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Hawaiian 2012–2013

L U N A R

C A L E N D A R

Ahupua‘a O Anahola • Moku ‘Okuna O Ko‘olau • Mokupuni O Mano-kalanipo-


Wainiha

Halele‘a

Lumaha‘i Waikoko Waipā Hā‘ena

Nā Pali

Hanalei

Kalihiwai Nāmāhana Kilauea

West Walakalua East Waikalua Pīla‘a Ko`olau Kāhili Waipake Lepeuli

Kalihikai

Wai‘oli

Hanakāpī‘ai

Ka‘aka‘aniu

Hanakoa Pōhauao Kalalau

Moloa‘a Pāpa‘a

Honopū

‘Āliomanu

Waiakalua

Anahola Kamalomalo‘o Waimea

Keālia

Kapa'a Kapa‘a Waipouli North Olohena South Olohena Wailua

Kona Lihue

Ha‘ikü

Niumalu Makaweli

Maps in this series derive from the following sources: Atlas of Hawai‘i, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, 1998 Waihona ‘Aina Corporation Hawaiian Government Survey Maps: 1869,1878, 1885, 1886, 1897, 1904 and Undated Hawai‘i Territory Survey Map, 1902 Office of Hawaiian Affairs, 2009 NASA Classified Landsat Thematic Mapper USGS Digital Elevation Models NOAA ETOPO1 Bathymetry 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Kīpū Kai

Māhā‘ulepū

Hanapēpē ‘Ele‘ele

Wahiawa Kalāheo

Lāwai

Pa‘a

Kōloa Weliweli

10

Miles

Produced by the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council pursuant to NOAA Award NA11NMF4410270 © 2012, Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council ISBN 1-934061-94-8

Kalapakī Nāwiliwili

Kīpū

Kaua'i Moku and Ahupua'a

0

Puna

Hanamā‘ulu

© 2011, Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council

Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council 1164 Bishop Street, Suite 1400 Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 phone: (808) 522-8220 Fax: (808) 522-8226 Email: info.wpcouncil@noaa.gov Web: www.wpcouncil.org


About This Calendar This Hawaiian lunar calendar features the work of students who attend the Kaiāulu Anahola after-school program in the ahupua‘a of Anahola, moku ‘okana of Ko‘olau, mokupuni of Kaua‘i. Under the guidance of Kumu Kamealoha Smith and Mikala Shofner, part of their science and Hawaiian language curriculum focused on the restoration of destroyed and neglected areas of Anahola Bay. Based on surveys and community feedback, the restoration of marine resources is critical to the survival of traditional practices including subsistence fishing and Hawaiian language use. The students began their training by learning about the traditional Hawaiian lunar calendar. The students studied the moon phases, the months and the seasons in Hawaiian. For most students, this was the first time they studied the Hawaiian cycle of moons as it pertains to the ocean and land resources. Students recorded their daily and nightly observations of the moon phases and changes in the weather. They also learned about Hawaiian place names, traditional fishing practices and water quality testing. Some of their findings are included in this calendar. The students gathered information based on the standardized calculation of the Hawaiian lunar month placements recorded in Hawaiian Antiquities written by Davida Malo (1793-1853). However, this calendar also features the traditional Kaua‘i names as recorded by J.M. Poepoe (1906) and N. Emerson (1898). The calendar also features information on traditional fishing knowledge from Ka Hana Lawai‘a (Kumu Pono Associates, 2003/2004).

The calendar was produced by the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, a federal instrumentality created by Congress in 1976 to manage federal fisheries in the US Pacific Islands. The Council coordinator for this project was Sylvia Spalding, under the leadership of Executive Director Kitty Simonds and in consultation with Council contractor Kalei Nu‘uhiwa, who provided the Kaua‘i lunar month calculations and worked directly with Kaiāulu Anahola. The tide charts are for Nawiliwili. They were produced by Barry Smith (University of Guam, retired) from data provided by the NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov).


