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W E ST O RA N G E T I M E S &

Health M atters

Obser ver

AUGUST

Observer

2019

Winter Garden, Ocoee, Oakland

YOU. YOUR NEIGHBORS. YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD. VOLUME 86, NO. 33

2019

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FROM THE GROUND UP Students to grow foo in low-income neigh bo d and eat healthy thr rhoods are learning ough Grow how Winter Ga rden.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

FOOTBALL PREVIEW

Get up to speed on everything football for this upcoming season. SEE PAGE 17.

In the Zone

YOUR TOWN TAKE YOUR SELFIE AT CITY HALL City Hall Selfie Day is back, and residents are being encouraged to take their best selfies in front of Winter Garden City Hall on Thursday, Aug. 15. Participants are eligible for a $50 Visa gift card. One prize will be awarded in each of 10 categories: Best Daytime Selfie, Best Nighttime Selfie, most Creative, Funniest, Best Dressed, Best Hat, Best Individual, Best Group, Best Use of Props and Best Selfie with Kids. Post the selfie to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter with #CityHallSelfie and upload it to wintergardenexperience. com/cityhallselfieday.

As we launch our new Observer School Zone section, we welcome Water Spring Elementary and Horizon West Middle schools to our community. PAGES 8-9.

Ocoee staff proposes decreasing millage rate LOCATION IS KEY City staff presented Danielle Hendrix

Felix Lopez was excited to start kindergarten at Water Spring Elementary School Monday, Aug. 12.

Development expected to bring new businesses

a budget balanced at 5.25 mills for the upcoming fiscal year.

The new site approved at 15500 Tucker Oaks Blvd. includes a warehouse, medical offices and commercial buildings. HANNAH SWAYZE NEWS EDITOR

Winter Garden City Commissioners approved a new site plan at a meeting Aug. 8 that is expected to bring more businesses to the Tucker Oaks area of West Colonial Drive.

The new development site is a 9.94-acre parcel that is located at 15500 W. Colonial Drive where the road intersects with Tucker Oaks Boulevard. Plans include 12 buildings altogether: one warehouse, three commercial buildSEE PROJECT PAGE 4

ERIC GUTIERREZ STAFF WRITER

From Winter Garden to Horizon West, we take a look at local retail rental costs. SEE PAGE 3.

Ocoee residents might see their property taxes lowered for the upcoming fiscal year. City staff presented a budget for the 2019-20 fiscal year with a proposed millage rate at 5.25. This proposed rate is a reduction of 0.25 mills from the current millage rate of 5.5. Although a lower millage rate SEE OCOEE PAGE 4


YOUR CALENDAR

THURSDAY, AUG. 15

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COFFEE WITH THE TOWN MANAGER 9 to 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, at the Oakland Meeting Hall, 221 N. Arrington St. The town of Oakland is hosting a coffee time with Town Manager Steve Koontz so residents can learn more about town services and programs, ask questions and share their thoughts and ideas. Groups, churches or businesses interested in hosting a Coffee with the Town Manager event can contact Elise Hui at (407) 656-1117, Ext. 2110, ehui@ oaklandfl.gov. GENEALOGY MYTHS AND LEGENDS: FACT, FICTION OR BOTH? 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, at the West Oaks Library, 1821 E. Silver Star Road, Ocoee. Family stories that are handed down from generation to generation are

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a wonderful thing, but beware. Explore common family legends and the nuggets of truth behind them. (407) 835-7323.

FRIDAY, AUG. 16

ART EXHIBITION: SOGNI D’ORO 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, at the Oakland Manor House, 620 N. Tubb St. The new art exhibition will feature an intimate view of the artist’s interpretation of the dreamscape. Admission is free, but guests must RSVP because space is limited. Hosted by Oakland Manor House Gallery and Artscape. (407) 614-8219.

SATURDAY, AUG. 17

BOOK CLUB FOR ART LOVERS 4 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at the SoBo Gallery, 127 S. Boyd St., Winter Garden. Adrienne Lee will lead a discussion of the novel “A Piece of the World,” by Christina Baker Kline. Each session will include art historical references, insightful discussions and images of the artworks mentioned in the books read. Cost is $10 for Winter Garden Art Association members, $15 for others. Wgart.org or (407) 347-7996.

BLACK COW JUMPS AT WGHF 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Winter Garden Heritage Foundation, 21 E. Plant St. Theatrical philosopher Banks Helfrich experiments with reality and performance. Black Cow Jumps explores reality through life that creates a mindful and comedic portrayal of the characters we play, as we try on the shoes of maturity. Black Cow Jumps is soup. Life’s Soup. Human Improv. The show is free and includes wine, cheese and crackers, but tickets are necessary for entrance at eventbrite.com/e/ black-cow-jumps-into-the-winter-garden-heritage-foundationtickets. For information, email bankshelfrich@gmail.com. WEST ORANGE HABITAT RESTORE ANNIVERSARY 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at the West Orange Habitat For Humanity ReStore, 13369 W. Colonial Drive, Winter Garden. Join the party to shop, win and celebrate. Enjoy free food, entertainment and drinks and win one of the $100 gift certificates. The Kevin Sutton Show from ESPN Orlando 580 FM will be joining the fun. Westorangehabitat.org.

SUNDAY, AUG. 18

JCCF FAMILY FUN BOWL Registration at 1:30 p.m., event 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, at Brunswick Wekiva Lanes, 2160 E. Semoran Blvd., Apopka. Enjoy a day of bowling for a great cause. All ages are welcome. Prizes will be awarded for best scores. Cost is $20 per bowler. Proceeds benefit the Jimmy Crabtree Cancer Fund to assist local families battling cancer. Register at jccancerfund.org.

MONDAY, AUG. 19

CUISINE CORNER: TEA EDUCATION & TEA TESTING 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19, at the Winter Garden Library, 805 E. Plant St. Enjoy tea education, from non-tea drinkers to those who have drank tea their whole life. Two teas will be served. Guests will learn about the history of tea, fun facts and different types of teas. Registration required at (407) 835-7323.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 21

WOMEN’S SELFDEFENSE CLASS 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21, at the Winter Garden Police Department, 251 W. Plant St. A police officer will hold a basic women’s self-defense class using S.A.F.E. self-defense

techniques. For women 13 and older. Register at (407) 6563636, Ext. 4076 or Kprice@ wgpd.com

SATURDAY, AUG. 24

DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB OF WEST ORANGE COUNTY 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at Ocoee Women’s Club, 4 N. Lakewood Ave., Ocoee. Light refreshments will be served during this third anniversary celebration. RSVP at dwcwocbirthday.eventbrite.com.

SUNDAY, AUG. 25

SUNDAY-SUNDAE Following the 11 a.m. service Sunday, Aug. 25, at Macedonia Freewill Baptist Church, 871 E. Bay St., Winter Garden. Enjoy an ice cream sundae with all the toppings. (407) 247-7316.

FRIDAY, AUG. 30

IRONMEN OF GOD COFFEE 7 to 8 a.m. Friday, Aug. 30, above Axum Coffee, 146 W. Plant St., Winter Garden. Join with other Christians in this independent men’s ministry focused on serving the men in the community. The guest speaker is Jeff Wallace. IronMenofGod.com.

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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

OrangeObserver.com

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

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Rent rundown TIM FREED MANAGING EDITOR

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or entrepreneurs hoping to make their small business dreams come true, West Orange County and its various communities are a popular place for a new storefront. West Orange’s booming residential real estate market combined with demographics make the area a prime spot for businesses to call home, said InVenture Group LLC Principal Mike Bagdonas, who has been helping businesses find space for more than 20 years. “Right now, I don’t think we’re seeing a slowdown at this point in time,” Bagdonas said. “I’m hopeful that this growth boom in Central Florida — particularly the West Orange area — continues to happen.” From established developments to up-and-coming projects, here’s a look at different areas in West Orange County as far as retail.

Experts and officials report West Orange communities continue to be hot destinations for retail space.

WINTER GARDEN

Downtown Winter Garden has grown more popular for retail over the years ever since a streetscape project back in 2003, City Manager Michael Bollhoefer said. “Now, it’s considered one of the top spots in the state for people wanting to bring retail to a small downtown,” he said. There’s currently a six-month waiting list for many of the spaces in downtown Winter Garden, Bollhoefer said, but more space is on the way in downtown Winter Garden — the City Commission recently approved a 45,000-square-foot building with office and retail on the eastern side of City Hall. “After that, we’re slowly but surely reaching buildout where there won’t be any more room,” Bollhoefer said. There might be a waiting list because of the influx of interest, but Bollhoefer said that was part of the goal. “When we were doing our redevelopment, it was to make Winter Garden the place you want to be,” Bollhoefer said. “We’ve had a whole thing about creating place and increasing that desirability and we’ve been very successful at it. I’d rather have a waiting list than a list of places that aren’t rented.” Executive Managing Director Jorge Rodriguez, of Colliers International, said Winter Garden Village at Fowler Groves is another major destination for retail space — if you can find a vacancy. “Winter Garden Village continues to be a monster in our market — I consider it to be the Waterford Lakes of west Orlando,” Rodriguez said. “Hardly any vacancy comes up there, and when it does, typically it’s already been leased. I have been very surprised, positively, on the amount of interest and growth that I’ve seen in the Colonial and Daniels area.” OCOEE

Central Florida as a whole is a hot

Downtown Winter Garden has become increasingly popular ever since a streetscape project in 2003.

AVERAGE PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT: DOWNTOWN WINTER GARDEN: $30 DOWNTOWN WINDERMERE: $26 OCOEE’S FIFTY WEST REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT: $35 to $45 HAMLIN: STARTING IN THE HIGH-$30S DR. PHILLIPS: $45 SUMMERPORT: $45 Sources: Winter Garden City Manager Michael Bollhoefer, Windermere Town Council Member and Real Estate Broker Loren “Andy” Williams, Ocoee Deputy Development Services Director Ginger Corless, Principal Mike Bagdonas of InVenture Group LLC, Boyd Development

market, and Ocoee is no exception, Bagdonas said. Ocoee Deputy Development Services Director Ginger Corless said the vacancy rate is extremely low in downtown Ocoee, with nearly every building being leased or occupied. The Fifty West Redevelopment District located between State Road 429, and Clarke Road is thriving as well, with less than 2% vacancy, she said. “The economic outlook for the Fifty West Redevelopment District

“I’m hopeful that this growth boom in Central Florida — particularly the West Orange area — continues to happen.” — Mike Bagdonas, InVenture Group LLC

is strong, stable and expanding as new development comes online, such as City Center West Orange and at Maguire (and) 50,” Corless said. The Ocoee City Commission recently approved a project in June adding more residents and retail space. The Ocoee Village Center includes 196 townhome units, 316 apartment units, 120 hotel units and 150,000 square feet of retail. HAMLIN

Abbott’s Frozen Custard is one of the newest businesses to join the Hamlin plaza off New Independence Parkway, celebrating a grand opening July 21. It was a decision made by coowners Steve and Jennifer Pelcher, because of how close the plaza was to their home. “Hamlin is right down the street from our house,” Jennifer said. “We live really close by in Summerlake, and with this being our first location, we wanted to be right here. We felt really strongly that we wanted to be immersed in a community that we already knew.” Jennifer noted she and her husband had looked at locations in Winter Park and along Colonial Drive, but none of them seemed like the right fit for a first shop. The fact that Hamlin is up-andcoming also played a major role in the decision, she said. According to HamlinFL.com, the Horizon West population within five miles of Hamlin has doubled since 2010 and at least 50% of new home closings in Orange County happened in Horizon West between the fourth quarter of 2015 and the third quarter of 2016. “There’s homes being built everywhere,” Jennifer said. “It was really a no-brainer because of how many people that are moving in. “The rent is quite honestly a little higher than other areas,” she said. “That’s understandable con-

Photos by Tim Freed

Steve and Jennifer Pelcher opened their first Abbott’s Frozen Custard location in Hamlin last month.

sidering where we are and the new development. When we looked at the numbers, we knew that we could do well enough in this location to make up for the higher rent. If we were to go up on (State Road) 50, sure we’d get lower rent, however, that wasn’t the market we were aiming for with our first shop. In the long-term — looking five to 10 years down the road — we knew that we wanted to be in this development. … We’ve been busy every day since we opened, so we can’t complain.” Rodriguez said Hamlin is one of the most desirable retail cores at the moment, because it sits in the middle of Horizon West and is protected through numerous regulations. “The development is protected by X amount of square footage ever to be allowed or be built in those markets,” he said. “The highest concentration of commercial entitlements are really in the Hamlin core. That’s why they’re able to build as much as they’re building. “What that does is it prevents over-saturation of commercial real estate, and it kind of protects the

neighborhood to be more residential, not to be over-populated by commercial,” he said. SUMMERPORT

The area has limited space for commercial and retail because of the zoning in the area, Bagdonas said, but when the space becomes available, it doesn’t last long on the market. That has driven the rent up to where it sits today, with $45 per square foot as a base rent, Bagdonas said. DR. PHILLIPS

Bagdonas said there’s always a demand for Dr. Phillips and Restaurant Row. “There’s a constant desire from tenants that I know that are looking at Dr. Phillips as a premier location — it’s definitely (a) flagship location,” Bagdonas said. He added the area is already well established, so redevelopment is the typical route. Bagdonas said the average rent sits at around $45 per square foot.


