Page 1

FC JMesinger May 2013_FC December 06 24/04/2013 12:18 Page 1

WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

May 2013

Excellence.

2008 Gulfstream G450 S/N 4118 • One Owner Since New, 1,578 Hours TTAF, BBML • As Seen on Page 29

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 26 - 77


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Project1_Layout 1 07/05/2013 10:58 Page 1


AC Index May13 25/04/2013 14:20 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS A318-112 Elite. . 34, A319 . . . . . . . . . . 85, A310-304 . . . . . . 172, A320 VIP . . . . . . 45,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 35, 48, 71, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 156, BBJ 3 . . . . . . . . . . 49, Super 727 VIP . . 49, 737-500 VIP . . . . 164, 747-8 . . . . . . . . . . 49, 757-200 Exec . . . 144, 767-200 . . . . . . . . 49,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 29, 45, 46, 49, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172, Global 6000 . . . . 172, Global Express . 21, 22, 29, 35, 46, 47, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69, 85, 141, 152, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172, Global Express XRS.. 13, 22, 47, 65, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 172,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

601-1A . . . . . . . . 56, 67, 69, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 46, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 24, 29, 46, 150, 601-3A ER . . . . . 24, 166, 601 w/3A . . . . . . 171, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 23, 45, 46, 51, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 166, 171, 172, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 12, 45, 71, 73, 85, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165, 172, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 850ER. . . . . . . . . 12, 172,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 57, 69, 99, 31ER . . . . . . . . . . 19, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 55, 149, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 19, 45, 61, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 47, 61, 69, 147, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 55, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 25, 69, 146, 166, 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . 71,

BRITISH AEROSPACE 146-100CJ . . . . . 158,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

Conquest

IIB . . . . . . . . . . . . 164, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 54, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161, 163, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 23, 35, 49, 64,

CESSNA

300 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 23, 99, 167, 171, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 49,

Citation

Grand Caravan

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 31,

208B. . .. . . . . . . . 167,

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

PAGE

EMBRAER

Challenger

4

AIRCRAFT

II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 54, 56, 167, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 54, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 54, 67, V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 172, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 54, 63, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 25, 56, 103, 157, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164, 168, 172, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 56, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 63, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 85, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 24, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 25, 31, 54, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 31, 49, 63, 85, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 43, 148, 153, 164, Encore . . . . . . . . 51, 85, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 103, 171, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 54, 55, 57, 69, Jet 2+ . . . . . . . . . 140, Mustang . . . . . . . 24, Super SII . . . . . . 69, Sovereign. . . . . . 25, 31, 43, 49, 54, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 79, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 25, 56, 139, II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57,

Legacy 600 . . . . 7, 22, 33, 35, 48, 54, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, Legacy 650 . . . . 13, Lineage 1000. . . 35,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 7, 61, 164, 170, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 46, 51, 54, 160, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163, 170, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 54, 63, 170, 171, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 170, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 49, 85, 103, 142, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170, 171, 172, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 23, 170, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 19, 23, 43, 62, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145, 170, 900EX EASy . . . 7, 170, 900LX . . . . . . . . . 23, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 16, 54, 79, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 46, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 23, 172,

GULFSTREAM


AC Index May13 25/04/2013 14:21 Page 2

- IN THIS ISSUE

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 79, 172, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 23, 48, 64, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 155, 172, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 69, 73, 172, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 35, 43, 91, 99, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 19, 22, 29, 51, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 14, 15, 22, 29, 35, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 69, 103, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 47, 49, 64, 65, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 166,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 54, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 61, 91, Premier 1A. . . . . 17, 91, 103, 167,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 200XPR . . . . . . . 54, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 69, 99, 103, 350i . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 85, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 57, 79, 103, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54, 85, 103, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 85, C90GTI . . . . . . . . 55,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

Hawker

SABRELINER

400XP . . . . . . . . . 54, 69, 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 172, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 165, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 24, 47, 51, 55, 79, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 143, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 17, 47, 85, 103, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 55, 85, 103, 161, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 45, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 24, 159,

65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 54,

IAI

A 109A MKII . . . 168, A109 Power . . . . 45, AW 109E. . . . . . . 115, AW 109S Grand. 115, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 103,

Astra . . . . . . . . . . 54, Astra 1125 . . . . . 69, Astra 1125 SP . . 154, 171, Astra SPX. . . . . . 29, 51, 63,

PIAGGIO Avanti II . . . . . . . 99, Avanti P180 . . . . 45, 61, 69,

PILATUS PC12-45 . . . . . . . 167,

PIPER Cheyenne IIXL . 54, Seneca . . . . . . . . 31, Seneca V . . . . . . 85,

SOCATA TBM 700A . . . . . 91, TBM 700B . . . . . 54, 91, TBM 850. . . . . . . 91, 162, 166,

05.13 AIRCRAFT

PAGE

EC 135 P2i . . . . . 115, EC135T2 . . . . . . 25, EC 135T2i . . . . . 85, EC155B1 . . . . . . 115,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 600N . . . . . . 103,

SIKORSKY

HELICOPTERS

S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 25,

AGUSTAWESTLAND

BELL 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 165, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 165, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 412EMS . . . . . . . 165,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 75, 82, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 107, 117, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 83, 97, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 169,

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 85, 168, AS 355 F-2. . . . . 168, AS 355 N . . . . . . 85, AS 365 N3 . . . . . 45, EC 135 P2+ . . . . 103,

The Global Aircraft Market Online

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

5


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Panel May13 23/04/2013 16:13 Page 1

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Panel May13 24/04/2013 13:25 Page 2

Contents

Volume 17, Issue 5 – May 2013

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 26

Control Towers & Business Aviation: Board Members should exercise good judgment on company flight activities. Thus, awareness of key aviation issues and access to unbiased data are essential.

30

BizAv: An Essential Travel Resource: Complementary, not competitive, Business Aviation and the Airlines each offer a level of access that adds to the ebb and flow of commerce. Find out how…

36

A Saga of Success (3 of 3): We conclude our three-part series outlining a company’s decision to use Business Aviation by describing actual results from launch 18 years ago to the present.

42

It Is Not Over Yet: Jay Mesinger offers his thoughts on which factors influence today’s persistently slow market for pre-owned aircraft, and which are merely distractions.

50

Entry Level Business Aviation (2 of 2): David Wyndham adds to his compendium of Business Aviation delivery systems, this month concluding his treatment of basic aircraft charter.

58

Insurance Coverage Audits: Insurance coverage audits are a part of a

26

42

Board’s due diligence in overseeing risk mitigation. Here, we provide a check list of items to examine for companies utilizing Business Aviation.

66

Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchanges (2 of 2): U.S. Tax Code allows for the disposal of a business aircraft and the acquisition of its replacement without generating a current tax liability. This month, we consider ‘Reverse Like-Kind Exchanges’.

72

Large Cabin Value: A look at the benefits of the Large Cabin jets, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

Main Features 92

OGARAJETS Interview: The leadership team at OGARAJETS sit down for a

66

discussion of the trends and market forces impacting the pre-owned jet marketplace.

98

Many Questions for the EBAA: Fabio Gamba and Brian Humphries offer a frank insight into the major issues facing Europe’s BizAv community and the on-going work at the EBAA.

104

Safety Matters – Summertime Blues : You may not need to de-ice your airplane before you take-off, but don’t let that lull you into a false sense of flying security. Here’s why...

108

Weather & Avionics: Environmental conditions and weather are intertwined and together they can significantly impact avionic equipment selection and performance.

112

European Fleet Overview: Statistical analysis of Europe’s Business Aviation fleet from Mike Chase, considering the popular models, makes and ‘based-at’ nations.

116

MRO Certifications: Planning is the key to certifying MRO work on an aircraft – and this is even more the case when the airplane is on a foreign register.

122

Jetcraft on Global Markets: David Dixon, Asia President and Mike Cappuccitti, Middle East Sales Director offer their views about the current state of their markets.

126

Change - Aviation’s One Constant: Foreign terms to pilots until a few short years ago, FANS, Batch 3 and CPDLC are now increasingly reshaping the way we fly.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Regular Features 20 78 84 86 114 130 134

Viewpoint Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Falcon 50 Aviation Leadership Roundtable Aircraft Performance & Specifications AIReport Market Indicators BizAv Round-Up

Next Month’s Issue Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits Downsizing Your Airplane Business Aviation & The Boardroom WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

9


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 29273 Registration: VP-BBJ • 18 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• One Owner Since New • Pats 9 Tank Configuration • CVR/FDR • SATCOM • Heads Up Display (HUD) • Airshow Network • SFAR88 modification requirements c/w

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

3/12

• Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • US$31,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 36714 Registration: VP-BFT • 18 Passenger - Andrew Winch Interior Design • Full Factory Warranties • Very low hours • Pats Gulfstream 6 tank Configuration G450 2Q 2012 (5 aft 1 fwd)

Gulfstream GV/512

• Aft state room with private lavatory and shower • Airshow Network • Five external cameras • Make Offer Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 28579 Registration: N920DS • 17 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• 2008 Paint & Interior • Both aft stateroom's have private lavatory & shower • Six fuel tanks installed (one in storage) • SFAR 88 tank mod c/w 4/09 • Flight Dynamics Heads Up Display (HUD)

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• CMC EFB's with XM Weather • High Speed wireless internet access • Engines on GE MCPH • Fresh 36 Month/2000 Hour Inspections • US$36,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 30076 Registration: VP-BBW • 19 Passenger • Interior Refurbishment 2010 • Pats 8 Tank Configuration • Recent A1, B1, C1 Checks and SFR88 Mod G450 2Q 2012 Gulfstream

Gulfstream GV/512

• Airshow Network • Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

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New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

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Freestream 2 May 24/04/2013 16:43 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Challenger 850ER Serial Number: 8051 Registration: VP-BSD Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • 1260 Hours Total Time

• APU: Time Since New 1861 Hours • Engines enrolled in JSSI/VEST Complete Plus Engine Maintenance Program • Airshow 410 • Two fuel tanks (PATS System) • AERO-H SATCOM Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• 15 Passenger • US$15,950,000

Challenger 605 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number 5704 Registration: M-FBVZ • Total Time: 1616 Hours • Total Cycles: 993 • Proline 21 • Collins SRT 2100 Inmarsat SATCOM Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Airshow 410

Gulfstream GV/512

• 10 passenger • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

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Freestream 2 May 24/04/2013 16:49 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Global XRS Serial Number: 9195 Registration: N4T Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 3119.4 hrs

• Landings: 1023 • Aircraft Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP SYSTEMS • Engines are on Condition • Second GPS (Honeywell GPS550) • Cabin Humidification System • FDR Upgrade – Crew Force Boeing BBJ/36714 Measuring System • High Speed Data • 13 Passenger Interior • In Service May 31, 2007 • US$31,950,000

Boeing BBJ/30076

Legacy 650

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 14501136 Registration: VP-CPL • Total Time: 633.18 • Total Cycle: 248 • Airframe is on Embraer Executive Care Agreement Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • Engines are enrolled on RRCC • Long-Range Fuel System • Electronic Flight Bag • Solid State Cockpit Voice Recorder – SSCVR • Solid State Flight Data Recorder – SSFDR • Airshow 4000 • 13 Passengers Interior Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$22,950,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

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Freestream 3 May 24/04/2013 16:51 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

2007 Gulfstream 450 • TTAF: 2480 • Landings: 881 Boeing BBJ/28579

• On JSSI Tip to Tail Maintenance Program

Boeing BBJ/29273

• Airshow 4000 System • Honeywell AIS-2000 Direct TV • Honeywell High-speed data system • Securaplane 500 Aircraft security system • Forward Galley • 14 Passenger Interior

Boeing BBJ/30076

Gulfstream IVSP Global XRS/9195

• Make Offer

Boeing BBJ/36714

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1385 Registration: N4818C • TTAF: 4266 • Landings: 2701 • APU on MSP • Honeywell MCS-6000 SATCOM Gulfstream500 G450 2Q 2012system • Securaplane security

Gulfstream GV/512

• CVR/FDR • Honeywell TCAS 2000 • Aft galley • 14 Passenger • Make Offer Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

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Freestream 3 May 24/04/2013 16:52 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

2008 Gulfstream 450 • Total Time: 976 • Landings: 410 • Airshow 4000 System

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• Honeywell PRIMUS EPIC II • External Camera System • Forward Galley • 14 Passenger • Available for Showings • Make Offer

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

Gulfstream IVSP Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1468 Registration: N700NY • TTAF: 4827 • Landings: 2692 • Engines on RRCC • CMP MSG-3 Maintenance Tracking Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7

Gulfstream GV/512

• EGPWS • 13 Passenger • RVSM Compliant • US$13,950,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 4 May 24/04/2013 16:46 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Citation XLS Serial Number: 5763 Registration: OE-GSZ Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 2919.50 Hours

• Total Cycle: 2206 Landings • RVSM Capable • Thrust Reversers • Precision RNAV Capability, B-RNAV/RNP5 • U.S. Steep Approach including England Option • On Cessna ProParts Program Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• On ProAdvantage+ Program • On AuxParts Program • Make Offer

Falcon 2000 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1 Registration: G-YUMN • Total Time: 6289.27 hrs • Landings: 5614 • Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold • B-RNAV/RVSM/RNP10/RNP5 Compliant Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • CVR/FDR • Honeywell Mark V EGPWS • Collins TTR 920 TCAS II • Aero M SCM1000 Honeywell SATCOM • Airshow Genesys 400 • Elegant 10 Passenger Fireblocked Interior • New Paint in April 2007 Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$5,950,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 4 May 24/04/2013 16:46 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Hawker 850XP Serial Number: 258812 Registration: D-CLBH Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • TTAF: 1552

• Landings: 1078 • Engines on MSP Gold • Collins Pro Line 21 system • Airshow 410 • 2nd 15’’ LCD monitor • Belted Lavatory Boeing BBJ/30076

• AFM Supplement for JAR OPS Boeing BBJ/36714 • Additional stowage drawers under four forward seats • Long Range Oxygen • US$5,750,000

Premier 1A

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: RB-172 Registration: G-EVRD • 1450 Hours TTAF • UK Based • Engines on JSSI • Executive Package

Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Moving Maps

Gulfstream GV/512

• Electronic Charts • US$2,250,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


O'Gara May 23/04/2013 14:31 Page 1

O’Gara Aviation Company—a name synonymous with expertise and professionalism—is now OGARAJETS. While the name is new, the mission endures. We continue to be a company that proves time and again that the most important elements in any aircraft transaction are integrity and trust.

FOSTERING CONFIDENCE IN AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS As the company now enters its 33rd year under the leadership of the second generation of the Foster family, we invite you to learn more about the competitive advantages that aircraft buyers and sellers enjoy as our clients. That is because OGARAJETS is uniquely structured to deliver highly personalized service experiences augmented by our renowned technical knowledge and market insight. A pioneer in the collection and analysis of aircraft market data, the OGARAJETS team continues to offer investment grade advice that comes not only from buying and selling aircraft, but owning and operating them as well. Interested in learning more? Contact us today at +1 770 955 3554 or ogarajets@ogarajets.com.


O'Gara May 07/05/2013 12:15 Page 2


Gil WolinMay2013_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 12:00 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

The State of Aviation by Gil Wolin had about finished writing this month’s column about Massachusetts’ commitment to supporting aviation – in my mind a model for other states – when we were confronted with the tragedy at the Boston Marathon. So forgive me if I pause for a moment, and think about something other than aviation. I have run marathons – not particularly well, but with enthusiasm, at least, as I’ve described before in these pages (Viewpoint, June 2012). That experience requires that I recognize that for all who make that commitment, it is more than just a race. And today, in Boston, much, much more. Millions watched in horror as what should have been a triumphant celebration for more than 20,000 runners and families from all over the world, became a nightmarish scene, torn from some all-too-graphic war movie. I’ll leave the detailed reporting to those better trained and more experienced. With any luck, by the time you read this, the authorities will have the culprits in custody. Suffice to say, the response that day by those on Boylston Street – from officials to medical personnel, to spectators and even runners who had just completed a four-hour endurance test – served as testimony to the best within each of us - all of which, in an odd way, brought me back to thinking about aviation. Disasters – whether natural, accidental, or man-made – often serve to illustrate one vital role aviation plays in all of our lives. Fortunately, Boston has some of the finest medical facilities and physicians in the world, many of them on site in the triage tent near the marathon finish line. The injured were wheeled or driven just a few blocks to emergency rooms where medical teams responded with lightning speed. Had this event occurred in some other locale, many of the 180 injured might well have been airlifted, by rotor or fixed-wing aircraft, to the nearest major city with appropriate medical services. That may well have been what happened in the fertilizer plant explosion which just occurred near Waco, TX, some

I

80 miles south of Dallas. We’re lucky in Massachusetts. With 39 public-use airports, distributed fairly evenly throughout the Commonwealth, only in the far reaches are you as much as twenty miles from a paved runway. And while in the case of a medical emergency life may sometimes depend on access to a runway, our state’s Department of Transportation recognizes that day-to-day life also depends on a healthy aviation infrastructure. Most people know about transportation in Massachusetts from their experience at Boston’s Logan Airport, from studying about Mayflower, or from hearing (Charlie on) The M.T.A., the late 1950s hit song mourning the commuter train rider trapped forever “‘neath the streets of Boston”. Richard Davie, the current Secretary of Transportation and CEO of the state’s Port Authority (Massport), cut his teeth in transportation as head of the state’s rail system – including the M(B)TA – but that hasn’t stopped him from fully supporting aviation throughout the state. So much so, that the NBAA just presented him with its Silk Scarf Award, for special contributions to the Business Aviation community. It began with a thorough examination of aviation’s economic impact on the state. A 2009 study, commissioned by MassDOT Aeronautics Division Administrator Chris Willenborg, revealed that General Aviation contributes more than $440 million annually to the state’s economy, with combined payrolls of more than $135 million. Those numbers couldn’t be ignored, especially on the heels of the recession that began the year before. By 2011, both Secretary Davey and Governor Deval Patrick were willing to make investments in Corporate Aviation. At the suggestion of Don Humason, head of the state aviation caucus, they began with the Gulfstream service center at Westfield-Barnes Airport, in the middle of the state. Gulfstream acquired this former K-C Aviation facility in 1998. The introduction of the new G650 required expansion of support facilities – and that meant more hangars were built and more trained technicians hired somewhere.

MassDOT and the Governor decided that “somewhere” should be Westfield. With more than 100 new high-paying technician positions in the offing – not to mention construction jobs, and millions in lease and property tax payments – the state committed $5 million to Gulfstream in support of facilities expansion. The funds are being used to realign internal perimeter roads, expand the adjacent apron, and build a new access road, opening up the adjacent area to further, nonaviation commercial development. Today Massachusetts continues to invest in aviation, with state-wide programs for pavement marking and maintenance, runway crack repair and obstruction clearing, and GA terminal construction. The key to the future, according to Davey, is to leverage our existing transportation assets – not only in the physical plant, like airports and seaport terminals, but also in human capital. With programs like the Real World Design Challenge, which encourages high school students to explore aeronautical engineering, MassDOT is investing in NextGen aviation people as well. As with everything else, it always seems to come back to people. Whether responding to a disaster or building for the future, it is people, and their commitment to doing what’s right that make the difference, everywhere. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. ❯ Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net

The world’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops & Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com 20

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Avpro full page May 23/04/2013 15:17 Page 1


Avpro 4 page May 22/04/2013 13:40 Page 1


Avpro 4 page May 22/04/2013 13:40 Page 2


Avpro 4 page May 22/04/2013 13:41 Page 3


Avpro 4 page May 22/04/2013 13:41 Page 4


BG 1 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:05 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Control Towers & Business Aviation. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

While Business Aviation is not their core expertize, Board Members are required to exercise good judgment on matters involving the company’s flight activities. Thus awareness of issues, such as the possible closure of control towers, and access to unbiased information from professionals are essential, notes Jack Olcott.

C

aptains of business jets prefer to operate from airports with control towers. Only about 10 percent of the 5,000 plus U.S. airports, however, have such facilities. Furthermore, the nature of on-demand transportation is the furtherance of expanding markets and servicing clients’ calls for operations into some locations without government or contract ATC facilities. When (and if) implemented, plans to close 149 of the 251 facilities where tower operators are contract employees rather than FAA personnel will reduce

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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the number of airports with towers to about 350. Ramifications of tower closures, obviously, are matters for Board consideration. A company’s ability to generate revenues and serve shareholders is impacted negatively when access to airports is curtailed. Business aircraft provide a unique and vital role offering transportation to new and existing markets. Scheduled Airlines focus on less than 50 hub locations, and many cities have no service from the Airlines. Business needs Business Aviation—it’s essential.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:06 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation Safety is also an issue that demands attention from the Board. Business aircraft transport a company’s most valuable resources—its employees. Their safety is paramount for a multitude of reasons. Compromising their wellbeing is neither moral nor good governance—and it is definitely bad for business.

