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DRAFT B R I S B A N E B AY L A N D S S P E C I F I C P L A N

Prepared for the

City of Brisbane, California By: Universal Paragon Corporation and Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, with BKF Engineers, CHS Consulting, Economic Planning Systems, Inc. and Biohabitats, Inc. February 2011


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

* CONTENTS

VISION & EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................I PROJECT OVERVIEW.................................................................................................................. I COMPONENTS OF THE PLAN ................................................................................................. III Sustainability Framework Plan ..........................................................................................iv Overall Land Use Concept ................................................................................................ v Conservation & Open Space .............................................................................................xi Circulation ......................................................................................................................xii Utilities and Services ........................................................................................................xv Implementation ............................................................................................................ xvi Financing ....................................................................................................................... xvi In Summary.................................................................................................................... xvi

1.

INTRODUCTION ............................................................1

1.1

PURPOSE OF THE PLAN ................................................................................................. 1

1.2

LEGAL CONTEXT ............................................................................................................4 1.2.1 Authority to Prepare the Plan.............................................................................. 4 1.2.2 Relationship to the General Plan ......................................................................... 5

1.3

PLANNING CONTEXT ..................................................................................................... 9 1.3.1 Approach to Planning ......................................................................................... 9 1.3.2 Background to the Plan ...................................................................................... 9 1.3.3 Market Research Inputs to Land Use ................................................................. 13 1.3.4 Planning Process ............................................................................................... 15 1.3.5 Contamination and Remediation ..................................................................... 16 1.3.6 General Plan Submittal Requirements ............................................................... 17

1.4

ORGANIZATION OF THE SPECIFIC PLAN ..................................................................... 18

2.

THE PLANNING AREA .................................................21

2.1

PLANNING AREA LOCATION ....................................................................................... 21

2.2

PLANNING AREA CHARACTER .................................................................................... 24

2.3

LAND OWNERSHIP ..................................................................................................... 26


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

3.

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK .................................29

3.1

SUSTAINABILITY OVERVIEW ....................................................................................... 29

3.2

CLIMATE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS .......................................................... 30

3.3

ENERGY ....................................................................................................................... 33

3.4

WATER ........................................................................................................................ 34

3.5

SOIL .............................................................................................................................. 35

3.6

ECOLOGY ..................................................................................................................... 36

3.7

MOBILITY/CIRCULATION ............................................................................................. 37

3.8

MATERIALS .................................................................................................................. 38

3.9

CULTURE AND ECONOMY ........................................................................................... 39

4.

LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN .....................41

4.1

PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................... 41

4.2

LAND USE CONSISTENCY ............................................................................................ 42

4.3

LAND USE GOALS ........................................................................................................ 43

4.4

PRECEDENTS ................................................................................................................49 4.4.1 Baylands History ............................................................................................... 49 4.4.2 Pearl District, Portland, Oregon ......................................................................... 51 4.4.3 Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California .................................................................. 52 4.4.4 University Circle, East Palo Alto, California ....................................................... 53 4.4.5 University Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts ...................................................... 55 4.4.6 Mission Bay, San Francisco, California ............................................................... 55 4.4.7 LA Live, Los Angeles, California ........................................................................ 56

4.5

LAND USE STRUCTURE/ KEY FEATURES .................................................................... 59 4.5.1 Historic Alignments .......................................................................................... 60 4.5.2 Land Forms and Drainage ................................................................................. 60 4.5.3 Key Alignments ................................................................................................ 61 4.5.4 Parks and Open Space ...................................................................................... 62 4.5.5 Transit-Orientation ........................................................................................... 63 4.5.6 Districts ............................................................................................................ 63 4.5.7 Concentrated Density & Retail Nodes ............................................................... 64

4.6

LAND USE PROGRAM .................................................................................................. 65

4.7

DISTRICT CONCEPT ...................................................................................................... 72 4.7.1 Roundhouse District ......................................................................................... 72 4.7.2 East Geneva District .......................................................................................... 74 4.7.3 Icehouse District ............................................................................................... 75 4.7.4 Visitacion Green (North) District ........................................................................ 76 4.7.5 Visitacion Green (South) District........................................................................ 77 4.7.6 Lagoon ............................................................................................................. 77

4.8

LAND USE REGULATIONS............................................................................................ 79

4.9

PRINCIPLES OF URBAN DESIGN .................................................................................. 84

4.10

DESIGN GUIDELINES AND DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS .......................................... 86 4.10.1 Overall Design Guidelines ................................................................................. 88 4.10.2 Roundhouse ..................................................................................................... 93 4.10.3 East Geneva ..................................................................................................... 99 4.10.4 Icehouse ......................................................................................................... 108 4.10.5 Visitacion Green North ................................................................................... 114 4.10.6 Visitacion Green South ................................................................................... 118


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.11

APPROACH TO GUIDELINES & DESIGN REVIEW ..................................................... 120

4.12

LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES .......................................................................................... 120 4.12.1 Private Realm Landscape Features .................................................................... 121 4.12.2 Overall Landscape Guidelines ........................................................................... 122

5.

CONSERVATION AND OPEN SPACE .........................129

5.1

PURPOSE .................................................................................................................... 129

5.2

RELATIONSHIP TO THE GENERAL PLAN AND OPEN SPACE PLAN .......................... 133

5.3

OPEN SPACE GOALS .................................................................................................. 134

5.4

OPEN SPACE AND OPEN AREA ................................................................................. 139 5.4.1 Windrows....................................................................................................... 139 5.4.2 Hydrology ...................................................................................................... 141 5.4.3 Parks and Open Spaces ................................................................................. 143 5.4.3.1 The Promenade ................................................................................. 143 5.4.3.2 Roundhouse Green............................................................................ 144 5.4.3.3 Central Plaza & Triangle Parks .................................................................. 145 5.4.3.4 The Quad .......................................................................................... 146 5.4.3.5 Visitacion Creek Park (West) .............................................................. 147 5.4.3.6 Visitacion Creek Park (East) ................................................................ 148 5.4.3.7 South Visitacion Park ......................................................................... 149 5.4.3.8 Ice House Hill .................................................................................... 150 5.4.3.9 Charter High School Community Use Area ........................................ 151 5.4.3.10 Lagoon Park .................................................................................... 152 5.4.3.11 Lagoon Perimeter ............................................................................ 153 5.4.3.12 Bay Trail Greenway .......................................................................... 153 5.4.3.13 Landscaped Areas............................................................................ 154 5.4.3.14 Open Area within Development Sites............................................... 154

5.5

GREEN SPACE ORIENTATION ..................................................................................... 155

5.6

OPEN SPACE GUIDELINES.......................................................................................... 155

6.

CIRCULATION ............................................................159

6.1

PURPOSE .................................................................................................................... 159

6.2

CIRCULATION GOALS ................................................................................................ 160

6.3

SETTING...................................................................................................................... 160 6.3.1 Highway and Roadway Systems ...................................................................... 162 6.3.2 Roadway Systems Performance Standards ...................................................... 163 6.3.3 Transit Systems ............................................................................................... 164

6.4

TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION PLAN .......................................................... 166 6.4.1 Circulation System and Functional Classification ............................................. 166 6.4.2 Streets and Access .......................................................................................... 166 6.4.3 Transportation Improvements ........................................................................ 170 6.4.4 Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation ................................................................... 172 6.4.5 Transit Plan ..................................................................................................... 175 6.4.6 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plans ......................................... 178

6.5

STREETSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ........................................... 181 6.5.1 Geneva Avenue .............................................................................................. 184 6.5.2 68’ Residential Flats ........................................................................................ 186 6.5.3 78’Neighborhood Retail Street (MUNI) ............................................................ 187 6.5.4 70’ Residential Flats (MUNI) ............................................................................ 188


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

6.5.5 6.5.6 6.5.7 6.5.8 6.5.9 6.5.10 6.5.11 6.5.12 6.5.13 6.5.14 6.5.15 6.5.16 6.5.17 6.5.18 6.5.19 6.5.20 6.5.21 6.5.22 6.5.23 6.5.24 6.5.25

64’ Residential Area - Townhomes .................................................................. 189 68’ Residential Area - Townhomes .................................................................. 190 78’ Residential Area - Promenade ................................................................... 191 56’ Residential Area - Promenade ................................................................... 192 40’ Residential Area........................................................................................ 193 74’ Roundhouse Circle ................................................................................... 194 70’ Creek Parkway ......................................................................................... 195 64’ Tunnel Avenue ......................................................................................... 196 107’ Office Area ............................................................................................. 197 Sierra Point ParkwayPath Zone ....................................................................... 198 88’ Retail Main Street ..................................................................................... 200 56’ R&D Area - Quad...................................................................................... 201 66’ Office Area ............................................................................................... 202 64’ R&D Area without Curbs .......................................................................... 203 80’ Connector Road (Roundhouse Arc) ........................................................... 204 74’ Lagoon Way ............................................................................................. 205 20’ Alley ......................................................................................................... 206 56’ Pedestrian Greenway ................................................................................ 207 Class I Path ..................................................................................................... 209 Class II Path .................................................................................................... 209 Recreational Path/ Trail .................................................................................. 209

7.

UTILITIES AND SERVICES ..........................................211

7.1

PURPOSE .................................................................................................................... 211

7.2

STORM DRAINAGE .................................................................................................... 212 7.2.1 Drainage System Goals ................................................................................... 212 7.2.2 Existing Storm Drainage System ..................................................................... 213 7.2.3 Proposed Storm Drainage System .................................................................. 216 7.2.4 Proposed System Wide Storm Drain Improvement Projects .............................. 218 7.2.5 Stormwater Treatment ................................................................................... 220

7.3

WATER SYSTEM ......................................................................................................... 222 7.3.1 Existing Water Provider ................................................................................... 222 7.3.2 Existing Water Distribution System.................................................................. 222 7.3.3 Future Water Demands and Criteria ................................................................ 224 7.3.4 Offsite Water Storage and Distribution System Improvements ......................... 226 7.3.5 On-site Water Distribution System .................................................................. 226

7.4

RECYCLED WATER ..................................................................................................... 226 7.4.1 Recycled Water Demand................................................................................. 227 7.4.2 Proposed Recycled Water Supply .................................................................... 227 7.4.3 Proposed Recycled Water Supply ................................................................... 227

7.5

WASTEWATER SYSTEM ............................................................................................. 228 7.5.1 Existing Collection System .............................................................................. 228 7.5.2 Proposed Wastewater System ......................................................................... 229 7.5.3 Flexible Building Service Connections .............................................................. 233 7.5.4 Proposed System Design and Approval Constraints ......................................... 233

7.6

EMERGENCY SERVICES.............................................................................................. 234 7.6.1 Police ........................................................................................................... 234 7.6.2 Fire Protection .............................................................................................. 235

7.7

SOLID WASTE ............................................................................................................ 236

7.8

DRY UTILITY SYSTEMS .............................................................................................. 237 7.8.1 Electrical System ............................................................................................. 237


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

7.8.2 7.8.3

Natural Gas System ........................................................................................ 239 Communications Infrastructure....................................................................... 240

8.

IMPLEMENTATION ....................................................241

8.1

PURPOSE .................................................................................................................... 241

8.2

IMPLEMENTATION SEQUENCE .................................................................................. 241

8.3

KEY IMPLEMENTING ACTIONS ................................................................................ 242 8.3.1 Specific Plan Adoption and General Plan Amendment ................................... 242 8.3.2 Zoning Amendment ....................................................................................... 242 8.3.3 Development Agreement................................................................................ 242 8.3.4 Environmental Review .................................................................................... 243 8.3.5 Permits and Approvals Required From Other Agencies .................................... 243 8.3.6 Development Approvals.................................................................................. 246 8.3.7 Minor Administrative Permits .......................................................................... 249 8.3.8 Minor Revisions .............................................................................................. 250 8.3.9 Minor Adjustments ......................................................................................... 250 8.3.10 Temporary Use Permit ..................................................................................... 251 8.3.11 Tentative Subdivision Map .............................................................................. 252 8.3.12 Public Improvement Plans .............................................................................. 252 8.3.13 Financing Plans ............................................................................................... 253 8.3.14 Final Subdivision Map ..................................................................................... 253 8.3.15 Responsibilities for Key Implementing Actions ................................................ 254

8.4

ADMINISTRATION OF THE SPECIFIC PLAN ............................................................... 254 8.4.1 Responsibilities for Administration of the Specific Plan .................................... 254 8.4.2 Specific Plan Consistency ................................................................................ 254 8.4.3 Specific Plan Amendment ............................................................................... 255 8.4.4 Conditions, Covenants, and Restrictions ......................................................... 255 8.4.5 Residential Density and Product Flexibility ...................................................... 256

9.

PUBLIC FACILITIES FINANCING ................................257

9.1

PURPOSE .................................................................................................................... 257

9.2

CITY FINANCING POLICIES ........................................................................................ 257

9.3

LAND USE ASSUMPTIONS......................................................................................... 258 9.3.1 Land Uses ....................................................................................................... 258 9.3.2 Land Use Absorption Estimates ....................................................................... 259

9.4

INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHASING............................................................................. 259 9.4.1 Summary of Improvements ............................................................................. 259 9.4.2 Cost Allocation Methodology ......................................................................... 260 9.4.3 Infrastructure Phasing ..................................................................................... 260

9.5

FINANCING METHODS .............................................................................................. 261 9.5.1 Measure A Funds............................................................................................ 261 9.5.2 Federal SAFETEA-LU Funds ............................................................................. 262 9.5.3 Transportation Fund for Clean Air ................................................................... 262 9.5.4 San Francisco Bay Trail Grants ......................................................................... 263 9.5.5 San Francisco Bay Area Conservancy Program................................................. 263 9.5.6 Highway Safety, Traffic Reduction, Air Quality, and Port Security Bond Act ...... 263 9.5.7 Housing and Emergency Shelter Trust Fund Act (Prop 1C) ............................... 264 9.5.8 Redevelopment Agency Tax Increment ............................................................ 264 9.5.9 Sales Tax Revenue ........................................................................................... 265


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

9.5.10 9.5.11 9.6

Special Assessment Districts ............................................................................ 265 Developer Financing ....................................................................................... 265

RECOMMENDED PROJECT FINANCING STRATEGY .................................................. 266

APPENDICES ...................................................................267 APPENDIX A: BRISBANE BAYLANDS SPECIFIC PLAN / GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY ANALYSIS ......... 269

APPENDIX B: INVOLVEMENT OF OTHER AGENCIES IN THE BAYLANDS .................................................. 293 APPENDIX C: USE CLASSIFICATIONS – BRISBANE BAYLANDS SPECIFIC PLAN............................................ 299 APPENDIX D: GLOSSARY ............................................................................................................................ 307

INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN......................................................................... (Separate Document)


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

LIST OF SPECIFIC PLAN FIGURES 0.1 0.2 0.3 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.2 3.1 3.2 3.3 4.1 4.2A 4.2B 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 9.1

District Concept The Six Districts of the Baylands Vehicular Circulation Baylands Area Site Analysis Topography Existing Land Use Designations The Baylands Specific Plan Process Site Contamination Zones Location Map Existing Land Ownership Brisbane Baylands Sustainability Framework Concept Diagram Sustainability Framework Proposed Transit Connections Key Features Land Use - Base Variant Land Use - Entertainment Variant District Concept Illustrative Plan Building Heights The Roundhouse District Development of Residential Flats Blocks Development of Townhome Blocks Open Space Framework Regional Open Space Recreation Hydrology Ecology/ Landscape Zones Sierra Point Parkway Cross Section Visitacion Creek Park Cross Section Existing Roadway System Vehicular Circulation Pedestrian & Bicycle Circulation Transit Circulation Transit Connectivity and Intermodal Transit Station Concept Plan Street Types Typical Intersections Existing Drainage Areas Conceptual Storm Drainage System Conceptual Water System Conceptual Recycled Water System Conceptual Sanitary Sewer System with WRF Conceptual Sanitary Sewer System with Direct Connection The Five Districts of the Baylands


Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

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Vision and Executive Summary Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

i

* VISION & EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PROJECT OVERVIEW The Baylands, comprising the 684-acre Planning Area1 of this Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan, is one of the largest undeveloped locations on the west San Francisco Bay Peninsula. The Baylands, most of which were formerly used for industrial and landfill purposes, is wellpositioned with expansive San Francisco Bay views and high visibility, as well as proximity to mass transit and highway access, yet has not been previously developed and has up to now remained underutilized due to challenges posed by contamination issues as well as a lack of a coordinated vision. At present, the Baylands is strategically positioned to capitalize on its location at the juncture of world-class research, investment and employment centers in Silicon Valley, San Francisco and the East Bay.

1

The plan balances pedestrianoriented development and economic regeneration with a strong public open space system. (View of the R&D campus district looking south towards Oyster Point)

Acreage was derived from the ALTA/ACSM Land Title Survey prepared by David Evans and Associates, Inc., October 2000; Sunquest

Properties (Universal Paragon) Parcel survey prepared by Brian Kangas Foulk, September 1989; and the LUK 2006 ALTA for the Lagoon subarea.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


ii

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Vision and Executive Summary

Originally part of San Francisco Bay, the Planning Area was once part of an estuarine ecosystem in which upland drainage flowed into nutrient-rich marshes, tidal mud flats, and open Bay waters. The advent of the railroad in the early 1900s, combined with the 1906 earthquake, began a process of filling the Bay that eventually moved the shoreline as much as three quarters of a mile eastward and created the upland area now called the Baylands. Since then, the Baylands have been used as a regional railway and freight hub, a municipal landfill, and a site for materials recycling – all uses that ignored the important ecological character of the land and left Brisbane with an underutilized and partially contaminated site and a visual and physical blight in the community for over four decades. re B lvd. Bay sho

re B lvd. Bay sho

re B lvd. Bay sho

railyards, and U.S. 101 and sanitary

Bay sho

shoreline (left to right): pre-rail, rail,

re B lvd.

Historical progression of the

landfill

This Specific Plan offers a vision for reclaiming this land as a part of Brisbane that contributes to the economic, social, and environmental well-being of the community and re-establishes a connection and appreciation for the natural environment. The present Specific Plan is the culmination of a multi-year effort to bring about this evolving vision. It includes a comprehensive plan, inspired by the community’s visions, for the entirety of the 684-acre area, including goals, policies, and development standards to guide future public and private actions related to development. This includes a balanced land use program, the creation of a public open space network, and the re-establishment of ecological functions. The Specific Plan also identifies necessary infrastructure and circulation improvements to accommodate the proposed growth and a strategy for ensuring coordinated implementation. The resulting plan was developed through extensive community involvement and collaboration with key stakeholders over several years. Most important, the plan defines a new model for community development which combines socially, economically and ecologically sustainable strategies into a compact, mixed-use, transit-friendly environment that features an ecologically-rich open space network, and is served by a low-impact infrastructure system which seeks to minimize carbon production. This Specific Plan is a revision of the 2006 Brisbane Baylands Phase I Specific Plan and supersedes that document.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


Vision and Executive Summary Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

iii

COMPONENTS OF THE PLAN The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan accomplishes this vision through the elements of a specific plan, detailed below. These elements are linked by the overarching framework plan, which sets forth the goals for sustainability, and guides the land use, circulation and infrastructure elements that complete the physical development. Finally, implementation and financing are addressed to ensure that the plan is legally sound and economically feasible and will be phased in a manner appropriate for market flexibility and regional economic needs. The following elements are included in the detailed chapters that follow: •

Sustainability Framework Plan

Overall Land Use Concept

Conservation & Open Space

Circulation

Utilities & Services

Implementation

Public Facilities Financing

The plan combines socially, environmentally and ecologically sustainable strategies into a compact, mixed-use, transit-friendly environment. (View of Neighborhood Retail Street in northern residential districts)

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


iv

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Vision and Executive Summary

The Specific Plan is designed to implement and advance the goals and policies set forth in the Brisbane General Plan. This includes a mix of local- and regional-serving commercial development that is balanced with parks and open space2 to provide balanced economic, recreational, and aesthetic benefits to the community. A key departure from the General Plan is the inclusion of housing in this Specific Plan . The rationale and benefits of providing housing, including serving a key regional need in this transit-rich area with excellent access to regional job centers, are discussed in detail in this document. An accompanying General Plan Amendment formally requesting this proposed change is being processed with this Specific Plan.

Sustainability Framework Plan The Sustainability Framework (detailed in Chapter 3) establishes the conceptual framework for the Baylands area, emphasizing an integrated approach to sustainable development, including open space, ecological enhancements, sustainable development standards, a multi-modal circulation network, land use mix, and sustainable infrastructure including alternative energy strategies, low-impact development (LID) standards and natural wastewater treatment. The Sustainability Framework reflects the City’s policy objectives for the Baylands and the greater community as expressed in the General Plan. It establishes a multi-functional open space system that protects and enhances the area’s natural resources, serves the recreational needs of the greater Brisbane community, and provides a “green” framework for future development. A primary goal of the open space system is to re-establish, where

The plan seeks to recreate ecological function by means of an extensive system of ecologically-rich open space. (View of wildlife refuge looking south with Ice House Hill on the right)

2

Here and throughout most of the text, “open space” is used in its more general and commonly recognized sense: land that is

not covered by structures, roads or parking areas and that provides some measure of either physical or visual openness. In certain instances, “open space” is used in its more technical sense as defined in the Brisbane General Plan; refer to Appendix D, Glossary for more information regarding this distinction.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


Vision and Executive Summary Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

v

possible, an ecologically productive environment largely lost in the Baylands since the early twentieth century. The Sustainability Framework also establishes key fixed alignments that will define and organize future development in the Baylands. The open space network and the circulation system for pedestrians, bicycles, transit, and automobiles for the Baylands are defined based on these alignments. As noted, the land west of the Caltrain tracks occupies a former Southern Pacific railyard while the land east of tracks occupies a former municipal landfill site. Since these landfilling operations were ceased in 1967, a soil cover of between 20 and 30 feet deep has been placed over the eastern site. The remediation strategy proposed for the west side is also to use a soil cap which could vary in depth to achieve other drainage and design goals. The plan includes a grading concept that benefits from the abundance of fill materials available on the site. The concept is intended to highlight the importance of Visitacion Creek Park by forming a broad valley with adjacent lands rising gently from the creek corridor. Along the north end of the Lagoon, a ridge landform is proposed that will screen development from Lagoon Park and Central Brisbane. Also, by filling the development parcels on either side of the Caltrain tracks, the rail line can effectively be recessed to reduce its visual and auditory impact to the Baylands and surrounding neighborhoods. Finally, the plan provides the masterplan for the various utilities and services that are necessary to accommodate future development in the Baylands, including storm drainage, water, sanitary sewer, electricity, gas, telephone, and cable television. The goal of the masterplan is to create a sustainable network of utilities and services, particularly with respect to stormwater management, renewable energy and wastewater treatment. The stormwater system proposed in the plan focuses on natural methods, including bioswales and an open drainage system combined with wetlands and riparian habitat to improve water quality on the site before it flows into the San Francisco Bay.

Overall Land Use Concept This Specific Plan addresses the 684-acre Baylands area, which is composed of 548 upland acres and 136 Lagoon-related acres. The Planning Area is generally bounded on the northeast by the Recology waste collection and recycling center, with a sliver of land that extends north along the railroad track to the San Francisco city limits and on the northwest by the San Francisco City and County line. Bayshore Boulevard forms the Baylands’ western boundary. The Union Pacific railroad tracks, which accommodate both freight and Caltrain commuter trains, bisect the Baylands forming its east and west areas, and U.S. Highway 101 forms the Planning Area’s eastern boundary. The convergence of U.S. 101 and the Caltrain railroad tracks south of the Brisbane Lagoon form the Specific Plan area’s southern boundary. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND Specific Plan Boundary

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

re B o

District Boundary

Bay

sho

Open Space

Roundhouse Northern Districts East Geneva

Ma in St.

Icehouse Central Districts

Visitacion Green (North) U.S. 101

vard oule re B sho Bay

Pk yon ann pe C dalu Gua

Park eek n Cr o i c ta Visi

. way Ice House Hill

Visitacion Green (South) Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

UPLAND AREA (548 ACRES)

Valley Dr.

Lagoon

Southern Districts

LAGOON (136 ACRES)

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N 0

0.1 DISTRICT CONCEPT

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


Vision and Executive Summary Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

vii

The overall land use strategy is to concentrate development density in the north—taking advantage of transit resources—and step density down as development extends southward. This concept led to the formation of three conceptual areas—north, central, and south—that form the five upland land use districts, in addition to the Lagoon, within the Specific Plan, as illustrated in Figure 0.1-District Concept. The northernmost districts would contain the greatest amount of density, transit links, and mix of uses, while the southernmost districts would be most integrated with the Lagoon and open space network, and represent the lowest degree of density and visual impact. The middle area, between the “Roundhouse Arc” and Visitacion Creek Park, represents a mid-range of density and “fingers” of open space extending between the northern and southern districts. The northernmost districts having the highest density of uses are “Roundhouse” and “East Geneva.” Roundhouse lies west of the railroad and features a concentration of predominately residential and mixed-use development with complementary ground-floor retail uses. East Geneva, lying east of the railroad, has a greater concentration of commercial office, retail and limited hotel uses with a variant option featuring entertainment facilities such as an arena, theater, a multiplex cinema, and a luxury hotel. These districts also correspond to the highest concentration of transit facilities – both existing and proposed – namely, the MUNI light rail (T-Third), the Caltrain commuter train, SamTrans routes and the proposed bus rapid transit (BRT) along Geneva Avenue which is planned to connect from the future

Roundhouse

East Geneva

Icehouse

Visitacion Green (North)

Visitacion Green (South)

Lagoon

Figure 0.2-The Six Districts of the Baylands: The Baylands will include five land use districts in the upland area and the Lagoon district to the south.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


viii

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Vision and Executive Summary

Table 0-1: Land Use Program

Visitacion Green (North)

Visitacion Green (South)

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Residential

43

49%

77%

Retail

1

1%

5%

Office/ Commercial

4

5%

4%

Parks & Open Space*

8

9%

4%

Rights-of-Way

31

36%

23%

Sub-Total

87

100%

13%

Retail

11

12%

56%

Office/ Commercial

45

49%

37%

Light Industrial

1

1%

9%

Parks & Open Space*

5

6%

3%

Rights-of-Way

30

33%

22%

Sub-Total

92

100%

13%

Residential

13

11%

23%

Office/ Commercial

11

9%

9%

Institutional

9

8%

100%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

6

5%

25%

Parks & Open Space*

57

50%

34%

Rights-of-Way

18

16%

13%

Sub-Total

113

100%

17%

Office/ Commercial

43

38%

36%

Light Industrial

10

8%

91%

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

5

4%

100%

Parks & Open Space*

32

29%

19%

Rights-of-Way

23

20%

17%

Sub-Total

113

100%

17%

7

6%

39%

Retail Office/ Commercial

19

17%

15%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

19

17%

75%

Parks & Open Space*

53

47%

31%

Rights-of-Way

15

13%

11%

113

100%

16%

13

6%

Sub-Total †

Lagoon (Upland )

Parks & Open Space* (Upland)

2%

Total Upland† Development Area (Including Lagoon Park)

531

78%

Railroad Right-of-Way (Upland†)

17

2%

548

80%

Total Upland Area Lagoon

Upland area includes the Roundhouse, East Geneva, Icehouse, and Visitacion Green (North and South) land use districts, the Lagoon Park, and the railroad right-of-way. Total right-of-way is 148 acres.

Percent of Total Land Use

Roundhouse

Icehouse

Percent of District Land Area

Land Use Category

East Geneva

* The 169.7 acres of parks and open space referred to elsewhere in the text include designated recreation and habitat areas in the upland area. Additionally, there are 25.6 acres of landscaped areas within development sites and 11 acres of Lagoon Perimeter (not included in the Upland area), totalling 196.6 acres.

Acres

District

Total Specific Plan Area

Open Area

11

7%

n/a

Open Water

111

74%

n/a

Rights-of-Way

14

9%

2%

Sub-Total

136

100%

20%

684

100%


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Hunters Point development to the Balboa BART Station. A potential stop for Caltrain’s Baby Bullet, an express commuter rail option that currently passes through Brisbane, and potential future connections to the California High-Speed Rail (HSR) may also provide augmented rail service to the Baylands. A “panhandle” linear greenspace is featured running north/south through the Roundhouse district providing passive and active open space for the residential neighborhoods. A large public park/plaza is centered in the East Geneva district providing an animated public space for functions, festivals and passive recreation. Through the middle of the site, densities drop and open space expands. On the east side, the “Visitacion Green North” district features R&D, production and warehousing uses with signature “campus” sites oriented along the Bay edge and production and warehousing uses fronting the railroad. On the west side, in the “Icehouse” district, a residential townhome neighborhood extends the residential neighborhoods southward from the Roundhouse area. A solar farm accommodating ground-mounted arrays of photovoltaic (PV) panels for solar energy generation buffers this neighborhood from the rail corridor. Beginning at the Roundhouse, a broad informal creek park runs south to Icehouse Hill then turns east towards the Bay. A re-created Visitacion Creek runs through the park providing tidal and freshwater hydrological function and habitat as a feature of the park. The park emphasizes active recreational uses near Roundhouse Circle and passive/natural uses extending southward and eastward. A habitat reserve area is proposed with minimal human access in the central portion of the Creek park on either side of the railroad. Along the Bayshore Boulevard

The East Geneva District accommodates a greater concentration of commercial, office, retail and limited hotel uses. (View of Central Plaza looking east)

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edge, a school site fronts the park and Roundhouse Circle and additional production/ warehousing sites extend southward towards Icehouse Hill. The southern area of the site is composed predominately of public open space including the Brisbane Lagoon and Lagoon Park, Icehouse Hill, and a large central greenspace running through the center of the eastern side of the Baylands. Development uses located within the “Visitacion Creek South� district include a limited number of low-rise R&D campus sites along the Bay edge and a small cluster of restaurant retail overlooking the Lagoon and Bay. A charter high school site south of Icehouse Hill sits in the southernmost tip of the Icehouse district west of the tracks. Another feature of this southern area is an additional solar farm accommodating arrays of ground-mounted PV panels for solar energy generation. This area forms a buffer along the eastern edge of the Kinder Morgan fuel storage facility. The land use program and associated acreages for the upland area are detailed in Table 0-1: Land Use Program. Overall, the Specific Plan allows for approximately 12.5 million square feet of commercial retail, office, residential, hotel, office R&D, and light industrial development on 414 acres (not including 134 acres of road and railroad rights-of-way), while preserving 170 acres of upland open space and 111 acres of open water and 11 acres of open space perimeter within the Brisbane Lagoon. The Specific Plan contains design standards and guidelines that will produce compact and sustainable development and support the

The Icehouse District, in the central Baylands, features lower-density residential neighborhoods oriented towards public open space. (View of townhome neighborhood looking west towards San Bruno Mountain)

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building of neighborhoods that are walkable, socially diverse, economically healthy, and a source of pride for the City of Brisbane. The development provides opportunities for employment, shopping, and entertainment while contributing to a stable and diverse tax base for the City of Brisbane. The creation and enhancement of open space resources is intended to expand recreation opportunities for Brisbane residents and improve the site’s ecological function.

The southern portions of the

Conservation & Open Space

Baylands feature open space and trails, and incorporate the area’s natural ecology. (View of South

The Conservation and Open Space framework is intended to provide a significant area of public open space within the Baylands. The open space network provides a balance of ecologically-rich natural areas and passive and active recreation areas as well as other functions, such as zones for natural stormwater detention and management and opportunities for community gardens. The Specific Plan seeks to re-create a more ecologically functional Visitation Creek corridor with associated tidal and freshwater wetlands bringing back some measure of the natural functions of habitat and stormwater hydrology that used to exist in this area of the Bay prior to the landfill and railyard operations that began at the turn of the 20th century. The open space network features two linear parks extending into the Roundhouse and Visitation Green North districts, a Roundhouse Circle park that includes the historic Roundhouse, a broad creek park extending from the Roundhouse Circle southward to the preserved Icehouse Hill then eastward connecting to the Bay. A broad central park extends north-south through the Visitation Green South district with

Visitacion Park looking south towards Lagoon and Oyster Point beyond)

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natural habitat, stormwater detention zones, and multipurpose recreation fields to serve the R&D campus users and the Baylands community. A new Lagoon Park will offer a mix of natural habitat and passive recreation activities which may include a nature center and a storage and launching facility for small, non-motorized watercraft. An extensive system of trails and multi-use paths will give public access to this extensive new park resource.

An improved Lagoon Park offers a mix of natural habitat and passive

Circulation

recreation activities. (View along Lagoon Park shoreline looking west towards Downtown Brisbane)

The circulation plan for the Baylands is designed to provide safe and efficient multi-modal circulation both within the Baylands and to and from surrounding areas. The circulation plan includes enhancements to existing roads (e.g. Tunnel Avenue and Lagoon Way) and the addition of new roads (e.g. Geneva Avenue and Sierra Point Parkway extensions) that will enhance both internal circulation and area-wide connectivity. In particular, the plan incorporates major transportation improvements called for in the City’s General Plan and the forthcoming Bi-County Transportation Study , including: the extension of Geneva Avenue from Bayshore Boulevard to U.S. 101; the construction of a new interchange overpass of U.S. 101 at Harney Way and Beatty Avenue/Alana Way to connect Geneva Avenue and Harney Way; modifications to the U.S. 101 interchange at Sierra Point Parkway to extend the ramps and improve the connection with Lagoon Way; and extension of the San Francisco Municipal Railway (MUNI) T-Third Street LRT line to connect to the Bayshore Caltrain Station and a planned BRT line along the Geneva Avenue extension to Candlestick Point. Within the development area, a series of new streets will be constructed to enhance access to and through the Planning Area, including two primary east-west streets and two primary north-south routes. These augment the Geneva Avenue extension at the north end of the Planning Area and an enhanced and realigned Lagoon Way at the south end,

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and ”Roundhouse Arc” in the central area, south of Geneva. All three of these east-west connectors will have grade-separated crossings of the railway. North-south traffic will be accommodated on an enhanced and realigned Tunnel Road and an extended Sierra Point Parkway along the eastern edge of the site between the northern end of the Planning Area and Lagoon Way. In addition to accommodating vehicular traffic, the plan provides an extensive network of facilities to support pedestrian, bicycle, and transit circulation all of which seek to reduce vehicle trips. A comprehensive system of bicycle and pedestrian routes is provided, connecting the Baylands both internally and externally to surrounding pedestrian and bicycle circulation systems. The system includes Class I (off-street) multi-use facilities along Sierra Point Parkway —consisting of a new segment of the Bay Trail, trails within Visitacion Creek and Lagoon Parks, and Class II bike lanes and landscape-separated sidewalks or trails along Geneva Avenue, Retail Main Street, Tunnel Avenue, Roundhouse Arc, and Lagoon Way. The Specific Plan promotes convenient access from the Roundhouse and East Geneva Districts to a relocated Caltrain station and a proposed Intermodal Station. This will unite existing and proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), SamTrans, and MUNI with Caltrain and enhance accessibility to regional networks. For development in the southern portion of the Planning Area, it is anticipated that a shuttle service established as part of a larger set of transportation demand management (TDM) measures will facilitate connections to the intermodal station. The Specific Plan generally requires the use of TDM measures to encourage transit use, carpooling, and non-automotive modes and to reduce single-occupant vehicle trips, thus reducing the traffic impacts of future development in the Baylands. Suggested measures include: establishment of a Baylands Transportation Management Association to coordinate and sponsor ride-sharing efforts and subsidization of transit passes; shuttle bus service between the Baylands and Caltrain, MUNI, and BART Balboa Park stations; alternative work scheduling and telecommuting; a guaranteed ride home program; and on-site bicycle facilities that include secure parking areas and shower/change facilities. The physical design of the circulation system is critical to establishing a distinctive character and sense of quality for the Baylands. As such, the Specific Plan provides detailed design guidelines and development standards for the streets and related circulation facilities. These standards and guidelines are designed to accommodate all modes of travel while creating 3

Led by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority in partnership with several agencies from both sides of the San

Francisco/San Mateo county line, the Bi-County Transportation Study aims to evaluate potential transportation improvements needed to address significant current and anticipated land use growth on both sides of the border. Originally scheduled to be completed in early 2010, the study has not been completed at the writing of this Specific Plan. Additional information may be found on the project website: <http://www.sfcta.org/content/view/319/166/>.

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nyd Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Vision and Executive Summary ale A ven u

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San Francisco San Mateo County

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more pedestrian-friendly streets. A primary focus is on reducing the functional and aesthetic conflicts between automobile traffic and other transportation modes. Given the important role that open space plays in the character of the Baylands, each major roadway has its own â&#x20AC;&#x153;streetscapeâ&#x20AC;? design concept with significant landscaping and stormwater management infrastructure such as bioswales. The circulation component also includes bike lanes and trail facilities, which further the vision for sustainable mobility.

Utilities and Services As noted, an important goal of the Specific Plan is to further sustainable design and practices throughout the development. A natural stormwater management system is a key component of this goal, which involves utilizing surface drainage to the extent feasible to filter stormwater runoff and improve water quality. This is accomplished through an integrated hierarchy of bioswales and water runoff detention zones located in open space, open areas, and within the street rights-of-way, and a tertiary water recycling facility. The water recycling facility will contribute greatly to improved water quality on the site and in San Francisco Bay and provide recycled water which may be used in future development for functions such as landscape irrigation, toilet flushing, and ornamental fountains. The Baylands development will also benefit from sustainable energy techniques. All future development within in the Baylands will be designed to meet the LEED Silver or equivalent standard for sustainable design. This includes techniques that will reduce energy demand and conserve resources through the use of more efficient fixtures, recycled materials, passive ventilation systems, native planting, and photovoltaic panels. Additionally, energy will be generated on-site through harvesting the sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy. A solar farm, consisting of groundmounted photovoltaic panels, will generate energy for peak periods, which will reduce the reliance of future energy needs on the existing facilities. This will augment the existing electrical system which is provided for the City of Brisbane by Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E). In addition to sustainable energy and stormwater management strategies, the Baylands will be provided with other necessary infrastructure and utilities, including wastewater and sanitary sewer systems, solid waste and recycling, dry utilities and emergency services. In most cases, development at the Baylands will utilize services provided by the City of Brisbane and typical utility providers available in the Bay Area. Whenever possible, environmentally-friendly strategies are included. Recycling facilities will be provided in all buildings and public areas, and the sanitary sewer system will be connected to the water recycling/treatment facility to undergo treatment that will allow for the use of greywater for irrigation and other uses. Emergency services will be provided by the City of Brisbane. These elements are discussed in greater detail in Chapter 3: Sustainability Framework and Chapter 7: Utilities and Services. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Vision and Executive Summary

Implementation The Specific Plan provides clear direction for its implementation with a program that includes a process for the submission and review of future development applications, the preparation of public improvements plans, and the subdivision of land. As part of implementation, a new Redevelopment Plan may be adopted and new land use regulations and application procedures will be adopted specifically for this plan, as set forth in Chapters 4 and 8. All future development is required to be consistent with the Specific Plan. It is anticipated that the primary landowner within the Planning Area, Universal Paragon Corporation and its affiliates, will enter into a development agreement with the City. This agreement will be used to specify the rules and obligations that will govern future development as it proceeds through the approval process. All applications for future development in the Baylands are required by the Specific Plan to undergo design review.

