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Washburn University

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volume 138, Issue 7 • wednesday, October 12, 2011

1700 S.W. College • topeka, kan. 66621

Sports

Photo by Tesa DeForest, Washburn Review

Photo courtesy of the City of Topeka

What parking problem?: With construction on the parking lot near Petro Allied Health Center running behind schedule, students at Washburn have faced a daily challenge of finding a place to park. Rick Anderson, vice president of administration and treasurer, calls it a “walking problem, not a parking problem.”

Topekans explore Greenville plan Michelle Boltz

WASHBURN REVIEW

Annually, the Topeka Chamber of Commerce sends a group of about 50 people to communities around the United States that are similar to Topeka in population size, economic and industry for ideas to revitalize our Downtown area. Washburn law student Angel Romero, along with Zach Snethen, were two people that went to Greenville, NC on September 15-17, 2011 to see how the Greenville community had revitalized their downtown area, and brought back some ideas on how we as a community could do the same. Greenville is well known for their biking community, and hosts the U.S. Cycling Tournaments every year. “Greenville is committed to keeping the community healthy, and have separate bike trails, similar to Shunga,” said Snethen. “We’re really proud of the work people in Greenville have done, they have a genuine passion for cre-

ating a great Residents community have made a around us. It conscious efwould go a fort to make long way for contact with progressive creative and development innovative in Topeka.” jobs, resulting Greento schooling, ville has been and people in the process were deterof revitalizing mined to stay their downin Greenville Photo courtesy of the City of Greenville town area for and raise their the past 20-30 Metamorphosis: The views of downtown families there. years. Their Greensville and Topeka serve as a road map. Although anchor is a Topekans went to Greensville to learn about Greenville is ballpark and downtown development similar sized bridge, givto Topeka, two ing it an urban look to their downtown, colleges, Clemson and Bob Jones Uniwhich has been done within the past 10 versity, surround them. Greenville also years. has a technical college. Greenville has When in Greenville, members of a smaller populations size than Topeka, Go Topeka met with individuals from but their metro community is bigger, their Young Professional Internship yet face similar challenges to ours. program, and had a great opportunity to Go Topeka, as well as Heartland see what they have done for Greenville. Vision and the Capital City Project

are currently transitioning with a design team to work with our community about what is unique about Topeka. “It’s a dynamic process. It needs to involve the whole community to make something unique for everyone to enjoy,” said Snethen. “We need to take ownership and take pride in our community to really creating a community, not just a cool downtown.” “We encourage students to keep up to date in our community for ways to get involved,” said Romero. “The best involvement is to be involved in activities and patronizing local-area businesses. Washburn students are just as much a part of the Topeka community,” said Snethen. To follow along on upcoming progress of the downtown revitalization plan, and to find out how to get involved, feel free to visit www.capitaldistrictproject.com, or www.topekachamber.org.

“It may be about changes, but it sounds boring. It’s an Evolution. Evolution of Adam. Me,” says senior artist Adam Koger. The Washburn Art Building on campus, currently houses Koger‘s “evolution.” The exhibit is required as part of Washburn University’s transformational experience for those graduating with a bachelor in fine arts degree. Koger’s emphasis for his degree is photography. It’s within these photographs and other works of art that show his own evolution. Koger’s first college experience was at Kansas State University. Koger spent four years at the university but

left in 2004, without obtaining a degree. “I was taking things in the wrong direction, partying too much late at night and enrolling in 8:30 a.m. classes,” said Koger. “It’d be easy to miss a class Photo by Jordan Loomis, Washburn Review ,and from there, it just spiraled.” Photo courtesy of the city of Greenville, NC He started Evolution: senior art student Adam attending Wash- Koger’s exhibit is on display in the Art burn University in Building. The exhibit will up until Oct. 18. August of 2007. Over the years, Koger has pho- relaxing for Koger.

tographed about 12 abandoned houses, with several hundreds of photos to show for it. “Evolution A” showcases the best of these. At first, Koger didn’t know exactly what he wanted to capture. Driving back roads and admiring the countryside were a start. The drive was peaceful and

Mariauna Hernandez WASHBURN REVIEW

“I wasn’t looking for abandoned houses. They started drawing me,” said Koger. Shortly after beginning to photograph abandoned houses, Koger felt connected. “Two years ago, I became a single father,” said Koger. “The mother decided she didn’t want to be a mom. I was left to raise a (now four year old) daughter by myself and finish school. I felt kind of abandoned at the time.” To deal with these emotions, Koger channeled them through his photos, explaining that it was therapeutic for him to get that out through his art.

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Michelle Bolz is a junior mass media major. Rech her at michelle.bolz@washburn. edu

Adam Koger evolves through his art

WASHBURN REVIEW

Bods earn road win

Another team fell victim Saturday to the momentum of the Washburn Ichabods as they toppled the Truman State University Bulldogs, 42-14. The Ichabods are now 6-0 for the first time since 1946, making head coach Craig Schurig the winningest coach in Washburn University history. The Washburn Ichabods are currently sitting at the No. 5 position in the nation on the American Football Coach Association top 25 poll. “It feels good for a team in the middle of the season,” said Schurig. “You‘re really just focused on one game at a time. We feel like we’ve played well and earned the wins that we’ve had. We feel like we could play better, but really you just try to focus on the next opponent, and try to get better for that next opponent.” Washburn’s defense was the first to take the field as they held the Bulldogs to just 20 yards of total offense in the first drive and had a sack by senior defensive end Dakota Palan-Johnson. Thanks to solid rushes and big pass completions, the Ichabod offense scored the first rushing touchdown of the game on a five-yard carry by senior running back Justin Cooper. Truman State’s following drive once again end in a punt after a joint sack by sophomore defensive end Adebayo Oladapo and junior defensive lineman Jayveri Kelly. The Ichabods tacked more points on to their lead after a four-yard touchdown reception by senior fullback Greg Schoenberg. TSU’s drive would be cut short by yet another joint sack this time by freshmen offensive lineman, Bryan Dale and Oladapo shutting out the Bulldogs in the first quarter, 14-0. Before officially getting settled into the second quarter the Ichabods received their third touchdown of the night by Washburn sophomore wide receiver, Ronnell Garner

Arts &Entertainment Kelly Hurla

Ichabods Rolling: Dane Simoneau dives for a gain in Washburn’s last home game. The Ichabods went on the road for a win last weekend 42-14.


News

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011

alendar Day offers family fun Mott shares life-changing tale

Wednesday, Oct. 12

Mulvane Art Museum exhibits: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Big Man On Campus: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Washburn B Beta Alpha Psi tutoring sessions: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., HC109 OPEN Meeting: 3 p.m., HC 107 WU Marching Band Festival: 5 p.m., Moore Bowl Thursday, Oct. 13

Big Man on Campus: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Washburn B Dark Side of Chocolate 7 p.m., HC 100 Planetarium Open House: 7 to 8 p.m., Stoffer Science Hall Friday, Oct. 14

Bookstore Family Day: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., bookstore WU Symphony Orchestra Concert: 7:30 p.m., White Concert Hall, Garvey Fine Arts Center Saturday, Oct. 15

Leadership Institute Family Brunch: 9:30 a.m., Kansas Room, Memorial Union Color An Ichabod: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., Union Lawn Alumni Association Tailgate: 11:30 a.m., Memorial Union lawn Pink-Out Game: 1 to 4 p.m., Yager Stadium Football vs. University of Central Oklahoma: 6 p.m., Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl Lady Blues Volleyball vs. Nebraska-Omaha University: 6 p.m., Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center Sunday, Oct. 16

Sherman Alexie’s War Dances iRead book discussion: 3 to 4:30 p.m., TSCPL Marvin Auditorium 101BC Monday, Oct. 17

Rob Burkett

WASHBURN REVIEW

Children and games will be a fixture this upcoming weekend, as Washburn gets ready to celebrate an annual tradition that brings people of all ages to the campus. Family Day is an event that students and their families look forward to each year. With a little bit of everything for everyone, the event is one of the highlights of the year. Traditionally, Family Day is celebrated earlier in the year, but due to changes in the football schedule this year it arrives in the middle of October. Among the events most anticipated this year are the inflatable carnival rides which children and Washburn students alike enjoy. While events like the childrens’ attractions are one outlet of enjoyment, other events off campus will also be part of the celebration this year as well. Topeka Civic Theatre in particular will take the lead as it features a variety of performing arts. Starting off on Friday, “The Witches” a youth play that tells the story of a boy and his grandma as they attempt to foil the plans of the Grand High Witch. On Saturday TCT will also feature an improv comedy performance by Laughing Matters Jr. a youth group that the theatre presents periodically.