ROUTINE OPERATIONS Because so few airports have towers, flight departments have procedures for accessing locations where air traffic control does not extend to the immediate environment of the landing facility. Pilots announce their intensions on a common frequency that is monitored by all aircraft planning to depart, flying within in the vicinity of the airport or intending to land. Pilots are taught to observe nearby traffic and never assume that a takeoff or landing path is clear. Daytime use of landing lights during takeoff and landing makes the aircraft easier to observe. Consequently, mishaps associated with aircraft operating near uncontrolled airports, although higher than near controlled airports, are very rare. The culture of safety that prevails within all aviation—especially Airline and Business Aviation—is maintained even though business aircraft have many operations at uncontrolled airports. Closure of contract towers is an unfortunate consequence of sequestration that can and will be managed safely and efficiently, if and when it occurs. Thus flight departments are prepared to operate safely if sequestration of government funds results in the closure of approximately 60 percent of our nation’s contract control towers. It is unclear, however, when such shutdowns will occur. Closures, which were to have started April 7th, have been postponed until June 15th. Bills have been proposed for both the U.S Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives prohibiting the FAA from proceeding with its closure program. About 50 cities have offered to use private money to keep control towers in operation at their local airports.

BOARD RESPONSE TO CLOSURES Considering that closures may occur, and recognizing that business aircraft have needs to access airports without control towers, Boards should assure themselves and shareholders that the company’s flight department or charter provider has procedures in place for operating in uncontrolled airspace near airports without control towers. Furthermore, such procedures should be well known and diligently practiced by crews, and they should be documented within the department’s Operations Manual. It is not the Board’s place, nor its area of expertise, to delve into a flight department’s or charter provider’s operational details, however. Board Members may not know where to look, what to examine or how to interpret what they see. They should, however, ask the responsible professional managing the company’s air transportation what process he or she has in place to deal with the reality that some flight operations are now (or will be) at Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

uncontrolled airports. If company procedure prohibits such operation, ask what will be the consequences of such restrictions if sequestration closes towers, and how will those consequences be mitigated.

WHAT, NOT HOW Business Aviation is a specialty. Gone (or at least rapidly disappearing) are the days when a company aircraft was the royal barge of the owner or privileged CEO. Today’s flight department is a business unit, important to the overall success of the corporation. It should be managed as other business units, with a clear Vision of the value it will bring to shareholders, a purposeful Mission that supports the corporation’s objectives, and specific Governing Principles that shape the culture of the department and foster safe, efficient and effective operations. Companies hire well-trained professionals with relevant experience in personnel management and aircraft operations to fulfill the need for on-demand air transportation. It is the profession’s job—not the Board’s—to design the detailed procedures for dealing with challenges that impact a company’s use of business aircraft. It is the Board’s duty to state what needs to be accomplished and to develop a system of oversight to assure that policy is being implemented. With the right manager in place, with a means of communicating with that manager, and with effective oversight, Board Members can be assured that their corporation and shareholders are being well served by Business Aviation.

“ It is the Board’s duty to state what needs to be accomplished and to develop a system of oversight to assure that policy is being implemented.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 30

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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JMesinger May_Layout 1 22/04/2013 15:39 Page 1

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JMesinger May_Layout 1 22/04/2013 15:39 Page 2

2008 GULFSTREAM G450 S/N 4118

S A

NEW TO MARKET

EN SE O

ASKING $26,500,000 | 1,578 Hours TTAF, 499 Landings

N V O C ER

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: • One U.S. Owner – Excellent Pedigree • Currently Operated Part 135 • Gulfstream PlaneView Integrated Avionics Suite • Certification Fox • Gulfstream Broadband Multi-Link (BBML) Wi-Fi Enabled • Honeywell AIS-2000 Multi-Region Satellite Television System • High SB Compliance, Good P&I, Great Aircraft

2007 GLOBAL 5000 S/N 9158

2001 GLOBAL EXPRESS S/N 9040

ASKING: $27,995,000 | 1,471 Hours TTAF, 600 Landings

ASKING: $18,750,000 | 3,823 Hours TTAF, 1,373 Landings, RRCC

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BG 2May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:08 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation: An essential travel resource

”Business aircraft also fly to airports where operations by Scheduled Airlines are non-existent.”

Scheduled Airlines and Business Aviation together provide industry with an essential resource—transportation that is safe, efficient and necessary for economic development. Complementary, not competitive, each offers a level of access that adds to the ebb and flow of commerce, notes Jack Olcott.

T

he two graphics presented below highlight the fact that business aircraft do not use the same airports as scheduled airliners. The left-hand column of Table A presents the 10 busiest U.S. airports by total passenger enplanements. (When ranked by itinerant operations of Scheduled Airlines, the list contains essentially the same locations but the order varies.) The right-hand column lists the busiest U.S airports ranked by movements of Business and General Aviation aircraft. Business Aviation represents about 4% of the traffic at the 10 busiest airports serving Scheduled Airlines. Business aircraft also fly to airports where operations by Scheduled Airlines are non-existent, as depicted in the Chart A.

• •

On average, 40% of trips via business aircraft are to locations with no service by Scheduled Airlines. Companies that use business aircraft are also significant purchasers of Airline tickets. They select the form of transportation that is most able to satisfy their needs.

Conclusion: Without Business Aviation, our nation’s companies would be disadvantaged and rural America would lack an air link to economic opportunity. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 36

TABLE A

CHART A

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle May 24/04/2013 15:59 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

Citation Specialist Since 1967 Aircraft Sales, Brokerage, & Acquisitions

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Re Pri du ce ce d

2005 SOVEREIGN, S/N 680-0019

2007 CITATION CJ3, S/N 525B-0162

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1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0343

1983 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0322

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P006_Layout 1 07/05/2013 11:04 Page 1


Avjet May_Layout 1 24/04/2013 10:32 Page 1

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2009 AIRBUS A318-112 ELITE

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ENHANCED AMENITIES Seating for 19 Passengers | High Speed Internet with Wi-Fi and Surround Sound System Crew area with separate crew lavatory | Zonal temperature control DVD Player in each zone and Airshow 4000 Airframe Total Time: 1,514.44 Hours Landings: 498 The Airbus 318 Elite typically seats up to 19 passengers flying larger groups than traditional business jets, making it ideal for big companies, government delegations, and extended families. With the widest and tallest cabin of any business jet, the A318 Elite also delivers unprecedented comfort, space and freedom of movement and can fly up to 9 hours non-stop. Avjet is pleased to offer this very special aircraft on behalf of its client. To find out more about this aircraft or any of Avjet’s other listings, call us at +1 (410) 626-6162 or visit www.avjet.com.

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Avjet May_Layout 1 24/04/2013 10:33 Page 2

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2000 Global Express, S/N 9010

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2006 Gulfstream G450, S/N 4044

1987 Gulfstream GIV, S/N 1022

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2009 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 1451089

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BG 3 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:10 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A Saga Of Success: A company’s results while using Business Aviation. (Part 3 of 3) Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

Describing actual results from launch 18 years ago to the present, Pete Agur concludes his three-part series that tracks a company’s use of Business Aviation. Personal details have been de-identified to maintain privacy. s presented previously, the Board approved the acquisition of a light jet in support of the business plan of their new CEO, Phil. They hired him to transform the company from a mid-level player to an industry leader with revenues in the multiples of its historic highs. Phil’s strategy was to grow the business by entering new territories. That is where the airplane came in. Small teams of corporate executives and sales folks could conduct concentrated and highly effective roadshows in first and second tier

A

markets. He also intended to use the aircraft as a tool to drive a significant shift in the company’s culture to one of high touch, and to create even higher service value while continuing to manage costs.

AIRPLANE PRACTICE It was important to Phil for the company to enter into Business Aviation in modest increments. He wanted the results of what Business Aviation could do for the company without the distraction of misunderstanding his intent. With that in mind, he selected a used light jet with an excellent pedigree as their first airplane. This choice kept the capital and operating costs down and avoided any appearance of excessive “ramp presence”. To inaugurate Business Aviation services, Phil conducted a C-suite meeting to discuss how he wanted the aircraft to be used. •

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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The authorizers for aircraft use would be any of the six senior executives. This level of oversight pre-empted the need for a charge-back system to meter demand. The aircraft would be available on a bestimpact-for-the-business basis. That meant trips with a higher benefit to the enterprise would have first priority. Phil confirmed he would change his schedule to accommodate high-value trips for other passengers. Anyone using the aircraft was encouraged to take additional team members along. This improved the impact of the trips and shortened the business cycle. All senior executives were challenged to add rising stars to their travel teams. This would broaden and accelerate the development of the organization’s leadership team. U Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Affiliates January_Layout 1 17/12/2012 15:30 Page 1

2003 CHALLENGER 850 SERIAL NUMBER: 7730 REGISTRATION NUMBER: N629DD Jet Affiliates International is pleased to announce this Challenger 850 to the market for immediate sale. This aircraft features: • No Known Damage History • Wi-FI • ICS-200 Two-Channel Iridium Satellite Telephone • New 2012 - 15 passenger VIP layout • New 2012 - Exterior paint • Airshow 410 • Fresh gear overhaul

Additional Equipment Audio Int. Cabin Management System Passenger Address System Emergency Exit Lighting System Two (2) 18" LCD Monitors Two (2) DVD Players One (1) 10-disc CD Player Twelve Midrange/Tweeter and 3 Subwoofer Stereo Speakers Two (2) Audio/Visual Amplifiers New MSA window shade system New Imbuia High-Gloss Finished Wood Veneer

Airframe & Engines Airframe Total Time: 10,165.1. Landings: 8934. No known damage history. General Electric CF34-3B1, Serial Number: 872657/873658, Total Time Since New: 9,845 hours/9,845 hours Cycles Since New: 8,534 cycles/8,534 cycles, TBO: On Condition Auxiliary Fuel System: New installation in 2009 by PATS Aircraft, LLC in Georgetown, Delaware. Full PATS warranty coverage and FAA/JAR certification

Avionics Dual Collins FCC-4000 Digital Flight Control Computers Dual Litton Aero LTN-101 Digital Autopilot System Collins RTA-844 Weather Radar Dual Collins ADC-850A Air Data Computers Dual Collins FMS-4200 Flight Management Systems with CDU Dual Collins VHF-422A Communication Transceivers Dual Collins ADF-462 Automatic Direction Finders Dual Collins DME-442 Distance Measuring Equipment Dual HF system Aircell ATG-5000 Dual Collins VIR-432 Navigation Receivers Dual Collins DCU-4004 Data Concentrator Units Dual Collins ALT-55 Radar Altimeter Allied Signal EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System with Windshear Detection Collins TCAS II Traffic Collision Avoidance System with Ch. 7 Collins GPS-4000A GPS Receiver L-3 Comm. FA2100 Cockpit Voice Recorder L-3 Comm. DA2100 Flight Data Recorder Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S Transponders 8.33 Spacing

Jet Affiliates International 7515 Lemmon Ave. Dallas, Texas 75209 Dennis Debo 214 353-2724 (O) 214 912-4247 (C) www.jetai.com


BG 3 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:11 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation To put it gently, with Phil’s oversight the addition of aviation services to the company’s internal resources made a dramatic and permanent impact. Not everyone bought in right away, however. A few months after the aircraft entered service, the CFO had a one-day conference in a city 400 miles away from home base. He wanted to take four members of his staff, so he rented a van and drove the eight hours each way. His logic was the out-of-pocket costs of the van were much less than using the airplane. Upon learning about the CFO’s decision, Phil asked me to have a conversation with him. Phil explained that if this CFO valued people’s time so little, he could find a new CFO. The next day I met with the CFO in a small conference room for about 30 minutes and told him that Phil had asked me to explain two things: The real cost of people’s time and the career opportunity associated with his current thinking. The CFO immediately became a huge advocate for the airplane. All humor aside, years later the CFO took the time to tell me how much of a Business Aviation advocate he had become based on his personal experiences and observations.

PROVEN RESULTS Since then the company has accomplished its growth goals, and much more. As their business footprint and volume expanded, so did their Business Aviation services capabilities. Today they have three airplanes that routinely blanket North America and several international destinations. And the impact of those efforts is telling. The company’s growth over the past 18 years, in millions, has proceeded as outlined in Table A, below. Between 1994 and 2011, Total Income grew 273% and Net Income 545%. That is an average compounded growth rate in revenues of over 6% per year and a compounded net income growth rate of about 10.5% per year. This growth is an even more amazing achievement considering much of it occurred during the most difficult financial period in modern times. The company has achieved two other significant goals that Phil established: •

Phil knew he needed to attract top people to work with him to pursue his aggressive business objectives. And he did not want to burn those people out. He pushed them to use the aircraft to be home with their families as much as possible. As a result, he has developed

a senior leadership team that is the envy of the industry, and that team has had very little turnover. The company became a deeply appreciated community citizen. They are repeat recipients of top “Best Places to Work” awards, reflecting the culture within the company. Of even more importance to many, they are leaders in a variety of outreach programs like Make a Wish, Habitat for Humanity, Special Olympics and many others.

IN CONCLUSION As Linda Ellerbee says, “And so it goes.” Eighteen years ago this company began the use of Business Aviation in pursuit of their goals. Today they are on the journey to achieve even more. Phil has retired. His successor has amped up the flying. And Phil’s saga of using Business Aviation for success continues. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 42

TABLE A Y ear 1994 2011 38

T otal Income $510mm $1,392mm

1 8-Year Company Growth G rowth N et Income $51mm 273% $278mm

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

“This growth is an even more amazing achievement considering much of it occurred during the most difficult financial period in modern times.”

G rowth 545% Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG4 May 13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:14 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

It is not over yet! Prices haven’t bottomed yet as many buyers fence-sit. Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards and is a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association. Contact him via Jay@jetsales.com.

“Buyer behavior is a key indication of the health of the market for business aircraft.”

42

Jay Mesinger offers his thoughts on which factors influence today’s market for pre-owned aircraft, and which are merely distractions.

D

epending on your equity holdings, watching changes in the Dow Jones averages can be fun or frustrating. Stocks indexes may be down 30 points in early trading and be up 60 by midday. Such moveWHAT FACTORS WILL INFLUENCE ment, however, does not A BUYER TO INVEST IN A JET ? tell us much about the market for business aircraft. If it did, aircraft values would be at all-time highs instead of being at all-time lows. Clearly there are influencers on the Dow that are not at play on aircraft sales. In this article I look at which influencers truly affect market activity and which are distractions, or simply market myths. Buyer behavior is a key indication of the health of the market for business aircraft. When real buyers are ready to buy, they just analyze and buy. They do not sit on the sideline and find reasons not to buy. At times like these, I wish I was in the business of selling fence railing. That way I could at least offer a product to those people who tell me they are not going to buy a business aircraft now as they sit on the fence and watch what is happening. Here are the factors that I think are at play with respect to the pre-owned market. U

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson May 22/04/2013 16:24 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Citation Sovereign SN 680-0157, Great Corporate Pedigree, One Owner Since New, Power Advantage +, Aux Advantage, Pro Parts, Over $1M accrued in programs, Motivated Owner, Replacement Aircraft has Arrived

Gulfstream G150 423 AFTT, Long Range Oxygen Bottle, Part 135 Certification, 7 Passenger, New Paint & Interior soft-goods in 2012

Learjet 45 3889 AFTT, Engines Enrolled on MSP, EGPWS, TCAS II, 9 Passenger-Double Club Configuration

Citation Bravo 4191 AFTT, Zero Time Engines, TCAS-1, GNS-XLS FMS, ProParts

Falcon 900EX 5300 AFTT, MSP Gold, Triple Laseref IV, Airshow 4000, 15 Pax configuration, Interior refurbished August 2010, Painted August 2010. Great Corporate Pedigree.

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


BG4 May 13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:15 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

FACTORS VS. DISTRACTIONS In every category of business aircraft there is just too much inventory. Some might argue that in several categories, such as high-end, relatively new aircraft, there are only a few listings. When you look at those few offerings and see that many have been on the market in excess of 100 days, you realize that a year’s worth of inventory is available for sale. That is too much supply! Excess supply exists because there are too few sales, and the real effect of fewer sales is lower pricing. Another factor influencing the market is a lack of non-relationship financing. Good lending options not only create more sales, they begin to affect positively the supply-to-demand ratio and provide confidence in buyers and sellers that residual values will be stable. Financing has been a game changer for our industry’s health. Before the recent presidential election everyone was sitting on the fence waiting to see which political party would come to office. Some observers were sure that a change in party would cause the industry and the economy to soar. Such thinking, I believe, was more of a distraction than a game changer. The economic instability in Europe, on the other hand, could truly be considered a game changer. It is still unfolding and has absolutely put the brakes on buying in much of Europe. Our “kick-the-can” methodology with respect to U.S. deficits and our nation’s economic housekeeping is a game changer, not a myth or a distraction.

playing field. High prices are not holding them back. They have never been lower. Yes, prices may not have bottomed yet, but I believe they are close. Uncertainty in pegging the bottom, however, should not be a reason to wait. The value of Business Aviation is the underlying reason to bring buyers back into our market. There is no substitute to using a business aircraft to grow your company and provide exceptional service to your customers. Identifying areas where this tool is needed and then acting on that need is what will overcome so many of the factors keeping the market sluggish. More awareness of Business Aviation’s value will create more sales – and more sales will pare down inventory levels, which will stabilize and elevate prices. Business activity creates business, which is the way exciting markets start. People come off the fence out of fear of what might be increasing prices. Then in fact prices do start to edge up. Who knows, maybe even lenders will feel the frenzy and work to get back in the game. Our industry might even be the catalyst for broader economic growth in other industry segments. But let me caution you against one thing: It is not yet over. There are still signs that prices will continue to edge down. There are still enough unsettled game changers to keep opportunities in abundance for buyers.

“ The value of Business Aviation is the underlying reason to bring buyers back into our market. ”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

INFLUENCERS Let’s identify what should bring buyers to the

Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 50

Compare aircraft performance using our

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 44

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


D ly E W ISH NE RB FU

RE


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Corporate Concepts May13 24/04/2013 10:45 Page 1

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BG 5 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:17 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Aircraft Charter: Entry-level Business Aviation, and so much more (Part 2). David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

David Wyndham adds to his compendium of Business Aviation delivery systems, concluding here his treatment of basic charter.

ast month’s overview described charter as an effective way to sample the benefits of Business Aviation without any commitment. This issue of World Aircraft Sales Magazine concludes the discussion by describing how you charter an aircraft, where you find a charter operator, the pros and cons of self-booking a flight as opposed to using a charter broker, and what questions to ask. Before you book a trip, you should have

L

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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travel information available so that you can discuss your options. The main items to consider before you search are as follows: • Where are you going? • How many people are going? • What sort of baggage will your group have? • When do you need to arrive? Answers to the first three questions will determine the size and capability of the aircraft to charter. Baggage can trip you up (pun intended). Just because the aircraft seats six does not mean it can take two large Pullman bags and six sets of golf clubs. Do not worry about when you want to leave— the aircraft departs on your schedule. Aircraft have different speeds, and depending on the trip length a fuel stop may or may not be needed. The beauty of Business Aviation is that your arrival time, not the scheduled departure time, is the driving force.

FINDING CHARTER OPERATORS Before the Internet there was the Yellow Pages. That directory still exists, and local charter operators advertise there. You may not find enough U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years.

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2002 Citation Encore

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2,344 Total Time. Honeywell Primus 1000 EFIS System. WAAS w/ LPV (GPS/WAAS). Safe Flight N1 Computer.

2001 Astra SPX

s/n 135

4,356 Total Time. TFE731-40R-200G Engines on MSP. Collins FCC 4000 Dual Flight Director, 4 Display EFIS.

2006 Gulfstream G450

s/n 4039

2,575 Total Time. 1,330 Landings. BBML and Direct TV. Excellent Maintenance and Care.

1999 Hawker 800XP

s/n 258396

2,448 Total Time. MSP Gold. Dual FMZ-2000. King KHF-950. Honeywell TCAS-2000. RSVM Certified.

1993 Citation VI

s/n 232

6,430 Total Time. Honeywell EDZ-605 (5) Tube EFIS. Dual Universal UNS-1Es FMS/GPS.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

+1 402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 4_17_13.indd 1

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BG 5 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:18 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation information there to determine all the capabilities that an operator offers, nor will you likely see listings for areas outside the immediate locale. On the other hand, the Internet may be too complete. For example, requesting a Google search of “aircraft charter Boston” will produce 4,470,000 results. Fortunately there are better ways to use the Internet than just a general search. The Air Charter Guide (http://www.aircharterguide.com) is a leading reference for charter airplanes and helicopters. That reference has global listings with contact information, aircraft makes and models, and list prices if publishable. The Guide’s “trip planner” can help you find operators. They also list empty legs — returning trips where the aircraft has no passengers and one-way travel might be available at a reduced price. Further, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) has a products and services directory listing air charter operators (http://data.nbaa.org/prodsvcs/directory/).