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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

Project planned CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

ings and eight buildings planned for medical offices. According to the city’s community development director Steve Pash, the warehouse on the west end of the property will be a twostory, 27,000-square-foot office building and 6,500-square-foot warehouse for Schmid Construction. The warehouse will provide storage for the company’s various construction materials. Upon completion of the building, the company will move its headquarters from Clermont, Pash said. Commissioner Bob Buchanan said at the meeting he believes the development will generate a lot of new growth in the area, which is close to Highway 50. “I’ve looked it over, and staff has really put together a goodlooking set of plans,” Buchanan said. “I know they’re not final, but the site plan and the development looks really nice, and I think that’s a good starter for Winter Garden.” “It’ll give us something besides fast food and car lots,” Buchanan added. Three 5,500-square-foot commercial buildings are scheduled for phase one of the plan. They will line the West Colonial Drive side of the property and, according to Pash, will most likely be restaurants. One is planned to be constructed with drive-thru features. Phase two of the plan contains three 5,000-square-foot medical offices between two larger buildings, one of which is expected to become a surgery center. The property is next door to a few residential neighborhoods and was rezoned from residential to commercial at the June 27 commission meeting. Pash said while it is a residential area, the

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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

IN OTHER NEWS n A rezoning ordinance for a property at 504 W. Plant St. passed its first reading. Plans for the site include a 9,344-square-foot office building and neighboring green space. A second reading and public hearing for the ordinance is scheduled for Aug. 22. n The city awarded a contract for debris monitoring services to Thompson Consulting Services LLC to prepare for hurricane season. For emergency debris management services, the commission approved Crowder Gulf to be the primary contractor and Phillips & Jordan as the secondary contractor. n TD Bank was approved as the contracted supplier of banking services for the city.

medical offices would act as a buffer between the homes and the commercial buildings along West Colonial Drive. FUNDS FOR VETERANS APPRECIATION

The Winter Garden City Commission approved funds to be given to Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church for the 13th annual Appreciation for Veterans and Families of Veterans. Coordinator Charlie Mae Wilder requested from the commission $500 — or “one thousand if possible.” The event supports local veterans and their families. The group organizes a program for the veterans and their families and cooks them a meal. Commissioners approved a donation of $500, an amount that is $200 more than last year. Wilder said the church continues with the event every year because the veterans deserve it — the church wants to show them the community’s appreciation.

WEST ORANGE TIMES &

Ocoee ponders rate Observer CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

has been proposed, the budget for the upcoming fiscal year still has to undergo two public hearings before the commission can take action. Those budget hearings are scheduled for 6 p.m. Sept. 11 and 25. Additionally, the budget workshop scheduled for Aug. 14 has been canceled. The millage rate is used to calculate property taxes, and it represents the amount of every $1,000 of the assessed value of a property. The total taxable value of a property is multiplied by the millage rate to calculate the property taxes. Finance Director Rebecca Roberts presented the budget to commissioners. She said with a budget for the upcoming fiscal year balanced at 5.25 mills, ad valorem revenue will be higher than what is projected in the current fiscal year. “Our ad valorem revenue is projected to be $15,226,165,” Roberts said. “That’s still $1.9 million higher than our projected (ad valorem) revenue for the current year, even though we are reducing the proposed millage rate.” The extra $1.9 million was used to help balance the budget, and made it to where the city can be less reliant on reserves. Total revenues are budgeted at $82,718,492, but that number accounts for an expected increase in the city’s restricted funds, Roberts said. “Our restricted funds — such as our impact fees (and) our capital charges — those particular revenues are a little more difficult to estimate early in the year,” Roberts said. “By the end of August … I will meet with all of our department heads once again to fine tune these revenue estimates. It’s just very difficult to estimate those early enough to produce a budget book, so

Commissioners appoint Ocoee Youth Council members Six local teens will serve on the council, which serves as an advisory role to the City Commission. ERIC GUTIERREZ STAFF WRITER

The members of the Ocoee Youth Council have been selected. City leaders voted unanimously during the Aug. 6 commission meeting to appoint six local teens to the Ocoee Youth Council. Commissioners also voted unanimously to approve a resolution amending the bylaws for the council. Additionally, commissioners voted unanimously to allow the OYC to attend the Florida League of Cities Youth Council Program on Saturday, Aug. 17. The OYC bylaws were amended to remove the minimum requirement of needing nine members to serve on the council, as only the six who were appointed met all the requirements and submitted all the required student materials before the deadline, OYC Coordinator Dorcas Dillard said. “We really want youth to be more involved in government matters and (learn) how they can make a difference in their city,” Dillard said. “The other thing is to try to bring younger people (in)

earlier into the (political) process so that they know the importance of showing up for meetings, how their voice makes a difference and — just in general — being part of the (political) process. … I think that a lot of things we do in society, we don’t bring young people in early enough to (let) them make decisions for the future, and a lot of things we’re doing now is going to affect them more.” The OYC will serve as an advisory role to the city commission and may address matters relating to and affecting youth in the community. The council also can address matters related to increasing youth participation in local government, come up with and suggest ways to improve communication with students in Ocoee schools, plan and carry out service projects that benefit the city and come up with educational activities, recognition programs and employment opportunities for youth in Ocoee. Two of those OYC members are Ocoee High senior Ashleigh Surrency, 17, and Wekiva High senior Erica Simmonds, 16. They both

said they joined the OYC to be more involved in the community and to learn more about city government and how it operates. “I felt as if our youth needed to be more (involved) in big decisions that they may not even know about,” Surrency said. “So that’s really why (I joined). I felt like our youth needed a voice in big decisions and not just put to the side and (have) the adults decide it without hearing what the youth actually think about certain things.” “I joined the Ocoee Youth Council because I wanted to make a change in my community,” Simmonds said. “(I look forward to) hopefully finding more people to help with community service around the area. … I hope to learn what really goes on (in government). I don’t really know much about government or politics, so I hope to learn more about what they do and how they do things and how (a city is run).” A strong supporter of Ocoee’s youth, Commissioner George Oliver has been leading the charge of establishing the OYC. With the OYC members appointed, Oliver said he looks forward to reaching out to more students at local schools during the school year.

we will revisit those. We don’t expect them to go down. We only expect that those will go up from where they are.” City leaders have previously said that growth has allowed for the city to lower the millage rate. As part of her budget presentation, Roberts highlighted the recent growth and increase in property values within the city. “We experienced a tremendous growth in our taxable value this year,” Roberts said. “Our property values went up by about 15%. Last year, we experienced about 2.6% growth in total property values. The median home sales price increased by 4.9%. Now, that was a percentage point lower than what was forecasted this year, but it still is terrific growth for the city. What was forecasted was 5.9%.” Roberts also highlighted the city’s low unemployment rate of 2.7%, which is lower than the state and nationwide unemployment rate of 3.7%. Although property values are up and unemployment rates are low, Roberts said that the recent growth in the area has led to an increase in construction costs. “What we are experiencing, locally, is about a 30% increased cost to construction,” Roberts said. “That’s the one — I would say — downside to so much growth in our city is it cost more, now, to produce.” In addition to increased costs in construction and an increase in overall revenues, the city’s expenditures are expected to increase as well, Roberts said. “As do the revenues go up, so do the expenditures,” Roberts said. “As I mentioned earlier, the cost of everything is getting higher, and therefore, the cost of doing business and the cost of providing the services that are necessary to our constituents gets higher as well.”

IN OTHER NEWS At the request of the applicant, city leaders suspended action pertaining to the CLRM Planned Unit Development. The project was originally scheduled to undergo a second reading and public hearing during the Aug. 6 commission meeting, but the reading and public hearing were suspended.

“What I’m really looking forward to is school starting and getting more kids involved, getting the word out to kids that may or may not have heard about it prior to the end of May,” Oliver said. “I’m excited to meet with some of the principals at the different high schools in West Orange County and let them know that the program is out here and it’s ready to go and we’re ready for these kids to start giving us input in youth affairs.” Oliver said in addition to reaching out to students in schools, he also plans on reaching out to homeschooled students. He added that he hopes to build a bridge between local youth and local government through the OYC. “I’m hoping to get some relationships built,” Oliver said. “I would like for our city government to build a bridge to our youth because we’re building a city (for them).”

“If we are to build a better world, we must remember that the guiding principle is this — a policy of freedom for the individual is the only truly progressive policy.” Friedrich Hayek

“Road to Serfdom,” 1944 President and CEO / Matt Walsh, mwalsh@yourobserver.com Editor and Publisher / Michael Eng, meng@OrangeObserver.com Managing Editor / Tim Freed, tfreed@OrangeObserver.com Design Editor / Jessica Eng, jeng@OrangeObserver.com Community Editor / Amy Quesinberry, amyq@OrangeObserver.com News Editor / Hannah Swayze, hswayze@OrangeObserver.com Sports Editor /Troy Herring, therring@OrangeObserver.com Associate Editor / Danielle Hendrix, dhendrix@OrangeObserver.com Staff Writer / Eric Gutierrez, egutierrez@OrangeObserver.com Multimedia Advertising Executives / Ann Carpenter, acarpenter@OrangeObserver.com Cyndi Gustafson, advertising@OrangeObserver.com Terri Hope, thope@OrangeObserver.com Creative Services Francesca Davidson-Di Fiore, fbannerman@OrangeObserver.com Advertising Operations Manager / Allison Brunelle, abrunelle@OrangeObserver.com Office Coordinator / Accounting Ashley McWilliams, amcwilliams@OrangeObserver.com

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AUG. 7 Tenth and Center streets. Battery, robbery, grand theft. Officers arrested a male suspect when a woman changed her mind about pressing charges in an alleged incident in June. According to an arrest affidavit, the victim told police she was driving on June 27 with her boyfriend when they began to argue and he pushed her from the vehicle. She said she tried to walk away from him when he attempted to get her back in the car by grabbing her by the back of the neck and pulling the straps on her purse until they broke. She said he took her purse and drove away but returned her belongings a few days later. The Winter Garden man was charged with battery, robbery (sudden snatching) and grand theft over $300 and under $5,000. AUG. 5 400 block of South Park Avenue. Resisting an officer, carrying a concealed weapon by a convicted felon. Police arrested a male suspect after receiving a phone call from a citizen about a man sitting in a park allegedly making comments about killing cops. According to the report, officers asked the man to sit down at a table when he began reaching into his pockets. Multiple officers attempted to restrain the man, and he was eventually handcuffed and searched. According to the affidavit, the man had a six-inch open knife and several pocket knives. A criminal history check informed officers he had previous felony charges. The man

was charged with resisting an officer without violence, resisting an officer with violence and carrying a concealed weapon by a convicted felon.

