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the review Homecoming kicks off washburn university

Washburn prepares for No.5 Northwest Missouri A5

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volume 137, Issue 8 • wednesday, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Photo by Tesa DeForest, Washburn Review

Royal Treatment: Washburn’s final ten homecoming candidates posed after being announced respectively on Monday night. This week students can vote at MyWashburn.edu for an eventual king and queen, who will be announced this weekend during halftime at the Washburn football game versus Northwest Missouri.

Richard Kelly WASHBURN REVIEW As flashbulbs went off and cheers rang through the audience, Washburn’s Homecoming candidates were announced Monday night. The Homecoming King and Queen will be crowned on Oct. 23 at halftime of the football game vs. Northwest Missouri State University, Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl. Caley Onek, president of Washburn Student Government Association, introduced each of them to the stage. Selected as Homecoming Queen candidates: Mikki Burcher, Kinsley, Kan., was nominated by Washburn Ad Club. She is a senior majoring in mass media and English and plans to start her own

business. Her parents are Alan and Becky Burcher. Lauren Eckert, Minneapolis, Kan., was nominated by Mortar Board. She is a senior majoring in mass media and plans to pursue a master’s degree in higher education. Her parents are Rick and Belinda Eckert. Lisa Ille, Ellinwood, Kan., was nominated by Future Alumni Network. She is a senior majoring in biology and plans to attend optometry school. Her parents are Mark and Linda Ille. Erica Koepsel, Rose Hill, Kan., was nominated by Sigma Phi Epsilon. Koepsel is a senior majoring in psychology and plans to join the Peace Corps and further her education. Her parents are Brian and Rene McDonald. Taylor McGown, Mound City,

Kan., was nominated by Washburn Student Government Association. She is a junior majoring in biology and plans to pursue a doctor of dental surgery degree. Her parents are Doug and Rhonda McGown. Selected as Homecoming King candidates: Blake Bryant, Independence, Kan., was nominated by the Washburn University Dancing Blues. He is a junior majoring in communication and plans to work in human resources as a corporate trainer. His parents are Steve and Glenda Bryant. Matthew Hall, Sabetha, Kan., was nominated by Mortar Board. He is a senior majoring in sports management and business. His parents are Randy and Denise Hall. Joe Muiller, Lawrence, Kan., was

nominated by Future Alumni Network. Muiller is a senior majoring in biology and plans to attend medical school to pursue a career as a surgeon. His parents are Steve and Michelle Muiller. Lucas Mullin, Eureka, Kan., was nominated by Washburn Student Government Association. Mullin is a senior majoring in public administration and plans to pursue a master’s degree in public administration. His parents are Russell and Denise Mullin. Matthew Peterson, Lansing, Kan., was nominated by Kappa Alpha Theta. Peterson is a senior majoring in history and plans to attend law school. His parents are Jon and Glenna Peterson. Following the announcement, the reality was still setting in for some of the candidates. “I was just really excited,” said

Koepsel. “After being after all the other four girls, I was like ‘I really wanna do this’ and I didn’t realize how much I wanted to do it until it was kind of this time. I didn’t ever really see it happening.” For Peterson, even after he was announced as a candidate, expectations were still modest on winning Homecoming King. “I definitely told everyone ‘I just want to get top five and I’ll be happy with that,’” said Peterson. “It’s definitely a great honor and I’m stoked.” And for Koepsel, where she’s at already is far more than what she envisioned. “I was really excited to be even one of the nominees,” said Koepsel. “I got nominated by another organization, so knowing someone else notices your leadership on campus is rockin.” Homecoming events continued Tuesday with a “Say Cheez” photo booth, royalty voting, top hat voting and WuBay. Laptops will be stationed in the union all week for royalty voting and 51 top hats lined tables around the union lobby to vote the one which was best designed. Mullin said that top hat submission was up from previous years. Nicole Perkuhn, Special Events Director for WSGA, looks for big numbers and with early Tuesday turnout for royalty voting, has already seen this begin. Much of it can be attributed to WSGA’s promotion of homecoming. “We have expected a good turnout so far,” said Perkuhn. “I think a lot of that has to do with who the candidates are. They’re very well known people on campus. “That’s been really exciting. I would love to see over 1,000 people vote and I don’t think that’s a lofty goal. I think it could easily be met if just people are out here voting and promoting.” For additional information on each of the candidates, visit www. washburnreview.org.

Richard Kelly is a junior social work/mass media major. Reach him at richard.kelly@ washburn.edu

Photos by Tesa DeForest, Washburn Review

An array of festivities: (left to right) Students from WUDANCE take part in the homecoming dance Monday night. They had the opportunity to have the floor to themselves for a song after candidate announcements.; Washburn Residential Living displays their top hat for voting. They were one of 51 top hats registered.; Students enjoy a late night breakfast after the homecoming dance Monday night. It was the capoff event of Monday night.

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Check out Washburn art department’s faculty exhibition at Mulvane

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See Washburn’s close call against Emporia State

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News • Wednesday, October 20, 2010

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Obituary: WU VPAA committee begins alendar alumnae passes appointment procedure Kelsie O’ Connell WASHBURN REVIEW

Wednesday, Oct. 20 Mabee mini golf Mabee Library 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Royalty voting, top hat voting and WuBay Main Lobby, Memorial Union 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Scorch on the Porch Memorial Union Lawn 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Brown Bag international lecture International House 12 p.m. Capital City Marching Band Festival Yager Stadium, Moore Bowl 6 p.m. Mabee mini golf tournament Mabee Library 7 p.m. Debate: “High Time: Should We Legalize Drugs in America?” Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center 7:30 p.m. Text messaging contest Main Floor, Mabee Library 8 to 8:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 Royalty voting, top hat voting and WuBay Main Lobby, Memorial Union 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. WU chef contest Lower Level, Memorial Union 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Britta Lee Livgren, 31, Topeka, left us suddenly, but peacefully on October 4, 2010. She was born December 3, 1978 in Topeka, the daughter of Chris Livgren and Roxanne DeGraw. She graduated from Washburn Rural High School in 1997 and attended Washburn University. She was a member of Susanna Wesley United Methodist Church where she sang in the Reach Praise Band. She loved to sing anytime she could, including in the many bands she was a member of and at karaoke. The Livgren family has lost our beloved Britta. Those of us who loved her, know that she was a light in the darkness, laughter in a world of sadness, love personified, with a voice that angels envy. She knew nothing better than how to love unconditionally, and wanted nothing from the world than the same. To say she will be missed would be to say the night will be dark. We love you with every breath and count the moments until we meet again. There will be too many. Goodbye our beautiful, fragile flower. Now