While these are very good sources, they do not necessarily help you determine the charter operator’s qualifications. Questions to be asked should address, at a minimum, credentials, safety history, date and results of most recent third-party safety audit, insurance coverage, and general procedures for the trip. When inquiring about a charter provider, it is appropriate to request the operator’s FAA Air Carrier Operating Certificate number, the particular FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) that oversees the operator and the FAA inspector responsible for that oversight. The FAA will respond to inquiries made directly to the local FSDO (coordinates are located in the phone book under US Government, Transportation, Department of). Auditors of charter operators should have relevant FAA information within their audit report, too.

CHARTER BROKERS Arranging an aircraft charter can get complicated, especially if you have never done it previously or the trip is flown outside the US. Thus you may need the services of a Charter Broker, which as the name implies, will arrange or “broker” a flight for you. Both the Air Charter Guide and NBAA have listings for aircraft charter brokers.

Brokers typically act as an agent of the charter operator and do not operate the aircraft themselves. The charter broker is skilled at matching your trip requirements to the charter company. They will take care of the details, provide you with a quote, and probably offer concierge services such as arranging hotels, ground transportation and other services that you may require. They may even handle all the trip billing. Charter brokers can save you a lot of time, offer you multiple aircraft options for the trip, and can provide trip-following and account management. Their services can be extremely valuable in planning trips and arranging and managing for the myriad of details that make the trip a success. Two important things to remember, however, when dealing with the charter broker: • They must clearly identify the FAA-certified operator or entity flying the trip. • They must state whether the operator or you covers their fees. The FAA regulates the aircraft operator but not charter brokers. The Department of Transportation has implemented some oversight of the air charter broker, but for the most part they remain selfregulated. Regardless of who arranges your charter, make sure that your quote is all-inclusive. What are the other fees beyond the hourly charge? They can include airport landing fees, special catering, ground waiting fees, and possibly fuel cost surcharges. If the flight is outside the US, there can be added air navigation fees, customs fees, and local handling fees. One last tip: make sure that your billing for the charter trip is itemized. In the US a 7.5% Federal Excise Tax (FET) is due on the hourly charges. FET is not due on other services such as catering. Aircraft charter can give you the benefits of Business Aviation with no long-term commitment. As with any service, you need to do a little homework and ask some questions. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 58

“Questions to be asked should address, at a minimum, credentials, safety history, date and results of most recent third-party safety audit, insurance coverage, and general procedures for the trip.”

QUESTIONS TO ASK CHARTER OPERATORS • Who is the actual charter operator, and what is their certificate number? • How experienced are the crewmembers and how often do they train? • Has the charter operator had a safety audit done by an independent third-party organization? When was the audit, and can you see the report? • Ask for a copy of the charter operator’s insurance certificate. How much liability coverage does the operator carry, and is it current? • How frequently does your charter carrier have their aircraft painted and refurbished? • In the event of an unexpected maintenance delay, will your charter carrier guarantee a similar replacement aircraft and honor the quoted price? • Will the aircraft be available early for departure? • What do the passengers need to have for security screening? • Who do you contact regarding the trip? Are they available 24/7? 52

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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JetBrokers May 22/04/2013 16:34 Page 1

1998 Falcon 50EX, S/N 268, 4078TT, MSP, Dual UNS-1C’s, EU Ops, 2C and Gear c/w 4/10, Dual Laserefs, TCAS 2, TAWS-A, Make Offer!

2009 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 145-1109, 2464 TT, On Corp Care, JAR Ops, Steep Approach, 13 Pax, Premium Sound, Expresso Maker, Make Offer!

1995 Falcon 2000, S/N 008, 6608TT, Dual FMS6100’s, Airshow 4000, 9 Pax, Thales EIED, SATCOM, Asking $6,400,000.00

2005 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 145-0873, 4400 TT, On Corp Care and EEC Enhanced, Satcom /w WIFI, 13 Pax, Steep Appr., Make Offer!

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 8179 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $1,995,000.00

2009 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0276, 604 TT, Pro Parts, Aircell Axxess II, JAR Ops, Airshow 4000, Ten Passenger Interior, Make Offer!

1980 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-45, 10229 TT, MSP Gold, RVSM, Freon Air, Garmin 530/430’s, Honeywell KMD850, Asking $625,000.00

1997 Citation VII, S/N 7082, 7167 TT, MSP, TCAS II, Dual GNS-XL’s, 8 Pax Interior, Good Paint and Interior, Asking $2,095,000.00

Also Available Astra S/N 030 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47 Citation III, S/N 650-0169 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0016 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326

Citation II, S/N 550-0295 Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0127 Citation II, S/N 550-0082 Gulfstream GIISP, S/N 206 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411

Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-36 Cheyenne IIXL,S/N 31T-8166017 King Air 200XPR, S/N BB226 King Air C90, S/N LJ-869 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232 Socata TBM700B, S/N 151


JetBrokers May 22/04/2013 16:36 Page 2

2008 Hawker 900XP, S/N HA-63, 1041 TT, MSP, Paperless Cockpit, XM Wx, G Check c/w 11/12 by HBC-TPA, 8 Place Interior, Asking $6,500,000.00

2008 Learjet 40XR, S/N 2102, 2358 TT, Smart Parts, Airshow, Iridium Phone, Steep Approach, Belted Lav, Dual UNS-1E’s, Asking $3,995,000.00

2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258684, 4108 TT, MSP on Engines & APU, HBC Winglets, Paperless Cockpit, One Owner, G Check c/w 9/12, Asking $4,450,000.00

2005 Learjet 60SE, S/N 289, 2203 TT, ESP Gold, 8.33/FM Immunity, UNS-1E, Enh Mode S, On CAMP, Asking $4,400,000.00

1999 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0301, 4361 TT, On TAP Elite, XM Wx, Iridium Phone, UNS-1K, TCAS 1, Doc 10 c/w 1/13, Price Reduced to $1,395,000.00

1993 Learjet 31A, S/N 65, 6967 TT, Engines on JSSI Plus, TCAS 2, UNS-1C, TRs, Big Door, Single Point Refueling, 12 Yr due 5/17, Price Reduced to $1,195,000.00

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $5,900,000.00

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Engine Fire Ext., Skywatch, Price Reduced to $2,200,000.00

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Main Office

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Conquest

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BG 6 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:21 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Insurance Coverage Audits: It pays to know what’s included in your policy. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

Boards consider insurance coverage audits as part of their due diligence in overseeing risk mitigation. Stuart Hope provides a checklist of items to examine for companies utilizing Business Aviation. ou’ve proceeded for years assuming your aviation insurance program is solid. Your policy comes up for renewal, you provide updated information to your broker, and you renew your policy without any thoughtful consideration as to whether your insurance program is as airtight as it could be. Should such an approach be condoned by a corporate Board? Clearly, the answer is ‘No’. Without a thorough examination of your company’s aviation coverage—in essence an insurance audit—Directors are failing to meet their responsibilities to shareholders. An insurance audit in response to Board oversight serves at least two purposes. Primarily, the corporation reviews its protection in the event there is ever an uninsured loss. What should a company policy cover

Y

regarding any form of transportation, ranging from something as simple as a taxi ride to something as sophisticated as travel on the company aircraft – and everything in between? Secondarily, the Board demonstrates due diligence in fulfilling its fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders. The scrutiny and liability that a Board might face in the event of a serious mishap would certainly be alleviated to some degree by the fact they went the extra mile by having an audit performed. Specifically, a comprehensive coverage audit will help answer many questions.

ARE YOU BUYING TOO MUCH OR TOO LITTLE COVERAGE LIMIT? By comparing and benchmarking your coverage with similar flight departments, an audit can quickly determine if your firm is under- or over-insured, at least by comparison with your peers. As safe as Business Aviation is, if your company is unfortunate enough to experience a “high profile” aircraft accident, having significantly less coverage than the industry standard can affect your company in a court of law, with some nasty repercussions.

ARE THERE ANY UNIDENTIFIED GAPS IN YOUR COVERAGE?

DON’T BURY YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND. AN INSURANCE AUDIT IS CRUCIAL

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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A comprehensive analysis of your policy coverage wording can serve to identify any potential known or unknown gaps in coverage. An audit isn’t about trying to make your current broker look bad. A good broker will welcome a “second pair of eyes” looking over the coverage language. Aviation insurance policies are uniquely constructed and very complex. Uncovering gaps or limitations do not necessarily mean that your broker isn’t doing an adequate job. There is no perfect insurance policy. Crafting the ‘perfect’ protection often is a creative process for your broker as he or she attempts to provide your company with the best U Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:40 Page 1


BG 6 May13_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 10:21 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

program of coverage and cost. Unknown gaps, per se, aren’t a bad thing provided you are aware of them and can make an informed decision to selfinsure and/or mitigate with other risk management techniques.

ARE YOUR PREMIUM RATES COMPARABLE TO INDUSTRY STANDARDS? Again, benchmarking your rates with others in your industry will provide a reasonable gauge of the competitiveness of your premium. Because of the volatility of the insurance market and the rating process, there will always be flight departments paying less and flight departments paying more for what appears at first glance to be comparable coverage. The question to resolve is whether your premium is significantly out of line with current market pricing structure.

ARE AIRCRAFT INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS ADDRESSED IN YOUR COMPANY’S POLICY? It pays to review all contracts/agreements you have entered (loan documents, hangar leases, dry leases, etc.) to verify compliance with the insurance language in each. You signed the agreements stating that you would comply with all requirements, correct? Therefore, to avoid being sued for inadvertent breach of contract, pay attention to the details.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS Beware of a consultant who uses the opportunity to

audit your insurance program as his/her chance to get their foot in the door and write your account. Some brokers will use the concept of “market standard” without an adequate explanation of what is being compared. Furthermore, there may not be agreement that all enhancements proposed are indeed available. If the consultant is also an insurance broker who could write your coverage, consider both a non-disclosure agreement and a clause that prohibits the broker from competing for your account for a minimum of three years. If the insurance auditor is good, such provisions (which also puts your current broker at a lower threat level) will probably be in the audit contract. Getting a second opinion in the medical field is routinely considered good practice. In a perfect world, it should be no different regarding other major decisions where the consequences of error are catastrophic. I may be biased but I would argue the consequences of having a high profile aviation accident, even though the likelihood of such a tragedy is very low, merit a second look at your insurance program. I would humbly recommend that you put an insurance audit on the calendar as a high priority task, sooner rather than later.

“You signed the agreements stating that you would comply with all requirements, correct? Therefore, to avoid being sued for inadvertent breach of contract, pay attention to the details.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 66

THE WORLD’S FINEST BUSINESS JETS, TURBOPROPS & HELICOPTERS FOR SALE AT 60

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation May_Layout 1 22/04/2013 16:50 Page 1


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BG 7 May12_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 14:11 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Aircraft Transactions: Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchanges of Aircraft (Part 2) Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

66

Attorney Chris Younger continues his explanation of IRS procedures related to deferring capital gains taxes when a company replaces an existing business aircraft with a similar piece of equipment. he IRS has endorsed two reverse like-kind exchange structures. They are commonly referred to as a "front-end" reverse like-kind exchange and a "back-end" reverse likekind exchange. In each of these types of exchanges, the company is required to enter into a Qualified Exchange Accommodation Agreement (QEAA) with an unrelated third party, who will act as a Qualified Exchange Accommodation Titleholder (QEAT). The Qualified Exchange Accommodation Agreement must contain certain terms as set forth in applicable IRS guidance. The Qualified

T

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Exchange Accommodation Titleholder fills a role that is essentially similar to the Qualified Intermediary (QI) in a forward like-kind exchange, which enables the creation of a direct exchange of aircraft between the company and the QEAT. In a front-end reverse like-kind exchange, the company ‘sells’ its existing aircraft to the QEAT. The QEAT then holds title to the relinquished aircraft until such time as it is purchased by a third-party U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAP May 23/04/2013 14:26 Page 1

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BG 7 May12_FinanceSept 23/04/2013 14:12 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation buyer. The QEAT acquires title to the replacement aircraft before transferring that title to the company to complete the like-kind exchange at the ‘front-end’ of the transaction. The company then owns the replacement aircraft, and the QEAT holds title to the relinquished aircraft until the sale of that aircraft to a third-party unrelated purchaser (which must typically be accomplished within 180 days of the acquisition of the replacement aircraft by the company). When the QEAT acquires title to the relinquished aircraft, it issues its promissory note to the company in an amount equal to the estimated fair market value of the relinquished aircraft. When the relinquished aircraft is sold, the amount of the note is adjusted to match the purchase price proceeds (per applicable IRS guidance), which are then ‘paid’ by the QEAT to the company in exchange for the cancellation of the QEAT’s note.

BACK-END REVERSE LIKE-KIND EXCHANGE In a back-end reverse like-kind exchange, the QEAT first takes title to the replacement aircraft and holds that title until such time as the company is able to complete the sale of the relinquished aircraft. The QEAT typically acquires the funds to purchase the replacement aircraft by borrowing them from the aircraft owner. Thus the QEAT owns the replacement aircraft until the sale of the relinquished aircraft occurs, at which time title to both aircraft is transferred into the hands of their rightful owners. In either a front-end form of a reverse like-kind exchange or back-end reverse like-kind exchange, the fiction of a direct exchange is maintained through the use of the Qualified Exchange Agreement Titleholder. In this way, like-kind exchange treatment is preserved, the IRS sanctioned reverse like-kind exchange procedures are followed and, provided that all other requirements (including the 180-day time limitation for completion of the transaction) are met, the IRS should respect the tax deferred character of the likekind exchange transaction.

RELATED/ANCILLARY ISSUES There are several related/ancillary issues that a Board must consider when engaging in a forward or a reverse like-kind exchange of aircraft. The newly acquired aircraft in a like-kind exchange typically takes a carry-over basis valuation that is equal to the company’s basis in the relinquished aircraft. The characterization of gain recognized upon the eventual sale of the replacement aircraft (e.g., depreciation recapture) is also retained. For these reasons, the Board must always consider whether engaging in a like-kind exchange of aircraft makes financial sense given that recognition of gain is merely deferred rather than being eliminated. In a like-kind exchange of aircraft, the Board must also consider state sales and use taxes. If not structured properly, the mere transfer of title to an aircraft may trigger liability for sales that could completely or partially negate the income tax benefit of engaging in the exchange. Furthermore, in many instances, the procedures required for engaging in a like-kind exchange of aircraft will impact the availability of cer-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

tain credits or exemptions from sales and use taxes (such as the credit for the value of an aircraft trade-in that is available in many states). A Board must also recognize that while most sophisticated buyers and sellers of aircraft and aircraft lenders understand like-kind exchanges and will be prepared to work with the company to enable it to complete the exchange, occasionally there are parties who are unfamiliar with the requirements for properly implementing a like-kind exchange. In such a case, it helps to have an intermediary party who can work with the uninformed aircraft seller or buyer to give that person the comfort they need to proceed with the transaction. Likewise, if a lender is involved in the transaction, the Board must communicate with the lender before making the determination that the company will engage in a likekind exchange. There is much complexity involved in the completion of a like-kind exchange of aircraft, and there are many ancillary issues that must be addressed. Whether or not a like-kind exchange of aircraft makes financial sense will often depend on a complete analysis of these issues and a comparison of the financial savings resulting from the like-kind exchange versus the outcome of trading aircraft without the use of a like-kind exchange. Expert legal counsel is a necessity.

“...the Board must always consider whether engaging in a like-kind exchange of aircraft makes financial sense given that recognition of gain is merely deferred...”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 72

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory May 22/04/2013 17:02 Page 1

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Year

Model

Serial No.

1988

Astra 1125

012

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1999

Challenger 604

5421

1997

Citation Jet

525-0198

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

1985

Citation Super SII

S550-0046

2001

Global Express

9029

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

1989

Gulfstream GIV

1107

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

2007

Gulfstream G450

4071

1998

Gulfstream GV

545

2004

Gulfstream G550

5029

2003

Hawker 400XP

RK-358

2005

Hawker 400XP

RK-407

2000

King Air 350

FL-268

1997

Learjet 31A

147

2002

Learjet 31A

239

1996

Learjet 60

085

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050


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The Jet Collection April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 15:37 Page 1


BG 8 May13_FinanceSept 24/04/2013 10:38 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Large Cabin Choice. Some missions call for more than a Light or Medium Jet. Sometimes it takes a larger jet to handle a large job hence the ongoing appeal of the Large Cabin jets.

“Seats-full range capabilities typically up to, and into the 6,000-nautical mile range make Large Cabin jets effective non-stop continent and ocean-crossing machines...”

72

S

ize is often used as a measure of quality or desirability. However, on some occasions, the mission demands an aircraft of larger capacity. In respect to that, this month our value examination focuses on our definition of Large Cabin business jets.

THINKING BIG WHEN SIZE MATTERS Some of us deal with the concept of size on a fairly routine basis, usually with little thought to the relativity of the concept. What constitutes small to one may appear large to another; what amounts to huge on my scale might only tip the scales toward medium for you. In aviation, one usually deals in such relativities with reference to weights. For the purpose of this month’s focus on Large Cabin jets we categorize aircraft MTOW roughly between 38,000 pounds and 100,000 pounds (the latter figure once constituting the upper-limits of business turbojet and turbofan jet airplanes). The advent of the additional, more niche-focused Ultra-Long-Range airplanes have since stretched those limits.

PERFORMANCE CONSIDERATIONS Large Cabin jets offer plenty in their favor. First, however, if there’s one defining negative element of

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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the Large Cabin jet and its upsize kin it is in the runway lengths they typically require. Runways longer than 6,000 ft (ideally longer than 7,000 ft) make access comfortable, particularly when the airport elevation is high or on days when the temperature is warm. As density altitude increases, so do runway requirements, but that’s not unique to the larger jets. Many paybacks counter-weigh the runway numbers. The key elements of this category’s appeal include speed, cabin size and range.

SPEED & RANGE The main differentiator between Large Cabin jets and their purpose-built Ultra-Long-Range counterparts generally stem from the larger fuel capacities and the higher gross weights. Otherwise, the average Large Cabin and Ultra-Long-Range airplanes share more in common than they differ, with similar cabin sizes and comparable cruise speeds. Speeds ranging roughly between 450-500 ktas are the overall trend for the Large Cabin segment. Seats-full range capabilities typically up to, and into the 6,000-nautical mile range make Large Cabin jets effective non-stop continent and ocean-crossing machines: and the fewer the stops, the shorter the U overall trip time.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BLOOMER_WAS_MAY13_Layout 1 4/22/13 2:19 PM Page 1

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BG 8 May13_FinanceSept 24/04/2013 10:37 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation SIZE Where the Large Cabin airplanes really excel (as the name would suggest) is in their cabin capacities. A cabin for this category of jet typically will stretch from around 30-, into the 40-feet range (or slightly more), enabling operators to enjoy a wider array of finishing options and office-like features than jets in the smaller segments. Cabin heights in excess of 6ft is the norm, and seating capacity depending on configuration, of eight to eighteen is typical for this category of aircraft. Naturally, the size and range capabilities of Large Cabin jets don’t come cheaply; you’ll need a larger fuel budget, more hangar space, a larger maintenance budget and, for safety and utility, a crew of three: two on the flight deck, and a professionally trained Flight Attendant for the cabin. Essentially, for the company with the need and budget, the Large Cabin business jet will rarely, if ever prove too small, and will only occasionally, be too large for an airport you’d prefer. For cases like those, you can always charter, just as the small aircraft operators do when they need to up-size for the occasional trip. Note: We have included 35 aircraft models in the following Large Cabin average price guide. For

additional assistance and interest, Conklin & de Decker Performance and Specification data for these Large Cabin models can be found on Page 86 of this edition.

LARGE CABIN JET PRICE GUIDE The following Large Cabin Jets Average Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1994 through Spring 2013. Values reported are in USD millions. Each reporting point represents the current average retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Bombardier Global Express XRS values reported in the Spring 2013 edition of the Bluebook show $33m USD for a 2005 model, $35m USD for a 2006 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. With the reader’s knowledge of aircraft, equipment, range and performance, the following Guide allows the reader to determine the best value aircraft for consideration. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com

U

“Essentially, for the company with the need and budget, the Large Cabin business jet will rarely, if ever prove too small...”

