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WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

September 2013

proudly presents

2003 BBJ Serial Number 32775 See page 28-29 for further details

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: Pages 20 - 65


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PRE-OWNED FALCON

WE BUILT THESE PLANES, WE TRACKED THEIR LIVES, WE KNOW THEM BEST. No one knows a pre-owned Falcon like we do. No one knows more about its past. Because we record the details of every Falcon’s history in our databases. And no one cares more about helping you get the best out of it. Because wherever you fly your pre-owned Falcon, our reputation flies with you.

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556


Project1_Layout 1 27/08/2013 08:44 Page 1

Falcon 2000

1998 • s/n 062 • 2,700 hrs. total time : very low time • 8 passengers • EASA / EUOPS1 • FWD and AFT lavatories • Engines & APU on MSP • Single Owner since new • Never chartered. Only private use • Next “C” in 2017 • New paint 2012, new partial refurb 2011

Falcon 2000LX

2009 • s/n 185 • 862 hrs. total time • 8 passengers • EASA Registered, EUOPS1 compliant • Engine on ESP Gold, APU on MSP • HUD, EVS, dual Electronic Flight Bags • 3 IRS, 3 FMS, 3 VHF • Aircell Axxes II Satcom, Wireless connectivity

Falcon 900EX

2003 • s/n 118 • 3,570 hrs. total time • 12 passengers • Low time aircraft EUOPS1 compliant • 3 IRS, 3 FMS, 3 VHF • HUD • Aero I Sat Com • 2012 new paint, 2011 cabin refurb

Falcon 900EX EASy

2005 • s/n 150 • 2,408 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • EASy II upgrade • FWD and AFT Lav • Sept. 2011 fresh C check • Aero I Satcom

Falcon 900DX

2007 • s/n 609 • 2,082 hrs. total time : low time • 14 passengers with forward and aft Lav • EASA / EUOPS1 compliant • FalconCare covered, MSP Gold covered • 3 IRS, 3 FMS, 3 VHF • Excellent in and out condition • Aero H+ Satcom, Satcom TV

Falcon 7X

2007 • s/n 005 • 2,780 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • EUOPS1compliant • FalconCare covered • ESP & MSP covered • HUD, Aero-HSD+ high speed data Satcom • August fresh 4A, 4A+ inspection • New Carpet


AC Index Sept13 22/08/2013 13:08 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale • AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS A310-304 . . . . . . 156, A318 . . . . . . . . . . 29, 156, A319 . . . . . . . . . . 59,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 23, 27, 28, 29, 71, BBJ II . . . . . . . . . 23, Boeing 27-200 . 109, Boeing 757-200 Exec . .109, CRJ 200 . . . . . . . 156,

BOMBARDIER

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125, 143, 149, 151, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 13, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 49, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 13, 40, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 34, 37, 52, 89, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 136, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 89, 142, CJ4. . . . . . . . . . . . 40, CJ525 . . . . . . . . . 105, 139, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 49, 53, 130, Encore . . . . . . . . 59, 148, Encore+ . . . . . . . 14, 53, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 155, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 150, Mustang . . . . . . . 13, Super SII . . . . . . 77, Sovereign. . . . . . 12, 27, 37, 52, 63, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 14, 37, 46, 128,

Global 5000 . . . . 6, 10, 18, 133, 156, Global 6000 . . . . 6, 156, Global Express . 10, 29, 39, 40, 55, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 77, 137, Global Express XRS.. 10, 23, 40, 156, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156,

Conquest

Challenger

II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47,

CRJ 700ER . . . . . 12, 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 12, 34, 83, 155, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 46, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 29, 156, 601-3A-ER . . . . . 67, 125, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 12, 40, 148, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 77, 134, 155, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 24, 59, 156, 800SE. . . . . . . . . 12, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 144, 850ER . . . . . . . . 156,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 77, 148, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 53, 132, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 156, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 57, 131, 156, 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 41, 57, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 53, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 14, 77, 83, 135,

CESSNA Citation ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 37, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 46, 52, 148, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 53, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 52, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 49, 85, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 89, 155, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 27, 37, 40, 77, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 156, XL . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 25, 27, 43, 46, 63,

EMBRAER Legacy 500 . . . . 27, 156, Legacy 600 . . . . 52, 59, 156, Legacy 650 . . . . 24, Lineage 10000 . 29, Phenom 100 . . . 43,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 6, 57, 59, 153, 154, 20-5BR-2C . . . . . 85, 20F . . . . . . . . . . . 153, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 12, 40, 45, 154, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 11, 154, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 11, 18, 59, 63, 71, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 11, 46, 153, 154, 900DX . . . . . . . . . 3, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 43, 45, 89, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 143, 154, 156, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 79, 138, 153, 154, 900LX . . . . . . . . . 11, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 25, 52, 57, 61, 71, 2000EX EASy . . 40, 156, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 34, 77, 156,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 105, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 19, 34, 45, 77, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 153, 156, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 10, 18, 24, 45, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 83, 156, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 10, 29, 34, 39, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 19, 49, 400XT . . . . . . . . . 79, Premier 1 . . . . . . 49, 77, Premier 1A. . . . . 63,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 47, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 59, 63, 145, 350i . . . . . . . . . . . 53, B100 . . . . . . . . . . 47, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 47, 49, 59, 63, 129, B200GT . . . . . . . 49, 67, 77, C90A . . . . . . . . . . 140, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 63,

Hawker 400XP . . . . . . . . . 52, 63, 77, 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 41, 49, 52, 149, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 19, 34, 41, 52, 63, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 800XPi . . . . . . . . 150, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 34, 41, 57, 63, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 41, 59, 63, 83, 156, 1000A . . . . . . . . . 25, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 14, 83,

09.13 AIRCRAFT

PAGE

Aztec PA-23-250 .140,

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 52,

SOCATA TBM 700B . . . . . 53, TBM 700C2 . . . . 105, TBM 850. . . . . . . 105,

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND A119 KE . . . . . . . 59, A109 E Power . . 151, AW139 . . . . . . . . 16, Grand . . . . . . . . . 59, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 63,

BELL 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 149, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 149, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 407GX. . . . . . . . . 119, 412EMS . . . . . . . 149,

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 59, AS 355 F-1. . . . . 151, AS 355 N . . . . . . 59, EC 130 B4 . . . . . 109, EC 135 P2+ . . . . 63, EC 135T2 . . . . . . 14,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS

IAI

MD 600N . . . . . . 63,

Astra 1125 . . . . . 45, 55, Astra SPX. . . . . . 45, 89,

SIKORSKY S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 14,

LOCKHEED Jetstar II . . . . . . 150,

PIAGGIO II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, Avanti . . . . . . . . . 27, Avanti II . . . . . . . 83, 150, Avanti P180 . . . . 57, 109,

GULFSTREAM

PILATUS

III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 129, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 67, 79, 156, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 11, 18, 24, 38, 40, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 77, 83, 125, 141, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 39, 77, 79, 153, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 29, 38, 43, 63,

PC12 . . . . . . . . . . 27, 105, 109, PC12-45 . . . . . . . 150,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 95, 113, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 89, 127, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 87, 117, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 89, Mods/Parts/Spares . . . . . . 107, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 127,

PIPER Cheyenne IIXL . 52, Seneca . . . . . . . 37, Seneca V. . . . . . 59, Meridian . . . . . . . 47, 83, 151,

The Global Aircraft Market Online

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Panel Sept13 21/08/2013 13:37 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL

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The global marketplace for business aviation News - Aircraft listings - Editorial WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Panel Sept13 20/08/2013 15:57 Page 2

Contents

Volume 17, Issue 9 – September 2013

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 20

A Tale of Two Markets: Current demand for large, long range business aircraft belies the fundamental character of Business Aviation, as Jack Olcott explains…

22

Business Aviation Demographics: The utility vans of companies with places to go and people to see, did you know that about 40 percent of the global fleet consists of turboprops?

26

Your Brand & Business Aviation: Being willing and prepared to speak favorably about the advantages of Business Aviation is a sound strategy for your company...

36

Business Aviation Optics: Until recently, owning and operating business aircraft seemed like a shell game. Can, or should a company hide its use of Business Aviation?

44

Sharing Ownership:

50

Risk Oversight For Boards: Now is a good time for the Board to take

20

66

Continuing his series on delivery options, David Wyndham explores the realm of joint- and co-ownership.

stock of the company’s current risk mitigation strategies for avoiding a potential insurance claim denial.

56

Fractional Aircraft Ownership: Board Members must understand risks faced by a company that owns - or is considering the purchase of - a fractional interest in an aircraft.

60

Large Cabin Jet Value: A look at the benefits of large cabin aircraft, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

Main Features 66

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – Challenger 604: How does the performance of the Challenger 604 stand up against the Falcon 2000?

80

Safety Matters – Season’s Change: With Fall fast approaching, it’s time to re-acquaint yourself with the skills and habits of Winter flying.

84

GAMA 2Q 2013 Shipment Analysis & Report: The surface view indicates some genuine cause for hope in GAMA’s latest quarterly report. Does the close-up view support this?

92

The Need to Go Around: A review of when it’s right to go around on an approach to avoid calamity – even when the pressure’s on to see a landing through.

Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics: 96

Avionics On-The-Fly: The more things change, the more things change, says Dave Higdon as he reviews the latest and greatest for the aircraft cockpit.

102

Aircraft Cockpit Enhancements: Do you have the knowledge to make smart panel upgrade decisions, asks Brian Wilson? Make sure you get the right fit for your airplane.

108

Value in Avionics: Ken Elliott looks at weighing the costs and benefits and building the value case for an avionics upgrade.

112

A Guessing Game: If avionics maintenance questions come with few answers, how can you plan for, or prevent unscheduled maintenance?

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

96 Regular Features 15 72 78 114 121

Viewpoint Aircraft Performance & Specifications Aviation Leadership Roundtable Market Indicators BizAv Round-Up

Next Month’s Issue Business Aviation & The Boardroom Ten Questions for Ed Bolen Aircraft Comparative Analysis: GIV-SP Dassault Mystere/Falcon 20 Celebration WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

9


Avpro September 19/08/2013 14:36 Page 1


Avpro September 19/08/2013 14:40 Page 2


Avpro September 19/08/2013 14:44 Page 3


Avpro September 19/08/2013 14:50 Page 4


Avpro September 19/08/2013 14:51 Page 5


Gil WolinSEPT2013_Gil WolinNov06 21/08/2013 14:37 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

Buyer Beware by Gil Wolin he announcements come flying at us daily, from carefullyworded press releases like this: “…the leading large cabin and super midsize aircraft management and charter company in the US, has announced the addition of [make/model] aircraft to its charter management fleet.” The leading large cabin and super midsize aircraft management and charter company? Says who? Well, says the press release, of course, as well as the website - in glowing and glorious terms. Now, there’s no law against a bit of bombast – that’s something we’ve never been short of in promoting business jets, going back 50 years to Bill Lear and the industry’s origins. And, as it happens, this particular company has earned both Argus Platinum and Wyvern Wingman ratings, so it does have some basis for the grandiloquence. But with 2,110 turbine charter operators in the US alone, according to Argus’ latest data, how is this operator different from the one whose website claims, “By providing the highest level of service at competitive rates, [company] continues to take the industry to new heights”? Or from this one: “[Company] has built an industry-leading private jet charter team with a singular goal in mind; to deliver excellence in every phase of your travel experience”? Let’s not omit the one that provides “unmatched levels of service to aircraft owners and charter customers,” and “exceeds even the highest expectations and ensures that each trip is executed flawlessly.” But how can the above possibly compete with “the leader in domestic and international private jet travel,” let alone one who is at “the forefront of private aviation, providing travelers with both world-class service and powerful value,” and provides “the highest level of professionalism” with “innovative solutions” for each flight? While the claims above are all almost identical, it takes a bit more digging to determine which are from FAR Part 135 jet charter operators, and which are made by charter

T

brokers, with no certificate and no aircraft fleet. As it happens, the first four are operators, the last two are brokers. But unless you’re well-versed in the language of business jet charter, the only term standard throughout the industry is “operator,” as only US charter companies possessing a current Part 135 certificate can claim to be, or advertise as a charter operator. And while good brokers (there are many) have a vested interest in customer safety and satisfaction, countless others couldn’t care less. Why should they? There is no government license or training required; no financial bond posted or security needed; no ethical standard to uphold. The only transportation regulation that applies to a broker is that it cannot “hold out” as an operator – hence the carefully-worded website copy that implies the necessary aviation operational expertise. Quite simply, where once an exact knowledge of aircraft, operators, airports, regulations and numerous ancillary service providers were required to sell charter, today only a laptop with Internet access, a slick website, and a cellphone are needed to establish one’s credentials as a broker. Argus numbers indicate that 90% of those 2,110 turbine aircraft charter operators have far fewer than 10 aircraft on certificate. Mostly regional in nature, they haven’t the sales personnel or budget to reach beyond their local area. So they depend on brokers located around the world to sell on their behalf, to clients who happen to be in the operator’s area on business or for pleasure, or to fill an empty leg with revenue on a deadhead flight home. In fact, most charter operators rely on brokers for a significant part of their charter activity. That often puts the “bedroom brokers” in competition with the operators on whom the brokers depend for charter aircraft to fly their own clients: an excellent example of “co-ompetition”, as are the relationships among operators themselves - for as often as not, operators function as brokers. Once operator sales and marketing efforts trigger

a call for charter, the operator is loath to say “Sorry, we don’t have an aircraft available.” So they subcontract the trip to another operator whom they trust to not try to lure away the client. Absent any forthcoming government oversight, leaders within the broker community have begun their own initiatives to bring some semblance of self-regulation to the industry. Within the US, the Air Charter Association of North America (ACANA) is one such effort, with limited success. More recently, Londonbased Baltic Air Charter Association (BACA), whose predecessor organization dates back to 1949, has expressed interest in establishing and implementing broker standards for its members similar to those required by IATA of commercial Airline travel agents. It’s up to both industry segments – operator and broker – to develop and implement a program to ensure the safety and economic well-being of all concerned: aircraft owners, charter customers, operators and legitimate brokers. Now that’s “industry leadership” that’s worth trumpeting on a website! ❯ Gil Wolin draws on forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. ❯ Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gil@wolinaviation.com, www.wolinaviation.com

The world’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops & Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

15


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Join us at this year’s NBAA to help us celebrate our 25th anniversary, and thank you for a quarter century of support. We’ll be hosting a cocktail hour to raise a glass to you, as well as sharing new products, new services, and new ways for you to save money, generate new business, and stay ahead of the competition. What great reasons to celebrate!

[ celebrate ] NBAA CONVENTION | OCTOBER 22-24 | LAS VEGAS | BOOTH #N5535

The World Leader in Aviation Market Intelligence | 800.553.8638 | +1.315.797.4420 | jetnet.com


Selling your aircraft at the highest possible price requires the innovative marketing you’ll find at J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, inc. including dedicated resources for pre-buy management, and an overall higher level of brokerage services. We’ll position your plane to stand out from the crowd. The best possible price...the fastest possible sale...that’s pretty sweet.


1988 FALCON 900B S/N 25

2007 GLOBAL 5000 S/N 9158

ASKING: $6,500,000 | 9,937 Hours TTAF, 5,111 Landings, MSP Gold

ASKING: $27,995,000 | 1,519 Hours TTAF, 611 Landings

•Currently Operated Part 135 •1C 2C 4C & Gear Restoration c/w 2012 •Dry Bay Mod SB c/w •Dual FMZ-2000 FMS Systems with 6.1 Software & WAAS/LPV •Aircell GoGo Biz High Speed Data •New Paint in 2012

NEW TO MARKET

2007 GULFSTREAM G450 S/N 4089

ASKING: $24,500,000 | 1,708 Hours TTAF, 734 Landings

•Excellent 1 U.S. Corporate Owner Pedigree •Certification Foxtrot Enhanced •Synthetic Vision •ADS-B Out •TCAS w/ Change 7.1 •Gulfstream Broadband Multi-Link (BBML)

•In-Service Date: January 2007 •Triple FMS/EVS Display/HUD •High Speed Data •Satellite TV •Extended Range SB c/w •November 2013 reserved slot at Bombardier for Batch 3, FANS 1/A and WAAS/LPV

2008 GULFSTREAM G450 S/N 4118 ASKING: $26,500,000 | 1,737 Hours TTAF, 536 Landings •Excellent 1 U.S. Owner Pedigree •Gulfstream Maintained •Certification Foxtrot •Gulfstream Broadband Multi-Link (BBML) •Honeywell AIS-2000 Multi-Region Satellite Television System •Currently 135 Operated

1994 GULFSTREAM GIV-SP S/N 1257 ASKING: $8,100,000 | 7,891 Hours TTAF, 4,240 Landings •Recent engine overhauls •72 Month due items c/w 8/2012 •Airshow Genesys •Triple Honeywell LASEREF •Heads-Up display •High service bulletin status

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


2005 GULFSTREAM G200 S/N 115

DEAL PENDING

ASKING: $8,595,000 | 1,832 Hours TTAF, 990 999 Landings, ESP Gold Lite

4,022 ASKING: Hours$1,400,000 TTAF, 3,482 Landings | 4,022 Hours TTAF, 3,482 Landings

•One U.S. Owner since new •Low time •Honeywell Mark V EGPWS with RAAS & Windshear •Safe Flight Auto Throttles •Great Paint and Interior •Currently Operated on a Part 135 Certificate

2005TOGULFSTREAM G200 HAWKER S/N 115 800XP NEW MARKET 2002

S/N 258588

ASKING: $3,300,000 $8,595,000 || 1,832 4,255Hours HoursTTAF, TTAF,999 3,532 Landings, Landings, ESP MSP Gold Lite •Proline •One U.S.21Owner Avionics since •AirCell new •Low Axxess time II Iridium •Honeywell flight Mark phone V EGPWS with •9 passenger RAAS & Windshear configuration •Safe Flight Auto Throttles •Great Paint and Interior •Currently Operated on a Part 135 Certificate

1996 BEECHJET 400A S/N RK-111

•Currently operated Part 135 •Engine overhauls June 2012 •Supplemental Air Conditioning •Upgraded Rockwell Collins AMS-5000 Avionics System with GPS-4000S Sensor

DEALTO NEW PENDING MARKET

1996 2003BEECHJET HAWKER 400A 800XPS/N S/NRK-111 258604

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BG 1 Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:20 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A Tale Of Two Markets Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

“For prompt transportation, many locations within the USA are dependent upon business aircraft. ”

20

Understanding the character of Business Aviation. The current demand for business aircraft relates to size and range, with larger designs selling better than smaller. That scenario, however, belies the fundamental character of Business Aviation, observes Jack Olcott. arger business aircraft with the range to reach distant markets and the cabin size to provide office-like features en-route appear to have dominated manufacturers’ order books lately. Demand for light to medium-sized designs seems lackluster. In essence, the market for Business Aviation looks bifurcated, with large jets selling significantly better than small airplanes. It was not always so. Traditionally, the Business Aviation community has been dominated by light to medium-size aircraft powered by jet or turbo-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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prop engines. Nor should we overlook the many light- to cabin-class aircraft propelled by conventional internal combustion engines turning propellers (piston airplanes). These machines—jet, turboprop or piston—are indeed workhorses, providing companies with access to regions where either the demand for public transportation by air is insufficient for Airline service or the airports serving the area are too small. For prompt transportation, many locations within the USA are dependent upon business aircraft. As the domestic economy recovers, so will the demand for traditionally-sized business aircraft, possibly with more activity in the small to medium category than previously seen. Because scheduled Airline service is focused on fewer than 50 locations of over 5,000 airports within the US, business aircraft provide access

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:11 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

that companies cannot obtain from other sources. The frequency of Airline flights even at those 50 major locations has been curtailed. Recent trends known as “capacity discipline” have prompted scheduled air carriers to reduce their service in order to fill airliners to capacity, and departures by scheduled Airlines have decreased by 8.8 percent at the major hubs and by over 21 percent at secondary hubs during the last five-or-so years. Traditional business aircraft will continue to be required to provide access not met by scheduled air service.

RECOVERY DYNAMICS Demand for larger, long-range aircraft is in response to a dynamic global economy searching for new markets. Domestically, the full impact of the U.S. “Great Recession” may not be fully understood or quantified, and Europe’s economic recovery is in its earliest stages. Uncertainty still prevails, as it surely will in the future (since there are very few guarantees in the business world). But the global economy has its bright spots, and the insightful entrepreneur and progressive corporation seek those opportunities, which in today’s economy often are found in far-off lands such as China, Africa and South America. Thus companies are purchasing business aircraft with performance and travel capability to reach distant ports. Coupled with the demand to travel long distances is the advance in connectivity that accompanies today’s larger business aircraft. In the era before satellites enabled passengers to use their mobile devices and laptops to connect with associates on the ground, business flights from the USA to Europe typically departed home base at night and passengers slept as their aircraft crossed oceans. Today’s intercontinental mission often is flown during the day. Passengers use the aircraft as a moving office, connecting with colleagues and customers while traveling, and arriving at their overseas destination in time to obtain hotel lodging before embarking on the next day’s business meetings. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

The demand for larger business aircraft is in response to those market dynamics—exciting opportunities in distant lands and aircraft sufficiently large to support the communications marvels of our new age of connectivity. Thus, we maintain our expectation that as the economy recovers, the demand for more traditionally-sized business aircraft will return.

GLOBAL DEMOGRAPHICS The population of turbine-powered business airplanes (i.e., business aircraft, excluding helicopters, powered by one or more jet or turboprop engines) total over 33,000 units operated by over 20,000 companies. Of those airplanes, about 19,000 are business jets and 14,000 are turboprops, and more than 60 percent are registered in the USA. Only a small percentage is in the category of large-cabin, long-range business aircraft. Even the assumption that demand today is focused primarily on the so called “heavy iron” business jets is flawed. As reported by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association recently, small to mid-cabin business jets deliveries during the first half of 2013 outnumbered their larger counterparts by more than 10 percent, while turboprop deliveries were nearly twice that of large-cabin activity. The typical business aircraft is selected to serve a practical mission—placing the right person in the right location at the right time, and as Pete Agur, our esteemed regular Boardroom columnist would add, for the right reason. Business aircraft are tools that enable a company to obtain maximum productivity from a firm’s two most valuable assets: people and time. Business Aviation’s basic value proposition will propel the demand for classic business aircraft in response to a recovering economy.

“The typical business aircraft is selected to serve a practical mission— placing the right person in the right location at the right time...

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 22

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

21


BG 2 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 12:10 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation Demographics Perhaps it is not surprising that North America is home to more than half the world’s turbine-powered business aircraft (mostly registered in the USA) - but did you know that about 40 percent of the global fleet consists of turboprops, not jets, asks Jack Olcott? ” But the true face of Business Aviation is a smaller aircraft, and its primary purpose is to link companies to customers...”

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usiness aircraft are the utility vans of companies with places to go and people to see. While popular media focus on the longrange, large-cabin models, the typical business aircraft in use throughout the USA and the rest of the world is a small- to medium-sized machine that can accommodate five to eight passengers. Only 60 percent are business jets, per se; the rest are powered by turbine engines turning propellers—i.e., turboprops. Not included in our Quick Look at Business Aviation demographics are the tens of thousands of General Aviation aircraft powered by internal combustion engines not too dissimilar to those found in automobiles. Like business jets and turboprops, they also enable access to places not served, or under-served by scheduled air transportation. It is true that the larger, long-range business jets

in the $50m+ category are selling well and generating significant revenue for their manufacturers, thanks to market dynamics that demand access to distant lands that are difficult to reach via commercial Airlines. But the true face of Business Aviation is a smaller aircraft, and its primary purpose is to link companies to customers, often within less than two hours flying time from the aircraft’s home airport. As the US and global economy recovers, demand for Business Aviation will likely trend toward its traditional norms of makes and models. Directors can be confident that the need for business aircraft in all shapes and sizes is enduring. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 26

GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF BUSINESS JETS & BUSINESS TURBOPROPS BUSINESS JETS vs BUSINESS TURBOPROPS

13938 19194

Jets T-Props

SOURCE: JETNET

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


1 Freestream September 22/08/2013 15:25 Page 1

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2 Freestream September 22/08/2013 15:21 Page 1

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3 FreestreamAug 21/08/2013 10:06 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS Citation XLS S/N: 5763. Reg: OE-GSZ • US$5,950,000 • Total Time: 2919.50 Hours / Total Cycle: 2206 • RVSM Capable • Thrust Reversers • Precision RNAV Capability, B-RNAV/RNP5 • U.S. Steep Approach including England Option Boeing BBJ/29273 • On Cessna ProParts Program • On AuxParts Program • On ProAdvantage+ Program

Boeing BBJ/28579

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• Elegant 10 Passenger Fireblocked Interior

Hawker 1000A S/N: 259034. Reg: G-GMAB • US$2,995,000

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025 • TTAF: 8498 / Landings 5281 • Engines on MSP Gold • 2006 Paint & Interior • Dual NZ-2000 with dual GPS • TCASs II with Change 7 • EGPWS • 48 Month Inspection c/w April 2013

Gulfstream G450 2012 Lear 45 S/N: 167. Reg:2Q G-GMAA

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BG 3 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 10:49 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Your Brand & Business Aviation: A Two Part Discussion. Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

“That attitude is exactly why you should be prepared to respond effectively when an unintended conversation, internally or publicly, about your Business Aviation services breaks out.”

Being willing and prepared to speak favorably about the advantages of Business Aviation is a sound strategy for your company, advises Pete Agur.

W

e have seen Business Aviation publicly reviled as the vehicle of choice for ‘Fat Cats’, typically without even a modicum of justification. With the exception of industry organizations such as the National Business Aviation Association, there has been minimal response from business aircraft owners and users, which indeed is unfortunate. The NBAA even went door-to-door trying to find companies and CEOs who were willing to be poster children for the argument in favor of Business Aviation. No takers. Why not? The more meaningful question is, “Why should any corporation publicly tout its use of Business Aviation?” After all, engaging business aircraft isn’t part of their core enterprise and, at best, any discussion of Business Aviation

would be a distraction from the firm’s central message; at worst the subject would become a lightning rod for questions many companies are not prepared to answer. That attitude is exactly why you should be prepared to respond effectively when an unintended conversation, internally or publicly, about your Business Aviation services breaks out. Otherwise, you could end up looking like one of the three automotive executives sitting before a congressional subcommittee. That debacle during the late fall of 2008 was clearly a professional low point for them and their companies.

PROACTIVE IS BETTER There are two ways to protect your internal and external brand from U

continued on page 30

26

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Jet Collection September_Layout 1 19/08/2013 14:55 Page 1

thejetcollection.com

2014 Q4 EMB 500

2007 Cessn Cessna a Citation Sover Sovereign eign

2014 Q2 BBJ

2002 Piaggi Piaggio io A Avanti vvanti

2008 Challenger 850

2001 PC-12 2

2007 Citation XLS

2000 Citatio Citation on X

CHICAGO 773.226.8541

DALLAS 214.415.3725 2 14.415.3725

TAMPA TAMP A PA 727.420.1607 727.420.1607

LYON L Y YON 33.6.28.75.69.30 33.6.28.75.69.30

ISTANBUL IST TAN A BUL 90.212.283.02.42 90.212.283.02.42

SAN FRANCISO 707.592.6960 707 .592.696 0

SAVANNAH SA AVANNAH A 912.727.4034

PARIS PARIS A 33.4.72.81.15.15 33.4.72.81.15.15

VIENNA VIENNA 43.1.533.04.15.55

BEIJING 86.10.65330620

SpeciďŹ cations and/or description descriptionss are are pr provided ovided as intr introductory oductory information. The They ey do not constitute representations representations or warranti warranties es of The Jet Collection. Y You ou should rrely ely on you your ur own inspection of the air aircraft. craft.


Avjet page September_Layout 1 22/08/2013 09:51 Page 1

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BG 3 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 10:50 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation pointed questions about your company’s use of Business Aviation: 1. Be Prepared; and 2. Respond Effectively (the subject of next month’s piece). The best preparation for defending your brand is to make certain your Business Aviation services are defensible within the context of your corporate culture and strategic business plan. As an example, Harley-Davidson is renowned for being an egalitarian company. That is the culture its founders established, and it remains that way today. H-D’s aviation services are clearly part of that culture. Each year H-D’s aircraft carry thousands of people among the company’s various sites. Their aviation department members, including flight crewmembers, are ambassadors for the company, from head to toe. Harley-Davidson has blended Business Aviation into its culture. No excuses. No stretch. No defensiveness. It is just part of who they are and how they do business. What about a company that uses the aircraft primarily as a strategic tool to carry key people? A business aircraft doesn’t need to be a company bus to create the greatest value. In fact, for many companies the absolute opposite is true. Getting the right people to the right places at the right time to do the right things is critical to most companies’ success. Deals or projects that would have taken many more days, if ever, to accomplish using commercial alternatives are greatly accelerated by using Business Aviation. As a union steward told me, “I love it when the top executives fly around in the corporate jets. That means they are doing deals that allow our floor folks to do their jobs.”

FUNDAMENTAL BUSINESS VALUE In both of the egalitarian and the key passenger cases, as different as they may be, Business Aviation is clearly supporting the success of the enterprise. Both kinds of organizations, top to bottom, have every reason to understand the value of Business Aviation and be proud of their use of aircraft services. Side issues create the problems, such as when Business Aviation services are not used solely for business purposes. Some years ago I wrote for a top business magazine. One day I was asked by the senior editor to “find an instance of a company jet being used to transport the CEO’s wife’s poodle to Miami for a haircut.” I told him I would not write that story but would be glad to do a story about a company jet being used for humanitarian reasons (by far, a much more common event). His response was classic, “Pete, that is not sexy. And sexy sells magazines.” The point is: How defensible are all your uses of Business Aviation services? Most of our clients prefer to play on the whiter side of gray. The purest policies do not allow any personal use of Business Aviation services or assets. A subset of this group allows the single exception for com-

30

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

IF YOUR USE OF BUSINESS AVIATION IS DEFENDABLE, WHY HIDE IT ? BE PREPARED TO DEFEND AND PROMOTE ITS BENEFITS TO THE COMPANY

munity outreach by allowing their aircraft to be used for humanitarian flights, usually with no publicity. The first approach avoids potential risks, the other accrues good will. Both are reasonable options that reside on the whiter side of gray. Personal use of business aircraft is a clear departure from the whiter side of gray. Even when rigorously complying to IRS and FAA limitations, nonbusiness use creates challenging perceptions that are best avoided. For a publicly held company, personal use of the company aircraft is a difficult ethical position to defend. There is an easy solution, however, when the Board believes that personal use is justified for compensational or motivational reasons: use air charter services, fractional aircraft shares or an aircraft services debit card for non-business trips. This approach takes the issue of personal use of corporate assets completely off the table, at least as far as the aviation department is concerned. The marginal cost increases that result from these approaches are modest in comparison to the risks and damage you may incur by not playing on the whiter side of gray. Assuming your Business Aviation services are defendable, next month we’ll explore how to respond effectively when the questions arise.

“Deals or projects that would have taken many more days, if ever, to accomplish using commercial alternatives are greatly accelerated by using Business Aviation.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 36

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG4 new Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:16 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation Optics: Now You See It, Now You Don’t Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards and is a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association. Contact him via Jay@jetsales.com.

Business aircraft should never be considered part of a shell game, observes Jay Mesinger.

ust a handful of years ago, following the Big Three Auto Makers’ testimony before Congress, the optics related to owning and operating business aircraft seemed like a shell game. Can, or should a company hide its use of Business Aviation? Then things got worse: companies divested from their aircraft altogether, since selling seemed like the surest way to avoid the optics spotlight. Unfortunately (but perhaps predictably) many other financial and critical business problems were created as a result of kneejerk reactions to the optics of the aircraft. Boards and senior management were having serious discussions about how to be less visible to the press and stock holders. In particular, discussions about using business aircraft as effective tools to accomplish growth and create competitive advantage were all but gone. Reaction to the optics issue exacerbated the economic problems that we all experienced starting in 2009. But now, in the fall of 2013, I have some good news. The optic controversy is subsiding.