Financing In order to ensure that the infrastructure and services necessary to serve future development of the Baylands can be feasibly financed, the Specific Plan provides an analysis of its financial feasibility and includes financing mechanisms and strategies for implementing the Plan. The Plan also establishes a framework that will allow the phasing of development and the choice of financing mechanisms.

In Summary The Specific Plan sets forth a visionary, forward-thinking plan for the Baylands, creating a â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? development, both in terms of sustainable infrastructure as well as being visually dominated by trees, parks, and greenways, and a network of pedestrian-friendly streets, and bicycle and pedestrian trails. Clustered development containing a mix of retail, residential, office, R&D and other employment uses will emphasize the creation of a high-quality pedestrian environment and employ a development scale and massing that is in keeping with the goal of creating compact, pedestrian-friendly, and transit-accessible neighborhoods. The Specific Plan establishes a comprehensive and integrated public open space network that will serve the community and repair historic damage to the Baylands environment, thus restoring ecological function through habitat creation and natural stormwater management.

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The Specific Plan provides a vision for development of the Baylands that is sustainable over the long term, addressing the economic, social, and environmental needs of the site and the broader Brisbane community. In summary, the Specific Plan is characterized by: •

The transformation of the Baylands into a vibrant and safe site for the Brisbane community;

A land-use mix that supplies needed housing, increased tax revenues and employment opportunities for the City, that greatly enhances jobs-to-housing balance and creates attractive local and regional shopping and entertainment destinations;

A comprehensive public open space system that incorporates ecological, recreational, and aesthetic enhancements;

Walkable, people-oriented districts linked to services, transit, and open space;

A high-quality, well-designed and distinctive built environment that serves as a model for new mixed use communities;

The use of green, sustainable, and energy efficient design techniques and technologies wherever applicable in the development of infrastructure, public space, and buildings.

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1 INTRODUCTION 1.1

PURPOSE OF THE PLAN

The Baylands Specific Plan is the product of a multi-year effort to create a regulatory framework for future growth and development within the 684-acre1 area in the northeastern quadrant of the City of Brisbane known as the “Baylands.” The Specific Plan area addresses the entirety of the Baylands, 548 upland acres, and 136 acres in the Lagoon area including 111 acres of open water in the Brisbane Lagoon. The majority of the Planning Area (88%) is owned by Universal Paragon Corporation (UPC). Preparation of this Specific Plan is a requirement of the City’s General Plan (Policy 329.1, page 238) prior to any development of the Baylands. As illustrated in Figure 1.1, the total Baylands area extends from Beatty Avenue and Brisbane’s city limit with San Francisco at its northern limit to the southern tip of Brisbane Lagoon. It is bounded on the east by U.S. Highway 101 (U.S. 101) and San Francisco Bay and on the west by Bayshore Boulevard. The Specific Plan provides a comprehensive land use program for the Planning Area along with goals, policies, and development standards to guide future public and private actions relating to the area’s development, and the creation of a publicly accessible open space system.2 The Plan also identifies necessary infrastructure and circulation improvements to accommodate proposed growth and a strategy for ensuring proper implementation. The Plan ensures that proposed development is coordinated and occurs in an orderly manner and has been adequately planned. All recommendations are based on prior environmental and economic analyses and, in general, the City’s adopted goals and policies as set forth in the Brisbane General Plan.3 1

Acreage was derived from the ALTA/ACSM Land Title Survey prepared by David Evans and Associates, Inc., October 2000; Sunquest Properties (Universal Paragon) Parcel survey prepared by Brian Kangas Foulk, September 1989; and the LUK 2006 ALTA for the Lagoon subarea.

2

For definitions of “open space” and “open area,” refer to Appendix D, Glossary

3

One exception to conformance with the General Plan is the Specific Plan’s proposal to allow housing in the northwest quadrant of the Baylands. Rationale for doing so are outlined and described in subsequent chapters. An amendment to the General Plan to permit housing has been filed and is being processed in conjunction with the adoption of this Plan.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

This Specific Plan was preceded by a 2006 Draft Specific Plan for the Baylands, which included only the eastern portion of the Baylands, referred to as Phase I. This area was defined as the area east of the Caltrain rail tracks, west of the U.S. Highway 101, and south of Beatty Avenue, including the Brisbane Lagoon. The current Planning Area includes the area previously known as Phase I in addition to the land west of the Caltrain rail tracks to Bayshore Boulevard, south to where they intersect U.S. Highway 101, and north to the San Francisco City Limit.

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1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

3 SpeciďŹ c Plan Area

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Figure: Phase 1 Specific Plan Boundary

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

1.2

LEGAL CONTEXT

1.2.1 Authority to Prepare the Plan A specific plan is a planning and regulatory tool made available to local governments by the State of California. By law, specific plans are intended to implement a city or county’s general plan through the development of policies, programs, and regulations that provide an intermediate level of detail between the general plan and individual development projects. State law stipulates that specific plans, as vehicles for the implementation of the goals and policies of a community’s general plan, can be adopted or amended only if they are consistent with the jurisdiction’s adopted general plan. Therefore any provision of this plan that is not consistent with the general plan (e.g. the allowance of housing) will need to be rectified through a general plan amendment. The authority to prepare and adopt specific plans and the requirements for its contents are set forth in the California Government Code, Sections 65450 through 65457. The law requires that a specific plan include text and diagrams specifying: • • • •

The distribution, location, and intensity of land uses, including open space, within the plan area. The distribution, location, and capacity of infrastructure, including public and private transportation, sewer, water, storm drainage, solid waste, and energy systems. Design standards and criteria for development and use of natural resources. An implementation program, including capital improvements plans, regulations, and financing strategies.

A Specific Plan must meet these requirements in order to be considered legally adequate. The Baylands Specific Plan meets all of the requirements of State law. Specifically, Chapter 4 of the Plan describes the land use concept for the Baylands in both text and maps and defines the concept by means of various land use goals, policies, use regulations, development standards, and design guidelines. In addition, the Plan provides a development program that identifies the types, intensities, and distribution of land uses in the Baylands as well as the form, pattern, and character of development. Since open space is a key component of the land use concept for the Baylands, Chapter 5 of the Specific Plan deals solely with the distribution and form of this land use, including the conservation, restoration, and enhancement of natural resources.

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The Specific Plan also proposes the distribution, location, and capacity of major components of the public and private infrastructure systems for the Baylands, as required by State law. Chapter 6 of the Plan describes the circulation network required for efficient access and movement of pedestrians, bicyclists, transit and vehicles in and around the Baylands. This includes the specific connections to adjacent systems, improvements to existing facilities, and development of new facilities. Design standards for transportation facilities are also specified as are the required service levels, which are the thresholds that trigger the development of additional facilities. Chapter 7 of the Plan describes the major components of other infrastructure systems necessary to adequately serve the Baylands in a sustainable manner, including storm drainage, sewer, water and other utilities. As with the circulation network, the Plan specifies the capacity and/or general location of these other utilities. As noted, Chapter 4 of the Specific Plan provides detailed land use regulations, development standards, and design guidelines that establish the criteria by which development in the Baylands will proceed. These criteria reflect the intended form, pattern, and character of development in the Baylands and are required by State law to clearly guide future development. Chapter 8 of the Specific Plan provides a program of implementation measures to assist both future applicants and the City in preparing and evaluating future development in the Baylands. The implementation program includes the key steps necessary to submit and review future development applications, prepare public improvements plans, and approve land subdivision. Finally, Chapter 9 of the Specific Plan deals solely with the financing programs and mechanisms that facilitate implementation and build-out within the Planning Area. Various methods of financing improvements are provided specific to programs and objectives. The standards contained in the Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan are enforceable to the same extent as standards contained in zoning regulations and other City codes.

1.2.2 Relationship to the General Plan Together, the 1994 City of Brisbane General Plan and the Baylands Specific Plan provide a framework to guide future land use and development decisions in the Baylands. The 1994 General Plan, which has not been comprehensively revised since its adoption, establishes goals and policies for development in the City of Brisbane. These goals and policies address community character; local economic development; land use, circulation; open space, recreation and community services; conservation; community health and safety; and housing. The General Plan also includes separate policies for 13 specific subareas, including the Baylands (Policies 328.2 to 373.1).

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

As required by California Government Code § 65454, the Baylands Specific Plan addresses consistency with the City of Brisbane General Plan. The Specific Plan provides detailed and site-specific policies and regulations that implement the broader Citywide and Baylandsspecific goals, policies, and standards of the General Plan. In particular, the Specific Plan fulfills the General Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy requirements pertaining to the planning and development of the Baylands, such as the preparation of a specific plan (see Section 1.3.5 General Plan Submittal Requirements). While the General Plan must always be considered in its entirety because no individual chapter, goal, or policy may supersede another, the major thrusts of the General Plan are summarized below to demonstrate that the Baylands Specific Plan is legally consistent with and serves as an extension of the General Plan. It is also noted that where the current plan departs from the policies established in the General Plan, an amendment to the General Plan will be required alongside the Specific Plan adoption. The General Plan sets forth a vision for the City of Brisbane that emphasizes the preservation and strengthening of its identity, which is formed in large part by San Bruno Mountain, San Francisco Bay, and the inherent natural beauty of these features. While located in an urban region, the Mountain and Bay separate the City from surrounding communities. Not only do these features create an independent visual identity, but they also cultivate a distinct community, both of which the General Plan seeks to maintain. Environmental protection is central to the General Plan, and this focus is evident in the Land Use and Local Economic Development chapters, which seek to preserve the natural environment while allowing environmentally-sensitive, well-planned development that provides social and economic benefits to the community. The Conservation and Open Space chapter emphasizes the protection of open space resources for environmental preservation as well as recreation. The Conservation and Open Space chapter seeks to expand interaction with the natural environment to increase awareness of its fragility and to promote the judicious use of its resources. Consistent with this environmental focus, the Transportation and Circulation chapter emphasizes a multi-modal transportation system that is oriented to the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land uses. The General Plan seeks reliable transit service and citywide access for pedestrians and bicyclists while still maintaining acceptable vehicular traffic flow, particularly on Bayshore Boulevard. The Recreation and Community Services chapter emphasizes the provision of facilities and opportunities for the personal growth and enjoyment of residents while strengthening the bonds of community. Finally, the Community Health and Safety chapter addresses natural hazards while identifying the necessary infrastructure and services to support the health and welfare of city residents and workers.

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The General Plan policies for the Baylands Subarea expand upon the citywide policies to address the specific conditions of the Baylands. These policies address the nature of development that is permitted—commercial, open space and recreation, and the preservation of views, etc.—as well as the process under which such development may occur. These policies also touch upon important transportation connections, such as the feasibility of extending Geneva Avenue, needed within the Baylands. Open space resources, such as the Lagoon and its wetlands habitat, are also identified, and other policies stress environmental conservation through recycling and energy efficiency. Given the Baylands’ earlier industrial uses and landfill soil conditions, the General Plan includes policies to identify potential hazards, such as hazardous materials, and ensure that future uses mitigate existing and potential dangers. The Baylands Specific Plan furthers these goals and policies of the General Plan by incorporating its identified principles into the vision and framework. It does, however, depart from the General Plan’s land use allowances that prohibit residential uses and includes residential and mixed-use development in portions of the site. Following the explicit recommendations and more general conservation direction of the General Plan, the Specific Plan provides significant areas of permanently protected open space that are focused upon the Baylands’ sensitive wetland habitats: the Lagoon and the drainage channel corridor. In keeping with the General Plan’s provision for open space, these proposed parks will serve to protect fragile Lagoon habitats, create new habitat, and also provide opportunities for educational interpretation and passive recreation. To strengthen community facilities and thereby community interaction, numerous recreation uses are proposed including passive and active recreation. The Specific Plan concentrates development in the northern portion of the Baylands to allow Central Brisbane—and its natural setting—to retain the geographically distinct nature and identity that is a goal of the General Plan. To maintain views of the Mountain and the Bay, development is aligned to create view corridors within the site, and development heights are regulated per the General Plan to protect views from Central Brisbane. A range of land uses are proposed in this area, including a range of residential and mixed-use densities, local- and regional-serving retail, flexible office and research and development (R&D) space in a variety of formats, and public and semi-public uses. Detailed development and design standards are included to ensure high-quality developments and to promote compact, walkable districts. Reflecting General Plan subarea policies, development will also be required to meet environmental sustainability standards, including a stormwater infrastructure that is integrated with the site’s existing hydrology and is integrated with a newly-created network

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

of wetlands. In accordance with the General Plan’s objectives for economic development, commercial development will be balanced with the natural environment while generating local tax revenues and increasing local employment and business opportunities. To connect the Baylands with the rest of Brisbane, the Specific Plan proposes a transportation system that, in keeping with the General Plan, is designed to comprehensively serve pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit riders in a manner that reflects and supports adjacent land uses. In order to serve vehicular circulation, the Specific Plan also adopts the traffic standards and incorporates roadway improvements outlined in the General Plan. The Specific Plan also plans for all utilities and services needed by the development, and thereby addresses the public health and welfare objectives of the General Plan. As part of permitted development, the contamination of the Baylands will be addressed as required by the General Plan and in accordance with City, County, and State regulating bodies, so that the Baylands may become safely accessible to City residents, workers, and visitors. In short, the Baylands Specific Plan, taken as a whole, “will further the objectives and policies of the general plan and not obstruct their attainment.”4 General Plan goals and policies are referenced as appropriate elsewhere in this Plan; for example, these goals and policies are discussed as they relate to land use in Section 4.4 Land Use Consistency. In addition, a detailed analysis of the consistency between the Specific Plan and relevant policies of the General Plan is included as Appendix A. Whereas the prior Draft Specific Plan was consistent with all land uses proposed in the 1994 General Plan, the current 2011 Specific Plan includes a land use—residential—that was not part of the original vision. Prior to the adoption of the Specific Plan, a General Plan amendment permitting housing must be adopted. The General Plan amendment is being processed concurrently with this Specific Plan.

4

“The Planner’s Guide to Specific Plans,” State of California, Governor’s Office of Planning and Research, January 2001 Edition, pg. 29.

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1.3

9

PLANNING CONTEXT

1.3.1 Approach to Planning The Design with Nature5 approach to environmentally-based planning first pioneered by Wallace Roberts & Todd and Ian McHarg, one of the firm’s founding partners, is the conceptual framework used to create the Baylands Specific Plan. The premise is that a systematic understanding of the environmental setting—including natural, cultural, social, and economic factors—is essential to the creation of truly sustainable communities. Using this approach, planning is a cumulative process in which layers of information describing individual factors are combined to create a more comprehensive and complex understanding of the whole. While the natural environment serves as a foundation for subsequent decisions regarding uses and development potential, no single factor works in isolation. Each factor informs and influences the others, resulting in a synthesis of natural and cultural patterns that is the basis for the plan. The Brisbane Baylands area is not a blank canvas. The fact that the Baylands is a highlyaltered and ecologically-compromised site makes this process all the more complex as the historical conditions that preceded the current state are understood. The most basic site conditions, such as topography, vegetation, and hydrology, have been significantly modified by human activities associated with over a hundred years of use and alteration of the land, including structures and other changes related to industry, rail, petroleum storage, and landfill activities. Brisbane General Plan policies also form part of the planning context, expressing the community’s aspirations and expectations for the area. Finally, economic conditions, particularly as they relate to market feasibility, financing, and implementation, represent the final layer that needs to be incorporated to ensure that the plan’s vision is a practical reality.

1.3.2 Background to the Plan Brisbane’s Baylands have played several roles throughout the community’s history. Prior to the settlement of Visitacion and Guadalupe Valleys, the area now known as the Baylands was actually part of San Francisco Bay. Located at the outfall for the Guadalupe Valley and the Visitacion Valley watersheds, the Baylands area was a combination of wetlands, estuary fringe and open water that fulfilled important habitat and hydrological functions within the broader ecosystem of the Bay (see Figure 1.2.A: Watersheds). 5

Ian McHarg, Design with Nature. New York: The Natural History Press. 1969.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

A: Watersheds

B: Vegetative communities

C: Original shoreline wetlands and drainage problem areas

D: Original shoreline and areas of land fill

Figure 1.2 Site Analysis. All plans adapted from the City of Brisbane General Plan 1994. Not for technical reference.

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1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

11

The Baylands estuary provided habitat to many native species and fertile hunting for pre-Spanish-era Native Americans. The upland backdrop of San Bruno Mountain and the smaller ridges framing Guadalupe and Visitacion Valleys also includes a number of distinctive terrestrial habitats and vegetative communities (see Figure 1.2.B: Vegetative Communities). When the Brisbane area was first settled, the road that is now Bayshore Boulevard generally followed the historic Bay shoreline, moving over and around the ridges, such as Ice House Hill, that protruded into the Bay. The railroad’s construction of the Bayshore Cutoff between 1904 and 1907 was the beginning of a process that would redefine the Bay shoreline, moving it eastward, and in so doing create the Baylands. The railroad causeway, which crossed through the inlet at Visitacion Valley, provided the eastern limit for filling the estuary’s wetlands with rubble from the 1906 earthquake, thereby blocking natural stormwater flows through the area. Subsequently, this filled area west of the causeway became the main railyard for freight train activity going in and out of San Francisco until operations ceased in 1960. (See Figure 1.2.C: Original Wetlands.) Filling of the Bay did not stop with the railyards, however. As early as 1932, San Francisco began using the area east of the tracks as a municipal sanitary fill site. The development of the Bayshore Freeway (U.S. 101) in the mid-1950s established the current edge to the Bay and of bay fill. (See Historical Progression diagram in Vision & Executive Summary) After the landfill operation was discontinued in 1967, a cover of soil had been placed over the site, meeting the closure requirements of the time.6 Except for more recent activities related to soil recycling and filling operations, the area remains largely unchanged since the late 1960s (See Figure 1.2.D: Areas of Landfill). The Baylands was annexed into the City of Brisbane in 1962, shortly after the City’s incorporation in 1961. UPC purchased the majority of the Baylands property in December 1989, and has since operated the soil recycling and filling operations and worked to mitigate site contamination. Through the successive changes to the Baylands over the years, the older portions of Brisbane have maintained an individual identity, largely unaffected by the growth and change of the Bay Area around it. Protected and contained by the landforms of San Bruno Mountain (see Figure 1.3), Central Brisbane retains a typical small-town character, a great source of pride to its residents.

6

In order to develop the Planning Area as proposed in the Specific Plan, modified closure that meets current regulatory requirements

must be completed. Preliminary closure plans for the Planning Area have been reviewed by the appropriate regulatory agencies, including the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board; and the San Mateo County Health Services Agency. Final approved landfill closure plans will be implemented over the Planning Area in conjunction with the proposed development. .

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12

Figure 1.3: Topography

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

Figure 1.4: Existing land use designations Note: Plan adapted from the City of Brisbane General Plan 1994. Not for technical reference.

The General Plan designates the majority of the Baylands as a Planned Development with the designation of Trade Commercial (see Figure 1.4). This designation currently allows for land use flexibility and the adoption of a Specific Plan and environmental impact report prior to any development. It also requires a minimum of 25% of the land be kept as Open Space/ Open Area. A Specific Plan adds specificity to the designation, identifying the key elements, including circulation, open space, and infrastructure necessary to accommodate a mix of viable land uses. The Trade Commercial designation currently applied to the Baylands site does not allow residential development. A general plan amendment to the Baylands Planned Development (PD)- Trade Commercial will therefore be required. The current proposed new land use designations are described in detail in Chapter 4: Land Use and Community Design. Although the 1994 General Plan has not been comprehensively updated, the draft 2006-2014 Housing Element Update was prepared in 2009 for review by the State of California. The Housing Element is part of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Plan, and specifically addresses the housing needs with respect to the other General Plan elements. Consistent with the goals of the 1994 Plan, and the previous housing element, the Housing Element furthers the focus on sustainable development, with special emphasis on minimizing greenhouse gas reduction through the reduction of vehicle trips. It demonstrates how Brisbane can accommodate its share of the regional housing need by identifying sites and densities that will further this aim. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

13

Densities are recommended to be a minimum of 20 units per acre. New housing also should be provided in a range of affordability options for all those working in Brisbane. Although the Baylands was not identified as a key site, the goals of the Housing Element are addressed through the compact, sustainable development that is central to the Specific Plan.

1.3.3 Market Research Inputs to Land Use The selection of land uses on the Baylands is based in part on an overview of current and projected long-range market conditions on the San Francisco West Bay Peninsula conducted by Economics Research Associates (ERA) and more recently by Economic and Planning Systems (EPS). Market projections indicated that within a long-range, 30-year time horizon, any of the land uses proposed could be developed on the Baylands. Hotel, office, retail, highdensity residential and various forms of R&D/biotech space could generate healthy land values in future years. However, at present, market conditions are relatively depressed for many of these uses, although there is currently a strong pent-up demand for appropriately sized and priced housing throughout the Bay Area. Residential uses have been added in the proposed Plan to address this demand. The 1994 General Plan policy 330.1, prohibits housing on the Baylands due to concerns over the potential public health risk associated with the historic contamination of the site. Remediation that will occur prior to housing development will address this contaminated condition in accordance with City, County, and State standards for residential uses. Adoption of the Specific Plan will replace the zoning of the site, and the concurrent proposed General Plan Amendment would remove the restriction of residential development. Based on market conditions, regional-serving retail concepts provide the best opportunity for meeting shared City and landowner objectives for development that will generate positive economic benefits. In the very near term, various forms of freeway-oriented, regional-serving retail would have market support. At this time, the Specific Plan allows for the development of regional-serving retail, including various mixed commercial uses, and large format retail. Other commercial uses that may be absorbed in the mid-term include various formats of office, flex office, and R&D office space.

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14

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

Timeline

Event Precedents for Open Space & Redevelopment Character

2004

2006

2006 Phase I Specific Plan

EIR Commencement

2008 Baylands Community Forums & Additional Stakeholder Outreach

2011

Project Alternatives (Community & Stakeholder Input and Finalization)

Revised Specific Plan

EIR (Publication)

2012 Figure 1.5: The Baylands Specific Plan Process

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Adoption of Specific Plan by City

Public Hearings, Review & Comment


1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

15

1.3.4 Planning Process The preparation of the Specific Plan has been a multi-year process. The present Specific Plan is a continuation of the Phase I Draft Specific Plan which focused on the 446-acre eastern portion of the Baylands. That Specific Plan was not adopted in that form; instead this current plan has built upon its foundation. As illustrated in Figure 1.5, the 2006 Phase I Specific Plan entailed a series of steps beginning with a comprehensive analysis of the site, its context, the Brisbane General Plan, other related planning documents, and market conditions. Concepts were developed in conjunction with General Plan goals, the landowner’s goals, market conditions, and meetings held with concerned agencies. Public presentations, including one on the “Draft Bubble Plan”, were made to the Brisbane City Council. The concepts for the Specific Plan were refined based on City Council and public feedback and in coordination with the technical expertise of civil engineers, transportation engineers, biologists, environmental consultants, economists, and hydrologists. After receiving further Council and public comments on the Preliminary Draft Specific Plan, the 2006 Phase I Specific Plan document was finalized. The 2006 Phase I Specific Plan was the result of numerous City Council- and landownersponsored workshops on the Baylands addressing brownfields development, sustainability, and urban design. Community input was gained and incorporated into the plan. The City of Brisbane also hired an independent consultant to review and evaluate existing and planned remediation activities within the Baylands. The Brisbane community continued to be engaged in the planning process since 2006. Various platforms have been provided to the community to provide input on the Specific Plan. On average, between 12 to 15 meetings, open to the public have been held each year since 2006. These meetings have taken place in the form of workshops, round table discussions, planning sessions, open house meetings and informational presentations from nationally renowned experts, to gain further understanding of City of Brisbane residents’ goals and aspirations for the Baylands. Community input has been incorporated into the goals and vision of the current plan. The 2011 Specific Plan considers public input and incorporates changes to adjust for evolving market conditions, more detailed study and understanding of geotechnical and infrastructure realities and costs, and innovation in technology and sustainable design.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

1.3.5 Contamination and Remediation As a result of its industrial past, the Baylands contains or previously contained polluting substances that present remediation challenges to certain forms of development. Residential uses were never considered for the site due to unknowns about remediating this contamination. Typically, residential uses require the lowest amount of contamination and the highest levels of remediation. The 1994 General Plan and subsequent plans have prohibited residential uses on the Baylands in part because of safety concerns due to contamination on the site. Since UPCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acquisition of its properties in the Baylands, several strategies have been underway to allow various types of development to occur including housing in specific areas. Both the State of California and San Mateo County provide regulatory oversight for these measures. Currently, these agencies continue to monitor the site and will oversee remediation techniques and results in accordance with the Remedial Action Plans (RAPs).

Figure 1.6: Site Contamination Reference Zones

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The Western half of the Baylands was contaminated during the occupancy of the Southern Pacific Railyards between 1914 and 1960. It has been divided into the Northern and Southern Portions, or Operable Unit 1 and Operable Unit 2 (OU-2), based on the type and nature of contamination. The Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) oversees Operable Unit 1, which contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A pump and treat system has been in place in this area since 1995 that has greatly improved groundwater conditions. Groundwater continues to be monitored through quarterly reports to DTSC. A RAP will need to be reviewed and approved by DTSC. Operable Unit 2 contains Bunker C fuel oil and heavy metals (primarily lead). The remediation strategies for this portion include the monitoring of groundwater and surface water quality, which is reported to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (SFBRWQCB). Both Bunker C oil and lead have low solubility and mobility, so a capping strategy has been approved in the RAP for OU-2. Capping, or another strategy to be defined in the RAP, will be implemented to prevent human contact and future groundwater contamination. Continued implementation of these remediation measures and monitoring by County and State agencies according to the RAPs will render the site suitable for residential development.


1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

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The Eastern half of the Baylands was contaminated from 1932 to 1967, when this area was occupied by the Brisbane Landfill. As previously mentioned, the landfill was subsequently buried with a cover of soil approximately 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30 feet deep over the site to prevent future contact with contamination. Some methane gas production remains, but is diminishing over time. Currently, emitted methane gas is collected through wells and piping and burned periodically in a flare. The San Mateo County Health Services Agency oversees the site, as well as the SFBRWQCB. Groundwater/leachate and stormwater quality is monitored regularly at well and outfall locations and reported to the SFBRWQCB. Remediation efforts will continue to be incorporated as a long-term element of the Brisbane Specific Plan. Additionally, development will be reviewed with regard to contamination throughout the build-out of the Planning Area. Any form of development must comply with the standards of remediation and on-going monitoring mandated by the applicable federal, state and regional control agencies associated with each specific land use. Development will not be approved if the land is not deemed safe for public use per any land uses proposed in the Plan.

1.3.6 General Plan Submittal Requirements As previously noted, the Brisbane General Plan sets forth specific requirements related to the planning and development of the Baylands. Specifically, Policy 329.1 requires that the City: Adopt one or more Specific Plans and accompanying environmental impact reports prior to any development of the subarea [i.e., Baylands]. In addition, Policy No. 329 states that: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prior to or in conjunction with the first Specific Plan for the Baylands subarea, a Concept Plan shall be submitted, which shows the disposition of the entire site. The Concept Plan shall include the following: 1. an overall conceptual plan, illustrative in nature, showing uses and locations by means of bubble and schematic diagrams with an accompanying text; 2. a general description of conceptual uses, densities, intensities and locations consistent with the adopted General Plan;

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

3. a listing of responsible State, Federal or local agencies which have jurisdiction over the development of the site in the manner contemplated by the Concept Plan and a description of the studies to be conducted and the issues to be resolved with such agencies.” This Specific Plan, prepared in accordance with the provisions listed above, fulfills the requirements of the Concept Plan.

1.4

ORGANIZATION OF THE SPECIFIC PLAN

The Specific Plan is organized to provide a step-by-step understanding of the plan’s components and the rationale behind its policy recommendations, design concepts, and implementation measures. The first two chapters are primarily descriptive, outlining the plan, the planning context, and the existing setting. Chapter 3 presents the long-range sustainable development framework for the Baylands. The goals, policies, standards, guidelines, and implementation measures that will regulate future development in the Specific Plan area are presented in subsequent chapters organized to correspond to planning categories established by City and State general plan guidelines. Chapters in the Specific Plan include: Vision & Executive Summary – provides an overview of the Plan’s goals and objectives, including the land use program and development potential of the area, the public open space concept, and the circulation and infrastructure requirements to implement the Plan. 1. Introduction – establishes the broad purpose of the Specific Plan as a guiding framework for improvement and growth within the Baylands, describes the legal context for the plan including environmental review, summarizes the general conditions and sequence of events leading up to the plan’s preparation and submission, and describes the Plan’s relationship to the General Plan. 2. The Planning Area – describes the Planning Area and its relationship to the surrounding context. This chapter describes the character of the Planning Area and surroundings, land ownership patterns, and key environmental factors that influence the plan’s form and policies. 3. Sustainability Framework– describes the overarching approach to sustainability and the elements that have been incorporated into the plan to carry out the Specific Plan objectives. This includes compact development, transit accessibility, ecology and open space, alternative energy strategies, green building, and other sustainable infrastructure elements. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


1. Introduction Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

19

4. Land Use and Community Design – describes the overall land use and development concept for the area, including the specific land use goals, policies, and regulations that apply to the Planning Area. The overall development program— including the types and intensities of land use and the form and pattern of new development—and the community design principles and goals, development standards, and design guidelines for development are also described. 5. Conservation and Open Space – describes the open space system and its primary components, including the creation and conservation of ecological resources, such as woodlands, meadows, and wetlands, and the incorporation of windrows, groves, and land form elements within this realm. Open space also includes urban parks and recreational space within the development. These recommendations link to elements of other sections, including landscaped areas, stormwater management, and energy conservation overall. 6. Circulation – describes the circulation network and identifies the components and design standards required for safe, efficient access and movement of pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, and vehicles in and around the Planning Area, including connections to adjacent systems, improvements to existing facilities, and development of new facilities. 7. Utilities and Services – describes the infrastructure and service improvements necessary to provide adequate sewer, water, storm drainage, emergency response, and other utilities and services to the new Baylands development using integrated stormwater management and other sustainable technologies wherever possible. 8. Implementation – describes steps that must be taken to implement the Plan, including development approval procedures and capital improvements. 9. Public Facilities Financing – identifies public improvement costs and potential sources of funding and cost sharing.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 1. Introduction

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2. The Planning Area Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

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2 THE PLANNING AREA 2.1

PLANNING AREA LOCATION

The Baylands is located approximately midway between San Francisco’s central business district and its international airport, as illustrated in Figure 2.1, and is one of the largest undeveloped tracts of urban land on the west San Francisco Bay Peninsula. The site is well served by regional transportation systems. U.S. Highway 101 is a major north-south freeway that provides direct access to the site from interchanges at Harney Way and Sierra Point Parkway. The Caltrain commuter rail between San Francisco and Gilroy and the Union Pacific freight lines both pass through the center of the Baylands. Rail spurs currently serve existing businesses in the area. With construction of the planned Intermodal Station at the north end of the Baylands, Caltrain and the San Francisco Municipal Railway (“MUNI”) T-Third Street Light Rail Transit (LRT) both will serve the area directly. In addition, implementation of the planned BRT along Geneva Avenue would ultimately connect Hunter’s Point and Candlestick Point to the Baylands and Balboa Park BART. Within the City of Brisbane, the site is bounded by commercial and industrial development to the west, Central Brisbane to the southwest, the Sierra Point business park and municipal marina to the southeast (i.e., east of the freeway), and the Recology waste collection and recycling center on the north. Low intensity commercial development and manufacturing uses within Daly City border the area to the northwest (i.e., along Bayshore Boulevard north of Geneva Avenue); this area is part of Daly City’s Bayshore Redevelopment Area. In

Central Brisbane, adjacent to the Planning Area, offers an

The Lagoon at the south end of the Baylands offers unique natural

appealing small town environment.

resources and passive recreational potential.

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22

Figure 2.1 Location Map Credit: Microsoft Corp (2005), Navteq (2004), & US Census

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 2. The Planning Area

addition, Daly City’s Geneva Avenue Urban Design Plan envisions higher intensity uses along that corridor in the future, including residential infill. Such improvements to the Bayshore Boulevard and Geneva Avenue corridors within Daly City would be consistent with the type of development envisioned within this Specific Plan. To the north immediately across the San Francisco city and county line that serves as the area’s northernmost Brisbane Baylands border, the former Schlage Lock site City of Brisbane and other vacant industrial properties, parking for the Bayshore Caltrain Station, and the northern portion of the Recology facility are located in San Francisco’s Visitacion Valley neighborhood. An affiliate of UPC owns the Schlage Lock site and is proposing the Vistacion Valley TransitOriented Development (VVTOD) Project on the site, which would complement the development proposed by this Specific Plan. Office parks, residential development, and the San Francisco 49er’s Candlestick Park are located on Candlestick Point northeast of the area and east of the freeway. Just north of Candlestick Point is the proposed Hunter’s Point Redevelopment project, which is transforming the former shipyard into a mixed-use area of housing, businesses, and a green technology incubator. The entire east side of the Baylands area is bounded by U.S. 101, and beyond that opens out to dramatic views of San Francisco Bay and the East Bay skyline. Several regional and local parks, including San Bruno Mountain State and County Park, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area, and McLaren Park are within a short walking or driving distance of the Baylands. Existing segments of the Bay Trail are located along Sierra Point Parkway and along Harney Way, with a connecting segment planned between the northern edge of Brisbane Lagoon and Beatty Avenue.

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2. The Planning Area Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

23

Aerial view of the Baylands, looking north towards San Francisco

The total area of the Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan area consists of approximately 548 upland acres (25 percent of the city’s total land area) and 136 acres of Lagoon subarea, including 110 acres of open water, totaling 684 acres.1 Although not all of the Lagoon district and its perimeter property are owned by Universal Paragon Corporation (UPC), they are mostly included within the Planning Area in order to provide comprehensive planning for—and ensure protection of—the Lagoon and public access to the entire Lagoon edge. 1

Acreage was derived from the ALTA/ACSM Land Title Survey prepared by David Evans and Associates, Inc., October 2000; Sunquest

Properties (Universal Paragon) Parcel survey prepared by Brian Kangas Foulk, September 1989; and the LUK 2006 ALTA for the Lagoon sub-area.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 2. The Planning Area

2.2

PLANNING AREA CHARACTER

Consistent with its historic and recent uses, the Planning Area has a disturbed, industrial character with low visual quality that is in significant contrast to its highly scenic setting on San Francisco Bay and in the shadow of San Bruno Mountain. Existing development adjacent to the Planning Area is reflective of the area’s industrial character and low visual quality. The north end of the Planning Area is bounded by the various waste collection, recycling, and distribution centers. The western edge is bordered by Bayshore Boulevard, while the busy U.S. 101 freeway corridor borders the Planning Area to the east. The former Southern Pacific railyard and the still active railroad tracks used by Caltrain commuter and Union Pacific freight trains travel north and south through the Planning Area The Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, L.P. fuel storage facility (tank farm)—which occupies an out-parcel in the southwest portion of the site (i.e., it is not included in the Planning Area and not under ownership of UPC)—represents a particularly negative visual element from within the site as well as from Central Brisbane and other surrounding areas. Physically, the area is largely undeveloped, comprising mainly disturbed areas that were formerly part of the San Francisco sanitary landfill. Since the landfill’s closure in 1967, the area has been used as a repository for clean fill materials from construction sites in the region and for recycling of sand, dirt, gravel, and other construction materials. Over time, these activities, which are authorized under a permit from the City of Brisbane, have resulted in a somewhat variable topography (as a result of the constant movement of materials in and out of the site) with elevations that are on average 20 to 30 feet above the surrounding grades.

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The drainage channel bisecting the eastern portion of the

The open areas in the eastern portion of the Baylands have been

Baylands provides limited habitat.

altered by fill operations.


2. The Planning Area Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

25

These elevated grades not only provide an effective cap on the former landfill site, but also allow for dramatic views out from the site in all directionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to San Francisco Bay to the east, Visitacion Valley and McLaren Park to the northwest, San Bruno Mountain and Central Brisbane to the west and southwest, and Brisbane Lagoon to the south. The continuous movement of fill material into and recycled materials out from the site has generally prevented the establishment of any significant vegetation. One key feature that remains despite the fill operations is the drainage channel that runs east-west through the center of the Planning Area. This drainage channel, which carries runoff from the Visitacion Creek watershed west of the site to the Bay, supports a narrow strip of wetland and riparian vegetation, and is held as an easement by the City of Brisbane. The only existing development within the Planning Area includes two building supply businesses (Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris) that are located in the northern portion. Both of these businesses are anticipated to be relocated to an alternate site in order to

This view from the City of Brisbane shows the fuel tanks and Ice House Hill in the foreground and downtown San Francisco in the background. Much of the Baylands is visible just beyond Ice House Hill and the tank farm.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 2. The Planning Area

provide enhanced operations for both businesses, and contiguous development within the Planning Area. The proposed site for these two businesses is located between the railroad right-of-way and Tunnel Avenue, just south of its current location. While the Specific Plan generally accommodates the proposed relocation, the precise details regarding the relocation will be addressed in a separate application.

