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WORLDCHEFS Issue 23 Anno 2019

Inside Worldchefs Behind the Scenes

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE WORLD ASSOCIATION OF CHEFS SOCIETIES

Food Culture Modern Teochew Cuisine

World Chefs Without Borders The Unsung Hero

Sustainability First In, First out


CARACTÈRE THE LEGEND CONTINUES

UNIQUE. WITH NO COMPROMISES Pleasure always has a selfish touch. The privilege of owning a Molteni is only matched by the certainty of knowing it is unique. www.molteni.com


CONTENTS IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN 31 IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN NEWS 35 TEOCHEW HERITAGE CUISINE 40 AN EXCEPTIONAL EDITION 42 IT TAKES A GLOBAL COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE A COOK 44 GET SHARP 48 FIRST IN, FIRST OUT 17

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50 NUTRIPRO – PLANTS TO FEED THE WORLD

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WORLDCHEFS AND YOU 04 FROM THE PRESIDENT

We invite external columnists to submit articles and express their views on issues related to the culinary industry. These articles are not necessarily the official view of Worldchefs. If you wish to express your point of view please contact words@foodcult.com.sg

06 WORLDCHEFS NEWS 10 THE UNSUNG HERO 14 INSIDE WORLDCHEFS 17 A BRIGHT FUTURE 20 THE YOUNG FORCE 23 GUIDE TO “FEED THE PLANET”

CONTRIBUTORS Eric Low, Singapore Jeremy Abbey, USA Paul Sorgule, USA Nestlé Professional FRIEDR DICK

24 SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF THESE

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26 INSPIRING THE NEXT GENERATION 58 WORLDCHEFS COMMITTEES 2016-2020 62 WORLDCHEFS NATIONAL CHEFS ASSOCIATIONS 64 APPROVED SCHOOLS 66 WORLDCHEFS EVENTS CALENDAR 2019

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FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Chef Friends and Colleagues from around the world, Like always, it is a great pleasure to share some words and thoughts that are in my mind to encourage us all to move towards a very modern and open-minded direction. A lot has happened in 2018. We all enjoyed a fantastic Worldchefs Congress in Malaysia. We had amazing and outstanding global winners for our Worldchefs events and a positive impact on old and new supporters and sponsors for Worldchefs. For me, two of the most important aspects are: Our Educational program support, which our team is working on, and keeping all the country members and presidents informed through the distribution of our monthly office report. THOMAS GUGLER WORLDCHEFS – PRESIDENT

All the committees are working hard on their individual goals and progressing in the right direction. There is a considerable amount of interest from non Worldchefs member countries to become acquainted with us as Worldchefs member countries. Interest for corporate membership is also increasing, and this is a very positive sign that demonstrates the impact our combined efforts are having in the industry sector. The Culinary World Cup in Luxembourg, another highlight in the culinary field, was a great and amazing show. Thousands of participants and exhibitors from all around the world showcased their skills, abilities, mastering the trade and demonstrated new innovative and creative ideas and solutions. This extraordinary food show was organised in a perfect way and manner. Special thanks to my Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the Office team and our Managing Director for their never-ending enthusiasm, time, dedication and hard work, which they always put into Worldchefs. For 2019, many Worldchefs events are in the planning stages: the Global Chefs Challenge Semi-Finals are set and everyone is looking forward for this new edition of the Global Chefs Challenge series. As well, we are looking forward to the Bocuse d’Or finals in Lyon, France. It will be the first time this competition will be held since the passing of the grand master himself, Paul Bocuse, however, his legacy will be everlasting. Many chefs from all around the globe are looking forward to participating in the finals and to see who will be the champion of this prestigious international competition. On a personal note, I would like to raise the awareness for a global understanding of other nationalities, races, beliefs and behaviors. It is a must within our organisation, trade and our own kitchen brigades in order to give respect and acceptance to all human beings. We, as chefs from all around the globe, should be setting the example in this regard.The power of the white jacket includes being noble, caring and sharing with each other. In closing, I would like to send all the very best culinary greetings and regards and may the future bring happiness, success, freedom and peace to all of you. Respectfully Yours, Thomas A. Gugler Worldchefs President

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WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE COVER PHOTO PHOTO BY SHUTTERSTOCK

PUBLISHER WORLDCHEFS WORLDCHEFS

15 RUE TIQUETONNE 75002 PARIS FRANCE T: +33 (0) 1 80 06 58 30 E: OFFICE@WORLDCHEFS.ORG

MANAGING DIRECTOR RAGNAR FRIDRIKSSON RAGNAR@WORLDCHEFS.ORG

MANAGING EDITOR JENNY TAN

WORDS@FOODCULT.COM.SG

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & DESIGN TOMAS BOLLI HAFTHORSSON TOMASBOLLI@GMAIL.COM

DO YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE OR PUBLISH ARTICLES IN THE MAGAZINE PR & MARKETING CONNIE LAU

CONNIE@WORLDCHEFS. ORG

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT THOMAS GUGLER VICE-PRESIDENT MARTIN KOBALD SECRETARY GENERAL CORNELIA VOLINO ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT UWE MICHEEL PRESIDENT AMBASSADOR LIAISON ASIA KK YAU ADDITIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHARLES CARROLL PAST PRESIDENT

MAURICIO ARMENDARIS CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR AMERICAS

ANDY CUTHBERT

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST

NEIL ABRAHAMS

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR PACIFIC REGION

RICK STEPHEN

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR ASIA

NEIL THOMSON

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR EUROPE NORTH

ALAIN HOSTERT

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR EUROPE CENTRAL

DOMENICO MAGGI

CONTINENTAL DIRECTOR EUROPE SOUTH


Afternoon Tea for the 21st Century is an evolution of Dilmah’s 8 year journey with the Dilmah Real High Tea Challenge.

THE

4

EXPERIENTIAL ELEMENTS

TASTE

ELEGANCE

GOODNESS

PURPOSE

The primary experiential element that should be fulfilled for a 21st Century experience: Good taste, including aroma, flavour, texture and taste harmony in culinary or mixology presentations.

Afternoon tea for the 21st century is an occasion that is characterized by indulgence. Elegance in taste harmony, presentation of food, presentation and service; including the table layout, menu, and other elements fulfill this.

Relative to the natural antioxidant potential in tea, the selection, preparation and presentation of teas should be made in such a manner that does not compromise the wellness in tea.

Amongst the chief reasons for the existence of Dilmah, is a commitment to enhancing the lives of the less privileged. Whilst Afternoon Tea for the 21st Century presents a tasteful and healthy experience, incorporation of ‘purpose’ in relation to humanitarian and environmental aspects is as important.

www.teainspired.com TeaGastronomy

Dilmah

DilmahCeylonTea

DilmahRealTea

#teainspired


WORLDCHEFS – NEWS

PAKISTAN HAPPENINGS Event: The 18th Convocation of the College of Tourism & Hotel Management (COTHM) Pakistan & Dubai, was held on Saturday, September, 29 2018 at Faletti’s Hotel, Lahore. What: A total of 200 students were awarded qualifications in various programs, while 60 students received medals and appreciation certificates on the basis of outstanding academic performance.

MEET THE NEW WORLDCHEFS BOARD

Highlights: The Convocation was attended by Honorable Mr. Richard A. Sprenger, Chairman Highfield Uk. Among the Guests of Honor included Mr. Hartmut Noak Cluster General Manager Avari Hotel and Mr. Waqar Ilyas Khan, Sr. Vice President Chefs Association of Pakistan.

who gathered in full force at Expogast in Luxembourg in December 2018 for an intensive but productive meeting. During the session, they examined topics such as how to better support and communicate with members globally, the future of Worldchefs’ Education programmes and strategies for 2019. Watch out for some exciting plans that will be rolled out soon!

GO, GHANA! The Chefs Association of Ghana, together with Ghana Tourism Authority rolled out a successful maiden edition of the West Africa Food Festival, which took place on19 and 20 September. The festival featured Ghanaian dishes and the ingredients available, and positioned West Africa as a primary culinary destination for tourists. The programme included Professional Chefs Cooking Competition, Inter-school Cooking Competition and Exhibition. This attracted the participation of team from Ghana, Benin, Liberia, Togo, Nigeria, the Gambia, South Africa and Lesotho.

WORLDCHEFS NEWS NEW CORPORATE MEMBER: LE CORDON BLEU We are proud to welcome Le Cordon Bleu as a corporate member. Founded in Paris in 1895, Le Cordon Bleu is considered today the largest network of culinary and hospitality schools in the world with more than 35 institutes in 20 countries and 20,000 students of over 100 nationalities are trained every year. Le Cordon Bleu combines innovation and creativity with tradition through its certificates, diplomas, bachelors and master degrees. Says Managing Director, Ragnar Fridriksson, “Worldchefs has a longstanding relationship with Le Cordon Bleu and we share a common passion in promoting the world of culinary and gastronomy. We look forward to more collaborations in this coming year and beyond.” 6 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE


WORLDCHEFS – NEWS

NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR THOUSANDS World Association of Chefs Societies (Worldchefs) entered a groundbreaking partnership with online culinary school Rouxbe (www.Rouxbe.com), creating affordable, flexible career-advancement opportunities for culinary workers around the world. Current and aspiring chefs who seek professional certification can complete Rouxbe’s Professional Cook Certification courses and be eligible to receive certification at the chef de partie and commis levels from Worldchefs. The partnership is spearheaded by Rouxbe’s Chief Academic Officer, Ken Rubin and Worldchef ’s Director of Education, Chef John Clancy.

HEADING INTO 2019 RAGNAR FRIDRIKSSON

MANAGING DIRECTOR – WORLDCHEFS

As we head into 2019 with new projects and challenges, it’s worthwhile to take a look back. 2018 was an extremely good year for Worldchefs. The Worldchefs Congress and Expo in Kuala Lumpur was a great highlight as Worldchefs celebrated its 90 years. 2018 represented a record year in so many aspects such as revenues, partnership value, membership numbers, exposure through website and social media, employment number reaching 8 positions at our office in Paris and achievements of all kinds.

Rouxbe’s 200-hour professional-level course offers instructional content found in top professional culinary schools, taught through 27 units with tools including 200 video lessons, student tasks, and instructor feedback and grading. The self- paced course was designed and is managed by leading chef educators with deep experience in well-respected, established cooking schools from around the country. The Rouxbe-Worldchef partnership now allows training and certification at a fraction of the cost of traditional schools and no need for student loans, an issue currently under scrutiny in the U.S. Rouxbe tuition alone is one-tenth of a typical community-college level culinary program (which averages $10,000 per program), and the savings are even more significant when compared to the cost of private culinary institutions with tuition price tags comparable to four-year private undergraduate programs.

We are now looking forward to new challenges in 2019 to further strengthen our position in key areas such as Education. Our pioneering Global Certification is putting Worldchefs in the forefront in addressing recruitment difficulties within our industry. Pilot partners represented by major industry recruiters have been successfully adapting the system to recruit, develop skills and retain qualified workers. As we enter into strategic alliances with more key industry players Global Certification will reach its growth stage to become a global benchmark for skills development in our industry. Social projects under the Feed the Planet umbrella have been successful beyond our dreams. This is to great extent thanks to our strong partnership with Electrolux and AIESEC with whom we are pulling together resources together. Having provided training for 75 underprivileged persons around the world in culinary arts, the pressure is now us to deliver more and wider. 2019 will also mark the kick off for promotion of Worldchefs Congress & Expo in Saint Petersburg in July 2020. Worldchefs will be present near you at Global Chefs Challenge Semi Finals that are being held across all continents, as well as in other key culinary events around the world. Stay informed by signing up to your free myChefspace account our Worldchefs.org now. Let’s keep it cooking ! WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – NEWS

WORLD CHEFS WITHOUT BORDERS BRINGS DISASTER AID RELIEF TO PALU A powerful 7.5 magnitude earthquake rocked the Indonesian island of Sulawesi on September 28, 2018 and triggered a devastating tsunami at Palu. More than 2,000 people lost their lives, many more were injured and missing. In total, there were 3 natural disasters in the area that included an earthquake, tsunami and soil liquefaction. The majority of the deaths occurred in Palu, a City that is home to more than 380,000 people. In addition, over 70,000 people were left homeless following the disaster. World Chefs Without Borders (WCWB) provided disaster aid relief that was coordinated by Stefu Santoso, WCWB Ambassador & Emergency Response Team Member and President ACP Jakarta, Together with his WCWB team, they organised dried relief packs, water purification tablets and generators as only air relief transport was allowed. The WCWB team also prepared 6,000 packed meals and distributed them to 9 refugee tents: District Thamrin, District Dayoh Daro, Central Mosque, Talise Beach, Sigi Village, 2 areas in District Kaleke, 8 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

District Wisolo and District Poi. To fund the above,  World Chefs Without Borders donated 5,000 euros and ACP Indonesia donated over 3.000 euros to assist in the disaster aid relief efforts.. The chefs who supported the event also paid for their own flights. In addition, World Chefs Without Borders also supported one of the Senior high schools that suffered damages from the earthquake with USD$2,500 in cash.  World Chefs Without Borders (WCWB) is a global humanitarian aid initiative by WORLDCHEFS. Our mission is to support and mobilize our global network of volunteer Chefs to undertake initiatives providing education and resources to those in need and afflicted by natural disasters. If you would like to join us in support of this and other disaster relief efforts, please visit:https://www.worldchefswithoutborders.org/stories. For further information on World Chefs Without Borders, please contact: Willment Leong, WCWB Chairman at WCWB@worldchefs.org


WORLDCHEFS – WORLD CHEFS WITHOUT BORDERS

THE UNSUNG HERO For years, Chef Oliver Esser Soe Thet has been championing humanitarian efforts in his adopted country, Myanmar. We shine the spotlight on the enthusiastic and humble Swiss chef, who’s also on the committee of World Chefs Without Borders as Global Disaster Aid Specialist. 10 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE


WORLDCHEFS – WORLD CHEFS WITHOUT BORDERS

HOW DID YOU LAND IN MYANMAR? I had many expeditions all over the world. I’ve been to deserts, ice, mountain ranges. From the Alti Plano in Bolivia and Peru, I visited over 60 countries before finally landing in Sri Lanka in 1984. I encountered Budhhism and went to Thailand to learn about meditation, language and cooking training in Thailand. I had planned to stay on but met Mr Juergen D Voss, who brought me from Kandawgyi Palace Hotel to Myanmar Yangon. I started in July 1995 and an earthquake happened! HOW DID YOU START DOING HUMANITARIAN WORK IN MYANMAR? I met Dr Heinz Schoeneich, a German Interplast Doctor who came to Yangon to offer free cleft lip and pallet operations. He shared at the medical university how they helped the people in Taliban, Afghanistan. This inspired me very much and since then, we arrange 2 to 7 Europe specialist doctors to visit the rural areas in Myanmar every year. Every year, we are able to reach out to over 800 people. This has since expanded to ENT, Neurosurgery , Dental, Public Health, Plastic surgery, Orthopedic, and from there other aid missions followed after cyclones and earth quakes. We are transparent in our operations, and have since built a truly global network.