“We wanted to help promote Family Day with some of our youth projects,” said Lynda Denton, administrative assistant. “Family Day is so much more than just what is happening at Washburn. The entire community is so family oriented.” The weekend will also feature two of Washburn’s most successful athletics programs with the Ichabods football team, currently No. 5 in the country, featured in a “Pink-Out” game against the University of Central Oklahoma during the afternoon. The football game will be followed by an evening exhibition of athleticism as the No. 5 ranked Lady Blues volleyball team will take on the University of Nebraska-Omaha in UNO’s final visit to Washburn before they move to Division I sports. The Family Day slate of events will finish off with a presentation at the Topeka and Shawnee Country Public Library by author Sherman Alexie as he discusses his book, “War Dances” which is the iRead book at Washburn this year. For more information go to http://www.washburn.edu/main/ ur/family-day/index.html. Rob Burkett is a senior mass media major. Reach him at robert.burkett@washburn.edu

Festival marches to WU Whitney Eastwood

WASHBURN REVIEW

The Washburn University Music Department is hosting the Capital City Marching Band Festival on October 12 at Yager Stadium. The Capital City Marching Festival is held annually at Washburn University. Bands from northeast Kansas come to participate in the festival. The bands from Topeka include the Highland Park Marching Scots, Shawnee Heights Marching Thunderbirds, Topeka West Marching Chargers, Washburn Rural High School Marching Junior Blues, and the Seaman High School Viking Marching Band. The Mission Valley Marching Vikings, Osage City Marching Indians, and Leavenworth Pioneer Marching Band will also be performing Awards will be given out based on overall performance ratings (I or II), superior ratings to those that receive a I rating, excellent ratings to those that receive a II rating, and participation plaques for all that participate. The Trophy of Distinction will be awarded to any band with all superior (I) ratings. Other trophies include drum major, drum line, and

Photo by Andrew Escandon, Washburn Review

auxiliary trophies for those that receive a superior (I) rating in their area, which will be scored separately from the overall band performance. Concessions will be open and serving standard stadium food, including hamburgers, french fries and hotdogs. The gates open at 5:30 p.m. and the festival begins at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults and $4 for students. Children five and under are free. Tickets will be available at the Yager Stadium ticket window on the day of the event. Whitney Eastwood is a senior English major. Reach her at whitney. eastwood@washburn.edu

Natalie C. Wang Senior Exhibition “West Meets East”: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Art Building

Kelly Hurla

WASHBURN REVIEW

“The very first thing I remember knowing about myself was that I was a girl, but born into a boy’s body,” said Stephanie Mott, who was born as Steven Mott. “The second thing I remember knowing about myself was knowing this meant I had to hide who I was.” She knew from the beginning that she was more like her sisters than brothers. Thus, the battle within herself begun. Mott struggled through her early years, thinking she couldn’t talk about it with anyone. When puberty hit, her body began changing in ways she didn’t want it to. The lines between boys and girls were becoming a lot more separated and defined. “It was the 1960s and basically impossible to be this way, definitely in Kansas,” said Mott. At the age of 17, she attended her first year at the University of Kansas. “Every moment of my conscious existence took place on the battlefield of who I am and who I thought I had to be,” said Mott. “Sometimes the battle lines seemed to be drawn between me and the God that created me.” Mott constantly lived in fear that someone would find out about her transgender identity. Within her first year at KU, Mott discovered alcohol. “It changed the way I felt. I didn’t have to feel that pain and I didn’t have the fear that torment,” said Mott. “I didn’t have to feel the shame and I didn’t have to feel the fear.” Over the next 30 years, Mott abusively used alcohol and drugs to hide from her reality. Fast forward to November 2005, when Mott became homeless. She moved to Topeka because of the quality of the Topeka Rescue Mission. Mott still struggled as a man, but trying over and over again to be something she wasn’t, was taking its toll. At the mission, Mott was able to get into treatment for alcohol abuse and start seeing a counselor about her gender identity. In July 2006, Mott was invited to attend the Metropolitan Community Church. “My second week there, the pastor read a verse,” said Mott. “It was 2 Corinthians 5:17, ‘Therefore if anyone is in Christ, they are a new

Photo by Nevada Millis, Washburn Review

Speaking out: Stephanie Mott, a senior in Washburn’s Bachelor of Social Work program, has struggled with gender identity issues in the past. In 2010, she helped found the Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project.

“ Often

times [people] just really don’t understand, and people are a lot of times afraid of things they don’t often understand. -Stephanie Mott Senior ”

creature. All things are passed away behold all things become new.’” This was the first time that Mott felt it was okay with others and okay with God for her to be the woman she truly was. “I was greeted with this unconditional love that Jesus talks about in the Bible; this ‘I have love, you look like you could use some, here it is no strings attached.’” On July 23, 2006, Mott signed the attendance sheet as ‘Stephanie Mott’ for the first time. For Mott, Stephanie was truly born this day and she never looked back. Today, Mott attends Washburn as a senior in the Bachelor of Social Work program. For three and a half years, Mott has been the transgen-

Kelly Hurla is a sophomore mass media major. Reach her at kelly. hurla@washburn.edu

Don’s Carz

Tuesday, Oct. 18

Making new friends one car at a time!

Beta Alpha Psi Tutoring Sessions: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., HC109

BUY

Campus Alumni and Friends Luncheon: 12:30 p.m., Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center

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WU Wind Ensemble Concert: 7:30 p.m., White Concert Hall, Garvey Fine Arts Center

1307 N Kansas Ave Topeka, KS 66608

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Don’t see your event in the calendar? Call the Review newsroom at 6702506 to have your event included in an upcoming edition. It’s FREE.

der columnist for “Liberty Press”, a statewide LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender focused) magazine that circulates out of Wichita. She is also on the Board of Directors for the Metropolitan Community Church. In 2010, Mott and others founded the Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project (K-STEP). She is the state vice-chair of the Kansas Equality Coalition and chair of the local Topeka chapter. For Mott, it’s important to share her journey for others to find out they’re not alone. “I have this ability to create that in the lives of other transgender people and also to provide education for people who quite frankly don’t have the opportunity to see and get to know somebody who’s transgender,” said Mott. “Often times they just really don’t understand, and people are a lot of times afraid of things they don’t often understand.” For more information about K-STEP, the Kansas Equality Coalition, or about transgenderism, contact Mott at stephtopeka@yahoo.com. Her personal website is: http:// publiclytransgender.pbworks. com/f/intro.htm.

Photo by Rob Burkett, Washburn Review

Campus Debate: Jed Smock, an evangelical christian, stands near the bell tower speaking to people passing by. Smock engaged students in lively debate throughout Tuesday afternoon.

SELL TRADE


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News • Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Honor society tutor students Fall brings vehicle challenges Michael Vander Linden WASHBURN REVIEW

Oswego Storage and Housing is considering building a new warehouse in New York. Oswego has 2 million common shares outstanding. The shares price at $11. Assume the risk free rate equals 4.5 percent with the beta equaling .75 and the risk premium being 11.5 percent. Estimate Oswego’s required return on its equity investment on the new warehouse. Most will admit they’d have no idea where to begin with this problem. However, there is a local organization helping students determine know not only where to start on these problems, but how to figure the entire solution. “Beta Alpha Psi is finance

and accounting society with a main goal of helping younger accounting and finance students with understanding concepts,” said Danyl Chapman, community service director of the club. Every Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons from 11-1, Beta Alpha Psi is offering tutors to help these younger students. These tutors are not just any ordinary student either. They are some of the brightest students in accounting and finance majors. “To be involved with Beta Alpha Psi, you have to be a junior with at least 54 credit hours and maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher,” said Chapman. This includes 23 members already involved in the organization and 21 candidates look-

ing to join within the next year. This number of committed students to their education helps Beta Alpha Psi to maintain a schedule of events outside of just tutoring. “We invite various CPA firms from Kansas City and Topeka area to meet and talk with us,” said Chapman. “We will also be volunteering at Harvesters in November and bowling for Junior Achievements in October.” So, students that need help with accounting and finance, this group is more than qualified to help with any homework needs and are willing to help whenever needed. Michael Vander Linden is a freshman mass media major. Reach him at michael.vanderlinden@ washburn.edu.

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Rob Burkett

WASHBURN REVIEW

Between broke students, faculty that haven’t received raises in four years and staff that works for minimum wage, fall always brings challenges to those driving on a budget. According to the AAA, the average cost of maintaining a car over an entire year breaks down to roughly $4.44 per mile. Much of that cost is accumulated during the summer months, but fall is when many experts say that drivers tend to spend their maintenance dollars. “October is one of those months where people get themselves ready for the winter months,” said John Neilson, director of AAA Approved Auto Repair. “The last thing anyone wants is to get stuck on the side of the road when the weather turns bad.” Neilson recommends that owners find a mechanic that they can trust and get in this month as many different auto repair businesses are running special deals in anticipation of the winter season.