2.3

LAND OWNERSHIP

As illustrated in Figure 2.2, UPC owns the vast majority of the upland portion of the Specific Plan area and more than half of the Lagoon subarea. Areas enclosed by—but excluded from—the Specific Plan Area include the tank farm owned by Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (23.5 acres) and the Machinery & Equipment building parcel and former rail access south of Ice House Hill. These parcels are not part of the Specific Plan and are likely to maintain their current operations for the foreseeable future. The parcels on which Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris Lumber operate total 8.6 acres and are located within the Specific Plan Area. The proposed new location for these businesses totals approximately 16 acres bounded by Tunnel Avenue, Visitacion Creek Park, and the Caltrain rail tracks. This proposed land swap will better integrate these viable uses into the overall plan for the area and enhance their operations. The proposed relocation and design of new facilities for these two businesses will be addressed in a separate application and will be subject to City approval. In addition to its upland holdings, UPC owns a major portion of the Lagoon itself totaling approximately 75 acres, or 55 percent, of the Lagoon. UPC’s upland and Lagoon properties are non-contiguous, separated by a 600-foot-wide strip of Lagoon property owned by the California State Lands Commission. The City of Brisbane owns a 60-foot-wide right-of-way for Lagoon Way, crossing the southern end of the Planning Area between the freeway off-ramp and Tunnel Avenue. In addition, the Bayshore Sanitary District holds a 60-foot-wide access (“roadway”) easement that follows Tunnel Avenue south of the Sierra Lumber site and then veers west to access the pump station. Union Pacific holds a 30-foot-wide railroad right-of-way parallel and west of Tunnel Avenue near the Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris sites. Caltrain operates on a 100-foot rail corridor easement, under ownership by the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board (PCJPB). Several utilities easements travel under Tunnel Avenue and the Caltrain rail corridor. Additionally, communication easements travel southward along the western boundary of the Specific Plan Area south of the Kinder Morgan tank farm,

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Visitacion Valley Transit-Oriented Development (VVTOD)

2. The Planning Area Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

27

SpeciďŹ c Plan Boundary UPC Ownership State Lands Commission Ownership Access Easement Railroad Easement Drainage Easement Waterline Easement Utility Easement

Ma

in

Str ee

t Indu stria y l Wa

Figure 2.2 UPC Ownership 2004

Ice House Hill

PG&E Easements

Pipeline Easements Lagoon Way

Communication Easements

Brisbane Lagoon

Note: Ownership was derived from a variety of sources, including the ALTA/ASCM Land Title Survey. This data is intended for planning purposes only. Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N 0

2.2 EXISTING LAND OWNERSHIP

350

700

1400 feet

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28

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 2. The Planning Area

and two 10-foot pipeline easements extend eastward from the southern base of the tank farm to the eastern edge of the Specific Plan area. Finally, a drainage easement follows the existing drainage channel and a waterline easement crosses the Baylands and terminates at the tank farm. A number of existing City-owned rights-of-way are not under ownership by UPC, but are included in the Specific Plan area and recommendations. This includes in particular Industrial Way, an access road at the western boundary of the Planning Area at the intersection of Main Street. Improvements to the right-of-way will be negotiated through a separate approval and development process. As previously noted, the Sierra and Van Arsdale-Harris lumber businesses will likely relocate. Ownership transfers or â&#x20AC;&#x153;swappingâ&#x20AC;? will be addressed in a separate application and will be subject to City approval. Additionally, some improvements are suggested outside of the Planning Area and should be addressed as part of existing or proposed circulation elements separately by the City. These may be implemented through a collaborative process with the City of Brisbane in future planning efforts.

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3. Sustainability Framework Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

29

3 SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK 3.1

SUSTAINABILITY OVERVIEW

The development of the Baylands is organized around elements of a sustainable community. These elements relate to every section of the Specific Plan, and fit together as an integrated, whole system. This Sustainability Framework chapter is, in essence, an overview of the Specific Plan. The intent of this plan is to set a new benchmark for the sustainable design and performance of new community development of this scale. A healthy community is synonymous with and dependent on a healthy environment. It is important to emphasize that sustainability, for the purpose of this plan, is defined in its broadest sense, including environmental, economic and social sustainability. Accordingly, the development of the Baylands as summarized in this framework will not only generate benefits to air quality, water quality, ecological resources, and surrounding communities, but will regenerate a previously degraded site into a thriving, and resilient community.

Figure 3.1: Brisbane Baylands Sustainability Framework Conceptual Diagram

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 3. Sustainability Framework

The Planning Area is uniquely situated as a large brownfield, infill site with existing and proposed future access to mass transit. The development will offer housing for adjacent job-rich urban centers as well as generate green jobs in the Baylands. Through remediating contaminants on the denuded site and creating ecologically-functioning corridors, such as Visitacion Creek, the development of the Planning Area also offers environmental benefits to regenerate the site and surrounding region. As shown in Figure 3.1, a sustainable community considers resources as interrelated, closed-loop systems, considering “waste” products as nutrients to feed these cycles. Any inputs and outputs to and from the Baylands should on average improve the surrounding region and beyond. Each of the following elements of sustainability listed below will describe the Specific Plan goal to efficiently use resource inputs from outside the Baylands, regenerate and cycle resources in the Planning Area, and maximize beneficial outputs such as reclaimed water, clean air, housing, jobs, public recreation, efficient transportation, education, and demonstration of a model sustainable community. The Sustainability Framework diagram, illustrating the elements of the Specific Plan that will work together, is shown in Figure 3.2.

3.2

CLIMATE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

The development of the Baylands will comply with the intent of the Global Warming Solutions Act (Assembly Bill (AB) 32) by reducing greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions through a variety of land use, transportation, infrastructure, and open space strategies. Land Use and Community Design

The development of the Planning Area consists of a compact, mixed-use community that is made walkable through the provision of a combination of local and regional planned services and destinations. Land use and community design strategies which aim to reduce GHGs include: • • • • •

Walkable streets Mixed-use, compact development Neighborhood serving retail and services Connections between on-site circulation and regional transit hubs Structuring of development density to fully leverage transit resources

Chapter 4: Land Use and Community Design develops these principles through detailed land use and urban design recommendations. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND Sun

nyd ale

Ecology31 3. Sustainability Framework Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Ave nu

Woodland Meadow/Field Chaparral Wetlands Groves Community Garden Area Public Park Open Space Windrows

e

sho

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

Bay

Beatty Road

Gen eva Ave nue

Land Use Green Buildings

Intermodal Station

Highest

Radiating Density Lowest

Distance to Intermodal Station

St. Mil

e

Main

1/4

Transportation

1/2

Mil

e

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

Transit Stop ExistingTransit Proposed Transit Regional (Caltrain) Water

Tunne

Energy

dalu

Solar Fields Specific Plan Boundary

ue

on P any pe C

l Aven

Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

U.S. 101

Creek Channel Bioswale Network Lagoon Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling Facility/ Constructed Wetlands

. kwy

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N

0

3.2 SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK

350

700

1400 feet

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32

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 3. Sustainability Framework

Mobility Options

The development of the Planning Area will minimize GHGs from transportation through its adjacency to existing transit stops as well as planned future transit stops in and near the Planning Area including: • •

Caltrain Bayshore Intermodal Station with Caltrain transit service every 30 minutes; MUNI T-Third LRT extension to Mission Bay and downtown San Francisco with transit service every 8.5 minutes (peak) to 10 minutes (mid-day); MUNI proposed BRT (28L) to Bayview, Hunters Point, Candlestick Point areas and the Balboa Park BART Station with service every 5 minutes; Additional proposed MUNI bus improvements with service every 7.5 minutes (peak) to 12 minutes (mid-day); Additional proposed SamTrans bus improvements with bus service every 15 minutes.

• • •

Chapter 6: Circulation discusses the various transit and TDM strategies, in addition to overall bicycle, pedestrian, and vehicular transportation systems. SamTrans Connection to U.S. 101 North

397

Figure 3.3: Proposed Transit Connections

T

BRT Extension to Hunter’s Point and Candlestick Park

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9AX Existing MUNI T-Third LRT and SamTrans on Bayshore Blvd Proposed T-Third Streetcar Loop through Roundhouse district

Pedestrian Overcrossing

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9AX

Intermodal Station (Caltrain/ BRT/ MUNI) Proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) on Geneva SamTrans proposed extension through Roundhouse, Icehouse, and East Geneva Districts

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Pedestrian Overcrossing

Transit Connector Corridor

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Pedestrian Overcrossing

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ENERGY

Development within the Planning Area is to be a model of energy efficiency, using various energy conservation and generation practices including deep efficiency that exceed the Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy code, Title 24, and an onsite solar farm to provide supplemental clean power. New electric, natural gas, and communication lines will be constructed to all of the applicable codes and requirements, providing appropriate services to serve the new community. As part of the electrical system, the Planning Area is designed to maximize use and generation of renewable energy to the extent feasible. Beyond generating renewable energy on the site, a robust green building program for all new buildings will reduce reliance on traditional energy sources. LEED Silver, GreenPoint rated, or better will be a requirement for all new buildings constructed at the Baylands in addition to exceeding the 2008 Title 24 energy efficiency and 2010 CALGreen building standards. Strategies for energy reduction in buildings include installing energy efficient lighting, appliances, and HVAC systems. Also, individual buildings may include renewable strategies such as capturing solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass energy outputs. These elements will further contribute to reduced GHG emissions from offsite power plants that primarily use conventional fuels and significantly reduce the emission of GHGs from building operations. Finally, the Baylands will include the renovated roundhouse, which will be a center for up-to-the-moment research on renewable energy. This will make the Baylands a hub for current thought and innovation on the topic of renewable energy, which will highlight the community in the forefront of this progress. The overall energy strategy will be fully outlined in Chapter 7: Utilities and Services and energy efficiency in building design is included in Chapter 4: Land Use and Community Design.

Solar panels may be included on roofs of individual buildings.

Up to 25 acres of ground-mounted solar panels are proposed within the Planning Area to produce renewable energy for future development.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 3. Sustainability Framework

3.4

WATER

The Specific Plan puts forth a multi-faceted approach to water resources. First, development is interwoven with a system of stormwater infrastructure consisting of biofiltration and treatment wetlands that will improve water quality and reduce water quality impairments from the development of the Planning Area. Second, efficient use of potable water will be mandated through building and site design requirements. This goal is accomplished through high efficiency plumbing and fixtures that exceed code, and use of reclaimed water. The stormwater collection and conveyance system located within the Planning Area will be designed to accommodate additional runoff generated by new development-related impermeable surfaces and capping on the landfill portion. Sea level rise is also a future component that may underscore the need for this sustainable infrastructure. The system will be designed to achieve or exceed the required stormwater treatment for runoff prior to the outfall to the Brisbane Lagoon and the San Francisco Bay. Additionally, the new storm water collection system will protect the Planning Area from flooding and improve existing flood-prone areas during 100-year rainstorm events. Bioswales within private development areas and the street rights-of-way, the riparian corridor that includes additional flood capacity, and detention zones along Visitacion Creek will provide storm water treatment as well as create a wildlife habitat in the Planning Area.

Resilience to Sea Level Rise Development of the planning area will increase final elevations and make it resilient to flooding from sea level rise. The mounded elevation of the landfill area from decades of use as a municipal landfill and clean fill storage area has already lifted the area out of the potential sea level rise flood zone. Additional soil to be imported to the western portion (former railyard) of the planning area will protect the upland portions of the planning area from flooding due to sea level rise. Lower-lying areas will be part of the open space network, or include substantial landscaped areas, which will allow areas for stormwater filtration. These strategies will allow the Baylands to be resilient to global changes that may impact future development in waterfront areas.

Development sites and buildings will likely be dual-plumbed to facilitate the use of reclaimed water for non-potable uses where allowed and safe. The construction of the water recycling plant, if permitted, will provide the necessary irrigation for the open space landscaping included in the Specific Plan, as well as the required plumbing fixtures in the proposed commercial buildings. The supply of reclaimed water will achieve the goal of reducing the overall consumption of potable water from the municipal supply.

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The proposed onsite Water Recycling Facility will aim to incorporate wetlands for wastewater treatment. The treatment wetland will not only require less energy, but also creates a feature integral to the open space plan. A portion of the treated water will be usable for irrigation and other non-potable water needs, decreasing the potable water demand within the Planning Area. The systems will be designed to be compatible with either conventional or natural wastewater treatment plant systems. The new water recycling facility will treat greywater flows from the Planning Area and have the ability to recycle portions of the flow for use as irrigation and other non-potable uses.

Rainwater detention areas are included within street rights-ofway throughout the planning area.

3.5

Open space areas will serve the dual purpose of providing areas for natural filtration of stormwater runoff and recreation.

SOIL

New development in the Planning Area will be preceded by the remediation and/or proper capping of legacy contamination of the soils. The former landfill portion served as a depository for wastes from the region for decades and the soil was contaminated as a result. Instead of exporting these onsite underground materials, the development will remediate and/or cap legacy contamination from the surface soils and utilize fill that meets regulatory standards to cap existing landfills. Different types of contamination associated with the landfill and the railyard will be remediated per the requirements of the oversight agencies, such as the CRWQCB and DTSC to ensure human health and safety, as well as environmental quality. The infrastructure plan requires land use and environmental strategies in areas where necessary to achieve the goal of safely improving and reusing the currently underutilized site. Appropriately designed barrier layers and systems for mitigating gases and proper disposal of leachate and landfill gases will ensure long-term safety of users and occupants in the Baylands without requiring extensive excavations that would generate the need for unnecessary haul trips and additional landfill space in offsite locations.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 3. Sustainability Framework

Site grading and improvements, in combination with structural components, will enable the Baylands to be safe and protected from contaminants, and help reduce the risk of differential settlement or earthquake damage. Critical infrastructure will be designed to facilitate needed utility and emergency access and service in the event of a major seismic event. The full Infrastructure Plan outlining this strategy is included in Appendix D of the Specific Plan.

Carbon Sequestration Increasing biodiversity and biomass, and improving soils in regenerated woodlands, meadows, wetlands, and other landscaping in the planning area will sequester carbon and improve air quality. Carbon Sequestration is a key aspect of reduced GHG emissions, which is another way in which the Baylands development addresses resistance to climate change.

3.6

ECOLOGY

The existing landfill and railyard portion of the Baylands consists of artificial and disturbed sites that are largely devoid of habitat. The location of the Planning Area at the base of San Bruno Mountain, on the San Francisco Bay, and at the mouth of Visitacion Creek, offers significant opportunities for ecological restoration. The Specific Plan aims to improve the hydrological functioning of Visitacion Creek as part of a central open space feature: Visitacion Creek Park. The creation of wetlands along this creek and the Lagoon fringe, along with an extensive open space framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including meadows, grasslands, woodlands and chaparral typical of the local Bay edge ecology â&#x20AC;&#x201C; aims to create a diverse and vibrant open space ecology throughout the Baylands. This network of open space will filter stormwater, improve air quality, provide habitat for wildlife, and offer recreational

The Lagoon offers opportunities for improved ecological functioning.

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The open space and natural environment of the Baylands will seek to balance development with a natural setting.


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opportunities for the Brisbane community. These green infrastructure corridors will also provide ecological connections between regional open space networks, which extend between San Bruno Mountain and the open water areas of the Lagoon, which provides habitat throughout and can contribute to wildlife movement. Ecological improvements are discussed in detail in Chapter 5: Conservation and Open Space.

3.7

MOBILITY/CIRCULATION

Transportation represents the greatest contributing sector of greenhouse gas emissions in California. The Baylands will be a pedestrian-friendly, transit-oriented development. Located adjacent to multiple existing and proposed transit corridors and hubs, residents and employees will be able to commute to work, go shopping, or recreate without getting in their cars. The Baylands will be a place where walking, biking, and the use of mass transit can take precedence over driving. The development of a new intermodal transit stationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where the extended Geneva Avenue crosses the Caltrain corridorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is a key component of a sustainable transportation network. Convenient, reliable, safe, frequent and easily accessible transit options will become available for travel in any direction. From the intermodal station, the land uses at appropriate densities will radiate out with the goal of locating the majority of the residential population within a quarter-mile walk or bike ride to convenient public transit, and the majority of the total full time employment population within a one-half-mile walk or bicycle ride. Free on-site shuttle service will be available for workers and visitors to travel to destinations beyond this distance. The Baylands will be a community where residents and workers can feasibly live and work without owning a car if they choose not to. Finally, the Specific Plan proposes housing in a jobs-rich location, in order to shorten or eliminate commutes and the associated production of GHGs from auto emissions. Specific Plan circulation and mobility options are outlined in Chapter 6: Circulation.

A variety of mass transit options will be included in order to ease traffic congestion and augment regional access to the Baylands.

Compact development within the Baylands will allow for the ability to walk and bicycle throughout.

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3.8

MATERIALS

A sustainable approach to materials selection typically includes the use of recycled or reused, and locally-produced or harvested materials. The Baylands features only a few older structures that may be reused as the majority of the historic structures have been completely removed from the site many years ago. There is, however, the ability to reuse materials from nearby sites that may echo a similar time period and aesthetic in future construction, which would still source local materials, and acknowledges the Baylands’ industrial past. Existing onsite materials may be used also to shape the land for enhanced ecological, hydrological, recreational and development function. To the extent feasible, deconstructed materials and fill may be reused within the Planning Area or for nearby offsite use for pavement materials. This will reduce the need for quarried materials and truck hauling, thereby reducing transportation-related emissions, and may also count towards sustainable building design credits (LEED Silver, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent). With the extensive proposed landscaped areas, ample opportunity will exist to locally source nursery materials or even to set up an on-site nursery. In general, materials used for buildings, landscape, and infrastructure will be chosen with a preference for characteristics including: • • • • •

Rapidly-renewable Recycled content Locally sourced Sustainable harvesting practices Low or no volatile compounds or off-gassing.

New buildings will be designed to be conducive to onsite and/or offsite separation of solid wastes, recyclable paper, plastic, glass and metal objects, and compostable organic materials, and will be compatible with municipal recycling services. The Specific Plan’s requirement to include an educational component on the topic of sustainable consumption practices will complete this goal. Building material selection and sustainable building requirements are included within the building design guidelines contained in Chapter 4: Land Use and Community Design.

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CULTURE AND ECONOMY

The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan is crafted and organized with the purpose of creating a whole community that enables its residents of all ages to live more sustainably. As a walkable, mixed-use community, the development of the Baylands will provide housing and jobs in close proximity to one another as well as to the surrounding urban communities in San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. Facilities such as a proposed center for renewable energy research, a clustering of office and R&D uses, and other planned services and resident businesses will provide green jobs to the region to stimulate the local economy. The connection to existing transit infrastructure will additionally integrate the community into the regional community and economy. Through the understanding and sensitive expression of Brisbane’s ecological, historical and cultural attributes, the Baylands Specific Plan seeks to create a community with its own unique identity rooted in its heritage and cultural composition. Brisbane’s pioneering spirit, strong connection to its natural setting and unique industrial heritage – including the old San Francisco railyards – are all contributors to this identity. While planning and design for the development will facilitate sustainable lifestyles, the realization of environmental benefits, such as minimizing GHGs from driving, water use, and energy use depends on post-occupancy behavior. Coaching towards a sustainable lifestyle may be one opportunity offered to future community members to ensure not only the greatest benefits of resources, but also to realize the full extent of a sustainable community.

High standards of building design will be required throughout the Baylands to ensure energy efficiency and context-sensitive design.

A variety of office and R&D uses will stimulate the local economy, while blending with the natural setting.

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4 LAND USE & COMMUNITY DESIGN 4.1

PURPOSE

This chapter describes the land use concept for the Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan through a series of land use goals, policies, development standards, and design guidelines that have been crafted specifically for the Planning Area. The chapter describes the development programâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the types, intensities, and distribution of land use and the form, pattern, and character of the built environment. It also establishes broad design goals and principles to guide development and improvements within the Planning Area, supplemented by more specific guidelines that will assist in achieving those goals. The chapter is organized according to the order in which the plan concept was realized. First, overarching land use goals and furtherance of General Plan principles are discussed, followed by brief overviews of similar development precedents that informed and share aspects of the Baylands plan. Key features of the Baylands physical setting and broad urban design and site planning goals are introduced and illustrated in Figure 4.1. Figures 4.2A and 4.2B demonstrate the physical pattern of land uses permitted in the Planning Area. Table 4-2A and Table 4-2B provide a summary of land use area and development program, and Table 4-3 demonstrates land use by development district. Regulations for land use and building design are included to ensure that development occurs according to the locations and types specified. Urban design principles and recommended guidelines are added as the final layer to produce architectural distinction and variety throughout.1 As required by State law and as noted in Section 1.2.2 Relationship to the General Plan, the Specific Plan, including this chapter, carries out the principles of the Brisbane General Plan. This Land Use and Community Design chapter is to be considered in conjunction with the other chapters of this Plan. This chapter contains goals, policies, standards, and guidelines, and includes conceptual drawings and area plans that illustrate how planned development could be realized under the Plan. It is important to note that these graphic representations are conceptual and illustrative in nature.

1

Residential mixed-use building types were developed in conjuction with WRT-Solomon, ETC.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.2

LAND USE CONSISTENCY

The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan provides refinement and specificity to the land uses proposed for the Baylands in the 1994 Brisbane General Plan. The General Plan identifies two designations for the Baylands: Planned Development-Trade Commercial (PD-TC) and Lagoon. The PD designation was included in the General Plan to promote the use of areas that are predominantly vacant and present unique problems and development constraints due to their size, location, environmental setting, lack of infrastructure improvements, and/or potential impact upon neighboring districts. The designation can be combined with other land use designations to provide clearer direction regarding the City’s preferred land use direction. The PD designation requires the completion and adoption of a specific plan and environmental impact report prior to development. It also requires that at least 25 percent of the surface land area be preserved for Open Space and/or Open Area.2 The Trade Commercial (TC) designation, which is combined with the PD designation in the Baylands, provides for a range of commercial uses including office, retail, restaurants, personal services, commercial recreation, light industrial, research and development, warehouses, distribution facilities, and other similar uses. The Lagoon designation simply identifies the Brisbane Lagoon as one of three types of aquatic areas in the City. The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan provides for a range of uses that will provide social and economic benefit to the City and the region through the generation of new housing units, jobs, and tax revenues. Overall, these uses are consistent with the General Plan’s PD-Trade Commercial and Lagoon designations except for the inclusion of residential uses. The inclusion of this use within the Planning Area will require an amendment to the General Plan. The inclusion of residential uses within the Baylands will yield development of housing units that respond to regional demand. It will also allow the Baylands to develop with a complementary mix of uses that will create active destinations, sustainable patterns of living, commuting, and working, and public spaces linked with the historical and ecological heritage of the area. It should be noted that since no specific plan has been previously prepared for the Baylands, there are no existing specific use regulations and design standards under the City’s Zoning Ordinance that apply to the area other than for interim uses. The development regulations and standards included in this Specific Plan will serve as the effective zoning requirements for implementing the development program under a revised PD zoning designation (refer to Chapter 8: Implementation for details). 2

Consistent with the 1994 General Plan, Open Area is defined as, “Parcels of land or portions thereof, primarily in private ownership,

that serve to soften the impacts of urban development and otherwise provide primarily green areas and a feeling of “openness” to the development pattern. Note: the remainder of the definition from page 86 of the 1994 General Plan incorporated by reference.”

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LAND USE GOALS

The following goals describe the land use concept for the Specific Plan and are consistent with the City’s General Plan goals.3 Goal 4.1:

Protection and enhancement of natural and cultural resources such as tidal channels and wetlands within a system of permanent open space.

As stated, the 684-acre Baylands Specific Plan area includes 548 acres of upland developable land and 135 acres that includes the lagoon and the land immediately surrounding the lagoon. Within the developable area, the Plan preserves approximately 170 acres, or 31 percent of the Planning Area, as open space and open area. The planned open space and the lagoon together results in approximately 45 percent of the Baylands as preserved open space and open area. The open space system is generally organized around the Lagoon and the Baylands’ existing hydrology and drainage into the San Francisco Bay. These defining features of the Baylands are incorporated as key elements in the Plan and are set aside for protection and enhancement. Enhancement of the tidal channels and wetlands will include habitat creation and improvements where appropriate, with the reintroduction of native species to improve habitat values. The open space system also provides direct links to adjoining open space resources and trail systems next to the Baylands and beyond. This includes improved pedestrian and bicycle access to and through the Area, including a proposed path to Central Brisbane and recreational amenities surrounding the Lagoon. (Refer to Chapter 5 for more detailed discussion of the open space system). This goal supports a number of goals within the General Plan: •

“Brisbane will be a place where economic development… sees sustainable growth as dependent on preservation and replenishment of natural resources…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 46)

“The City of Brisbane will… incorporate and reflect the natural environment as an integral part of land use…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 54)

“The City of Brisbane will be a place… where open space lands have been set aside to protect the natural environment; where outdoor areas provide recreational open space and education opportunities; [and] where open space and natural areas provide respite to both residents and businesses…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 110)

3

One exception to conformance with the General Plan is the Specific Plan’s proposal to allow housing in the northwest quadrant

of the Baylands. Rationale for doing so are outlined and described in subsequent chapters. An amendment to the General Plan to permit housing has been filed and is being processed in conjunction with this Plan.

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Goal 4.2:

Development that contributes to the Baylands’ sense of place and identity.

Implementation of the Baylands Specific Plan will contribute to the unique sense of place that characterizes this portion of the Bay Area in a variety of ways. The Plan will establish a new positive identity for the Baylands—an area of Brisbane that has lacked a positive image for decades. The Baylands as it exists today is certainly not reflective of the rest of Brisbane and does not convey a positive image of the City. Redevelopment of the Baylands will revitalize currently derelict and underutilized brownfield lands, converting them into dynamic and productive mixed-use neighborhoods that will be a model for sustainable site design and green building techniques. The Plan will reconnect and reintegrate the Baylands area with the surrounding natural and urban systems and establish the area as an integral part of the Brisbane community. The system of parks, open spaces, and landscape features created by the Plan will enhance and highlight Brisbane’s connection to San Francisco Bay, maintain a sense of openness within the Baylands, and establish a new verdant landscaped character for the area. In addition, the Plan provides detailed design standards and guidelines intended to promote development that establishes a distinctive identity and sense of place unique to its Brisbane locale. By siting development to create attractive, pedestrian-friendly streets and public space framed by well-designed buildings and by structuring the development to take advantage of views and vistas to surrounding natural features such as San Bruno Mountain, the Bay, the Lagoon and the newly-enhanced Visitacion Creek corridor. Development in the Baylands will create an atmosphere that is in keeping with Brisbane’s unique character. This goal embodies the General Plan goals that:

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“The City of Brisbane…will remain a place independent and distinct…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 38).

“The City of Brisbane will… celebrate diversity as essential to the physical character of the City [and] incorporate a mix of land uses to best serve its citizens…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 54).


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Goal 4.3:

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Regional-serving commercial development that is also convenient and beneficial to City residents, providing opportunities for employment, shopping, and entertainment, while contributing to a stable and diverse tax base for the City.

The Plan provides for a range of uses that will be economically viable and beneficial for both the City and the region. The focus on regional-serving retail, entertainment, office, and other commercial uses takes advantage of the site’s unique location and convenient regional access as well as current and projected opportunities in the local economy. The Plan will provide greater opportunity for Brisbane residents to work and shop in their own community, rather than having to go elsewhere. The comprehensive nature of the retail and employment uses in the Plan is intended to meet both local and regional needs and reduce retail leakage (i.e., local residents shopping outside Brisbane) to shopping centers in surrounding cities, while being generally complementary and non-competitive with uses in downtown Brisbane and other adjacent neighborhoods. Developers and property owners at the Baylands will be encouraged to include local businesses and hire local residents for both the construction and operations of the Baylands. The Land Use Program (see Tables 4-2A and 4-2B) represent a market-based development strategy tailored to capture near- and mid-term market demands, while maintaining the flexibility to accommodate new uses in response to long-term shifts in the market. Specifically, the near-term strategy focuses on capturing current demand for housing and neighborhood-serving retail uses, with limited office and R&D uses, and key areas for potential renewable energy generation. The long-term strategy is to accommodate more regional-serving retail and additional office and institutional uses once market demand for this type of development strengthens. The intent is to help diversify the City tax base by contributing a stable source of future annual revenues. This goal is consistent with the General Plan’s local economic development goals: •

“Brisbane will be a place where economic development… stabilizes and diversifies the tax base; serves the community by encouraging convenient and beneficial commercial development; provides sufficient revenues for necessary city services; [and] facilitates employment of residents…” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 46).

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Goal 4.4:

Development that is appropriately coordinated and timed to ensure the provision of the infrastructure needed to serve it.

The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan outlines a conceptual framework for major circulation, land use, open space, and infrastructure for the entire Baylands in Chapter 3: Sustainability Framework. This addresses all of the necessary circulation, land use, open space, and infrastructure for the 684-acre Baylands area (including 548 upland acres and the 136 Lagoon acres) from the standpoint of sustainability that will unite the site and further ecologically-conscious goals of development. This approach ensures that the impacts on City infrastructure systems—sewer, water, drainage, and circulation—that are produced by the build out of the Baylands area are properly assessed and mitigated. This element for the Baylands identifies the major improvements required to accommodate the development program for the planning area and eventually all of Brisbane. The infrastructure needs associated with the entire Specific Plan area are described in greater detail in Chapter 7: Utilities and Services, and the Infrastructure Plan. The identified infrastructure requirements are based upon the land use program described within this chapter. The actual provision and phasing of infrastructure will occur through Public Improvements Plans, documents to be submitted as part of development proposals. Public Improvements Plans, which are required by and described in greater detail in Chapter 8: Implementation, will include the detailed engineering of the improvements necessary to service proposed development as well as service benchmarks that must be met prior to occupancy. In short, the Specific Plan ensures that these proposed systems are integrated with existing systems and phased in conjunction with development. This goal reflects the General Plan land use goal that: In short, the Specific Plan ensures that these proposed systems are integrated with existing systems and phased in conjunction with development. Goal 4.4 reflects the General Plan land use goal that: •

“The City of Brisbane will… design infrastructure and public facilities to be efficient, cost-effective and to contribute to the cohesion and character of the community.” (Brisbane General Plan, 1994, pg. 54)

The following goal, although not consistent with the General Plan, is seen as essential to the overall land use mix and success of the Baylands as an integrated transit-oriented development, rooted in a foundation of sustainability. Goal 4.5: DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

New housing development that accommodates regional housing


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needs with a range of affordability options and an emphasis on sustainable development. Currently the City of Brisbane does not allow for residential development in the Baylands. The General Plan, which has not been updated since 1994, continues to govern development within the City. The Housing Element, which is the element of the General Plan that specifically guides housing development, was updated in 2009, and has been submitted to the State for review.. Although this Element does not include the Baylands as a site for future housing development, many of the goals of the Housing Element are met by the development proposed in the Baylands Specific Plan. The 2009 Housing Element sets forth a number of policies that will be adopted into the residential recommendations of the Specific Plan. Many of these are focused on sustainability goals and compact development patterns4: • • • • • • • •

Rezoning of land to accommodate regional housing needs; The inclusion of more mixed-use and multi-family housing allowed in residential zones; Green building program implementation; Addressing energy concerns through conservation programs and use of renewable sources; Inclusion of solar sensitive design and water conservation in new housing development projects; Linking residential and employment uses in order to reduce vehicle trips for work commuting; Regulating development of environmentally sensitive and hazardous lands to assure mitigation of significant impacts; Reducing regulatory constraints to infill housing that would add to a mix of types, size, tenure and affordability.

The Specific Plan includes a range of housing options in a compact pattern. All types of housing included are intended to be higher-density, ranging from residential flats with retail in the ground floor to medium-density townhomes. This furthers both the goals of affordability, by including a range of types that will also have different sizes and prices, and encourages compact development. Residential uses are within either a quarter- or half-mile walk of commercial and office development so that residents may live close to shopping and employment destinations. Additionally, the Baylands is linked with regional transit 4

The following goals are taken from the Draft Housing Element for 2007-2014 prepared by the City of Brisbane as a part of the

current General Plan Update. (2009)

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

options, including San Francisco MUNI, Caltrain, existing and proposed SamTrans systems, and a proposed BRT. At least one of these transit options are within a five-to-ten minute walking distance to all housing areas. Also included in the Specific Plan are opportunities for renewable energy and solar infrastructure. This includes the potential for both on- and off-site generation and reliance on alternative forms of energy that will reduce reliance on the grid. This is paired with green building standards that will reduce inefficiencies in building and site design, thereby reducing consumption. Water conservation is also central to the Specific Plan. This is addressed thoroughly in Chapter 5: Conservation and Open Space and Chapter 7: Utilities and Infrastructure. The entire Baylands Specific Plan is intended to fully encompass the ecologically-sensitive goals that are intrinsic to the City of Brisbane, and accordingly, the General Plan. This goal embodies the Housing Element goals that the City of Brisbane will:

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“Maintain a diverse population by responding to the housing needs of all individuals and households, especially seniors and those with income constrains or special needs…” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-1).

“Ensure that new residential development is compatible with existing development and reflects the diversity of the community.…” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-1).

“Encourage compact, in-fill, mixed-use and transit-oriented development to reduce vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas emissions...” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-1).

“Encourage sustainable residential development to conserve resources and improve energy efficiency to reduce housing costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions…” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-1).

“Provide housing opportunities for people who work in Brisbane to reduce vehicle miles travelled and greenhouse gas emissions….” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-1).

“Ensure that housing development that is not in urbanized areas mitigates the infrastructure costs and impacts of development….” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-2).

“Avoid unreasonable government constraints to the provision of housing….” (Brisbane 2007-2014 Housing Element, pg. VI-2).


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49

PRECEDENTS

The land use program and development pattern recommended for the Baylands reflects the success of past and ongoing redevelopment projects similar in type and scale. This includes allusions to the Baylands’ own history and development. The projects that follow range from mixed-use infill redevelopment in former industrial areas, planned communities adjacent to wetlands, research and development uses intermixed with residential, and an entertainment-based district in a downtown core. All of these ideas fused together, and situated in a manner appropriate to the Baylands regional and natural setting, produced the resulting development program and land use plan.

4.4.1 Baylands History The shape, context, and existing conditions of the Baylands are a function of the history of the site, the City of Brisbane, and the entire Bay Area. The influences of industry that supported the region have left traces on the Baylands, and ultimately define its identity. This industrial character is the primary precedent that drives the structure of the plan. Likewise, the spirit of industry, and the drive towards innovation has been the driving force of the Baylands’ current condition—to once again make this area a hub of activity and economic strength. The Baylands were originally created to support the railroad that linked the San Francisco Bay Area to the region and the United States. The railroad alignment that currently exists was previously a trestle on pilings built to cross the Bay inlet, and was completed in 1907. The route was called the “Bayshore Cutoff,” as portions of the Northern Ridge (Icehouse Hill) were removed to facilitate train access. During construction, the earthquake of 1906 delayed progress, and much debris and rubble from the earthquake was taken from San Francisco and deposited in the area west of the tracks. The railroad dubbed this area “Bayshore” and built facilities to service the railroad, including a switching yard, a brick roundhouse, and a turntable, which were completed around 1910. The Baylands were the hub of freight engine service for the Southern Pacific (later Union Pacific) Railroad. It employed hundreds of people in multiple on-site service facilities for many years until the railyard was officially closed in the 1980s. The Roundhouse was used less frequently as diesel train engines replaced steam engines, and the building was eventually abandoned in 1982. In March 2010, the Roundhouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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The few remaining buildings that date back to the time when the Baylands site was occupied and thriving serve as an important reminder of Brisbaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heritage. The intention is to respect the heritage of the site by preserving and reusing the buildings that can feasibly be reused, documenting those that cannot, and developing new uses that complement them. There are three existing buildings in the planning area vicinity that are regarded by Brisbane City officials and the general public as characteristic of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial past. These are the Roundhouse, the Lazzari Charcoal Building, and the Machinery and Equipment Building. Another well-known structure, the Moore Building was demolished in 1997). These historic buildings provide a rich vocabulary of architectural elements that can influence new Baylands development. Rather than mimicking these historic buildings, new development can complement them in a manner in which they can be important features of the new Baylands community.

Lazzari Charcoal Building

Moore Building

Machinery and Equipment Building

The Roundhouse

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The land use mix and development strategy of the Baylands draws influence from the successful redevelopment of a number of precedent projects from around the country. The following are descriptions of several important examples.

4.4.2 Pearl District, Portland, Oregon The Pearl District, located within the central city of Portland, is an approximately 300-acre former industrial area that was redeveloped in the 1990s and 2000s to include a combination of residential, commercial, and office uses. The area is linked by the iconic Portland Streetcar and includes substantial parks and open space, including historic parks. Aesthetically, the Pearl District features a mix of modern high-rise residential buildings juxtaposed with former warehouses, which are of brick construction. This is a distinguishing feature of the Pearl District. The streets and public spaces also incorporate ecological design and stormwater management techniques that result in a “greening” of the public realm. Tanner Springs and Jamison Square, two of the main parks, both include wetlands and evoke the natural hydrology of the waterfront area. Tenure is nearly evenly divided between rented and owned units.5

Buildings in the Pearl District include a mix of industrial buildings that have been rehabilitated for residential and commercial uses and compact infill development that addresses the pedestrian realm with ground-floor retail. A network of parks and open space are located at regular intervals throughout and land uses are welllinked with transit that shares the right-of-way with cars, bicyclists, and pedestrians. LAND USE & INTENSITY Townhouses, 25-40 DU/Ac net High Density Flats, 45-100 DU/Ac net High-Rise Flats, +125 DU/Ac net Office / R&D, 1.0-4.0 FAR

5

“Guide to the Pearl District Neighborhood.” http://www.movingtoportland.net/living_pearl.htm

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4.4.3 Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California Playa Vista, a mixed-use planned development in Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Westside, shares similarities with the Baylands. The 1,087-acres area was formerly an airport and aircraft factory, with remaining historic structures, that now features a mix of residential, office, commercial and cultural uses. It is adjacent to important wetlands and a creek, which are incorporated into the development through parks and open space. Playa Vista incorporates sustainable design practices and will include as a hub of green technology. With construction beginning in the mid-2000s, Playa Vista includes a range of housing types, including affordable housing. The architectural design of building is drawn from regional examples, incorporating a variety of types and styles to add diversity and interest. Medium-density housing accommodates retail and office uses in the ground floor, which enhance residential areas with convenient services and active uses. The residential area was the first phase of the development to be completed in the western portion. A neighborhood retail center is planned to be the centerpiece of the development, with an office campus towards the east. A Los Angeles Clippers training center is located on-site as well as several key office tenants. Tenure is an equal mix of rental and ownership units, with the majority owned. Playa Vista includes a range of housing types, parks, and a strong link to the natural setting. The development is balanced with land uses that support housing, including retail and employment uses. Streets are designed to accommodate a range of mobility options. LAND USE & INTENSITY Townhouses, 20-30 DU/Ac net Medium Density Flats, 45-65 DU/Ac net Office / R&D, 0.3-1.0 FAR Retail, 0.3-0.4 FAR

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4.4.4 University Circle, East Palo Alto, California University Circle provides a precedent within the Bay Area of a mixed-use development focused primarily on office uses oriented towards public open space. University Circle, completed in 2002, is located alongside U.S. 101 northeast of Downtown Palo Alto and Stanford University, 30 miles south of San Francisco, and 10 miles south of the San Francisco International Airport. The site is situated with ideal highway visibility and access among the growing office sector of this area and serves as an excellent example for the freeway frontage parcels in the northeast quadrant of the Baylands. University Circle is part of a 22.8-acre redevelopment area of the City of East Palo Alto, which was formed in 1998. The area was previously characterized by physically-dilapidated buildings and crime. The master developer of the project – University Circle, Inc. (U.C.I.) began preparing the site in the 1999. Today, the development consists of three office buildings with surface parking, a 200room Four Seasons Hotel with parking garage, and restaurants in ground floor spaces. The buildings were all constructed with high-quality building materials, state-of-the-art technology, and landscaping. The central open space is a primary feature of the campus, onto which all four buildings front and is ringed by a vehicular drive. It includes green space, paths, benches, and a water feature and serves as the central gathering and social space. The 450,000 square feet of office space is occupied by a combination of law firms, financial institutions, a foundation, and other locally-serving businesses, on 25,000 s.f. floorplates. A shuttle to Downtown Palo Alto is also offered to link the development with the popular Palo Alto attractions and Stanford University. The property owner also continues to work with the City to encourage local employment and contracting opportunities.6

University Circle includes state-ofthe-art office space oriented around a strong open space element. LAND USE & INTENSITY Mid/High-Rise Office, Hotel, Ground-floor Retail, Surface and Structured Parking 0.5-0.1 FAR

6

“Economic Development in East Palo Alto.” http://www.ci.east-palo-alto.ca.us/economicdev/successes.html.