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Retail Price Guide May13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 16:37 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

LARGE CABIN JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE SPRING 2013 2013 US$M

2012 US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER

28.0

22.0

20.0

19.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

27.0

22.5

20.5

18.5

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

18.0

17.0

16.0

17.5

16.5

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

13.4

12.7

11.9

10.9

11.250

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

22.0

18.2

17.2

15.5

14.650

13.750

12.750

11.750

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000

56.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000

45.0

40.0

37.0

34.750

32.750

29.750

27.750

24.750

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

53.0

47.0

45.0

42.0

39.0

37.0

35.0

33.0

49.0

44.0

41.0

38.0

37.0

36.0

30.0

25.0

23.8

21.9

20.0

18.5

19.5

16.0

15.0

21.0

19.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS DASSAULT FALCON 7X

52.3

DASSAULT FALCON 2000S

27.1

DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX

32.4

DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY

17.3

16.3

28.0

25.0

15.7

14.8

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

13.8

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

42.2

39.0

36.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY

12.3

11.8

11.3

11.0

23.0

33.0 31.0

30.0

27.0

26.0

25.0

24.0

24.0

21.0

20.0

19.0

18.0

17.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX DASSAULT FALCON 900C

16.8

15.8

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000

50.0

45.0

43.0

41.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ

29.0

25.0

23.0

EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ

25.0

23.0

20.0

16.0

14.0

12.5

11.7

11.2

10.5

GULFSTREAM G650

64.5

GULFSTREAM G550

52.0

48.0

45.0

42.0

40.0

38.0

34.0

33.0

32.0

GULFSTREAM G500

44.0

39.0

37.0

33.0

32.0

29.0

25.0

24.0

23.0

GULFSTREAM G450

38.0

32.0

29.0

27.0

25.0

24.0

21.0

20.0

GULFSTREAM G400

19.0 16.5

GULFSTREAM G350

33.0

27.0

24.0

23.0

22.0

19.0

GULFSTREAM G300

17.0

16.0

15.0 12.5

GULFSTREAM G280

24.0

GULFSTREAM GV GULFSTREAM G1V-SP AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide May13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 16:42 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

10.0

9.0

8.1

7.7

7.2

6.8

6.5

6.2 4.4

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604 4.1

3.9

11.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 6000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL 5000 BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS

23.0

22.0

21.0

20.0

19.0

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS DASSAULT FALCON 7X DASSAULT FALCON 2000S DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

10.0

9.6

9.1

8.6

8.1

7.6

7.1

6.6

6.1

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

21.8 18.6

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY 17.4

16.8

16.3

15.3

14.5

14.0

13.5

12.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX

15.2

14.7

14.2

13.2

12.2

11.5

12.0

11.5

11.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900C 10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900B EMBRAER LINEAGE 1000 EMBRAER LEGACY 650-135BJ

10.0

9.5

EMBRAER LEGACY 600-135BJ GULFSTREAM G650

30.0

GULFSTREAM G550

22.0

GULFSTREAM G500 GULFSTREAM G450

15.5

GULFSTREAM G400 GULFSTREAM G350

11.5

GULFSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G280 25.0

24.0

22.0

21.0

20.0

19.0

14.0

13.0

12.5

11.5

11.0

10.5

18.0 10.0

17.0 9.5

GULFSTREAM GV 9.0

GULFSTREAM G1V SP

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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AirCompAnalysisMay13_ACAn 24/04/2013 10:11 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 50

CITATION X FALCON 50

Dassault Falcon 50 by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of Pre-Owned business jets in the $4.0 million-or-less price range for the purpose of valuing the preowned Dassault Falcon 50. We’ll consider the productivity parameters - payload/range, speed and cabin size, and cover current and future market values. The field in this study includes the Dassault Falcon 50 and the Cessna Citation X. In this comparison we will see how the Falcon 50 fares against the world’s fastest aircraft, the Citation X. Prices are for 1996 models.

I

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

BRIEF HISTORY The Falcon 50 is a French-built super midsize, long-range business aircraft with three jet engines. It was first certified in February 1979 in France and a month later in the United States. Production of the Falcon 50 ended in 1996. Aviation Partners has since developed winglets for the Falcon 50 as a retrofit kit. Following the Falcon 50 came the Falcon 50EX which made its first flight in 1996. The Falcon 50EX offered improved engines over the Falcon 50 among other improvements that enabled this popular business jet more range. There have been 352 Falcon

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50, 50-40 (engine upgrade), and 50EX aircraft delivered since 1979, and rather remarkably there have been only eight Falcon 50s retired from the fleet. Production of the Falcon 50 series ended in 2007.

MARKET SHARE Chart A (overleaf) represents the in-operation aircraft Market Share as of February 2013 for the Dassault Falcon 50, 50-40, and 50EX fleet combined (53%) and the Cessna Citation X (47%). There are currently 653 total aircraft in operation for these models.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


LEAS Single May_LEAS 07/05/2013 11:47 Page 1

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2008 Citation Sovereign s/n 680-0213 • • • • •

Very low time, only 468 hours Engines and APU on 100% JSSI AirCell ST-3100 SAT COM Airshow 4000 w/European map RVSM, EASA approved

Price $7,595,000

1998 Falcon 2000 s/n 66 • • • • •

Engines on CSP Gold, APU on MSP AirCell Axxess II dual channel Iridium SATCOM ATG 4000 Broadband Hi-speed Wi-Fi internet Paint and interior July 2009 1C/2C insp., landing gear detailed insp. & O/H insp. July 2010

Price $7,495,000

2006 Citation Sovereign s/n 680-0105 • • • •

Engines on ESP Gold, APU on MSP, On ProParts AirCell Axxess II SATCOM XMR 100-01 Weather/ Radio Cessna Tech Survey & Doc. Letters 6,14, 20, 21, 39, 40 & 42 c/w Nov. 2012 • 8 pax. with extended refreshment center option

Price $5,895,000

1990 Gulfstream IV s/n 1155 • • • • • •

ASC 190 gross weight incr. 75,000 lbs. ASC 266A Dunlop wheels/brakes ASC 469 water line ribbon heater upgrade ASC 230 stabilizer access covers Interior refurbishment Jan. 09, new paint Sept. 08 16 pax, forward and aft lavs

Price $3,395,000

Price $2,895,000

2008 King Air B200GT s/n BY-3 • • • •

Partial interior refurbishment Oct. 2012 New paint Nov.. 2012 5 year insp. and Phase I-IV Oct. 2012 JAR OPs compliant, previously EASA registered

1999 Hawker 800XP s/n 258419 • • • •

Engines on MSP Avionics Enrolled on Honeywell HAPP New paint and refreshed interior 2007 On CAMP, on a Hawker progressive maintenance schedule

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S , L L C

W W W. L E A S . C O M


AirCompAnalysisMay13_ACAn 24/04/2013 10:12 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 50

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

CHART A - MARKET SHARE

The data contained in Table A (left) is published in the B&CA, May 2012 issue, but is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. As we have mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Falcon 50’s ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 1,280 pounds is less than the Citation X.

Total 653 Aircraft

344 53%

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Falcon 50EX, at 700 cubic feet is greater than the Citation X (593 cu ft), as shown in Chart B (left).

Source: JETNET

POWERPLANT DETAILS TABLE A - PAYLOAD CAPABILITY

Model

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel IFR Range (nm)

Falcon 50

38,320

15,520

3,570

1,280

3,200

2,868

CitationX

36,100

12,931

2,375

1,444

3,125

2,703

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, M.A. USA: JETNET; B&CA May and Aug. 2012 Operations Planning Guide

CHART B - CABIN VOLUME 700

Falcon 50 593

Citation X

500

550

600

650

700

Cubic Feet

750

As mentioned previously, the Falcon 50 aircraft has three Honeywell TFE731-3-1C engines each offering 3,704 pounds of thrust (total = 11,112 lbst). By comparison, the Citation X is powered by two RollsRoyce AE 3007 engines - offering substantially more thrust at 6,764 pounds (13,528 lbst total). Using data published in the May 2012 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2012 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost in the August 2012 edition was $6.30 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year. Table B (left), sourced from the Aircraft Cost Calculator, shows the fuel usage of each aircraft in our field of study. The Dassault Falcon 50 - at 330 gallons per hour (GPH) and the Cessna Citation X burn the exact same gallons per hour, but both use 20 gallons per hour (or 6.5%) more fuel than the Dassault Falcon 50EX (at 310 GPH).

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS Chart C (right), which details “Cost per Mile”, compares the Falcon 50 to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 1,000 nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Falcon 50’s cost per mile comparisons at $8.02 is more expensive per mile compared to the Citation X. (It should be noted that the Falcon 50 aircraft was developed in the late 1970s while the Citation X was developed a decade or more later.) The Citation X cost per mile is significantly lower at $5.48 per nm.

TABLE B - FUEL USAGE Model

Fuel Usage (GPH)

Dassault Falcon 50

330

Cessna Citation X

330

Dassault Falcon 50EX

310

Source: Aircraft Cost Calculator (www.aircraftcostcalculator.com)

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisMay13_ACAn 24/04/2013 10:13 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 50

The ‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart D (right) - is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous trip expense. The total variable cost for the Falcon 50 at $3,275 per hour is more expensive to operate than the Citation X at $2,708. The points in Chart E (right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in the B&CA 2012 Purchase Planning Handbook and Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors: 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jet aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Falcon 50 as shown on the productivity index Chart E is competitive with the Citation X. The Falcon 50, which was inoperation almost 20 years ahead of the Citation X shows a better productivity value. It offers a larger cabin, more range and a slightly lower retail price – although it is slower, and costs more to operate than the Citation X, which will offset the price advantage over a period of time. Table C (right) contains the relative retail prices from B&CA and from Vref for each aircraft (1996 production model). The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage “For Sale” and the number “Sold” over the past 12 months are from JETNET. As presented, the Falcon 50 has a high percentage of the existing fleet “For Sale” at 19.4% (buyer’s market). The total Dassault Falcon Business Jet Fleet “For Sale” percentage is at 12.7%, and the in operation Dassault Falcon Business Jet Fleet has surpassed the 2,000 mark at 2,021 ❯ units. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CHART C - COST PER MILE*

$8.02

Falcon 50

$5.48

Citation X

$0.00

$2.00

$4.00

$6.00

$10.00

$8.00

US $ per nautical mile

CHART D - VARIABLE C0ST

$3,275

Falcon 50

$2,708

Citation X

$0

$2,000

$1,000

$3,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

CHART E - PRODUCTIVITY $5.0

Price (Millions)

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

Citation X $4.0

Falcon 50 $3.0

$2.0 0.5

1.5

1

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE LongRange Cruise (KTS)

Cabin Volume (cu.ft.)

Max Payload w/avail fuel range(nm)

Falcon 50

410

700

Citation X

470

593

Model

Vref Retail Prices $m (Model Year)

In Operation

% For Sale

Avg. Sold Monthly*

2,868

$3.9m (1996)

236

19.4%

3.4

2,703

$4.0m (1996)

309

7.1%

4.2

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, MA, USA; JETNET; 2012 Operations Planning Guide B&CA Aug. 2012. * Past 12 months

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

81


AirCompAnalysisMay13_ACAn 24/04/2013 10:27 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS DASSAULT FALCON 50

TABLE D FALCON 50 FLEET BY REGION

Location of Aircraft By Continent Make/Model Dassault Falcon 50 Fleet Percentage

Africa

Asia

Australia/ Oceania

Europe

North America

South America

Total

9 4%

3 1%

-

39 17%

176

6 3%

233 100%

76%

Twelve (12) aircraft are in shared ownership arrangements and 57 are in a fractional program Source: JETNET STAR Reports

LOCATION BY CONTINENT The major ‘based-at’ location of the Falcon 50 fleet is the United States (76%) followed by Europe (17%) according to information compiled by JETNET in its STAR reporting system. Such data can be valuable information for dealer/broker repeat business.

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value. There are

other qualities such as airport performance, terminal area performance, and time-toclimb performance that might factor in a buying decision too, however. The Dassault Falcon 50 aircraft fares well against its competition, so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Falcon 50, which started delivering in 1979, will continue to do relatively well in the pre-owned market for the immediate future.

For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com, Web: www.mdchase.com

TECHNICAL CONSULTANCY Gamits consultants and qualified engineering staff offer pre purchase inspections, aircraft modifications, refits and completion projects advice, full maintenance management and on site representation.

TECHNICAL SERVICES SUPPORT As approved by EASA Gamit offer CAMO engineering services including on-going engineering planning. Full back office technical support to ensure your aircraft is safe and airworthy.

SPARE PARTS AND LOGISTICS SUPPORT Gamit is an aircraft spare parts stockist holding relationships with major OEM parts manufacturers and repair & overhaul workshops. Offering global supply chain including AOG support.

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TELEPHONE FACSIMILE EMAIL WEB

+44 (0)1279 818 800 +44 (0)1279 818 801 enquiries@gamit.co.uk www.gamit.co.uk

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wright Brothers November 22/10/2012 17:18 Page 1

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title is a provider of aircraft title management and escrow services for all types of aircraft. Doing business both domestically and around the globe, Wright Brothers offers quick, personalized service from Debbie Mercer, always with the utmost of confidentiality. Available 24.7.365

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title 9075 Harmony Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73130 Telephone: (405) 680-9289 Toll-Free (within the US): (866) 217-5700 Fax: (405) 732-7457 e-mail: dmercer@wbaircraft.com

Title Search Title Clearing Escrow Services Registration Services Accident / Incident searches Preparation of Documents Domestic and International Services


JMesingerMay13_JMesingerNov06 23/04/2013 10:53 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

A Treasure Hunt hen you were younger do you remember going on a treasure hunt in which the host gives you a list of clues that would eventually lead you to discover the ‘treasure’ ? The first person to find the treasure would win the prize. It was all in good spirit and made for a great event. Similarly, I thought it might be fun to have an old-fashioned treasure hunt in this column, so I am going to give you all the clues. Together we can use these and the identity of the treasure will become clear. Here we go! Our first clue is to find a place where there is no connectivity whatsoever (No 3G/4G network, no internet cafes or any other hot spots). This is not because the networks are down, simply that there are absolutely no means of using your computer, smart phone or tablet. It may take a week or so to figure this isolated location out and then travel there. Once you have found that Shangri-La let’s continue with clue number two... This next clue will take you all around the location identified from your first clue. You are to find a person or company that has no trade area outside this location. In fact, not only a limited trade area but a person or company that has never traveled outside the area. This one may be harder than the first one... The third clue will narrow the ultimate treasure range even further. Now go find a person or company that meets all of the tests of the first two clues, and who has just hit the largest Powerball jackpot ever won. Please take your time… Now that you are successful with clue three let’s go to the fourth and final clue which is to find that person or company who has no connectivity, no trade area outside of their current location, has won the largest Powerball jackpot in history AND has never seen a private jet. It is time to identify the treasure. If you were the successful hunter you have just discovered the only person or company in the whole World that has no idea what airplanes

W

should sell for, and who would over-pay because they have not had any contact at all with the outside world. No internet, no friends that own aircraft, no brokers to guide them, and more money than sense. My gut instinct says that person or company does not exist in this highly connected world – so you could actually be searching through your clues for a long time. So why the discussion about treasure hunts? It’s simple… as I look at airplanes that are for sale, I see within every category asking prices and sales price expectations that must have been set by sellers that are more certain than I am that that person or company may really exist. I talk daily to people who say, regardless of all the data points, they will not lower their price to meet what the market keeps screaming IS the market. Our treasure hunt becomes rather more of a wild goose chase! I have said for months that this market is just not responding. We have seen endless quarters of lower prices. I cannot see anything in the near-term that will cause a reversal of this trend. We have way too much inventory; no real across-the-board financing solutions; entire segments of the inventory that - due to age – are not eligible for what little financing may be available. The news is not all bad though. For those sellers who have seen through the misleading ‘clues’ and abandoned the idea of near-term better days of higher prices, their aircraft are selling; not in record numbers, but at least with a more brisk activity than existed two years ago. And of course, for buyers the opportunity to purchase at great prices has never been as real as today. What is this month’s take away? Find an aircraft sales professional you can trust, and make sure you entrust them. I assure you that I do not come to work each day to talk people into taking less to make my job easier. Even when aircraft are priced right this business of mine is not easy. I come to work each day to

gather the best Intel I can find, piece it together into a meaningful presentation and then offer it to my clients. I work hard to gain their confidence and help them to embrace the reality of these challenging times. Our industry is full of great players who will guide their clients in the right pricing direction. This market is not changing quickly and prices are still edging down. If you are a follower in this parade you will probably get less in the long-term than you could get now. To join the leaders in this parade is the only place to be. Let’s just skip the treasure hunt-come-wild goose chase and work to help clients understand the market-pricing dynamics; highlight the benefits; articulate the offering correctly; and overcome the challenges with correct pricing. Shout the opportunity to anyone who will listen. Don’t be shy, silent or think that a pocket listing will get more favorable attention. Today’s market is not one to be still in. Be very loud and active! ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards (BAAB). Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com

Whilst selecting from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen May_Layout 1 22/04/2013 17:07 Page 1


ACSpecs IntroMay13_AC Specs Intronov06 23/04/2013 11:10 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LARGE CABIN JETS

JUNE ISSUE: Medium Jets JULY ISSUE: Light Jets AUGUST ISSUE: Turboprops

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Large Cabin Jets – appears opposite, to be followed by Medium Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

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nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BO MB AR DIE RC HA LLE NG ER BO MB 601 AR -3R DIE RC HA LLE NG ER BO 60 MB 4 AR DIE RC HA LLE NG BO ER MB 60 AR 5 DIE RG LO BA L5 00 BO 0 MB AR DIE RG LO BA LE XP RE BO SS MB AR DIE RG LO BA LE XP BO RE MB SS AR XR DIE S RG LO BA L6 00 DA 0 SSA UL TF AL CO N2 00 0

AircraftPer&SpecMay13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 11:13 Page 1

LARGE CABIN JETS $4,189.04

$3,708.80

$3,487.24

$5,175.90

$5,391.20

$5,364.12

$5,224.28

$3,840.21

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.1

6.08

6.08

6.25

6.25

6.25

6.25

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

8.2

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

8.17

7.7

CABIN LENGTH FT.

28.3

28.4

28.4

42.47

48.35

48.35

48.35

31

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1035

1150

1150

2022

2140

2140

2140

1024

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.83

5.83

5.83

6.17

6.16

6.17

6.17

5.6

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3.08

3.08

3

3

3

3

2.6

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

115

115

115

195

190

195

195

134

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

9

9

9

13

13

13

13

8

MTOW LBS

45100

48200

48200

92500

95000

98000

99500

35800

MLW LBS

36000

38000

38000

78600

78600

78600

78600

33000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

26250

27100

27150

50861

50300

51200

52230

22750

USEABLE FUEL LBS

17635

19850

19852

38959

43158

44642

44716

12155

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1365

1263

1298

2930

1792

2408

2804

1095

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

4750

4815

4850

7139

5700

4800

5770

5910

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3380

3824

3834

5200

5940

6055

5890

2975

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3590

4119

4123

5350

6125

6226

6080

3130

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

6500

5765

5840

5540

6170

6170

6476

5440

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4500

3833

3833

3667

3667

3667

3667

4333

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4259

4345

4345

3450

3450

3300

3300

3730

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1207

680

581

704

522

474

474

377

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

488

488

511

505

511

511

475

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

443

459

459

488

488

488

488

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

425

425

425

471

459

471

471

430

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

CF34-3A1

CF34-3B

CF34-3B

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

BR 710-A2-20 BR 710-A2-20 BR 710-A2-20 BR 710-A2-20 CFE 738-1-1B

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

87


90 0D X

90 0C

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

90 0B

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

20 00 S

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

20 00 LX

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

20 00 EX

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

20 00 DX

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

20 00 EX EA Sy

AircraftPer&SpecMay13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 11:14 Page 2

LARGE CABIN JETS $3,251.99

$3,401.42

$3,274.97

$3,229.59

$3,228.31

$4,100.56

$3,891.50

$3,611.75

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

CABIN LENGTH FT.

