivaneri

Larry Banta

CLARK

Statler College Outstanding Researchers Award

The recipient of this award is chosen from the list of outstanding researchers and most exemplifies the mission of the College based on their research activities and their mentoring of graduate students.

The recipients are chosen by a committee of their peers based on their research activities and their mentoring of graduate students for this year, as well as the continuity of quality research over a several-year period.

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

The recipient of this award is chosen from the list of outstanding advisors and most exemplifies the mission of the College in helping students achieve their educational goals.

SOLLEY

NAPOLITANO

Statler College Researcher of the Year

Marcello Napolitano

BANTA

Nigel Clark Marcello Napolitano

Statler College Staff Recognition Award

Dave Solley

This award distinguishes staff that work tirelessly to ensure the department runs smoothly. These members are recognized for their overall exceptional performance and their willingness to go beyond the basic requirements of their positions.


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

THOMPSON

19th Annual Academy of Distinguished Alumni Teaching Award

Gregory Thompson

This award is given to a teacher that works to expand student’s knowledge beyond the curriculum. The Promotion and Tenure Committee of the Department nominates a candidate for this prestigious award.

SABOLSKY

2011 George Weaver Award

Edward Sabolsky

This award is given in recognition of excellent teaching of courses in engineering mechanics. Engineering mechanics includes the subjects of statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials, which form the foundation of several engineering disciplines.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

LIU

Early Career Faculty Fellow Award from the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society

Xingbo Liu

The award recognizes an assistant professor for his or her accomplishments that have advanced their academic institution, and for abilities to broaden the technological profile of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society. United States Department of Energy Research and Development 100 Award

Xingbo Liu

The Research and Development 100 Awards recognize the most promising new products, processes, materials, or software developed throughout the world and introduced to the market the previous year. Awards are based on each achievement’s technical significance, uniqueness, and usefulness compared to competing projects and technologies. BARBERO

Ever Barbero

The title was presented by the vice president for academic affairs of the Universidad Nacional de Trujillo during a ceremony held at the municipal concert hall of the city of Trujillo. An honorary professor is entitled to all the rights and privileges of regular permanent faculty of the university.

Fellow, Institution of Mechanical Engineers

James Smith

This is the highest class of elected membership, and is awarded to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional commitment to and innovation in mechanical engineering.

Federal Lab Consortium Mid Atlantic Region Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer

Xingbo Liu

The award honors outstanding work of transferring technologies into commercial markets.

FacultyAwards

Honorary Professor at Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Peru

SMITH

15


ALUMNI

Alumni Outreach Planned Larry Banta has been appointed to coordinate outreach activities to mechanical and aerospace engineering (MAE) alumni. For more than 10 years, Banta has coordinated the Academy of Distinguished Alumni, but he now plans to reach a broader cross-section of our graduates. BANTA

“We have not done a good job over the years of keeping track of our alumni,” Banta said, “and that is a big loss both for us and for them. Many of our former students are out in the world doing great things, and we would like to let their fellow MAE grads and the world know about them. It enhances the reputation of our Department, the College, and the University—and thus the value of a West Virginia University diploma in a competitive market. But on a more immediate level, it’s very inspiring to our current students to see people come out of our halls and build rewarding careers.” Banta hopes to build community and enhance the connection between MAE alumni and the Department. “I’m testing a number of ideas,” Banta said, “and I am eager to collect more.” He’s exploring the logistics for streaming audio and video from guest lectures, student projects, and other special events to alumni. Another idea is to provide on-line mini-courses or workshops on special technical subjects to graduates. Some of these might be hosted or taught by the alumni themselves. “We have people doing all kinds of advanced technical work in areas outside the expertise of our faculty,” Banta said. “It would be great if our faculty could learn alongside our current students in lectures from our grads.” A host of other possible projects exists, but Banta would like to hear from the alumni, too. “What would make it attractive to go to our website once a week or once a month to see what’s happening?” he asks. “Would you attend a social function for Statler College grads in your geographic area? What would be a fun or useful way for us to stay connected?” Contact Banta with your ideas at larry.banta@mail.wvu.edu.

16

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

HALL

Tim Hall, a 1989 graduate of West Virginia University with a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering, currently serves as a manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Mission Operations Directorate. He has worked on more than 30 space shuttle flights and was a certified console operator for the International Space Station (ISS). Hall visited the WVU campus this past fall, spending time with students talking about his College experiences and life at NASA. He shared the story of how he walked onto the football team and participated in the Walt Disney World College program, encouraging students to take every opportunity that was offered to them. And where Morgantown was the beginning of his college career, so, too, was it the beginning of his career with NASA. “I owe my career to a hurricane,” Hall said.

His initiative paid off. Hall graduated from WVU and immediately went to work for NASA, where he has played an integral part and witnessed such historical

Alumnus Lectures on Success After College events as the first three-person space walk and the Hubble Space Telescope deployment. In 1997, Hall left NASA for seven years and worked in the IT industry. He spent time working for a number of global IT service companies, including Compaq, Xerox, and Getronics. According to Hall, his career change was aided by the “Introduction to Micro Processor,” course that he took while studying at WVU. Currently, Hall leads a software team that develops applications for the ISS global flight control teams as well as the astronaut crew. He has led teams that have created software with local development organizations as well as projects that have reached across several NASA space centers, engaging the expertise from various NASA centers such as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Ames Research Center. Hall ended his presentation with some career advice for students, warning them to be wary of their presence on social media sites and encouraging them to continue their education by gaining advanced degrees in a slow economy. “And be friends with everybody,” Hall laughed. “You never know who might get you a job someday!”

Alumni

Hurricane Gilbert hit the coast in September 1988. A college friend and fellow mechanical and aerospace alum was working for NASA and had been evacuated from his home, fleeing to Morgantown to attend a Mountaineer football game. Hall, who ran into the alum while he was visiting, convinced him to pass on his resume to his employer.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

17


DistinguishedAlumni

SKUJINS

PRUCZ

Dr. Ojars Skujins

Thomas J. DeWitt

BSAE ’68, West Virginia University MSAE ’70, West Virginia University PhD ’73, West Virginia University

BSME ’70, West Virginia University MSME ’72, West Virginia University

Inducted 2011

Ojars Skujins earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from West Virginia University in 1968 and 1970, respectively. After completing his doctorate in 1973, he entered active duty in the Air Force at the Aerodynamics and Performance Branch of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. During his four-year military career, he developed, modified, and used computational fluids computer codes to support many Air Force projects.

DistinguishedAlumni

During this time, Skujins was involved in various aspects of simulation, testing, and evaluation of components for the KC-135, the F-4E, and F-111. He also worked on evaluation of the YF-16 and the YF-17 prototype aircraft, which later became the F-16 and F-17 of today. He departed from the Air Force at the rank of captain in 1977.