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University Park (left) and Mission Bay (right) transformed former industrial uses and railyards into pedestrian-oriented streetscapes that enliven the public realm.

University Park (left) and Mission Bay (right) include a variety of uses, including office and laboratory buildings geared towards biotechnology companies.

University Park (left) and Mission Bay (right) include a mix of residential uses, incorporating a variety of architectural styles.

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4.4.5 University Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts University Park is a mixed-use redevelopment project in Cambridge, Massachusetts that consists of residential development, retail areas, parks and open space, and office and laboratory buildings geared towards biotechnology companies. The land is owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but is leased by a master developer and was developed in partnership with the City of Cambridge. The site was previously occupied by manufacturing plants linked by rail adjacent to the Charles River. Previously, it had been marsh land which was filled to accommodate industrial uses, similar to the Baylands. When this industry declined, MIT acquired the land, but failed to develop the parcel until the 1970s. The master developer began construction in the mid-1980s and the project was completed in 2005.

University Park includes a range medium-high density housing types, hotels, retail, and parks, all in support of a dense concentration of university- and research & development-related office and lab buildings. Mobility options balance walkable and bikeable streets, excellent public transit access, and structured parking. LAND USE & INTENSITY Medium Density Flats, 30-65 DU/Ac net High Density Flats, 60-100 DU/Ac net High-Rise Flats / Hotels, +125 DU/Ac net Office / R&D, 3.0-6.0 FAR Structured Parking, 3-7 stories

University Park includes 1,300,000 sq.ft. of office space, 92,800 sq.ft. of retail, and a hotel. Transit service is widely accessible, with Boston’s “T” subway and bus lines in close walking distance, and an on-site employment shuttle that services University Park itself. The design goals of the project were to create a pedestrian-oriented campus with a variety of land uses that allowed living, working, and shopping locally, but also linked with the City of Cambridge. New construction echoes the street pattern and materials and architectural detailing of Cambridge, while several historic buildings were converted into residential lofts and technology space.7

4.4.6 Mission Bay, San Francisco, California Mission Bay is a 303-acre redevelopment area on the eastern waterfront of central city San Francisco. The site, which was previously a railyard of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, was deemed a redevelopment area in 1998 and was re-envisioned as a hub for biotechnology and innovative design. Development and design guidelines are overseen by the Redevelopment Agency of San Francisco and the master developer: Catellus Development Corporation. Being a contaminated site built on reclaimed land and a former railyard, Mission Bay has many parallels to the Baylands.

The redevelopment of Mission Bay is centered around the new UCSF campus, and all of the related uses to complement a contemporary biotech campus: a hospital, R&D buildings, office buildings, dormitories, mediumhigh density housing, structured parking and parks. A new network of streets builds upon adjacent street patterns, all centered on investments in public transit, namely MUNI’s T-Third Street LRT.

The development program for Mission Bay, which is still under construction, will feature a mix of uses and an extensive parks and open space plan to link the site with the surrounding waterways, including Mission Creek. This includes 6,000 housing units, 4.4 million sq.ft.

LAND USE & INTENSITY High Density Flats, 75-125 DU/Ac net Office / R&D, 2.5-5.0 FAR Structured Parking, 4-8 stories

7

“University Park at MIT.” http://www.fceboston.com/portfolio_up_overview.asp?node=0#; “University Park at MIT.” http:// casestudies.uli.org/Profile.aspx?j=8273&p=5&c=3; “University Park,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_Park_at_MIT.

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of office/ commercial space geared towards biotechnology, a 2.65 million sq. ft research campus for the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), a UCSF hospital, a hotel, and additional neighborhood-serving retail and community facilities. Companies such as Bayer Pharmeceuticals and other pharmaceutical, biosciences, and medical technology research companies have begun or relocated to Mission Bay in recent years. It is projected that 30,000 permanent jobs will be created in Mission Bay. Residential density is estimated at 100 units per acre. The redevelopment area is adjacent to downtown San Francisco and is accessible via a consistent street network that accommodates pedestrians, bicycles, and vehicles. Pedestrianoriented buildings and public spaces unite the development, as well as the newly-constructed T line of San Francisco MUNI. The architecture of Mission Bay is cutting-edge, both in a bold aesthetic and green building principles. In August 2010, Mission Bay was named a Catalyst Site by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), recognizing its leadership in sustainable design.8

4.4.7 LA Live, Los Angeles, California LA Live is a 27-acre redevelopment area in Downtown Los Angeles that features 5.6 million sq. ft. of development focused on entertainment uses, including live performance and movie theaters, and nightlife. The development also includes residential towers and a 54-story hotel and condominium tower, which is the site’s centerpiece. It is adjacent to the Staples Center on the Figueroa Boulevard corridor at the juncture of Interstates 10 and 110. The entertainment portion of LA Live is similar in size to the entertainment variant proposed for the Baylands in the northern portion, however will be proportional in scale to the development character of the Baylands. Pedestrian activity in LA Live is centered around a central plaza on which entertainment and retail uses front. The design intent of the project is to be a 24-hour entertainment destination for the city that unites tourists and locals. It was developed by Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) and financed both through private investment and city redevelopment funds. Access to a number of transit routes is nearby through the Pico Boulevard and 7th Street Metro stops on the Los Angeles Metro system. The Metro bus has several routes that are close to the site, in addition to the DASH bus, which target service in Downtown. A shuttle to nearby USC students is also offered on weekends, and bicycle parking is offered inside parking garages.

8

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“Mission Bay.” http://www.sfredevelopment.org/index.aspx?page=61


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LA Live is a entertainment-focused development in Downtown Los Angeles that is linked to the Convention Center and the Staples Center. It also includes residential buildings which are close to Downtown. LAND USE & INTENSITY High-Rise Flats / Hotels, +200 DU/Ac net Mid-Rise Office, 2.5.0-4.0 FAR Retail: 2.0-3.5 FAR Arena & Theatres Structured Parking, 3-7 stories

Photo credit: Flickr user David Jones.

Photo credit: Flickr user Prayitno.

Photo credit: Flickr user David Jones.

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7.

Concentrated Density & Retail Nodes

Roundhouse Icehouse East Geneva Visitacion Green

6.

Districts

Lagoon

5.

4.

3.

2.

1.

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Parks & Open Space

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LAND USE STRUCTURE/ KEY FEATURES

The land use program, street network, and conceptual site plans are based on carefullycrafted design principles to ensure that future development results in an attractive and sustainable new mixed-use development for the Baylands. It is important that the land use, development, and design principles depicted in the land use diagram and accompanying figures will be respected and understood in the implementation of the plan. The Key Features Diagram (Figure 4.1) identifies the natural and historic features and fundamental design decisions that led to the structure and major alignments as presented. The land use plan first was influenced by historic and natural features and topography, such as the alignment of Bayshore Boulevard that forms the western boundary, the rail rightof-way, and the footprint of the former railyard. Existing natural features, topography, and drainage systems drove the location of development and key land uses, which provided the framework for distinct districts to take shape. Addressing the natural features and respect for the ecological prominence of the Baylands, an extensive parks and open space system was created to knit these districts together and provide a connection to the natural environment. Transit networks were designed to link with existing facilities and to provide necessary convenience throughout the Baylands, especially in areas of greatest density concentration. Finally, key retail nodes were positioned to complement transit links and density. These areas will allow a range of retail types and formats, encouraging pedestrianoriented retail in residential areas. An entertainment variant is also suggested, which would allow an arena, theater, and multiplex in the northeast quadrant (East Geneva). Links to regional transportation and the gradual decrease of density to favor natural elements in the south drove the concentration of density in the northern portion of the Baylands. Ground-floor retail will activate the streetscape and public realm in areas of greatest density and activity.

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4.5.1

Historic Alignments

The shape of the present-day Baylands is a result of the history of the site and the region. The site is bounded on the west by Bayshore Boulevard, which historically ran along the edge of the San Francisco Bay, when the Planning Area was once part of an estuarine ecosystem of marshes, tidal mud flats, and open Bay waters. The advent of the railroad in the early 1900s would permanently alter the area, which began by the laying of railroad causeway across the Bay inlet. This area between the causeway and Bayshore Boulevard was filled with tons of rubble generated by the 1906 earthquake, and in 1914, this area was permanently filled and became the main railroad yard for freight train activity into and out of San Francisco until operations ceased in 1979. The Bay east of the tracks was used as a municipal landfill site beginning in the 1930s and continuing through to the construction of U.S. Highway 101 in the 1950s. Over this period, the shoreline moved as much as three quarters of a mile eastward and created the area now known as the Baylands.

4.5.2

Land Forms and Drainage

Variations in topography have historically been a key part of the character of Brisbane, as it is developed on the side of San Bruno Mountain and slopes downward into the Bay. The Baylands is a continuation of this pattern, responding to these existing elements. Conversely, the Baylands is man-made, heavily-altered site, and development intends to unite the site with the natural and built features that surround it. Ice House Hill, located in the southwest portion of the Planning Area, is a prominent feature that will become incorporated as open space. Icehouse Hill stands as a remnant of the “Bayshore Cutoff,” which cut the hillsides to accommodate the passage of the rail right-of-way. Presently, the “train slot” bisects the Baylands site at an even elevation and is itself a topographical site feature. The Baylands development program is situated to respond to natural topography and drainage systems. Parks and open space will further contribute to the ecological functioning of the site.

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The Brisbane Lagoon is a primary feature of the Baylands Specific Plan and is at the heart of the Brisbane Community. Preserving this naturalized water feature and addressing its presence is central to land use decision. Additionally, the tidal channel that currently exists at the northern edge of the Lagoon, which is a drainage easement and is also preserved, serves as the southern boundary of the developed portion of the Specific Plan. Within the development area of the Baylands, drainage responds to the variation in topography and the natural ecological function of the land. Overall, development sits on higher ground and drains to low features, including the Visitacion Creek Corridor and the Lagoon. The area previously occupied by the landfill was covered by 20 to 30 feet of clean soil after landfill operations ceased in 1967. This area is at much higher elevation than the western portion of the site. Some of this will be redistributed to the eastern portion of the site during development in order to complement the natural features, preserve views to the Lagoon and the Bay, and accommodate the proposed land use pattern.

4.5.3

Key Alignments Roundhouse Circle

The land use concept and districts that form the foundation of the Specific Plan are based on key alignments that create order, reinforce views and vistas to open space and natural features, and link it with existing transportation routes and access points.

Geneva Avenue Roundhouse Arc

Roundhouse Circle is a key geometric driver in the design of the Baylands. It is the primary existing site feature that both tells the history of the site and also dictates circulation patterns on the western side. The open space network and a key east/ west alignment both hinge on the Roundhouse Circle. The Roundhouse Arc and Geneva Avenue form the primary east and west alignments. The Roundhouse Arc has its origin around the historic Roundhouse, and extends eastward. This connects the Roundhouse area to the eastern districts, and serves as the primary thoroughfare through the middle portion of the planning area. Geneva Avenue is a continuation of the existing Geneva Avenue, and will anchor the highest density of retail, residential, commercial, office, and (possibly) entertainment uses together and connect to U.S. 101 and Candlestick and Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point.

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Open Space alignments are also essential to the land use framework. The “Promenade” open space that extends northwest from the Roundhouse Circle is the linear park system that extends through the northern residential district that intersects with Geneva Boulevard. Another open space axis extends southwest from the Roundhouse Circle, parallel to Bayshore Boulevard. On the eastern side, the Eastern Panhandle (“Tuning Fork”) ties land uses together and provides a public open space spine for R&D uses. It originates at Geneva Boulevard in the form of the Retail Main Street and extends south, uniting the commercial area with the R&D campus. It terminates as a “campus green” that opens into larger open space. All of the alignments are intended to serve as gateways into the planning area. Additionally they provide important viewsheds to surrounding features. These include views the Bay, the Lagoon, and San Bruno Mountain. The western Panhandle emphasizes views to San Bruno Mountain and the Eastern Panhandle together with the southern area is designed to provide views southward to the Lagoon. As previously noted, the rail tracks are a major feature of the site that is also a key alignment in the determination of the land use plan.

4.5.4

Parks and Open Space

The network of parks and open space provides each district with a variety of urban parks and plazas, recreation amenities, and a direct link to the ecological and habitat areas associated with the Lagoon and regional open space network. The open space in the northern portion is mostly in the form of urban parks, which provide gathering space and recreational opportunities within developed areas and provide green space within to balance with dense development. Open space is a major component of the southern portion of the Baylands. Open space in this area serves multiple functions of recreational open space, restored habitat for native flora and fauna, groves, and limited agricultural uses. These areas are meant to be amenities for the urbanized portions of the Baylands and the City of Brisbane, restore the natural ecology of the site, and also serve as a transition zone between the development in the north to the conservation lands in the south and west.

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Transit-Orientation

Transit use and links are integral to the Baylandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compact design and sustainability principles. Additionally, transit provides important economic ties to the greater Bay Area, with Caltrain extending between San Francisco and San Jose, and MUNI and SamTrans providing access to San Francisco and points in San Mateo County. Transit links are provided at key points within the Planning Area. The Roundhouse district is intended to function as a transit-oriented development area, with stops for MUNI, a proposed Bus Rapid Transit system (BRT), and a transit hub to connect these providers with the regional Caltrain system. This intermodal transit station would act as the activity center for the Baylands and the City of Brisbane. A proposed SamTrans extension would provide transit service to residential and office uses in the lower-density southern areas around the Roundhouse and across the Roundhouse Arc. This would also allow access to the retail, business, and entertainment uses in the northern portions of the Baylands. Overall, almost the entirety of the developed area of the Baylands will be within a quarter or half mile walk of transit.

4.5.6

Districts

Fitting within the key alignments and features, respecting the natural features of the site, and considering the land use program desired for the Baylands, the subdivided site forms four districts, each with distinct characteristics. These include the Roundhouse district in the northwest, East Geneva in the northeast, Icehouse, and Visitacion Green (North and South). The Lagoon is an additional district, although only open space uses are proposed therein. These districts are discussed in greater detail in Section 4.7: District Concept. Each district has a separate and distinct land use make-up and gives a framework for land use programming and development standards.

East Roundhouse Geneva Icehouse

Visitacion Green (North and South) Lagoon

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4.5.7

Concentrated Density & Retail Nodes

The development of the Baylands is designed to concentrate density in the north, close to transit routes and gradually descend southward. In the areas of greatest density, key retail nodes are planned to offer convenient shopping and a supplemental tax base for the City of Brisbane. Retail would be developed in several formats, responding to adjacent land uses and block structure, and will be flexible to market conditions. Boulevard-scale retail is planned for Geneva Avenue within the Roundhouse transit-oriented development area. This density of uses, and regional traffic and visibility, will provide ideal conditions for a vibrant regional-serving retail corridor. This area links with the retail destination on the eastern side of Geneva, forming a continuous corridor Two blocks north of Geneva in the Roundhouse district is a proposed Neighborhood-serving Retail corridor. Along this street, stacked residential flats will feature retail in the ground-floor, which will offer services to support the surrounding residential community. Larger format, regional-serving retail is proposed for the area on either side of Geneva Avenue in the East Geneva district. The block pattern and development regulations in this area will allow for large format, regional-serving retail tenants that will serve the local community, and also attract a regional market. This could alternately incorporate a theater, arena, and multiplex, in addition to regional-serving retailers as expressed in the entertainment variant of the land use plan. Hinging from this regional-serving retail node is the Main Street retail corridor that extends south of Geneva to anchor the mid- and high-rise office uses in the southern portion of East Geneva. Retail in this area will serve both a local and regional market, providing services to office or entertainment users in upper stories of buildings, and offer generally smaller floorplates than those of the regional retail area to the north. This street continues southward towards the campus R&D area, Visitacion Green North, which will also be at a convenient proximity to access these services.

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LAND USE PROGRAM

As noted, the entire Baylands area includes approximately 684 acres which will be developed with a variety of land uses. (see Figures 4.2A and 4.2B) The land use program and design was based on the opportunities and constraints of the key natural and historical site features, the surrounding context and character, land applicable precedents of neighborhood design, and finally, market conditions and economic indicators. The land use program accommodates a mix of uses including retail, residential, dining and entertainment, hotels and conference, office, institutional, R&D, light industrial, and parks and open space uses. Overall, from the north, density steps down and development becomes more integrated with open space in the southern portion. The land use character in the northern portion of the Baylands is transit-oriented with the highest-density of residential uses combined with a mix of retail, commercial, office, and entertainment uses, linked with parks. The primary focus in the central portion of the Planning Area is on campus-style office, R&D, and institutional uses to the east, and lower-density residential to the west. The primary focus of the southern portion is on open space and recreational uses, with a limited number of additional R&D development sites along the eastern edge, and potential sites for renewable energy production along the western edge. This area will be the lowest impact and serve to preserve and enhance the Lagoon and surrounding uplands. As noted in Chapter 2: Planning Area, the Planning Area is currently largely vacant and highly disturbed. Two building supply businesses, Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris Lumber, currently operate in the northern portion of the Planning Area east of Tunnel Avenue. As a means of better integrating these viable uses into the overall plan for the area and enhancing their operations, both of these businesses are anticipated to be relocated to an alternate site just west of Tunnel Road in the area designated for Light Industrial uses. As shown in Figure 1.1-Project Area, the relocation site is bounded by Tunnel Avenue, Roundhouse Arc to the north, the Caltrain rail tracks, and the wastewater treatment site to the south. The proposed relocation and design of the new facilities for these two businesses will be addressed in an application separate from this Specific Plan. The existing Kinder Morgan Energy tank farm located farther southâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;bounded by Tunnel Avenue, Lagoon Way, and the Caltrain rail tracksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is outside of the Specific Plan boundary, so therefore no changes are anticipated for this site or its current operations by this Specific Plan.

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While the Specific Plan provides flexibility for property owners to craft individual plans, the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intent is that future development patterns will fulfill the concepts presented in this document and closely resemble the general development principles depicted in the conceptual site plans. Table 4.3 identifies the level of flexibility associated with various plan elements by identifying which characteristics are essentially fixed (i.e., they are intended to be implemented as illustrated in the Plan) and which characteristics are more flexible (i.e., their implementation may vary from what is illustrated in the Plan). When it is stated that certain characteristics be fixed, this is understood to be within the context of the overall design for the entire Planning Area, including Land Use and Sustainability Goals (see Chapter 3) and circulation diagrams. Due to the scale of the maps in this Specific Plan, the location of elements such as road alignments and land use boundaries are approximate. They will be developed more fully in the infrastructure plan. This depicted development patterns will require flexibility and interpretation, however, the basic patterns, alignments, and intent presented in these maps will be maintained as closely as possible as they are critical to the character and function of the plan. The land use, circulation, and other diagrams must be understood in conjunction with all Specific Plan goals, policies, standards, and guidelines. Similarly, it is important to note that the conceptual site plans for various development areas are illustrative, showing one way in which the Specific Plan goals, policies, and land use program can be realized. Substantial changes to the Specific Plan will require an amendment, the process for which is described in Chapter 8: Implementation.

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Table 4-1: Regulatory Nature of Plan – Fixed and Flexible Characteristics Plan Characteristics

Fixed

Flexible

Land Use

− Maximum amount of gross floor area within the planning area − General location and distribution of land use districts − Development Standards

− Precise acreage within each designation − Mix of permissible land uses within each land use district

Streets

− − − − − −

Geneva Avenue Promenade Park Streets Roundhouse Circle Roundhouse Arc Retail Main Street General circulation system layout, including: • General location, alignment, and classification of arterial and collector streets • Interconnectivity of street and trail systems • Design standards • Key alignments and streets

− Precise circulation system layout, including: • Precise street and trail alignments (other than key alignments) • Block length • Angle/configuration of intersection, etc. • Number and location of local streets and alleys • Street names • Phasing of circulation system

Open Space

− − − −

Promenade Park Amount of designated open space Key attributes of open space areas General distribution and configuration of open space

− Precise dimensions/configuration − Precise location and design of open area − Open space programming and design (i.e., use and improvement) − Ownership of open space

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

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RESIDENTIAL Flats (High Density) Flats (Medium Density) Townhomes (High Density) Townhomes (Medium Density)

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use Circ

R ou n

5th St.

3rd St

ho

le

d

.

K St.

L St.

INDUSTRIAL Light Industrial Renewable Energy Generation(R.E.G.) R.E.G. / Open Space Reserve

7th St.

M St.

L St

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

J St.

2nd

H St.

ast)

OPEN SPACE Open Space UPC Ownership U.S. 101

ue

vard oule re B sho Bay

E St.

E St.

est) 7th St. (W

F St.

Tunnel Aven

G St

7th St. (E

S t.

G St.

G St.

INSTITUTIONAL Institutional

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

I St

(J St.)

se Arc Roundhou

4th St.

Ma in St.

COMMERCIAL Retail High-Rise Office Mid-Rise Office Office R & D - 1 Office R & D - 2 Hotels & Conference Ground Floor Retail Below Other Use

. 2nd S 2nd t. ( Wes t) St. ( Eas t)

sho Bay

.

R St

.

Gen eva Ave nue

Ave

S St

Specific Plan Boundary

ay rkw

.

a ek P Cre

E St

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

C St.

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

B St.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

A St.

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N 0

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

4.2A LAND USE - BASE VARIANT

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

69

Table 4-2A: Land Use & Development Program - Base Variant Land Use Category

Percent of

Square Feet5

Acres

4,351,800

38.3

7.0%

16.9

3.4%

5,150,400

55.2

10.4%

261,100

2.1

0.4%

Land Use

Residential Residential Flats 3 (Units) Residential Townhomes

(3,950) 2

(Units)

798,600 (484)

Non-Residential Hotels & Conference 1 (Hotel Rooms)

369

Retail

566,300

18.9

3.5%

Office

2,651,200

24.9

4.5%

R&D

3,328,300

94.9

17.3%

Institutional

110,800

8.9

1.6%

Existing Roundhouse

28,200 n/a

10.5

1.9%

6,945,900

160.2

29.2%

Open Space

169.7

31.0%

Streets

116.7

21.0%

Railroad R.O.W.

16.9

3.1%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

24.9

4.5%

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

4.8

0.9%

333.0

60.8%

547.6

100%

Light Industrial

Total Area4

12,096,300

Lagoon Area

135.6

Total Specific Plan Area

684.0

1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Based on 650 GSF per hotel room. Based on 1,100 GSF per unit. Based on 1,650 GSF per unit. Not including existing light industrial uses to be relocated: Sierra Point Lumber and Van Arsdale Lumber (Approx. 142,500 GSF) Structured parking is not included in building GSF or FAR calculations.

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND

70

RESIDENTIAL Flats (High Density) Flats (Medium Density) Townhomes (High Density) Townhomes (Medium Density)

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design Sun

nyd ale

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

re B o

.

Q St

.

P St

Beatty Road Multiplex

OS

h 8t

t.

P St.

.

St

Theater

eva

N St. 8th St

Ave .

1st

St.

Gen

MS

t.

R ou n

5th St.

3rd St

use Circ le

d

ho

K St.

Roundhou

INDUSTRIAL Light Industrial Renewable Energy Generation(R.E.G.) R.E.G. / Open Space Reserve

(J St.)

se Arc

2nd

H St.

ast)

INSTITUTIONAL Institutional OPEN SPACE Open Space U.S. 101

ue

vard oule re B sho Bay

E St.

E St.

est) 7th St. (W

F St.

Tunnel Aven

G St

7th St. (E

S t.

G St.

G St.

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

I St

L St.

Arena Parking

4th St.

J St.

M St.

7th St.

.

6th St.

Arena

L St

Ma in St.

COMMERCIAL Retail Arena Theater, Multiplex High-Rise Office Mid-Rise Office Office R & D - 1 Office R & D - 2 Hotels & Conference Ground Floor Retail Below Other Use

. 2nd S 2nd t. ( Wes t) St. ( Eas t)

sho Bay

S St

R St

.

Gen eva Ave nue

Ave

UPC Ownership Specific Plan Boundary

ay arkw ek P Cre

.

E St

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

C St.

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

B St.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

A St.

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Universal Paragon Corporation

4.2B LAND USE - ENTERTAINMENT VARIANT

N

0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

71

Table 4-2B: Land Use & Development Program - Entertainment Variant Percent of

Square Feet5

Acres

4,351,800

38.3

7.0%

16.9

3.4%

5,150,400

55.2

10.4%

Arena

630,100

13.4

2.5%

Theater

337,200

4.6

0.8%

71,000

1.7

0.3%

586,800

2.7

0.5%

Land Use Category

Land Use

Residential Residential Flats 3 (Units)

(3,950)

Residential Townhomes

2

(Units)

798,600 (484)

Non-Residential

Multiplex Hotels & Conference

1

(Hotel Rooms)

719

Retail

283,400

12.7

2.3%

Office

2,252,300

22.1

4.0%

R&D

2,599,200

83.7

15.3%

Institutional

110,800

8.9

1.6%

Existing Roundhouse

28,200 n/a

10.5

1.9%

6,899,027

160.2

29.2%

Open Space

169.7

31.0%

Streets

116.7

21.3%

Railroad R.O.W.

16.9

3.1%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

24.9

4.5%

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

4.8

0.9%

333.0

60.8%

547.6

100%

Light Industrial

Total Area4

12,049,400

Lagoon Area

135.6

Total Specific Plan Area

684.0

1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Based on 650 GSF per hotel room. Based on 1,100 GSF per unit. Based on 1,650 GSF per unit. Not including existing light industrial uses to be relocated: Sierra Point Lumber and Van Arsdale Lumber (Approx. 142,500 GSF) Structured parking is not included in building GSF or FAR calculations.

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


72

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.7

DISTRICT CONCEPT

The following discussion describes the intended land use in each of the Specific Plan Districts and the land use designations that will regulate them. The land use and additional use area designations were written to implement the overall concept for the Baylands while maintaining the flexibility needed to ensure feasible development. The land use description for each designation is supplemented with land use regulations (see Section 4.8), design guidelines (Section 4.9), and development standards (Section 4.10), tailored to the specific range of permitted uses.

The Roundhouse district includes stacked flats with residential over ground-floor retail, a streetcar, and a pedestrian-friendly environment.

4.7.1 Roundhouse District The Roundhouse District, located in the northwest corner of the Specific Plan area bounded by Bayshore Boulevard, Roundhouse Arc and the railroad. Roundhouse is the primary residential district within the Baylands. The district features nearly 80% of all of the residential acreage within the Baylands. Building typologies include mostly mid-to-high density residential buildings including stacked flats and high-density townhomes at the periphery near Bayshore Boulevard. Residential buildings front on the Promenade- a linear park that extends through the center of the distrct. The Roundhouse District includes also the Roundhouse Greenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the historical icon of the Baylands. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND

COMMERCIAL Retail High-Rise Office Mid-Rise Office Office R & D - 1 Office R & D - 2 Hotels & Conference Ground Floor Retail Below Other Use

Bay

sho

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

RESIDENTIAL 73 (High Density) 4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Flats Flats (Medium Density) Townhomes (High Density) Townhomes (Medium Density)

Beatty Road

Promenade

Gen eva Ave nue

East Geneva Roundhouse

INDUSTRIAL Light Industrial Renewable Energy Generation(R.E.G.) R.E.G. / Open Space Reserve

Triangle Park Central Plaza Roundhouse Green

Ma in St.

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

The Quad

OPEN SPACE Open Space UPC Ownership

Pk yon ann pe C dalu Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

ue

U.S. 101

Tunnel Aven

Icehouse

Visitacion Green (North)

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

Visitacion Creek Park (West)

INSTITUTIONAL Institutional

ark ek P

Specific Plan Boundary District Boundary

Way

reek on C t) taci Visi rk (Eas Pa Cre

South Visitacion Park

Ice House Hill

. way

Visitacion Green (South) Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Valley Dr.

Charter High School Community Use Area

Lagoon Way

Landscape Area Tank Perimeter

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

Lagoon Park

BRISBANE LAGOON

N 0

4.3 DISTRICT CONCEPT

350

700

1400 feet

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011 February 2011


74

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Roundhouse features the major mixed use pedestrian-oriented Main Street and neighborhood serving retail districts in the Baylands. These areas will encourage walkable streets with streetscapes and a diversity of architectural design. This district also includes retail and office. This district also corresponds to the highest concentration of transit facilities – both existing and proposed – namely, the MUNI light rail (T-Third Street), the Caltrain commuter train, SamTrans routes and the proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along Geneva Avenue which is planned to connect the future Candlestick/Hunter’s Point development to the Balboa Park BART Station.

4.7.2 East Geneva District The East Geneva District, located between the railroad and Sierra Point Parkway and north of Roundhouse Arc, is the primary commercial and office district that complements the residential character of Roundhouse. East Geneva contains over half of all retail areas within the Baylands, all of the high-rise office uses, in addition to a hotel and conference center. The majority of the district is dedicated to office uses, including high- and mid-rise office buildings. The primary open space feature is a 2.7-acre Central Plaza onto which the office buildings front that provides an animated public space for functions, festivals and passive recreation. Regional retail uses are located along Geneva Avenue. This retail concentration continues to a walkable retail corridor that extends southward perpendicular to Geneva and terminates into the Quad, the campus open space area to the south. As the commercial center of the Baylands, East Geneva will be a major activity center not only within the Baylands, but for Brisbane, San Francisco, and the Peninsula. The Entertainment Variant for land use allows for the inclusion of key entertainment facilities including an arena, mid-sized theater venue, and multiplex cinema. This land use variant also will accommodate an expanded hotel and conference center.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

75

4.7.3 Icehouse District Icehouse, located between Bayshore Boulevard, Roundhouse Arc and the railroad, is a multiuse district located south of the higher-density Roundhouse district. Consisting of mostly open space, Icehouse also incorporates residential, office/commercial, and institutional uses, in addition to renewable energy generation. In residential areas, the district features townhomes in a variety of formats organized around a fine-grained street pattern. These residential uses are buffered from the rail corridor to the east by a strip of ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) fields. Icehouse includes important open space resources, including Visitacion Creek Park (West) and Ice House Hill. Visitaction Creek Park, a broad, informal park, begins just south of Roundhouse Circle, extending south to Ice House Hill and east towards the Bay. Ice House Hill, a natural area located at the southern end of Icehouse that is a remnant of the original ridge system, is also an important component of the open space network. Trails may be included throughout this area, connecting the open space resources within this district to the overall pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Most of the institutional uses in the Baylands are located in Icehouse, including two school sites. An elementary school, located at the northern portion of Icehouse would front along

The Icehouse District features lower-density residential neighborhoods oriented towards public open space and views of San Bruno Mountain.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


76

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Visitacion Green Park (West) and Roundhouse Circle. The other—a proposed charter high schoollies south of Icehouse Hill at the southern boundary of the district.

4.7.4 Visitacion Green (North) District The area south of Roundhouse Arc east of Tunnel Avenue and west of the Bay is grouped collectively as the Visitacion Green Districts. They are divided into “North” and “South” areas by Visitacion Creek Park (East). The Visitacion Green North district is bounded by Roundhouse Arc to the north, Visitacion Creek Park (East) to the south, Tunnel Avenue and the train right-of-way to the west, and Sierra Point Parkway to the east. The district is predominated by campus R&D development including signature “campus” sites oriented along the Bay edge, while additional production and warehousing uses front on the railroad. This district also contains all of the light industrial uses within the Baylands. These uses are located between the railroad and Tunnel Avenue, incorporating the new location of the Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris facilities and the wastewater treatment/recycling facility.

The Visitacion Green (North) district balances office R&D buildings with a strong public open space system and pedestrian realm, and is situated to offer views of the San Francisco Bay.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

77

4.7.5 Visitacion Green (South) District Visitacion Green (South) is the southernmost district within the Baylands located closest to the Lagoon. As the termination of the gradual stepping down of densities, this district has the least amount of development at its lowest intensity. Over half of the land is retained as parks and open space, with an approximately 700-foot-wide open space area extending southward from Visitacion Creek Park (East) and meeting Lagoon Park. Development includes a few low-rise, campus R&D sites along the Bay edge and a small cluster of restaurant retail overlooking the Lagoon and Bay. Another feature of this district is an additional solar farm accommodating arrays of ground-mounted photovoltaic panels for solar energy generation, which forms a buffer along the eastern edge of the Kinder Morgan fuel storage facility. A portion of this strip will serve as a swing parcel for open space should the full area of solar panels not be utilized. Buildings within this district will be accessed by vehicular routes from the Sierra Point Parkway on the east side. Potential trail enhancements are provided within the broad southern park area that link with the overall trail and recreation network.

4.7.6 Lagoon The Lagoon area consists of both the aquatic portions of the Lagoon and the upland fringe. The entire district is designated as Open Space and is intended to preserve sensitive natural resources, provide new opportunities for passive recreation, contribute to the character and identity of the Baylands, and enhance the entry experience to downtown Brisbane. The area bounded by the realigned Lagoon Way on the north, Sierra Point Parkway on the east, and the railroad tracks on the west would become a public park accommodating passive recreational activities while protecting and enhancing the Lagoon and tidal marsh habitat. The upland area at the north end of the Lagoon will be the primary recreation area and may include facilities such as picnic areas, informal turf areas, multi-use paths, viewing platforms, boardwalks interpretive features, a non-motorized craft storage and launching facility, restrooms, and parking. A proposed Lagoon Nature Center, to be located in this area, would provide the City of Brisbane with community meeting space. Improvements in other areas of the park generally would be restricted to low-impact trails, landscaping, seating, and overlooks.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


78

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Table 4-3: Land Use Program by District

Visitacion Green (North)

Visitacion Green (South)

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Residential

43

49%

77%

Retail

1

1%

5%

Office/ Commercial

4

5%

4%

Parks & Open Space*

8

9%

4%

Rights-of-Way

31

36%

23%

Sub-Total

87

100%

13%

Retail

11

12%

56%

Office/ Commercial

45

49%

37%

Light Industrial

1

1%

9%

Parks & Open Space*

5

6%

3%

Rights-of-Way

30

33%

22%

Sub-Total

92

100%

13%

Residential

13

11%

23%

Office/ Commercial

11

9%

9%

Institutional

9

8%

100%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

6

5%

25%

Parks & Open Space*

57

50%

34%

Rights-of-Way

18

16%

13%

Sub-Total

113

100%

17%

Office/ Commercial

43

38%

36%

Light Industrial

10

8%

91%

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

5

4%

100%

Parks & Open Space*

32

29%

19%

Rights-of-Way

23

20%

17%

Sub-Total

113

100%

17%

7

6%

39%

Retail Office/ Commercial

19

17%

15%

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

19

17%

75%

Parks & Open Space*

53

47%

31%

Rights-of-Way

15

13%

11%

113

100%

16%

13

6%

Sub-Total †

Lagoon (Upland )

Parks & Open Space* (Upland)

2%

Total Upland† Development Area (Including Lagoon Park)

531

78%

Railroad Right-of-Way (Upland†)

17

2%

548

80%

Total Upland Area Lagoon

Upland area includes the Roundhouse, East Geneva, Icehouse, and Visitacion Green (North and South) land use districts, the Lagoon Park, and the railroad right-of-way. Total right-of-way is 148 acres.

Percent of Total Land Use

Roundhouse

Icehouse

Percent of District Land Area

Land Use Category

East Geneva

* The 169.7 acres of parks and open space referred to elsewhere in the text include designated recreation and habitat areas in the upland area. Additionally, there are 25.6 acres of landscaped areas within development sites and 11 acres of Lagoon Perimeter (not included in the Upland area), totalling 196.6 acres.

Acres

District

Total Specific Plan Area

Open Area

11

7%

n/a

Open Water

111

74%

n/a

Rights-of-Way

14

9%

2%

Sub-Total

136

100%

20%

684

100%


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.8

79

LAND USE REGULATIONS

The land use regulations in this Specific Plan are intended to reflect and implement the overall land use concept and goals and to establish a clear regulatory framework for approving future development in the Baylands area. Goal 4.6

A mix of complementary land uses that contributes to the creation of socially vital and commercially viable centers of activity that serve both local and regional needs.

Goal 4.7

Land use regulations that provide clear direction while providing flexibility and supporting streamlined development approvals.