WHAT WAS THE HIGHLIGHT FOR YOU? I started in 1996 with the first medical aid missions. A highlight was 2008 Nargis Cyclone where we could raise over 12 million Euro in 4 years – not money but aid items from clothing, staple food, 700 fishing boats, 460 houses, thousands of interest-free micro credits, child and infant food..it gave me new perspective..from 2010, it’s mainly with World Chefs Without Borders as umbrella for us.   HOW MANY PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED IN? It’s difficult to say as most of our projects are sustainable and don’t stop when the aids return. We carry on and develop the project further with good partners such as as LOG – Aviation Without Borders Germany, Mercy – Barmherzigkeit Germany or Action Myanmar and German - Myanmar Dental Public Health organization as cooperation partners with us for many years. With Interplast Germany we have been operating medical aid for 21 years. I guess over 200 projects in 10 years is still a very small number – not all are super big scale but they are big in impact. For example, in a region of 120 people, they could be eating normally for the first time in their lives; something all of us take for granted. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – WORLD CHEFS WITHOUT BORDERS

WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT? It was when I saw the very young mother of a refugee camp in North Rakhine in a BBC documentary with her 8 months old child and the reporter said “.... the baby is always sick and the head cannot stop growing...the medical officers do not know why.” For me it was clear that it’s a hydrocephalus (water head where the spine is blocked and the brain gets pressed and damaged by the water which can not drain out. We had treated several cases in Maynmar and all you need is a simple drain pipe installation. It took me 5 months to find the camp, mother and baby and to convince all authorities to agree, take the risks and sign so that we could arrange the young mother and baby to fly to Yangon and be operated by the best neurosurgeon doctor of Myanmar Dr Myat Thu. As I learnt from my friend Frank Franke once:”... you cannot save the whole world, so if you save one child, you save the child’s whole world…” This wonderful feeling stayed in my heart forever. WHAT DOES “HUMANITARIAN WORK” MEAN TO YOU? It is the work, which only “assists” people who are taken out of their normal lives, whether by man-made circumstances or disasters. Humanitarian work must come in when they would need to risk their health, lives or risking whatever they have to survive – the end game is to ensure that they return to total independence as quickly as possible Humanitarian work must ensure that the dignity of the victims is fully ensured and that none get stuck on an Aid Pipeline. This is often tricky and there is a danger that societies and people get so used to aid that they become dependent. Humanitarian Work must be clear with an exit strategy after successful implementation and normalisation of lives and daily welfare of the people hurt.     HOW HAS WORLD CHEFS WITHOUT BORDERS HELPED IN THE HUMANITARIAN WORK IN MYANMAR? World Chefs Without Borders has done good work in a short period of time. We helped raise enough funds within the first week of Cyclone Nargis. The disaster devastated 2 million lives and 180,000 died. We were able to quickly bring food aid and housing material to the victims, and initiate fishing boat carpenter workshops at cyclone sites. Each boat built gave 4 families an income and a future to build on. In 2011 the WCWB network and manpower ensured 90 ton of food baskets to Somalia refugees during the drought to support an initiative by the Myanmar Chefs Association. The international status of WCWB and Worldchefs gave confidence in transparency and non biased aid management to many international aid organizations.The list goes on…   HOW HAS THAT HELPED OR CHANGED THINGS? We saw at the iconic WCWB Myanmar Tour for Humanity 2018 how people who had nothing to do with the event came in and gave a helping hand. 4 weeks later, during the flood, we could use the “mobile aid kitchen” designed by Willment Leong, based on big pots, simple power gas stoves. It was very independent and can be applied at any situation, ground or weather. We refined this model to be ZERO Plastic – ZERO Waste Aid mission. Teaming up with other aid agencies which were good in logistics and had the benefiters data base of the flooded area already, they gave us simple meal orders and time. We produced, packed, and delivered by boat. It is a totally new way of Food Aid delivery invented through World Chefs Without Borders aid missions. And it is always a freshly cooked nutrition rich hot meal in a disaster area. Weeks after we were twice called by humanitarian aid organisations to collaborate. 12 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

WHAT ELSE NEEDS TO BE DONE IN MYANMAR?  Need vocational training and Train the Trainer programmes, especially with growing tourism. A real vocational hospitality training Center is needed. HOW HAS THE NEED FOR HUMANITARIAN WORK CHANGED, WITH THE CHANGE IN POLITICAL PARTIES?  The breakthrough was in 2013 when finally the elected president could push the low cost phone sim cards through. In 1996, the SIM card costs USD$6,000 and later, $2,500 for many year! Today it is as low as $0.50! This has allowed more communication and the demise of certain monopolies. In 2008, we needed to pay for a truck 10 times the normal rate for 600 bags to the disaster area. In 2015, a truck driver would offer on facebook the truck for free and only charged for gasoline!   WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR CHEFS OUT THERE WHO WANT TO HELP YOU IN YOUR WORK?  First and first again is your job,..... ensure that your job is done well and best. Keep on with daily learning so you can help others next time. When you have time and power, share without expecting anything back. Take care of your health, and don’t put yourself at risk. And when you see one without a smile – than give him yours….always keep it Hot and Cooking!


WORLDCHEFS – INSIDE WORLDCHEFS

BEHIND THE SCENES What do the Bylaws, Competitions and International Chefs Day committees work on? These committee members share a little on what goes on with their teams. HOW IS THE INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY COMMITTEE STRUCTURED? Currently, our Committee consists of 9 members from across the globe, including Chairman, Joanna Ochniak, and our Corporate Partner, Rochelle Schaetzl of Nestlé Professional. With this team, magic is made to make great things happen for children around the globe!   WHAT TYPES OF PROJECTS OR INITIATIVES CAN WE EXPECT FROM YOUR COMMITTEE? International Chefs Day will remain an annual event, however, we would like to build it out to become a sequence of events, with broader reach to more children and in more countries around the world. PLEASE DESCRIBE THE 2018 INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY CAMPAIGN Every year on October 20th, chefs give back to their communities, promote the career of chefs, and like most of us that are members of Worldchefs, we get out and educate children on healthy eating habits. This year’s campaign, with the generous help from Nestlé Professional, was “Healthy Foods for Growing Up.” This campaign allowed children, of any age, to eat the right foods to help them grow up to be in the profession they want to be by eating nutritious fruits & vegetables like their role models. It’s not about being recognised as a Chef, it’s about recognizing the day as chefs to give back and spend some time with our youth and keeping them healthy! In 2018, we increased the number of participating Chefs by 1000, the number of global events to 194 and reached 37,470 children worldwide. I was thrilled to be able to encourage 70 chefs to participate this year in the Tampa Bay Area of Florida, USA and together we reached  a total of 7,077 children!

VANESSA MARQUIS

Vice Chairman, International Chefs Day Committee USA

WHAT TYPE OF WORK IS DONE BEHIND THE PLANNING OF YOUR COMMITTEE’S CAMPAIGNS?

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH THIS COMMITTEE?

Once we collect all the reports from all the associations and events, we review and consolidate the results. We then listen to all the feedback and consider it for the next year’s campaign. We then collaborate with our creative teams at Nestlé Professional to develop the campaign idea, artwork and toolkit and then most of the work goes into liaising with all member associations, external partners and sponsors to organize the campaign executions for the next year. It’s definitely a full year program. And we start working for the next year’s campaign the moment we have consolidated the results for the current year’s campaign. HOW CAN WORLDCHEFS MEMBERS BECOME INVOLVED WITH INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY? 

I joined the Committee in April, 2018. Prior to, I was honored to be part of something also dear to my heart. My local American Culinary Federation Chapter in Tampa, Florida already takes part in this type of campaign under the Chef & Child Initiative. Chefs participate weekly with local schools sampling vegetable/fruit smoothies, new fruits & vegetables, and starting garden programs.

This does not have to be a one day or a one week event. We suggest making this an initiative throughout the entire year. I encourage and challenge you to create an International Chefs Day Committee in your local organization; reach out to your child’s school and do a demonstration for the class or start a garden with a school; contact your local BGC (Boys & Girls Club), and spend some time educating them about healthy eating

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF THE INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY COMMITTEE? To educate children from around the world about the importance of healthy eating. In doing so, we will expose children to the culinary profession and teach them good eating habits that they can carry on with them for life.​

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WORLDCHEFS – INSIDE WORLDCHEFS

habits. If you start now, it’s easier to then have access to where you will participate in October for International Chefs Day. HOW DO YOU ENCOURAGE YOUNG CHEFS TO SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY? If you are a culinary instructor, or take a leadership role in your local organisation, encourage young chefs to be more involved. They love to have fun and they love to be around children. Who better to educate children than our Young Chefs? We have had incredible success showing Young Chefs that giving back to the community starts now through volunteering and assisting children to recognise the recipe for a healthy future. WHO SHOULD YOUNG CHEFS OR CHEFS CONTACT IF THEY WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ON INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY? For current updates, visit us at www.internationalchefsday.worldchefs.org or email internationalchefsday@worldchefs.org OVER THE NEXT 2 YEARS, WHAT IS THE OVERALL IMPACT THE INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY COMMITTEE HOPES TO MAKE?  All in all, we just want to reach as many children as possible to encourage healthy eating habits and making it fun at the same time. According to WHO (World Health Organization), worldwide child obesity, aged 0 to 5 years, has increased to 41 million children. At this rate it can continue to grow to 70 million by 2025. We can help to ensure this number is not reached. As long as our outreach numbers continue to grow, then we are doing our part to keep that number down. Are you doing your part?

CAN WORLDCHEFS NATIONAL MEMBER SOCIETIES SUBMIT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR BYLAW CHANGES OR ADDITIONS? National Member Societies of Worldchefs may provide submissions at any time for proposed amendments or updating of the Worldchefs Bylaws/Statutes or Standing Rules. Proposals must be submitted by the respective acting President of the association. For the current copy of the ByLaws, they can be downloaded from: www.worldchefs.org/ About-Us/ByLaws OVER THE NEXT 2 YEARS, WHAT IS THE OVERALL IMPACT THE BYLAWS COMMITTEE HOPES TO MAKE? The Bylaws/Statutes and Standing Rules had a major revision over a period of 2 years (both for their content and correct grammar)  and were passed unanimously at the 2016 Worldchefs Congress in Thessaloniki. The view is that the Committee’s remit should include a monitoring role, by assisting the Board of Directors and the National Member Societies as needed to adhere to the Bylaws and Standing Rules. This should help to avoid the problems that Past Presidents and their Board of Directors have had to focus on and allow National Member Societies to become familiar with the Bylaws and Standing Rules and use them for guidance.    COMPLETE THE SENTENCE. WORLDCHEFS IS… A fantastic instrument to make the world a better place.

COMPLETE THE SENTENCE. WORLDCHEFS IS... The mothership of all culinary organisations by leading the industry with continuing education, certifications, competitions, and an international camaraderie that has blessed me with friends from all over the world!

RAINER WERCHNER Chairman, ByLaws Committee Austria

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF THE BYLAWS COMMITTEE?       This constitution is a statement of the practices of the Worldchefs organisation. The statutes do not consist of formal concepts, which are eternal and carved in stone, but must be accurately supplemented or adapted to changing circumstances. Bylaws shall be established to ensure and reflect the operations within a community for the benefit of its members. We, the members of the Bylaws Committee ensure that the regulations are observed.   WHO IS CURRENTLY ON THE BYLAWS COMMITTEE? The Committee consists of Brith Bakken,Vice Chairman (Norway), Brian Cotterill (United Kingdom) David Sosson (Qatar) and Karl Guggenmos (USA). We discuss the briefs from the Worldchefs Board of Directors. Our recommendations are then sent back to them for review. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – INSIDE WORLDCHEFS

ensure that all Worldchefs endorsed competitions follow the necessary requirements. We also monitor the Judges to ensure they meet the highest level of integrity and competition standards    WHAT IS THE PROCESS IN BECOMING A WORLDCHEFS JUDGE?   

RUDOLF MULLER

Committee Member, Culinary Competition Committee Hong Kong (Swiss and Canadian citizen) WHAT IS THE MISSION OF THE CULINARY COMPETITION COMMITTEE? The former Worldchefs President, Gissur Gudmundsson, wanted all judges to have the same level of competency when serving as jury members. To become a Worldchefs Approved Judge you must attend an educational seminar in judging review it every five years. This is for fairness of the team’s efforts and the brand and confidence of Worldchefs. The same goes for the food competitions held worldwide under our brand.   HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH THIS COMMITTEE?  Since Erfurt, Germany in October 2012 (6 years).   HOW IS THE CULINARY COMPETITION COMMITTEE STRUCTURED? It is led by Committee Chairman Gert Klötzke, a devoted and welldecorated veteran of culinary competition, with an unmatched passion and integrity for our trade.  Then we have 8 committee members consisting of A level Judges which have the same or similar passion and understanding from different locations around the world. We work closely with the Continental Directors in matters of competition in their area.  We are in essence, the goalkeepers of the Worldchefs Judging Seminars, Global Chefs Challenge Series and we assist in endorsing culinary competitions. WHAT TYPES OF PROJECTS OR INITIATIVES CAN WE EXPECT FROM YOUR COMMITTEE? We verify all information passed down to us in terms of competition and judging, and make sure that they comply with our rules and regulations. We offer Judging Seminars worldwide to establish and maintain a pool of qualified Judges in every corner of the world. We also meet after every major competition, once or twice a year, to reflect, review, and revise the competition rules and requirements, if needed.We strive to be current with industry standards, food trends and nutritional values, only permit the use of sustainable and safe food practices, and 16 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

The application form can be found at www.worldchefs.org under the competitions tab.  Once completed, it should be sent to the National Member Society President to sign as one of the required guarantors as this will demonstrate respect and transparency within their country.  It is important that the applicant has previously competed and won some medals in competitions; preferably Worldchefs endorsed  competitions.  The applicant should also be able to communicate in English where applicable. They are also required to be chefs working in the food industry, and up to date on new trends and nutritional guidelines, but most of all… they need integrity and honesty, and be consistent with it.    WHAT IS THE PROCESS IN HAVING A COMPETITION ENDORSED BY WORLDCHEFS? They have to complete the form found on our website under competitions and send us their rules and regulation which have to match our requirements. They can choose from  4 different levels: national; international;  continental, and  Global is only for EXPOgast in Luxembourg  and IKA in Germany.   WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS TO HAVING A COMPETITION ENDORSED BY WORLDCHEFS? This gives your competition validation and the insurance that a high level of different criteria will be met, ie solid rules and regulation, Worldchefsapproved judges, a proper set up in the kitchen, a fair and high level competition which will be at the same level as any Worldchefs competition. It will ensure that the competitors are treated fair and respectfully, and through our network it will attract regional and international Chefs to participate. A medal and certificate endorsed by Worldchefs will carry more weight than any other competition. It will also enhance the prestige of the event, which should have a positive impact on corporate partners and visitors alike.   WHAT ARE YOUR COMMITTEE’S PLANS FOR 2019? Constantly fine tuning our rules and regulations  as this is a living document and we have to be alert and attentive to industry trends.  We would also like to introduce vegan and vegetarian categories into the individual hot cooking.   OVER THE NEXT TWO YEARS, WHAT IS THE OVERALL IMPACT THE CULINARY COMPETITION COMMITTEE HOPES TO MAKE? We need to be at the forefront of sustainability, minimize food waste, consider animal welfare, and general good housekeeping with minimal wastage of energy and water. Thereby, changing the competition categories from static with aspic glazed buffets to a full edible buffet where the food is consumed and judged at the same time for National and Junior teams. We plan to accomplish this by 2020, which is definitely a big step in the right direction.   COMPLETE THE SENTENCE. WORLDCHEFS IS...  The window to the culinary world for all the cooks and chefs from around the globe.


WORLDCHEFS – EDUCATION

A BRIGHT FUTURE

The School of Hospitality at the Sunway University is an institution in Malaysia for good reason. We chat with Soon Pau Voon, Teaching Fellow at the School of Hospitality.