J

I am not saying that companies are shining spotlights on their aircraft or advertising the acquisition of a new business jet. They never did that even before that ill-fated Congressional hearing in 2008. The idea of remaining low profile for security reasons still exists and, in fact, in this very dangerous world security concerns are even greater than ever. Security aside, however, the benefits of both buying and using the business aircraft to increase shareholder value and grow the company by getting out ahead of your competition and in front of your client are enormous. And such benefits are being recognized by Boards and opinion leaders. That willingness to emphasize the company aircraft as a valuable business tool will no doubt be the beginning of a more stable and vibrant recovery.

TAKE A FRESH LOOK If you are still grappling with optics, please take a minute to visit several very important websites. The first, of course, is the National Business Aviation Association’s site, www.nbaa.org. This is the association U

“Reaction to the optics issue exacerbated the economic problems that we all experienced starting in 2009. But now, in the fall of 2013, I have some good news. The optic controversy is subsiding.”

continued on page 42

36

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle September 22/08/2013 09:47 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

Citation Specialist Do you want your Citation Sold too? If so, call the experts at Eagle! Since 1967 Aircraft Sales, Brokerage, & Acquisitions

Want Your Aircraft Sold? Put It Here. Call Today!

SOLD 2004 CITATION X, S/N 750-0233

SOLD 2005 SOVEREIGN, S/N 680-0019

SOLD 1998 CITATION ULTRA, S/N 560-0463

D L O S 1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

2002 CITATION CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0343

1976 PIPER SENECA, S/N 34-7670073

After hours contact • Jet Sales: Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 Matt Fullerton +1 316 722-4375 • Piston Sales: Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822-5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Paint & Interior, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service


Project1_Layout 1 27/08/2013 08:51 Page 1

LYNN BEAUDRY | +1 912 965 4000 | lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com

GULFSTREAM G150 S/N 256

GULFSTREAM G150 S/N 274

1632 TT, Six (6) Passenger Configuration

2155 TT, Eight (8) Passenger Configuration

$8,400,000

$7,750,000

GULFSTREAM G150 S/N 277

GULFSTREAM GIV SP S/N 1330

2152 TT, Nine (9) Passenger Configuration

7927 TT, Fifteen (15) Passenger Configuration

$7,750,000

$7,950,000

THE WORLD STANDARD速


Project1_Layout 1 27/08/2013 08:52 Page 1

GULFSTREAM GV S/N 518 7448 TT, Fourteen (14) Passenger Configuration For Lease

GULFSTREAM G550 S/N 5008

GULFSTREAM G550 S/N 5121

2265 TT, Eighteen (18) Passenger Configuration

1481 TT, Fourteen (14) Passenger Configuration

$32,500,000

$37,950,000

GULFSTREAM G550 S/N 5203

GLOBAL EXPRESS S/N 9027

3887 TT, Eighteen (18) Passenger Configuration

4808 TT, Ten (10) Passenger Configuration

$39,250,000

$17,250,000

GULFSTREAMPREOWNED.com


Project1_Layout 1 27/08/2013 08:54 Page 1

FEATURED Ă“3 Ă“32(31Ă”/d 32(31Ă”/d

A plane for

EVERY MISSION.

1998 CITATION X - SN 750-0044 (ĂžK L Ă? ĂšI!Ă“LĂœ LHĂ˜ Ă? !3ÚÓ(L L            3 1H  L Ă˜ LĂ˜HL L * H     

When you come to Jetcraft to acquire an aircraft, we’ll start with a question:

What’s your mission? Are you looking for an office

in the sky, a luxury getaway jet or a helicopter? With our large inventory of new and pre-owned models, our broad

2004 FALCON 2000EX EASy - SN 029

customer base and unmatched global network, we can fit your

(L L (LI IL(0Ă›*IÿÛb(LI ILa0Ă›          J/ÿÔÛ0HHĂœ Ăż)  /0ÄŽĂ“L K ILHK* K H        

needs perfectly. And with over 50 years’ experience, we’ll do it quickly. Talk to us and see. Our mission is fulfilling yours. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

1987 FALCON 50 - SN 181        âÞ ""1IKH1  ÿJ00Ó(L L ÛI H        ()Ó0øĊÿ3 ÛH LKJL 

1995 CHALLENGER 601-3R - SN 5178

2003 GLOBAL EXPRESS - SN 9113

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Ă?H HĂœ  IĂ“  HK Ă˜ H    8C Inspection Currently Underway at BAS - Dallas

2006 CITATION CJ1+ - SN 525-0620

2007 GLOBAL XRS - SN 9185

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2011 CITATION CJ4 - SN 525C-0063

1997 GULFSTREAM IVSP - SN 1316

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Project1_Layout 1 27/08/2013 08:54 Page 1

1987 HAWKER 800A - SN 258089

2008 HAWKER 900XP - SN HA-0036

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2003 HAWKER 800XP - SN 258626

2006 LEAR 60 - SN 305

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Download the e Jetcraft - Search aircraft listings gs listing - Sort listings by manufacturer - Download aircraft brochures

2006 HAWKER 850XP - SN 258787 +IL  a0ÛIL(L L ĎÛbÿÔL b0Ô HKI0 L 3              IFIS 5000 with Dual File Servers

App p

- Read recent Jetcraft news upcoming - View Jetcraft’s upcom event schedule - Receive notifications about new listings

0HLK ./I KI 0HLK ./I KI o your Apple download to device. or Android d evice.

™ HUD VISION ACCESS A - World’s leading lead ding low-visibility soluti solution ion for aftermarket airc aircraft raft

Now STC Approved for Your Challenger 604 HUD Vision Access™, Jetcraft’s enhanced flight vision solution for aftermarket aircraft, combines Kollsman’s innovative AT-HUD and EVS-II to give you enhanced visibility through rain, snow, smog, even heavy fog — and with a level of detail and contrast never before achieved. Improved safety and flexibility plus reduced operating costs allow you to achieve your mission efficiently with true peace of mind. Now, for the first time, you can experience the HUD Vision Access advantage of superior performance and operational awareness in your Challenger 604.

Contact: Ken Elliott | kenelliott@jetcraft.com | +1 706 650 2140 | www.jetcraft.com Canada Contact: Andrew Skerritt | andrewskerritt@phaleron.ca | +1 613 914 5116

Low visibility solutions never looked better. The most innovative e and advanced low visibility solution to meet aircraft oper operational rational needs worldwide. �ÛIKIKILH �  �ÛIKIKILH � 

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BG4 new Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:18 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation credited with the daily furtherance of our wonderful industry. If you are considering operating a business aircraft or currently do and are not a member, I encourage you to join immediately. The association, its President Ed Bolen, the staff and the Board of Directors are passionate and devoted to Business Aviation. The other website that was developed specifically to alter the course of the optics battle is The Alliance For Aviation Across America. Its site can be found at http://act.aviationacrossamerica.com.

This wonderful resource illustrates state-by-state the importance of Business Aviation. You can see the number of aviation related jobs by state as well as the grass roots efforts in each state to promote the advantages of transport via business aircraft. Consulting the website, you begin to understand the legislative initiatives in each state with respect to the positive attributes of Business Aviation and the people it touches. Both websites allow you to communicate directly with your elected officials to let them know how Business Aviation is positively affecting you and your company. You also see legislative items that negatively affect the use and costs of Business Aviation for your operation.

THE BOTTOM LINE Business aircraft transactions are increasing, in large part due to a less oppressive attitude towards Business Aviation. Our community is getting back to business. What we hope will be sustainable is the positive attitude toward and ultimate use of business aircraft. As I pen this article I am feeling optimistic about the continuance of this transaction activity. I do caution, however, that this renewed activity still leaves the supply of available aircraft higher than normal, which will keep pricing pressure formidable. We still have many domestic as well as International economic challenges to weather. Our industry as well as the entire global economy still remains fragile. We must view the recovery one day at a time. We must collectively shout to the world that our Business Aviation economy is a cornerstone of the entire global economic recovery—not just our industry’s recovery. Factories are created in rural America because Business Aviation provides access to economic opportunity. Business aircraft bring the ebb and flow of commerce to all parts of our nation and the world. Embrace Business Aviation. Be proud to operate business aircraft and be involved with this community. Remember that use of a business aircraft is the sign of a well-managed company. [Editor’s Note: To learn more about Business Aviation, attend the NBAA 2013 Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition taking place in Las Vegas, October 22 through 24.]

“Embrace Business Aviation. Be proud to operate business aircraft and be involved with this community. Remember that use of a business aircraft is the sign of a well-managed company.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 44

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson A September 19/08/2013 15:32 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Falcon 900EX 5398 AFTT, MSP Gold, Triple Laseref IV, Collins SATCOM 2100 w/Swift Broadband, Airshow 4000, 15 Pax, Interior Refurbished August 2010 and Painted August 2010

Gulfstream G150 423 AFTT, Long Range Oxygen Bottle, Part 135 Certification, 7 Passenger, New Paint & Interior soft-goods in 2012

Phenom 100 SN 50000035, 565 AFTT, Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold, Embraer Prodigy Flight Deck, HF Radio, XM Satellite Radio & Weather, Air Conditioning, Satcom, Datalink, Embraer Executive Care

Citation XLS SN 560XL-5672, 4089 AFTT, ESP Gold, APU, EGPWS, Cockpit Voice Recorder, 9 Passenger, Air Conditioning

King Air 200 7756 AFTT, 1727 TSO, High Float Gear, Quiet Turbofan Props, Dual Aft Body Strakes, Exhaust Stack Fairings

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


BG 4 Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:25 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Sharing Ownership: Stepping up from Fractional Ownership in Business Aviation David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

“Each joint owner is responsible for individually covering their variable operating costs (fuel expenses, maintenance reserves, landing fees, etc.)”

44

Business Aviation is available in a variety of forms, each with unique features and advantages. Continuing his series on delivery options, David Wyndham explores ownership beyond fractional shares.

I

n the past, using business aircraft involved two options: you either owned or you chartered the equipment. Today, there are numerous means for accessing business aircraft. If charter does not fulfill your needs but you cannot (or do not want to) pay the full costs associated with whole aircraft ownership, two alternatives are Joint Ownership and Co-Ownership. While both involve two or more entities owning the aircraft, they differ in terms of who provides the crew.

JOINT OWNERSHIP Joint ownership is defined under US Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 91.501(c)(3) as “…an arrangement whereby one of the registered joint owners of an airplane employs and furnishes the flight crew for that airplane and each of the registered joint owners pays a share of the charge specified in the agreement.” The FARs require that all owners be listed on the aircraft registration. One registered owner may provide the flight crew and the other registered joint owner(s) may pay a share of the fixed ownership

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

costs (such as hangar, insurance, etc.) as specified in the agreement. Each joint owner is responsible for individually covering their variable operating costs (fuel expenses, maintenance reserves, landing fees, etc.). To be eligible, the aircraft must fall into one of the following groups: • The aircraft has a maximum takeoff weight of over 12,500 pounds; • The aircraft is a multiengine turbojet aircraft (regardless of size); or, • The aircraft is a fractional program aircraft (regardless of size). The NBAA has coordinated with the FAA for a "Small Aircraft Exemption" to allow piston airplanes, airplanes weighing below the 12,500 pound limit, and all helicopters to make use of the cost reimbursement options allowed under Part 91, Subpart F. For additional information, NBAA Members should visit the Small Aircraft Exemption Web page: www.nbaa.org/admin/options/exemption/

U

continued on page 48 Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S 2 0 0 8 G u l f st re a m 2 0 0 s /n 1 8 2

Low Total Time. Excellently Equipped. Beautiful Interior Cosmetics. Meticulous Care. Iridium SATCOM Phone. Airshow 4000. Two 17-inch Monitors. Two DVD Players. Espresso Maker. Microwave Oven.

2006 Gulfstream G450

s/n 4039

2,575 Total Time. 1,330 Landings. BBML and Direct TV. Excellent Maintenance and Care.

2002 Falcon 900EX

s/n 105

4,044 Total Time. Winglets. Gogo Biz Broadband. Inmarsat SwiftBroadband. MSP Gold.

1989 Astra 1125

s/n 31

Collins ProLine 21 EFIS 3 Displays. Astra SP Modifications. Dual Universal UNS-1D +FMS. Custom G100 Interior.

1993 Citation VI

s/n 232

6,430 Total Time. Honeywell EDZ-605 (5) Tube EFIS. Dual Universal UNS-1Es FMS/GPS.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

2001 Astra SPX

s/n 135

4,356 Total Time. TFE731-40R-200G Engines on MSP. Collins FCC 4000 Dual Flight Director, 4 Display EFIS.

+1 402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 8_14_13.indd 1

8/9/2013 11:58:06 AM


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Falcon

Challenger

2003 Falcon 900C | 197

Citation 111

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation XLS

1985 Citation III | 650-0077

Citation Ultra

2006 Citation XLS | 560-5631

Citation 11

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

1980 Citation II | 550-0116 Also Available: 550-0350, 550-0286

For full specs & additional photos, please visit our website at www.BellAviation.com


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

King Air B200

King Air 350

1998 King Air 350 | FL-199

King Air 200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

King Air B100

1981 King Air 200 | BB-917

Conquest

1980 King Air B100 | BE-97

Meridian

1985 Conquest II | 441-0339

2009 Meridian | 4697402

Also Available: 441-0116

Also Available: 4697247


BG 4 Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:25 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

While the FAA has not established a minimum percentage of ownership, the relationship must be a true joint ownership and not just a token ownership interest. Regarding taxes, the IRS has determined that a joint ownership agreement, if executed correctly, is noncommercial for tax purposes. This is based on each of the registered joint owners paying their pro rata share of all fixed costs and each also paying the variable operating costs when they are on board their aircraft. The rules are somewhat convoluted, thus it is best to consult an aviation tax authority for guidance.

CO-OWNERSHIP Co-ownership is very similar to joint ownership whereby each of the owners is a registered owner of an aircraft. But, instead of one designated owner operating the aircraft for all of the owners, each owner is responsible for employing their own pilots. Under co-ownership the respective owners independently can either: • • •

Fly the aircraft themselves, Hire a pilot, or Hire a management company. (With large, turbine business aircraft, the most common scenario involves the use of a professional management company to crew and maintain the aircraft. The management company may be given the option to charter the aircraft when the owners are not using it.)

Successful shared ownership requires consideration of the Three Cs: ‘Compatibility’, ‘Compromise’ and ‘Contracts’. Compatibility: There needs to be a degree of compatibility between the owners. The type of aircraft must be suitable to the owners' missions. A turboprop that is capable of getting into small airports

48

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

will not be suitable for long-range travel with large passenger loads. Just as important is NOT having similar travel schedules. If both owners need to use the aircraft every Monday through Wednesday, sharing cannot work. Compromise: Even if the owners have compatible aircraft requirements and complimentary travel schedules, there needs to be compromise. There will be times when you need flexibility in the schedules. Contract: Lastly, there needs to be a contract outlining the sharing of the costs, the responsibilities of each owner (and management company), and perhaps most important, a way to end the shared ownership. I had one client who shared the ownership of an aircraft with one other entity. Both parties used the aircraft to fly between the US East and West Coast. But as their usage of the aircraft changed, conflicts arose. Not being able to compromise, they tried "first come, first served" for scheduling. Then they attempted to set aside certain times when each owner used the aircraft. Nothing worked satisfactorily. When it became clear that the arrangement no longer served each company, the owners could not easily reach an agreement regarding who sells to whom as the contract was not explicit in how to dissolve the partnership. The Co-ownership did end without legal action, but a friendship ended. Sharing the ownership of an aircraft can lower the cost to access the advantages of Business Aviation, but everyone involved needs to work together to maximize the utility of the aircraft.

“Just as important is NOT having similar travel schedules. If both owners need to use the aircraft every Monday through Wednesday, sharing cannot work.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 50

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Elliott Aviation September_Layout 1 20/08/2013 17:20 Page 1


BG6 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 12:32 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Risk Oversight For Boards: The cause for a denied claim. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

“Let me assure you: when your aviation insurance broker asks for a fully completed pilot form, prompt compliance with that request should be considered best practice.”

50

Autumn is a good time for the Board to take stock of the company’s current risk mitigation strategies for avoiding a potential claim denial, observes Stuart Hope.

A

lthough aviation insurance policies do not have blanket exclusions for violation of the Federal Air Regulations (FAR), they do have certain conditions associated with specific FARs. Two of the most important are related to violation of the pilot warranty and violation of the approved use clause. Readers of previous insurance articles that have appeared in this magazine will quickly notice a common thread, namely the importance of the

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Approved Pilot Clause and the Usage Clause. These two sections of an aviation insurance policy generate a disproportionate share of claim denials.

APPROVED PILOT As an insurance broker, I often receive calls from clients who seek approval for a substitute pilot to make a flight in their aircraft. Their current pilot may be sick or has requested vacation days. Many will send me a resume or bio that the pilot has prepared; some simply send an email with cursory pilot information and ask for the OK to use him/her. Some clients appear irritated if we request they have the pilot complete a more detailed pilot experience form. Let me assure you: when your aviation insurance broker asks for a fully completed pilot form, prompt compliance with that request should be considered best practice. One of my clients—an aircraft dealer—sold a King Air 300 to a fairly large medical company. The firm interviewed and selected a pilot, and their insurance broker submitted the aviator’s credentials to the underwriter for approval. The pilot provided military records showing he was qualified in the military equivalent of the King Air 300, was current in the aircraft and had completed recent recurrent training. Based on this information, the underwriter approved the pilot. On the first flight, the pilot flew the aircraft into a mountain while attempting an instrument approach in bad weather, killing both himself and his wife. In the ensuing insurance investigation, it was discovered that he lied about U continued on page 54 Aircraft Index see Page 4


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JetBrokers September 19/08/2013 15:51 Page 1

2009 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0276, 604 TT, Pro Parts, Aircell Axxess II, JAR Ops, Airshow 4000, Ten Passenger Interior, Make Offer

2009 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 145-1109, 2464 TT, On Corp Care, JAR Ops, 13 Pax, Premium Sound, Expresso Maker, Asking $13,900,000.00

1987 Citation III, S/N 650-0132, 7856.6 TT, MSP Gold, Pats APU, Universal MFD, Dual UNS-1D+’s, Doc 8 c/w 12/12, New Paint 4/13, Make Offer

2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 731 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,550,000.00

1997 Citation VII, S/N 7082, 7167 TT, MSP, TCAS II, Dual GNS-XL’s, 8 Pax Interior, Good Paint and Interior, Make Offer

1995 Hawker 800A, S/N 258254, 9121.1 TT, MSP Gold, TCAS II, Dual NZ-2000’s, G Insp c/w 5/12, L/R O2, Iridium Phone, Asking $1,695,000.00

1999 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0301, 4361 TT, On TAP Elite, XM Wx, Iridium Phone, UNS-1K, TCAS 1, Doc 10 c/w 1/13, Asking $1,395,000.00

2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258684, 4108 TT, MSP on Engines & APU, HBC Winglets, Paperless Cockpit, One Owner, G Check c/w 9/12, Make Offer

Also Available Beechjet 400,S/N RK-84 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47 Citation III, S/N 650-0132 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0301

Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0295 Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0127

Falcon 2000, S/N 8 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-45 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-36 Cheyenne IIXL, S/N 31T-8166017 King Air C90, S/N LJ-869


JetBrokers September 19/08/2013 15:52 Page 2

2008 Citation Encore+, S/N 560-0798, 511 TT, Power Adv Plus, Pro Parts, XM Wx, Collins FMS-3000 w/ WAAS, Single Pt. Refueling, Like New!, Asking $5,750,000.00

2008 Learjet 40XR, S/N 2102, 2358 TT, Smart Parts, Airshow, Iridium Phone, Steep Approach, Belted Lav, Dual UNS-1E’s, Asking $3,695,000.00

2000 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0935, 4548 TT, On Power Adv, Pro Parts, TCAS II, Mk-VII EGPWS, EU-Ops, Phase 1-5 c/w 11/12, Asking $2,200,000.00

2005 Learjet 60SE, S/N 289, 2203 TT, ESP Gold, 8.33/FM Immunity, UNS-1E, Enh Mode S, On CAMP, Asking $3,995,000.00

1980 Citation IISP, S/N 551-0169, 311 SMOH by Dallas Airmotive, TR’s, Freon Air, Skywatch HP, RVSM, Aft Baggage, MFD w/ WSI Wx, Asking $995,000.00

1993 Learjet 31A, S/N 65, 6967 TT, Engines on JSSI Plus, TCAS 2, UNS-1C, TRs, Big Door, Single Point Refueling, 12 Yr due 5/17, Asking $1,195,000.00

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $5,900,000.00

1999 Socata TBM700B, S/N 151, 2422 TT, 626 TSHS, 43 SPOH, Skywatch, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, Dual Garmin GNS-530W, Annual c/w 4/13, Price Reduced to $1,275,000.00

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

CHICAGO

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DENVER

FARNBOROUGH

+1-630-377-6900 Phone

+1-248-666-9800 Phone

+1-303-494-6900 Phone

+44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BG6 Sept13_FinanceSept 19/08/2013 14:28 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation his pilot experience to get the job. The claim was denied by the insurance company. Clearly, completing an insurance form properly is important. Yes, it’s a hassle for the pilot to supply all requested information and for your admin team to review the submission. But don’t let inconvenience or workload get in the way of good business practice. Some clients go the extra mile and have all pilots submit a fully completed pilot form, a copy of their pilot license, medical certificate and recurrent training records each year.

A FULLY-COMPLETED PILOT FORM IS NOT AN INCONVENIENCE IT IS AN ESSENTIAL

USAGE CLAUSE The other exclusion that also is a violation of the FARs pertains to the Approved Use clause, which specifies what operations are permissible under the terms of the policy. One of the more frequent calls I receive is from clients who want to “dry lease” their aircraft to other firms or individuals. (Dry lease refers to leasing the aircraft without insurance, crew, maintenance, etc.) If handled correctly on all fronts, dry leases can be approved rather easily. The key words are “if handled correctly”. Many aircraft owners/pilots are under the false impression that “dry leasing” (which is not defined per se in the FARs) is already covered under their insurance policy. As always, the answer is “it depends”. If wording of the usage clause on the policy is broad, dry leasing is probably allowed; otherwise it is not. Unless properly endorsed, many policies would exclude coverage since dry leasing is basically rental of the aircraft (a commercial use). In addition, all dry leases contain contractual insurance requirements that (if improperly handled) could trigger a possible breach of contract suit in the event of a loss. We lost a client last year who was dry leasing his aircraft to multiple parties but refused our attempts to properly endorse his policy to cover that exposure. The client said it was none of our business to whom he was dry leasing his aircraft and that he was sure it was already covered since the operations were considered “Part 91”. He took his business to another broker who wouldn’t ask so many questions. I sincerely hope he never has a loss. The message should be loud and clear. Be very careful. Pay particular attention when adding pilots or utilizing your aircraft for operations that your insurance company might not sanction. Insurance is not a commodity; don’t treat it as such. Insurance brokers aren’t selling cell phones; they sell financial protection of your hard earned holdings. There’s a big difference! Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 56

COMPARE AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE USING OUR

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 54

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Project1_Layout 1 22/08/2013 13:27 Page 1


BG 7 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 10:32 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Fractional Aircraft Ownership Programs: Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

Avoiding Turbulence in the Marketplace. Recent developments in the marketplace for fractional aircraft programs make it imperative that Board Members understand risks faced by a company that owns - or is considering the purchase of - a fractional interest in an aircraft, cautions attorney Chris Younger.

T

he purchase of a fractional aircraft interest is typically perceived as a less risky alternative to owning and operating an aircraft. However, an issue that Board Members must evaluate is the viability, strength and reputation of the fractional program provider. As reviewed in David Wyndham’s articles on Fractional Ownership (July and August editions), the fractional program provider normally sells the fractional aircraft interest to its customer, manages the customer’s aircraft operations for a fee and, at the end of the program term, re-purchases that interest. It is therefore imperative that Directors choose a fractional program provider with a proven track record of successfully honoring its commitments during the life of the fractional contract, and having the financial

wherewithal to repurchase that interest at contract conclusion. There are several ways that a Board may mitigate the risks of an unsatisfactory fractional experience, as outlined here.

DUE DILIGENCE First, the Board should obtain as much information as possible concerning the fractional program provider’s business operations and financial condition. Fractional providers are known for carefully guarding such information. What is available to a prospective owner is typically only those data that are published by the fractional program provider in its marketing materials or is provided to regulatory bodies as required by law (e.g., SEC filings). It is therefore imperative that the U

“It is therefore imperative that Directors choose a fractional program provider with a proven track record of successfully honoring its commitments...” 56

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation September 19/08/2013 16:01 Page 1


BG 7 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 10:32 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

Board request as much information as it believes is needed. The best time to request additional information is prior to purchasing a fractional interest or renewing the program. This is the point at which the Board will have the most leverage to obtain the information it needs to make an informed decision. Secondly, the Board must ensure that the agreements between it and the fractional program provider contain maximum protection for the company. These provisions include terms that will allow the company as early as possible to liquidate its investment if a fractional program provider’s solvency is questionable or if it fails to perform completely its obligations to its customers. An example of such a provision is a requirement that the fractional program provider operate all flights in accordance with the terms and conditions of the program documents and that the program provider will be in default if it fails to do so, thus giving a fractional owner the opportunity to “pull the plug” at an early stage. Many provisions can be built into program documents to provide protections to an owner, such as financial covenants, representations and warranties concerning the program provider. Each of these terms is intended to give a fractional owner advance notice of issues that could affect its interests. Despite the Board’s best efforts, however, a fractional provider may without advance warning cease operations or be forced into receivership or involuntary bankruptcy proceedings. In such an event, the Board will need to make itself aware of the potential outcome of such a situation so that it can chart the best course of action.

insured on a going-forward basis so that the value of the aircraft can be maintained for purposes of selling the asset at the earliest possible time. If the fractional program provider owns an interest in the same aircraft, the process of liquidating the fractional owners’ investment in that aircraft will be more difficult because creditors of the fractional program provider may seek to assert liens against the aircraft or to repossess it. Even if the fractional program provider does not own such an interest, it is likely that vendors that provided services with respect to the aircraft may seek to assert mechanics’ and similar liens against the aircraft for amounts owed to those vendors. Ultimately, the Board’s thorough evaluation of the financial health and reputation of a fractional program provider is of paramount importance. All of the risks that may be eliminated or lessened through the purchase of such an interest in lieu of direct aircraft ownership and operation are worthless if the fractional program provider is not able to fulfill all of its commitments during the entire term of the program and at its end. Adding legal protections for a fractional owner offers only limited protection to the owner. However, those protections can be designed to provide early notice to an owner of a program provider’s financial (or other) difficulties, and may allow the owner to liquidate its investment before the fractional provider’s business implodes. Note: This article should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The reader is urged to consult legal counsel or other advisors concerning his/her own situation and specific legal questions.

THINGS HAPPEN

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 60

If an untoward event occurs, the owner will need to work with other fractional owners of the same aircraft to ensure that it is properly maintained and

58

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

“Many provisions can be built into program documents to provide protections to an owner, such as financial covenants, representations and warranties concerning the program provider. ”

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen September_Layout 1 19/08/2013 16:03 Page 1


BG 8 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 12:26 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Large Cabin Choice Many missions demand more than a Light or Medium Jet. It takes a large jet to handle a large job - hence the ongoing appeal of the Large Cabin Jet.

S

ize is often used as a measure of desirability and status. However, there are occasions, when the mission dictates an aircraft of larger capacity. Consequently, this month our value study focuses on our definition of Large Cabin business jets.

“Many paybacks counter-weigh the runway numbers, however. The key elements of this category’s appeal feature speed, cabin size and range.”

60

THINKING BIG WHEN SIZE MATTERS What constitutes small to one may appear large to another; what amounts to huge on my scale might only tip the scales toward medium for you. In aviation, one usually deals in such relativities with reference to weights. For the purpose of this month’s focus on Large Cabin jets we categorize aircraft MTOW roughly between 38,000-100,000 pounds.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

PERFORMANCE CONSIDERATIONS Large Cabin jets have much in their favor. First, however, if there’s one defining negative element of the Large Cabin jet it’s in the runway lengths they typically require. Runways longer than 6,000 ft (ideally longer than 7,000 ft) make access comfortable, particularly when the airport elevation is high or on days when the temperature is warm (hot and high performance). As density altitude increases, so do runway requirements, but that’s not unique to this category of jets. Many paybacks counter-weigh the runway numbers, however. The key elements of this category’s appeal feature speed, cabin size and range. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


2003 Falcon 2000 SN 192 2500 Hours and Exceptional Pedigree. Redefining “super” in a super-midsized aircraft. The Falcon 2000 has been the long-standing leader in the “super-mid” category. With a spacious, quiet cabin, transcontinental range and a miserly fuel burn, the Falcon 2000 delivers outstanding value. 2003 Serial Number 192 offers even more. This low-time aircraft briefly served as a Falcon demonstrator, and has since been flown Part 91 by a single corporate owner, one who has operated Falcons continuously for over 45 years. This aircraft has been cared for and maintained to the highest standard. The roomy cabin is tastefully finished in neutral earth tones and is ideally configured for 8 passengers, including a 4-place club arrangement and a 4-place conference group. Perfect for working, dining or just relaxing! Additional comfort comes from knowing your maintenance costs can be controlled through SN 192’s enrollment in Honeywell’s MSP engine and APU programs, as well as HAPP and CASP avionics programs. It’s time to redefine your flying experience with the truly distinctive Falcon 2000 SN 192. To learn more, call Jim Donath at Donath Aircraft Services.

Donath Aircraft Services 773.935.9871 jimdonath@donathaircraft.com Visit DonathAircraft.com


BG 8 Sept13_FinanceSept 20/08/2013 09:53 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation SPEED & RANGE The main differentiator between Large Cabin jets and their purpose-built Ultra-Long-Range counterparts (here enveloped into the one category) generally stem from the larger fuel capacities and the higher gross weights, allowing the latter category to go enormous distances. Otherwise, the average Large Cabin and Ultra-Long-Range airplanes share more in common than they differ, with similar cabin sizes and comparable cruise speeds. Speeds ranging roughly between 450 and 500kts are the overall trend for the Large Cabin segment. Seats-full range capabilities typically are up to, and into the 6,000-nautical mile range making Large Cabin jets effective non-stop continent and oceancrossing machines: and the fewer the stops, the shorter the overall trip time.

SIZE Where the Large Cabin airplanes really excel (as the name suggests) is in their cabin capacities. A cabin for this category of jet typically will stretch from around 30, into the 40 feet range, enabling operators to enjoy a wider array of finishing options and office-like features than jets in the smaller segments can provide. Stand up cabins are the norm, and seating capacity of eight to eighteen is typical for this category of aircraft. Naturally, the size and range capabilities of large cabin jets don’t come cheaply; you’ll need a larger fuel budget, more hangar space, a larger maintenance budget - and, for safety and utility, a crew of three (two on the flight deck, and a profes-

62

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

sionally trained Flight Attendant for the cabin). Essentially, for the company with the need and budget, however, the Large Cabin business jet will rarely, if ever prove too small, and will only occasionally, be too large for the airport you’d prefer. In these situations, charter can be the answer.

LARGE CABIN JET PRICE GUIDE The following Large Cabin Jets Average Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1994 through Summer 2013 (20year period). Values reported are in USD millions. Each reporting point represents the current average retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Dassault Falcon 2000LX values reported in the Summer 2013 edition of the Bluebook show $17.7m USD for a 2007 model, $19.2m USD for a 2008 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. With the reader’s knowledge of aircraft, equipment, range and performance, the following Guide allows the reader to determine the best value aircraft for consideration.

Note: We have included 36 aircraft models in the following Large Cabin jets average price guide, however, for additional assistance and interest, Conklin & de Decker Performance and Specification data for these Large Cabin models can be referred to, beginning on page 72 of this issue. U

www.AvBuyer.com

“A cabin for this category of jet typically will stretch from around 30, into the 40 feet range, enabling operators to enjoy a wider array of finishing options and office-like features...”