31

31

31

31

31

33.2

33.2

33.2

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1264

1264

1264

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.7

5.7

5.6

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.7

2.7

2.6

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

131

131

131

131

131

127

127

127

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

8

8

8

12

12

12

MTOW LBS

41000

42200

42200

42200

41000

45500

45500

46700

MLW LBS

39300

39300

39300

39300

39300

42000

42000

42200

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

23190

23190

23190

24440

24750

25275

25275

25800

USEABLE FUEL LBS

14600

16660

16660

16660

14600

19165

19165

18830

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

3410

2550

2550

1300

1850

1260

1260

2270

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6510

6510

6510

5260

4950

2945

2945

5064

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3335

3915

3915

4125

3658

3450

3450

4100

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3440

4045

4045

4255

3681

4080

4080

4290

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5300

5585

5585

5850

4652

5144

5144

4890

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4333

4333

4333

4450

4450

3633

3633

3633

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4575

4375

4375

4350

4350

3755

3755

3880

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

490

490

490

490

490

645

645

796

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

482

482

482

482

482

500

500

482

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

459

459

459

466

466

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

442

442

442

442

442

428

428

430

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

TFE 7315BR-1C

TFE 7315BR-1C

TFE 731-60

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

88

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


GI VS P

GU LFS TRE AM

LEG AC Y6 50

EM BR AE R

LEG AC Y6 00

EM BR AE R

13 5S HU TTL E

7X

EM BR AE R

90 0LX

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

90 0E XE AS y

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

DA SSA UL TF AL CO N

90 0E X

AircraftPer&SpecMay13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 11:16 Page 3

LARGE CABIN JETS $3,760.66

$3,641.67

$3,634.10

$3,946.55

$3,609.01

$3,646.22

$3,678.05

$4,989.88

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6

6

6

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

6.9

6.9

6.9

7.3

CABIN LENGTH FT.

33.2

33.2

33.2

39.1

42.4

49.8

49.8

45.1

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1264

1264

1264

1552

1410

1650

1650

1525

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.8

5.6

5.6

5

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.5

2.5

2.5

3

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

127

127

127

140

42

286

286

169

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

325

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

12

12

12

12

16

13

13

13

MTOW LBS

48300

49000

49000

69200

44092

49604

53572

74600

MLW LBS

44500

44500

44500

62400

40785

40785

44092

66000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

24700

24700

26400

35600

25829

30081

31217

43700

USEABLE FUEL LBS

21000

21000

21000

31940

11321

18170

20600

29281

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2800

3500

1800

1660

7162

1507

1910

2019

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6164

6164

4464

5400

9445

5193

4939

5300

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

4500

4500

4800

5950

1866

3090

3642

3880

MAX. RANGE N.M.

4725

4725

5000

6065

2034

3490

3964

4166

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5215

5215

5215

5505

4741

5887

6028

5700

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3750

3750

3833

3583

3417

3844

3912

4458

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3880

3880

3880

-

2923

3040

3062

3640

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

755

703

703

-

577

777

808

701

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

482

482

482

-

447

455

459

500

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

459

488

447

455

459

476

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

430

430

459

400

424

425

445

3

3

3

3

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

PW307A

AE 3007A1/3

AE 3007A1E

AE 3007A2

TAY 611-8

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

89


AircraftPer&SpecMay13_PerfspecDecember06 23/04/2013 11:18 Page 4

G6 50 GU LFS TRE AM

G5 50 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

G5 00

G4 50 GU LFS TRE AM

G4 00 GU LFS TRE AM

G3 50 GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GU LFS TRE AM

GV

G3 00

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

LARGE CABIN JETS $5,315.26

$4,822.56

$4,715.51

$4,825.33

$4,728.89

$4,682.66

$4,707.56

$5,268.88

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.4

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

8.5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

50.1

45.1

45.1

45.1

45.1

50.1

50.1

53.6

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1669

1525

1525

1525

1525

1669

1669

2138

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6.28

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

226

169

169

169

169

226

226

195

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

13

13

14

13

14

18

18

18

MTOW LBS

90500

72000

70900

74600

74600

85100

91000

99600

MLW LBS

75300

66000

66000

66000

66000

75300

75300

83500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

48400

43700

43000

43700

43200

47900

47900

54000

USEABLE FUEL LBS

41000

26700

25807

29281

29281

34940

41000

44200

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1500

2000

2493

2019

2519

2660

2500

1800

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

6100

5300

6000

5300

5800

6600

6600

6500

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

6250

3486

3680

3880

4100

5620

6490

-

MAX. RANGE N.M.

6675

3820

3900

4166

4400

5991

6950

-

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

6200

4700

5065

5700

5770

5385

6200

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3750

4417

4417

4417

4417

3667

3667

4167

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3610

3805

3960

3640

3760

3950

3650

-

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

820

767

736

701

712

707

594

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

508

500

500

500

500

508

508

516

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

488

476

476

476

476

488

488

-

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

445

445

445

445

459

459

488

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

BR 710-A1-10

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

BR 710-C4-11

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

BR 710-C4-11 BR 725 A1-12

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

90

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI_WAS_MAY13_Layout 1 4/19/13 1:19 PM Page 1

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1991 TBM 700A

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OGara May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 15:54 Page 1

OGARAJETS OBSERVATIONS

BEGINNING TOP LEFT AND MOVING CLOCKWISE: JOHNNY FOSTER, PRESIDENT & CEO; MATT HUFF, VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS; CHRIS ISON, VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING & CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATION; ASHLEY CHARNLEY, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST; SANDRA WYATT, CONTROLLER; DAVID FOSTER, PARTNER & EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT; EILEEN COLLINS, EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT; JOHN FOSTER, CHAIRMAN.

OGARAJETS Interview Market perspectives from a two-generation leader in aircraft sales. he leadership team at OGARAJETS recently sat down for a discussion of the trends and market forces impacting the pre-owned jet marketplace. Based in Atlanta, OGARAJETS has been serving buyers and sellers of pre-owned business jets for more than 30 years. The OGARAJETS team offered their perspectives on how the industry has evolved and where it is likely headed. The team interviewed included John Foster, chairman and company co-founder; Johnny Foster, president & CEO; David Foster, partner & executive vice president; and Matt Huff, vice president, operations.

T

92

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

WAS: What are the biggest changes you have seen in the pre-owned jet marketplace over the last 30 years?

John: The biggest difference is access to information. Data to which only the broker/dealer community once had access is now widely available online. This has both positive and negative impacts. Buyers and sellers are more empowered than ever, but at the same time, the sheer amount of data can be overwhelming. And much of it is inaccurate or misleading.

Johnny: Globalization is another big change. We are now dealing with a truly www.AvBuyer.com

global marketplace. For the most part, that creates expanded opportunities for aircraft sellers, although some markets like China generally favor new over pre-owned jets. It also requires mastering the complex intricacies of multinational transactions. We’ve invested a lot of time and effort over the last few years to be able to successfully transact business in multiple countries with widely differing regulations and jurisdictions.

Matt: The market has matured in its sophistication. Most buyers today are current or previous owners, with fewer firsttime buyers out there. Aircraft Index see Page 4


OGara May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 15:55 Page 2

OGARAJETS OBSERVATIONS

WAS: How has the role of the aircraft broker/dealer evolved in that time?

WAS: There’s more information available than ever for aircraft buyers and sellers. Is professional representation still even needed?

Johnny: As more and more data becomes available, buyer and seller expectations increase exponentially. The once-simple task of “knowing” the market has become incredibly complex. Established firms have become experts in data management—not just knowing where a good deal lies, but being able to assimilate global data and deliver accurate and timely guidance to their clients.

David: For the same reasons one would hire an attorney or a CPA, hiring a professional representative in buying or selling an aircraft means that a particular expertise is being leveraged to one’s advantage. While most aircraft owners or pilots may go through a handful of transactions over many years, established brokers and dealers have hundreds of transactions as a base of experience. John: Ultimately, a broker must be able to demonstrate that whatever fees are being charged are more than offset by the advantages that result from the relationship. That can come in the form of better price negotiation, insight on where to locate the transaction, expertise at inspections and other key phases of the purchase. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Matt: Absolutely. Contracts are getting more complicated. Financing is more difficult to obtain. The process of buying or selling a jet is a big, complex capital investment. During a recent company meeting, we outlined the steps required to complete a successful transaction, noting the possibility for as many as 400 individual processes. Each one has the potential to turn into a time-consuming financial or legal problem without the expert guidance of a reputable broker. David: Even more important, with so many options, a buyer needs a professional team’s guidance through the process. You can’t help but learn a thing or two after doing 1,000 transactions like we have. Completing the sale or acquisition in a timely manner within an informed framework, and working to protect the client’s best interests is where an established broker adds tremendous value. Johnny: Agreed. Now more than ever, the vast amount of readily available information can give buyers and sellers a false sense of knowledge. Sorting the objective from the biased data requires a lot of analysis that most peowww.AvBuyer.com

ple don’t have time for. We monitor the global market day in and out. With professional representation comes the knowledge to empower clients to make truly informed decisions.

WAS: Across three decades of business, you’ve seen a lot of up and down markets. How does the recent downturn and recovery compare to past cycles? John: The downturn from January 2009 to the present is the most severe yet; and while values have leveled off, we remain in a depressed market with the promise of limited, if any, improvement in the next several months. It is all about perception, of course— the economy, taxes, and business uncertainties. It’s no secret that we are still in a buyer’s market with many positive opportunities including the opportunity to upgrade to more modern, larger and capable aircraft. Dollar for dollar, savings on upgrades today are significantly better.

Matt: This most recent downturn saw the unprecedented loss of aircraft values nearly across the board, while the costs of maintenance, fuel, avionics upgrades and crew training have risen. While I believe we have seen stabilization over the past 12 months, the rate of recovery has been slower than previous market recoveries. ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – MAY 2013

93


OGara May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 15:56 Page 3

OGARAJETS OBSERVATIONS

David: This down market has been much longer in duration, even to the point of redefining “normal”. I don’t think we have quite hit bottom yet on some models. Never before have we seen supply so high with such a significant impact on pricing and time to recovery. This reshaping means that some makes and models will never recover.

David: Not in the near future, but they should eventually rebound.

especially to the uninitiated or inexperienced purchaser or seller.

John: They will improve with the economy

John: They are more complex if you pay

and business confidence, but I doubt they will return to the overheated levels of 2007-2008 for quite some time.

attention to all the details, but not necessarily more difficult—as long as you have an experienced team to manage all those details. In our case, we’ve complemented our sales staff with Matt Huff, a 35-year veteran of Business Aviation, as vice president of operations; Chris Ison, our vice president of marketing and contracts administration—widely regarded as one of the most professional transaction managers in the industry; and Sandra Wyatt, our controller, who has been with our firm since 1983. We have made the investment to develop a well-established sales support, marketing and research team, complemented by access to the best aviation legal and technical consultants in the industry.

Johnny: Unlikely, except possibly in the very WAS: Where is the pre-owned jet market right now

modern and ultra-long-range segments.

on the path to recovery?

David: We still have a long way to go to reach anything we might call full recovery. Nevertheless, we’re optimistic that there are still many good opportunities out there.

John: The market has finally stabilized in most segments, but with great prices and low interest financing.

Johnny: Recovery is very segmented. Late model and ultra-long-range aircraft remain the strongest in valuation. Aircraft older than 15 years remain challenged by limited domestic U.S. financing as well as very limited international appeal. Many of these aircraft are reaching, or have reached the end of their viable “economic life” and will likely never see a recovery in value.

WAS: Will the new and pre-owned jet markets ever return to their pre-recession levels? Matt: It’s too early to tell. Historical precedent says yes, it will eventually return to prerecession levels. 94

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

WAS: You mentioned the increasing complexity of today’s aircraft transaction. Why is that happening? David: The excess in supply has resulted in buyers being routinely bombarded with messages of opportunity that can make it hard to maintain focus. Much of the complexity for buyers and sellers alike comes in discerning the accurate from the inaccurate data, and then translating the most reliable information into a coherent strategy for buying or selling an aircraft.

WAS: This kind of complexity can presumably be paralyzing to both buyers and sellers. How do you help them make confident decisions?

Johnny: Aging aircraft are bringing far more issues in pre-purchase inspections, which results in significantly longer inspection periods, more complex issues of corrosion, engineering/repairs, defaults by buyers and sellers, etc.

Matt: Escalating regulatory, legal, financial and inspection complexities tend to expand the length of time it takes to complete a deal. The details of completing a successful transaction have increased in scope and demand, making the entire process more complex, www.AvBuyer.com

Johnny: We believe that an informed, empowered buyer or seller ends up making a better decision. So we lay out all options to consider, and then provide detailed analysis of the relative advantages and potential problems with each one. In every case, the best option eventually emerges, and then we work tirelessly to bring it to fruition.

John: If 30+ years in the business teaches you anything, it is to be a good listener. We listen ❯ and communicate frequently during the Aircraft Index see Page 4


Project1_Layout 1 23/10/2012 11:22 Page 1

– and more

1st Source Bank has more than 25 years of experience as a leading national aircraft lender, and almost 150 years as a full service bank. We know aircraft financing – and we know banking. The aviation lenders at 1st Source – experts in aircraft financing – can give you the right advice and the right financing to get you airborne fast. Our service is outstanding, and we have the full array of financial products and services to keep you coming back. Whether you are a first time buyer, trading up or refinancing your current aircraft, give us a call. Strong, stable and personal, we’ll keep your best interests in mind. Contact us at 574-235-2037 or by e-mail at marketing1stSource.com.


OGara May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 15:56 Page 4

OGARAJETS OBSERVATIONS contracting, inspection, and pre-delivery processes. Ultimately, our objective is to put ourselves in the client’s shoes and then to anticipate and resolve any issues or problems that might develop.

WAS: How has globalization and the opening of new markets changed the landscape for aircraft owners? How has it changed your business? Johnny: We have conducted transactions in more than 50 countries, and in that time, developed a network of aviation associates to help us, and our clients, navigate unfamiliar cultures and regulatory issues. As our reach has become significantly more global, so has the depth and breadth of our network.

David: It has required us to gain the technical, legal and financial knowledge for overseeing import and export transactions. Our relationships with clients and industry leaders worldwide continue to generate a significant part of our business. While roughly 75% of transactions are still U.S.-based, the rest of the world is reaching an economic threshold where corporate aircraft will begin trading at a more frequent rate, especially after the regulatory and commercial infrastructures are in place (i.e., runways, FBOs and MROs). WAS: Business jet use is still getting some bad press and has become a “political football” recently. What can owners and operators do to improve those perceptions? Matt: Some politicians have decided to target Corporate Aviation as a means of creating a sense of class warfare or negative entitlement. Ironically, those very same politicians regularly utilize private aviation—even demand it— because of the clear benefits it offers. David: The opportunity to discuss the positive impact of private air travel on the employees and shareholders of companies that use business aircraft must be repeated again and again to the media and our leaders in Washington. We all need to support the work of organizations such as NBAA and AOPA.

WAS: You recently changed the name of the company from O’Gara Aviation Company to OGARAJETS. What’s that all about?

Johnny: People need to be reminded that in

Johnny: Entering our 33rd year of business,

the increasingly impersonal electronic world of emails and Skype, major business deals still depend on personal contact. Business jets are the accelerators of the economy. We know that, and our clients know that. We just need to make sure elected leaders and the media hear that side of the story. At a recent meeting, a new client of mine offered, “I don’t know how we ever found the success we did without our new Gulfstream. In eight months, we have flown more than 600 hours, allowing our teams to remain in front of clients and new global business opportunities.” What a great message!

96

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

our company is transitioning ownership to a second generation of partners. My brother, David, and I are now partners and manage the day-to-day operations. Dad now serves as Chairman and remains an active member of our sales team. The change in name and logo reflects the changing face of the organization, but our fundamental and founding values will never change.

John: We are embarking on a new phase in the life of the company as we invest even more in our capabilities and our team to provide consistent, knowledgeable and personal www.AvBuyer.com

support to our clients. The name change is a component of a new look for our marketing efforts that will take the company well into the next 30 years.

David: As a forward-looking company, we are focused not just on the present market, but the future. That means anticipating the challenges and opportunities that our clients will need to address. Our new name and logo express our ability to address the new opportunities and horizons we will be opening up for our clients in the years ahead. ❯ More information from www.OGARAJETS.com

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIC Title May_Layout 1 22/04/2013 18:06 Page 1


Ten Questions for EBAA_PAMA interview November06 23/04/2013 12:17 Page 1

EBAA INTERVIEW

Many Questions For EBAA: An open, frank discussion on the key issues facing European BizAv. by Mike Vines hortly before EBACE2013, World Aircraft Sales Magazine caught up with Fabio Gamba CEO of EBAA and its President Brian Humphries who offered a frank insight into the major issues facing Europe’s Business Aviation community and the on-going work at the EBAA as its expert working groups try to make workable sense of the latest proposals from the EU and its nation States.

S

WAS: What is the main worry for European business aircraft operators at the moment? Gamba: It’s got to be the proposed introduction of full slot coordination at airports across Europe and its potential negative effects on Business Aviation users. We have to ensure that Business Aviation is recognized equally with other airport users. The fact is that non-scheduled aircraft [business aircraft] operators shouldn’t be forced to leave an airport once it has become fully [slot] coordinated. All too often we’ve seen this happen in the past and it is probably going to happen over time at London-Luton [the U.K.’s busiest airport for Business Aviation] which has been proposed to become a fully coordinated airport. [The changes are designed to increase throughput at congested airports where demand exceeds capacity for most of

98

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

FABIO GAMBA, CEO, EBAA

BRIAN HUMPHRIES, PRESIDENT, EBAA

the day or is high at peak hours.] Luton’s Business Aviation movements are around 20% of the airport’s total annual movements, so when it becomes fully coordinated we run the risk of being progressively exempted from access as Airline demands rise. This is what we are fighting against. The proposal came from the European Commission last year. We told them it was a mistake and that they would shoot themselves in the foot in the longterm. They listened but they didn’t change anything so we had to fight in the European Parliament throughout last year. We got some important amendments recognizing that Business Aviation did not have direct [scheduled] slots and gained some assurances. We have also been able to redress the proposal a little at member States level.

priority to large aircraft’ and we depart from ‘first come first served’ logic, then it’s going to be a problem. We have no grandfather [slot] rights so when an airport becomes fully slot-coordinated, unless we are treated as an entity we will have no rights. As an example a new Airline will automatically get priority over us. So we’ve been saying to our associate members, if you’re thinking about investing in an airport then make sure that the airport has agreed to give you a proportion of slots. This is still in consultation at LondonLuton. To be honest the pressure at Luton at the moment is not that intense as like most other airports it is suffering from the downturn - but if they do become fully coordinated and if our based FBO members don’t get some guarantees then long-term their futures at Luton do not look good.

Humphries: Access is Number ONE! This whole idea of “big is beautiful” is the biggest threat to us, and although we didn’t do terribly well with the Commission we’ve done some excellent work with the EU Parliament. I think we have made some progress - at some airports we now have some slots allocated for Business Aviation. The new ruling that we worked on with Parliament looks a bit more favorable, but there’s no doubt that access is going to be the big challenge. The airport decides on this, but if the ruling says ‘you must give www.AvBuyer.com

WAS: What other European airports are affected and how can this be overcome? Gamba: Geneva and Dusseldorf are affected and there are around 10-15 airports where you have a matching number of scheduled and non-scheduled movements. Geneva’s Business Aviation traffic is around 18-20% while Dusseldorf’s is between 15-18%. There are traffic peaks between 08.00-10.00; 11.0014.00; and sometimes from 17.00-20.00 or even 21.00. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Southern Cross April 19/03/2013 15:01 Page 1

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Ten Questions for EBAA_PAMA interview November06 23/04/2013 15:42 Page 2

EBAA INTERVIEW

It’s not going to be overcome through legislation. What we’ve been extremely successful in ensuring is that the proposed legislation is a leeway to adapt to the local situation. Whilst the Commission wanted to kill the possibility of flexibility, it is still allowed, so I guess we’ll talk to the National Authorities of the UK, Switzerland and Germany. We would like solutions like in Geneva and Dusseldorf where there is a specific flow distribution for Business Aviation in parallel with the allocation of slots for scheduled movements.

Humphries: We were recently told that business jets below 40 tons were going to be banned from London-Heathrow. We managed to give the stakeholders a comprehensive presentation [in defense of Business Aviation] and the motion was thrown out. We are now trying to get some interest in LPV SBAS [Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance with Space Based Augmentation System] approaches at Heathrow so we could fly steep approaches, landing half way down the runway, thereby missing wake vortex problems altogether. It could be used in conjunction with EGNOS [European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service] to give increased accuracies. All we’ve then got to do - and it’s a lot is get the approaches approved. We’re still allowed in to Heathrow currently, but the number of slots available is very small. Last year there were around 100

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

1,200 movements and it’ll probably be even fewer this year. Some people still want to fly into Heathrow in a business jet to interline with the Scheduled Airlines, and this was the point I made to the Airlines. We’re probably talking about £20 millionworth of traffic as these passengers only fly first class. So if we can get mixed approaches approved (we’re going to continue to push this) it would benefit everybody as it increases the overall capacity and doesn’t hurt anyone.