OCOEE

AUG. 6 600 block of Melva Avenue. Battery on person, criminal mischief. Police arrested a male suspect after responding to an Ocoee residence in reference to an incident during an argument between a mother and her son. According to arrest documents, the mother told police her son had been acting strange and they got into an argument. She said she followed him outside and called his name and returned to the house when he did not respond. On her way back in, she said her son ran inside, pushed her down and ran back out. Scared, she told police, she ran inside, shut the door and called 911. The report states the man forced his way inside, grabbed the keys to a vehicle and left. He then grabbed a glass ash tray and threw it toward the car, shattering the tray and chipping the rear window. The woman valued the window at $400; the son was arrested shortly after. On the way to the station, police said the son told officers he had gangrene and thought he broke his neck from falling out of a tree months ago. The Ocoee Fire Department checked his neck, which moved freely. He was transported to the station and charged with battery on a person 65 years of age or older and criminal mischief over $200 and $1,000.

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State bill would compensate descendants of 1920 riot victims Florida Senator Randolph Bracy filed a bill that would allocate $10 million in compensation for the 1920 Election Day Massacre in Ocoee. HANNAH SWAYZE NEWS EDITOR

Descendants of the victims of the 1920 Ocoee Election Day Massacre could receive millions of dollars in compensation if a bill filed by Florida Senator Randolph Bracy (D-Ocoee) passes. Senate Bill 8 was filed Aug. 1 and includes an in-depth study into the events that took place Nov. 2, 1920, when prominent black community member Julius “July” Perry was lynched. Mobs descended on what is now known as Ocoee to terrorize the black community — burning down homes and churches. The exact number of residents killed is unknown, but is estimated to be anywhere from six to more than 30. “This was a gruesome event,” Bracy said. “The fact that the government was complicit in all of it ... I think there needs to be an accounting for that.” Bracy believes the bill has merit not only because of the events of that day but also in the time that followed. He added the government was complicit in actions taken by white residents whoB:10” forced black neighbors out ofT:10” the area, redistribut-

ing their property among white residents who remained. “I’m not doing this to make a statement,” Bracy said. “I think there’s an actual legitimate claim for the compensation bill. There’s a reason for it.” Bill Maxwell is a local activist serving his 11th year on the city of Ocoee’s Human Relations Diversity Board. He has been working to honor the memory of Perry and publicize events that transpired during the Ocoee Election Day Massacre. He said he is proud to see follow-through at the state level and that Senate Bill 8 deserves support. “I believe that we’re on the cusp of really healing the wounds inflicted on the state of Florida, the Orange County community and Ocoee by the 1920 Election Day Massacre,” Maxwell said. “I believe we’re really that close.” The bill comes at a time when, locally, officials are starting to formally acknowledge the tragic event. Last year, the city of Ocoee issued a proclamation declaring Nov. 2 a day of remembrance for those who died in the massacre. Orange County followed suit in June, erecting a historical marker in

downtown Orlando memorializing Perry and the events that surrounded his death. Maxwell said the city of Ocoee has worked to promote diversity and education about the event and has done all it can do. Should the bill pass, it would be a “cap” on all the work done at the local level, he said. “You can’t know where you’re going until you know where you’re coming from,” Maxwell said. An official study into the incident exploring compensation possibilities is already underway. Bracy hopes that by the beginning of the legislative session in January, there will be a more comprehensive direction for the bill. He also hopes for a better idea about how to compensate the descendants of the victims appropriately — given the 100-year gap — whether it be via a scholarship or another method. “I think that our nation needs to start having a conversation about the systematic oppression that black people have endured since the beginning of this country,” Bracy said. “This is a local issue, but I think that we need to deal with what has happened, how the government has been a part of this systematic oppression and how do we deal with it, we reconcile it, and do our best to move forward.”

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

Heirloom Amish Furniture opens in Winter Garden Shoppers can custom order furniture in various wood grains, stains and styles and choose from dozens of flavors of cheeses, jams, salsas and more. COMMUNITY EDITOR

The owners of Heirloom Amish Furniture finally have found what they say is the perfect location for their store — downtown Winter Garden. The amount of business they had on their grand-opening day Aug. 3 was a testament to that, said John Zahradnik Sr., John Zahradnik Jr. and Frank Beardsley. “It was as good as we expected,” Zahradnik Sr. said. “We wrote some orders, sold some furniture off the floor. It was proof that we can do this at this location. We just needed a bigger storefront.” Heirloom has a showroom of furniture that can be purchased off the floor, as well as catalogs full of furniture styles, sizes, wood types and colors. The company orders from about 100 different Amish builders in the Millersburg and Berlin areas of Ohio. The craftsmen make everything by hand without the convenience of electricity; natural gas generators allow them to power their air tools. To order a product from the builders, Heirloom has to fax the order to a courier, who delivers the specifications by hand. Depending on the time of year, a full bedroom set can be delivered in six to 10 weeks. Some customers already have

been pleased with Heirloom’s service. A couple needed to replace a piece of Amish bedroom furniture that had broken; they found what they were looking for in an Amish builder’s catalog, and they had it crafted to match. Another couple took in a dining room chair and was able to order bar stools made in the same design. A resident wanting a tall, wide library shelf with a ladder ordered exactly that. While setting up at their new location, they made a delivery of a whiskey barrel table and two whiskey barrel bar stools. The indoor products are made strictly by the Amish, but there are outdoor furniture pieces, such as Adirondack chairs, that are made of recycled milk jugs by other vendors. AMISH MARKET

Heirloom Amish Furniture isn’t only a furniture store, either. It sells an assortment of cheeses, including Bermuda onion, hot habañero and jalapeño cheddar, bruschetta jack, smoky bacon, hickory smoked horseradish cheddar and goat. Shelves near the front of the shop hold jams (such as blueberry, red raspberry, Hoppin’ F-R-O-G and sour cherry rhubarb), pickles (such as sweet garlic, sweet hot habanero, and zesty bread and butter) and various relishes and salsa flavors.

IF YOU GO HEIRLOOM AMISH FURNITURE 121 W. Plant St., Winter Garden PHONE: (321) 303-3126 WEBSITE: Heirloomamishfurniture.com OWNERS: John Zahradnik Sr., John Zahradnik Jr. and Frank Beardsley HOURS: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday

The food is made of all-natural ingredients, the owner said, and it all comes from the same area of Ohio. One wall is filled with handmade decorative signs and puzzle piece-shaped picture frames.

HAPPINESS is here

Amy Quesinberry

John Zahradnik Sr., front, John Zahradnik Jr., left, and Frank Beardsley have opened Heirloom Amish Furniture in downtown Winter Garden.

BUILDING A BUSINESS

Zahradnik Sr. was retired from AT&T when he started the business in north Georgia at a country store. He opened a different franchise in Tennessee. When he brought Heirloom Amish Furniture to Florida, he started out at convention center shows and eventually had a permanent spot at the Oviedo Farmers Market. In 2017, the partners opened a showroom in Altamonte Springs, but they didn’t receive

much foot traffic. Heirloom also manages a booth annually at the Spring Fever in the Garden festival. The owners said they have been looking for a location just like the one in downtown Winter Garden since 2014. They checked out strip malls, but discovered people tend to drive right by without stopping. “We like Winter Garden (because of) the walking traffic, so everybody gets a little curious,” Zahradnik Sr. said.

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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

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The sign is nearly all that’s left of Nora Farrell’s Tack Boutique business. She closed last month.

Amy Quesinberry

For eight years, Tack Boutique was the equestrian center of downtown Winter Garden, with its offerings of riding outfits and accessories and horse-themed décor. Nora Farrell has owned and operated her business at 21 S. Main St. since its opening in June 2011. Prior to that, she ran it as a mobile store for a year, attending horse shows and visiting barns to sell her merchandise. Farrell retired and closed her doors permanently July 31, and it was a bittersweet day for the shop owner. Many of her customers became her friends, and she said she will miss the regular visits and conversations. “I appreciate my loyal customers so much, and I loved getting to know them all and developing relationships with my customers,” Farrell said. “That was a really great part of my job, part of the business.” Much of her business came from repeat customers, who frequented the store to buy products for themselves as well as gifts for friends and family. “That was the thing about being downtown,” she said. “I had people come in all the time.”

Farrell said it was fun to see who was going to walk in the door next because she had customers from all over the world. Although she was located on one of downtown’s side streets, people acknowledged her sign outside and ventured in. Her best sellers were the starter packs for new riders. Now that she has closed her brick-and-mortar business, Farrell said she is considering setting up an eBay account or selling merchandise to other stores. “It was just a personal decision (to close),” Farrell said. “My mom is 89; my sister just moved down here. I wanted more time to just spend with my family. (My husband), Nick, travels a lot; I might get to travel some with him.” Most days, it was Farrell behind the cash register; she had only occasional part-time help plus assistance from her husband and three children. “People don’t realize it’s 24/7 when you own your own business, and I was just tired,” she said. “(On)

“I appreciate my loyal customers so much, and I loved getting to know them all and developing relationships with my customers.” — Nora Farrell

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the business side of it, I think I plateaued. I never got to the next level where I could hire another person.” Farrell might have closed her shop, but she has no intentions of leaving the equestrian world. “I’ve been connected to it for my whole life,” she said. “I’m not hanging up my boots or anything like that. I’m hoping to get back into riding, because I really haven’t been on a horse in a few years.” She said she would like to spend some time volunteering at local therapeutic horseback-riding organizations, such as Freedom Ride Inc., and those with animal therapy programs, such as Soul Haven Ranch. She admits she doesn’t plan to stay retired forever and would be happy working again, hopefully in the horse industry. But for now, she is OK with giving up her storefront and stressing less about the issues that come with business ownership. “It was my home for eight years,” Farrell said. “I will miss it, but I’m happy to not have to be here all day every day. It’s just time for someone else to take the reins, so to speak.”

MAGUIRE RD.

After eight years in downtown Winter Garden, Nora Farrell has shuttered her equestrian-themed business.

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Tack Boutique closes shop


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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

HEALTHY WEST ORANGE

OBSERVER SCHOOL ZONE

presents

Welcome to Observer School Zone!

WOW

Only 3 Days WEST ORANGE WALK Away! August 18 - 7:30 am Cinepolis Hamlin w Horizon West

MICHAEL ENG EDITOR AND PUBLISHER

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Celebrate the school year and join us for our Back To School WOW at Cinepolis Hamlin in Horizon West! We’ll be running and walking a 5K together with our friends from Orlando Health and Bears Who Care. It’s also the first event in the Beary Healthy Challenge. For more info on what’s happening, check us out on social or HealthyWestOrange.org.

Observer School Zone_081519.indd 1

8/9/19 9:35 AM

As I pen this column introducing you to our new Observer School Zone, my oldest child is about halfway through his first day of sixth grade. My middle is starting her fourth-grade year, and my youngest just moved up a room in her preschool. This day — Monday, Aug. 12 — began with a 5:10 a.m. alarm. Then: showers, getting dressed, breakfast, brushing of hair (and several reminders to do the same to teeth), obligatory firstday-of-school photos outside our front door, a text from my wife to remind our 11-year-old son about deodorant (you’re welcome, teachers), a lastsecond panic when we couldn’t find a class schedule and a minor bike-to-scooter crash on the way to middle school. But by the time the Eng Ubers made their final stops, all three were delivered to their destinations, on-time and with minimal bloodshed. So, as I rely on a steady stream of caffeine to pull me through the rest of Monday, I am delighted to welcome you to Observer School Zone. Regular readers of the Observer know we fill our pages with hyperlocal content created and curated specifically for our readers in West Orange County. We’re unapologetically “homers” for our community. We work here, live here and raise our families here. And with more than 50 schools operating within the West Orange community (special shout-out to our three

newest schools: Castleview and Water Spring elementaries and Horizon West Middle), we know education is a critical component of what makes West Orange such a special place. That’s the inspiration behind Observer School Zone. Each week, you will find unparalleled, unique schools content within the pages of the Observer as well as online at ObserverSchoolZone.com. Starting next week, we will launch a new feature, Influencer of the Week, through which we will spotlight school staff members whose presence has had a lasting and positive impact on students. Online, we are launching a School Bulletin Board, on which we will post announcements, reminders and other tidbits. Through Observer School Zone, we will have more opportunities to celebrate accomplishments and achievements within West Orange education, giving you the most comprehensive schools coverage available — reliably and consistently. Furthermore, we’re working on some partnerships to have our staffers assist journalism initiatives at several of our schools. If you happen to see one of our Observerites out and about, please do say hello. We’d love to hear from you. Parents: We did look into seeing how Observer School Zone could alter the Central Florida weather pattern and delay afternoon thunderstorms until after pick-up. But alas, we don’t have that kind of power, so, unfortunately, the 30/30 is still going to remain the occasional inconvenience. Nevertheless, we hope Observer School Zone inspires, entertains and informs. And if you have any suggestions, story ideas or feedback, please don’t hesitate to email me at meng@ orangeobserver.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

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Welcome, Otters! Water Spring Elementary was among three new Horizon West-area schools to open its doors for the first day of school. DANIELLE HENDRIX ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Eric Gutierrez

Seventh-grader Pascal Biegelaar and his mother, Monique, were excited for the first day of school.