“If you wait until something wrong happens with your vehicle its going to cost so much more than it would taking care of it now,” said Neilson. “This is true in two ways. First, its better to replace something before it damages other related parts on your car. Second, the prices that are out there for things like oil changes and battery replacements will be more expensive later on as well.”

Car Maintenance In addition to the routine maintenance for a vehicle, Neilson also recommends that owners take a look at their tire tread, as well. According to Neilson, many accidents at the beginning of bad weather season are attributable to poor tread on tires that reduce traction and increase the dangers of hydroplaning and loss of control on slippery surfaces like snow and ice. One of the other things that many are not aware of but that can cause undue stress to a vehicle is the loss of tire pressure as the temperature continues to drop outside. “We recommend that ev-

eryone check their tire pressure,” said Rick Wilson, manager of Midas on Topeka Boulevard. “People don’t realize that loss of tire pressure affects fuel mileage and can damage tire tread.” Wilson also said that his shop has seen an increase in traffic as people start to realize that the cold season is on its way. “Yes, we’ve seen a lot more people coming in or making appointments,” said Wilson. “Most people are coming in to get their belts and fluids checked right now.” Currently Midas is offering a special on their oil and filter change. The service normally runs $44.99 and is currently on special at $24.99. In order to take advantage call ahead to set up a time to get your car looked at by dialing 235-3461. “We hope that everyone will come down and take advantage of what we have to offer,” said Wilson. “Save yourself the headache of costly repairs and get in for some maintenance.” Rob Burkett is a senior mass media major. Reach him at robert. burkett@washburn.edu.

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Washburn needs to take parking situation seriously Ryan Hodges

WASHBURN REVIEW

As a resident of Washburn Village, I feel I must take exception with vice president of administration and treasurer Rick Anderson’s comments in the Sept. 21, 2011, issue of the Washburn Review. Contrary to Anderson’s statements, it is not easy to find a parking space near the Village. I recently walked, as I often do, from the Village to the sacrificing my valuable parking Memorial Union at around space and might not be able to 10 a.m. During this walk, I find a reasonable parking spot paid particular attention to the upon my return. A quart of ice number of parking spaces that cream could melt as I slowly were visible in Lots 7, 9, 10 weave my way through the and 11. At the most, I saw two parking lots looking for a vaor possibly three open parking cancy. spaces during my walk. I also Walking across campus to saw several cars (more than the attend class is one thing. Walknumber of spaces ing across campus available) slowly carrying an armGUEST snaking their way full of groceries is through the park- COMMENTARY a whole other ball ing lots in search game. The parking of Anderson’s lot situation also mythical empty space. I have negates one of the attractive also frequently observed stu- features about living at Washdents parking on the side streets burn Village, namely the adalong MacVicar Ave. between vantage of not needing to worry 21st Street and 17th Street. about finding a parking space in As a resident of Washburn the first place. Village, this situation has preOne thing that I would defsented me with an interesting initely like to see is a specific problem. On Fridays, when I designated parking area for studon’t have class, I frequently dents who live on campus. We find myself trapped on campus, pay to live here, so it would be due to the fact that I would be nice if we could have a parking

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lot to call our own. I recognize that Anderson is fairly new to his position at Washburn, having only held the Vice President of Administration and Treasurer job since November, 2010, so maybe he isn’t quite familiar with the concept of what it means to be an Ichabod. One of the things that makes Washburn unique, and the primary reason why I chose to attend this university in particular, is that it has the feeling of a small community, rather than just being another mega-sized university. I was personally offended by Anderson’s insinuation that Washburn students are “lazy.” It isn’t a matter of walking across campus… I do it everyday. It is, however, about students being able to find safe and secure places to park in the general vicinity of campus. I understand that Anderson’s position here is more “bean counter” than academian, but his attitude toward the students of Washburn frankly concerns me. The parking situation at Washburn is not going to go away. And as we look at recordsetting enrollment this year and a future filled with expansion, it is vital for this university to address its students’ needs.

Bod on

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Opinion

The seasons are changing and Kansas is once again riding the weather rollercoaster with regards to the weather. As Fall is upon us, it is time to reflect on the holidays to come....

What Fall traditions

Jesse Botello Sophomore, Art “I’m definitely looking forward to dressing up for Halloween, hanging out with friends and having a good time seeing everyone’s costumes and seeing who gets the most ridiculous costume together.”

Kim Montague Freshman, Nursing “I really like Halloween and the pumpkin seeds, just eating them.

Ryan Hodges is a junior social work major. He can be reached at ryan.hodges@washburn.edu.

Kris Roberts Junior, Art My favorite fall tradition is Thanksgiving, because it brings the family together.

Grace Hilden Senior, Communication I just like walking through the leaves and listening to them crack under my feet.

are you looking forward to?

Raj Patel Sophomore, Physics

Nevada Mills Freshman, Psychology

“Halloween. Just going to see all the costumes that people are going to wear.”

I just like to sit around campus and take photos of the changing leaves.

Our Staff Contact Us

Phone: (785) 670-2506 Fax: (785) 670-1131 www.washburnreview.org Print Editor-in-Chief Rob Burkett Online Editor-in-Chief Brian Dulle Advertising Manager Elisa Gayle News Editor Megan Hash Sports Editor Sam Sayler A&E Editor Tricia Peterson Photo Editor Mike Goehring Graphic Design Editor Maggie Pilcher Copy Editors Josh Rouse • Richard Kelly • Chandler Loomis Production Assistants Ryan Hodges • Cameron Hughes • Chris Young Writers Rob Burkett • Angela Connell • Kelly Andrews • Nicholas Birdsong • Michelle Boltz • Jordan Chilcote • Mariauna Hernandez • Matthew Kelly • Derek Koehler • Jordan Loomis • Ben Mack • Scott Moser • Brad Pechanec• Alex Schoenberger • David Wiens• Photographers Kelly Andrews • Ryan Burge • Rob Burkett • Tesa DeForest •Jessica DeJager • Mike Goehring • Jordan Loomis • Anthony Richardson • Josh Rouse • Stephanie Wilhelm • Assistant Online Editor Bryce Grammer Videographers Denise Hemingway • Bradley Hernandez • Derek Koehler • Adam Stephenson• Rodolfo Parisi • Russell Pearman Advertising Staff Melissa Bylsma • Autumn Kitchner • Anne Poulsen Promotions Staff Myles Howell • Anthony Fast •Nate Hargis Business Manager Scott Moser Adviser Regina Cassell

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The Washburn Review accepts letters to the editor pertaining to articles appearing in the Washburn Review or on issues of importance to the Washburn or Topeka community. We do not accept mass letters to the editor. Please limit letters to less than 400 words. Letters must be submitted via Word document if possible, and there must be a phone number where the person can be reached for verification. Please e-mail letters to wureview@gmail.com. The Review reserves the right to edit all submissions to the paper for length, libel, language and clarity. Because of volume on the opinion page, we are unable to print all letters and are unable to return submissions.

Washburn Media would like to present the Voices of Washburn! Join us in the Mabee Library for a listening party, enjoy free pizza and experience the DNA talk show for the first time!

Thursday Oct. 13th 2:30-3:30

© The Washburn Review Copyright 2011

Corrections: While The Review strives for accuracy, we sometimes make mistakes. Any corrections will appear here.


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Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A&E

Brewer directs new take on classic Brian Dulle

WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo courtesy of footloosemovie.com

Dancing to success: Actress Julianne Hough credits her sucess and much of her fame to her appearance on “Dancing With the Stars.” Hough stars in the re-make of “Footloose,” which opens in theatres this Friday.