18

DEWITT

Skujins rejoined the Aerodynamics and Performance Branch at Wright-Patterson as a member of the Forward Swept Wing Independent Review Team, a program that eventually produced the X-29. He also served on a rocket/ramjet missile Independent Review Team. Skujins was the aerodynamics expert on the source selection team for the C-17 cargo/transport airplane. Meanwhile, he became the leader of the Aerodynamics Group. In 1986, Skujins was assigned to the top secret Advanced Technology Bomber program as the flight technology lead, with responsibility for a wide range of functions on the B-2 Stealth Bomber. In 1997, he was reassigned from the B-2 to the F-15S Saudi Foreign Military Sales program as chief engineer. He also served as chief engineer of the USAF F-15C/D programs, and as chief engineer of the F-15 program office. In 2001, Skujins was promoted to chief, Flight Mechanics Branch, in the Engineering Directorate at the Aeronautical Systems Center. He was responsible for supporting all USAF program offices, encompassing flight controls, stability and control, aerodynamics, air vehicle performance, CFD, and vehicle management systems. Skujins was selected to chair the C-5 re-engineering and upgrading executive independent review team. Skujins has won numerous awards, ranging from individual recognition for excellence in engineering to leadership awards for team performance.

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

PRUCZ

Inducted 2011

Thomas J. DeWitt grew up in Fairmont, W.Va., and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1970 and 1972, respectively. While a student, he worked as a janitor and then as a draftsman for Morgantown Machine and Hydraulic (MM&H) Company. He also worked with his father at a subsidiary of MM&H, the Deron Corporation, to invent a spray system for dust mitigation in coal mines. DeWitt was active in the invention of numerous devices for the mining industry, and became a majority shareholder in Deron. Upon earning his master’s degree, DeWitt became the first-ever degreed engineer at MM&H. Shortly thereafter, MM&H and Deron were purchased by National Mine Service Corporation (NMS). DeWitt worked as an engineer for NMS’s hydraulics division until 1976, when he was appointed manager of operations. In 1978, he was promoted to general manager and, in 1980, was promoted to vice president, where he was responsible for the Morgantown Machine and Hydraulics division. In 1990, DeWitt was named group vice president of the NMS, responsible for MM&H plus two other divisions. In 1995, NMS was attempting to sell its hydraulics division, and DeWitt resigned and joined CWS Company, d.b.a. Swanson Plating Company as vice president. At the time, Swanson had about 160 employees and $16 million in annual sales. DeWitt and his colleagues expanded the hydraulics repair business of CWS/ Swanson and began competing directly with MM&H. DeWitt and two other WVU graduates, Frank Dulin (MinE, 1984) and Mark Carter (BSIE 1984), formed Swanson Industries in 2001 to purchase the business from the founders of CWS/Swanson. DeWitt assumed the role of president and chief executive officer. That same year, the team opened a branch plant in Rural Retreat, Va., and purchased Morgantown Machine and Hydraulics. Swanson Industries Group now comprises 11 different companies doing business throughout the United States and abroad. The group employs almost 800 people and had projected sales of $160 million in 2011. DeWitt was elected to the West Virginia Business Hall of Fame in 2010.


Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT AND GRADUATION TRENDS The undergraduate enrollment in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering has continued to grow steadily.

We attribute the steady growth in our undergraduate enrollment and graduation rates to the excellent reputation enjoyed by our Department, to our pro-active recruiting efforts, and to the excellent educational value WVU provides for both West Virginia residents and non-resident students alike.

The number of students pursuing both the bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering and the bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering has more than doubled over the past decade (includes dual majors).

The demand for engineering graduates in general and mechanical and aerospace engineers in particular is expected to grow in the near future. We plan to continue to increase our undergraduate enrollment as we add new faculty members.

The number of students enrolled in the dual AE/ME degree program comprises about 39 percent of the total undergraduate enrollment; its enrollment has remained steady in the past three years. Dual majors are not double counted in the data; enrollment figures shown represent the actual number of students, currently 456.

Table: Enrollment Trends Across 10 Years

Undergraduate Enrollment Trends

With 456 undergraduate students, the MAE Department has the largest enrollment in the Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (22 percent of the students pursuing B.S. degrees in engineering at West Virginia University). We are the only department in the College whose undergraduate enrollment has increased consistently over the past decade.

456

500 450 400 350 300

ME

236

250

AE

178

200

DUAL AE/ME TOTAL

150

The number of B.S. degrees awarded by our Department was 165 in the last academic year or 35 percent of the total number of bachelor of science degrees awarded by the College in the 2010-2011 academic year.

100

42

50

1 /2

20

10

01 /2

09 20

01

0

9

8

00

20

08

/2

7

00 /2

07 20

/2

20

06

00 /2

05 20

00

6

5

4

00

00

20

04

/2

3

/2

20

03

00 /2

20

02

00 /2

01 20

20

00

/2

00

2

1

0

GRADUATE ENROLLMENT AND GRADUATION TRENDS We had a significant increase in the number of graduates from both the master’s and doctoral programs in the 2010-2011 academic year. With graduate enrollment remaining steady and an increase in graduation rates, we are starting to see the effect of our increased recruiting efforts.

Graduate Degrees Awarded

Graduate Enrollment 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

60

162

51

50

87 75

MS

40

PhD

30

Total

30

MS

21

PhD Total

20 10

2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011

0

2005/2006

2006/2007

2007/2008

2008/2009

2009/2010

2010/2011

EnrollmentTrends

Graduate enrollment for 2011 remained the same as last year. Enrollment in the Ph.D. degree program decreased slightly, while M.S. enrollment rose. Over the past five years, overall enrollment has grown slightly. We anticipate graduate enrollment to increase in the coming years with a renewed focus on graduate recruitment.

19


Graduates 2010-2011

Graduates2010-11

BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES DEGREES AWARDED

20

Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering Eric Allen Blamble Dale Robert Born Douglas Steven Bowman * Cory Neil Brant Thomas Patrick Burke Richard Brian Cain Thomas Wayne Carpenter, II Ryan Daniel Coder *** Zachary C. Cohen *** Cari C. Crumbaker Jeffrey Thomas Datsko Justin Ray Davis Keith Joseph Earl Zachary James Eckman ** Samuel Devin Fletcher Bradley Leonard Gaensbauer * Jeremy Lee Garrison Megan Rae Gorrell * Nicholas Lee Hillen * J. Legend Huffman Adam Donald Hunter Timothy Ray Jackson *** Adam Seth Johnson * David Scott Loud * David Henry Lower John Charles Martin Lydia Katelyn McDowell ** Sherene Carolyn McLean Philip Christopher Morgan Thomas Wing Hong Ng Jared Scott Nutter Andrew Colin Parrish Ryan Patrick Pekar ** Kyle Franklin Potts Cory Albert Ramler Matthew David Roesch William George Rosen * Timothy Sierzega Rouse * Justin William Schulte * Aaron Matthew Smith Christopher Anthony Stewart * Charles Joseph Takes, II Alexandra Gail Thomas * William Lawrence Vogel August Christopher Weber, IV *Cum Laude

