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WORLD

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The global marketplace for business aviation

2001 GV S/N 642 SEE PAGES 19-21 FOR FURTHER DETAILS

May 2014

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AC Index May 17/04/2014 12:51 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale • AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS A318 Elite. . . . . . 93, 119, 120, A319CJ . . . . . . . . 71, 156, A320 VIP . . . . . . 34,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 54, 55, 56, CRJ-200 ER . . . . 29, CRJ-200 LR . . . . 34, 156, Super727 200 VIP ..55, MD-DC-8 VIP. . . 55, MD-87 . . . . . . . . . 149,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 7, 10, 31, 34, 59, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, Global 6000 . . . . 7, 156, Global Express . 10, 35, 54, 57, 71, 93, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134, 156, Global Express XRS..21, 28, 35, 51, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 156,

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 31, 34, 135, 144, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 156, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 49, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 57, 601-3A-ER . . . . . 95, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 69, 151, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 34, 55, 67, 69, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 23, 34, 53, 66, 71, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, 145, 156, 850 . . . . . . . . . . 34, 850ER . . . . . . . . 156,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 31ER . . . . . . . . . . 43, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 113, 36A . . . . . . . . . . . 150, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 66, 71, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 127, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 45BR . . . . . . . . . . 113, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 69, 129, 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 57, 69, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 63, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 35, 63, 66, 69, 156,

CESSNA Citation ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 43, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 42, 62, 81, 132, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 148, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 49, 62, 95, 133, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 113, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 69, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 69, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 69, 73, 149, XL . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 83, 148, 156, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 31, 142, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 31,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 44, 62, 71, 81, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 12, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 42, 45, 55, 71, M2 13, 414A. . . . . . . . . . . 62, 560 XLS+ . . . . . . 138, 650 45, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 12, 33, 62, 128, Encore . . . . . . . . 13, 33, Encore +. . . . . . . 69, Mustang . . . . . . . 12, 62, 148, Sovereign. . . . . . 11, 20, 26, 42, 49, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 59, 66, 83, T182T . . . . . . . . . . .81, T206H StationAir .81, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 12, 147,

Conquest I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,

Grand Caravan Executive Caravan.55,

CIRRUS SR22 G3 GTS Turbo...81,

EMBRAER EMB-135LR . . . . 54, ERJ-145ER. . . . . 55, Legacy 500 . . . . 20, Legacy 600 . . . . 55, 73, Legacy 650 . . . . 93, Lineage. . . . . . . . 55, Phenom 100 . . . 13, 88, 113, Phenom 300 . . . 66,

FAIRCHILD DORNIER 328 . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 81,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 53, 59, 71, 154, 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 20F . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 155, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 42, 51, 59, 62, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66, 71, 140, 152, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 155, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 154, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 11, 23, 42, 154, 155, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 20, 31, 55, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 155, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 11, 39, 42, 154, 155, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 29, 34, 154, 156, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 34, 53, 154, 155, 900LX . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 139, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 21, 29, 53, 55, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 62, 69, 71, 137, 2000EX. . . . . . . . 93, 2000EXEASy . . 21, 49, 59, 156, 2000S . . . . . . . . 10,

FOKKER

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 130, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 10, 36, 37, 66, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 83, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 36, 51, 83, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 10, 21, 49, 62, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 137, 155, 156, 280 . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 10, 20, 21, 37, 53, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54, 83, 156, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 31, 37, 53, 55, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136, 141, 146, 156, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 21,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft RK-194 . . . . . . . . 33, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 13, 33, 63, Premier 1A. . . . . 66, 113,

King Air 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 51, 63, 71, 83, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 26, 33, 43, 69, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 71, 83, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 13, 31, 33, 43, F90-1. . . . . . . . . . 93,

Hawker 400XP . . . . . . . . . 21, 66, 69, 83, 149, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 13, 69, 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 800 . . . . . . . . . . . 149, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 42, 51, 63, 73, 149, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 7, 13, 20, 66, 69, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 131, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 83, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 13, 35, 83, 153, 156, 1000A . . . . . . . . . 151,

IAI Astra . . . . . . . . . . 63, Astra SP . . . . . . . 49, Westwind II . . . . 152,

05.14 AIRCRAFT

PAGE

SOCATA TBM 700A . . . . . 88, TBM 700B . . . . . 62, TBM 850. . . . . . . 33, 69, 88, 143, TBM 900. . . . . . . 33,

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND A109A II Plus . . 14, A109A Power . . 156, A109E Power. . . 14, 31, A109S Power . . 14, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 83, A119 KE . . . . . . . 71, AW 139 . . . . . . . . 55,

BELL 206 L4. . . . . . . . . 150, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 150, 222 UT . . . . . . . . 14, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 71, 407 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 69, 412 EMS . . . . . . 150, 429 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 57,

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 71, AS 355 N . . . . . . 71, AS 355 F2 . . . . . 55, AS 365 N2 . . . . . 14, BK 117C1. . . . . . 71, EC 120 . . . . . . . . 113, EC120B . . . . . . . 153, EC 130 B4 . . . . . 31, EC 135 P2+ . . . . 83, EC 135 P21 . . . . 14, EC 155 B . . . . . . 55,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 600N . . . . . . 83,

SIKORSKY

PIAGGIO

S-76C++ . . . . . . 29,

Avanti . . . . . . . . . 41, Avanti II . . . . . . . 113, Avanti P180 . . . . 59, 69, 152,

PILATUS PC12NG . . . . . . . 21, PC12-45 . . . . . . . 88,

PIPER Cheyenne II . . . . 71, Cheyenne IIXL . 62, 88, Meridian . . . . . . . 43,

100 Executive Jet..152,

PZL

GULFSTREAM

M28 Skytruck . . 88,

IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 155, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 20, 57, 73, 156, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 10, 21, 26, 36, 55,

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 63,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, Aircraft Engine /Support . 47, 118, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 109, 114, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118, 124, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 107, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 97, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,

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Panel may14 16/04/2014 14:06 Page 2

Contents

Volume 18, Issue 5 – May 2014

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 16

Are Business Jets Boondoggles: Jack Olcott suggests that some Boards are abusing business aircraft at the expense of shareholders... Avoid this error.

18

Business Aviation - Investment Tools: Not taking advantage of what BizAv provides is an abuse. Maximise the company jet’s use as an investment tool.

22

Vision Unlimited: Pete Agur reflects on his responses to clients who seek the advantages of operating business aircraft.

30

Special Interest or Special Tool…: How effectively is your business aircraft employed in the service of the company, asks David Wyndham…

38

Cause and Effect: Are aircraft valuations unduly impacted by external factors? Jay Mesinger explores the role of ‘non-technical factors’.

46

Contractor Pilots & Insurance: When you employ a pilot, whether to hire the

16

64

aviator as an independent contractor or an employee should be made carefully…

50

Business Aircraft Ownership & Operations: The concluding part to our study of common mistakes boards make in connection with the acquisition and operation of business aircraft.

58

Large Cabin Jet Value: A look at the benefits of the Large Cabin jets, and a listing of values for the models built over the last 20 years.

100

Main Features 64

Flight Dept. Management Skills – Leadership Styles: A review of managerial styles, their merits and weaknesses when applied to the Flight Department.

68

Flight Dept. Management Skills – International Operators Conference: A review of the recent NBAA International Operators Conference held in Tampa, FL.

72

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – Falcon 900EX/EX EASy: How does the performance of the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy stand up against the G450/GIV-SP?

86

European Fleet Guide: Mike Chase analyses the current European Business Jet and Turboprop fleet trends, identifying the popular types on the continent at this time.

89

An Interview With Mark Winzar: JSSI’s VP, Technical Service Operations speaks with World Aircraft Sales Magazine about the company’s growing international operations.

96

The Dope Debate: How does legalization of marijuana in certain states square with the Federal Aviation Administration’s goal for safety?

Other Features 15 78 94 98 110 112 115 121

Wichita Insider Aircraft Performance & Specifications Aviation Leadership Roundtable The G650 Factor Introducing Your New Jet for Charter Stop the Clock: EU-ETS Market Indicators BizAv Aircraft

100

Safety Matters – Summer Flying: A collection of illustrations highlighting the perils of summer flying. Treat this season with every bit of care it demands.

Next Month’s Issue

104

Piston to Propjet: Dave Higdon looks at how a change in engine type can bring

Business Aviation and the Boardroom Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits Aircraft Comparative Analysis (Piper Meridian)

more power, more speed and more climb to certain piston airframes… for a price. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

9


Avpro May 14/04/2014 12:42 Page 1

GLOBAL 5000 VISION 2015 DELIVERY POSITION

GLOBAL 5000 SERIAL NUMBER 9255

GLOBAL EXPRESS SERIAL NUMBER 9100

GULFSTREAM V SERIAL NUMBERS 525 & 584

GULFSTREAM G450 SERIAL NUMBER 4024

GULFSTREAM G450 SERIAL NUMBER 4007

GULFSTREAM IV-SP SERIAL NUMBER 1363

GULFSTREAM IV-SP SERIAL NUMBER 1318

GULFSTREAM IV SERIAL NUMBER 1141

GULFSTREAM 150 SERIAL NUMBER 258

GULFSTREAM G200 SERIAL NUMBER 203

FALCON 2000S SERIAL NUMBER 711

900 BESTGATE ROAD z SUITE 412 z ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 21401 z TEL 410-573-1515


Avpro May 14/04/2014 12:43 Page 2

WWW W W W . AVPROJETS AV P R O J E T S . C COM OM

VIEW W VIDE IDEO EO OF OU UR R EX XCLUSIVE CLUSIVE LISTINGS!

FALCON 2000 FALCON SERIAL NUMBER 105

FALCON 900LX F ALCON 900 LX SERIAL NUMBER 1900

FALCON 900C F ALCON 900 C SERIAL NUMBER 195

FALCON 900B F ALCON 900 B SERIAL NUMBER 3

F FALCON ALCON 50 50EX EX SERIAL NUMBER 275

F FALCON ALCON 50 50EX EX SERIAL NUMBER 3200

FALCON FALCON 50 SERIAL NUMBER 158

FALCON F ALCON 50 SERIAL NUMBER 1599

FALCON 50 FALCON SERIAL NUMBER 161

C HALLENGER 3000 CHALLENGER 43 SERIAL NUMBER 2004 20043

CHALLENGER CHALLENGER 604 SERIAL NUMBER 5373

CITATIO CITATION N SOVEREIGN SOVEREIIGN SERIAL NUMBER 2788

INFO@AVPROJETS.COM

WWW.AVPROJETS.COM


Avpro May 14/04/2014 12:43 Page 3

CITATION X SERIAL NUMBER 37

CITATION X SERIAL NUMBER 204

CITATION X SERIAL NUMBER 254

CITATION MUSTANG SERIAL NUMBER 39

CITATION CJ1 SERIAL NUMBER 429

CITATION CJ1 SERIAL NUMBER 495

CITATION CJ2 SERIAL NUMBER 15

CITATION CJ2+ SERIAL NUMBER 332

CITATION ULTRA SERIAL NUMBER 439

CITATION BRAVO SERIAL NUMBER 895

900 BESTGATE ROAD z SUITE 412 z ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 21401 z TEL 410-573-1515


Avpro May 14/04/2014 12:43 Page 4

V ISIT ISIT

W WWW WW.A AVPROJETS VP ROJ E T S . C COM OM VIIEW VIIDEO OF OU UR R EX XCLUSIVE CLUSIVE LISTINGS!

CITAT CITATION T ION E ENCORE NCORE SERIAL NUMBER 543

CITATION M2 M2 POSITION POSITION O CITATION 4TTHH QUART UARTER ER 2014 DELIVE ELIVERY ERY

HAWKER H HAW KER E 800XP SER ERIAL RIAL NUMBER 258293

HAWKER HAW KE ER 800XP SERIAL NUMBER 2584144

HAWKER H HA AWKER E 900 900XP XP SER ERIAL RIAL NUMBER HA-49 HA-49

HAWKER HAWKER E 4000 SERIAL NUMBER RC-8 RC-8

BEECHJET B EECH HJET 400 400A A SER ERIAL RIAL NUMBER RK-164 RK-164

BEECHJET 400A BEECH HJET 400 A SERIAL NUMBER R RK-67 K-677

KING KING AIR AIR C90B C90B SER ERIAL RIAL NUMBER L LJ-1453 JJ-1453

E EMBRAER MBRAER PHENOM 100 1 SERIAL NUMBER 61

INFO@AVPROJETS.COM

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Avpro May 14/04/2014 12:44 Page 5

AGUSTA A109E POWER SERIAL NUMBER 11831

AGUSTA A109E POWER SERIAL NUMBER 1170

AGUSTA A109S POWER SERIAL NUMBER 22077

AGUSTA A109E POWER SERIAL NUMBER 11145

AGUSTA A109E POWER SERIAL NUMBER 11129

AGUSTA A109A II PLUS SERIAL NUMBER 7436

BELL 429 SERIAL NUMBER 57056

BELL 430 SERIAL NUMBER 49028

BELL 407 SERIAL NUMBER 53127

BELL 222UT SERIAL NUMBER 47567

EUROCOPTER EC135P2I SERIAL NUMBER 0691

EUROCOPTER AS-365N2 SERIAL NUMBER 6650

900 BESTGATE ROAD z SUITE 412 z ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 21401 z TEL 410-573-1515


WichitaMay14_Gil WolinNov06 16/04/2014 16:55 Page 1

WICHITA INSIDER

Travel Air To Textron Aviation What goes around, comes around for Beech and Cessna. by Dave Franson ike the blades of a propeller on a radial engine (or a turboprop, for that matter) what goes around, comes around with the passage of time in Wichita’s aviation history. In February of 1925, a Kansas farmer with a mechanical bent, a barnstormer from Tennessee, and a Navy Reserve pilot who had migrated from Kansas to California and back again got together and formed a company to make airplanes. Nearly ninety years later, the company they started is making a comeback, of sorts. You might say that Textron’s (Cessna’s parent company) recent acquisition of Beechcraft is like a software update: Textron Aviation is really Travel Air 2.0! In the middle of the Roaring 1920s, the three aviation pioneers set up shop in a building on West Douglas Avenue in Wichita and called their enterprise the Travel Air Manufacturing Company. They built aircraft together until differing ideas on design and market focus took them in varied directions. The farmer, Clyde Cessna, decided to build monoplanes with cantilever wings. The barnstormer, Walter Beech, focused on biplanes and high performance, and the Naval Reservist, Lloyd Stearman, made his mark with sturdy trainers. Stearman and Cessna left Travel Air in September of 1927, starting their own companies. Stearman’s operation eventually became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Cessna began building monoplanes at a newly constructed factory on East Pawnee Road. Beech stayed on at Travel Air, which merged with CurtissWright, until 1932 when he launched his firm. In the interim, he actually leased factory space from his former partner, Cessna, whose production lines had virtually shut down with the coming of the Great Depression. Nearly 90 years later, the three airplane makers might be surprised by what has become of their former joint venture. For starters, they wouldn’t recognize the old

L

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

building. It’s not an airplane factory any more. It has a new facade and it houses a rental car agency and a beauty salon. The operation Mr. Stearman left behind in the early 1930s to become President of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation is, itself, leaving Wichita behind after more than eight decades. What became Boeing-Wichita has now nearly completed its exodus from the Air Capital, leaving behind a heritage of thousands of aircraft built, tens of thousands of jobs provided, and an empty factory that covers acres of space. It’s safe to assume it’s not likely to end up as a home to Hertz and a hairdresser! Clyde Cessna and Walter Beech created great companies that became the dominant forces in General Aviation. Cessna’s monoplanes spawned dozens of single engine piston models, an impressive line of twins, a durable Air Force jet trainer, and eventually, the Citation line, the world’s most prolific family of business jet. Beech is actually best remembered for his signature biplane, the Model 17 Staggerwing, outstanding piston singles and twins such as the Bonanza and Baron, both of which are still in production and, of course, the venerable King Air twin turboprop. Cessna and Beech built outstanding product portfolios, provided tens of thousands of jobs, and, along with Boeing, earned Wichita its ‘Air Capital of the World’ nickname, even before Bill Lear and Learjet showed up in the early 1960s. It’s safe to say that Walter Beech, who died in 1950, and Clyde Cessna, who passed away in 1954, both realized that their namesake companies had become extraordinarily successful as separate entities competing directly, head-to-head, for the same customers. It’s pretty unlikely, however that, were they to return today, they would expect to find their airplane companies had come full circle--and are again part of the same family. “Family” may be a bit of a stretch, in fair-

❯ Dave is a veteran communications executive with more than 35-years’ experience in corporate management and consulting roles. Former employers include NBAA; AlliedSignal; Cessna; and Bombardier Aerospace, and today he is Principal of The Franson Consulting Group, a PR and Marketing Communications firm serving a variety of domestic and international clients, and is Executive Director of the Wichita Aero Club. ❯ Contact Dave via dave@fransonconsulting.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

ness: The competitive juices that have flowed on both sides of Wichita for three generations probably won’t dissipate overnight. There’s simply too much “company pride” among former and current Beechcrafters and Cessnans to expect the corporate armistice to be instantaneous. But, the two companies, which at least in the short term, will remain separate brands, do offer General Aviation some great synergies. Plugging the twin engine King Air turboprops into the product ladder between the Cessna Caravan single engine turboprops and the line of Citation business jets provides a logical progression and a broad range of turbine-powered alternatives. The combination of two diverse engineering and marketing teams could also yield some fresh and effective ideas in what remains a very competitive and challenging marketplace for piston singles all the way to mid-size corporate jets. The merged rivals should make for a formidable competitor in Business and General Aviation. When all is said and done, had Clyde and Walter known it would work out this way, they would probably be surprised… and justifiably proud, too.

15


BG 1 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 15:09 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Are Business Jets Boondoggles? Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

The answer depends on a company’s usage. Jack Olcott suggests that some Boards are abusing business aircraft, at the expense of shareholders, by underutilizing this vital business tool.

A

ll too often journalists are quick to accuse corporate aircraft owners of receiving unfair advantages through their use of Business Aviation. For example, a wellrespected Op Ed writer for a prominent New York newspaper recently vilified “private jets” because of what he felt were subsidies available to “tycoons” who employ business aircraft for transportation. He referenced three areas: Accelerated writeoffs for depreciating business aircraft, using our nation’s Air Traffic Control System “paid for by chumps flying commercial”, and reducing personal taxes of aircraft owners by stating that company leadership needed more security when traveling. With no acknowledgement that companies require efficient and safe transportation for their personnel and customers, he asserted that CEOs simply desire a more comfortable way to travel—all at taxpayer’s expense. Characterizing Business Aviation as a boondoggle, he wrote “I worry about those tycoons sponging off government. Won’t our pampering damage their character?” Aside from his pejorative generalizations, the Op Ed writer displayed a biased unfamiliarity with the tax rules applicable to business use of aircraft, which require that an aviation asset (like other assets subject to depreciation and deduction of related business expenses) must be proven to be ordinary and necessary to the generation of a company’s revenues. Failure to do so precludes any asset, including business aircraft, from being depreciated. Nor did he appreciate that owners of business aircraft pay fuel taxes for their marginal use of our nation’s ATC system, which would exist to serve the country even if all “private jets” were grounded. Regarding security, no one would deny

UNLOCK YOUR COMPANY AIRPLANE TO ACHIEVE ITS FULL POTENTIAL

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:40 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

President Obama access to Air Force One. Yet the CEO of a major company is many times more exposed to kidnapping than the US president. A quick search of the Internet shows that CEO kidnapping for ransom is a real concern and is happening far too often - even in first-world areas of the globe. A company-owned aircraft cannot be considered a business expense if its primary use is personal. Furthermore, carefully proscribed rules apply when an executive flies for non-business reasons, and the financial benefits of such a privilege are taxed to the passenger at the rate applicable to the executive’s personal tax rate. To avoid abuse as well as the specter of inappropriate use, Boards establish and oversee policies applicable to personal use of company aircraft. Directors are well advised to review their company’s policy for personal use.

REAL ABUSE Without appropriate oversight, any corporate asset can be abused. A business aircraft is no exception. Transgressions are minimal, however, since few company assets receive the detailed scrutiny from many sources—IRS, shareholders and press—that Business Aviation receives. A company’s real abuse of business aircraft is more likely to be failure to use this asset to its fullest potential. Companies and their Boards transgress by omission rather than by commission. The corporation that limits access to the company aircraft to only executives on Mahogany Row fails to return all the benefits of Business Aviation to its shareholders. Owners should follow the best practices of their peers by opening the use of the company aircraft to middle managers, technical experts and service personnel; e.g., to any employee with a need to serve Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

customers and cultivate clients. On average among companies operating business aircraft, only about 20 percent of passengers are top executives, according to data gathered by Harris Interactive, Inc. for the National Business Aviation Association. Examples of abusing Business Aviation are refusing to use the company’s aviation assets to establish stronger bonds with customers or to travel more efficiently. Bringing clients to the home office for factory tours and relationship building is a welldocumented advantage. Yet a major Fortune 100 corporation with which we are familiar waited more than four decades before it explored such usage. The same company limited access to the top dozen or so of its corporate executives. Such a narrow application of company resources is, in my opinion, real abuse of Business Aviation.

SPEAK OUT AND INFORM Business Aviation is not well understood. Had the Op Ed journalist referenced earlier in this article known more about the use of business aircraft, I doubt he would have equated “private jets” to boondoggles and subsidies for wealthy “takers”. Thus it is imperative that users of Business Aviation stand tall and articulate the reasons why company aircraft, properly managed, are particularly beneficial applications of corporate assets. If you would like to give testimony to how Business Aviation is used as a vital tool to the furtherance of your business for inclusion in these pages, we would be delighted to hear from you. Contact Jack via the email below.

“The corporation that limits access to the company aircraft to only executives on Mahogany Row fails to return all the benefits of Business Aviation to its shareholders.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 18

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

17


BG 2 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 15:25 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation: Investment Tools As with any good investment, business aircraft must be utilized to produce returns for investors. Not taking advantage of what Business Aviation provides is an abuse, asserts Jack Olcott. eople and time are a company’s two most important assets. Management has a responsibility to shareholders to protect and amplify the productivity of employees and to create a working culture where time is used efficiently. Business aircraft are proven tools for obtaining the greatest benefits from people and time. Companies that use Business Aviation to address travel needs are more successful in generating returns for shareholders than non-users. Furthermore, the advantages of Business Aviation are available to all companies, not only to those that own business aircraft. Many reliable non-scheduled air carriers provide safe and cost-effective charter services. Business aircraft can be rented by the mile, by the hour, or for a set number of hours in a given period. Shared ownership is available, as are programs for joint use among two or more firms. Business Aviation is a tool for generating the best returns from a company’s employees and their time working to achieve company objectives. Travel$ense is a computerized travel analysis that compares the time difference between trips utilizing business aircraft and those flown on Scheduled Airlines. As shown below, the savings in time are dramatic. More significantly, such time savings have a powerful impact on a company’s bottomline performance. Business aircraft are business tools. Utilizing them effectively is good management.

P

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 22

Travel$ense Study Time savings of 11 companies traveling by business aircraft rather than by Scheduled Airlines during a period of four months

• Reduced travel time - 5,939 hours • Business days not required for travel -1,530 • Nights not required to be away from home - 2,640 18

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

”Time is the scarcest resource and unless it is managed, nothing else can be managed.” Peter Drucker, Business Guru

”Any problem that you have in life that can be solved with money is really not that big. The only thing in life that we cannot get back is time.” Robert Herjavec, Entrepreneur

”Humans are the scarce resource - not money so you want them working as productively as possible. Talent is too scarce to deploy it in less than an optimal manner.” Warren Buffett, Investor

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:43 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Vision Unlimited The Revolution of Business Aviation Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

“The launching point for most new owners is when they realize the Scheduled Airlines are too limiting.”

Pete Agur reflects on his responses to clients who seek the advantages of operating business aircraft.

I

’ve been introducing individuals and organizations to Business Aviation for over 40 years. It is a lot of fun for me because every time is a first time. I get to watch as each new owner discovers that the value of Business Aviation is far greater, and much broader, than what they had foreseen. The launching point for most new owners is when they realize the Scheduled Airlines are too limiting. Many test the waters with charter flights or fractional ownership programs. The ones who need more of what Business Aviation offers consider whole ownership. That is often when we get the call to conduct a Business Aviation needs analysis. Most frequently we are asked to do the study for one of two reasons: 1.

2.

There is no shortage of opinions from friends, Members of the Board, senior members of the organization and others. There is one common theme: Lots of recommendations and no consensus. An expert third-party perspective can smooth the way to gaining that consensus as well as starting the process in a more orderly fashion.

EXAMINING NEEDS During the needs analysis we help the client define how they will gain value using Business Aviation. The benefits fall into two buckets: 1. Growing the business; 2. Saving money and time. The first bucket is by far the largest – and the focus of this article. The second bucket is much smaller, yet very rewarding, and will be the topic next month. When I first meet with top executives who are exploring the use of Business Aviation, often they ask if we have ever not recommended buying an aircraft. The answer is “yes, but rarely”. The reason is simple. Most business leaders are very cautious about advocating the use of business aircraft for a wide variety of reasons, public and private. By the time they get to the point of examining the business case, however, they are well beyond the tipping point. U

WHAT’S THE BIZAV ‘TIPPING POINT’ FOR BUSINESS LEADERS?

22

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:49 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

The most basic benefit of Business Aviation is the ability to do what the Airlines cannot do. For instance, a company may need to get a broad cross section of employees to diverse locations. HarleyDavidson (H-D) has done this for years. Their headquarters and many of their plants are not at hub cities. Rather than have each plant replicate the entire staff, H-D has identified certain skills (engineering, production, quality control, accounting, etc.) that can be shared among them effectively, thereby yielding wide-scale efficiency. Each year H-D moves thousands of employees throughout its company locations to help deliver great bikes and accessories to avid bikers.

UNIQUE BENEFITS We are currently in the midst of a single-aircraft start-up. The US division of a closely held multinational manufacturing company is being “gifted” with its first aircraft by its parent company. The needs analysis is a given. The division’s North American headquarters is in a third tier Airline city, and the closest hub is a three-hour drive away. Its planned use of the aircraft is very traditional, and it expects to fly its senior executives on the trips the Airlines cannot serve well. A quick examination of the division’s historic commercial travel shows it will save over 40 days per year of executive time using the business aircraft. But, that is only the start. During a meeting with the executive responsible for aviation services, I explained that she will find much broader value as her company learns how and when to use the aircraft. There is no question that leveraging the time/place mobility of key people will be the bread and butter of their aircraft use. This is as fundamental as getting a division president to more locations more often. But, as with H-D, the newly acquired business aircraft will allow timely visits by technical

24

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

specialists to various facilities more often, enabling them to improve the company’s efficiency, productivity and quality. Being able to compete more effectively for, and keep, top talent is another tremendously valuable benefit associated with their aircraft. The company is based in a desirable geographic region, it is a very familial organization, and is known for being the leader in its industry. The company’s biggest drawbacks in attracting top talent are the demands and abuses associated with commercial travel. The airplane turns that negative into a positive. I asked the executive if the company ever has immediate-response requirements. “Yes, of course” was her reply. As a manufacturer of high-cost equipment, the company’s customers expect that equipment will be on line, all the time. When a disruption occurs, the quicker her company can respond the easier it is to convert an operational failure into a service success. Business Aviation can raise the company’s customer care to a level its competitors will envy. Then I asked her if the company was planning to use the aircraft to facilitate customer visits to their plants. Her eyes lit up with the realization that factory visits will enhance the buyer’s appreciation for the firm’s products. Even more importantly, they will promote relationships that allow the customer to know, through eye-to-eye contact, that their service requests will be in great hands now and well after the deal is done. She now realizes that the value of Business Aviation is limited only by how she sees those services supporting her core business. Some owners are only skimming the surface. Is your vision sufficient to get the best return from your fully integrated Business Aviation services?

“She now realizes that the value of Business Aviation is limited only by how she sees those services supporting her core business.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 30

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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1 Freestream May 16/04/2014 16:56 Page 1

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2 Freestream May 16/04/2014 16:57 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS Falcon 900EX S/N: 87. Reg: OE-IMI • Make Offer • Total Time: 4113 hours / Landings 2371 • Will deliver with Engines & APU on MSP • Avionics on Honeywell Advanced Protection Plan

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BG 4 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:53 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Special Interest or Special Tool? David Wyndham is co-owner and President of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

How effectively is your business aircraft employed in the service of the company? David Wyndham explores how a company transitions its aviation assets from being the boss's special interest to the corporation’s business tool.

C “The business aircraft was identified emotionally with that particular individual, and not with the corporation.”

30

hange is inevitable. Either through growth or decay, change happens in nature and in business. The aviation department, if integrated with the business structure of the company, can adapt to change. But if Business Aviation is a sideline endeavor—a special interest outside of the dayto-day running of the company—the flight department may not be able to adapt and serve the interests of shareholders. We have seen some aviation departments that were formed by the CEO and frequently functioned for his or her express use. That leader typically was a dynamic force for growth, and the aircraft was put to good use. It also enhanced the CEO’s personal life and that of his or her family. The business aircraft was identified emotionally

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

with that particular individual, and not with the corporation. When that CEO left, the incoming chief executive did not see the value of the business aircraft. The corporation as a whole certainly did not. Depending on the nature of change, the new CEO and staff approached the flight department as a reminder of the former CEO (good or bad). If change needed to occur, the aircraft needed to go.

SERVICE DEPARTMENT The corporate flight department is very adept at serving its master. When that means a single individual, it can be complacent in the aircraft’s special status and not be involved with the corporation as a normal business unit. Just as a corporation can have difficulties when its dynamic CEO-Founder leaves without U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo April_Layout 1 17/03/2014 14:52 Page 1


BG 4 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:54 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation creating the corporate culture and knowledge needed for continuing success, a flight department can disappear if it served an individual rather than the company as a whole. How does a company make the emotional and administrative transition from ‘boss's special interest’ to ‘business tool’ that serves the whole company? How does it prevent from being eliminated when its principal user moves on? Even in the case of the company aircraft being a special interest of the CEO, the flight department can be adding significant value to the corporation by allowing that CEO to utilize time effectively. Changing CEOs does not require selling the CEO’s special interest. But it does mean that Directors need to appreciate that a transition may be required when preparing for a leadership change. What worked in the past when the flight department was small or the aircraft was underutilized may not be best for shareholders going forward. Governing the use of Business Aviation requires attention to how the flight department is organized and managed within the corporate structure.