Hornets fill the nest ERIC GUTIERREZ STAFF WRITER

With new classrooms, new teachers, new friends and new traditions to look forward to, Horizon West Middle School was abuzz with students and teachers excited about their brand-new space. Classes are now in session in the newest West Orange middle school, and the Horizon West Hornets descended on their nest in droves on the first day of school on Aug. 12. Many students and parents arrived early to pick up schedules and ask some lastminute questions, and Principal Michelle Thomas was there to help. “For the most part, (the first day) has gone very smoothly,” Thomas said. “I’m very excited. The parents have been great, the community has been great, and I’ve had a lot of help from the district and (the builders) WhartonSmith. The team here has been great, so I think it’s gone very well.” Tammy Forrester is the president of the HWMS Parent Teacher Student Organization, and her son, Deuce, is a sixth-grader at the school. She said she’s happy they now have a school that they can call home. Because of school rezonings over the years, her children have gone to multiple elementary schools. “I think the biggest thing about it being the first day is just the excitement that’s around (having) a brand-new middle school,” Tammy said. “We’ve lived here for over eight years. We’ve been to three elementary schools, (but) never moved ... there will be no

more movement (of schools) with the kids.” Deuce said he was nervous about starting middle school at first, but that mood has since changed after his first day of school. “It went really well,” Deuce said of his first day of middle school. “There was some parts that are very different — me going to different classes — but besides that, it was really fun. The thing that was different is that there wasn’t teachers following you everywhere — making you stay in line (or) be quiet. You have your own little freedom. It was really fun. I like having freedom.” In terms of his classes, Deuce said his favorites so far are language arts, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and life science. “I’m excited for them, because the teachers seem fun and the activities we’re going to be doing seem fun,” he said. “I’m most excited about interacting with my friends and having fun with the classes.” This isn’t the first time Tammy has served as PTSO president for a new school. She was the Parent Teacher Organization president at Bay Lake Elementary when it opened in 2016. “Being able to get the PTSO … up and running was a little easier this time, (because) we’ve already done that (at Bay Lake),” Tammy said. “It’s a little different than elementary school, because we’re not the one-man show (like) they are in elementary schools. Everybody is really trying to raise funds for their programs, which is a great opportunity for the kids to get involved.”

Walking up to the doors of Water Spring Elementary, the buzz of excitement filling the air was almost electric. Some students and parents gathered outside the front entrance more than 30 minutes before staff opened the doors to welcome hundreds of new Otters for the first time. Everyone was excited for the first day of school on Monday, Aug. 12, and it showed. And like clockwork, as soon as the doors opened at 8:20 a.m., the hallways of the brand-new school were filled with a sea of backpacks. Principal Amy Klaber, a familiar face for many Otters now, stood in the main hallway greeting parents and students. She took photos with students at parents’ request, offering directions to classroom — and even some hugs when they were needed. “I have to say the most exciting part about the building opening this morning was watching those front doors opening and seeing the smiling faces of our community members walking into the building,” Klaber said. “You could feel the energy come into the room, you could feel that good feeling and the excitement, and there’s nothing better. You couldn’t imagine what that felt like.” Water Spring is one of three new Horizon West-area schools opening this fall to accommodate the fast-growing area. It is located in Village H’s Storey Grove community off of Avalon Road. As the relief school for Keene’s Crossing and Independence elementary schools, it has a program capacity of 837. According to Orange County Public Schools documents, the projected fall 2019 enrollment was 929. Valerie LaKemper, records secretary for Water Spring’s PTO, helped set up the Boohoo/ Yahoo Breakfast for the kindergarten parents while simultaneously getting her own kindergartner, Levi, ready to go to class. “This is our first impression of any school, but we’ve been very

Jordyn Crews played with blocks on the carpet in her classroom.

Photos by Danielle Hendrix

Principal Amy Klaber gave hugs and took photos with students at parents’ request.

impressed,” she said. “Everything that they’ve done for the kids and the parents — making sure everyone feels really comfortable on the first day — has been really comforting for us as first-time parents taking our kids into kindergarten. He’s ready: he knows everything, he’s met his teacher, he’s made friends, we’ve done meet and greets, and so it’s been really good.” LaKemper wanted to make the transition to school life easier for both herself and Levi, so she knew it was important to get involved with the PTO before school even began. “I thought it’d be really important because it was a new school and I felt like I wanted to be able to prepare my son to be a

part of something before school even started, so he knew some kids and I knew some parents,” she said. “We had an opportunity to be really involved even before school started. Because I did that, he is comfortable and he is prepared, and I am as well, and I feel confident going into the school year.” That preparation paid off for Levi and his family. Although he had some first-day-of-school jitters, Levi was visibly excited to go to his new classroom. “We made the comment last night that this is the first of 14 years (of schooling) and we now have a child in school,” LaKemper said. “It’s a big transition, but I think he’s ready, and I think we’re ready for it. I think once he gets into the classroom, he’ll feel more confident. Once he makes friends and he sees some more kids, gets in and finds a place to put his backpack and he knows where he sits, he’ll be fine. It’ll be exciting.” That seemed to ring true for Water Spring’s staff, as well. As the stream of parents and students dissipated, with everyone headed their separate ways, the school day was ready for kickoff — and so was Klaber. “I think the first-day procedures went very well,” she said. “I know that it can be rocky starting with everybody coming into something new, and everybody’s learning systems at the same time. But the wonderful thing was that everybody was patient, everybody understood and everybody had a smile on their face. I think this morning was a success.”

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ust in time for the start of the new school year, the Winter Garden Library held a back-to-school craft event for students Saturday, Aug. 10. Craft stations were set up for participants to decorate their pencils, pencil cups and other classroom accessories. Local service providers, including Healthy West Orange, set up information booths for parents.

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Juliette Bogusz, 6, wrapped her entire pencil with decorative tape at the Winter Garden Library’s back-to-school craft event.

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NOW OPEN!

Caleb Huang, 3, waited patiently for assistance during craft time at the Winter Garden Library. Right: Fernanda Ferreira, 6, carefully chose the perfect decorative tape for her craft at the Winter Garden Library’s craft session.

Upcoming Events at HarborChase of Dr. Phillips AUG

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4-6pm

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Also Join us for Happy Hour for Professionals Every Tuesdays in August at 2:30pm While you are here, be sure to take some time to explore our beautiful community, check out our amazing amenities and experience the exceptional lifestyle our residents and their families enjoy every day.

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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

11

Isabella Gonzales grabbed a snack before hitting the pool. Left: Arlette and Aleeza Williams came for an afternoon swim.

Dawn Merlin, left, gave her daughter Jaida a helping hand in a game of cornhole.

Ocoee residents beat heat with end-of-summer family fun

I

t was an afternoon of fun in the sun at the Ocoee Family Recreation Day Saturday, Aug. 10. Families gathered at the Jim Beech Recreation Center for games, music, free burgers and hot dogs and a day of play. The pool also was open and admission was free for families who wanted to beat the heat. Alex Hammock was soaking wet when he climbed the rock wall after a quick swim.

— ERIC GUTIERREZ

Arielle Williams had a blast splashing around under the mushroom fountain in the pool.

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Reach West Orange’s affluent residents and visitors while they plan what they’re going to do this season. More than 63% of Observer’s readers attend arts and cultural events each year.* The Fall/Winter Season magazine is Orange County’s most comprehensive go-to calendar of events from October through February including music, dance, theater, arts, gallery and museum exhibitions, events, outdoor festivals and more. If it’s happening in arts and culture, it’s in Season magazine.

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12

WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

WGHF exhibit highlights area’s churches AMY QUESINBERRY COMMUNITY EDITOR

Religious communities have been established in West Orange County since folks first began residing here in the late 1800s. The churches of yesteryear started in family rooms and under tents, and as congregations grew, so did the building funds. The Winter Garden Heritage Foundation’s newest exhibit is “Praise! From Tents to Temples,” and it focuses on the area’s earliest churches. The first churches typically were wooden structures, and as membership expanded, many of these buildings were razed and replaced by larger brick facilities on the same property. Some congregations simply moved to bigger spaces. Segregation forced black citizens to create their own church families, and many of them were formed in Oakland and Winter Garden. “Diverse faith traditions have always been a big part of West Orange County life, so I wanted to highlight various houses of worship that were established here over the past 150 years,” Jim Crescitelli, WGHF program director, said. “The photographs and religious artifacts in the Winter Garden Heritage Foundation’s archive show how determined the early settlers were to erect church buildings almost as soon as they arrived here.”

‘From Tents to Temples’ documents West Orange County’s original churches in a series of photos at the Heritage Museum.

Amy Quesinberry

Church memorabilia is on display in “Praise! From Tents to Temples,” the newest exhibit at the Winter Garden Heritage Museum. The Assembly of God, Winter Garden, held services in a tent beginning in 1924, before a building was constructed. Donations allowed a small wooden church to be built on Palmetto Street. A larger, two-story building was constructed in 1948, and the current sanctuary was built in 1965. The church became non-denominational in 2007 and renamed itself Vineland Road Christian Fellowship.

‘PRAISE: FROM TENTS TO TEMPLES’

WHERE: Winter Garden Heritage Museum, 1 N. Main St. WHEN: 1 to 5 p.m. daily through Sept. 30 DETAILS: See a collection of photographs and memorabilia from some of West Orange County’s oldest churches and learn about their changes and growth through the decades.

Right: Windermere Union Church (United Church of Christ) began in the 1890 Schoolhouse on Seventh Avenue in Windermere. A piece of land was offered in 1919, and by 1924, a church was constructed. It has operated at its current site on Park Ridge-Gotha Road since 2006.

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Church images courtesy of Winter Garden Heritage Foundation

The Seventh-day Adventist Church of Winter Garden was built on North Highland Avenue around 1920. A growing congregation forced it to look for more land, and by 1985, a second building had been constructed on Wofford Road. The church built a new facility in Windermere in 1997 and underwent a name change to reflect the new location. Young Adventists stood on the front porch of the Highland location for a photo around 1940.

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13

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

Nikki and Quentin Snyder posed for a quick photo before dinner Saturday at the Winter Garden Elks Lodge.

Pigging out Wally Hatch, left, Joe Sanchez, Douglas Miller, Jim Bean, Ray “Possum” Jernigan, Mike Jernigan and Bill Hall are members of the Elks and regulars at the lodge.

F

Wally Hatch, left, and Joe Snyder prepared the roasted pig for the eager diners on Saturday afternoon at the Winter Garden Elks Lodge.

riends and neighbors gathered Saturday afternoon at the Winter Garden Elks Lodge 2165 for some laughs, fellowship and great food. On the menu were beans, corn on the cob and a whole roasted pig for pulled pork sandwiches. There was even an alligator made of pineapple for some added fun. Friends enjoyed games, a raffle and music while raising money for the lodge’s building fund for regular building maintenance. The organization raises money for local charities like Matthew’s Hope and Army of Hope.  — HANNAH SWAYZE

Ellen Snyder, left, Gloria Wallick, Renee Harper, Pam DePriest, David Doyno and Daniel Kowal took in the sunshine on the back porch Saturday afternoon at the Winter Garden Elks Lodge.