WAS: What is the EBAA’s take on the suspension of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme relating to aircraft operating from non-EU countries and will the U.S., China and Russia ever agree to it? Humphries: We’re committed to working with ICAO and we’ve been pushing them as we feel this is the only possible approach. So we’re not against the idea we’re just against EU-ETS which is such a shambles and so unfair. We’re watching to see what happens at ICAO but there’s no doubt about it; the European Commission will have to go back to the European Parliament and report what is happening. I think that they’re sitting on a very sharp fence because there is no way that they can re-introduce EU-ETS [for non EU operators] as there is no way the Americans are going to accept it the way it was. It remains to be seen how much progress is made by October. We think that trying to develop something at ICAO is the www.AvBuyer.com

only possible way forward. They [U.S., China and Russia] might agree if it’s done through ICAO, but they’ll never go for EU-ETS and who could blame them? It creates unfair competition - but all of us flying in Europe are stuck with it.

Gamba: We are in favor of an international agreement - we’ve always said so and this is what we are trying to achieve through IBAC. Our members told us that formal derogation [EU-speak for temporary policy change] is totally useless and is essentially increasing distortion in competition [between EU operators and the rest of the world]. We want to make sure that the EU Commission is not trying to get away with a face-saving exercise at our expense. We have no other way than to accept this derogation, but we have to make sure that it comes to an end in one year and that it goes back to the status quo or the whole EU-ETS program should be removed. What we don’t want is a fudged compromise which might satisfy non-EU operators but would further disadvantage EU operators. WAS: Why is business so bad? The Eurocontrol Business Aviation activity figures show a -7.7% drop in growth Europe-wide since March 2012. Gamba: The numbers are absolutely abysmal. Italy had an -18% drop in Business Aviation movements last year. In the rest of Europe it was -4.4%, so Italy was four times ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Ten Questions for EBAA_PAMA interview November06 23/04/2013 15:43 Page 3

EBAA INTERVIEW year, so in a bad year it becomes even more obvious. We’ve been faced with four to five years of tough times and even before the financial crisis we had over-capacity. There are tangible signs of willingness to consolidate and there are a few known attempts at initiatives. One such initiative is known as AirClub which consists of eight companies that together represent more than 100 charter aircraft. AirClub’s chairman Christian Hatje (of PrivatAir) is expected to make an announcement at EBACE this year.

On the positive side, jet deliveries to the EU are still growing year-on-year with around 5% growth last year. What is not advancing is demand. So you have growth in aircraft numbers, a diminishing number of movements, accompanied by slightly less total hours flown. - Fabio Gamba worse. It’s unheard of. The Italian luxury tax [brought in last year] is totally unsustainable and is bringing in nothing, while at the same time killing the sector. [Italy also has a Business Aviation air passenger tax which on a Rome-Chicago-Rome round-trip would cost each passenger an additional 400 Euros, for example.] On the positive side, jet deliveries to the EU are still growing year-on-year with around 5% growth last year. What is not advancing is demand. So you have growth in aircraft numbers, a diminishing number of movements, accompanied by slightly less total hours flown. This is because long-haul movements both from and to Europe are holding up pretty well. Overall, though, 2012 was a bad year and we do not expect to have a particularly good 2013.

European flights that are so poor. Business Aviation APD [Air Passenger Duty] came into force in the UK on 1 April. We came out of this quite well considering the original British Treasury plan was to charge £186 per U.K. departure, regardless of destination. If it’s a short-haul flight a lot of our small aircraft would count as economy (because they don’t have a 40 inch seat pitch) and costs passengers £13 each. As a rough guide if you’re flying on an aircraft weighing less than 20 tons and it has a seat pitch of more than 40 inches it will cost passengers £26 per departure, while aircraft above 20 tons with less than 19 seats costs £52 per departure.

WAS: How many operators have gone out of business in the last year? Do you see more consolidation and take-overs amongst European operators?

Humphries: Large, long-range aircraft are still pretty busy. One operator has told me his number of flights were down, but total flight hours were holding up because of a lot more long-range flights. It’s the intra-

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Gamba: There are over 850 operators in Europe, most operating just one or two aircraft, it is difficult monitoring them all. By definition we have over-capacity in a normal www.AvBuyer.com

Humphries: We are seeing some take-overs and genuine amalgamations and I think this will continue. [DC Aviation acquired Zurichbased Jet-Link; Oxford-based Hangar8 acquired Farnborough-based International Jet Club; Marshall of Cambridge acquired FlairJet recently.] The Business Aviation helicopter side is desperate, although offshore helicopter business is booming as is air ambulance. The VIP helicopter companies have probably suffered the most, and if the economy goes on like this for much longer there will be some real casualties. Those operating managed helicopters are doing fine as long as the owner doesn’t mind his aircraft getting little charter work. WAS: What else is EBAA working on? Humphries: The Single European Sky doesn’t seem to be getting anywhere. It was supposed to bring costs down but it doesn’t there’s no real commitment to deliver it, and we need it. We need a proper introduction of SBAS [Satellite Based Augmented Approaches] to Europe. There are something like 4,000 SBAS approaches in the U.S. and only around 200 all over Europe. SBAS supplemented by EGNOS [European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service] gives increased accuracies and ability to fly a CAT 1 approach to any airport where there is enough obstacle clearance. If you’re flying an aircraft with an Enhanced Vision System then you can fly to CAT II. But whereas in the States people have been picking it up and running with it, we’ve been very slow in Europe. We are working with Eurocontrol to develop more services for which we’d have to pay, but I can certainly see this helping them to facilitate the more widespread introduction. This would be a dream scenario for us - the fact that you can fly a CAT I approach to any airfield almost to the equivalent of ILS. ❯ More information from www.ebaa.org

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Safety Matters May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 14:45 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS: SUMMERTIME BLUES

Summer Flying: De-icing season may be over, but weather extremes increase. by Dave Higdon

ilots in the Northern Hemisphere recently bid a happy “Adieu!” to their airport de-icing routines. Spray rigs in the Lower 48 entered hibernation as the northern half of the world exited a winter marked by sequential storms that spurred seemingly endless days of namedstorm media coverage. For a few months there will be no more fighting chilled winds during pre-flights clothed into the shape of a well-known tirecompany mascot. Approaching the Summer Solstice, daylight flying hours grow into the teens; night-flying shrinks accordingly; and maintaining night currency becomes more challenging.

P

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This article is less of a ‘farewell and so long’ to winter with all her recent extremes, and more of a head’s-up of warm-weather flying’s singular pitfalls. Do winter’s cold temperatures truly exemplify the greatest extremes with which aviation annually deals? Or does it only feel that way to us? It could be because we spend the winter transiting between warm buildings and the chill of unheated hangars and the great outdoors that it seems so, but the reality is that the summer produces the greatest temperature extremes in flying. Before summer’s recurring waves of inclement weather start making their way across the country, consider what summer means to the airplane: www.AvBuyer.com

The 100-plus degrees of the ramp at engine start in which the jet and turboprops can go from finger-stinging heat on the ground to hypothermic minus 60-degree cold at cruise within the space of about 40 minutes. That’s a 160-degree temperature swing at a bone-chilling change rate of 3.5 degrees per minute, on average. Contrast that with winter, and a 30degree ramp temperature that yields to the same minus 60 – but ultimately produces a far less severe temperature swing of 90 degrees (only 2 degrees drop per minute). It’s clashes between those planet-level temperature differences that fuels the warmweather churn behind the worst of the summer. Everything about the season exacerbates the extremes. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 14:47 Page 2

FIVE THINGS ABOUT WEATHER •

About 70 percent of all airline delays stem from weather, according to FAA; weather below published minima at one airport can influence operations from airports in clear weather – whether a few miles away or thousands; Weather impacts Business Aviation in much the same way as it impacts commercial carriers, scheduled and nonscheduled alike; General Aviation is weather-immune only to the extent that operators don’t face the constraints of FARs and the operating specifications of Airlines and charter companies. Otherwise, aircraft regulations and specifications dictate conditions below which commercial flights are restricted from departing or attempting landings.

About 5-6 percent of General Aviation accidents involve pilots attempting to fly visually in instrument meteorological conditions. Sometimes that pilot is instrument rated – but not using the system or is not current (or is ignoring common sense). Occasionally such accidents involve business-turbine pilots. VFRinto-IMC accidents are consistently dangerous – and more than 80 percent fatal. Loss-of-Control accidents are often weather-influenced, as are accidents involving lowaltitude flight. Still, the ability to safely, legally aviate in poor weather immunizes no pilot from the influence of summer’s meteorological extremes on flight. Consider the following five areas of concern as fodder for helping passengers, family and bosses understand when any of them faces a flight being delayed or scrapped. It’s not unfair to remind people that if the Airline pilot has a rationale for avoiding certain weather you can be sure most business jet pilots have the same, or at least very similar, reactions.

1. WHICH HURTS MOST: WINTER OR SUMMER WEATHER? • • • •

Longer days increase the heat load; Shorter nights shorten cooling periods; More-direct sun angles increase radiant transfer; The uneven heating of the air by the Earth’s surface contributes to atmospheric instability and the morestable-and-cold temperatures at altitude help stir the atmospheric pot.

The Sun’s energy has to go somewhere; energy morphs from one form to another. With that greater heating in the Northern Hemisphere the frequency and severity of storms poses the major concern. Thankfully, we know what to look for – and enjoy access to modern tools with which to look. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

It may surprise you, but according to decades of records, it’s actually Summer weather that can hurt you the most. Summer storms are more powerful than winter storms – and they’re faster-moving. Winter storms generally take days to develop to their peak and slowly transit the continent, whereas Summer’s worst weather often erupts quickly, stretches along a line hundreds, even a thousand of miles long…and moves fast ! The peak months for weather-caused flight delays are generally in late spring through mid-summer. In recent years, May, June and July reliably ranked in the top five worst months with December and April rounding out the five. www.AvBuyer.com

2. WEATHER AVOIDANCE IS MORE IMPORTANT IN THE WINTER (…OR SUMMER)? Avoiding severe weather is always important. It’s the greater degree of violence and higher level of electrical activity of summer storms that makes them more punitive. Pilots may escape most of the worst of winter storms during all but take-off and approach/landing phases. Additionally, the violence and electricity of summer storms is extremely rare in winter storms. Thunderstorm systems are inherently dangerous and should be considered impenetrable – period. Safety and weather experts, and the FAA all concur in their recommendations: Avoid thunderstorm systems and cells by at least 20 miles. A significant number recommend 20 miles on the back side, 50 miles on the front side - while a few say 50 miles, period. These boundary perimeters exist because of the twin thunderstorm’s threats of hail and lightning. You should even avoid over-flying a thunderstorm system because you’re unlikely to be far enough above the weather to escape the threat of a lightning strike coming from the clouds below (or horizontally in the case of cloud-to-cloud lightning). Most turbine pilots can work out in their heads how big an arc the detours cover and the extra time needed to fly the extra miles, and turn that into a time report for the passengers. The bottom line should always be that arriving late beats never arriving; there hasn’t been an airplane built that bad weather can’t destroy with enough of an opportunity. Remember Air France 447 on June 1, 2009? Yes – summer…

3. THE WORST WEATHER IS EASY TO AVOID – YOU CAN SEE IT FROM FAR AWAY...? Twisters are, indeed, relatively easily avoided – once you see one. Unfortunately, thunderstorms and tornados often are imbedded in clouds and invisible to all but Doppler weather radar. The pilot’s best bet is to Respect FAA-issued SIGMETs and AIRMETs. In aviation-weather vernacular SIGMETs are warnings of SIGnificant METeorological phenomena potentially hazardous to aviation operations, and these come in two forms: • Non-Convective SIGMETs. These deliver specific information on severe icing, turbulence, or volcanic ash judged by forecasters as hazardous to flight; the Aviation Weather Service issues these asneeded for four-hour blocks; • Convective SIGMETs. The word "convective" refers to thunderstorms and these are issued specifically for convective weather judged to have an impact on aviation operations. They’re issued hourly for ❯ periods of 2 hours. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Safety Matters May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 14:47 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS: SUMMERTIME BLUES One benefit of these meteorological warnings is they’re available online, via weather datalink services, and via old-fashioned VHF radio through Flight Service. You can share any of these with your passengers or traveling companions when they ask why the flight is ostensibly “waiting on weather” when their Smartphone shows clear weather – from where they sit.

4. UNPREDICTABILITY IS HIGHER IN THE WINTER? Actually, it is a myth that unpredictability is higher in winter time. Influences that demand a new decision abound during the summer. Volcanoes erupt, spewing hot ash and lava cinders miles high into the sky where high winds can scatter the particulate across hundreds of thousands of square miles of airspace, for example. The ash and lava particulates can damage engines, airframes and transparencies. With recent eruptions in mind the FAA recently called for Pilot Reports to include “the detection of sulfur gases (H2S and SO2) in the aircraft cabin,” to questions Flight Service briefers should ask pilots when soliciting information for PiReps (FAA Notice JO 7110.616). The FAA plans to report volcanic

activity when pilots do not see an ash cloud but do smell sulfur gases within the aircraft. Some parts of Earth are prone to earthquakes. When they strike, their force can damage runways, buildings, the power grid – potentially forcing flight-plan changes. Wildfires - a predominantly summer problem - influence flying conditions by pouring so much added heat into the atmosphere that the inferno generates its own weather over a wide range of airspace. In general, if you’re flying across the planet in summer weather, frequent updates are your best hedge against encountering an unpleasant surprise.

5. AT LEAST IN SUMMER WE CAN KISS GOODBYE TO AIRFRAME ICING, RIGHT? Despite the reference earlier to the summer hibernation of de-icing rigs, airframe icing remains a very real, dangerous threat to flight – just not on the ground. Although flying in sub-freezing air and visible moisture guarantees airframe icing, liquid water trapped inside airframe parts can be a cause of problems when it freezes at altitude – and in so doing can create problems in control movement or balance. More than a few pilots in the past few years have

suffered a control-system jam caused by water freezing and binding hinges, pulleys and cable runs. Lower altitude with warmer air melts away the problem – although that doesn’t assure that the water drains. Anytime the airplane sits through a downpour or hours of rain, to make sure during pre-flight that the water has drained away is simply self-preservation.

REMEMBER: STUFF CHANGES Pilots planning long cross-country flights must engage in mental time travel, digesting all available weather information, imagery and project hours into the future conditions as they should exist there – and do it now. These pilots should repeat again and again a decision-making process used prior to launching – and then repeat… Repeat at cruise, repeat mid-route…and all the way to the start of the approach, through the initial and final-approach fixes to the missed approach point. Never have pilots enjoyed access to the up-to-the-minute weather of today’s avionics, computers and cockpit and personal electronics. But seeing the furor of a storm on the pilot’s electronic flight bag alone is not a path to safely, smartly navigating that storm.

Pilots planning long cross-country flights must engage in mental time travel, digesting all available weather information, imagery and project hours into the future conditions...

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Weather May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 14:35 Page 1

WEATHER & AVIONICS

The Environment, The Weather and Avionics

By Ken Elliott

B

oth environmental conditions and weather are intertwined and together they can significantly impact avionic equipment selection and performance. The following paragraphs will address that shared relationship and the influence it has on aircraft operations and

maintenance. Understanding weather is not just knowing how to avoid storms or turbulence. To highlight this, Tables A and B (right) show different types of environment and weather - the impact and equipment to detect and protect against these are listed for each event. The environment and weather can impact all phases of flight and later ground storage of an aircraft, including layovers during trips. Its effect can be immediate, slow to act or simply hidden, like corrosion or the intermittent failure of avionics components sensitive to extreme heat and cold. Many people don’t realize that electronics are thin adjacent layers of different natural or man-made materials that are highly sensitive to heat, cold, static and moisture. The more we miniaturize avionic components, the harder it will be to minimize environment and weather impacts. When trading an aircraft, always look carefully at the maintenance records. In the instance of repeat entries for the same problem ensure the last one shows a clear and concise resolution that makes sense. This will help to prevent being stuck with an avionics lemon.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS Recent technology developments have integrated the display of weather, terrain, traffic and moving maps on both primary and secondary cockpit displays. The weather itself comes from two sources; on-board radar and external derived satellite data. Equipage for weather detection has come a long way over the last few decades, and while ‘a weather radar’ is still a weather radar, it is common in today's environment for a radar system to include vertical profile for ❯

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

TABLE A E vent

I mpacts

E quipment to detect and protect Static wicks + bonding

Electrostatics

Communications

Lightning

Physical + hidden damage

High intensity radiated freq. Turbulence

Avionics

Radar, lightning sensor, static wicks + bonding HIRF protection

Discomfort + damage

Radar + weather service

Wind shear

Performance

Radar + weather service

Storms

Discomfort + orientation

Radar + weather service

Ice

Performance

Anti-icing

Wind

Performance

Weather service + FMS

Fog, smog, haze or dust

Visibility + sit. awareness

Snow and rain

Visibility + sit. awareness

Night

Visibility + sit. awareness

EVS (+ with HUD for credit) EVS (+ with HUD for credit) EVS (+ with HUD), maps

Volcanic ash

Engines

Weather + other services

Barometric pressure

Electronics outside pressure vessel

Use correctly rated components

TABLE B E nvironment and weather hidden impacts outside of normal operations: E vent

H idden Impact

A ction

Volcanic ash

Engine damage

Engine service

Humidity

Corrosion

Regular inspection/hangar

Extreme heat and cold

Materials + electronics

Hangar with air + heat

Rain and snow

Corrosion

Regular inspection/hangar

Ice and hail

Surface damage + antenna's

Regular inspection/hangar

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Weather May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 15:36 Page 2

WEATHER & AVIONICS

cloud tops, turbulence, wind shear and lightning detection, along with four bands of color for precipitation intensity. While weather radar is real-time and subject to maximum range capability, a reliable weather service has some time delay of data but is virtually unlimited in its coverage. Along with maps, weather services provide much more data and therefore more of a forecast, enabling predictive planning before and during the flight. Both types of weather detection have their strengths and weaknesses but complement each other during flight operations. Some legacy business jets require expensive avionic upgrades to display weather video on cockpit primary flight displays. As a general rule if the displays are flat panel then video may be available either standard or as an option. Electronic flight bags provide an alternative for cockpit map and weather displays. With commercial off the shelf (COTS) such as iPads finding certification and operational acceptance, the cost is much less than an upgrade. However having all the primary map, terrain, traffic, weather, navigation and aircraft performance right in front of both pilots is clearly optimal.

SITUATIONAL AWARENESS When it comes to human factors and situational awareness in and around airports, primary flight displays can take second place to heads-up displays (HUD). When you add enhanced vision systems (EVS) to the HUD, the weather concerns of snow, rain, smog, haze, fog, dust and night-time visibility are greatly reduced. In fact when properly trained, HUD operators can improve the weather and situational experience

dramatically in all phases of flight. For example, some experienced HUD operators use EVS and its nighttime infrared vision to assist in the analysis of questionable cloud tops with regard to the potential for turbulence and wind shear, shown differently on radar and weather displays. Having this additional tool helps operators make informed and safe weather avoidance decisions. Enhanced vision that sees through smog or haze can help map coastlines and other terrain features, enhancing situational awareness and adding to the pilot's orientation safety kit. Remember, enhanced vision comes in different flavors, and its ability to penetrate the various weather phenomena vary significantly between the use of cooled and uncooled systems. Cooled systems may also see the approach lights through the various weather conditions while new LED approach lights with infrared emitters are in development in the US and Europe at this time. Enhanced vision typically cannot see through pure cloud. While this is usually not a concern, at low altitudes during an approach, where it can sometimes be foggy, there is a limitation to operational performance. New avionic technologies akin to the 'holy grail' of “always seeing as if on a clear day” are now emerging. Examples of complementing avionics that will ultimately enable the aircraft to see through all weather are a combination of multi-spectral cameras, passive millimeter wave technology and (although not real time) the mature and ever improving synthetic vision systems. Today in the US, a program exists for surface movement guidance control (SMGCS) and low vision operations (LVO), where ground movements are dramatically improved in weather-induced poor visibility

EVS: WHAT YOU SEE ON THE SURFACE

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conditions. Apart from lighting and surface marking enhancements, the FAA is reviewing the use of own-ship position and enhanced vision while on the ground to provide approvals of surface movement during low visibility events.

PROTECTIVE PAINT AND ANTENNAS Electrical bonding, static and lightning protections are significant maintenance and operational goals on an aircraft. Behind the aircraft radome is situated the radar that must be able to see through it. Radomes are not metal but have lightning diverter strips to ensure high atmospheric static discharges are dissipated correctly into the metal tube of the aircraft. As composites become more the construction norm, concerns around electrostatics is greatly increased and protections need to be well maintained. Specifically, the electronics in avionics and other aircraft systems are today protected from high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF). HIRF protection is elaborate and mostly internal to the avionic boxes, but in modern jets avionic boxes have evolved into card cage assemblies for less interconnection, space, weight and more ease of access. HIRF can emanate from the aircraft itself (typically antenna radiated), but a weather event could include solar flares. The interference also may be external, but man made instead, such as emanating from the thousands of transmission towers across our landscape. When trading an aircraft always carefully inspect the radome and adjacent nose for good condition of anti-static paint finish. Have the static wicks on trailing edges and wing tips checked. Those require both low voltage bonding and high voltage static discharge checks, COCKPIT FMS WITH WEATHER MAPS

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Weather May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 14:41 Page 3

WEATHER & AVIONICS

but even just a visual inspection for wear and tear will be helpful. Make sure electrical bonding straps are properly intact as well. Generally the condition of aircraft paint and antennas can significantly reduce weather impacts. From electrostatic lightning to hidden corrosion from humidity and rain, environmental effects of weather dramatically increase as environment and weather-proofing of an aircraft decreases.