Photo provided by Penwell-Gabel Funeral Home

your voice can make the Lord smile. Survivors include her mother, Roxanne DeGraw; father, Chris Livgren and wife, Cheryl; brothers, Jake (Mary) Livgren and their children, Gavin, Lyda and Hayden; Christopher Plank; sisters, Jessica (Matthew) Matheis and their children, Julian, Abigail and Miles; Crystal Plank; and grandparents, Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Edgar and Rethal DeGraw, all of Topeka. Memorial services were hosted at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 9, at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 3625 S.W. Wanamaker Rd. The internment was a private family affair. Penwell-Gabel Southwest Chapel assisted the family with arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to the Britta Livgren Memorial Fund, and sent to her sister, Jessica Matheis, 5838 S.W. 25th St., Topeka, KS, 66614. Please make checks available to “Jessica Matheis” To leave a special message for the family online, visit www. PenwellGabelTopeka.com

    The search for the new Washburn Vice President of Academic Affairs wrapped up Friday, Oct. 8 with the final presentation of the fourth candidate. Awaiting the appointment of the new VPAA, in the meantime the students and staff of the Washburn community will be left in suspense. For the past three weeks, four candidates from nearly 80 applicants were chosen to appear at Washburn to present hour long lectures, which included a question and answer portion at the end of each lecture.   “This process as far as I know has been in the faculty handbook for 20 to 25 years or more,” said John Mullican, chair of the VPAA committee. “As far as I know this is the process that’s been in place for a long time.” Mullican was appointed chair of the search committee for the next VPAA, bringing the committee total to 18 staff members. In May, when the committee began reviewing possible candidates for the position, they came up with a set time for each candidate to present, making the process as fair as possible for each person. Each committee member helped when it came to the process of selections. “I had great representation in all of my meetings,” said Mullican. Students were also a part of the selection process, including Caley Onek, Washburn Student Government Association President and Lucas Mullin, her vice president. Onek and Mullin were among seven other students who met with each candidate

International issues forum with Lisa Johnston International House 12 to 1 p.m. Lady Blues soccer Moore Bowl, Yager Stadium 6 p.m.

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This week has been filled with so many amazing activities! If you have not participated yet, there are still many going on to go to!

Royalty voting, top hat voting and WuBay Main Lobby, Memorial Union 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Don’t see your event in the calendar? Call the Review newsroom at 670-2506 to have your event included in an upcoming edition. It’s FREE. For upcoming Washburn athletic events, go to www.wusports.com.

NOW LEASING:

Hello Everyone!

Friday, Oct. 22

Catholic Campus Center open house 1633 S.W. Jewell 6:30 p.m.

Kelsie O’Connell is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at kelsie.oconnell@washburn.edu.

-paid for byWSGA-

Crane Observatory Fourth floor, Stoffer 8 to 9:30 p.m.

WU After Hours and top hat auction Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center 5 to 7 p.m.

the new VPAA is yet to be announced, although an approximate time has been given. “I could see probably as early as January,” said Mullican. “The other option, realistically, is next fall.” Today will be the deadline for all comments pertaining to the VPAA to be submitted to Jerry Farley, Washburn President. Students and staff who viewed each presentation have been encouraged to email Farley their opinions on each candidate in order to help him choose the best possible VPAA for Washburn University. For more information on the VPAA candidates as well as the list of committee members, students and faculty may visit MyWashburn.edu.  

VICE President’s Press

Yell Like Hell pep rally Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center 7:30 p.m.

Author presentation, Bonar Menninger Mabee Library’s iRead Lounge 12 to 1 p.m.

for an interview. Similar to that of the normal presentations given, Onek and Mullin were able to tell Farley about their personal findings with the candidates. “Everybody’s here for students and that was something that all the [VPAA candidates] said,” said Mullin. “If students aren’t on this campus, then the [staff] won’t have jobs.” Mullican also agreed that the position of VPAA is an extremely important one on a college campus, which is why student involvement is key. Although schedules are busy for many students, Washburn’s web software MyWashburn. edu enables students and staff to view the presentations online via video. “The VPAA are the top faculty member on campus,” said Mullican. “They are an advocate for students and advocates for the faculty.” Mullican said he suspects Washburn students and faculty will know who will be the next VPAA in the next two to four weeks. The starting date of

Richard Kelly is a junior mass media/social work major. Reach him at richard.kelly@washburn.edu

Wednesday • Scorch on the Porch – 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Evening Activity • Mabee mini golf 7 p.m. and text message competition 8pm (iPad prize!) (Register by 5pm) Thursday Noon Activity • WU Chef – 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Evening Activity • Yell Like Hell – 7:30pm (Soccer- home at 6 p.m. ) Friday Evening Activity • Alumni After Hours, BTC – 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. • Friday Night Madness – 10 p.m. Saturday • Parade Lineup – 9 a.m. • Parade – 10 a.m. • Game and Homecoming Crowning – 1 p.m. I hope to see everyone at the Game on Saturday! GO BODS! Lucas Mullin WSGA Vice President


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Wednesday, October 20, 2010 • News

WASHBURN UNIVERSITY HOMECOMING 2010 round of golf to qualify for the tournament at 7 pm / Mabee Library (Info: 670.1986) 10 AM—1 PM ➟ Top Hat decorating contest coin voting, silent auction and wuBay auction / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—1 PM ➟ Homecoming royalty candidate voting (students only) / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—5 PM ➟ Mulvane Art Museum exhibits (Info: 670.1124) 11 AM—1:30 PM ➟ Scorch on the Porch Tailgate: food, live music and bookstore sales / Memorial Union lawn (Sponsored by Memorial Union offices) (Info: 670.1454) 6 PM ➟ Capital City Marching Band Festival / Area high school marching bands will perform and compete. / Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl (Info: 670.1511) 7 PM ➟ Mabee mini golf tournament / Mabee Library (Info: 670.1986) 8—8:45 PM ➟ Student Friends of Mabee text messaging contest (students only) / Mabee Library (Info: 670.1986)

THURSDAY, OCT. 21 10 AM—1 PM ➟ Top Hat decorating contest coin

voting, silent auction and wuBay auction / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—1 PM ➟ Homecoming royalty candidate voting (students only) / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—5 PM ➟ Mulvane Art Museum exhibits (Info: 670.1124) 11 AM—1 PM ➟ WU Chef: Cake Decorating Challenge / Lower level, Memorial Union (Sponsored by Washburn Student Government Association) (Info: 670.1169) 6 PM ➟ Soccer: Lady Blues vs. Missouri Western State University Griffons / Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl (Info: 670.1134) 7:30 PM ➟ Yell Like Hell contest / Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center (Sponsored by Washburn Student Government Association) (Info: 670.1169) 7:30 PM ➟ Thursday Night Live (Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship)/1520 SW 17th St. (Info: 234.5555) 8—9:30 PM ➟ Crane Observatory open house / Fourth floor, Stoffer Science Hall (Sponsored by physics and astronomy department) (Info: 670.2141)