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – EDUCATION

HOW DOES SUNWAY UNIVERSITY SET ITSELF APART FROM THE OTHER CULINARY & HOSPITALITY SCHOOLS? The School of Hospitality is part of the Sunway University, which is a leading not-for-profit private university committed to the pursuit of education through scholarship, research and enterprise. It is ranked among the top 2.5% of universities in Asia and offers an engaging learning space for students and academics. Sunway University is recognised by the Ministry of Education and the Malaysian Qualifications Agency. Programmes are designed to fulfil the needs and interests of a modern society. In adopting a global approach, the University has established close partnerships with Lancaster University UK and Le Cordon Bleu International, which lend international qualifications to Sunway’s programmes. The University has fostered ties with Harvard, Oxford and Cambridge in bilateral exchange of expertise and research. Sunway’s academic staff is an international blend of leading researchers and experts in the field. The University is committed to developing new technologies and addressing some of the world’s most pressing challenges through its research efforts. The University is actively expanding its research and establishing itself on the global stage, and is investing in its staff and facilities, including building new, state-of-the-art teaching and learning spaces and research laboratories, as well as some of the best sporting facilities in Malaysia. Sunway researchers are amongst the most highly cited in Malaysia and are globally engaged in cross-border, multidisciplinary collaborations. 18 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

The University’s 2018 QS Asia Ranking, the 5 Stars achieved in the QS Stars University Ratings for “Teaching”, “Facilities” and “Employability”, and the Tier 5 “Excellent” rating in the local SETARA 2017 quality assessment bear testament to Sunway’s resolve in ensuring teaching, research and service excellence. To date, the University has drawn more than 26,000 students from over 90 countries to its vibrant, 880,000-square-feet campus. Supported by the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation, the University has invested in excess of RM400 million in its infrastructure and continues to expand its teaching and learning, and research spaces. Here at Sunway, students and academics thrive in the discovery of ideas and opportunities in the heart of Sunway City, adjacent to some of the best public, medical and social amenities in Malaysia. The School of Hospitality provides high quality education and training in the hospitality, culinary and events related industries. We deliver innovative teaching approaches and flexible learning methods which are at the forefront of hospitality education and training. The objective of our programmes is to equip students with the vital skills necessary to work in this vibrant service sector industry. WHAT IS THE SCHOOL’S PHILOSOPHY? The vision is to be a leading hospitality School within the South East Asia region . The mission is to nurture all-round individuals who will be able to contribute to the advancement and betterment of the hospitality industry within the region.


WORLDCHEFS – EDUCATION

WHAT ARE THE RECENT ACHIEVEMENTS? The School recently received the Sustainability and Humanitarian Project Appreciation Award from Professional Culinaire Association of Malaysia (PCA).This award was presented in recognition of the hosting of the BGF Meal Packing Programme, where the school hosted over 100 young chefs from around the world and together with the students of the school, successfully packed 100,00 dry meals. This conveys the School’s commitment in supporting the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal #2: Zero Hunger. HOW HAS THE CULINARY AND HOSPITALITY SCENE IN MALAYSIA CHANGED OVER THE YEARS? Culinary and hospitality institutions support the development of workforce which contributes to the growth tourism and hospitality sector. The culinary and hospitality scene are now more aware of the sustainability concept more ever than before – no plastic bags, no plastic straws, etc. The advancement of technology has also driven the growth of culinary business - food ordering apps, food production and management apps, etc. WHAT ARE THE MUST-HAVE SKILLS THAT A CHEF IN MALAYSIA NEEDS TO HAVE TODAY?  Putting aside the culinary skills, a chef should be equipped with entrepreneurship and managing skills. They need to able to think and plan strategically, and ready to step out of their comfort zone. HOW ARE THE CULINARY AND HOSPITALITY INSTITUTIONS OF TODAY DIFFERENT FROM THE PAST?  There are more opportunities for education and scholarship opportunities, professional culinary competitions as well as networking. There are also more pacious and state-of-art learning facilitates that facilitates the teaching and learning process, that enhances learning experiences through experiential and blended learning with learning tools such as learning apps, videos, etc. There’s also more industry and association support of programmes and mentorships, and we work with partners such as PCA, Worldchefs, Electrolux, Nestle Professional. Students these days are also more empowered learning out of classroom enables students explores opportunity beyond textbooks.

WHAT ADVICE WILL YOU HAVE FOR ASPIRING YOUNG CHEFS? Never stop learning, education is a lifelong learning process. Always upgrade yourself. Be ready to engage and network with fellow young chefs. Embrace sustainability in your work. HOW HAS BEING A WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED SCHOOL HELPED YOU IN ACHIEVING THE SCHOOL’S GOALS?  It offers an opportunity for students to take part in the Worldchefs Academy Pre-Commis Chef Certification – one fine example of how students are able to enhance what they have learn in school and to complete the certification through mobile or computers. For the Sustainability Culinary Education programme, we are thankful to Chef Chris and his team at Feed the Planet for sharing the valuable programme with us. This will enable us to conduct the programme within the school and this further reinforces our commitment towards sustainability. The RQCE enables us to self-audit and to discover our SWOT. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – YOUNG CHEFS

THE YOUNG FORCE

NingBo in China has just hosted their first International Young Chefs Challenge (IYCC) initiative, to much success.

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WORLDCHEFS – YOUNG CHEFS

Never underestimate the power of the youth. At the inaugural International Young Chefs Challenge (IYCC), there was stellar support on all fronts. Minister of Human Resources for the Province of Zhejiang, Minister Wu made a statement that the government was supportive of this event and looked forward to a great competition. President Yu of NingBo Shi Gulin School also shared that due to popular demand, the organisers are already planning to extend another day for 2019’s edition. What Took Place: 24 International teams out of China met with 14 teams from China to compete in the Two Tango category. At this prestigious competition, teams only had 1 hour to complete their task of a warm appetiser and a warm main course in a fully fitted out kitchen at the college. Besides the Two to Tango in the hot kitchen, there were other compe-titions such as Farm to to Plate and NingBo seafood that took place in the same area. The Cold Display took place with some outstanding work showcased in the Tapas, 3 course menu, appetizers, cakes and desserts sections. The Strong Support: The event was attended by WorldChefs Asia Continental Director Rick Stephen, along with the President Yu of NingBo Shi Gulin School with the support of Minister Wu. Judging Powers: The judging panel was made up of accredited Worldchefs jury members with 3 Rookie judges. One of the interesting twist to the whole event as was when 8 of the judges did a series of demonstrations to the chefs who had either just finished their cooking or were about to go on to cook. After all, the whole idea for this event was about young chefs and learning our profession. Happy Ending: Continental Director, Rick Stephen has full praise for the whole event, especially with the slogan of New Skills, New Youth, New Dream. Senior Jury member Mr Alan Orreal shared this is a rare opportunity that presents young chefs with a unique learning opportunities to network together and learn from one another by sharing ideas and observing new techniques, plating styles, flavour combinations, making new friends and contacts and so much more the list is endless. Coming up: The next edition will take place from October 24th – 27th in 2019.

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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THE WORLD’S FIRST GLOBAL CULINARY CERTIFICATION IS HERE

#GOGLOBAL

GET VALIDATED ... GO GLOBAL ... GET AHEAD FASTER ...

THE WORLDCHEFS GLOBAL CULINARY CERTIFICATION IS AVAILABLE AT NINE LEVELS

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED MASTER CHEF – WCMC

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED MASTER PASTRY CHEF – WCMC

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED CULINARY EDUCATOR – WCCE

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED EXECUTIVE CHEF – WCEC

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED CHEF DE CUISINE – WCCC

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED PASTRY CHEF – WCPS

FIND OUT MORE TODAY! CONNECT WITH US ...

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG/CERTIFICATION

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED SOUS CHEF – WCSC

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED CHEF DE PARTIE – WCCP

WORLDCHEFS CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL COOK (COMMIS CHEF) – WCCC


WORLDCHEFS – FEED THE PLANET

GUIDE TO “FEED THE PLANET” The Feed the Planet campaign has been inspiring chefs from around the world to make a change in their own kitchens. If you have not joined the revolution, here’s a short guide to what’s getting everyone excited! BOH FOOD WASTE REDUCTION In general, BOH food waste is generated via spoiled or excess food and/or prep waste. Kitchen operations produce byproduct waste that is difficult or impossible to eliminate. An example is protein bones from cooking meats, poultry, and fish for center-of-the-plate menu items. After flavours are extracted in stocks, the bones are completely spent and destined for compost or landfill. Below are the four main BOH operating sectors, along with a key phrase for waste reduction: 1. Purchasing - Close relationships with purveyors help prevent food waste. 2. Food Prep - Strong training & mentorship programs prevent food waste. 3. Food Storage & Equipment - Strong training & equipment maintenance programs prevent food waste.

WHY? Everyday across the world, food is discarded from foodservice operations. Much of this food waste is disposed of in a landfill, which over time produces methane that is very damaging to the atmosphere and contributes mightily to global warming. In addition, wasted food represents wasted energy, water, land, human labour, and other precious resources. For the restaurant owner, wasted food means an elevated food expense, which reduces profit. For multiple reasons, it should be the goal of restaurants around the world to find ways to reduce the food waste in their daily operations.

WHAT? The Worldchefs Food Waste Challenge for Foodservice Operations is a way for restaurateurs, chefs, and cooks to learn about how to reduce food waste in their kitchens and commit to reducing their own food waste. Participants will receive direct and continuous support from Worldchefs in forms of training, progress tracking and benchmarking with other restaurants all around the world.

HOW Measure waste at Back-house to establish baseline with provided toolkits

Monthly Progress Check-in

4. Menu Planning - Conscious menu planning helps prevent food waste. The following are proven steps for getting started with a BOH food waste reduction program: Create a baseline of the quantity of food waste generated. Determine why | how food waste was generated – is the waste preventable? Identify “easy-win” first steps.  Develop a staged-in game plan filled with lots & lots of baby steps. Set-up a metrics tracking system to quantify waste reduction and cost-savings. Importantly, remember to Keep It Simple! Extracted from www.zerowastezone.blogspot.com. This blog is run by Holly Elmore who owns Elemental Impact, a collaborative partner of the Feed the Planet programme.

Repeat the Challenge with Front house

SIGN UP

1st Webinar: Introductory with Chris Koetke

2nd Webinar: Set goals & Apply waste-cutting practices

Final Submission of Back-house Waste Progress

7TH JANUARY 2019

3 MONTHS AFTER

6 MONTHS AFTER

To find out more please visit www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org/fwc or email office@worldchefs.org. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – COMPETITIONS

SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF THESE Participating in the Global Pastry Chef Challenge 2018 has been a life-changing affair, says champion Lim Wei Hrn. Lim Wei Hrn, demi chef de partie, Resorts World Sentosa represented Singapore at the Global Pastry Chef Challenge competition in 2018, even though he has only been a pastry chef for 5 years. The talented pastry chef looks back and reflects on this milestone of his life.

THE GLOBAL PASTRY CHEF CHALLENGE IS NOT NEW TO ME I have participated in competitions before and was part of the Singapore National Team as assistant in the Global Pastry Chef Challenge in Thessaloniki, Greece in 2016. Back then, I was the assistant, so the pressure is different. It was my first international competition and I learnt so much, from preparing for logistics to training for the competition.

IT IS A REAL CHALLENGE I wanted to challenge myself in 2018 as this is one of the top competitions in the world. So when the opportunity came for me to represent Singapore, I took it as a challenge to see how far I can go. I went to Thaifex in Bangkok for the Global Chefs Challenge Asia Pacific selection even though I did not need to. I chose to do this as I wanted to “warm up” and start practising before going for the competition. I 24 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

won the competition Global Pastry Chef Challenge in 2017 for Asia Pacific and that was a huge boost in my confidence to start preparing for the finals.

EVERY MOMENT IS MEMORABLE The biggest moment, though, is the announcement of the results. It was very unexpected for me. After we finished our competition, we saw that the standards was very high for the other teams and were a little demoralised as my expectations for myself is very high. When I knew the results, I was quite shocked. Everyone, including my mentor Kenny Kong, were shouting for joy. It was an emotional moment and a milestone for me.

MY DISHES WERE “TRULY ASIA” During the training sessions, we needed to try many things and to keep improving. For example, for plated desserts, we had to keep changing until we found the perfect one that we liked the best. My competition dish is a hot and cold ice cream dessert. The hot item consists of: hot phyllo pastry as a base with chocolate almond cream and green tea with jasmine sorbet with pineapple coulis and coconut gula melaka parfait. I looked for Asian flavours to present to everyone. We changed


WORLDCHEFS – COMPETITIONS

this dish many times, and we played with the flavours at least 4 times and examined every component bit by bit. For the gateau section, my creation was a pear yuzu chestnut gateau. It was layered with chestnut sponoge, pear compote and yuzu jelly with mascarpone mousse and cashew nut crumble. The difficulty in making this gateau is the pear flavour, which is hard to extract. The flavour of pear will be gone if cooked for too long. This is one of the most challenging parts and we tried with different pears and various cooking methods before arriving at the final method. 

THE SHOWPIECE, THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE Until the last day, we were still thinking of how to improve the presentation. We wanted to create a Hornbill (the bird found in Sarawak, Malaysia) and the famous Rafflesia flower below. At the very last minute, I decided to make a Malaysian traditional Kite (‘wau’ in Malay) to bring out the colour of the showpiece. I decided to craft it, like sugarwork. It brightened up the piece immediately as the sugar was shiny and colourful. Once we had the idea, it was all about practicing and improvising.

IT’S A PRIVILEGE TO COMPETE A competition is never a solo affair. It’s important to have good mentors, a positive mind-set and to never give up. Things are always changing and it is easy to give up, but you must believe that if you try your best, anything is possible and you can win! I will like to thank my chef and mentor Kenny Kong and Nicole from the Singapore Pastry Alliance, also my assistant who helped ..also my assistant who helped me throughout the competition. It takes an entire village to prepare a competitor properly. Once I’ve started, I now know I cannot and will not stop competing!

THE GLOBAL PASTRY CHEF CHALLENGE IS LIFE CHANGING It is the biggest achievement I have made for myself in my career. After this competition, I have learnt so many things that make me more confident in my pastry skills. It’s also opened up the doors for me to delve deeper into this amazing and magical world of pastry. I also learnt about organising skills we need when we are working and how to get things in proper workflow. In competition, to do the best pastry, you need to organise yourself well.

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WORLDCHEFS – INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY

The All Japan Chefs Association (AJCA) celebrated with 54 sixth grade students of Fujimi Elementary School in Tokyo.

INSPIRING THE NEXT GENERATION International Chefs Day 2018, held in partnership with Nestlé Professional, inspired the next generation on healthy eating. Here are the snapshots!

26 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE


WORLDCHEFS – INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY

The 2018 edition of International Chefs Day made a truly global statement, with 4,600 chefs and 37,500 children participating. Chefs rolled out 249 events in 64 countries, sharing with young kids the importance of healthy eating.