TRANSITION Step one: The flight department needs to be integrated into the corporate structure like any other business unit. Except under extraordinary circumstances that may exist but are hard to envision, Business Aviation should not be a "special ops unit" with a secret budget that is outside the normal corporate structure. In addition to tempting abuses, a stealth operation is not in the best interest of the corporation or its shareholders. The flight department needs reporting and budgeting rules and procedures as do other corporate business units. Its duties and responsibilities must be documented, and metrics for measuring its success are necessary. The flight department’s mission must be in alignment with the corporate mission. If the corporate mission changes, aviation must be able to adapt to serve the corporation's shareholders. That transition may mean adding additional aircraft or downsizing when times get tough. The mission of the corporation drives the mission of the flight department, which drives the requirements of the aircraft. If this requirement is documented and is transparent to the Board, the question of why the company has an aircraft is self-evident. Step two: The flight department needs to prepare for the future. Not only is a budget required, but so is a strategic plan. The flight department needs to know what the goals of the corporation are and have a plan to support those goals. The flight department needs to know that it serves the needs of the corporation, not a special individual. It needs to be monitoring the appropriate performance metrics, which may also involve external benchmarks. The flight department may need support for its incremental improvements aimed at being cost effective and mission effective. Step three: Those managers within the aviation department need to grow in their managerial skills.

32

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

IS THE FIT FOR A FLIGHT DEPARTMENT OBVIOUS IN YOUR COMPANY?

As new aircraft come into aviation, it is clear that the pilots and maintenance team must be trained on the equipment. So it is with the aviation management team. Running a single-aircraft operation dedicated to a single person if vastly different than managing multiple aircraft with expanded corporate responsibilities. Most aviation managers come up the ranks as skilled pilots or maintenance technicians. As the responsibilities of the flight department change and grow, these managers may need additional education and support.

SAME MEASURES When Directors are evaluating how best to utilize aviation assets, they must assure that those assets are managed with the same professionalism and measures of success as other business units. Effectively employed in service to the corporation, the business aircraft is a special tool adding measurably to the future success of the corporation.

“The mission of the corporation drives the mission of the flight department, which drives the requirements of the aircraft.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 38

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Elliott Aviation May_Layout 1 14/04/2014 14:16 Page 1


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Project1_Layout 1 28/04/2014 16:20 Page 1


BG5 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:57 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A New View of Cause and Effect: Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of Mesinger Jet Sales. Jay serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards and is a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association. Contact him via Jay@jetsales.com.

Are valuations unduly impacted by external factors? Jay Mesinger explores how factors not directly related to equipment characteristics might impact the market for business aircraft. n the general view of valuation we tend to think of technical items that impact the value of business aircraft. By technical items I refer to definitive, easily quantified measures such as airframe time, whether the model is in production or out of production, capabilities of the aircraft’s avionics suite, and the newness of its paint and interior refurbishments. All these items are important criteria for establishing value of one aircraft or model over another. In fact, the two reporting books most used by the resale community (Aircraft Bluebook and Vref) list these criteria as definitive for adjusting

I

“Non-technical factors are those world events taking place daily that create headline news and affect the psyche of buyers and sellers.”

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

the value of aircraft. Basic valuations in these books are based on actual sales in preceding quarters, adjusted for the technical factors. This article will deal with different (and potentially greater) factors in valuation—ones that could affect the entire industry. For simplicity, let’s call them non-technical factors. They are items that are not related to the specifics of any individual aircraft. Non-technical factors are those world events taking place daily that create headline news and affect the psyche of buyers and sellers. For example, they cause stock markets to surge or pull U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


2001 Falcon 900C SN 191 3000 hours with fresh major inspections. This 900C factors nicely in your value equation. If you’re looking for the newest, lowest time Falcon 900 that also meets your capital budget, the right answer may very well be the Falcon 900C. Pairing the international range and large cabin size of a 900B with the 900EX Primus 2000 cockpit, the Falcon 900C presents a true value opportunity. 2001 SN 191 delivers this value without compromise. It is an exceptional aircraft with one corporate owner and just 3000 hours. Plus, SN 191 will be delivered with a fresh 2C (6 year) inspection and landing gear overhaul! It has no damage history and is covered under MSP engine as well as avionics maintenance programs. This aircraft offers a spacious, open cabin with seating for 12 passengers, including 4 club seats forward and aft, with a 4-place conference group in the middle. SN 191 is well appointed and is in exceptional condition. To learn how Falcon 900C SN 191 can factor into your value equation, call Jim Donath at Donath Aircraft Services.

Donath Aircraft Services 773.935.9871 jimdonath@donathaircraft.com Visit DonathAircraft.com

Price Reduced $1 Million! Now $11,995,000!


BG5 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 14:59 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

back, move 24/7 news programing into high gear, and before you know it may have changed dramatically the direction of our valuation models.

TODAY’S CHANGING EVENTS As the recovery in our industry gathers pace, we are all particularly sensitive to disruptions in marketplace trajectory. Let us consider what non-technical events, as I have defined them, mean to us. We have experience with the cause and effect of technical characteristics (e.g., Aircraft A has twice the flight hours of the fleet average, or the cosmetics of Aircraft B are not as nice as the cosmetics of Aircraft C). Technical issues are easy to grasp. The cause and effects of non-technical issues are not so easy to discern. You might say they are soft considerations with hard impacts. Let’s take a closer look at non-technical issues such as global or regional military conflicts. Crimea is a perfect example. This geo-political power-grab is unfolding a world away, but it may be unsettling a buyer of business aircraft closer to home. Russia flexes its muscles to exert influence; the G8 reacts; financial sanctions are imposed and the Russian stock market is affected. Then stock markets around the world react, and the economy hits a speed bump. Is this a momentary distraction or an economic game changer? Malaysian flight MH370 goes missing, the loss of life seems unfathomable and questions arise about airline safety and the idea of criminal intent or ‘mere’ mechanical failure surfaces. Stock prices of the companies involved with the aircraft, its systems and its operation (and airlines in general) take a hit. Is this tragic event a distraction in the world economic recovery or will it be a game changer as was the effect of 9/11? Could this non-

40

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

technical factor cause a buyer to pause in deciding whether to acquire an aircraft? Or could the opposite happen and demand be stimulated among entrepreneurs who want greater control over their travel options?

IMPACT ON MARKET DYNAMICS The idea of non-technical events having great impact on the valuation of our aircraft in a fragile recovery could be real. How do we bracket the real impact and work to shore up our recovery so as not to be so vulnerable to these events? As an industry we in Business Aviation must assess events and quantify their impact. Are non-technical events distractions or real game changers? Will they have a lasting and large affect compared to events that have short term, minimal impact on global economies? Each event has to be analyzed and evaluated against many factors. As strategists and economic leaders grapple with global events, it is critical that those of us involved with Business Aviation keep our wits about us. Our reactions must be responsible, and as an industry we must watch, listen and respond to inputs from those who really are capable of analyzing and shaping outcome. It is important to reflect on why our industry is recovering. Business Aviation is vital to business. In fact, business could not be conducted as we know it without Business Aviation. We must react to nontechnical events cautiously, keeping level heads and separating distractions from game changers. The value of Business Aviation is real. This recovery is real. Hold on to it and protect it. It is worth fighting for!

“The cause and effects of non-technical issues are not so easy to discern. You might say they are soft considerations with hard impacts.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 46

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Jet Collection May_Layout 1 14/04/2014 16:48 Page 1

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2002 Piaggio Avanti Serial Number 1062 | Registration N962JC

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1982 Falcon 50

2007 Citation Sovereign

1979 Citation II

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99

680-0122

550-0047

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2001 Falcon 50EX

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1984 Hawker 800A

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1985 Citation III

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2007 Citation CJ3

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1981 Citation ISP

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1984 Learjet 35A

35A-600

1991 Learjet 31ER

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1981 King Air B200

1981 King Air B200

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1997 King Air C90B Blackhawk

1975 King Air C90

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2006 Piper Meridian

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2007 CJ3 | S/N 200 2271 TSN, 270 SH, TCAS II, SAT WX RADAR FDR, CVR, STORMSCOPE, GPS-4000S (WAAS) BELTED LAV, BRAVO STYLE ENTRY STEPS EU OPS 1 APPROVED DOC 5, 7, 9, 22, 24 & 40 c/w JAN/2014

1984 CITATION 650 | S/N 059 5928 TSN, –3C, MSP GOLD HONEYWELL EFIS (4-TUBE), DUAL GNS-XLS w/GPS TCAS II, KING EGPWS, SATPHONE, FREON NINE PASSENGER INTERIOR INCLUDING BELTED LAV DOC 1, 3 & 19 c/w FEB/ 2014, DOC 8 c/w APRIL/2012 PAR AVION LTD. IS ACTIVELY SEEKING NEW LISTINGS.


BG 6 May14_FinanceSept 16/04/2014 09:16 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Insurance Decisions: Does Your Firm Use Contractor Pilots? Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

When your company employs a pilot, the decision on whether to hire the aviator as an independent contractor or an employee should be made only after careful consideration, warns Stuart Hope.

ne of the company’s employee pilots has requested time off for vacation or sick leave. Your aviation manager has located a qualified person who flies the same make and model aircraft for another owner on the field to fill in and take the trip. This arrangement appears to be a very convenient solution - made all the better by hiring the pilot as an independent contractor, thereby avoiding the administrative hassle of employment contracts, payroll deductions, and other costs associated with making him or her an “employee”. But this convenience comes with serious downsides—the most critical being exposure to a

O “...your insurance policy will not respond to any pilot injuries that should have been covered by a workers’ compensation policy.”

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

lawsuit resulting from the bodily injury or wrongful death of the independent contractor pilot. As independent business persons, contractors are expected to provide their own liability insurance and workers’ compensation. For this reason, your insurance policy will not respond to any pilot injuries that should have been covered by a workers’ compensation policy. Second, as we have discussed in previous articles, the independent contractor may be an approved pilot (which validates only your coverage) but he/she personally is not provided legal liability protection. In fact most independent contractor pilots do not carry any insurance, either U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 6 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 15:01 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation because they are not aware they should, or it is cost prohibitive. Who do you think is left “holding the bag”? In the event the contract pilot who doesn’t carry workers’ comp coverage is injured on the job, a court is likely to rule that the contract pilot was an employee by definition and should have been covered under your workers’ compensation insurance. You could be faced with paying significant retroactive premiums, employment taxes and interest. If the pilot is ruled an independent contractor, then the protection generally granted an employer under the workers’ comp bar (which in essence prohibits an employee from suing their employer for job-related injuries) is removed, thereby allowing the independent contractor or his estate to sue the aircraft owner for bodily injury. Since greater than 85% of all aircraft accidents are caused by pilot error, logically you would think it unlikely the pilot or his/her estate would have grounds to sue you or your company for their own negligence. But things often aren’t logical, and the fact that you are the one with the deep pockets puts you squarely in the cross-hairs after an aircraft accident. As you can quickly see, there’s a lot more than meets the eye when using independent contractor pilots. The distinction between who is an employee and who is an independent contractor is no different with pilots than with any other person you employ. The situation remains one of the most misunderstood areas of employment law in business today.

APPROPRIATE STRATEGY Option 1: Don’t use independent contractor pilots. This isn’t really a practical solution, however, because finding a pilot to fill in on short notice is difficult. But beware—most supplemental pilots available immediately are probably flying for another aircraft operator on the field and are just trying to do your pilot a favor by filling in. They aren’t going to purchase their own liability or workers’ compensation insurance for the few flights they might make for your company. Option 2: Use a well-known temporary pilot staffing company that can issue proof it provides its pilots with workers’ compensation and adequate liability protection. Option 3: Go through the pain of hiring the aviator as a part-time employee. This process is costly

and time consuming, but it eliminates the liability and workers’ compensation exposures, and at the same time provides protection for the pilot filling in. This option is probably the best solution. Option 4: If you decide to continue using independent contractors, add them to your workers’ compensation insurance and endorse your aircraft liability policy to properly protect them (and your company!). Operators must satisfy many masters in the aircraft ownership world (IRS, FAA, Insurance), which often is very complicated. I just touched the surface of the complexities in this article. Your best strategy is to seek professional help, and I mean that in the best way. When it comes to insurance, your aviation insurance broker will be one of your most valuable allies. Use that resource. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

“But things often aren’t logical, and the fact that you are the one with the deep pockets puts you squarely in the cross-hairs after an aircraft accident.”

Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 50

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com

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48

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years.

2005 Falcon 2000EX EASy

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1983 Learjet 55

s/n 097

7,800 Total Time. MSP. P1/1A Mods. UNS-1C FMS. BAS ICT 12 Year. Paint. Interior in 2008. NDH.

1991 Astra SP

s/n 18

4,120 Total Time. Primus EPIC EFIS. Dual FMS. Nine Passenger Interior. One Fortune 500 Owner Since New.

s/n 195

2,074 Total Time. 1,274 Landings. ESP Gold. Nine Passenger Interior. Wi-Fi.

1984 Challenger 601-1A

s/n 3024

Universal EHFI 640 Five Display EFIS. Dual UNS 1 FMS. 100% JSSI. Gear Overhaul July 2012.

2001 Gulfstream 100

s/n 47

9,490 Total Time. MSP Gold. Fortune 500 Owned. READY TO BE SOLD.

2005 Citation Sovereign

2008 Gulfstream 200

s/n 140

4,711 Total Time. 3,866 Landings. MSP Gold. APU.

1986 Citation III

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BG 7 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 15:02 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aircraft Ownership & Ops: Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

Common Mistakes, and How to Avoid Them (Part 2). Following last month’s article, Attorney Chris Younger describes two additional mistakes that Boards make in connection with the acquisition and operation of business aircraft.

I “The Board must ensure that myriad restrictions on the availability of deductions relating to aircraft ownership and operations are analyzed and thoroughly considered...”

50

ssues related to federal tax liabilities and the need for adequate documentation are addressed in the following paragraphs.

TAX PLANNING AND FINANCIAL REGULATORY COMPLIANCE A corporation’s Board must consider the federal income tax and excise tax ramifications of an aircraft acquisition and the requirements of any financial regulations that the company must follow in connection with ownership and operation of the aircraft. In many instances, a Board fails to adequately address these issues. Business aircraft are depreciable business assets that can provide a company with substantial deductions from taxable income provided that they are owned and operated in a manner that allows a company to take those deductions. The Board must ensure that myriad restrictions on the availability of deductions relating to aircraft ownership and operations are analyzed and thoroughly considered to ensure that a company gets the income tax benefits to which it is entitled, and on which an aircraft acquisition may be predicated. These include basic issues such as whether the deductions are ordinary, necessary and reasonable, and whether the correct depreciation schedule is utilized. However, there are far more complex and esoteric issues that a Board must analyze, including limitations on deductibility of hobby losses and passive activity losses, listed property rules, at-risk loss limitations, and compliance with like-kind exchange requirements. There are also a host of income tax and financial regulation requirements that pertain specifically to non-business employee use of company-provided aircraft. Knowledge of, and careful compliance with, these regulatory requirements is an essential element U

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

DON’T GET FLAGGED FOR A TECHNICAL VIOLATION.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson 1 May 14/04/2014 14:57 Page 1

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Global XRS 1814 AFTT, JSSI Platinum – 100%, Inmarsat Aero-H+, CES Version 7.0, Second-Generation Enhanced Vision System. Longer Range Aircraft with double crew rest will benefit those wishing to use the aircrafts maximum range potential

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Hawker 800A 8378 AFTT, MSP Gold, Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 FMS, Aviation Partners Blended Winglets, Airshow 400, Aircell Iridium SATCOM, CVR, 8 Pax

Falcon 50 13,502 hrs, Engines on MSP Gold, Collins Pro-Line 4, Dual Honeywell Laser Ref III, Magnastar Airphone C-2000, Airshow 400, MGTW Increase, 8 Passenger Seating

King Air 350 Engines 1300/46 TSO, Props 726/726 TSN, EGPWS, TCAS II, CVR, 3 interiors Corporate, Medevac and Commuter

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


BG 7 May14_FinanceSept 16/04/2014 09:11 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation of any aircraft owner’s acquisition plan. Another common mistake is the failure to consider potential federal air transportation excise tax liability. This issue often arises when a company enters into a poorly structured aircraft management agreement, which can unknowingly subject the aircraft owner to federal excise taxes. Companies that own business aircraft often utilize the services of a third party aircraft manager in lieu of establishing their own internal flight department. The manager provides aircraft support services to the owner including items that are essential to the operation of the aircraft such as crew, insurance and hangar. However, if the agreement between the company and the manager is not properly structured, the company could be held liable for federal excise tax of 7.5% of all amounts it pays to the manager. The Board’s failure to adequately consider and address any of these issues can lead to severe financial consequences to a company and to substantial tax liabilities and civil and criminal penalties imposed on the company and/or its owners and officers. Examination of these issues ahead of time is therefore imperative.

INCOMPLETE OR INSUFFICIENT DOCUMENTATION Designing and implementing a legally-compliant and tax-efficient business aircraft ownership and operating structure is just the tip of the iceberg. Much of the real work in this area comes after a company acquires an aircraft. The Board must ensure that the company creates and maintains adequate documentation to support its tax planning objectives and to meet its ongoing legal obligations. In many instances, the Board hires a Business Aviation consultant who works with it to create a dazzling aircraft ownership and operating structure that is designed to minimize sales tax liability, maximize income tax benefits and ensure full compliance with all regulatory requirements. However, follow-through is often lacking. Specifically, the Board may not fully understand its recordkeeping and reporting obligations, which include creating internal systems and hiring external advisors and consultants to provide and maintain the records that provide the foundation to support the plan that was so carefully designed. It is essential for the Board to understand that a company needs adequate and thorough documentation to support its position in the event of a sales or income tax audit. In many instances, because of the complexity inherent in the ownership and operating structure that is utilized, the creation and continued maintenance of these records can be time consuming and expensive. However, the failure to create and maintain appropriate records will ultimately lead to higher costs and a more time consuming problem. It is also essential that the Board gain a complete understanding of the company’s regulatory reporting obligations, and that the company file all reports that are required of it with respect to its business aircraft ownership and operations.

52

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

“Specifically, the Board may not fully understand its recordkeeping and reporting obligations...” Note: This article should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The reader is urged to consult legal counsel or other advisors concerning his/her own situation and specific legal questions. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 58

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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SN9244 | 1 OWNER SINCE NEW, NEVER CHARTERED BATCH 3, FANS 1/A & CPDLC READY | LOW TIME ONLY 1344 HOURS | ENHANCED VISION SYSTEM

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Corporate Concepts 1 May 17/04/2014 10:05 Page 1

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Gulfstream G-450 ■ Satellite phone and Swift Broadband ■ 14 passenger interior – Forward and Aft Lavatories ■ Enhanced Vision system – Corporate Care, MSP and HAPP ■ Call for Private Showing in the U.S. ■ Contact us for New Pricing – See www.flycci.com

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Corporate Concepts 2 May 17/04/2014 10:10 Page 1

Embraer ERJ-145ER ■ 50 seats – Ideal for regional airliner, corporate shuttle or special assignments or as a special use aircraft ■ Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care ■ For Sale, Lease, Lease/Purchase – Some Trades Considered ■ Call for details

2008 Legacy 600 ■ New generation cabin with increased headroom ■ High speed internet with satellite phone ■ Enrolled in Executive Care & Corporate Care programs ■ Forward and Aft lavatories ■ Burns half the fuel of a Gulfstream G-IV ■ FAA Part 135 - Fresh Inspections ■ Motivated owner - Immediately Available

Falcon 2000 ■ Highly desired ten passenger configuration ■ Upgraded entertainment system with six individual monitors ■ Ultra Mid-Class cabin with over 3,000 mile range ■ For Sale or Lease – Some Trades Considered – Financing Available - Motivated Owner ■ EASA compliant – Currently operating under a EASA commercial certificate

Gulfstream G-IV SP ■ New Price - $6,995,000 ■ Recent 5,000 landing inspection including landing gear and Thrust reverser overhaul ■ 16 passenger / Forward Galley ■ Forward and Aft Lavatories ■ On Condition engines ■ ASB 469 complied with ■ Current FAR Part 135

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BG 8 May14_FinanceSept 15/04/2014 15:08 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Large Cabin Choice There are occasions, when the mission dictates an aircraft of larger capacity. This month our value study focuses on our definition of Large Cabin business jets.

“...for the transoceanic traveller, the advantages offered by these airplanes far outweigh the negatives.”

T

he average Large Cabin and Ultra-LongRange airplanes share more in common than they differ, with similar cabin sizes and comparable cruise speeds ranging roughly between 450 and 500 ktas. For the purpose of this month’s focus, we’ll categorise Large Cabin and Ultra-Long-Range jets under the generic category of ‘Large Cabin jets’, on the basis of their shared characteristics, and MTOWs that generally range between 38,000 pounds and 100,000 pounds. Large Cabin jets have much in their favor. Seatsfull range capabilities typically go up to, and into the 6,000-nautical mile range, making these effective non-stop continent and ocean-crossing machines. The fewer the stops, the shorter the overall trip time! One disadvantage the Large Cabin jets have over their smaller Light and Medium jet kin is their need for runways longer than 6,000ft, which restricts the

number of airports they can use by comparison. Nevertheless, for the transoceanic traveller, the advantages offered by these airplanes far outweigh the negatives. Where the Large Cabin airplanes really excel (as the name would suggest) is in their cabin capacities. A cabin for this category of jet typically will stretch from 30-40 feet or more, enabling operators to enjoy a wider array of finishing options and office capabilities than jets in the smaller segments can provide. Cabin heights in excess of six feet guarantees standup cabin comfort, while seating capacity (depending on configuration) of eight to eighteen is typical for this category. Naturally, the size and range capabilities of Large Cabin jets don’t come cheaply, and you’ll need a larger fuel budget, more hangar space, and a larger maintenance budget. Yet essentially, for the company with the need and budget, the Large Cabin business jet will rarely, if ever, prove too small - and will only occasionally, be too large for an airport you’d prefer to access. In these situations, supplemental charter is the answer.

LARGE CABIN JET PRICE GUIDE The following Large Cabin Jets’ Average Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1995 through Spring 2014. Values reported are in US$ millions. Each reporting point represents the current average retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Bombardier Challenger 300 values reported in the Spring 2014 edition of the Bluebook show $15.5m US$ for a 2010 model, $19.0m US$ for a 2012 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. With the reader’s knowledge of aircraft, equipment, range and performance, the following Guide allows the reader to determine the best value aircraft for consideration. Note: We have included 36 aircraft models in the following Large Cabin average price guide, however, for additional assistance and interest, Conklin & de Decker’s Performance and Specifications data for these Large Cabin models can be referred to, beginning on page 78 of this issue. U

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation May_Layout 1 14/04/2014 15:03 Page 1


Retail Price Guide May14_RPG 16/04/2014 09:21 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

LARGE CABIN JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE 2014 US$M

SPRING 2014

2013 US$M

2012 US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER

30.0

21.5

19.0

18.0

17.0

16.0

15.0

14.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

29.0

21.5

19.0

17.5

16.5

15.5

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604

2005 US$M

14.5 12.0

11.0

10.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

21.5

19.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000

56.0

49.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000

43.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

17.0

15.5

14.5

13.5

12.5

11.5

11.0

36.0

33.5

31.5

30.5

28.5

25.5

23.5

21.5

45.5

40.5

38.5

36.5

34.5

31.5

29.5

28.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS

24.5

DASSAULT FALCON 7X

52.8

49.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000S

27.7

27.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX

32.9

31.5

44.0

41.0

37.0

35.0

33.0

31.0

26.5

23.5

22.5

20.0

19.0

17.7

17.5

15.5

14.5

19.5

18.5

DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASy DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASy

17.0

15.8

15.2

11.3

10.8

10.3

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

42.2

39.0

34.0

32.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASy

30.0 28.0

26.5

24.0

23.0

22.0

21.0

21.0

20.0

19.0

18.0

17.0

16.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX DASSAULT FALCON 900C

15.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000

50.0

40.0

39.0

38.0

37.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ

30.5

23.0

22.0

20.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ

25.0

19.0

18.0

17.0

GULFSTREAM G650

63.0

59.0

GULFSTREAM G550

53.0

47.0

43.0

41.0

39.0

37.0

39.0

37.0

35.0

32.0

33.0

28.0

26.0

26.0

23.0

21.0

14.0

12.0

11.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 135BJ

GULFSTREAM G500 GULFSTREAM G450

38.0

10.0

9.5

35.0

33.0

32.0

31.0

28.0

25.0

24.0

25.0

24.0

21.0

19.0

18.0

20.0

19.0

16.0

14.0

13.0

GULFSTREAM G400 GULFSTREAM G350 GULFSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G280

22.0

20.0

GULFSTREAM GV GULFSTREAM GIV-SP AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide May14_RPG 16/04/2014 09:22 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2004 US$M

2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

9.1

10.5

8.1

7.4

6.7

6.4

5.9

5.7

5.4

5.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604

3.8

3.7

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R

10.25

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

21.5

20.0

18.5

17.0

16.5

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS DASSAULT FALCON 7X DASSAULT FALCON 2000S DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASy

14.3

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASy

12.9

11.9

10.0

9.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX 8.5

8.2

7.5

7.0

6.5

6.2

5.8

5.4

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

20.0

19.0 16.250

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASy 15.5

14.750

14.0

13.250

12.5

11.750

11.0

11.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX

14.0

13.5

13.0

12.250

11.5

11.0

10.0

12.0

11.0

10.5

DASSAULT FALCON 900C 10.0

9.5

9.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000 EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ

9.0

8.5

8.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 135BJ GULFSTREAM G650

30.0

29.0

GULFSTREAM G550

23.0

22.0

GULFSTREAM G500

17.0 15.0

GULFSTREAM G450 14.0

GULFSTREAM G400

12.0 11.0

GULFSTREAM G350 10.0

GULFSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G280 22.0

20.0

18.5

17.5

16.5

15.5

15.0

14.5

GULFSTREAM GV

11.5

10.5

9.9

9.1

8.6

8.2

7.8

7.3

GULFSTREAM GIV SP

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

61


JetBrokers May 14/04/2014 15:04 Page 1

1989 Falcon 50, S/N 194, 7922 TT, MSP, Triple UNS-1K+, 4C c/w 1/13, Landing Gear O/Hed Nov 11, Great History, On CAMP, Aft Lav, Ready to go!, Asking $2,395,000.00

2008 Gulfstream G200, S/N 212, 1158 TT, Airshow 410, Iridium SATCOM, Warranty until 12/24/14, Premium Interior, Asking $10,500,000.00

2000 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0935, 4548 TT, On Power Adv, Pro Parts, TCAS II, Mk-VII EGPWS, EU-Ops, Phase 1-5 c/w 11/12, Asking $1,950,000.00

2011 Citation Mustang, S/N 510-0391, 362 TT, Chartview, Sat Phone, Current 135 – Available for Three-year Lease!

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871, 1890 TT, Garmin GTN750/650, TCAS 2, New Paint & Interior, Current 135, Available for Three-year Lease!

1993 Citation V, S/N 560-0232, 9686.6 TT, 2232.6/2595.6 SMOH, 780.6 TSHS, TCAS II, Freon Air, Single Point Refueling, Fresh Phase 1-5, Asking $1,395,000.00

1999 Socata TBM700B, S/N 151, 2422 TT, 626 TSHS, 43 SPOH, Skywatch, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, Dual Garmin GNS-530W, Asking $1,225,000.00

1987 Citation III, S/N 650-0132, 7857 TT, MSP Gold, Dual UNS-1D+, Universal MFD, PATS APU, Exc. Paint & Interior, Asking $1,390,000.00

Also Available Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47

Citation II, S/N 550-0216

Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-45

Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016

Falcon 2000, S/N 8

Cheyenne IIXL, S/N 31T-8166017

Citation II, S/N 550-0326

Falcon 10, S/N 54

Cessna 414A RAM V, S/N 414A-0613


JetBrokers May 14/04/2014 15:05 Page 2

2010 Learjet 60XR, S/N 378, 1730 TT, Engines on ESP Gold, Pro-Line 21, IFIS, APU, On CAMP, Iridium Phone, Asking $6,895,000.00

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 646 TT, ESIS, Collins Venue, AirCell Axxess Satcom, TCAS 2, Nine Passenger, Asking $4,995,000.00

2005 Learjet 60SE, S/N 289, 2203 TT, ESP Gold, 8.33/FM Immunity, UNS-1E, Enh Mode S, On CAMP, Asking $3,500,000.00

1995 Hawker 800A, S/N 258254, 9121.1 TT, MSP Gold, TCAS II, Dual NZ-2000’s, Landing Gear O/H c/w 12/13, G Insp c/w 5/12, Asking $1,495,000.00

1993 Learjet 31A, S/N 65, 6967 TT, Engines on JSSI Plus, TCAS 2, UNS-1C, TRs, Big Door, Single Point Refueling, 12 Yr due 5/17, Asking $950,000.00

1992 Beechjet 400A, S/N RK-48, 5375.4 TT, 1825.0 SMOH, 41.4 TSHS, On JSSI Select, TCAS 2, AMS5000 w/ dual GPS, New Style Interior, Asking $1,050,000.00

1989 Astra, S/N 30, 10,223 TT, MSP, TCAS II, Astra SP Prototype with ALL SP Mods, Fresh C & 10000 Hr Inspections, L/R Oxygen Asking $1,295,000.00

1980 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-36, 10,644 TT, Engines on JSSI, Freon Air, TCAS I, St. Louis based most of its life!, On CAMP, Asking $295,000.00

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

CHICAGO

DETROIT

DENVER

LONDON

+1-630-377-6900 Phone

+1-248-666-9800 Phone

+1-303-494-6900 Phone

+44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


Flight Dept Mng1 May_Finance 15/04/2014 14:29 Page 1

FLIGHT DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT SKILLS

Leadership Styles for Aviation Managers by Jack Olcott n aviator seeking to transition from pilot or maintenance specialist to departmental manager should be aware of fundamental leadership styles, and relate those styles to his or her understanding of what needs to be accomplished. This article will outline the most frequently cited styles and relate them to typical scenarios found within flight departments. A word of caution, however: Rarely does one style fit all situations.

A

AUTHORITARIAN Perhaps the Authoritarian leadership style is most aligned with an aviator’s experi-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

ences. Many aspects of aviation are exacting. For example, an aircraft’s desired approach speed is a precise number determined by weight, aircraft configuration, density altitude and wind conditions. When the co-pilot is given the opportunity to fly the approach and the captain is acting as safety pilot or instructor, there is little tolerance between what the captain desires and what the co-pilot is expected to achieve. If there is any doubt regarding what the co-pilot is or should be doing, the captain makes his or her intentions crystal clear and intercedes as needed. The captain is exhibiting the characteristics of an authoritarian leader. www.AvBuyer.com

An authoritarian leader maintains tight control over those employees he or she manages. Usually the relationship between leader and follower is strictly professional, often boarding on cold and impersonal. Supervision is very close, with little room for individualism on the part of those being managed. The leader sets the goals; usually engages in one-way communications when issuing directions; controls the conversation; and allows interaction by permission, rather than encouraging twoway dialogue. The leader needs to clearly communicate what is expected, since an authoritarian style often stifles feedback and questions. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Flight Dept Mng1 May_Finance 15/04/2014 14:30 Page 2

PATERNALISTIC Just as the name implies, the Paternalistic leader influences the flight department through serving as a father (or mother) figure. Those being lead follow as would loyal children, moved by the compassion and unselfish decisions of the team leader. In return for such paternalism, the leader expects complete trust and loyalty. Life in the workplace, however, is not the same as the life at home that children experience as they transition to adulthood. Furthermore, children eventually want their own space and responsibility, just as employees desire to be treated as adults. A leadership style that is based upon a parent/child relationship has its own set of dynamics and limitations, which may complicate the effective leadership of highly motivated and skilled aviation personnel. While it is appropriate that the leader exhibit concern for his or her employees, care must be taken not to foster an unrealistic environment.