Hough plays it loose for film Brian Dulle

WASHBURN REVIEW

Most widely known for being a two-time winner of ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars,” country music singer and actress, Julianne Hough, is getting ready to cut loose in front of audiences worldwide this Friday ainthe remake of “Footloose,” directed by Craig Brewer, comes to the big screen. Hough said that she owes basically everything to “Dancing with the Stars.” “I think that the exposure that I got and the fan base have been so amazing and followed me from day one,” said Hough. “[People] know, my music and my acting now, I definitely would not be (wearing that) today without that show.” Hough said that a lot of people don’t know that she has been singing, dancing and acting her whole life. “I think each career path that I’ve chosen has fulfilled something different inside of me,” she said. “This has been such an amazing experience doing ‘Footloose’.” Some audiences might wonder what it is like dealing with all the pressure of creating a remake to an incredibly beloved film. Hough said if she wasn’t confident, she wouldn’t be promoting this movie. “And I know Kenny Wormald and Craig Brewer. We are all on this tour right now and going around country,” she said. “And I think if we were worried, we wouldn’t be doing it.” Hough said when she first

found out they were doing a remake of an iconic movie like “Footloose” she was not looking forward to it. “It is really close to my heart. I grew up watching this movie and lived in Utah where it was filmed,” said Hough. “I thought nobody ever does remakes justice, but when I found out that Craig Brewer was attached, there’s nobody that could have done it justice the way that he has.” Hough said that there were many great moments in the making of the film. “I mean, all the dances were so much fun, because there was just good energy,” she said. “The cowboy scene, my mom and my three sisters are actually in, and so that was really fun having them on set.” Hough said that she knows for a fact, fans of the 1984 film will still enjoy this movie just the same. “We’ve been doing screenings around town, and diehard “Footloose” fans that are skeptical about this movie go in so ready to hate on it,” said Hough. “Then they turn around and come out of the theater loving this version. It was everything that they loved about the original and so much more.” Hough said one thing that she felt like she missed from the original film was depth to the character of Ariel, played by Lori Singer. She felt like she was just kind of a bad girl and was a trouble-maker. “I saw this version and saw that Craig had re-written her to show the depth that she has and the relationship that her and her

father have and then you see why he acts like he does,” said Hough. “I really wanted it to be my own, and when we were shooting this movie, we really felt like it was our own movie, that this was the first time we were ever shooting this movie and the scene and these characters.” Hough said there wouldn’t have been a better choice to do this film other than Craig Brewer. “I think that he is well known for his gritty movies and how real and honest they are. “Footloose,” back in the day, was not bubble-gum, but when you look back at it, it kind of seems a little cheesy,” she said. “But it’s very easy to make that cheesy again.” Hough said she is proud and thinks that people who saw the original are going to be impressed with the things that didn’t need to be there for a generation’s sake, making it more current, and she thinks the people who haven’t seen it are going to be surprised. “I think that in our time now, we kind of need a movie like this, she said. “There are not a lot of teenage movies that have a lot of morals and messages and heart. It’s all about the CGI, which don’t get me wrong, I love watching, but I think it’s hard to come across a good teenage movie.”

Known for using music to complement his storytelling, director and screen writer Craig Brewer brings back the 1984 classic film “Footloose” onto the big screen this Friday with the same classic story but with a different look to it. Brewer said that he knows how to put music together in a movie that is thrilling or compelling and is a huge fan of the original “Footloose.” “Not only was I into the soundtrack of the movie,” said Brewer, “but I actually figured out a way where I have one of those pop-loader VCRs, and I have these audio outputs on the back of the VCR, and I kind of put together that I could go buy a RCA cord from RadioShack and plug the VCR into the back of my boom box and I can make it a cassette tape copy of the movie, of the audio.” “So I actually had the dialogue and everything from “Footloose” on my Walkman when I would walk to school,” he said. Brewer said he knew he was going to need a balance of songs that were untouched from the original. “We begin with Kenny Loggins’ Footloose,” he said. “We also have Deneice Williams’, Let’s Hear It for the Boy, but we also remade these songs as well.” Brewer passed on the movie twice because he saw how they were going to be making it. “They kind of got the same team that had made ‘High

School Musical’,” said Brewer. “I shook my head saying ‘I don’t know what they’re going to do with that,’ but “Footloose” is more than a dance movie.” Brewer said when he decided to do “Footloose” he had to make peace with the fact that there was going to be a wall of hate coming his way. “That’s the prayer that I gave to “Hustle and Flow” and “Black Snake Moan” on every day of my shoot,” he said. “I have only known polarizing (stripes), and I have never known a (hiss).” “I’ve known people coming up to me later and saying they saw my movie on TV or on DVD and that it was really good and if they had known it was going to be like that, they would’ve gone to see

Photo courtesy of imdb.com

Craig Brewer: Re-created “Footloose” to be more than just a dance movie.

some of the cheesy songs,” Brewer said. “We live in a time where Red State-Blue State Divide is rearing its ugly head again and again, and I think that we managed to make “Footloose” more relevant today than it was in 1984.” Brewer met with the director of the original film, Dean Pitchford, to talk about the script. “I let him know that he made something for me when I was 13 that made me feel like I wasn’t alone,” said Brewer. “I told him what I wanted to do, and he was very supportive of me, and he’s seen the movie recently, and he loved it.” “As a writer, it was special to him to see a new interpretation of his ideas and to see that it worked more than 25 years later and that it’s still relevant.”

it in a movie theater,” said Brewer. Brewer said that he had never been more confident in his life as a director that he nailed a movie. “I nailed the “Footloose” remake,” said Brewer. “I think that nobody would’ve made it better than the team that we put together.” Brewer said that there is a tremendous amount of love for the original “Footloose”, but there is also an urgency to tell a movie that had the ideals and energy of the original “Footloose” that had the energy of the original. “I know I get eye rolls for that because people look at Brian Dulle is a senior mass “Footloose” as the big hair media major. Reach him at brian. and the tight jeans and dulle@washburn.edu

Brian Dulle is a senior mass media major. Reach him at brian. dulle@washburn.edu Photos courtesy of imbd.com

Thank you Mabee Library and SAGL for your support!

Good actors, terrible shows: Tim Allen (left) and Zooey Deschanel (right) both have mediocre rolls in this fall’s comedy lineup. Both seem to be portraying highly stereotypical rolls, and are not funny or convincing.

Fall television’s stereotypes return David Wiens

shows be taken off the air. CBS, while simultaneLet’s be honest—net- ously trying to make “How I work television does not Met Your Mother,” the only have a great track record justification for the network’s when it comes to comedy existence and cramming as and feminism. Yes, they have many police-procedural spinbeen doing better at avoiding offs into primetime as they both masculine and feminine can, tacked on a show called stereotypes, but the lineup of “How to be a Gentleman,” new comedies this fall seem which is about a sissie-boy to be attempting to undo all who cares about manners and of that in one fell swoop. respecting women rediscovABC is not ering how to hit only dragging people and sleep Tim Allen out COMMENTARY with women for of what I can the sake of his only assume was some sort ego. of punishment for making The CW … I apologize, eight seasons of “Home Im- it is difficult to even write provement” to give him what about that network without seems to be an even more bursting into laughter. regressive show called “Last Fox appeared to be makMan Standing,” but is sup- ing at least a half-hearted plementing it with a show attempt to change things up about three guys rediscover- with “New Girl,” or so it ing their masculinity called seemed when I read several “Man Up.” My only hope articles about it. Then, foolis that these programs reen- ishly, I went and actually force masculine stereotypes watched the pilot in which so much that male viewers Jess, played by Zooey Detake offense and demand the schanel, spent most of the WASHBURN REVIEW

Washburn Media would like to present the Voices of Washburn! Join us in the Mabee Library for a listening party, enjoy free pizza and experience the DNA talk show for the first time!

Thursday Oct. 13th 2:30-3:30

episode sobbing over her recent breakup and watching “Dirty Dancing,” because nothing says ‘fresh take’ like a woman crying and her guy friends telling her she just needs to get laid. NBC, as usual, has nothing to offer anymore; I mean, if they’re desperate enough to keep “The Office” on the air in spite of the fact that it barely had enough momentum for two seasons and the main character bailed, they clearly cannot have anything good to bring to the table this fall. I held out some hope for “Whitney,” until I heard “… taped in front of a live, studio-audience …” which really means “a lot of predictable jokes and gags with minimal flashbacks or cutaways.”

David Wiens is a senior English major. Reach him at david.wiens@ washburn.edu


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Arts and Entertainment • Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Pumpkin Patch entertains with fall activities, food Whitney Eastwood

WASHBURN REVIEW

Gary’s Pumpkin Patch, located just 10 miles east of Topeka in Grantville, offers some unique fall activities. The eight acre corn maze has two bridges to cross and offers hours of entertainment. The design of the corn maze changes every year, and this year’s design is a cow. For the little kids, Gary’s Pumpkin Patch offers a small tire maze that is easier and shorter to get through. Another kids’ attraction is the Cornpit Peril. Three thousand pounds of corn kernels were poured into a bin. Kids are allowed to crawl around and jump in. Gary’s Pumpkin Patch offers a five-acre pumpkin patch, so there are plenty of pumpkins for everyone. “Gary’s Pumpkin Patch has it all! It is the best pumpkin patch in Kansas,” the website, www.garyspumpkinpatch.com, boasts. A visitor favorite is the pig races that are held on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Haybale Haven is a jungle gym made of haybales with tunnels, steps and forts. Other great attractions are

Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review

Fall Festivities: Gary’s Berries offers a variety of fall activities including an eight acre corn maze.

the Halloween themed hayrack ride, the giant rocking chair, the slither slides and goat mountain. Gary’s Pumpkin Patch also serves an assortment of food. Their kitchen offers hamburgers, hotdogs, funnel cakes, giant turkey legs and apple cider slushes among other food and drink items. The admission price is $9.95, which includes all activities except the bonfire. Weekend hours are 4 p.m.-10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday,and 12 p.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Starting the October 19th, Gary’s Pumpkin Patch will be open Wednesday and Thursday from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Whitney Eastwood is a senior mass media major. Reach her at whitney.eastwood@washburn.edu.