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10 AM—1 PM ➟ Top Hat decorating contest coin

voting, silent auction and wuBay auction / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—1 PM ➟ Homecoming royalty candidate voting (students only) / Main level, Memorial Union (Info: 670.1723) 10 AM—5 PM ➟ Mulvane Art Museum exhibits (Info: 670.1124) 11:30 AM ➟ Alumni Fellows luncheon / Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center (Sponsored by Washburn Alumni Association) (Info: 670.1641) 1 PM ➟ Online voting for Homecoming royalty candidates ends 5—7 PM ➟ WU After Hours and Top Hat auction / Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center (Sponsored by Washburn Alumni Association) (Info: 670.1641) 6:30 PM ➟ Catholic Campus Center 40th Anniversary open house / Catholic Campus Center, 1633 SW Jewell (Info: 233.2204 or www.wucatholic.com) 7 PM ➟ Volleyball: Lady Blues vs. Truman State University Bulldogs / Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center (Info: 670.1134) 7—9 PM ➟ Kappa Mu Epsilon reunion (Members of Kansas Delta Chapter only) / McGivern Room, Bianchino Pavilion (Info: 670.1498) 10 PM ➟ Friday Night Madness (pep rally) / Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center. Community welcome to attend! (Sponsored by Bod Squad, Student Athletes Advisory Committee and Washburn Student Government Association) (Info: 670.1169)

SATURDAY, OCT. 23 9 AM—12 PM ➟ Washburn Law Clinic 40th

Anniversary Celebration (open to Law Clinic alumni, faculty, staff and guests)/ School of Law Clinic (Info: 670.1191 or www.washburnlaw.edu/clinic/40thanniversary) 10 AM ➟ Homecoming parade around campus 11 AM ➟ Alumni Association tailgate / North side of Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl Admission: free for dues paid members of the Alumni Association and $5 for non-members. (Sponsored by Washburn Alumni Association) 11 AM—12:30 PM ➟ Catholic Campus Center tailgate / North side of Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl. Look for “Oh Lordy, Look Who’s 40!” red and white flag. (Info: 233.2204 or www.wucatholic.com) 1 PM ➟ Football: Ichabods vs. Northwest Missouri State University Bearcats / Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl Homecoming royalty

SUNDAY, OCT. 24 10 AM ➟ Catholic Campus Center 40th

Anniversary Mass and reception / Washburn Room, Memorial Union (Info: 233.2204) 1—4 PM ➟ Mulvane Art Museum exhibits (Info: 670.1124) 1:30—5:30 PM ➟ Baseball alumni golf outing (baseball alumni only) / Cypress Ridge Golf Course, 2533 SW Urish Rd. (Info: 670.1793) 3 PM ➟ Washburn fall choral concert White Concert Hall, Garvey Fine Arts Center (Info: 670.1511)

TOP HAT AUCTION Take home your favorite Top Hat! Top Hats, which were designed and created by the Washburn community, will be available to purchase by silent or wuBay auctions. See calendar for display times and locations. All proceeds benefit United Way. For more information, call 670-1723.

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7:30 AM—6:30 PM ➟ Mabee mini golf. Play a

crowning during halftime (Info: 670.1134) 1—4 PM ➟ Mulvane Art Museum exhibits (Info: 670.1124) 6 PM ➟ Volleyball: Lady Blues vs. Missouri Western State University Griffons / Lee Arena, Petro Allied Health Center (Info: 670.1134) 6 PM ➟ Soccer: Lady Blues vs. Northwest Missouri State University Bearcats / Yager Stadium at Moore Bowl (Info: 670.1134) 7—10 PM ➟ Catholic Campus Center 40th Anniversary celebration dance / Washburn Room, Memorial Union Donations accepted at door (Info: 233.2204 or www.wucatholic.com) 7—10 PM ➟ Reunion concert: Students band with artist Livy High / Rooster Tail, 830 N. Kansas Ave., Admission: $5 at door (Sponsored by Alpha Delta fraternity) (Info: 316.706.7636)

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Opinion • Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Think Pink Roberts disapproves of plan Roberts campaign: Pat WASHBURN REVIEW attention rather than awareness an election year. While I am pleased to hear Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius is admitting that the new law is unworkable by making exceptions for some companies, I am disappointed that she has not extended these waivers to all who are affected. So while almost a million workers will be able to keep their plan, the rest will likely see their plans change and their costs go up if they are fortunate enough to remain covered by their employer at all. The bottom line is that these waivers are an admission by the Administration that the new law isn’t working. The

Dear Editors:

Americans continue to disapprove, in high numbers, of the new health care reform law. We have now seen reports that U.S. businesses including McDonald’s cannot afford to comply with the new mandates in the law, warning that they will result in increased costs or dropped coverage for their workers. The reality of this new law is so negative that the Administration has resorted to handing out waivers to ease the blow at this critical time during

It is estimated that 39,840 women will die this year from breast cancer, and 201, 090 will be diagnosed with the disease. Washburn University, along with the rest of the country, has turned pink in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. And I’m getting tired of it. This year, with “Bowling for Boobs” and “I like boobs” t-shirts, I stopped being able to appreciate the pink ribbons tied to trees and signposts. It’s not that I am anti-breast, or antiawareness, but I also think that serious campaigns have the responsibility to be tasteful, not tacky. Obviously, slogans that say “boobs” are going to get the attention of both sexes. So did the “I like it on the floor” statements on Facebook, where women posted where they like to put their purse in a way that suggested less mundane activities. However, as my high school drama teacher likes to say, “Pulling your pants down on stage get FROM THE may laughs, EDITOR but it d o e s n ’t amount to comedy.” These sexheavy themes for breast cancer awareness get attention, but do they really help with breast cancer awareness or just breast awareness? Can all the people with the “I like boobs” bracelets and shirts tell me three effective ways to prevent breast cancer? I highly doubt it. Also, no one has been able to tell me what the location of my purse has to do with breast cancer. I’m not trying to come down on “Think Pink” week. I have about 50 pink ribbons that festoon my room and belongings. My grandmother is a breast cancer survivor. It’s not that I don’t care about the pink movement. The issue is that I take breast cancer very seriously, and although I’m not against having fun while raising awareness, I think that something that kills over 35,000 women a year should be looked at with a bit more seriousness. It doesn’t matter if you can get a woman’s boyfriend to wear an “I like boobs” shirt if he isn’t going to push her to get a yearly mammogram. The other problem is that, while breast cancer is an issue, more than 910,000 Americans die each year from heart disease. That is more than four times the number of those diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Oddly enough, both diseases share their two biggest preventable factors: diet and exercise. And, with obesity and diabetes rates continuing to rise, it seems that although “awareness” is up, Americans have yet to act in their own best interests. So, while we wait for our lifestyle decisions to kill us, I want to take the opportunity to spread some breast cancer awareness of my own: men who develop breast cancer have higher mortality rates because they fail to recognize the symptoms sooner. All I’m saying is it doesn’t have to be sex related to be more than a “woman’s” disease. Regina Budden is a senior mass media major. Reach her at regina. budden@washburn.edu

Bod on

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– Pat Roberts

Pat Roberts is a Kansas representative to the United Staes Senate and a member of the Republican Party. The views expressed in his letter are not necessarily the views of The Washburn Review or Washburn University. Letters can be sent to wureview@gmail.com with “Letter to the Editors” in the subject line.

burn Student Media! We will be awarding lots of prizes to the top three artists. Final

Nancy Morton Sophomore “I’m going to the parade and get candy.”