DEMOCRATIC When faced with decisions, the Democratic leader seeks participation from those being lead. Such an approach is effective when the leader frames the discussion within the bounds of the flight department’s Vision, Mission and Guiding Principles. (If the flight department lacks such governing materials, the conversation can quickly diverge into an inefficient and ineffective talkfest.) The leader aligns the options being considered with the interests of the corporation and the flight department, always shaping the direction of discussions and debate to move constructively toward a decision based upon consensus. Research by educators within the field of management indicate that the Democratic style of leadership can be very effective when objectively practiced by an inspiring leader who is willing to encourage unbiased dialogue, is fair-minded, and listens well. Flight department personnel who participate in problem-solving are more likely to implement the solution that results from such leadership. It must be noted, however, that a democratic approach still requires leadership and is not a license to abdicate the leader’s responsibility for the decisions that result from group participation.

LAISSEZ-FAIRE This form of leadership might be better described as ‘lack of leadership’. It is defined as a leadership style where the staff assumes all rights and powers for decision making. In essence, the leader takes a “hands-off” approach, delegating all tasks to those he or Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

she is responsible for leading and providing very little, if any, direction. To preclude surprises and possible chaos, the leader must be aware of what the staff decides as a result of his or her laissez-faire approach. Even with clear feedback from the staff to the flight department manager, such a management-style often results in low productivity and lack of standardization. Rarely is laissez-faire leadership desirable for running a corporate flight department.

TRANSACTIONAL Appearing in literature within the last 50 or so years, most notably in the early 1980s, Transactional leadership relies upon motivating others through a system of rewards and punishments. The main elements of such a system are “Contingent Rewards” and “Management-by-Exception”. The leader provides either physical or psychological rewards for performance that satisfies the needs of those being lead. Thus the aviator who is steadfast in following Standard Operating Practices may do well working with a Transactional leader. Existing rules are reinforced, while there is minimal motivation for changing the status www.AvBuyer.com

quo. Changes result from exceptions to established procedures rather than wholesale revisions of existing operational methods.

TRANSFORMATIONAL Transformational leaders bring fresh ideas to the flight department by challenging and inspiring staff to examine what they do for the company and how their services can be delivered more successfully. In essence, such leaders are change agents by installing within their staff a sense of renewed purpose and commitment to their work. Transformational flight department managers are willing to take risks and apply unusual strategies in the pursuit of achieving newly defined goals. Communicating effectively and offering compelling concepts for change are the key tools of transformational leaders. They are generally charismatic, selfconfident and authentic, exhibiting comprehensive knowledge of Business Aviation as well as personnel management. Next month World Aircraft Sales Magazine will address Douglas McGregor’s theories of leadership and motivation. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Project1_Layout 1 28/04/2014 16:23 Page 1


Flight Dept Mng2 May_Finance 15/04/2014 14:32 Page 1

FLIGHT DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT SKILLS

NBAA International Operators Conference rue to a tradition that began in the 1980s, the International Operators Committee of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) convened its comprehensive and highly informative annual conference (known through the community as simply the IOC) to discuss issues of importance to crews flying business aircraft globally. Nearly 600 aviators and aviation suppliers converged on Tampa, Florida on March 17th for four days of seminars focused on worldwide activities affecting international operations. Each presentation was conducted by an individual personally knowledgeable in the area under discussion, thereby differ-

T

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

entiating the IOC from other NBAA conferences that feature professional speakers and published authors associated with the topics under discussion. Presentations by practitioners in the art and science of international operations created a program of great authenticity and value. Based upon their personal experiences and those of their associates flying into areas where rules and norms differ from typical U.S. operations, speakers provided insightful perspectives and sound advice.

ICAO AND DIFFERENCES Day One’s agenda presented an overview of best practices, international regulations, operational protocols and safety. Of particuwww.AvBuyer.com

lar note was the presentation of Kurt Edwards, Director General of the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC). While U.S. operators are most familiar with the Federal Aviation Regulations, many nations throughout the world use the standards offered by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Edwards gave an excellent overview of global standards and practices recommended by ICAO regarding safety, air navigation, security, the environment and facilitation of aviation globally. He emphasized that the laws and regulations of the state responsible for the airspace being transited take precedence, regardless of ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory May 15/04/2014 10:39 Page 1

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Year

Model

Serial No.

1995

Challenger 601-3R

5176

1995

Challenger 601-3R

5180

1999

Challenger 604

5421

2007

Citation Encore+

560-0771

1997

Citation X

750-0016

1988

Falcon 900B

30

1998

Falcon 2000

75

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

1987

Gulfstream GIV

1021

1998

Gulfstream GV

545

2003

Hawker 400XP

RK-358

2005

Hawker 400XP

RK-407

2002

Hawker 800XP

258562

2010

Hawker 4000

RC-45

1999

King Air B200

BB-1645

2008

King Air B200GT

BY-39

2000

Learjet 45

072

2000

Learjet 45

079

2008

Learjet 45XR

383

2000

Learjet 60

198

1999

Learjet 60

168

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2007

Learjet 60XR

333

1990

Piaggio P180

1004

2014

Socata TBM-850

673

1997

Bell 407

53121


Flight Dept Mng2 May_Finance 15/04/2014 14:34 Page 2

FLIGHT DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT SKILLS

the nationality of the aircraft entering, flying in or departing the airspace. In practice, determining which regulations an operator must follow is complicated, he said. While ICAO Standards are intended to have global application, individual countries (referred to as “States” in the nomenclature of ICAO) are expected to transpose the international body’s wording into its own national law or regulation. If it chooses not to do so, the State files its “difference” with ICAO, and those differences between ICAO and State (i.e., national) regulations are published by ICAO and the State. In part because the U.S.A. has the world’s longest established and most active aviation system, it has numerous differences between ICAO standards and FARs. When flying within its national airspace, operators of aircraft registered within that State must adhere to national regulations (e.g., N-registered aircraft use FARs when operating in the US). IBAC’s Director General Edwards emphasized that when the operator is flying internationally, “differences” that apply when operating “at home” do not apply. “Differences cannot be exported”, he said, adding that “operators who [fly internationally] are strongly advised to equip their aircraft in line with ICAO Standards.” Continuing his explanation of how ICAO oversees international aviation, Edwards

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

described Supplementary Procedures (given the acronym SUPPS). He noted that SUPPS, which are established by regional groups (known as PIRGS) in coordination with ICAO Headquarters and all of the “user States” involved, have the authority of regulation. In essence, he noted, the use of the word “procedures” is a misnomer since a SUPPS is a regulation. Capping his informative presentation, Edwards noted that international standards for aircraft equipage can be found in ICAO Annex 6 Part 1 (International Commercial Air Transport Operations), ICAO Annex 6 Part II (International General Aviation Operations), ICAO Annex 10 (Aeronautical Telecommunications), ICAO Regional Supplementary Procedures (Document 7030), Reports of Planning and Implementation Regional Groups (PIRGS) and State Aeronautical Information Publications (AIPs). He recommended international operators access websites offered by ICAO, Eurocontrol and the FAA.

DAYS 2, 3 AND 4 NBAA’s International Operators Committee, organizers of the IOC, structure their activities into eight subcommittees each focusing on eight regions globally. Steven K. Thorpe, Assistant Chief Pilot for Merck & Co., Inc., chairs the International www.AvBuyer.com

Operators Committee, and Amway’s Christian Strand is Regional Lead Coordinator. Following Day One’s coverage of subjects applicable to all international operations, independent of the region of flight, subsequent days provided a venue for operators who are intimately familiar with regional conditions to describe their experiences and offer helpful suggestions. Interspersed between presentations by operators with local knowledge of the eight regions were relevant topics such as security uniquely applicable to international operations, avionics mandates and implementation strategies, medical issues for domestic and international operators, catering considerations, fatigue risk management, and international trip planning and execution. Each year the International Operators Conference provides a wealth of essential information as well as practical tools for conducting safe, efficient and successful operations throughout the globe. With today’s expanding use of business aircraft for international commerce, NBAA’s IOC is a “must attend” event. More from www.nbaa.org/events/ioc/2015 Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen May_Layout 1 14/04/2014 15:44 Page 1


AirCompAnalysisMay14_ACAn 16/04/2014 12:22 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 900EX/EX EASy

GULFSTREAM G450

Dassault Falcon 900EX/EASy by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of New/Pre-Owned business jets in the $12-42.2 million range for the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Dassault Falcon 900EX and 900EX EASy. We’ll consider the usual productivity parameters, including payload/range, speed and cabin size, and cover current and future market values. The field in this study also includes the Gulfstream GIV-SP and G450.

I

BRIEF HISTORY The Dassault Falcon 900 series is produced by Dassault in France. First flight of the

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

original Falcon 900 took place on September 21, 1984. Today, the Falcon 900 series, along with its smaller Falcon 50 sibling and Falcon 7X stand alone in that they are the only business jets boasting three engines. The Falcon 900 is derived from the Falcon 50, which itself was a development on the Falcon 20 aircraft. Development included computer-aided design and the incorporation of composite materials, and various subsequent updates and developments on the original 900 model have occurred over the years. Improved models include the Falcon 900B, featuring improved engines and increased range, and the Falcon 900EX featuring further improvements in engines and range and an “all-glass” flight www.AvBuyer.com

deck. The Falcon 900C, meanwhile, is a lower-cost companion to the Falcon 900EX and replaced the Falcon 900B. In 2003, Dassault began offering its 900EX with the new EASy (Enhanced Avionics System) digital cockpit based on the Honeywell Primus Epic avionics system. In 2005, the Falcon 900DX entered service. Both the Falcon 900EX EASy and Falcon 900DX ended production in 2010. Prior to this, at EBACE 2008, Dassault announced another development of the 900 series - the Falcon 900LX - incorporating High Mach Blended Winglets designed by Aviation Partners Inc. These same winglets are being offered for the entire Falcon 900 series today as a retrofit kit. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


LEAS Single May_LEAS 15/04/2014 17:28 Page 1

Contact us: USA 201-891-0881 aircraftsales@leas.com WWW.LEAS.COM 1999 Gulfstream V s/n 565 Engines on RR Corporate Care, APU on MSP, Avionics on Honeywell HAPP, On Honeywell Mechanical Protection (MPP), Aircell Wi-Fi, Heads Up Display, Interior refurbished 2011

2006 Challenger 604 s/n 5633 Engines on GE OnPoint, APU on MSP Gold, On Smart Parts, Precision Plus Upgrade w/ Autothrottle, Hi-speed internet & wi-fi, Gross weight increase mod, New Interior & paint 2012, Operated Part 135 Price $7,800,000

2005 Gulfstream 200 s/n 126 10 passenger, Engines on ESP, APU on MSP, Avionics on CASP Program, 8C inspection just completed, Autothrottle, Maintained Part 135

1996 Gulfstream IV-SP s/n 1296 APU on MSP, Avionics on HAPP, ATG-4000 broadband transceiver Wi-Fi, Racal MCS 6000 SATCOM, Airshow 4000, ASC-469 Water Line Heater Upgrade Price $5,495,000

1990 Gulfstream IV s/n 1137 Engines 300 hrs since midlife, APU on MSP, 72-mo. insp. 10/2013, Direct TV, ASC 469 Water Line Ribbon Heater 12/ 2010, New carpet, side panels & divan fabric 11/2011 Price $995,000

Price $4,950,000

2000 Citation X s/n 750-0122 Engines on Corporate Care, APU on Aux Advantage, 9-yr insp. & Doc 3 c/w 9/2011, 4500 hr c/w 8/2008, Single point refuel, improved TR’s, Maintained Part 135

2005 Embraer Legacy 600 s/n 14500933 Engines & APU 100% JSSI, 8-yr “C” check 8/2013, Paint 1/2012, interior 9/2013, Steep Approach Kit (London City), Has operated Commercial EU-OPS 1

1990 Hawker 800A s/n 258182 Engines on MSP, Universal UNS-1EW-FMS WAAS/LPV, Collins RTA 858 Weather Radar & Panel,Wi-Fi & Internet, Honeywell MK VII EGPWS w/RAAS, SATCOM, DECS Engine Upgrade, Jetmap II Moving Map, Ship in excellent condition

1999 Hawker 800XP s/n 258419 Engines on MSP, Avionics on HAPP, New paint & refreshed interior 2007, SATCOM, gear O/Hs, X-rays, 48 mo. & G insp. 6/2011., Operating Part 135

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S , L L C

W W W. L E A S . C O M


AirCompAnalysisMay14_ACAn 15/04/2014 17:49 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 900EX/EX EASy PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A – PAYLOAD & RANGE MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Fuel Usage (GPH)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max Payload Range (nm)

Falcon 900EX

48,300

21,000

282

6,164

2,800

4,725

3,413

Falcon 900EX EASy

49,000

21,000

282

6,164

3,500

4,725

3,405

Gulfstream GIV-SP

74, 600

29,281

447

5,300

2,019

4,166

3,328

Gulfstream G450

74,600

29,281

447

5,800

2,519

4,400

3,549

Model

SOURCE: DATA COURTESY OF CONKLIN & DE DECKER; B&CA PURCHASE PLANNING HANDBOOK; AIRCRAFT COST CALCULATOR (ACC)

CHART A - CABIN CROSS-SECTION

The data contained in Table A (left) is sourced from Conklin & de Decker and is also published in the May edition of B&CA. As we have mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability. The Falcon 900EX ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 2,800 pounds is eclipsed by the Falcon 900EX EASy (3,500 pounds), but is greater than that of the Gulfstream GIV-SP at 2,019 and G450 at 2,519 pounds. Also, depicted in Table A, and sourced from Aircraft Cost Calculator, the Falcon 900EX and 900EX EASy each burn 282 gallons per hour (GPH) of JET A, which is 165 GPH – or 36.9% less fuel than the Gulfstream GIV-SP and G450 (447 GPH).

CABIN DIMENSIONS According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Falcon 900EX and 900EX EASy at 1,264 cubic feet has 17.1% less cabin volume than the GIVSP/G450 at 1,525 cubic feet. The GIV-SPIG450/G450 is almost 12 feet longer than the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy. As illustrated in Chart A (left) – sourced from the UPCAST JETBOOK, the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy interior dimension is slightly wider than the Gulfstream GIV-SP/G450 with both aircraft offering the same cabin height.

POWERPLANT DETAILS SOURCE: UPCAST JETBOOK

CHART B - COST PER MILE

Gulfstream GIV-SP

$8.53

$7.00

Gulfstream G450

$5.63

Falcon 900EX/EASy

$0.00

* 1,000 nm Mission Costs

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

$10.00

$5.00 US $ per nautical mile

www.AvBuyer.com

The Falcon 900EX/EX EASy has three TFE731-60 engines each offering 5,000 pounds of thrust. By comparison, the Gulfstream GIV-SP and G450 each have two TAY 611-8 and TAY 611-8C RollsRoyce engines respectively, offering 13,850 pounds of thrust. Using data published in the May B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost used from the August 2013 edition was $6.08 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisMay14_ACAn 16/04/2014 11:44 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 900EX/EX EASy this source does not represent an average price for the year. Chart B (left), which details “Cost per Mile”, compares the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 1,000nm mission with 800 pounds (four passengers) payload. The Gulfstream GIV-SP ($8.53) and G450 ($7.00) show the cost comparisons are more expensive to operate per mile than the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy ($5.63 per mile).

CHART C - VARIABLE COST Gulfstream GIV-SP

$3,738

$3,042

Gulfstream G450

$2,414

Falcon 900EX/EASy

$0,00

$1,000

$3,000

$2,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS The points in Chart D (right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in the B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook and Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors: 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The average speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jet aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious ❯ business aircraft buyers are Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY $45.0

Price (Millions)

The total ‘Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart C (right) - is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Cost, and Miscellaneous Trip Expenses. The total variable hourly cost for the Gulfstream GIV-SP at $3,738 and the G450 at $3,042 are considerably more expensive to operate than the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy at $2,414 per hour.

G450 ‘14

$40.0 $35.0

F900EX EASy ‘10

$30.0 $25.0 $20.0

F900EX ‘03

$15.0 $10.0

GIV-SP ‘02

$5.0 1

2

1.5

3

2.5

4

3.5

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE B - COMPARISON TABLE Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (cu ft.)

Falcon 900EX

430

1,264

3,413

Falcon 900EX EASy

430

1,264

3,405

Gulfstream GIV-SP

445

1,525

3,328

Gulfstream G450

445

1,525

3,549

Model

Max B&CA & VREF Payload Price $ w/avail fuel (Model Year) range(nm)

$16m USED 2003

$28.5m USED 2010

$10.4m USED 2002

$42.2m NEW 2014

In Operation

% For Sale

Sold*

118

7.6%

2

120

8.3%

1

304

8.9%

3

287

6.6%

3

SOURCE: DATA COURTESY OF CONKLIN & DE DECKER; JETNET; OPERATIONS PLANNING GUIDE B&CA * FULL SALES TRANSACTIONS PAST 12 MONTHS; SOURCE; JETNET STAR REPORTS

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AirCompAnalysisMay14_ACAn 15/04/2014 17:59 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 900EX/EX EASy usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy on the Productivity Index are competitive. Before the introduction of the Falcon 900EX, each Falcon 900 series failed to close the productivity advantage of the Gulfstream GIV-SP/G450 aircraft that were largely made up of greater range, speed and cabin volume (at a higher retail price). However, although the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy still offer a smaller overall cabin volume, they offer greater payload with full fuel, and are considerably less expensive to operate - with a competitive retail price. Table B (preceding page) depicts the retail prices from Vref and from B&CA for each aircraft. The number of aircraft in-operation, the percentage ‘For Sale’, and the average monthly number ‘Sold’ over the past 12 months are from JETNET. Curiously, as shown, all of the aircraft in our comparative field represent a traditional seller’s market (less than 10% of the fleet ‘For Sale’).

CHART Eered - VALUE Quads & DEMAND Value

Falcon 900EX/EASy (Cubes) GIV-SPs (Octahedrons) G450s (Spheres)

Dema

nd $30M $25M $20M $15M $10M $5M

5 25

20

10

15

Quan

Years

tity

15

10

Old

20

25

5

SOURCE: MEE INC.

TABLE C – PART 91 & 135 MACRS SCHEDULE

TABLE C - PART 91 & 135 MACRS SCHEDULE Following is the MACRS schedule for PART 91: Year 1 2 3 4 5 6

Following is the MACRS schedule for PART 135:

Deduction 20.00% 32.00% 19.20% 11.52% 11.52% 5.76%

Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Deduction 14.29% 24.49% 17.49% 12.49% 8.93% 8.92% 8.93% 4.46%

ASKING PRICES vs AFTT & AGE

SOURCE: NBAA

TABLE D - MACRS DEPRECIATION SCHEDULE 2003 Falcon 900EX - Private (Part 91) Full Retail Price - Millions Year Rate (%) Depreciation Depreciation Value Cumulative Depreciation

$16.0 1

2

3

4

5

6

20.0% $3.2 $12.8 $3.2

32.0% $5.1 $7.7 $8.3

19.2% $3.1 $4.6 $11.4

11.5% $1.8 $2.8 $13.2

11.5% $1.8 $0.9 $15.1

5.8% $0.9 $0 $16.0

2003 Falcon 900EX - Charter (Part 135) Full Retail Price - Millions Year Rate (%) Depreciation Depreciation Value Cumulative Depreciation

$16.0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

14.3% $2.3 $13.7 $2.3

24.5% $3.9 $9.8 $6.2

17.5% $2.8 $7.0 $9.0

12.5% $2.00 $5.0 $11.0

8.9% $1.43 $3.6 $12.4

8.9% $1.43 $2.1 $13.9

8.9% $1.43 $0.7 $15.3

4.5% $0.71 $0.0 $16.0

SOURCE: ACC - WWW.AIRCRAFTCOSTCALCULATOR.COM

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Chart E (left), sourced from the Multi-dimensional Economic Evaluators (MEE) Inc., (www.meevaluators.com), shows a Value and Demand chart for the Falcon 900EX/EX EASy as well as for the Gulfstream GIV-SP and G450. The current pre-owned market for these business jets shows 65 aircraft ‘For Sale’. Thirty Three of the 65 aircraft have an asking price with the remaining 32 inviting offers. We have plotted the 33 with asking prices. For demand, we grouped the points into five bins: 1. Those priced less than or equal to $18m; 2. Those greater than $18m, but less than or equal to $23m; 3. Those greater than $23m, but less than or equal to $25m; 4. Those greater than $25m, but less than or equal to $27m; 5. Those priced greater than $27m. Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisMay14_ACAn 15/04/2014 18:00 Page 5

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 900EX/EX EASy By doing so, we obtained the unbiased Demand Equation, which reads: $14M = $43.6 * Quantity^-0.47. This equation has an adjusted R^2 of 98.9%, an F-Statistic of 369 and a P-Value of 0.03%, meaning that it is an excellent predictor of demand. For value, we found that we could best predict price using 1) Years, and 2) Cubic Feet of Cabin Volume per Passenger. In this instance, age in years and total time on the airframe were highly cross-correlated, preventing us from using them at the same time. We obtain this unbiased Value Equation: $14M = 0.039853 * Years^-0.612 * Vol/Pass^1.62. This equation has an adjusted R^2 of 94.1%, an F-Statistic of 256 and P-Values for Years and Volume per Passenger of 5.30E10 and 2.17E-07, respectively. This equation is an excellent predictor of value. The ‘Cubic Feet of Volume per Passenger’ term is a metric that separates out a ‘comfort factor’. It is the Cabin Cubic Feet divided by the passenger capacity for any given airplane’s executive configuration. We modeled the dataset using other variables such as TTAF, etc. Volume per Passenger, however, had a strong positive correlation and it made sense, so we used it.

DEPRECIATION SCHEDULE FOR BUSINESS AIRCRAFT Aircraft that are used in a trade, business, or for the production of income that are primarily operated domestically, and not used in common or contract carriage may be depreciated over a five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) schedule. Aircraft used in common or contract carriage (e.g., Part 135) are depreciable under seven-year MACRS (see Table C, left). Table D (left) shows an example of using the MACRS schedule for a 2003 model Falcon 900EX in private (Part 91) and charter (Part 135) operations over five and seven-year periods, assuming a Vref retail value of $16.0 million. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CHART F - RANGE MAPS Dassault Falcon 900EX

4545.000 Nm

Dassault Falcon 900EX EASy

4545.000 Nm

Gulfstream G450

4350.000 Nm

Gulfstream GIV SP

4049.000 Nm

SOURCE: AIRCRAFT COST CALCULATOR

RANGE COMPARISON

SUMMARY

Finally, Chart F (above) shows the circle ranges from Geneva, Switzerland, for all the business jets in this field of study, as sourced from Aircraft Cost Calculator. The Falcon 900EX/EX EASy shows greater range coverage than the Gulfstream GIV-SP and G450. Note: For jets and turboprops, ‘Seats Full Range’ represents the maximum IFR range of the aircraft at Long-Range Cruise with all passenger seats occupied. ACC assumes NBAA IFR fuel reserve calculation for a 200 nautical mile alternate. The lines depicted do not include winds aloft, or any other weather-related obstacles.

Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value. There are other qualities such as airport performance, terminal area performance, and time to climb performance that might factor in a buying decision, too, however. Using JETNET/AvData information, there are currently 61 or 12.2% Falcon 900 series aircraft (incorporating the 900, 900C, 900DX, 900EX, 900EX EASy, 900LX) “For Sale”. The Falcon 900EX and EX/EASy series of aircraft fares well alongside its competition, so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value.

Our expectations are that the Falcon 900EX and EX EASy will continue to do well in the preowned market.

❯ For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com; Web: www.mdchase.com

Next month’s Comparative Analysis Piper Meridian www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

77


ACSpecs IntroMay14_AC Specs Intronov06 15/04/2014 16:58 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LARGE CABIN JETS

JUNE ISSUE: Medium Jets JULY ISSUE: Entry Level & Light Jets AUGUST ISSUE: Turboprops SEPTEMBER ISSUE: Large Cabin Jets

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Large Cabin Jets – appears opposite, to be followed by Medium Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

78

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

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nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BO MB AR DIE RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 30 DIE 0 RC HA L BO LEN MB GE AR R3 DIE 50 RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 60 DIE 1-3 RC R HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 60 DIE 4 RC HA L L EN BO GE MB R6 AR 05 DIE RC HA LLE BO NG MB ER AR 85 DIE 0 RG LO BA LE BO XP MB RE AR SS DIE RG LO BA BO LE MB XP RE AR SS DIE XR RG S LO B AL GL OB 50 AL 00 60 00

AircraftPer&SpecMay14_PerfspecDecember06 15/04/2014 17:08 Page 1

LARGE CABIN MEDIUM JETSJETS $3,281.73

$3,311.16

$4,383.45

$3,903.40

$3,628.17

$3,855.07

$5,718.91

$5,690.67

$5,457.39

$5,506.33

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.08

6.08

6.1

6.08

6.08

6.08

6.25

6.25

6.25

6.25

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.17

7.17

8.2

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

CABIN LENGTH FT.

28.6

28.6

28.3

28.4

28.4

48.4

48.35

48.35

42.47

48.35

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

860

860

1035

1150

1150

1990

2140

2140

2022

2140

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

6.22

6.22

5.83

5.83

5.83

5.8

6.16

6.17

6.17

6.17

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.5

2.5

3

3.08

3.08

3.08

3

3

3

3

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

106

106

115

115

115

202

190

195

195

195

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

9

10

10

15

13

13

13

13

MTOW LBS

38850

40600

45100

48200

48200

53000

95000

98000

92500

99500

MLW LBS

33750

34150

36000

38000

38000

47000

78600

78600

78600

78600

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

23850

24800

26250

27100

27150

34618

50300

51200

50861

52230

USEABLE FUEL LBS

14045

14150

17635

19850

19852

18274

43158

44642

38959

44716

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1105

1800

1365

1263

1298

358

1792

2408

2930

2804

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3350

3400

4750

4815

4850

9382

5700

4800

7139

5770

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3065

3200

3380

3756

3756

2456

5940

6055

5200

5890

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3340

3600

3590

4119

4123

3096

6125

6226

5350

6080

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4810

4853

6500

5765

5840

6305

6170

6170

5540

6476

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3833

3850

4500

3833

3833

4120

3667

3667

3667

3667

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4240

-

4259

4345

4345

3395

3450

3300

3450

3300

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

474

-

1207

680

581

443

522

474

704

474

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

470

470

459

488

488

459

505

511

511

511

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

443

459

459

442

488

488

488

488

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

425

425

425

425

459

471

471

471

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

HTF 7000

HTF 7350

CF34-3A1

CF34-3B

CF34-3B

CF34-3B1

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

BR 710A2-20

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

79


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0 SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0D SSA X UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0E SSA X UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0E SSA XE UL AS TF y AL CO N2 DA 00 0LX SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0LX SSA S UL TF AL CO N2 00 DA 0S SSA UL TF AL CO N9 DA 00 B SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 C

AircraftPer&SpecMay14_PerfspecDecember06 15/04/2014 17:09 Page 2

LARGE CABIN JETS $4,108.69

$3,387.22

$3,483.69

$3,353.13

$3,298.15

$3,298.15

$3,369.32

$4,314.33

$4,119.65

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

CABIN LENGTH FT.

31

31

31

31

31

31

31

33.2

33.2

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1264

1264

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.7

5.7

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.7

2.7

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

134

131

131

131

131

131

131

127

127

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

12

12

MTOW LBS

35800

41000

42200

42200

42200

42200

41000

45500

45500

MLW LBS

33000

39300

39300

39300

39300

39300

39300

42000

42000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

22750

23190

23190

23190

24440

24440

24750

25275

25275

USEABLE FUEL LBS

12155

14600

16660

16660

16660

16660

14600

19165

19165

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1095

3410

2550

2550

1300

1300

1850

1260

1260

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

5910

6510

6510

6510

5260

5260

4950

2945

2945

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

2841

3378

3878

3878

3817

3817

3613

3450

3450

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3130

3440

4045

4045

4255

4255

3681

4080

4080

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5440

5300

5585

5585

5850

5850

4652

5144

5144

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4333

4333

4333

4333

4450

4450

4450

3633

3633

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3730

4575

4375

4375

4350

4350

4350

3755

3755

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

377

490

490

490

490

490

490

645

645

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

475

482

482

482

482

482

482

500

500

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

459

459

459

459

459

466

466

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

442

442

442

442

442

442

428

428

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

CFE 738-1-1B

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

TFE 7315BR-1C

TFE 7315BR-1C

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

80

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle May 17/04/2014 09:45 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

Citation Specialist Do you want your Citation Sold too? If so, call the experts at Eagle!

Deal Pending

2004 CITATION CJ2, S/N 525A-0203

2007 CITATION XLS

135 Engines

1999 EXECUTIVE 328 JET, S/N 3121

1981 CONQUEST I, S/N 425-0063

1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0343

2007 SR22 G3 GTS TURBO, S/N 2470

2010 TURBO T206H STATIONAIR, S/N T20608965

2006 TURBO T182T, S/N T18208523

After hours contact • Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 Matt Fullerton +1 316 722-4375 • Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822-5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Paint & Interior, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA DX SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA EX SSA UL TF AL CO N9 00 DA EX SSA EA UL Sy TF AL CO N9 00 DA LX SSA UL TF AL CO N7 EM X BR AE RL EG AC Y6 00 EM BR AE RL EG AC Y6 50 GU LFS TRE AM G2 80 GU LFS TRE AM G3 00

AircraftPer&SpecMay14_PerfspecDecember06 15/04/2014 17:10 Page 3

LARGE CABIN JETS $3,857.39

$4,111.87

$3,787.44

$3,734.94

$4,131.24

$3,999.90

$4,143.21

$3,246.54

$5,293.75

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6

6

6.25

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7

6.9

7.2

7.3

CABIN LENGTH FT.

33.2

33.2

33.2

33.2

39.1

49.8

49.8

32.25

45.1

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1264

1264

1264

1264

1552

1650

1650

935

1525

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

6

5

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.26

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.5

2.5

2.75

3

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

127

127

127

127

140

286

286

34

169

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

120

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

12

12

12

12

12

13

13

8

13

MTOW LBS

46700

48300

49000

49000

70000

49604

53572

39600

72000

MLW LBS

42200

44500

44500

44500

62400

40785

44092

32700

66000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

25800

24700

24700

26400

36600

30081

31217

24150

43700

USEABLE FUEL LBS

18830

21000

21000

21000

31940

18170

20600

14600

26700

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2270

2800

3500

1800

1660

1507

1910

1000

2000

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

5064

6164

6164

4464

4400

5193

4939

4050

5300

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

4100

4500

4500

4800

5490

3091

3661

3387

3486

MAX. RANGE N.M.