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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WWORLDCHEFS – INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY

4 THINGS ABOUT INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY 1. Each year on October 20th we celebrate International Chefs Day. 2. Since its creation by esteemed chef Dr. Bill Gallagher in 2004, Worldchefs has committed to using International Chefs Day to celebrate the noble profession, always remembering that it is our duty to pass on our knowledge and culinary skills to the next generation of chefs with a sense of pride and commitment to the future. 3. Over the past years, Worldchefs has partnered with Nestlé Professional to teach kids around the globe about the importance of healthy eating by hosting fun-filled workshops worldwide. 4. This year’s campaign theme is Healthy Foods for Growing Up. It

encourages kids to think about the profession they’d like to have when they’re grown up, and how eating healthy foods today can help them get there. For the full coverage of International Chefs Day action in the various countries, visit www.internationalchefsday.worldchefs.org/ICDNews

PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES Argentina Brazil Canada Chile Colombia Costa Rica Cuba Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Jamaica Mexico Nicaragua Panama Peru Trinidad & Tobago USA Bulgaria Czech Republic Finland Germany Greece Iceland Italy Moldova Morocco Norway Poland Russia Slovakia 28 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

Switzerland Sweden Turkey UK Egypt Ghana Kenya Liberia Nigeria South Africa Uganda China Hong Kong India Indonesia Japan Jordan Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Pakistan Palestine Philippines Saudi Arabia Singapore Turkey UAE Vietnam Australia/Oceania Fiji New Zealand Papa New Guinea


WORLDCHEFS – INTERNATIONAL CHEFS DAY

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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fs

WORLD ASSOCIATION OF CHEFS SOCIETIES

We dedicated ourselves to design and produce a pan for every application: “The World’s Best* Pan” * “The World’s Best Pan” according to VKD, largest German chefs association VKD German Chefs Association

Euro-Toques European Union of Chefs

VKD German Chefs Association

2018

www.bestpan.com


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – NEWS

NON-DIARY CHEESE?

THE WORLD’S SLOWEST RECIPE Filip Fastén, acclaimed Swedish chef and recipient of a coveted Michelin Star, has begun preparing a meal that will be ready to eat in March 2020. “The World’s Slowest Recipe” is a tribute to giving ingredients the time and the love they need as well as a reaction against an increasing speedobsessed food industry. The collaboration is being run together with the iconic Swedish cheese brand ‘Västerbottensost®’ which is famous in restaurant kitchens across the globe and gets its signature  flavour from its unique traditional craftsmanship and long maturing time.   Each ingredient will be prepared according to old traditional Swedish cooking techniques.They will be carefully grown, harvested, salted, pickled and stored, and then finally served as a twelve-course  gastronomic experience in March 2020, in the small city of Burträsk, located in the north of Sweden. Check out the launch video on: https://youtu.be/TtNkWniks4  

That’s what ArtizzanCheeze, a revenue generating startup that designs, creates & manufactures in the UAE is producing. The portfolio includes non-dairy cheeze, dips, spreads that are HALAL & free from gluten, sugar, additive, preservative and color. Other than offering a healthy alternative to cheese, they also stock yogurt, protein balls, brownies on www.artizzanheeze. com. We hear they have perfected the taste and texture of non-dairy Mozzarella Cheese, suitable for pizza chains and 4/5 star hotels!

THE PERFECT TRAY Thanks to AMT’s GN casted multi tray with 11 moulds, chefs can now have perfectly cooked hamburger patties, hash browns and egg specialties. The tray is heat resistant up to 260° and free from distortion. The multi tray has a stacking aid which allows safe, gentle storage that protects the surface from scratches. It promises easy cleaning and saves up to 20% time and energy! Check with your local stock-ists for more information.

IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN LOOKING FOR THE GOLDEN (COFFEE) POT What: The Alen Thong Golden Coffee Pot Young Chef Challenge is a competition organised by the Abu Dhabi chapter of the Emirates Culinary Guild in collaboration with Worldchefs. Launched in memory of John Alen Thong, a founding father of the Emirates Culinary Guild, who passed away in 2015, the competition was born in 2016 and is part of La Cuisine at SIAL, an event for foodservice professionals around the world. Action: The gastronomic competition took place from 10 December to 12 December, and required participating teams to prepare a cold buffet table for 40 people in just 48 hours. The Champion: The Singapore National Culinary team took back the championship the second time running. The team consists of Elvin Chew (Manager); Ong Jing Qin (Team Captain); members Daren Teo, Lim Wei Ling, Joe Chong; and Rachel Chong (Team Pastry). This is the second consecutive time Singapore took home the Gold. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – NEWS

3 REASONS WE LOVE THE LES VERGERS BOIRON 5TH GENERATION TRAY

1. IT’S A

THREE YEAR-LONG RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

It involved dozens of the company’s employees, required millions of euros in investments and resulted in a patent.

2. EASIER TO USE The new Les vergers Boiron tray can be opened easily with a wellpositioned and identifiable tab. It ensures you peace of mind with its innovative clip concept making it airtight. Its new lid offers you both food safety and easy use with a double opening system. Its compact shape gives an easier grip, so you can move freely and always manage successful creations. Lastly, it is more environment-friendly since it contains less plastic.

3. DESIGNED BY CHEFS FOR CHEFS

From the beginning, Chefs from all over the world contributed to its creation. By listening to their observations and analyzing their work methods and after three year-long efforts, tests and research, the new tray is finally ready. No surprise it’s been an immediate hit with chefs around the world!

For more information, visit www.molteni.com

MOLTENI CARACTÈRE: A TAILOR-MADE, MODERN ICON What’s Hot: Having established itself at the heart of some of the world’s most renowned kitchens, the latest generation of the iconic Molteni stove promises to deliver a new era of luxury cuisine with the birth of a state-of-the-art bespoke solution. About: Developed by Electrolux Professional, Molteni Caractère is the ultimate custom-crafted premium stove, created to blend traditional cooking heritage with contemporary design. 32 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

Style factor: Fusing ultra-modern and high tech materials with compact surface, stylish finishing, and a solid-steel structure, the range fulfils the aspirations of the most renowned restaurants, hotels and private residential homes, for a number of seamless, contemporary combinations. What We Love: Each Molteni Caractère can be personalised to meet exact needs with no compromises. From limited edition corners embellished for everlasting beauty, to the expertly-fashioned control knobs and durable top, Molteni Caractère promises to turn every chef ’s dream into first-class reality.


The Spirit of Sterling White Halibut Sterling White Halibut pioneered farming of halibut and are today the worlds largest producer. We provide farmed halibut from the cold, crystal clear Norwegian fjords, for use in both classic and modern restaurant kitchens. Sterling White Halibut is in charge through the entire value chain from brood­ stock to the final customer. In addition our popular Sterling Academy gives the neces­ sary education and support the professional kitchen needs. The Sterling White Halibut brand is your guarantee of safe, pristine, first class fish, and is found on the menus of many of the best chefs in the world.

The Spirit The Fish The Chef The Presentation The Academy The Company

sterlingwhitehalibut.com


iu a em er s s Pr rim vlee u lee llo m ea de P alfs sv te f iu m V i l K V m de era m Ka era um re iu di de ern miu e P rem um rim emi ne n i h r a e T P T u m P r al Ca Vi e Pr 肉 re de P a Ve La alv La ne d ét 牛 t P era eau Ve k H m r é 仔 e u a m s C H rn e V i Ģ d 選 em 倱 miu lee La 肉 de Te e d 特 r n e v P a 肉 de nd 牛 e 䈲䈃 Pr alfs a Vi e 牛 h 仔 a n a T ⮷ Vi K 仔 r 選 La ih 選 Ca La 峐 era ium 特 nl a a 特 L Ề rim em ik s P Pr as aa ee v vl kal de ét lih sch ta V ch ihaa s n f a l H l a ei as is r Ka ium ne sik bfl ar fle kan er m rem Va Kal P alb asi T u i e K V l m P sta m ed re ra iu ea um sta rn t P era Pa rem m V emi ara a é C u r P H im r s P mi s P La SI N CE 1997 eP Da Pre Da eal 肉 d e V sch 牛 ra h T m um lei 仔 ne iu mi bf 選 er em re al 特 e T Pr e P m K ed llo Th iu haa arn te m nli C i e V r a a di s P sik L The premium veal from Peter’s Farm is top-quality ne Da Va r ta Ca s and has a soft flavour. The meat is tender, light ra La Pa

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and easily digestible. It is conducive to every menu and lends itself easily to combinations. The veal products from Peter’s Farm are supplied with a farm code tag that can be used to request information about the farmer via the website. The code is also stated in the form of a QR code so that the information can be directly accessed with a smartphone or tablet.

The calves from Peter’s Farm live in herds of approx. 60 animals. The stables are spaciously designed to include ample daylight. Skippyballs are hung in the stables for the calves to play with and brushes have been mounted there for them to rub up against. The calves are fed their calf milk through automated drinking machines. As soon as a calf comes to the automated machine, a portion of the menu is served. They are able to drink several times throughout the day and their multi-grain muesli is supplied in such a way that they always have a fresh supply of feed. All the stables at Peter’s Farm have the Beter Leven seal of approval from the Netherlands Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, guaranteeing animal-friendly production. The Foundation for Quality Guarantee of the Veal Sector (SKV) carries out intensive checks at all of the VanDrie Group’s veal farms to monitor the calves’ health and quality of their feed. The Integrated Chain Management (Integrale Keten Beheersing or IKB) quality management system forms the basis for the checks. Thanks to this, and in combination with the VanDrie Group’s own quality system called Safety Guard, the group guarantees high-quality, safe and delicious veal.

Check our website for more information www.vandriegroup.com

www.petersfarm.com S I N CE 1 9 9 7

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06-11-18 13:00


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – FOOD CULTURE

Teochew Fish Porridge

TEOCHEW HERITAGE CUISINE Stepping off the World Heritage Cuisine Summit at Amristar in Punjab, India last October, I had a lot of takeaways in terms of observing the diversity of Indian cuisine across the country. BY ERIC LOW

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIC LOW

Having been in Chennai just 6weeks before, I saw a contrasting world of differences and influences within the Indian cuisine spectrum. Two issues ago, I wrote about Teochew Cuisine across Peninsula West Malaysia from Johor to Bukit Mertajam up north. The Heritage Cuisine Summit made me reflect on how my own Teochew heritage cuisine has influenced the foods of a number of South East Asia countries. From Thailand to Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore, we can see local dishes in each of the five countries carry elements of Teochew or Chaozhou influences as we address it in Mandarin. From cooking techniques to ingredients, they are all pointing towards the same source of inspiration. So how did Teochew food and its attributes spread its wings so far and wide?

CHAOZHOU PREFECTURE Let’s start with the Teochew people from Chaozhou prefecture as it is known as geographically in China. Chaozhou city is the old capital

city before the port city of Shantou was recognised after the birth of communist China.The eight districts of the province includes Chao Ann, Jie Yang, Teng Hai, Chao Yang, Hui Lai, Nan Ao, Rao Ping and Pu Ning. With a long coast line, fertile soil inlands and a great moderate climate all year round, the province was abundantly rich in land based agricultural resources and seafood supply all year as reflected in the cuisine.The cuisine, considered one of the healthiest in the entire school of Chinese foods encompasses more water based cooking methods than dry heat cooking or deep frying.Taste expectations of Teochew gourmets are sublime, well balanced natural flavours enhanced by local special fermented seasoning sauces and pickles. Some of the significant seasoning sauces include fish sauce, fermented beans sauce, sacha sauce, kumquat oil and plum paste and aged tangerine skin marmalade. Significant Teochew condiments and pickles which can span more than 40 varieties includes marinated chye sim, gong chye, pickled leek bulbs, black olives, black olive flavoured mustard greens (or kana chye), preserved sweet and salty radishes, sour mustard vegetables and salted plums. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – FOOD CULTURE

THE TEOCHEW IDENTITY

Teochew Ah Balling

The Teochews are known as Jews of the East; they always have an aspiration for better life. The declining years of the Qing dynasty saw desperation in southern China for the Chinese to migrate for better lives. The first wave of Teochew people migrated down south what is now known as Indochina to the countries of Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand. Taking along with them were cuisine knowledge, cultures of music, performing arts and embroidery. A significant number of them became hawkers and soon the local cuisines were adapting to the new culinary ideas and ingredients from the incoming migrants. With the Europeans colonising Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia from the 1800s onwards, that opened up opportunities for the second wave of migration for more Teochews who badly wanted to escape poverty back home of then a declining country.

NOODLE ADAPTATIONS

Braised Duck

Khao Kha Moo

Pad Thai

36 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

With the Teochews landing in all these South East Asian countries, they started to shape the way food is cooked and eaten while integrating with local civilisation and ingredients. Most of the Teochew influences were at street food levels, with the hawkers adapting to local ingredients and taste preferences. What was fish porridge gruel in Chaoshan became Khao Tom in Thailand and Chao Ca in Vietnam. While the cooking method remains technically the same, service was different in each country. In Thailand, they created a spicy blend of lime, chilies and coriander as dipping sauce for the fish slices, while in Vietnam, they switch to a diluted fish sauce and palm sugar dip known as Nuoc Mam. In Singapore, many hawkers switch from the traditional fermented beans dipping sauce style back in Chaoshan to sliced chilies and light soy. From the district of Jie Yang which is famous for their rice noodles products, it is home to a humble dish of dry fried fresh rice noodles known Char Kway Teow. Cooked with kale, preserved radish and seasoned with fish sauce, this humble dish has transformed to what is known as pad Thai in Thailand, a similar version of it found in Penang, Malaysia equally endearing to the locals as Char Koay Teow and a different permutation in Singapore flavoured with molasses flavoured thick sweet dark soy to give it its unique Singaporean version identity. Additional ingredients like cockles, fresh prawns, garlic chives, dried Chinese sausages and compressed beancurd are also added in the different localised versions. What remains unanimously consistent across each other is the noodle must be fried with pork lard. As quipped by the late Chef Anthony Bourdain: “I can’t believe something this messy can actually taste so good!!” Besides the fried version of the rice noodles, a soupy broth based version also known as Kway Teow Soup with either pork or beef based flavours, found its way down south with the migrants. In Thailand, it became Kuey Tiew Moo Nam Tok and eventually spinning off to spicier versions of boat noodles with finer noodles. In Vietnam, Hu Tiew Nam Vang was the local adapted version with some added seafood elements like dried shrimp and cuttlefish for the broth, while prawns and fish cakes were added as toppings. Across over in Cambodia, Kuy Teav Phnom Penh became one of the most popular street grub very similar to its Vietnamese cousin. In Penang, locals added duck bones to the broth for a more unique slightly gamey flavour while in Singapore, the broth is flavoured with dried sole bones and seaweed. The dry version of Kuey Teow Soup is often serve with fettucine like type of egg


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – FOOD CULTURE

Hoi Tod

Oyster Omelette

Khao Kha Moo

Pho Bo

hu Tiew Nam Vang.jpg

noodles call Mee Pok instead which is toss in pork lard, black vinegar and fish sauce. This is evidently seen across Cambodia and Vietnam as well as Singapore. The beef version of Kuey Teow Soup is believed to be the predecessor for what is Pho Bo in Vietnam, Kueytiew Nea in Thailand, Kuy Teav Sach Kho in Cambodia. Both the Cambodians and Vietnamese also relate the dish similar to what their previous French colonial masters were fond of, Pot Au Feu. And sometimes you can see the locals using the French technique of using burnt onions to enrich the color or flavour of the broth. While Cambodia and Vietnamese versions are similar, the Thai version of the broth is spicier.