WEATHER FORECAST The ability to bring weather forecasting right into the cockpit and display it where it matters is a huge benefit to pilots. Domestic and international weather services are increasing and as ADS-B ground stations become active an additional data-based service will be provided for UAT equipped GA aircraft. On another level, and from a truly international perspective, Australia is ahead of the pack when it comes to embracing ADS-

B. Also the recent acceptance of low-vision based operations by ICAO and particularly a commercial HUD equipage mandate decision by China's CAAC, clearly demonstrate how aviation authorities intend to reduce weather impacts across the globe. As our airspace is being transformed with next generation trajectory-based operations, weather, traffic and terrain impacts become more of an issue. Those aircraft properly equipped and maintained will be able to take full advantage of new 4D operational elements. They will remain in control of weather impacts and not subject to them. Environment and weather impacts permeate across all avionic systems, affecting their ability to perform as designed. This effect can be both short- and long-term, and when a cause of visible or hidden damage, may be a factor in aircraft transaction decisions. Vigilant operators who are trained to use

and ensure the proper service of avionics will be thankful of their investment. This ensures adequate preparation for each and every flight because environment and weather are factors in all of them.

❯ Ken Elliott is an avionics

veteran of 40 years and more recently focused on NextGen. His work within the NextGen Advisory Council sub-committees brings him close to current and intended development effort. Equally, his specialization in low-vision operations provides a deeper insight into one of the pillars of NextGen. Ken has served the aviation industry on three continents from light GA to large corporate aircraft. His current employer Jetcraft is a leading aircraft brokerage company with worldwide presence. More from www.jetcraft.com, email: kenelliott@jetcraft.com

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European BizAv May13_PAMA interview November06 23/04/2013 15:40 Page 1

EUROPEAN FLEET OVERVIEW

European Overview Current view of the European business jet and turboprop fleet. by Michael Chase uring May, thoughts turn to Geneva, Switzerland for the May 21-23, 2013 EBACE event, jointly hosted each year by the European Business Aviation Association (EBAA), the leading association for Business Aviation in Europe, and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), the leading voice for the Business Aviation industry in the United States. The focus of this article is to report the current European Business Jet and Turboprop fleet from several views.

D

Bombardier and Dassault Falcon (See Chart A, opposite, third row). These top three manufacturers accounted for over 75% of all the nearly 2,600 business jets in Europe.

BY MANUFACTURER (TURBOPROP) Beechcraft lead all manufacturers of business turboprops in operation in Europe with 415 (or 34%) of the total 1,207 strong fleet – see Chart B (opposite, third row). Piper, Cessna and Pilatus made up the remaining manufacturers that accounted for more than 10% of the business turboprops in operation in Europe.

BY CONTINENT At the end of March 2013, Europe accounted for 2,591 (or 15%) of the total wholly-owned Business Jet fleet and 1,207 (or 9%) of the total Business Turboprop in operation fleet, as highlighted in yellow in Table A (top, opposite). Europe ranked second for the total number of business jets behind the Continent of North America, but was third for the total number of business turboprops behind North and South America.

BY MODEL The King Air B200 (109 units) and Citation Mustang (91 units) lead the Top 10 Business Turboprop and Business Jet models in Europe, as depicted in Table B (opposite, second row).

BY MANUFACTURER (BUSINESS JETS) Cessna lead all manufacturers of business jets in operation in Europe followed by

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BY COUNTRY (TOP 10) Germany has the largest number of business jets and business turboprops in Europe (see Table C and D ( opposite, bottom). The total number of aircraft that are wholly-owned, shared and in fractional ownership are also indicated for the top 10 countries in the both tables, along with the numbers leased. Leased business jets make up 8% of the total fleet of nearly 2,600 aircraft in operation in Europe, and business turboprops are at 9% of the total fleet. ❯ For more information: • Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/ published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


European BizAv May13_PAMA interview November06 23/04/2013 12:11 Page 2

EUROPEAN FLEET OVERVIEW

TABLE A

Location of Aircraft by Continent - Based In WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION MARCH 2013

AFRICA

ASIA

JETS Percentage

440 3%

1,240 7%

TURBOPROPS Percentage

738 6%

700 5%

AUSTRALIA NORTH SOUTH EUROPE TOTAL OCEANIA AMERICA AMERICA 203 2,591 11,812 1,254 17,540 1% 15% 67% 7% 100% 452 3%

1,207 9%

8,114 63%

1,726 13%

12,937 100%

Source: JETNET

TABLE B - TOP 10 POPULAR MODELS IN EUROPE EUROPE WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION ALL JETS as of 3/29/2013 RANK

MAKE

MODEL

1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 9 10

CITATION CHALLENGER CITATION CITATION FALCON GULFSTREAM CITATION CITATION CITATION CITATION CHALLENGER GLOBAL EMBRAER

MUSTANG 604 525 CJ3 7X G-550 XLS CJ2+ CJ2 II 300 EXPRESS XRS LEGACY 600

EUROPE WHOLLY OWNED - IN OPERATION ALL TURBOPROPS as of 3/29/2013

EUROPE Global TOTAL 91 75 74 74 71 68 67 66 64 64 57 57 54

410 348 337 366 157 360 233 197 228 557 344 154 159

CHART A BUSINESS JETS - EUROPE (MARCH 2013) 107 108 4% 174 4% 7%

RANK

MAKE

MODEL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10

KING AIR CARAVAN PIPER PIPER PILATUS KING AIR KING AIR CHEYENNE AVANTI AVANTI PILATUS

B200 208B MERIDIAN MALIBU JETPROP PC-12 NG 200 350 II P180 II PC-12/45

85 7%

Bombardier

920 35%

Hawker

124 10%

Beechcra Piper

415 34%

Cessna Pilatus Socata

97 8%

Gulfstream Embraer

Cheyenne 127 11%

Other 585 23%

1,043 1,550 453 232 328 661 663 344 77 91 516

93 8%

Falcon

463 18%

109 88 77 62 60 50 46 44 43 42 42

CHART B BUSINESS TURBOPROPS - EUROPE (MARCH 2013)

Cessna

234 9%

EUROPE Global TOTAL

Total 2,591

Avan 127 11%

139 12%

Other Total 1,207

Source: JETNET

Source: JETNET TABLE C l

TABLE C TOP 10 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES - BUSINESS JETS Wholly Fractional Total Shared Owned

Country

Rank

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

TABLE D

Leased

Rank

TOP 10 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES - BUSINESS TURBOPROPS Wholly Country Fractional Total Shared Owned G ermany 2 25 224 1 F rance 1 89 175 13 1 U nited Kingdom 1 72 166 6 S witzerland 97 96 1 I taly 78 78 -

Leased

G ermany

4 42

441

1

-

21

1

U nited Kingdom

3 84

382

2

-

12

2

A ustria

2 32

230

2

-

19

3

F rance

2 26

220

6

-

43

4

S witzerland

2 02

200

2

-

15

5

P ortugal

1 63

34

-

129

3

6

S pain

46

46

-

16

3

I taly

1 51

151

-

-

43

7

B elgium

44

43

1

-

-

S pain R ussian F ederation D enmark

1 29

129

-

-

4

8

L uxembourg

41

25

-

-

-

1 26

126

-

-

12

9

N etherlands

35

35

-

-

3

67

66

1

-

2

10

S weden

34

34

-

-

6

Source: JETNET

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

5 26 14 13

Source: JETNET

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AIReportMay13_AIReport Sept08 23/04/2013 11:58 Page 1

AIREPORT

The Aircraft Replacement Plan by David Wyndham y mini-van will need a new timing-belt later this year. They are not inexpensive, but my van is paid off and runs great. After this Winter, it was quite dirty, but a trip to the car wash took care of that. It is not yet time to replace my van. But what about your aircraft? There are two basic reasons to replace your current aircraft:

M

• •

The aircraft is no longer capable of performing the mission. The costs of operating the aircraft make it no longer the best economic choice for the mission.

MISSION DRIVES REQUIREMENTS As a business tool, the aircraft should have a clear and specific mission assigned to it. As the mission changes, grows or evolves the ability of the current aircraft to effectively meet the needs of the mission will change. Are your trip distances changing? Are you carrying more, or fewer passengers? Are you doing more business in a different location? If the trip distances are getting longer, maybe the small jet or turboprop you operate isn't roomy enough for either passengers or cargo. Conversely, if you just sold or closed the international division, then why continue to operate a long range aircraft? The aircraft is a tool that enables you to get the job done. Sometimes, you need to use a different tool. In order to analyze the aircraft effectiveness, you need to know what mission it is tasked to do. Ideally, this mission should connect directly to the accomplishment of the cor-

porate mission. This mission needs to be turned into a set of requirements that are measurable: Passenger load, distance, payload, length of runway, etc.

COSTS INCREASE & AVAILABILITY DECREASES As an aircraft ages, the cost to maintain it increases. For long-out-of-production aircraft, the availability and pricing of spares can be a serious issue. Along with the increase in cost comes an increase in the number of days per year the aircraft is in for maintenance. Every day the aircraft is in for maintenance is a day that the aircraft is unavailable for flight, and thus unavailable to perform its mission. Changes in technology are creating more cost effective solutions. Engines are more fuel efficient than 20 years ago. Updated avionic systems offer improved situational awareness for the pilots, increasing the level of safety even further. Navigation requirements for tomorrow's airspace such as NextGen, or Stage III/Stage IV noise requirements, and CO2 emission costs can render older models technologically obsolete or leave them too costly to upgrade.

AIRCRAFT REPLACEMENT PLAN Just as a successful business has a plan for the future, so should the aviation operation. Once an aircraft is in operation, it usually is there for at least five years and often for much longer. You need to have a plan for the eventual replacement of the current aircraft. Your Aircraft Replacement Plan should project to at least as long as you expect to operate that model. The mission needs to be

clear so that it can define the requirements. You should be able to point to the goals and mission of the overall organization and identify how the business aircraft is helping to achieve those goals. A good Aircraft Replacement Plan should be void of emotional issues and stay as objective as possible. Having firm numbers doesn't remove all questions, but it does offer a justification based on reasoned thought. Do you have a plan? When was it last updated? Like your budget, your Aircraft Replacement Plan needs reviewing and updating too! ❯ David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker. The mission of Conklin & de Decker is to furnish the general aviation industry with objective and impartial information in the form of professionally developed and supported products and services, enabling its clients to make more informed decisions when dealing with the purchase and operation of aircraft. With over 1,800 clients in 90 countries around the world, Conklin & de Decker combines aviation experience with proven business practices. ❯ More information from www.conklindd.com; Tel: +1 508 255 5975. ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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19/04/13

16:38


Interiors May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 10:42 Page 1

THE KEY TO CERTIFICATION IS BASIC: PLANNING, PLANNING, PLANNING. (PHOTO COURTESY OF DUNCAN AVIATION)

MRO CERTIFICATION

The Road To Certification By Kate Dolan & Danielle Kavan hen aircraft operators choose a Major Repair and Overhaul facility (MRO) to perform maintenance, upgrades or repairs on their aircraft, they are hiring much more than someone to service, refurbish and install equipment in their aircraft. They need to also make sure the MRO facility they hire knows how to work with the oversight authority for their aircraft’s country of registry, providing the proper documentation

W

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

and certification required to return the aircraft to service. This final step - the documentation and certification - is what ensures that the aircraft will fly another day. “In aviation, all roads lead to certification,” explains Mike Chick, Manager of Engineering Certification, Duncan Aviation (Lincoln, Nebraska). “Without the required certification, an aircraft sits on the ground. Period. “Whether we fix a broken antenna, retrofit www.AvBuyer.com

a cockpit—replacing all of the old analog equipment with digital—or re-foam and cover all of the cabin seats, we have to inspect and re-certify our work in order to maintain the airworthiness of the aircraft. To do that, we have to meet two criteria: The aircraft has to meet its type design (or properly altered condition), and it needs to be in a condition for safe operation. We at Duncan Aviation have to ensure those two conditions are met on every aircraft that we work on in our hangars.” ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Interiors May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 10:49 Page 2

MRO CERTIFICATION

WHERE IN THE WORLD? Certification teams should be well-versed in navigating the often tricky skies of Civil Aviation Authorities (CAA) all over the world. Whether an aircraft’s country of registry is Colombia, Estonia, Mongolia, Indonesia, Tanzania, India or any other, certification specialists need to work with the CAA to secure the necessary plan for approval of the alterations. Many countries, including South Africa, Canada and Australia, have organizations approved by their CAA that are similar to the EASAapproved DOAs (Design Organization Approval). Some countries certify data themselves through their CAA. According to Mary Bill, Engineering Alterations Planning Specialist, Duncan Aviation, “The agency responsible for regulating and maintaining the safety of civil aviation in Brazil is the ANAC (Agencia Nacional de Aviacao Civil), and we secure all of the necessary approvals and certification from them prior to Brazilian-registered aircraft touching the ground in the United States. “We stay on top of the regulations for our customers by working with the CAAs for their countries of registry to ensure the aircraft that are returned to service meet the requirements determined by their airworthiness authorities.” Look for similar arrangements to be in place before choosing an MRO shop to perform maintenance, upgrades or repairs on your foreign-registered aircraft.

A HERON AVIATION FALCON 900EX WHICH RECENTLY UNDERWENT INSPECTIONS, UPGRADES, AVIONICS, PAINT AND PARTIAL INTERIOR REFURBISHMENT BY DUNCAN. (PHOTO COURTESY OF HERON AVIATION)

A COMPLEX PROCESS Aircraft are complex and safety is crucial. So navigating a certification is not a simple process. Whether they are working with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) or another regulatory agency, an MRO facility needs to have a plan for final certification before a project begins. “We know certification is not a simple process,” says Mary Bill, Engineering Alterations Planning Specialist, Duncan Aviation. “But we’ll help customers, make sure they have a great experience and get them home on time. All we need is a solid plan that accounts for a variety of scenarios and requires nearly all the paperwork to be done prior to the aircraft’s arrival.” As European aviation authorities continue to harmonize their specifications under the EASA umbrella, Bill outlines that shops should be constantly working to stay up-todate on new regulations in order to walk customers through each step of the process,

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from the initial review of design data to the Design Organization Approval (DOA) and approval for return to service. She highlights a series of partnerships Duncan Aviation enjoys with EASAapproved DOA firms who provide design approval and certification for the work the company does on EU-registered aircraft. Duncan can seek the necessary certification from these entities without tacking on additional downtime for customers. As with a recent project completed by Heron Luftfahrt GmbH & Co. Aviation, all the planning can even help get a customer back in the air before anticipated.

AN EARLY DELIVERY From the moment Duncan and Heron signed the proposal for inspections, partial interior work, upgrades, avionics and paint for a Germany-registered Falcon 900EX, the customer tracked down aircraft data needed to obtain design change approvals that complied with EASA standards. Duncan requestwww.AvBuyer.com

ed Heron provide flammability data, floor plans, the interior maintenance manual and completion specifications (among other documents). “It’s important to request this information up front; otherwise you won’t be successful with the project,” Suzanne Hawes, Completion Sales Representative, Duncan Aviation outlined. “We’re transparent about the process early on because setting realistic expectations is vital to our overall success.” This data is needed for design approvals, but tracking down exactly what the DOA needs in a sea of paperwork can be a daunting task. Consequently, when an aircraft is placed on the schedule, a certification coordinator should be assigned along with a project manager and a variety of team leaders who provide hundreds of years of experience combined working with and for the customer to hone in on the right documents. “There are a variety of different names and descriptions for exactly what we need and it can be more than confusing, which is why we help the customer during this initial ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Interiors May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 10:49 Page 3

MRO CERTIFICATION

PROPER PLANNING STARTS AT THE BEGINNING

DUNCAN AVIATION'S ALTERATIONS PLANNING TEAM: TED BROOKS, SEAN DAVENPORT, MARY BILL, MARK PAWLOWSKI AND SHAWN CARRAHER

Planning properly helps set a realistic turn-time on a project and helps to ensure the proper paperwork is completed, filed and approved when the project is completed, allowing the aircraft to return to service with a minimal amount of hassle for the operator. When an operator turns his questions into an official Request for Quote (RFQ), Ryan Oestmann, Manager of Engineering Services, Duncan Aviation explains that it is critical to involve his team in this step. “Before we remove a bolt from an aircraft, the customer has a quote that details the timeframe, costs and data necessary to certify the aircraft for airworthiness and return it to service.” Shawn Carraher, Manager, Alterations Planning Team, is fond of his edited, fiveP version of the military’s six-Ps: Prior planning prevents poor performance. Reporting to Engineering management the team reviews quote requests every morning. In addition to providing accurate information in quotes, the team seeks to help customers receive more efficient and less expensive service.

(PHOTO COURTESY OF DUNCAN AVIATION)

process,” Bill says. Once the team and the customer find all the necessary data, a plan for approval is compiled to determine whether or not any pertinent information is missing. If not, the team will submit design changes to one of several DOAs for approval. If data is found to be missing, the certification coordinator should make every attempt to track it down. “After exhausting all resources and relationships to obtain the data, we can re-engineer it in-house, but that takes extra time and adds to the overall cost, so we really try to work with the original source,” Jerri Becker, Certification Coordinator, Duncan Aviation, outlines. With extensive planning for international aircraft modifications, if reengineering is required, it should be done prior to the aircraft’s arrival and thus it shouldn’t affect overall turn-time of a project. “There are times when the data just isn’t available,” Hawes says. “When this happens, we have other methods we can use, which

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

are not always optimal. For example, we are currently working on an aircraft where we have to sample panels to get the data we need. It’s not optimal, but if we’re able to plan for it it’s attainable.” Heron’s Falcon 900EX was scheduled for an airframe 2C inspection, 144-month routine upgrades as well as due items, avionics Traffic Collision Avoidance System 7.1 installation, partial interior refurbishment and partial paint refurbishment. Happily the customer was able to supply the data and the DOA approved Duncan’s plan. Yet even with all of the above planning, the process isn’t foolproof. “The DOA on this particular project had to change its process in the middle of everything, so we adapted too,” Becker reveals. “That’s why all the team members are involved from the very start through delivery, so we can shift all the moving parts together when the unexpected materializes.” After approval, EASA issues a part number for each compliant part. Those numbers www.AvBuyer.com

have to be physically inscribed on each part prior to final installation and engineering bulletin sign-off, which completes the production process. “We did a check flight, fixed a handful of minor squawks the following morning and the aircraft departed five days before the expected delivery,” outlines Jerry Tollas, Duncan Aviation Project Manager. It’s worth noting, however, that regulations continue to change, and that no two aircraft projects are ever identical. That’s why it’s vital that any Certification Planning Team you consider for MRO on your airplane should demonstrably excel at problem-solving, extensive planning and a little extra elbow grease to ensure an on-time delivery.

❯ More information from www.Duncanaviation.com

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Jetcraft May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 11:28 Page 1

JETCRAFT ON GLOBAL MARKETS

Global Expertise nterviews with key aviation companies help us understand the challenges facing Business Aviation in emerging markets. Here, David Dixon, Jetcraft Asia President and Mike Cappuccitti, Jetcraft Middle East Sales Director offer their views about the current state of their markets. As a diversified player in an increasingly competitive global market, Jetcraft has never strayed from its core Business Aviation interests. Alluding to the company’s successful business model, Jetcraft Asia president and over 40-year aerospace veteran David Dixon

I

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

explained “Our key approach is to get closer to the market with people in the field who understand the local requirements. This is why we have offices in Moscow, the Middle East, Hong Kong and soon a presence in Africa and Latin America.”