Table 4-4 indicates the land use regulations for each Specific Plan land use designation. The regulations for each designation are identified by the letters “P,” “C,” and “PG.” The letter “P” identifies permitted uses; “C” identifies uses upon which conditions may be imposed during the Design Plan review process (refer to Section 8.3.6 Development Approvals), and “PG” refers to uses that may be permitted in the ground-floor only. The letter “I” identifies interim land uses that are allowed prior to the buildout of the Planning Area or redevelopment of parcels with uses identified as “P,” “C,” or “PG.” A Temporary Use (TU) Permit, as defined in this Specific Plan, is required for interim uses not identified as “I” uses; The TU Permit process will supersede Section 17.41 of the Zoning Code (Interim uses in the Baylands Subarea). Use classifications for permanent uses not listed in Table 4-4 are generally prohibited (see Policy 4-2), as are uses that are addressed with “--” rather than an aforementioned code. Appendix C includes definitions of the use classifications. Policy 4-1

Land uses in the Baylands will be guided by the use regulations of this Specific Plan and will be subject to a Baylands Planned Unit Development (PUD) Permit or a Temporary Use Permit (TU) process that provides for administrative approval of all permitted uses.

Policy 4-2

In order to allow for possible omissions or the introduction of new land uses over time, uses that are not identified in the Specific Plan use regulations but are consistent with Specific Plan goals and the identified development character may be considered as conditional uses. Such uses will be regulated in the same manner as the existing use classification into which the new use is integrated.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


80

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Table 4-4: Use Regulations by Land Use Designation Uses

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

INDUSTRIAL

Office R & D - 1

Office R & D - 2

Hotels & Conference

Light Industrial

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

R.E.G./ Open Space Reserve

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

Institutional

Open Space

Not permitted

Mid-Rise Office

--

High-Rise Office

Permitted in Entertainment Variant

Theater. Multiplex

E

Arena

Permitted as GroundFloor Use

Retail

PG

Townhomes (Medium Density)

Conditional Use Townhomes (High Density)

Permitted Use

C

Flats (Medium Density)

P

Flats (High Density)

Key:

PG

PG

--

--

PG

--

--

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

C

--

Public & Semi-Public uses Clubs or lodges Colleges, public or private

--

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

C

--

C

--

--

--

P

--

Cultural institutions

PG

PG

--

--

P

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

--

--

--

--

C

C

Day care

PG

PG

--

--

C

--

--

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

C

--

Educational research and development

PG

PG

--

--

P

C

C

P

P

P

P

--

C

--

--

--

C

C

Exhibition/Convention center

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

Golf Course

--

--

--

--

I

--

--

--

--

I

I

I

--

I

C

I

--

P

Government offices and facilities

PG

PG

--

--

--

C

C

C

C

P

P

C

C

--

--

--

C

--

Non-motorized craft launching and storage facility

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

C

Parks and recreation

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

C

C

--

P

Religious institutions

C

C

C

C

P

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

P

--

Alcoholic beverage sales

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

PG

PG

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

Animal sales and services

--

--

--

--

P

--

--

--

--

C

C

--

--

--

C

--

--

C

Automobile/vehicle sales and services

--

--

--

--

C

--

--

--

--

C

C

--

C

--

--

--

--

--

Banks and other financial institutions (including ATMs)

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

PG

PG

PG

--

--

--

--

--

--

Building materials sales and services

--

--

--

--

I

I

I

I

I

C

C

--

P

--

--

--

--

I

Business services

PG

PG

--

--

P

C

C

PG

PG

PG

PG

PG

PG

--

--

--

--

--

- Full service

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

P

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

C

- Limited service

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

P

P

P

--

--

--

--

C

C

- With live entertainment

--

--

--

--

P

P

P

C

C

--

--

C

--

--

--

--

--

C

- With outdoor seating

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

C

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

C

Food and beverage sales

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

P

P

P

--

--

--

--

C

C

Commercial uses

Eating and drinking establishments

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

81

Table 4-4: Use Regulations by Land Use Designation Uses

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

INDUSTRIAL

Flats (High Density)

Flats (Medium Density)

Townhomes (High Density)

Townhomes (Medium Density)

Retail

Arena

Theater. Multiplex

High-Rise Office

Mid-Rise Office

Office R & D - 1

Office R & D - 2

Hotels & Conference

Light Industrial

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

R.E.G./ Open Space Reserve

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

Institutional

Open Space

Key:

Home improvement sales and services

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

PG

PG

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

Hotels

C

C

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

Laboratory, commercial

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

P

P

C

C

--

--

C

--

--

Maintenance and repair services

--

--

--

--

C

--

--

--

--

--

C

--

P

--

--

--

--

--

Offices

PG

PG

--

--

P

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

--

--

--

--

C

--

Parking facilities

C

C

I

I

C

P

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

I

--

I

C

C

Personal instructional services

PG

PG

--

--

P

--

P

PG

PG

PG

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Personal services

PG

PG

--

--

P

--

--

PG

PG

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

P

Permitted Use

C

Conditional Use

PG

Permitted as GroundFloor Use

E

Permitted in Entertainment Variant --

Not permitted

Recreation and entertainment

--

--

--

--

C

P

P

C

C

--

--

PG

--

--

C

--

C

C

Retail sales

PG

PG

--

--

P

P

P

PG

PG

C

C

PG

--

--

--

--

--

--

Arena

--

--

--

--

C

P

C

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Multiplex/ Cinema

--

--

--

--

C

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Theater

--

--

--

--

C

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Entertainment uses

Industrial uses Concrete Recycling

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

Production

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

P

P

--

P

--

--

--

--

--

Research and development

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

P

--

--

--

--

--

Soil and Rock Processing

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

Warehousing and storage

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

C

P

--

P

--

--

--

I

I

Wholesaling and distribution

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

C

P

--

P

--

--

--

--

--

Duplexes

P

P

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Multi-family Apartments

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Stacked Flats

P

P

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Single-family Attached

--

--

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Single-family Detached

--

--

--

C

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Townhomes

P

P

P

P

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Residential uses

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Table 4-4: Use Regulations by Land Use Designation

Institutional

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

Light Industrial

Hotels & Conference

Office R & D - 2

Office R & D - 1

Not permitted

Mid-Rise Office

--

High-Rise Office

Permitted in Entertainment Variant

Theater. Multiplex

E

Arena

Permitted as GroundFloor Use

Retail

PG

Townhomes (High Density)

Conditional Use Flats (Medium Density)

Permitted Use

C

Flats (High Density)

P

Townhomes (Medium Density)

Key:

Open Space

INDUSTRIAL

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

R.E.G./ Open Space Reserve

Uses

Transportation, Communication, and Utilities Commercial Parking

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

Communications facilities

--

--

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

C

Energy Storage

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

Ground-mounted Photovoltaic Array

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

P

P

I

I

I

Renewable Power Generation*

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

P

P

C

C

--

Transmission towers

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

- Transportation passenger terminals

PG

PG

--

--

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

--

--

--

--

--

Wastewater Treatment/ Recycling

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

P

--

--

Utilities, minor

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Transportation facilities

* The use of solar panels on rooftops or integrated into structures may be permitted by right, but will be subject to design review as part of overall design review process. See Sections 4.10.1 and 4.11. Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

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4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N 0

4.4 ILLUSTRATIVE PLAN

83

350

700

1400 feet

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.9 PRINCIPLES OF URBAN DESIGN The following principles illustrate the overarching principles for building and site design throughout the Baylands. 1) Expression of unique natural setting. Development is designed to respond to the natural setting that makes the Baylands unique. Land uses are situated so that buildings may capture views and that recreation is interlaced with natural amenities.

2) Concentrated density linked with transit Central to the design of the Baylands Specific Plan is the concentration of development close to existing and proposed transit links. This includes both residential and commercial development, both which will benefit from the convenience of accessible transit. Further to the south, density drops down to respect the natural ecology with land uses that are more suitable to this setting.

3) Active and pedestrian-friendly streets, frontages, and destinations. Creating active streets and destinations is accomplished through the coordination of building design and land use. Places to live, work, and shop, and inand outdoor entertainment that are located in close proximity will produce regular activity, while building frontages, scale, and streetscapes will address the street and encourage a comfortable and welcoming street environment.

4) Sustainability in all forms Sustainable design in every form informs the development strategy of the Baylands. This unites all scales of sustainability: compact development with links to transit; the incorporation of natural stormwater strategies in streets and open space; green building standards, on-site power generation, and site design that preserves the natural environment.

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5) Quality and diversity in design The Baylands will become a special place to live and work not only because of its unique setting but because of the distinctive buildings that will shape its appearance. To achieve distinction in design, development guidelines ensure that architecture is high-quality, distinctive, and various design styles are to be used for different blocks, which will contribute to variety in the private realm.

6) Streets with unique senses of place Street environments are impacted by scale, building design, land use, and the presence of various modes of transportation. Within the Baylands there is a hierarchy of streets created to respond to various adjacencies and create different experiences. These are reinforced by varying sidewalk and setback widths, bike lanes, building heights, and park frontages. Building, street furniture, and landscaped elements further encourage diversity among streets.

Tuck-under Parking

7) De-emphasizing vehicles and parking. As a development that will feature strong elements of transit and pedestrian orientation, personal vehicles and private parking will play a lesser role. Parking will be designed to be tucked under both townhouse units and high-rise residential buildings in addition to office and commercial uses. Parking structures will be designed to allow for sharing between different land uses. Entrances to parking garages and structures will be located on secondary streets to reserve the primary street frontage for an enhanced public realm.

8) Response to specific technical characteristics. The physical setting of the Baylands includes topographical variation produced as a combination of historic alignments, transportation routes, land alteration, and existing drainage. This produces challenges in building and site design that will yield innovation in architecture and engineering, while maintaining the overarching design goals of the Baylands vision. Bi-level Building Frontages at Geneva Boulvard.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10 DESIGN GUIDELINES AND DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS To ensure that the distinctive, high quality development envisioned for the Baylands is achieved, design guidelines and development standards have been tailored to the specific uses and areas proposed for development. The design guidelines and development standards are organized by district and the building types and land use designations that are predominantly located within that district. These are presented according to district in the sections that follow (Sections 4.10.1 through 4.10.5). Table 4.5 provides a guide to the regulations that follow. Specific Plan development standards will function as requirements that must be implemented by future projects. Design guidelines will function as recommendations that provide more general design direction whose intent must be fulfilled, but whose realization is flexible and can be achieved in more than one way. Both the standards and the guidelines are intended to inform the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design review and development approval process. In the following sections, each land use designation begins with a general statement of design intent, followed by design guidelines that provide general direction on how to achieve the desired development character, followed by development standards tables that set forth specific development requirements. The guidelines and standards each address, as applicable, development intensity, lot size, setbacks, building height, design character, building materials, parking and loading, signage, and landscaping. While standards generally cannot be waived except as provided for in Section 8.3.6, the guidelines will be applied and reviewed on a case-by-case basis during the design review process that will be required as part of the Baylands Design Plan Review process (refer to Section 8.3.6: Development Approvals). To illustrate the concepts embodied in the development standards and design guidelines, prototypical sections and predecent photos are included for each land use designation. Additionally, each district discussion includes an aerial massing view demonstrating prototypical build-out. These illustrations show an example of how the design guidelines and development standards could be realized. Similarly, an overall illustrative plan (Figure 4.4) shows how the build-out of the entire project might occur. It is important to note that these graphic representations are conceptual and illustrative in nature and do not have a regulatory function. The section contains a combination of required standards and recommended guidelines appropriate for the various building types provided. Terms are defined in Appendix D: Glossary.

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4.5 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS KEY LAND USE DISTRICT

SECTION

PAGE

ROUNDHOUSE RESIDENTIAL: Flats (High Density)

4.10.2

94

RESIDENTIAL: Flats (Medium Density)

4.10.2

95

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density)

4.10.4

109-110

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

COMMERCIAL: Single-Use Retail

4.10.2

96

COMMERCIAL: Retail

4.10.3

100

COMMERCIAL: High-Rise Office

4.10.3

101

COMMERCIAL: Mid-Rise Office

4.10.3

102

COMMERCIAL: Hotels & Conference

4.10.3

103

COMMERCIAL: Multiplex/ Cinema

4.10.3

105

COMMERCIAL: Theater

4.10.3

106

COMMERCIAL: Arena

4.10.3

107

EAST GENEVA

ICEHOUSE RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density)

4.10.4

109-110

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (Medium Density)

4.10.4

111

INSTITUTIONAL: Institutional

4.10.4

INDUSTRIAL: Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)9

113 n/a9

VISITACION GREEN NORTH COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

4.10.6

119

INDUSTRIAL: Light Industrial10

4.10.5

116

INDUSTRIAL: Wastewater Treatment / Recycling11

4.10.5

117

VISITACION GREEN SOUTH COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

4.10.6

119 n/a9

INDUSTRIAL: Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.) INDUSTRIAL: R.E.G./ Open Space Reserve

See R.E.G. or Open Space

COMMERCIAL: Single-Use Retail

4.10.2

OPEN SPACE: Open Space

96

See Chapter 5: Conservation & Open Space

Notes: 9 Design standards associated with the renewable energy land use will be subject to a separate approval process. 10 The development of the Light Industrial uses will be negotiated as part of the anticipated relocation of the Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris Lumber companies. 11 Design standards associated with the wastewater treatment/ water recycling facility will be subject to a separate approval process.

Figure 4.5 shows the allowable maximum building heights for the plan area. Each specific district section further elaborates on these height standards as well as the other development standards associated with the various land uses. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.1 Overall Design Guidelines High-quality design is a priority for all development in the Baylands. Design guidelines ensure that future development meets the standards and principles set forth. The following design elements, illlustrated below, are key aspects of successful building design. All future development in each land use area should comply with these principles. When a greater degree of specification is appropriate, it is so indicated in the tables that correspond to each land use.

Building Articulation The street walls defining urban blocks shall be articulated to create rhythm and variety, achieving a fine-grained pattern to the urban fabric. Articulations in building massing are achieved with projections, recesses and notches, bay windows, balconies, roof overhands, and step-backs.

Transparency The facade of a building shall be appropriately transparent at ground level to allow active ground floor uses, such as retail, commercial or community uses, to be visible from the street.

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Roofs Roof design should be compatible with the building design and articulation, emphasizing color, form, materials. Rooftop mechanical equipment should be screened. Roofs should incorporate opportunities for solar panels (PV or solar hotwater). Roof design should facilitate stormwater management and the reduction of stormwater runoff. Flat roofs should incorporate open space and planting bed opportunities.

Fenestration Fenestration, also called window patterns, should be well-proportioned to the building, varied to achieve diversity in architecture, and provide adequate light and air to interiors.

Entrances Entrances should be welldesigned, appropriatelyscaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

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Materials Materials should be high quality with textures and colors that further accentuate building design. Material changes should relate to building massing.

Signage Signage should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance the public realm.

Parking Private parking must be onparcel with entrances prohibited on primary streets. Visitor parking is accommodated on street. Podium or structured parking should be wrapped with active uses, not exposed to the street. Parking ratios are established for each use per square footage or dwelling unit. Parking standards for Retail, and Mid- and High-Rise Office uses are based on proximity to transit. Distances are from transit station entrance to building entrance, considering access to MUNI T-Third and BRT, and Caltrain.

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Canopies and Awnings Canopies and awnings should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design. Canopies and awning may project up to 4’ into the public right-of-way. They should provide at least allow 8’ clearance below.

Porches, Stoops and Bay Windows Stoops, overhangs, bay windows and balconies are encourage to animate the streetscape and give human-scaled articulation to the building designs. They should be incorporated into the design of the overall building and landscape. Projections up to 3’ may occur in the public rightof-way that are no more than 12’ wide and allow 8’ clearance below. (In process) Canopies and awning may project up to 4’ into the public right-of-way. They should provide at least allow 8’ clearance below.

Bay Windows

Porches and Balconies

Front Stoops

Width: Up to 12’ Depth: May project into the public right of way up to 3’ Clearance: At least 8’ underneath where they project into the public right-of-way

Width: No limit Depth: Balconies may project into the public right of way up to 3’ Clearance: At least 8’ underneath where they project into the public right-of-way

Width: no limit Depth: May not project into the public right of way

Source: WRT - Solomon ETC, 2010.

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LEGEND

92

No New Buildings 25’ 25 - 35’ 35 - 45’ 45 - 55’ 55 - 70’ 90’ 125’ 150’ 160’ UPC Ownership

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

sho

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

Bay

Beatty Road

Gen eva Ave nue

Heights in Entertainment Variant may differ; see Inset

Specific Plan Boundary

Ma in St.

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

ue

U.S. 101

Tunnel Aven

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

ay rkw

a ek P Cre

. way

Ice House Hill

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

Valley Dr.

BRISBANE LAGOON

ENTERTAINMENT VARIANT Beatty Road

Multiplex: up to 90’ Theater: up to 125’

Arena: up to 150’

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N 0

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

4.5 BUILDING HEIGHTS

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.2

93

Roundhouse

Roundhouse is the primary residential district within the Baylands. Building typologies include mostly mid-to-high density residential building, including stacked flats and highdensity townhomes at the periphery near Roundhouse Arc Road. Residential buildings front on the Promenade—a linear park that extends through the center of the district. Roundhouse also includes Roundhouse Green. Design guidelines are created to address the diverse features of the Roundhouse district, including the mixed-use pedestrian-oriented Geneva Avenue, the neighborhood-serving retail district, and transit facilities. Land Uses, Building Typologies, and Frontage Conditions: Land Use

Section

Page

RESIDENTIAL: Flats (High Density)

4.10.2

94

RESIDENTIAL: Flats (Medium Density)

4.10.2

95

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density)

4.10.4

109-110

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

COMMERCIAL: Single-Use Retail

4.10.2

96

Flats – Medium Density

Flats – Medium Density

Promenade Park Flats – High Density

Retail

Office R&D 1

Townhomes – High Density

Roundhouse

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.2 - A

RESIDENTIAL: Flats – High Density Property Line 8-story building at designated corners Continuous 6-story buildings along Geneva Stacked flats Projecting bay windows and/or balconies Residential courtyard over parking podium Ground floor retail 1-2 levels of structured parking

Description High Density stacked flats are the proposed use for the blocks fronting on Geneva Avenue. These high density buildings will feature ground floor retail and an active pedestrian environment. They range from a minimum of 4 stories to a maximum of 8 stories at key corners. Units and potential towers will be situated around podiums with structured parking below. Density ranges from 60 to 95 dwelling units per acre (DU/Ac) net.

High Density stacked flats with ground floor retail, along multimodal transit street. (85-125 DU/Ac net shown in photo at right)

Required Heights

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Required • 45’ to 70’ typical range • Up to 90’ at 4 tower locations along Geneva at 2nd Street • Up to 125’ at 2 tower locations along Geneva between 5th Street and Caltrain R.O.W. (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Retail, commercial of flex space required on Geneva

Recommended

F.A.R.

2.0 - 4.0

Building Articulation

Facade articulation of 5 ft. at intervals of 80 ft maximum required

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. on Geneva • 65% min. Typical

Transparency

At least 60% ground floor retail should be transparent.

Setbacks

• 0’ at ground floor retail • 6’ on 40’ Residential Streets • 8’ Typical • 8’-12’ on Promenade •12’ on Bayshore Blvd

Entrances

Should be well-designed, appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Projections

Bulk Controls

10% bulk reduction above 70 feet.

Parking Spaces

1 per dwelling unit + 1 space per 1,000 s.f. ground floor retail.

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Parking Location

Structured parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited on primary streets.

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.2 - B

95

RESIDENTIAL: Flats – Medium Density

3 or 4-story buildings along 40’ wide streets

5-story buildings along 68’ wide Streets

Residential courtyard over1-2 levels of structured parking podium

Property Line 6-story building along designated streets Stacked flats Projecting bay windows and/or balconies Ground floor retail along neighborhood retail street. Otherwise ground floor residential.

Description The majority of the stacked flat building types within the Baylands are Medium-density stacked flats. They range from 4 to 6 stories, plus a pair of narrow 8 story (90’) towers along Geneva. The buildings sit atop and around podiums with structured parking below. Ground floor retail is required along Geneva and P Street to establish the pedestrian-oriented shopping district in this area. Buildings will address the Promenade open space with articulation, massing and entrances oriented towards the space. Density ranges from 45 to 70 dwelling units per acre (DU/Ac) net.

Required

Medium density stacked flats with ground floor neighborhood serving retail. (50-55 DU/Ac net shown in photo at left)

Recommended

Heights

• 45’ to 70’ typical range (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

Building Articulation

Facade articulation of 5 ft. at intervals of 80 ft maximum required.

F.A.R.

2.0 - 3.5

Transparency

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. Typical • 65% min. on 40’ residential

At least 60% ground floor retail should be transparent.

Entrances

Setbacks

• 0’ at ground floor retail • 6’ on 40’ Residential Streets • 8’ Typical • 8’-12’ on Promenade •12’ on Bayshore Blvd

Should be well-designed, appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Projections

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Bulk Controls

15% bulk reduction above 70 feet.

Parking Spaces

1 per dwelling unit + 2.5 per 1,000 s.f. ground floor retail

Parking Location

Structured parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited on primary streets.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Retail required on Neighborhood Retail Street DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


96

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.2 - C

COMMERCIAL: Single Use Retail

1-2-story building with high ceilings heights; up to 40’

Property Line Tower element along Geneva

Skylights delivering natural light to center of large floor-plate building

Awnings along Geneva Surface parking behind building with trees and landscaping

Description Single Use retail is allowed within the Roundhouse district on the corner of Bayshore Boulevard and Geneva Boulevard. The purpose of this retail location is to draw visitors into the Baylands and continue along to the retail destinations on Geneva. The parcel will accommodate up to a 40,000 s.f. grocery store and complimentary in-line retail uses.. The building shall be designed to complement the pedestrian environment of Geneva.

Required

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Recommended

Heights

See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

0.4 - 1.25

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. on Geneva • 65% min. Typical

Setbacks

• 0’ at Geneva

Bulk Controls

None

Parking Spaces

3:1,000 s.f.

Parking Location

Entrances prohibited on Geneva Boulevard.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Retail required

Building Articulation

Facade articulation of 5 ft. at intervals of 80 ft maximum required. Should have a tower of other major vertical element, which may exceed height limit.

Transparency

At least 40% transparency recommended on Geneva.

Entrances

Should be well-designed, appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.


97

4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Neighborhood Retail Street MUNI T-Third Line extension Transit Plaza & Station Overcrossing

Building articulation

Special massing/taller feature at corner

Residential open area atop parking podum

Ground-floor retail along Geneva

Podium parking adjacent to train right-of-way

6-story stacked flats along Geneva

High Density Flats Intermodal station Tower Elements forming Gateway Street trees on both sides of the street (typical)

Bus Rapid Transit at center of Geneva Geneva elevated at Caltrain Crossing

Townhomes fronting onto common open space

Caltrain

Rear yard

Building mass steps up to follow site grading

Parking podium access

Source: WRT - Solomon ETC, 2010. Tunnel Avenue

Figure 4.6: The Roundhouse District This diagram illustrates the potential build-out and character of the Roundhouse District, street types and character, the location of parking for stacked flats and townhomes, the location of key links to transit, and orientation of buildings to the street.

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Proposed Development All 4 blocks are developed with Stacked Flats, following height and massing guidelines

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

8-story corner tower at designated locations Parking podium with landscaped courtyard above Unit access 40’ Residential Streets

Notches subdivide building massing

Alternative Development Option 1 Stacked Flats line major streets and townhomes line minor streets

6 stories buildings along major streets and open spaces 3-4-story stacked flats along minor (40’) streets

5 stories along 68’ Street

8-story corner tower at designated locations

Parking podium with landscaped courtyard above Podium parking access for Flats & Townhomes

5-6 stories buildings along major streets and open spaces

Unit access

3-story townhomes, with rear gardens, lining minor (40’) street Notches subdivide building massing

Alternative Development Option 2

8-story corner tower at designated locations

Portal over rear-parking access

Parking podium with landscaped courtyard above

Stacked Flats line wide rightsof-way. Townhomes line minor streets and extend to block perimeters along major streets.

40’ Residential Streets Mid-block open space Front access to townhomes Tuck-under townhomes

4-5-story building

Source: WRT - Solomon ETC, 2010.

Figure 4.7 Development of Residential Flats Blocks

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

In order to achieve the diversity in the built environment, the design guidelines and development regulations allow for various approaches for the development of urban blocks. This includes various combinations of low and mid rise apartment buildings and townhomes, complemented by various parking strategies. The Proposed Development, below, is slightly more dense than the Development Options 1 and 2.


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.3

99

East Geneva

The East Geneva District is the primary commercial and office district in the Baylands. East Geneva contains over half of all retail areas within the Baylands and all of the highrise office uses, in addition to a hotel and conference center. The majority of the district is dedicated to office uses, including high and mid-rise and office R&D buildings. Central Plaza, located at center of the district, may include recreational areas and a concert pavilion. Land Uses, Building Typologies, and Frontage Conditions: Land Use

Section

Page

COMMERCIAL: Retail

4.10.3

100

COMMERCIAL: High-Rise Office

4.10.3

101

COMMERCIAL: Mid-Rise Office

4.10.3

102

COMMERCIAL: Hotels & Conference

4.10.3

103

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

Neighborhood Retail

Regional Retail

Destination Retail along 7th Street

High-Rise Office

High-Rise Office

Hotel

Office R&D 1

Central Plaza

Structured Parking

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


100

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.3 - A

COMMERCIAL: Retail Property Line Mid-rise office Tower element along Geneva 2-3 story building with high floors Awnings along Geneva Structured parking beneath building Geneva Ave raised on bridge at railroad crossing

Vehicle access to structured parking at grade level Possible Parking under Geneva

Description Retail and commercial land uses are featured north of Geneva Avenue. This land use will support multiple forms of retail development, from medium to large box national retailers to ground floor retail on Geneva Boulevard. This development will serve a local and regional market.

Recommended

Required Heights

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

See Figure 4.5 Heights

Building Articulation

Facades fronting on primary streets should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and enhance public realm.

F.A.R.

0.4 - 1.25

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. on Geneva • 65% min. Typical

Transparency

Setbacks

• 15’-30’ Typical • 0’ at Geneva

At least 50% ground floor retail should be transparent.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Parking Spaces, per 1000 sf

Dist. to Trans.

1/4 mile

1/2 mile

+1/2 mile

Retail

2.5

3.0

3.5

Parking Location

Behind building. Structured or surface parking. Parking must be on parcel with access prohibited from Geneva.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial / Retail only. Office uses allowed on upper floors.


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.3 - B

101

COMMERCIAL: High-Rise Office Property Line

Mechanical penthouse (does not count against building height limit)

6-9 story building, as per the height limit diagram; step back above 70’

Landscaped podium above structured parking

1-2 levels of structured parking Building massing at “zero” setback from property line Double height ground floor retail space with mezzanine along both sides of retail main street, locations per the land use plan

Description High-rise office development will form the core of the East Geneva district with the greatest amount of development intensity and activity at ground level. Buildings will support commercial offices on upper stories while ground-floor retail will anchor the Retail Main Street that runs through the center of the district.

Required

Required Heights

Ground Floor Use

See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

2.25 - 3.50

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. on Geneva • 65% min. Typical

Setbacks

• 15’-30’ Typical • 0’ at Geneva • 0’ on Retail Main Street (7th Street)

Bulk Controls

10% bulk reduction above 70 feet

Parking Spaces, per 1000 sf

Dist. to Trans.

1/4 mile

1/2 mile

+1/2 mile

Retail

2.5

3.0

3.5

Office

2.0

2.5

3.0

Commercial only. Ground-floor retail required on Geneva & Retail Main Street (7th Street).

Recommended

Parking Location

Structured parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited on Geneva.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Building Articulation

Facades fronting on primary streets should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and enhance public realm.

Transparency

At least 50% transparency recommended on Geneva & Retail Main Street.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


102

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.3 - C

COMMERCIAL: Mid-Rise Office

Mechanical penthouse (does not count against building height limit) Landscaped podium above structured parking Property Line 3-4 story building along minor streets

4-5 story building Prominent entrance canopy/ feature Landscaped setback Open space location per the site plan

Description The Mid-Rise Office land use will feature commercial offices on upper stories with ground-floor retail on the ground floor on Geneva Boulevard and the Retail Main Street. This land use forms a transition between the most intense commercial development at the center of Geneva East to the lower-rise Office R&D uses at the southern end of the district and into Visitacion Green North. In the Entertainment Variant, this land use extends further south.

Required Heights

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Recommended See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

2.0 - 3.0

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% min. on Geneva • 65% min. Typical

Setbacks

• 15’-30’ Typical • 0’ at Geneva • 0’ on Retail Main Street (7th Street)

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Parking Spaces, per 1000 sf

Dist. to Trans.

1/4 mile

1/2 mile

+1/2 mile

Retail

2.5

3.0

3.5

Office

2.0

2.5

3.0

Parking Location

Structured parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited on Geneva.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only. Retail required on Geneva & Retail Main Street (7th Street).

Building Articulation

Facades fronting on primary streets should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and enhance public realm.

Transparency

At least 50% transparency recommended on Geneva & Retail Main Street.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to identify retail and/or mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.3 - D

103

COMMERCIAL: Hotel & Conference

Description A Hotel and Conference land use is included in East Geneva to serve the local and regional business and tourism community. The Entertainment Variant allows for a greater amount of hotel and conference space. This use is situated along Sierra Point Parkway and the Bay in order to facilitate access and capture views of the natural setting. Height will be concentrated on the north side of the block, to maximize views to the Bay.

Mechanical penthouse (does not count against building height limit) Building massing stepback with projecting balconies (not required)

Double height ground floor lobby and amenity space with mezzanine Prominent entrance canopy or feature

12-16 story building, 160’ as per the height limit diagram Hotel rooms Multiple levels of structured parking, as required Landscaped amenity podium above structured parking Facade screening at structured parking

15’ building massing setback from property line Open space location per the site plan

Required Heights

Recommended Up to 160’ with 40’ podium (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

F.A.R.

2.0 - 5.50

Streetwall Coverage

90%

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

Transparency

Ground floor should have high degree of transparency to highlight ground floor uses.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Setbacks

15’-30’

Bulk Controls

10% bulk reduction above 90 feet

Parking Spaces

1 per room 1 per 1,000 s.f. for other uses

Canopies & Awnings

Parking Location

Structured parking on upper floor levels, with facade screening

Should identify retail and/or entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


104

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.3 - V

East Geneva Entertainment Variant

The East Geneva District is the primary commercial and office district in the Baylands with a range of retail options to draw a regional market. A variant is proposed for East Geneva to include over 1 million square feet of destination-oriented entertainment uses. (See Table 4.2B - Entertainment Variant). This will augment the regional-serving retail uses and high- and mid-rise office uses proposed in East Geneva and add to the regional draw of the Baylands. Land Uses, Building Typologies, and Frontage Conditions: Land Use

Section

Page

COMMERCIAL: Multiplex/ Cinema

4.10.3

105

COMMERCIAL: Theater

4.10.3

106

COMMERCIAL: Arena

4.10.3

107

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

Multiplex Conference Hotel Theater

Arena Central Plaza

Arena Parking Structured Parking Office R & D 1

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.3 - E

105

COMMERCIAL: Multiplex / Cinema Property Line Dynamic building massing or giant signage element along Geneva Sloped cinema Pedestrian access and awnings along Geneva Structured parking beneath building Geneva Ave raised on bridge at railroad crossing Vehicle access to structured parking at grade level Possible parking under Geneva

Description The Entertainment Variant will allow for a 10-screen multiplex, or movie cinema, of approximately 71,000 s.f. to be built north of Geneva in the retail district. This use will front onto Geneva and further animate the pedestrian life of the entertainment hub. Parking will be accommodated on-parcel in structured parking beneath or behind the multiplex building. Parking is accessed from 8th Street or Beatty Road.

Required

Recommended

Heights

Up to 90’ (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

F.A.R.

0.4 - 1.25

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% on Geneva • 50% on remaining streets

Setbacks

• 0’ at Geneva • 15’-30’ Typical

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Parking Spaces

3.3 per 1,000 s.f. 2.5 per 1,000 s.f. ground floor retail or other uses

Parking Location

Structured parking onparcel, beneath or behind the building. Shared parking may be utilized if feasible.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

Transparency

Transparency should activate ground floor while remaining consistent with function of building.

Building Material

Should be high quality with textures and colors that further articulate building design and function.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should identify retail and/or entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

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106

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.3 - F

COMMERCIAL: Theater

Roof massing up to 125’ Property line Stepback at 90’ 20’ min.

Dynamic building massing or giant signage element along Geneva Theatre seating Atrium / entry lobby Arena promenade with pedestrian access from Geneva Service areas beneath main entry level, possibly including parking Stage Sloped theater floor

Description The Entertainment Variant will allow for an 5,500 seat mid-sized theater venue, of approximately 337,000 s.f., to be built north of Geneva in the retail district. This use will front onto Geneva and further animate the pedestrian life of the entertainment hub. Parking will be accommodated on-parcel in structured parking below the theater and in shared parking arrangements with other entertainment/retail destinations.

Required

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Recommended

Heights

• Up to 90’ at front 20’. Up to 125’ after front stepback. (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

F.A.R.

1.0 - 3.0

Transparency

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% on Geneva • 65% on remaining streets

Transparency should activate facade and ground floor while remaining consistent with function of building.

Setbacks

• 0’ at Geneva • 15’-30’ Typical

Building Material

Should be high quality with textures and colors that further articulate building design and function.

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Entrances

Parking Spaces

2.0 per 1,000 s.f. 2.5 per 1,000 s.f. ground floor retail or other uses

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Parking Location

Structured parking onparcel, beneath or behind the building. Shared parking may be utilized if feasible.

Canopies & Awnings

Should identify retail and/or entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.3 - G

107

COMMERCIAL: Arena

Roof massing up to 150’ Property line Stepback at 90’

20’ min.

Giant signage element along Geneva Area seating Sky-lobby overlooking Geneva Arena promenade with pedestrian access from Geneva Service areas beneath main entry level Geneva Ave raised on bridge at railroad crossing

Description The Entertainment Variant will allow for 17,000-20,000 seat arena, of approximately 600,000 - 900,000 s.f. arena, to be built south of Geneva. This use will face upon Geneva and further animate the pedestrian life of the entertainment hub. Parking will be accommodated on the parcel just south of the arena, identified in the land use plan as “Arena Parking”, as well as in shared parking arrangements with adjacent office uses.

Required

Recommended

Heights

• Up to 90’ at front 20’. Up to 150’ after front stepback. (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

F.A.R.

1.0 - 2.5

Transparency

Streetwall Coverage

• 80% on Geneva • 65% on remaining streets

Transparency should activate facade and ground floor while remaining consistent with function of building.

Setbacks

• 0’ at Geneva • 15’-30’ typical

Building Material

Should be high quality with textures and colors that further articulate building design and function.

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Entrances

Parking Spaces

3.0 per 1,000 s.f. 2.5 per 1,000 s.f. ground floor retail or other uses

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should identify retail and/or entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Parking Location

Parking on adjacent parcel. May be surface or multi-level parking structure. Also in shared parking arrangements as feasible.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only

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108

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.4

Icehouse

The Icehouse District is a multi-use district featuring open space, residential, office/ commercial, institutional, and renewable energy generation. Residential areas consist of townhomes in a variety of formats organized around a fine-grained street pattern. These residential uses are buffered from the rail corridor to the east by a strip of ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) fields. The district also contains all of the institutional uses in the Baylands and Office R&D uses. Land Uses, Building Typologies, and Frontage Conditions: Land Use

Section

Page

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density)

4.10.4

109-110

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (Medium Density)

4.10.4

111

INSTITUTIONAL: Institutional

4.10.4

113

INDUSTRIAL: Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.) COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

Roundhouse Townhomes (High Density) Institutional Townhomes (Medium Density) Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.) Office R&D 2

Ice House Hill Tank Farm (Not In Planning Area)

Not in Planning Area

Institutional

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

n/a 4.10.6

119


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.4 - A

109

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density) Property Line

8’ setback zone

2 1/2 to 3 1/2 story building massing

Front porch, elevated 3’ min above sidewalk grade, projecting into setback zone; with direct unit / front door access

Tuck-under parking, 1/2 level below sidewalk grade

Residential street with continuous sidewalks and street trees on both sides, typical

Mid-block units facing onto common green open space

Alley

Townhomes with parking access from the back Description High Density Townhomes are featured on either side of Roundhouse Arc in both the Roundhouse and Icehouse districts. This type of housing will allow for singleand multi-family townhouse units on a fine-grained neighborhood scale. Parcels will allow for a variety of private outdoor open space, front porches and stoops, and a variety of parking access options.

Required

Pictured at right: Three-story high density townhouses with landscaped front setbacks and rear-accessed tuck-under parking. (25-30 DU/Ac net shown)

Recommended

Heights

Up to 35’

F.A.R. / Density

0.8 - 2.0 / 25-35 DU/Acre

Streetwall Coverage

At least 65%

Setbacks

8’ to 12’ Typical

Bulk Controls

None

Parking Spaces

1.5 spaces per unit

Parking Location

Each development should include front-accessed and rear-accessed parking, to add variety to the streetscape.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Residential only

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

Fenestration

Should be proportioned to building, varied to achieve diversity in architecture, and provide adequate light and air to interiors.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and provide adequate security and separation between public and private realm.

Projections

Should occur within setback zone and be incorporated with overall building and landscape.

Signage

Signage is discouraged except to indicate building addresses.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


110

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.4 - A

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (High Density) (continued) Garage doors and front doors both face street

Property Line 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 story building massing Parking at grade level, accessed from the front Private back gardens

8’ setback zone Bay windows over garage door Front porch, projecting into setback zone Residential street with continuous sidewalks and street trees on both sides, typical

Units facing cross-street

Townhomes with parking access from the front

High Density Townhomes: A Variety of Configurations With parking access from the back

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

With parking access from the front 2 ½ story attached townhouses with narrow front setbacks and rearaccessed parking. 30-35 DU/Ac net

3 story attached townhouses with frontaccessed parking. Setbacks include planting and stoops with narrow 30-35 DU/Ac net

3 story attached townhouses with front planters and rear-accessed parking. 35 DU/Ac net

3 story attached duplex townhouses with frontaccessed parking. Setbacks include planting and entry pergolas. 20-30 DU/Ac net

3 ½ story attached townhouses, along greenway, with landscaped front setbacks and rearaccessed parking. 30-40 DU/Ac net

Detail of unit/building access and parking access. Front setback include planting, stoops and patterned front driveway. 20-30 DU/Ac net


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.4 - B

111

RESIDENTIAL: Townhomes (Medium Density) Property Line 8’ -12’ setback zone 2 to 3 1/2 story building massing Private back garden

1 to 2 1/2 story private garage with potential granny flat / studio unit above

Front porch, elevated 3’ min above sidewalk grade, projecting into setback zone; with direct unit / front door access

Vehicle access to garages by common alley

Residential street with continuous sidewalks and street trees on both sides, typical

Townhomes with parking access from the back Description Medium-Density Townhomes are featured south of the higher density townhouses as density steps downward. This type of housing will allow for single-family townhouse units on a fine-grained neighborhood scale. Parcels will accommodate a variety of private outdoor open space, front porches and stoops, and multiple parking access options.