Prior to Western contact, Hawaiians recognized two classes of food, ‘ai (vegetables from the ‘āina, or land) and i‘a (fish from the kai, or sea). In traditional times the ‘ai was always accompanied by tasty i’a. I’a was eaten raw, dried or cooked. ‘Ono (delicious) and maika‘i loa (very good) are words used to describe just how much Hawaiians are thankful for these makana (gifts) from the sea. Hawaiians often celebrated the ‘ono of the i‘a through song, chant and stories. Anahola, like other communities around Hawai‘i, are looking to strengthen accountability for the health and long-term sustainability of its marine resources through revitalizing local fishing traditions and practicing culturally appropriate resource management.

Photo courtesy of Kalei Nu‘uhiwa

Ho‘olauna (Introduction)


Welehu

November-December 2012 Tue 13 6

N

Start of Hooilo (wet season)

November

Hilo

6

6

Hilinamā

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Wed 14

Thu 15

Fri 16

Sat 17

Sun 18

Mon 19

Tue 20

Wed 21

Thu 22

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Fri 23

Sat 24

Sun 25

Mon26

Tue 27

Wed 28

Thu 29

Fri 30

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Sat 1

Sun 2

December

Huna

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

Mon 3 6

N

‘Olepau

Tue 4 6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

Wed 5 6

6

N

‘Kāloakūlua

Thu 6 6

6

N

Kāloapau

Fri 7 6

6

N

Kāne

Sat 8 6

6

N

Lono

Sun 9 6

6

N

Mauli/Muku

Mon 10 6

6

N

Tue 11 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Halaulani, The Anahola Muliwai According to one kūpuna (elder) the name of the muliwai (estuary) where the Anahola river meets the ocean is called Halaulani. In one of our local mo‘olelo (traditional stories), ‘A‘a Hoaka, the name appears as ‘Olali-moe-one-o-Halaulani (the delectable shallow-water fish). In the mo‘olelo, Kahala was ‘ono for that fish when she was ready to give birth to her daughter, whom she named Nalehuaolulupali. The muliwai in Anahola is a place where the waters from mauka (mountain areas) meet the waters of the bay. The quality of the water is a tremendous concern to all who use this area to fish, swim, paddle and surf. Kaiāulu Anahola students have been collecting data and testing the water quality in the muliwai for its pH, alkalinity and ammonia quantities. Preliminary conversations with others indicate that runoff and silt gather at the muliwai. Negative impact on the ecosystem is visible. After major storms, branches and other debris clog up the muliwai making the water murky. At one time a natural filter of hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) would have cleaned out the muliwai; however, it doesn’t seem to be intact today.


Makali‘i

December 2012-January 2013 December

Hilo

Hoaka

Wed 12 6

N

Kūkahi

Thu 13 6

6

N

Kūlua

Fri 14 6

6

N

Sat 15 6

6

N

Kūpau

Kūkolu

Sun 16 6

6

N

Hilinehu

‘Olekūkahi

Mon 17 6

6

N

‘Olekūlua

Tue 18 6

6

N

‘Olekūkolu

Wed 19 6

6

N

‘Olepau

Thu 20 6

6

N

Fri 21 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Sat 22

Sun 23

Mon 24

Tue 25

Wed 26

Thu 27

Fri 28

Sat 29

Sun 30

Mon 31

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Kāloapau

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Muku

Tue 1

Wed 2

Thu 3

Fri 4

Sat 5

Sun 6

Mon 7

Tue 8

Wed 9

Thu 10

January

‘Olekūkahi

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Nalu (Waves) in Anahola Bay Kā‘elo (Hilioholo) coincides with the beginning of the Kaiāulu Anahola lunar calendar project in 2011. Kā‘elo is mentioned as the time of year when the waves are the best for surfing. The Kaiāulu Anahola students observed people surfing in three areas: Aliomanu, Kanahawele and Halaulani. The students had a keen interest in understanding the relationship between Kā‘elo and surfing. Kanahawele was observed as being the most popular area. According to some surfers, it is the best place to surf. Kanahawele is mentioned in the story A‘a Hoaka as the place where ali‘i (chief) Kalalea and his best friend Palikoa would surf. Three types of waves occur in Anahola during the Ho‘oilo (cool, rainy) season. They are ‘ale ni‘au (waves that are formed when ocean waters are stirred up by the wind), ‘ale kualono (long swells that break in lines) and nalu halehale (called a “tube” by modern-day surfers).