SOY GOOD

Bak chor Mee

The Teochews are also famous for their soy braised dishes. Teng Hai district has a unique bred of goose known as Lion Head Goose that is used exclusively to be braised in soya sauce with dark caramel and spices like star anise, dried tsaoko fruits, cinnamon, blue ginger, garlic and dried tangerine peel. Unable to find the right kind of goose in South East Asia, local ducks were braised instead. These can be found in the street grub or Teochew restaurants in Bangkok, Ho Chi Minh City, Penang, Johor and Singapore. Besides duck and goose, pork is also a favourite to be braised in soya sauce. Different cuts of pork have contributed to what is each different countries significant dishes. Thailand has Khao Kar Moo which is Soy Braised Pork Knuckles and Trotters over rice served with soy braised egg, local kale, sour mustard greens and freshly sliced garlic. It is eaten with a fiery spice dipping WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

37


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – FOOD CULTURE

Vietnamese Fish Soup

Penang Kwat Teow Thng

Soy Braised Duck

Pho Bo Penang Char Kway Teow

sauce of chilies and vinegar. Meanwhile the Vietnamese took the idea and created a new version which is known as Thit Ko. It uses pork belly and differs by reducing the sauce to a gelatinous consistency and further enhanced with some fish sauce. Cambodians have Kaw Sach Chrouk which is the version of assorted soy braised pork and offals with rice or noodles. Both soy braised duck and pork also forms another back drop for what is known as Kway Chap in Singapore and Malaysia, Kuey Jab in Thailand. Besides having offal, the Thais go up one notch by making the broth more peppery and adding crispy roast pork pieces to the dish for contrasting textures. Other notable influences to local foods in the south east Asian countries include Oyster Omelette evolving into Hoi Tod in Thailand and Banh Xeo in Vietnam, while the Singapore and Malaysia versions of the dish has the fish sauce added in during cooking instead of serving it as a dipping sauce and of course, adding a chili paste and vinegarish chili dip to it as well for the spiciness.

SNACKS DOWN SOUTH Teochew snacks have also found their way down south. Teochew Sio Bee had become Kanom Jeeb Thai and Guchai Tod came from our famous Koo Chye Kueh that originated in old Chaozhou City back in Chaozhou Prefecture. The use of pork lard for flaky layers in baked pastries and both salty mung beans and sweet red bean fillings were also introduced by Teochew migrants. The art of making Fish Balls and various types of Meat Balls were also introduced by the Teochews to the south east Asian countries. 38 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

TWO WAY STREET So did the Teochews take back anything from South East Asia? Yes! They did. Satay sauce introduced by Malays in Singapore and Malaysia were used by Teochews migrants to create a unique satay sauce that was drenched over fine rice vermicelli with brined cuttlefish, cockles, water spinach and sliced pork.This gravy was introduced by returning migrants to Chaozhou Prefecture and they adopted the name Satay sauce, literally which sounded like a 3 teas sauce. In Chinese characters. They were written as sacha when pronounced in Mandarin. They created their own versions made with dried shrimp, krill, spices and chilies. Today, sacha sauce is one of the most popular in Chaozhou, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Fujian areas as a dipping sauce for hot pots dining where cooked meats and seafood are dipped with it before eating.

ABOUT CHEF ERIC LOW Worldchefs accredited competition judge and cookbook author of the award-winning The Little Teochew Cookbook and Teochew Heritage Cuisine Cookbook, Chef Eric is the founder of Lush Epicurean Culinary Consultancy. Well versed in both culinary arts and food science, he manages a portfolio of foodservice projects and events curation from Singapore to China and Sri Lanka. Contact him at Eric Low 刘 奇 荣 (Mobile: +65 9825 2686, E-mail: lushepicurean@gmail.com, www.lushepicurean.com)


Chef Phillip Esteban, CH Projects, San Diego, USA Springfield Essential Chef Coat: BCSZ009-WHT | Austin Chef’s Bib Apron: ABCCD006-NAT

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IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – EXPOGAST 2018

AN EXCEPTIONAL EDITION What made the EXPOGAST 2018 and Villeroy & Boch Culinary World Cup stand out? EXPOGAST 2018 and the Villeroy & Boch Culinary World Cup ended on Thursday 29th of November on a grand note with an international cast of top chefs. Here are our top 4 highlights.

THE JUNIOR NATIONAL TEAM WINNER AUSTRIA

The Worldchefs Village (80 square metres) was the hotspot, as we welcomed chefs around the world with our exhibiting partners. They were: Koppert Cress, Emirates Chefs Guild, Bridor, Electrolux Professional, Wales Chefs Association, Vito, Dilmah and Nordic Chefs Association. Daily demonstrations with our partners were also a highlight!

1. FINE(ST) CULINARY ART

The Villeroy & Boch Culinary World Cup is one of the largest and most important culinary competitions in the world, with the first edition published in 1972. Like the enthusiastic audience that gathered and cheered at Luxexpo The Box, we salute the chefs who crafted the spectacular works. It was also a priceless experience to taste the competition creations of the national teams, the junior teams and the “Community Catering” teams. 40 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – EXPOGAST 2018

THE NATIONAL TEAM WINNER SWEDEN

REGIONAL TEAM WINNER SWEDEN

2. ROYAL SUPPORT

Gastronomy has a place in everyone’s hearts, and it was such an encouragement to see royalty support the efforts of the chefs in white. His Royal Highness Grand Duke Henri, together with Michel von Boch, President of the Villeroy & Boch Family Council, jointly presented the award to the best national team, Sweden.

3. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

COMMUNITY CATERING WINNER SWEDEN

Every four years, EXPOGAST brings together the most talented chefs from the five continents in Luxembourg. EXPOGAST is both a professional and public exhibition dedicated to the professions of gastronomy and tableware, and we are glad to have been a part of this international showcase!

4. STRONG SUPPORT

Congratulations to the organisers! This could not have happened without the total dedication and professionalism of the members of the Vatel Club, organiser of the competition, the many volunteers and the students of the École d’Hôtellerie et de Tourisme du Luxembourg. Their hard work generated 45,000 visits, an impressive number! WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – COMMENTARY

IT TAKES A GLOBAL COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE A COOK The education of cooks and future chefs is not a destination process - it is a lifelong commitment to building true understanding, says Paul Sorgule. BY PAUL SORGULE MS, AAC

As cooks and chefs we clearly understand the technical aspects of cooking and how years of practice, trial, and error are necessary to become mildly proficient at the craft. We know that a well-prepared dish involves an appreciation for as well as an understanding of ingredients, flavor profiles, and the impact that season, terroir, and ingredient handling have on the appropriate preparation of that dish. Time, technical skills, and flavor memory are key elements of cooking, however, if these were the only steps in becoming a cook, the only objectives for those of us who tie on an apron and sharpen our knives, then what we do would be predictable, and limited. To be a professional cook is so much more than checking off the skills needed to assemble wonderful dishes in restaurants for a discerning public. To be a cook or chef is to be a representative of varied cultures, a guardian of traditions, a historian of food and it’s impact on society, a storyteller who portrays food through the eyes of his or her own upbringing and family connection, and an inquisitive student of all that came before. This list provides a whole new interpretation of what it means to be a cook. This list allows us to see that we may understand very little, that our base of knowledge may have gaps. The education of cooks and future chefs is not a destination process 42 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

- it is a lifelong commitment to building true understanding. When this is the goal, then a method can be formulated to allow for the true evolution of understanding. Through this process comes better cooking – cooking that is an extension of absolute appreciation. It takes a global community, and a lifetime of experience, to fully develop this base of knowledge. True culinary education only begins in the classroom and training kitchens that are prevalent throughout the world - true culinary education occurs when we all accept that every aspect of culinary education must be connected. We may invest significant time in the development of foundational skills in the kitchen: knife skills, established foundational cooking methods, ingredient identification, food presentation, and so on, but, until we connect the important dots that represent real understanding then all of that remains - very limiting. Until we understand the power of food and cooking and the limitless potential for good that our craft provides, we will limit what we do. The best cooks are portals of information, process, history, culture, and a deep appreciation of the people behind food – this education takes a global community effort. It has been said that “the purpose of life is a life of purpose” 1 – as cooks - once we understand the power of our purpose then, and only then will we feel complete. Setting the stage for this to happen is the function of culinary education.


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – COMMENTARY

THE IMPORTANCE OF CULTURE Culture is a combination of many disciplines and beliefs. Culture includes language, spiritual connections, art, music, literature, theater, history, and cooking. To attempt to be a well-rounded cook without having a connection to the other disciplines would be seriously incomplete. In other words, to cook any type of food well, without the benefit of understanding many components of a culture, would be difficult, if not impossible. The missing ingredients in great cooking will go way beyond the components of a dish, they may be a lack of appreciation for how that dish came into being, why a certain ethnic cuisine is built a certain way, or how the indigenous preparers of that food felt at the time of preparation. The best cooks study all aspects of what the food means as well as how it is prepared.

LEARN FROM DIVERSITY The best cooks and chefs thrive on the environment of a kitchen that attracts and encourages diversity. A cook’s education only begins in a classroom – it is in the burning hot conditions of the kitchen where we share common goals and add our own unique background, just as we add a spice to a dish, where the magic of cooking becomes apparent. Just as a great wines’ character is influenced by the variety of natural microbial yeasts that are present in the fermentation room, so too are the flavors of a restaurant influenced by the presence of diverse characters working within the kitchen space.

HISTORY IS IMPORTANT We may feel that what we cook is new and unique, deeply personal and a reflection of our specific influence, but in reality, it is the history of the kitchen that provides the canvas for cooking to take place. Everything that we do in the kitchen is built on what others have done in the past. We learn, grow, and assimilate from history what will become the style that we think is unique. The best cooks learn that understanding the historical foundations of the kitchen is essential if we are to create anything that is credibly acceptable today. Whether this happens in the classroom, or more likely through working experiences, is not the question – the question is how do cooks learn to accept that this is the case - always.

THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF THE KITCHEN – TELL THE STORY Cooks who are comfortable in their own shoes are those who constantly learn through observation, travel, study, research, and alignment with others. Once this becomes second nature to the cook then it is possible for that same individual to tell the story of a dish through cooking. Every excellent menu provides a story and every cook is a storyteller. Storytellers perform their craft through a feeling of confidence and confidence comes from knowing.

TECHNIQUE IS PUBLIC DOMAIN Each of us has a responsibility to help develop, train, and teach the next generation of serious cooks. Gone are the days when we (established cooks and chefs) can claim that a process, formula, or recipe is something that we own and can ill-afford to share. Everything that we do in the kitchen is and should be public domain. We owe it to history

and to future generations to willingly, and happily share what we know. This is our ongoing contribution to education.

RELISH THE OPPORTUNITIES TO GIVE BACK What we do is important. What the next generation of cooks will do is even more important. This value statement is far more significant than that beautiful restaurant food that we are inherently proud of. We possess the gift of food storytelling, the developed skill that allows us to take nature’s ingredients and combine them into beautiful, delicious, and nourishing dishes that promote health and wellbeing as well as communication, smiles, and universal common ground. How can we channel all of this into a life of purpose? It may be as simple as showing a family how to cook nutritious meals; or it could be taking the lead to help those suffering from tragedy with the most basic provision of a good meal. When Jose Andres helps to facilitate the feeding of thousands after the tragedy of a hurricane, fire, or earthquake, he is providing a forum for cooks to demonstrate a life of purpose that complements and goes beyond the assembly of beautiful restaurant plates. How wonderful and fulfilling is this? Part of a cook’s education is the process of learning how to be generous with his or her craft and time. Showing them how to be caring and generous human beings should complement showing students how to be competent cooks. This takes a community to teach – it must become part of who we are rather than what we do.

BREAKING BREAD IS OUR GIFT TO GLOBAL UNDERSTANDING It was Julia Child who once inferred that any major change in history was accompanied by a major change in the way that we grew, processed, prepared, and served food. This can actually be validated if you compare those factors, but what is even more important is the relationship that food has had to the way people interact with one another. Every major and minor event in our personal histories is serviced well by food. Weddings, anniversaries, funerals, graduations, state dinners, and business negotiations find common ground in good food. This is powerful! Cooks have the opportunity to impact how people communicate and view each other. Great food is the one thing that every person can agree on and as such sets the stage for more favorable results regardless of the situation at hand. Education is a combination of teaching and training, but also deep understanding of who we are, what the world is like, how people evolve, what the issues are that drive a food culture, and a more pronounced appreciation for what makes us different and what makes us the same. We all share in this process that stretches way beyond the culinary classroom. It does take a global community to educate a cook.

ABOUT CHEF PAUL SORGULE Paul Sorgule, MS, AAC is from Harvest America Ventures, LLC, Restaurant and Culinary School Consulting and Training and the Harvest America Cues Blog: www.harvestamericacues.com. He can be contacted at psorgule@hotmail.com WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

43


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – IN THE KITCHEN

GET SHARP How much do you know about the art of sharpening your knives? SHARPENING STEEL: THE CORRECT APPLICATION Knives stay sharp for a long time if they are only used for their intended purpose.The knives should be used for cutting and not chopping. Bones or the like must be chopped with a cleaver. Use wooden or plastic cutting boards; knives can very quickly become blunt if a stone (e.g. marble) or glass cutting board are used. Even the best knife will lose its sharpness over time due to wear on the food being cut and on the cutting board. The knives can then be resharpened with a suitable sharpening steel. The user can influence the cutting performance and edge retention when resharpening knives and therefore also large­ly determine the quality of the cutting results. The cutting edge becomes blunt when using the knife. It is no longer sharp when you look at it in cross-section - but slightly rounded - not visible to the naked eye. This worn cutting edge should be sharpened immediately on a sharpening steel. This process of slight blunting and subsequent sharpening can be frequent­ly repeated, provided that two important points are observed: 1. The sharpening steel and knife cutting edge must come into contact with each other at the right position. 2. The steel and knife cutting edge must be positioned at the correct angle to each other. The sharpening movement has to begin with the end of the knife blade at the tip of the sharpening steel and be guided in a wide arc while applying light pressure to ensure that it ends with the tip of the knife close to the sharpening steel handle. It is important that you alternate the side of the knife that comes into contact with the sharpening steel. 44 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

You should never first move one side of the knife and then the other side of the knife several times along the sharpening steel, otherwise a curved burr will form towards the other side of the knife, which will remain after the last sharpening movement. However, only a very fine burr forms with alternate sharpening (also known as a thread), which is removed by bending it back and forth. It is vital to apply less and less pressure to­wards the end of the alternate sharpening movement to ensure that the fine burr becomes weaker and weaker.


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – IN THE KITCHEN

SHARPENING UNIT THIS IS HOW THE “RAPID STEEL ACTION” SHARPENING UNIT WORKS: Place the knife on one side of the gap for precise guidance and draw the knife with light pressure and in a curved stroke through the gap in the sharpening unit. Repeat this several times – you will then have a sharp knife with a perfectly formed angle.

Other advantages: Optimum angle is already set. Simultaneous sharpening of the complete cutting edge. Ergonomic design.

This sharpening rods have a wear-resistant, ultra-hard special coating for very good honing. A simple and safe drawing motion results in an optimum cutting edge.

WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

45


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – IN THE KITCHEN

Balanced tapering to the tip. Effective surface protection due to galvanised coating.

Uniform cut (grooves) for smooth, ultra-sharp cutting. Safety due to high quality finger guard.