4290

4725

4725

5000

5870

3485

3980

3690

3820

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4890

5215

5215

5215

5600

5614

5741

4750

4700

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3633

3750

3750

3833

3583

3850

3927

5083

4417

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3880

3880

3880

3880

-

2639

3022

5000

3805

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

796

755

703

703

615

761

757

844

767

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

482

482

482

482

-

455

459

482

500

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

459

459

488

447

447

470

476

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

430

430

430

459

424

425

459

445

3

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

PW307A

AE 3007A1E

AE 3007A2

HTF 7250G

TAY 611-8

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian April 20/03/2014 14:39 Page 1

2005 Citation XLS

2004 Global 5000

2700TT. Beige leather. ESP Gold. ProParts. Satcom. EU Ops

2550TT. EVS & HUD. Satcom. Airframe on SmartParts. Engines on Rolls Royce Corporate Care

2008 Hawker 750

2013 Gulfstream 450

1900TT. Beige leather. Satcom. MSP Gold

File photo

Gulfstream 550

2009 Beech B200GT King Air

Several aircraft including 2013

1450TT. Sand leather. Raisbeck mods. Satcom. Support Plus

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

2007 Eurocopter EC135P2+

Three MD600N available

1450TT. Beige leather interior. Single pilot IFR. Engines on ESP Gold

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE


AircraftPer&SpecMay14_PerfspecDecember06 15/04/2014 17:11 Page 4

G6 50 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GV

G5 50 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

G5 00

GIV -SP GU LFS TRE AM

G4 50 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

G3 50

G4 00

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

LARGE CABIN JETS $5,125.00

$5,296.63

$5,138.92

$5,463.26

$4,947.92

$4,973.94

$5,631.48

$5,364.27

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.4

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

8.5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

45.1

45.1

45.1

45.1

50.1

50.1

50.1

53.6

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1525

1525

1525

1525

1669

1669

1669

2373

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6.28

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

169

169

169

169

226

226

226

195

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

14

13

14

13

18

18

13

18

MTOW LBS

70900

74600

74600

74600

85100

91000

90500

99600

MLW LBS

66000

66000

66000

66000

75300

75300

75300

83500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

43000

43700

43200

43700

47900

47900

48400

54000

USEABLE FUEL LBS

25807

29281

29281

29281

34940

41000

41000

44200

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2493

2019

2519

2019

2660

2500

1500

1800

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6000

5300

5800

5300

6600

6600

6100

6500

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3680

3880

4100

3880

5620

6490

6250

-

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3900

4166

4400

4166

5991

6950

6675

-

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5065

5700

5770

5700

5385

6200

6200

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4417

4417

4417

4458

3667

3667

3750

4167

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3960

3640

3760

3640

3950

3650

3610

-

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

736

701

712

701

707

594

820

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

500

500

500

500

508

508

508

516

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

476

476

476

488

488

488

-

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

445

445

445

445

459

459

459

488

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TAY 611-8C

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

TAY 611-8

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

BR 710-C4-11 BR 710-C4-11 BR 710-A1-10 BR 725 A1-12

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

84

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


08 -10 DECEMBER 2014 DUBAI WORLD CENTRAL, UAE

BUSINESS AVIATION IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND www.meba.aero

ORGANISED ON BEHALF OF:

MEET US AT EBACE: STAND 2243


European Fleet Guide_Pre-Owned Sales Jan06 15/04/2014 12:16 Page 1

EUROPEAN FLEET OVERVIEW

The European Business Jet & Turboprop Fleet. by Michael Chase his month, eyes turn to Geneva, Switzerland for the EBACE2014 event, jointly hosted each year by the European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). With this in mind, we ask what is the health of the Business Aviation fleet in Europe at this time?

T

EU ECONOMY According to the European Commission Forecast, Winter 2014, within the EU economy, welcome recent improvements point to a path towards recovery. GDP growth in the EU, which turned positive in the second quarter of last year, is increasingly driven by domestic demand - as it is typical following deep financial crises. However, the recovery remains fragile. EU GDP, which rose 0.1% in 2013, is now expected to rise 1.5% in 2014, and 2.0% next year, while growth in the euro area, which was 0.4% for 2013 as a whole, is expected to be 1.2% in 2014 and 1.8% in 2015. After two years of contraction, the European Commission’s economic forecast is very good news for Business Aviation in Europe. With that established, the focus of the following paragraphs is to report the current European Business Jet and Turboprop fleet from several views.

FLEET PERCENTAGES At the end of March 2014, Europe accounted for 2,526 (or 14%) of the global wholly-owned, in operation business jet fleet, and 1,236 (or 9%) of the total business turboprop fleet – see Table A (opposite). This was a decline of 65 fewer (-2.5%) business jets in Europe in 2014 compared to 2013. However, business turboprops increased by 29 aircraft (+2.4%) within Europe in 2014, compared to 2013. Europe ranked second for the total number of business jets, behind North America, and third for the total number of business turboprops, behind both North and South America.

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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BY TOP 10 MODELS Table B shows that the Citation Mustang (94 units) and King Air B200 (107 units) lead the Top 10 business jet and business turboprop models in Europe.

BUSINESS JETS (BY OEM) Cessna leads all manufacturers of business jets in operation in Europe, as depicted in Chart A, followed by Bombardier and Dassault Falcon. These ‘Top Three’ manufacturers account for 75% of the over 2,500 business jets in Europe.

BUSINESS TURBOPROPS (BY OEM) Of the Turboprop OEMs, Beechcraft leads the way in Europe with 414 units (33%) of the total 1,236 units in operation there. Cessna, Piper and Pilatus comprise the remaining manufacturers that hold more than a 10% share of the business turboprops in operation in Europe. Combined, the ‘Top Four’ account for 65% of all the Turboprops in Europe, see Chart B.

TOP TEN OPERATING NATIONS As depicted in Tables C and D, Germany has the largest number of business jets and business turboprops in Europe. (The total numbers of aircraft that are wholly-owned, shared and fractionally owned are also shown in both tables, along with the numbers leased.) In fact, leased business jets make up 8% of the total fleet of over 2,500 business jets in operation within Europe, and 9% of the more than 1,200 business turboprops. ❯ For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


European Fleet Guide_Pre-Owned Sales Jan06 15/04/2014 12:17 Page 2

EUROPEAN FLEET OVERVIEW TABLE A

Location of Aircraft by Continent - Based In WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION AUSTRALIA NORTH SOUTH AFRICA ASIA EUROPE TOTAL OCEANIA AMERICA AMERICA 455 1,342 198 2,526 12,172 1,357 18,050 3% 7% 1% 14% 67% 8% 100%

MARCH 2014 JETS Percentage TURBOPROPS Percentage

791 6%

778 6%

471 3%

1,236 9%

8,359 62%

1,857 14%

13,492 100%

Source - JETNET

TABLE B

Location of Aircraft by Contine nt - Base d In WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION ALL JETS as of 3/31/2014 RANK

MAKE

1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 10

CITATION FALCON GULFSTREAM CHALLENGER CITATION CITATION CITATION CHALLENGER CITATION CITATION CITATION

MODEL

Location of Aircraft by Continent - Based In WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION ALL TURBOPROPS as of 3/31/2014

EUROPE Global TOTAL

MUSTANG 7X G-550 604 CJ2+ CJ3 525 300 XLS CJ2 II

94 85 70 69 66 66 65 61 57 55 54

428 200 410 343 208 384 330 385 233 225 551

CHART A - BUSINESS JETS - EUROPE (MARCH 2014)

RANK

MAKE

MODEL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10

KING AIR CARAVAN PIPER PIPER PILATUS KING AIR KING AIR PILATUS AVANTI CHEYENNE AVANTI

B200 208B MERIDIAN MALIBU JETPROP PC-12 NG 200 350 PC-12/45 II II P180

4%

Hawker 220 9%

Bombardier Falcon Hawker

Embraer

Bombardier 573 23%

Other

Total 2,526

Beechcra

Beechcraft 414 33%

Cessna Piper Pilatus

Socata 95 8% Pilatus 123 10%

Gulfstream

Falcon, 454 18%

1,040 1,578 488 240 385 659 680 516 99 340 77

Other 155 13%

Avanti 83 7% Cheyenne 89 7%

Cessna

Cessna 868 34%

107 95 73 64 59 48 44 43 42 42 41

CHART B - BUSINESS TURBOPROPS - EUROPE (MARCH 2014)

Embraer 114 Other 4% 106 Gulfstream 191 8%

EUROPE Global TOTAL

Socata Cheyenne

Piper 137 11%

Avan

Cessna 140 11%

Other

Total 1,236

Source: JETNET

Source: JETNET

TABLE C

TABLE D Top 10 Countries - Business Jets March 2014 Wholly Total Shared Fractional Owned

Top 10 Countries - Business Turboprops March 2014 Wholly Total Shared Fractional Owned Germany 231 230 1

Leased

Rank

1

18

1

374

2

10

2

France

188

174

11

226

225

1

18

3

United Kingdom

179

173

6

16

216

211

5

44

4

Switzerland

93

92

1

1

Switzerland

197

195

2

15

5

76

76

Portugal

145

42

1

4

6

Russian Fed

50

50

7

ltaly

133

133

42

7

Spain

42

42

3

8

Spain

124

124

13

8

Sweden

42

42

15

9

Russian Fed

124

124

10

Belgium

57

52

Rank

Country

1

Germany

432

431

2

United Kingdom

376

3

Austria

4

France

5 6

Source: JETNET

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

2

102

3

Country

ltaly

5

9

Belgium

41

40

3

10

Luxembourg

41

27

3

Leased 6 27

8

1 14

2

Source: JETNET

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

87


CAI_WAS_MAY14_Layout 1 4/15/14 11:40 AM Page 1

CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC.

2014 1983 –

PHONE: +1 (561) 433-3510 | www.caijets.com CAI has used over 30 years of experience to complete hundreds of corporate jet and turboprop aircraft transactions. We specialize in Single Engine Turboprops such as the TBM, Pilatus PC-12 and Piper Meridian, and Light Jets such as the Citation, Learjet and Phenom. In addition, CAI is focused on providing our clients with the information they require to determine which Aircraft best meets their mission profile – avoiding costly mistakes. CAI also arranges Pilot Training, Insurance, and Financing. We invite you to give us a call. J.P. HANLEY PRESIDENT, CAI

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.CAIJETS.COM, OR CONTACT J.P. HANLEY DIRECTLY ON HIS MOBILE AT +1.561.289.3355.

2008 PHENOM 100

2005 PILATUS PC-12/45

S/N 009 ONLY 600 HOURS TOTAL TIME SINCE NEW! Mint Condition. JSSI Engine Program, EEC Standard, Flight Docs, Weather Radar, XM Satellite Radio, DME, Premium Pax Door and more…AVAILABLE FOR LEASE OR PURCHASE.

S/N 635 One Corporate Owner Since New, FLOWN BY SAME PROFESSIONAL PILOT, MAINTAINED AT PILATUS SERVICE CENTER, RVSM EQUIPPED, Dual Garmin 530 with WAAS, INCREASED MAXIMUM TAKE-OFF WEIGHT 4,500 KG. (9,920 LBS.), No Damage History, Excellent Paint and Interior!

2008 TBM 850

2004 PZL M28 SKYTRUCK

Available for

PURCHASE OR LEASE

S/N 435 ONE OWNER AND ONLY 670 HOURS SINCE NEW! Garmin G1000 Full Glass Panel Flight Deck with Synthetic Vision, Owner will consider a LEASE/PURCHASE. Please contact us for further information.

S/N AJE-0305 No Runway? No Problem! Mfr by Polskie Zaklady Lotnicze Co. Ltd (PZL), a Sikorsky Company. Twin Turboprop Engs (P&W PT-6A-65B), Fixed Gear w/Steerable Nose Gear for Ops on Unpaved Airfields, Short Takeoffs & Landings (STOL).

1993 TBM 700A

1983 PIPER CHEYENNE IIXL, HB-LNX

Sale PENDING

S/N 90

Only Three Owners and 2,838 Hours TTSN, Garmin GNS-530W, Argus 7000 Moving Map, 2-Tube EFIS, WX-1000E, No Damage History. Annual Inspection, Landing Gear Actuators/Propeller Overhaul and 5-Year Structural Inspection complied with October 2013 by RLAC.

S/N 31T8166050

8005 TT; 600 SMOH / 3600 SMOH; IFR; 2003 Paint; 2003 Interior, Cargo Door, KFC-300 AP/FD, Dual Garmin 530’s w/WAAS, Always Hangared and No Damage History.


Mark Winzar_Edit 15/04/2014 15:34 Page 1

AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK WINZAR

LEFT TO RIGHT: RICKI MUSKETT, OLIVER NEWTON, MARK WINZAR, KERRIE HARDING, ANGY WELLSTEAD.

JSSI’s Farnborough Hub An interview with Mark Winzar. by Mike Vines

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

ost of us wouldn’t contemplate travelling overseas without health insurance: one phone call will solve all your problems and it’s vital to your peace of mind. In the same way, Chicago-headquartered Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI) has been offering peace of mind and much more for business aircraft owners over the last 25 years, and is the world’s largest independent provider of hourly cost maintenance programs for business aircraft engines, APUs and airframes. When your aircraft goes ‘tech’ it’s nice to

know that just one call starts the JSSI rescue co-ordination process. The company offers flexible and affordable financial tools, managing the often unpredictable costs of operating and maintaining nearly all types of turbine-powered aircraft - be they jets, turboprops or helicopters. Worldwide, JSSI supports customers in over 75 countries and is the largest purchaser of business aircraft maintenance services. In 2010, JSSI opened its second Business Aviation hub at TAG’s Farnborough Airport in England. This office is the core of operations for Europe, the Middle East, Africa and ❯

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

M

89


Mark Winzar_Edit 15/04/2014 15:36 Page 2

AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK WINZAR

“We say that if an aircraft is not under an engine program as a minimum it’s a naked aircraft.” - Mark Winzar

Asia, and JSSI continues to expand its international network of key technical advisors to be ever closer to clients. In an exclusive interview with World Aircraft Sales Magazine, Farnborough-based Mark Winzar, Vice President, Technical Services Operations, JSSI, explains the company’s expansion strategy and trends, and hints at new offerings. “We decided to make Farnborough our international headquarters and European hub; one of the real benefits is the continued expansion, growth and popularity of the airport,” he explained. “Effectively, we’re where our customers are, based, right in the passenger terminal.” [The company also has technical and sales offices in Europe based in Basel, Frankfurt, Paris and Vienna.] Aircraft not covered by any such hourly cost maintenance program are known as ‘naked aircraft’. The programs offer far more than just protection for unscheduled events. They provide budget security, protect assets and limit financial risk, while making it easier for the owner or broker to eventually sell the aircraft. “We say that if an aircraft is not under an engine program as a minimum it’s a naked aircraft,” Winzar outlines.

INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION Aside from its presence in Farnborough, JSSI has a technical representative based in the free zone near major FBOs at Dubai International Airport and has a sales representative there too. In Hong Kong, the company’s technical support office is based in the International Airport’s Business Aviation center. In India, JSSI’s man is based at Mumbai; in South Africa at Johannesburg; in Malaysia at Kuala Lumpur; and in New Zealand (also covering Australia) at Wellington. “We have global presence and also have a strategic partner relationship in China with China Business Aviation Group headed by Jason Liao in Beijing,” Winzar added, while indicating that JSSI is about to support an undisclosed Chinese fleet operator. JSSI’s Farnborough hub will eventually be replicated in the Middle East and Asia, according to Winzar. “We’ll put them where we see the growth. It’s vital for us to have our people close to where the business is located. This will help achieve the company’s growth ambitions worldwide within five years.” Winzar points out that globally JSSI has over 3,000 aircraft engines covered on its programs and a growing number of Tip-to-Tail® aircraft contracts. Around 35% of airframe contracts are from outside of the Americas, highlighting the global nature of its business. “In terms of new business contract values in 2013, over 50% were generated outside of the US. New business is coming from the emerging markets of the Middle East, China, Africa and South America (the latter is the responsibility of JSSI’s Chicago HQ) and these regions are contributing very heavily to our success.”

CHANGING PORTFOLIO JSSI’s client portfolio is also changing dramatically, moving from smaller twin turboprop and mid-sized business jets into coverage for G550s, Challengers, Global Express, Global 5000 and 6000s, BBJs and ACJs. “The BBJs and ACJs are all engine contracts currently, but we are planning to launch a BBJ airframe contract which will cover everything apart from the bespoke interior,” Winzar elaborated. Tip-to-Tail® is now available for the G650 and is the earliest in an aircraft’s lifecycle that a program has ever been made available by the company. The smallest aircraft types covered by Tip-toTail®, meanwhile, are the King Air family and Phenom-line, and JSSI launched the program for the Gulfstream G280 in January. JSSI’s new business in 2013 accounted for a 179% improvement over that of 2012. This company worldwide figure includes engine, APU and airframe programs. “Airframe ❯ contracts are a big chunk of this, it is

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


IAG May_Layout 1 28/04/2014 16:12 Page 1

Contact: Cass Anderson or Jeff Habib Tel: +1 212 888 7979 B6C=6II6C™H:6IIA:™H>A>8DCK6AA:N

Email: info@iagjets.com

Challenger 300 s/n: 20059 20052005 Challenger 300 s/n: 20059

Fresh 96 Month Inspection, Landing Gear Overhaul (Completed in December 2013 at Bombardier Tucson): s One US Owner Since New s 9 Seat Interior with Divan s GoGo Biz High Speed Data s Iridium SATCOM s Currently Operated Commercially in Accordance with FAR Part 135 Regulations s Extended Overwater Equipment s Enrolled on SmartParts Low Utilization Program s Turn Key Option - Keep Aircraft with Existing Management Company and Charter Certificate s No Known Damage

Fresh 96 Month Inspection, Landing Gear Inspection, New Combustion Liners (Completed in December 2013 at Bombardier Tucson): • One US Owner Since New • 9 Seat Interior with Divan • GoGo Biz High Speed Data • Iridium SATCOM

• Extended Overwater Equipment • Currently Operated Commercially in Accordance with FAR Part 135 Regulations 2004 Falcon 2000EX s/n: 025 • Enrolled on SmartParts Low Utilization Program Highest Serial Number Falcon 2000EX • Turn Key Option - Keep Aircraft with Currently Existing For Sale: s Unmatched Pedigree - One OwnerCertificate Since New Management Company andUS Charter s Engines / APU on ESP Gold • No Known Damage s AvTrak Maintenance s 10 Passenger Seating w/Jump Seat s TT-5000 HSD+/Swift 64 SATCOM s Airshow 400 Cabin Display s Baker CD/DVD Player s 88 Parameter SSDFDR s FAR Part 135 Material Burn Cert./Swatches s No Known Damage

2004 Falcon 2000EX s/n: 025

2001 Falcon 900C s/n: 189 Exclusive Falcon 900C Lease opportunity:

Highest Serial Number Falcon 2000EX Currently For Sale: • Unmatched Pedigree - One US Owner Since New • Engines / APU on ESP Gold • AvTrak Maintenance • 10 Passenger Seating w/Jump Seat

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s Fresh 2C and Landing Gear Overhaul s US Registered s No Damage history s MSP Gold s 18 Passenger Seating 64 SATCOM • TT-5000 HSD+/Swift s AirCell Iridium – Axxess II SATCOM • Airshow 400 Cabin Display s Forward and Aft Lavatories • Baker CD/DVD Player s TT: Cycles:SSDFDR 2122 • 883958 Parameter • FAR Part 135 Material Burn Cert./Swatches • No Known Damage


Mark Winzar_Edit 16/04/2014 09:49 Page 3

AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK WINZAR

“‘Warranty is not Maintenance’ and one of our educating arguments, especially in emerging markets, is that even if the aircraft is not flying much, you still have to maintain it in accordance with the manual - and a warranty will not cover that maintenance.” - Mark Winzar

becoming more popular and will continue to evolve in response to the market,” Winzar outlined. “I’m sure there’ll be some more Tip-toTail® news coming out shortly as to how this will work,” he hinted. “Particularly in emerging markets, airframe contracts are much more popular simply, I think, because flight hourly budget stability is crucial. Support is also a major factor when selecting hourly cost maintenance contracts in emerging markets as maintenance support infrastructure is in a fledgling state. There is limited experience to deal with certain maintenance events and the workforce is probably not as mature as it would be in the US and Europe.” The company is focused on covering the larger long range business jets as this segment has been less affected by the recession and has continued to grow. “We’ve done an inordinate amount of work creating programs for brand new aircraft and are taking more under our wing,” Winzar outlined. “Historically, people with brand new aircraft haven’t taken our support programs because of the warranty. But ‘Warranty is not Maintenance’ and one of our educating arguments, especially in emerging markets, is that even if the aircraft is not flying much, you still have to maintain it in accordance with the manual - and a warranty will not

cover that maintenance. “Warranty may help in the event of a parts failure; it may help in getting costs back if defects are found as a result of maintenance - but effectively warranty is not maintenance!” Although a small part of the overall JSSI business, helicopter contracts are predominantly ‘engine only’ although include some that are Tip-to-Tail®. “The helicopter market is something that, strategically, we intend to expand into,” Winzar elaborated. “Helicopters tend to work in fleets…and these operators are becoming far more educated on the benefits of hourly programs. Tip-to-Tail® has recently become available for the EC135 and EC145.” As an illustration of the usefulness of having your aircraft covered on an hourly program, Winzar concluded with a casestudy, giving an insight into how JSSI handled an AOG incident in China two years ago during Chinese New Year when a TAG Asia-managed Global Express (which was on a JSSI engine program) had to land at Chengdu with an engine problem. It was subsequently found that an engine would have to be removed. “We were the first company to take a Rolls-Royce BR710 rental engine into mainland China,” Winzar recalled. “The paperwork was endless with thousands of emails generated. Even more import/export paperwork was required for the damaged engine and rental engine. We engaged Rolls-Royce On-Wing Care to do the engine change for us and we coordinated with TAG Asia. “We had a meeting with the owner at ABACE 2012 who at the time was pretty upset because the aircraft had been grounded whilst a rental was installed and the engine was in mid-repair. The engine was repaired but later that year the second engine had an issue. That was also successfully supported by JSSI so when we met up again at ABACE 2013 the feedback received was, ‘Last year I asked why I’d enrolled onto such a program. This year, I say ‘thank you’ for the JSSI program!’ That speaks volumes for the benefits of an hourly cost maintenance program, especially in emerging markets such as Asia.” From a strategic point of view, one of the advantages that JSSI offers is that it has a wide range of products covering virtually every type of turbine powered Business Aviation airplane and engine across the spectrum – also offering transferability so that owners can take the program from one aircraft to another, regardless of which OEM it comes from.

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


PremiAir March_Layout 1 17/02/2014 15:12 Page 1

2002 Global Express Off Market

2011 Dassault Falcon 2000LX Off Market

2008 Airbus ACJ A318 Elite Total time 2020 Hours 19 Seat VVIP aircraft Price ‘Make Offer’

2012 Embraer Legacy 650 Off Market

1985 King Air F90-1 Total time 3225 Hours Price ‘Make Offer’


JMesinger May14_JMesingerNov06 15/04/2014 11:28 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Just A Friendly Reminder... t’s not the price; it’s not the sizzle; and it’s not the paint job. In fact you could name just about every facet of our industry and once you finish that list, print it, neatly fold it, then crumple it into a ball and throw it away! I assure you all those wonderful items you just spent time thinking about, organizing by segment and then writing down are nowhere near as important to a great industry as are the people. I take the time to point this out every couple of years. It never changes in order of importance. The people are the key to safety, customer service, great product development, and so on. There is no denying the people, and in fact one should never overlook them. Remember to say ‘great job’; remember to shout out the extra effort when it’s noticed. Remember to acknowledge those who may not get much acknowledgement day after day, such as the line-service men and women, the back shop teams, and the people who are not out front but who provide the foundation of the service offering of all of the industry segments. Believe me, we all notice when people are not providing the standards promised, but too often we forget those behind-the-scenes people who care, and do make a difference in your ultimate experience. Sure, we walk into an OEM facility and the name on the side of the hangar exudes confidence in what one should expect to find inside - but I assure you if a customer has one bad people experience in one of these facilities it can sour the experience and create an irreversible outcome. I am not necessarily talking about a safety of flight problem, but an exchange between customer and employee. As we begin to really see and feel a recovery in our industry, the need will never be greater than now for people to work well with other people. As business loads start to come back and extra hiring is beginning to take place and work hours increase, the toll on these facilities and their employees will never have been greater during the past five years.

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Bravo for the recovery and its immediate effect on the people. After all it is this dedicated group of men and women who make our world go round. I remember a time when I was staying in a Ritz Carlton, famed for being one of the finest hotel chains in the world. One morning I was coming down to the lobby in an elevator which stopped en route, and the doors opened just as two personnel from housekeeping were passing each other. Neither noticed my presence as I watched from the elevator - but one addressed the other as ‘Mister’, who responded to the former as ‘Miss’. They both wished one another a good morning and a great day. That culture of respecting not only the hotel patron but each other, even as employees, is one of the reasons for the hotel’s renown. It’s the people! The culture of these companies and the way they train and encourage their employees will set the stage for a success far greater than a known manufacturer’s name above the hangar. People thrive on recognition for not just work done well but also just being. So the idea that a pat on the back or a word of encouragement can move mountains if you expect that mountain to be moved by people is exactly correct. Back to the idea of the recovery and the people: I have been writing for months that we are on the cusp of a real recovery. It will be slow and steady, but that provides greater certainty of a sustained recovery. It may not always look like a recovery if you do not stand back and take it all in. If you are only measuring it by a price recovery, don’t hold your breath. If you are measurwww.AvBuyer.com

ing it by transactions, first-time buyers coming into the market, or shop activity for pre-buys, modifications and cosmetic improvements, you are no doubt already pleased with what you are seeing. There are other areas that will follow and will look better over time, such as the price of the airplanes - these will never get back to 2008 levels, but they will stop going down. I do believe that given the increase in transactions a broader lending community will get interested again, and that will help stabilize our recovery. In all of these areas that are enjoying the increase in business, the people will benefit first: more jobs; better dependability; and stability in work hours – along with greater opportunity in our industry for employment. Just remember it is a people business. Bravo for the recovery and its immediate effect on the people. After all it is this dedicated group of men and women who make our world go round. Their skills and the desire to implement them in their daily work life will continue the growth, safety and enjoyment of not just the recovery but the sustainability of our industry moving forward. So I say ‘Thank You’ to you all for caring and lifting our industry back into blue skies. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of Mesinger Jet Sales. Jay serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards (BAAB). Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Innotech May_Layout 1 16/04/2014 10:36 Page 1

Please contact: Andrew Pearce - UK Call: +44 (0) 7557 237 730 Email: Andrew.pearce@innotech-execaire.com Harald Maron - Toronto Call: +01 (905) 673 0800 Email: harald.maron@innotech-execaire.com Ken Moon - Vancouver Call: +01 (905) 604-273-8686 Email: ken.moon@innotech-execaire.com

1986 Citation III S/N 650-0104 Motivated to sell. This aircraft has approximately 7,850 hours Total Time, the engines have approximately 300 hours since CZI and are enrolled on a MSP engine service plan. The 8 place interior is configured with a 2 place forward divan, 4 place club and 2 aft forward facing seats. A 10� monitor is installed in the forward cabin. The avionics include dual Universal 1K FMS, TCAS II, TAWS and 406 ELT. Any reasonable offers are considered

CL 601-3A/ER S/N 5069 Innotech-Execaire is pleased to offer this 10 passenger Challenger 601-3A/ER for sale. The aircraft interior was refurbished in 2010 and includes a 4 place belted divan with a forward lav and aft galley. The aircraft currently has 7,522 hours and 4,751 cycles

2012 Challenger 605 This year 2012 Challenger 605 offers an exceptional opportunity having very low hours and landings, JSSI 100% and very well appointed and high quality 12 passenger interior

www.execairejetsales.com


Data Comm Feb14_Edit 16/04/2014 09:43 Page 1

THE DOPE DEBATE

Don’t Let Marijuana Ground Your Jet. By David G. Mayer ublic opinion appears to be turning in favor of legalizing recreational use of marijuana, as evidenced by relatively new statutes in Colorado and Washington where such use of marijuana is now permitted. The New York Times has predicted that Oregon and Alaska will act next. For Business Aviation, this shift in attitudes extends into and far beyond the states that have already decriminalized certain aspects of possession and/or permitted medical use of marijuana. It also touches the 5,000 public-use airports used by thousands of private jets and other General Aviation aircraft all around the U.S., because those aircraft may have transited states where such use is now legal. Despite trends toward legalization and decriminalization, federal law, including the Controlled Substances Act, makes it illegal to manufacture, distribute, transport or dispense marijuana, and federal law takes precedence over state law, even for medical use of marijuana permitted by state law. On the other hand, it might be tempting to brush off the concern of federal law sanctions in

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So where do these Federal actions leave the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), whose top mission is to “provide the safest, most efficient aerospace system in the world?” light of the 2013 issuance by the Department of Justice (DOJ) of its Guidance on Marijuana Enforcement, where the Deputy Attorney General of DOJ says that it will stand down and look to the states to make and enforce the laws about the production, distribution and possession of marijuana. So where do these Federal actions leave the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), whose top mission is to “provide the safest, www.AvBuyer.com

most efficient aerospace system in the world?” Consistent with this mission, Section 91.19(a) of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) states: “[N]o person may operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marijuana…are carried in the aircraft.” Yet, even this statute creates an “out” in FAR Section 91.19(b), which provides that the regulation “does not apply to any carriage of…marijuana…authorized by, or under any Federal or State statute or by any Federal or State agency.” How this affects Business Aviation is at best cloudy. Has the legal morass given you or your guest – or your charter customer - a free ticket to fly with marijuana on the operator’s or the owner’s aircraft? The prudent, if not the obvious, answer to this question is still “no.” The complex web of statutes and interaction between state and Federal law makes compliance confusing and violations perilous. You could make a potentially serious mistake to assume that no one will catch you or care about your carrying or consuming Aircraft Index see Page 4


Data Comm Feb14_Edit 15/04/2014 16:07 Page 2

Not just a tug.