Recommended

Required Heights

Up to 35’ (See Figure 4.5 Heights)

F.A.R.

0.7 - 2.0 / 20-30 DU/Acre

Streetwall Coverage

At least 65%

Building Articulation

Facades should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction.

Fenestration

Should be proportioned to building, varied to achieve diversity in architecture, and provide adequate light and air to interiors.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and provide adequate security and separation between public and private realm.

Setbacks

8’ - 12’ Typical

Bulk Controls

None

Parking Spaces

2.0 spaces per unit

Parking Location

Each development should include front-accessed and rear-accessed parking, to add variety to the streetscape.

Projections

Should occur within setback zone and be incorporated with overall building and landscape.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Signage

Signage is discouraged except to indicate building addresses.

Ground Floor Use

Residential only

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112

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Figure 4.8 Development of Townhome Blocks In order to achieve diversity in the streetscape, townhome blocks shall be designed as follows:

A.

Developments should mix parking access options, including both front-accessed and rear-accessed units. Option 1, below, shows front-loaded units. Option 2 shows rear-loaded units.

B.

Developments should mix building types and sizes within close proximity. For example, 2-story and 3-story townhouses mixed along the same block frontage. Another strategy is to locate 3-story, more prominent buildings at special locations, like at the end of a row of 2-story buildings, or forming a pair of pavilions across the street to frame a view or street, as illustrated below.

C.

Developments should mix unit types within close proximity. For example, have 2BR, 3BR, and 4RB unit types available within a single block length. This will help foster physical and social diversity within a neighborhood.

D.

Variety in architectural and community character is desired. This may be accomplished through the strategies listed above as well as varying the architectural character, style, fenestration patterns, projections, and detailing of the individual buildings.

Option 1 Front-loaded Townhouses

Major massing forming gateway Front-loaded townhomes and landscaped setbacks.

Urban green

Private rear gardens Private garages accessed from the front Townhomes fronting on alleys.

Mid-block footways

Front-loaded townhomes.

Option 2 Rear-loaded Townhouses

Townhomes fronting on alleys.

Rear-loaded attached townhomes.

Major massing forming gateway Urban green Alley access to tuck-under parking Mid-block common open space

Alley-facing side of rear-loaded townhomes.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Private garages accessed from the rear

Source: WRT - Solomon ETC, 2010.


4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.4 - C

113

Institutional Potential gymnasium / field house

Tower element along public frontage (does not count against height limit)

1-3 story building with daylit corridor

Prominent canopy or entry feature

Outdoor court

Property Line 30’ landscaped setback Visitation Creek Park, where occurs in site plan Public street

Description An elementary school and a charter high-school are allowed for within the Baylands, both located in Icehouse. These uses will be designed to complement surrounding residential and open space land uses, and shall comply with the City of Brisbane’s design standards, except where otherwise indicated. The elementary school site terminates the view corridor along the Promenade Park axis. The building massing should mark the site’s northeast corner with a vertical element, such as a tower feature. A site is also identified for a combined police/fire facility, centrally located adjacent to Roundhouse Green.

Required

Recommended

Heights

See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

0.3 - 1.0

Streetwall Coverage

At least 65%

Setbacks Bulk Controls Parking Spaces

Building Articulation

Should be articulated to achieve rhythm and variety and architectural distinction. Should include a tower element at prominent corner.

Fenestration

Should be appropriately proportioned to building and interior functions. Interior spaces should maximize daylighting wherever possible.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

Per Brisbane and Jefferson Unified School District Standards

Parking Location Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Institutional only

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114

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.5

Visitacion Green North

Visitacion Green North is dominated by office R&D development, with signature “campus” sites oriented along the Bay edge. Production and warehousing uses front on the railroad. Light industrial uses are also contained within this district and will be occupied by the future Sierra Lumber and Van Arsdale-Harris facilities and the wastewater treatment facility. Land Uses, Building Typologies, and Frontage Conditions: Land Use

Section

Page

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

4.10.5

115

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

4.10.6

119

INDUSTRIAL: Light Industrial

4.10.5

116

INDUSTRIAL: Wastewater Treatment / Recycling

4.10.5

117

Views to Bay

Light Industrial

Office R&D 1 The Quad Office R&D 2 Wastewater Treatment / Recycling Visitacion Creek Park (East)

South Visitacion Park Renewable Energy Generation/Open Space Reserve

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4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.5 - A

115

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 1

Property Line

Mechanical penthouse level (does not count against building height limit)

Prominent entrance canopy/feature

5 story building

30’ landscaped setback with hinged connections for differential settlement

Landscaped courtyard over parking podium Surface parking with trees and landscaping

Open space location per the site plan Public street

Description Office R&D 1 uses are included in several districts within the Baylands including Roundhouse, Icehouse, and Visitacion Green (North). This land use includes a variety of office uses, usually situated along parks and open spaces to create favorable working environments. For buildings along the Quad, 6-stories (up to 85’) features may be considered by variance.

Required Heights

Recommended See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

0.6 - 2.0

Streetwall Coverage

At least 65%

Setbacks

30’ Typical

Bulk Controls

No bulk reductions required

Parking Spaces, per 1000 sf

Dist. to Trans.

1/4 mile

1/2 mile

+1/2 mile

Office

2.0

2.5

3.0

R&D

2.0

2.5

2.5

Parking Location

Structured or surface parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited facing the Quad.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only.

Building Articulation

Facades facing the public realm should be articulated at regular intervals to achieve rhythm and variety.

Fenestration

Should be appropriately proportioned to building and interior functions. Interior spaces should maximize daylighting wherever possible.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

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116

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.5

INDUSTRIAL: Light Industrial Tunnel Avenue

Storage hall / shed behind Administration building

Landscaped setback adjacent to street right-of-way

Caltrain right-of-way

Surface parking

Landscaped buffer

Administration building facing street (1-2 stories) with tower feature

Working yard area

Description The Light Industrial land use occurs along the western edge of the Visitacion Green North district, between Tunnel Avenue and the Caltrain right-of-way. This land is identified as a possible relocation site for existing industrial uses (Van Arsdale-Harris and Sierra Lumber) within the Planning Area. These uses will typically incorporate large footprint, high-ceiling, one story buildings. Administrative and support space should be located in a feature building at the front of the site. Parking and vehicle servicing is preferably located easily accessible from Tunnel Avenue.

Required Heights

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Recommended Up to 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

F.A.R.

N/a

Streetwall Coverage

20% min. on Tunnel Ave.

Building Articulation

Facade articulation of 2 ft. at intervals of 80 ft maximum required. Should have a tower or other major vertical element, which may exceed height limit.

Setbacks

30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; along all property edges

Bulk Controls

None

Transparency

None required

Parking Spaces

1:1,000 s.f.

Entrances

Parking Location

Surface parking easily accessible from Tunnel Avenue

Should be well-designed, appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Canopies & Awnings

Should be used to mark entries and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.


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117

INDUSTRIAL: Wastewater Treatment / Recycling Tunnel Avenue Administration building facing street (1-2 stories) Iconic sustainability structure with PV panels and/or wind turbines

Landscaped setback adjacent to street right-of-way

Access ways between treatment facilities

Surface parking

Constructed wetlands

Description The Wastewater Treatment / Recycling land use occurs along the western edge of the Visitacion Green North district, between Tunnel Avenue and the Caltrain rightof-way. This location will allow for the wastewater treatment/recycling facility, as part of the project’s overall sustainable infrastructure system. This land use may incorporate small buildings for administrative and support services, but its primary use is as a site for water treatment, characterized by constructed wetlands, bio-retention and detention areas, aeration basins, and related storage, processing, and support facilities. A small amount of surface parking should be included behind, or in front of, the administration/ support buildings.

Required Heights

Recommended Up to 25’

F.A.R.

No requirement

Streetwall Coverage

10% min. on Tunnel Ave.

Setbacks

30’ along all property edges

Bulk Controls

None

Parking Spaces

1:1,000 s.f. of administration building

Parking Location

Surface parking preferably behind buildings

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Building Articulation

Facade articulation of 2 ft. at intervals of 40 ft maximum required.

Transparency

None required

Entrances

Should be well-designed, appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should be used to mark entries and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.10.6

Visitacion Green South

Over half of the land use within Visitacion Green South is dedicated to Parks and Open Space and development has the lowest range of intensity of anywhere in the Baylands. Low-rise campus R&D sites along the Bay edge and a small cluster of restaurant retail overlooking the Lagoon and Bay characterize the buildings. Another feature is the solar farm with arrays of photovoltaic panels for solar/ renewable energy generation. Land Uses, and Building Typologies: Land Use

Section

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

Page

4.10.6

119

INDUSTRIAL: Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.)

n/a

INDUSTRIAL: R.E.G./ Open Space Reserve

See R.E.G. or Open Space

COMMERCIAL: Single-Use Retail

4.10.2

96

Renewable Energy Generation (R.E.G.) Renewable Energy Reserve/ Open Space

Visitacion Creek Park (East)

Visitacion Creek Park (West)

South Visitacion Park

Avenu e Tunnel

Tank Farm

Office R&D 2

Restaurant Retail Cluster

Lagoon Park

Lagoon Way

Brisbane Lagoon

Lagoon Park and Nature Center (See Chapter 5)

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4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

4.10.6 - A

119

COMMERCIAL: Office R&D 2

Open space location per the site plan, with mutli-use pathway

Mechanical penthouse level (does not count against building height limit)

30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; landscaped setback with hinged connections for differential settlement

2-3 story building massing Prominent entrance canopy/feature Grand entrance atrium with views to courtyard and Bay Landscape courtyard with Bay views, above parking podium (set following down-slope of site)

Property Line

Description The Office R&D 2 use is a primary feature of Visitacion Green South. This land use will be similar to the Office R&D 1 use except a lower intensity of building square footage and will allow surface parking. This land use is situated between South Visitacion Park and the Bay which creates favorable working environments.

Required Heights

Recommended See Figure 4.5 Heights

F.A.R.

0.6 - 2.0

Streetwall Coverage

At least 60%

Setbacks

30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Typical

Bulk Controls

no bulk reductions required

Parking Spaces, per 1000 sf

Dist. to Trans.

1/4 mile

1/2 mile

+1/2 mile

Office

2.0

2.5

3.0

R&D

2.0

2.5

2.5

Parking Location

Structured or surface parking must be on parcel with entrances prohibited facing the Quad.

Sustainability

LEED, GreenPoint Rated, or equivalent

Ground Floor Use

Commercial only.

Building Articulation

Facades facing the public realm should be articulated at regular intervals to achieve rhythm and variety.

Fenestration

Should be appropriately proportioned to building and interior functions. Interior spaces should maximize daylighting wherever possible.

Entrances

Should be appropriately-scaled and easy to find, and serve as a special feature in building design.

Canopies & Awnings

Should occur at regular intervals to mark entries and lobbies and accent building design.

Signage

Should complement building design in material, scale, lettering and lighting and enhance public realm.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.11 APPROACH TO GUIDELINES & DESIGN REVIEW The goal of the development regulations in the Brisbane Baylands is to introduce variety into the design of blocks to create a genuine neighborhood grain and experience. This will include buildings with a range of sizes, typologies, and architectural designs. Those items listed as required and recommended are meant to achieve a specific streetscape experience and building design. The greatest goal of the design guidelines, however, is to produce variety in each block. Therefore, each project will be evaluated in the context of adjacent developments and certain guidelines may be loosened in order to achieve these results.

4.12 LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES The following guidelines provide more detailed guidance regarding the character of landscape features within the Planning Area. Many of these occur within privately owned areas, but may be visible to the public and be used by the public to varying degrees. The following guidelines apply to all landscaped areas, but are intended to guide those items that may be included as part of individual developments, and will be the responsibility of the developer and designer. Guidelines that apply specifically to the public realm are included in either Chapter 5: Conservation and Open Space or Chapter 6: Traffic and Circulation. These chapters, however, may reference the overall design guidelines contained in this section. Within the private realm, areas which may be landscaped include:

Street trees and planted elements within building facades and setbacks add comfort to the pedestrian realm and improve the aesthetic appearance of the streetscape.

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Plantings integrated with building design that is visible from the public right-of-way should complement the design and style of the building.

4.12.1 Private Realm Landscape Features 4.12.1.1 Pedestrian Zone and Setbacks The pedestrian zone refers to the interface between the public and private right-of-way, or the portion of private building development that is visible from the street. Landscaping and street furnishings that occur within this area could be within designated setback zones or, in the case of a zero-foot setback, adjacent to the right-of-way. Landscape design and street furnishings that occur within these areas should be coordinated with the design of the public realm.

4.12.1.2 On-site Open Area On site open area refers to landscaped areas within private areas located on parcel. In residential buildings, this can be in the form of shared courtyards or paseos, front yards, back yards, or patios. Retail and office developments may also include on-site open area in the form of courtyards, paseos, and other seating areas. Design of these privately-owned public spaces should correspond to the architectural design of the building. Design guidelines for open space, which may apply to open areas within development sites, are contained in Section 5.6 in Chapter 5: Conservation and Open Space. Guidelines that apply to privately-owned areas, or that may abut the public right-of-way, are contained in the following section: 4.12.2 Overall Design Guidelines. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

4.12.2 Overall Landscape Guidelines Street Trees

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A diverse and healthy urban forest is essential to the character and ultimate success of the Baylands. Ample soil planting depth, subsurface preparation, aeration, irrigation, and drainage are minimum requirements for proper tree growth.

Substantial tree planting is recommended throughout the Planning Area’s developed and open areas in order to enhance the area’s visual quality and identity, visually buffer new development, and provide environmental benefits such as micro-climate control (e.g., shade, wind buffers, etc.), wildlife habitat, and stormwater management (e.g., slow runoff and remove air pollutants).

Native tree species are preferred, though non-native species that are non-invasive, easily-maintained and drought tolerant may be appropriate; refer to Table 4-12 for recommended tree species.

Street trees should be used to create a comfortable and well-defined pedestrian zone adjacent to the travel way and to establish a distinctive identity for each district. To optimize their beneficial effect, emphasis should be placed on the consistent use of tree species, size, and spacing.

Generally, street trees should be planted in the zone adjacent to the curb to keep open the pedestrian thoroughfare and provide maximum space for tree canopies. Exceptions may be allowed for biowsales and other special conditions.

Tree grates should be used in commercial districts and areas with high pedestrian activity to protect trees and reduce safety hazards. Cast iron tree grates with pouredin-place metal frames should be used with at-grade tree planters that are surrounded by paving.

Use of a continuous length of structural soil is recommended for any tree planted in a sidewalk or hardscape plaza, and should connect individual planter locations.

Soil depths should be coordinated with landfill capping requirements to ensure ample root medium and integrity of the barrier.


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Shrubs and Groundcover

To minimize water usage and application of water over the landfill cap, drought-tolerant and preferably native species should comprise the majority of the planting.

Plants that are ornamental and that provide wildlife habitat are recommended for use in all roadway corridors, parking areas, windrows, and screening applications.

In public gathering areas such as street plazas, mid-block courts, and paseos, planting that contributes to the visual interest and character—such as flowers, foliage color, and texture—is encouraged.

Furnishings

Furnishing such as benches, trash receptacles, bicycle racks, and bollards should be of a consistent color and finish and used consistently within distinct areas or street types.

Trash receptacles should be located regularly at intersections, primary doorways, and seating areas. Each receptacle should accommodate recycling, prevent rainwater from entering the canister, facilitate side access to the liner, and have the option to be anchored.

All furnishings should be located outside of thoroughfares and not impede pedestrian traffic. Racks in retail areas should be located within 75 feet of a building entry.

The style and color of street furnishings such as trash receptacles and bollards should be consistent within districts and incorporate distinctive design and sustainable features.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Distinctive paving and bollards can be incorporated into private realm landscaping to accent entrances and other site features.

Paving

Decorative paving materials, patterns, and textures should be used to highlight important pedestrian zones such as plazas, paseos, courts, sidewalks, and crosswalks.

Decorative paving materials, patterns, and textures should be used to highlight important pedestrian zones such as plazas, paseos, courts, sidewalks, and crosswalks.

Stone pavers, concrete unit pavers, brick, exposed aggregate concrete, and sandblasted colored concrete are recommended. Concrete that is stamped or formed to simulate another material (such as stone or brick) is strongly discouraged.

Designated crosswalks locations should incorporate contrasting color and texture.

All surfaces should be slip resistant and compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Bollards

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Metal pole bollards with accent texture or banding should be used to prevent vehicles from entering pedestrian zones. They may also be used to mark pathway entries at public-private interfaces.

Bollard style and color should match the selected bench and be consistent within each land use district.


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125

Both street and on-site lighting should accent the design of the space as well as provide safety for the pedestrian zone.

Street and Parking Facility Lighting

Street lights are an important element in creating a safe and distinctive sense of place. Too little light can affect the public’s sense of security, whereas too much can create a harsh and unappealing character. The scale and character of the fixtures is also an important defining element of place. Tall, “cobra” head fixtures cast a bright, undifferentiated light over a broad area and tend to signify that the street is the sole domain of the automobile. Street lot lighting in the Planning Area should focus on the needs of the pedestrian and minimize the contribution to unnecessary lighting of the night sky. These guidelines for street lights are also generally applicable to parking lot lights. •

Street lighting should emphasize the use of shorter, pedestrian-scaled fixtures, rather than tall cobra head fixtures; when larger fixtures are required, both pedestrian- and automobile-oriented luminaires should be provided, either separately or on combined poles.

Light fixtures should be selected that produce a warm light and focus the light downward onto the pedestrian zone.

Use a consistent style and size of light standards and fixtures along a single street or within a district is recommended. (Illuminating Engineering Society of America (IESNA) Guidelines recommended).

Use minimal foot candle levels acceptable for public safety as a guide for street and parking lot lighting, rather than the upper limits typically recommended. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Accent Lighting

Lighting could be used to emphasize landscape and building features that uniquely characterize the public and private realms. Various techniques such as shadow creation, wallwash, oblique-angle lighting, spot lighting, and down lighting can be employed to achieve the desired effect. However, it is important that lighting not contribute to increased lighting of the night sky, thus accent lighting that is directed upward is generally not encouraged. Lighting should also not conflict with driver or bicyclist safety. •

Sodium lamp types are discouraged in order to preserve color rendition and public safety.

In-ground up-lights with diverter shields should be used where vandalism is a greater concern.

Typical building features that benefit from illumination include corner towers, entry façades, arcade columns, gable-type structures, special detailing, and relief. Shadows of trees and structures can also be cast on blank building wall surfaces.

Special landscape features within entry zones and gathering areas should be emphasized with accent lighting.

Retail district entry elements, columns, and rows of trees should be lighted. In public and private gathering spaces, special landscape features should be accented at night.

Maintenance

Landscape improvements in open areas will require on-going maintenance to preserve the area’s intended quality and character. For landscape improvements on private property, the Specific Plan requires developers to adopt binding Conditions, Covenants, and Restrictions (CC&R’s) to ensure on-going maintenance (refer to Section 8.4.4) by landowners/ tenants. Maintenance for public parks is described in Section 5.4 of Chapter 5: Conservation and Open Space.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


Botanical Name

Allepo Pine

Pinus halepensis

Austrialian Tea Tree

Leptospermum scoparium

Brisbane Box

Tristania conferta

California Pepper Tree

Schinus molle

Canary Island Date Palm

Phoenix caneriensis

Catalina Ironwod

Lynothamnus floribundus

Chinese Pistache*

Pistachia sinensis

Deodar Cedar

Cedrus deodara

Drooping Melaleuca

Melaleuca armirillis

European Hackberry*

Celtis australis

Flowering Cherry*

Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’

Flowering Pear*

Pyrus Kawakami

Ginko*

Ginko biloba

Holly Oak*

Quercus ilex

Holywood Juniper

Juniperus chinensis ‘Torulosa’

Honey Locust

Gleditsia triacanthos

Italian Cypress

Cupressus sempervirens ‘Italica’

x

Italian Stone Pine

Pinus pinea

x

Lemon Scented Gum

Eucalyptus citrodora

x

Leptospermum laevigatum

Austrailian Tea Tree

Leptospermum scoparium

New Zealand Tea Tree

Live Oak

Quercus agrifolia

Lombardy Poplar*

Populus nigra ‘Italica’

London Plan Tree*

Platanus acerfolia ‘Bloodgood’

Mayten*

Maytenus boaria

Mexican Fan Palm

Washingtonia robusta

Monterey Cypress

Cupressus macrocarpa

Myoporum

Myoporum laetum

New Zealand Christmas Tree*

Metrosideros excelsus

Olive

Olea Europa

x

Pink Melaleuca

Melaleuca nesophila

x

Purple Acacia

Acacia baileyana ‘Purpurea’

Raywood Ash*

Fraxinus “Raywood)

x

Red Iron Box

Eucalyptus sideroxylon

x

Red Maple

Acer rubrum

Silver Dollar Gum

Eucalyptus polyanthemos

Southern Magnolia*

Magnolia Grandiflora

x

x

x

Strawberry Tree

Arbutos unedo

x

x

x

Sweetheart Tree

Magnolia soulangiana

x

x

x

Tuart Gum

Eucalyptus gomphocephela

Weeping Willow*

Salix baylonica

Western Red Ceder

Calocedrus decurrens

Western Sycamore

Platanus racemosa

White Ironbark

Eucalyptus leucoxylon

Yew Pine*

x

x

x

x x

x x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x x

x

x

x x

x

127

Windrow

Common Name

Other Open Space

Parking Lot

Park Tree: Promenade, Central Plaza, The Quad

Street Tree: Beatty Road

Street Tree: Lagoon Road, Creek Parkway

Street Tree: Collector Streets

Street Tree: Local Streets

Table 4-6: Recommended Tree List

Street Tree: Geneva Avenue

4. Land Use and Community Design Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

x x

x

x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x

Podocarpus macrophyllus

x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x

x x x

* Approved Species: City of Brisbane Street Tree List, Latest Available Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, 2011. Fred Tipping, Arborist, 2004

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 4. Land Use and Community Design

Selected Tree Species Images

Tristania Conferta

Pinus halepensis

Washingtonia robusta

Platanus x Acerifolia

Pyrus calleryana

Cedrus deodara

Acer rubrum

Populus nigra â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;italicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Ginko biloba DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


5. Conservation and Open Space Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

5 CONSERVATION OPEN SPACE 5.1

129

AND

PURPOSE

A strong public open space system is central to the Baylands Specific Plan. This system will be a trifold network that serves the recreational needs of the greater Brisbane community, includes areas for wildlife and vegetative habitats, and improves natural hydrological functioning for the site. As described in Chapter 4: Land Use and Community Design, the form of the open space concept draws its inspiration from the site’s historic connection to the Bay and from the surrounding natural landforms and drainage patterns. Providing recreational open space, protecting the natural environment, and conserving resources are goals of the Brisbane General Plan. This chapter describes the open space concept and specific elements addressed in the Specific Plan. Consistent with the requirement of the Brisbane General Plan, the Specific Plan preserves at least 25 percent of the Baylands as open space. Of the approximately 548-acre upland area, approximately 31 percent (approximately 170 acres) of land use is preserved as open space (See Figures 4.2A and 4.2B).1 Additionally, five to ten percent

The open space network is designed to be integrated with the improved ecological function of the Baylands, including habitat areas and access along the Brisbane Lagoon, and the Lagoon Nature/ Community Center, shown here.

1 As defined elsewhere in the Specific Plan, “open space” is used in its more general and commonly recognized sense: land that is not covered by structures, roads or parking areas and that provides some measure of either physical or visual openness. In certain instances, “open space” is used in its more technical sense as defined in the Brisbane General Plan; refer to Appendix D, Glossary for more information regarding this distinction.

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LEGEND Sun nyd Brisbane ale Stre et

130

Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

Open Space Open Water Bay Trail

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

sho

re B o

Trail

Bay

Beatty Road

Potential Trail Enhancement

Gen eva Ave nue

Windrows Green Street Connector

Promenade

UPC Ownership Specific Plan Boundary Triangle Parks Central Plaza Roundhouse Green Ma in St.

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

Visitacion Creek Park (West)

The Quad

U.S. 101

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

ue

Tunnel Aven

Upland Area (548 Acres)

Visitacion Creek Park ay arkw (East) ek P Cre

Landscape Area Sierra Point Parkway

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm South Visitacion Park

Charter High School Community Use Area

Lagoon Park

Lagoon Way

Landscape Area Tank Perimeter BRISBANE LAGOON

Lagoon (136 Acres) Lagoon Perimeter

Lagoon Perimeter

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Universal Paragon Corporation

5.1 OPEN SPACE FRAMEWORK

N

0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


5. Conservation and Open Space Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

131

of the land within all private development sitesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;approximately 16 acresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will be used as open area in the form of planted and paved outdoor spaces, such as plazas, courtyards, and gardens. In sum, approximately 33 percent of all upland area within the Specific Plan will be in the form of open space and open area. The Specific Plan Area also includes 136 acres located south of the upland area. This area is comprised of the Lagoon, which is approximately 111 acres of open water, railroad and street right-of-way, and 11 acres of perimeter open space referred to as the Lagoon Perimeter. UPC owns a non-contiguous 74.5-acre portion of this southern portion of this Specific Plan area. Refer to Figure 2.2. Those areas that are not under UPC ownership are not dedicated as open space in this Specific Plan. However, they are included in the overall tabulation of open space. This total amount is 196.6 acres, or approximately 28.5 percent of the Specific Plan area, not including open water. Illustrated in Table 0.1, the Lagoon District includes the Lagoon Park that is planned within the upland area, the Lagoon Perimeter open space, and the Lagoon, which all together equals 136 acres. 2. Parks & Open Space

As illustrated, the proposed open space network was informed by the natural and man-made topography of the Baylands. Low-lying areas include the drainage channel along Visitacion Creek, the Lagoon, and the Caltrain right-of-way. Ice House Hill is the highest point, while areas of fill form broad, flat areas on which development will evolve. Open spaces form the backbone of development, both by providing the central spines of land use districts and areas for habitat and passive recreation along aquatic and riparian zones.

1. Land Forms & Drainage

The open space network is informed by both natural and man-made topography, and hydrologic systems.

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JOHN MACLAREN PARK

132

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

CANDLESTICK POINT Sun nyd ale Stre et Bay sho re B oule vard

San Francisco San Mateo County

Beatty Road

LEGEND

Gen eva Ave nue

Regional Open Space Baylands Open Space Tidal/Freshwater Wetland Enhancement Zones

Main

St.

Green Street Connector int Pa Sierra Po

Bay Trail/ Blue Greenway UPC Ownership

o re B ard ulev

a pe C dalu Gua

ay arkw ek P Cre

U.S. 101

sho

ue

Bay

Tunnel Aven

rkway

Specific Plan Boundary

n Pk nyo . way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

SAN BRUNO MOUNTAIN STATE PARK

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

2 Recommended recreational amenities were obtained from the City of Brisbane Baylands PublicNSpace Master Plan, prepared by The Universal Paragon Corporation Dangermond Group. June 22, 2009.

5.2 REGIONAL OPEN SPACE

0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


5. Conservation and Open Space Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

5.2

133

RELATIONSHIP TO THE GENERAL PLAN AND OPEN SPACE PLAN

The Open Space chapter of the 1994 General Plan outlines the City’s plan for stewarding its open space lands. Specifically, this chapter sets the following goal: The City of Brisbane will be a place…where open space lands have been set aside to protect the natural environment; where outdoor areas provide recreational open space and educational opportunities; where open space and natural areas provide respite to both residents and businesses; and where residents reciprocate by respecting and maintaining the land and the waters for future generations. (General Plan, pg. 110) The Open Space chapter of the General Plan establishes a means for the “comprehensive, long range preservation and conservation of open space lands…” (General Plan, pg. 118). The Open Space Chapter outlines policies and programs for the preservation and acquisition of such lands. These policies and programs emphasize using a wide variety of acquisition methods consistent with the priorities established by a community survey conducted as part of the 1994 General Plan. This survey suggests that residents favor allowing the private development of undeveloped lands within the City as long as developers provide public benefits, such as open space. The survey also asked residents to indicate which open spaces within the City should be preserved by the City, and the largest number of respondents indicated that the Lagoon was either their highest or second highest priority (General Plan, pg. 118-121). In order to implement the open space policies of the General Plan, an advisory implementation document—the 2001 “Open Space Plan” study—identified, evaluated, and analyzed open space resources by General Plan subarea. Prepared by the City of Brisbane Open Space and Ecology Committee, the study’s recommendations for the Baylands emphasize: • • •

Permanently protecting open space uses surrounding the Lagoon and existing drainage channel, which is proposed to be a “wetland river park”; Providing trails, such as the undeveloped segment of the Bay Trail; and Any development of the remaining portion of the Baylands shall require quality urban design and the inclusion of sufficient open areas, particularly south of the drainage channel.

These concepts and the direction provided by the General Plan provided the starting point for the goals and policies of this chapter as well as the Specific Plan’s designation and recommended programming of open space lands.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.3

OPEN SPACE GOALS

Using the direction provided by the 1994 General Plan and the recommendations of the 2001 Open Space Plan, the following section includes the open space goals for the Baylands Specific Plan. The Open Space network is a combination of key, unifying frameworks, and the individual parks and open spaces that complete the system. Similar to the land use plan, the open space network is driven by overarching urban design goals of the Specific Plan and influenced by the natural forms and historic fabric intrinsic in the site geography. (See Figure 4.1: Key Features.) The Baylands features a wide variety of open space areas, including large natural areas such as South Visitacion Park at 47 acres, to small privately-owned gardens. Together, these provide a natural setting for future development within the Baylands and a constant reminder and link to the natural surroundings and adjacent regional open space—a key goal of the General Plan, and of the present Specific Plan. Regional open space resources to which the Baylands Open Space plan is connected and draws inspiration are illustrated in Figure 5.2: Regional Open Space. Goal 5.1:

Open space that reveals and celebrates the natural features of the Baylands and provides the community with multiple opportunities for recreation and education.

The plan creates major open spaces that will provide public access to and enjoyment of the area’s natural resources and affirm Brisbane’s connection to the Bay. The Baylands open space network will offer a range of both passive and active recreation opportunities. Public programming amenities may include a nature and interpretive center, a habitat observation area, and a youth education center with associated trails, boardwalks, and overlooks to enrich the public’s experience and understanding of the local ecology. Open space areas may also include recreational amenities such as soccer and baseball fields, tennis, basketball, and volleyball courts, dog parks, and driving ranges. Additionally, spaces adjacent to the Brisbane Lagoon may include water related activities such as a pier and a non-motorized craft storage and launching facility.2 Trails will be provided throughout to offer recreational enjoyment of the Baylands’ natural setting. 2

Recommended recreational amenities were obtained from the City of Brisbane Baylands Public Space Master Plan, prepared by The

Dangermond Group. June 22, 2009.

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LEGEND Sun nyd ale Stre et

Passive Active

5. Conservation and Open Space Brisbane Baylands Specific PlanPark135 Regional - Natural Regional Park - Recreational / Cultural District Park - Recreational

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

re B o

Neighborhood Park - Recreational

sho

Water-Related Recreation Zone

Bay

Beatty Road

Wild Life Refuge

Gen eva Ave nue

*

Public Destination Trail Bay Trail/ Blue Greenway Specific Plan Boundary

Main

Central Plaza Recreation / Entertainment Area

St.

Roundhouse Amphitheater ay int Parkw Sierra Po

Community Garden Elementary School

ue

*

. way

Wild Life Refuge

Ice House Hill

Charter High School

U.S. 101

Tunnel Aven

vard oule re B sho Bay

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

Habitat Observation Area

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

*

*

Potential Non-motorized Craft Storage & Launching Facility Potential Nature / Community Center

BRISBANE LAGOON

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

N

0

5.3 RECREATION

350

700

1400 feet

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

Goal 5.2:

Improvement of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ecological and hydrological function through habitat creation and natural drainage and stormwater management.

Consistent with the 1994 General Plan and the 2001 Open Space Plan, the plan concentrates major open space around the existing drainage channel and along the northern edge of Brisbane Lagoon where it will contribute to the ecological health of the Baylands and the waters of the Bay and Lagoon. Additionally, all open space and open area will be a part of an improved water cycle at the Baylands, aided by bioswales within the street rights-of-way and created wetlands within major open space areas. Visitacion Creek Park will serve as the central open space for the Baylands. This park, which has both an eastern and western portion, begins at Roundhouse Green in the Icehouse district and extends southward along the existing drainage channel and newly configured creek corridor to the broad, flat area at the northern foot of Ice House Hill. From this point, the park extends eastward to the Bay with an integrated band of wetlands and fields, and opportunities for community gardens. South Visitacion Park expands southward from this axis to form a broad open area that extends to meet Lagoon Park at the southern end of the Planning Area and features a system of detention wetlands and chaparral hills. An important feature of the open space network, occurring at the base of Ice House Hill at the lowest topographical point of the Planning Area, is the main tidal wetland and estuary habitat reserve. Similarly, Lagoon Park will build on the Lagoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural history as a Bay remnant and its saltmarsh habitat to showcase native ecology. This system of natural areas provide both an opportunity for wildlife habitat and restored functioning of the water cycle and natural filtration which will improve water quality on the site and in the Bay. The wildlife refuge located within Visitacion Creek Park (West) will feature native habitat and wetlands, and will be lined with windrows according to the overall open space framework.

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Goal 5.3:

137

An extensive and visually distinctive open space framework that organizes the site, counterbalances the impact of developed areas, protects views of San Bruno Mountain and the Bay, and gives a distinctive identity to the Baylands.

The network of parks, landscaped easements, and windrows will give visual continuity to the site and contribute to the image of a green Baylands characterized by trees, parks, and greenways. Orientation to the open space network provides an overarching structure to the development framework, with views to natural resources and access to parks providing rationale for the urban plan. In addition, the windrowsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;lining major open space and roads helping to mitigate the winds blowing across the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will tie the site together visually and soften the impact of development as seen from Central Brisbane and from the freeway, helping to protect views out to the Bay and back toward San Bruno Mountain. Goal 5.4:

An integrated pedestrian and bicycle trail system that provides direct links to adjoining open space resources and trail systems as well as improved access to and through the Baylands.

The open space program for the Baylands includes recommendations for recreational facilities such as pedestrian paths and a bicycle trail system. These networks will facilitate movement throughout the Baylands, connecting major open spaces internally and linking the Baylands to its immediate surroundings and the greater Bay Area. This includes links to San Bruno Mountain via Central Brisbane and the continuation of the Bay Trail along the eastern edge of the Planning Area. A new perimeter trail that connects to the Bay Trail and creates a continuous path along the Lagoon edge may be included as part of a future planning study. Goal 5.5:

Opportunities for community gardens that can provide access to healthy food options and an enhanced connection to the natural environment.

Many communities are including sites for community gardens in open space as a means of both increasing access to healthy foods for urban inhabitants and for enhancing recreational and social infrastructure. Several areas within the Baylands open space network may accommodate community gardens in raised planters and groves of native fruit trees. These are primarily located in the Icehouse district, adjacent to the elementary school, and in Visitacion Creek Park (East), alongside the wetlands areas. Groves are also provided in Lagoon Park and in the Central Plaza among the East Geneva office developments. These are dispersed within the Baylands in order to offer proximity to residents and workers and to utilize the most suitable open space sites. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Table 5-1: Open Space and Open Area Land Area (Acres)

Percent of Total Key Attributes Open Space & Open Area

Open Space (Upland) The Promenade

4.1

2.1%

Linear park to anchor transit-oriented residential and commercial areas.

Roundhouse Green

3.4

1.8%

Public open space and preservation of historic roundhouse.

Central Plaza

Triangle Parks

2.7

Key public park/plaza space within commercial and office district and venue for outdoor events.

0.2%

Green space gateway to hotel and conference area.

4.7

2.4%

Campus-style planted quad with pathways and seating areas; passive recreation.

Visitacion Creek Park (West)

21.2

10.8%

Visitacion Creek Park (East)

26.0

13.2%

Enhancement of wetlands and riparian habitat in creek corridor; with passive and active recreation.

South Visitacion Park

47.2

24.0%

Broad open space feature with habitat and constructed wetlands with passive and active recreation facilities.

Ice House Hill

31.7

16.1%

Iconic topographical feature of Baylands to include recreational trails and habitat

Charter High School Community Use Area

5.3

2.7%

Shared-use recreational facilities with charter high school

Lagoon Park

13.3

6.8%

Enhancement of the Lagoon frontage for native habitat and improved public access; active and passive recreation.

Landscape Areas

9.7

4.7%

Densely planted areas adjacent to Sierra Point Parkway and Tank Farm.

169.7

86.3%

15.9

8.1%

185.6

94.4%

11.0

5.6%

196.6

100%

The Quad

Open Space (Upland) Sub-Total

0.3

1.4%

Open Areas (Upland) Open Area within Development Sites

Open Space and Open Areas (Upland) Sub-Total

Planted or paved areas that contribute to a feeling of openness, such as courtyards or plazas.

Open Space (non-Upland) Lagoon Perimeter

Total Open Space & Open Area

Undeveloped area around Lagoon that may be integrated with regional trail connections. Includes lands not under UPC ownership.

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011. Note: Figures have been rounded to the closest whole number and, therefore, may not total 100 percent.

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5.4

139

OPEN SPACE AND OPEN AREA

The Specific Plan defines land to be designated for open space and open area as shown in Figure 5.1. The acreage and key attributes are summarized in Table 5-1. The following policies address the future ownership and management of parks and open space following the adoption of the Specific Plan. Policy 5-1:

All lands in the Planning Area designated “Open Space (OS)” and areas designated for public recreation shall be owned and maintained by one or more of these options: •

Lands designated as Open Space shall be dedicated in fee title to the City or a public open space agency designated by the City or have permanent open space easements placed upon them. These areas will be owned and maintained consistent with the City’s parkland dedication requirements and the City’s ability to maintain these open space lands.

A Mello-Roos Community Facilities District or another special assessment district shall be established to raise funds for park maintenance. Those areas designated as Open Space parcels shall then be owned by the City of Brisbane and shall be maintained by a private management group contracted by the City to oversee park maintenance, security, landscaping and janitorial service.