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Evolving Art: Adam Koger’s senior art exhibit is displayed in the Art Building on campus. Koger’s work is centered on the evolution of his life. Koger said that he has evolved through his work and it helped him work through many hardship. His exhibit is the manifestation of overcoming struggles.

Student evolves with senior art exhibit Continued from page 1 Although Koger’s feelings of abandonment left him feeling sad and depressed at first, after almost three years of parenthood, his feelings changed for the better.

“It’s not that I feel sad anymore,” said Koger. “Now it’s almost become an abandoning of those first abandoned feelings.” Koger’s “Evolution A” exhibit will remain on display in the Art Building until Friday,

Oct. 14. A gallery talk will be held today at noon. The gallery talk is also part of the Washburn Transformational Experience and gives the artist a chance to explain and answer questions about their exhibit. The gallery talk is open to

all faculty and students. It will be held at the Art Building in front of Koger‘s work. Kelly Hurla is a sophomore mass media major. Reach her at kelly. hurla@washburn.edu

CAREER TRAINING. MONEY FOR COLLEGE.

Photos by Rob Burkett, Washburn Review

Pumpkin Carving Contest: Gordan McQuere, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, holds the pumpkin that won “best theme” for the Design I class of Jennifer Marsh, Washburn art professor. The “scary clown” pictured above won the title “most horribly horiffic.”

AND AN ENTIRE TEAM TO HELP YOU SUCCEED. Serving part-time in the Air National Guard, you’ll have an entire team of like-minded individuals who want to help you get ahead. You can choose from nearly 200 career specialties, and develop the high-tech skills you need to compete in today’s world. You also train close to home, all while receiving a steady paycheck, benefits and tuition assistance. Talk to a recruiter today, and see how the Kansas Air National Guard can help you succeed.

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Arts and Entertainment • Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Country artists dazzle Topekans Josh Rouse

Finally, Miranda Lambert hit the stage and put on a great performance. She had previously performed at the 2010 Country Stampede in Manhattan and performed at Landon Arena in 2007 with Jason Aldean for Dierks Bentley’s Live & Loud Tour.

was actually a shotgun. I also enjoyed her cover songs, particularly “Purple Haze” by Jimi Grammy-winning female Hendrix. country vocalist, Miranda About halfway through Lambert, was the headline perher performance, she also informer Oct. 6 at the Kansas troduced Angaleena Presley Expocentre. She performed and Ashle Monroe, her fellow along with Justin Moore and members of the all-girl trio, the Randy Rogers Band the Pistol Annies, which to produce a very enterreleased its debut album taining show. “Hell on Heels” in August. The night began The Pistol Annies sounded with the Randy Rogers great together, mostly perBand, a lesser-known forming acoustic songs country band that had a with gritty themes, and I’m few good songs but only excited to hear more from performed about five them in the future. Lamsongs. The band opened bert will also be releasing last year for Willie Nelher next solo album, “Four son at the Topeka Perthe Record,” Nov. 1. forming Arts Center and Overall, I thought the was in the running for the concert was a great sucACM Awards Top Vocal cess for the Expocentre. Group of the Year award, It’s nice to see events like along with the Band Perthis have success in Topery, Little Big Town, the ka, and the crowd support Photos by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review Zac Brown Band and was overwhelming. It was Local Concert: Miranda Lambert was the main Lady Antebellum. definitely the loudest I’ve act last Thursday night at the Topeka Expocenter, Justin Moore’s with Justin Moore and the Randy Rogers Band. ever heard a crowd get in performance was next, Landon, and that’s saying and he drew a huge ovation Lambert’s hit songs list has something, considering I’ve from the audience. His hits, been growing for some time been to soldout RoadRunner such as “Small Town USA,” now, beginning with her first hit games and the Carrie Under“Backwoods” and “If Heaven “Kerosene” and continuing with wood concert. I’d love to see Wasn’t So Far Away” made a “White Liar,” which reached more events of this magnitude big splash, and his antics on No. 2 on the Billboard Country at the Expo in the future, and by stage were appreciated by the Songs chart, and “Gunpowder the sounds of it, I’d say there’s crowd. At one point, he started & Lead,” which reached No. 7. a good chance we will. riding his microphone stand The audio presentation was terlike a horse. I had heard many rific, and I was able to get right of Moore’s songs on the radio, up by the stage for her perforbut I didn’t know he sang them mance. I thought Lambert’s voall until the concert, so it was cal performances were electric, Josh Rouse is a senior mass media a nice surprise to hear many and I laughed a bit when I real- major. Reach him at joshua.rouse@ songs that I knew the words to. ized that her microphone stand washburn.edu WASHBURN REVIEW

Photos by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review

Country Star puts on successful concert: The female country singer sang popular songs such as “Kerosene” and “White Liar” into her shotgun shaped microphone.

Symphony Orchestra: Comedian delivers message with laughter Music to WU’s ears Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW

Kelly Hurla

WASHBURN REVIEW

It’s like music to Washburn’s ears. What better way to get a music fix then come to this Friday’s Symphony Orchestra concert? This is one of the five orchestra concerts to be held this year, and it’s free. The Symphony Orchestra is made up of about 50 students. This includes music majors, minors and even non majors. “It’s a diverse body of very talented students,” said Chris Kelts, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Orchestras. The concert will consist of classical and traditional symphony pieces. “I pick the music ac-

cording t o t h e educ a tional experience f o r playe r s

[or] if I think it will please the audience,” said Kelts. Music composed by Wagner, Mozart and Tchaikovsky are all in the evening’s lineup. Kelts further explains his decision making for the music by saying that some pieces include most of the instruments to make for more players. He also tried to find lesser known music with few players to give a contrast to the program. The Symphony Orchestra is Kelts’ largest ensemble group. He also teaches Enjoyment of Music, offers conducting classes, viola lessons and is responsible for overseeing and conducting the String Orchestra in addition to the Symphony Orchestra. “I wish more of the student body would take advantage of our free concerts,” said Kelts. “If you’ve never been, it’s a great experience.” The Symphony Orchestra concert will be held at White Concert Hall this Friday at 7:30 p.m.

Phases, almost everyone goes through one during their lifetime. Whether it is a childish phase, like carrying around a favorite toy, or a habitual phase, like smoking—it almost never has a good outcome. Especially, when the outcome is life threatening. Bernie McGrenahan, Los Angeles Daily News’ “Most important comedian in the Country today,” knows personally about how dangerous phases, such as high risk drinking, can affect one’s life. “At this age it’s not just a college phase,” said McGrenahan. “It’s a drinking problem.” The presentation consists of two separate shows; a 30-minute comedy show and then a 30-minute discussion about high risk drinking. “That’s my show,” said McGrenahan. “Come laugh and have a good time. Let’s do some comedy and relax.” Then, after the audience

WASHBURN REVIEW

Graphic by Cameron Hughes, Washburn Review

Photo by Joeseph Scherr, Washburn Review

Comedian jokes about serious issues: Bernie McGrenahan stresses a serious message through jokes in the Washburn Room Tuesday night. “My 19 year old brother shot himself, said McGrenahan. “Alcohol and drugs are no joke.” McGrenahan uses his personal stories in the hope of affecting one student if not many. Senior English education major John Henderson said that “the stories about his experiences with alcohol and how it affected him and his family personally were very powerful.”

One of the ideas behind the presentation is just for the audience to enjoy themselves. “I want everyone to have a good time,” said McGrenahan. ”But at the same time, I want students to be given the opportunity to address any problems they may or may not have at this present time with alcohol.”

shook the room with its dramatic intensity. Much of the highenergy could be atoned for the brass section. It was like one big thrill ride that as quickly as it started, it was over. To allow for the viewers to catch its breath, the Ensemble followed up with Miles Davis’ “Boblicity”, a composition very laidback and cool. It makes sense as the song was off of Davis’ Birth of the Cool album. The masterpiece maintained a lowlevel of intensity throughout. Michelle Flanagan made sure of this, keeping the song on the low with her piano playing. “Only You” by the legendary Count Bassie was next as Doty returned on vocals. The song deals with someone professing their love for the only person that they feel is right for them. The band accompanied her in an over-dramatic fashion. Another Bassie arranged song emerged as the band fired

through Deedles Blues. A call and response was present as Doty commanded her baby to “Come Back!” The ensemble would respond with an uproarious and flashy response. The WU Jazz Ensemble I concluded the show with “Gaining On You”, a fast paced and sizzling composition that got heads nodding. Treinen joked during the introduction that Andy Rhodes would wear the finish off of his brand new bari-saxophone. Rhodes did just that, leaving a few chunks left behind. The band continued with ferocious momentum and ended with a sonic-boom.

Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at jordan. loomis@washburn.edu

Washburn bands get jazzy Brad Pechanec

Kelly Hurla is a sophomore mass media major. Reach her at kelly. hurla@washburn.edu

has laughed and begun relaxing, McGrenahan delivers his lesson. “Let’s deliver this serious message that has always been delivered in high school by power point slides,” said McGrenahan. “This time though, let’s make it important.” McGrenahan began his presentation, “The Happy Hour Comedy Tour,” 14 years ago. “I got into a lot of trouble as a kid,” said McGrenahan. “That’s what part of my show is based off of—my own past experiences and the current binge drinking and overuse of alcohol that is taking lives of students around the country.” Though, unlike most comedians, McGrenahan has a very serious aspect to his presentation. “I had three DUI’s by the time I was 20 years old,” said McGrenahan. “I went to jail for six months and dropped out of college in merely six months.” His personal experience is a huge concept to what McGrenahan wishes to teach students.

Last Thursday, the Washburn University Music Department presented “An Evening of Jazz” to the public. The program featured Jazz Ensembles I & II and Jazz Combo I all under the direction of Craig Treinen. The WU Jazz Ensemble II crew was up first, and they did not disappoint. Their opening of Alamode dazzled audience members with solos by Taylor Dunham on trumpet, trombonist Danielle Brown, Evan Coleman on tenor saxophone and Daniel McCready on guitar. Next was the sultry and casual Early Afternoon Blues led by the saxophone playing of Coleman and Amanda Kathrens. Jordan Ward also contributed to the composition with her slick piano playing. To conclude the night for Jazz Ensemble II was Duke Ellington’s Cotton Trail.

The song was very brass-heavy, including solos by trumpeter Caitlyn Priddy and trombonist Andrew Anderson. The WU Jazz Combo I entered the stage playing the funky and buoyant Lucky Southern. The group was comprised of tenor sax Casey Artzer, trombonist Easton Bell, Nusret Ozakinci with Bass, Sawyer Treinen on guitar and Lucas Whippo on the drums. The quintet was followed with “Every Time We Say Goodbye”, a bluesy and soulful song about bidding ado to the one we love the most. Taryn Doty added resonance to the song with her sultry vocals. During the song “All of Me”, everyone in the group complimented each other and begged to ask the question: “Will you not take all of me?” Last, but not least, was the WU Jazz Ensemble I. The opening number, “Gingerbread Boy”, began with a bang and

Brad Pechanec is a junior mass media major. Reach him at brad. pechanec@washburn.edu


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Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Sports

Receiver steps up for Ichabods Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW

Bods bully Bulldogs, bring on Bronchos

Defense first: The Washburn Ichabods offense has been explosive after the first six games, but it’s the defense that has lead the team get off to a 6-0 start. The Bods sacked Truman State a school-record nine times Saturday, including three by senior defensive end Dakota Palan-Johnson. Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Continued from Page 1 for 72 yards. WU’s second drive, after a quarter of big TorÊ Hurst receptions, set up the Ichabod’s fourth touchdown as Washburn senior running back Justin Cooper put the Bods up 28-0. The sputtering Bulldog offense strove to start a spark that would ultimately remain unlit. The Ichabods had to utilize their punting unit after a 10 yard sack on Washburn senior quarterback Dane Simoneau by Truman State sophomore defensive end Matthew Smith. The Bulldog offense returned in pursuit of a score only to be disappointed by a sack for a seven yard loss by Kelly, followed by an interception by Washburn freshman full safety Calvin Kenney. Kenney’s pick placed the Ichabods at the 30yard line in Bulldog territory. Unable to break into the end zone, the WU offense called upon Washburn junior kicker Jeremy Linn who failed to con-

necton a field goal from the 33yard line. The next two drives left both teams empty handed until the final 40 seconds of the half where TSU saw their first score even after a six yard sack by Palan-Johnson. Truman State senior wide receiver Andy Mundwiller’s 34 yard touchdown reception revived the lifeless Bulldogs offense at the half. Time spent in the locker room seemed to only heighten the dynamics of the WU offense as they came out full speed on their first drive. In the first minute of the third quarter, Washburn senior quarterback Dane Simoneau hooked up with Washburn senior fullback Greg Schoenberg for a 36 yard touchdown reception, extending the Ichabod’s lead to 35-7. Midway through the third, TSU acquired its second score by sophomore wide receiver Dallas Grier, for an 18 yard reception. The third quarter ended with bouts of punting and yet another sack on Truman State

senior quarterback J.B. Clark, by Washburn senior linebacker Marty Pfannenstiel. The fourth quarter opened with a sack by Palan-Johnson, his third of the night. The final score of the game would be a 73 yard run touchdown by Cooper. Cooper had 19 carries for 168 yards with three touchdowns, which earned him the title of MIAA Athlete of the Week. Washburn’s offense came away with points in each quarter of Saturday’s game, racking up 553 total yards. Simoneau went 17-for-29 for 275 yards with three touchdowns and no interceptions. Garner had three catches for 139 yards and one touchdown. Hurst had four catches for 86 yards and Schoenberg had two receptions for 40 yards accompanied by two TD’s. Another teammate of Cooper’s is also adorning the recognition of MIAA Athlete of the Week. The Ichabod defense’s powerful performance set a school record with nine sacks

in a single game. The three that came from Palan-Johnson totaled 18 yards and earned him the MIAA accolade. “I was able to watch a lot of film last week, and it gave away tendencies of the tackles and basically the O-line,� said Palan-Johnson. “What happened is that after awhile of doing certain moves, you trick them into thinking you’re going to do something else, and they do what you want them to do. You manipulate the O-line to have it your way, so I ended up getting sacks. Our defense was well prepared.� Washburn’s battle to stay on top continues this Saturday at 1 p.m. at Yager Stadium with the Ichabods facing the University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos. Mariauna Hernandez is a sophomore mass media major. Reach her at mariauna.hernandez@washburn.edu.

Value pick ups help fill bye week gaps

Fantasy Football

Scott Moser

WASHBURN REVIEW

The first of the NFL bye weeks is behind us. Here are a few players to look for in the coming weeks to cover up bye weeks for your fantasy squad. Jackie Battle- RB Kansas City Chiefs (Yahoo! owned 10%): Battle had a great game this past Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts with 19 carries for 119 yards. The Colts have

allowed 145.2 yards per game this season so this may just be a one-week wonder. The Chiefs have a bye this week but the week after the bye, they travel to Oakland to play the Raiders. The Raiders have also had a tough time stopping the run. If you are short on running back talent, Battle is worth a look because he should continue to get opportunities in the Chiefs backfield. Pierre Garcon- WR Indi-

anapolis Colts (Yahoo! owned sets, and I would argue that Vic78%): Pierre Garcon has had a tor Cruz might be the second couple of great games the past most explosive asset on that few weeks. The Colts made a team (behind Hakeem Nicks.) quarterback change and have Plug-and-Play Defensestarted the younger Curtis Buffalo Bills (Yahoo! owned Painter over aged veteran Kerry 12%): The Buffalo Bills will Collins. Painter has developed travel to MetLife stadium to a good feel for where Garcon play the New York Giants this is on the field, and together weekend. The Buffalo defense they have put up decent num- picked Michael Vick off four bers. The Colts should be be- times this past weekend and hind often enough to warrant a Eli Manning, and the Giants pickup if he is available in your have had a tough time hanging league. onto the ball this season. Just Victor Cruz- WR New this past weekend against the York Giants (Yahoo! owned Seahawks, the Giants turned 60%): The New York Giants the ball over five times, and have been very inconsistent Eli Manning was sacked three this season. Cruz was given a times. I will be looking for chance to play more in week much the same this weekend. 3 when Mario Manningham, Pre-order your New York’s no. 2 receiver, was Kaw Yearbook! out with a concussion. Because Preserve the fondest memories Cruz had such a great game that of your college years $15 by is a senior acScottforMoser week, he has been given every pre-ordering copy of themajor and has fantacounting opportunity to play more. With your 2011-12will Kaw Yearbook today! prowess. Reach him sy football Manningham back, Cruz at scott.moser@washburn.edu. be used in three-wide Name receiver ___________________________ Phone (____) ____-_________