Justin Michael West *** Jason Famous Wettig Jonathan Lewis Withrow Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Gregory Thomas Antill Derrick Allan Banerjee *** Nicholas Scott Baxter ** Timothy Jordan Berry Eric Allen Blamble Andrew Kerry Bledsoe Dale Robert Born Douglas Steven Bowman * Cory Neil Brant Nickolas Scott Brown *** Jason Michael Bupp Richard Brian Cain Thomas Wayne Carpenter, II Joshua Anthony Cecchetti ** Edward Boswell Chambers *** Zachary C. Cohen *** Thomas Edward Corazzi * Mark Robert Coulson Marcus McKinley Cramer Sean David Cronin *** Corey Edmund Crossan Cari C. Crumbaker Joseph Harley Daniels Jeffrey Thomas Datsko Justin Ray Davis Alexis Riane DeBona Kiran Krishna Dhulipalli McKenzie Matthew Ditty ** Keith Joseph Earl Zachary James Eckman ** Curtis Allen Evick Andrew Paul Fowler Jeremy Frye Bradley Leonard Gaensbauer * Robert Handley Garton Anthony Robert Gioia Megan Rae Gorrell * Joseph Philip Greenleaf Ralph Edward Hardt ** Clinton Lee Hartman Joseph Austin Hawley **

** Magna Cum Laude

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

Jared Michael Heilman Thomas Matthew Heller Justin Andrew Heydon Samuel James Hindman Seth Michael Hipkins ** Michael Paul Houle J. Legend Huffman Dustin Tyler Hull Adam Donald Hunter Timothy Ray Jackson *** Peter Winger Januszkiewicz Adam Seth Johnson * Emily Elizabeth Jones Andrew David Judy Craig Joseph Kammerman Brent Michael Kostak Tyler Joseph Krisko Calvin Yancey Kuhn * Samantha Blair LaBenne Ky Jordan Layfield John Frederick Ledermann Nathan Elliot Levine Robert Marshall Loehr * David Scott Loud * Michael Vladmir Ludinsky James Edgar Ludovici Adam J. Lupo Matthew Michael Madurski * Peter Anthony Mardosa Jordan Brandon Martin *** Joshua Aaron Matheny Sherene Carolyn McLean Claire Munirih Miller * Philip Christopher Morgan Anthony Joseph Paletta, Jr. John Timothy Paletta Andrew Colin Parrish Ryan Patrick Pekar ** Matthew Ryan Phillips Brandon Robert Pierce Nicholas Haven Pivar Kyle Franklin Potts Andrew Steven Pustay Jahad Hassan Radwan Cory Albert Ramler Steven Daniel Rhodes *** William George Rosen *

***Summa Cum Laude

Timothy Sierzega Rouse * Christopher Leo Schachle Justin William Schulte * Caleb Aaron Sites John Scott Smallwood *** Alexander Nicholas Smith Gina Danielle Sottosanti Christopher Anthony Stewart * Jacob Alan Sunyak *** Chad Edward Swenglish ** Robert Ashbee Sykes ** Charles Joseph Takes, II Alexandra Gail Thomas * John Adam Ulishney William Lawrence Vogel Michael Joseph Wagoner August Christopher Weber, IV Justin Michael West *** Jason Famous Wettig William Cody Wilhide Jeremy David Alcott Williams Jonathan Lewis Withrow Brian L. Wright, II * Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering Rajiv Ravi Dastane Shanti D. Hamburg Steven L. Hard Sarah Elizabeth Smith Andrew George Zinchiak Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering Clay Samuel Bell Pingen Chen Jennifer Nicole Davis Rignesh S. Desai Brian Charles Eberly Peter B. Eshak Philip E. Evans Joaquin Maria Gutierrez Jared Jay Hartsell Jason Daniel Ice Chet Mun Liew Franklin Aaron Montejo Krishna Priya Nandanavanam

Idowu Olajire Olatunji Kedar Vasantrao Panday Soheil Razmyar Ross Henry Ryskamp Cesar Augusto Sandoval Leon Venkata Reddy Sathi Fatemeh Sedigh Imani Umesh Shewalla Kevin T. Shields Joshua Joe Sill Timothy Lee Weadon Jr. Brenton Kyle Wilburn Doctor of Philosophy in Aerospace Engineering Peter David Gall Kerri Beth Phillips Sergio Tamayo Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering Brice Gnonleba Gnahore Mingyang Gong Todd Robert Hamrick Ertan Karaismail Fatma Nihan Karaismail Songke Liu Yan Luo Kartikeya Krishnoji Mahalatkar Emily Deanna Pertl Steven Lee Rowan Francisco Posada Sanchez Jairo Andres Sandoval Leon Jared Michael Tannenbaum Manoharan Thiagarajan Jairo Antonio Valdes Ortiz Jay Paul Wilhelm Yuebin Wu Mingjai Zhi


Editorial and Professional Service EDITORIAL BOARDS

SAE FELLOWS

Ismail Celik, associate editor, Journal of Fluids Engineering, ASME

SAE recognizes its most accomplished members with the grade of Fellow, the highest membership grade available. These members have made a significant impact on mobility technology through leadership, research, and innovation. Nigel Clark, professor and Berry Chair James E. Smith, professor

Marvin Cheng, editor, International Journal of Convergence Information Technology; editor, International Journal of Intelligent Technologies and Engineering Systems Sam Mukdadi, associate editor, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, since 2009 James E. Smith, editor In chief, International Journal of Innovation Studies; associate editor, The International Journal of Computers and Their Applications

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Larry Banta, session chair, ASME Fuel Cells Conference Patrick Browning, session chair, SAE AeroTech Propulsion; session chair, SAE AeroTech Flight Science Ismail Celik, member, CFD Technical Committee, Fluids Engineering Division, ASME; member, Nuclear Engineering CFD Best Practice and Guidelines Committee Marvin Cheng, session chair, 2011 American Control Conference Nigel Clark, member, National Academies - Fuel Economy of Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicles committee; member, Soichiro Honda Medal Committee Mridul Gautam, member, EPA Clean Air Act Subcommittee, Mobile Sources Technical Review Subcommittee; member, EPA SmartWay Legacy Fleet Workgroup; member, DOE EPSCoR Task Force; member, Clean Fuels Advisory Committee, South Coast Air Quality Management District, Calif.; member, EMA/EPA Calibrations Standards Task Force Heavy-Duty On-Highway Committee Wade Huebsch, session chair, AIAA Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Conference

ASME FELLOWS ASME awards the rank of Fellow to members who have made significant engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession. Ever Barbero, professor Ismail Celik, professor John Kuhlman, professor James E. Smith, professor

SAMPE FELLOWS SAMPE’s prestigious Fellow Award is recognition of members for distinguished contributions to the fields of materials and processes. Ever Barbero, professor

INSTITUTE OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS FELLOWS This is the highest class of elected membership, and is awarded to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional commitment to and innovation in mechanical engineering. James Smith, professor

Hailin Li, chair, ASME, ICE Division Fall Technical Conference. Xingbo Liu, chair, TMS High Temperature Alloys Committee; vice chair, TMS Energy Conversion and Storage; executive committee member, ECS High Temperature Materials Division Donald Lyons, member, board of directors, International Society of Agile Manufacturing; member, board of directors, International Society for Productivity Enhancement Ken Means, vice chairman, Machine Design Exam Committee, National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying

Andrew Nix, chair, ASME IGTI Aircraft Engine Committee; chair, ASME IGTI Heat Transfer Committee; chair, ASME IGTI Wind Energy Committee; chair, AIAA Gas Turbine Engine Technical Committee Edward Sabolsky, co-chair, The American Ceramic Society Electronic Materials and Applications Conference; co-chair, Electrical Materials and Application Conference, Technologies for Sustainability and Green Materials Processing; cochair, European Ceramics Society, Science and Technology of Anisotropic Ceramics Workshop and Nanomaterials Session Nick Wu, treasurer, executive committee of Sensor Division, The Electrochemical Society; chair, Functional Nanomaterials Session, International Conference on Materials for Advanced Technology

Robert J. Aquaro Robert J. Aquaro & Associates, LLC Tracey Baker IBM Lenovo John C. Benner Los Alamos National Laboratory Gregg Corley ATK Tactical Systems Company Christine Cropp Arion Systems, Inc. David B. Doman AFRL/RBCA Gary Fleming NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA William L. Fourney Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland Andrea Holladay Volvo/Mack Wade Huebsch West Virginia University Neil Jubeck Naval Air Warfare Centre Richard E. Kleine Cummins Robert R. Lenhart Parsons Corporation Aubra D. McKisic Trinity Tank Car, Inc. B. Robert Mullins, Jr. Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Tim Pawlak ANSYS, Inc. Greg Thompson West Virginia University John S. Tomblin Wichita State University Bob Welch Toyota Motor Manufacturing, West Virginia, Inc. Scott Wenger National Aeronautics and Space Administration Paul White Dominion Generation Kirk Yerkes Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate

Graduates2010-11

Victor Mucino, member, board of directors, SAE International

VISITING COMMITTEE

21


Publications 2010 PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS Angle II, G. M., F. A. Pertl, M. A. Clarke+, and J. E. Smith. 2010. Lift augmentation for vertical axis wind turbines. International Journal of Engineering. 4(5): 430-442. (MAE) Bakhoum, E. G+. and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Capacitive pressure sensor with very large dynamic range. IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies. 33(1): 79-83. (MAE) Bakhoum, E. G.+ and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Novel capacitive pressure sensor. Journal of Electrostatics. 68(3):249-253. (MAE) Bakhoum, E. G.+ and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Novel capacitive pressure sensor. Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. 19(3): 443-450. (MAE) Barbero, E. J. and D. H. Cortes*. 2010. A mechanistic model for transverse damage initiation, evolution, and stiffness reduction in laminated composites. Composites Part B. 41(2): 124-132. (MAE) Cairns, D. R., M. S. Shafran+, K. A. Sierros, W. W. Huebsch, and A. J. Kessman*. 2010. Stimulus-responsive fluidic dispersions of rod shaped liquid crystal polymer colloids. Materials Letters. 64(10): 11331136. (MAE) Campa G., M. L. Fravolini+, M. Mammarella*, and M. R. Napolitano. 2010. Bounding set calculation for neural network based output feedback adaptive control systems. Neural Computing and Applications. Online: DOI: 10.1007/s00521-010-0404-6. (MAE) Chen, C.Y.* and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Backstepping Controller design for a manipulator with compliance. International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control – Express Letters. 4(5): 19911996. (MAE) Chen, C. Y.* and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Open architecture design of embedded controller for industrial communication gateway. International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control–Express Letters: Part B. 1(1): 51-56. (MAE)

Publications

Chen, X.*, N. A. Schmid, L. Wang*, and N. N. Clark. 2010. Regressionbased oxides of nitrogen predictors for three diesel engine technologies. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association. 60(1): 72-90. (MAE)

Davis J.*, M. G. Perhinschi, and H. Moncayo. 2010. Evolutionary algorithm for artificial immune system-based failure detector generation and optimization. AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. 33(2):302-320. (MAE) Fagan, J. A.+, B. J. Bauer+, E. K. Hobbie+, M. L. Becker+, A. R. Hight-Walker+, J. R. Simpson+, J. Chun, J. Obrzut+, V. Bajpai+, F. R. Phelan+, D. O. Simien, J. Y. Huh+, and K. B. Migler+. 2010. Carbon nanotubes: Measuring dispersion and length. Adv. Materials. 23(3): 338-348. (MAE) Feng, C.*, J. M. Tannenbaum*, B. S. Kang and M. A. Alvin+. 2010. A load-based multiple-partial unloading micro-indentation technique for mechanical property evaluation. Experimental Mechanics. 50(6):737743. (MAE) Gatts, T.*, H. Li, C. Liew*, S. Liu*, T. Spencer, S. Wayne, and Clark, N. 2010. An experimental investigation of H2 emissions of a 2004 heavy-duty diesel engine supplemented with H2. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 35(20):11349-11356. (MAE) Guo, H.*, G. Iqbal*, and B. S. Kang. 2010. Development of an in-situ surface deformation and temperature measurement technique for SOFC button cell. International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology. 7(1): 55-62. (MAE) Guo H.*, G. Iqbal*, and B. S. Kang. 2010. Effects of PH3 contaminant on SOFC performance and related anode surface temperature measurements. International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology. 8(1): 68-73. (MAE) Guo, H.S.+, W. S. Neill+, W. Chippior+, H. Li, and J. D. Taylor+. 2010. An experimental and modeling study of HCCI combustion using n-heptane. Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. 132(022801):1-10. (MAE) Hobbie, E. K.+, D. O. Simien, J. A. Fagan+, J. Y. Huh+, J. Y. Chung+, S. D. Hudson+, J. Obrzut+, J. F. Douglas+, and C. M. Stafford+. 2010. Wrinkling and strain softening in pristine single-wall carbon nanotube membranes. Physical Review Letters. 104(12). (MAE) Iqbal G.*, H. Guo*, B. S. Kang, and O. A. Marina+. 2010. Durability prediction of solid oxide fuel cell anode material under thermomechanical and fuel gas contaminants effects. International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology. 8(1):13-22. (MAE)

Cheng, M. H. and E. G. Bakhoum+. 2010. A simplified approach of word length estimation for digital controllers in state-space representation. International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control – Express Letters. 4(4): 1295-1300. (MAE)

Karaismail, E*., and I. Celik. 2010. Numerical and modeling issues in application of CFD to flow in a simplified plenum relevant to a prismatic VHTR. Nuclear Engineering and Design. 240: 2011-2022. (MAE)

Cheng, M. H. and G. T-C.Chiu+. 2010. A mechatronic approach to a virtual laboratory service on internet. International Journal of Virtual Technology and Multimedia. 1(2): 140-154. (MAE)

Karaismail E.*, and I. Celik. 2010. On the inconsistencies related to prediction of flow into an enclosing hood obstructed by a worker. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. 7(6): 315-325. (MAE)

Clark, N. N., K. A. Vora+, L. Wang*, M. Gautam, W. S. Wayne, and G. J. Thompson. 2010. Expressing cycles and their emissions on the basis of properties and results from other cycles. Environmental Science & Technology. 44 (15): 5986–5992. (MAE) Cortes, D. H.*, and E. J. Barbero. 2010. Stiffness reduction and fracture evolution of oblique matrix cracks in composite laminates. Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics. 1(1): 29-40. (MAE) Cortes, D. H.*, S. K. Datta+, and O. M. Mukdadi. 2010. Elastic guided wave propagation in periodic multi-layered piezoelectric array with finite cross-section for 1D array ultrasound transducers. Ultrasonics. 50(3):347–356. (MAE)