SHARPENING STEEL: THE CLASSIC ONES SHARPENING STEEL CUTS / SURFACES: Rough cut: For domestic use Diamond: Diamond surface for exceptional honing Standard: Very good honing Fine cut: Minimal honing Polished: No honing, only for polishing and straightening the cutting edge Ceramic: Particularly suitable for hard knives/ fine honing A greater or lesser degree of surface roughness is obtained on the sharpened cutting edge depending on the coarseness or fineness of the sharpening steel cut. The extent of the sur­face roughness is a result of the grooves created during the sharpening. The grooves are transverse to the cutting edge when sharpened correctly. A cutting line, which has more or less pronounced serrations (saw-like) is formed on the cutting edge itself at the point that the grooves from both sides of the knife meet, depending on the depth of the grooves. It may be that an ultrasmooth or somewhat rough cutting edge profile is desired.This depends on what the knife will be used for. A serrated cutting edge penetrates the “hardness” of the food to be cut (e.g. the skin of fruit andvegetables, bread, the crust from roasts, etc.) easier than a smooth knife.

Wear-resistant surface with a shatter-proof tough core thanks to the latest hardness technology.

FOR VIDEOS ON KNIFE CARE, SCAN THESE 2 QR CODES

SHARPENING STEEL SHAPES: Round shape: Low net weight Oval shape: Large contact area and particularly effective sharpening results Flat shape: Linear contact, maximum effectiveness Square shape: Combines 2 sharpening steels in one 46 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

Visually appealing handle design.

Information source: FRIEDR. DICK


HUG Filigrano Tartelettes

HUG AG, Neumühlestrasse 4, CH-6102 Malters/Luzern · Phone +41 41 499 76 30 · Fax +41 41 499 76 01 food-service@hug-familie.ch · www.hug-foodservice.ch · www.facebook.com/hugfoodservice · Certificate: ISO 9001:2000 · IFS


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – SUSTAINABILITY

FIRST IN, FIRST OUT

KITCHEN INVENTORY AND CHANGING THE SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY What’s your New Year Resolution for the kitchen? Jeremy Abbey shares some ideas. BY JEREMY ABBEY

WCMC, CEC, CEPC, CCE, CCA

48 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE


IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – SUSTAINABILITY

Another year over and another one has begun. Many restaurants and foodservice businesses have either just wrapped up a year-end inventory or have begun to take stock of the goods on hand. Successful operators understand the importance of taking inventory to ensure a profitable bottom line. One key to a successful inventory is the concept of “first in, first out (FIFO).” In the culinary industry, this principle ensures that the best and freshest food creations reach our guest. As the New Year begins, take this time to inventory yourself as well as the products you work with.

FIRST IN, FIRST OUT Walking into the refrigerator, the smell of rotting flesh and ocean funk hits you in the face. “What in the world could that be?” you think to yourself; what could even produce the vile aroma. As you need to complete the prep list before service, you grab the beautiful whole Dover sole that is on top of the ice and began to fillet; resuming preparation. With each drag of the boning knife through the delicate flesh, the thought of the stinky refrigerator fades from consciousness. Hours later, as service ends, time avails itself to investigate the source of the “funk.” Examination determines a lack of product rotation has let a gorgeous Dover sole deteriorate into a stinky goo. You feel your blood pressure rise as a mistake has caused the operation to lose money. “Further training will have to be done” you think to yourself as you wrap up the night and journey home. No ethical cook or chef would sit back and let a beautiful fresh fish rot in the back of the refrigerator while serving a fish that just came in the door. Never would gorgeous produce be allowed to develop mold and rot away. It is the responsibility of all cooks and chefs to appreciate, value the products we use and respect the integrity of them. Using the inventory method of First in, First out ensues that the products served are the best and is the most responsible way to manage the bottom line of any operation. Through training, observation and regular inventory, chefs and cooks can prevent products from going into the trash. Are we able to apply these methods to more than just food?

NOT JUST THE SEAFOOD Just like a food service operation, we need to take a personal inventory of ourselves. Weather an individual does this every day, once a week or on an annual basis, looking at ourselves and our actions towards others allows us to make decisions on what we keep on hand, or what we throw out. As the industry changes, our kitchen brigades have taken on a new look. The actions of our employees and our guests have changed. As chefs and culinary professionals, it is our responsibility to change to meet the industry and stay engaged with our profession. There is no reason to complain about the stinky seafood, we need to do something about it. Investigate the cause of the smell and discard it. Many chefs were trained in brigades where being talked down to, abused, taken advantage of and demoralized was the “norm”. Myself included. Some of the personality traits that we bore witness to has become a part of us. Not by choice but due to a lack of knowing any better or the excuse of “that’s what I went through.” As culinary professionals, the time is upon us to throw these actions and attitudes out with the old seafood in order to increase the social sustainability of our industry. WWW.WORLDCHEFS.ORG

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IN&OUT OF THE KITCHEN – SUSTAINABILITY

MORE THAN MONEY Taking time to reflect on our attitudes and actions makes us better leaders, better workers and overall better humans. Rarely does the pace of the culinary industry allow us to take the time to reflect on ourselves. Without taking a physical inventory of products, an operator does not know the value of their business. Without taking a personal inventory, a human does not know the value of themselves. It is more than just the money. When we reflect on ourselves; how we treat our coworkers, we take the opportunity to analyze our cost of goods. This deep look into our actions allows us to pause and reflect on whether the item is worth keeping. Do we say hello to all of our coworkers, everyday? Do we treat everyone as the professionals they deserve to be treated as? Do we lead by example in a more positive manner than what “the old days” taught us? Do we strive to increase the social sustainability of our operation? I ask myself on a regular basis questions that provoke thought. If I find that an attitude or action does not fit into my quality standard of personality, I reflect on it and then throw it out if it is no longer good. Changing the culture in a work environment to be more socially conscious might not see the return on investment as quickly as a lower food cost but the long term benefits will be highly profitable. By creating a more sustainable industry worker, we are able to reduce turn over, increase productivity and accountability ultimately leading to happier employees and higher customer satisfaction. All of this is worth way more than just money.

PROCESS TO CREATE A BEAUTIFUL DISH The media has turned its focus to the harsh reality of the culinary industry that we all experience. Addiction (in its many forms), stress, depression and poor working conditions are in the forefront of social media more than ever before. For years, cooks and chefs have been struggling with mental issues and feeling like there is nowhere to turn to. It is easy for people to tell us what needs to be done but if we as leaders and industry professionals aren’t comfortable with ourselves how can we encourage others to talk about issues and coach them to be comfortable as well? When the problem is talked about and a solution offered, it is just like a chef telling a prep cook, “the customer wants classical French cuisine……go make Esscoffier #1658” while working in a Japanese restaurant. The industry lacks the knowledge of the steps to create the solution just as a prep cook in the Japanese restaurant lacks the knowledge to create #1658. First step in changing the culture and improving social sustainability begins with the individual. Looking at ourselves and owning our actions will allow us to begin the process of change. Once we identify the sources of our “stinky fish,” we will be able to correct the issue. If may be as easy as discarding the poor behavior (throwing out the fish). It may take some work such as learning a better method of motivating employees or improving our communication skills (finding a new supplier for seafood). Investing in our selves is an investment into the operations we work. When we learn the process, we can create a beautiful dish. Learning new skills takes time and changing the culture of the culinary industry will take time as well. It has to start with each individual taking 50 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

an inventory in order to find out what needs to go, or what needs to be held in stock. If old attitudes and actions are beginning to smell, throw them out and make room for some fresh ideas. Social sustainability and increasing the quality of the environment we work in is everyone’s responsibility. Every kitchen around the globe is aware of the conditions of the industry. When chefs and cooks step up to the challenge to change the culture, we will begin to see a more sustainable future. Honest self-reflection can be painful and changing actions can take time but by creating a more welcoming, positive, accountable environment, we will save money. Take an inventory and practice FIFO as we kick off a new year and continue to improve the social sustainability of the culinary industry.

Chef Abbey is the owner and operator of Detroit Underground Omakase (DUO) and is active in many aspects of the culinary industry. He believes that more focus needs to be on social, financial and environmental issues in order to ensure the sustainability of the culinary industry. He is also Owner /Chef – Culinary Impressions, Inc and can be contacted at Chef.jeremy.abbey@gmail.com


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world PLANTS TO FEED THE

5

POPULATION GROWTH AND URBANISATION

2050

BY THE GLOBAL POPULATION WILL INCREASE

20%

BILLION

7.6 BILLION

9.1 BILLION

2000

2018

2050

WILL BE URBAN COMPARED TO 3.7 BILLION TODAY. CITY DWELLERS HAVE LARGER INCOMES AND EAT MORE MEAT ON AVERAGE.

OUR CURRENT FOOD SYSTEM USES OVER

30 70 20 OF ALL ICE-FREE LAND

%

TO FEED

THIS LARGER, WEALTHIER, URBAN POPULATION, FOOD PRODUCTION

% 70 NEEDS TO INCREASE BY

6 BILLION

6.4

AGRICULTURE

%

OF ALL FRESH WATER

6

%

OF ALL ENERGY

THROUGH

2050.

THERE ARE CURRENTLY

55 BILLION

LIVESTOCK CONSUMING FOOD GROWN ON NEARLY

¾

OF THE ARABLE LAND.

THERE IS SIMPLY

NOT ENOUGH LAND TO FEED 9 BILLION THE CURRENT DIET.


SHIFTING TOWARD A MORE PLANT-BASED DIET

SOY CONTAINS

35-40

BEEF PROTEIN

%

REQUIRES ABOUT

100 TIMES MORE WATER THAN

PROTEIN AND INCLUDES ALL ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS. HOWEVER, 75% OF SOY IS FED TO LIVESTOCK.6

SOY

RICE

161 116

CORN

96

LEGUMES

87

THE SAME AMOUNT OF PLANT PROTEIN.7

MILK

37

EGGS

35

MEAT/ POULTRY

20

BEEF

9

USABLE PROTEIN PER ACRE OF FARMLAND8

MEASURED IN KILOGRAMS

EVEN AS WE STRIVE FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE PLANT-BASED DIET, CROP PRODUCTION STILL REQUIRES A NITROGEN SOURCE. THIS IS MOST COMMONLY PROVIDED THROUGH NITROGEN FERTILIZER WHICH REQUIRES TREMENDOUS ENERGY, AND AS A POLLUTANT, IS CONSIDERED AMONG THE TOP THREE THREATS TO GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY. MORE SUSTAINABLE FARMING METHODS LIKE CROP ROTATION WILL NEED TO BE EXPLORED.9 Nutripro® by Nestlé Professional®


Serving

IT UP

Integrating more plants into your menu? Here are some ideas to expand your plant-based options. Planning a plant-based meal

Add appeal to plants

1. Select the category of your dish. Is it a roast, soup or stew, or multi-component main dish?

Use interesting textures to intrigue the senses. Try roasting vegetables for a crispy feel, or oven-dry them to concentrate the flavours, increasing the “meaty” texture. You can also combine vegetables with raw nuts and seeds to provide varying levels of crunchiness.

2. Choose your anchor vegetables. What’s in season? 3. Consider how it can be prepared and choose your cooking method. 4. Plan your spices and seasonings around your choices.

Try unusual spice and flavour combinations.

5. Add balance from a nutritional perspective. Can you combine foods to provide a complete protein?

This is a good way to complement or accent the flavours of the produce. For example, nutmeg is good with root vegetables such as sweet potatoes, potatoes, and pumpkins. Cumin and coriander go well with sweet vegetables like beets. And mustard complements cabbage, broccoli, sprouts, and kale. Smoking or grilling fruits and vegetables can also enhance their flavour profile.

6. Enhance your plating, with complementary colours, shapes, flavours, and textures.

Experiment with the form of the dish. Just by slicing vegetables differently, you can create a different experience. Try serving a portabello mushroom as a “steak,” slice cucumber or zucchini into ribbons and serve in place of pasta, or use a ricer on cooked cauliflower. You can even cook carrots and puree them into a foam or blend with pulses for hummus.

Make room on the menu It’s a good idea to integrate vegan and vegetarian dishes with the rest of the menu. This draws more attention to your plant-based recipes and avoids creating a stigma around non-meat dishes. Make sure your descriptions are just as cravable as the rest of the menu, and these dishes may become some of your guests’ new favourites.


Choosing an alternative centre of plate Putting protein on the plate drives satiety and delays digestion. If you’re not using meat in your dish, there are many other interesting ways to provide bulk and quiet hunger pangs. While some of these options are also good sources of protein, others need to be combined with different foods in order to provide a complete protein. Vegetarian meat alternatives

Pulses (beans and lentils)

Tubers*

Close to familiar meat form and texture. May contain spices or other flavouring to simulate meat taste. Substitute wherever you would use meat.

Available dry or canned. Firm texture, may have slightly nutty flavour. Add to soups, salads, stews or casseroles, or make into “meat”balls.

Cost-effective, filling, and absorbs flavours readily. Boil, bake, roast, mash, or fry. Try sweet potatoes with black beans in enchiladas.

Tofu

Mushrooms

Bulbs*

Comes in many forms including extra firm, firm, soft and silken. Soft, smooth and flavourless on its own, it is a prime candidate for flavourful marinades, sauces, and seasonings. Add to soups, stir-fries, and scrambles.

Porcini, shiitake, and portabello mushrooms add umami flavour and hearty texture. Can be eaten raw, cooked in salads, sauces, soups, and sandwiches, or grilled.

Fennel and artichokes add textural interest and presence on the plate. Roast with olive oil and add to salads or dips.

Tempeh

Choose unripe or canned in water or brine to avoid sweetness. Grill and shred like pulled pork, slice into "steaks," or add to stir-fries and salads.

Sold in flat, rectangular pieces. Has a slightly earthy taste and chewy texture. Crumble and add to soups, salads, or pasta, or serve in a sandwich.

Seitan Made from cooked wheat gluten, it has a chewy texture and is a good source of protein. It’s commonly used in Asian dishes.

Jackfruit*

Cauliflower* Mild taste absorbs flavours easily. Chop and eat raw, slice into "steaks" and oven roast, add to curries and stir-fries, or boil and mash or put through a ricer.

Beetroot* Roasted and caramelized, it plates nicely and adds rich colour. Roast or boil and add to soups or salads.

Nuts & peanuts Enhance food with a nutty flavour and crunch. Add to salads, pasta, desserts, etc. (Note: Nuts are food allergens. Identify on menu and check with guests before serving.) *Not a good source of protein.

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COOKING

WITHOUT ANIMAL-BASED INGREDIENTS Milk, eggs, and other animal-based ingredients often perform functional roles in cooking, so it can be a challenge to replace them. Finding a suitable alternative depends on their role in the original recipe. While substitution is an experimental process, the following tips and tricks are a good place to start. MILK SUBSTITUTES

EGG SUBSTITUTES

Eggs may serve more than one purpose in a recipe. To choose an appropriate replacement, consider their function in your dish. Coagulation/Gelation: A typical custard or flan recipe uses one egg to set 250 mL of full-cream milk with 25 g of added sugar. To replace the egg, substitute a combination of 3-4 g (1 tsp) corn starch + 0.5 g gum. Depending on the fat content of the milk , the amount of sugar, and additional ingredients in the recipe, this might have to be adjusted. If you are also replacing the milk with a plant-based alternative, add a pinch of salt to set the gel. Emulsification: Eggs help incorporate oil and water-based liquids together into a stable substance. To replace them in salad dressings and mayonnaise substitute 5 g (1 tsp) lecithin + 0.5 g gum for one egg yolk. (Note that some lecithin is animal-based, so look for soy-based alternatives.) In sweet batters, combine thick fruit purĂŠes (like apple or banana) with the lecithin and gum to emulsify and add body to the recipe.