It’s a

8700 Series

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THE DOPE DEBATE small amounts of marijuana at any airport or on a private aircraft. Rather, take time to: • Know the rules and regulations of the state, city and on any property where you may possess or use marijuana. Only Colorado and Washington have legalized small amounts of marijuana for recreational use, but your risks become evident (if not obvious) in the details of the implementation, licensing and restrictions in their laws. If law enforcement, the Drug Enforcement Agency or the FAA elects to find a criminal or civil violation on, or near your jet or airport, you may find that at a minimum it is expensive to “lawyer-up” and fight back. • Review your various agreements affecting your aircraft and its use. This should confirm what may happen if you or your customer is stopped, fined or jailed for alleged unlawful possession, consumption, use, display, transfer, distribution, sale or transportation of marijuana on your jet or at any airport - even if in Colorado or Washington. Also, if you are the one that needs protection from an operator’s actions in violation of the various laws and regulations (e.g., a private jet owner that charters Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

the aircraft), seek advice on how to strengthen and clarify the provisions in your agreements to allay your concerns and minimize your risks. • Consider whether you may trigger a default or breach under your financing or other transaction documents if your aircraft is subject to any legal action, such as a confiscation and seizure, for criminal and civil law marijuana violations. • Understand the potential to do serious (if not irreparable) damage to your organization’s reputation and/or the reputation of a financier, manager, owner, charterer or lessee or any other Part 135 operator associated with a marijuana incident or accident on, near or involving your aircraft or airport— even in Colorado or Washington. • Appreciate that the pilot can ground your aircraft as a result of the unlawful use of marijuana. The choice of whether to do so puts the pilot between the proverbial “rock and a hard place”. He or she risks being fired or suspended by the boss and, if convicted on drugs charges, losing his or her certificate, rating or authorization. The safest action for the pilot, therefore, is to stop illegal marijuana use on board the aircraft. www.AvBuyer.com

The legalization and decriminalization of marijuana has generated huge press and public interest, but it remains to be seen whether risk management regarding marijuana gains traction in private aviation or simply goes up in smoke. The FAA’s prime mission is to ensure safety in aviation. It is hard to imagine anyone would credibly endorse the idea that marijuana use or possession on private jets or airport property supports that objective or is free of risk.

❯ David G. Mayer is a partner at the Dallasbased law firm of Shackelford, Melton, McKinley & Norton, LLP. He represents clients in domestic and international private aircraft matters, including buying, selling, financing, regulatory compliance/structuring, risk management and tax issues. Mr. Mayer is a member of the National Aircraft Finance Association, NBAA and the Equipment Leasing and Finance Association.

❯ He can be contacted at dmayer@shackelfordlaw.net or (214) 780-1306. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Andrew Bradley May14_Bradley 15/04/2014 14:48 Page 1

THE G650 FACTOR

Gulfstream G650: Could Gulfstream’s ultimate business jet end the industry’s longest slump? by Andrew C. Bradley f you’ve worked in Business Aviation as long as I have, you’ve seen the continued roller-coaster over the past two or three decades of economic prosperity. Some of you who have been in the industry longer have witnessed pretty much everything: from the oil embargo in the 1970s; the early-1980s recessions; the 1987 Stock Market crash; two Gulf wars; 9/11; and lastly the global financial meltdown of 2008/2009. With the exception of that last event, we’ve emerged from adversity each time quite quickly and ramped back up to speed with barely a glitch. The last crisis, however, has proved to be stubbornly hard to ditch. For the most part, inventories in the preowned markets are still battling significant over-supply, and prices on all but the newest aircraft have seen accelerated depreciation over the past two years. In some markets prices are falling 10% or more per year, while in other extreme cases the number is closer to 20%. In past crises these types of numbers cropped up occasionally, but only on aircraft twenty to thirty years old and close to their retirement age. Today we are seeing these sorts of numbers on aircraft less than 15 years old. New aircraft deliveries are steadily creeping up but are nowhere near the levels of pre2008. For each of the past five years I can recall renewed optimism at NBAA about the upcoming year only to be disappointed. While the pace of flight department shutdowns has abated, it has not totally disappeared. Both at the corporate level and the flight department level, scrutiny prevails on every aspect of business jet operation whether stemming from internal shareholder-led scrutiny, or public media perception. Business Aviation has struggled to generate much excitement in recent years.

I

GAME CHANGER? There have been plenty of new aircraft brought into service over the course of the past few decades, but I can’t recall any of

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them generating as much excitement as Gulfstream’s new G650. Nor can I recall any of the past new entrants in the market providing a “shot in the arm,” so to speak, in terms of pulling our industry out of a prolonged slump. In my opinion, Gulfstream’s new G650 is a “game changer” and in a time of global expansion is the ultimate business tool. More importantly Gulfstream’s G650 entry into service in 2012 created a “buzz” in our industry I’ve never seen before. I must get a dozen calls a week from clients asking when the next position is available for a G650, and if one can be purchased in the secondary market. Parked on the ramp at our Burbank headquarters, each of our three G650s generates tremendous reaction from those nearby. The oft-used term “game changer” sounds like a cliché but I believe the G650 truly is a state of the art “clean sheet” design that doesn’t build upon its predecessor’s airframe— which itself spawned multiple Gulfstream models over the past 35 years. The G650 is a totally new airframe, and its 7,000 nautical mile range and performance that brushes up against the speed of sound make it the ultimate business jet in today’s market. It’s not just what you experience on the outside, however. The cabin truly allows you to stand up and stretch your arms and legs without problem. I have noted that for the first time your iPhone, iPad and other electronic devices will feel right at home in the G650 - Steve Jobs would definitely approve of the G650 were he around to try out his many marvelous devices cruising at the speed of sound. And when entering the cockpit for the first time, you’d be forgiven if you thought you’d stepped into a space shuttle or an F18 fighter jet. In some regards, the G650 far eclipses even those cockpits. The feedback from our own pilots, maintenance personnel, and charter clients has been outstanding, and similar feedback has been received from other operators - especially pilots who cannot seem to help themselves when espousing the virtues of Gulfstream’s www.AvBuyer.com

flagship product. Yet, in many ways the excitement of the G650 has to be balanced with the fact that this aircraft takes us into uncharted territory with its new technology and clean sheet design. Sometimes we have to remind ourselves that Gulfstream is in the business of building these aircraft, but has little experience operating them – and that is where today’s operators, Avjet included, who operate multiple G650s, will have an advantage in the G650 marketplace. So in closing, why have I devoted several paragraphs to outline the virtues of the G650? I firmly believe that the G650 is the start of something very positive for our industry and that the continued strong demand for this aircraft is just what we need to finally break out of this five-year slump. I truly believe that when we look back in ten, maybe twenty years’ time we will see the introduction of the G650 as an inflection point in aviation history. I was genuinely saddened a decade ago when the Concorde went out of service. Even more disheartening was the fact that no viable replacement was on the horizon to take aviation into the next one hundred years. I think the G650 may just be the breakthrough product that will push aviation to exceed the bounds that the Concorde set almost forty years ago. These types of developments couldn’t have come at a better time to point us in the right direction. ❯ Andrew C. Bradley is President, Global Sales & Acquisitions at Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter and management solutions. The company is headquartered in Burbank, California, and maintains a global presence in Washington D.C., Seoul, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Moscow and other locations around the globe. To learn more about the company, visit www.avjet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Safety Matters MAY14_Edit 16/04/2014 08:58 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS: SUMMER FLYING

Hot Fun in Summer Skies: Warm-season weather imposes its own considerations.. by Dave Higdon

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s the people south of the Equator approach fall and winter, Business Aviation users in the upper half of the planet brace for their summer. Already, weather authorities claim, North America is off to a slow start – which could portend some significant catch-up disturbances as Nature seeks the impossible: Atmospheric equilibrium. As pilots and meteorologists learn early in their training, Earth's weather originates from uneven heating of the planet's surface. Hence the crews of high-flying turbinepowered aircraft deal with a dichotomy in summer weather, with temperature extremes far greater than those of winter.

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www.AvBuyer.com

Plunging from more than 110 Fahrenheit on the ground to minus 60 at FL510 subjects the aircraft to a thermal swing of 170 degrees – and back up again on descent and landing. Beyond the creature discomforts, such extreme temperature swings stir the atmospheric stew into the range of weather challenges flight crews face every day. The FAA says weather-related accidents struggle with a 25 percent fatality rate. And weather is a top topic in this year's ‘Most Wanted List’ posted annually by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). Add the reality that private aircraft often cross multiple time-zones and possibilities increase that a given flight will also transit different weather systems. Consider these the challenges of summer flying. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters MAY14_Edit 16/04/2014 08:59 Page 2

Beyond the creature discomforts, such extreme temperature swings stir the atmospheric stew into the range of weather challenges flight crews face every day.

ICING 1: NOT JUST A COLD-SEASON THREAT... The temperature at the departure airport to the East of Kansas hovered in the mid-80degree range. Sixty minutes later, westbound over the western Rocky Mountains at FL390 the First Officer (F.O.) flipped on the light jet's landing lights; the startled Captain sardonically asked his junior: “You expect to see a runway now?” The F.O. first activated the jet's anti-ice system before again hitting the landing light switch and pointed forward at the instant the aircraft slipped into a cloud. Minimal ice had accumulated that time, but cloud tops stretched beyond the aircraft-light's reach. Now the captain understood what he had missed seeing. Cloud tops - and far higher Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

than forecast. Icing exists, anytime and anywhere. Sub-zero temperatures exist with visible moisture. Anytime ice builds up on flying surfaces, their aerodynamic characteristics quickly begin to change negatively. Frost, also, can so deteriorate a wing's lifting ability to the point that it threatens flight itself. Most businessturbine aircraft deliver with anti-ice protection approved for flight into known icing conditions (FIKI), but these protective technologies have limitations: they protect only a small part of an aircraft airframe. Consequently, sustained flight in all but the lightest icing exposes the aircraft to the risk of ice accumulating on the unprotected surfaces of the aircraft – the fuselage in particular. While not the same aerodynamic issue as www.AvBuyer.com

lifting surfaces, every inch of ice increases aircraft weight, which is another factor in ice deteriorating aircraft performance. An inchthick square foot of ice weighs 4.9 pounds. A small jet that accumulates an inch over the entire upper half of its 300 square feet of fuselage gains about 735 pounds. It's unlikely that only the upper half of only the fuselage would accumulate ice, making a real-world number far higher. And discerning ice accumulation becomes more challenging at night – even when the aircraft sports ice lights to illuminate the wing. With cloud tops able to soar high into the flight levels, climbing to remain clear of the clouds isn't always an option; aircraft approved to FL410 may be able to climb higher – but the clouds may still be a threat, as we'll see in another weather story below. But even after staying ice free above the visible moisture, a business-turbine aircraft can face long periods in the clouds on descent, adding ice every minute until descending into abovefreezing air. Total avoidance remains the only iron-clad protection. Diverting offers an option when reaching the planned destination would mean spending too long in the ice. Standard safety considerations when iced-up include flying approaches at higher speeds, but the standard pre-ice-protection escape maneuver remains the best response to the threat when duration ❯ is the issue: a 180-degree turn. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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SAFETY MATTERS: SUMMER FLYING POP-UP STORMS: SURPRISE! ‘That storm wasn't there a few minutes ago’, the pilot thought as he broke out on the ILS approach as planned: Ceiling at 800 feet, visibility six miles. The break-out proved fortuitous, the pilot recalled: “Thanks to that set-up, I could see Nature's little hide-and-seek game.” Now you see the runway...now you don't. Had the flight descended to Decision Height, the Missed Approach procedure would have had him flying directly into a Level 3 thunderstorm, likely swallowing the aircraft in mayhem while drenching the airport in a down-pour. Instead, the pilot had time to break off, inform Approach of the situation and head to the hold point. On the way back in after the storm passed, the pilot nearly missed again because lightning knocked out the Inner Marker Beacon transmitter...in the end, the airplane broke out with 50 feet to spare. Much like pilots fret about so-called “popup TFRs” the pop-up thunderstorm present an immediate threat because of its surprise nature, visible on neither radar nor on the minutes-old in-cockpit Doppler weather graphics. The last thing a pilot wants to see is the airport ahead get enveloped by the black blob of a thunderstorm that’s just unexpectedly popped up during the approach. Surprise…!

THEY DON’T ALWAYS GET WHAT THEY WANT…

ICING 2: HIDE-AND-SEEK The single pilot of the light jet happily cruised along with the Flight Management System handling navigation and flight-control chores...right up until the point that, unexpectedly, the flight control system failed to make a course turn programmed into the FMS. A few seconds later, the clutch for the autopilot's aileron servo released with a jerk as the system overcompensated when attempting to get back to its planned course. The pilot found the yoke resistant to returning to level, but he managed to muscle the airplane back. A check later found evidence of iced pulleys in the roll circuit. Another two-person crew experienced a similar problem in pitch – and, again, evidence of frozen cables and pulleys underpinned the explanation. In recent years, instances of unseen icing have threatened the control of some aircraft. These incidents have afflicted aircraft exposed to heavy rains because water entered spaces not generally

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visible during the pre-flight inspection. Ailerons, flaps and wingtips can accumulate water that freezes as the aircraft climbs. Leveling off from that climb can present the flight crew with frozen controls when cable runs or pulleys freeze up. Weight imbalances can also result, leaving the flight crew questioning the weight-and-balance calculations that guided their loading of people and equipment. While performing the control-integrity check – full-aileron deflections, complete check of elevator range-of-travel and deploying and retracting flaps – does not always assure full draining of water. Individual aircraft should be checked for open drain holes, proper seals, and a check with mechanics or OEMs about the best way to assure removal of all trapped water before take-off. But should the situation arise, remember, the airframe interior's only anti-ice protection is warmer air – and lower altitudes almost always takes an aircraft to warmer air. www.AvBuyer.com

Aviation's accident history is rife with examples of pilots continuing an approach into the tumult of a downpour. Even scarier, lightning sometimes out of inertia - sometimes because an ATIS or other weather broadcast said the ceiling and visibility were better. They probably were better twenty minutes earlier. But the extreme convection that comes with the uneven heating of the Earth's surface can rapidly send down water and turbulence when the pilot least wants it – close to the ground. Many times these isolated pieces of convective weather move on, or dissipate as quickly as they form, so spending a few minutes at the holding point for a missed approach certainly beats the battering that accompanies a rough landing. One other caution: Such a storm can, in a fraction of a second, damage important landing aids if lightning strikes the marker-beacon transmitters arrayed along the final-approach segment to help the crew positively identify their proximity to the runway threshold.

THIN RED LINES The line of thunderstorms stretched from O'Hare Airport (ORD) in Chicago to Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) in northern Texas. The briefer who answered the phone at the Flight Service Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters MAY14_Edit 16/04/2014 11:28 Page 4

SAFETY MATTERS: SUMMER FLYING station drawled, “Son, I don't care if you've got radar, Stormscope, datalink or a pipeline to the Almighty... I'm looking at tops above Flight Level six-zero-zero... airline pilots are looking for a place to hide... not even Concorde can clear those tops... Now, is there anything else I can do for you?” The briefer kindly gave the pilot recommendations for a pilot-friendly hotel in town, a nearby restaurant – and a Mississippi River floating casino. “You've already won big today, you should put some chips on a number and spin the wheel. If you'd continued past dark, you may have never seen what killed you.” Occasionally, you just can't get to where you want, wherever you are. Other times, you might be able to get there, with fuel and time to make an end run... But when either scenario adds several hundred miles flying to the left or right - the simplest option is to find a safe harbor. When FL600 is too high, and the left and the right end too far, you should first find an airport one with a hangar - and then find a hotel. Break the ‘good news’ to the folks at your destination. Tell them about all the other business aircraft and jetliners crowding in behind you – because when the business pilots know it’s time to land, you know the airline pilots are close behind. With good sense, you will still be intact to make the trip...tomorrow.

WHEN THE WORLD'S A ‘CORDUROY ROAD’ The traffic on Denver Center that night chattered with repeated entreaties from high-flying pilots asking ‘for smoother’ skies, and the helpful Center controllers accommodating those requests as best as traffic conditions and separation standards would allow. The controllers alternated between “Climb to (requested altitude) approved,” and “Descent to (requested altitude) approved,” with an occasional “Unable at this time, maintain Flight Level...” The pilot of a twin turboprop started fretting. “Those airline guys know their stuff; maybe we should ask for higher...or lower...” The fact was, that twin prop was already flying in the smoothest air available over Colorado and West Kansas that night. “Those captains are worried about passenger complaints about the ride...those captains don't want a drop spilled.” Who does? Business aircraft crew and owner pilots face the same sensitivities, but often with a greater likelihood that their passengers understand that smoother isn't always available. But sometimes, even savvy Business Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Aviation veteran users may not understand the issue beyond the comfort level. The bottom line is that when the air turns rough enough to rattle teeth, turbulence moves beyond a human-comfort issue and into the safety realm. It's simpler to say than to explain, but beyond a certain level, any airframe risks damage if flown too fast or maneuvered too abruptly. The sources vary with the seasons and with conditions: Mountains, deserts, extreme temperature differences, weather fronts in conflict, all contribute to the phenomenon of rough air at different times, places and conditions. Flight crew train to observe aircraft limitations, and they know that above a specific speed, dramatic control-surface deflections can bend the airframe – possibly breaking it. Slowing is the first step, and escape is the other. Slowing may run counter to the mission, but it cleaves to safety. Windshear – turbulent air that is the www.AvBuyer.com

boundary layer between bodies of air moving at high speed but in different directions – produces among flying's least-comfortable air type. High up and below maneuvering speed, human discomfort dominates risks; at pattern altitude or lower ground proximity the risk is raised significantly of an out-of-control arrival. So while the sun smiles down on you this summer, and the world seems a serene place as you go about your pre-flight check at ground level – don’t be lulled into a false sense of security. Be as alert as ever – perhaps even more so remembering that the very warmth you feel on your face can be the cause of some stark contrasts as you climb to higher altitudes.”

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Piston to Propjet_Gil WolinNov06 16/04/2014 10:36 Page 1

PISTON TO PROPJET

More Speed, More Climb, More Costs Turboprop conversions from pistons: big performance - at a price. by Dave Higdon

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Piston to Propjet_Gil WolinNov06 15/04/2014 16:10 Page 2

here's no such thing as a free lunch. Whether you ascribe that phrase to Robert Heinlein's 1966 science-fiction novel The Moon is a Harsh Mistress or to economist Milton Friedman – he made the phrase the title of a book – the adage serves aviation well. Do you want efficiency above speed? Piston airplanes and small aircraft deliver excellent numbers in terms of miles per pound of fuel, and costs per knot. The trade-off is that if you’re crossing the North American continent, it’ll take a full day of flying - providing weather fluctuations don't waylay your plans. Perhaps you want to speed along faster than 200 mph at between 10,000 to 25,000 feet (above ugly lower weather fronts). Plenty of piston-powered equipment can deliver – albeit at a higher price in terms of fuel cost. But if you want even more speed and space with the ability to cross oceans, and with room to move around the cabin, it’s going to cost you significantly more money; upfront and on a flying basis… Now you're into solid turboprop and jet territory, with the significantly higher costs that accompany ownership and operation of these business-turbine aircraft. As the saying goes: ‘There's no free lunch’. So for the light business piston aircraft operator, the odds are that the airplane flown is the one the operation can afford. If you fall into this category, did you know that a middle ground exists that may allow you to keep the airplane you can afford, know and perhaps even love, while stepping up into turboprop performance levels? Have you ever considered converting a piston airplane to propjet power? While it’s still not cheap – turbine engines just aren't inexpensive – conversions offer owners the benefits that are inherent to the powerplant, but at costs that are closer to the piston airplane that was converted. This conversion route is significantly less expensive to finance (think mid-toupper six figures for a package) compared to the exposure from buying comparable performance for an added million or more. Thanks to the distinct operating characteristics of turboprop powerplants, converted aircraft typically gain the ability to fly a mile higher, 50-60 knots faster, and still carry slightly more payload thanks to a lighter powerplant. Depending on the conversion, that extra payload capability may go to tanking more fuel. With lower specific heat content in Jet A versus Avgas, turboprop engines need more fuel per power unit – and more per mile – than gas engines. But thanks to the efficiency ❯

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Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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Piston to Propjet_Gil WolinNov06 15/04/2014 16:13 Page 3

PISTON TO PROPJET gained in high-altitude cruise, the airplane will fly faster and further, above the weather, and at its best efficiency on a full load of fuel. In addition, thanks to their lighter weight per power unit, a turboprop engine may allow you to carry more even after enabling a larger fuel supply.

A NEW SPIN ON POWERPLANTS Pistons inside engines go up and down, up and down; the memory aid applied by generations of student pilots puts it: ‘Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow’. For every two turns of the engine crankshaft the engine's pistons first draw in air on the downward intake stroke, then squeeze down the air-fuel mixture on the compression stroke. The power (or ignition stroke) comes when the fuel/air mixture explodes, pushing down the piston as the rods connecting piston to crankshaft transfer the pistons' vertical motion into spinning motion by rotating a

crankshaft. Along the way cams must rotate to open and close intake and exhaust valves and an ignition system must provide a precisely timed jolt of electricity to spark plugs which light the fires in each cylinder to provide the power making all this happen. Any engine running at peak fuel-andpower efficiency uses some of its power to sustain itself. That applies to turbine engines which, in contrast, gain some efficiency by spinning their way to high-power performance. Air must still flow into the engine and endure compression; a fuel must be flowing into a fire produced to power the plane and the power-making process. But everything happens on a continual, uninterrupted, nonreciprocating basis: air compressed by a linear or centrifugal compressor that squeezes atmospheric air into progressively smaller spaces until it enters a combustion chamber where a continual spray of fuel mist mixes constant-flame combustion – the process that

While their longer lifespans help offset their per-hour overhaul costs, the mid-six-figure costs of turbine-engine overhauls, plus service and rentals, make for some serious planning before going for overhaul.

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pushes power turbines driving the compressor and accessories – including the propellers of turboprop engines. Piston engines enjoy benefits of being small, relatively inexpensive, simple to build and repair, and tolerant of some level of mismanagement, even with their complex assembly of moving parts. Conversely, normally aspirated piston engines suffer from hypoxia as the airplane climbs higher, reducing power output and air to cool the engine. Turbocharging – forcing compressed air through the inlet system – improves engine breathing to produce cruise power to far higher altitudes. But turbocharging doesn't ameliorate the cooling issue – even when combustion-air cooling is employed. Turbine engines similarly suffer power loss from the effects of high-altitude flying, helping them maintain power up to their rated altitude limit. And cooling is less of a challenge. On high-bypass fanjet engines, their powered fan section provides enough air to feed the compressor section while between two and seven times the volume of combustion air bypasses the engine core for what's often labeled ‘free thrust’. Thus the total nature of turbine engines make them better performers at high altitudes compared to even turbocharged engines. Turboprop engines also enjoy the benefits of lighter weight per horsepower and smaller frontal area or form factor – so they can be installed more aerodynamically. So why don't all pilots – particularly business pilots – fly behind turbine engines? Arguably their two biggest drawbacks involve that most-finite of resources: money. Compared to piston aircraft engines, turbine engines cost significantly more per power unit – turboprops less so than jets, but still far more than pistons. Similarly, turbines need more fuel per horsepower, mainly due to being designed to use less-volatile, lower-energyladen Jet A. Finally, turbine engines tend to offer far longer overhaul periods, with 3,500 hours between visual hot-section inspections and the 7,000 hours for suggested overhaul. While their longer lifespans help offset their per-hour overhaul costs, the mid-six-figure costs of turbine-engine overhauls, plus service and rentals, make for some serious planning before going for overhaul. So to recap: compared to piston-powered business aircraft, turbines let you climb higher to fly faster – but you'll spend more on fuel, by any measure, and more on overhaul when the time comes. For many, the debate stops at “climb higher to fly faster”. But for others, the issue is more about time than money. For these frugal folks, a conversion to a turboprop from a piston need only gain them time within acceptable limits for the costs. Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Piston to Propjet_Gil WolinNov06 15/04/2014 16:14 Page 4

PISTON TO PROPJET

CONVERSION CANDIDATES O&N: SILVER EAGLE P210 UPGRADE

Arguably, no conversion better illustrates the weight differences between a piston and propjet engine than the Silver Eagle. The pressurized Cessna P210s left Wichita with a turbocharged piston-six of 310 horsepower that provided a maximum ceiling of FL230. Every one of those 310 horsepower needed 1.65 pounds of engine to produce – 510 pounds in all. The Rolls-Royce (Allison) 250-B17F/2 powerplant at the heart of O&N Aircraft Modification's package, however, produces 450 shp from a package weighing 205 pounds. That calculates to 0.46 pounds per horsepower. Not all of that weight savings goes into payload, though, with some given back to system improvements and fuel-system upgrades (among them a 27-gallon header tank). With the standard 88 gallons of usable capacity, the header tank gives the Silver Eagle 115 gallons usable. The fuel change and an increase in speed by nearly 50 knots combine to increase cruise range beyond 1,000 nautical miles - to almost 1,200 nautical if you pull power back a few knots. We're talking about 20 GPH of Jet A to cruise at 215 knots, versus 168 knots and 18 GPH of Avgas. A new prop, refurbished airframe, in-house crafted interior, avionics improvements and added electrical-system redundancy contribute to a comprehensive package that yields an airplane with operating economics at the top of

its class. You can also factor in better payload, shorter runway needs, higher cruise speed and faster climb. The changes make the P210 a greatly improved option for the owner/pilot or small-business flight department. Maybe, however, you prefer a non-pressurized option? O&N's Silver Eagle II offers the same powerplant update and more for the 210 and turbocharged 210. And if a twin-engine piston is more what you were thinking, O&N offers those same Rolls-Royce turboprops in a pairing on the Cessna 340, converting the piston twin into the turboprop-powered Silver Eagle 340. In each case the same degrees of payload and performance improvements result from the package – along with reduced maintenance demands of 3,500 hrs TBO.

❯ More from www.onaircraft.com

AVIATION ALLIANCE: EXCALIBUR 421 CONVERSION Cessna's 400-series piston-twins all enjoy reputations as solid, hard-working business aircraft. The unpressurized, normally-aspirated 402 was for years a darling of small regional charter companies and commuter airlines. Cessna's cabin-class 421 piston twin won legions of fans among business-owner/pilots thanks to its good speed, efficiency, pressurized cabin, and decent pilot manners. “All it really needs to be an ongoing contender is a pair of turboprop engines,” opined one local commercial pilot. Thanks to Aviation Alliance, that may well become reality. Lead by a veteran managing director of operations – one Jack Pelton, former chairman

and CEO of Cessna Aircraft – the Paso Roblesbased outfit is developing the Excalibur 421, and in doing so, is delivering “essentially a brand-new” aircraft, according to Pelton, with a completely remanufactured airframe. The conversion employs Pratt & Whitney PT6A135A turboprop engines, an extensive custom Garmin avionics suite, a new-generation cabin interior, new tires, brakes, anti-icing, hydraulics and electrical systems. The result: a propjet twin that is capable of exceeding 300 knots in cruise at altitudes of up to FL300 – and covering more than 1,400 nautical miles (with IFR reserves). The Aviation Alliance manages the program participation of Excalibur 421 LLC partnering companies, which include Capital Aviation, Clay Lacey Aviation and Oklahoma Jet Center. An Excalibur prototype was already flying under the engine-conversion STC at the time of the program's launch in early 2013.

❯ More from http://aviationalliancellc.com/

ROCKET ENGINEERING – BRIEF SUMMARY One company particularly busy in the conversion of Pistons to Propjets is Rocket Engineering, as pinpointed below: •

The number of JetPROP DL and DLX Mirage conversions is nearing 300; the 279th was delivered in February. http://jetprop.com/

Northwest Turbine, LLC employs Rocket to perform the conversion work on its Royal Turbine Duke, a pressurized B60 Beech Duke airframe fitted with a pair of Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A propjets and new props. http://royalturbine.com/

West Pacific Air STC'd the conversion to PT6A engines of the venerable Beech Bonanza, with Rocket handling the work to deliver what it calls the TurbineAir Bonanza. http://turbinebonanza.com/

Cougar Baron LLC continues to work with Rocket to complete the newest of its engine-conversion STCs, switching B58P pressurized Barons to PT6As. http://cougarbaron.com/

In each of the above cases, higher speed, better payload and range result from replacing the high-stress, turbocharged piston engines or even the naturally aspired piston mills. And these packages all offer far more in the way of aircraft refurbishment than mere powerplantand-prop upgrading.

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Intro your new jet MR_Edit 15/04/2014 12:05 Page 1

INTRODUCING YOUR NEW JET

Introducing Your New Jet for Charter By Patrick Margetson-Rushmore n the March issue of World Aircraft Sales Magazine, I looked at the process of buying and collecting a new business jet, up to the point when you bring the aircraft home. So what happens next…? The aircraft is standing by on the ramp, ready to fly in a charter operation, and you can sit back and watch all the eager customers form a queue, right? Not a chance. You need to make the business happen.

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BROKERS & PRESS COMMUNICATIONS At LEA, brokers are effectively the marketing arm of our business, so naturally we need to ensure they have all the information they need about the new aircraft to promote our services accurately. That information goes far beyond basic pricing details. In order to do their jobs as productively as possible, brokers need to understand thoroughly the capabilities, and indeed the limitations, of the aircraft. Availability details need to be clear too, www.AvBuyer.com

particularly if the aircraft is being managed on behalf of a third-party owner. When is the owner using the jet and when is the aircraft available for charter? As a key part of the liaison process, we want brokers to physically see and touch the aircraft, internally and externally. We will therefore invite them to acquaint themselves fully with the new jet on arrival on the ramp, which might involve one-on-one meetings, or perhaps a group ‘open day’. Now is also the time to put public Aircraft Index see Page 4


Intro your new jet MR_Edit 15/04/2014 12:06 Page 2

Executed well, taking delivery of a new aircraft – and introducing that aircraft to the market – should be one of the most exciting experiences in aviation. relations teams into top gear. Customers need to be made aware of the opportunities opened up by the arrival of the new aircraft. Ensure journalists have all the input they need, formulating the information you distribute according to the market being addressed. Remember that aviation industry journalists might, for example, be interested in technical jet specifications, whereas regional newspapers may prefer to know how the aircraft will help local businesses. If introducing a new type of aircraft into the market, a launch event can be an effective means of educating many industry audiences at once, from brokers to the media. We have held such events with great success in the past for the Mustang and the Cessna Citation Excel. Not that one day’s work will be sufficient: from press releases to carefully selected direct client marketing, you should be looking to heavily promote your aircraft type to achieve market awareness for at least 18 months.

TEAM COMMUNICATIONS In your eagerness to communicate with brokers, potential customers and the media, don’t forget to communicate with your own team too. Email all your staff with the key operational, pricing and availAdvertising Enquiries see Page 8

ability information that you are also sharing with brokers. The personal service that is so vital to executive aviation means that your company representatives that handle customer enquiries and bookings should be wellinformed and able to ‘challenge the brief’. Does this new aircraft, for example, actually meet the customer’s requirements better than the aircraft the customer is requesting?