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian May 15/07/2013 15:05 Page 1

2008 Citation XLS

2007 Beech Premier 1A

1600TT EU Ops compliant

2007. 1200TT 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite

2007 Hawker 850XP

2013 Gulfstream 450

1290TT. MSP. Tan leather interior. Satcom

File photo

Gulfstream 550

1992 Falcon 900B

Several aircraft including 2013

9800TT 12 pax interior in Beige. Satcom. EU Ops compliant. MSP Gold

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

2007 Eurocopter EC135P2+

Three MD600N available

330TT. Dark metallic grey with dark grey and cream seats

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE


Retail Price Guide Sept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 09:56 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

LARGE CABIN JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE

SUMMER 2013

2013 US$M

2012 US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER

31.981

25.0

20.0

19.0

18.0

17.0

16.0

15.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

31.023

25.0

21.5

19.5

17.750

16.750

15.750

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

13.1

12.4

11.7

10.7

11.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

24.853

20.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000

60.485

52.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000

48.963

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

17.5

16.2

15.0

14.2

13.2

12.0

11.5

42.0

37.0

35.0

32.5

30.5

27.5

25.5

22.5

49.0

45.0

42.0

39.0

37.0

34.0

32.0

29.0

47.0

42.0

39.0

36.0

35.0

34.0

28.0

24.0

22.7

20.2

19.2

17.7

18.5

16.0

15.0

19.5

18.5

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS DASSAULT FALCON 7X

52.3

DASSAULT FALCON 2000S

27.1

DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX

32.4

DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY

17.0

15.8

26.0

23.0

15.2

14.3

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

13.2

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

42.2

37.0

34.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY

11.8

11.3

10.8

10.5

21.0

31.0 29.0

28.0

25.0

24.0

23.0

22.0

22.0

20.5

19.5

18.5

17.5

16.5

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX DASSAULT FALCON 900C

16.0

15.0

10.7

10.3

9.7

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000

53.0

46.0

43.0

41.0

40.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ

29.995

26.0

24.0

22.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ

26.0

22.0

21.0

19.0

GULFSTREAM G650

64.5

62.0

GULFSTREAM G550

58.5

49.0

44.0

42.0

39.0

37.0

36.0

33.0

32.0

31.0

40.0

38.0

36.0

32.0

31.0

28.0

25.0

24.0

23.0

35.0

30.0

27.0

26.0

24.0

22.0

20.0

19.0

18.0

15.0

13.0

11.7

EMBRAER LEGACY 135BJ

GULFSTREAM G500 GULFSTREAM G450

41.0

GULFSTREAM G400

16.0

GULFSTREAM G350

29.0

26.0

23.0

22.0

21.0

18.0

GULFSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G280

16.0

15.0

14.0 12.0

24.0

21.0

GULFSTREAM GV GULFSTREAM G1V-SP AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide Sept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 09:57 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

9.7

8.8

7.8

7.4

6.9

6.5

6.2

5.850 4.2

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604 3.8

3.7

10.750

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

21.5

20.0

19.0

18.0

17.5

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS DASSAULT FALCON 7X DASSAULT FALCON 2000S DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY

12.2 9.5

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX 9.1

8.6

8.1

7.6

7.1

6.6

6.1

5.6

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

19.8

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY

17.6

16.4

15.8

15.3

15.5

14.0

14.3

13.8

13.3

12.2

11.2

10.0

11.5

10.5

13.5

12.5

11.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX

13.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900C 10.0

9.5

9.0

8.5

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000 EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ

9.2

8.7

EMBRAER LEGACY 135BJ GULFSTREAM G650

29.0

GULFSTREAM G550

22.0

GULFSTREAM G500 GULFSTREAM G450

15.0

GULFSTREAM G400 GULFSTREAM G350

11.0

GULFSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G280 24.0

23.0

21.0

20.0

19.0

18.0

13.0

12.0

11.5

10.5

10.0

9.7

17.0 9.2

16.0 8.7

GULFSTREAM GV 8.350

GULFSTREAM G1V SP

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

65


AirCompAnalysisSept13_ACAn 20/08/2013 09:37 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 604

FALCON 2000

Bombardier Challenger 604 by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of Pre-Owned business jets in the $11-11.5-million range for the purpose of valuing the Bombardier Challenger 604 (CL604). We’ll consider the productivity parameters - payload/range, speed and cabin size and

I

66

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

cover current and future market values. The field compared to the Bombardier Challenger 604 in this study includes the Falcon 2000.

BRIEF HISTORY Bombardier introduced the Challenger 604 in 1995 as a longer-range derivative of the 6013R with a larger fuel capacity and upgraded CF34-3B engines. Standard avionics include a

www.AvBuyer.com

Rockwell Collins Pro Line 4 package (along with dual FMS-6000, dual Litton LTN-101 IRS and Collins WXP-4220 digital turbulence detection radar), while the CL604 offers a completely new undercarriage, and structural improvements to wings and tail over the CL601-3R. The CL604 ended production in 2006. It can be RVSM certified when Service Bulletin SB-604-34-012 is complied with. ❯

Aircraft Index see Page 4


LEAS Single September_LEAS 19/08/2013 16:15 Page 1

Price $9,750,000

Whether you are looking to buy or sell, it pays to have a trusted advisor to help navigate the complex processes of aircraft ownership. Through over $10 billion in aircraft transactions, Leading Edge has earned a reputation for developing and executing solutions that make the best sense for its clients.

2008 Citation Sovereign s/n 680-0213 • • • • •

Very low time, only 468 hours Engines and APU on 100% JSSI AirCell ST-3100 SAT COM Airshow 4000 w/European map RVSM, EASA approved

Contact us: USA 201-891-0881 aircraftsales@leas.com WWW.LEAS.COM

1992 Challenger 601-3A-ER s/n 5109 • APU on MSP, Honeywell avionics on HAPP • Aircell 2-channel Iridium Axxess phone system • 240/60 mo. calendar inspections incl. 120-mo. landing gear restoration c/w 2/2012 • Securaplane • Operated Part 135 Price $2,995,000

2008 King Air B200GT s/n BY-3 • • • •

Partial interior refurb., new paint Oct. 2012 5-year inspection Oct. 2012 RVSM, JAR OPs compliant, previously EASA registered L3 cockpit voice recorder

1990 Gulfstream IV s/n 1137 • • • •

Fresh midlife engines 72-mo. airframe inspection scheduled Direct TV system Honeywell DL900 Dataloader

Price $2,450,000

1999 Hawker 800XP s/n 258419 • • • •

Engines on MSP Avionics Enrolled on Honeywell HAPP New paint and refreshed interior 2007 On CAMP, on a Hawker progressive maintenance schedule

1996 Gulfstream GIVSP s/n 1296 • • • •

APU on MSP Honeywell avionics on HAPP Aircell AGT-4000 broadband transceiver Wi-Fi Racal SatCom MCS 6000

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S , L L C

W W W. L E A S . C O M


AirCompAnalysisSept13_ACAn 20/08/2013 09:38 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 604

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel IFR Range (nm)

Challenger 604

48,200

19,850

4,815

1,263

4,119

3,010

Falcon 2000

35,800

12,155

5,910

1,095

3,130

1,411

Model

POWERPLANT DETAILS

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME

Challenger 604

1150

1024

1000

950

1050

1100

1150

1200

Cubic Feet

TABLE B - FUEL USAGE

Additionally, using data published in the May 2013 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2013 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost in the August 2013 edition was $6.08 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year. Chart B (left) details “Cost per Mile” and compares the Challenger 604 to its competition factoring direct costs and with each aircraft flying a 1,000nm mission with 800 pounds (four passengers) payload. The Challenger 604 long range cruise at an average 425 knots shows a cost per mile at $7.07, which is 8.9% more than a Falcon 2000 at $6.49 per nm.

Fuel Usage (GPH)

Challenger 604

306

Falcon 2000

258

Source: Aircraft Cost Calculator (www.aircraftcostcalculator.com)

CHART B - COST PER MILE*

Challenger 604

$7.07

$6.49

Falcon 2000

$6.40

$6.60

$6.80

$7.00

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

$7.20

The “Total Variable costs” illustrated in Chart C (top right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense,

US $ per nautical mile * 1,000 nm mission costs, 800 lbs Payload

68

As mentioned previously, the Challenger 604 has two CF34-3B General Electric engines each offering 8,729 pounds of thrust. By comparison, the Falcon 2000 is also powered by two General Electric engines – the CFE 738-1-1B type - each offering substantially less thrust at 5,918 pounds. Table B (left), sourced from the Aircraft Cost Calculator (ACC) shows the fuel usage by each aircraft model in this field of study. The Challenger 604 - at 306 gallons per hour (GPH) - uses 48 gallons per hour (or 18.6%) more fuel than the Dassault Falcon 2000 (258 GPH).

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS

Model

$6.20

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Challenger 604 at 1,150 cubic feet is 12.3% greater than the Falcon 2000 (1,024 cu. ft.) - see Chart A (left).

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, M.A. USA: B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook

Falcon 2000

The data contained in Table A (left) is published in the B&CA May 2013 issue, but also sources information from Conklin & de Decker. As mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability. The Challenger 604 “Available payload with Maximum Fuel” at 1,263 pounds is 15.3% greater than the Falcon 2000 aircraft at 1,095 pounds.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisSept13_ACAn 20/08/2013 15:43 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 604

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS The points in Chart D (right) center on the same group of aircraft (but as a matter of interest, we’ve included the Challenger 605 and the other aircraft in the Falcon 2000 series – the DX, EX EASy, and LX). Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The average speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number, so for the purpose of charting each result is divided by one billion. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jet aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Challenger 604 business jet is very competitive against the Falcon 2000 due, largely, to it offering more range and more cabin volume although the Falcon 2000 costs less to operate hourly and per mile. The Falcon 2000DX, EX EASy, and LX versions of this aircraft family demonstrate how they have closed the index gap compared to the CL604 and the CL605. In Table C (right) are the relative retail prices from Vref for each aircraft. The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage “For Sale” and the number “Sold” over the past 12 months are from JETNET. The Challenger 604 led all competitors in full sales transactions (sold) in the past 12 months at 65 (or five per month). Currently, 13.2% of the CL604 fleet is ‘for sale’, making this a buyer’s market (traditionally defined by over 10% of the fleet). Likewise, the Falcon 2000 has 10.8% of its fleet ‘for sale’, with 1.5 units retailing on average per month over ❯ the past year. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CHART C - VARIABLE COST

Challenger 604

$3,053

Falcon 2000

$2,782

$1,000

$0

$3,000

$2,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY

$40.0

Price (Millions)

Scheduled Parts Cost and miscellaneous trip expenses. The total variable cost for the Challenger 604 at $3,053 per hour is 9.7% more to operate than the Falcon 2000 at $2,782 per hour.

LX

DX

$35.0

CL605

$30.0

EX EASy

$25.0 $20.0 $15.0

Falcon 2000

$10.0

CL604

$5.0 1.25

0.75

1.75

2.25

2.75

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE

Long Range Cruise (kts)

Cabin Volume (cu.ft.)

Max Payload w/avail fuel range(nm)

Vref Retail Prices $m (Model Year)

Challenger 604

425

1,150

3,010

$11.5m (Used 2006)

Falcon 2000

430

1,024

1,411

$11.0m (Used 2006)

Model

In Operation

% For Sale

Avg. Sold Monthly*

363

13.2%

65

230

10.8%

18

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; Orleans, MA, USA: JETNET; 2013 Operations Planning Guide B&CA; Aug. 2013 * Full Sales Transactions past 12 months; Source: JETNET STAR report

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

69


AirCompAnalysisSept13_ACAn 20/08/2013 09:40 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 604 DEPRECIATION SCHEDULE FOR BUSINESS AIRCRAFT Aircraft that are used in a trade, business, or for the production of income that are primarily operated domestically, and not used in common or contract carriage may be depreciated over a five year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) schedule. Aircraft used in common or contract carriage (e.g., Part 135) are depreciable under seven-year MACRS, see Table D (right). Table E (right) shows an example of using the MACRS schedule for a pre-owned 2006 Challenger 604 in private (Part 91) and charter (Part 135) operations over five and seven year periods assuming a Vref retail value of $11.5 million.

TABLE TableD D- MACRS SCHEDULE (BY OPERATION TYPE) Following is the MACRS schedule for PART 91: Year 1 2 3 4 5 6

Following is the MACRS schedule for PART 135:

Deduction 20.00% 32.00% 19.20% 11.52% 11.52% 5.76%

Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Deduction 14.29% 24.49% 17.49% 12.49% 8.93% 8.92% 8.93% 4.46%

SOURCE: NBAA

LOCATION BY CONTINENT Table F (right), meanwhile, offers a breakdown of the location by continent for the Wholly-Owned Challenger 604 business jet. North America is home to the majority of the fleet with 65% of the 351 wholly-owned CL604 aircraft, followed by Europe at 21%. Currently there are seven Challenger 604 aircraft in shared ownership and five in fractional ownership programs.

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the key attributes that business jet operators value. However, there are often other qualities such as service and support that factor in a buying decision, but are beyond the scope of this article. Using JETNET/AvData information, there are currently 48 or 13.2% of the preowned Challenger 604 models “For Sale”. The Challenger 604 fares well alongside its competition, so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Challenger 604, which started delivering in 1995, will continue to do well in the preowned market.

TABLE E - SAMPLE MACRS SCHEDULE (2006 CL604 @ $11.5M)

TABLE E TABLE E

2006 Bombardier Challenger 604 - Private (Part 91) Full Retail Price - Millions $11.5 Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 Rate (%) 20.0% 32.0% 19.2% 11.5% 11.5% 5.8% Depreciation $2.3 $3.7 $2.2 $1.3 $1.3 $0.7 Depreciation Value $9.2 $5.5 $3.3 $2.0 $0.7 $0 Cumulative Depreciation $2.3 $6.0 $8.2 $9.5 $10.8 $11.5 2006 Bombardier Challenger 604 - Charter (Part 135) Full Retail Price - Millions $11.5 Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 Rate (%) 14.3% 24.5% 17.5% 12.5% 8.9% 8.9% Depreciation $1.6 $2.8 $2.0 $1.4 $1.0 $1.0 Depreciation Value $9.9 $7.1 $5.0 $3.6 $2.6 $1.5 Cumulative Depreciation $1.6 $4.5 $6.5 $7.9 $8.9 $10.0

7

8

8.9% $1.0 $0.5 $11.0

4.5% $0.5 $0.0 $11.5

SOURCE: ACC - www.aircraftcostcalculator.com

TABLE F TABLE F

TABLE F - LOCATION BY CONTINENT Challenger 604 By Continent – July 2013 (Wholly Owned)

For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com, Web: www.mdchase.com

Make/Model Challenger 604 Fleet Percentage

Africa 7

Asia 32

Australia/ Oceania 8

Europe 74

North America 227

South America 3

Total 351

2%

9%

2%

21%

65%

1%

100%

SOURCE: JETNET STAR Reports

THE WORLD’S FINEST BUSINESS JETS, TURBOPROPS & HELICOPTERS FOR SALE AT 70

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Corporate Concepts September 19/08/2013 16:16 Page 1

Corporate Concepts International, Inc.

GREEN BBJ ■ Immediately Available ■ Seven Long Range tanks ■ Low Cabin Altitude ■ Alternative Navigation ■ Immediate Completion Slots Available ■ Attractively Priced – Call for Details

FALCON 900B – S/N: 058 ■ New paint in January 2013 ■ EASA qualified – Currently operating under a EASA commercial certificate ■ Thirteen passenger configuration with forward and aft lavatories ■ Financing Available – For Sale or Lease – Some Trades Considered

GULFSTREAM G-450 – New to Market ■ Satellite phone and Swift Broadband ■ Fourteen passenger interior ■ Enhanced Vision system ■ Enrolled on Corporate Care, MSP and HAPP plans ■ Forward and Aft Lavatories

Off Market – BOEING BBJ ■ Low time aircraft ■ Seven long range tanks ■ Immediately Available

FALCON 2000 – S/N: 030 ■ Highly desired ten passenger configuration ■ Upgraded entertainment system with six individual monitors ■ Ultra Mid-Class cabin with over 3,000 mile range ■ Financing Available – For Sale or Lease – Some Trades Considered

GULFSTREAM G-IV SP – $6,495,000 ■ New Reduced Price ■ 16 passenger / Forward Galley ■ Forward and Aft Lavatories ■ On Condition engines ■ Recent inspection and ASB 469 ■ Current FAR Part 135

Contact us for further details and see additional aircraft at www.flycci.com Dennis Blackburn +1 832 647 7581

Fernando Garcia Latin & S. America +52 55 54077686

Chris Zarnik +1 919 264 6212

Larry Wright +1 704 906 3755

Austin • Charlotte • Raleigh • Mexico City • Middle East-Northern Africa

Corporate Concepts International, Inc.

Member NBAA, NAFA, ISTAT, AOPA


ACSpecs IntroSEPT13_AC Specs Intronov06 20/08/2013 09:58 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LARGE CABIN JETS

OCTOBER ISSUE: Medium Jets NOVEMBER ISSUE: Entry Level & Light Jets DECEMBER ISSUE: Turboprops

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Large Cabin Jets – appears opposite, to be followed by Medium Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

72

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

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nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BO MB AR DIE RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 30 DIE 0 RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 60 DIE 1-3 RC R HA LLE BO N GE MB R6 AR 04 DIE RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 60 DIE 5 RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 85 DIE 0 RG LO BA L5 BO 00 MB 0 AR DIE RG LO BA LE BO XP MB RE AR SS DIE RG LO BA BO LE MB XP RE AR SS DIE XR RG S LO B AL FA LCO 60 00 N2 00 0

AircraftPer&SpecSept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 12:42 Page 1

MEDIUM LARGE CABINJETS JETS $3,324.18

$4,391.82

$3,916.99

$3,639.87

$3,877.58

$5,442.21

$5,696.28

$5,667.86

$5,492.02

$4,005.20

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.08

6.10

6.08

6.08

6.08

6.25

6.25

6.25

6.25

6.20

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.17

8.20

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

7.70

CABIN LENGTH FT.

28.60

28.30

28.40

28.40

48.42

42.47

48.35

48.35

48.35

31.00

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

860

1035

1150

1150

1990

2022

2140

2140

2140

1024

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

6.22

5.83

5.83

5.83

5.80

6.17

6.16

6.17

6.17

5.60

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.50

3.00

3.08

3.08

3.08

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

2.60

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

106

115

115

115

202

195

190

195

195

134

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

9

10

10

15

13

13

13

13

10

MTOW LBS

38850

45100

48200

48200

53000

92500

95000

98000

99500

35800

MLW LBS

33750

36000

38000

38000

47000

78600

78600

78600

78600

33000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

23850

26250

27100

27150

34618

50861

50300

51200

52230

22750

USEABLE FUEL LBS

14045

17635

19850

19852

18274

38959

43158

44642

44716

12155

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1105

1365

1263

1298

358

2930

1792

2408

2804

1095

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3350

4750

4815

4850

9382

7139

5700

4800

5770

5910

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3065

3380

3756

3756

2456

5200

5940

6055

5890

2841

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3340

3590

4119

4123

3096

5350

6125

6226

6080

3130

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4810

6500

5765

5840

6305

5540

6170

6170

6476

5440

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3833

4500

3833

3833

4120

3667

3667

3667

3667

4333

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4240

4259

4345

4345

3395

3450

3450

3300

3300

3730

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

474

1207

680

581

443

704

522

474

474

377

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

459

488

488

459

511

505

511

511

475

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

443

459

459

442

488

488

488

488

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

425

425

425

425

471

459

471

471

430

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

HTF 7000

CF34-3A1

CF34-3B

CF34-3B

CF34-3B1

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

CFE 7381-1B

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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❯ 73


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0D SSA X UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0E SSA X UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0E SSA XE UL AS TF y AL CO N2 00 DA 0LX SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0S SSA UL TF AL CO N9 DA 00 B SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA C SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA DX SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 EX

AircraftPer&SpecSept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 12:43 Page 2

LARGE CABIN JETS $3,396.62

$3,547.05

$3,419.65

$3,402.03

$3,400.71

$4,287.75

$4,087.67

$3,809.38

$3,949.55

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

7.70

CABIN LENGTH FT.

31.00

31.00

31.00

31.00

31.00

33.20

33.20

33.20

33.20

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1264

1264

1264

1264

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.70

5.70

5.60

5.60

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.60

2.60

2.60

2.60

2.60

2.70

2.70

2.60

2.60

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

131

131

131

131

131

127

127

127

127

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

10

10

10

10

10

12

12

12

12

MTOW LBS

41000

42200

42200

42200

41000

45500

45500

46700

48300

MLW LBS

39300

39300

39300

39300

39300

42000

42000

42200

44500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

23190

23190

23190

24440

24750

25275

25275

25800

24700

USEABLE FUEL LBS

14600

16660

16660

16660

14600

19165

19165

18830

21000

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

3410

2550

2550

1300

1850

1260

1260

2270

2800

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6510

6510

6510

5260

4950

2945

2945

5064

6164

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3378

3878

3878

3817

3613

3450

3450

4100

4500

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3440

4045

4045

4255

3681

4080

4080

4290

4725

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5300

5585

5585

5850

4652

5144

5144

4890

5215

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4333

4333

4333

4450

4450

3633

3633

3633

3750

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4575

4375

4375

4350

4350

3755

3755

3880

3880

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

490

490

490

490

490

645

645

796

755

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

482

482

482

482

482

500

500

482

482

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

459

459

459

466

466

459

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

442

442

442

442

442

428

428

430

430

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

TFE 7315BR-1C

TFE 7315BR-1C

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

74

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


DA SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA EX SSA EA UL Sy TF AL CO N9 00 DA LX SSA UL TF AL CO N7 X EM BR AE RL EG AC Y6 00 EM BR AE RL EG AC Y6 50 EM BR AE RL INE AG E1 00 GU 0 LFS TRE AM G2 00 GU LFS TRE AM G2 80 GU LFS TRE AM G3 00

AircraftPer&SpecSept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 14:14 Page 3

LARGE CABIN JETS $3,841.55

$3,819.70

$4,295.88

$3,991.05

$4,157.71

$6,341.56

$3,316.86

$3,313.64

$5,115.16

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.00

6.00

6.56

6.25

6.25

6.20

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.70

7.70

7.70

6.90

6.90

8.79

7.20

7.20

7.30

CABIN LENGTH FT.

33.20

33.20

39.10

49.80

49.80

84.32

24.50

32.25

45.10

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1264

1264

1552

1650

1650

4085

868

935

1525

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.60

5.97

6.00

6.00

5.00

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.60

2.60

2.60

2.50

2.50

2.46

2.75

2.75

3.00

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

127

127

140

286

286

323

25

34

169

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

120

125

120

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

12

12

12

13

13

19

8

8

13

MTOW LBS

49000

49000

69200

49604

53572

120152

35450

39600

72000

MLW LBS

44500

44500

62400

40785

44092

100972

30000

32700

66000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

24700

26400

35600

30081

31217

71055

19950

24150

43700

USEABLE FUEL LBS

21000

21000

31940

18170

20600

48217

15000

14600

26700

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

3500

1800

1660

1507

1910

1319

650

1000

2000

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6164

4464

5400

5193

4939

9414

4050

4050

5300

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

4500

4800

5950

3090

3642

4237

3130

3387

3486

MAX. RANGE N.M.

4725

5000

6065

3490

3964

4638

3530

3690

3820

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5215

5215

5505

5887

6028

6440

6600

4750

4700

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3750

3833

3583

3844

3912

3694

4352

5083

4417

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3880

3880

-

3040

3062

3464

3700

5000

3805

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

703

703

-

777

808

1153

395

844

767

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

482

482

-

455

459

470

470

482

500

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

488

455

459

470

459

470

476

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

430

459

424

425

454

430

459

445

3

3

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

PW307A

AE 3007A1E

PW306A

HTF 7250G

TAY 611-8

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

AE 3007A2 CF34-10E7-B

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

75


AircraftPer&SpecSept13_PerfspecDecember06 20/08/2013 12:53 Page 4

G6 50 GU LFS TRE AM

G5 50 GU LFS TRE AM

G5 00 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GV

G4 50 GU LFS TRE AM

G4 00

GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

G3 50

GI V-S P

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

LARGE CABIN JETS $5,147.24

$5,280.59

$5,118.05

$5,160.78

$5,601.03

$4,918.60

$4,943.53

$5,377.83

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.20

6.40

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.30

7.30

7.30

7.30

7.30

7.30

7.30

8.50

CABIN LENGTH FT.

45.10

45.10

45.10

45.10

50.10

50.10

50.10

53.60

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1525

1525

1525

1525

1669

1669

1669

2138

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

6.28

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

169

169

169

169

226

226

226

195

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

14

13

13

14

13

18

18

18

MTOW LBS

70900

74600

74600

74600

90500

85100

91000

99600

MLW LBS

66000

66000

66000

66000

75300

75300

75300

83500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

43000

43700

43700

43200

48400

47900

47900

54000

USEABLE FUEL LBS

25807

29281

29281

29281

41000

34940

41000

44200

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2493

2019

2019

2519

1500

2660

2500

1800

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6000

5300

5300

5800

6100

6600

6600

6500

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3680

3880

3880

4100

6250

5620

6490

-

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3900

4166

4166

4400

6675

5991

6950

-

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5065

5700

5700

5770

6200

5385

6200

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4417

4458

4417

4417

3750

3667

3667

4167

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3960

3640

3640

3760

3610

3950

3650

-

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

736

701

701

712

820

707

594

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

500

500

500

500

508

508

508

516

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

476

476

476

488

488

488

-

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

445

445

445

445

459

459

459

488

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TAY 611-8C

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

BR 710-A1-10 BR 710-C4-11

BR 710-C4-11 BR 725 A1-12

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

76

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory September 19/08/2013 16:16 Page 1

EXCLUSIVELY OFFERED

LOS ANGELES 562.989.8800

DALLAS 214.451.6953

ATLANTA 334.502.0500

PALM BEACH 561.747.2223

BOSTON 617.820.5268

Year

Model

Serial No.

2002

Beechcraft Premier I

RB-50

1999

Challenger 604

5421

2005

Challenger 604

5587

1985

Citation Super SII

S550-0046

1997

Citation X

750-0016

1999

Citation X

750-0101

2012

Falcon 2000LX

236

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

1998

Gulfstream GV

545

2004

Gulfstream G550

5029

2003

Hawker 400XP

RK-358

2004

Hawker 400XP

RK-372

2005

Hawker 400XP

RK-407

2008

King Air B200GT

BY-56

1997

Learjet 31A

147

2002

Learjet 31A

239

2007

Learjet 60XR

320


JMesingerSept13_JMesingerNov06 19/08/2013 13:20 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Pre-Buys: Getting Ready and Getting Started. s business starts to pick up, I thought it would be worth revisiting the discussion we have had many times in the past: preparing for, and going through the pre-buy inspection. This can be a tension-filled process, and I would like to offer some advice to help those on both sides minimize the stress and tension around the maintenance event. In fact that might be the first key to a less stressful event: calling it what it is, a ‘maintenance event’. First let’s look at this from the buyer’s point of view, as it is being performed at the buyer’s request. It is very important to understand a crucial contract term, “as is, where is”. This could be misleading to a reader of the agreement. The aircraft is not actually being sold ‘as is, where is’ until the closing. Every contract will have a set of delivery conditions that must be met for a buyer to be obligated to close and purchase the aircraft. These most likely include a mechanical condition of the aircraft that must be met by the Seller, such as, “All systems functioning to manufacturer’s tolerances; all ADs and Mandatory SBs with dates on or before the closing date accomplished at the seller’s expense; no major damage or major corrosion resulting in a major repair for correction; all records complete, consecutive and original.” The list will of course include other items, so when one reads ‘sold as is, where is’, that will only apply once accepted and purchased by Buyer. Prior to closing, the aircraft will have to meet the agreed-upon delivery conditions. Thus, the value of a thorough pre-buy inspection is enormous. It is designed to provide an expert view of the mechanical and records condition of the aircraft. Once all is corrected that is found during the pre-buy and that is called out in the Delivery conditions, the aircraft is tendered by the Seller to the Buyer and then the ‘as is, where is’ language kicks in. So as a Buyer, what is the best way to

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

prepare for the Maintenance Event? There are a few critical steps. The outcome is to have a work scope and inspection facility agreed to by both parties. Let’s look at the process to get to that outcome. First it is very important for the buyer or someone on the Buyer’s team to have fully understood the current maintenance status of the aircraft. This can easily be accomplished by reading the aircraft’s computerized maintenance printout. Regardless of the manufacturer of the aircraft there will be a corresponding report, be it CAMP, CMP or CESCOM, etc. The report tracks upcoming maintenance that is scheduled, as well as compliancy dates of ADs and SBs. It is a huge mistake to say you want a pre-buy and not define the inspections specifically at the beginning of the LOI phase, and certainly by the contract phase. If the Buyer has not taken the time to articulate these items then the Seller will feel that the Buyer keeps changing the rules, creating manufactured tension that is hard to forget. So as a Buyer, be clear and specific. Next it is important to agree on a facility to perform the pre-buy. After all, there will be a huge reliance on whoever was chosen. Choose wisely. Most contracts will allow the maintenance facility in conjunction with the aircraft’s maintenance manual to be the determining factors in declaring what is in or out of limits. You must have confidence in the facility that is chosen. This is a defining moment in your new ownership as these corresponding log entries and the pre-buy report will be the Buyer’s trigger to accept the aircraft or not. Our company philosophy is as often as possible - based on scheduling of shop time to go to a manufacturer, or at the very least a factory authorized repair station for the particular make and model of the aircraft being inspected. This is an important factor when engineering questions arise. Preparing for the pre-buy as a Seller is also an important part of reducing the stress and cost of the inspection. Have your local

www.AvBuyer.com

shop or maintenance personnel do a thorough pre-flight and avionics systems check of the aircraft. There may be many items that will not be difficult to fix at your home-base that can save money. If you have access to that level of maintenance at home, take advantage of it. Tires that need to be changed, light bulbs or items that can be changed or fixed at home should be fixed before the airplane ever leaves. Be sure if you have been putting off simple log discrepancies to take care of those sign offs at home. This will make huge differences to the stress and cost of rectification later. There is no way to avoid the pre-buy, but there are thoughtful and professional ways to mitigate issues and concerns and make this maintenance event go smoothly for both parties. There are enough areas in a transaction that will be stressful. There are enough areas in the process that cannot be anticipated and will be a surprise, so do try to keep surprises to birthday parties and anniversary celebrations. There is no good place in an aircraft transaction for surprises. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards (BAAB). Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Sojourn Aviation September_Layout 1 20/08/2013 17:11 Page 1

2007 2000 Falcon 900EX EASy Gulfstream GV (LX) $21,000,000

2000 GV 2004Gulfstream Hawker 800XP $3,950,000

1991 Gulfstream GIV 2000 Citation X Call for Pricing

2012 2008 Nextant 400XT G550 Gulfstream Call for Pricing

AVIATION VIATION SOLUTIONS AS GLOBAL AS YOUR BUSINESS. Capitalize on a world of opportunity with Sojourn n Aviation. Our acquisition, sales and consulting services – as u to the ideal solution. We can also help you fi finance well as a broad selection of aircraft – will guide you nance your ou broader exposure acquisition at terms that fit your needs. And our international distribution network gives you rom start to finish. whether you’re buying or selling. No matter where your travels lead, we’ll be with you from

For more aircraft listings, visit SojournAviation.com or call 316.733.6500.


Safety Matters SEPT13_Gil WolinNov06 20/08/2013 12:24 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS: SEASON’S CHANGE

Season’s Shift: It’s time for a Fall and Winter flying tune-up. by Dave Higdon ny business-turbine pilot knows: weather up high has a degree of consistency unmatched below the Flight Levels that start at 18,000 msl. Higher up, frigid air dominates and is mostly (but not always) dry. The greatest sign of instability below can come with the occasional penetration of towering cumulonimbus clouds. Their uplift can take build-ups soaring to more than 10 miles high – a whopping 60,761 feet! Of course, most business aircraft pilots avoid such potential towers of terror by whatever means are available – with landing and waiting a frequent best-practice solution. Below FL180 Spring and Summer offer their specific challenges – heat and turbulence;

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

rain squalls and thunderstorms (related to those towering clouds mentioned above); standing water on runways and ramps can challenge both departures and arrivals. Fall and Winter offer up some of the same complications lower down – as well as a host of other temperature-related issues complicating life for pilots and the schedules of their charges. Up high relatively little changes in Fall and Winter, but lower in the atmosphere down to ground level the difference can be substantial. Those pilots who fly internationally between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres often face seasonal changes on the same day - every time they transit between above 30 degrees north latitude and below 30 degrees south latitude, where the seasons are www.AvBuyer.com

always 180 days out of sync. But for most operators, those changes are profound. With Fall drifting towards us in the Northern Hemisphere, the differences are worth revisiting and preparing for.