Foaming: The foaming ability of egg whites aerates foods to make them light and fluffy. When making mousses and terrines, replace egg whites with whippable non-dairy creams especially formulated for this purpose. In baked goods, you can replace eggs by increasing the amount of baking powder/ baking soda and adding a teaspoon of vinegar/lemon juice for taste. Colour: Instead of relying on eggs for browning, use a pinch of turmeric to add a light golden touch. Be careful not to overdo it, as turmeric could also impart its flavour. Texture: Eggs are also used for binding, or holding ingredients together. To bind savoury dishes without eggs, try adding mashed potatoes, rice flour, or wheat or corn starch to thicken the recipe. In cake batters, mashed banana, apple puree, and a pinch of gum or corn starch will give a nice thick texture to the batter. In glutenfree recipes , create a slurry of 1 tbsp flax seed dissolved in 3 tbsp water and set it aside until sticky, then use this in place of egg. Taste: Eggs add a richness to the flavour of baked goods, desserts, sauces, and dressings. Add a teaspoon of nut, sunflower, or olive oil to compensate for every egg removed in these recipes.

Like eggs, milk has several functions in food, so there are no universally fail-proof substitutes. Liquids: In beverages and pourable applications (like dressings and sauces), you can typically use a 1:1 substitution with plant-based dairy alternatives, vegetable broths, fruit juices, or water, depending on the recipe. Other dishes: In more complex recipes, milk’s protein, fats, carbohydrates, salts, and minerals may affect the dish’s functionality. Several plant-based dairy alternatives for milk , cream, and yogurt, each with its own formulation and functionality, are commercially available, but finding the most suitable replacement for each recipe involves trial and error. You may need to adjust the flavour by adding a pinch of salt, sugar, or a squeeze of lemon to balance sweetness, saltiness, and acidity. For baked custards, batters, and egg & milk emulsions, add 1 g of additional salt per 250 mL of milk alternative.


Sources 1 The Nielsen Company, 2017. 2 IRI Survey. October 2017. www.iriworldwide.com 3 China Dietary Guidelines, 2016. http://dg.cnsoc.org 4 Euromonitor International 2018. Nutrition: Sustainable Protein From Flexitarian to Vegan (Part 2). 5 How to Feed the World in 2050. www.FAO.org. 6 The Hidden World of Soy. World Wildlife Foundation. 7 Oki, T; Sato, M; Kawamura A; Miyake, M; Kanae, S; Musiake, K. Virtual water trade to Japan and in the world. 8 Kaldy, M.S. Econ Bot 1972. 26: 142. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02860775 9 Aiking, Harry. Future Protein Supply. Institute for Environmental Studies, 2011.

GELATIN SUBSTITUTES

HONEY SUBSTITUTES

Bovine gelatin is used to set gels, moulded desserts, and candies, and sometimes to add a transparent coating or glaze to appetizers or fruit desserts. To replicate its setting ability, substitute the same amount of powdered agar (derived from seaweed) or carrageenan. Approximately 2 g of agar will set 250 mL of liquid. Alternatively, gums (from guar, xanthan, or locust bean) can also be used. One gram of gum will provide the same functionality as 3 g of gelatin or 2 g of agar.

Honey’s primary function is to add sweetness or flavour to recipes. While the flavour is unique and can’t be replicated by plant-based ingredients, you can substitute maple syrup, agave syrup, or brown sugar in a 1:1 ratio to provide sweetness.

Every day more of us are relying

on plants for the nutrition and flavour we crave. While this shift is inevitable if we want to feed the world, it’s also an exciting opportunity to expand your culinary repertoire. From grains to fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices, the world of plant-based ingredients is full of colours, flavours, textures, and nutrients, all ripe and ready for you to satisfy your customers.

10 Colleen Forgarty Draper et al. A 48-hour diet challenge in healthy women and men. 11 FAIRR Sustainable Protein DD09, Feb. 2018. 12 Lea, E., & Worsley, A., 2001. Influences on meat consumption in Australia. Appetite, 36, 127–136. 13 2006 UN Food and Agriculture Organization study. https://news.un.org 14 Proteins: The Facts. Compiled by the Nestlé Research Center. 15 EFSA Population Reference Intakes for Protein, 2012. https://www.efsa.europa.eu 16 USDA; FAO/WHO/UNICEF Protein Advisory Group, 2004. 17 Palmer, Sharon. Plant Proteins. Today’s Dietitian, February 2017. http://www.todaysdietitian.com 18 Schaeffer, Juliann. Color Me Healthy. Today’s Dietitian, November 2008. http://www.todaysdietitian.com 19 WHO International. Food-based dietary guidelines in the WHO Euorpean region. http://www.euro.who.int

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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ADOCHEFS DOMINICAN REPUBLIC MRS. DIANA MUNNE TEL: +809 621 3336 D.P.R. KOREA COOKS ASSOCIATION OF D.P.R KOREA MR. HAN YONG HUN TEL: +850 2 381 4427 / 4410 ECUADOR CHEFS ASSOCIATION OF ECUADOR MR. MAURICIO ARMENDARIZ TEL: +593 2466975 WWW.ASOCHEFECUADOR.NET EGYPT EGYPTIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. HOSSAM EL DIN MOHAMED (0020) 106 666 3280 / (0020) 122 345 3080 WWW.EGYPTCHEFS.COM ENGLAND BRITISH CULINARY FEDERATION MR. PETER GRIFFITHS WWW.BRITISHCULINARYFEDERATION.CO.UK ESTONIA ESTONIA CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. TAIGO LEPIK FIJI FIJI CHEFS MS. SHAILESH NAIDU FINLAND FINNISH CHEF ASSOCIATION MRS. ULLA LIUKKONEN TEL: +358 50 66347 WWW.CHEFS.FI FRANCE MUTUELLE DES CUISINIERS DE FRANCE MR. CHRISTIAN MILLET TEL: +33 (0) 1 42 61 52 75 GHANA CHEFS ASSOCIATION OF GHANA MR. ISSAC SACKEY EMAIL: SACKOFI@YAHOO.COM GERMANY VERBAND DER KOCHE DEUTSCHLANDS MR. ANDREAS BECKER TEL: +49 (0) 651 945 12 24 WWW.VKD.COM GREECE HELLENIC CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. MILTOS KAROUBAS TEL. +30 210 8251 401 WWW.CHEFCLUB.GR GUAM MICRONESIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. PETER DUENAS HONG KONG HONG KONG CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. MAK KAM KUI TEL: +852 25 827 180 WWW.HONGKONG-CHEFS.COM HUNGARY HUNGARIAN NATIONAL GASTRONOMIC ASSOCIATION MR. ANDRÁS KRIVÁCS TEL: +36 70 9770 111 WWW.MNGSZ.EU ICELAND ICELANDIC CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. BJÖRN BRAGI BRAGASON TEL: +354 696 4443 WWW.CHEF.IS INDIA INDIAN FEDERATION OF CULINARY ASSOCIATIONS MR. MANJIT SINGH GILL TEL: + 0124 417 2001 WWW.IFCA.INFO INDONESIA ASSOCIATION OF CULINARY PROFESSIONALS INDONESIA MR. STEFU SANTOSO TEL: +62 888 973 8850 WWW.ACP-INDONESIA.NET WWW.BALICHEFS.COM

ITALY FEDERAZIONE ITALIANA CUOCHI MR. ROCCO CRISTIANO POLUZZO TEL: +39 06 4402178 WWW.FIC.IT JAPAN ALL JAPAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. TOSHI UTSUNOMIYA TEL: +81 3 5473 7275 WWW.AJCA.JP JORDAN THE JORDANIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. SHADI ABU KHADEEJAH PRESIDENT@JCA.JO TEL: +96 279 515 7494 KAZAKHSTAN CULINARY ASSOCIATION OF KAZAKHSTAN REPUBLIC MS. YELENA AASHCHINSKAYA TEL: +7 7162 251345 WWW.KAZ-CHEFS.KZ KENYA KENYA CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. GURPREET SINGH MEHTA TEL: +254704595744 KINGDOM OF TONGA KINGDOM OF TONGA CULINARY ASSOCIATION MR. TUITUIOHU MAFI KYRGYZSTAN ASSOCIATION OF COOKS OF THE KYRGYZSTAN MR. SHUHRAT SHARIPOV TEL: +99 6556 777 356 WWW.CHEFS.KG LATVIA LATVIAN CHEFS CLUB MS. SVETLANA RISKOVA RZOMMERS@INBOX.LV TEL: +371 29238453 WWW.CHEF.LV LEBANON LEBANON HOSPITALITY SERVICES S.A.R.L MR. JOUMANA SALAMÉ TEL: + 96 136 57 655 LIBERIA LIBERIA PROFESSIONAL CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. EDWIN LAWRENCE JOSIAH TEL: +231 0776 015411 EDWINJOSIAH@LIVE.COM LITHUANIA ASSOCIATION OF LITHUANIAN RESTAURANT CHEFS AND CONFECTIONERS MR. DARIUS DORBAVOLSKAS TEL: +370 615 67405 WWW.LRVVK.LT LUXEMBOURG VATEL CLUB LUXEMBOURG MR. ARMAND STEINMETZ TEL: + 352 802 453 WWW.VATEL.LU MACAU MACAU CULINARY ASSOCIATION MR. RAYMOND VONG TEL: +853 85983 148 WWW.MACAUCULINARY.NET MACEDONIA ASSOCIATION OF CHEFS GASTRO MAK MS. ADRIJANA ALACHKA TEL: +38976573265 WWW.GASTROMAK.EU.MK MALAYSIA PROFESSIONAL CULINAIRE ASSOCIATION OF MALAYSIA MR. CHEF KAMARUDDIN ADNIN EMAIL: KAMARUDDIN.ADNIN@SHERATON.COM TEL: +603 9274 0217 WWW.MALAYSIACHEFS.COM

MAURITIUS MAURITIUS CHEFS ASSOCIATION MS. AMBA THUNGAVELU WWW.MAURITIUSCHEFSASSOCIATION.COM MOLDOVA ASSOCIATION OF CULINARY CATERING MOLDOVA MS. ELENA CIOBANU WWW.ACCM.MD MONGOLIA MONGOLIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. OKTYABRI JANCHIV TEL: +976 11 460 900 WWW.MGLCHEFS.MN MONTENEGRO CHEFS ASSOCIATION OF MONTENEGRO MR. BAASANDORJ MUNKHTUR TEL: +86 468 246 WWW.CHEFSMONTENEGRO.COM MOROCCO MOROCCO CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. KAMAL RAHAL ESSOULAMI TEL: +212 522 97 95 60 WWW.FMAC.MA MYANMAR MYANMAR CHEF’S ASSOCIATION MR. OLIVER E. SOE THET TEL: +95 1 501123 WWW.MYANMARCHEFS.COM NAMIBIA NAMIBIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MS. PHILIP KLYNSMITH PHILIP.K@NAMIBIANCHEFS.COM TEL: +264 61 253 542 WWW.NAMIBIANCHEFS.COM NEPAL CHEFS ASSOCIATION OF NEPAL MR. SHREE RAM ADHIKARI EMAIL: NFO@CHEFSNEPAL.COM.NP NETHERLANDS KOKSGILDE MR. WALDRIK CREMER TEL: +31 (0) 6 53308780 WWW.KOKSGILDE.NL NEW ZEALAND NEW ZEALAND CHEFS ASSOCIATION INC. MR. GRAHAM HAWKES WWW.NZCHEFS.ORG.NZ NORWAY NORWEGIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. HELGE JOHANSEN TEL: +47 51 47 46 WWW.NKL.NO PAKISTAN CHEF ASSOCIATION OF PAKISTAN (CAP) MR. AHMAD SHAFIQ TEL: +92 300 9484904 WWW.CAP.NET.PK PALESTINE PALESTINE CHEFS CLUB ASSOCIATION MR. NADIM MOHAMMAD MILHEM TEL: +972 (02) 277 0462 PERU ASSOCIATION PERUANA DE CHEF COCINEROS Y AFINES MR. JAMES ANTOLIN TEL: +511 7856524 WWW.APCCAPERU.ORG PHILIPPINES LTB PHILIPPINES CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. FERNANDO FIDEL C. ARACAMA EMAIL: JSANTOLIN@YAHOO.COM TEL: +632 844 2787 WWW.LTBCHEFS-PHILS.COM POLAND POLISH OF KITCHEN & PASTRY CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. JAROSLAW USCINSKI TEL: +48 510 126 484 WWW.OSSKIC.ORG.PL PORTUGAL ASSOCIAÇÃO DOS COZINHEIROS PROFISSIONAIS DE PORTUGAL MR. FAUSTO AIROLDI TEL: +351 213 622 705 WWW.ACPP.PT

MALDIVES CHEFS GUILD OF MALDIVES MS. MARIYAM NOORDEEN TEL: +960 777 3385

PUERTO RICO ACF THE CHEFS AND COOKS ASSOCIATION OF PUERTO RICO M. MARCOS A. RODRIGUEZ CABAN TEL: +787 257 7373 WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ACFPUERTORICOCHAPTER

MALTA MALTA CHEFS SOCIETY MR. PAULINO SCHEMBRI TEL: +356 21 523 667 WWW.MALTACHEFSSOCIETY.ORG

QATAR QATAR CULINARY PROFESSIONALS MR. DAVID SOSSON TEL: +974 4479 2221 WWW.QATARCP.COM


REPUBLIC OF BELARUS BELARUSIAN CULINARY ASSOCIATION MR. VIKTOR RADEVICH TEL: +375 296 789 100 REUNION CERCLE DES EPICURIENS DE LA RÉUNION MR. JEAN-CLAUDE CLERET TEL: +33692619150 ROMANIA ASOCIATIA NATIONALA A BUCATARILOR SI COFETARILOR DIN TURISM MR. STEFAN BERCEA TEL: +40 0722 773 337 WWW.ANBCT-ROMANIA.RO RUSSIA RUSSIAN CULINARY ASSOCIATION MR. VIKTOR BELYAEV TEL: +7 495 650 3756 SAMOA SAMOAN CULINARY ASSOCIATION MR. JOE LAM EMAIL: JOE.LAM@SAMOA.WS SAUDI ARABIA SAUDI ARABIAN CHEF ASSOCIATION MR. YASSER B. JAD TEL: +966 2 6846266/6267 WWW.SAUDICHEFSASSOCIATION.COM SCOTLAND FEDERATION OF CHEFS SCOTLAND MR. DAVID LITTLEWOOD DGLITTLEWOOD@HOTMAIL.CO.UK TEL: +44 01698 232603 WWW.SCOTTISHCHEFS.COM SERBIA SERBIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. DEJAN STANKOVIC OFFICE@SERBIAN-CHEFS.RS TEL: +381 11 2681 857 WWW.SERBIAN-CHEFS.RS SINGAPORE SINGAPORE CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. EDMUND TOH TEL: +65 6885 3074 WWW.SINGAPORECHEFS.COM SLOVAKIA SLOVAK UNION OF CHEFS AND CONFECTIONERS MR. BRANISLAV KRIZAN TEL: + 421 2 5464 8417 WWW.SZKC.SK SLOVENIA SLOVENIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. TOMAZ VOZELJ TEL: + 386 41 371 651 WWW.KUHARJISLOVENIJE.SI SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. JAMES KHOZA JAMES.KHOZA@TSOGOSUN.COM TEL: +27 11 482 7250 WWW.SACA.CO.ZA SOUTH KOREA KOREA CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. JEONG-HAK KIM TEL: +82 2 734 1545