Open Space areas will be developed by the primary developer and shall remain under private ownership. These areas will be leased to individual property owners or developers and subsequently be maintained by funding through homeowners associations and/or business improvement districts. Parks will be intended for public use.

Policy 5-2

Recreational amenities that are intended to be linked with regional networks, or may be outside of the Specific Plan boundary, will be coordinated with applicable regional agencies and land owners.

5.4.1

Windrows

Windrows—a strong character-defining landscape feature of the Baylands—will reinforce the overall organizing framework of the Baylands urban plan. Winds coming down from Visitacion Valley and San Bruno Mountain are intermittently very strong and tend to fan out over the Planning Area and have significant impact on site environment. To mitigate this effect, rows of trees will be planted in the California agrarian landscape tradition along DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND Sun nyd Brisbane ale Stre et

140

Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

Wastewater Treatment / Recycling Facility Open Space Tidal/Freshwater Wetland Enhancement Zones

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

sho

Bio-Detention Zone

Bay

Beatty Road

Creek Channel

Gen eva Ave nue

Bioswale Network Specific Plan Boundary

Main

St.

ay int Parkw Sierra Po U.S. 101

Tunnel Avenue

vard oule re B sho Bay

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

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5.4 HYDROLOGY

Universal Paragon Corporation

N

0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


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roads and open space, thereby â&#x20AC;&#x153;greeningâ&#x20AC;? the Baylands development, softening views of development areas, and screening undesirable elements such as the tank farm. The windrows are oriented so as to maintain unobstructed views of the Bay and San Bruno Mountain from within the Planning Area while screening some development from Central Brisbane. A distinct species for both the north-south and east-west windrows will be selected to emphasize the major axes of the Planning Area. In most cases the plantings will occur in landscape corridors or along the edges of open space. See Figure 5.1 for windrow locations and Chapter 4, Table 4-6 for recommended windrow trees.

5.4.2

Hydrology

The open space network is the central element for improving the natural hydrological functioning of the Baylands. The hydrology system is centered around the improved Visitacion Creek drainage channel and natural wetlands that respond to the tidal fluctuations of the Bay. Additionally, constructed wetlands are proposed within South Visitacion Park that will further detain natural stormwater flows. A wastewater treatment and recycling facility, the final stage of the on-site wastewater treatment process, is planned to be located east of the railroad and north of the tank farm. This facility will treat stormwater runoff before it enters the Bay via the Visitacion Creek drainage channel. These features are identified in Figure 5.4: Hydrology. In addition to undeveloped land, and parks and open space, the entire street network will augment the improved hydrology system. Every street contains low-impact design facilities that will aid in stormwater management through the inclusion of structured and unstructured bioswales in a range of 5 feet to 10 feet, and raingardens in more dense residential areas. These will allow for stormwater retention and detention, which together slow runoff and treat contaminants in a manner similar to undeveloped land. These facilities, which are essential to realize the ecological restoration and overall sustainability goals of the Baylands, will be addressed in greater detail in Chapter 6: Circulation and Chapter 7: Utilities and Infrastructure. They will also contribute to the creation of green visual corridors that unite the natural aesthetic of the Baylands.

A combination of structured raingardens, bio-detention zones, and restored wetlands comprise the key hydrological functioning elements of the Baylands.

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LEGEND

142SunnydaleBrisbane Baylands Specific Plan St

5. Conservation and Open Space

reet

sho

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

Natural Woodland Meadow/Field Chaparral Wetland Open Space Semi-Natural Windrows Groves Community Garden Area Recreational Open Space

Bay

Beatty Road

Gen eva Ave nue

Main

Urban Civic Plaza / Public Park Semi-public Private Specific Plan Boundary

St.

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

ue

U.S. 101

Tunnel Aven

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

ay rkw

a ek P Cre

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

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Universal Paragon Corporation

5.5 ECOLOGY/ LANDSCAPE ZONES

N

0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


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5.4.3 Parks and Open Spaces

5.4.3.1 The Promenade The Promenade is the central green space around which the residential neighborhoods of the Roundhouse district are oriented. The alignment of the Promenade is based on the historic alignment of the railyard towards the historic roundhouse, and parallel to Bayshore Boulevard, which is along the southwest axis. The approximately 4-acre park will be a linear green onto which medium- to highdensity residential uses face. The park also crosses over both the Neighborhood Retail and Retail Main Streets (P Street and Geneva Avenue, respectively). Commercial uses may be oriented to take advantage of this outdoor amenity, and views of the Promenade will be prime features of the design of multi-family dwelling units. This open space will provide an area for passive and active recreation, with adequate space for smaller recreation facilities such as tennis and basketball courts. In general, this open space spine provides for a break within the urban environment of the Roundhouse district and serves as a key piece of the open space network.

Sport Courts

Multifunctional green space

Tot lot

Geneva Avenue

Windrow on west side

Roundhouse Green

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.4.3.2 Roundhouse Green Roundhouse Green is a multi-purpose component of the open space network. The 3-acre site is located at the southern terminus of the Promenade at the westernmost point of the Baylands adjacent to Bayshore Boulevard and includes the historic roundhouse. The renovated roundhouse will be a potential location for renewable energy research, in addition to an exhibit space and cafes. The green is surrounded by the Roundhouse Circle, with open space to the south, and campus R&D and residential townhome development to the north. The proposed enhanced Visitacion Creek drainage corridor passes through the center of the green with passive recreation fields and multifunction space making up the remainder of the open space. The Roundhouse Green is a key nexus of the open space network, uniting the northern and southern portions together along the western axis (Roundhouse Arc).

Roundhouse Plaza Space

Creek channel Seasonal wetlands/ detention zone

Roundhouse Green features the renovated Roundhouse with a public plaza and open space with a portion of a daylighted Visitacion Creek.

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5.4.3.3 Central Plaza & Triangle Parks

Natural Zone

Multi-purpose Performance park/ plaza Pavillion/ Concert space Venue

Triangle Parks

The Central Plaza and the Triangle Parks are the main open space components of the East Geneva district. The Central Plaza is 2.7 acres and the Triangle Parks together are 0.3 acres, located at the entrance to the hotel and convention center area adjacent to Sierra Point Parkway. The Central Plaza, which is likely to be privately-owned, serves as the main open space for the office uses of East Geneva as well as a component of the region retail destination extending from Geneva Avenue. This space is more urban in character and has characteristics of park and plaza designed for more intensive use and a variety of functions. Central Plaza will have public park elements such as seating and landscaped areas, and will offer the opportunity for gathering space, public art installations, and events such as concerts and festivals. The triangle parks are primarily designed to complement the hotel and convention area, enhance views to the Bay, and mark a gateway into the Baylands for this important tourism and business sector. These green spaces may also offer opportunity areas for seating and public art.

Central Plaza (looking east towards the Bay) provides a space for a variety of uses, including concerts and festivals, and a public space amenity for the East Geneva district.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.4.3.4 The Quad Providing the primary western alignment on the eastern side of the Baylands, the Quad provides a connection between the commercial uses of East Geneva to Visitacion Creek Park (East) to the south. The Quad, a five-acre linear greenspace will serve as the centerpiece of the Visitacion Green North district, providing a simple, multifunctional park for informal recreation and a central greenspace amenity for the surrounding R&D campus development. Formally landscaped, the Quad will include shade and accent trees with multi-use zones in the center and landscaped areas along edges. Paved pathways will facilitate convenient pedestrian crossing of the Quad and will align with the larger circulation network and/or the entries to surrounding buildings. A publicly-accessible park, the Quad will allow for public and semi-public activities, such as food cart vending, special public and private events, and the gathering of the general public and employees of surrounding businesses. It may also accommodate small recreation facilities such as basketball and volleyball courts and multi-purpose recreation fields. The Quad is the central green space for use by adjacent commercial uses in the Visitacion Green North District. It includes plentiful trees, fields, and stormwater detention areas.

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Multi-purpose recreation fields

Detention Zone (Typical) Ball Courts

Meadows (Typical) Chapparal Mounds (Typical)


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5.4.3.5 Visitacion Creek Park (West)

Roundhouse Green

Windrows Small Amphitheater Community Gardens Multi-purpose recreation fields

Creek Channel

Seasonal Wetland Detention Zone

Visitacion Creek Park is the primary open space element in the Baylands. This extensive park is divided into two sections by the railroad right-of-way. The western portion, at 21.2 acres, is located north of Ice House Hill and south of Roundhouse Green. The Visitacion Creek Parks are centered around a new creek channel reconfigured around the existing tidal channel and serve as the centerpiece of this mostly passive wetland park. Native plantings, picnic facilities, multi-use paths, trails, overlooks, a small amphitheater, and interpretive features are proposed. The park will offer open vistas of the Bay, Ice House Hill, and San Bruno Mountain. The western portion provides sites for community gardens in raised beds and groves on the western edge, recreational open space, woodlands and meadows featuring native coastal scrub and grassland, and wetlands adjacent to the creek channel. Residential townhome development to the east and campus R&D and institutional uses to the west will have convenient access to this park, which terminates into the wildlife refuge/habitat observation area in the south, at the base of Ice House Hill. This low-lying portion of the creek drainage channel will serve a central role in the improved hydrological functioning of the Baylands and respond to natural fluctuations based on tides, flood events, and seasonal variations in the water table.

Fruit Tree Grove

A small amphitheater may be included in the northern portion of Visitacion Creek Park (West) for community events and performances. Habitat Reserve

Ice House Hill

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Visitacion Creek Park (West) (previous page) will be located in close proximity to the Roundhouse Green and the Icehouse district, providing neighborhood as well as regional recreational amenities.

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.4.3.6 Visitacion Creek Park (East) The eastern portion of Visitacion Creek Park, at 26.0 acres, will continue the Baylands central open space feature from the railroad right-of-way to the eastern boundary of the Baylands. The park originates at the restored habitat area at the base of Ice House Hill and, similar to the western portion, features a restored tidal channel and wetland area, native scrub and grasslands, and sites for community gardens and groves. This open space area may also include picnic facilities, multi-use paths, trails, overlooks, and interpretive elements. At the center of the open space network, this park will be accessible to bicyclists and pedestrians from areas to the north, south, and west, and from Sierra Point Parkway/Bayshore Trail to the east. The improved creek corridor will be a significant aspect of the hydrological system of the Baylands.

Wetlands/ Wastewater Recycling Facility (not a part of park)

Habitat Reserve

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Meadow

Multi-purpose Paths (Typical)

Windrows

Tidal Wetlands

Creek Channel


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5.4.3.7 South Visitacion Park In the southern third of the Baylands Specific Plan area, development gives way to open space as the predominant use. South Visitacion Park is the approximately 700-foot broad open space area that anchors the Visitacion Green South district and brings the open space network to meet the Lagoon. The 47.2-acre South Visitacion Park expands upon the eastern open space axis established by the Quad and Visitacion Creek Park (East), and provides the physical orientation as well as recreational opportunities for the development of the campus R&D uses at the eastern edge of the Baylands. These uses will be accessed from the east at Sierra Point Parkway and from the South at Lagoon Way as no vehicular access is planned through the center of the park. Programmatically, South Visitacion Park features significant vegetative habitat areas and open space connected by a network of trails. The park also provides a substantial hydrologic function through seasonal wetlands and bio-detention zones that augment the natural drainage system. Privatelyowned, publicly accessible baseball fields or golf facilities are potential uses for the southernmost portion of South Visitacion Park that will serve the dual purpose of active recreation and stormwater detention area. To the east of South Visitacion Park is the commercial area that may include uses such as a restaurant and related retail uses that will capitalize upon views to the Bay, the Lagoon, and the recreational amenities in the vicinity.

Seasonal Wetlands/ Detention Zones Windrows

Windrows

Chapparal Mounds Multipurpose Recreation Fields

Privately-owned Regional Recreation / Destination Facility

South Visitacion Creek Park (view looking south towards Lagoon and Oyster Point) provides both local and regional recreational amenities adjacent to campus R&D uses.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.4.3.8 Ice House Hill Ice House Hill, a remnant of the former ridge system of the site, is a key feature of the open space network and an icon for the City of Brisbane and the Baylands. The highest point of the Baylands, Ice House Hill will include more rustic recreational trails that will supplement the lower-lying trails that circulate through the tidal and wetland areas. This 30-acre park includes woodlands habitat, as well as native grasslands and chaparral. This entirely undeveloped area will be a prime location for wildlife habitat and educational opportunities associated with the observation of the natural ecology of the Baylands.

Multi-purpose path and lookout points

Grasslands

Woodlands

Chapparal

Ice House Hill is located directly west of the Kinder Morgan Tank Farm and the railroad, and will be a prime feature of the habitat open space areas.

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The Charter High School Community Use Area offers the opportunity for joint-use recreational fields for both community and school use.

5.4.3.9 Charter High School Community Use Area

Recreation/ Sports Fields/ Courts

The Charter High School Community Use Area is the open area associated with the charter high school at the southern edge of the Baylands at the base of Ice House Hill. This approximately 5.3-acre site, though part of the high school grounds, may offer the opportunity for shared-use recreational fields, such as tennis and basketball courts, with the community.

Charter High School

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

5.4.3.10 Lagoon Park Closest to Central Brisbane neighborhoods and the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown, the 13.3-acre Lagoon Park will be located along the northern edge of Brisbane Lagoon. A variety of open space uses are proposed to meet the recreational needs of the community and to ensure the protection of habitat resources. Multi-purpose recreation fields and meadows will constitute the majority of the park, augmented with trails, picnic tables, boardwalks, viewing platforms, interpretive elements, and native gardens. Parking and restrooms facilities may be included as needed. A key element of this park is the Lagoon Nature/ Community Center. This facility will provide community space and programs related to the history and ecology of the Baylands. In addition, a non-motorized craft storage and launching facility may be provided for canoes and kayaks. Proposed habitat enhancement could include shoreline restoration of tidal marsh, upland coastal scrub, and grassland. Provisions for aquatic habitat enhancement or restoration should be explored. Access to the park will be provided from Central Brisbane via Lagoon Way, which will include a sidewalk and bicycle lane in each direction. The park will also feature recreational trails that link the Lagoon to the trails included throughout the open space network.

Meadows Lagoon Nature/ Community Center

Tidal wetlands along shore Lagoon Perimeter (not included in UPC ownership)

Non-motorized craft storage and launching facility

A non-motorized craft storage and launching facility for canoes and kayaks, and nature/ community center with interpretive elements are proposed as potential amenities within the Lagoon Park. Mission Bay and the Ecocenter at Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Head Park in San Francisco local examples of similar facilities.

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5.4.3.11 Lagoon Perimeter Extending south from Lagoon Park along the railroad, and south of the Lagoon near Sierra Point is an additional 11 acres of open space within the Specific Plan that may be maintained as a recreational and environmental resource. (UPC owns approximately 4 acres of this open space). Although no specific proposals are made for this area as part of the Specific Plan, the plan suggests that future recreational facilities established within the Baylands are united with regional networks through coordination with related recreational plans and planning entities. This includes potential trail enhancements within the City of Brisbane and a contiguous recreational trail loop around the Lagoon edge. Currently, the western side of the Lagoon directly abuts the railroad right-of-way and the eastern edge is outside of the Specific Plan area. A study to gauge the feasibility of this trail loop and to identify alternative locations, such as along Bayshore Boulevard, may be addressed separate from this Specific Plan in the future.

5.4.3.12 Bay Trail Greenway The missing segment of the Bay Trail planned from the northern edge of Brisbane Lagoon (at Sierra Point Parkway) to Beatty Avenue and Alanna Way is proposed as part of the Specific Plan implementation. This segment would tie into the southern end of the “Blue Greenway” portion of the Bay Trail. This segment of the Bay Trail is envisioned as a paved, off-street Class I bicycle path and pedestrian trail developed within a linear greenway along the extension of Sierra Point Parkway that transitions to sidewalks and a combination of Class I and II bicycle facilities on the northern end as Sierra Point Parkway curves away from U.S. 101. Extensive plantings within this 5-acre zone will screen U.S. 101 and shade the trail. A Class I multi-use path connection to the existing improved Bay Trail segment along Harney Way, however, would be preferable to the current unimproved segment

Figure 5.6: Sierra Point Parkway cross section showing Bay Trail Greenway/ Multi-use Path along U.S. Highway 101.

12' Multi-use Path 18' Path Zone

8' Bioswale

11' Travel Lane

11' Travel Lane

31' Roadway Reserve

87' Right of Way

Bay Trail Greenway

8' Bioswale U.S. 101

87’ Sierra Point Parkway (Interim)

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

along Alanna Way, and the Specific Plan recommends that the Association of Bay Area Governments consider such an alternative. Such a connection should be considered as part of the proposed ramp replacement and overpass construction project for the adjacent U.S. 101 interchange. The location of the Bay Trail is illustrated in Figure 5.2: Regional Open Space and Figure 6.4: Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation.

5.4.3.13 Landscaped Areas Landscaped areas include the portions of open space that will feature landscape treatments to screen undesirable views, mark entryways, or provide visual continuity at the periphery. These transitional areas will contribute to the overall natural landscape character desired for the Baylands. As a whole, these landscape areas, which include the landscape periphery around the tank farm and the strip of landscaped area along Sierra Point Parkway, total 9.7 acres, or about 1.5 percent of the Specific Plan area. These areas are illustrated in Figure 5.1: Open Space Framework.

5.4.3.14 Open Area within Development Sites Open area within development sites (“open areas”) will play an important role in achieving the open space character of the Baylands by effectively integrating the built environment and the open space network. As defined by the 1994 General Plan, open areas are, “parcels of land or portions thereof, primarily in private ownership, that serve to soften the impacts of urban development and otherwise provide primarily green areas and a feeling of ‘openness’ to the development pattern” (1994 Brisbane General Plan, page 86). Open areas include both landscaped areas, such as yards, gardens and planted setbacks, and hardscaped areas, such as plazas and patios. Approximately 16 acres of developable land within the Planning Area is anticipated as open area, as conceptually illustrated as Urban Open Space in Figure 5.5: Ecology/ Landscape Zones. Examples of these types of open spaces include private interior courtyards and landscaped front yards in residential development and the semipublic open spaces that will be included atop podiums in office block developments. These open areas will introduce a sense of nature and a place for outdoor enjoyment into the Open area can be included in front area setbacks (left), interior courtyards of residential or commercial developments, and at podium level in campus R&D buildings (right).

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built environment. These open areas form an integral piece of the natural focus of the Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for the Baylands.

5.5

GREEN SPACE ORIENTATION

The combination of the extensive open space network, windrows, and open areas will create an overall feeling of integration with the natural environment throughout the Baylands. Development zones will be segmented and contained by this green framework, and street alignments and visual axes will terminate at park areas and natural features such as the Bay and Brisbane Lagoon, always orienting the user towards the green space and larger natural setting. This framework will continually reinforce the importance of nature and public open space within the Baylands.

5.6

OPEN SPACE GUIDELINES

While parks and open space areas are intended to be largely undeveloped, a limited number of buildings and structural improvements will likely be introduced, including small-scale park and recreational, educational, and support facilities, such as interpretative centers, restrooms, a facility for storage and launching of non-motorized water craft, parking lots, etc. Additionally, the network of pedestrian and bicycle paths that traverse the open space areas will be developed in a manner that will reinforce the circulation hierarchy, link elements aesthetically, and complement the natural surroundings. The following guidelines and standards apply only to improvements in designated Open Space areas. In areas where visitor facilities may be included within open space areas, applicable visitor services should be provided. In these cases, individual project plans should be undertaken to address building design, interpretation, and necessary servicing and infrastructure. Paths

Path design will be tailored to respond to the needs of likely user groups, with a range of paved and unpaved options. In habitat observation areas, elevated paths may be necessary to limit environmental impact in sensitive areas.

Open space areas will clearly mark areas for pedestrian and bicycle circulation and incorporate natural plant materials.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

the site, such as dirt and gravel. When paving is necessary, porous pavement is encouraged. Paths may also be used in an artistic manner to draw users into focal areas using special pavement techniques. The overall network of paths and trails is described in greater detail in Chapter 6: Circulation, which includes cross sections for each trail and path type. Bridges Path paving can attractively highlight natural areas.

Bridges will strongly shape the overall image of the Baylands open space areas and enhance the visitor experience. A variety of bridge types may be included throughout natural areas to provide access to habitat observation areas or connect circulation elements. Bridges will be designed according to environmental and structural requirements in order to limit environmental impact. Bridge aesthetics will be coordinated to create a unifying architectural language while providing opportunity for place-specific variation to enrich the imagery and allow for functional differences.

Bridges will harmoniously blend with natural environment.

Site Amenities

In order to enhance public enjoyment and understanding of the open space resources, a number of amenities will be provided. A signage program may be implemented to guide and inform visitors through areas of interest, such as the wildlife refuge. Lighting will be used minimally throughout the open space areas unless needed for safety. Lighting and signage design should be low-profile and made with materials that complement the natural surroundings. Other

/ Seasonal Wetlands

Figure 5.7: Visitacion Creek Park Cross Section.

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amenities such as benches and drinking fountains may be located at habitat observation areas, education and interpretive centers, and trail heads, and should reinforce the material and aesthetic character of the Baylands. Building Design

Buildings and structures generally should be sited near the public street that accesses the area in order to facilitate utility connections and reduce intrusion into the open space. Buildings and structures generally should maintain a low-profile that blends into the open space setting and be constructed of natural, local materials. Buildings in open space areas should be designed to LEED Silver or GreenPoint Rated (or equivalent) standards or higher.

Lighting, trash receptacles, and seating areas may be included in public spaces.

Landscaping

Landscaping of open space areas should be natural in character and predominantly use native species. Habitat improvement areas will require the preparation of individual restoration project plans. In general, landscape materials should match the native species of the coastal grassland, scrub, woodlands, and marshland typical to the San Francisco Bay. Chosen plantings should require minimal

Buildings will be low-slung to integrate with topography.

Travel Lane

Travel Lane

70â&#x20AC;&#x2122; R.O.W.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 5. Conservation and Open Space

maintenance and control erosion. Landscape treatments used as accent materials in visitor or recreational areas should follow these same principles to continue the highest degree of natural aesthetic for the Baylands. Refer to Table 4-6 for the Recommended Tree List. Parking and Loading

Plant materials should be native species that complement the natural setting and require minimal maintenance.

To enhance access to the open space and recreational resources proposed within the Baylands, additional parking facilities will be needed in various locations. Those areas indicated as regional resources in Figure 5.3: Recreation will need to accommodate visitors. Shared parking based on divergent peak times should be encouraged for the regional recreation facilities that are located adjacent to land uses that include substantial parking as part of development standards. In general, parking for recreational uses should maximize use of on-street parking and/or share with adjacent uses. For example: recreational fields can share parking with the retail commercial uses located to the east, while the institutional use within the Roundhouse can share with the adjacent light industrial and school uses, as well as utilizing on-street parking. Additional parking will be addressed as part of individual project plans for regional facilities that are built within the Open Space designated uses. Parking lot design at each of these locations will be consistent with the natural character of the open space. Parking lot surfaces will use compacted natural materials rather than paving. Native plant materials shall be used to screen parking from streets, paths, and interpretive areas.

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159

6 CIRCULATION 6.1

PURPOSE

The Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan is designed to provide a safe, efficient, and attractive multi-modal transportation system for the future development in the Planning Area. It also forms a key component of the sustainability framework plan described in Chapter 3: Sustainability Framework. The circulation plan is consistent with the City of Brisbane General Plan policies and programs relating to new developments and to vehicular/bicycle/ pedestrian circulation and roadway design standards used by the City. This chapter describes the transportation and circulation network for the proposed development both in terms of its function as well as character. It identifies the components and design standards required for efficient access and movement of pedestrians, bicyclists, transit and vehicles in and around the Planning Area, including connections to adjacent systems, improvements to existing facilities, and development of new facilities. The chapter then establishes standards and guidelines for the overall character of roadway corridors, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;streetscapes,â&#x20AC;? within the Planning Area. For parking standards, refer to Section 4.10 Design Guidelines and Development Standards.

Future development in the Baylands will support a range of mobility options and an active pedestrian realm.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.2

CIRCULATION GOALS

The following are the circulation goals for the Baylands Specific Plan: • • • • •

A multi-modal circulation network that safely accommodates pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and vehicular circulation and enhances connectivity within the current network. Walkable, pedestrian-friendly districts that incorporate an interconnected system of sidewalks and off-street paths and trails. A comprehensive and inter-connected bicycle circulation system that provides access throughout the Baylands with connections to surrounding neighborhoods. Development mix and intensities adequate to support frequent and regular transit service to the Baylands, including both existing and proposed services. A street network that can safely accommodate the increased traffic volumes resulting from new development, including both north/south and east/west trips, while minimizing traffic impacts on Central Brisbane and adjacent communities.

Complete streets are proposed throughout the Baylands, which will include facilities for a range of circulation modes, including areas for transit, bikes, and pedestrians, and well-scaled street trees, and lighting.

6.3

SETTING

Figure 6.1 presents the existing roadway system within and surrounding the Planning Area. U.S. Highway 101 (U.S. 101) provides direct north-south regional access to the Baylands. Other major access roads to the Planning Area include: Bayshore Boulevard, Geneva Avenue, Tunnel Avenue, Guadalupe Canyon Parkway, Valley Drive, Lagoon Way, Beatty Road, and Sierra Point Parkway. The Union Pacific/Caltrain commuter rail tracks cut northsouth across the Baylands, and since no at-grade crossings are allowed, the tracks present a physical barrier to east-west movement. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

161 Specific Plan Boudary

Candlestick Point/ U.S. 101 Interchange

Sierra Point/ U.S. 101 Interchange

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Universal Paragon Corporation

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350

700

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.3.1 Highway and Roadway Systems

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U.S. 101 is a major freeway that provides direct access to the Planning Area. With four lanes in each direction in the vicinity of the Baylands, the freeway connects San Francisco with the Peninsula and San Jose. Two sets of access ramps connect the Baylands to U.S. 101: the Candlestick Point Interchange and the Sierra Point Interchange. The Candlestick Point Interchange provides direct access to both the northbound and southbound lanes. While the Sierra Point Interchange also allows travel in both directions, the northbound ramp is located approximately one mile south of the southbound ramp, and the route to the northbound ramp is not clearly signed.

Bayshore Boulevard is a major north-south arterial street that originates in San Francisco and extends, partially along the Planning Area, to Airport Boulevard in South San Francisco. Access from U.S. 101 northbound to Bayshore Boulevard and from Bayshore Boulevard to U.S. 101 southbound is possible but is circuitous and difficult to find. Bayshore Boulevard is generally a four-lane road with left turn lanes at major intersections. Access to the former landfill portion of the Planning Area from Bayshore Boulevard is via Tunnel Avenue.

Geneva Avenue is a major east-west arterial street that connects Bayshore Boulevard in Daly City with Interstate 280 (I-280) in San Francisco. It varies in width from four to six lanes. There is presently no direct access from Geneva Avenue to the Planning Area; Geneva Avenue traffic must use Bayshore Boulevard to connect to Tunnel Avenue. In both the San Francisco and San Mateo County Congestion Management Plans, Geneva Avenue is identified as a Principal Arterial Street.

Guadalupe Canyon Parkway is a major east-west arterial road in the City of Brisbane that provides access between Bayshore Boulevard and I-280 in Daly City. The parkway, which has two travel lanes in each direction, is a hilly and winding road with relatively low traffic volumes.

Valley Drive is a major east-west collector street in the City of Brisbane that provides access from Bayshore Boulevard to the Brisbane Industrial Park.

Old County Road is a major east-west collector street in the City of Brisbane. West of Bayshore Boulevard, Old County Road provides access to Central Brisbane, and east of Bayshore Boulevard, the road becomes Tunnel Avenue.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

Lagoon Way is a short but major east-west collector street within the Planning Area that links Tunnel Avenue and Sierra Point Parkway. As the primary gateway from U.S. 101 to the City of Brisbane, the street serves important traffic and symbolic roles. While the U.S. 101 southbound ramps are directly accessible from Lagoon Way, northbound ramps are only accessible by a circuitous route that requires using Sierra Point Parkway to travel beneath the freeway.

Tunnel Avenue is a two-lane north-south collector street that begins and ends at Bayshore Boulevard. Approximately two-miles long, Tunnel Avenue bisects the Planning Area. Much of Tunnel Avenue is within the City of Brisbane, though the northernmost section is located within San Francisco. Between Sierra Point Lumber and the Tunnel Avenue Overpass, the roadway is presently within the ownership of UPC. The northern portion of Tunnel Avenue closely parallels railroad tracks adjacent to the Caltrain Bayshore Station, and there is currently a station entry and small parking area accessed from Tunnel Avenue.

Beatty Road is an east-west collector street in the City of Brisbane that provides access from U.S. 101 southbound to Tunnel Avenue. Bordering a northern portion of the Planning Area, Beatty Road also provides access to U.S. 101 northbound via Alana Way, which includes a narrow three-lane underpass beneath U.S. 101 (two lanes westbound and one lane eastbound), and Harney Way in Brisbane and San Francisco. This route beneath the underpass also serves an unimproved on-street portion of the regional Bay Trail, which presently terminates at Beatty Road.

Sierra Point Parkway is a north-south collector street in the City of Brisbane that connects the U.S. 101 southbound ramps near Lagoon Way with the northbound ramps and the Sierra Point commercial development on the east side of the freeway. Sierra Point Parkway serves as an on-street portion of the regional Bay Trail that includes bicycle lanes and sidewalks.

163

6.3.2 Roadway Systems Performance Standards The 1994 Brisbane General Plan has established transportation system performance standards for the City’s roadway systems. The adopted standard for all City intersections is Level of Service (LOS) D, except for the intersections of Bayshore Boulevard with Old County Road and San Bruno Avenue, where an LOS C must be maintained. LOS is a qualitative description of an intersection’s performance based on the average stop delay per vehicle. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Policy 6-1:

The intersection Level of Service (LOS) in the Planning Area and those areas of the City affected by Planning Area development shall be consistent with the performance standards established in the General Plan.

6.3.3 Transit Systems There are three transit agencies that provide bus or rail service within the vicinity of the Planning Area. There is currently bus service provided adjacent to the Planning Area. The Sunnydale Station of the San Francisco Municipal Railway (MUNI) T-Third light rail line is located near the northwestern boundary of the Planning Area. These are illustrated in Figure 6.4: Transit Circulation. •

San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans) operates two bus lines (292 and 397) that run on Bayshore Boulevard adjacent to the Planning Area. In addition, SamTrans operates three shuttles that travel between Caltrain’s Bayshore Station, BART’s Balboa Station, downtown Brisbane and the Crocker Industrial Park.

MUNI currently operates several local and express bus lines, such as 8X, 8AX, 8BX, 9, 9L, 56, primarily along Bayshore Boulevard to the north of the Plan Except for 56, which is a local bus route from the San Francisco Executive Park to Visitacion Valley, the other lines connect Visitacion Valley with downtown San Francisco.

North of Geneva Avenue, the MUNI Third Street light rail (T-Third), runs in the median of Bayshore Boulevard. The T-Third’s southern terminus is currently just south

SamTrans, serving San Mateo County, has two bus lines that currently operate in the vicinity of the Planning Area on Bayshore Blvd.

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San Francisco’s MUNI T-Third Line operates services between San Francisco and the Planning Area via Bayshore Boulevard.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

165

of Sunnydale Avenue, on Bayshore Boulevard. The T-Third connects the Planning Area to San Francisco’s easternmost neighborhoods, including the newly-redeveloped Mission Bay area, downtown San Francisco, and continues in southwest direction to the Balboa Park Station as the line becomes the K-Ingleside. •

Caltrain provides commuter rail services from San Francisco to Gilroy. The Bayshore Station is located just north of Beatty Road and includes a pedestrian overpass with elevators, ticket machines, and furnished waiting areas. As of January 2011, forty out of Caltrain’s eighty-six daily weekday trains, however, stop at the Bayshore Station. The majority of Caltrain’s service is now comprised of “Baby Bullet” and “Limited Stop” trains that make limited station stops to decrease travel time between major destinations, but the Bayshore Station is not presently served by Baby Bullet trains, and only half of the Limited Stop trains. There is a limited parking lot on the east side of the Bayshore Station that is generally well-utilized on typical weekdays.

MUNI is planning for the development of a new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line that will connect the Planning Area eastward to Candlestick Stadium and beyond and westward to the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Balboa Park Station, which also serves several other MUNI light rail and bus lines. The alignment of the BRT is under review, but portions of it are expected to be within or near the Planning Area.

Several private commuter shuttles currently operate between business campuses at Sierra Point in Brisbane, business campus and residences at Executive Park in San Francisco, Caltrain’s Bayshore Station, and BART’s and MUNI’s Balboa Park Station.

MUNI is proposing a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) that would link the Planning Area to Candlestick Point and other regional transit options.

Caltrain currently passes through the Planning Area on the existing rail right-of-way. The proposed Intermodal Station would include a Caltrain stop within the Planning Area.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.4

TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION PLAN

The transportation and circulation system for the Planning Area implements the transportation policies established in the Brisbane General Plan. These policies address Traffic Flow, Convenience and Access (Section VI.1); Traffic Safety (Section VI.2); Transit and Transportation Management (Section VI.3); Parking (Section VI.4); Bicycles (Section V1.5); Pedestrians (Section V1.6); and Circulation and Land Use (Section VI.7). The circulation network not only provides the structure for development within the Planning Area but also constitutes the first step in implementing both the comprehensive and integrated circulation network envisioned in this Plan, the Brisbane General Plan, and a more recent effort, the Bi-County Transportation Study. The latter is a collaboration between the Cities of Brisbane and Daly City, the City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo County, and the City and County of San Francisco.

6.4.1 Circulation System and Functional Classification The Plan’s functional classification of roadways is consistent with the Brisbane General Plan. The circulation system consists of arterial, collector, and local streets as shown in Figure 6.2 and Table 6-1.

6.4.2 Streets and Access The circulation objective of the Plan is to provide for the safe and efficient movement of people and goods into and through the Planning Area. U.S. 101 will continue to serve as the key regional vehicular access to the Planning Area. The two major access points are the Candlestick Point Interchange at Harney Way/Alana Way and Sierra Point Interchange at Sierra Point Parkway/Lagoon Way. The Candlestick Point Interchange will provide primary access to the East Geneva district with secondary access to the Visitacion Green North District. The Sierra Point Parkway Interchange will provide primary access to the Visitacion Green South and Lagoon Districts. The Geneva Avenue extension from Bayshore Boulevard to U. S. 101—proposed in the General Plan and described in Section 6.4.3—will be constructed to serve as the major gateway to the adjacent commercial and residential land use districts.

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A variety of options are being considered for reconfiguring the existing intersection of Alana Way, Thomas Mellon Circle, Harney Way and the U.S. 101 Interchange in order to accommodate future traffic conditions. The City of Brisbane shall coordinate with the San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) and Caltrans to ensure project-


LEGEND

167 6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan Freeway

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BRISBANE LAGOON

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Table 6-1: Circulation System and Functional Classifications Street

Functional Classification

Extent

Geneva Avenue

Arterial

Extended from Bayshore Boulevard to the U. S. Hwy 101 southbound ramps at Beatty Avenue/ Alana Way

Bayshore Boulevard

Arterial

U.S. 101 in San Francisco to U.S. 101 near the Brisbane and South San Francisco border/ Alana

Sierra Point Parkway

Arterial

Beatty Avenue to Lagoon Way

Beatty Avenue

Collector

Tunnel Avenue to U.S. 101

Tunnel Avenue

Collector

Realigned from Beatty Avenue to Lagoon Way; terminated at Lagoon Way

Lagoon Way

Collector

Realigned from U.S. 101 to Tunnel Avenue/ Bayshore Boulevard

Creek Parkway (D St. (East))

Collector

Sierra Point Parkway to Tunnel Avenue

Retail Main Street (P St.)

Collector

Tunnel Ave. to Roundhouse Arc Rd.

Roundhouse Arc Road (J St.)

Collector

Roundhouse Circle to Sierra Point Parkway

Roundhouse Circle

Collector

Around Roundhouse Green

Residential - Promenade (2nd St. East and West)

Collector

Roundhouse Circle to Sunnydale Ave.

Office (8th St. North)

Collector

Beatty Rd. to Sierra Point Parkway

R&D - Quad (7th St. East and West)

Collector

Roundhouse Arc Rd. to Creek Parkway

Residential Flats (L-S Sts., 1st-5th Sts.)

Local

Between Bayshore Blvd. & Caltrain tracks

Residential Townhomes (D-K Sts., 3rd-5th Sts.)

Local

South of Geneva & West of Caltrain

Office (L and M Sts., 6th-8th Sts.)

Local

South of Geneva, North of Roundhouse Arc Rd., East of Tunnel Avenue

R&D Area (E and G, 6th St.)

Local

South of Roundhouse Arc Rd., north of Creek Parkway

Alley

n/a

Locations to be determined per individual development plans

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

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6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

169

generated vehicle trips are accounted for in the Harney/Candlestick Point Interchange analyses and design. One of these options under analysis removes auto-traffic from Alana Way and replaces it with BRT. Executive Park Blvd West would then terminate at Alana Way, and Harney Way westbound would be widened to accommodate two right turns onto northbound U.S. 101, and three lanes of westbound through-traffic. In this scenario, two travel lanes would accommodate eastbound traffic on Harney, east of U.S. 101. A frontage road will be constructed along the eastern edge of the Planning Area, which will be named “Sierra Point Parkway,” extending the existing Sierra Point Parkway northward to link with Geneva Avenue. Beatty Road access will be maintained and will provide a linkage to Tunnel Avenue. A realigned Tunnel Avenue will terminate at a “T” intersection with Lagoon Way after connecting with streets in the East Geneva and Visitacion Green districts. Primary access to these districts, however, will be from the extended Sierra Point Parkway rather than Tunnel Avenue. Tunnel Avenue will provide access to the Visitacion Valley and Little Hollywood neighborhoods in San Francisco as well as the neighborhoods along Geneva Avenue. Access to and from Central Brisbane will primarily be from Lagoon Way, with its intersection at Tunnel Avenue reconfigured to provide a through way from Old County Road to U.S. 101. Roadway improvements shall continue to permit the safe movement of tanker trucks between the Tank Farm and U.S. 101. Figure 6.2 illustrates the Specific Plan vehicular circulation system and its connections with existing streets and roadways.

Streets throughout the Baylands will allow on-street parking, street trees, and building frontages that activate the street.