CHURCH DIRECTORY OCOEE CHURCH OF GOD Pastor Thomas Odom 1105 N. Lakewood Avenue, Ocoee 407-656-8011

METHODIST

This page appears weekly in the West Orange Times & Observer and online at OrangeObserver.com. To advertise in the Church Directory call 407-656-2121 or email AdvertiseNow@OrangeObserver.com

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 125 N. Lakeview Ave Winter Garden Service Times 9:00 AM and 11:15 AM Phone – 407-656-1135 Web: fumcwg.org

PURPOSE CHURCH OLANDO 13640 W. Colonial Dr., Ste 110, Winter Garden 407-654-9661 • Prayer 9:30AM, Fellowship 9:45AM, Service 10:05AM

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STARKE LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH PO Box 520, 611 W Ave, Ocoee Pastor Jeff Pritchard (407) 656-2351 www.starkelakebaptist.org

CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH 241 N. Main, Winter Garden Services: 8, 9:30, & 11am, 7pm www.churchofthemessiah.com

Advertise your Services or Events on this page weekly.

WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. Windermere, FL 34786 407-876-2112 Worship times: 9:00am Adult Sunday School 10:00am Worship www.windermereunion.org

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 125 E Plant St., Winter Garden 407-656-2352 SUNDAYS 8:30 am Traditional 9:45 am Bible Study 11:00 am Contemporary WEDNESDAYS - 6pm - Awana Pastor Tim Grosshans www.fbcwg.org 2nd Campus: FOUNDATION WORSHIP SUNDAYS 9:45 am - All Ages Foundation Academy High School 15304 Tilden Rd., Winter Garden www.FoundationWorship.com 407-730-1867

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Beulah Baptist Pastor Casey Butner 671 Beulah Rd, Winter Garden 407-656-3342 | BeulahBaptistWG.org SUNDAY BIBLE STUDY 9:30AM SUNDAY SERVICE 11:00AM WEDNESDAY SERVICE 6:00PM

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14

WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

WEST POINT COMMONS

REAL ESTATE

The home at 13820 Eden Isle Blvd., Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 5, for $370,000. Built in 2003, it has four bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 2,444 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $151.39. WINDERMERE LANDINGS

The home at 6008 Golden Dewdrop Trail, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 6, for $590,000. Built in 2012, it has eight bedrooms, five baths and 4,751 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $124.18. WINDERMERE TRAILS

Zillow.com

The home at 5364 Bowman Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $1,125,000. There’s ceramic tile throughout the main floor; wood flooring in the master bedroom and the office; crown molding; custom woodwork in the kitchen and on the bar wall; and custom cabinets throughout all the bedroom closets, the laundry room and the office.

Overlook at Hamlin estate sells for $1.125M A home in the Over-

community topped all

$349,000. Built in 2017, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,010 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $173.63.

Winter Garden-area

ORCHARD HILLS

look at Hamlin

residential real-estate transactions from Aug. 5 to 12. The home at 5364 Bowman Drive, Win-

The home at 4349 Old Sycamore Loop, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 7, for $438,500. Built in 2016, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,988 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $146.75. OVERLOOK2/HAMLIN

bedrooms, six baths and

The home at 5431 Bowman Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $429,500. Built in 2015, it has four bedrooms, three-and-one-half baths and 2,458 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $174.74.

5,600 square feet of liv-

OVERLOOK AT HAMLIN

ter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $1,125,000. Built in 2016, it has five

ing area. The price per square foot is $200.89. GOTHA

BLACKWOOD ACRES

The home at 1976 Blackwood Ave., Gotha, 34734, sold Aug. 7, for $490,000. Built in 2008, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,857 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $171.51. CITRUS OAKS

The home at 9341 Comeau St., Gotha, 34734, sold Aug. 7, for $190,000. Built in 1988, it has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,546 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $122.90.

HORIZON WEST HAWKSMOOR

The home at 16584 Wingspread Loop, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 6, for $393,530. Built in 2018, it has five bedrooms, three baths and 2,608 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $150.89. HICKORY HAMMOCK

The home at 15791 Citrus Grove Loop, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 5, for

The home at 5513 Thomas Square Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 7, for $620,000. Built in 2016, it has four bedrooms, threeand-one-half baths and 3,941 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $157.32. The home at 7807 Bostonian Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 6, for $390,000. Built in 2014, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,446 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $159.44.

SNAPSHOT

Total Sales: 55 High Sale Price: $1,125,000 Low Sale Price: $120,000

Aug. 8, for $420,000. Built in 2016, it has four bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 2,259 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $185.92. The home at 15130 Night Heron Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $340,000. Built in 2017, it has three bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 2,186 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $155.54. SUMMERPORT

The home at 5221 Beach River Road, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 8, for $345,000. Built in 2005, it has four bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 3,145 square feet. The price per square foot is $109.70. The home at 5249 Lemon Twist Lane, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 7, for $331,000. Built in 2006, it has four bedrooms, two-and-onehalf baths and 2,306 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $143.54.

The home at 11934 Angle Pond Ave., Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 5, for $455,000. Built in 2013, it has four bedrooms, three-and-one-half baths and 3,407 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $133.55.

The home at 14233 Confetti Drive, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 9, for $215,000. Built in 2004, it has two bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 1,212 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $177.39.

The home at 8412 Coventry Park Way, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 8, for $295,000. Built in 2015, it has three bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 1,720 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $171.51.

VINEYARDS/HORIZON WEST

OAKLAND

The home at 6655 Merrick Landing Blvd., Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 6, for $350,000. Built in 2014, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,115 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $165.48. WATERLEIGH

The home at 10393 Atwater Bay Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $627,000. Built in 2018, it has five bedrooms, three-and-one-half baths and 4,910 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $160.36. WATERMARK

The home at 14645 Scott Key Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 6, for $499,900. Built in 2016, it has four bedrooms, three-and-one-half baths and 3,427 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $145.87. The home at 9948 Pallid Hickory Way, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $344,000. Built in 2019, it has four bedrooms, two-and-onehalf baths and 2,221 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $154.89.

WINTERS LANDING

The home at 412 Macchi Ave., Oakland, 34787, sold Aug. 12, for $454,900. Built in 2006, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 3,354 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $135.63. TRAILSIDE STATION

The home at 1190 Stationside Drive, Oakland, 34787, sold Aug. 5, for $300,000. Built in 2002, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,453 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $122.30.

OCOEE

BROOKSTONE

The home at 630 Chester Pines Court, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 9, for $360,000. Built in 2003, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,126 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $169.33. FOREST LAKE ESTATES

The home at 821 Dusty Pine Drive, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 5, for $332,140. Built in 2019, it has three bedrooms, three baths and 2,034 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $163.29.

RESERVE AT BELMERE

The home at 1203 Glenheather Drive, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 5, for $485,000. Built in 2004, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,514 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $192.92. SIGNATURE LAKES

The home at 15505 Camp Dubois Crescent, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $386,000. Built in 2014, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,522 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $153.05. coldwellbankerhomes.com

SUMMERLAKE

The home at 7567 Purple Finch St., Winter Garden, 34787, sold

The home at 3157 Kentshire Blvd., Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 7, for $490,000. The house includes hardwood flooring, upgraded carpets and tile floors, along with an oak stairway to the second floor. The master bath has a shower and a Jacuzzi tub.


WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

OrangeObserver.com

STONEYBROOK WEST

BRADFORD CREEK

The home at 2505 Black Lake Blvd., Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 7, for $430,000. Built in 2006, it has five bedrooms, three baths and 2,814 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $152.81.

The home at 14282 Creekbed Circle, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 5, for $500,000. Built in 2015, it has four bedrooms, four baths and 3,274 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $152.72. BRONSONS LANDING

Realtor.com

The townhouse at 622 Olympic Drive, Unit A, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 6, for $120,000. Built in 1981, it has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,234 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $97.24. MCCORMICK WOODS

The home at 3455 McCormick Woods Drive, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 5, for $300,000. Built in 2010, it has three bedrooms, three baths and 2,403 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $124.84. MILL CREEK VILLAGE

The home at 22 Moor Green Court, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 9, for $293,000. Built in 1992, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,718 square feet. The price per square foot is $170.55. OAK LEVEL HEIGHTS

The home at 10545 5th Ave., Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 9, for $130,000. Built in 1958, it has three bedrooms, one bath and 1,118 square feet. The price per square foot is $116.28. OCOEE COMMONS

The home at 926 Hire Circle, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 9, for $300,000. Built in 2006, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,295 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $130.72. OCOEE WOODS

The home at 2011 Nancy Ann Terrace, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 5, for $174,900. Built in 1982, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,442 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $121.29.

PRAIRIE LAKE RESERVE

The townhouse at 1900 Compass Flower Way, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 7, for $225,000. Built in 2013, it has five bedrooms, twoand-one-half baths and 1,785 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $126.05. WESTYN BAY

The townhouse at 740 Fortanini Circle, Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 7, for $176,500. Built in 2007, it has two bedrooms, two-andone-half baths and 1,372 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $128.64. WINDSOR LANDING

The home at 3157 Kentshire Blvd., Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 7, for $490,000. Built in 2002, it has five bedrooms, three baths and 3,159 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $155.11. The home at 64 Calliope St., Ocoee, 34761, sold Aug. 6, for $441,000. Built in 2003, it has five bedrooms, three baths and 3,649 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $120.86.

area. The price per square foot is $186.06.

WINTER GARDEN AVALON RESERVE

The home at 1061 Vinsetta Circle, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $522,000. Built in 2015, it has five bedrooms, four baths and 4,741 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $110.10. The home at 1129 Vinsetta Circle, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $386,000. Built in 2014, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,522 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $153.05. BAY ISLE

The home at 14423 Hampshire Bay Circle, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 7, for $438,000. Built in 2006, it has four bedrooms, three-and-one-half baths and 2,945 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $148.73.

The home at 2240 Rickover Place, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 5, for $500,000. Built in 2009, it has five bedrooms, four baths and 3,766 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $132.77. JOHNS LAKE POINTE

The home at 15123 Dragonfly Court, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $369,900. Built in 2015, it has four bedrooms, two-and-one-half baths and 2,629 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $140.70. LAKE ROBERTS LANDING

The home at 2005 Lake Roberts Landing Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $650,000. Built in 2008, it has five bedrooms, four-and-one-half baths and 4,707 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $138.09. The home at 2029 Lake Roberts Landing Drive, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 12, for $410,000. Built in 2010, it has four bedrooms, two-and-onehalf baths and 2,832 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $144.77.

The home at 15331 Pebble Ridge St., Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $485,000. Built in 2001, it has five bedrooms, three baths and 3,460 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $140.17.

The home at 14041 Fox Glove St., Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $335,000. Built in 2002, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 2,081 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $160.98. The home at 14016 Fox Glove St., Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $310,000. Built in 2003, it has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,608 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $118.87. VERDE PARK

The home at 16004 Ollivett St., Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 9, for $455,000. Built in 2014, it has seven bedrooms, four baths and 4,700 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $96.81. WESTFIELD LAKES

The home at 263 Blue Stone Circle, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $390,000. Built in 1997, it has four bedrooms, three baths and 2,437 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $160.03.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

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The home at 504 Cascading Creek Lane, Winter Garden, 34787, sold Aug. 8, for $323,000. Built in 2007, it has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,929 square feet of living area. The price per square foot is $167.44.

The home at 5341 Isleworth Country Club Drive, Windermere, 34786, sold Aug. 9, for $2 million. Wood floors travel from the foyer and formal dining room to the center-island kitchen offering granite countertops, custom cabinetry and professional appliances.

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WEST ORANGE OBITUARIES

WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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SHAWN P. WALLER DIED MONDAY, JULY 1, 2019.

IRVIN S. SUGGS DIED MONDAY, AUG. 12, 2019.

Irvin S. Suggs, 91, affectionately called “Shorty” by those close to him, passed away at home Monday, Aug. 12, 2019. Mr. Suggs was born Feb. 22, 1928, in Orlando, Florida, the son of the late John Henry and Mable (Reaves) Suggs Sr. He was a resident of Winter Garden. A member and former governor of the Orlando Moose Lodge #766, Irvin served his country proudly in the United States Army in World War II. Irvin was a loving husband to wife, Bea Suggs, and brother to Ralph Suggs, of Winter Garden. He was the dearly loved patriarch to six daughters, three sons, 31 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren.

Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, and funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 at Winter Garden Primitive Baptist Church, 943 W. Story Road, Winter Garden, FL 34787.    Irvin’s funeral arrangements are in the caring guidance of Winter Oak Funeral Home & Cremations. In lieu of flowers, please donate to Winter Garden Primitive Baptist Church in his honor.

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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

Shawn P. Waller, age 47, passed away unexpectedly on Monday, July 1, in Orlando, Florida. He was born in Apopka, Florida on Feb. 4, 1972. He attended West Orange High School, completed basic training with the Florida Conservation Corps and, within three months, received his GED from Seminole Community College. Shawn then proudly enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1990, beginning an adventure that led to his becoming an Army Ranger, serving as an Airborne Infantry heavy weapons team leader. He later served in a similar capacity with the Army National Guard from 1997 to 2004. Shawn worked on the Lake Apopka restoration project, earned a certificate in fire safety from the Florida State Fire College and was awarded a Florida Distinguished Service Award for his role in Operation Firestorm, 1998. He was a big man with a gentle heart. His interest in nature and science from childhood led him to love animals and to study their habitats. As a fisherman, the pollution of Lake Apopka was close to Shawn’s heart. The Florida Conservation Corps provided Shawn the opportunity to partner with the Lake Apopka Restoration Project, where he planted wetland plants behind protective barriers to provide habitat for fish and wildlife. He also worked on projects with St. Johns Water Management. From his early years through his teens, he was an active member of 4-H, where he acquired

Agapita “Grace” Enriquez, of Winter Garden, 80, died July 10, 2019. Baldwin Fairchild Funeral Home, Winter Garden. Edith Hopper Feltman, 77, died Aug. 6, 2019. Collison Carey Hand Funeral Home, Winter Garden.

public speaking and leadership skills and became a member of the 4-H Ambassadors and earned the privilege to attend the University of Florida 4-H Congress in Gainesville as a lobbyist. Shawn loved art, Christian and classical music and playing guitar. He was an expert marksman and loved to hunt. He also studied German, Spanish and Hebrew and became an avid student of Comparative Religion. He is survived by his mother, Brenda Louise Gwinn, and her husband, Jon; his brother, Chris Waller, wife, Tiffany and nephew, Blake; Christy Jackson Tacti (Sissy); his maternal grandmother, Diane Anderson; maternal aunt, Sandy Bekemeyer; first cousins, Breann Bekemeyer and Michael Shaw; first cousin Michele Sanchez, husband Nick and grand-cousins Tyler, Alexis and Gage; dad, Charlie Simmons, and wife, Suzy; and brothers Matthew and Greg. There will be a military interment at Bushnell Veterans’ Cemetery at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 16. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Disabled American Veterans (DAV). Services entrusted to Loomis Family Funeral Home, (407) 880-1007, loomisfuneralhomes. com.

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Macie Fogarty, 83, of Ocoee, died July 7, 2019. Collison Carey Hand Funeral Home, Winter Garden. Helen Evelyn Rogers Hutchinson, 96, died Aug. 9, 2019. Woodlawn Memorial Park & Funeral Home, Gotha. Waylon Eugene Powell, 48, of Orlando, died Aug. 9, 2019. Woodlawn Memorial Park & Funeral Home, Gotha. Jim Simmonds 72, of Winter Garden, died Aug. 5, 2019. Winter Oak Funeral Home & Cremations, Winter Garden. Mary Helen Smith, 80, of Winter Garden, died July 24, 2019. Baldwin Fairchild Funeral Home, Winter Garden. Charles Stanley Stone, 80, died July 26, 2019. Collison Carey Hand Funeral Home, Winter Garden. Jerry Lehmon Watson, 90, of Ocoee, died Aug. 7, 2019. DeGusipe Funeral Home & Crematory — West Orange Chapel, Ocoee.

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2019

FOOTBALL PREVIEW

PAGES 18-20 Photo by Troy Herring

After a long offseason of conditioning and practices, the 2019 high-school football season has finally arrived. Here’s what’s in store for the schools covered by the West Orange Times & Observer.


18

SPORTS SPOTLIGHT

WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

SPONSORED BY MARK’S FLOORS

Madison Cockcroft

A senior at Ocoee High, Madison Cockcroft takes to the football field and cheer mat as the only four-year varsity athlete on the Knights’ cheer squad. When she’s not cheering on her Knights, she’s taking in some Florida football with her dad or spending time at the beach with her family.

What first got you into cheer? I’ve been cheering since I was five years old … first I did Ocoee Bulldogs, which I did for only two years and then after that my mom signed me up for competitive cheerleading, so I did that for almost eight years. When high school rolled around I tried out for the cheer team and made varsity as a freshman.

THE BASICS SPORT: Cheerleading SCHOOL: Ocoee High GRADE: Senior AGE: 17

winter we start competitive cheerleading. That’s my favorite part, because it reminds (me) of when I used to do competitive cheer.

What was it about cheer that drew you to it? I like competing and the adrenaline before (a competition) — all the excitement, and our team is just ready to go out and do what we do on the floor. That’s what really drew me to it — getting to compete in front of everybody.

Is there a highlight for you in your four years at Ocoee? I think winning states — I think that was the best part of everyone’s season, just because we got the state title. We’ve been working toward that for the whole year — that’s the one competition we work toward.

What was that first year of varsity like as a freshman? It was really different, because (in) competitive cheerleading we don’t do football games and basketball games, so it was really different coming into it, but I really liked it my freshman year. I was nervous going into tryouts and then I made the team, and it was really nerve wracking the first couple of football games, but once I knew what I was doing I really loved it.

Is cheerleading something you plan on doing in college? I don’t want to go for cheerleading, because I’ve been doing it for so long that I think after this year I’m going to be done just because it’s hard to get scholarships for cheerleading, too. I’m going to go to Valencia and then get my bachelor’s degree, then I want to be a Realtor. What do you enjoy doing in your spare time? I really just like to spend time with my family and friends at home — watch college football a lot with my dad, and baseball. And spend time at the beach a lot.

What’s been your favorite part about cheering at Ocoee? I really like the competitions. We do football games in fall, and in

Do you have a team you pull for? How are you feeling about their upcoming season? Florida Gators, but I feel good — hopefully we win this year. Do you have a favorite go-to meal after a football game or cheer competition? Chick-fil-A for sure. Some of my teammates, we go before games usually to get Chick-fil-A.

OCOEE KNIGHTS

1925 Ocoee Crown Point Parkway, Ocoee | Class 7A, District 4 (Region 1)

I

f you ask Ocoee football Head Coach Aaron Sheppard how he feels about the upcoming season, he’ll give you the straightforward answer. “It’s good — we feel pretty confident,” Sheppard said. “We’ve worked enough during the summer to be OK, and we should be competitive.” The Knights have spent the last few weeks prepping for the new season in hopes of improving on a season that had its ups and downs. Wins over Olympia and Lake Minneola highlight a 5-6 season that was filled with tough, close losses in Sheppard’s first year at the helm of the program. In fact, in three of those six losses the Knights fell by a touchdown or less — which includes a one-point loss to Boone. If the ball had fallen another way, the Knights could have easily had an 8-3 season. Regardless, Sheppard’s first season was a smashing success when you consider the Knights went 1-9 in the 2017 season. “We’re a tough team — we’ll get after you and we are physical and real gritty,” Sheppard said. “We have to find ways to win. Last year we had a lot of games we should have won, because we didn’t pull it together in the end, so we need to make sure we do that now.” Though he has lost a few key guys from last season’s team — such as Jeremiah Fails, Matt Hogan and Kendall Bohler — Sheppard will once again look to a core group of seniors in receiver/corner Dexter Rentz, corner/ strong safety Lovie Jenkins and quarterback Nick Wright to lead the Knights. Looking ahead at this season, Sheppard will need his Knights to be ready to go as they take on a schedule featuring the likes of Apopka, Wekiva and West Orange, but he isn’t worried — he’s just ready to go. “I’m just looking forward to playing and just getting out there and seeing what they got,” Sheppard said.

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2019 SCHEDULE

Aug. 16 vs. University — Preseason Kickoff Classic Aug. 23 @ Oak Ridge Aug. 30 @ Olympia Sept. 6 vs. Lake Nona Sept. 13 vs. Apopka Sept. 20 vs. Wekiva Sept. 27 @ Evans Oct. 11 @ Lake Brantley Oct. 17 @ Lake Mary Oct. 25 vs. West Orange Nov. 1 vs. Freedom

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2018 RECORD: 5-6 (4-2 in district) PLAYOFF APPEARANCE: No HEAD COACH: Aaron Sheppard KEY RETURNERS: Dexter Rentz, Lovie Jenkins, Nick Wright KEY LOSSES: Jeremiah Fails, Matt Hogan BIG GAME(S): Apopka, Wekiva, West Orange

All games are at 7 p.m. unless otherwise stated.

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731 S. Dillard St. Unit 101/103 Winter Garden, FL 34787 (407) 410-8998

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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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CFCA EAGLES 700 Good Homes Road, Ocoee | Sunshine State Athletic Conference

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The Eagles are back and looking to make progress following a 5-6 season last year.

t’s a new season for the CFCA Eagles, and no one could be happier than Head Coach Jeremy Campbell. After going 2-9 in his first season back in 2017, Campbell led the Eagles to a 5-6 record last year — their best since the 2015 season. “I’m very optimistic, quite honestly,” Campbell said. “We have a good group of guys who came back from last year’s team. We are young in some areas, but we have some depth in other areas where we lacked it before. “We’re in a tough conference of the SSAC with OCP and Windermere Prep … it’s a tough district, but we are up to the challenge — that’s for sure,” he said. Just like most coaches, Campbell will be counting on his starting quarterback to lead the way for his team. Luckily, he has a solid returner in Keenan Milroy, who threw for 1,251 yards and four touchdowns and ran for two touchdowns last season. Unlike last season, however, there is some competition at the QB position as freshman Ty Gustafson has been looking strong in camp. “He’s competing very well and it’s very close at this point,”

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

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SNAPSHOT 2018 RECORD: 5-6 PLAYOFF APPEARANCE: No HEAD COACH: Jeremy Campbell KEY RETURNERS: Keenan Milroy, Finley Voorheis KEY LOSSES: Macena Gay, Jameri Cook BIG GAME(S): Orlando Christian Prep, Windermere Prep

2019 SCHEDULE All games are at 7 p.m. unless otherwise stated

Campbell said. “Luckily we don’t play tomorrow.” On the defensive side of the ball, Campbell has the talent in the front seven to lock down opposing offenses. Junior nose tackle Finley Voorheis will anchor down Campbell’s defense, while players like freshman Justin Preaster on the outside hope to shut down the passing game. The talent level Campbell has now is probably some of the best he’s had since he took over at CFCA, and it’s a key aspect to being successful this season. “We have the depth now to be able to compete and roll guys, and not worry about the talent level rolling off,” Campbell said.