* representative of students; + signifies individuals outside of the college 22

Peer Reviewed Archival Publications Only January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

Kessman, A. J.*, D. R. Cairns, P. J. Richter+ and F. J. Bottari+. 2010. Mesostructured island formation in sol-gel SiO2 films through controlled, concentration-dependent flocculation of colloidal silica particles. Materials Letters. 64(3): 258-260. (MAE) Khan, A. B. M. S.*, and Clark, N. 2010. An empirical approach in determining the effect of road grade on fuel consumption from transit buses. SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles. 3(1):164-180. (MAE) Kirch, J.+, T. Garrod+, S. Kim+, J. H. Park+, J. C. Shin+, L. J. Mawst+, T. F. Kuech+, X. Song, S. E. Babcock+, I. Vurgaftman+, J. Meyer+, and T. Kuan+. 2010. InAsyP1−y metamorphic buffer layers on InP substrates for mid-IR diode lasers. Journal of Crystal Growth. 312(8):1165-1169. (MAE)


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Kweder, J.*, C. Panther*, and J. E. Smith. 2010. Applications of circulation control, yesterday and today. International Journal of Engineering. 4(5): 411-429. (MAE)

Perhinschi M. G., B. Smith*, P. Betoney*. 2010. Fuzzy logic-based detection scheme for pilot fatigue. Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology: An International Journal. 82(1):39-47. (MAE)

Lee, J. Y. C*.and M. H. Cheng. 2010. Psychophysical measurement of perceptual sensitivity to pitch variations. International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control – Express Letters. 4(1): 77-82. (MAE)

Pertl, E. D., D. K. Carder, and J. E. Smith. 2010. Experimental protocol development for a passive thermal management system. International Journal of Latest Trends in Computing. 1(2). (MAE)

Li, H., G. A. Karim+, and A.Sohrabi+. 2010. An experimental and numerical investigation of spark engine ignition operation on H2, CO, CH4 and their mixtures. Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. 132(3):1-8. (MAE) Liew, C.*, H. Li, J. Nuszkowski, S. Liu*, T. Gatts*, R. Atkinson, and N. Clark. 2010. An experimental investigation of the combustion process of a heavy-duty diesel engine enriched with H2. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 35(20): 11357-11365. (MAE) Lindsley, W.G.+, F. M. Blachere+, K. A. Davis+, T. A. Pearce+, M. A. Fisher+, R. Khakoo+, S. M. Davis+, M. E. Rogers+, R. E. Thewlis+, J. A. Posada, J. B. Redrow*, I. B. Celik, B. T. Chen+, and D. H. Beezhold+. 2010. Distribution of airborne influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus in an urgent care medical clinic. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 50(5): 693-698. (MAE) Liu, S., and L. Banta. 2010. Parametric study of glass fiber drawing process. International Journal of Applied Glass Science. 1(2): 180-187. (MAE)

Porter, D. W.+, A. F. Hubbs+, R. R. Mercer+, N. Q. Wu, M. G. Wolfarth+, K. Sriram+, S. S. Leonard+, L. Battelli+, D. Schwegler-Berry+, S. Friend+, M. Andrew+, B. T. Chen+, S. Tsuruoka+, M. Endo+, and V. Castranova+. 2010. Mouse pulmonary dose- and time courseresponses induced by exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Toxicology. 269(2-3): 136-147. (MAE) Posada, J. A., J. Redrow*, and I. B. Celik. 2010. A mathematical model for predicting the viability of airborne viruses. Journal of Virological Methods. 164(1-2): 88-95. (MAE) Rivas Murillo, J. S.*, M. E. Bachlechner+, F. A. Campo, and E. J. Barbero. 2010. Structure and mechanical properties of silica aerogels and xerogels modeled by molecular dynamics simulation. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids. 356(25-27): 1325-1331. (MAE) Sabolsky, E. M., L. Maldonado+, M. M. Seabaugh+, and S. L. Swartz+. 2010. Textured-Ba(Zr, Ti)O3 piezoelectric ceramics fabricated by template grain growth (TGG). Journal of Electroceram. 25:77-84. (MAE) Sagoo, G.*, S. Gururajan*, B. Seanor, M. R. Napolitano, M. G. Perhinschi, Y. Gu, and G. Campa. 2010. Evaluation of a fault tolerant scheme in a Six-degree-of-freedom motion flight simulator. AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication. 7(2):47-67. (MAE)

Mahmoud, A. M., P. Ngan+, R. Crout+, and O. M. Mukdadi. 2010. High-resolution 3D ultrasound jawbone surface imaging for diagnosis of periodontal bony defects: An in vitro study. Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 38(11): 3409-3422. (MAE)

Seehra, M.+, V. Singh+, X. Song, S. Bali+, and E. Eyring+. 2010. Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of non-crystalline ferrihydritenanoflakes. Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids. 71(9):1362-1366. (MAE)

Mammarella M.*, G. Campa, M. R. Napolitano, and M. L. Fravolini+. 2010. Comparison of point matching algorithms for the UAV aerial refueling problem. Machine Vision and Applications. 21(3):241-251. (MAE)

Shelton, M.+, I. Celik, E. Liese+, and D. Tucker+. 2010. A study in the process modeling of the startup of fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid systems. Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. 132(1): 1230112309. (MAE)

Mao, S.*, and I. Celik. 2010. Modeling of indoor airflow and dispersion of aerosols using immersed boundary and random flow generation methods. Computers and Fluids. 39(8): 1275-1283. (MAE)

Shoukry, S. N., J. C. Prucz, G. W. William, T. H. Evans. 2010. Lightweight, energy-dense systems for gaseous hydrogen storage. World Journal of Engineering. 6(Supplement):939. (MAE)

Moncayo, H.*, M. G. Perhinschi, and J. Davis*. 2010. Aircraft failure detection and identification using an immunological hierarchical multi-self strategy. AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. 33(4):302-320. (MAE)

Shoukry, S. N., G. W. William, K. C. Mcbride*, M. Y. Riad, and J. D. Wriston+. 2010. Buffalo Creek Bridge: A case study of empirical versus traditional deck design. Journal of Bridge Structures. 6(3):139-153. (MAE)

Nanduri, J. R., D. R. Parsons*, S. L. Yilmaz+, I. B. Celik, and P. A. Strakey+. 2010. Assessment of RANS-based turbulent combustion models for prediction of emissions from lean premixed combustion of methane. Combustion Science and Technology. 182(7): 794-821. (MAE)

Sierros, K. A., D. A. Banerjee*, N. J. Morris*, D. R. Cairns, I. Kortidis+, and G. Kiriakidis+. 2010. Mechanical properties of ZnO thin films deposited on polyester substrates used in flexible device applications. Thin Solid Films. 519(1):325-330. (MAE)

Perhinschi M. G., H. Moncayo, and J. Davis*. 2010. Integrated framework for artificial immunity-based aircraft failure detection, identification, and evaluation. AIAA Journal of Aircraft. 47(6):18471859. (MAE)