Night of Media Merriment banquet on Dec. 2, 2010.

Submit your logo file in a .PDF format to wureview@ gmail.com. Deadline for submission is Nov. 19, 2010.

Michael Harris Freshman “I’m ready to whoop the Bearcats’ butts in the football game.”

Laura Depke Freshman “Yell Like Hell because I’m in it with Delta Gamma.”

Homecoming activity?

Rachel Consani Freshman “I’m most excited for the football game.”

* Jeremy Edwards Freshman “The pep-rally, the athletic teams are doing skits that should be funny.”

Interviews and photos by Adam Stephenson.

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The Washburn Review Contact Us Phone: (785) 670-2506 Fax: (785) 670-1131 ww.washburnreview.org Print Editor-in-Chief Regina Budden

logo will be presented at the

What is your favorite

Eli Johns Freshman “I’m looking forward to tailgating and getting ready for the game.”

Design a new logo for Wash-

w It’s homecoming week, so the Washburn Review hit the streets to ask students what they enjoy most about this week’s activities.

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Regina Budden WASHBURN REVIEW

waivers are an attempt to hide that fact from voters in order to minimize the political fallout just before the midterm elections.

Your logo here!

Online Editor-in-Chief Josh Rouse Advertising Manager Ashley Shepard News Editor Richard Kelly Sports Editor Kate Hampson A&E Editor Linnzi Fusco Assistant Online Editor Jordan Shefte Photo Editor Tesa DeForest Copy Editors Robert Burkett • ReAnne Wentz Production Assistants Ryan Hodges • Cameron Hughes • Maggie Pilcher Writers Elise Barnett • Michelle Boltz • Christina Butler • Hannah Cockerill • Samantha Corber • Kate Fechter • Kelsie Klotzbach • Timothy Lake • Jaimie Luse • Robert Miller • Peter Newman • Kelsie O’Connell • Sam Sayler • David Wiens • Anjelica Willis Photographers Molly Adams • April Ewing •Candice Morris• Zachary Lambert • Brittany Pugh • Mallory Shehi Senior Videographer Brian Dulle Videographers Bryce Grammer • Adebayo Oladapo • Adam Stephenson Advertising Staff Anna Henry • Business Manager Lily Pankratz Adviser Regina Cassell

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The Washburn Review is published every Wednesday throughout the academic year, excluding holidays and some other dates. Copies are free for students, faculty and staff, and can be found at numerous locations around the campus of Washburn University. Subscriptions to the Washburn Review are available at the following rates: 13 issues for $20 or 26 issues for $35. For more information, please visit our Web site at www.washburnreview.org or call (785) 670-2506. The Washburn Review is a member newspaper of the Associated Press (AP), the Kansas Associated Press (KPA) and the Kansas Associated Collegiate Press (KACP). The Review was the 2009 winner of the All-State award, given to the best four-year public university newspaper in the state of Kansas. The Washburn Review accepts letters to the editor pertaining to articles appearing in the Washburn Review or on issues of importance to the Washburn or Topeka community. We do not accept mass letters to the editor. Please limit letters to less than 400 words. Letters must be submitted via Word document if possible, and there must be a phone number where the person can be reached for verification. Please e-mail letters to review@washburn.edu. The Review reserves the right to edit all submissions to the paper for length, libel, language and clarity. Because of volume on the opinion page, we are unable to print all letters and are unable to return submissions.

© The Washburn Review Copyright 2010

Corrections Even professionals get it wrong sometimes. If your information was inaccurately printed, please let us know and send an e-mail with “Correction” in the subject line to wureview@gmail.com.

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Cameron Hughes is a sophomore art and graphic design major. Reach him at cameron.hughes@washburn.edu.

Or you may call or leave a message at 785-670-2506


review sports washburn university

Wednesday, OCTOBER 20, 2010

Homecoming Photo courtesy of Mike Knipper, Washburn Sports Information

Breaking tradition: Dane Simoneau, Washburn quarterback, center, drops back for a pass against Pittsburg State. The Ichabods beat the Gorillas 35-34 in double overtime and won in Pittsburg for the first time since 1977.

Josh Rouse WASHBURN REVIEW Two weeks after breaking its three-game losing streak and one week after beating Nebraska-Omaha for the first time since 1966, Washburn beat Pittsburg State in Pittsburg for the first time since 1977. This week, the Ichabods’ Homecoming matchup is against the defending national champions, the Northwest Missouri Bearcats, a team that hasn’t lost an MIAA game since 2005. “Obviously, it adds some excitement to the game,� said Craig Schurig, head coach. “You always want to play well in front of people that are coming back to the university, and some of them haven’t been back

in quite some time. You want to goal. At the end of regulation, show your program off and the Craig missed another potential players. They know it’s a little game-winner. This would be added feature to the game, par- the theme for the day. ticularly the pregame stuff that In the second overtime, the builds up to it, so there’s a little Gorillas marched down the field added excitement to it.� and scored on Terreance Isaac’s Against Pittsburg State last third touchdown of the day, but Saturday, WashCraig missed the burn led 28-7 at point after atICHABOD halftime before tempt and left the FOOTBALL giving up 21 unscore at 34-28. answered points Simoneau then in the second half tied the score to tie the game at 28. on the next possession with a In the first overtime, Wash- 16-yard pass to Joe Hastings, burn had a chance to score but sixth-year senior receiver, and had a Dane Simoneau pass de- Steve Ivanisevic, senior kicker, flected and intercepted at the capitalized on the disparity in PSU 2-yard line. The Gorillas experience between himself then had a chance to win the and Craig by nailing the gamegame, but Jake Craig, freshman winning PAT kick. kicker, missed a 37-yard field While the Ichabods may

have been lucky against the Gorillas, they’ll need a lot more than luck against the No. 5 Bearcats this weekend for Homecoming. “The only thing with Northwest is obviously their personnel are very good,� said Schurig. “We basically prepare the same week in and week out no matter what you doubt each unit, because of the talent and the execution that Northwest has, you have to do some different things just to combat what they do. “They have a real strong receiver, so we have to extra conscious of that. The quarterback can run and throw very well, so you have to be extra Please see BODS page A6

Photo courtesy of Mike Knipper, Washburn Sports Information

Carrying the load: The Ichabods backfield, Greg Schoenberg, left, Vershon Moore, center, and Justin Cooper, rushed for a total of 179 yards in their win over the Gorillas.