COCKPIT AND CABIN The arrival of the aircraft at home base will, in the case of a new type, allow you to put training into practice. Pilot and maintenance training should have been organised and carried out in advance to coincide with the arrival of the aircraft. As well as the appropriate simulator courses, your chosen ‘ferry pilots’ will also have gathered valuable hands-on experience flying the jet back to home base from Kansas or Brazil. And with the aircraft safely home, introduce the interior accessories. In many ways, it is the attention to detail, from toiletries and iPads to the best linens, that can set your operation apart from your competitors and make an impression in the mind of a new, but soon-to-be-loyal, customer. www.AvBuyer.com

Don’t relent on those interior checks, either. Regular refurbishment of the cabin interior and commercial accessories will help ensure that even long-serving aircraft continue to offer the latest in passenger luxury. Sharp and clean interiors are essential, not optional. Interior diversity is a selling point too. At LEA, for example, not only do we offer eight types of business jet, but also, because of our hybrid mix of owned and managed aircraft, we have a range of customised interiors meeting each owner’s specifications. We can therefore meet charter customer requirements and desires to a very specific degree. Executed well, taking delivery of a new aircraft – and introducing that aircraft to the market – should be one of the most exciting experiences in aviation. If you plan hard and work hard, it will be.

❯ Patrick Margetson-Rushmore is a founding member

of LEA and is responsible for the overall strategic development and financial control of the company. In the 1980s and early 1990s he worked in the City of London in corporate finance advising both private and public companies. Patrick is a board member of AirClub, the world’s leading corporate jet alliance, and also sits on various committees for the BBGA (British Business and General Aviation Association). ❯ More from www.flylea.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Stop the clock_Gil WolinNov06 12/05/2014 10:01 Page 1

STOP THE CLOCK: EU-ETS

‘Stop-the-Clock’ on EU-ETS: It’s no blank check for aviation. by Ciel Jolley he European Commission’s ‘Stop-the-Clock’ regime for the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) has been extended to 2016, but this suspension of enforced obligations for EU-bound flights is “no blank check for the aviation community” according to European Business Aviation Association CEO, Fabio Gamba. The EU introduced ETS for all aircraft operating in and out of Europe in 2008 and expected to enforce it on January 1, 2012. However, with serious concerns raised by Industry and EU Member States regarding the practicalities of implementation and harmful double standards for commercial and non-commercial air carriers, and with international opposition escalating to a point where trade wars threatened to be a possibility, it was clear that an alternative solution was necessary. The EU agreed to a one-year provision, dubbed “Stop-the-Clock”, to give the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) time to devise a more effective system: a global market-based mechanism (MBM) to curb aviation emissions.

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A SURPRISE BOTTLENECK In March this year, as the EU considered prolonging ‘Stop-the-Clock’, there was an unexpected bottleneck. Despite endorsement by the European Council, the Parliament’s Environment (ENVI) committee voted against the new ETS proposal. These representatives were expecting stricter terms on ETS revenue spending by Member States and insisted on catching all flights to and from Europe.

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FABIO GAMBA, CEO, EBAA

More pragmatic, and perhaps more riskaverse, their colleagues in plenary eventually accepted the extension. Consequently, “Stopthe-Clock” continues until the ICAO General Assembly in September 2016, with a clear sine qua non that if no agreement is reached, the ETS Directive will revert to its original toand-from-Europe scope. “The flaws in the original ETS caused frustration in the Business Aviation community,” said Gamba. “Not only was the distinction between commercial and non-commercial operations seen as discriminatory, but the system’s cost effectiveness unfounded, and focus on punishment as opposed to encouragement lackluster.”

BENEFITS OF THE NEW PROPOSAL Along with prolongation of ‘Stop-the-Clock’, the Commission introduced some welcomed developments with modifications for small operators emitting less than 25,000 tons of CO2. The new non-commercial exemption threshold for those emitting less than 1,000 tons CO2 was a partial-victory; as a direct result, more than 2,000 small operators who should never have been considered in the scheme are now exempt. For now, all international flights to and from Europe are exempt from ETS. This compromise lifts some pressure from international operators, eases international opposition, and gives the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) more time to devise the MBM. “Despite having no concrete measures yet, our industry does not want, after all its hard work, to see a regression to the original www.AvBuyer.com

conditions, which it finds unfair and impractical,” added Gamba.

THE FUTURE OF ETS The ICAO Assembly in 2016 will have an impact on all parties involved as the EU responds to the proposals, readjusts the scope of ETS, and makes a final decision. “We have achieved some semi-successes and I’m confident that the outcome will be positive,” said Gamba. “The danger, however, is in sitting on the sidelines and taking the viewpoint that ‘Stopthe-Clock’ will be definitive. This is not the case. Non-EU operators are relieved, but eventually they will have to comply to an environmental scheme, whether limited in scope, like the EU-ETS, or international.” As it stands, if the industry recognizes this opportunity to express its side of the story and puts forward a convincing scheme that is palatable to ICAO, then the EU will accept it, replacing the ETS. “We don’t want to be forced to implement a scheme that doesn’t fit, so we encourage collaboration between stakeholders to devise a simple, non-discriminatory and effective proposal that will elaborate on the positive work already done,” concluded Gamba. ❯ Ciel Jolley is an experienced Communications Consultant based in Brussels. She is a former Online Editor and Journalist for a respected international Business Aviation publication and has a background in business and trade association communications and events. Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Market Indicators Will the US and EU sanctions somehow affect business aircraft ownership, or flight activity in Russia? “I don’t think so - at least, not in the short-term”, reasons Ivan Veretennikov, publisher of Upcast AvBooks business aircraft comparison apps… Russians - especially the ultra-wealthy - have much to be taking care of at this time. Firstly, there is still economic momentum left from the Winter Olympics, and Sochi needs to be quickly restructured to avoid becoming a ghost town. While not at levels recorded during the Games, there is still plenty of Business Aviation activity in that region, aided by the new infrastructure there. Overall, Russian operators make many more flights abroad than domestically, but there has been an increasing trend for Russian aircraft owners to move within the country more - and this is certainly true of the Crimea region; the Soviet’s Côte d’Azur. Money has already started flowing here and hotels and restaurants need to be built; airports restructured; and factories upgraded. Reports say that business jet movements on the peninsula have never been as high.

Purchasing Activity With no Russia-made alternatives, the existing Russian Business Aviation fleet (thought to number approximately 500 jets) is expected to continue to fly. Those directly affected by the current sanctions won’t be buying replacement aircraft any time soon (no new Gulfstreams for Mr. Timchenko, Airfix Aviation, who at one time was considering the acquisition of eleven aircraft for his operation). Others wait to see how things develop before committing to a new acquisition – but none of this stops them from flying what they do have. As a matter of fact, to keep business moving in these uncertain times, people are flying even more. Some economists believe if pressure continues to rise, Russia may go through a serious recession. On the other hand, further sanctions (an embargo on importing aircraft) could force the country to develop its own alternatives to Western technology and partner with more “friendly” countries (in the case of Business Aviation, anything from revitalising the Sukhoi S-21 Supersonic Business Jet program to buying only Embraer jets). What is certain is that there won’t be many winners if the conflict continues. “Don’t Buy (insert country name here)” isn’t a slogan for 21st Century Russia – and there are more than a few US and EU companies who wouldn’t like the sound of it either… MI www.upcast-media.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

BizAv Activity - US & Canada of 1.1% (TRAQPak analysts estimated a rise of 0.9%). The results by operational category showed an increase in the Part 135 segment, up 4.9% year-over-year. The Part 91 market finished the period flat from March 2013, while the fractional market finished the period down -3.1%. Flight activity by aircraft category also followed the recent trend with large cabin activity posting a 10.4% increase from March 2013. Mid-size and small cabin aircraft finished the period up 1.4% and 3.3% in that order. However, the turboprop industry posted a yearover-year decrease of -4.4%. The largest growth for an individual segment occurred in the small cabin fractional market, with an increase of 23.9%, marking the third consecutive month that this segment has seen the largest growth year-over-year.

Reviewing March flight activity monthover-month, flights increased from February to finish the period up 11.4% overall, according to ARGUS TRAQPak. All operational categories were up from the previous month with fractional flight activity posting the biggest monthly increase, up 17.1%. Meanwhile Part 135 and Part 91 flight activity posted increases of 10.7% and 10.4% respectively. Aircraft category results were also up with turboprops posting the largest monthly increase, up 12.0% from February. Small, midsize and large cabin aircraft posted increases of 11.0%, 11.9% and 9.7% in that order. The largest single month-over-month increase occurred in the fractional turboprop market which finished the month up 29.0%. Reviewing flight activity year-over-year (March 2014 vs. March 2013), TRAQPak data indicates that March 2014 posted an increase

MI www.argus.aero

March 2014 vs February 2014 Turboprop Small Cabin Jet Mid-Size Jet Large Cabin Jet All Combined

Part 91 12.3% 10.9% 8.4% 8.4% 10.4%

March 2014 vs March 2013 Turboprop Small Cabin Jet Mid-Size Jet Large Cabin Jet All Combined

Part 91 -4.6% 0.0% 0.9% 10.8% 0.0%

Part 135 10.2% 8.9% 13.5% 9.8% 10.7%

Fractional 29.0% 18.6% 15.7% 15.6% 17.1%

All 12.0% 11.0% 11.9% 9.7% 11.4%

Part 135 5.5% 3.0% 4.2% 9.0% 4.9%

Fractional -52.7% 23.9% -1.1% 11.5% -3.1%

All -4.4% 3.3% 1.4% 10.4% 1.1%

BizAv Activity - Europe WINGX Advance recently released its Business Aviation Monitor for February 2014, providing insights into important trends of Business Aircraft activity… Among the highlights, February's 0.4% increase in Business Aviation flight hours registered a fourth consecutive month of activity growth in Europe. There were 43,524 flights, 0.6% more than in February 2013. The YOY February performance was, however, flattered by private flight activity - especially on business pistons and turboprops. Charter flights fell 2.3% and flights on business jets were down 0.8% YOY. Activity growth in Ukraine reflects the crisis there, as it may also have done in Russia (along with Sochi). Significant flight growth in Germany may indicate a market turnaround, although it mostly came in piston aircraft. MI www.wingx-advance.com

Russia Sanctions & BizAv

www.AvBuyer.com

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Market Indicators

In-Service Aircraft Technical Condition & Price

China’s “Top-Heavy� Fleet

Maintenance status for the 77 fixed-wing models and 1,554 aircraft listed “for saleâ€? researched on February 28th by Asset Insight, Inc. evidenced little change in asset quality since its January analysis (see Table A). • Maintenance Condition (ATC Score): Technical Condition of assets listed ‘For Sale’ decreased a mere 2.0 AI2 basis points, to 5.388, thereby maintaining an ATC Score comfortably above the MidTime/Mid-Life 5.000 level – on the ATC Score scale of -5 to 10. • Financial Condition (ATFC Score): The Average Financial Condition (ATFC Score) decreased by only 5.3 AI2 basis points, falling a fraction below the MidTime/Mid-Life 5.000 level, at 4.991, on the zero to 10 ATFC Score scale. • Financial Exposure (ATFE Value): Asset Technical Financial Exposure Value (accumulated/future maintenance expense) improved by more than $55k, falling to just over $1.2 Million. While the overall asset quality continues to be good, this latest solid improvement in Large and Medium Jet quality was offset by Small Jet and Turboprop figures.

Market Outlook With this month’s Financial Exposure reaching the lowest figure since September, the ETP Ratio increase is attributed to a decrease in average Ask Price (see Table D). This is not positive news for expectant sellers. However, if you are a buyer, there has probably never been a better time to purchase an in-service aircraft – especially if you are pursuing a Large or Medium Jet. If you are seeking a Small Jet or Turboprop, your range of quality assets might be a bit narrower, but the opportunity is readily available to address an aircraft’s Maintenance Financial Exposure (ATFE Value) through a price adjustment. It might take a bit of research, but some pre-purchase analytics could create true value going forward. MI www.assetinsightinc.com

Pundits long assumed that smaller jets would eventually play a larger role in the next wave of China's Business Aviation market. According to consultant and market observer Brian Foley, fulfilment of that prediction may be a very long time coming (if at all). Foley contends that China's preference for larger, heavier, longer-range jets will remain in place for the foreseeable future – as has happened in the Middle East. Mainland China's current business jet population of 198 aircraft can be broken down into 63% heavy, 25% medium and 12% light aircraft according to aircraft database provider AMSTAT. Having nearly two-thirds of the fleet concentrated in large aircraft seems lopsided compared to the worldwide average of 26% heavy, 34% medium and 40% light. Foley finds it interesting that China's fleet profile closely mirrors the Middle East's heavy, medium and light fleet mix of 68%, 22% and 9% respectively. "Like the Middle East, China is faced with long internal distances and a heavy international requirement, both favoring larger and more capable aircraft‌the present mix will [likely] remain relatively constant even as the total fleet size increases." And where is China's fleet growth headed? Mainland China's fleet more than doubled in three years and grew 23% in just the last year alone. But Foley estimates its next market doubling may now take five years. "We're already seeing China's market normalizing to a more sustainable pace. Contrary to industry perception there's a finite pool of capable buyers, whose numbers have been cut as the economy continues to moderate." MI www.brifo.com

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Exposure to Price Ratio (ETP Ratio) Spread in the ratio of maintenance Financial Exposure to aircraft Ask Price (ETP Ratio) widened this month (see Table B), while the

Overall Market average for the aircraft tracked by Asset Insight increased to 39.4% from 38.3% (see Table C). We consider anything over 40% to be an excessive ATFE Value in relation to the Aircraft Ask Price, and the ETP Ratio has been steadily increasing since September, negatively affecting ‘value’ (asset quality compared to ask price). Of the models we track, 27.3% of the aircraft listed ‘For Sale’ (versus last month’s 27.0%) generated an ETP Ratio of 40% or more.

 

 

 

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIC Title May_Layout 1 14/04/2014 16:28 Page 1


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Market Indicators

Middle Eastern Flight Trends

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developed markets such as the UK. Also, Gulf businessmen are more attuned to the concept of using a charter instead of buying a jet as they consider it financially more feasible.” He elaborated that Gulf businessmen prefer having a private charter to commercial flights as they appreciate the luxury and the hassle-free environment that comes with a private charter. The notion of a private jet charter being more expensive than a commercial flight is not valid if a small group is traveling, he explains. “It is an established fact now that charter is generally the least expensive form of business jet travel, especially if there are lots of round-trip flights in compressed time periods,” Kelly comments. “Private Jet Charter prides itself on its access to the largest and most comprehensive fleet of private jets anywhere in the world.” The average business jet flies about 400 hours per year, according to statistics compiled by the National Business Aviation Association. Kelly concludes that Gulf

www.AvBuyer.com

businessmen are well-versed with the jet models available in the market, however, many of them have realized that buying a jet means locking money up, as opposed to the option of chartering. MI www.privatejetcharter.com

In the UAE, the average number of hours a UAE businessman flies on a private jet is between 100-150 hours per year, whereas in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, this figure rises to between 150-200 hours, according to Private Jet Charter. By comparison, Private Jet Charter (PJC), which has a sizable market share in Europe and the Middle East, says that European businessmen fly a lot less (barely between 50100 hours) on private jets due to the economic downturn in Europe. The benchmarking study reveals that Saudi businessmen travel the most in the Middle East due to the country’s vibrant economy and vast size, and according to Hugh Courtenay, Founder and Chief Executive, PJC, “They tend to fly more on domestic routes by private jet. The availability of commercial options on domestic routes is limited countrywide, so the private jet option is the most practical solution.” Ross Kelly, Managing Director for Middle East, PJC added: “There is a growing market for air charters in the Gulf compared to other

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BizAv Aircraft Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) Boeing launched the Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) MAX family of airplanes after receiving the first order from an undisclosed customer. The order is for a BBJ MAX 8, based on the 737 MAX 8 and the newest business jet to join the BBJ family.

Bombardier The Learjet 85 has successfully completed its first flight marking the start of the aircraft's flight test program leading up to the first customer delivery. With a customer-driven clean-sheet design, the Learjet 85 aircraft will be the largest, fastest and most

Cessna Cessna announced an upgrade program for its Citation CJ2+. The new Alpine Edition CJ2+ modification package includes the installation of a Garmin G3000 avionics suite, making the jet compliant with Next Generation (NextGen) requirements. Also featured are new pressurization and environmental systems, the latest diagnos-

Cessna The new CJ3+ will include a state-of-the-art fully integrated Garmin G3000 avionics suite, all-new interiors with a redesigned cabin and cockpit, new pressurization, and new diagnostics systems. Additional features of the CJ3+’s new G3000 avionics include improved turbulence detecting weather radar, TCAS II, advanced TAWS, a wireless media server, Garmin integrated

Cessna The milestone delivery of the 100th Grand Caravan EX has taken place. The aircraft has been supplied to Hussain Ali Rashid Almoalla for use at his aviation club in the United Arab Emirates. The first 100 units of the Grand Caravan EX have been delivered around the world for diverse missions. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

More from www.newairplane.com

The new BBJ family also will include the BBJ MAX 9, based on the 737 MAX 9, which is expected to offer a 6,255 nautical mile (11,584 km) range with an even larger cabin than the BBJ MAX 8. Plans for a BBJ MAX 7 are still being studied.

More from www.bombardier.com

capable Learjet aircraft yet. Powered by two PW307B engines, each boasting 6,100 lbst, the aircraft targets a high-speed cruise of Mach 0.82 and a transcontinental range of approximately 3,000 nautical miles.

More from www.cessna.com

tics systems and a redesigned cockpit. The Alpine Edition includes increased access to the cockpit with the removal of seven inches from the legacy pedestal, and much more. Cessna is collaborating with Duncan Aviation to obtain the necessary STC from the FAA for the G3000 component of this new upgrade.

More from www.cessna.com

cockpit and Iridium cabin phone/high speed internet capabilities. The CJ3+ includes the installation of ADS-B capabilities, bringing the aircraft in compliance with this aspect of Next Generation (NextGen) requirements. Cessna’s CJ3+ is expected to receive FAA certification during the second half of the year.

More from www.cessna.com

The Grand Caravan EX, announced in 2012, is powered by a PT6A-140 engine, and boasts a 38 percent improvement in rate of climb over the Grand Caravan; a 350-foot reduction in takeoff roll; and a 1012 knot cruise speed improvement. ❯ www.AvBuyer.com

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BizAv Aircraft

Cirrus Aircraft Cirrus announced the successful first flight of certification Vision SF50 aircraft ‘C-Zero’ (C0). The SF-50 is a seven seat, pressurized, single engine jet and the newest airplane in Cirrus’ line of composite high performance personal aircraft. Designed to be a straightforward transition for pilots of high-performance

Continental Motors In partnership with ASI Innovation of Reims, France, Continental Motors acquired from insolvency the Type Certificate, inventory and manufacturing rights for the twin engine turboprop formerly produced by Reims Aviation. The F406 is a twin engine, unpressurized, 14 passenger turboprop aircraft first

Dassault The Falcon 2000S and 2000LXS twin jets recently received approval to operate at one of the world’s most challenging airports, London City, located in the heart of Europe’s financial hub. Dassault is the only business jet manufacturer to have its entire current production fleet certified to operate at London City. “The ability to operate at

Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. (EAI) EAI announced the first customer delivery of its Eclipse 550 Twin-Engine Jet in Albuquerque, N.M. following Federal Aviation Administration certification. Eclipse announced the start of production of the 550 at its Albuquerque facility in June of 2012. The aircraft can fly at alti-

Embraer Executive Jets Embraer has delivered the 300th Phenom 100 (the first being delivered back in December 2008), and the current fleet is now operating in over 25 countries. A cleansheet-design jet announced in 2005, the Phenom 100E is the most spacious entrylevel jet with a cabin that delivers ample space. 122

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

More from www.cirrusaircraft.com/vision

piston/turboprop aircraft, the Vision SF50 features a high-end cruise speed of 300 KTAS, advanced avionics, the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) and an all-carbon fiber structure. With a list price of $1.96 million, the jet seats up to five adults and two smaller passengers in an expansive cabin.

More from www.continentalmotors.aero

introduced in 1983, and this acquisition offers the partners a rugged, respected aircraft that can be configured to fill many missions and roles worldwide. The airframe can be powered by either PT6 powerplants or Continental Motors' piston engine, using any of the company's geared, FADEC and diesel engine technology.

More from www.falconjet.com

London City gives operators an added measure of flexibility and a distinct advantage in day-to-day operations,” Dassault outlined. In other news there is a high degree of speculation that a stretch version of the Falcon 7X will be announced at EBACE this month.

More from www.eclipse.aero

tudes up to 41,000 feet for up to 1,125 nautical miles, with a maximum speed of 375 knots. In cruise, the Eclipse 550 consumes only 59 gallons of fuel per hour, making it the most fuel-efficient twin-engine jet in production today, according to the company.

More from www.embraerexecutivejets.com

The aircraft is also the fastest in its class, according to Embraer, with an operating cost comparable to that of leading turboprop aircraft, and features typically seen in larger aircraft, such as an integrated air stair, a private rear lavatory, and the largest baggage compartment in its class. www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BizAv Aircraft Gulfstream

More from www.gulfstream.com

Gulfstream recently delivered its 300th G450. The milestone comes nine years after the aircraft entered service in May 2005. The G450 has a range of 4,350 nautical miles at its normal cruise speed of Mach 0.80. Equipped with the Gulfstream PlaneView flight deck and Head-Up Dis-

play, Gulfstream continues to upgrade the PlaneView system to meet the latest regulations around the world and now includes Controller Pilot Data Link Communications and Automatic Dependent SurveillanceBroadcast Out (DO-260A) as standard equipment.

Piper Aircraft

More from www.piper.com

Piper delivered its 550th new Meridian to a Swedish customer who purchased the first new Meridian to enter service in that Northern European country. Håkan Svensson, CEO, Aston Harald AB, located in Öckerö, Sweden, accepted delivery of his first aircraft in ceremonies at Piper’s Vero Beach headquarters.

The Piper Meridian with its PT6A-42A turboprop engine allows for notable speed and agility, with 500 horses pulling passengers to altitude with ease. Holding the title of both lowest fuel burn and lowest acquisition cost in its class, the company maintains that the Piper Meridian is an unmatched value.

Sun 'n Fun Round-Up The “Spring Break for Pilots” attracted owners and pilots of some 11,000 aircraft and thousands more representing every segment of aviation, noted Sun 'n Fun president John “Lites” Leenhouts. ED BOLEN ON ESSENTIAL NATURE OF BIZAV He pointed to business aircraft displays as indicative of the event's success. Consider the following Business Aviation inventory: • •

Daher-Socata: Debuted its new TBM900, weeks ahead of EBACE; Eclipse Aerospace: Marked the recent certification of the 550 VLJ by displaying the sixth delivered; Epic Aircraft: Showed a conformal fuselage mock-up of the developmental

More from www.sun-n-fun.org

E1000 propjet single, along with two of the original 2004 kit aircraft; Piaggio Aero: Drew crowds to the latest iteration of the P-180 twin turboprop; Pilatus: The PC-12 draws pilots interested in comfort, speed, short-field utility and friendly single-pilot flying; Piper Aircraft: Celebrated the delivery of the 550th Meridian single-engine propjet and exhibited the 549th; Textron Aviation: Exhibited three Beechcraft King Airs – the 350i, 250 and C90GTx – in celebration of the line's 50th anniversary, while Cessna showed its latest Grand Caravan, and Bell Helicopter brought a full-size mock-up of its new value-leader 505 Jet Ranger X; Quest Aircraft: Highlighted the new “Summit Executive Interior” option for the propject-single Kodiak, already wellestablished in utility and back-country roles.

TBM 900

Beyond the business aircraft displays, NBAA president and CEO Ed Bolen participated in a panel discussion of association leaders on ‘Building Interest in the Future of Aviation’. Bolen stressed the “essential nature of Business Aviation,” urging the audience to emphasize GA’s role in transporting vital organs for transplants, reuniting combat veterans with families, and responding to natural disasters – flying supported by NBAA members beyond increasing the efficiency of operators' businesses. ❯

The world’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops & Helicopters

For Sale at www.AvBuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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BizAv People

Linda Adams

Bill Boisture

Scott Ernest

Aircraft Electronics Association recently promoted two long-time staff members: Linda Adams, was promoted to vice president of member services, where she works with AEA-member companies to implement a variety of membership benefits and programs. Lauren McFarland, was promoted to director of advertising, where she is responsible for advertising sales of Avionics News magazine, the annual Pilot’s Guide to Avionics publication and online advertising on the AEA’s website.

Bob Sanchez

Christi Tannahill

Shawn Vick

of Universal Avionics. Sanchez comes to Universal with over eight years of experience at BAE Systems.

Textron Aviation recently announced leadership movements follow-

Mike Moore has been promoted to VP of aviation sales for Meridian

ing the $1.4 billion merger of Cessna and Beechcraft under the newly created Textron Aviation, there have been various senior management changes, including: Scott Ernest formerly president and CEO, Cessna becoming head of Textron Aviation as CEO. Bill Boisture, who had been CEO at Beechcraft, has left. Shawn Vick, former executive vice president, sales and marketing, also departs. The new Textron Aviation leadership team comprises mainly Cessna executives with three leaders coming from Beechcraft: Christi Tannahill, former senior vice president of global customer support for Beechcraft, becomes senior vice president, turboprop aircraft; Russ Bartlett, president of Beechcraft Defense Company, becomes senior vice president, defense; and Dave Rosenberg, vice president of strategic planning and programs for Beechcraft, becomes vice president of integration and strategy forTextron Aviation.

Air Charter. Moore has been with Meridian since 2008 in the role of selling aircraft management.

Matt Wing has been appointed VP of sales & marketing at

Jason Miller has joined Sierra Industries, Ltd. to serve in the capacity

Teledyne Controls. Previously the director of business development programs at Boeing, Wing joined Teledyne Controls in 1991.

Brian Andrews has been added to Duncan Aviation’s airframe service sales team, where he will provide technical sales and quote support for airframe maintenance projects.

Keith Marshall is the new CEO at PremiAir International Group. Marshall’s appointment signals a drive to bolster PremiAir’s capabilities in aerospace systems markets.

of president. Miller will lead Sierra Industries’ growing aircraft MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) organization.

Bob Sanchez has been appointed to the newly created position of program development manager, Military and Government, on behalf

Paul Young is the new director of operations at Jet Source. His duties will include safety operations of all Jet Source managed aircraft, including oversight of flight operations, flight standards and charter maintenance departments.