Aug. 16 vs. Northside Christian (St. Petersburg) — Preseason Kickoff Classic Aug. 23 vs. Cornerstone Charter Academy (Belle Isle) Aug. 30 vs. Orlando Christian Prep Sept. 6 @ Mount Dora Christian Academy Sept. 13 vs. Windermere Prep Sept. 20 vs. Lafayette (Mayo) Sept. 27 @ Trinity Christian Academy (Deltona) Oct. 11 @ Faith Christian Oct. 18 vs. First Academy

WEST ORANGE WARRIORS 1625 Beulah Road, Winter Garden | Class 8A, District 4 (Region 1)

I 2019 SCHEDULE All games are at 7 p.m. unless otherwise stated

Aug. 16 @ Bishop Moore — Preseason Kickoff Classic Aug. 23 vs. Olympia Aug. 30 @ Wekiva Sept. 6 vs. Dr. Phillips Sept. 13 vs. Evans Sept. 20 @ Boone Sept. 27 vs. Lake Mary Oct. 11 @ Apopka Oct. 17 vs. Lake Brantley Oct. 25 @ Ocoee Nov. 1 @ Jones

SNAPSHOT

2018 RECORD: 7-4 (2-1 in district) PLAYOFF APPEARANCE: Class 8A regional quarterfinal HEAD COACH: Dee Brown KEY RETURNERS: Julian Calvez, Jaylon Carlies, Tyler Jones KEY LOSSES: Darrell Harding BIG GAME(S): Bishop Moore, Wekiva, Dr. Phillips, Apopka, Ocoee

The Warriors face a tough schedule in head coach Dee Brown’s first season with the team.

t’s a new era for West Orange football, as the Warriors take to the field under the guidance of first-year head coach Dee Brown. A former Syracuse running back and NFL player, Brown comes to West Orange High following a coaching stint at Rocky River (Mint Hill, North Carolina). “I was very excited about being a first-year coach, seeing what we had coming out of the spring and what we needed to work on,” Brown said. “We needed to get bigger and stronger, and we did that. We really honed in on the weight room and conditioning this season — our guys have said, ‘This is the most lifting and running we’ve done since we’ve been here.’” Coming into the new season, Brown inherits a lot of the talent that last year led the Warriors to a 7-4 season — including a talented backfield with senior backs Nemea Hall and Sinica Sigler. While he has decided to start sophomore Julian Calvez at the quarterback position, Brown is also planning on utilizing a twoQB system. “I know a lot of coaches don’t do it, and that’s their problem,” Brown said. “I do it for the simple fact that I feel like offensively — in my past — if we are good enough, we can do that with two quarterbacks. If you have two good quarterbacks, you should play them,

Julian Calvez has been tapped as the starter at quarterback for the Warriors.

because you never know what’ll happen.” Despite the loss of wide receiver Darrell Harding — who is about to start his freshman year on the Duke football team — Brown has two of his fastest skill players in Jaylon Carlies and Matthew McDoom on the outside. That offense, along with a defense loaded with talented players like safety/corner Tyler Jones, should make the Warriors a fun sight to behold, Brown said. “I know West Orange is in the public eye, and they think we’re going to be down, but all I can say is, ‘If God keeps waking you up this fall on Fridays, come check us out,’” Brown said.


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WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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OrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

FOUNDATION ACADEMY LIONS W

ith the new FHSAA p l ayo f f fo r m u l a now in place, many schools coming into this season were looking to beef up their schedules. While Foundation Head Coach Brad Lord has always scheduled good teams, the playoff change motivated him to put together one of the toughest schedules in Class 2A football. “Two-A is very, very strong this year — the whole 2A statewide,” Lord said. “I checked it off the other day, and eight out of our 10 games are with ranked opponents in 2A or 3A. We have a tough schedule, and I think it’ll be good with the points system — especially with the RPIs — but I think if we stay healthy we should be able to compete with any of the teams we’ll be playing.” The schedule for the Lions is not only difficult, but also backloaded. The Lions have a stretch of five games against teams — Trinity Christian Academy, TFA, Windermere Prep, University Christian and Orangewood Christian — that all made the playoffs last season. Fortunately for Lord he returns a solid chunk of the offense that helped lead the Lions to a 9-3 record last season. All-State players like Henry Austad and Danny Stutsman will be weapons for the Lions, and will lead a potent offense that averages about 24 points per game.

15304 Tilden Road, Winter Garden | Class 2A, Region 2 Co-captain Danny Stutsmann will be one of the go-to players for coach Brad Lord.

2019 SCHEDULE All games are at 7 p.m. unless otherwise stated.

SNAPSHOT 2018 RECORD: 9-3 (2-0 in district) PLAYOFF APPEARANCE: Class 2A regional final HEAD COACH: Brad Lord KEY RETURNERS: Henry Austad, Danny Stutsman, Mykal Chan KEY LOSSES: Warren Sapp II and Andrew Johns BIG GAME(S): Windermere Prep, Orangewood Christian

Last season, Austad threw for 2,125 yards and 28 touchdowns, and rushed for 313 yards and

three touchdowns. Meanwhile, Stutsman racked up 650 receiving yards on 43 receptions and hauled in 11 touchdowns. On the defensive side of the ball, the Lions will be without two of the program’s best players in Warren Sapp II and Andrew Johns — who at the defensive end position, combined for 45 total sacks. Despite that loss, Lord isn’t concerned, because he knows the guys he has coming back can handle the pressure of a difficult schedule. “The good thing about it is we do have a veteran squad,” Lord said. “If we tackle, block and take care of the ball we should be fine.”

Aug. 16 vs. Orlando Christian Prep — Preseason Kickoff Classic Aug. 23 vs. Cambridge Christian (Tampa) Aug. 30 @ St. Petersburg Catholic (St. Petersburg) Sept. 6 @ Bradenton Christian (Bradenton) Sept. 13 vs. Northside Christian (St. Petersburg) Sept. 20 vs. Trinity Christian Academy (Deltona) Sept. 27 vs. The First Academy Oct. 4 (4:30 p.m.) @ Windermere Prep Oct. 11 (7:30 p.m.) @ University Christian (Jacksonville) Oct. 18 vs. Orangewood Christian (Maitland) Oct. 25 vs. West Oaks Academy

LEGACY EAGLES 2019 SCHEDULE

1550 E. Crown Point Road, Ocoee | Sunshine State Athletic Conference

All games are at 7 p.m. unless otherwise stated. Aug. 16 vs. Halifax Academy (Daytona Beach) — Preseason Kickoff Classic Aug. 23 @ St. Edward’s (Vero Beach) Aug. 30 @ Seven Rivers Christian (Lecanto) Sept. 6 vs. Santa Fe Catholic (Lakeland) Sept. 13 vs. Ocala Christian (Ocala) Sept. 20 @ Cornerstone Charter Academy (Belle Isle) Oct. 4 vs. First Academy Oct. 11 vs. North Florida Educational Institute (Jacksonville) Oct. 18 @ Cocoa Beach (Cocoa Beach) Nov. 1 @ Jones

SNAPSHOT 2018 RECORD: 7-3 (4-0 in district) PLAYOFF APPEARANCE: No HEAD COACH: Trent Hopper KEY RETURNERS: Jacob Worley, Trent Phillips, Elijah Post KEY LOSSES: Gabriel Chambless, Matthew Strubel BIG GAME(S): St. Edward’s

Following one of their best seasons in program history, Legacy Charter looks to turn 2019 into another successful year.

W

ith the arrival of the new season, optimism runs rampant in the Legacy Eagles’

camp. Despite a tough loss to end last season, the Eagles had one of their best years in program history, as they went 7-3 overall and

4-0 in the SSAC Florida Championship Series North — good enough for first place. “We had a good season last year,” said Trent Hopper, the team’s head coach. “Our junior class last year was the biggest class we had, so they’re all grown up now and it’s their last year —

there’s about 11 of them that can play. We are very optimistic.” Outside of a few players lost to graduation, Hopper will see key cogs of his Eagles team return for the 2019-20 season. Senior quarterback Jacob Worley will once again go under center, where he looks to build upon

last year’s success that saw him throw for 1,539 yards and 20 total touchdowns (18 passing, two rushing). Adding to the offense will be the Eagles’ No. 1 receiver in Eli Post (491 receiving yards, four touchdowns), while the offensive line will be one of the team’s most experienced units. “A lot of our offensive weapons are back, and we’re returning three offensive linemen in Noah Velazquez, Mac Long and Brody Thalmann,” Hopper said. “We’re looking real good on what we have returning offensively. We have a little bit of a building block on defense, but our offensive game should be pretty strong.” The schedule, which kicks off with a preseason game against Halifax Academy on Friday, Aug. 16, is favorable enough that the Eagles should be able to dominate and match — or best — their win total from last season. There is one team in particular that Hopper is eyeing, as far as it relates to gauging how good his team will be. “We actually have a whole lot of new faces on there that we don’t know a whole lot about,” Hopper said. “St. Edwards is always a measuring stick — it’s usually the best-coached team that we play all year.”


WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

THESE OLD TIMES

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FROM THE WINTER GARDEN HERITAGE FOUNDATION

THROWBACK THURSDAY AUG. 18, 1966 The bowling alley has been located on South Dillard Street for decades and has served as a recreational destiny for generations of West Orange County residents. In 1966, Manager Guy E. Neff advertised in The Winter Garden Times his various bowling leagues: mixed, scratch, women’s and men’s. There was a snack bar and a billiard room and even a nursery so league players could take their children with them. The bowling alley remains an entertainment staple in the city and now is called Winter Garden Bowl.

90 years ago

The game of horseshoes was introduced at Lakeview High School for these reasons: “It is a very interesting game to play. It is a clean game, and everyone can play it. It is a good game to have at school because after students get through playing, they aren’t hot and their nerves aren’t all torn up. When they go to class, they can put their minds on their work. But if they played a game like football, they would be hot and nervous and couldn’t study.

80 years ago

65 years ago

The last service in the old Ocoee Methodist Church building was held. It has stood for 65 years and is the third church building to stand on or near that location.

45 years ago

The long ride is over for Jane Fulmer and Virginia Spigener of Winter Garden. They are among seven young people from the Lutheran Camp in

FROM THE ARCHIVES The gift shop at West Orange Memorial Hospital celebrated its first anniversary on Nov. 15, 1967. The medical center, funded by the creation of the West Orange Healthcare District Taxing Authority, once stood on the property bounded by Division and Dillard streets and Surprise Drive in Winter Garden. Today’s Health Central on West Colonial Drive is a descendant of the region’s original hospital. Pictured are Mrs. Smythe, left, gift shop chair, and Mrs. Dorothy Wurst, auxiliary president.

The mission of the Winter Garden Heritage Foundation is to preserve the heritage and architecture of Winter Garden while creating new cultural experiences. The Foundation also preserves the material culture of West Orange County, using it to educate the area’s youth on the community’s rich history.

Montverde who have completed a 136-mile bicycle ride around Central Florida carrying their own bedrolls and food. Not only is it good exercise, but it can save on gas.

20 years ago

The Winter Garden City Commission presented a plaque to City Clerk Helen Pryor for her 11 years of service. Pryor resigned from her position and moved out of state.

CONCEPT by Evan Kalish; CROSSWORD CORE Edited by David Steinberg

102 Intense devotion 104 Wish granter 105 ___ Paulo 106 *Slow down to see a wreck (Switzerland) 111 Fortress 113 Threat-ending words 114 *Breakfast order with ham, on some menus (Italy) 119 Shoelace tips 120 Ed of “Modern Family” 121 Stoats, e.g. 122 Sandwiches with gooey cheese 123 Campsite sights 124 Major Northwest airport

©2019 Universal Uclick

ACROSS

1 Shuts a store’s doors 7 Entertain 12 Sir’s counterpart 17 Breakfast nook 19 “Algiers” star Hedy 21 “Help wanted,” e.g. 22 *Country dissolved in 1993 (Norway) 24 Franklin dubbed “Queen of Soul” 25 Walks furtively 26 *Luckless person, in Yiddish (Peru) 28 (Walk me!) 31 Blokes

32 Musicians’ times to shine 33 Darth Vader’s allegiance 35 Cool merch 39 Business with white sales? 43 Hard-to-pronounce berry 44 *Low-cost malaria reducer (Ecuador) 47 1861-65 prez 48 Tubular pasta 50 Brings together 51 Jabbed playfully 53 “Naughty!” 54 Oklahoma city on the Arkansas

58 Again ___ again 59 Accountants’ minuses 60 Japanese sash 61 “The Pink Panther” inspector 64 Noble gas after neon 65 Certain loaves 67 Center of a nation’s political power ... or of each starred entry 70 Ova 73 Promised 75 Places to leave full 77 “No more seating” sign 78 Any author of the Constitution 80 Lifesaving technique,

briefly 82 Back in fashion 83 Roofer’s gunk 84 Was queen 85 What a lead-in leads up to 88 Flyer with a remote control 90 Moray ___ 91 *Side-by-side evaluations (France) 95 Aware of, as a joke 96 Battle over a Wikipedia page 99 Anna’s sister in “Frozen” 100 Jon Snow’s wrap in “Game of Thrones”

City of Ocoee officials held a ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of the city’s newest addition to its recreation department, the Jim Beech Recreation Center, on A.D. Mims Road.