ACKNOWLEDGE DIFFERENCES “Winter flying in most parts of the United States can adversely affect flight operations. Poor weather conditions with fast-moving fronts, strong and gusty winds, blowing and drifting snow, and icing conditions are just part of the conditions that require careful planning in order to minimize their effects. Operation in this environment requires special winter operating procedures.” - “Tips on Winter Flying”, FAA Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters SEPT13_Gil WolinNov06 19/08/2013 12:59 Page 2

In essence, make your preflight as slow, deliberate and penetrating as though you're checking out the airplane sitting on a ramp in the Bahamas...it's no less important...

The introduction to the Federal Aviation Administration's “Tips on Winter Flying” nicely sums up the various challenges that help make the colder season challenging in its own right. Preparation and the exercise of good judgment remain the best hedges against a report detailing how your failure to account for existing weather factored into an incident or accident. Starting with the aircraft and moving along the typical chain of activities, we detail steps that will help neutralize the impact of weather and help you plan your work-around.

THE AIRCRAFT: Turbine-engine operators enjoy a slight advantage over operators of piston-powered Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

propeller-driven light business aircraft; turbine-powered aircraft normally operate at altitudes with the norm of sub-freezing air temperatures. The designs and sizing of heat exchanger systems, such as oil coolers, the choices of engine and other lubricants already account for the frigid, thin atmosphere. Operators flying piston aircraft, however, need to attend to the pilot operating handbook or other manual for factory instructions on baffling oil coolers, changes in engine-oil viscosity, any differences in lubricants, and the need to pre-heat the engine before attempting to start it whenever temperatures hit <40°F. Otherwise, oil may be too thick for the pump to handle. A pre-oiling system may even provide less help than usual. For Turbine operators, remember to check your aircraft engine and airframe maker’s recommendations for treating the Jet A in your tanks; some may call for an additive to lower the freezing point of water and avoid the formation of ice crystals that can block fuel screens or clog small passages and starve the engine in the process. Also, keep in mind that neither crew or passengers are likely to appreciate entering a cold-soaked airplane and waiting for the heating systems to remove the chill – all the while laboring against the ambient temperature as the aircraft climbs into even colder air. Manufacturers usually recommend a nice warm hangar, or at least using APUs or ground sources to warm up the aircraft. All its systems and its passengers will be happier. Check, regularly, the function of heated surfaces: anti-ice leading edges and cowl inlets; pitot tubes; angle-of-attack sensors; static ports; windscreen heater - anything designed to keep anything else ice-free. Demands on these systems can be far higher in winter than in summer. And if keeping the airplane outside, the experts recommend covers and plugs for any opening that might be inviting to small wildlife looking for warmer shelter; covers for wings and windscreens can be a bit of an investment, but they offer a payback in protecting those surfaces from ice, snow, frost, and the need to de-ice. www.AvBuyer.com

In essence, make your preflight as slow, deliberate and penetrating as though you're checking out the airplane sitting on a ramp in the Bahamas...it's no less important, so fight the human instinct to get out of the cold quickly, which can lead to a rushed inspection and missing something that you’ll later wish you’d spotted. Don't allow the weather to hurry you.

THE OPERATIONS: You may face a runway contaminated with standing water at any time of the year; all it takes is enough water and temperatures above freezing. Iced runways, however – runways coated in frost, runways snowed over, slathered with slush – these generally are winter-only problems, save for a handful of runways at extreme elevations. Blowing Snow & Ice Fog: Blowing snow can be a hazard on landing, and a close check should be maintained throughout the flight as to the weather at your destination. If the weather pattern indicates rising winds, then blowing snow may be expected which may necessitate an alternative course of action. Ice fog is a condition opposite to blowing snow and can be expected in calm conditions <30°F. Ice fog tends to be found close to populated areas, since a necessary element in its formation is hydrocarbon nuclei (such as found in automobile exhaust gas or the gas from smoke stacks). Both of the above conditions can form very rapidly, and are only a few feet thick (usually no more than 50 feet) and may be associated with clear en route weather. A careful check of the forecast, weather, and – as mentioned cautious pre-flight planning for alternative courses of action should always be accomplished. Ground Ice: Ground icing is often the most complex – and most often underestimated – problem for pilots. De-icing is the logical solution. But even highly conscientious pilots may struggle to determine the effectiveness of the de-icing process, in part because the procedure varies in effectiveness and depends on several variables. NBAA offers several ❯ resources to help operators learn about the WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

81


Safety Matters SEPT13_Gil WolinNov06 19/08/2013 13:01 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS: SEASON’S CHANGE various forms of icing and the different procedures for removing airframe ice. Overrun accidents prompted the NTSB to recommend the FAA require real-time, current-condition-specific calculation of landing distances for commercial operations some time ago; many business pilots already did exactly that before-descent assessment - and many more do, today. Aircraft manuals post landing distances for different weights and density altitudes; they also include adjustment factors to give the pilots a realistic increase allowing for the contaminant: from water to ice. A runway that is more than ample when dry may be vastly too short when wet, snowcovered or, worst of all, covered in wet ice. An alternative destination may be the smartest solution. It’s better late, or needing ground transport, than sitting in a field far from the pavement of the runway, waiting for someone to extract you and your passengers. Airborne Ice: While the aircraft may be approved for flight into known icing, dawdling in conditions that add ice to the airframe invites problems. While ice comes off the protected surfaces it can remain, and grow, on unprotected surfaces... think fuselage; the underside of wings; gear doors;

and/or exposed landing gear surfaces. Exit the icing conditions as soon as it’s clear that continuing an approach will keep you accumulating ice for too long. Consider how many square feet of unprotected surface an aircraft fuselage has got on its top half only – do you have that image in your mind? Now, multiply those square feet by 5 pounds (the weight added by one square foot of ice at an inch thick). In heavy accumulation conditions, an airframe can pick up an inch of ice in minutes, and another a few minutes later, and so on. Make no mistake, excess ice has brought down Airliners in the past. Divert ASAP in order to fly another day. When the time comes to land, hit the numbers you've calculated: The Vref target, adjusted as required for the circumstances; altitudes correct at the appropriate crossing points; and on the glideslope for touchdown within the designated zone – the first 1,000 feet.

THE PILOT: Winter work days often begin well before sunrise – at hours similar to summer. Winter work days often end long after dark – no later than usual, just long after sunset. Heavier

clothes, the dramatic swing in temperatures between outdoors and in, the need to eat more to make up for the body's cold-weather countermeasures - these all combine to take their toll on rest. Between the body's higher caloric needs in colder weather, a shift in day/night cycles to predominantly dark, and an increase in departures and landings in night conditions, the all-too-human fatigue factors often come into play. Fatigue, we already know, is cumulative. String together several days of disrupted rest patterns, coupled with the longer nights, and a few time-zone changes and consuming more calories, and staying on topform can suffer all too easily. When it's dark at the start and the end of the workday, as one pilot shared recently, the day can feel disrupted simply because the only time the pilot sees daylight is from the cockpit. And so as the evenings begin to creep in, and the first chill begins to necessitate the light jacket comes out of the cupboard again, prepare and reacquaint yourself with the safe flying habits that have seen you safely through past Falls and Winters. Be ready, and be safe.

A runway that is more than ample when dry may be vastly too short when wet, snow-covered or, worst of all, covered in wet ice.

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


SCA September_Layout 1 19/08/2013 16:21 Page 1

G GLOBALLY LOBALL LLY IINTIMATE. NTIMA ATE. BROKERAGE | ACQUISITIONS | SALES | MANAGEMENT

Visit our w website: ebsi e ite: w www.scross.com ww.scross.ccom

Email:: acsales@scross.com Email ac csales@scross.com w www.twitter.com/SCrossAviation ww.twitter.com/SCrossA Avia v ation www.facebook.com/SCrossAviation www.facebook.com/SCrrossA Aviation v

2011 Gulfstream G450 • s/n 4212

2000 Gulfstream IVSP • s/n 1413

648 Total Hours • 319 Total Cycles • Engines on RRCC • APU on MSP • Jar Ops Compliant • Aircraft in Savannah and ready for immediate delivery • All offers / trades considered

Lowest time GIVSP in the world • 2497.2 TT • 797 TC • 2010 Paint • 2010 Interior • Engine Mid Life’s c/w 2010 • 144 / 72 month inspections c/w 2012 • Turnkey aircraft will be next GIVSP to trade

2003 G200 • s/n 71 • N458BN

2008 Challenger 300 • s/n 20219

2500 TT • ESP Engines • MSP APU • Airframe enrolled on Planeparts • MSG-3 maintenance Program • Excellent Cometics and Pedigree • No Damage

1625 hours TTSN • Very well equipped • Factory Service Center Maintained • One private owner since new

2012 Hawker 900XP • s/n 198

2011 Hawker 4000 • s/n 59

Under 600 TT • Engine and Avionics warranties in effect • Custom interior design and well equipped w/ options

Only 250 TT • Full Warranties in effect • Engines on MSP • Airframe & APU programs • loaded w/ options

2008 Learjet 60XR • s/n 344

1985 Gulfstream GIII • s/n 472 • N353MA

1550 TT • JSSI Tip to Tail Program • Jar Ops equipped • Owner will trade towards late model, large cabin aircraft

2010 all new interior • Stage 3 Hush Kits • Original engines w/ one fresh OH and one fresh Mid Life • Owner would consider trading up to a Falcon 900B

2008 Piper Meridian • s/n 4697331 • N546MA

2007 Piaggio Avanti II • s/n 1133 • OK-PIA

1460 TT • 150 SHOT • Avidyne Entegra Avionics package w IHAS 8000 package • Several factory options • No damage • Replacement aircraft in service • Motivated owner

Only 700 TT • 490 TC • Pro Line 21 • No damage • JAR OPS equipped • Replacement aircraft already in service

AIRCRAFT WANTED: Challenger 300 - all models considered • Gulfstream G200 - all models considered • Challenger 604 - 2000 or newer Hawker 800XP - 2003 or newer • Lear 31A/45/60 - all models considered • Citation Excel / XLS - all options considered

FT FT.. LA LAUDERDALE UDERDALE

CHARL CHARLOTTE OTTE

S SÃO ÃO PAULO PA AULO

LONDON L ON NDON

1120 NW 51s 51stt C Court ourt F Ft. t. Lauder Lauderdale, dale, FL 33309 US USA A

17718 King’s Poin Pointt Dr Dr., ., S Ste. te. A C Cornelius, ornelius, NC 28031 US USA A

AV A V Copacabana Copacabana 177-Alpha 177-Alphaville ville 06453-041-São Paul Paulo-Brazil o-Brazil

C Conway onway House - Cranfield Cranfield MK43 MK4 43 0FQ 0FQ - United Kingdom Kingdom

Tel: T el: e +1 (954) 377-0320 F Fax: ax: +1 (954) 377-0300

Tel: T el: e +1 (704) 990-7090 F Fax: ax: +1 (704) 990-7094

Tel: T e el: +55 (11) 3588-0311

Tel: T e el: +44 + (1234) 817-770

(In (Invoicing/Contracting voicing/Contracting A Address) ddress)

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GAMA SEPT13 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 19/08/2013 13:28 Page 1

GAMA SECOND QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS

GAMA Second Quarter 2013 Shipment Analysis The best quarterly GAMA report for five years? by Mike Potts he General Aviation Manufacturers Association has issued what is arguably the best quarterly deliveries report in the last five years, showing total shipments up 8.9 percent and billings up 26.4 percent over the previous year. Deliveries rose from 931 units last year to 1,014 for the first half of 2013, while billings totaled $10.4 billion, up from $8.2 a year ago, marking the first time since 2008 that billings have exceeded the $10 billion mark in the first half of a year. Every market segment but one showed gains over last year, some by double-digit margins. Piston sales, which have been lagging since 2006, were up for the second year in a row – this time by a significant 16.1 percent margin. Since every major recovery in Business Aviation sales since WWII has been led by an upturn in the piston market, this spike in piston deliveries can be seen as a definitive bellwether that the downturn of 2008 is finally passing into history. Both segments of the turboprop market were up, with twin-engine turboprops scoring an ‘eye-popping’ 70.6 percent increase over last year. Single engine turboprops were ahead of last year by a 3.8 percent margin. Collectively, total business turboprop deliveries (a number GAMA no longer highlights) in 2013 added up to 165 units – an increase of 19.5 percent from the 138 delivered in 2012.

T

Only business jets were behind the 2012 total, by a narrow 4.1 percent margin, with 283 units compared with 295 delivered a year ago. This delivery pattern is shaping up to be very similar to what happened in the 20032004 timeframe when the industry began recovering from its last major downturn. Back then, piston sales began an upturn compared with the prior year performance in the first quarter of 2003, and turboprops sales began climbing upwards in the second quarter of 2003. It was not until the first quarter of 2004 that jet sales turned positive compared with the year before. Once jet sales turned upward, however, they grew quickly. What followed would be the strongest business jet market in history, peaking in 2008 with an annual delivery total of 1,313 units. Can we legitimately pronounce recovery as being underway, based on the evidence in the 2013 half-year GAMA report? GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce was cautiously optimistic, but seemed unready to pronounce the market in recovery mode. “We are encouraged to see a strong increase in billings this quarter, but the mixed results in shipments and the big differences in performance among sectors demonstrate that GA airplane manufacturers still face some strong headwinds as the global economy recovers.” Not withstanding Bunce’s concerns, I believe the market is now clearly in recov-

ery. The single biggest piece of evidence, in my view, is the 26.4 percent increase in billings we’ve seen over last year. While not all segments of the industry are fully recovered, the majority of participants appear to be doing better – in some cases significantly better – than they were a year ago. The economy is picking up, the stock market is doing very well and customers are clearly spending a lot more money than they did this time last year. Bunce is correct to be concerned about the segments that are still lagging. The light end of the jet market is still surprisingly soft compared to the other jet segments, and the single-engine turboprops are stagnant compared with the twins. This does not mean that recovery is not underway and that it won’t soon be spreading to include all market participants.

THE JET MARKET Looking at the specifics of the various markets, we see a more complex blend of ups and downs than GAMA’s general overview ❯ reveals. In the jet market, five of the eight

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GAMA SEPT13 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/08/2013 14:26 Page 2

GAMA SECOND QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS manufacturers reporting to GAMA are down for the first half of 2013, including Airbus, Boeing, Beechcraft, Cessna and Dassault. Looking at just the second quarter results, again five of the eight were down, but not the same five... Bombardier’s results were slightly off in the second quarter, while Dassault’s were up. The leading jet manufacturer for the first half of 2013 is Bombardier, with a total of 84 units, including 39 in the first quarter and 45 in the second. A year ago Bombardier had 75 for the half year, consisting of 29 in the first three months and 46 in the second. Gulfstream was second in jet deliveries with 65, up 62.5 percent from the 40 units it reported for the same period last year. Both Gulfstream’s lighter G150/280 series and large cabin G450/550/650 series were significantly ahead of last year’s totals during both quarters (the smaller series Gulfstreams were up 100 percent from five units to 10, and the larger aircraft rose more than 57 percent from 35 units to 55. Cessna, the traditional leader in business jet deliveries, was a somewhat distant third in the first half of this year with 52 units. The OEM lagged last year’s pace by 40.22 percent when it led the market with 87 deliveries. Cessna’s 52-unit first half total included just 20 deliveries in the second quarter, down from the 49 units it reported in 2012. Both Cessna’s and Bombardier’s totals were impacted by weakness in the lighter end of the market. While only Cessna’s Citation XLS+ model matched its last year delivery total, its biggest reductions were in its Mustang and CJ series, which were down 47 percent from 63 units in 2012 to 33 this year. Similarly, Bombardier’s lightest market entry, its Learjet 40XR/45XR series, was its weakest performer with just one unit delivered in 2013 compared with five a year ago. By contrast, Bombardier’s best-selling models were its large cabin Global 5000/6000 series with 31 units and its Super Mid-Size Challenger 300 model with 30 units. A year ago Bombardier’s sales for these two models were 18 for the Globals (increased 72 percent in 2013) and 24 for the Challenger (25 percent increase). Clearly the middle and upper segments of the jet market are much stronger than the lower-end. Gulfstream led the jet billings for the first half of the year with more than $3.34 billion, followed closely by Bombardier with $3.1 billion. These two manufacturers accounted for more than 61.9 percent of the industry’s total billings for the six-month period. Third place went to Dassault with

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

$1.37 billion. None of the other companies reporting to GAMA had billings above $1 billion. Embraer captured fourth place for jet deliveries for the first half of 2013 with 41 units, up from 33 units last year. The company’s Phenom 100 model fared better than some of the other light jets in the market, recording a 45.5 percent increase so far this year, with gains in both quarters (five and 11 compared to four and seven a year ago). Phenom 300 deliveries were off by 16.7 percent at 15 units, down from 18 last year (three and 12 by quarter compared with eight and 10 last year). Fifth in jet sales was Dassault at 29 units, versus 34 last year. In the second quarter, Dassault’s sales were ahead of last year’s second quarter total by two units, with a total of 21 compared to 19 the year before. In last place among the traditional business jet manufacturers was Beechcraft Corporation which reported delivery of six Hawker 4000s, all in the first quarter. Late last year Hawker announced it was leaving the jet market to concentrate on its traditional turboprop and piston products. Beechcraft is acting as something of a statistical spoiler in the jet market right now, with production halted and selling down its remaining inventory. The company’s numbers may be making the market look weaker than it actually is. If Beechcraft’s jet deliveries for both years are removed from the GAMA totals, on the grounds that the company is no longer an active producer of business jets, the total jet market comes in at 278 units for the first half of this year compared with 279 www.AvBuyer.com

last year – a shortfall of just 0.35 percent (versus the 4.1 percent shortfall as calculated in the current GAMA listing). It all depends on how you choose to count the numbers. Closing out the jet market are the airliner-based business jets from Boeing and Airbus. In previous GAMA reports this category has been very stable and almost impervious to the recession. That’s all changed this year as both Boeing and Airbus finished the first half with reduced totals. Airbus delivered three units in the first half, compared with four last year while Boeing also reported three deliveries, down from six at this time last year. If we were to consider deducting airliner-based business jets from the GAMA total, on the grounds they are truly in a different category from the traditional business jets, without the BusinessLiners, and without the Hawker Beechcraft numbers, the business jet total is ahead of last year by a narrow margin: 272 units compared with 269 a year ago - a gain of 1.1 percent – which could be seen as further evidence that the market is beginning to turn around and a recovery is underway.

THE TURBOPROP MARKET Turning to the turboprop market, we can see further evidence of a recovery. GAMA now differentiates between single- and multi-engine turboprops – a change introduced last year. The multi-engine turboprop category is by far the fastest growing right now with a 70.6 percent gain over last year. ❯ It is only fair to point out that the Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA SEPT13 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/08/2013 14:33 Page 3

GAMA SECOND QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS multi-engine turboprop market consists of just two companies that report to GAMA right now: Beechcraft and Piaggio Aero. Piaggio in recent years has reported results to GAMA only sporadically, usually at the mid-year point and at the end. This year Piaggio hasn’t reported to GAMA at all, so, for now the multi-engine turboprop category represents solely the output of Beechcraft, so it’s a little difficult to determine how much of the upturn in multiengine turboprops represents an increase in demand, and how much is the result of Beechcraft putting renewed effort into selling its King Air products. Either way, multiengine turboprop sales totaled 58 units so far this year, up from 34 last year. One of those 34 units sold last year was a Piaggio airplane. The single-engine turboprop category also requires some explanation. The GAMA report shows 218 units in this category for the first half of 2013, compared with 210 a year ago. What GAMA doesn’t tell us is that 111 of the 218 this year and 106 of the 210 last year are agricultural airplanes that have no application in the traditional business aircraft market. It would be helpful, I believe, if GAMA would create a separate category for these airplanes as it has with the single- and multi-engine turboprops. With the agricultural aircraft subtracted, there were 107 single-engine business turboprops delivered in 2013, up 2.9 percent from 104 delivered last year. These air-

planes came from seven manufacturers, of which four - Cessna, Extra, Quest and Socata - had slightly improved sales in 2013, and three - Pacific Aerospace, Pilatus and Piper - had slight reductions. Within the single-engine turboprop category, Cessna is by far the dominant producer, with 45 units so far in 2013, up from 40 a year ago. Then came Pilatus (with 18 units, down from 19 the prior year); Socata (with 17, up from 16); and Piper (14, down from 15). The remaining single-engine turboprop manufacturers all reported deliveries in single digits, including Quest (nine, up from six); Pacific Aerospace (three, down from eight); and Extra (one, up from zero). Collectively, the single and multi-engine turboprops total 165 units, a number that since 2002 has only been exceeded in the years 2007 (186 units) 2008 (221) and 2009 (191). Compared against the best selling year (2008), this year’s total is just 25.34 percent below the market peak. By comparison, the jet market (283 units) is still 78.44 percent off its peak performance of 1,313 in 2008.

THE PISTON MARKET The piston market, while gaining significantly in the past year, is also far off the peak totals it enjoyed earlier in the previous decade. The current half-year piston total of 455 units is 64.45 percent below the 1,280 piston units delivered at the half-way mark of 2006 – the best year for piston deliveries this century.

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED WORLDWIDE SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

Cirrus is comfortably the leader in piston singles this year at 130 units, up 23.8 percent from last year’s total of 105. Cessna is a somewhat distant second at 103 units, down 11 units from the 114 it reported a year ago. Cessna was one of three piston manufacturers that didn’t match their last year’s totals. Eight of the 12 piston single aircraft builders had improved numbers - notably Piper, which finished in third place in piston deliveries with 55 units, ahead of Diamond which has usually occupied the number three spot in recent years. Diamond finished the half with 52 singles, up from 51 last year. Other companies with better results this year included American Champion, Beechcraft, Extra, Waco and Cubcrafters. Finishing equal to (or behind) last year were Gippsland, Liberty and Maule. The piston twin segment featured a surprise market leader: Beechcraft, with 19 units (up nearly 217 percent) from the six airplanes it delivered last year. Second was Piper, with 17 (equal to last year), followed by traditional piston-twin market leader Diamond with 12, down from 13 in 2012. It will be interesting to see if the current surge in piston sales marks the beginning of the long awaited upturn in our industry. I’m betting that it does. ❯ To view a full reproduction of GAMA’s Second Quarter 2013 shipment report, see ❯ overleaf.

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED IN U.S. ONLY 3

Q1

Q2

YTD

166

241

407

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

Q1

Q2

YTD

124

208

332

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

16

32

48

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

12

24

36

TOTAL PISTON AIRPLANES

182

273

455

TOTAL PISTON AIRPLANES

136

232

368

SINGLE-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

102

116

218

SINGLE-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

88

91

179

MULTI-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

34

24

58

MULTI-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

34

24

58

TOTAL TURBOPROP AIRPLANES

136

140

276

TOTAL TURBOPROP AIRPLANES

122

115

237

BUSINESS JETS

129

154

283

BUSINESS JETS

71

68

139

TOTAL TURBINE AIRPLANES

265

294

559

TOTAL TURBINE AIRPLANES

193

183

376

GRAND TOTAL

447

567

1,014

GRAND TOTAL

329

415

744

NOTES FOR THE ABOVE AND FOLLOWING TABLES: 1. A shipment occurs when a general aviation airplane is shipped from its production facility to a customer located anywhere in the world. 2. Shipments may include deliveries to a fractional operator owned by the company or to an aircraft dealer. 3. An airplane is considered to be manufactured in the United States when produced under an FAA production certificate. 4. Military airplane shipments are not included in shipment table totals. 5. Company billings are not reported. Where available, GAMA estimates total billings using public information including B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook 2013. 6. Cessna Aircraft Company C162 SkyCatcher (SLSA), CubCrafters CC11, Diamond Aircraft HK36 Motor Glider and Flight Design GmbH ASTM CT Series models are included in civil make-model shipment total, but not summary tables. This change is intended to properly capture all deliveries by the companies listed while maintaining a consistent baseline of shipments from previous years' reports. GAMA will further integrate CS-VLA and S-LSA aircraft into future shipment reports. 7. Airbus and Boeing twin aisle shipments will be identified in the report as opposed to in the footnotes going forward. GAMA, however, is not including the value of twin aisle airplane shipments in the calculation of billings. 8. The listing in this report of Beechcraft Corporation for the period ending March 31, 2013 includes Hawker Beechcraft Corporation deliveries through February 15. 9. Gulfstream deliveries will be recognized at the time of completion ("outfitted") starting 2012 to better align with shipment recognition with other OEMs. The 2011 report has been updated and prior years data will be amended. 10. Piaggio Aero does not provide quarterly data, but reports airplane deliveries on an annual basis.

88

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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89


GAMA SEPT13 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 19/08/2013 13:31 Page 4

GAMA SECOND QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT REPORT

Second Quarter Airplane Shipment Report 2013 MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

YTD

AIRBUS7

MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

YTD

BBJ 3

0

0

0

0

0

ACJ318

1

0

1

BOEING 747-8

0

ACJ319

1

0

1

TOTAL UNITS

1

2

3

ACJ320

0

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS 7

$55,000,000

$120,500,000

$175,500,000

ACJ321

0

1

1

BOMBARDIER

ACJ330

0

0

0

LEARJET 40XR/45XR

1

0

1

TOTAL UNITS

2

1

3

LEARJET 60XR

2

4

6

TOTAL BILLINGS 7

$151,000,000

$110,000,000

$261,000,000

30

CHALLENGER 300

14

16

AIR TRACTOR

CHALLENGER 605

5

11

16

AT-401B

0

0

0

GLOBAL 5000/6000

17

14

31

AT-402A

0

0

0

CL850/870/890

0

0

0

AT-402B

11

8

19

TOTAL UNITS

39

45

84

AT-502A

1

1

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

AT-502B

21

19

40

CESSNA AIRCRAFT 5,6

AT-504

0

0

0

172R SKYHAWK

0

0

0

AT-602

4

6

10

172S SKYHAWK SP

16

31

47

AT-802

4

2

6

182T SKYLANE

4

7

11

11

15

26 3

$1,516,800,000

$1,586,800,000 $3,103,600,000

AT-802A

14

5

19

T182T TURBO SKYLANE

TOTAL UNITS

55

41

96

206H STATIONAIR

3

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$24,108,208

$18,575,795

$42,684,003

T206H TURBO STATIONAIR

3

12

15

400 CORVALIS TTx

0

1

1

AMERICAN CHAMPION 7EC CHAMP

0

0

0

208 CARAVAN 675

2

1

3

7ECA AURORA

0

0

0

208B GRAND CARAVAN

16

26

42

7GCAA ADVENTURER

0

0

0

510 CITATION MUSTANG

2

5

7

7GCBC CITABRIA EXPLORER

1

0

1

525A CITATION CJ2+

5

1

6

2

3

5

8GCBC SCOUT

1

4

5

525B CITATION CJ3

8KCAB SUPER DECATHLON

1

5

6

525C CITATION CJ4

11

4

15

8KCAB EXTREME DECATHLON 1

0

1

560 CITATION XLS+

7

7

14 5

TOTAL UNITS

4

9

13

680 CITATION SOVEREIGN

5

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$703,600

$1,563,100

$2,266,700

750 CITATION X

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

87

113

200

$402,766,920

$270,084,520

$672,851,440

BEECHCRAFT CORP 8 BONANZA G36

9

9

18

TOTAL BILLINGS

BARON G58

7

12

19

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT

KING AIR C90GTx

5

5

10

CIRRUS SR20

11

14

25

KING AIR 250

13

7

20

CIRRUS SR22

14

27

41

KING AIR 350i/ER

16

12

28

CIRRUS SR22T

26

38

64

HAWKER 4000

6

0

6

TOTAL UNITS

51

79

130

TOTAL UNITS

56

45

101

TOTAL BILLINGS

$31,161,244

$50,576,878

$81,738,121

TOTAL BILLINGS

$368,336,100

$172,410,800

$540,746,900

CUBCRAFTERS6 CC1-100 SPORT CUB S2

0

1

1

BBJ

1

1

2

CC11-160 CARBON CUB SS

14

14

28

BBJ 2

0

1

1

CC18-180 TOP CUB

4

3

7

BOEING BUSINESS JETS7

90

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 2


GAMA SEPT13 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 19/08/2013 13:47 Page 5

GAMA SECOND QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

YTD

MAKE & MODEL

CUBCRAFTERS TOTAL UNITS

18

18

36

MOONEY AIRCRAFT

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,609,386

$2,965,173

$6,574,559

DASSAULT FALCON JET 5

Q1

Q2

M20R OVATION

0

0

0

M20TN ACCLAIM

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

0

$0

$0

$0

FALCON 900LX

2

3

5

FALCON 2000LX

2

2

4

TOTAL BILLINGS

FALCON 2000S

0

1

1

PACIFIC AEROSPACE LTD

YTD

FALCON 7X

4

15

19

PAC 750XL

1

2

3

TOTAL UNITS

8

21

29

TOTAL UNITS

1

2

3

TOTAL BILLINGS

$358,600,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,940,000

$3,463,000

$5,403,000

$1,009,200,000 $1,367,800,000

DIAMOND AIRCRAFT 6

PIAGGIO AERO 10

HK-36

0

0

0

P.180 AVANTI II

N/A

N/A

0

DV20

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

0

DA20-C1

3

3

6

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

$0

DA40 (ALL)

27

19

46

PILATUS

DA42 (ALL)

4

8

12

PC-6

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

34

30

64

PC-12

7

11

18

TOTAL BILLINGS

$12,752,000

$12,371,600

$25,123,600

EMBRAER 5

TOTAL UNITS

7

11

18

TOTAL BILLINGS

$31,255,000

$49,115,000

$80,370,000

0

0

0

PHENOM 100

5

11

16

PIPER AIRCRAFT, INC

PHENOM 300

3

12

15

PA-28-161 WARRIOR III

LEGACY 650

4

3

7

PA-28-181 ARCHER III

0

23

23

LINEAGE 1000/E190 HEAD OF STATE 0

1

1

PA-28R-201 ARROW

0

0

0 7

SHUTTLES (ERJs & E-Jets)

0

2

2

PA-34-220T SENECA V

1

6

TOTAL UNITS

12

29

41

PA-44-180 SEMINOLE

4

6

10

TOTAL BILLINGS

$161,865,000

$368,340,000

$530,205,000

PA-46-350P MALIBU MIRAGE 12

12

24

PA-46R-350T MATRIX

4

8

EA300

7

8

15

PA-46-500TP MERIDIAN

6

8

14

EA500

1

0

1

TOTAL UNITS

27

59

86

TOTAL UNITS

8

8

16

TOTAL BILLINGS

$29,723,271

$47,095,306

$76,818,577

TOTAL BILLINGS

$4,420,000

$3,120,000

$7,540,000

QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY KODIAK 100

2

7

9

ASTM CT SERIES

25

26

51

TOTAL UNITS

2

7

9

TOTAL UNITS

25

26

51

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,550,000

$12,425,000

$15,975,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,765,444

$1,878,456

$3,643,900

SOCATA TBM 850

5

12

17

5

3

8

TOTAL UNITS

5

12

17

$17,340,000

$41,600,000

$58,940,000

EXTRA AIRCRAFT

FLIGHT DESIGN GmbH 6

GIPPSAERO PTY LTD 5 GA8 AIRVAN

4

TOTAL UNITS

5

3

8

TOTAL BILLINGS

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,634,800

$2,180,880

$5,815,680

THRUSH AIRCRAFT, INC. S2R-T34

5

4

9

4

6

10

S2RHG-T65

1

0

1

GULFSTREAM G450/550/650

25

30

55

S2R-T660

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

29

36

65

S2R-G10

0

1

1

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,507,900,000 $1,830,900,000 $3,338,800,000

S2R-H80

1

3

4

TOTAL UNITS

7

8

15

$6,214,000

$6,583,000

$12,797,000

GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE 5, 9 GULFSTREAM G150/280

LIBERTY AEROSPACE XL2

0

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

0

WACO AIRCRAFT COMPANY

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

$0

2T-1A-2

0

1

1

YMF-5D

2

1

3

MAULE AIR, INC M-7-260C

1

1

2

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

4

TOTAL UNITS

1

1

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,124,000

$810,000

$1,934,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$190,978

$190,978

$381,956

GRAND TOTAL CIVIL SHIPMENTS6 486 GRAND TOTAL AIRPLANE BILLINGS $4,695,759,951

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

608 $5,722,749,486

1,094 $10,418,509,436

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

91


The Go Around_Gil WolinNov06 19/08/2013 12:38 Page 1

THE NEED TO ‘GO AROUND’

Failing The Go-Around Test Overrun risks outweigh near-miss risks. by Dave Higdon

92

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Go Around_Gil WolinNov06 20/08/2013 12:55 Page 2

irVenture - the annual gathering of the Experimental Aircraft Association - perennially highlights the perils of not going around, and indeed of going around, too. This year the Oshkosh spotlight shone on a number of landing incidents leaving a small number of aircraft unable to depart when the pilot wished to go home. Wheelbarrow landings on nose wheels; loss of directional control; ground loops; all of the little errors capable of collapsing or otherwise damaging the landing gear manifest themselves during the 10 days the AirVenture traffic mushrooms. The ‘wheelbarrowing’ mistake similarly befell a Southwest Airlines pilot recently, too; and business aircraft overruns are trending up. In recent years - says the National Transportation Safety Board - Loss of Control accidents in the landing phase have become a leading cause of bent and damaged metal; and Business Aviation pilots are prime sufferers of the malady, not just the largely recreational pilot pool that populates Oshkosh. Over the years other landing incidents held the spotlight – specifically the overrun accident (a close cousin to the linearly unstable landings that cause most of the abovecited gear problems). In addition, plain old hard landings contributed to the bounty of bent metal and frayed fabrics. In all three scenarios the salvation is in the decision to ‘go around’. “This isn't the easiest place on the planet to pull the plug on an approach and go around,” one safety investigator observed at Oshkosh, “but it's also a place that could use more pilots willing to break off the approach, go back to Ripon and start again.” Oshkosh is hardly your typical airport, but the lesson is apropos because Airline and business jet pilots sometimes face the pressure to execute an approach despite all the indicators that the smart decision involves going around – or going elsewhere.