Many streets include travel lanes in both directions and separated (Class II) bicycle lanes.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.4.3 Transportation Improvements The Specific Plan begins the phased implementation of several transportation projects identified in the Brisbane General Plan and the Bi-County Transportation Study.1 The improvements within the Planning Area include the Geneva Avenue extension and Candlestick Point Interchange Improvements, both of which will require a combination of private and public funding sources to implement. Table 6-2 summarizes these and other Baylands Specific Plan improvements. The construction of transportation improvements will be phased with the development of the Planning Area to ensure adequate access and levels of service (see Chapter 8: Implementation). Policy 6-2:

Allow for extension of Geneva Avenue from Bayshore Boulevard to U.S. 101 as an arterial road with an overpass crossing the Caltrain tracks. The remainder of Geneva Avenue should be designed to include at-grade intersections with signals at appropriate locations. No grade-separated crossing to Geneva Avenue shall be permitted; except at Tunnel and (east of Tunnel). Design speeds shall reflect existing speeds on Geneva Avenue and Bayshore Boulevard, i.e. no more than 35 miles per hour; short-term onstreet parking shall be provided; and on-street deliveries shall be prohibited.

Policy 6-3:

Design streets to serve transit, non-motorized vehicles, and pedestrians.

Policy 6-4:

Design streets with sufficient, but not excessive, width to safely accommodate normal day-to-day traffic needs, rather than over-designing streets to meet worst-case scenarios.

Policy 6-5:

Coordinate the phasing of collector road improvements with the phasing of development to minimize localized traffic impacts.

Policy 6-6:

Design Roundhouse Arc Road with an overpass over Tunnel Avenue and the Caltrain railway to facilitate safe and efficient east-west circulation.

Policy 6-7:

All road rights-of-way and street improvements within the Planning Area shall be developed to City standards and may be dedicated to the City of Brisbane as public streets. All improvements attributable to private development will be made at the expense of developers and property owners prior to dedication.

1

Led by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority in partnership with several agencies from both sides of the San Francisco/San Mateo county line, the Bi-County Transportation Study aims to evaluate potential transportation improvements needed to address significant current and anticipated land use growth on both sides of the border. Originally scheduled to be completed in early 2010, the study has not been completed at the writing of this Specific Plan. Additional information may be found on the project website: <http://www.sfcta.org/content/view/319/166/>.

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Table 6-2: Roadway Circulation System Improvements General Plan and Bi-County Transportation Study Improvements Geneva Avenue Extension: Bayshore Boulevard to U.S. 101 southbound ramps at Beatty Avenue/Alana Way Road

- Extend new roadway using Arterial Street standards, with right-of-way reserved in median for future MUNI BRT/LRT (see Figure 6.5.1).

Sierra Point Interchange Improvements

- Reconstruct the Sierra Point southbound ramps to reconfigure Lagoon Way/ Sierra Point Parkway/ Sierra Point Parkway Intersection

Tunnel Avenue

- Rebuild street using Collector Street standards within realigned right-of-way (see Figure 6.5.12). Terminate street at a reconfigured Lagoon Way.

Lagoon Way overpass (currently Tunnel Avenue overpass)

- Add bike lane stencils to existing bicycle lane in each direction.

Specific Plan Improvements Lagoon Way

- Rebuild street using Collector Street standards within realigned right-of-way (see Figure 6.5.20). - Extend roadway from Sierra Point interchange to Bayshore Boulevard via current Tunnel Avenue overpass and roadway.

Sierra Point Parkway between Beatty Avenue and Lagoon Way, north of present Sierra Point Parkway

- Construct new roadway using Arterial Street standards (see Figures 6.5.14).

Roundhouse Arc Rd. between Roundhouse Green and Sierra Point Parkway

-

Creek Parkway between Sierra Point Parkway and Tunnel Avenue

- Construct new roadway to Collector Street standards (see Figure 6.5.11).

Candlestick Point Interchange Access Improvements

- Extend Executive Park Boulevard south as a two lane road to Harney Way. - Alana Way to be used only for BRT. Widen Harney Way to accommodate turn lanes for traffic entering and exiting U.S. 101.

Additional traffic signals and intersection improvements

- Construct additional traffic signals to allow efficient traffic flow at Geneva Avenue Extension/Alana/Beatty and Lagoon Way/Sierra Point Parkway. - Make additional lane and intersection geometric changes at Bayshore Boulevard/Old County Road.

Create overpass over Tunnel Avenue and Caltrain tracks

Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.4.4 Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation Consistent with the City’s emphasis on accommodating alternative modes of travel, the Baylands Specific Plan establishes a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system that complements and augments the Plan’s vehicular roadway system (see Figure 6.3). In keeping with the policies and programs of the Brisbane General Plan, the Specific Plan’s system of pedestrian and bicycle facilities not only connects the Planning Area internally but also links local and regional pedestrian and bicycle systems. The pedestrian circulation plan provides for sidewalks or single- or multi-use paths adjacent to every roadway within the Planning Area, thereby allowing complete pedestrian access. The Plan also establishes streetscape standards and guidelines (see Section 6.5 Streetscape Design Guidelines and Standards) to ensure not only the provision of these facilities but also the comfort and safety of their design. This includes continuous sidewalks along all streets and enhanced pedestrian street crossings at key intersections to facilitate safe and convenient walking. Enhanced pedestrian street crossings, which may include bulb-outs, are designed to calm traffic speeds and reduce crossing distances for pedestrians. Potential configurations of bulb-outs are illustrated in Figures 6.7. The bicycle circulation plan includes a comprehensive system of on-street and off-street bicycle routes. Through a combination of east-west and north-south on-street bicycle lanes and off-street multi-use paths, bicyclists can access any part of the Planning Area, including open space and natural resources. The variety of bicycle facilities and multi-use paths are illustrated in Sections 6.5.23 - 6.5.25. Policy 6-8:

Provide pedestrian routes—sidewalks, trails, or single- or multi-use paths— and provide for pedestrian safety improvements on all roadway corridors within the Planning Area.

Policy 6-9:

Ensure that the bicycle routes within the Planning Area provide direct and convenient access to various destinations, as well as to the City of Brisbane and the regional Bay Trail system.

Policy 6-10:

Provide at least one overpass over the Caltrain right-of-way and Tunnel Avenue to allow pedestrians and bicyclists to travel east-west between districts.

The Caltrain right-of-way and Tunnel Avenue are at a lower elevation than the majority of the Planning Area and create physical barriers to pedestrian and vehicular access. At least one pedestrian overcrossing will be provided over these areas to facilitate circulation for pedestrians and bicycles. One overcrossing already exists at the current Bayshore Caltrain station. In one scenario, this will remain and an additional overcrossing will be constructed as part of the DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


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Potential Trail Enhancement Potential City Pedestrian/ Bike Enhancement

Potential Overpass Location

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Multi-use Trail

Beatty Road 5th St.

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San Francisco San Mateo County

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F St.

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J St.

L St.

5th St.

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E St. .

E St

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B St.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

A St.

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BRISBANE LAGOON

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6.3 PEDESTRIAN & BICYCLE CIRCULATION

350

700

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Bayshore intermodal transit station, to be located just north of Geneva Avenue. In an alternative scenario, the existing overcrossing will be moved from its current location to the location of the intermodal transit station. These locations are illustrated in Figures 6.3 and 6.5.

Table 6-3: Bicycle and Pedestrian Circulation System Improvements Improvement

Location

Class I single- or multi-use paths (offstreet)

- West side of Sierra Point Parkway between existing onstreet Bay Trail terminus at the existing Sierra Point Parkway southbound ramp to N Street. - East side of Tunnel Avenue from Lagoon Way to the boundary of the Specific Plan Area (just south of Beatty Road)

Off-street trails (designed primarily for pedestrian use and may be unpaved)

-

Class II bicycle lanes (on-street) in both directions

- Both sides of N Street and 8th Street between Sierra Point Parkway and Beatty Road to the existing unimproved Bay Trail terminus at Alana Way - Geneva Avenue extension from Bayshore Boulevard to 8th Street - Neighborhood Retail (P) and Retail Main Streets (7th) - 5th Street between P Street and Sunnydale Avenue - 2nd Street and Roundhouse Circle - Creek Parkway - Lagoon Way

Sidewalks

- All streets, except where, as noted above, alternative facilities are provided.

Both sides of Lagoon Way and throughout Lagoon Park Both sides of Visitacion Creek Park (East) East side of Visitacion Creek Park (West) Throughout South Visitacion Park Icehouse Hill down toward Lagoon Park Roundhouse Green and to Bayshore Boulevard

Note: The connection to the northern portion of the Bay Trail is currently proposed as a combination of sidewalks and Class I and II facilities to the existing unimproved trail segment at Beatty Avenue and Alana Way, however a Class I connection to the existing improved Bay Trail segment along Harney Way would be preferable and should be considered as part of the proposed ramp replacement and overpass construction project for the adjacent Candlestick Point U.S. 101 interchange. Source: Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

The pedestrian network consists of sidewalks on the majority of streets, and a variety of recreational trails.

Mulit-use paths and trails are planned alongside streets and throughout recreational areas for pedestrian and bicycle use.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

175

6.4.5 Transit Plan Transit services to and from, and within the Baylands will be augmented substantially. Services will be united at a new intermodal transit station that would accommodate more frequent Caltrain services, the proposed BRT on Geneva Avenue, the southern terminus of the T-Third light rail, and MUNI and SamTrans buses. Transit agencies typically will provide sufficient services to serve the increased demand created by population and user growth. In addition to improving access, the transit network is a key component of sustainability in the Baylands. The Geneva Avenue extension design will reserve a right-of-way in the center median to accommodate long-term planned MUNI BRT service. In the near term, transit services will be available from the existing Caltrain Bayshore Station, which will conveniently connect with the Planning Area via Tunnel Avenue and Sunnydale Avenue or 5th Street, and MUNI and SamTrans buses along Bayshore Boulevard. Figure 6.4 illustrates these current transit routes as well as conceptual bus routing proposed in the Specific Plan to serve planned development. A concept plan depicting how the station area could be configured to provide convenient access to the Planning Area along Tunnel Avenue is shown in Figure 6.5. The Specific Plan anticipates that the currently operating SamTrans bus lines (292 and 397) and the three SamTrans shuttles traveling between Caltrain Bayshore Station, BART’s Balboa Park Station, downtown Brisbane and the Crocker Industrial Park, would be rerouted in the future to connect with the future Bayshore Intermodal Station; however, no re-routing is currently proposed. Several private shuttles currently operate between business campuses at Sierra Point in Brisbane, business campus and residences at Executive Park in San Francisco, Caltrain’s Bayshore Station, and BART’s Balboa Station. Private shuttle service may be included within the Planning Area to connect future offices and residences with transit stations. Policy 6-11:

Work with SamTrans to expand bus services into the Planning Area as development occurs. New bus routes should have conveniently located bus stops with easy pedestrian access. Each bus stop should be designed to meet the functional requirements established by SamTrans and should have sufficient amenities, such as bus shelters, benches, and route information.

Policy 6-12:

Encourage Caltrain to schedule additional Limited Stop and Baby Bullet stops at the Bayshore Station to provide faster and more frequent rail service as development occurs. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


176

T

SamTrans Existing Ave

SamTrans Proposed MUNI Existing

P St

.

2nd

Bay

St. ( Eas t)

sho

re B o

5th St.

ulev ard

nyd ale

To Balboa Park 9AX

BRT Proposed

292

Sun

9AX

San Francisco San Mateo County

LEGEND

To Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Shipyard and Candlestick Park

397 Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

MUNI Rail Proposed

T

Caltrain & Freight

*

xx

xx

Caltrain Platform

Transit Route Number Transit Connector Corridor

St.

Specific Plan Boundary

2nd

397

R ou n

dh

*

Intermodal Station

ouse Circle

7th St.

292 Ma in St.

Gen eva Aven ue

le

1/4

Mi

Bay

ue

Tunnel Aven

U.S. 101

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

St.) Roundhouse (J

sho o re B ard ulev

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

le

1/2

Mi

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

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N 0

350

700

1400 feet February 2011


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

SamTrans Connection to U.S. 101 North

397 T

BRT Extension to Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point and Candlestick Park

292

9AX

P St

9AX

.

Potential Pedestrian Overcrossing (Existing)

T

2nd

St.( E

as t )

5th St.

Existing MUNI T-Third LRT and SamTrans on Bayshore Blvd Proposed T-Third Light Rail Loop through Roundhouse district

e

nu

va

Potential Pedestrian Overcrossing

Intermodal Station (Caltrain/ BRT/ MUNI) Proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) on Geneva

177

e Av

ne

Ge

Transit Connector Corridor

397 292

SamTrans proposed extension through Roundhouse, Icehouse, and East Geneva Districts

Proposed SamTrans Extension along Promenade

Bus Rapid Transit

Intermodal Station

Pedestrian links / Transit Connector Corridor T-Third Light Rail Extension t.

PS

Caltrain Potential Pedestrian Overcrossing

5th

A pedestrian overcrossing will be included as part of the intermodal transit station, as illustrated. In one scenario, an additional overcrossing will be constructed in addition to the existing overcrossing at the Bayshore Caltrain station. In an alternative scenario, the existing overcrossing will be moved from its current location to the location of the intermodal transit station.

Cal

St.

tra

in

Figure 6.5: Transit Connectivity and Intermodal Transit Station Concept Plan.

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178

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Policy 6-13:

Improve access to the Balboa Park BART Station through extension of existing MUNI routes and proposed shuttle service.

Transit stops will be inciorporated into the streetscape design where transit facilities are proposed.

In areas where MUNI or SamTrans transit stops coincide with bicycle lanes (which are specified in typical roadway sections in Section 6.5) bicycle lanes should be redirected behind the stop or platform, so that transit passengers may await and board transit without conflicting with bicycle circulation. These individual transit stops will be developed as part of a separate detailed design process and incorporate the standards of the respective transit agencies.

6.4.6 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plans The Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s circulation concept aims to reduce automobile traffic, and a key component of this approach will be the implementation of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plans that encourage use of nearby transit and provide incentives to reduce single-occupant vehicle trips. In San Mateo County, the Congestion Management Program requires that new development expected to generate more than 100 peak hour trips incorporate measures necessary to reduce the net number of trips. Since development is expected to occur in several phases, TDM Plans will be prepared for each applicable development project as it undergoes Planned Development (PD) Permit review. A wide range of TDM measures is available; implementation will earn credits toward the mitigation of overall traffic impacts from future development. (See Table 6.4 for a list of potential measures.) Policy 6-14:

Require, as applicable, employers and home owner associations located in the Planning Area to implement applicable TDM-related measures to reduce vehicle trips, particularly during commute hours.

Additional measures are available as described in the City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guidelines for the Implementation of the Land Use Component of the Congestion Management Program.

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6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

179

Table 6-4: Transportation Demand Management Measures Element

Future

Designate a TDM Coordinator

The TDM Program includes a designated full-time TDM Program Coordinator in charge of the following activities:

-

Promote and manage implementation of the TDM program. Establish modal split goals. Develop a program to accomplish the goals mutually agreed upon with the City of Brisbane. Develop an information package of transportation services on project site. Monitor and update, as appropriate, the TDM program on an annual basis as the basis for updating the modal split status and the TDM program. Conduct employees and visitor travel surveys on a biannual basis. Coordinate with 5.11.org to establish a rideshare matching program. Coordinate parking management and the shuttle bus program. Help people plan their trips and work with transportation agencies and others to promote transit, vanpooling, carpooling and carsharing, bicycling and walking.

Promote TDM Program

Organize and conduct a Transportation Day Fair annually. The fair includes representatives from local and regional transportation agencies, the Bicycle Coalition, 511.org, and carshare companies, and provide information about transit, ridesharing and bicycling. - The TDM Coordinator would promote attendance at these events by providing incentives for employees and residents to attend the Fair, such as free transit fast passes, free bicycles, and food and drink. - Provide a centralized kiosk/booth with a computer terminal in a conveniently accessible area in each building where employees could obtain maps, schedules, and regional transit information (such as 511.org); enroll in web-based “car sharing”/”ride sharing”; and reserve car sharing vehicles. - Publish a quarterly newsletter with semi-regular update on transit and travel issues within the Baylands, containing highlighted program elements and benefits and contact information. - Create a dedicated intranet/web site/page containing relevant transit and parking information and related links. - The TDM program would include participation in the Commuter Benefits program for tax-free paycheck deductions of transit and bicycle commuter expenses. - Work with major employers to provide employees with an “Eco Pass” (transit pass) which would allow unlimited transit use in San Francisco or comparable benefits on other transit systems. Eco pass could be purchased at a discount bulk rate on a monthly and/or annual basis, and then be made available to all employees who work on the Project site. - Work with major employers to encourage compressed work weeks, flex time, and telecommuting.

Parking Policy

- Include a maximum permitted of one off-street parking space per residential unit within ¼ mile radius of transit station or BRT stop, as well as maximum permitted ratios for other development type. - Residential parking would be “unbundled” and sold or leased separately from units. Unbundling parking makes the cost of parking visible to households, and may encourage some residents to save money by opting for a single off-street space or no dedicated parking. Unbundled parking would also serve as a “self selection” incentive for residents who prefer to live in car-free or car-reduced neighborhoods. - Additional parking management strategies such as residential permit parking, time of day restrictions, parking technologies, and parking wayfinding would also be considered as needed to supplement other parking strategies.

Promote Carpool/ Vanpool

- Provide Rideshare matching program by 511 Regional Rideshare Program. - Provide free parking for carpool/vanpool vehicles. - Designate preferential carpool/vanpool parking spaces at parking facilities closest to the elevator(s) or main entrance to a building.

Promote CarSharing

- Maintain a sufficient number of dedicated “car sharing” (e.g., City CarShare, ZipCar, or similar vendor) parking spaces. - Investigate and implement, where feasible, “site license” arrangement with CarShare or another vendor that would allow reduced cost memberships to the employees and residents. DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


180

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Table 6-4: Transportation Demand Management Measures Element

Future

Promote Bicycling

- Install at least the LEED-level required number of bicycle parking spaces in or near each building. - Bicycle support facilities to encourage bicycling would include parking facilities for both residential and commercial developments (such as racks, indoor/long-term parking, locers, showers), attended bicycle parking and repair facilities at major destinations, and potentially a bike sharing or rental program. - Provide Shared Bicycle Program.

Promote Transit Usage

- Work with major employers to promote transit subsidy and commuter check program for its employees (Also referenced in Promote TDM Program) - Provide on-site sale of transit passes and commuter checks. - Work with the SamTrans, Caltrain JPB, and SFMTA to provide transit shelters at the bus stops adjacent to buildings. - Install “Next Bus” or similar technology at a prominent location to provide transit users with real-time transit and shuttle bus arrival time information. - A transit center at Baylands would enable efficient and convenient transfers among Caltrain/SamTrans buses/MUNI LRT and buses while providing a central location for transportation brochures and other information to be distributed and for attended bicycle parking. Major BRT stops throughout the Project site would also include information kiosks and real-time transit updates. - Exclusive bike lanes and frequent bus rapid transit (BRT) service operating in dedicated lanes with signal priority, would offer convenient alternatives to driving to, from, and within the Project site. Additional transit service would include extended MUNI routes, increased MUNI frequencies, and enhanced connections to the regional network (BART and Caltrain). Baylands will provide Right-of-Ways for BRT route and stations/ stops. - Homeowner’s dues would include the cost of “Eco Passes” (transit pass) which would allow unlimited transit use in San Francisco and/or comparable benefits on other transit systems. The Eco Pass would offer significant benefits including: a group discount (transit pass costs, while mandatory, would be priced significantly lower than individual passes because they are mandatory), a steady funding stream for enhanced transit service, and a “self selection” incentive.

Shuttle Service

- Provide shuttle bus connecting Executive Park, Baylands, the housing development on the Schlage Lock Site, and Balboa Park BART Station.

Guaranteed Ride Home

- Work with major employers in Baylands to provide guaranteed ride home services for employees when an alternative means of travel is not available.

Jobs-Housing Linkage

- By providing a range of job types (retail, research, hospitality, office, etc) and a range of housing types from affordable apartments to single family townhomes, the developments in Baylands would maximize the potential job/housing “matches” on site. - Encourage large employers to offer relocation assistance to employees who agree to become Brisbane residents.

Streets designed for Alternative Transportation Modes

- All new streets and intersections would be designed in consideration for the convenience and the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists. - Provide extensive Class I, II, and III bicycle routes within the Baylands. - Provide “Safe Routes to School” program.

Encourage Walking

- People walk more when destinations are within close proximity, along flat routes with easy street crossings, and through interesting areas with storefronts, street streets, street furniture and other pedestrian-oriented amenities. The Baylands would embrace these principles, with approximately 50% of development located within ¼ mile (5-minute) and up to 90% of development located within ½ mile (10-minute) radius of transit and neighborhood retail services integrated into residential blocks. All streets leading to the Caltrain Multi-modal Transit Center and BRT stops would have sidewalks and crosswalks. - A comprehensive wayfinding signage program would support the network of walkways and shared-use paths, encouraging pedestrian and bicycle trips.

Source: CHS Consulting and Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, 2011.

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6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

6.5

181

STREETSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS

The term “streetscape,” as used within this Plan, describes the area associated with a particular street, including the entire public right-of-way but excluding adjacent development. By considering how streetscapes look and feel in addition to how they will safely accommodate projected circulation (of all modes), the streets at the Baylands will surpass their primary duty of circulation and serve as distinctive public spaces. This second role partially complements the first, as pedestrians and bicyclists, in particular, are sensitive to the character of their surroundings, which are experienced without the protection of a vehicle. By scaling streets to reflect all of their users and providing landscape amenities such as street trees, attractive light fixtures, and other furnishings, the streets within the Baylands should serve as destinations as well as routes. Development immediately outside the public right-of-way can greatly influence a streetscape, and the development standards and design guidelines established in Chapter 4 are intended to work in tandem with the guidelines and standards stipulated here. Additionally, much of Section 4.12.2 Overall Landscape Guidelines is directly applicable to streetscapes and should be referenced for guidance on planting materials, furnishings, etc. The following streetscape design guidelines and standards describe the fixed and flexible characteristics of the streets within the Planning Area, as per Table 4-1, and identify specific design requirements. Following a statement of intent for the streetscape, bulleted guidelines provide general direction, and standards follow immediately thereafter in a table. These standards follow the City of Brisbane’s street design standards as well as the Caltrans and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Design Manuals. The standards reflect typical roadway speeds of approximately 25 miles per hour on local and collector streets and 35 miles per hour or higher on arterial roads, such as Geneva Avenue. As elsewhere in the Specific Plan, guidelines are intended to be flexible, whereas standards represent outright requirements, notwithstanding adjustments that may be made during individual development project approvals to reflect the most current traffic safety information (refer to Policy 6-16 in Section 6.6 Implementation of Specific Plan Circulation System). Roadway cross sections illustrating these guidelines and standards are provided for each named fixed roadway. Bulb-outs are included at intersection within streets in all locations where on-street parking is included. All roads include on-street parking except for Tunnel Avenue, Sierra Point Parkway, and the 70’ residential area streets where the MUNI LRT operates and groundfloor retail is not present. Examples of typical bulb-out configurations are illustrated in Figure 6.7.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


LEGEND

182

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

Geneva Avenue 68’ Residential - Flats

Sun

nyd ale

64’ Residential - Townhomes 70’ Residential Flats (MUNI)

S St

.

Q St

2nd

.

78’ Neighborhood Retail Street (MUNI)

.

68’ Residential - Townhomes Beatty Road

78’ Residential - Promenade

5th St.

.

St. ( We st) St. ( E as t)

R St

P St

Gen eva Ave nue

Ave

2nd

Bay

sho

re B o

ulev ard

San Francisco San Mateo County

56’ Residential - Promenade

OS

40’ Residential Area h 8t

t.

P St.

74’ Roundhouse Circle

.

St

St. 1st

N St. eva

Ave .

5th St.

3rd St

R o un

L St.

87’ Sierra Point Parkway

7th St.

6th St.

.

le

Ma in St.

L St

ouse Circ

64’ Tunnel Avenue

M St.

MS

t.

dh

70’ Creek Park Way

8th St

Gen

107’ Office Area 88’ Retail Main Street

K St.

56’ R&D Area - Quad

I St

Ro

(J St.)

Arc undhouse

66’ Office Area

2nd

H St.

64’ R&D Area without Curbs (Potential) 80’ Connector 74’ Lagoon Way Sunnydale Avenue (per SF Standards)

ue

k on P any pe C dalu Gua

vard oule re B sho Bay

U.S. 101

ast)

E St.

est) 7th St. (W

F St.

Tunnel Aven

G St.

7th St. (E

St.

G St.

G St

64’ R&D Area without Curbs

ay int Parkw Sierra Po

4th St.

J St.

UPC Ownership Specific Plan Boundary

E St. ay rkw

.

E St

a ek P Cre

est) . (W

st)

. (Ea

D St

D St

C St.

. way

Ice House Hill

Valley Dr.

B St.

Kinder Morgan Energy Tank Farm

A St.

Lagoon Way

BRISBANE LAGOON

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183

Table 6.5 Street Type Standards Key R.O.W.

PAVEMENT WIDTH

TRAVEL LANES

STREET PARKING

BIKE FACILITIES

PED. FACILITIES

BIOSWALE

SECTION

Geneva Avenue

140’

33’

11’ (4)1

22’ BRT; SamTrans

11’ (2)

5’ (2) (Class I)

10’ (2) (Opt.1) and 11’ (2) (Opt.2)

8’ medians (2); 3’ tree buffer (2) (Opt.1)

6.5.1

Sierra Point Parkway

87’

53’

11’ Interim (2); Buildout (4)

none

none

12’ multi-use path (Class I)2

8’ (2) with 9’ central median (Buildout)

6.5.14

70’ Residential Flats (MUNI)

70’

40’

11’ (2)

MUNI

8’ (1)

5’ (2)

10’ (2)

5’ (2)

6.5.4

78’ Residential - Promenade

78’

48’

11’ (2)

SamTrans

8’ (2)

5’ (1)

10’ (2)

5’ (2)

6.5.7

56’ Residential - Promenade

56’

38’

12’ (1)

SamTrans

8’ (2)

6’ (1)

10’ (1)

5’and 7’ (at park)3

6.5.8

74’ Roundhouse Circle

74’

38’

11’ (2)

SamTrans

8’ (2)

6’ (1) (Class I)

15’ (inner); 10’ (outer)

5’ (1)

6.5.10

64’ Tunnel Avenue

64’

24’

12’ (2)

none

none

12’ multi-use path (Class I); and 6’ (1)

11’ (1)

6.5.12

107’ Office Area

107’

36’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

6’ (2)

8’ (2)

5’ (2); 9’ central median

6.5.13

88’ Retail Main Street

88’

54’

11’ (2)

SamTrans

8’ (2)

6’ (2)

14’ (2)

5’ (2)

6.5.15

56’ R&D Area - Quad

56’

34’

12’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

6’ (1)

8’ (1)

7’ (2)

6.5.16

80’ Connector (Roundhouse Arc)

80’

50’

11’ (1)

SamTrans

11’ (1)

8’ (2)

6’ (2)

8’ (1); 10’ (1)

6.5.19

74’ Lagoon Way

74’

42’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (1)4

5’ (1); 6’ (1)

6’ (1)

10’ (2)

6.5.20

68’ Residential- Flats

68’

38’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

n/a

6’ (2)

5’ (2)

6.5.2

70’ Creek Parkway

70’

42’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (1)

6’ (2)

6’ (2)

8’ (2)

6.5.11

78’ Neighborhood Retail Street (MUNI)

78’

48’

11’ (2)

MUNI

8’ (2)

5’ (2)

10’ (2)

5’ (2)

6.5.3

64’ Residential Townhomes

64’

38’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

n/a

6’ (2)

7’ (2)

6.5.5

68’ Residential Townhomes

68’

38’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

n/a

8’ (2)

7’ (2)

6.5.6

40’ Residential Area

40’

28’

10’ (2)

none

8’ (1)

n/a

6’ (2)

0’ - 8’ (1) Raingarden

6.5.9

STREET TYPE

TRANSIT

ARTERIAL STREETS

COLLECTOR STREETS

COLLECTOR/ LOCAL STREETS

LOCAL STREETS

66’ Office Area

66’

38’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

n/a

6’ (1)

7’ (2)

6.5.17

64’ R&D Area without Curbs

64’

38’

11’ (2)

none

8’ (2)

n/a

6’ (1)

7’ (2)

6.5.18

Alley

20’

20’

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

6.5.21

Pedestrian Greenway

56’

n/a’

n/a

none

none

5’ (2) (multi-use)

8’ (2)

7’ (2)

6.5.22

Notes: 1. Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of times a facility occurs within the right-of-way. In the case of travel lanes, (2) means one lane in each direction, (4) means two lanes in each direction. In the case of all other facilities a (2) indicates that a facility occurs on both sides of the street whereas a (1) means it occurs only on one side. 2. Class I bike lanes are indicated parenthetically. Other bike lanes are Class II. Streets that do not include bike facilities are assumed to include sharrows. 3. Bioswales less than 7’ in width are structured bioswales while those 7’ or greater are vegetated. 4. Gravel parking shoulder on Lagoon side of street. 5. All widths are subject to change based on individual developments.

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184

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.1 Geneva Avenue (Option 1: Non-elevated portion of street)*

6.5.1 Geneva Avenue (Option 2: Non-elevated portion of street)*

*The Geneva Avenue extension is not part of the Specific Plan. These figures are for illustrative purposes only.

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6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

185

Description Geneva Avenue, stretching from Brisbane’s border with Daly City to the U.S. 101 Harney Way interchange, is expected to serve as a primary vehicular and transit entrance into the Baylands. Supported by active and appropriately scaled mixed-use, residential, and commercial development, Geneva Avenue will act as an urban boulevard with wide sidewalks and a right-of-way for future BRT service in a broad center median.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

140’ R.O.W./ 33’ uninterrupted pavement width on either side of landcaped medians/ BRT corridor

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

2 11’ travel lanes in both directions plus dual parking/ travel lane

Transit

22’ R.O.W. for proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) through center of road

On-street Parking

11’ on-street parking/ travel lane on both sides of the street

Bicycle Facilities

5’ separated bike lane adjacent to sidewalk on both sides of street

Pedestrian Facilities

10’ (Option 1) and 11’ (Option 2) sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

8’ landscape buffers on either side of BRT; 3’ tree buffer (Option 1)

Furnishings Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street in sidewalk planting areas at regular intervals of 25–35 feet, at grade or in slightly raised planters. - Street trees shall be planted in landscaped buffer medians at regular intervals of 25–50 feet, at grade or in slightly raised planters. - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height. - Trees placed at grade in sidewalks shall utilize a metal grate with a minimum dimension of 3 feet by 5 feet.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet average foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas. Luminaires shall consist of both vehicular and pedestrian types, mounted on separate poles and or on combined poles.

A street in Amsterdam provides a precedent for the proposed bike lane separated by a buffer on Geneva Boulevard.

The Embarcadero in San Francisco includes mutliple travel lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks with transit passing through the median, as is proposed on Geneva.

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Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.2 68’ Residential Flats

Description This street type serves as the primary residential street in the Roundhouse district, connecting residential flats with Geneva Avenue and other connector streets and arterials. The street type includes parallel parking, structured bioswales, and 10-foot sidewalks on both sides of the street to encourage a pedestrian-oriented environment.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

68’ R.O.W./ 38’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

none

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on either side

Bicycle Facilities

Bicycles allowed full use of lane

Pedestrian Facilities

6’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

5’ structured bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

187

6.5.3 78’ Neighborhood Retail Street (MUNI)

Description The 78’ residential street type applies to the Neighborhood Retail Street in the Roundhouse district. The rightof-way is specifically designed to accommodate light-rail as well as on-street parking and bike lanes, which are vital to achieving the expected street life of the Neighborhood Retail Street. Buildings along this street are medium-density residential flats that are lined with ground-floor retail. The street links Bayshore Boulevard with townhomes and Visitacion Creek Park to the west.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

78’ R.O.W./ 53’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction, shared with MUNI

Transit

MUNI light-rail operates within shared right-of-way with traffic

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on either side

Bicycle Facilities

5’ bike line between parking and travel lanes on both sides of the street

Pedestrian Facilities

10’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

5’ structured bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


188

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.4 70’ Residential Flats (MUNI)

Description This street type connects the Neighborhood Retail Street with Sunnydale Avenue north of the Planning Area, and serves as a Collector street. The street includes the potential MUNI T-line light rail extension, yet is distinct from the 78’ Neighborhood Retail Street in that it the streetscape does not include ground-floor retail, and therefore does not require an equal amount of on-street parking. This street type occurs along several blocks in the Roundhouse district that include medium-density residential flats.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

70’ R.O.W./ 50’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

MUNI light-rail operates within shared right-of-way with traffic

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking lane on MUNI side of the street

Bicycle Facilities

5’ bike line between parking and travel lanes on both sides of the street

Pedestrian Facilities

10’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

5’ structured bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

189

6.5.5 64’ Residential Area - Townhomes

Description The 64’ residential street type provides a north-south link between Rounhouse Arc (80’ Connector) and the Creek Parkway on the west side of Icehouse. The street forms the boundary between the Icehouse townhomes and Visitacion Creek Park to the west.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

64’ R.O.W./ 38’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

None

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on either side

Bicycle Facilities

Bicycles allowed full use of lane

Pedestrian Facilities

6’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

7’ bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas. - A different type of lighting may be chosen for the side of the street that abuts Visitacion Creek Park

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


190

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.6 68’ Residential Area - Townhomes

Description The 68’ residential street type is the primary street within Icehouse that provides the grid framework for townhome development. The street type links the district to Roundhouse Arc (80’ Connector), Creek Parkway, and residential areas to the north. This type differs from the 64’ Townhome type in that it has an 8’ sidewalk rather than 6’, which promotes a more prominent pedestrian realm. The street features one travel lane in each direction, with parallel parking, a bioswale, and sidewalk on both sides of the street.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

68’ R.O.W./ 38’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

None

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on both sides of street

Bicycle Facilities

Bicycles allowed full use of lane

Pedestrian Facilities

8’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

7’ bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

191

6.5.7 78’ Residential Area - Promenade

Description The 78’ Residential Area - Promenade occurs adjacent to the Promenade in the Roundhouse District. This is an undivided street that connects the divided 56’ Residential Area - Promenade couplet across other collector streets. The street includes a sidewalk, structured bioswale, and parallel parking on both sides of the street with one 11’ travel lanes in each direction.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

78’ R.O.W./ 48’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

potential SamTrans route extension

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on either side

Bicycle Facilities

5’ bike line between parking and travel lanes on both sides of the street

Pedestrian Facilities

10’ sidewalk on both sides of street

Bioswale

5’ structured bioswales on both sides of street

Furnishings Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


192

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.8 56’ Residential Area - Promenade

Description The 56’ Residential Area - Promenade is the street that loops around the Promenade central greenway in the Roundhouse district. The street is a one-way couplet except where it crosses major collector roads where it becomes the 78’ Residential Area type. The street features a 10’ sidewalk adjacent to residential buildings, with a structured bioswale, parking lane, and bike lane on this frontage. The street edge abutting the park features a 7’ bioswale and one parking lane.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

56’ R.O.W./ 38’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 12’ travel lane

Transit

potential SamTrans route extension

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on opposite side from park

Bicycle Facilities

6’ bike lane adjacent to parking lane on opposite side from park

Pedestrian Facilities

10’ sidewalk on opposite side from park

Bioswale

5’ structred bioswale on opposite side from park; 7’ bioswale adjacent to park

Furnishings

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas. - A different type of lighting may be chosen for the side of the street that abuts the Promenade


6. Circulation Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan

193

6.5.9 40’ Residential Area

Description The 40’ Residential Area street type provides the secondary street structure within the residential areas of the Baylands. This type exists in both the Roundhouse and Icehouse districts, connecting the wider, primary street types. The 40’ residential street includes a 6’ sidewalk on both sides of the street, one travel lane in each direction, and a raingarden/bulbout area on one side of the street.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

40’ R.O.W./ 20’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 10’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

none

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking with bulb-out on one side of the street

Bicycle Facilities

Bicycles allowed full use of lane

Pedestrian Facilities

6’ sidewalk on both sides of the street

Bioswale

8’ raingarden/ bulbout area on one side

Furnishings Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted in bioswales on one side of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height.

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas.

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011


194

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan 6. Circulation

6.5.10

74’ Roundhouse Circle

Description The Roundhouse Circle loops around Roundhouse Green, including six intersections at which points it connects to the Roundhouse Arc (80’ Connector), the 56’ Residential Area - Promenade in two locations, the Creek Parkway and a 40’ residential street. The circle will feature a 15’ sidewalk on the interior which abuts Roundhouse Green and a 10’ sidewalk on the outer edge. The outer edge includes a structured bioswale and a separated bike path. The two-way circle includes a 11’ travel lane and on-site parking on both sides of the street.

Standards Right-of-Way/ Pavement Width

74’ R.O.W./ 38’ uninterrupted pavement width

Vehicle Lanes/ Width

1 11’ travel lane in each direction

Transit

potential SamTrans route extension

On-street Parking

8’ on-street parking on both sides of the street

Bicycle Facilities

6’ separated bike path on outer edge of circle

Pedestrian Facilities

15’ sidewalk on interior of circle; 10’ sidewalk on outer edge

Bioswale

5’ structured bioswale on outer edge of circle

Furnishings

DRAFT SPECIFIC PLAN February 2011

Street Trees & Planting

- Street trees shall be planted on both sides of the street at regular intervals of 25–35 feet at grade in bioswales; - New street trees shall be a minimum of 15 feet in height, 6 feet in spread, and 8 feet in canopy height. - A different type of tree may be chosen for the side of the street that abuts the Roundhouse Green

Lighting

- Street lights shall be regularly spaced and provide illumination to meet the City’s minimum foot-candle requirements for street and sidewalk areas. - A different type of lighting may be chosen for the side of the street that abuts the Roundhouse Green


Prepared for the City of Brisbane, California by Universal Paragon Corporation and Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC, with BKF Engineers, CHS Consulting, Economic Planning Systems, Inc. and Biohabitats, Inc. February 2011

Profile for wrtdesign

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan  

Working with a developer-led consultant team, WRT prepared a Specific Plan for this 548-acre brownfield site adjoining San Francisco’s south...

Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan  

Working with a developer-led consultant team, WRT prepared a Specific Plan for this 548-acre brownfield site adjoining San Francisco’s south...

Profile for wrtdesign
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