BizAv Events 2014 If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

Certificate in BizAv Management NARA Spring Meeting Reg Airline Assoc., Convention & Trade Show EBACE: (European Business Aviation Convention) ILA – Berlin Air Show HeliRussia 2014 AeroExpo UK AOPA Fly – In HELI UK JETNET iQ Global Business Aviation Summit Middle East Corporate Aviation Summit Cannes AirShow NATA Air Charter Summit AviationExpo Europe European Heli Show NBAA: Flight Attendants/Technicians Conf Baltic Business Aviation NBAA: Business Aviation Regional Forum Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

May 6 - 9 May 7 - 9 May 13 – 15 May 20 – 22 May 20 – 25 May 22 – 24 May 30 - June 1 May 31 June 3 - 4 June 3 - 4 June 12 June 12 - 14 June 16 - 18 June 19 - 21 June 19 - 21 June 20 - 21 June 26 June 26

Goodwood, UK Dana Point, CA, USA St. Louis, MO, USA Geneva, Switzerland Berlin, Germany Crocus Expo Moscow, Russia Sywell, Northants, UK Indianapolis, IN, USA Sywell, Northants, UK New York, NY, USA Abu Dhabi, UAE Cannes, France Dulles, VA, USA Hradec Kralove, Czech Rep Hradec Kralove, Czech Rep West Palm Beach, FL, USA Tallinn, Estonia Van Nuys, CA, USA

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www.miuevents.com www.nara-dealers.com ■ www.raa.org ■ www.nbaa.org/www.ebace.aero ■ www.ila-berlin.com ■ www.helirussia.ru ■ www.expo.aero/uk ■ www.aopa.org ■ www.heliukexpo.com ■ www.jetnetiq.com ■ www.aeropodium.com ■ www.cannesairshow.com ■ www.nata.aero ■ www.expo.aero/europe ■ www.eurohelishow.com ■ www.nbaa.org ■ www. aeropodium.com ■ www.nbaa.org ■

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NBAA Corp May_Layout 1 16/04/2014 14:50 Page 1

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Northern Jet Lear 40XR May 16/04/2014 14:40 Page 1

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2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

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• Smart Parts Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 3,146 / Right Engine 3,138 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter

• Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel Aircraft management Services Available

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 462 7709 Tel: +1 616 336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 336 4709 mserbenski@northernjet.net www.northernjet.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Northern Jet Citation Bravo May 16/04/2014 14:41 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1134 N412BT 4888 3922

Engines Left Engine 674 SOH @ P&W Right Engine 674 SOH @ P&W Phase 1 - 5 completed January 2014 Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 L FMS • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • Radio Altimeter

Exterior Overall Snow White with Black Metallic, Silver Plat Met, and Coral Red Pearl stripes Interior executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for an eighth passenger. Left and Right executive tables with Sienna leather inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Willow leather with Mink lower sidewalls, and finished Topaz Kayawood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • Ski Tube • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable Aircraft management Services Available

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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Tel: 800 462 7709 Tel: +1 616 336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 336 4709 mserbenski@northernjet.net www.northernjet.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Jet Lear45XR May 16/04/2014 14:45 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2009 Learjet 45XR Airframe TT: Landings:

2164 1685

Northern Air Inc is pleased to offer this 2006 Lear 45XR to the marketplace for immediate sale • MSP and Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 2164 Right Engine 2164 Avionics • Second Universal UNS-1E FMS • Enhanced Mode S Transponders • Dual KHF-1050 Communication with SELCAL • Steep Approach Capability • Second Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) • Cockpit Voice Recorder • Digital Flight Data Recorder • Electronic Flight Bag (EFB)

Exterior Off White with Sandalwood Tan Stripes Interior Eight passenger seats in a double club configuration with a belted lav seat certified for takeoff and landing. Interior is finished in tan tones and satin nickel plating. Optional Equipment • Concorde Batteries-38 Ampere-Hour (Exchange) • Tail Illumination Package • Exterior Lighting Package • Lighted Control Wheel Chart Holders • Pulsating Recognition Lights • Aircraft Locking Package • Foreign Certification

Entertainment • Airshow 410 • Forward monitors • DVD system • Cabin audio • XM Radio

Northern Jet Management Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 462 7709 Tel: +1 616 336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 336 4709 mserbenski@northernjet.net www.northernjet.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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AeroSmith Penny Gulfstream IVSP May 14/04/2014 17:19 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1337 N52MK 4561 2602

Airframe & Engines Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Engines: Mid-Life Inspection C/W at Rolls-Royce Canada: 17/Sep/2007 L/H Engine S/N: 16795 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 Cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life R/H Engine S/N: 16796 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life Honeywell GTCP 36-100 (G) APU S/N: P-741, on JSSI Avionics FLIGHT DIRECTORS HONEYWELL SPZ 8400 6-TUBE EFIS COMMS TRIPLE COLLINS VHF 422 W/AFIS NAVS DUAL COLLINS VIR 432 W/FM IMMUNITY DME DUAL COLLINS DME 442 ADF DUAL COLLINS ADF 462 TRANSPONDERS DUAL COLLINS TDR 94D WITH FLIGHT ID RADAR HONEYWELL PRIMUS 880 RADAR ALTIMETER DUAL HONEYWELL AA300 EGPWS HONEYWELL MARK VW/WINDSHEAR ALERT &RAAS FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DUAL NZ 2000 HF COMMS DUAL COLLINS HF 9000 W/SELCAL IRS TRIPLE HONEYWELL LASEREF GPS DUAL HONEYWELL GNSSU 12 CHANNEL GPS SENSORS FLIGHT PHONE MAGNASTAR C-2000 & SATCOM 6000

FLIGHT RECORDER FAIRCHILD COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER FAIRCHILD A-100A Features & Equipment Airshow 400 Moving Map/Info Four External Video Cameras Dual Hi-Def/Blue Ray DVD Players Audio System with iPod Dock and Remote Control Game Port Connections and LAN Connections Throughout Eight Rosen Video Monitors; VCR/DVD/Camera/Game and Airshow Available Six Club Seat Rosen Monitors Updated to 6500 Series in March 2007 Maintenance 72/144 Month inspection done 2010 196 Month completed 2013 Exterior Matterhorn White base with Super Jet Black underside, Coral, Cashmere and Gray striping. New April 2012 Interior The 13 passenger executive interior was designed for functionality and flexibility with three separate seating areas making it ideal for entertaining or conducting business. The aircraft is configured with a forward crew lav as well as an aft passenger lavatory. The forward cabin contains four single seats in a double-club configuration with two pull out writing tables and four 5.6 inch video monitors

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

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Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aerosmith Penny Hawker 800XP February 14/04/2014 17:21 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1996 Hawker 800XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

258289 N881AF 10,001.6 6291

• Aviation Partners Winglets • Interior new 2012 standard eight place • Exterior, 2012 Overall White Blue and white with blue stripes • MSP Airframe & Engines TFE731-5BR ENROLLED IN HONEYWELL MSP APU GTCP35-150W 4513 APU HRS 6048 APUS Avionics FMS: DUAL HONEYWELL NZ2000’S RADIO SYSTEM: HONEYWELL PRIMUS II INTEGRATED COMMS: DUAL HONEYWELL RCZ-851w/8.33spacing NAVS: DUAL HONEYWELL RNZ-850 RMS: DUAL HONEYWELL RM-850 TRANSPONDER: DUAL HONEYWELL RCZ-833k HF: DUAL BENDIX/KING KHF-950 R/ALT: HONEYWELL RT-300 AHRS: DUAL AHZ-600 RADAR: HONEYWELL PRIMUS 870 ADC: DUAL HONEYWELL AZ-810

AFCS: DUAL HONEYWELL DFZ-800 EFB: SINGLE FG7000 Adv. Data Research TCAS: HONEYWELL ACSS TCAS II W/CH.7 CVR: UNIVERSAL CVR-30B EGPWS: ALLIED SIGNAL Extras AVIATION PARTNERS WINGLETS CAMP MAINTENANCE PROGRAM DUAL HONEYWELL PRIMUS II SRZ-850 DATA LOADER LSZ-850 LIGHTNING SENSOR ARTEX C406-1 ELT HONEYWELL N1 DEECS Interior New 2012 STANDARD EIGHT PLACE INTERIOR Exterior 2012 Overall White Blue and white with blue stripes

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Sun Jet International Citation II April 14/04/2014 17:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation II Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings: Engines JT15D-4 Engine 1: 8,223.3 Total Time. 2,016.7 HRS SOH 210.7 HRS SHI

550-0098 N211JS 9,067 1308

Engine 2: 8,972.9 Total Time. 2,696.7 HRS SOH 901.7 HRS SHI

Avionics ADF: Dual Honeywell DF-850 Autopilot: Honeywell SPZ-500 IFCS W/AP switching COMMs: Dual Honeywell Primus II DME: Dual Honeywell FMS: Universal UNS-1K w/GPS Radar Alt: Sperry RT-300 TAWS: Sandel Transponder: Dual Honeywell Mode S AHRS: Dual Collins AHC-300 CVR: Fairchild CVR EFIS: Honeywell EDZ-805 5-tube NAVS: Dual Honeywell Primus II Stormscope: Honeywell LSZ-850 TCAD: Ryan WX Radar: Honeywell Primus 800 color w/checklist

Additional Citation V Avionics Package!!! Single Pilot IFR Keith Freon Air Conditioning Rosen Visors Rear Baggage Compartment Interior 1999 Interior consisting of a 7 passenger, Beige leather seating, mid-cabin club configuration. GREAT CONDITION! Exterior 1999 Paint, Overall White with light blue & Gold and Metallic. ALWAYS HANGARED!

Sun Jet International Inc 1770 SkyPlace Blvd, San Antonio, TX 78216

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Eugenio Gonzalez Tel: +1 (210)667-8180, +1 210.805.3141 E-mail: info@sunjetinternational.com www.sunjetinternational.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Sun Jet International Citation III April 14/04/2014 17:24 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1985 Cessna Citation III Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

650-0099 XA-AEB 10,447

Engines TFE731-3C-100S Engine 1: Engine 2: 10,196 Total Time 10,196 Total Time 3,449 HRS SOH 3,449 HRS SOH Avionics ADF: Collins ADF-60A Autopilot: Sperry PSZ-650 COMMs: Dual Collins VHF-22A CVR: Fairchild GA100 EFIS: Sperry ED-600 2-tube Flight Phone: MaganStar C-2000 NAV: Dual Collins VIR-32 RMI: Collins RMI-30 TCAS: AlliedSignal CAS-67A w/Change 7 Weather Radar: Honeywell Primus 800 w/WA 800 Antenna & WI-800 Indicator AFIS: AFIS Compass: Sperry C-14D DME: Collins DME-42 Flight Director: Sperry ED-600 2-Tube FMS: Dual Global GNS-XLS w/GPS Radar Alt: Collins ALT-50A TAWS: Sandel ST3400 Class B Transponder: Dual Bendiz/King MST-67A

Additional Rohr Thrust Reversers Tailcone Baggage Mod Wemac Cooling DC Flap Mod Gross Weight Increase Mod Zero Fuel Weight Mod Large Oxygen System Interior 2011 Interior Consisting of a 7 Passenger Executive configuration. Airshow with LCD Monitors and Aft. Potty Exterior 2001 Paint by Duncan Aviation. Matternhorn White w/Stripes re-designed in 2011

Sun Jet International Inc 1770 SkyPlace Blvd, San Antonio, TX 78216

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Eugenio Gonzalez Tel: +1 (210)667-8180, +1 210.805.3141 E-mail: info@sunjetinternational.com www.sunjetinternational.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Albinati Global Express April 15/04/2014 17:53 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Asking price: USD19,750,000

2005 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9145 HB-JEX 3741 1308

• Aircraft scheduled maintenance performed by Innotech Aviation Montreal and Jet Aviation Geneva and Basel branches • 4C inspection performed at Jet Aviation Basel in July 2010 • 8C inspection due in July 2015 • No damage history Engines (under RR Corporate Care) Rolls Royce Deutschland BR 700-710A2-20 • LH: S/N 12405 - 3659 TSN, 1265 CSN • RH: S/N 12406 - 3741 TSN, 1308 CSN APU (under JSSI) Honeywell RE 220 (GX) S/N P-264 Time: 2845 TSN / 3405 CSN Avionics • Communications Triple Honeywell RCZ 833E • Navigation Dual Honeywell RNZ 851 • ADF Dual Honeywell P2000XP • RMU Dual Honeywell RM 855 • Transponder Dual Honeywell P2000XP, Mode S • Radar Honeywell WU 880 • IRS Triple Honeywell Laser Ref III • HF Dual Collins HF 9031A with Selcal • GPS Dual Honeywell HG2021 & GNSSU • FDR Honeywell SS FDR QAR • CVR Honeywell SS CVR • Triple Honeywell Flight System Management W/CD 820 CDU

Special Features • Aircraft under CAMP maintenance tracking service • Aircraft under Bombardier Smart Parts Plus coverage • Cabin Altitude Reduction for Passenger Comfort (4’500 Feet) • Honeywell RT 950 TCAS II, Version 7.0 • Honeywell Mark V Enhanced GPWS • Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM (6 Channel)/2 Channel Iridium • RVSM, 8.33 MHz Spacing and FM Immunity Certified • Heads Up Display (HUD), EVS, RAAS • BATCH 3, WAAS (SBAS-LPV), FANS 1/A performed in December 2013 • Artex ELT 110-406 Emergency Locator Beacon • Teledyne Datalink System Interior (refurbished in February 2011) • Twelve passenger configuration and a threeplace divan 9G certified in beige leather and brown nubuck • Forward lavatory and crew rest area • Fully equipped galley and annex • Aft private lavatory, storage closet and baggage compartment • Cabin entertainment system with flat screen video monitors, satellite TV for Europe and USA, WLAN Internet, DVD and an airshow • Electric window shades • EMTEQ system lighting retrofit • AIMS soundproofing system Exterior White top, light beige bottom with gold accent stripes

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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Stefano Albinati Tel: +41 (0) 22 306 1060 E-mail: info@albinati.aero Web: www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aero-Dienst May_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 15/04/2014 12:05 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Price: Make Offer

2009 Challenger 300 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

20272 849 623

2010 in Service - Double Club Cabin for 8 Passengers - Lufthansa NICEview Cabin System - Inmarsat and Iridium SATCOM - DeLuxe Galley - Collins ProLine 21 - EASA OPS 1 Equipped RVSM - MNPS - RNP 5 / RNP 1 / RNP 0.3 Fresh 48 Months LUMP Inspection 12/2013 38,850 lbs MTOW - No Damage History Engines 2 Honeywell AS907-1-1A (MSP) L/H: S/N P118687 R/H: S/N P118686 TSN: 849 hrs TSN: 849 hrs CSN: 623 CSN: 623 APU Honeywell GTCP-36-150(BD) (On MSP) Avionics and Other Features Collins Integrated Digital ProLine 21 Avionics Suite with Collins Automatic Flight Control System 4 Collins CDU 3 Collins VHF-4000 Comm w/8.33 kHz Spacing 2 Collins HF-9031A with SELCAL 1 ICS-200 Iridium Satcom 1 Collins Inmarsat Satcom-5000 ACARS Data Link w/ Graphical Weather Maps 2 Collins NAV-4000 Nav 2 Collins DME-4000 DME 2 Collins NAV-4000 ADF 2 Collins TDR-94D Mode S w/Enh. Surveillance 2 Collins FMC-5000 FMS with V-Speed

Additional Equipment Lighted Chart Holders Enhanced Baggage Compartment 16G Seat in Lavatory Certified for Take Off and Landing Lufthansa NICEview Cabin System Airshow 410 Cabin Entertainment with DVD/CD Player and Two 18” Monitors Deluxe Galley with Espresso Machine Forward Partition with Sliding Door Floor Accent Light Over Water Flight Kit Cockpit Writing Tables Dual LED Navigation Lights Pulsating Main Landing Lights Door Lock Package Cabin The cabin has a luxury layout for eight passengers consisting of dual club four individual passenger seats arrangement with three bi-fold retractable and one plug-in executive tables. The aft lavatory is fitted with a warm/cold water dispenser, lighted mirror, storage drawers and a belted 16G seat certified for take off and landing. Seats are upholstered in grey leather, ceiling and side wall are of light grey, armledges, tables galley, cabinetries, forward and aft cabin partition are of high gloss carbon fiber. DeLuxe Galley comprises a microwave oven, two hot liquid containers, an ice drawer with overboard drain, and ample drawer storage for crystal and china. Interior in excellent condition Exterior Painted allover white with one warm red stripe from nose to tail. Excellent condition

Aero-Dienst GmbH & Co. KG,

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Flughafenstrasse 100 90411 Nuernberg Germany

Tel: +49-911-9356-120 Mobile: +49-171-4950309 E-mail: armin.hoehnemann@aero-dienst.de www.aero-dienst.de

www.AvBuyer.com

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Aviation Advisors May 14/04/2014 17:25 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2004 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5033 VP-BNR 1750 870

• One owner since new • One of a kind designer interior in like new condition • Enhanced Navigation Upgrade & TCAS 7.1 • RVSM/RNP-1, 4, 5 & 10. MNPS. CPDLC. ADS-C • Securaplane 450 Security System • Airshow 4000 System • Four 5.6” Monitors, one 12” and one 20.0” Monitor • Single 5-Disc Audio CD Player / Controller • Two Multi-Region DVD Players • Miltope Cockpit Printer & Cabin Laser Printer • SATCOM and Ethernet: - Wireless LAN - One (1) Honeywell MCS-7000+ Satcom System - One (1) Honeywell AIRSAT 1 Satcom System - One (1) MagnaStar C2000 Radiotelephone (Functions also as a PBX connecting all handsets to each other and to the Honeywell MCS-7000 INMARSAT System. • JSSI “Platinum” (pro-rated)

Engines RR BR-710 Engines: 1750 hrs (as of January 23, 2014) Enrolled in JSSI Platinum Honeywell RE220 (G550) APU: 2053 Hours Avionics Certification “Foxtrot” basic completed August 2011, Navigation upgrade “Enhanced” c/w June 2013 (ASC 84B & ASC 96), Runway Awareness Advisory System (RAAS), Four (4) Honeywell DU-1310 Flat Panel Display Units, Two (2) Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers, One (1) Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel, One (1) Honeywell/Kollsman Visual Guidance System (VGS), Three (3) Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionics Units, One (1) Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel, Three (3) Honeywell MC-850 Multifunction Control Display Units, Three (3) Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules, One (1) Honeywell WU-880 Weather Radar Receiver/Transmitter Antenna, Two (2) Honeywell WC-884 Weather Radar Controllers, Three (3) Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V Micro Inertial Reference Units, Two (2) Honeywell MRC-855A Modular Radio Cabinets, Three (3) Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels, One (1) Honeywell MT-860 Third Navigation /Communication Cabinet Two, (2) Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters, One (1) L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), One (1) Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) Control Panel, One (1) L3 Flight Data Recorder (FDR), Two (2) Davtron Digital

Aviation Advisors International Inc 8191 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida, 34243-2032

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Clocks, One (1) Goodrich EBDI-4000 Radio Magnetic Indicator (RMI), One (1) Goodrich Magnetometer, One (1) Goodrich GH-3100 Standby Attitude/Airspeed/Altitude Indicator, One (1) Honeywell RT-951 (TCAS 2000) 7.1 (ASC 103), Two (2) Mason Cursor Control Devices, One (1) Thales Satcom antenna, One (1) Honeywell LP-860 processor, One (1) Honeywell LU-860 controller, One (1) Honeywell AT-855 brick antenna, One (1) Honeywell LSZ-860 Lightning Sensor System (LSS) Interior 18 Passenger custom designer interior w/ fwd galley including convection oven & microwave. Flight attendant seat. Fwd & aft vacuum lavatories. Fwd cabin: Six individual seats of which two are berthable. Mid-cabin: Four-place club arrangement. Aft-cabin: Two four-place divans. Interior is in excellent like new condition Asking Price: Call! Aircraft can be viewed by appointment during EBACE (not on static display). Please call +1-512-619-1552 to schedule your visit

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400 Tel: +1 (210) 490 1883 - San Antonio office Email: bobd@aaisrq.com www.aviationadvisorsintl.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente 2009 Gulfstream G200 & Falcon 2000 May 14/04/2014 17:41 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1997 Falcon 2000 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

38 N710ET 5197.8 2775

Engines CFE738-1-1B On ESP Gold Left: S/N 105193, 4948.4 Hours, Cycles: 2599 Right: S/N 105190, 4948.4 Hours, Cycles: 2599 APU Honeywell GTCP35-150 On MSP S/N P-139, 2817.7 Hours, Cycles: 3770 Avionics Collins Pro Line 4 w/ 6.1 upgrade Dual Honeywell Laseref III / Dual Collins FMS-6100 Dual Collins FCC-4002 Flight Director Dual Collins GPS 4000A Dual Collins APS-4000 IFCS / Autopilot

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com Dual Collins ADF-462 Dual Collins VHF-422C w/ 8.33 spacing Collins TCAS-94 TCAS II w/change 7 Honeywell Mark V EGPWS Dual Portable EFB System w/ Bluetooth GPS Additional Features RVSM Certified / Collins AHS-85E AHRS Allied Signal SSCVR / Allied Signal AFIS Airshow 400 / 14.2” forward cabin monitor Aircell ST-4200 telephone / Aircell WIFI System RVSM Compliant / 115V AC Power outlets Third Crew - Jump Seat / Dual Davtron Digital Clocks Maintenance CAMP Systems Tracking / High service bulletin level compliance. 3C Due Jan 2015

Interior Beautiful eight passenger executive interior featuring a forward four-place club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious aft cabin boasts another four-place conference or dining arrangement with adjacent credenza with ample storage. Seating is tastefully finished in light earthy leathers. Interior is complemented with matching earth tone carpeting found throughout the cabin. The cabinetry is high gloss stained veneers; the rose gold plating completes the interior. Forward full service 46” galley, 18” galley annex, private aft lavatory Exterior The single tone base Matterhorn White paint is complemented by a, Cabernet Red, and Regiment Blue striping. It was fully repainted by Dassault Little Rock in September 2006. Touched up March 2014

2009 Gulfstream G200

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior Well appointed, nine (9) passenger interior features forward four place club seating and aft three(3) place divan opposite two (2) place club. Upon entering this beautiful aircraft, you notice the well-appointed forward galley, including TIA Wavejet Microwave, two (2) hot liquid dispensers, wine storage, large serving area, and generous ice drawer and trash receptacle. The medium toned, high gloss, wood veneers are accentuated by mushroom leather seating and a brown fabric divan. The intricately woven, 100% wool carpet shows little wear and compliments the interior perfectly. Passenger will be entertained with an Airshow 410 system as well as forward and aft 17” LCD monitors and a multi-region dual DVD player Exterior Overall, White with Zephyr Orange and Black Accent Stripes

230 N331BN 1821.4 1060

Engines ESP GOLD P&W306A Engine 1: PCE-DF0103 1821.4 SNEW Engine 2: PCE-DF0104 1821.4 SNEW Auxiliary Power Unit HONEYWELL 36-150IAI SN: P-339 982 Total Time 1187 Total Cycles Avionics 5 Tube EDS / COLLINS PROLINE 4 2 COLLINS VHF-422D COMMS 2 COLLINS VIR-432 NAVS 1 COLLINS ADF-4500 ADF

2 COLLINS DME-4000 DME 2 TDR-94D MODE S W/ FLT ID TDR 1 COLLINS TWR-850 RADAR 2 COLLINS FMC-6000 FMS 2 COLLINS GPS-4000A GPS 1 HNYWL KTR-653 W/SELCAL HF COLLINS TTR-4000 W/CHG 7 TCAS HNYWL DMU-AFIS AFIS ICG IRIDIUM ICS-200 SAT/COM ARTEX 406 W/NAV INTERFACE ELT HNYWL MARK V W/ WS & RAAS EGPWS UNIVERSAL CVR -120 CVR COLLINS FCC-4005 CAT II AUTOPILOT Special Features IN SERVICE 12/22/2009. RNP-5/-10 / MNPS RVSM/8.33/FM IMMUNITY. EMERGENCY LIGHTING AIRCELL AXXESS II. ATG 4000

Mente Group, LLC 15301 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 1010 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

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Jet Alliance International May 16/04/2014 10:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Factory Warranty until March 31st, 2015!

2009 Cessna Citation 560 XLS+ Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

560-6024 610 550

• EU OPS 1 APPROVED No damage history, always Hangared, Aircraft on CESCOM, EASA Compliant. Annual Inspection completed April 2014

Engine Type Pratt & Whitney PW545C, with FADEC & 4,119lbs of thrust Serial Number: PCE-DF0047 PCE-DF0048 Engine Time Since New: 610 hours 610 hours Cycles Since New: 550 cycles 550 cycles APU Honeywell RE100 (XL) 200 hours since new Additional Equipment Collins Proline 21 w/4 Tube EFIS, Dual Collins FMS, RVSM compliant, 8.33 kHz space radios. Satellite Phone (3 hadsets) • Collins ProLine 21 EFIS System with Four 8 x 10 inch (20 x 25cm) Screens • Collins Flight Guidance System with Emergency Descent Mode • Collins FMS Performance Database • Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) • Electronic Charts • XM Satellite Weather • Collins TWR-850 Turbulence Doppler Weather Radar • L-3 Communications WX-1000 Lightening Detection Stormscope • Collins TCAS-4000 (TCASII) • Mark V EGPWS

• Collins HF-9031S with SELCAL • L-3 Communications FA2100 CVR • FDR Quick Access Recorder • Aircell AXXESS II Irridium Satcom w/Three Handsets Additional Equipment • Forward LH Refreshment Center • Forward RH 33.53” Cabinet with Storage for Entertainment • Forward RH Single Side Facing Seat • Stereo Speakers • Airshow 410 • Rosen Flight View Moving Map System Interior The Cabin is configured with standard center club seating, with RH forward closet and RHforward side-facing seat, standard floor tracking on seats 5 & 6, standard 180 degree swivel and full recline on all seats. LH forward Refreshment Center with general storage, 2 hot liquid dispensers, cup dispensers, ice drawer, food tray storage, pop storage and trash drawer, 110 volt Universal outlets are located in RH forward closet and lower sidewalls at seats 6 & 7, Axxess II handsets are located in lower sidewall at seats 6 & 7 and the flight deck overhead.Interior has executive tables and slim line tables in wood veneer, a magazine rack, standard aft dividers with sliding doors. RH externally serviceable toilet and LH jumpseat with fold down backrest. Tha cabin is equipped with dual disc DVD player, Airshow 410 system with four plug-in Rosen Screens with Receptacles in Sideledge at each Pedestal Seat, stereo speakers Jet Alliance International 2 Rue Honoré Labande 98000 Monaco

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Exterior Overall white with light blue and dark blue stripes Tel: +377 93 25 36 03 Fax: +377 93 50 02 90 www.jetallianceinternational.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Dassault Falcon 900LX May 17/04/2014 15:07 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2011 Falcon 900LX Serial Number: Registration: Airframe Total Time: Landings:

254 N264C 1436 543

APU (s/n P611) Honeywell GTCP36-150(F) (on MSP) Maintenance CAMP. Inspections Due: B at 1600 hours; Z May 25, 2015; 1C May 25, 2017. EASy II – baseline Service Bulletin 414 Rev. 2 complied with. ADS-B Out S. B. 402 FSBA installed March 2014 Exterior White over Blue lower fuselage with English Blue and Yellow accent stripes (Original) Interior Light Beige leather seats, Tan leather lower sidewalls, Ivory headliner, Beige with Blue accents designer wool carpet, Hi-Gloss Figure Cut Marbled Walnut veneer, blue custom fabric divan, brushed aluminum plating (Original) Seating 12 passengers; 4 forward club seats, 4 midcabin club seats, aft 3-place divan with opposing executive seat, forward and aft lavatory, third crewmember seat Avionics Honeywell Primus Epic System (EASy II – Cert. I) Flight Display System Honeywell EASy Flight Management System triple Honeywell EASy Global Positioning System dual Honeywell VHF Communication Systems triple Honeywell TR-866B VOR/ILS/Marker Navigation System dual

Honeywell NV-875B DME Systems dual Honeywell DM-855 ADF Systems dual Honeywell DF-855 Transponder System dual Honeywell XS-857A TCAS II System ACSS TCAS-3000 Color Weather Radar System Honeywell Primus 880 Head-Up Guidance System Rockwell Collins HGS-4860 Enhanced Flight Vision System Rockwell Collins EFVS-4860 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) dual CMC CMA1100 “Pilot View” HF Communication Systems dual Collins HF-9000 Micro Inertial Reference System triple Honeywell Laseref V Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System Honeywell EASy Radio Altimeter System dual Honeywell RT-300 SATCOM Honeywell MCS-7120 Cockpit Voice Recorder Honeywell SSCVR (120 minutes) Flight Data Recorder Honeywell SSFDR Additional Equipment Rockwell Collins FCMS: 17 & 21.3 inch LCD monitor, dual DVD player. Airshow 4000 (non-interactive). Honeywell: (3) AV-900 Flight Deck Audio, Selcal, LSS-860 Lightning Sensor System. Honeywell EASy: Electronic Jeppesen Charts, Uplink Weather capability. Meggitt MK2 Secondary Flight Display, ELTA ADT-406 (tri-frequency) ELT with NAV interface, 115 cubic foot oxygen bottle

www.falconjet.com/preowned

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Mark Verdesco: Director, Pre-owned Aircraft Sales USA Tel: + (1) (201) 541-4556 Tel: + (1) (201)-541-4620 E-mail: preowned@falconjet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

139


Florida Jet Falcon 50 April 14/04/2014 17:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1991 Falcon 50 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

223 N451CL 7,442 5,055

Engines TFE 731-3-1C ENGINES ENROLLED ON MSP Engine #1: Engine #2: Engine #3: S/N: P76811 S/N: P76812 S/N: P76810 TT: 7241 TT: 7221 TT: 7275 CSN: 4893 CSN: 4126 CSN: 4947 SHSI: 252 SHSI: 251 SHSI: 219 SMOH: 3115 SMOH: 3095 SMOH:3149 APU GARRETT GCTP 36-100A S/N P333 TT 2990 HOURS/1501 HOURS SHSI Avionics • DUAL COLLINS FLT DIR. • COLLINS APS 85 AUTOPILOT • DUAL COLLINS EFIS 86-C-14B SYSTEM • DUAL COLLINS VHF22 COM • DUAL COLLINS VIR 32 NAV • DUAL BENDIX MST-67A XPNDR • DUAL COLLINS ADF60 • DUAL COLLINS DME42 • DUAL UNIVERSAL UNS 1-F FMS • HONEYWELL AFIS SYSTEM • DUAL KING KHF950 HF COM • FREDRICKSON SELCAL • AIRCELL ST3100 FLITE FONE

Navigation Compliance RVSM, FM IMMUNITY, RNP5, 8.33 COM, MNPS & RNP10 Exterior PAINTED JANUARY, 2007 - DUNCAN AVIATION, SHOWS LIKE NEW Interior COMPLETED JANUARY, 2007 - DUNCAN AVIATION THIS ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS AND METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED FALCON 50 HAS A DESIGNER INSPIRED INTERIOR IN EARTH TONE COLORS AND A CUSTOM PAINT SCHEME. CUSTOM FABRICS, SUPPLE BEIGE LEATHER UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS, AND MEDIUM HIGH GLOSS CABINETRY COMPLIMENT THE 9 PASSENGER EXECUTIVE INTERIOR WITH THE FOLLOWING FEATURES: • DUNCAN 50EX STYLE INTERIOR • AIRSHOW 410 PASSENGER INFORMATION SYSTEM • HONEYWELL CABIN ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM • ONE 15” MONITOR • DVD PLAYER • HONEYWELL PRONTO CABIN ENTERTAINMENT REMOTE • AIRCELLAXXESS IRIDIUM PHONE SYSTEM W/2 HANDSETS • LED READING AND WASH LIGHTING SYSTEM • TIA MICROWAVE • TIA COFFEE MAKER • 9 PASSENGER CONFIGURATION INCLUDES 6 CHAIRS AND A 3 PLACE DIVAN • SIDE FACING JUMPSEAT • AFT LAV

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Axiom Aviation March 15/04/2014 17:58 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2010 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5294 VT-TMS 1218 445

• One owner since new • Low time, well maintained • BBML Hi Speed Internet • SAT TV • Custom Interior • Enhanced Nav • Synthetic Vision • Forward Galley • Forward Crew Comm Area • Forward Crew Lavatory Engines Rolls Royce BR 710C4-11 Enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Serial Numbers: LH: 15687 RH: 15676 Hours/Cycles: 1218/445 1218/445 APU Honeywell GRT RE 220 Enrolled on MSP Serial Number: P-627 Total Time Since New: 884 hours Avionics Honeywell PlaneView™ Avionics Suite with Certification Foxtrot including: Four (4) 13x10-inch LCD Electronic Display System Dual Autothrottle Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Kollsman Enhanced Vision System II Triple Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules Honeywell Primus 880 Color Weather Radar w/ Turbulence Detection

Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Honeywell Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS) -w/ Windshear Detection Honeywell MT-860 Third Nav/Comm Cabinet Triple Honeywell Navs with FM Immnunity Honeywell ADFs Triple Honeywell Epic Planeview Flight Management Systems (FMSs) Triple Honeywell LASEREF V Micro-Inertial Reference Systems (IRSs) L3 Radio Magnetic Indicator (RMI) L3 Standby Attitude/Altitude/Airspeed Indicator Dual Mason Cursor Control Devices Interior Vestibule: Forward full size RH galley with Microwave, Warming oven, Cooling compartment, Ice drawers, Aerolux Espresso/Coffee maker. LH Crew Communication Compartment with sidewall mounted phone and berthing capability. LH Crew Lavatory with fold down sink, 7” monitor Forward Cabin: Four place club seating with two fold out tables, master entertainment, lighting and heating controls at RH # 2 seat. Remote control storage, HDMI port, 7” monitor at each seat, RH and LH 20” LCD monitors on FWD bulkheads Mid-Cabin: Four place club seating with two fold out tables, 7” monitor at each seat Aft Cabin: RH Four place Divan, LH single seat with fold out table and 7” monitor, 20” LCD monitor on Aft LH Bulkhead Aft Lavatory: Full size lav, RH and LH storage closets, Bidet sprayer Options Cabin Customization. Recliner Type leg rests. Manual/electric lumbar support

AXIOM AVIATION Inc. 26380 Curtiss Wright Parkway Suite 106 Richmond Heights, Ohio 44143

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 216-269-3631 Email: Ron@AxiomAV.com www.axiomav.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

141


Carolina Jets May 16/04/2014 14:46 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2009 Cessna Citation XLS+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

560-6019 N193SB 2400 2130

Engines Engine Cycles Since New 1819/1819 APU Since New 500 Cessna Power Advantage+ Cessna ProParts Avionics Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics 4 Tube EFIS Dual Collis AHC-3000 AHRS Dual Collins ADC-3000 Air Data Computers Dual Collins CCP-3310 Cursor Control Panels Collins IFIS-5000 (Weather & Charts) Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II Dual Collins FMS-3000 Collins FMS Performance Database WAAS w/ FMS 4.0 Software & V Speeds Dual Collins GPS-4000S (12 Channel) Dual Collins RTU-4000 Radio Tuning Units Dual Collins NAV-4500 Navigation Receivers Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S Transponders Collins DME-4000 Collins AALT-4000 Radio Altimeter XM Satellite Weather L3 Communications FA2100 CVR Dual FSU 5010 Mark V EGPWS w/RAAS Collins WXR-850 Turbulence Doppler Weather Radar Jeppesen Electronic Charts