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AVIATION WATCHES YOU... Merely arriving at Oshkosh or Sun 'n Fun during the period of ‘special rules’ can put the pilot in far closer proximity to other traffic; both high-density and closely spaced. Likewise, being part of the parade of airplanes arriving for Business Aviation events Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

such as October’s National Business Aviation Association Convention differs only slightly: arrivals continue at spacings appropriate for the conditions, VFR or IFR; but traffic density is still generally higher and the impact of a goaround the same. The process takes a while to accomplish when Air Traffic Control already has traffic stacked up for many miles and many more minutes. Thus, the urge to land despite contrary signs is not difficult to fathom but is still hard to understand. The urge to “get down and get done” can be powerful, particularly when a go-around means making a long, expensive repetition of an arrival or instrument approach instead of a simple turn-around pattern. Even under normal circumstances and under nominally normal conditions some pilots hesitate going around because they see traffic on their cockpit displays that could come into near-miss range. Whether on the Oshkosh Ripon arrival or the Sun 'n Fun Lake Parker arrival; the special procedures into NBAA; or on a normal day at a familiar airport when things don't quite work as needed, the bottom line remains the same: Forcing a landing from an ugly approach sets up an overrun that could easily cost more than another 20 minutes of Jet A, up to (and including) a life.

A PROBLEM WITH BROAD SCOPE Business Aviation pilots, Airline pilots and General Aviation pilots alike learn the imporwww.AvBuyer.com

tance of the stabilized approach during instrument training and other ratings. Failure to stabilize an approach, however, is where the errors start to compound. According to a study by the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) international and European aviation committees, about 96 percent of unstabilized approaches fail to trigger a go around. Between hard data and anecdotal information, the results revealed increased exceedances in aircraft performance and an increased rate of violation of air traffic control instructions, the FSF report noted. According to the FSF, data indicates that flight crews often continue an unstabilized approach because of the pilot's confidence in either the airplane or their own ability to handle the situation. Using 2011 statistics, the FSF said data analysis reveals that potentially 54 percent of all aircraft accidents that year could have been prevented by a go around decision.

RISKS TRIGGER NTSB RECOMMENDATIONS In July the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) asked the FAA to modify its procedures for directing traffic around major airports with a view to reducing the risks of mid-air collisions and near-misses involving an aircraft on a go around. The board studied five incidents involving departing aircraft making a go around where traffic conflicts forced crews to take evasive actions to avoid a mid-air. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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The Go Around_Gil WolinNov06 19/08/2013 12:40 Page 3

THE NEED TO ‘GO AROUND’ In all five incidents, the aircraft that aborted the landing and started to go around was directed into the flight path of another aircraft - some arriving, some departing from the same airport but from a different runway. Evasive action at low altitude and high closing speeds presents particularly high hazards - the NTSB said - putting the crew of the aircraft on go around in a position of aggressively maneuvering at low altitudes and typically slower air speeds (a combination with its own additional risks). The board's letter to the FAA said that existing separation standards and current operating procedures for this scenario are inadequate and need revision. The board studied three incidents at Las Vegas' McCarran Airport (LAS); another incident at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York (JFK); and one at North Carolina's Charlotte-Douglas Airport (CLT). One of the three McCarran incidents involved a Cessna Citation and a Spirit Airlines Airbus A319. The Citation was on a short final for landing on a runway different from the departing Airbus and during the go around the pair flew to within about 1,300 feet horizontally and 100 feet vertically from each other. A Learjet 60 departing another airport and a JetBlue Airways Airbus A320 landing at LAS were involved in the second Las Vegas incident when they flew to within about 1,800 feet horizontally and 100 feet vertically of each other. Current FAA procedures are specific about separations between aircraft departing from different runways that have intersecting flight paths. The procedures, however, do not prohibit controllers from clearing an airplane to land at a time when it would create a potential hazard if it then needed to make a go around.

FAILING THE GO-AROUND TEST The lack of a go around puts the crew at risk of overrunning the runway end or in some cases running off the side of the runway. In rare cases, the runway excursion can put the landing aircraft squarely in the path of an aircraft landing on a different, intersecting runway. A variety of insurers concur that hull losses resulting from runway overruns are on the rise – and that overrun accidents now lead all causes for hull losses and claims. Flight instructors across the spectrum stress that the catalysts to going around are well known and adequately taught. It's largely a human factors accident, one in which refusal to recognize the need to give up on

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an approach leads to the accident or incident (for the lucky). Three parameters are the key to a good landing. Miss any one of them for an unhappy outcome; miss two of them and an accident becomes likely; miss all three while forcing the landing and you may as well call ahead for the Crash Fire and Rescue crews... Key#1 - Airspeed: The Asiana 777 accident showed graphically the results of being too slow on approach, landing short and hard, possibly breaking the airplane. The results of being too fast are diametrically opposite, landing long, fast and (too often) with insufficient runway remaining to stop safely. The reference airspeed, calculated for each landing's weight, temperature, humidity and density altitude, is needed – not 15 knots under and, in particular, not 15 knots or more over. Remember your lessons about ground effect – which excess airspeed makes better, more effective, for even longer floats. Key#2 - Altitude: Too low, as the Asiana accident demonstrated, and you're back to short. Too high and you dramatically increase the chances of a landing far down the runway – depriving you of useful pavement. Beware the instinct to burn off excess altitude by diving toward the runway

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threshold, lest you resurrect the problem of excess speed. Hit the altitude marks posted on the approach and, if you can see them, monitor your descent by checking in with the approach slope indicator. Key#3 - Touchdown Zone: Runways helpfully have markers to identify their orientation, the runway arrival end or threshold, and the touchdown zone and runway remaining. The third problem contributing to landing LOC accidents involves pilots failing to touch down in the first 1,000 feet of runway – the touchdown zone. In some cases the pilot turned at an incompatible spot; in others the glide ending outside the touchdown zone stems directly from mistakes in airspeed or altitude during approach. The touchdown zone exists, along with other landing aids, to help pilots put the airplane down in a safe spot. Miss any one of the three above keys, and you need to go around. When you find yourself out of sync in any of the three areas above, consider that your personal invitation to go-around. Calculate your landing needs airportby-airport and annotate your calculations with the numbers at which a go around should be automatic. After all, the extra fuel will always be cheaper than the repair work.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Go Around_Gil WolinNov06 19/08/2013 12:41 Page 4

THE NEED TO ‘GO AROUND’

TECH HELP FOR AIRBUS PILOTS As this story was being finished Airbus announced its initial EASA certification of a new and innovative system created to help prevent overrun accidents. Its Runway Overrun Prevention System (ROPS) technology will initially be standard on A320ceo aircraft. An on-board cockpit technology that Airbus pioneered is already in service on the A380 and increases pilots’ situational awareness during landing; reduces exposure to runway excursion risk; and if necessary provides active protection. This should be welcome news to ACJ pilots, as Airbus is making the system retrofitable to earlier models, as well as working to make it available to pilots of airframes (other than Boeing). In line with this, Airbus is working to make ROPS commercially available for aircraft from other manufacturers. The planemaker says the system will be coupled to the mandatory Terrain Avoidance Warning System already installed and will utilize an enhanced and specially developed version of its worldwide runway database. The Airbus-patented ROPS computes minimum realistic in-flight landing and on-ground stopping distances while comparing them to available landing distances in real time. The analyses takes into account factors such as runway topography, runway condition, aircraft weight and configuration, wind and temperature. The system produces audio callouts and alerts for pilots, making ROPS an awareness tool to assist the crew in the go around decision-making process and also the timely application of retardation/stopping means on touchdown. ■

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics

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Avionics On-The-Fly: The more things change, the more things change...

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Aircraft Cockpit Enhancements: Do you possess the knowledge needed to make a smart decision?

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Value In Avionics: Weighing the costs and benefits of an avionics upgrade.

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A Guessing Game?: Avionics maintenance questions come with few answers.

Avionics On-The-Fly The more things change, the more things change... by Dave Higdon

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f a clever filmmaker like a Steven Spielberg or Tim Burton decided to make a movie focusing on the business of Business Aviation avionics you'd expect somewhat divergent tones, given the historical records of these two artists. Spielberg, we'd expect to be celebratory in highlighting the many advances brought to aircraft cockpits in the past decade, lauding the geniuses who created sophisticated packages that enhance and improve many elements of the pilots' jobs while overcoming some of the shortcomings of the packages. Burton, we'd expect to reflect a darker tone, with the shortcomings more prevalent

I www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 1 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:00 Page 2

A GARMIN PANEL IN THE NEW CITATION X

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So before things change again – as anticipated at the National Business Aviation Association convention in Las Vegas – let’s consider the state-of-the-art as well as the advances of recent years.

CLEARING A HIGHER BAR Business Aviation started seeing significant advances in turbine aircraft cockpits decades ago, as each of the major players brought to market new systems that replaced various mechanical and electro-mechanical instruments with analog sensors feeding information to the displays that often merely mimicked the mechanical instruments. The Electronic Flight Instrument System www.AvBuyer.com

(EFIS) advanced cockpits slightly with heavy, power-hungry Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) enlisted to produce images that duplicated the original mechanical dials and gyroscopic instruments. Unfortunately, the largely analog sensors feeding the displays often worked no better than the original instruments – though the CRT displays did bring a degree of simplicity, and the beginnings of instrument integration that would later achieve critical mass. The Beechcraft Starship I of the late 1980s brought the EFIS cockpit to a new level with 11 CRTs providing everything from movingmap details to engine-management data. Such systems, like the Rockwell Collins WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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with the success in overcoming the systems' deficits growing out of an anti-hero-turnedhero in the final reel. It’s a pity that many systems reflected in these blue-sky scenarios would be obsolete and entering their sunset phase by the time the filmmakers worked through the process of scripting, casting, shooting, editing and releasing their works. That's how quickly avionics advances seem to arrive these days – at a rapid clip that nearly surpasses the obsolescence rate of mobile phones. While admittedly something of an exaggeration, there remains no denying that the fastest-changing element of aircraft today is within the cockpit and specifically the panel.


Plane Sense 1 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:10 Page 3

HONEYWELL APEX PANEL INSTALLED IN A TWIN OTTER

package in the Starship, began to proliferate through Business Aviation - but most of the systems remained analog, with digital sensors and communications looming. By the end of the 1990s the shift to digital data and flat-screen displays began another revolution that ushered in a higher degree of integration and brought previously undreamt-of flight data and flight management capabilities - from multiple display systems evolved into as few as one box with a split screen, to those employing four, five or six screens with computing power greater than any Space Shuttle ever flown; and from analog sensors to digital data sensors and recorders driven by millions of lines of computer coding churned out by software engineers. That's the point at which we pick up advances today – advances that helped spread the sophistication of the integrated digital cockpit from the humble environs of grass strips and simple personal airplanes, to the apogee of Business Aviation.

THE SOFTWARE CHALLENGE

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vision system (EVS). EVS produces a grayscale image of the world as seen by an infrared sensor camera and can reproduce images of cattle and wildlife, humans and vehicles – hopefully before tragedy strikes.

ADVANCES SOMETIMES DELAYED As of this writing, three Cessna business jet programs awaited resolution of software issues in two Garmin flight-deck packages. For the upcoming Citation M2, the hang-up is with the Garmin G3000, whereas for the Cessna Sovereign and revised Citation X the issue is with the G5000 packages. Initial deliveries of the Citation M2, Sovereign and X will push back– into the fourth quarter of this year from the third quarter for the first two, and into early 2014 for the Citation X. And delays in the G5000 could also impact Bombardier, since a variation of the same avionics packages are planned for Learjet's new Garmin Vision cockpit in the Lear 70 and 75, and the all-new composite 85. The G5000 and G3000 packages, both allnew, share in touch-screen control technology with dedicated controllers managing most functions once controlled by banks of buttons, knobs and switches. The G5000's three large-screen high-resolution data displays produce the graphic images pilots need for navigation, communications control, powerplant and environmental-systems control. Two pairs of controllers are themselves touch-sensitive display screens with graphical-user interfaces that reproduce everything from radio-tuning Aircraft Index see Page 4

Today's increasingly digital film-making process shares some issues with modern avionics – at least where the limitations of imagination and software design cross. The challenges of creating, testing and tweaking software for cockpit avionics differs significantly from the processes employed back in the analog years. To work properly with an autopilot servo a spinning gyroscopic attitude indicator may need a little tweaking of its analog-based sensing system – a calibra-

tion, if you will, so that the servo responds proportionally to the gyro's changes in attitude. But for a solid-state Attitude Heading Reference System (AHRS), the influence of gravity on a solid-state MEMS sensor (microelectro-mechanical system) is translated into a code that a computer must process in order to provide the correct response. There are no mechanics, no hydraulics or pneumatics involved – just the clean, neat transfer of digital information between the machine that sensed the motion and the machine that manipulates an aircraft control surface, trim-tab or automatic throttle system. On occasion, the programming process itself can bring about a program delay or other hiccup. It's more common than desired. Honeywell worked overtime to get the Primus Epic system working to specification for the old Hawker 4000 developed in the late 1990s. Rockwell Collins also struggled with software issues for its Pro Line Fusion system before offering it to the planemakers. Among the most-coveted of the features offered in almost all new packages today are enhanced and synthetic vision capabilities. Synthetic vision uses GPS location data to orientate the aircraft over landscape while the computer software generates a view of the outside world, complete with landscape details – roads, highways, rivers, ponds and lakes. But the synthetic vision image is merely a memory of stored data recalled and appropriately placed on a multifunction or primary flight display; SVS can't show what is not within its memory. For that you need actual eyeballs and the former enhanced


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Plane Sense 1 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:11 Page 4

BOMBARDIER VISION FLIGHT DECK

controls to navigation and systems management. The G3000, meanwhile, works on essentially the same platform, but with only two control-unit touch-sensitive screen displays.

BOMBARDIER VISION & PRO LINE FUSION There's another ‘Vision’ system filling Bombardier’s cockpits, and like the Learjet's Garmin-based versions (mentioned above) it offers the benefits of an enhanced vision system. This package, however, comes courtesy of Rockwell Collins, which developed the Pro Line Fusion system and worked with Bombardier to land this system in the four Global models in its line-up. Something of a breakthrough in Business Aviation, the Bombardier Vision Flight Deck is the first business jet cockpit to blend seamlessly with the cabin. Designed to deliver a completely new cockpit experience, the Vision Flight Deck combines the best in technological advancements with superior designer aesthetics, to provide pilots with an unprecedented level of control and comfort. The Bombardier Vision Flight Deck was developed to minimize probability of human error; provide VFR-like operations in IFR conditions; enhance situational awareness; reduce pilot workload and simplify operations; and increase mission availability and completion rate. Rockwell Collins is bringing the benefits of its Pro Line Fusion as both an offering to OEMs and as an upgrade option for the venerable Beech King Air line-up for aircraft already equipped with a Pro Line 21 package.

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AN APEX WITH EPIC PROPORTIONS Two of the best programs to come to a halt called upon Honeywell and its Primus Epic integrated cockpit package – the SinoSwearingen SJ30 and the Hawker 4000. Nevertheless, the package has won several installations with all current Gulfstream models from the G350 up; the current-production Falcon 2000 and 900 series aircraft and the Falcon 7X; and the AgustaWestland AW139 helicopter. Its combination of large, high-resolution screens, cursor-control-device systems management and easily maintained Line Replaceable Units continue to keep Epic system variants in high demand. Meanwhile, Honeywell's Primus Apex system continues to slowly win converts to its smaller, more-compact package. So far Pilatus and Viking Aircraft tapped the Primus Apex system for its utility, flexibility and reliability. The Pilatus PC-12NG came first while Viking Aircraft and its resurrected Twin Otter Series 400 are delivering for a new strata of operator. Specifically tailored for the Twin Otter, Honeywell’s Primus Apex offers state-of-theart redundancy and reliability needed in a modern utility aircraft. Primus Apex also offers Twin Otter owners new functions previously available only in the most sophisticated business jets. These functions include integrated crew alerting and graphical flight planning for exceptional safety and improved situational awareness. In the Pilatus PC-12NG the unsurpassed graphical displays in the BMW DesignWorks www.AvBuyer.com

cockpit provide a comfortable, informative office designed to enhance the pilots' experience. Two Primary Flight Displays (PFDs) and two Multifunction Displays (MFDs) offer crystal-clear data and wide viewing angles for exceptional cross-cockpit scanning. The package fully integrates aircraft systems into its operation, including safety sensors, navigation and terrain database information for increased safety and situational awareness.

INCORPORATING FUTURE ADVANCES Avionics-makers developed their latest advances recognizing that the technologies continue to evolve, and with an eye toward integrating future advances, such as tomorrow's requirements for enhanced Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) and ever increasing emphasis on RNP operations to enhance capacity in areas of high traffic density. There’s no way around it; systems cannot become so complex and confounding that flight crews lose their focus on flying the airplane while searching out some mysterious code to identify a fault, however. Expect the tug of war to continue between advancing technological capabilities in the name of flight safety, and equipping flight crew with the basic tools needed for handling the aircraft by hand in crisis situations. The solutions must strike the balance that some feel is lacking today. At least now, the conflict is readily identifiable and on the radar screens. And that may be the most important of all of today's points of progress. ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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PS 2 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:20 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics

KNOW HOW TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOUR COCKPIT PANEL

Aircraft Cockpit Enhancements Do you possess the knowledge needed to make a smart decision? by Brian Wilson

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

diving in could leave you with less-thandesirable results.

FLIGHT DECK OBSTACLES Every week I receive phone calls from customers who want to upgrade their flight deck to one they had seen in another aircraft or based on the current hottest-selling glass panel available today. Most times their query is based on an emotional response and not one devoted to the time and detail needed when pursuing such a complicated and expensive investment. Before even a rough order of magnitude proposal can be generated, there are many factors that should be considered: • • • • • •

Availability of a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC); Future regulatory requirements; Compatibility with existing avionics systems; Effects on Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM); Autopilot system; Flight Management System (FMS). Aircraft Index see Page 4

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lot of time and resources go into the effort to purchase an aircraft. Everything from the cost of the aircraft, maximum range, annual operating costs, hangar fees and fuel consumption receives careful attention and the list goes on. My experience tells me that new aircraft owners like to ride around for three-to-six months to get a “feel” for their aircraft before taking advantage of the first maintenance interval and down-time to perform a few enhancement upgrades. Other flight departments do their homework up-front and perform their planned upgrades after the prepurchase inspection and subsequent transfer of title is completed. Here lies the premonition that most pilots and owners fall into; one in which they “shoot for the stars” wanting the best, the fastest and the newest products and features available. They might have seen the product in another aircraft, read about it in a magazine article, or even attended one of the industry-related conventions. It is human nature to want the best all the time, but just


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PS 2 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:21 Page 2

WHAT DOES AND DOESN’T NEED CHANGING TO INTERFACE WITH THE NEW GLASS PANEL?

“This is a subtle way to inform you that some of your existing avionics that you were not looking to upgrade must be upgraded to interface with your new flight deck.”

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could leave you with an “outdated” glass cockpit. Ask the MRO if they own the STC or will they be purchasing the rights to use the documentation from the STC holder. This is a standard practice in the industry and should not alter your plans when selecting an MRO for the upgrade. With that said, make sure they have done the upgrade before and have a thorough knowledge of the data package.

EVALUATE YOUR EXISTING AVIONICS Another area that could offer a costly surprise and affect your budget is the commonly stated avionics caveat, “Some options may require equipment upgrades from the baseline equipment list”. This is a subtle way to inform you that some of your existing avionics that you were not looking to upgrade must be upgraded to interface with your new flight deck. You will see this term on every proposal and sales bulletin you receive when inquiring about a new glass cockpit. I have been part of many sales presentations where the price of the glass cockpit is within budget, only to have the ancillary costs of upgrading the existing avionics deflate the mood of the buyer. My advice is that if the shop you are soliciting for a proposal does not pressure you for a detailed equipment list they are doing you a disservice by giving you a price and burying this caveat somewhere in the proposal. In defense of the manufacturers who www.AvBuyer.com

design and package the glass cockpit upgrades; they have done a brilliant job of reducing the number of existing radios that require an upgrade over the past 5-10 years. The manufacturers have achieved this by engineering their new products to work with older interface standards and they are cognizant as to how this added cost of replacing existing avionics has affected sales of their product. In many cases the existing autopilot system has to be changed in conjunction with the glass cockpit upgrade. The older analog systems can’t deliver the performance specifications required by their newer digital counterparts that promise to deliver an exceptionally smooth ride for the passengers and provide the crew with enhanced features and reliability. Autopilot certification costs can be substantially higher than other avionics systems and a percentage of these absorbed costs will be included in your installation price. RVSM certification is usually not a concern because the standard pneumatic instruments are pulled out and replaced by highly accurate RVSM compliant digital computers; however, in the case of the light to mid-sized aircraft (for which numerous configurations are possible) you must confirm the STC covers your existing equipment. Another area of concern surrounds the existing FMS systems. It is imperative that Aircraft Index see Page 4

Total out of pocket costs, financing and return on investment (ROI) calculations can be dramatically changed based on how the previously mentioned topics are addressed. An STC that covers a glass cockpit upgrade can easily cost the applicant over $100k, and up to $250k in some cases. The STC-holder will attach the costs to the upgrade price IAW to the business model they put together prior to submitting the STC. Normally the STC-holder is looking to break-even in the first seven to 10 aircraft based on the cost and complexity of the certification. Since no two aircraft are identical, deviations to an STC can be expected and will be another added cost. ADS-B, FANS, RNP, LINK 2000 (just to name a few) fill the regulatory horizon, and determining if your planned upgrade covers these topics is very important. Late last year in the United States, GPS-based Lateral Precision with Vertical Guidance approaches (LPV) exceeded Instrument Landing System (ILS) approaches. Does your glass cockpit upgrade and existing FMS have the hardware and software enhancements needed to shoot a coupled LPV approach? Sometimes there are multiple STCs available for your aircraft, but some airframes have only one STC that covers their configuration and that doesn’t mean it’s a perfect fit. Some STCs are several years old and if not amended to cover the latest technologies


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PS 2 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:22 Page 3

“The primary factor here is cost and one can easily understand that if you can get something for less money and you get more functionality, then why not?”

you discuss what has to be done to the FMS to achieve the full benefit and features of the new flight display system. Some upgrades require that the FMS must be replaced; however, others simply state the upgrade retains the existing FMS system and uses verbiage referring to its possible capabilities. Simply stated, this means your FMS either has had a recent upgrade or will need an upgrade to achieve value added features like coupled Vertical Navigation (VNAV) and LPV. Normally these upgrades cost over $100k and require their own certification path.

pre-owned aircraft that are less than fifteen years old. Both of these events have reduced the inventory of available preowned aircraft and also affected asking prices. For the first time in years, year-todate asking prices have shown an increase over last year. It is this writer’s opinion that the following events have created the perfect storm of opportunity for buyers and owners of pre-owned aircraft to get a “great deal” to enhance the value of their prized commodity:

state-of-the-art cockpit for millions less than purchasing a new airplane. Research has shown that aircraft updated with a modern cockpit stand well above their brethren in the resale market and capture nearly 70% of their investment. Consider, too, the current value of a Falcon 2000 at $6-8m compared to a Falcon 2000LX at $21-22m. The annual interest alone for the purchase of the Falcon 2000LX is over $1m, equaling (or exceeding) the one time price of a cockpit upgrade to your existing aircraft.

• •

SMALLER AIRPLANES

VALUE PROPOSITION Choosing the right aircraft to meet your company’s business plan is very important, but it’s equally compelling to purchase one with the right avionics platform that can be easily upgraded. Currently the worldwide trend is the acquisition of existing aircraft over the purchase of new ones, unequivocally due to the attractive low prices available today. In fact worldwide purchases of pre-owned aircraft have hit a record high while deliveries of new aircraft are at their lowest levels in almost ten years. It’s exciting to see that a record number of first-time buyers have entered the market and are predominately purchasing

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

• • • •

Very attractive purchase prices; Purchase prices are stabilizing (get in at the right time); Discounted package incentives from the Vendors; Aircraft Blue Book value increases; Immediate return on investment (ROI); Improved situation awareness and reliability.

Going back to my earlier statement referring to emotional responses associated with “shooting for the stars”, consider the following action: Take the time to consult with both an aircraft broker and an experienced avionics professional that can guide you to the purchase of a pre-owned aircraft that can be modified to provide you with a www.AvBuyer.com

By definition, I refer to the Citations, King Airs, Learjets and others that fall under the more cost-conscious category. When we think cockpits we tend to always associate upgrades with glass cockpits, but this type of Part 25 aircraft consistently flirts within the “grey” area for which Part 23 certified equipment has become increasing popular. There are indeed plenty of certified glass cockpit upgrades available for these aircraft, but I am talking more about the replacement of the existing radios and control heads. The primary factor here is cost, and one can easily understand that if you can get something for less money and you get more functionality, then why not? For starters, consider interface concerns Aircraft Index see Page 4


PS 2 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:22 Page 4

and incompatibility issues: When a manufacturer decides to design and create a product to a targeted market, they typically only certify the equipment in one category - Part 23 or Part 25, due to the cost and time needed to get the certification approved. The software and hardware design engineers will then focus on interface configurations standard for the type of aircraft certified in this category. Most of these aircraft are outfitted with analog systems including the autopilot, whereas newer technology is mostly digital. To help alleviate interface issues, remote digital-to-analog converter boxes are installed. Some provide standard conversions where others require unique software modifications which might have to be written numerous times to solve the problem. Standard control heads have many ancillary functions that now require additional switches and enunciators to be installed on the instrument panel. Perhaps the most overlooked result is that an operator spends money to upgrade their cockpit only to possibly “reduce” the hull value of the aircraft. At some time they will look to sell their aircraft which now has a unique configuration (one that would alter or at least complicate any future owner’s attempt to install a certified glass cockpit owing to compatibility Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

issues). The likely net result would be a reduced number of prospective buyers especially if they have a working knowledge of the avionics systems.

REMOVE THE CLUTTER Finally, your upgrade creates an opportunity to remove the clutter that currently exists today in the cockpit. I refer to the removal of the many carry-on devices that provide rudimentary functionality better allocated to an integrated system. Define the features these devices currently provide the crew and ensure they will be included as part of your next panel upgrade. Electronic Flight Bags are convenient but they are bulky, require power, loose cabling and are usually just lying around the cockpit. The best place for this information is on the panel, allowing the pilot to keep both hands free to fly the aircraft. Books filled with Jeppesen charts take up a lot of room and add weight (not to mention time needed to manually update the revisions). Today’s modern cockpits feature automated data transfers allowing a secure connection either by a Wi-Fi network or a cellular signal to update FMS databases, electronic charts, enhanced maps, graphical weather and maintenance reports. All this information is superimposed on one large Liquid Crystal Display allowing www.AvBuyer.com

the crew un-paralleled situational awareness and reduced workload. Loose cabling, hardware, suction cup antennas and Velcro have no place in the cockpit. If your portable device has a standard wall adapter for power, then that’s exactly where it should be located; in your home or office! The cockpit area should be organized, neat and clean, resembling a military barracks ready for inspection. The mission of every pilot is ultimately to facilitate their passengers’ safe arrival at their destination. Having the right resources allows these professionals to get the job done right!

❯ Brian Wilson oversees all

activities related to Banyan Air Services’ avionics department including sales promotions, aircraft avionics installations, bench and line troubleshooting, engineering and used avionics component sales. His avionics career started 30 years ago, when he joined the U.S. Navy as an Avionics Technician. Wilson has also worked at Midcoast Aviation, Raytheon, Bombardier/Learjet and Jet Aviation in West Palm Beach where he headed the Avionics, Engineering and Interior departments. He serves on the Rockwell Collins Dealer Board, and sits on the AEA Board. Brian can be reached at 954-232-3606 or email bwilson@banyanair.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Plane Sense 3 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:30 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics

COST & BENEFITS OF AN AVIONICS UPGRADE

Value In Avionics: Weighing the costs and benefits of an avionics upgrade. by Ken Elliott

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

several accommodation mishaps, for us it became very important to consider the hotel. However that choice is subject to a value equation where price is only one of several key factors. When it comes to aircraft, and specifically avionics, it is highly likely that the value equations used in non-aviation related decisions can still be applied. For this article I will focus on the case for cockpit upgrades that can extend from Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs) to a full new avionics suite. To begin with, the high level value equation could look something like Figure 1 (overleaf) where the outcome could end up in any of the four quadrants, all of which are weighted according to the needs and priorities of various aircraft operators. Aircraft Index see Page 4

â&#x2013;˛

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F

orever the frugal partner, my wife for years diligently selected the lower cost shoe, then complained of foot pain and sought the advice of medical experts. She will willingly admit to ignoring my suggestion that the quality (and subsequently price) of the shoe is directly related to the comfort of the foot. One day after all other avenues were exhausted she relented and purchased an expensive pair of shoes and has never looked back on the need to evaluate value when making choices. Older and wiser today we both make decisions based mostly on a value equation. Another great example of that is choice of vacations, particularly accommodation. For some folks the vacation is about sightseeing, and not where they stay. After experiencing


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Plane Sense 3 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 15:00 Page 2

FIGURE 1. THE HIGH LEVEL VALUE EQUATION

TABLE A - BUILDING A VALUE CASE C onsideration

V alue Case Completing several upgrades at once reduces cost and downtime Combining cockpit upgrades with major maintenance makes sense

Bundling Aircraft Maintenance Events Are you keeping the aircraft?

Do you update to sell or to use long-term?

Currency Multiple fleet Selling Modifying existing systems Impact to insurance Is ground infrastructure required? Look at all the features On condition or recurring costs Training needs

TYPICAL COCKPIT UPGRADES

On a recent trip to Capri, my wife and I elected to stay in an upper-price-range hotel that - as it turned out - included the #1 restaurant on this world famous island. It was not the most expensive hotel or restaurant, but our value experience was first rate. Value can mean many things to many people.

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I recently discussed the topic of EFBs with a client and the immediate request was, “May I install iPads as Class 1 devices?” To begin with, EFBs - and specifically iPads - are a popular low-cost cockpit upgrade. There is also a trend toward the use of tablet interface devices that allow existing aircraft avionics to be integrated and shown on the actual flight bag. An extension of this trend is the ability to monitor and download aircraft performance at minimal cost. At the other end of the spectrum would be a full glass cockpit. Usually the glass cockpit upgrade brings in other features such as weather, maps and enhanced vision displayed on primary or multi-function monitors. Because most avionics require some form of pilot interface, just about any aircraft electronics upgrade outside of cabin entertainment involves something new in the cockpit. As a result there are many cockpit changes that fall in the range of complexity between the EFB and the full glass panel, including FMS, ADS-B, TCAS, TAWS, HUD-EVS, Electronic standby displays, Satcom, data com, and more.