Sierros, K. A., D. R. Cairns, J. S. Abell+, and S. N. Kukureka+. 2010. Pulsed laser deposition of ITO films on flexible PEN substrates at room temperature. Thin Solid Films. 518(10):2623-2627. (MAE)

Perhinschi, M. G., M. R. Napolitano, and S. Tamayo*. 2010. Integrated simulation environment for unmanned autonomous systems – Towards a conceptual framework. Modeling and Simulation in Engineering. 2010(2010):12 pages. (MAE)

Sierros, K. A., D. S. Hecht+, D. A. Banerjee*, N. J. Morris*, L. Hu+, G. C. Irvin+, R. S. Lee+, and D. R. Cairns. 2010. Durable transparent carbon nanotube films for flexible device components. Thin Solid Films. 518(23):6977-6983. (MAE)

Publications

Mahmoud, A. M., H. H. Ammar*, O. M. Mukdadi, I. Ray, F. Imani*, A. Chen, and J. F. Davalos. 2010. Non-destructive ultrasonic evaluation of CFRP-concrete specimens subjected to accelerated aging conditions. NDE&T International. 43(7):635–641. (MAE)

* representative of students; + signifies individuals outside of the college 23


Publications 2010 Slezak, A., J. M. Kuhlman, L. J. Shadle+, J. Spenik+, and S. Shi+. 2010. CFD simulation of entrained-flow coal gasification: Coal particle density/size fraction effects. Powder Technology. 203(1): 98-108. (MAE) Smirnov, A., A. Burt*, H. Zhang*, and I. Celik. 2010. Component based modeling of multi-physics systems. International Journal of Modelling and Simulation. 30(4):4587-5023. (MAE) Soloiu, V. A+., M. H. Cheng, and C. Y. Chen*. 2010. Analytic solution of shock waves equation with higher order approximation. International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control – Express Letters. 4(5): 1723-1728. (MAE) Spencer, M. J.*, A. Feliachi, F. A. Pertl, E. D. Pertl, and J. E. Smith. 2010. Hardware platform for multi-agent system development. International Journal of Latest Trends in Computing. 1(2).(MAE) Thompson, G. and J. Nuszkowski. 2010. Neat fuel influence on biodiesel blend emissions. International Journal of Engine Research. 11(1):61-77. (MAE) Upadhyay, P. C.*, W. S. Wayne, J. C. Prucz, D. W. Lyons. 2010. Hygrothermal stresses in coated hollow/solid fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMC’s). Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites. 29:600-617. (MAE) Wang, D.+, H. Zhao+, N. Q. Wu, A. El Khakani+, D. Ma+. 2010. Tuning the charge transfer property of PbS-quantum dot/TiO2-nanobelt nanohybrids via quantum confinement. Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 1(7):1030-1035. (MAE) Wang, L.+, R. R. Mercer+, Y. Rojanasakul+, A. Qiu+, Y. Lu+, J. F. Scabilloni+, N.Q. Wu, and V. Castranova+. Direct fibrogenic effects of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes on human lung fibroblasts. Journal of Toxicology & Environmental Health. 73(5):410-422. (MAE) Weiland, N., R. –H. Chen+, and P. Strakey+. 2010. Effects of coaxial air on nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flame length and NOx Emission. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. 33(2):2983-2989. (MAE)

Publications

Weiland, N. T. and P. A. Strakey+. 2010. NOx reduction by air-side vs. fuel-side dilution in hydrogen diffusion flame combustors. Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. 132(7):2-9. (MAE) Wowczuk Z. S.*, E. D. Pertl, M. A. Clarke+, J. E. Smith, S. Bjorge+, and R. McNutt+. 2010. A complete command, control, communications, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance system for a C-130 aircraft. AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication. 7(6):179-187.(MAE) Wu, N. Q., J. Wang*, D. Tafen+, H. Wang+, J.-G. Zheng+, J. P. Lewis+, X. Liu, S. S. Leonard+, and A. Manivannan+. 2010. Shape-enhanced photocatalytic activity of single-crystalline anatase TiO2 (101) nanobelts. Journal of American Chemical Society. 132 (19): 6679–6685. (MAE) Zhang Q.+, T. Sun+, F. Cao+, M. Li*, M. Hong+, J. Yuan+, Q. Yan+, H. H. Hng+, N. Q. Wu, and X. Liu+. 2010. Tuning the shape and thermoelectric property of PbTenanocrystals by bismuth doping. Nanoscale. 2:1256-1259. (MAE)

Peer Reviewed Archival Publications Only January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010

PATENTS Angle II, G. M. and J. E. Smith. May 4, 2010. Circulation controlled airfoil. United States Patent Number 7,708,229 B1. (MAE) Khabashesku, V. N.+, E. V. Barrera+, D. McIntosh, and L. PenaParas+. 2010. Carbon nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites achieved through benzoyl peroxide initiated interfacial bonding to polymer matrices. Patent WO/2006/116547. (MAE) Morris, G. J. May 11, 2010. Ambient condition detector with selectable pitch alarm. United States Patent Number 7,714,700 B2. (MAE) Morris, G. J. July 6, 2010. Environmental condition detector with speech recognition. United States Patent Number 7,752,047 B2. (MAE) Pertl, F. A. and J. E. Smith. May 25, 2010. Plasma generating ignition system and associated method. United States Patent Number 7,721,697. (MAE) Richter, P. J.+, D. R. Cairns, and F. J. Bottari+. 2010. Antiglare coating and articles. United States Patent Number 7, 780, 776. (MAE) Richter, P. J.+, D. R. Cairns, and F. J. Bottari+. 2010. Antiglare coating and articles. United States Patent Number 7,736,428. (MAE) Smith, J. E., R. S. Nutter, Jr., G. J. Thompson, Z. S. Wowczuk*, and G. M. Angle, II. June 1, 2010. Aerial Sensor Pod Deployment System. United States Patent Number 7,726,604 B1. (MAE) Smith, J. E., R. S. Nutter, Jr., G. J. Thompson, Z. S. Wowczuk*, and G. M. Angle, II. June 1, 2010. Aerial Sensor Pod Deployment System. United States Patent Number 7,726,605 B1. (MAE) Smith, J. E., R. S. Nutter, Jr., G. J. Thompson, Z. S. Wowczuk*, and G. M. Angle, II. October 5, 2010. Aerial Sensor Pod Deployment System. United States Patent Number 7,806,368 B1. (MAE)

BOOKS Barbero, E.J. 2010. Introduction to composite materials design, second edition. CRC Press. Book: 1-562. (MAE) Barbero, E. J. 2010. Chapter 2: Time-temperature-age superposition principle for predicting long-term response of linear viscoelastic materials. Creep and fatigue in polymer matrix composites. R. M. Guedes (Ed.). Woodhead Publishing. Book Chapter. (MAE) Fravolini M. L.+, M. Mammarella*, G. Campa, M. R. Napolitano, M. Perhinschi. 2010. Chapter 5: Machine vision algorithms for autonomous aerial refueling for UAVs using the USAF refueling boom method. Innovations in defense support systems, 1st Ed.A. Finn (Ed.). Studies in Computational Intelligence, 304:95-138. (MAE) Young, D. F.+, B. R. Munson+, T. H. Okiishi+, and W. W. Huebsch. 2010. A brief introduction to fluid mechanics, 5th edition. Wiley. Book: 1-528. (MAE)