Kā‘elo

January

January-February 2013

6

Hilioholo

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Fri 11

Sat 12

Sun 13

Mon 14

Tue 15

Wed 16

Thu 17

Fri 18

Sat 19

Sun 20

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Mon 21

Tue 22

Wed 23

Thu 24

Fri 25

Sat 26

Sun 27

Mon 28

Tue 29

Wed 30

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

Thu 31 6

N

‘Olekūlua

February

‘Olekūkahi

6

‘Olepau

Fri 1 6

N

Kāloakūkahi

Sat 2 6

6

N

‘Kāloakūlua

Sun 3 6

6

N

Kāloapau

Mon 4 6

6

N

Kāne

Tue 5 6

6

N

Lono

Wed 6 6

6

N

Mauli

Thu 7 6

6

N

Muku

Fri 8 6

6

N

Sat 9 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Manawa ‘Ino, The Storms of March 2012 On March 5, 2012, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported “the closure of Kuhio Highway, the evacuation of Anahola residents, and numerous other road closures, floods and landslides.” Kaua‘i County was under a severe thunderstorm watch that was in effect most of the night. Traffic from all over the island was diverted. Two kumu (teachers) from the project went to Anahola that night to survey the storm and take video footage as the storm hit Anahola Bay. For weeks following the storm, large debris dominated the landscape of Anahola Bay. Debris and an incredible amount of tree stumps littered the ‘aekai (shorelines) of Anahola. The community cleaned the beach for an entire day. The long-time residents knew exactly what to do after a storm of that magnitude.


Kaulua

February

February-March 2013

6

Hilionalu

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Sun 10

Mon 11

Tue 12

Wed 13

Thu 14

Fri 15

Sat 16

Sun 17

Mon 18

Tue 19

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Wed 20

Thu 21

Fri 22

Sat 23

Sun 24

Mon 25

Tue 26

Wed 27

Thu 28

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

Lā‘aupau

March

Huna

6

Fri 1 6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

Sat 2 6

N

‘Olepau

Sun 3 6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

Mon 4 6

6

N

‘Kāloakūlua

Tue 5 6

6

N

Kāloapau

Wed 6 6

6

N

Kāne

Thu 7 6

6

N

Lono

Fri 8 6

6

N

Mauli

Sat 9 6

6

N

Muku

Mon 11

Sun 10 6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


In April 2012, Kaiāulu Anahola students had the opportunity to play host to two Hawaiian monk seals, when a mother and her pup hauled up in an area called Kua‘ehu in Aliomanu, the neighboring ahupua‘a. Monk seals are known to come ashore quietly and give birth. This was the first time in a long time for our area. We were fortunate to see the pup grow over the next few weeks, moving from one area of the beach to another. At night when we would come back to see the seals, they would be gone and then the next morning they would return. The mother and her pup left after a few weeks, and we haven’t seen either since. We celebrated the arrival of our special visitors by writing about our huaka‘i (field trip) in our Anahola children’s story, ‘O Anahola, Ku‘u Kulāiwi.