REQUIRED vs DESIRED Currently assuming the business jet you own or are looking at acquiring is up-to-date for the U.S., you primarily only need to be concerned about ADS-B Out in 2020 as a requirement. Internationally there are ADS-B, PBN and data com (EU-2015) mandates either in place or on the horizon. Note other nonwww.AvBuyer.com

Is the upgrade likely to be outdated soon – obsolescence factor! If you have several aircraft upgraded – pilots have familiarity Selling an aircraft equipped against one non-equipped is a plus How many other existing aircraft systems need upgrades to work? Consult your insurance provider for possible coverage savings Sequestration is slowing NextGen. Only equip if airports are ready Sometimes minor features can be your largest gain! Does the upgrade require significant recurring servicing? What are the training implications to your flight and service team?

cockpit requirements around CVR, FDR and ELTs may already be in place. WAAS-LPV, weather, electronic charts, RNP, electronic instruments including engine and performance are some desired, but not required popular upgrades. Generally the higher the turn-key price, the harder the business case - and hence the lower the popularity. Full cockpit upgrades take a lot of business case development in order to move from an interest to actually closing a deal.

DEVELOPING THE BUSINESS CASE When it comes to value in avionics there are certain forces ‘against’. One of these is what the CEO and corporate executives ‘see’ or ‘use’. Sitting in the cabin there are not a lot of cockpit benefits that filter through…or are there? There is the financial benefit of less time, fuel and ‘wear and tear’ some avionics upgrades bring. These may be quantified and provided as a return on investment (ROI) over a given time period. There is also the aspect of safety and situational awareness that many upgrades provide, but that are difficult to quantify. However improving efficiency and reducing pilot workload and stress all relate to added safety and awareness. During a recent business case development for HUD and EVS, I was able to identify several key elements that clearly apply to many other cockpit upgrades (see Table A above). The list contained in the table is further expanded by actual data or features that support (see Figure 2, above right). Using the given example in Table A, it is Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 3 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 15:16 Page 3

FIGURE 2. COST SAVINGS UNIQUE TO HUD

TABLE B - EXPANDING A VALUE CASE (HUD) B usiness Case

Save fuel with better performance and less diversions due to weather.

S afety

Acceleration deviation cue

A ccess P erformance

Airspeed deviation cue

S ituational A wareness C ost Savings

Flight Path Vector indicator Flight Path Angle reference cue

R OI F lexibility to U pgrade E xtended W arranty B onus Depreciation

Unusual attitude display (safety)

P remier Product E quipped for the F uture

clear there are many value components but there are barriers such as cost of the system; resistance to unfamiliar technology; existing head-up displays were clunky, hot and noisy over the pilot’s head, and EVS performance is still gaining acceptance. One concern regarding value is the perception that exists in the very small world of aviation. Perception can boost or reduce an ability to sell and upgrade cockpits. Residual perception, if negative can really be a problem to overcome - even if the current version of an upgrade differs widely from earlier versions.

OPERATOR VALUE CONSIDERATIONS Value considerations truly begin at what you have to spend - and that may be what can be spent over a period of time. Some MROs develop multiple Supplemental Type Certificates (STCs) for a given cockpit system allowing the work to be completed in phases, launching aircraft back into service each time and spreading out the costs to the operator. One operator asked me recently, “What does it cost; how long will it take to install; what does it do; and what is my ROI?” Structuring a value equation around that is a great place to start. So if there is struggle in fully and convincingly responding to those basics that will satisfy a flight department, it is time to bring in equally convincing business cases that will bring the sale case back toward the center of Figure 1. Note: Vref and Blue Book are great tools for determining avionics’ financial value related to overall aircraft equipage. Also note that Universal Avionics and Duncan Aviation Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

have a great WAAS-LPV ROI calculator on Duncan’s website. Clearly mandates ‘sell’ upgrades as with in the past ELTs, RVSM, TCAS, TAWS and soon with ADS-B Out – all, by the way, have some relevance to safety. Other factors can, however, be equally persuasive and at least elective from an operator’s perspective. The FAA and international authorities sometimes truly get it right and provide what I call - ‘enablers’ that sit well with many operators. Perhaps the best avionics example for non-commercial aircraft in the US is WAAS-LPV, where ILS-like approaches can be flown with minimal ground infrastructure required. While they are a great business case for the FAA (less cost on the ground), they are an even greater gain for aircraft operators. There are over 3,100 WAAS (LPV) approaches versus 1,524 Cat-I and II ILS. This provides additional lower precision landings for equipped aircraft. The FAA has further enabled this benefit or value by allowing 100 FT DH into all the LPV and ILS Cat-I approaches if straight-in, when an aircraft is equipped and certified with HUD and EVS (EFVS). But that is not all. The FAA now has a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) that will allow suitably equipped aircraft to go all the way down to 0/0 in low-visibility. Some would argue that a bigger ‘operatorperceived’ cockpit benefit is the EFB. EFBs provide significant benefit for the financial cost while tooling the pilot with all sorts of features, saving time and the weight of paper. www.AvBuyer.com

E xpand the Case Eliminates the safety of flight issues for approach and landing Triples the aircraft access into airports in most weather conditions Increase of runway access and pilot performance with a HUD 24-hours of real-time visual clarity low visibility conditions Extend the service life of aircraft by book performance of any pilot A positive return on investment and resale advantage Multiple STCs that allow phased installations Showing faith in the product quality and a commitment to clients Possible capital equipment tax depreciation The only EVS with 1000ft RVR credit; the latest HUD design FAA NPRM allowing even more operational benefits than today

There are a number of other value considerations over and above those previously mentioned that may be very meaningful for operators when considering cockpit upgrades – see Table B (above). I have only brushed the surface of value as it relates to avionics cockpit upgrades - but there are many more resources to help you, some of which include the Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) www.aea.net and National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) www.nbaa.org, which are great resources for Avionics value research. Meanwhile Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) www.flightsafety.org and EASA’s Skybrary www.skybrary.aero are powerful tools for safety and awareness value cases.

❯ Ken Elliott is an avionics veteran of 40 years and more recently focused on NextGen. His work within the NextGen Advisory Council sub-committees brings him close to current and intended development effort. Equally, his specialization in low-vision operations provides a deeper insight into one of the pillars of NextGen. Ken has served the aviation industry on three continents from light GA to large corporate aircraft. His current employer Jetcraft is a leading aircraft brokerage company with worldwide presence. ❯ More from www.jetcraft.com, email: kenelliott@jetcraft.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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PS4 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:35 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics

A Guessing Game? Avionics maintenance questions come with few answers. by Steve Watkins

T

he old analog cockpit instruments did not change much over the years. They had vacuum applied to the system and a spinning gyro that moved the dials to indicate the flight attitude of the aircraft. Today, we turn on a switch and several computers start to hum, and a picture appears on one of the five flat screens in the instrument panel. The advances in technology over the last 40 years are impressive - and come with their own set of challenges. I used to send the old flight instruments out for repair when they failed, and even back in the dark ages of aviation shops had loaner or exchange units for you while your unit was being repaired. The repair invoices would come to me with similar charges. If the unit was worn out or had suffered a catastrophic failure, the invoice would read “Beyond Economic

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Repair” with a dollar sign and a few numbers next to it. Alternatively, I would get a list of parts that needed to be replaced for each repair or overhaul - parts like bearings and races, which allowed the gyro to spin at a high speed. The need for replacement of these parts was determined not only by an inspection at the time of teardown, but by taking into account the 40-year history of repairing these same types of units. This historical track record would help determine which parts wear out, and then, after replacing those parts, result in a repaired/overhauled unit with some useful life expectancies. This seemed to work very well, as I seldom had a flight instrument fail again after I replaced the worn out parts. Maintaining the next generation of avionics was a different story. I would get invoices www.AvBuyer.com

on units that told me the unit had been inspected, a few diodes and transistors replaced, the unit tested, put into an oven and tested it again, then sprayed with a coolant and tested again. All functional checks would come back good. I would take this unit back to my hangar, take it out of the box, put it in the airplane, turn it on and nothing worked. The unit had failed, out of the box. Returning the unit back to the avionics shop with a few choice words about the shop’s repair, they would put the unit on the bench, perform the appropriate functional checks, but would be unable to duplicate the problem - and I would land up with another invoice for a second inspection, and, no doubt, for those few choice words.

FAST-FORWARD TO PRESENT DAY Moving forward several decades in aviation, Aircraft Index see Page 4


PS4 Sept13_FinanceNov 20/08/2013 11:36 Page 2

“So how do we plan for, or prevent unscheduled avionics maintenance? Maintenance Programs that cover the aircraft’s avionics...is one option...” the required replacement items for bearings and similar parts no longer appear on invoices for flight instruments. What you have now is a flight panel full of “Could Not Duplicate” or “Failed Out of the Box” units just waiting to cost you plenty of maintenance time and money. Avionics manufacturers are constantly refining their products with new bells and whistles, and improving reliability rates - and I must say they do a commendable job. After years of experience as a technician and many hours of thought on the subject, I believe I have finally come to a conclusion about why cockpit avionics systems are so hard to maintain… There are so many questions to ponder when analyzing avionics repair. How long does a capacitor work before it starts to fail? Can you visually see that a capacitor is getting Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

old and tired? After a capacitor heats up for a couple of hours, does it actually start to cause a voltage change to a system that doesn’t like voltage changes? Or will a solder joint, that has started to fail due to the heat and cold causing the joint to grow and shrink on a circuit board, affect the avionics rack 15 feet from the unit that is giving you a problem? You can take all of the little electrical components that are in computers and cockpit instruments today and apply similar types of questions. The more poignant questions involving these systems include: How does age/temperature changes/pressure changes/low power/power spikes/quality of material and manufacturing, affect each component? There are avionics manufacturer personnel, sitting in their cubicles, asking these same questions, every day. They may not get an ear-full of choice words from people like me that the old avionics technicians sitting at bench used to get, but I am sure their managers are asking these same questions and searching for better solutions. The bottom line is, when avionics engineers are asked about how long these little electrical components will last, what affects their failure rate, and at what specific time or interval should we change-out these components, the only answer I can find is, no one knows. www.AvBuyer.com

So how do we plan for, or prevent unscheduled avionics maintenance? Maintenance Programs that cover the aircraft’s avionics - like JSSI and some OEMs offer - is one option. Planning to replace the avionics at some specific interval is another. The first option will protect you from the unexpected costs of component failures and repairs. The second option of replacement comes with the challenge of determining just what that interval should be, because no one really knows the answer. Questions like these with few answers makes maintaining avionics systems of today more of a challenge but, speaking for my fellow technicians, we will persevere!  Steve Watkins is Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.  Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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MarketIndicators Sept13_Layout 1 20/08/2013 12:35 Page 1

Market Indicators JETNET View JETNET has released June 2013 and the first six months of 2013 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop, helicopter and commercial airliner markets. Highlighted in Table A are key worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments, comparing June 2013 to June 2012. “Fleet for Sale” percentages for business jet and business turboprop market sectors were down in the June comparisons, but stayed the same or increased slightly in the helicopter markets. Business jets are showing a slow start in the first six months of 2013 with a -7.8% decrease in pre-owned sale transactions, and are taking more time to sell (28 days) than last year, with a 4.2% increase in average asking price. This is the second consecutive month this year with an increase in the YTD average asking price. Business turboprops decreased -7.5% in sale transactions, with a double-digit increase in asking price of 14.4%. Helicopters (turbine and piston) saw double-digit declines in sale transactions YTD at 19% and 20.1%, respectively. Turbine helicopters recorded a double-digit decrease in average asking price, at 26.9% in the YTD comparisons through June 2013. Commercial airliners, meantime, are reported by JETNET in Table A - Worldwide Trends and include the numbers for sale for both commercial jets (including airliners converted to VIP) and commercial turboprops. However, commercial turboprop YTD sale transactions are significantly lower at 283. Table B is a view of the pre-owned turbine helicopter market share, showing the view by each of the OEMs. In the first six months of 2013, the total market is down by 19% compared to the same period in 2012. Eurocopter and Bell have the most pre-owned sale transactions of all the OEMs, although all manufacturers show decreases in transactions in the first half of 2013 compared to 2012. Sikorsky is showing the largest percentage decline at 51.2%.

TABLE A W ORLDW IDE TRENDS J UNE

B usiness Aircraft

H elicopters

J ets T urbos T urbine 19,139 13,913 19,323 2,518 1,070 1,196 13.2% 7.7% 6.2% 13.5% 8.9% 6.2% (-0.3)pt (-1.2)pt N.C. J ANUARY TO JUNE 2013 Full Sale Transactions 1,070 643 562 Avg. Days on Market 402 313 393 Avg. Ask Price (US$M) $4.683 $1.431 $1.114 Y TD JANUARY TO JUNE 2013 vs Change – Transactions -7.8% -7.5% -19.0% Change – Days on Mkt 28 -30 -32 Change – Asking Price 4.2% 14.4% -26.9% In-Operation Fleet For Sale Fleet % For Sale 2013 Fleet % For Sale 2012 % Change For Sale

P iston 9,463 588 6.2% 5.9% (0.3)pt 426 329 $0.221 2012 -21.0% -35 -2.2%

C ommercial A irliners J ets T urbos 24,659 9,596 581 408 2.4% 4.3% n/a n/a

1,027 379

283 361

TABLE B PRE-OWNED TURBINE HELICOPTER - FULL SALE TRANSACTIONS O EM Eurocopter Bell AgustaWestland MD Sikorsky Other TOTAL

2 013 234 227 29 29 21 22 562

F irst Six Months 2 012 C HANGE 279 -45 281 -54 31 -2 34 -5 43 -22 26 -4 694 -132

% -16.1% -19.2% -6.5% -14.7% -51.2% -15.4% -19.0%

Source: JETNET

Market Indicators - September 2013

/ More from www.jetnet.com

IBA View ing a more robust investment potential include the super-mid-size Bombardier Challenger 300 as well as the Gulfstream G280…In contrast, IBA advises caution around the Hawker 4000 which could face product support issues due to the Hawker Beechcraft bankruptcy.” During the period 2005-2010 the Very Light Jet (VLJ) sector saw a period of spectacular growth on products such as the Eclipse 500, Embraer Phenom 100 and Cessna Citation Mustang. Despite these entry level aircraft faring poorly during the recent economic downturn, IBA’s expert opinion

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

predicts this sector will show significant growth by 2025. Dr Stuart Hatcher, Head of Valuations and Risk for IBA, commented, “We regularly view the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 as popular and robust investment opportunities in today’s market; their business jet variants are the pinnacle of the industry alongside the long range Gulfstream and Bombardier jets. These long range, intercontinental aircraft are predicted to be strong performers as the market continues to expand globally and we expect to see the MAX- and Neo-based business jets do well later this decade.”

The International Bureau of Aviation’s (IBA) Business Jet Asset Report 2013 provides insight and intelligence on market value trends and key product developments as well as important considerations in protecting business jet value. Highlights of this year’s report forecast how business jet fleets will grow to a total of nearly 31,000 aircraft by 2025, an increase of 11,000 jets. Much of the new growth is expected to come from new deliveries, implying many business jet models have a solid future ahead of them. Report author Jonathan McDonald commented, “Current production models offer-

/ More from www.ibagroup.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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MarketIndicators Sept13_Layout 1 20/08/2013 10:18 Page 2

Market Indicators

2

ARG/US View TRAQPak data shows that July 2013 flight activity levels increased from June to finish the month up 2.8% overall. The results by operational category were all positive for the month with fractional flight activity showing the largest gain, up 8.0% from June. Part 135 and Part 91 saw increases of 4.3% and 0.7% respectively. Aircraft category results were also on the positive side with turboprops posting the biggest gain, up 5.0%. Reviewing year-over-year activity (July 2013 vs. July 2012), TRAQPak data shows July 2013 posted a year-over-year increase up 1.4%. The results by operational category indicate that Part 135 activity picked up with a year-over-year increase of 17.8%. Comparing January - July 2013 vs. the same period in 2012, flight activity has seen an overall decrease of -1.3% (in 2013). TRAQPak is a sophisticated aircraft activity analysis and market intelligence reporting tool that integrates the intelligence of the world’s largest Business Aviation databases, with FlightView aircraft move-

ment data and JETNET aircraft owner/operator contact information. TRAQPak data is serial-number specific aircraft arrival and departure information on all IFR flights in

Market Indicators - September 2013

the US, including Alaska and Hawaii, and Canada. The information provided reflects month-over-month and year-over-year business aircraft activity data.

/ More from www.argus.aero

AMSTAT View average levels for these market groups. While overall the percentage of jets and turboprops for sale continues to contract, this trend is not consistent across all market segments. Certainly, compared to Q1 2013, inventories of Heavy and Light Jets contracted. However, Turboprop inventories were flat (at 8%) and Medium Jet inventories were up over Q1 (12.9% from 12.8%) and up more significantly versus a year ago (12.5%). Helicopter inventories were also up over Q1 from 5.9% to 6.1%. Whether a result of flat or higher inventories or flat or lower transaction activity, the average asking prices for Light Jets, Medium Jets and Multi-Engine Helicopters continued to see price erosion in Q2 2013, versus Q1 2013 and Q2 2012. Heavy Jet prices now seem to have stabilized having steadily trended upwards over the last three years. Turboprops are the only segment of

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the market where prices have consistently appreciated over the past year reflecting year-on-year inventory contraction and (generally) improved resale transaction activity. In Q2 2013 Single-Engine Turbine Helicopter asking prices continued their upward trend started in mid-2012, while the MultiEngine Helicopters continued to see average asking prices slide downward. Upon reviewing the data, Tom Benson, AMSTAT Executive Vice President said, “While many headlines focus on the contracting business aircraft inventory levels, the poor Q2 2013 transaction activity is troubling and not what we would like to have seen. We look for Q3 to reset the market to the progressive (if slow) recovery we saw between 2009 and 2012. However, we caution that Q3 is frequently the slowest quarter each year for resale market transaction activity.”

/ More from www.aso.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

According to AMSTAT the business aircraft resale market experienced a poor Q2 2013 transaction performance when compared to Q1 2013 and the same quarter last year (Q2 2012). In Q2 2013, compared to Q1 2013, resale retail transactions for Business Jets were down (2.3% of active fleet sold versus 2.5%) with the poorest performing segment being the Light Jets (down to 2.5% versus 2.9%). Similarly Business Turboprop transaction activity was down at 2.1% versus 2.3% the quarter before. Overall Turbine Helicopter activity was flat in Q2 compared to Q1 (at 1.5% versus 1.6%) with the Single Engine Turbine Helicopters experiencing the poorest performance with 1.6% of the active fleet turning over, versus 1.8% in Q1 2013. Resale retail transaction activity in Q2 2013 for jets, turboprops and turbine helicopters continued to lag the respective 20-year


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ASSET INSIGHT View Technical Condition – Aircraft Listed “For Sale”: Our evaluation of 65 models and 1,459 aircraft listed “for sale”, conducted on June 28, evidenced another decline in Asset Technical Condition (ATC Score), and a new market low point for the year (4.879). For the third month in a row the average Financial Condition (ATFC Score) rose slightly, increasing just over 10 AI2 basis points to 4.873, while the average maintenance Financial Exposure Value (ATFE Value) decreased by nearly $26k to $1.610 Million, from an annual high of $1.636 Million one month ago (Table A). Medium cabin jets continued generating the best combination of ATC (5.085) and ATFC (5.243) Scores, while a big surprise this month was the dramatic ATFC Score improvement (nearly 32%) for Turboprops. Along with a nominal $10k Ask Price increase, this group’s Financial Exposure decreased by nearly $147k, leading to an impressive ATFC Score of 5.501 for Turboprops, the highest among all aircraft groups this year. Technical Condition and Ask Price: Spread in the Ratio of maintenance Financial Exposure (ATFE Value) to aircraft Ask Price, which had been tightening all year, expanded slightly in June, with figures ranging from 4.0% to 253.1% (Table B), while the weighted average increased to 44.5% from 41.9%. Small Jets demonstrated the impact that a $223k average Ask Price reduction combined with a $55k

TABLE A

Maintenance Exposure increase can create, sharply raising the Ratio for this group from 46.4% to 57.0%. Market Outlook: In-service aircraft maintenance status is bound to fluctuate as assets enter and exit the market. However, we do not anticipate a major overall improvement in average asset quality until aircraft whose ATFE Value consistently exceeds 40% of their Ask Price cease operating. Some will be retired by regulatory mandate, such as noise; but many others will continue to fly, and be listed “for sale”, until maintenance requirements force their owners to see value in converting them for alternative use, such as pots and pans.

TABLE B Model Fal con 2000LX Fal con 900EX EASy Chal l e nge r 605 Fal con 900DX Fal con 2000EX Easy Boe i ng BBJ Fal con 900EX Ci tati on X Fal con 2000EX G-150 Ci tati on CJ1+ Fal con 2000 Ci tati on CJ3 Le arje t 60XR Ki ngAi r 350 Gl obal XRS Phe nom 100 Pi l atus PC-12 Fal con 900C Pi aggi o P-180 G550 Gl obal 5000 Fal con 50EX Chal l e nge r 300 Pre mi e r 1A G-200 Ci tati on Encore Le arje t 45 Chal l e nge r 604

Anthony Kioussis is President of Asset Insight, Inc., which provides asset evaluation and financial optimization services. Kioussis has over 35 years of aviation industry experience within Corporate & General Aviation, major Airlines, fixedwing & rotary OEMs, technical services providers and financial services companies. He is a published author, experienced industry speaker, and active industry association member, serving as Secretary on the Board of the National Aircraft Finance Association, and on the Associate Member Board of the National Aircraft Resale Association.

Market Indicators - September 2013

Ratio 4.0% 6.1% 7.9% 8.0% 8.6% 8.7% 9.3% 9.6% 9.6% 9.6% 10.0% 10.6% 11.3% 11.6% 12.3% 12.6% 12.7% 12.9% 12.9% 13.0% 13.1% 13.5% 14.1% 14.2% 15.7% 16.1% 17.5% 18.1% 18.3%

Model Embrae r Le gacy 600 Ci tati on XLS Ci tati on CJ2 Pi pe r Me ri di an Hawke r 800XP Gl obal Ex pre ss Ki ngAi r 300 Ki ngAi r B-200 Hawke r 400XP GIV -SP Pre mi e r 1 GV Le arje t 31 GIV -SP (MSG3) Ci tati on Bravo Ci tati on Ul tra CL-601-3R Le arje t 55C Hawke r 1000A Hawke r Be e chje t 400A Ki ngAi r C90 Le arje t 60 Le arje t 55 Ci tati on II Be e ch B-1900C Ci tati on V I Hawke r Be e chje t 400 Le arje t 35A Chal l e nge r 601-1A G-III

Ratio 18.4% 19.0% 20.2% 20.7% 25.5% 27.4% 27.7% 29.0% 32.4% 33.6% 35.2% 37.8% 44.4% 44.9% 45.4% 46.7% 46.9% 47.8% 52.1% 58.7% 68.4% 69.4% 73.3% 76.6% 84.9% 86.0% 87.4% 100.2% 152.6% 253.1%

/ More from www.assetinsightinc.com

WINGX View •

There were 71,000 flight departures in July 2013 (3% increase on June). Of these, 37,967 were charter flights (a 7% increase on June). Compared to July 2012, however, Business Aviation activity is down 3.3%. Most of that decline is in the jet (as opposed to turboprop and piston) fleet’s flight activity (70% of all movements and down 4.8%). The YOY contrast with 2012 Olympic (UK) and Football (Ukraine & Poland) events exaggerated relative decline. Unusually,

departures from Russia also fell. Eight of the top 20 European countries posted growth, YOY, although slight and in smaller markets. There was growth in private flight activity in Germany, mostly on domestic routes, and mostly turboprop. Decline in European Business Aviation activity is also seen in falling arrivals from other regions including Middle East and APAC, but growth from Brazil and South Africa. Big decreases were noted in BizLiner activity, along with continued declines throughout midsize and light jet sectors.

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Flight growth was noted on ULR and Super Midsize (SM) jets, while VLJs stayed strong and Pistons also posted growth. There were isolated gains for certain OEM fleets, specifically: ULR and SM jet segments for Bombardier, especially charter; LJ private flights for Embraer; VLJ, Turboprop and Piston Cessna aircraft flights. The continued strong growth of Cessna Mustang flights, up 8.1% in July, is a bright spot. This segment is taking flights from other light jets, although charter flights for CJ2 and XLS aircraft were up. / More from www.wingx-advance.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

According to WINGX’s latest monthly Business Aviation Monitor:


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FOLEY View While Latin and South America as a whole are still helping to sustain private aviation growth, the countries responsible for the strength are changing places, notes aviation industry authority Brian Foley. “The good news is that although the previous market leaders have temporarily been side-lined, there are others who are now rising to the occasion.” According to Foley, what’s most relevant to a vibrant private aircraft industry is a healthy economy, which can often be measured by local stock market performance. Before investing in aircraft individuals have to feel wealthy by virtue of rising personal portfolios and businesses must have confidence and a supporting balance sheet. Private aviation is a dis-

cretionary spend, so it can be quickly turned off and back on again. From this perspective, Brazil and Mexico are now pulling back while other regions have started to prosper. As evidence, Brazil’s stock market has lost a quarter of its value so far this year and Mexico’s close to 10%. Conversely, Argentina has risen 10% year-to-date while Venezuela’s stock market index has been on a white hot tear – up 165% this year. “This economic diversity in the region makes for a more stable and consistent market overall.” Foley also points out that Brazil is one of the BRIC countries, all of which have sagged of late. Recently the International Monetary Fund (IMF) revised its growth outlook down-

Market Indicators - September 2013

ward for each BRIC nation, and for emerging markets as a whole. These countries had previously been fond of large-cabin business jets, and as such Foley expects that aircraft segment to cool a bit. According to aircraft database provider AMSTAT, the Latin and South American business jet fleet grew 6% in the last year. It was led by large-cabin jets with a 12.5% increase. Light jet and medium jet populations grew 5.2% and 4.8% respectively. And this uptick was not just limited to business jets, with the population of turboprops up 5% and helicopters 6.4%. Within the rotorcraft segment, high value twin-turbine helicopters led the way with a 9.3% gain. / More from www.brifo.com

JP MORGAN View The July JP Morgan Business Jet Monthly Report states caution remains appropriate on new demand. Most commentary this earnings season was consistent with recent characterisations of small jet demand as weak, with larger jets holding up better, though not quite healthy. Embraer was an outlier, as management reported incremental softness at the high end. We attribute some of this to the specific positioning of Embraer’s key large platform - the Legacy 650 - though the company cited overall EM market weakness and this clearly bears watching in light of slowing GDP growth. Bombardier remained the most bullish among OEMs and targets for 2013 cash flow and 2014 margins depend on at least a moderate recovery. A US pickup would more

than offset an EM slowdown for the market overall, but it is not clear that sentiment among US buyers is improving, and while US flight ops have picked up a bit they are still only barely growing. Overall July’s used inventory changed little, but inventory of the toddler and Pre-K fleet (0-5 year-old aircraft), which competes more directly with new aircraft, declined an estimated 60 bps to 6.8% with broad strength. Toddler/pre-K inventory is now around the average level of the past eight years. On the other hand, pricing remains strikingly weak. The average asking price for all in-production models (not only toddler/pre-K) was down 2.1% sequentially in July, following 3% declines the prior two months. Pricing fell for the third consecutive

Market Indicators - September 2013

month and was down 13% y/y. Pricing was weakest for Medium jets, which fell 3.4%, primarily driven by Lear 55/60, which is likely ending production, and Citation X which is set for an upgrade. Heavy jets were weak too with a 2.1% sequential decline. Light jet prices were flat. The report adds that used inventories decreased by 10 bps in July. Inventories fell to 10.1%, the lower-end of the 10.0-10.6% range it has been in since early 2012. Heavy jets fell 50 bps, partially offset by Medium (+20 bps) and Light (+10 bps). As noted above, inventories for the toddler/preK fleet fell 60 bps. Falcon 7X contributed most, though Challenger, Citation, Phenom 100 and G550/G650 all had fewer young aircraft for sale. / More from www.jpmorgan.com

UBS View UBS Investment Research’s latest Business Jet Market Index dropped to 39 from 41 in May. The index measures “total value” in a survey of 131 “U.S. domestic and international broker/dealers, manufacturers, fractional providers, financiers and others,” according to UBS. The majority, 63%, are brokers/dealers. The survey doesn’t assess absolute business conditions but measures changes in re-

spondents’ views. The index is near a fouryear low, “and well below the 50 mark that is indicative of sequential improvement.” Some components of the index showed slight improvement, including customer interest and pricing (up 1 and 2%, respectively), but the 12-month outlook was down 11% and willingness dropped 9%. In the customer interest component, the strongest response was for North America, although that

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number dropped 5% from the previous survey. Asia dropped 11%, and the Middle East climbed 13%, while Latin America and Europe grew by 1%. Buyer interest in large-cabin jets continues to grow (at 67%) followed by small cabin at 21% and midsize at 12%. Pricing levels are steady, according to 53% of respondents, while 3% saw increases and 44% saw declines.