Don’t forget to have your picture taken! Email ___________________________

Address ________________ Apt #_____ City______ State _____ Zip __________

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2009-10 Kaw Yearbook

Kaw Yearbook 2011

One of Washburn University’s three starting receivers, Matt Kobbeman, a sophomore majoring in criminal justice, has proven himself worthy to his coaches already, after only two games this season. “He’s done very well so far this season,� said Washburn head coach, Craig Schurig. Kobbeman started his football career as a sophomore at Shawnee Heights High School in Topeka as a receiver. “I’m home grown, if you’d say,� said Kobbeman. “I’ve had my friends and family supporting me so far throughout my entire career. That’s one of the reasons as to why Washburn University was my first choice in a college.� When asked about the start of his college football career, Schurig said that Kobbeman spent his freshman year learning from one of Washburn’s current alumni. “When Matt was a freshman, he red-shirted and worked underneath some very good players—one of them being Joe Hastings, a current player for the San Francisco 49ers.� As a friend and mentor, Hastings has left a lasting impression on Kobbeman. “Joe taught me a lot,� said Kobbeman, “Just learning from him was everything to me as a freshman—He taught me how to see the breaks in a play, how to place and set up the defenders,� said Kobbeman. “Basically, Joe taught me everything I know about playing as a receiver.� Kobbeman is still in contact with Hastings now. “I haven’t been able to talk to him as much as I’d like to, but I actually just talked to him two weeks ago,� said Kobbeman. “He’s doing good.� Kobbeman has worked hard for his starting position

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Wide Open: Sophomore wide receiver Matt Kobbeman serves as one of Washburn’s offensive weapons. Kobbeman spent last year learning from Joe Hastings, last year’s leading receiver.

said Schurig. “He’s put in his time. That’s for sure,� said Schurig. “Matt learned early on, so he knew he had a good chance this season to come in and start.� Working hard everyday during practice has definitely paid off for Kobbeman. “I feel like my performance against Sioux Falls has been my stronger performance so far this season—I had three catches, one of which was a touchdown catch.� Kobbeman had one catch during the second game of the season against the Lincoln University Tigers. “We didn’t throw the ball a whole lot against Lincoln,� said Kobbeman. “But we ran the ball really well.�

Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at jordan.loomis@washburn. edu.

New coach joins top ranked Lady Blues Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW

Change isn’t easy—whether it involves a new town, a new school or new people; it always requires the very best in a person. Washburn University’s new 2011-12 assistant volleyball coach, Taylor Pohlman, knows this. Coach Pohlman didn’t begin her career in volleyball at Washburn University. She began it during elementary school. “I had to choose a sport to play, and regardless of the other sports offered, my first and only choice was volleyball,� said Pohlman. “I’ve always been pretty good at it.� After continuing to play volleyball all throughout high school, Pohlman was asked to go to a junior college in Tampa, Fla., where she played two seasons. She was recruited to play at Nova Southeastern University soon afterwards, where during her first season, she was injured. “I dislocated both of my shoulders, had my knees scoped and had a hip reconstruction,� said Pohlman.“After my injury, I knew I wanted to continue working with volleyball.� After graduation, Pohlman received some exciting news. “I had actually landed an assistant coaching job at a high school that was affiliated with Nova Southeastern University.� The head coach of that high school left before the season began, so Pohlman ended

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Sideline Support: Lady Blues Assistant Head Coach Taylor Pohlman watches the No. 5 ranked Lady Blues play Emporia State Tuesday. Pohlman joined Washburn this season.

up taking over the program as head coach. “It was truly one of the best experiences I could’ve asked for,� said Pohlman. “My team had our best finish in the program that year, too. They were district runner-ups and regional qualifiers, as well.� Then, once the girls’ volleyball season was over, Pohlman took over the boys’ volleyball team in the high school. “We had a winning season, which was better than the previous year’s season,� said Pohlman,

Continued on Page 10


A9

Sports • Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Lacy leading way for Lady Blues Michael Vander Linden WASHBURN REVIEW

Photos by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Epic Battle: Freshman outside hitter Korie Thompson and junior outside hitter Hillary Hughes attack during Tuesday’s match against rival Emporia State. The Lady Blues were able to come from behind to win 3-2.

Lady Blues escape sting of Hornets

Sam Sayler

WASHBURN REVIEW

The world has seen many heated rivalries over the years, such as Allies vs. Axis, North vs. South and Oprah vs. obesity. Last night, the Washburn University Lady Blues volleyball team settled another Turnpike Tussle, winning 3-2 against the Emporia State Hornets. The Lady Blues started off coming from behind to clinch the first set with the Hornets countering back in the second. WU nearly won set three in a close contest, but ESU made sure to answer by the end. However, WU came back to win the last two sets. “We won, but it doesn’t feel very good,” said Chris Herron, Lady Blues head coach. “I thought they out-played us, especially for the first three games. Even though we won game one, I don’t think that we played that well.” After a lackadaisical second set, the Lady Blues sensed the impending danger of defeat in order to take back the match in their home court.

“Game two, they beat us bad,” said Herron. “Game three, we made a great comeback, but there was no sense of urgency until it was 17-10, and then all of a sudden, we’re tied up at 25.”

Even after attaining a victory over WU’s bitter adversary, there are still several issues for the team to address going forward. “Winning doesn’t make everything better,” said Herron. “We have some deficiencies, obviously as a coach, I have to address. Each individual kid needs to get a little bit better. I need to do a little bit better job. “I take this win, and we got to run with it. I’m happy that we won, but never very happy with the way we played.” One of Herron’s biggest

disappointments of the match was his feeling that the Lady Blues did not show much positive playing or competitive spirit until halfway through the third set. “Even though we lost [set three], I thought we showed a sense of urgency,” said Herron. WU started on the comeback trail after they were able to slow down ESU’s right side in the middle of the match with well-played serves and blocks. “Their right sides were killing us in games one and two and half of three,” said Herron. “Then we were able to gather some momentum.” With WU’s next match against the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Herron has plans to ready his team. “We’ll have some nice practices the next couple of days,” said Herron. “Let’s put it that way. We’ll be ready.”

Sam Sayler is a sophomore English major. Reach him at samuel.sayler@ washburn.edu.

At age 9, little Mollie Lacy first picked up the game of volleyball. Even though it was not her favorite sport, she continued playing through her high school days and picked up a deep love for the game. Of course, growing up in Lincoln, Neb., she was impacted by the local Nebraska University Volleyball Team. “I went to so many college volleyball games growing up,” said Lacy. “I fell in love with the environment and wanted to be one of them.” It also helped her confidence when she had more success in high school than most can imagine. Throughout her high school career, her team won the state championship two years, and her local club team won the national championship. Personally, she was named an American Volleyball Coaches Association High School Senior All-American, Second Team Super State, First Team All-State and First Team All-City. Her legacy still lives on at Lincoln Pius X High School in Lincoln. She has held the school records for 452 kills in one season and a career total of 160 blocks since she graduated. With such great success, Lacy had opportunities to play volleyball at many different colleges. However, when she visited Washburn, something seemed to catch her attention. “I fell in love with the campus,” said Lacey. “It was the perfect size for me because I didn’t want a big university.” Another reason she said she wanted a small school was the chance to play, and she got

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Lead by example: Senior middle hitter/right side hitter Mollie Lacey send an attack over the net against Emporia State Tuesday. Lacey has been a leader in key statistical categories en route to a 19-1 record. that chance for the Lady Blues. As a freshman, she started every match. She ranked second on the team in attack percentage, and even earned the award of third team All-MIAA. Lacy continued to improve in her second year, leading the team in kills, kills per set and attack percentage. In fact, she not only set a school record, she led the entire conference and ranked fifth in the nation in attack percentage. These stats helped her earn first team AllMIAA, first team All-Region and even honorable mention All-American. She continued her success through her junior year and picked up another first team All-MIAA and first team AllRegion. However, Lacy is not one to brag about herself. In fact, the personal goals she had for herself were never the main focus for her. “Coach Herron pushes us all to be the best team we can be,” said Lacy. “All the things I did just fell in behind the success the team was having.” Nothing has changed for her mindset heading into her final season at Washburn either.

She wants to achieve success in winning conference, hosting conference, hosting regionals and hosting the Elite 8. This would mean continuing to win in the fashion they have. Currently, the Lady Blues sit at No. 5 in the nation with a record of 19-1. Typically, with an athlete like this, academic success is put on the backburner. However, Lacy matches her on-court play with her off-court performance. Lacy is currently finishing her nursing program at Washburn with a 4.0 GPA. This has earned her numerous awards including; three-time MIAA Scholar Athlete, three-time Academic Excellence Award, twotime MIAA Academic Honor Roll, Academic All-District and a CoSIDA Academic AllAmerican award. “I actually didn’t even have a 4.0 in high school,” said Lacy. “But my mom graduated with a 4.0 GPA, and I realize that academics will follow me after my volleyball career is over.” Michael Vander Linden is a freshman mass media major. Reach him at michael.vanderlinden@washburn.edu.