Equipment Lead Acid Battery 77 Cu. Ft. Oxygen Bottle Four (4) 110VAC Cabin Outlets Two (2) 110VAC Cockpit Outlets Fwd LH Refreshment Center w/ Tambour Doors, Additional Soda Storage & Pull-out PolyStone Work Surface Aft Vanity & Baggage Smoke Detectors Monorail Sunvisors External Serviceable Lav 10.4" Video Monitor mounted in RH Fwd Cabinet 2 Executive Tables & 2 Slimline Tables w/Leather Inserts Airshow 4000 Plus w/ Rosen Flight View Moving Map System Removable Aft Belted LH Side Facing Seat Aft RH Magazine Rack Exterior Snow White with Platinum Metallic, Tibetan Gold Metallic & Ming Blue II Metallic Accent Stripes Interior Seating / Layout: 2+9 Center Club Configuration featuring Two Forward-Facing Aft Seats, a Forward Two-Place Divan located across from the entry way, and a Left-Hand, Side-Facing Seat (located across from the Potty) serves as the ninth seat. Materials / Colors: Seats are covered in island sand beige leather with matching carpet, headliner and window reveals; crew seats feature sheepskin covers; the cabinetry, side ledges and tables are finished in a high-gloss wood veneer; the aft divider is completed in mirror bronze (upper) and high gloss veneer (lower); all hardware is finished in satin champagne gold

Tel: +1 (0) 336.793.8451 Fax: +1 (0) 336.722.7585 Cell: +1 (0) 336.971.2134 Email: BRANDON@CAROLINAJET.NET WWW.CAROLINAJET.NET

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI TBM 850 May 14/04/2014 17:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 TBM 850 Serial Number: Airframe TT:

435 675

• Only One Owner and 675 Hours Since New • Garmin G-1000 Flight Deck • RVSM Equipped • Garmin GDL-69A data-link XM/WX weather • On new Socata Maintenance Program • Annual Inspection complied with by Socata Aircraft April 2014 Engines PRATT & WHITNEY PT6A-66D (3000 HOUR TBO) Propeller Model HARTZELL 4-Bladed Avionics • 2 GMA 1347C Dual digital audio controller with integrated marker beacon receiver, intercom and public address capability on outer side for pilot and co-pilot side • 1 Sennheiser HMEC25 noise attenuating headset with ship-power connection • 2 GDU 1040A, 10'' PFD display with three axis flight dynamics, air speed, altitude, vertical speed, HSI w/ perspective modes, turn, bank side slip, NAV/COM frequencies indication and AP annunciation • 1 GDU 1500 15'' multi-function display with engine (w/ optimum TRQ setting display), pressurization, electrical, fuel, flaps and trims indication, Crew Alerting System (CAS), checklist, aircraft synoptic and super large navigation mapping system

• 2 GIA 63W Nav/Com/ILS/WAAS GPS • 2 GEA 71 Engine and airframe interface unit • 2 GRS 77 Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) Advanced Position and Traffic Awareness Package • RVSM data package • GTX 33 Mode S transponder (#2) • KRA 405 B Radar Altimeter displayed on GDU 1040As • TAWS-B, class B TAWS worldwide database • KTA 810 Traffic Advisory System (TAS) • KN 63 DME displayed on GDU 1040As • Electric pitch and rudder trims on co-pilot control wheel • Co-pilot side map light and approach plate holder Onboard Weather Package • WX 500 Storm-scope displayed on G1000 displays • GWX 68 digital four color weather radar - 10'' antenna Deluxe Leather Package • 6 genuine leather seats with adjustable backrests and folding armrests • Genuine leather upper side panels • Satin-brass trimming of individual fresh-air vents and reading light ring Miscellaneous • GDL 69 A data-link XM/WX weather information and XM audio infotainment (US Coverage Only) • Chart view option for GDUs • Pulse light anti-collision system

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

143


Global Jet Challenger 300 May 16/04/2014 10:41 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2007 Challenger 300 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

20138 TC-ISR 3493 1410

• Camp Systems Maintenance Tracking Program • Engines on MSP • Rockwell Collins/VHF4000 • 8.33 COM • MNPS • RNP5 • RNP10 • FM Imunity Airframe & Engines 3493 hours, 1410 Cycles. Camp Systems Maintenance Tracking Program. Engines: MSP Maintenance Program. Left Engine: # P118393 AS907, 3400 TT, 1376 Cycles. Right Engine: # P118396- AS907, 3493 TT, 1410 Cycles. APU - MSP Maintenance Program, GTCP36150BD, P-246, 2180 hours

ALT-4000 1, TCAS I or TCAS II or TTR-4000 1, TCAS II Chg7, GWPS or EGWPS, LR-NAV, FDR A145, CVR A129 (120M) 1, ELT ARTEX ELT C406-N 1 Additional Equipment Navigation Compliance RVSM 8.33 COM FM Imunity MNPS RNP5 RNP10 Interior 9 seats certified for occupancy during taxi, takeoff and landing Price: $10,900,000 ~ BEST OPPORTUNITY!

Avionics FLT DIR., Auto Pilot, EFIS AFD-5220 4, VHF COM ROCKWELL COLLINS / VHF4000 3, NAV ROCKWELL COLLINS / NAV 4000 1, XPNDR ROCKWELL COLLINS / ATC MODE S 2, ADF ROCKWELL COLLINS / NAV 4000 1, DME ROCKWELL COLLINS / DME 2, FMS ROCKWELL COLLINS / FMC 5000 2, GPS ROCKWELL COLLINS / GPS 4000A 2, AFIS, SATCOM ICS-200 1, HF COM ROCKWELL COLLINS / HF-9031A 2, SELCAL RIU-4000 2, FFONE, RADAR XMWR-1000 1, RAD ALT

Global Jet Monaco Florian Van Der Cruyssen, Aircraft Sales Director, L'Albatros, 9, bd Albert 1er, MC - 98000 Monaco

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Tel: +377 97 77 01 04 E-mail: florian.vandercruyssen@ globaljetmonaco.com www.globaljetconcept.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Global Jet Challenger 605 May 16/04/2014 10:46 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Challenger 605 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5733 G-MACO 1772 676

• Camp Systems Maintenance Tracking Program • Collins Pro-Line 21 Avionics Suite • Dual Collins VHF 4000 with 8.33 Spacing Radios • Dual Collins Nav 4000 with FM immunity • RVSM Capable • Collins HF 9000 with Coltech Selcal • Collins TCAS 4000 system TCAS II with change 7 • No Damage History Airframe & Engines 1772 TT, 676 Cycles. General Electric CF34-3B. Engine#1: 1586.45 hrs/617 cycles. Engine#2: 1586.45 hrs/617 cycles. APU: Honeywell GTC-36-150(CL) 1541 hrs Avionics Collins Pro-Line 21 Avionics Suite, Dual Collins VHF 4000 w/8.33 spacing radios, Dual Collins Nav 4000 w/FM immunity, Dual Collins FGC 3000 Flight Guidance Computers: single A/P system autopilot, Dual Collins TDR 94D w/enhanced surveillance txps, Dual Collins DME 4000, Dual Collins ADC 3000 RVSM Capable, Dual Collins FMS 6000 w/dual GPS 4000A receivers, Collins HF 9000 w/Coltech Selcal, Collins TWR 850 Turbulence Weather Radar, Collins Alt 4000 Rad Alt, Collins TCAS 4000 system TCAS II with change 7, Honeywell Mark V EGPWS w/wind shear detection, Solid State two hour CVR, Fairchild FA 2100 FDR, Artex C406-2 ELT

Additional Equipment Iridium Satcom with dual handsets, WiFi, Airshow ASX, Microwave Oven, Personal monitors, LED cabin lighting with lighting assistant, Sleeps up to 5 (1 double bed & 3 single beds) Interior 9 seats certified for occupancy during taxi, takeoff and landing. Appointed in the classic Challenger nine passenger seating arrangement, and delivering incomparable style and comfort, this aircraft features seating in glove soft tan leathers, complemented with matte birds eye veneers and taupe carpet.Passengers enjoy a four place club configuration forward and a two place club opposite a three place divan aft. Productivity is maximized in flight with fold out executive writing tables, iridium Satcom and electrical outlets. Fixtures in satin nickel plating and beige sidewalls all enhance the passenger experience. Entertainment and relaxation is provided through the forward and aft mounted 18” flat screen monitors, Airshow ASX and dual CD/DVD combination players. An efficient forward galley includes hot pot, microwave oven, ice drawer and abundant storage. The externally serviced, private, aft lavatory features a vanity mirror, sink, storage cabinet and drawers. AFT Cabin: A 3 seats, fully breathing divan & opposite of 2 club seats Exterior White Exterior Asking price $15,500,000 VERY GOOD OPPORTUNITY!

Global Jet Monaco Florian Van Der Cruyssen, Aircraft Sales Director, L'Albatros, 9, bd Albert 1er, MC - 98000 Monaco

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +377 97 77 01 04 E-mail: florian.vandercruyssen@ globaljetmonaco.com www.globaljetconcept.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

145


Global Jet Gulfstream G550 May 16/04/2014 10:47 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2004 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5018 N818RF 3375 1021

• Beautiful G550 in a good condition • Extended cabin without crew rest • Automatic Flight Guidance System • Visual Guidance System • Triple VHF Communications 8.33 kHz • Fwd cabin club 4 seats • 18 seats Certified for Taxi, Take-Off and Landing Airframe & Engines 3375 Hrs & 1021 Cycles. Rolls-Royce: BR710C4-11. S/N: 15139/15138, 3375/3375 Hrs, 1021/1021 Cycles. Next major check: 4000 hrs. APU: Honeywell RE220GV, S/N: P-328, on MSP, 3430 hrs, Next major check: 2014. Last major check: Dec. 2013, Next major check: Dec. 2014 Avionics Automatic Flight Guidance System, Triple Inertial Reference System, Two 24-channel Global Positioning System (GPS), Visual Guidance System - Heads-up Display (HUD), Enhanced Vision System (EVS) - Forward Looking Infrared Camera, Data Transmission and Auto-Calling: Facsimile System, MCS-7000 SATCOM system, Dual Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS), 60 Hertz Power System, Dual HF Transceivers, Triple VHF Communications 8.33 kHz, Dual ATC transpondeurs / TCAS 2000, Traffic Collision Avoidance System / TCAS 2000,

Color Weather Radar, MagnaStar C-2000 radio telephone system, Flight Management System FMS, Flight Data Recorder System and Cockpit Voice Recorder Additional Equipment One main galley/bar that includes a coffee maker, micro-wave oven, thermal oven and hot cup. A forward L/H coat closet and entertainment cabinet. Fwd cabin club 4 seats. Mid cabin club 2 seats and a 4 place divan. A dining area with 2 double seats. 3 Place divan in aft cabin with a single seat and console table. Vanity and toilet lavatories, with sink, soap dispenser, shelves and mirror. 17», 14» and 5.6» LCD monitors, DVD & CD player, Cabin Stereo Equipment, Display cabin - Airshow 400, Wireless LAN network system with shared network printer Interior Once again, the cabin atmosphere created by Gulfstream Aerospace shows the main aim of its conception: the permanent consideration of the passenger and his comfort. Great care have been taken in selecting and matching finishes and colors to highlight the interior. Soft forms have been used to increase the feeling of warmness produced by the mix of beige colors of seats and the wood Exterior White with a black belly and several stripes on the fuselage Price: $29,500,000

Global Jet Monaco Florian Van Der Cruyssen, Aircraft Sales Director, L'Albatros, 9, bd Albert 1er, MC - 98000 Monaco

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J Hopkinson 2 October 18/02/2014 12:07 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

Cessna Citation Ultras AVIONICS Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell Primus GNS-XL FMS System

Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS INTERIOR Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior

EXTERIOR Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior MAINTENANCE Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option

1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


ONE STOP – ONE SHOP BAM SALES – SCANDINAVIA’S PREMIER VIP HANDLING COMPANY!

Bromma Air Sales presents following aircraft for sale. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need more information about these objects or visit www.bamsales.aero

Please visit www.bamsales.aero for more details! FALCON

7X

WANTE D!

2008 Citation XLS sn 5807. Pwr Adv+ and Pro Parts. EU Ops

2007 Citation Mustang sn 49, Pwr Adv+ and Pro Parts. EU Ops

Bromma Air Sales AB

1979 Citation IISP, 2.550 SMOH. Very high Maintenance Status!

Hangar 4, Stockholm Bromma Airport, 168 67 Bromma, Sweden. Phone: +46 8 566 190 00, fax: +46 8 566 190 90 Direct phone; Gunnar Samuelsson: +46 708 80 44 77, Jonas Sundberg: +46 708 19 64 62. Web: www.bamsales.aero


P149-153 16/04/2014 14:37 Page 2

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Tel: +1 703-917-9000 E-mail: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

Capital Jet Group Price:

$1,950,000

Year:

1993

S/N:

258241

Reg:

XA-CHA

TTAF:

5875

MSP GOLD for engines. API winglets for added range and performance. 2011 paint. 2013 48 month inspection. Global AFIS. Aircell Iridium satphone. Dual GPS. Digital FDR. HF. TCAS 2000 8 passenger interior with DVD/CD/Airshow system with dual monitors

Location: USA

Hawker 800XPi

Tel: +1 703-917-9000 E-mail: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

Capital Jet Group Price:

$3,950,000 USD

Year:

2005

S/N:

258723

Reg:

M-YCEF

TTAF:

4,219

Hawker 850 performance for 8 passengers in a turn-key package. HBC Winglets. Dual File-servers. 2012 paint and interior. MSP for engines and APU. Fresh 8 year/48 month inspections at Duncan Aviation. Fresh Engine Core Overhauls. No Excuses, no projects. Make an offer soon.

Reduced to $3,950,000 USD

Location: USA

Cessna Citation X

Sapphire International Price:

Please call

Year:

2002

S/N:

750-185

Reg:

N750DD

TTAF:

2832

Tel: +1 (561) 753 5353 E-mail: ramsesparziale@gmail.com

Honeywell Primus 2000 Avionics, CAMP Systems, All SBs and ADs up to date on ProParts. Engines: Left /Right Description: Rolls-Royce AE3007C1/Rolls-Royce AE3007C1,Engine Program:Corporate Care,Total Time Since New: 2832 Hours,Total Cycles Since New: 1885 Cycles ,Engine Program, Corporate Care, 8 Passenger interior plus Belted Lav. Leather seats Reduced Price!

Location: USA, FL

McDonnell Douglas MD-87

Premier Avia Price:

Please Call

Year:

1987

S/N:

49412

Reg:

P4-AIR

TTAF:

45683

Location: Switzerland

Hawker 800

Cooper/T. Smith Price:

$1,450,000 USD

Year:

1988

S/N:

258139

Reg:

N218AD

TTAF:

8150.2

Tel: +7 985 762 9787 Email: a.kondratyev@premieravia.ru Nineteen seats. Aft owner’s private stateroom with a double bed and private lavatory. 2 forward crew rest areas. Galley with three refrigerators. Three 42”, two 32”, two 20”, two 15” video monitors. Maximum range 7000km(3780nm). Additional Fuel Tanks System, composed of eleven auxiliary fuel tanks (2200 gal or 6680 kg). One original aft auxiliary fuel tank (784 gal or 2374 kg). AC meets requirements for RVSM/MNPS/CATIIIa/TCASII Change 7/EGPWS/ICAO An16 Vol1 Ch4. Iridium ICS-200 Satcom.

Tel: +1 251-454-2161 E-mail: Daniel.Valentim@coopertsmith.com Landings 5687, Honeywell avionics, 5 Tube EFIS, AFIS, SPZ 8000 DIFCS, Primus 870 Weather Radar with Lightning Sensor, DUAL LASEREF ll Inertial Reference Units, Interior: Leather seats in neutral colors with Berber carpet, Rear 4 place club, Forward 3 place couch on the left, Paint: By Duncan Aviation Battle Creek MI. completed on 01-FEB2005, Matterhorn White, Astro Blue, English Blue

Location: USA

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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P149-153 17/04/2014 12:58 Page 3

Marketplace Learjet 36A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,695,000

Year:

1977

S/N:

36A-030

Reg:

N160GC

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Learjet 36A, Long range capability, as configured 2,400 nautical miles. Can be upgraded to 2,600 mile range. Recent paint and interior, RVSM. Competitively priced at $1,695,000 USD, may trade on helicopter

TTAF: Location: USA

BELL 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

52265

Reg:

N339MG

TTAF:

1700

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Full EMS Medical 4 patient and 4 attendant interior. Recent ‘no expense spared’ airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’ will provide Fresh annual /Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Five Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

1991-1996

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Five, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore’. Available for immediate use. Asking $3.1M to $3.6M USD. Serial numbers: 35034, 35048, 35060, 35088 and 35096

Location: USA

King Air B200

Keystone Aviation Price:

Please Call

Year:

2001

S/N:

BB-1767

Reg:

N441AL

TTAF:

2,592

Location: USA

150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

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Tel: +1 801-933-7509 E-mail: mparker@keystoneaviation.com Aircraft is excellent condition, w/ no known damage history. Equipment includes: Collins EFIS-84/ Pro Line II, TAWS, TCAS, ADF, BLR Winglets w/ Extended Boots, Raisebeck 4Blade Quiet Turbofan Props, Ram Air Recovery, Enhance Performance Leading Edges, Nacelle Wing Lockers, Cat Soft Touch Tires, Heated Brakes, Auto Feather, Prop Synch, Frakes Stacks, Stainless Steel Fasteners, Dual Door Cables, Electric Cabin Heat, Aft Blower. Hots JAN 2013, Gear June 2013

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P149-153 17/04/2014 10:17 Page 4

Marketplace Hawker 1000A

Tel: 1-850-213-3218 E-mail: jetmarkets@aol.com

International Jet Markets, Inc. Price:

Make Offer

Year:

1992

S/N:

259010

Reg:

N52SM

TTAF:

5400

MSN 259010, ESP Gold, Honeywell Avionics, Excellent 9 Pax Interior, Well maintained, 2 Corporate Owners, Replaced & excess to needs $2,450,000.00 but Make Offer Contact: Bill Pilker Mobile 1-770-330-2691

Location: USA

Bombardier Challenger 604

Asia Corporate Jet Pte., Ltd Price:

Make offer

Year:

2005

S/N:

5626

Reg:

N787LG

TTAF:

2569

Tel: +65 97 335 058 E-mail: jon.evans@asiacorporatejet.com

Low time CL604, GE On-Point, SmartParts and MSP. 12 pax configuration with dual aft divans. Fresh Gear and 96M Inspection

Location: Singapore

Challenger 300

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 8,495,000

Year:

07/2004

S/N:

20004

Reg:

D-BFJE

TTAF:

5,991

Tel: +49 7403 914 04 66 E-mail: sales@basjets.com New Paint and Interior Dec 12, 96 mths. done 12/2012; Airframe and Engines on MSP and Smart Plus; No Damage History; only one Owner since new; CVR/FDR; SATCOM, Airshow with DVD; Microwave, Coffee Maker; 8 Pax Club Seat Config; belted Toilet Seat; CAT II; MNPS; In and Out like new

Location: Germany

www.basjets.com

Challenger 600

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 700,000

Year:

1982

S/N:

1066

Reg:

D-BSNA

TTAF:

10,392

Tel: +49 7403 914 04 66 E-mail: sales@basjets.com Interior + Exterior new in 2009, 11 Pax Club Seat and Conference Configuration; Airshow; Cabin Entertainment System; dual FMS; CVR/FDR; dual Collins TDR (Mode S); Triple Collins VHF; Coffee Maker; Oven; MSP; CAMP; RVSM; No Damage History

Location: Germany

www.basjets.com

Challenger 601-3R

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 3,150,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

5173

Reg:

D-AKUE

TTAF:

7,596

Tel: +49 7403 914 04 66 E-mail: sales@basjets.com Exterior 2008; 11 Pax Club Seat and Conference Configuration and Divan; Airshow; RVSM, B-RNAV; Tail Tank; CAMP; dual FMS; CVR/FDR; HF/SELCAL; ELT; dual Collins TDR (Mode S); No Damage History; Fresh 6/12/24/48/60 /120 Months Inspection Package (due 11/2014)

Location: Germany

www.basjets.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

151


P149-153 16/04/2014 14:45 Page 5

Marketplace Westwind II

Thomas Jets LLC Price:

$495,000 USD

Year:

1984

S/N:

409

Reg:

N629WH

TTAF:

5102

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (613) 991 2935 E-mail: paul@thomasjets.com This no damage, RVSM compliant aircraft, is an excellent, late model Westwind II, Flight Director: Collins FDS-85, Auto Pilot: Collins APS-80, Comms: Dual Collins VHF-20B, ADF: Collins ADF-60A, Keith Freon Air, Airshow 200, Wireless Headsets, The cabin is equipped with five individual executive seats and a forward three place couch. The fully enclosed lavatory, located in the rear of the cabin, has a belted flushing potty and sink. Seats and couch was recovered 2013. Good condition. Feb 2005

www.thomasjets.com

Dassault Falcon 50

Thomas Jets LLC Price:

$2,895,000 USD

Year:

1986

S/N:

168

Reg:

N514MB

TTAF:

5750

Location: USA

Tel: +1 (613) 991 2935 E-mail: paul@thomasjets.com Landings: 3268, This is an exceptional, low time Falcon 50 with excellent maintenance status and history. 4C & Corrosion Protection Control Program (CPCP) complied with August, 2013, New Paint, MPI’s (Weststar Alton, IL), Gear Overhaul August, 2011. New paint August, 2013 (Weststar Alton, IL) Excellent Condition. Six Individual Grey Leather Seats With a Three Place Divan and Jump Seat, Keurig Coffee Maker, Sony DVD Player, CD and Pull Out Wide Screen LCD Monitora

www.thomasjets.com

Westwind II

Thomas Jets LLC Price:

$550,000 USD

Year:

1981

S/N:

345

Reg:

N345TR

TTAF:

10,190

Tel: +1 (613) 991 2935 E-mail: paul@thomasjets.com This no damage, RVSM compliant aircraft, is an excellent, late model Westwind II. 35 hours since “C” Check Oct, 2013 Trimec Aviation, 800 hour structural “B” complied with, Keith Freon Air, Titanium Tail Hinge, B & D Cabin Display, Davtron Clock M 811-B, The cabin is equipped with four individual executive seats and a forward three place couch. There is a forward refreshment center with ample storage space

Location: USA

www.thomasjets.com

Fokker 100 Executive Jet

MJET GmbH Price:

Make offer

Year:

1992

S/N:

11403

Reg:

OE-IIB

TTAF:

30935

Location: Austria

Piaggio Avanti P180

GCSurplus.ca Price:

USD$2,500,000

Year:

2003

S/N:

1065

Reg:

C-GFOX

TTAF:

4927.8

Tel: +43 (0) 1 706 2700 720 E-mail: asset@mjet.eu Retrofitted to Executive/V.I.P. configuration - first quarter of 2007; 28 passenger seats; - AFTS (additional fuel tank system) - 4,800 km (~ 2,600 nm) range; - CAMP Maintenance Management System; - Honeywell Entertainment & Environment Management System (DVD, VCR, CD players, LCD Displays, cabin temperature & lighting controllers); - Satellite Phone System (Aircell)

Tel: +1 (613) 991 2935 E-mail: adam.clarke@pwgsc.gc.ca Available via Online Sealed Bid Auction. - GCSurplus <br> Minimum Bid: $2,500,000 CDN. End date May 1st, 2014<br> Full specs available contact: Adam Clarke <br> +1 613-991-2935 / +1 613-854-9769

Location: Canada

152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P149-153 16/04/2014 17:20 Page 6

Marketplace Eurocopter EC 120B

Tel: +44 (0) 7921 949 147 E-mail: info@wingedbee.co.uk

Darren Williams Price:

£615,000 excl VAT

Year:

2001

S/N:

1236

Reg:

G-ISSY

TTAF:

2615

UK delivered, one owner from new. Eurcopter UK VIP spec, flotation equipment. Sold with fresh 12yr check & new paint of choice. Engine has 12yr calendar life remaining

Location: United Kingdom

Hawker 900XP

Tel: +49 (0)821-7003-100 Email: sales@beechcraft.de

Beechcraft GmbH Price:

Please Call

Year:

2012

S/N:

N-Reg, Pro Line21, 2xHF-9000, 2xFMS-6000, 2xTDR-94D XPDR, TCAS II, RVSM capable, SSFDR, Aircell & Highspeed Internet, on JSSI, with several Warranties – Aircraft like new!

Reg: TTAF:

892

Location: Europe

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), May 2014, Vol 18, Issue No 5 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................154 Aero-Dienst ...............................................................135 AeroSmith/Penny............................................130-131 AIC Title Services ....................................................117 Albinati Aeronautics............................................... 134 AMSTAT .....................................................................124 Aradian Aviation..........................................................83 Aviation Advisors .....................................................136 Aviatrade ...........................................................119-120 Avjet Corporation.................................................56-57 Avpro ......................................................................10-14 Axiom Aviation ..........................................................141 BAM............................................................................148 Bell Aviation...........................................................42-43 Bombardier..................................................................25 Boutsen Aviation ........................................................71 Carolina Jets .............................................................142 Central Business Jets .............................................155 Charlie Bravo ..............................................................31 Conklin & de Decker ...............................................109 Corporate Aircraft Photography..............................97 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Corporate AirSearch Int’l................................88, 143 Corporate Concepts...........................................54-55 Dassault Falcon Jet Europe..........................2-3, 139 Donath Aircraft Services ..........................................39 Duncan Aviation..........................................................49 Eagle Aviation..............................................................81 Elliott Aviation..............................................................33 Florida Jet Sales ......................................................140 Freestream Aircraft USA....................................28-29 General Aviation Services........................................59 Global Jet .........................................................144-146 Gulfstream Pre-Owned ......................................36-37 Innotech-Execaire.......................................................95 Intellijet International .................................................6-7 Intercontinental A/C Group .....................................91 Jet Alliance ................................................................138 Jet Support Services (JSSI).......................................5 JetBrokers..............................................................62-63 Jetcraft Corporation....................................34-35, BC Jeteffect ........................................................................69 JETNET ......................................................................114 John Hopkinson & Associates ........................51,147

www.AvBuyer.com

Leading Edge Aviation Solutions...........................73 Lektro ............................................................................97 MEBA ...........................................................................85 Mente Group....................................................... 137 Mesinger Jet Sales........................................FC,19-21 NBAA Corporate .....................................................126 Northern Jet Management.............................127-129 OGARAJETS........................................................26-27 Par Avion................................................................44-45 PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales ................................93 Rolls-Royce..................................................................47 Sojourn Aviation ...................................................66-67 Southern Cross Aviation ........................................113 Sun Jet International.......................................132-133 Survival Products.....................................................118 Tempus Jets.................................................................23 The Jet Business ........................................................53 The Jet Collection ......................................................41 Universal Avionics ......................................................99 VREF Aircraft Values ..............................................118 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title ................................107 WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2014

153


21st Century March 19/02/2014 17:14 Page 1

Tri-Jets have earned a stellar reputation among owners and operators and usually command higher resale values than the competition. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter, providing a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the world's first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology.

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ May_CBJ November06 15/04/2014 10:30 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

TEL: 52.55.5211.1505

TEL: (952) 894-8559

CELL: 52.55.3901.1055

FAX: (952) 894-8569

E-MAIL: Enrique CBJets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

Celebrating 30 Years!

2000 GULFSTREAM V SN N33M Of fered by Original Fortune 100 Corporation, Over 40+ Year History as a Fleet Operator of Gulfstream Aircraft, Honeywell Satcom with Wifi, Immaculate Maintenance, RRCC Engine Program

GULFSTREAM G200 SN 199 1960 TT / 1040 Landings, ESP Gold, Meets all EASA / JAR OPS Requirements, Impressive List of Options including Aerial View Camera

FALCON 900EXy SN 121 Single Owner, Former Falcon Demonstrator, Most Systems are Triple, 2529 Total Hours, FWD & AFT Lavs, AFT Cabin Divider, MSP Gold

FALCON 900B SN 155 Always US Owned, 6400 TT, MSP Gold, Forward & Aft Lavs, Dual Aft Couches

FALCON 900C SN 194 Single Owner, 3850 Total Hours, 2060 Cycles, MSP Gold, Standard Interior w/ Dual Aft Couches, FWD & AFT Lavs.

FALCON 20F SN 470 - FALCON 900C ENGINES & APU MOD 7827 TT / 5009 Landings, MSP Gold, Collins Proline II EFIS Cockpit, Dual Collins Radio Tuning Units, Dual Universal 1Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s w/WAAS, ETC

FALCON 50EX SN 255 2 Midwestern Owners Since New, MSP Gold, Dual Laseref, Dual NZ2000's, Satcom

FALCON 50-40 SN 25 Last Falcon 50 Ever to be Multi-million Dollar Converted, Proline 21 cockpit, TFE-40 Engines on MSP Gold, 50EX Interior New 2010

www.cbjets.com ALSO AVAILABLE: Gulfstream IISP SN210 * 2000 Gulfstream V w/ 5800 TT on RRCC * Falcon 900EXy SN238 (Lease Only)


As anyone in aviation knows,

TURBULENCE is an art.

Buying and selling aircraft can be a bumpy business. But for over 50 years, we’ve earned a reputation for delivering the smoothest ride, as well as the best deal. We did it by building our business entirely around our customers’ needs. With transaction specialists who really know aircraft and markets, and an unmatched global network of partners. The result? Faster, easier transactions and lots of repeat clients. So call us and relax. You’ve got the best navigator around. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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2007 Challenger 300 - SN 20135

2007 Falcon 900DX - SN 614

Immediately Available - Fully Programmed 2,042 Hours; 1,494 Cycles

2011 Challenger 605 - SN 5855

C Check Currently in Progress in TAG Aviation Geneva Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold

1,274 Hours; 531 Cycles - 12 Passenger Configuration Engines Enrolled on GE OnPoint

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2010 Agusta A109 Power 2001 Airbus A319CJ 2010 Challenger 300 2007 Challenger 850ER 2006 Citation XLS 2002 CRJ 200LR 2004 Falcon 2000EX EASy 2009 Global 5000 2015 Global 5000

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2015 Global 6000 2005 Global Express 2009 Global XRS 2001 Gulfstream G200 2008 Gulfstream G450 2011 Gulfstream G550 1990 Gulfstream IV 2008 Hawker 900XP 2008 Lear 60XR

2007 Global 5000 - SN 9226

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2007 Global XRS - SN 9234

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3/28/14 1:49 PM

World Aircraft Sales Magazine May 2014  

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