/ More from www.ubs.com/investmentresearch

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BizAv Round-Up NEWS ROUND-UP

09.13

BIZAV ACCIDENT RATES: A MIXED PICTURE 

Cessna is currently celebrating several program milestones. The new Citation X made its maiden flight in its march towards certification and delivery. The mid-size business jet is one of the few business jets permitted to operate at an altitude of 51,000 feet. The Citation X upgrades were announced in the fall of 2010, including a longer cabin and greater range. In addition, the first production unit of the Citation M2, Cessna’s newest business jet, has exited the company’s manufacturing facility in Independence, Kansas. Designed with capabilities and features based on insights provided by pilots and customers the M2 is expected to start delivering in the fourth quarter of 2013. Finally, a program covering all scheduled maintenance and parts costs for the Citation Sovereign was announced by Cessna. The “Sovereign Shield” program practically eliminates maintenance-related direct operating costs of model year 2013 Citation Sovereign aircraft, meaning that buyers can take possession of a 2013 Sovereign with confidence that the maintenance for the next five years (or 1,500 flight hours) is covered. / More from www.cessna.com

Conklin & de Decker has released the latest version of LIFE CYCLE COST 2013 Volume II. The most powerful aircraft budgeting and financial analysis tool available, LIFE CYCLE COST from Conklin & de Decker, provides aircraft owners, operators, flight department managers, and aircraft consultants with independently researched ownership and operating cost data for more than 400 jets, turboprops, helicopters and piston aircraft. / More from www.conklindd.com

The first half of 2013 saw a mixed record when it came to Business Aviation safety, with accident rates down, but an increase in fatalities according to the latest report from aviation safety experts Robert E. Breiling Associates, Inc. The U.S. business jet fleet experienced seven accidents during the first six months of the year, compared to 10 during the same period in 2012. However, the number of fatal accidents increased to three, resulting in nine fatalities (compared with two fatal accidents and nine fatalities during the first half of 2012). Looking at non-U.S. business jets, the number of accidents increased to four from three in the first half of 2013, compared with the same period in 2012. There was one fatal

and quickly produce associated takeoff parametric cards, takeoff and landing cards and maximum takeoff/landing weight tables. In addition, the Falcon Perf application is supported by Dassault’s Falcon Sphere, a new touch-based user interface for the CMA1100 Electronic Flight Bag introduced last year. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

Dassault Falcon is upgrading its Falcon Perf takeoff and landing performance tool and extending availability of the software package for Falcons, such as the 7X, equipped with the advanced EASy cockpit. Introduced in May 2012, in partnership with Jeppesen, Falcon Perf allows pilots to easily calculate takeoff and landing performance Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

accident resulting in two fatalities in the first half of this year, compared with one fatal accident and three fatalities in first half of 2012. Turboprops fared worse. In the U.S., there were 14 turboprop accidents, including eight fatal accidents resulting in 15 fatalities during the first six months of this year. That compares with 13 accidents and no fatal accidents during the same period last year. Meanwhile, there were 17 accidents involving non-U.S. registered turboprops, including nine fatal accidents with 41 fatalities. That compares with 20

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accidents, including six fatal accidents and 24 fatalities in the period in 2012. In the report, Breiling said all three of the fatal U.S. jet accidents this year involved aborted landing approaches, one of which was at night, and the other occurring during a heavy rain storm. Over the past 10 years, Breiling noted that 45 percent of business jet accidents and incidents have occurred during landing. However, in 2012 the accident rate while landing had increased dramatically to 58 percent. / More information from www.breilinginc.com

Elliott Aviation, a leader in a diverse set of Business Aviation services including more Garmin G1000 King Air installations than all dealers worldwide combined, announced the inclusion of the first Garmin G5000 simulator at its NBAA 2013 Las Vegas tradeshow booth, C8143. The announcement follows the company’s recent announcement of starting on its 100th Garmin G1000 King Air installation and the announcement from Garmin announcing the Beechjet G5000 program. The G5000 system will replace an entire avionics package in a Beechjet, which due to its advanced technology will increase a useful load by an average of 250 pounds. The Beechjet G5000 STC is expected to be WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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BizAv Arrivals available in 2015. Elliott Aviation is currently offering an incentive to operators that pre-book their Beechjet Garmin G5000 installation. / More from www.elliottaviation.com

Eurocopter will become Airbus Helicopters as of January 1, 2014.The reasoning is, that Eurocopter has grown to be the most international company in the EADS group. Over the past decade it has developed its international footprint in the most emerging markets and is also well known in key countries such as the U.S., Brazil and Asia. The Eurocopter name no longer limits itself to just Europe. Even though the name will change, the scope of Eurocopter’s activities and of the company itself will be unchanged. / More from www.eurocopter.com

CHAD ANDERSON

ANDREW HOY

JETCRAFT EXPANDS EXECUJET AIRCRAFT TRADING ACQUIRED 

G280: CHINESE & CANADIAN APPROVAL

Jetcraft Corporation an international leader in new and pre-owned business aircraft sales, acquisitions and trades has become the largest Business Aviation brokerage company in the world following last month’s announcement concerning the acquisition of the aircraft brokerage activities of ExecuJet Aircraft Trading (EAT), the business aircraft sales division of ExecuJet Aviation Group, of Zurich, Switzerland. The newly combined Jetcraft sales force in-

cludes 20 senior sales executives, and another 20 sales, technical and marketing support staff, located in offices worldwide. Chad Anderson remains President of Jetcraft and Andrew Hoy, formerly Managing Director, EAT, will oversee sales in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Meanwhile, Jetcraft Corporation and its subsidiary Jetcraft Avionics LLC announced that their HUD Vision Access system is available for sale and installation on Bom-

bardier Challenger 604s (CL604). Last month, Kollsman announced that the FAA had awarded a “lower landing credit” approved supplemental type certificate (STC) for the Kollsman enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) for the CL604. As a major Kollsman EFVS distributor to the Business Aviation aftermarket, Jetcraft has commercialized this offering and branded it as HUD Vision Access. / More information from www.jetcraft.com

DALLAS SALES & DESIGN FACILITY

Gulfstream recently earned type certificate validation in China and Canada for the G280. The G280 has also been certified in the United States, Israel and the European Union. The aircraft entered service on Nov. 13, 2012. Additionally, Gulfstream’s Enhanced Vision System (EVS) II and Head-Up Display (HUD) II for the new G280 business jet have been certified by the FAA. The systems allow pilots to see terrain, runways, taxiways and possible obstructions in low-visibility conditions. In further news, Gulfstream has opened a sales and design center at the company’s facility in Dallas. The 9,300-square-foot center enhances the customer experience during the sales and design stages of a Gulfstream business jet by allowing them to see and evaluate potential paint schemes, cabin layouts and interior cabin selections. Gulfstream Dallas comprises a completions center for Gulfstream mid-cabin aircraft, the new super midsize G280 and the wide-cabin, high-speed G150, and a service center for all Gulfstream aircraft. / More from www.gulfstream.com

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Pilatus recently delivered the 1,200th unit of its single engine turboprop PC-12 to fractional aircraft ownership program PlaneSense. PlaneSense built its business model on the PC-12 eighteen years ago and today employs the largest civilian fleet of PC-12 aircraft in the world. The PC-12 fleet has amassed over 4 million flight hours of operating experience, including thousands of hours in some of the world’s harshest environments. In further news, Pilatus Aircraft Industry (China) Co., Ltd opened for business last month in the Chinese metropolis of Chongqing. The new joint venture company will allow Pilatus Aircraft Ltd to establish itself in the Chinese market. / More from www.pilatus-aircraft.com

Quest Aircraft’s Kodiak turboprop single received certification from the aviation authorities of China and India. With these approvals, the Kodiak is certified in 12 countries, with further certifications in process, the company said. / More from www.questaircraft.com

Rockwell Collins has reached a definitive agreement to acquire ARINC Incorporated, a portfolio company of The Carlyle Group, and a leader in communications and information processing solutions for the commercial aviation industry, for $1.39 billion. / More from www.rockwellcollins.com

Signature Flight Support recently opened its new FBO at Singapore Changi International Airport. This location marks the second facility in Asia for Signature (the company has also invested in the Hong Kong Business Aviation Centre at Chek Lap Kok/Hong Kong International Airport).

PC-12: 1,200 DELIVERED

www.AvBuyer.com

/ More from www.signatureflight.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BizAv Round-Up

Aria Bahawdory

Andrew Bradley

Lannie O’Bannion

Aria Bahawdory has been appointed Technical Sales Consultant at Flight Display Systems, a global leader in new generation custom flight displays and advanced cabin electronic solutions.

Andrew C. Bradley has been appointed president of Global Sales, on behalf of Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter, sales and management solutions. Bradley, previously Avjet’s Senior Vice President of Global Sales, joined the company in 1997. Since that time, he has overseen hundreds of long-range, large-cabin jet transactions worth more than a billion dollars. Bradley directs the work of the company’s sales, consulting and research teams. He will continue to work at Avjet’s Washington, D.C., area office while overseeing numerous projects around the globe. He is a certified pilot and aircraft owner with a distinguished military career.

James Cooling an aviation attorney whose numerous, continuing contributions to industry causes have extended far beyond his service on the NBAA’s Board of Directors, will receive the John H. Winant Award at NBAA2013. Cooling, the managing director of the law firm of Cooling & Herbers, P.C., served on NBAA's Board of Directors from 2001 to 2008. Edward Dolanski has been named president and CEO of Aviall. Dolanski joined Aviall in 2007 as senior vice president of operations. He was promoted to executive vice president and COO in January 2010, and in this role he was responsible for Aviall’s day-to-day business.

Bob King has been named business leader for the Cessna Citation Mustang, M2, CJ2+, CJ3 and CJ4 aircraft. In his new role, King will be responsible for overall profitability, as well as guiding strategy within his product lines.

Greg Maldonado is the new executive vice president of sales and marketing at Priester Aviation. Maldonado will be responsible for Priester’s global sales and marketing activities and is based at the company’s Chicago area headquarters. Lannie O’Bannion has been named regional vice president of sales at Cessna for the Midwestern U.S. and Canada. Based in

Kelly Ortberg

Bill Quinn

Wichita, O’Bannion will report directly to Kriya Shortt, senior vice president of sales, and will be responsible for representing the broad range of Citation products.

Kelly Ortberg, president, Rockwell Collins, has been elected to the additional role of CEO. He has also been appointed to the company’s Board of Directors and to the Board’s Executive Committee. Ortberg succeeds Clay Jones who retired as CEO after nearly 34 years with the company, and continues as non-executive chairman. Sabrina Prewitt has been elected to the National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) Board of Directors. She has been elected to fill the recently vacated board member seat of Ben Murray, and will hold the position for the remaining 2013/2014 term. As senior vice president of Jack Prewitt & Associates, Inc., she brings more than 30 years of business aircraft transaction experience.

William J. (Bill) Quinn founder of Aviation Management Systems, Inc. (AMS), and aviation industry entrepreneur, will assume his former role of president and chief operating officer (COO) immediately. This management change comes after former AMS President and COO, Lee Rohde, recently announced his departure from the company to pursue other interests. “We are saddened by Lee’s decision to leave the company but certainly wish him well in the days ahead,” commented Quinn. “As I step back into this leadership role for AMS, I am excited to see what appears to be a strong surge in our business and I believe we are poised for significant growth in the days ahead. As the market continues to improve and evolve, the need for aviation consulting and direct support with aircraft acquisitions will continue to pick up. Coincidently, this is AMS’ sweet spot, so I see tremendous opportunities for us going forward.” AMS is a well-established aviation consulting and aircraft acquisitions firm based in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Incorporated in 1983, AMS’s primary focus is assisting clients with aircraft acquisitions and transactions, asset based management solutions, management support, technical and operational support, plus a variety of other services.

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Please contact: Andrew Pearce - UK Call: +44 (0) 7557 237 730 Email: Andrew.pearce@innotech-execaire.com Harald Maron - Toronto Call: +01 (905) 673 0800 Email: harald.maron@innotech-execaire.com Ken Moon - Vancouver Call: +01 (905) 604-273-8686 Email: ken.moon@innotech-execaire.com

Citation XLS A very well maintained example of a Citation XLS with an 8 seat interior finished in light grey leather and mahogany wood. Interior offers a forward galley/stowage, an aft lavatory and Satphone. • Financing Available • Fully EASA EU-OPS1 Compliant • CESCOM • MSG-3 Maintenance Program • Engines on JSSI-Premium • APU on JSSI

CL 601-3A/ER S/N 5069 Innotech-Execaire is pleased to offer this 10 passenger Challenger 601-3A/ER for sale. The aircraft interior was refurbished in 2010 and includes a 4 place belted divan with a forward lav and aft galley. The aircraft currently has 7,522 hours and 4,751 cycles

Gulfstream IVSP Late model Gulfstream IVSP with 13 passenger interior offering excellent comfort and amenities. • Part 135 – US registered aircraft • Engine Mid Life completed March 2010 • MSG-3 Maintenance Schedule and on CAMP • 150 APU upgrade on MSP Gold • EGPWS with RAAS • Forward and Aft Lavatories • Cabin WIFI, I-Pod station & VOIP • Excellently appointed AFT Galley

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Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

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Cessna Citation Ultras AVIONICS Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell Primus GNS-XL FMS System Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS INTERIOR Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior EXTERIOR Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior MAINTENANCE Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option

1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


Welsch Aviation September 20/08/2013 14:36 Page 1

For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

Gulfstream III S/N 450

The premier GIII on the market today! 21st Century Primus EPIC glass cockpit, Stage III hush kits, one of the lowest total time GIII's available, Gulfstream IV features and benefits at a Gulfstream III price, worldwide transcontinental operations equipped, GCMP, 72 month inspection complied with July 2012, excellent records. Motivated seller

King Air B200 S/N 1647

Turnkey aircraft ready to move Only 2493 hours total time, 820/820 hours since hot section, props due 2017, meticulous U.S. corporate owner/operator, Part 91 certified, dual 3 tube EFIS 85B, UNS-1K+ FMS, Artex ELT, CAMP, factory maintenance program, Raisbeck wing lockers, dual strakes, tasteful paint/interior rated "9", no damage history. Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

New York

Washington DC

Texas

Georgia


Northern Jet Citation Bravo September 20/08/2013 14:38 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1134 N412BT 4548 3636

Engines Left Engine 4548 Right Engine 4548 Both engines 0 since overhaul at Pratt Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 L FMS • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • Radio Altimeter

Exterior Overall Snow White with Black Metallic, Silver Plat Met Interior Fire-blocked Seven passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for an eighth passenger. Left and Right executive tables with Sienna leather inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Willow leather with Mink lower sidewalls, and finished Topaz Kayawood gloss laminate. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • Ski Tube • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616 336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 336 4709 mserbenski@northernjet.net www.northernjet.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Jet Lear45 September 20/08/2013 14:48 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Learjet 45XR Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

45-298 N191TD 2500 1678

Northern Air Inc is pleased to offer this 2006 Lear 45 to the marketplace for immediate sale. Features of this aircraft include: • Management Services Available • Maintenance performed through Learjet factory authorized service centers since new. • Fully paid MSP Gold engine plan for engines and APU • Honeywell Primus II 1000 package • Duel FMS/GPS/8.33 • Duel UNS1-E • Air Show 4000

Avionics Honeywell Primus II 1000 package, Duel FMS/GPS/8.33, Duel UNS1-E, AFIS, TCAS-II w/ ch7, EGPWS, 880 weather radar – upgrade, SELCAL, HF, 406 ELT. Interior Condition Excellent. 8 place double club, belted lavatory, forward and aft, 10.4 monitors, 10 Disc CD, DVD player, Air Show 4000, Satellite telephone system, lighted vanity mirror, premium wood package, premium carpet, locking package. Exterior Condition Excellent. Inspection Status Current: 2400 major inspection performed in October 2012.

Airframe & Engines 2500 hours, 1678 Landings. Engines: (2) Honeywell TFE731-20BR-1B, 3500 lbs Thrust each, extended TBO, (1) APU. Fully paid MSP Gold engine plan for engines and APU.

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616 336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 336 4709 mserbenski@northernjet.net www.northernjet.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Northern Jet Lear 40XR September 20/08/2013 14:49 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 2763 2230

• Extended Range Fuel • Fresh A-D check at Bombardier Wichita Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 2575 / Right Engine 2567 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660

• ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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Aircraft Acquisitions Sept H/R_Layout 1 20/08/2013 15:34 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2011 GLOBAL 5000

Serial Number: 9398 | Airframe TT: 791 | Landings: 235 Engines Rolls-Royce Deutschland BR710A2-20 turbofans Thrust: 14,750 lb (65.6 kN) Flat rated to: ISA + 20ºC (95ºF) Rolls Royce CorporateCare Avionics Honeywell Primus 2000XP Avionics Suite with Batch 3 upgrades WAAS/LPV CPDLC/Link 2000/FANS 1/A+ Swift Broadband SATCOM system with CNX-200 Series 2 router Thales/Sextant Heads-Up display Triple Honeywell NZ-2000 navigation computers and dual global positioning systems Collins ASXi Airshow with 24” monitors with network six-paks, day-night with time zones, etc Cabin Entertainment System: CES software update V7 iPod cradle inserts for integration to CES Enhanced soundproofing Part 135/EAS-JAR ops ready Honeywell LASEREF IV Inertial Reference System Honeywell LSZ-860 lighting sensor

Quick access recorder Crew force measuring system Performance Range At M 0.85: 5,200 NM 9,630 km (Theoretical range with NBAA IFR Reserves, ISA, 8 pax/3 crew. Actual range will be affected by speed, weather, selected options and other factors) Speed Mach kt mph km/h High-speed 0.89 513 590 950 Typical cruise speed 0.85 488 562 904 Airfield Performance Takeoff distance (SL, ISA, MTOW): 5,540 ft (1,689m) Landing distance (SL, ISA, MLM): 2,760 ft (814m) Operating Altitude Maximum operating altitude: 51,000ft (15,545m) Relative cabin pressure altitude at 45,000 ft (13,716m): 4,500ft (1,371m) Noise Level (EPNdB) Flyover: 80.1 Approach: 88.2 Lateral: 89.7

PO Box 389, Durham, North Carolina 27702 | Telephone 919.683.2600 | Fax 919.680.0208 | info@aircraft-acquisitions.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

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Empyrean Challenger 604 Sept 2013_Empyrean 20/08/2013 14:58 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Bombardier Challenger 604 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5624 HB-JGR 4,856 1,987

• Smart Parts Plus • APU enrolled on Honeywell MSP • Enrolled on CAMP • Fully EASA compliant Engines GE CF34-3B Total Time & Total Cycles: 4,840 Hours & 1,968 APU Honeywell GTCP-36-100 – 4,615 Hours Avionics Electronic Flight instrument and Engine Indication & Crew Alerting System Airborne Flight Information System (AFIS) Auto Throttle Flight Control System Inertial Reference Unit (IRU) and Air Data System Weather Radar System Flight Management System

Advisory System Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System Cockpit Voice Recorder Maintenance Diagnostic Computer Standby Attitude Indicator Standby Airspeed Indicator Standby Altimeter Emergency Compass Cockpit Audio Control Observer Audio Control Emergency Locator Transmitter Interior Cabin Layout: Fwd Cabin: Four place club. Aft Cabin: Four place berthable divan and four place conference / dining group with dual double seating. Forward Galley (equipped with oven, microwave and brewer coffee machine) Aft Lavatory Entertainment: Two (2) DVD Player One (1) CD Changer Two (2) Monitors (1ea installed on forward and aft cabin wall) Satcom (Iridium) For Immediate Sale

Additional Equipment Radio Sensor System Radio Altimeter System

Empyrean Aircraft Consulting Ltd Contact: Andrew Butler

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Tel: +34 96626 1967 Cell: +44 7880 717362 Email: ajb@empyreanaircraft.com www.empyreanaircraft.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Empyrean Learjet 60XR Sept 2013_Empyrean 20/08/2013 15:01 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Learjet 60XR Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

421 M-GLFZ 95 47

• Smart Parts Plus • Engines on ESP Gold. • APU on MSP. • Enrolled on CAMP. • EASA compliant. Engines P&WC 306A Total Time & Cycles: 95 Hours & 47 cyc. APU Honeywell GTCP 36-150 Hours: 99. Avionics Autopilot L3 Honeywell PS-440 HF Dual Honeywell VHF-422C VHF Comms Dual Collins VIR-432 VHF Nav Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins DME-442 DME Dual Collins TDR-94D ATC Transponder Collins RTA-844 Weather Radar Collins ALT-4000 Rad Alt. Collins TTR-4000 TCAS Dual Collins GPS-4000A GPS Artex C406-2 ELT Honeywell Mk V EGPWS

Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) (XR) Cockpit Voice Recorder Rosemount Ice Detection system Dual FSU with electronic charts Enhanced map overlays Additional Equipment Avionics Digital Flight Data Recorder Cockpit Voice Recorder Equipment Hide-A-Key Interior Aircell Axxess, Dual Channel Iridium W/Wired Handsets Acoustic Curtain, Passenger Door Seat Pan Lifter (XR) Dual Hot Liquid Containers (XR) Microwave Oven - 28VDC (XR) Floorplan Executive Floorplan H Interior This aircraft features a seven (7) passenger configuration offering a forward double club seating arrangement and two single forward facing seats. A seventh belted seated can be found in the aft lavatory section. There are also forward and aft mounted 15 inch video monitors with DVD and Passenger Audio / Video inputs. For Immediate Sale

Empyrean Aircraft Consulting Ltd Contact: Andrew Butler

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +34 96626 1967 Cell: +44 7880 717362 Email: ajb@empyreanaircraft.com www.empyreanaircraft.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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Albinati Citation CJ2 September 20/08/2013 15:11 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citation Jet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0422 HB-VPB 1036 1038

No damage history Engines Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 on TAP ELITE FADEC Controlled • LH: S/N 216252 - 1036 TSN, 1038 CSN • RH: S/N 216177 - 1036 TSN, 1038 CSN Program Coverage and Maintenance Status Aircraft scheduled maintenance performed exclusively by Jet Aviation Zurich since new Aircraft under Cesscom (CAMP) maintenance tracking service Airframe under Cessna Proparts program coverage Engines under Williams International TAP ELITE coverage Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays • AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3000 • ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 • IFIS 1 Collins IFIS 6.0 • FMS 2 Collins FMS-3000 (incl. DME II) • GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel Receiver • RTU 2 Collins RTU-4220 • NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 • ADF 1 Collins ADF • DME 1 Collins DME-4000 • VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing

• XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94D Mode S • TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II • EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with Runway Awareness and Advisory System (RAAS) • Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 • ESIS GH-3000 ESIS • ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT (121.5/243/406 MHz) Additional Equipment • HF System HF-9000 • Aircell Flitefone (2 Handsets) • Lightning Detection Sytem WX-1000E • Turbulence Weather Radar WXR-852 • Cockpit Voice Recorder DK-120 • Data Link • Cabin Briefer PBS250 • Annunciator Voice System • Electronic Check List • Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Interior Configuration • Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats • Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables • RH Fwd Refreshment Center • Dual Aft Dividers Assembly with sliding doors • One Aft Potty Belted Seat Colors • Beige leather seats - Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut • Goldy Plated Hardware Finish Exterior Overall light beige with brown stripes Asking price: Make Offer

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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Tel: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


Albinati Global Express September 20/08/2013 15:12 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2005 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9145 HB-JEX 3694 1289

• Aircraft scheduled maintenance performed by Innotech Aviation Montreal and Jet Aviation Geneva and Basel branches • 4C inspection performed at Jet Aviation Basel in July 2010 • 8C inspection due in July 2015 • No damage history Engines (under RR Corporate Care) Rolls Royce Deutschland BR 700-710A2-20 • LH: S/N 12405 - 3613 TSN, 1249 CSN • RH: S/N 12406 - 3694 TSN, 1289 CSN APU (under JSSI) Honeywell RE 220 (GX) S/N P-264 Time: 2553 TSN / 3120 CSN Avionics • Communications Triple Honeywell RCZ 833E • Navigation Dual Honeywell RNZ 851 • ADF Dual Honeywell P2000XP • RMU Dual Honeywell RM 855 • Transponder Dual Honeywell P2000XP, Mode S • Radar Honeywell WU 880 • IRS Triple Honeywell Laser Ref III • HF Dual Collins HF 9031A with Selcal • GPS Dual Honeywell HG2021 & GNSSU • FDR Honeywell SS FDR QAR • CVR Honeywell SS CVR • Triple Honeywell Flight System Management W/CD 820 CDU

Special Features • Aircraft under CAMP maintenance tracking service • Aircraft under Bombardier Smart Parts Plus coverage • Cabin Altitude Reduction for Passenger Comfort (4’500 Feet) • Honeywell RT 950 TCAS II, Version 7.0 • Honeywell Mark V Enhanced GPWS • Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM (6 Channel)/2 Channel Iridium • RVSM, 8.33 MHz Spacing and FM Immunity Certified • Heads Up Display (HUD), EVS, RAAS • BATCH 2+ • Artex ELT 110-406 Emergency Locator Beacon • Teledyne Datalink System Interior (refurbished in February 2011) • Twelve passenger configuration and a threeplace divan 9G certified (see, floor plan) in beige leather and brown nubuck • Forward lavatory and crew rest area • Fully equipped galley and annex • Aft private lavatory, storage closet and baggage compartment • Cabin entertainment system with flat screen video monitors, satellite TV for Europe and USA, WLAN Internet, DVD and an airshow • Electric window shades • EMTEQ system lighting retrofit • AIMS soundproofing system Exterior White top, light beige bottom with gold accent stripes Asking price: USD $25,250,000

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero

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Florida Jet Falcon 2000 September 20/08/2013 15:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Falcon 900EX EASy Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

160 N731FJ 1383.3 994

Engines Honeywell TFE 731-60-1C On MSP Gold Left: S/N: P112609 1383.3 Hours 994 Cycles Center: S/N: P112610 1383.3 Hours 994 Cycles Right: S/N: P112613 1383.3 Hours 994 Cycles APU GTCP36-150(F) S/N: P490 1534 Hours On MSP Gold Avionics Honeywell Epic Flight Controls Honeywell EASy Honeywell EASy II Baseline SB 400 C/W Triple Honeywell VHF TR-866 Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Triple Honeywell Laseref V Head Up Display - CAT IIIA Capable Primus 880 Weather Radar Dual Honeywell NV - 875A VOR/ILS/Marker Dual Honeywell DME DM - 855 Dual Honeywell AA-300 Radio Altimeter Dual Honeywell XPDR XS - 857A w/ Flight ID Dual Honeywell ADF DF – 855 Honeywell TCAS 2000 w/ Chg. 7 Honeywell Easy EGPWS Dual Collins HF-9000 Honeywell AV-9000 SELCAL Triple Honeywell EASY FMS Dual Honeywell GPS-90X

ELTA ADT-406 Tri Band ELT Honeywell SSCVR (120 minutes) Honeywell SSFDR Additional Equipment Thrane & Thrane TT-5000 HSD+ Video Camera Securaplane GoGo WiFi SATCOM AERO H+/Swift 64 Tel-Tail Recognition Lights Maintenance A/A+, 2A+, 4A+, Z, B1, C Inspections complied with 12-2012 by DFS Paris. Dry Bay Mod C/W 12-2012 On CAMP Interior Completed by Standard Aero SPI Fourteen (14) passenger executive interior features a forward 4-place club and mid-cabin 4-place conference group opposite a credenza, two aft 3 place divans. The seats and divans are finished in tan leather. Custom Wood Veneer. All woodwork is high gloss finish. Four (4) Rosen 8.4” LCD Plug in Monitors. ERDA 3rd Crew Jump Seat. 25"Fwd RH Crew Lavatory w/ Hanger Bar, Forward RH 36" full service galley, LH 30" Aux Galley/Entertainment Cabinet. Iacobucci Coffeemaker, hot cup, TIA Wavejet microwave and hot oven. Cabin amenities include: forward coat closet with horizontal manual storage, Airshow 410, Two 20" flat screen monitors, Dual DVD players, (3) telephone handsets (2 in cabin and 1 in cockpit) and fax machine. Aft lavatory with vanity. External Water System Servicing. Two Twelve (12) Man Life Raft Exterior TBD. Painted by Standard Aero SPI

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI CJ525 September 20/08/2013 15:48 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Citation CJ 525 Serial Number: Airframe TT:

525-0239 1,726

Engines On TAP Elite WILLIAMS/ROLLS FJ44-1A LEFT: 1503 TT RIGHT: 1726 TT Interior New Jan. 2006! Six-Passenger Beige Leather Seating w/Complementing accents. Deluxe Refreshment Center, Dual Executive Writing Tables, Aft Divider w/Removal Curtain. CD Player w/XM Radio System for Cabin Entertainment. LH Belted and Flushing Lav. Gloss Wood Laminate w/24K Gold Plated Hardware. New 1/06 by Goderich Aircraft, Canada

Garmin MX200, XL Weather and TCAS 900 BX Garmin 500 GPS w/WAAS, XM Weather & TAWS Sperry SPZ-5000 Autopilot and Flight Director Dual Bendix/Kng KY 196A Comm Radios Dual Bendix/King KT70 Mode Transponders Bendix/King KN63 DME w/Hold Button Bendix/King Radio Altimeter KRA-405B Locator Beacon Artex ELT 407 Angle of Attack (AOA) Aircel SAT Phone RVSM Compliant Additional New Doc. 21 completed August 2, 2013 at Citation - Greensboro. Cescom, aircraft sustained damage after landing and was repaired 1/06 (complete dates available.)

Exterior New Jan. 2006! Attractive Overall Off-White with Black and Copper Trim. New 1/06 by Goderich Aircraft, Canada Avionics Honeywell/Sperry SPX-5000 2-Tube EFIS Bendix/King RDR-2000 VP Color Dual Bendix/King KN53 Nav Radios Dual Bendix/King KR87 ADF Honeywell C-14D Compass System Fairshild A-100 CVR TCAS 900 BX Traffic Collision System

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com

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OwnWings AT KA Piper Aug 20/08/2013 15:54 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1991 Beechcraft King Air C90A Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

LJ1285 SP reg 3100

Well-tended King Air C90A • Pressurization increased: 8.000ft cabin at 23.000ft. • Maximum cruise boosted to 247 KTAS up 12 knots from the latest predecessor and a full 19 knots from the original Model 90. • Payload upped so you can carry a pilot, four passengers, full fuel and 100+ pounds of baggage. • Hydraulic landing gear. Quieter, smoother, more reliable, easier to maintain. • Pilot cowls increase ram air efficiency by 30 %. Air intake heated constantly by engine exhaust to prevent icing. • Fail-safe main wings spar tension member with redundant load paths and clevis fittings.

• Cockpit layout is redesigned. • Electronic-HSI, rudder boost and autofeather are standard features. Engines Pratt Whitney PT6A-21, 3100hrs The PT6A-21 with a TBO of 3,600 hours Interior Grey leather seats and interior Exterior White with blue stripes Avionics Avionics Collins Pro Line II COMM dual Collins VHF-22A NAV dual Collins VIR-32 GPS

ADF Collins ADF-60A DME Collins DME-42 Transponders dual TDR-94 CVR Loral Fairchild FA2100 Radar Collins WXR-270 Autopilot Collins APS-65H Stormscope WX-1000+ TCAS Skywatch SKY-497 KAS 297 - Bendix King. Bendix/King IN-182A Color Weather Radar Indicator Bendix/King KFS598 VHF Comm Control Remarks If purchase is concluded, I am asking politely for a management fee of 2,5 percent (negotiable). Requirements and information are welcome. $ 856.000,00 excluding VAT

1975 Piper Aztec PA-23-250 Turbo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

27-7554161 N reg 5100

Suitable for a short runway – Takeoff Ground Roll: 820 ft Landing Ground Roll 850 ft Over 50 ft obstacle: 1250 ft The best Piper PA-23-250 Turbo Aztec E on the market with revised instrument panel and controls and with longer pointed nose and a single piece windshield. New hoses, wires, welding of exhaust flanges, landing gear seals, new overhaul right turbocharger, new battery, brand new factoy built in oxygen tank with O2 for 6 persons rear of baggage compartement. Full Co-Pilot intruments and dual brakes . . . 180 kts at 75% power. Engines 2x Lycoming TIO-540-C4B5. Engine times 610 hrs SMOH left and right side. Propeller times: 300 hrs SPOH left and right side.