Photo courtesy of Kalei Nu‘uhiwa

‘Ilioholoikauaua, Sila Hawai‘i, Special Visitors


Nana

March

March-April 2013

6

Hukipau

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Mon 11

Tue 12

Wed 13

Thu 14

Fri 15

Sat 16

Sun 17

Mon 18

Tue 19

Wed 20

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Thu 21

Fri 22

Sat 23

Sun 24

Mon 25

Tue 26

Wed 27

Thu 28

Fri 29

Sat 30

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

Sun 31 6

N

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Kāloapau

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Muku

Mon 1

Tue 2

Wed 3

Thu 4

Fri 5

Sat 6

Sun 7

Mon 8

Tue 9

April

‘Olekūkahi

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Kāheka, The Tide Pool of ‘Aliomanu Kua‘ehu point is one of several important wahi pana (celebrated or sacred places) in ‘Aliomanu, the ahupua’a that neighbors Anahola to the north. According to legends, Kua‘ehu was a kupuna (elder), very knowledgeable in the area of navigation. He would observe the stars and ocean patterns and report what he learned to the ali‘i (chief) Kapaopao. Today Kua‘ehu serves as one of the places where people enter the ocean to go deep-sea fishing. At Kua‘ehu, a kāheka (tide pool) opens to the ocean. There is always wave action just outside the pōhaku (stones) that serve as the main walls for the kāheka. Where the kāheka connects to the ocean, we observed a variety of plants and animals, including small manini (surgeonfish), āholehole (flagtails), loli (sea cucumber), ‘opihi (limpets) and an occasional appearance of puhi (eels). The two most common fish in the kāheka are the pāo‘o (Zebra blenny) and the ‘o‘opu ohune (tide pool goby). The pāo‘o is said to sit at the bottom of the ocean ready to dart quickly. Our studies indicate that our kāheka has these fish but not in large quantities.


Welo

April

April -May 2013

6

‘Ikuā

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Wed 10

Thu 11

Fri 12

Sat 13

Sun 14

Mon 15

Tue 16

Wed 17

Thu 18

Fri 19

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Sat 20

Sun 21

Mon 22

Tue 23

Wed 24

Thu 25

Fri 26

Sat 27

Sun 28

Mon 29

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

Tue 30 6

N

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Kāloapau

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Wed 1

Thu 2

Fri 3

Sat 4

Sun 5

Mon 6

Tue 7

Wed 8

May

‘Olekūkahi

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

Muku

Thu 9 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

On the moons that start with “‘Ole,” fishing activities should not be conducted because they will be unsuccessful.

www.wpcouncil.org


‘Imu Kai (Underwater Fish Trap) A summary of a prayer that appeared in a 19th century Hawaiian language newspaper illustrates the important role that fishing played in traditional times. He Mooolelo no ka Lawaia ana Ua akamai kekahi poe kanaka Hawaii i ka lawaia, no ia mea, ua kapa ia lakou, he poe lawaia. O ka makau kekahi mea e lawaia ai. O ka upena kekahi, a o ka hinai kekahi. A Story of Fishing Some of the people of Hawai‘i were very knowledgeable about fishing, and they were called fisher-people. The hook was one thing used in fishing. The net was another, and the basket trap, another. According to many who live in Anahola and neighboring communities, the only way to positively impact our marine resources is to change the way we behave in the ocean. Teaching our students traditional ways of fishing is a pertinent goal of Kaiāulu Anahola, so we built an ‘imu kai (underwater fish trap). The ‘imu kai is not necessarily an Anahola traditional fishing practice, but it is a practice we can use to teach kids about some aspects of traditional fishing. Under the direction of the kumu (teachers), the students had a chance to gather pōhaku (stones), build the underwater fish house and monitor the fish in the ‘imu kai. We made the ‘imu kai by piling stones into a mound. Like ‘imu kai of the past, seaweed grew on the stones and attracted fish. The fish trap was loosely built so water flowed through it and the fish sometimes hid inside it. According to some traditional sources, wahine (women) would mālama (care for) the ‘imu kai. The wahine would catch both fish and eel for mea‘ai (food). The ‘imu kai was meant to be temporary and would be disassembled after a period of time. We built our ‘imu kai in June 2012 and repaired it each time we held classes at the beach. We were challenged by people who knocked over the rocks because they didn’t know what the structure was and by strong currents pulling the rocks apart.