Washburn University

FAMILY DAY EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

Saturday, Oct. 15 . Pre & Post Events Oct. 14 & 16

FRIDAY, OCT. 14

» 8 AM – 5 PM Washburn Bookstore open. Annual Family

Day sale of buy one get one half price* on Washburnimprinted merchandise. Receive a free Moore Bowl sun catcher with purchase of $75 or more. Info: 670-1049 » 10 AM – 5 PM Mulvane Art Museum, Garvey Fine Arts Center, 17th St. and Jewell Ave. Info: 670-1124 » 7:30 PM Washburn Symphony Orchestra concert, White Concert Hall, Garvey Fine Arts Center. Info: 670-1511

» 11 AM – 1 PM Picnic, Washburn Room, Memorial Union. »

» »

SATURDAY, OCT. 15

» 9 AM – 3 PM Washburn Bookstore open. Annual Family

»

» » »

Day sale of buy one get one half price* on Washburnimprinted merchandise. Receive a free Moore Bowl sun catcher with purchase of $75 or more. Info: 670-1049 9:30 AM Leadership Institute family brunch, Kansas Room, Memorial Union (invitation only). Info: 670-2000 Information table, Memorial Union lawn 10 AM – 12:30 PM Inflatable and carnival games, Memorial Union lawn 10 AM – 12:30 PM Color an Ichabod, Memorial Union lawn. Sponsored by Washburn Alumni Board of Directors. Info: 670-1641

»

»

» »

Cost: $9 adults; $5 children ages 10 and younger. Info: 670-1154 11:30 AM Alumni Association football tailgate, north side of Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl. Cost: free to dues-paid Alumni Association members; $5 per person for nonmembers; free for children ages 12 and under. Info: 670-1641 12:40 PM Pre-game show, Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl 1 PM Pink-Out football game, Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl. Wear pink to raise breast cancer awareness. Think Pink t-shirts will be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to breast cancer awareness and education. Sponsored by Zeta Tau Alpha. Info: 620-617-7624 1 PM Football, Ichabods vs. University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos, Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl. Family of the Year and Washburn Athletic Hall of Fame inductees will be recognized at halftime. Info and tickets: 670-BODS or wusports.com 1 – 2 PM Fun Family Finger Painting, Mulvane ArtLab, Mulvane Art Museum, Garvey Fine Arts Center, 17th St. and Jewell Ave. Cost: $5. Info: 670-2420 1 – 4 PM Mulvane Art Museum, Garvey Fine Arts Center, 17th St. and Jewell Ave. Info: 670-1124 6 PM Volleyball, Lady Blues vs. University of Nebraska Omaha Mavericks, Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center. Info and tickets: 670-BODS or wusports.com

SUNDAY, OCT. 16

» 1 – 4 PM Mulvane Art Museum, Garvey Fine Arts Center,

17th St. and Jewell Ave. Info: 670-1124 » 3 PM Sherman Alexie’s “War Dances” iRead book discussion, Marvin Auditorium, Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library, 1515 SW 10th Ave. Sponsored by department of English, Mabee Library and Washburn University. Info: 670-1912 *Good in Bookstore only; half price on equal or lower price; and not good with any other offers.

DIRECTIONS TO WASHBURN Washburn.edu/driving-directions

1700 SW COLLEGE AVE, TOPEKA, KS 66621

Washburn.edu


Sports • Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A10

Roadrunners sweep Wichita Falls in weekend doubleheader

Richard Kelly

WASHBURN REVIEW

Photos by Richard Kelly, Washburn Review

Roadrunners Run Wild: Roadrunners forward Dan Dupell sets up to attack Wichita Falls goalie Tyler Green during Saturday’s game. The Roadrunners are on the road until Nov. 11, playing 10 games away from home. ing frame, contrary to the 10-3 advantage they held after the first period on Friday night.

Early in the second period, at 2:32, forward Andrew O’Leary fired a shot past Wild-

Pohlman then came to Washburn University after her previous coach, the head coach from Nova Southeastern University, received a special phone call from Washburn University’s current head colleyball coach, Chris Herron. “My head coach from Nova University actually knew coach Herron here at Washburn University,” said Pohlman. “So, when coach Herron called and asked if my head coach knew

anyone who would be available to help coach this year as the Lady Blues assistant coach, we went through the whole application process.” Two months later, Pohlman had landed the job. “I’m trying to help run the program now and it’s been a very interesting experience,” said Pohlman. “I’m still getting used to a few things, such as the needs of the team, the paperwork, and the time schedules but it’s been a lot of fun so far. I truly love it.”

Week Five

the games

Magellan

Dickie D. Hashbrown Billy Noble Fried Bryce Roose Juice

Slayer

Roboto

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

MWU

MWU

MWU

MWU

ESU

MWU

MWU

MWU

KU

OU

OU

OU

OU

OU

OU

OU

KSU

KSU

TTU

TTU

TTU

TTU

KSU

KSU

Baylor vs Texas A&M

TAMU

Baylor

TAMU

TAMU

OSU

TAMU

Baylor

Baylor

Oregon vs Arizona St.

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

ASU

Oregon

Oregon

Pats

Pats

Pats

Pats

Cowboys

Cowboys

Pats

Pats

Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs New Orleans Saints

Saints

Bucs

Saints

Saints

Bucs

Bucs

Saints

Saints

Minnesota Vikings vs Chicago Bears

Bears

Bears

Bears

Bears

Vikings

Bears

Bears Cowboys

Bears

Fort Valley St vs Bethune-Cookman

Beth-Cook

FVS

Beth-Cook

FVS

FVS

Beth-Cook

Beth-Cook

Beth-Cook

5-5

7-3

8-2

8-2

5-5

8-2

7-3

6-4

18-12

22-8

20-10

22-8

15-15

22-8

19-11

19-11

Washburn vs University of Central Oklahoma

Emporia State vs Missouri Western @ Kansas vs Oklahoma

SunSet Nails & Spa

Richard Kelly is a senior social work and mass media major. Reach him at richard.kelly@washburn.edu.

w e i v e Staff Pick ‘Em R e Th

New Coach

Continued from Page 8

cat goalie Tyler Green to give the RoadRunners a 1-0 advantage. At 9:53, forward Ryan

chance to win. We got the win and that’s important, but there are some lessons that have to be learned after tonight.” Hillegas is now 3-0-2 on the season. He has 1.78 goals against average and a .925 save percentage, which are 8th and 14th in the North American Hockey League. Goaltender Eric Rohrkemper has also been strong for the RoadRunners. While he is 3-30 on the season, Rohrkemper has a 1.77 goals against average and a .915 save percentage. This is opposed to his 2.46 goals against average he registered last season with a .893 save percentage. Topeka now takes to the road to face the Amarillo Bulls Friday and the Texas Tornado next Saturday and Sunday. Games will be broadcasted live on countrylegends106.9 fm.com. They will not play their next home games until Nov. 11-12.

the staff

Plagued with difficulties in goaltending through portions of last season, the Topeka RoadRunners knew this season would have to be different with seven strong divisional opponents ready to take aim. Rookie goaltender Josh Hillegas may be the sparkplug the team needed. Hillegas stopped all 27 shots he faced on Saturday night as Topeka (6-3-1) overcame a slow start to defeat the Wichita Falls Wildcats 3-0 at Landon Arena. “It was pretty special,” said Hillegas. “It was very fun to be part of it.” With the win, Topeka swept the weekend series. They trounced the Wildcats 6-2 in their home opener on Friday night. During the first period on Saturday, Wichita Falls (2-7-1) fired 14 shots against Hillegas, but he was able to turn them all aside. Topeka only mustered nine shots on goal in the open-

Doucet scored his second goal of the season to put Topeka on top 2-0. During the second period, the RoadRunners reversed the shots margin of the first period, outshooting Wichita Falls 14-9 in the second period. In the final frame, the score would remain 2-0 until forward Robbie Davis landed the puck in an empty net to seal the victory at 19:16. The game was not without its fair share of physicality as three misconducts and one game ejection were handed out between the two teams. Eightytwo penalty minutes were recorded in total. Despite the win, Topeka head coach Scott Langer knows his team can perform better. His example of better play was Friday night’s contest. “It was just enough to win, certainly not the effort we had (Friday) night,” said Langer. “Some veterans took the night off, which is disheartening at this time of year. I thought Hillegas kept us in the game. He played well and gave us a

Kansas State vs Texas Tech

Dallas Cowboys vs New England Patriots

Last Week Record OVERALL RECORDS

The Review Staff Pick ‘Em is a weekly feature where we pick the winners of college and pro football games around the country. Check back weekly to see our standings!

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2011-12 Issue 7  

Editor-in-chief Rob Burkett and staff cover Topekan's exploration of the Greenville plan.

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