Klone pursues records, med school

travels around and is more competitive. “We traveled all around the A native of Casper, Wyo., Rocky Mountain region, and Ashley Klone, senior goalkeep- then played high school soccer. er, has made quite the impres- Then I met [Head Coach] Tim sion on the Lady Blues Soccer Collins and came to Topeka.� Despite all of her success team. Now in her fourth year at Washburn University, Klone is playing the game, it was someranked second all-time in wins thing completely foreign and new to Klone’s in goal with 25, family. 13 shutouts, “My sis169 saves and “ ter has never I’d put Jordan Shefte has played over played soccer,� 4,000 minutes, on lead vocals because said Klone. the second she loves to sing and “And my parmost of any she’s crazy and it’s very ents both said goal keeper in entertaining that when they Washburn hiswere kids, they tory. didn’t have “I’ve been -Ashley Klone soccer. So playing socLady Blues Goalie when I started cer since I was playing soccer about 6,� said � and got pretty Klone. “The into it, they had first team I ever played on was a Boys and Girls to learn the rules of the game.� After visiting many Club team in Casper, WY. I just played soccer throughout schools, Klone chose Washburn the years, and as I got older, I because of the atmosphere, played on a club team, which small class sizes, friendly peo-

Sam Sayler WASHBURN REVIEW

Archive photo, Washburn Review

ple, and because she liked the campus Throughout her time as a Lady Blues’ goalie, Klone has enjoyed traveling and the surprise victory of the underdog. “It was fun my sophomore year we went to Hawaii and played two games,� said Klone. “That’s a trip I’ll never forget.� Just for fun, Klone has also imagined a hypothetical rock band consisting of Lady Blues soccer players. “I’d put Jordan Shefte on lead vocals because she loves to sing and she’s crazy and it’s very entertaining,� said Klone. “She’s a really good rapper. A lot of people don’t know that. I’d put Danielle Sicard on drums because she’s crazy and intense in whatever she does. “I’d put Tia Stovall on guitar because she’s taking guitar class and so she’d actually know what she’s doing. Everyone else on our team could be dancers because everyone on Please see KLONE page A6



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A6

Making it a family affair

Sports • Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Student-athletes find comfort in going to school with siblings Robert Burkett WASHBURN REVIEW

Throughout life, people grow up and relationships change. Some relationships though, withstand the forces of time. For a few athletes at Washburn, such is the case. As one of the more profound experiences of life, growing up in a family with brothers and sisters is part of what can shape a person. Rarely then, is the chance to continue that relationship into college years. In the case of Ty Lewis, senior football player and his brother Xavier, sophomore baseball player, there wasn’t a conscious effort to bring the two back together. “Well I was recruited out here and then when Xavier became a senior in high school I showed [baseball head coach Steve] Anson some of what my brother was all about and he kinda came out here,” said Ty Lewis. Upon his arrival at Washburn, Xavier, who lived in the dorms at Washburn during his first years, spent more time at his brother’s house initially. “Having Ty here made things a lot easier for me,” said Xavier Lewis. “I spent a lot of time my first year at his place hanging out since I didn’t really know anyone yet.” The adjustment to college in some cases is less of a struggle for some other athletes. In the case of Sami McHenry, freshman volleyball player coming to Washburn was an easy choice for her due in part to her family connection to the University. McHenry’s father,

Ron is the head coach of the letes. In the case of Jake IverLady Blue’s basketball team. son, senior football player and For McHenry though every his brother Payton, sophomore volleyball game and practice is football player their friendship time spent with her sister, Dani and competition goes back to (McHenry) Schmidt, assistant high school where they wrestled volleyball coach. and played football together as “We have a great bond,” well. Now that they are in colsaid Sami McHenry. “We’ve lege together they play different always been pretty close.” positions and compete together Dani demonstrated ath- but that hasn’t changed their letic-excellence as a two-sport competitive drive. athlete at Washburn when she “We do stuff like friendplayed for the Lady Blues bas- ly competition in the weight ketball and volleyball teams. room,” said Jake Iverson. The athletic “[Payton]’s experience the man in allows Sami the weight to relate to It’s just one of those r o o m , her sister. though.” “[Dani] things where having In the has always your best friend close is case of the been a great just something you can’t Iversons, the athlete so two brothI’ve always really replace er’s bond is tried to take something what she that influsays beenced Paycause she ton in his - Xavier Lewis choice is just tryof Washburn pitcher college. ing to make me better,” “Havsaid Sami ing Jake here McHenry. was cerBeing in the relationship of tainly an aspect to the choice to coach and player though is one come to Washburn,” said Paything that they make a point of ton Iverson. “Having him here keeping on the court. made the move to Washburn “We try to keep it two easier for me.” separate worlds when we get In fact the two are roomtogether outside of practice,” mates which allows them to said Dani Schmidt. “My dad keep close even despite busy and I had to work around this academic and athletics schedsituation when I played with ules. him here so I kind of know how Sometimes though, sibto work through this.” lings can be close and yet lead Along with being in a sib- separate lives at Washburn. For ling relationship, come the nat- Lindsey Himpel, sophomore ural competitiveness that is part outfielder on the softball team, of being close in age and ath- and her sister Lauren, a fresh-

man outfielder, their choice of school was for similar and yet different reasons. “With our mom having graduated from Washburn, it was kind of a natural progression for me,” said Lindsey Himpel. While Lindsey chose Washburn due to family connection, Lauren came to the same school but for different reasons. “I looked all around, wanting to go somewhere else besides Washburn, but the program here for [physical therapy] is a good one so I ended up here,” said Lauren Himpel. Outside of their time on the softball diamond, the Himpel sisters who have grown accustomed to playing together spend a great deal of time in their own separate pursuits. “We don’t really think about [playing together] that much anymore,” said Lauren Himpel. “We spend time with different friends and stuff, I mean we still talk and stuff but we live apart to.” No matter what sport or what kind of relationship a sibling has with their brother or sister one thing is sure, there is a family thread that runs through Washburn and continues to help carry forward the legacy of Washburn athletics. “It’s just one of those things where having your best friend close is just something you can’t really replace,” said Xavier Lewis. Robert Burkett is a senior mass media major. Reach him at robert. burkett@washburn.edu.

KLONE: Hard work paying off Continued from page A5 our team loves to dance. I’d be the manager because I’m pretty boring and shy.” Klone’s efforts have not gone unnoticed by others around her who cannot praise her enough. “She does a fantastic job just leadership by example,”

said Tim Collins, head soccer coach. “She’s one of the hardest workers in the program. She always shows up. She always gives her best, day in, day out. Always is one of our themes. She’s the epitome of that.” Klone also puts in time breaking a mental sweat. Even with Klone’s success as a goalie, the biology major recently

applied to medical school and hopes to rise in the field as high as the neck of Apatosaurus, her favorite dinosaur. “I think the other thing that she brings is that she’s a biology major,” said Collins. “That’s a tough major here at Washburn and she’s fantastic in the classroom. She’s one of the Capital Federal scholar athletes, and

she has a terrific grade-point average. “And her dedication to being here for the right reasons, being here as a student and being here as an athlete sets a pretty high bar.” Sam Sayler is a freshman undecided major. Reach him at samuel. saylor@washburn.edu.