Ikiiki

May-June 2013 Thu 9 6

N

Start of Kau (hot season)

May

Hilo

6

6

Welehu

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Fri 10

Sat 11

Sun 12

Mon 13

Tue 14

Wed 15

Thu 16

Fri 17

Sat 18

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Sun 19

Mon 20

Tue 21

Wed 22

Thu 23

Fri 24

Sat 25

Sun 26

Mon 27

Tue 28

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Wed 29

Thu 30

Fri 31

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Kāloapau

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Muku

Sat 1

Sun 2

Mon3

Tue 4

Wed 5

Thu 6

Fri 7

June

‘Olekūkahi

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Aku (Katsuo) Cultural Exchange In June, Kaiト「lu Anahola students and staff welcomed Keiko Takano of Ocean Foods Cooking School from Kanagawa, Japan. Community members donated aku (skipjack tuna, or katsuo in Japanese) to our after-school program for this international exchange with Keiko-sensei (teacher). Keiko-sensei used traditional dressings of miso, sesame and ginger to prepare fresh aku in sashimi (sliced raw fish) style. Keiko-sensei compared the importance of miso and other traditional ingredients to our sacred plant, the kalo (taro). Keiko-sensei demonstrated use of every part of the aku including the bones to create Japanese soups and other Japanese delicacies for our students and staff. In addition to this, we had an opportunity to learn about the Japanese katsuo fishing culture.


Ka‘aona

June

June -July 2013 6

Kā‘elo

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Sat 8

Sun 9

Mon 10

Tue 11

Wed 12

Thu 13

Fri 14

Sat 15

Sun 16

Mon 17

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Tue 18

Wed 19

Thu 20

Fri 21

Sat 22

Sun 23

Mon 24

Tue 25

Wed 26

Thu 27

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

Fri 28 6

N

‘Olepau

Sat 29 6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

July

‘Olekūkahi

Sun 30 6

6

N

6

‘Kāloakūlua

Mon 1 6

N

Kāloapau

Tue 2 6

6

N

Kāne

Wed 3 6

6

N

Lono

Thu 4 6

6

N

Mauli/Muku

Fri 5 6

6

N

Sat 6 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Anahola has at least one prominent coral reef bordered by Kahala Point and Kanahawele. We are doing research to find out the traditional name for this reef. For our studies, we referred to it as Papa Iki (small reef). Based on observations, we know that the reef has at least one channel on the Kanahawele side, which allows fish to enter the bay. According to kūpuna (elders) the reef was once much larger and had more fish. The community used to gather to hukilau (fish by using a large net near the shoreline, which many people pulled together). The fish were so plentiful that everyone in the community received some after the hukilau. Others say that Anahola was traditionally known as the fish refrigerator. Today, Papa Iki has ongoing problems with its health, and area residents attribute this to a number of factors. At a global level, studies attribute gill nets, marine debris and ocean acidification as the main factors that negatively impact the health of reefs. Marine debris includes man-made objects disposed in the ocean and toxic run-off from the ‘āina. To mālama (care for) the ‘apapa (reef) in Anahola, we follow this code of conduct: • Don’t touch live coral. • Don’t step or walk on live coral. • Don’t take chunks of coral as souvenirs. • Don’t use bleach or other toxins to catch fish.

Photo courtesy of Kalei Nu‘uhiwa

Papa Iki, The Anahola Coral Reef


Hinaia‘ele‘ele

July

July-August 2013

6

Ikiiki

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Sun 7

Mon 8

Tue 9

Wed 10

Thu 11

Fri 12

Sat 13

Sun 14

Mon 15

Tue 16

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Wed 17

Thu 18

Fri 19

Sat 20

Sun 21

Mon 22

Tue 23

Wed 24

Thu 25

Fri 26

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Sat 27

Sun 28

Mon 29

Tue 30

Wed 31

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

Kāloapau

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Muku

Thu 1

Fri 2

Sat 3

Sun 4

Mon 5

August

‘Olekūkahi

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


NÄ Mea Kanu (Native Plants) According to experts, for plants to survive near the ocean, they must be able to live in poor soil with lots of salt and wind and very little rainfall. Along the Anahola shoreline, we identified six native plants—naupaka kahakai (beach naupaka), niu (coconut), lauhala (pandanus), la‘i (Hawaiian ti plant), milo (Thespesia populnea) and hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus). Non-native plants such as false kamani and ironwood dominate the beach landscape.