Avionics IFR certified. Aspen Pro1000 Glass panel with back up battery Garmin GNS530 GPS (Option) Garmin GNS430 GOS, VHF, WAAS 2012 Garmin GMA340 Audio panel Garmin GTX327 transponder mode S Garmin GPS496. Zaon TCAS on the glare shield. New 406 MHz ELT. Autopilot Altimatic IIIC with electric trim. Digital Engine Monitor JPI w/ fuel flow & download dataport. Panel power & headseat jacks in front for pilot and copilot. Ipod Audio Input in front and rear, MP3, etc.12V in rear DVDplayer etc. Iridium Sat-telephone on board. Avionics installed at Saratosa Avionics 2009 for $ 40.000

OWNWINGS Aircraft Trading Mr. Anton Fink

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Interior Fair, seats are good, but the carpet may need to be replaced. Exterior Paint very good, de-icing boots excellent. Options Metco tip tanks hold 20 gal each and feed into the outboard tanks by gravity (no extra switching or pumps are required). Total fuel capacity 184 gal / 567 litres. Location Italy Remarks If purchase is concluded, I am asking politely for a management fee of 2,5 percent (negotiable). Requirements and information are welcome. Euro 99.000,00 EU VAT is paid

Tel: +43 664 14 777 44 Email: ownwings@gmx.at http://www.Aircraft-Trading.AT

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AeroSmith Penny June 20/08/2013 16:02 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1337 N52MK 4504 2573

Airframe & Engines Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Engines: Mid-Life Inspection C/W at Rolls-Royce Canada: 17/Sep/2007 L/H Engine S/N: 16795 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 Cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life R/H Engine S/N: 16796 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life Honeywell GTCP 36-100 (G) APU S/N: P-741, on JSSI Avionics HAAP and Corporate Jet Support Maintenance Programs Standard Honeywell SPZ 8400 Cockpit Package w/NZ 2000 Navs Triple Honeywell HG1075 Inertial Reference Units Dual Honeywell FMS and Single Lasertrak Nav Display Collins Nav/Comm Package with Three Comm’s, w/Dual Collins RTU’s Collins TDR 94 Transponders with Eight Parameter Enhanced Surveillance SAT AFIS Equipped with Printer Magnastar & Honeywell SATCOM 6000, One Cockpit and Three Cabin Handsets G-Monitor Computer Heads-up Checklist Flight Data Recorder 2 Hour Voice Recorder

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Features & Equipement Airshow Genesis Moving Map/Info Four External Video Cameras Dual Hi-Def/Blue Ray DVD Players Audio System with iPod Dock and Remote Control Game Port Connections and LAN Connections Throughout Eight Rosen Video Monitors; VCR/DVD/Camera/Game and Airshow Available Six Club Seat Rosen Monitors Updated to 6500 Series in March 2007 Interior The 13 passenger executive interior was designed for functionality and flexibility with three separate seating areas making it ideal for entertaining or conducting business. The aircraft is configured with a forward crew lav as well as an aft passenger lavatory. The forward cabin contains four single seats in a double-club configuration with two pull out writing tables and four 5.6 inch video monitors. Exterior Matterhorn White base with Super Jet Black underside, Coral, Cashmere and Gray striping. New April 2012 Maintenance 72 Month inspection done 2010

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com

www.AvBuyer.com

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Aviation Advisors September 21/08/2013 16:27 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Citation CJ3 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

704 486

Engines Williams FJ44-3A Left Right TSN 704 hrs 704 hrs CSN 482 482 TBO 4000 4000 Maintenance Phase I-V c/w 08/2012 Complete logs, No damage History Always hangered Avionics A/P: Collins 3 Axis ADF: 2 Collins Radar: Col WXR 800 STRMSCOPE: TTR 4000 FDR: L3 FA 2100 CVR: L3 FA 2100 GPS: YES FMS: 2 COL FMS 3000 XPNDR: 2COL TDR 94D; Mode: S Surveillance TAWS: YES EGPWS: HNYWL MK VIII Interior: Main Cabin Color: Cream Lthr Configuration: Executive Passenger: 8 Fire Blocked: Y Refreshment Center: RH Fwd Slimline

Refreshment Center (Non-Standard) Sideledge / Tables: LH / RH Sideledge (Non-Standard) Additional Furnishing: Airstair step assembly (Leather covers for air-stair holders) (Non-Standard) Baggage Compartment (Non-Standard) TCAS II: COL TTR 4000 Electrical Outlet: 220 VAC (European non standard) Co-Pilot’s Side Console with Lid Lower sidewall at seats #5 and #6 with Lid (Non Standard) Entertainment (Non standard): AvVisor Plus (without DVD) 8.4” Monitor Flushmounted in LH Fwd Cabinet Data Outlet for downloading Interior: Aft Cabin Toilet /Closure LH Toilet (Non-Standard) Notes: Storable inboard armrest, Seat back pockets, 2 Storable slim-line tables, Quaker city plating polished gold 18K, AvVisor Plus 8.4 in Monitor, Aft Vanity storage area, Sunvisors, Belted Flushing Lav Exterior Color: White, Gold, Blue Dark Turquoise Blue with Antique Gold Shadow. Starlight Silver Metallic Emergency Door markings: Color: Antique Gold Metallic Features RVSM Certified: Yes

Aviation Advisors International Inc 8191 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida, 34243-2032

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Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400 Fax: +1 (941) 359-3448 Email: bobd@aaisrq.com www.aviationadvisorsintl.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente Citation XLS/Falcon 900EX Sept 20/08/2013 16:12 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Falcon 900EX

Brian Proctor Cell: +1 (817) 307-7720 E-mail: brian@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior Soft goods refurbishment completed 2010 13-passenger configuration w aft lavatory Forward 4-place club seating Mid Cabin double club conference & dining group Private Aft cabin - 2 Place Club w 3 Place Couch Forward jumpseat Exterior New Paint in 12/2009 Overall in Matterhorn white with Taxiway yellow & black accent stripes Slant style engine mounted registration markings Maintenance Details FAA FAR Part 91 C / 2C – A / A+ & Multiples -11/29/10 @ Standard Aero Landing Gear OH APU HSI – Last HSI @ 2558.8

35 N913SN 7,619 3,595

• PRIMUS ELITE COCKPIT UPGRADE • FLIGHT DYNAMICS CAT III HUD • XM GRAPHICAL WEATHER • TRIPLE SYSTEMS FMS/IRS • DC-820 FMS UPGRADE Airframe & Engines TFE731-20/-40/-50/-60 MSP Engine Program Engine # 1 S/N: P112216 7233 hours, 3473 cycles Engine # 2 S/N: P112213 7065 hours, 3382 cycles Engine # 3 S/N: P112218 7182 hours, 3433 cycles APU Allied Signal GTCP36-150(F). P-326 4353 Hrs

Highlights Primus Elite Cockpit Upgrade $800,000.00 Installed Value XM Graphical Weather CD-820 FMS – Upgrade Flight Dynamics Cat III Heads UP Display Collins Airshow Genesys MagnaStar UHF/Satcom Phone w/fax Honeywell AFIS w/Sky Printer Provision for EFBs Avionics Honeywell Primus 2000 w Elite Flight Deck Upgrade Collins Radio Package Proline 4 • New DU-875 Primus Elite Upgraded Cockpit • With Dual Cursor Control Units • Dual Collins VIR-432 VOR/ILS/Marker • Triple-Honeywell FMZ 2000 with dual GNSSU GPS • LCD Technology

2005 Cessna Citation XLS

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Precise Pulselites HF-1050 Provisions Av Visor Plus, LED wing, navigation and strobe lights Interior Six premium grey leather executive seats are complimented by a two-place side facing divan opposite entry door and belted seat opposite the lav. Burl cabinetry, grey headliner, grey sidewalls, neutral lower sidewalls and grey carpeting, extended galley with ample storage and ice cooler. Three 110-volt outlets. Exterior Matterhorn White with Starlight Silver, Ocean Blue Metallic and Columbia Blue Pearl striping. Inspections/Maintenance CESCOM-CAMP DOC 44 c/w May 2012

560-5575 N75XL 4,954.2 4,574

• FRESH ENGINES • DELIVERS ON ESP GOLD Engines PW545B: L/H: 4954.2 HRS TSN R/H: Completion in July 2013 APU Honeywell RE100XL 808.5 HRS TSN, 1789 CSN Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 Dual XS-852 Mode “S” Enhanced XPDR Honeywell Primus 1000 A/P Honeywell Primus 880-Color Radar

Dual Honeywell RCZ-833 Comms Heads Up Technologies Automated Pax PBS-250 Dual Honeywell NV-850 Navs TCAS II w/ change 7 Honeywell DF-850 ADF Honeywell Mark V TAWS A EGPWS with RAAS Dual Honeywell DM-850 DME AirCell ST-3100 Satcom Phone Dual UNS-1Esp 803 Software UniLink UL-701 COM Data Management System Features & Equipment RVSM Artex C406-2 ELT MSG-3 maintenance as of July 2008 8.33KHz & FM-Immunity RG-380E/44LA3 Lead Acid Concorde Battery L3 FA2100 CVR Cockpit Speaker Mute Switch

Mente Group, LLC 15301 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 1010 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

143


JB Park September 20/08/2013 16:19 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Owner is interested in a quick deal!

2008 Challenger 850 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

8063 OE-IKG 2000

Engines Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP General Electric CF34-3B1. E950527. 1500. HSI and Overhaul: On Condition General Electric CF34-3B1. E950528. 1500 HSI and Overhaul: On Condition APU Honeywell GTCP 36-150 RJ, s/n P-1311; 1168 hrs Avionics Collins Proline 4 w/ EICAS: Dual FCC-4000 Digital Flight Control Computers Dual ADC-850 Digital Air Data Computers Dual DCU 4000 Data Concentrator Units Dual RTU-4000 Radio Tuning units

Make offer

MDC-4000 Maintenance Diagnostic Computer Collins WXR 840 Color Weather Radar Dual Collins FMS-4200 Flight Management System Dual Collins GPS-4000A GPS Dual Collins AHRS Dual VHF 422C Comm System with 8.33 spacing Dual VIR-432 Nav System with FM immunity Dual DME 442 Dual ADF 462 Dual TDR-94D Mode S Transponders Dual Collins ALT-55B Radio Altimeter Collins TCAS 94 (TCAS II with Change 7) Collins HF-9000 HF with Coltech SELCAL Additional Equipment RVSM, MNPS and RNP 5 Equipped L3 Communications SSCVR Cockpit Voice Recorder (2 hour) L3 Communications SSFDR Digital Flight Data Recorder

Honeywell Mk V EGPWS Artex C406-2 ELT Iridium ICS-200 SATCOM Communications System Airshow 4000 Passenger Information System Audio International Cabin Management System Interior Originally completed by Midcoast Aviation; March 2008. The cabin features a twelve (12) place executive interior configuration. Forward cabin features four (4) club seats. The mid cabin has a four (4) place conference group on the left with a manually operated - hi-low table, opposite is a credenza with storage as well as a 20" LCD pop-up monitor. The aft cabin has a two (2) place divan opposite two club seats. The lower sidewalls are a cream colored ultraleather. The carpet is light tan. Exterior Painted March 2008. Overall Matterhorn white, dark and light blue accent stripes run from nose to tail.

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2006 Cessna Citation Sovereign Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

0066 OE-GBY 4000

Engines Engine Hours L&R 2,381 Engine Cycles L&R 1,357 APU Hours 1,937 Avionics Multifunction Displays 4 Honeywell DU-1080 VHF COM 2 Honeywell TR-865A VHF NAV 2 Honeywell NV-875A HF Communication 1 Honeywell KHF 1050 ADF 2 Honeywell DF-850 DME 2 Honeywell DM-855 FD/Autopilot 2 Honeywell Primus Epic

Interior Total 11 certified seats including 3 seats sofa. One owner since new. Engines are covered with JSSI program and airframe with Cessna Pro parts

JB Park GmbH Mr Andrei Aleynikov Sales Director

144

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; September 2013

Make offer

Transponder (Enhanced Mode-S) 2 Honeywell XS-857A EGPWS 1 Honeywell EGP-100 TCAS II 1 Honeywell CAS-67 FMS Control Unit 2 Honeywell MC-850 GPS 2 Honeywell GR-2400 Radio Altimeter 1 Honeywell RT-300 Weather Radar 1 Honeywell WU-880 SSFDR 1 L3 Communications CVDR FA 2100 SSCVR 1 L3 Communications CVDR FA 2100 ELT 1 Kannad 406AF Satcom 1 Aircell ST 3100

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +38 044 351 70 26 Cell: +38 095281 1 282 Fax: +38 044 351 77 67 E-mail: aleynikov@upi.com.ua Aircraft Index see Page 4


Carolina Corporate Jets September 20/08/2013 16:29 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Beechcraft King Air 350 Serial Number:

• • • •

FL-580

New to Market! Gorgeous Showroom Condition! Only 1171 Hours Total Time! Over $619,000 in Factory Options!

Avionics/Radios Collins ProLine 21 w/ IFIS 5000 Three AFD-3010 displays – 2 PFD’s & MFD Comms: Collins Dual VHF-4000 (8.33 spacing) Navs: Collins Nav 4000 and Nav 4500 FMS: Collins dual FMS-3000 and GPS Autopilot: Collins FGC-3000 Radar: Collins TWR-850 DME: Collins dual DME-4000 ADF: Collins dual Nav-4000 Xponders: Collins Dual TDR-94 Mode S w/ Enhanced Surveillance TCAS: Collins TCAS II 4000 EGPWS: Honeywell Mark VII

• State of the Art Entertainment System! • One Owner, Professionally Flown! • Pratt & Whitney ESP & Factory Support Plus Programs!

Exterior Attractive Overall White with Custom IBIS Crystal Mica Design Interior Stunning Nine Passenger Seating in Black Leather with Complimenting Accents and Beautiful High-gloss Limba Veneer Woodwork. Dual Pyramid Cabinets; Forward Refreshment Center w/ Nespresso Coffee Machine; Optional Custom Dual Catering Cabinets. I Package w/ Monitors and ipod Docks at each seat and three disc DVD player

Additional Equipment RVSM; Collins HF-9000 w/ Selcal; Raisbeck Wing Lockers and Aft Strakes; IRIS Nose and Tail Cameras; Hi Intensity Presti Landing Lights; AirCell ST3100; Collins ECH-5000 Electronic Charts integrated into IFIS; L3 Communications FA-2100 CVR; Collins/XM GWX-3000 Satellite Graphical Weather

Carolina Corporate Jets

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (0) 704 662 8680 info@carolinajets.com www.carolinajets.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

145


IBA Citation X September_Empyrean 20/08/2013 16:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2004 Cessna Citation X Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

750-0232 OE-HAC 3,542 1987

Engines Engine Number 1: Rolls Royce AE3007C1 Engine S/N: CAE 330487. Engine HSN: 3,542. Engine CSN: 1,987 Engine Number 2: Rolls Royce AE3007C1 Engine S/N: CAE 330484. Engine HSN: 3,542. Engine CSN: 1,987 APU Honeywell 36-150(CX) APU Serial Number P-355 APU Hours Since New 3,673 Avionics Honeywell Primus 2000 CVR L3 Con 000263081 FDR Honeywell 10548 Dual MADC Honeywell 7004700-607 Dual COM Honeywell 7510700-665 Dual NAV Honeywell 7510100-731/3 Dual GPS Honeywell HG2001GD03 ELT Martec 81821502-02 AFIS Honeywell 400-045500-0003 Dual HF Honeywell 064-1015-01 Altimeter Honeywell 7001840-936 SATCOM Aircell 400-10640-001 GNSSU Honeywell HG2021-GD02 Selcal AvTech 1200008-000 EGPWS Honeywell 965-0976-040-213-213

Dual IAC Honeywell 7017300-31424 TCAS Honeywell 066-01146-1211 Interior Configuration and Optional Equipment 8 seats in two club four arrangements Side mounted folding tables between each seat pair 110v outlets AirCell AST3500 Airshow 400 system Two DVD/CD players LCD Monitors in cabin Hot and Cold Galley including Microwave WC with Belted option and 110v outlet Sheepskin Covered Flight Deck Seats LCD fold down Flight Deck Monitor Weight Data Maximum Ramp Weight 16,510 kgs Maximum Take Off Weight 16,193 kgs Maximum Zero Fuel Weight 11,067 kgs Maximum Landing Weight 14,424 kgs Basic Empty Weight 9,943 kgs Fuel Capacity 5,790 kgs Maintenance Schedule and Status Enrolled in Cessna ProParts and JSSI programmes

International Bureau of Aviation Contact: Ben Jacques

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Tel: +44 (0) 1372 22 44 88 Email: ben.jacques@ibagroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-152 20/08/2013 15:53 Page 1

Marketplace Gulfstream G200

Tempus Global Jet Partners, LLC Price:

USD$5,500,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

036

Reg:

B-KSJ

TTAF:

3,614

Tel: +1 (480) 703 6698 Email: mlong1533@aol.com

Lowest Priced G-200 on the World Market! * Very Low Total Time and Cycles Since New! * Only Two Corporate Owners Since New! * Fully Paid P&W Factory ESP Gold Engine Program! * Fully Paid Honeywell Factory MSP Program on APU! * Excellent Maintenance History and Condition!

Location: USA

www.tempusglobaljetpartners.com

Cessna Citation II C550

Government of Canada Public Works & Services Price:

Online Auction

Year:

1991

S/N:

550-0684

Reg:

C-FJXN

TTAF:

9453

Tel: +1 (613) 991 2935 Email: adam.clarke@pwgsc.gc.cs Owner: Transport Canada, Available via online sealed bid auction at www.gcsurplus.ca, Pratt & Whitney JT15D-4 Engines, Rockwell Collins Proline 21 System, Contact Adam Clarke, adam.clarke@pwgsc.gc.cs

Location: Canada

Challenger 601-3R

Aero Air, LLC Price:

Make Offer

Year:

1995

S/N:

5191

Reg:

N605T

TTAF:

6085

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (503) 640 3711 Email: nralston@aeroair.com Engines: Left: S/N: 807347 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN Right: S/N: 807348 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN. APU Garret GTCP36-150: 1545 Hours On MSP. Honeywell Primus II System; Honeywell AFIS/VHF SATCOM; Dual Honeywell HF; Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt; Dual Honeywell RCZ833J Com Int: New in 2004: 10 place with normal four place forward club, aft four place divan across from two place club, or 12 place with second four place divan installed in place of aft two place club. Ext: New in 2004. White top with blue bottom and three silver pin strips down the side

www: www.aeroair.com

Cessna Citation Encore

Aero Air, LLC Price:

Make Offer

Year: S/N:

656

Reg:

N656Z

TTAF:

2770

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (503) 640 3711 Email: nralston@aeroair.com Landings: 2082 TTSN. L Eng S/N DC0247 TTSN 2770/ TTSHS 262. R Eng S/N DC0248 TTSN 2770/ TTSHS 262. Honeywell P-1000 3 Tube EFIS. Dual Primus 833 Coms. Dual Primus 850 VHF Navs. CD-850 Control Clearance Delivery. Dual DM-850 Primus II DME. N1 Computer, mounted in panel. Instrument Panel Glare Shield Lighting. AT.02 Satellite Phone -Aircell w 2 handsets. Aircell Intercom Switch. Factory Original Tastefully appointed eight passenger (plus belted lav seat) interior has a center club seating design with Westwood Seat Tailoring

www: www.aeroair.com

Lear 31A

Aero Air, LLC Price:

$1,150,000US

Year: S/N:

50

Reg:

N38SK

TTAF:

9625

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (503) 640 3711 Email: nralston@aeroair.com Landings: 7725. L Eng S/N P99201 TTSN 9241/TTSCZI 1589/TTSMPI 138. R Eng S/N P99202 TTSN 9205/TTSCZI 1300TTSMPI 1300. MSP Gold on Both Engines. Bendix/King 5 Tube EFIS. Bendix/King ED-551A Flight Director. Bendix/King RDR-2000 Radar. Dee Howard TR4000 Thrust Reversers. Cargo Door. Artex 406 ELT. Refurbished in 2004. Eight passenger executive interior finished in medium blue leather seats and aft three place divan, light gray headliner and medium brown carpet. 2001 paint by Duncan. Overall white with AND light and dark blue stripes

www: www.aeroair.com 148

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-152 21/08/2013 09:13 Page 2

Marketplace Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling

Hawker 800A

Price:

US $3,375,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

6615.3

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,375,000 or consider trades for Citation CJ1, CJ2, or Bell 212, 412 or 407.

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling

BELL 206L4

Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

N339MC

TTAF:

1700

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling

BELL 412EMS

Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’.Fresh annual / Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Seven Available)

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

Call for details

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

Location: USA

Cessna Citation XLS

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Price:

Please Call

Year:

2007

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

EU-Reg

TTAF:

3,120

Tel: +49 (0)821 7003 100/145 Email: info@beechcraft.de

EU Reg, EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German commerc. certif., CAMO+, fresh HSI 08/2012!

Location: Europe

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

149


P148-152 21/08/2013 14:39 Page 3

Marketplace Cessna Citation Jet

Price:

Make offer

Year:

1995

S/N:

525-0089

Reg:

N600HS

TTAF:

5,700

Location: France

Hawker 800XPi

Tel: +1 (626) 584 8170 Email: jason@aviasource.aero

Avia Source, Inc.

This excellent Citation Jet has 5,700 hours total time, 5,760 total landings and is covered under Cessna Pro Parts. It has Williams TAP ELITE coverage on the engines. The Honeywell Avionics include SPZ-5000/IC-500 AP/FD, Dual KY-196 COM, Dual MST-67A Transponders, RVSM, and KMH-820 TAS/EGPWS. The exterior is Overall White w/ bottom dark blue – 2 lines red and grey. The interior has high gloss cabinetry, fwd refreshment center, club seating with an additional side facing seat. It has Cream Leather and Beige Carpet.

Tel: +1 (703) 917 9000 Mob: +1 (703) 568 9466

Capital Jet Group Price:

$4,295,000

Year:

2005

S/N:

258723

Reg: TTAF:

Hawker 850 performance for 8 passengers in a turn-key package. HBC Winglets. Dual File-servers. 2012 paint and interior. MSP for engines and APU. Fresh 48 month inspection. Fresh Engine Core Overhauls. No Excuses, no projects. Make an offer soon

4,183

Location: USA

E-mail: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

Lockheed Jetstar II

Price:

Please call

Year:

1978

S/N:

5226

Reg:

TC-SSS

TTAF:

8446.1

Location: Turkey

Pilatus PC12/45

Tel: +90 530 568 2483 Email: st@genelhavacilik.com.tr

Genel Havacilik A.S.

No Damage History, Complete Original Log Books, Computerized Maintenance System. Currently Under Annual Inspection. by GENEL HAVACILIK A.Ş Istanbul. Tank&Plank Inspection complied with at 2008. Installed newly overhauled Pitch Trim Actuator. All maintenance is being carried out at GENEL HAVACILIK A.S. at Istanbul under EASA/JAA Regulations. EASA.145.0527 & SHY/JAR-‐145 approval Ref. No:TR 00060 Genel Havacılık can offer complete maintenance & parts support

Tel: +41 (0)44 828 88 88 Email: r.schmid@lionairgroup.com

Lions Air Ltd. Price: US$ 1,790,000 excl VAT Year:

2000

S/N:

349

Very well equipped aircraft. Maintained by Pilatus Aircraft or there Service Centres and always flown by professional pilots. Managed under EASA CAMO organisation. One owner. Located Zurich International Airport, LSZH.

Reg:

HB-FOQ

Contact: Renè Schmid for more information.

TTAF:

3000

Location: Switzerland

Piaggio Avanti II

Wingtip, Inc. Aviation Consulting Price:

Make Offer

Year:

2006

S/N:

1106

Reg:

N780CA

TTAF:

1780

Tel: +1 (0)732 222 0274 Mobile: +1(0)973 768 1821

Low Time, Collins ProLine 21 Cockpit, XM Weather, Electronic Charts in the Cockpit, Aircell Satellite Telephone, TCAS-I, TAWS-B, DVD/CD with IPOD Docking, FAR Part 135 Compliant, Fully Paid and Transferrable Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold Engine Service Plan, Beautiful Corporate interior and Exterior. Price Reduced, Please Call

Location: USA

Fax: +1 (0) 732 222 2042 150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-152 21/08/2013 09:16 Page 4

Marketplace Piper Meridian-PA 46T

Tel: +34 (0)650 981 547 Email: gesjet@gmail.com

Gesjet Price:

Please call

Year:

2008

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

EC reg

TTAF:

800

Description: Private Meridian in perfect condition. Only one owner wanting to sell or to share half time. No damage history.

Location: Spain

Eurocopter AS 355F-1

Tel: +44 (0)1895 833 365 Email: info@helicopterfilm.tv

HFS Aviation Ltd Price:

£350,000 excl. VAT

Year:

1982

S/N:

5043

Reg:

G-LECA

TTAF:

13,847,25

Light weight VFR Utility. Good component times. Priced reduced to £350,000 GBP +VAT. Contact Jeremy Braben for more details.

Location: UK

Agusta A109E Power

Tel: +52 (55) 5202-3429 Email: adrian@carasa.com.mx

Carasa, SA de CV Price:

USD$5,500,000

Year:

2005

S/N:

11641

Reg:

XA-VIC

TTAF:

1111

Location: Mexico

The Agusta will be sold by auction in Toluca, Mexico next August 22th. Open to international bidders. Starting Price $1,950,000 USD. NO COMMISSIONS. Immediate delivery. No damage history. Physical auction with CARASA WebCast. Engines Pratt & Whitney PW206c, Series: pcebc0527 y pce-bc0516, 561 Hp, Rotor Agusta Model 1090111-02-101, Agusta Model 109-0162-02-103, TT engine1 1,110.7 hrs, TT engine2 1,110.7 hrs. Interior skin color beige. Excellent conditions

www.tempusglobaljetpartners.com

Cessna Citation XLS

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Price:

Please Call

Year:

2005

S/N:

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100/145 Email: info@beechcraft.de

EU Reg, EU-OPS, 9-Seat Config, HF-1050, Head Up Checklist, 2x FMS UNS-1 ESP, TCAS II, Aircell ST3100, EASA German commerc. cert. New Carpet + Seats in Dec 2012 - top deal !

Reg: TTAF:

4.510

Location:

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

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P148-152 21/08/2013 14:43 Page 5

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News - Aircraft listings - Editorial

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), September 2013, Vol 17, Issue No 9 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 11th September 2013 Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation.................................154 AeroSmith/Penny ......................................................141 AIC Title Services ......................................................117 Aircraft Acquisitions............................................ 133 Albinati Aeronautics ................................... 136-137 Aradian Aviation............................................................63 Aviation Advisors .......................................................142 Avjet Corporation...........................................FC, 28-29 Avpro.........................................................................10-14 Bell Aviation.............................................................46-47 Bombardier....................................................................51 Boutsen Aviation ..........................................................59 Carolina Corporate Jets...........................................145 Central Business Jets.....................................153, 155 Conklin & de Decker.................................................127 Corporate Aircraft Photography ............................127 Corporate AirSearch Int’l...............................105, 139 Corporate Concepts ...................................................71 Dassault Falcon Jet Europe .....................................2-3 Dominion Aircraft..........................................................85 Donath Aircraft Services ............................................61 Duncan Aviation ....................................................45, 99

152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – September 2013

Eagle Aviation................................................................37 Elliott Aviation......................................................49, 101 EMBRAER PreFlown ...........................................32-33 Empyrean............................................................134-135 Florida Jet ....................................................................138 Freestream Aircraft USA......................................23-25 Gamit...............................................................................95 General Aviation Services..........................................57 Gulfstream Pre-Owned........................................38-39 HELI UK EXPO .........................................................147 Heliasset.com.............................................................119 Inada................................................................................31 Innotech-Execaire ......................................................125 Intellijet International...................................................6-7 Int’l Bureau of Aviation .............................................146 J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ........................17-19 JB Park GmbH...........................................................144 Jet Support Services (JSSI)....................................113 JetBrokers................................................................52-53 Jetcraft Corporation..........................40-41, 154 (BC) Jeteffect ..........................................................................77 JETNET...........................................................................16

www.AvBuyer.com

John Hopkinson & Associates ........................43, 128 Leading Edge ................................................................67 Lektro ..............................................................................89 Mente Group ..............................................................143 NBAA Meeting & Convention ................................124 Northern Air .......................................................130-132 OGARAJETS..........................................................34-35 Own Wings.................................................................140 Par Avion ........................................................................89 PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales ....................................5 Rolls-Royce.................................................................115 Singapore Airshow....................................................126 Soujourn Aviation .........................................................79 Southern Cross Aviation ............................................83 Tempus Jets...................................................................55 The Jet Collection.........................................................27 True North Avionics ...................................................107 Universal Avionics .....................................................103 VREF Aircraft Values...................................................89 Welsch Aviation .........................................................129 Wentworth & Affiliates..............................................109 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title.....................................87 Aircraft Index see Page 4


CBJ September_CBJ November06 21/08/2013 09:57 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

C e l e b r a t i n g 3 0 Ye a r s

GULFSTREAM V S/N 567

GULFSTREAM G200 S/N 199

Of fered by Original Fortune 100 Corporation, 35 year history as a Fleet Operator of Gulfstream Aircraft; Immaculate Maintenance, Rolls Royce Corporate Care Engine Program, Can Deliver w/ New Interior & Configuration

1,800 TT / 935 Landings, ESP Gold, Meets all EASA / JAR OPS Requirements, Impressive List of Options including Aerial View Camera

FALCON 900EXy S/N 121

FALCON 900C S/N 194

Single Owner, Former Falcon Demonstrator, Most Systems are Triple, 2476 Total Hours, 1140 Cycles, MSP Gold Engine Programs

Single Owner, 3850 Total Hours, 2060 Cycles, MSP Gold Engine Programs, Standard Interior w/ Dual Aft Couches, FWD & AFT Lavs

FALCON 20F "500NH" SN/470 w/ FALCON 900C Engines & APU Modification 7800 TT / 5000 Landings, MSP Gold, Collins Proline II EFIS Cockpit, Dual Collins Radio Tuning Units, Dual Universal 1L's w/ WAAS, ETC

Also Available - Falcon 900EXy S/N 238 For Lease • Off Market Falcon 7X w/ only 425 Hours


21st Century December 2010

17/11/10

16:47

Page 1

Tri-Jets Range Map 7X=5950nm 900EX=4500nm 900DX=4100nm 50EX=3267nm

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet in the sky; and the Federal Aviation Administration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. Aircraft safety is determined by reliability and redundancy. In the event of an engine failure a reduction of climb rate, speed and altitude occur. Critical engine-driven systems may be compromised including the hydraulic, electrical and bleed-air systems which draw their power from the aircraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s engines. The FAA emphasizes redundancy more than the number of engines for flight safety over water; although there is a relationship between the two. Very High levels of safety are achieved with the Tri-Jets; the 900 for example has two hydraulic systems that are powered by hydraulic power from four sources; three engine-driven hydraulic pumps plus a standby pump powered electrically. The left-hand and right-hand engines provide power for the right hydraulic system; and the center engine supplies power for the right hydraulic system with backup from the standby pump. One system can supply enough hydraulic power to operate the aircraft and land safely if a system fails. An erroneous conclusion is that Tri-Jets cost more to operate than competitive twin-jets. Many long-range twin-jets use excessively large engines and supporting structure. Tri-Jets with their effective configuration, utilize smaller more fuel efficient engines. With fuel efficient engines, Tri-Jets carry less fuel than twin-jets. This results in a reduction of weight and operating costs. Smaller engines, the Tri-Jets aerodynamic improvement and lower operating weight culminates in an aircraft that burns less fuel than many heavier twin-jets. Tri-Jets have earned a stellar reputation among owners and operators; and usually have higher resale values than the competition.

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ September_CBJ November06 21/08/2013 09:58 Page 2

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

C e l e b r a t i n g 3 0 Ye a r s

De Int sign er er ior

PIAGGIO II S/N 1158

CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5577

Only 860 Hours Since New, Pratt & Whitney ESP Engine Program, Elaborate Interior including External View Cameras, Collins Proline Collins Cockpit including TCAS II and XM Graphics

Freshly completed by Duncan Aviation for its 96-Month Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, 2000 Hours TT, On Smart Parts Plus and MSP -150 APU Engine Programs, Spectacular Terence Disdale Designed 10 Place Interior

2009 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20264

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5066

1451 TT, Iridium SAT Phone w/ Swift Broadband Wifi, MSP GOLD, 2nd IFIS FSU (Paperless Cockpit), Impressive list of Options including Sliding cabin/galley Pocket Door, Deluxe Galley w/ sink, Maintained to Part 135 Standards

Everything desired in an Excel. Preferred 8 place interior, Cessna Engine/APU/Airframe Maintenance Programs, Dual FMS, TCAS II, Enhanced Surveillance, External Lav Service, 48 month inspection c/w April 2012

CITATION VII S/N 7052

HAWKER 800XP SN/258298

24 Carat Gold Standard 61 Year Corporate Department History, 6200 TT, 3584 Cycles, MSP Gold, Dual UNS-1C's, 880 Radar, 8 + 1 Place Interior

Fortune 500 owned. MSP Gold Engines. 48 Month c/w March 2012. 8 Place interior with airshow display

Also Available - Falcon 900EXy S/N 238 For Lease • Off Market Falcon 7X w/ only 425 Hours


This being the aviation industry, you’d think more companies would share our

51,000 foot view.

Up here, the air and the competition are rare. Our birds-eye view of the aircraft brokerage market comes from our unmatched combination of over 50 years’ experience and a large, global network of partners and customers. That means you have more buy, sell and trade options. put a tailwind on your transaction. Call us and see. You’ll love the view. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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Scan this QR code to download to your Apple or Android device.

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

2011 Airbus A318 Elite

Extremely Low Time, Excellent Opportunity 27 Hours TTAF, 8 Cycles - Increased MTOW to 66 tones

2009 Falcon 2000LX - SN 182 Price Recently Reduced Fresh 1A/1A+, 2A/2A+, 3 and Z Inspections

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2006 Challenger 300 - SN 20087

One US Operator Since New Smart Parts - CASP and MSP - North East Based 1988 Airbus A310-304 2010 Challenger 300 1989 Challenger 601-3A 2005 Challenger 604 2010 Challenger 605 2007 Challenger 850ER 2005 Citation X 2006 Citation XLS 1997 CRJ 200 2005 Falcon 2000EX EASy 2001 Falcon 900EX 2007 Global 5000

2014 Global 6000 2005 Global Express 2010 Global XRS 2001 Gulfstream 200 2008 Gulfstream 450 1988 Gulfstream IV 1998 Gulfstream IVSP 2008 Hawker 900XP 2001 Lear 45 2007 Lear 45XR 2007 Legacy 600 Q1 2015 Legacy 500

2005 Challenger 604 - SN 5606

14 Passenger Interior - Fully Programmed Triple IRS and FMS

2003 Global Express - SN 9076

3,456 Hours/1,273 Landings - Fresh 1A & 1C Checks Engines Newly Enrolled on RRCC

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Better perspective on market trends. And worldwide connections that

8/13/13 10:19 AM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine September 2013