BODS: Large obstacle www.washburnreview.org ahead in homecoming Your resource for the latest in Washburn sports: conscious of that. The quarterback can run and throw very well, so you have to be extra conscious of that. Then defensively, they’re usually very strong up front, so you have to be very secure in your blocking assignments.” Senior linebacker Michael Wilhoite, who amassed 11 tackles and teamed up with Bryce Atagi for a sack against Pitt State, will be experiencing his sixth Homecoming game at Washburn after injuring his right tibia and sitting out his redshirt senior season last year. “It means a lot,” said Wilhoite, “I really enjoy it because I tend to play better when more people are at the game and I really enjoy people coming out and cheering us on and rooting us on. It comforts you and gives you more confidence in yourself and as a team. You’ve got the school supporting you, you’ve got family supporting you, you’ve got alumni coming. The stadium gets a little louder and it gives you energy when you might be tired on fourth down or in the fourth quarter, they feed you the energy to make you want to keep going.” While the team is looking forward to the game, the quality of the opponent certainly represents a challenge. After losing its first game of the season to Texas A&M-Kingsville, the Bearcats scored at least 42 points in each of their next five victories, including a 42-0 romp over then-No. 8 Missouri Western. “I think of it like this: we’re

playing Northwest,” said Luke Schuckman, senior linebacker. “We’re playing the defending national champs, coming to our house and we’ve got to rise to the occasion and knock them off the throne. To be the best, you’ve got to beat the best and right now they claim to be the best.” Schurig said once the distractions of the week are over, the team will be ready to get down to business on the field against the Bearcats. “Once the game starts, it’s a game,” said Schurig. “We obviously are playing a very good opponent, so that’ll feature itself. Homecoming is great, it’s something you look forward to and the players hear the buzz on campus when they’re in class and things that are going on all during the week, so I think they enjoy it.” Wilhoite’s biggest concern, however, is about making the game enjoyable for the fans. He said that if they manage to get the crowd into the game, his play will take care of itself. “I’ve always looked at it like ‘If they’re willing to come out and watch us play, let’s at least put on a great show for them,’” said Wilhoite. “ It really means a lot to me, I really enjoy the family days and the senior days and the homecomings, it brings more people out and I think it’s a lot more fun of an atmosphere. If you can have fun, the game is just a lot easier.” Josh Rouse is a senior mass media major. Reach him at joshua. rouse@washburn.edu.

• • •

Blues climb to No. 2 in nation Sam Sayler WASHBURN REVIEW

The Washburn University Lady Blues volleyball team checked off another win this past Friday in a tumultuous match against Emporia State and were ranked second in the nation, the highest ranking in school history. After the Lady Blues won the first two games, the outcome became more uncertain as ESU won the next two, forcing Washburn to win in a tie-breaking fifth game. “The biggest thing is Molly Smith was really good defensively,” said Chris Herron, head coach. “Breanna Lewis was pretty much unstoppable, and that’s kind of where it was.” Herron acknowledged the difficulty in facing a team of such high caliber on the court. “We’re fortunate enough to win,” said Herron. “They’re a good team. It’s a good team. They’ve got an amazing rightside player, and we have an amazing right-side player.” Despite having only one loss this season, the Lady Blues still have room for improvement. “You know, I thought our left sides, at times, were good, but they were pretty roller coaster-ish throughout the night,” said Herron. “We need to be a little more efficient with our left sides if at all possible. Other than that, I’m sure it was fun for the crowd.” The members of the team

seemed to be in high spirits after their dramatic and suspenseful victory against the adversarial ESU Hornets. “It was a tough game for us,” said junior outside hitter for the Lady Blues Courtney Wallman. “Emporia’s always one of our biggest rivals. You know, it’s one of those deals where we hope we come out and come out strong and everyone’s on. “Tonight’s one of those nights where everyone was kind of clicking. We came together as a team and pulled it off.” Wallman offered her own thoughts on the chinks in the team’s armor and what needs to be done to mend them. “Serving is one of the things that we always have to work most on,” said Wallman. “Serving aggressive and, you know, passing and just staying consistent as hitters and all around ball control hits, too.” With several matches still yet to be played, the team still needs to stay sharp and ready for what comes next. “Right now, we need to make sure we don’t hit our peak,” said Wallman. “You know, we keep practicing, doing the little extra things that keep us in tip-top form and that way we can keep on winning the rest of the season.” Sam Sayler is a freshman undecided major. Reach him at samuel. saylor@washburn.edu.



Videos Photos Updates

Look forward to our live chat during Homecoming!

w e i v e Staff Pick ‘Em R e Th

Week Six

the staff

Continued from page A5

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Reaching for the win: Jessica Fey, sophomore right hitter goes up for a block against Emporia State. The Lady Blues won a close match 3-2

the games

Katoe

Washburn vs Northwest Mo.

Washburn Kansas State

Kansas State vs Baylor @ Nebraska vs Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

A. Shep.

Roboto

Roosey

Mike G.

Washburn

Washburn

Northwest Mo.

Northwest Mo.

Northwest Mo.

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Baylor

Kansas State Oklahoma State

R.K.

Choosey Washburn Kansas State

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

MIssouri

MIssouri

Oklahoma

Missouri

Oklahoma

Auburn

LSU

LSU

Auburn

LSU

LSU

Chiefs

Chiefs

Chiefs

Chiefs

Jaguars

Jaguars

Denver Broncos vs Oakland Raiders

Broncos

Broncos

Broncos

Broncos

Broncos

Broncos

Broncos

Pittsburgh Steelers vs Miami Dolphins

Dolphins

Steelers

Steelers

Steelers

Steelers

Steelers

Steelers Colts

New England Patriots vs San Diego Chargers

Patriots

Patriots

Chargers

Patriots

Patriots

Patriots

Patriots Cowboys

Minnesota Vikings vs Green Bay Packers

Vikings

Vikings

Vikings

Vikings

Packers

Packers

Vikings

Oklahoma vs Missouri LSU vs Auburn Kansas City Chiefs vs Jacksonville Jaguars

Auburn Chiefs Georgia Tech

Nebraska

Last Week Record

4-6

7-3

5-5

5-5

5-5

7-3

3-7

OVERALL RECORDS

31-20

30-21

28-23

33-18

34-17

30-21

28-23

The Review Staff Pick ‘Em is a weekly feature where we pick the winners of college and pro football games around the country. Check back weekly to see our standings!


review a&e washburn university

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Mulvane exhibit showcases faculty work Elise Barnett WASHBURN REVIEW

The art faculty of Washburn University have created a cross-media show to impress audiences well past its inception. The 2010 faculty exhibit, which debuted Friday October 15 at the Mulvane Art Museum, is a mix of pottery, sculpture, glass work, photography, oil panting, textile and more. Though the Mulvane hosts a faculty exhibit every two years, this year seems to be particularly unique. “It’s always special,� said Marguerite Perret, associate professor of art. “This year it is particularly special because we have a few new faculty members who are showing this year.� Perret, who specializes in mixed media installations, had photographs of her recent offsite installations and a pamphlet detailing her work. She also has two large-scale light boxes on display that were part of an installation at the University of Kansas that had never been shown in Topeka before. Though each artist shows work at various places over the course of a year, the Mulvane exhibit seems to be especially important to many of them. “A lot of times we’re showing at other places, sometimes other parts of the world,� said Perret. “This is like coming home and having our own community come and see what we’re doing.� Not only is it a chance to show off to the community, but it offers these professors a