mil o

Most people in the area attribute the lack of variety of native coastal plants to land degradation and the introduction of foreign plants.

naupaka

p a n d a nu s


Hilinaehu

August-September 2013 August

Hilo

Hoaka

Tue 6 6

N

Kūkahi

Wed 7 6

6

N

Kūlua

Thu 8 6

6

N

6

N

Kūpau

Kūkolu

Fri 9 6

Hinaia‘ele‘ele

Sat 10 6

6

N

‘Olekūkahi

Sun 11 6

6

N

‘Olekūlua

Mon 12 6

6

N

‘Olekūkolu

Tue 13 6

6

N

‘Olepau

Wed 14 6

6

N

Thu 15 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Fri 16

Sat 17

Sun 18

Mon 19

Tue 20

Wed 21

Thu 22

Fri 23

Sat 24

Sun 25

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

‘Olepau

Kāloakūkahi

‘Kāloakūlua

Kāloapau

Mon 26

Tue 27

Wed 28

Thu 29

Fri 30

Sat 31

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

September

‘Olekūkahi

6

6

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Muku

Sun 1

Mon 2

Tue 3

Wed 4

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


As kia‘i kai one (caretakers) at Anahola, it is the kuleana (responsibility) of each haumana (student) to know a lot of information about Anahola Bay and to learn about aspects of the bay in the Hawaiian and English languages. The study is grounded in both Hawaiian and Western world views. Students were tasked with learning how to malama (care for) the bay based on the ‘Ōlelo Nō‘eau (proverb) “Ma ka hana ka ‘ike” (We learn by doing). This means, in part, to build one’s knowledge from direct experience in the kai (sea), working the land (in or around the kai) with one’s hand and discussing one’s experience.

By the end of the training, students should be able to • Incorporate the basic principles associated with the Hawaiian lunar calendar into their individual life as an essential cultural practice; • Learn to express different simple phrases in the Hawaiian language as they relate to the Hawaiian lunar calendar; • Apply principles of the Hawaiian lunar calendar to planting, fishing and monitoring coastal marine vegetation and fishing populations; • Understand the different careers one might pursue in the field of ocean resource management in which traditional Hawaiian knowledge is an essential component of the job’s function;

• Assist kumu (teachers) with collecting information for a Hawaiian calendar; and • Educate visitors to Anahola Bay about what they are learning. Our hope is to continue to supplement classroom learning with project-based learning so kia‘i in training have a place to apply what they learn in class to real-world situations in places like Anahola Bay.

Photo courtesy of Kalei Nu‘uhiwa

Kia‘i Kai One (Caretakers)