THAILAND THAI CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. SOMSAK RARONGKUM TEL: +66 84 5589 292 WWW.THAILANDCHEF.IN.TH TOGO JEUNES CHEFS TOGO MR. TOSSOU OUTSA TEL: +228 91885 TUNISIA MAITRES DES SAVEURS ET GASTRONOMES DE TUNISIE MR. NEBIL ROKBANI TEL: +216 23 335300 TURKEY COOKS AND CHEFS FEDERATION OF TURKEY MR. Y. YALCIN MANAV TEL: +90 (212) 272 46 40 WWW.TUMAF.ORG.TR UKRAINE ASSOCIATION OF CULINARY WORKERS OF UKRAINE MR. ANDRIY MAGALETSKIY TEL: + 67 503 44 12 WWW.UKRAINE-ACU.ORG.UA U.S.A AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION MR. STAFFORD T. DECAMBRA SDECAMBRA@ACFCHEFS.NET TEL: + 1 904 824 4468 WWW.ACFCHEFS.ORG UNITED ARAB EMIRATES EMIRATES CULINARY GUILD MR. UWE MICHEEL TEL: +9714 3403128 WWW.EMIRATESCULINARYGUILD.NET

ROMANIA CULTURAL ASSOCIATION EURO EAST ALTERNATIVE DR. IULIA DRAGUT WWW.CAMPIONATDEGATIT.RO

YOUNG CHEFS CLUB

SOUTH TYROL SUDTIROLER KOCHEVERBAND MR. REINHARD STEGER INFO@SKV.ORG WWW.SKV.ORG SPAIN SELECCION ESPANOLA COCINA PROFESIONAL MR. ADOLFO MUÑOZ EMAIL: ADOLFO.MM@ADOLFO-TOLEDO.COM SAUDI ARABIA MHG HOLDING GROUP SACTC (SAUDI ARABIAN CHEFS TABLE CIRCLE) MR. THOMAS A. GUGLER TAIWAN TAIWAN TOQUES BLANCHES MR. CHANGWEI HUNG (JOHN) HUNH.CW9@GMAIL.COM TEL: +886-2-27055282 TUNISIA FEDERATION TUNISIENNE DES RESTAURANTS TOURISTIQUES MR. SADOK KOUKA EMAIL: BUREAU.SADOK.KOUKA@GMAIL.COM TURKEY TURKISH NATIONAL CULINARY FEDERATION TAFED MR. ZEKI ACIKOZ USA SOCIETE CULINAIRE PHILANTROPIQUE WWW.SOCIETECULINAIRE.COM

VANUATU VANUATU CHEFS AND FOOD HANDLERS ASSOCIATION MR. DAVID HOLLIDAY TEL: + 67 855 71671 WWW.VANUATUCHEFS.COM

CORPORATE MEMBERS

VENEZUELA ASOCIACION DE CHEF DE VENEZUELA MS. ELIA NORA RODRIGUEZ TEL: + 58 241 8 255064 WWW.VENEZUELACHEF.COM

CHINA EFUN CULINARY EDUCATION MR. CLINTON ZHU

VIETNAM THE SAIGON PROFESSIONAL CHEFS GUILD MR. LY SANH TEL: +84 8 382 44691 WWW.VIETNAMCHEFS.COM WALES CULINARY ASSOCIATION OF WALES MR. ARWYN WATKINS TEL: +44 1341 247 268 WWW.WELSHCULINARYASSOCIATION.COM

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

SPAIN FEDERACION DE ASOCIACIONES DE COCINEROS Y REPOSTEROS DE ESPANA MR. SALVADOR GALLEGO JIMINEZ WWW.FACYRE.COM SRI LANKA CHEFS GUILD OF LANKA MR. TYRELL WASALATHANTHRIE TEL: +9 411 2055 041 WWW.CHEFSGUILDOFLANKA.COM

AUSTRIA KLUB DER KOCHE KARNTEN CARINTHIAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. GUNTER WALDER OFFICE@KKK.AT

SYRIA THE SYRIAN CULINARY GUILD MR. MAJED AL SABAGH MAJED@CIC-UAE.COM

ECUADOR ORGANIZATION OF GASTRONOMIC ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAS AND THE CARIBBEAN MR. MAURICIO ARMENDARIS

SWEDEN SWEDISH CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. CONNY ANDERSSON TEL: +46 733 648010 WWW.SVENSKAKOCKARSFORENING.SE

HUNGARY CHEF CLUB ‘99 MR. MARTON KAROLY CHEFCLUB@HUNGUESTHOTEL.HU

TAIWAN TAIWAN CHEFS ASSOCIATION MR. ALEN CHIEN TEL: +886 4 24261248 WWW.FORMOSACOOKING.COM.TW

USA JOHNSON & WALES UNIVERSITY WWW.JWU.EDU

UZBEKISTAN ASSOCIATION OF COOKS OF UZBEKISTAN MR. UMAROV AKBAR HAMDAMOVICH TEL: +99871 265 2771 WWW.CHEFS.UZ

ARGENTINA INSTITUTO INTERNACIONAL DE ARTES CULINARIAS MAUSI SEBESS MS. MARIANA SEBESS MARIANA@MAUSIWEB.COM WWW.MAUSIWEB.COM

SWITZERLAND SOCIETE SUISSE DES CUISINIERS MR. ANDREAS FLEISCHLIN TEL: +41 41 418 22 22 WWW.HOTELGASTROUNION.CH

MONGOLIA MONGOLIAN CULINARY FEDERATION MR. NATSAG KHANDSUREN

CHINA ZHEJIANG SANHE KITCHENWARE CO., LTD MR. CHEN FANG WWW.CHINASANHO.COM

FRANCE CORDON BLEU 13-15 QUAI ANDRE CITROEN, PARIS, FRANCE MS. CATHERINE BASCHET CBASCHET@CORDONBLEU.EDU GERMANY DELIKATESSEN MANUFAKTUR WWW.DELIKATESSENMANUFAKTUR.DE IRAN HORIZON RASH INTERNATIONAL TOURISM INSTITUTE MALAYSIA KDU COLLEGE –SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY, TOURISM AND CULINARY ARTS WWW.KDU.EDU.MY MALDIVES MALDIVES EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE SERVICES LTD MR. HUSNIE RAUF TEL: +960 3333630

AUSTRALIA WA CULINARY YOUTH CLUB WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/WA-CULINARY-YOUTH-CLUB CANADA CCFCC WWW.CANADIANJUNIORCHEFS.CA/ CHINA SHANGHAI JUNIOR CHEFS CLUB TEL: +86 21 33135647 SHJUNIORCHEFS@GMAIL.COM WWW.SHANGHAIJUNIORCHEFS.ORG HONG KONG HONG KONG YOUNG CHEFS CLUB CONTACT: MR. KEVIN WONG WWW.HKYCC.HK/ INDONESIA YCCI YOUNG CHEFS CLUB INDONESIA WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/YCCIYOUNGCHEFSCLUB INDONESIA YCCI BALI CULINARY PROFESSIONALS JR CHEFS BALI CHAPTER WWW.BALICHEFS.COM MALAYSIA YOUTH CHEFS CLUB MALAYSIA WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CAMYOUTHCHEFS MALAYSIA PJCC PENANG JUNIOR CHEFS CLUB WWW.PENANGCHEFS.COM MAURITIUS MAURITIUS CHEFS ASSOCIATION YOUNG CHEFS CLUB CONTACT: MR. JASON SANGAHOOPIE TEL: (230) 465 3856 JACPAY@INTNET.MU WWW.MAURITIUSCHEFS.COM SERBIA SERBIAN JUNIOR CHEFS CLUB SERBIANJUNIORCHEFSCLUB@GMAIL.COM SERBIAJCC@GMAIL.COM SLOVENIA YOUNG CHEFS CLUB SLOVENIA SRI LANKA SRI LANKAN JUNIOR CHEFS CLUB CONTACT: UDITHA GANEWATHIHA SLJCHEF@GMAIL.COM WWW.SLJCHEF.BLOGSPOT.COM/ USA ACF YOUNG CHEFS CLUB WWW.ACFCHEFS.ORG WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ACFCHEFS TWITTER.COM/ACFCHEFS USA CULINARY INSTITUTE LE NÔTRE VANUATU VANUATU YOUNG CHEFS CLUB WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/VANUATUYOUNGCHEFS VIETNAM JUNIOR CHEFS CLUB VIETNAM CONTACT: NGUYEN TIN TRUONG DUY WWW.VIETNAMCHEFS.COM

MEXICO INSTITUTO CULINARIO DE MEXICO WWW.ICUM.EDU.MX RUSSIA CARVING ACADEMY WWW.CARVING-ACADEMY.COM SINGAPORE SINGAPORE EXHIBITION SERVICES PTE LTD WWW.SESALLWORLD.COM SINGAPORE KOELNMESSE PTE LTD WWW.KOELNMESSE.COM.SG

ISRAEL MR. SARKIS YACOUBIAN TEL: +972 50 86 1111 4 CHEFSARKIS@HOTMAIL.COM

SOUTH AFRICA PEPPADEW® INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD MR. RICHARD PELCZARSKI WWW.PEPPADEW.COM/

MALAYSIA CHEFS ASSOCIATION OF MALAYSIA 2016 MR. FAKHRUL ALIFF ARIFIN BIN MOHARI FAKHRUL.MOHARI@MALAYSIACHEFS.MY TEL: +60193110034 WWW.MALAYSIACHEFS.MY

SWITZERLAND BASEL MESSE AG WWW.MCH-GROUP.COM USA CULINARY INSTITUTE LE NÔTRE MR. JEAN LUC HAUVILLER WWW.CULINARYINSTITUTE.EDU

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WORLDCHEFS EDUCATION APPROVED SCHOOL The Worldchefs Recognition of Quality Culinary Education program seeks to recognize educational companies, associations and institution’s which offer culinary and pastry art programs of various design and size and meet or exceed global standards for quality culinary education as established by the Worldchefs Education Committee. Recognized companies, associations and institutions share in the future development of Worldchefs global standards as the list of recognized programs continues to expand around the world.

64 WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE

Hospitality Industry Training and Development Center Hong Kong Berjaya Higher Education SDN BHD Malaysia KDU University College Malaysia West Coast Academy of Hospitality & Tourism Australia South Africa South Afican Chefs Training & Innovation Academy MSA Mesleki Egitim Merkezi Turkey South Africa HTA School of Culinary Art South Africa Cilantro Culinary Academy Malaysia At-Sunrice Singapore ICAS TRAINING & EDUCATION COLLEGE Singapore Capsicum Culinary Studio (Pty) Ltd South Africa College “Tsaritsyno” Rusia International Centre For Culinary Arts Dubai UAE Triumph Higher Education- Escoffier Boulder USA Global Culinary and Hospitality Academy Philippines Sotra Videregående skule Norway Mausi Sebess Instituto Internacional de Artes Culinarias Argentina Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts-Austin USA GQB Escuela De Arte Culinario Mexico Dublin Institute of Technology Ireland Humber College Canada International Culinary Institute of Switzerland Switzeland Instituto Superior Tecnologico de Arte Culinario de Guayaquil Ecuador State Budget Educational Institution of Secondary Vocational Education Russia Ullvigymnasiet Sweden Moscow State Educational Institution of Secondary Vocational Education College of Technology No. 14 Russia International Institute of Culinary Arts, New Delhi India YOUNGSAN UNIVERSITY, Busan Korea South Korea Florence University of the Arts Italy DATA Greece Johnson County Community College USA Culinary Art’s School Ecuador International School for Culinary Arts & Hotel Management (ISCAHM) Philippines Cheboksary Economic- Technological College Russia Culinary Trainer School Ecuador Keiser University Center for Culinary Arts - Melbourne USA Collège Communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick-Edmundston Canada Keiser University Center for Culinary Arts- Sarasota USA Centro Superior de Hosteleria Mediterraneo Spain Keiser University Center for Culinary Arts- Tallahassee USA SRM Institute of Hotel Management India Seoul Hoseo Technical College South Korea Ryssbygymnasiet Sweden Kai Ping Culinary School Taiwan Akmi Greece South Metropolitan Tafe Australia First Gourmet Academy Philippines Chef’s Table Culinary Academy Turkey KES College Cyprus LPU Culinary Institute Philippines Tourism Department of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts - Eastern Mediterranean University Cyprus College of Tourism & Hotel Management (COTHM) Pakistan A Chef Culinary Academy South Korea EKS Culinary Academy Turkey Italian Chef Academy Italy Escuela Gastronomica Egopereira Colombia Escuela Gastronomica de Occidente Colombia Guam Community College Guam Mathimata Mageirikis Culinary Center Greece Istituto Eccelsa S.r.l. Italy Taylor’s University School of Hospitality Tourism and Culinary Arts Malaysia Chef Academy Italy School of Hospitality and Tourism Studies D Y Patil University India ITI Technologico Internacional Ecuador Golden Chef College of Culinary Arts Malaysia Lyceum of the Philippines University Laguna Philippines Royal Academy of Culinary Arts Jordan The South African Academy of Culinary Arts South Africa Dusit Thani College Thailand Karachi Institute of Culinary Art Pakistan Ask Institute of Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts India Escuela Appyce Argentina Kitchen Club Academy Palestine KDU Penang University College Malaysia Bangalore Culinary Academy India Sunway University School of Hospitality Malaysia Ambitious Academy Malaysia IIEK OMIROS Greece TransWorld University Taiwan


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WORLDCHEFS EVENTS CALENDAR 2019 ENDORSEMENTS

PRESIDENTS FORUM

14-16 January 2019

23-25 March 2019

18-20 January 2019

26 May 2019

Horeca Kuwait

The Chef Challenge Pakistan & Pakistan International Culinary Festival

26-28 February 2019 Chefs Ireland

4-6 March 2019

Emirates International Salon Culinaire

21-24 March 2019

Thailand Makro Horeca Challenge

6-7 August 2019

American Culinary Classic

SEMINARS 27 January 2019

Worldchefs Hot Kitchen Judging Seminar Sirha Trade Show, Lyon

27 January 2019

Worldchefs pastry Judging Seminar Sirha Trade Show, Lyon

27 January 2019

Worldchefs Community Catering Judging Seminar Toronto

European presidents Forum – Belgium Asian president Forum – Thailand

CHEF2CHEF WORKSHOPS The “Art & Science Come Together” partnership between Electrolux Professional and Worldchefs aims to combine the culinary creativity of professional chefs with the specialized knowledge and technology within the leading manufacturer’s commercial cooking solutions, helping kitchens across the globe to develop more streamlined and sustainable cooking processes. Chef2Chef brings chefs together at Electrolux’s Innovation Centers and provide world-class seminars, themed workshops and demonstrations that offer the opportunity to work with the latest cooking technology, focusing around the exclusive Cook&Chill solution offered by the manufacturer. Participants gain valuable skills and advice from experienced Professional chefs willing to share their international experience and passion for the continual discovery of contemporary develop-ments in the culinary arts. Follow www.worldchefs.org website and stay up-to-date with the latest news on the upcoming Chef2Chef workshops organised across the globe in 2018.

GCC REGIONALS 16-19 February 2018

Europe Regional GCC Selection – Rimini, Italy

25-26 May 2019

Americas Regional GCC Selection – Canada

66 66 WORLDCHEFS WORLDCHEFS MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

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Worldchefs Magazine Issue 23  

The first issue of 2019 highlights activities in 2018 and future projects in 2019 of Worldchefs Committees and Members, especially World Che...

Worldchefs Magazine Issue 23  

The first issue of 2019 highlights activities in 2018 and future projects in 2019 of Worldchefs Committees and Members, especially World Che...