(Jamaica) 41 Drive the getaway car, e.g. 42 Cardinal and maroon 45 “Sorta” prefix 46 Homer’s next-door frenemy 49 And so on, briefly 51 Knock down a ___ 52 Wind lower than a flute 55 Stomach concern 56 Basket of laundry, say 57 “How ya doin’?” 59 Appliance with a lint trap 62 Like many memorial flames 63 Small battery 64 Bickering DOWN 66 Not a huge amount 1 Agcy. tracking epidemics 68 Breath mint brand 2 Cleo portrayer in ‘63 69 Wrath 3 Number of syllables in 71 Yogurt add-in “scratched” 72 Kia SUV 4 Splinter group 5 Concern for a good govern- 74 Married 76 Greenskeeper’s supply ment 6 “That guy stole my wallet!” 78 Let loose 79 Had regrets about 7 Soothing succulents 80 Photo taker, for short 8 Dallas b-ball team 9 Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” 81 Tube in Mario games 85 Idiot 10 Nordstrom competitor 11 Former Attorney General 86 Horace’s “___ Poetica” 87 Secretive org. Holder 12 Like the majority of Utah, 89 Tear 91 Close-knit groups religiously 92 Have because of 13 “You can relax, cadet!” 93 Inconsequential person 14 Airhead 94 Small burgers 15 Icy Hot target 97 iPad Pro, for one 16 Soup kitchen offering 98 Takes control (from) 18 Nueva York or Nuevo 101 “Get what I’m telling Mexico you?” 20 “Go team!” cries 103 Give a whole new look to 21 Really ace the test 104 Lena Dunham’s HBO 23 Easy gaits show 27 Big-box store for a DIYer 106 Wander 28 It lets you recharge on 107 Desire vacation (var.) 29 Triggers a speed trap, say 108 Ring maker? 109 Small price to pay 30 *Front man of the Four 110 Patella’s place Seasons (Ukraine) 111 Ancient Briton 34 Family 112 Princess from Alderaan 35 Space heater? 36 Nintendo gaming system 115 “xXx” actor Diesel 116 It’s dynamite! 37 To blame 117 Green or black drink 38 Enter 118 Upper-left key 40 *Pizza oven inserts

CELEBRITY CIPHER

By Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

“R ZYSSGZZJYP SMLDGVAVAMW JMT LG AZ RPURFZ EMAWE MYV VNGTG RWK DYVVAWE 100 DGTSGWV AWVM UNRVGCGT A’L KMAWE.”

–ZALMWG XAPGZ

“UH RUSVA, N ILHA AU INH. UDD RUSVA, N ILHA AU GZ L GZAAZV WZVOUH. AZHHNO NO L WLAX AU PC DSASVZ.”

–PLVNL OXLVLWUML

Puzzle Two Clue: C equals Y

W.S. Pounds has announced he will at once begin the work of putting the Ocoee trailer camp and fish camp into tiptop shape for the coming season.

21

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

Puzzle One Clue: C equals V

WEST ORANG E HISTO RY

OrangeObserver.com

©2019 NEA, Inc.

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

©2019 Andrews McMeel Syndicate

8-15-19


CLASSIFIEDS

percent into whatever I’m doing.” – Simone Biles Puzzle Two Solution: “On court, I want to win. Off court, I want to be a better person. Tennis is a path to my future.” – Maria Sharapova

This week’s Sudoku answers

Thursday, August 15, 2019

This week’s Celebrity Cipher answers

This week’s Celebrity Cipher answers

INFO & RATES: 407-656-2121 • EMAIL: classifieds@orangeobserver.com • ONLINE: www.orangeobserver.com Puzzle One Solution: Puzzle One Solution: HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm • DEADLINES: Classifieds - Monday at 10:OOAM • Service Directory - Friday at 10AM • PAYMENT: Cash, Check or Credit Card

Merchandise Wanted

“A successful competition for me is “A successful competition for me is always going out there and putting 100 always going out there and putting 100 percent into whatever I’m doing.” percent into whatever I’m doing.” – Simone Biles This week’s Celebrity Cipher answers – Simone Biles

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We provide Medical Marijuana in a variety of forms such as tinctures, pills, pain patches, vapes, concentrates, buds, vape shatter pills, dry flower & much more!

You NOW get the dry flower to

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SMOKE!

This week’s Crossword answers

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2019

This week’s Crossword answers

Commercial Property For Rent

WE MAKE IT

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UPSTAIRS OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE This week’s Crossword answers

EASY

TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD

CALL 407-656-2121

CALL 941.955.4888 OR EMAIL

SEARCH • FIND • POST ONLINE COMMUNITY

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As low as $15 for 1 week!

YOU’RE CORDIALLY INVITED TO “SUNDAY-SUNDAE” – Please join us on Sunday, August 25, 2019 for 11:00 AM Worship Service at Macedonia Freewill Baptist Church located at 871 East Bay Street, Winter Garden 34787. After Worship, enjoy a delicious ice cream sundae with your choice of toppings! We’re also giving away school supplies to prepare the kids for back to school! See you there! 8/15 gs

©2019 NEA, Inc.

Call now for your FREE pre-evaluation by phone

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE

Puzzle Two Solution: “On court, I want to win. Off court, I want to be a better person. Tennis is a path to my future.” – Maria Sharapova

Tomasco Enterprise currently has an exciting opportunity for an Administrative Assistant. Candidates will be dynamic, personable and able to provide support in a rapidly scaling and fast paced organization. We are looking for a highly motivated, energetic, Office Administrator help with day to day administrative support and customer service. Monday-Friday Compensation $30/hr. Send your resume to jamesmicheal099@gmail.com. 8/15,22 jm

Office Space Upstairs! UTILITIES INCLUDED!! This beautiful, 4-room professional office is located in a secure 2019 building. Three offices with plenty of natural light with a spacious reception area A 2019 and separate conference room. beautiful wood - framed glass entry door crafted by a local master carpenter invites clients into the bright and welcoming office suite. Bring your business to this great space located above a busy retailer, PITTMAN JEWELERS, on Highway 50, Clermont, Fl - call 352-394-2612. 314552

2019

Visit OrangeObserver.com/Calendar

HERE’S MY CARD - BUSINESS DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONING

AUTO SERVICE

LV11098

407-656-3495

313494

SCRAP BATTERIES

LV16621

West Orange Times & Observer reserves the right to classify and edit copy, or to reject or cancel an advertisement at any time. Corrections after first insertion only. *All ads are subject to the approval of the Publisher. *It is the responsibility of the party placing any ad for publication in West Orange Times & Observer to meet all applicable legal requirements in connection with the ad such as compliance with town codes in first obtaining an occupational license for business, permitted home occupation, or residential rental property.

AUTO SERVICE

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• Bridgestone • Michelin • Toyo • BFG Tires

www.gsairsystems.com email: gsairsystems@cfl.rr.com Licensed & Insured - State License #CAC1814407

See store for details

BMW 3 Series Mercedes C-Class

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OrangeObserver.com 2 WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019 23 OrangeObserver.com

CATERING

313479

Willie’s Bar-B-Que

REALTORS

“A luxury everyone can afford!”

• Chicken • Ribs • Pork • Beef • Small & Large Orders • Catering

407-496-4900

norb@HomeRebateRealty.com

Willie J. Fulmore Owner

50% Commission Rebate! Buying or Selling Any Builder or Realtor

We make Old Fashioned, Texas Style BBQ! A portion of the profits help to fund Homeless Women and Children.

• 18 YEARS OF REBATES •

Open Friday and Saturday • 11 am until 7 pm

TRAYWICK'S GARAGE

HomeRebateRealty.com

312671

17436 7th Street • 407-469-0060 Montverde, FL 34756

NORB WELLER Broker

CONSTRUCTION

TFN 313482

1045 S. Vineland Rd. •Winter Garden • New and Used Tires • Alignment • Complete Auto Repair • A/C Serv. & More

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(407) 654-9516 Office (407) 491-0355 Mobile (407) 654-0145 Fax pcm050@sunbeltrentals.com

313484

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10% OFF your rental

Residential Sales and Direct: 407-448-0857 Property Management Fax: 407-933-6939

Lic. Real Estate Broker Lic. Real Estate Instructor Notary/Certified Ask Signing MeAgent About

Email: realtorteacher@gmail.com My Rebate Offers

www.karlarealty.com 1101 Miranda Lane Kissimmee, FL 34741 www.karlarealty.com Direct/Text: 407-448-0857 Licensed Real Estate Broker

314371

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407-656-1817

sunbeltrentals.com

ROOFING

PET SERVICES

PEET ROOFING

Puppy Dreams Pet Hotel

Family Tradition Since “1937”

Jason Robert Peet

Your pet’s home away from home

881 S. 9th Street • Winter Garden, FL 34787

Project Manager

a unique no-cage facility daycare and overnight boarding

863-617-8649

jasonpeet70@gmail.com

(407) 654-8885

703 S. Vineland Rd. Winter Garden, FL 34787

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 8AM - 5PM

FREE HAILSTORM INSPECTIONS

TFN

Office: 407-268-3178 1641 Woodland Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789

313488

WE BUY JUNK CARS WE BUY SCRAP METAL

Licensed - Insured CCC1327383

www.puppydreams.com

• All Engines $200.00 each • All Transmissions $100.00 each • Tires $15.00 and up • Batteries $25.00 • Warranties on all parts sold!

Insurance Specialists Residential

TFN 313481

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

FIRE TECH

EXTINGUISHER

407-656-4707

SERVICE Ocoee, FL

313485

Danny Motes TFN

www.Firetechextinguisher.com

“Your Complete Service Center” 10 West Story Rd. Winter Garden, FL 34787

GET YOUR NAME

OUT THERE!

REG# MV-01095

Phone 407-656-6646

UPGRADES & REPAIRS

Advertise your business in The Observer Business Directory Call 407-656-2121 to advertise

313486

Richard Hudson • Reggie Hudson Classified Ads Bring Results • 407-656-2121

313489

Cell 407-466-4738 Tel 407-654-2395 Fax 407-654-2986

313480

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TFN

312226

AUTO SERVICE

VIRUS & SPYWARE WinterREMOVAL Garden’s Premier Roofing Company Since 1978 Serving All of West Orange County DATA & PASSWORD Fully Licensed and Insured Roof Repairs and Replacement RECOVERY 407-656-8920 WIRELESS & WIREDWestOrangeRoofing.com NETWORKING FREE ESTIMATES

Your ad here! 407-656-2121 OrangeObserver.com

WICK'S TRAYRA GE AUTO SERVICE

GA

TFN

$.

TFN

.. ET RP From

CA talled

301021

AIR CONDITIONING

ter Garden 1045 S. Vineland Rd. •Win ment • New and Used Tires • Align • Complete Auto Repair • A/C Serv. & More

407-656-1817

OPERATED –

.6268 407.296.9622 407.877 ystems@cfl.rr.com

: gsairs www.gsairsystems.com email

• Quality • Service • Sales • Installation • Commercial • Residential

License #CAC1814407

Battery Testing and Replacement

on Call for a FREE estimate . Equipment Replacement d credit

We offer financing with approve

Scheduled Maintenance

Transmission and Engine Repair

Ray Cornell Jr. Doug Gallinger

301016

Licensed & Insured - State

Working Owners

www.r-dauto.com

Computerized Diagnostics

Tune-Ups and General Repair

3 Business Card Sizes to choose from:

3 59

$

...

/ sq . ft.

Ins

WATERPROOF

4

$ 99/ sq. ft.

Fully Installed From...

3.3" x 1" starting at $25.00 3.3" x 2" starting at $30.00 3.3" x 4" starting at $50.00

Tires and Alignments

In House Towing Available

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FLOORING T E • WAT E R P R O O F CARPET • LAMINA

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y Full

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WE BUY JUNK CARS WE BUY SCRAP METAL OPE

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THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2019

298995

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LV11098

HERE’S MY CARD - BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Color included on all ads! Publishes every thursday, and deadlines Friday the week prior.


WEST ORANGE TIMES & OBSERVER

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1 Hospital in Florida

We are honored to be recognized as the best hospital in the state. We’re home to Central Florida’s largest health network, including seven nationally recognized specialties with world-class physicians delivering elite and individualized care to every patient body, mind and spirit to help you feel whole. FeelHealthyFeelWhole.com

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