Hilinamā

September

September-October 2013

6

Māhoemua

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Thu 5

Fri 6

Sat 7

Sun 8

Mon 9

Tue 10

Wed 11

Thu 12

Fri 13

Sat 14

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Sun 15

Mon 16

Tue 17

Wed 18

Thu 19

Fri 20

Sat 21

Sun 22

Mon 23

Tue 24

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

Wed 25 6

N

‘Olepau

Thu 26 6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

Fri 27 6

6

N

‘Kāloakūlua

Sat 28 6

6

N

Kāloapau

Sun 29 6

6

N

Mon 30 6

6

N

Kāne

October

‘Olekūkahi

6

Lono

Tue 1 6

N

Mauli

Wed 2 6

6

N

Muku

Thu 3 6

6

N

Fri 4 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Keauhou (New Beginnings) When Kaiāulu Anahola introduced culture- and project-based learning to students, there was almost no written information about Anahola to reference. Nothing had been written about our ahupua‘a in Hawaiian for more than 100 years. We thought a book about the various wahi pana (sacred and/or celebrated places) in Anahola and a lunar calendar could give us the baseline information we needed to build our understanding and appreciation of traditional fishing and marine resource knowledge. Students at Kaiāulu Anahola started collecting information of the wahi pana for the Anahola book in February 2012. The students involved in this project were all elementary school students from Kawaikini Hawaiian Immersion Public Charter School located in Puhi. The students came to Kaiāulu Anahola three days a week in the Spring semester. ‘O Anahola! ‘O Anahola! ‘O ko’u moku e noho ai. ‘O ko‘u ‘āina e noho ai. ‘O ko‘u kulāiwi e noho ai. ‘O Anahola! ‘O Anahola! Mai Kalalea a Papaloa. Mai nā kuahiwi kualapa o Makaleha a ka hono‘o Anahola! Anahola is the district where we live, the land where I live, my homeland. Anahola starts from Kalalea until the reef called Papaloa, from the ridges of Makaleha until the bay of Anahola. Now we have a book and a lunar calendar we can use as a base to study about the ahupua‘a of Anahola and the larger moku (district) of Ko‘olau.


‘Ikuā

October

October-November 2013

6

Māhoehope

Hilo

Hoaka

Kūkahi

Kūlua

Kūkolu

Kūpau

‘Olekūkahi

‘Olekūlua

‘Olekūkolu

‘Olepau

Fri 4

Sat 5

Sun 6

Mon 7

Tue 8

Wed 9

Thu 10

Fri 11

Sat 12

Sun 13

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

6

Huna

Mohalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘aukūkahi

Lā‘aukūlua

Lā‘aupau

Mon 14

Tue 15

Wed 16

Thu 17

Fri 18

Sat 19

Sun 20

Mon 21

Tue 22

Wed 23

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

‘Olekūlua

Thu 24 6

N

‘Olepau

Fri 25 6

6

N

Kāloakūkahi

Sat 26 6

6

N

‘Kāloakūlua

Sun 27 6

6

N

Kāloapau

Mon 28 6

6

N

Kāne

Tue 29 6

6

N

Lono

Wed 30 6

6

N

Mauli

November

‘Olekūkahi

Thu 31 6

6

N

6

Muku

Fri 1 6

N

Sat 2 6

6

N

6

2 1 0 –1

www.wpcouncil.org


Kaiāulu Anahola is a project funded by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Castle Foundation. The project is dedicated to utilizing the Hawaiian language for diverse marine resource curricula. The goal is to provide job skills and career guidance as a means to better prepare and encourage ‘opio (youth) for the work in marine science, ocean resource management and other related careers where they can incorporate both Western academic education and native traditional knowledge.

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council has worked with communities in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands since 2006 to produce traditional lunar calendars to promote ecosystem-based fisheries management and support indigenous fishing and management practices. In Hawaii, the Council is a strong supporter of the traditional Aha Moku system of natural resource management, which recognizes the traditional moku (district) as the basis for cultural and community consultation, adaptive management, education, generational knowledge and a code of conduct. More information on the Council and the Aha Moku system can be found at www.wpcouncil.org and www.ahamoku.org. If your moku is interested in working with the Council on a calendar, please contact us at info.wpcouncil@noaa.gov.

He Wahi Mahalo!

Kamealoha Hanohano-Smith, Mikala Shofner, Adam Prall, Uncle Vern Kauanui, Jazzes-Lindsey Loulani Tiohionalani Kaionanapuaopi‘ilani Self, Jordon Kana‘i Guererro, Auntie Amanda Kaleiohi, Napua Jeffries, Kawaikini Public Charter School, Castle Foundation, Office of Hawaiian Affairs and Kapa‘a High School Hawaiian Language Class

ISBN 1-934061-94-8

Profile for Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council

2012-2013 Hawaiian Lunar Calendar (Kauai)  

This Hawaiian lunar calendar features the work of students who attend the Kaiāulu Anahola after-school program in the ahupua`a of Anahola, m...

2012-2013 Hawaiian Lunar Calendar (Kauai)  

This Hawaiian lunar calendar features the work of students who attend the Kaiāulu Anahola after-school program in the ahupua`a of Anahola, m...

Profile for wpcouncil
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