Zhi, M.*, F.N. Cayan*, I. Celik, R. Gemmen+, S.R. Pakalapati and N.Q. Wu. 2010. Temperature and impurity concentration effects on degradation on nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia anode in PH3 containing coal syngas. Fuel Cells. 10(1):174-180. (MAE)

* representative of students; + signifies individuals outside of the college 24

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Research AWARDS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, Third Generation Transforming and Hybrid Projectiles, Gautam, $303,740 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, Hybrid Projectiles-Next Generation Technology, Gautam, $2,173,855 ALLEGHENY ENERGY SERVICE CORPORATION/ MONONGAHELA POWER COMPANY, West Virginia Super Circuit Project, Sneckenberger, $28,928 BATTELLE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE, Resilient Tunnel System - Flood Containment Plug, Means, Banta, Barbero, Huebsch, $312,583 BOEING COMPANY, Sensitivity Study on the Evolution of Contrails Behind Aircraft, Lewellen, $150,000 CATERPILLAR, INC., Regulated Gaseous and PM Emissions of In-Use Heavy-Duty Trucks-Phase II, Shade, $159,626 CDC/NIOSH, Construction, Experiments, and CFD Simulations of a Modified Cough Aerosol Simulation System, Celik, $47,996 COORDINATING RESEARCH COUNCIL, INCORPORATED, Fuels to Enable Light-Duty Diesel Advanced Combustion Regimes, Nuszkowski, $120,000 CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Emissions in a Dispersing Plume of Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck: Wind Tunnel Studies, Gautam, $251,166 DEPT OF HLTH & HUMAN SERVICES, Prediction and Mechanism of Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrosis, Wu, $60,081

LOC NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, User-Controlled Biocatalysis Induces Self-Decontamination of Enzyme-Based Composites Challenged with Simulant of B Anthracis, Wu, $109,185 LOC NATL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, RET Site: Energy and the Environment, Cairns, $153,746 LOC NATL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, NCMR Scholarship for Ms. Jessica Lankford, Wu, $10,000

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS, Long Term Reliability Investigation on TBC, Kang, $5,200 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS, Prediction of Emissions from Gas Turbine Combustion via LES, Celik, $26,000 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS, Fundamental Transfer Processes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Experiments and Simulation, Celik, $13,795

LOC NATL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, Motor Protein Based Transport Mechanisms for Nano-Scale Biomolecules and Devices, Wu, $3,692

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS, LLC, In-Situ Electrochemical Investigation on Bit-Rock-Fluid Interaction during UDS Experiments, Liu, $28,000

LOC US DOE - ILLINOIS, Experimental Investigation of Turbine Vane Heat Transfer for Alternative Fuels (DOE-EPSCoR), Nix, $15,000

SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT, Performance of An SCRT System on a Class-8 Tractor, Gautam, $76,000

LOC US DOE - METC, AO1 [3] High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 and H2S Sensors, Sabolsky, $299,950

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, P450 ProteinProtein Interactions Determined by Selective Protein Manipulation, Wu, $135,654

NARA BOOZ ALLEN, CAST-NARA/STEP Research Test Bed on the Long Term Electronic Storage, Retention, Retrieval and Use of Complex Engineering Information, Mucino, $89,423

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA, Bioactivities of Surface-Functionalized Metal Oxide and Siler Nanoparticles, Wu, $43,950

NASA, Spray Cooling Heat Transfer Mechanisms, Kuhlman, $412,314 NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER, Aviation Safety Research and Design, Napolitano, $1,500,000 NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, TornadoSurface Interaction, Lewellen, $260,261

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA, Bioactivity of Engineered Fiber-Shaped Nanomaterials, Wu, $96,474 URS, Integrated Multi-Dimensional, Multi-Scale Cathode Mode, Celik, $92,200 URS, Model Validation and Exhaust Gas Recycle Studies, Celik, $81,335 URS, Simulation of Carbon Management for Existing Power Plants via Measurement and Control Optimization, Celik, $53,963

DOF, AIR FORCE, OFF OF SCI RES, Experimental Flow Characterization and Model Development of Advanced Firefighting Agent Application Technologies, Morris, $130,627

NORFOLK SOUTHERN CORPORATION, Norfolk Southern CSC-Special Projects-VA-2008-01, Wayne, $298,250

URS, Fundamental Transfer Processes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Experiments and Simulations, Celik, $72,943

FARADAY TECHNOLOGY INC., Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects, Liu, $132,402

OCEAN NANO TECH, LLC, Magnetic Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots for Diagnosis of Early Stage Ovarian Cancer, Wu, $45,000

URS, Simulation of Reactive Flows: Prediction of Emissions and Flame Characteristics, Celik, $170,855

GAS TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE, Integrated Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Increased Utilization of Gaseous Opportunity Fuels, Li, $112,270

OF, ARMY, OFF OF RES & DEV, Advanced Communications for Wireless Sensor Networks, Gautam, $1,058,985

GROTE INSTITUTE, Durable Flexible Solid State Lighting for Exterior/Interior Application in OEM Markets, Sierros, $80,000

PHYSICAL SCIENCES INC., Distributed Conformal Actuation for Simultaneously Controlling Flow Separation and Transition, Huebsch, $224,001

LOC DEPT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Non-Invasive High Resolution Diagnosis of Periodontal Attachment Levels Using Real Time Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging, Mukdadi, $181,294

RDS, 3D Reconstruction and Image Enhancement for the NETL UDS X-ray Video System, Kang, $4,000

URS, Development of Methods, Equipment and Approaches to Identify and Quantify the Products Generated in Gasification Reactions, Celik, $38,773 URS, Coal Partitioning Project FY 2010 Phase 1, Kuhlman, $47,500 URS, Integrated Controls for SOFC/GT Hybrid Generation Systems, Banta, $60,000 URS, Hybrid SOFC/GT Generation Systems Controls, Banta, $64,617

ResearchAwards

NETL, Metal Oxide/Carbon Composites for Supercapacitors, Wu, $20,473

25


Research AWARDS URS, TBC Durability/Damage Assessment of Advanced Turbine Components, Kang, $31,530 URS, Mechanical Property Evaluation of Torrefied Biomass Materials with Correlation to Grinding Efficiency, Kang, $24,000 URS, Micro-Indentation Techniques for TBS Stiffness/Material Property Determination, Kang, $57,473

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, Separation of Mineral Matter from Coal in a Riser System, Johnson, $150,937

URS, Microstructure Analysis of SOFC Anode Operating on Fossil-Derived Fuels, Song, $54,556

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, Warm Air Drying of Fine Particles (CAST Round III), Johnson, $76,759

URS, Gulf Oil Spill Response Effort Support, Weiland, $7,070

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, Photoactive, OrganicInorganic Hybrid Porous Structures for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction, Liu, $26,667