Of the Earth

Exhibit focuses on human body Kate Arroyo WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo by Molly Adams, Washburn Review

Mixed Media: The Mulvane Art Museum is hosting a faculty show that features a variety of mixed media. This year’s exhibit is unique because there are some new faculty members showing for the first time. chance to show off their work to their students. “The cool thing about this show is that the students get to see what their professors actually do as far as their own art,� said Kymm Hughes, adjunct professor of art. “We teach it, but they they don’t get to see what we actually do. I remember when I was a student, I came to see it because I wanted to see what they all really did.� Betsy Knabe Roe, adjunct professor of art, brings her art appreciation class to the exhibit so they can admire all the hard work put in by Washburn

art faculty. “This show is made up of a lot of big pieces,� said Roe. “There’s a real presence to it.� The show also allows new faculty to gain insight on their fellow professors and show off what they have to offer the department. “I’m just getting to know the department, getting to know the individuals,� said John Paul, professor in the sociology/anthropology department, who will be joining the art department this spring. “It’s obvious that everyone is super talented.� Whether someone comes

to see the nearly photographically detailed landscapes of Ye Wang, assistant professor of art, or the looming crescent of wood-cut printed boxes created by Mike Hager, Mulvane Art Museum preparator, attendees can find genius and talent in every collection and from every staff member represented. The faculty exhibit runs from Oct. 16 until Jan. 23 in the upstairs galleries of the Mulvane Art Museum. Elise Barnett is a sophomore English major. Reach her at elise. barnett@washburn.edu.

the boundaries of the ceramics medium.� The pieces created by Lanter are mixtures of ceramic The Friday evening open- and crochet, which she states ing reception at Lawrence Arts symbolize, celebrate and satiCenter was crowded as patrons rize the pursuit of pleasure, seenjoyed viewing new exhibits curity and stimulation. “With critical humor I atfeaturing a wide variety of ceramics arts. The pieces ranged tempt to portray the perceived from miniature to life-size, from inelegancies of the human traditional to eclectic, from se- psyche for what they truly are, rene to disturbing. The works elegant and powerful adaptive were created by artists from techniques for survival.� Her pieces are considered around the country, including Washburn Catron professor of thought-provoking, and somewhat mysteart, Stephanie rious. Their Lanter. soft and lacy Lanter ’s “ exteriors are pieces were These pieces offer to part of the unique perspectives inviting the touch, an “Body Awareon awareness of interesting ness� exhibit, juxtaposition which showthe body as well to the hard obcased the work as innovative jects within. of four artists approaches to the T h e working with “Body Awarecontemporary ceramics medium. ness� exhibit ceramics. also includes Accord- Ben Alvers work from ing to Ben Curator, LAC Tom Bartel, Alvers, curator of LAC, � an assistant professor at the artists ofOhio Univerten incorporate mindfulness of the human sity, who often creates disjointed human forms. The pieces shape into their art. “These pieces offer unique wear clownish hats with bright perspectives on awareness of colors and patterns on distorted the body as well as innovative human figures. approaches to the ceramics me“My intentions are best dium,� said Alvers. “These four conveyed through fragmentation individual voices create a fresh of the human form where my conversation on the subject interest is to encourage, if not of body awareness, surprising require, the viewer to participate us both in the ways they chal- with the work,� said Bartel. lenge expectations about bodPlease see EXHIBIT page A8 ies and in the ways they push

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Arts & Entertainment • Wednesday, October 20, 2010

A8

Vegas on a budget Cheap options available for vacation to Sin City Josh Rouse WASHBURN REVIEW

With the stress of midterms and last minute Homecoming plans causing most students to wish for a vacation of some sort, perhaps now is the best time to plan one for the future. For those travelers age 21 and over, the top tourist destination, time and again, is Las Vegas. With movies such as “The Hangover” and “What Happens in Vegas...” glorifying Sin City and the crazy, alcohol-laden antics that take place year round within it’s city limits, it’s easy to see why the allure of Vegas is so strong. What most don’t realize is that visiting the city itself is relatively affordable for college students. In fact, several lowcost airlines, such as Wichita’s Allegiant Air, offer cheap vacation packages with stays at many Vegas casinos, including the MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay, Caesars, Palms, Monte Carlo, Mirage, Stratosphere, Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review Excalibur, New York New York, Tropicana, Rio Suites, What We Do is Secret: Despite its reputation as a town for high rollers, a Bally’s, Las Vegas Club, Fla- trip to Las Vegas doesn’t have to be out of reach to college students. mingo, Riviera, Luxor, Circus dome screen covering Fremont Circus, Hooter’s, Imperial Pal- Street incorporates an overhead ace, Harrah’s, Treasure Island, audio-visual experience unlike Gold Coast, Westin Casuarina, anything you’ve probably ever Golden Nugget, Aladdin, South witnessed. Coast, Four Queens and StarOne of the downfalls of Vedust. gas is its expensive drink selecFor those who are unfamil- tion. For instance, a small froiar with Sin City, zen margarita from each of these hoVIVA Treasure Island tels has something can cost in excess LAS VEGAS to offer entertainof $10. Downtown, ment-wise. Whether you check the booze selection isn’t much out the pirate show at Treasure cheaper. If you stay at the Gold Island, where they sink a ship Coast casino, take advantage of each show, check out the World T.G.I. Friday’s huge margaritas, Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review Series of Poker action at the Rio as they are still a cheaper option during the summer, check out than Treasure Island, although Have a Drink on Me: One the robotic statues at Caesar’s the Treasure Island margaritas downside to Vegas is that, while Palace or the water show at the are amazingly delicious. Also plentiful, the drink selections often Bellagio, there is a lot of qual- keep in mind that cocktails are come at a steep price. ity free entertainment in Las free when you’re gambling Vegas. Walking around down- in Vegas, so when you hear a take this opportunity to load up town Las Vegas is another way lady yelling “Cocktails!” while on whatever your heart desires. Also, give yourself at least to see a free show as the huge you’re sitting at the penny slots, a day each to check out the Strip and Downtown. There is so much to see at each of these areas, and once the sun goes down its even better. Stop in at the Gold Nugget on Fremont and check out the world’s largest gold nugget, which weighs in at almost 62 pounds and was purchased by the casino in 1980 from someone in Australia with a metal detector for a million dollars. If you do decide to hit up Las Vegas on your next trip, remember to bathe in sunscreen, hydrate constantly and set a spending limit for yourself. Try not to marry a total stranger, lose your best friend on the roof of your hotel or leave your car in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard with a note that says “Couldn’t find the meter but here’s four bucks.” Most importantly, never walk away from a heater. Josh Rouse is a senior mass media major. Reach him at joshua. rouse@washburn.edu.

Please join members of the Mass Media department for a not-sosilent night of hors d’oeurves, drinks, and festivities. Holiday goodies will be available as door prizes or as gift baskets in the silent aution. Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010 7 pm - 9:30 pm Ramada Inn - Grand Ballroom $10 per ticket for students $20 per ticket for non-students

EXHIBIT: “Body Awareness” displayed Continued from page A5 “Throughout our life as we age our appearance inevitably changes and in the process our skin records the story.” said Bartel. Lisa Marie Barber is an assistant professor of Art at the University of Wisconsin makes sculptures that at first glance, seem to be children surrounded with their toys. Upon closer inspection, you will discover many levels of symbolism and meaning in her displays. “I strive to have my work consist of several layers…to describe life as positive, elusive and

rich with sentiment and possibility,” said Barber. One of the other displays is that of Benjie Heu, associate professor of ceramics at Southeast Missouri State University. From across the room, what appear to be grim, gray, alien heads stare with glassy eyes. As one draws closer, attendees notice they are covered not with wrinkled skin, but intricate carvings that draw one nearer and nearer, mesmerized by a landscape of stories etched in minute detail upon the heads. In his own words, revealing truth and humor in the face of horror and the seemingly absurd is his answer.

The “Body Awareness” exhibit, along with other ceramics exhibits, will be on display at Lawrence Arts Center through Nov. 23. The exhibits are free to the public and the center also offers several pottery and ceramics classes for those who are interested in trying this hands-on medium yourself. Also, don’t miss the chance to meet and watch six nationally recognized ceramists for two days of workshops during the Oct. 22 and 23 Lawrence Arts Center Ceramics Symposium. Kate Arroyo is a junior mass media major. Reach her at kate. arroyo@washburn.edu.

“Jackass 3D” doesn’t pull punches Josh Rouse WASHBURN REVIEW

The other day I decided to drop $13 to go see “Jackass 3D.” Best decision ever. The group known for doing the unthinkable managed to combine their usual crude, hilarious, oftentimes disgusting format with something new: emotion. While I know that is hard to believe, keep in mind that this was the first time Steve-O has been on-set with the Jackass crew since undergoing rehab, and his sober performance adds a whole new side to the daredevil. The ending credits also add a level of sentimentality to the movie, as it shows the various members of the Jackass crew throughout the years and even as children. To those who have spent the past 10 years watching the antics of these idiots, it’s kind of heartwarming to see them as kids. That said, “Jackass 3D” doesn’t pull any punches. In one scene, Johnny Knoxville dresses

up like an old man and makes remote control helicopter to his out with a young girl, telling the member and watches it whirl in person next to him he’s the girl’s circles. The title of this scene is grandfather. In another scene, “Helicockter.” In another one, Steve-O sits in a port-a-potty Pontius uses his peep as a basethat’s been harnessed to two bun- ball bat. The scene is shot in slow gee cords. Needless to say, by the motion, and the expression on his time the experience is over, he’s face makes it that much better. A covered in feces. black censor bar covers his busiPerhaps the most disgusting ness most of the time, although scene, which actually made me they intentionally move it every gag a little bit, was when Preston now and then so you get a peek Lacy ran on a treadat it. mill in a “sweatIt also does a MOVIE suit,” then drain the great job of incorREVIEW sweat from his suit porating the 3D into a cup and Steve-O drinks it. element, although it’s usually A good deal of vomiting ensues. something sick like vomit. The Another sick scene that is a little two best 3D scenes involve Johnmore funny is when a toy train ny Knoxville jumping a jet ski goes around a green hill, but it out of a pool and through a bush turns out the hill is actually a vol- getting jacked up in the process cano. I’m not going to give away and Will the Farter farting into a the ending, but Dave England is party whistle that blows right at involved. you in 3D. There is also a lot of fullI’ll leave you with that vifrontal male nudity in this movie, sual image. which is a little unnerving, but most of the scenes that incorpo- Josh Rouse is a senior mass media rate it end up being hilarious. In major. Reach him at joshua. one scene, Chris Pontius ties a rouse@washburn.edu.

Photo by Molly Adams, Washburn Review

Paraguayan Pianist: Blanca Gatti performed music from South America during a recital at Washburn University. Gatti, a native of Paraguay, is currently touring Kansas high schools and will also perform at Emporia State University.

Community enjoys pianist Elise Barnett WASHBURN REVIEW

Several students and community members gathered in Carole Chapel this past Thursday to hear Blanca Gatti, a Paraguayan pianist, play melodies of South America. The room was quiet as patrons sat patiently for the performance to begin. Gatti opened the performance with a Mozart classic, “Sonata Major K.V. 332.” The light, airy music played in tandem with the sunset and set the mood for the performance. Next, Gatti played two songs by the composer Hector Villa-Lobos, “Preludio No. 4 de las Bachianas Brasileras,” a pounding tune, and “Polichinello,” a children’s melody. “This piece is from the Bachianas Brasileras by Hector Villa-Lobos,” said Gatti through the mouth of her translator. “He was greatly inspired by Bach.”

The whole chapel swelled with vibrations during the Bachinspired movement as Gatti pounded each note hard into the keys. Being deaf, Bach relied on feel and vibration to “hear” the music he was composing. Often works inspired by him emanate a similar strength. The second piece by VillaLobos was a children’s song, “Pilichinello.” Gatti introduced the basic melody common to the entire piece and then began the playful melody. This piece is not only bubbly to listen to, but the way Gatti tapped and bounced her hands on the keys was beautiful and childish, simultaneously. Next Gatti played a piece by Alberto Ginestera entitled “Danza de la Moza Donosa” from a collection known as the “Danzas Argentinas.” “Argentina is very flat like Kansas,” said Gatti. “When I play this, I see the moon and the green color of the land.”

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Continuing the performance, Gatti played works by Astor Piazzola and Juan Carlos Moreno. When she got to the piece by Ernesto Nazareth, Gatti asked if she could play an example of the classic tango before playing Nazareth’s interpretation. “He brought the tango to a higher level,” said Gatti. Though still encapsulating the dramatic back and forth of movement of the tango, Nazareth’s composition had a softness and grace to its embellishments. To close the performance Gatti played a piece by Oscar Lorenzo Frenandez called “Jongo Danza Negra.” This piece mimicked the soulful vocal melodies and rhythmic drum beats of the African influenced part of Brazilian culture. Gatti’s performance at Washburn was sponsored by Partners of the Americas and Kansas Paraguay Partners as well as Washburn International Programs and the Washburn Music and Theatre Departments. Gatti will also be touring Kansas high schools, visiting with students and music instructors as well as playing Oct. 21 at Emporia State University. Elise Barnett is a sophomore English major. Reach her at elise. barnett@washburn.edu.

2010-11 issue8  

Editor-in-chief Regina Budden and staff cover the Homecoming kickoff.

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