URS, Biomass Property Measurements, Kang, $35,749

URS, Co-Gasification Reactions and Kinetics, Weiland, $27,000

URS, 3D Reconstruction and Image Enhancement for the NETL UDS X-Ray Video Systems, Kang, $27,621

US ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY, Unmanned System Algorithm Development, Gautam, $2,621,403

WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION OF ENERGY, Center for Building Energy Use, Means, $80,000

URS, Design and Optimization of SOFC Cathode Architecture, Wu, $41,647

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, Advanced Coal Technology Consortium, Celik, $39,861

WV DEPT OF COMMERCE/WV DIV ENERGY, Industry Energy Efficiency Program, Means, $120,000

URS, Fundamental Transfer Processes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Experiments and Simulations, Wu, $39,671

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring for Boiler Tubes in Next Generation Coal-Based Power Systems, Liu, $269,634

URS, Modeling and Characterization of Fundamental Kinetics in SOFC Cathode, Liu, $78,900 URS, In-Situ Electrochemical Investigation on Materials Corrosion and Cracking Behavior During HPHT Drilling, Liu, $81,357 URS, Comprehensive Modeling and Improvement in Cathode Performance, Liu, $104,128

ResearchAwards

URS, Microstructural Engineering of Porous SOFC Cathodes, Sabolsky, $45,052

26

URS, Investigation of Microstructure and Chemistry Origin of Corrosion of Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasifiers, Song, $41,000

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/NETL, Microstructure Analysis of Ni-Based Superalloys, Song, $2,842 US DEPT OF ENERGY, Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells, Celik, $568,279 US-DOE-NETL-ALBANY, Microstructure Analysis of Cr-based Superalloys, Song, $10,000

WV DEPT OF HIGHWAYS, Bridge Monitoring, Shoukry, $303,340 WV HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION, West Virginia Energy Materials Program, Barbero, $283,630


WVU BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Donors 2010-2011 THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT We have made every effort to make this list complete and accurate, but please let us know if you spot an error, so that we may correct it. $50,000 or more Mr. Forrest D. L. Coontz $25,000 or more Mr. Ray M. Anderson Research Trust Fund $1,000 or more Mr. & Mrs. Gregory S. Babe Mr. John W. Campbell Mr. & Mrs. James E. Conklin Ms. Marsha H. Fanucci Dr. & Mrs. William L. Fourney Mr. & Mrs. Walter R. Haddad Keith Asset Management LLP Dr. Suryanarayana R. Pakalapati Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Palmer Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Walter

$500-$999 Boeing Company Matching Gift Program Mr. John F. Halterman Mr. Richard J. Kacik Dr. James A. Keenan Mrs. Dana McGrath Mr. & Mrs. Alan S. Pyle Mr. & Mrs. Barrett L. Shrout Dr. Richard E. Walters

$100-$249 Mr. & Mrs. Larry J. Andrews Mrs. Rita A. Bajura Book Mart Corp Mr. & Mrs. John W. Botts Mrs. Kendra L. Burch Mr. Michael J. Carter Mr. & Mrs. William C. Cavage Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Collins Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. DeWitt Mr. Brian J. Downie Mr. Richard L. Falkenstein General Electric Company Mr. & Mrs. Timothy M. Gessner Ms. Sheree L. Gibson Mr. Gus Glyptis Mr. & Mrs. Matthew G. Goff Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. Gore Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Halterman, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. James E. Hardy Mr. James C. Hare Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Hill Mr. Brian E. Johnson Johnson Controls Foundation Dr. & Mrs. John M. Kuhlman Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Lechnar Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas M. Lengyel Dr. Barbara T. Leonard Dr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Long Mr. E. Daniel Lynch, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Paul G. Migliore Mr. & Mrs. Randy A. Nicholson Mr. George S. Paul Mr. & Mrs. W. Scot Phillips Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Reeder Mr. Boyd W. Rhodes Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Rich

Mr. & Mrs. Brad J. Roberts Mr. & Mrs. Gary J. Schweitzer Shell Oil Company Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Morris M. Shor Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Sirk, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Skelton Ms. Linda Slonksnes Dr. James L. Spenik Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Steerman Mr. Charles E. Stricklin Mr. & Dr. Kevin D. Swisher Mr. & Mrs. Caleb A. Tarleton Textron, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Dennis P. Townsend Mr. & Mrs. Roy M. Turner Mr. & Mrs. David A. Velegol, Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Gary W. Wamsley Mr. John L. White Mr. & Mrs. David M. Wiebking Mr. George A. Williams Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Wilson Mr. Richard Yungwirth Up to $99 Air Products Foundation, Inc. Mr. Ravi K. Bahl Mr. Scott A. Bartlett Mr. John W. Byrd Dr. Hsi F. Chou Mr. Isaac W. Crimm Mr. Scott A. Dietrich Discover Financial Services Mr. & Mrs. Ronald G. Eckard Mr. & Mrs. James F. Edwards, Jr. Mr. David L. Faber Mr. & Mrs. Nick A. Fleece Mr. & Mrs. Kent R. Frohme Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Haller Mr. & Mrs. Gregory S. Harness Mr. & Mrs. Glenn R. Holmes, Jr. Dr. Gusheng Hu Mr. & Mrs. George A. Jones Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Kalo Mr. Richard H. Lemmon

Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Lenhart Mr. & Dr. Derek McClung Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Mills Mr. & Mrs. Alfred R. Nerz, Jr. Mr. James C. Pack, Jr. Mr. Adam Pauley Mr. John D. Pellegrin Mr. & Mrs. Dennis E. Pennline Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Rood Mr. Arthur K. Schuler Mr. Stan T. Serpento Mr. & Mrs. Steven P. Shaver Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Shaw Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Shoemaker Mr. Andrew T. Slobozien Mr. Jeffrey A. L. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Jerry J. Smutney Dr. & Mrs. John E. Sneckenberger Mr. Brian D. Spencer Mr. Terry L. Stab Mr. Corey M. Strimer Prof. W. David Teter Mr. Anthony V. Thounhurst Mr. Charles E. Traugh II United Technologies Mr. Gregory S. Watterson Mr. Stephen L. Wiedmann Mr. Gary R. Zidzik

Donors

$250-$499 Dr. & Mrs. Jimmy P. Balsara Dow Chemical Company Mr. & Mrs. Howard M. Hatala Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Jamison II Lutheran Community Foundation Dr. Kenneth H. Means & Dr. Carol D. Means Mr. C. Douglas Miller Mr. & Mrs. Edward L. Perry Mr. & Mrs. Jon K. Phillips Dr. Kerri B. Phillips

Dr. Jacky C. Prucz Mr. Phillip M. Sabree Dr. James B. Stenger Dr. Karen E. Warden Dr. & Mrs. James D. Wilson

27


IN MOTION

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering West Virginia University COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ANDand MINERAL RESOURCES Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering Mineral Resources PO Box 6106, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106

Non-Profit Organization US Postage PAID Morgantown, WV Permit No. 34

StudentProjects

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

28

MAE Circulation 4,500 copies, also available online www.mae.cemr.wvu.edu/news/annual_reports.php

MAE Annual Report

2010-2011


Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 2010-2011 Annual Report