AN INTERNATIONAL FOOTPRINT Buoyed by the prospects of international growth, Dixon believes that Asia is a hotspot for Business Aviation deals. They have long embraced Business Aviation and this form of transportation is not new to countries such as Australia, Indonesia, the Philippines www.AvBuyer.com

and Thailand. Dixon highlighted the sale of 20 preowned business aircraft to Australia during the last two years with Indonesia being the largest market in unit volume sales for Asia. Believing that the geographical expanse of Asia makes Business Aviation ideal for the region, Dixon explained, “The countries in the region are vast with remote cities and resources scattered across a wide area. Many often do not realise that the size of Indonesia is equivalent to the distance between New York and Los Angeles. It’s a big, maritime continent!” Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jetcraft May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 11:28 Page 2

Regional market reflections from Jetcraft Corp. by Sanjay Rampal The Middle East (M.E.) is a markedly different story as characterised by the recent revolutionary uprisings. Sequestering time between deals Jetcraft Middle East Sales Director, Mike Cappuccitti told World Aircraft Sales Magazine, “The Middle East is still reeling from the Arab Spring and whilst aircraft are being traded in the countries affected, operating in the region is both difficult and dangerous.” Revolutions aside, the recession has also had an impact with Cappuccitti describing the market as “sluggish”, but he is quick to point out that this was more to do with a Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

lack of investor confidence, and he remains optimistic for the expected turnaround.

BUSINESS AVIATION VITAL FOR GROWTH Feeling that the economic benefits imparted by Business Aviation are not always fully understood in Asia, Dixon expounded “Owners of business aircraft develop businesses that enrich an economy. Such enterprises employ thousands of people and are engines for growth. Our message is a simple one – do not scare these entrepreneurs away as they may invest elsewhere”. www.AvBuyer.com

Expressing his concern at the views held by bureaucrats that owners of multimillion dollar jets can afford higher fees and taxes, Dixon countered, “This is not the case. It takes years for these people to grow their businesses and red tape will not help their cause. These investors employ people who pay taxes, buy goods and help the local economy so it is not just about exports. It is about providing opportunity and for people to better themselves.” The ramification of a flourishing Business Aviation market has also underlined the lack of infrastructure for the region. Citing Hong ❯ Kong airport as an example, Dixon said, WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Jetcraft May13_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 11:30 Page 3

JETCRAFT ON GLOBAL MARKETS “The solution is a simple one to resolve if government will is there. Clark and Subic Bay airports in the Philippines could take up the slack, but Hong Kong airport needs to devise a solution for itself.” However it is not all gloom as Dixon revealed that other countries were focusing more on Business Aviation. “Singapore has invested heavily in Seletar Airport recognising the role of Business Aviation not just in Asia but with an eye on India as well. In fact India is a sleeping giant. The Thai government announced better use of the former main airport Don Muang. Furthermore Kuala Lumpur has Subang and Jakarta Halim airport and both are ideal centres for our industry.” Overall Jetcraft has the perception that existing infrastructure in S.E. Asia could be put to good use without the need for costly, bespoke terminal developments. These include older existing airports and making space for business aircraft at major hubs.

M.E – AHEAD OF THE CURVE

“Overall Jetcraft has the perception that existing infrastructure in S.E. Asia could be put to good use without the need for costly, bespoke terminal developments.”

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www.AvBuyer.com

The Middle East being ahead of S.E. Asia in the Business Aviation stakes means that Jetcraft experts like Cappuccitti can focus on understanding the motivations of their customer base. “Customers range from royalty, business and high-net-worth entrepreneurs. Also some M.E. charter operators purchasing new planes tend to splash out on opulent interiors and associated luxury that their clients have come to expect.” In contrast to S.E. Asia, the M.E. has fewer importation restrictions for Jetcraft to contend with but Cappuccitti hinted at other issues. “The M.E. countries tend to follow EASA and FAA regulations with their own ‘twist’. The biggest problem is bureaucracy and endless delays.” Highlighting some of the cultural nuances, Cappuccitti added, “It takes a long time to cultivate relationships, and they do not respond to any sort of pressure.” The views expressed indicate that Jetcraft understands the dynamism of their markets through local expertise. Reinforcing this argument, Jetcraft marketing director Christie Martin-Gray said, “I believe that in addition to our truly global presence, our success is largely due to our people, and especially our leadership team.” Jetcraft divisions are indeed well placed strategically to take advantage of opportunities as they arise, thereby creating an agile and very capable organisation that has done much to promote Business Aviation across the globe.

❯ More from www.jetcraft.com

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


THE WORLD IS COMING

17-21 NOVEMBER 2013 The Dubai Airshow moves to Dubai World Central www.dubaiairshow.aero

#DXB13


Andrew Bradley_Gil WolinNov06 23/04/2013 10:33 Page 1

AIR TRAFFIC COMMUNICATIONS UPDATES

Change: It’s the one constant in Technology and Aviation. by Andrew C. Bradley

s we prepare for another year at EBACE, it really struck me how far technology has come since I entered the industry nearly twenty years ago. Technology has pervaded every aspect of our lives over the years but none so much as in aviation where the goal of quicker, quieter, safer and more efficient is the order of the day. Technology has revolutionized our daily lives. As I began to write this article about the positive impact of technology on aviation I was quickly reminded that with all the advances come hurdles. As I typed this article, American Airlines had just announced the grounding of its entire fleet of aircraft in the US—nearly 360 of them–due to a technical computer glitch in its system software. Perhaps they are running Windows 8 software… Shifting back to Business Aviation, many of our clients have been inquiring recently about the changes we face with regard to Air Traffic Communication; specifically many of the new regulations coming out of Europe and the US.

A

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The terms ‘FANS’, ‘Batch 3’, ‘CPDLC’ were foreign to pilots a few short years ago, but in this technology-dominated environment these terms are increasingly reshaping how we fly, communicate and operate moving forward. While this is a positive development, much confusion exists on these regulations which have been poorly communicated to the aviation market. Much like our old antiquated phone system of the last century which is now transitioning into the digital age, much the same is occurring in the realm of Air Traffic Control (ATC). The current system in use was devised and implemented prior to WWII and consists of outdated analog radio systems and conventional radar. Aircraft are controlled and monitored using both Positive and Procedural Control, the first of which uses conventional radar to space aircraft apart from each other to ensure safe passage by way of voice command in most cases. The latter - used mainly over large oceanic spaces where the former is not available - is the main driver of the early attempts to introduce FANS-based systems to www.AvBuyer.com

improve air traffic routing and avoid congested air space. Traditional means of communication consist of pilot voice-over-radio using either VHF bands for line-of-sight communication or existing HF bands which have been notoriously bad for long-distance communication. This existing system requires multiple aircraft to be tuned to the same frequencies, thereby limiting the air traffic controller’s ability to handle additional aircraft once a saturation point has been reached. Increased air traffic due to military use, commercial use, and Business Aviation has largely devoured available bandwidth. In addition, the current ATC system in place is a patchwork of inefficient systems all bound together by different proprietary systems along with human monitoring on the ground which don’t always work well together.

FANS DEVELOPMENT During the 1980s the concept of Future Aviation Navigations Systems (FANS) came about to lay the groundwork for an all-digital ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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AIR TRAFFIC COMMUNICATIONS UPDATES system less reliant on conventional bandwidth and human monitoring. FANS was meant to allow greater flexibility and more efficient traffic control in the areas of communications, navigations and surveillance (CNS). Several versions of FANS technology were used initially on Boeing aircraft, specifically the 747-400 and later on some Airbus models to fill gaps in Oceanic regions (South and North Pacific). The technology incorporated the use of automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) and controller–pilot datalink communications (CPDLC) which allow aircraft and control system to send and receive digital communications - akin to text messaging in aviation speak. These new technologies initially adopted in the Airline sector improved route efficiencies and greatly improved fuel management in conjunction with Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Contact (ADS-C). CPDLC will initially be implemented above FL285 but eventually cover all levels. In essence, FANS allows for the efficient transition from voice communications to digital communications; a switch from conventional navigation to 100% satellite GPS navigation; and surveillance from voice reports to

digital reports. All these digital advances allow for more compact spacing over oceanic airspace, reducing traffic congestion and greatly improving safety. The system is conveyed by both Iridium and Inmarsat satellite systems.

ADOPTION OF FANS Much of the 20th Century saw the US Federal Aviation Authority drive ATC and safety standards for all forms of aviation, but in the past thirteen years Europe has been the driving force behind newer, more efficient air traffic management systems to improve aviation efficiency. Most of the new upcoming air traffic management initiatives are being driven in Europe by Eurocontrol, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation—an intergovernmental organization which brings together the 39 Euro-member states. Eurocontrol believes that CPDLC will eliminate and reduce voice-channel congestion, miscommunication, less fatigue and greater efficiency as crews read messages rather than issue and process voice commands. Eurocontrol estimates that if 75% of air traffic is equipped with current technology available, capacity gains of 11% or higher will be seen within

Europe and surrounding air space. Ironically the United States and the FAA have chosen not to adopt the same FANS standards as Europe initially, which has created much confusion among operators both in the US and Europe. Many of the upcoming mandates in the next 12-24 months for Business Aviation will prove extremely costly for those operators who don’t meet compliance. Aircraft not equipped with FANS technology such as CPDLC will be forced to fly longer routes at less than optimal altitudes compared to those equipped with such. In February of this year, the North Atlantic Track System (NATS) - which experiences 1,500 crossings daily of which 6% are business aircraft - mandated that center tracks between FL360 and FL390 be closed to non-FANS equipped aircraft. By January of next year the standards will get even stricter for non-FANS -approved aircraft. By 2015 entire portions of the North Atlantic will be entirely closed off to those aircraft operating without FANSbased equipment who will be unable to communicate with ATC using the required VHF data link (VDL) model 2. Older aircraft typically can’t achieve FL400 due to weather conditions or payloads and will be operating at

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Andrew Bradley_Gil WolinNov06 24/04/2013 12:56 Page 3

AIR TRAFFIC COMMUNICATIONS UPDATES much less efficient altitudes causing significant increases in fuel burn until they become FANS equipped.

OBSTACLES TO FANS Part of the obstacle facing operators who wish to equip their aircraft with FANS technology is the absence of “one-stop-shop solutions” to comply with the new regulations. In many cases multiple systems such as the Flight Management System (FMS), communications management units, Satcom systems, display units and data-capable cockpit voice recorders must be upgraded or added to many older aircraft. Some of these STCs may prove costly for some operators. According to an article by Bill Carey published late last year in AIN, installing the equipment is only the first step. The second step involves significant crew training and additions to the current operations manuals as well as letters of authorization (LOAs) from governing bodies in each operator’s jurisdiction such as the FAA and EASA. Operators who aren’t prepared will find this element of the process time consuming. Lastly, in some cases operational authorization may require route demonstration that the system works, according to Carey. In some cases operators can request exemptions in the initial phases, but eventually all operators will need to comply with these new EU regulations. It remains to be seen how quickly the United States and other regions adopt EU standards in the near-term. The US is an especially complex case as multiple delays, cost overruns and other government hurdles remain with the redesign and implementation of NextGen ATC system which is badly needed to upgrade the current system. Over the past two decades in aviation, I can recall many new technologies and standards that helped make our industry safer and more efficient. Few, however, will have the impact of the upcoming advancements in air traffic communication which are now taking shape. Along with upgrading the air traffic communications systems on ground, FANS, CPDLC and ADS-C will have a huge benefit to General Aviation operations. The key to any new technology is being properly informed, adequately prepared, and realistic with one’s expectations. Presented on the right are some of the key European mandates ahead for operators in this area. ❯ Andrew C. Bradley is senior vice president, Global Sales & Acquisitions at Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter and management solutions. The company is headquartered in Burbank, California, and maintains a global presence in Washington D.C., Seoul, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Moscow and other locations around the globe. To learn more about the company, visit www.avjet.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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Market Indicators ARGUS View TRAQPak data shows that March 2013 flight activity levels increased significantly from February 2013, finishing the month up 10.4% overall. The results by operational category were all positive led by fractional aircraft, which posted back-to-back month-over-month increases to finish up 15.7%. Aircraft category results were also positive for the month with

small cabin aircraft leading the way, up 12.7%. Reviewing year-over-year activity (March 2013 vs. March 2012), TRAQPak data indicates an overall decrease of 2.6%. Results by operational category were mostly negative for the period with the exception of Part 135 activity which posted a year-over-year increase of 9.3%. Looking at the activity by aircraft cate-

MARCH 2013 vs MARCH 2012*

MARCH 2013 vs FEBRUARY 2013 OPERATIONAL CATEGORIES

AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES

7.7%

• Part 135

12.8%

• Fractional

15.7%

OPERATIONAL CATEGORIES

• Turboprops • Small Cabin • Mid-size • Large Cabin

DOWN

AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES UP

UP

UP

UP • Part 91

gory, the turboprop segment showed the largest decline, finishing the month down 8.8%. * Note: When reviewing the March year-overyear comparison, it is worth noting that the Easter Holiday fell in March 2013 but did not fall in March 2012 which could have impacted business aircraft activity this year vs last.

10.4% 12.7% 11.6% 4.0%

• Part 135

9.3%

• Small Cabin • Mid-size • Large Cabin

DOWN

DOWN

DOWN • Part 91

7.6%

• Fractional

6.8%

Market Indicators - May 2013

1.0% 0.7% 0.4%

• Turboprops

8.8%

/ More from www.argus.aero

Foley View inflexibility when operating private aircraft in China which constrain its full sales potential. “Imagine if there was a 22% tariff on imported cars, drivers had to ask permission to drive two days in advance and could only drive to specified cities via a sub-optimal route with few services. Driving to a city not on the approved list would require a ‘navigator’ to ride along,” Foley proposed. “It’s safe to say you wouldn’t sell many cars, but that’s exactly how the aircraft operational environment is in China today, which isn’t great for selling airplanes either.” With development of General Aviation a national objective, both the government and private Chinese companies have made a number of aerospace acquisitions and joint ventures in the last couple of years. “A clear, unified, strategic approach hasn’t really emerged yet, and some deals seemed to have

Market Indicators - May 2013 130

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

unnecessarily favored the seller. As familiarity with the segment increases, one would expect to see more systematic, logical, pragmatic and deliberate actions commensurate with building an aviation industry.” According to AMSTAT there are just 176 business jets based in mainland China, and another 118 in Hong Kong. Combined that’s 294 or only 1.5% of the 19,373 business jets in operation worldwide. While the Chinese fleet is expected to have a phenomenal growth rate, it will be from a very small base. Despite its market limitations, over the next decade China will be a nice adjunct to the overall market and account for as many as 900 (or 9%) of future worldwide business jet deliveries. “I view this next decade as a period when the market congeals and some of these impediments slowly get addressed. This could set up the following decade to be truly extraordinary.” / More from www.brifo.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

China has been hailed as the next great market frontier for General Aviation. Indeed, during the worldwide recession the country snapped up expensive, high-end business jets at an unprecedented rate, providing a rare glimmer in an otherwise flagging industry. “Some interpreted this as the beginning of a sales explosion and the time to get in on the action at any cost,” notes aviation market researcher Brian Foley. “While that didn’t last, a more sustainable market should come but will take more patience.” The initial sales boom was a bit of an anomaly, a product of sudden, new-found wealth in the region. Since then the local stock market declined, economic growth moderated and assorted “bubbles” ensued, causing the early private aircraft buying enthusiasm to wear off proportionately. In addition there are a number of restrictions and


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Market Indicators

JETNET View JETNET has released its February 2013 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop, and helicopter markets. Highlighted in the Tables are the ‘for sale’ worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments, comparing February 2013 to February 2012. Fleet for sale percentages in all market sectors were down in the February comparisons, except piston helicopters. Business turboprops moved still lower, well below the 10% mark, clearly moving it into a seller’s market. Two segments, business jets and turbine helicopters, have crossed the 19,000 in-operation level. It is noteworthy to report that ‘for sale’ business jets have changed very little from the 2,500 level over the past several years since climbing from the 1,600 level prior to 2008. The percentage for sale has declined as a result of the growth of the in-

TABLE A

WORLDWIDE TRENDS FEBRUARY

Business Aircraft

Helicopters

Jets

Turbos

Turbine

Piston

In-Operation Fleet

19,005

13,829

19,089

9,402

For Sale

2,537

1,090

1,173

567

% Fleet For Sale 2013

13.3%

7.9%

6.1%

6.0%

% Fleet For Sale 2012

13.9%

9.4%

6.4%

5.9%

% Change For Sale

(-0.6)pt

(-1.5)pt

(-0.3)pt

(0.1) pt

TABLE B

Business Jet Fleet

February 2013

2012

Change

%

In-Operation Fleet

19,005

18,533

472

2.5%

For Sale

2,537

2,567

-30

-1.2%

% For Sale

13.3%

13.9%

(-0.6)pt

operation fleet numbers. In-operation business jets have increased by 472 (2.5%) while those for sale have decreased by 30 (-1.2%).

These changes produced results with percentages for sale at 13.3%, declining by 0.6 percentage point from 13.9%. / More from www.jetnet.com

Market Indicators - May 2013

JP Morgan View According to JP Morgan there is little evidence that new jet demand is gathering momentum. Inventory remains elevated for younger jets, used pricing has not bottomed and flight operations are barely growing in the US and shrinking in Europe. The Chinese government’s austerity campaign is another concern. Business jets do not appear to be a target thus far, but this could change, depressing demand at least for a time in an important growth market. JP Morgan estimates that China (including Hong Kong and Macau) took 6% of new deliveries during the 2010-2012 period, including 17% of Gulfstream deliveries. First Quarter (Q1) deliveries probably will not be overly impressive, given the atmosphere outlined above, along with cautious anecdotal commentary from management teams and industry participants, as well as preliminary delivery data

that does not look robust. We could see the market recovering in future quarters enough to overcome a weak Q1 and JP Morgan does not expect cuts to 2013 delivery forecasts at this point, but does expect cautious commentary and mediocre order metrics. Used inventories were down 20 bps in March. The used inventory of in-production models fell to 10.2%, the bottom of the 10.2-11.2% range in which inventories have hovered since the start of 2011, and inventory could break below 10% for the first time since September 2008. This would be a positive indicator, albeit in the context of the other data points cited above. Light jets drove the March decline, falling 60 bps, while inventories for Heavy jets (+10 bps) and Medium jets (+20 bps) were marginally higher. Inventory for the “toddler and pre-K” fleet (aircraft 0-5 years old) remains elevated at an estimated 7.7%, and this is a reason to discount the

/ More from www.jpmorgan.com

Market Indicators - May 2013 132

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

impact that falling overall inventory could have on demand for new aircraft. Average asking price was down 0.5% m/m in March and used pricing weakened further, falling for the eighth time in 12 months. Persistent declines have been a signal that new demand would remain weak, and judging by recent readings, a near-term recovery is unlikely. Prices fell by 60 bps for Heavy jets in March and by 80 bps for Medium jets, while Light jet pricing improved by 0.2%. Flight ops improvement took a modest step backward in February. The headline number for US flight ops was a 3.8% decline, and while this converts to only a 0.4% decline when adjusting for the extra day last year due to the leap year, it still represents a slowdown from the low single digit gains from October 2012 through January 2013. European flight ops fell 4.8% year-over-year in February (-1.4% adjusted for the leap year).

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


MarketIndicators May13_Layout 1 23/04/2013 15:38 Page 3

3

Market Indicators

WINGX View “Euro Zone crisis sees a collapse in Business Aviation activity in March 2013”, observes WINGX’s latest monthly Business Aviation Monitor. • •

March 2013 marked a major fall of 10% in Business Aviation aircraft flight departures in Europe compared to March 2012 (YOY). The YOY slowdown was accentuated by major YOY declines in activity in Europe’s key Business Aviation markets (over 20% in Italy, 14% in Germany, and 8-10% in the UK, France and Switzerland). The decline looks especially bad due to March 2012’s relatively strong performance. March 2013 was 20% more active than February 2013. With seasonal adjustment, sequential monthly progress was flat. There were regional bright spots including growth in YOY activity in Ukraine, Turkey, the Russia Federation, Norway, and also in smaller markets like Ireland, and major activity spikes in Malta and Cyprus. Reversing last month’s trends, incoming flights from Eastern Europe and North Africa subsided in March. But there were increased flights from BRIC countries, the Middle East, and both East and West Africa. The largest fall within all aircraft cate-

gories was in piston activity, 27% down YOY. Business jet activity was not as badly affected, but activity was still down 6% on March 2012. Private flights fell most in March 2013, followed by Government and Training flights. There were 6% fewer Charter flights than in March 2012. Usage correlated to aircraft size; Bizliner, Ultra Long Range and Heavy Jet usage continued to grow, the Super Midsize segment gained ground, but all smaller aircraft – including VLJs - lost activity YOY. Fleet activity reflected the popularity of Bombardier and Pilatus aircraft, mixed results for Dassault and Gulfstream aircraft, and generally declining popularity of Cessna, Beechcraft and Piper aircraft. Aircraft usage bright spots included: charter flight popularity of Challenger 600 and Embraer Legacy; increased private flights on PC-12 and Piper Malibu; Year-to-date gains for BBJ3s, Eclipse and Phenom 300 aircraft.

Christoph Kohler, Managing Director of WINGX Advance, commented, “March analysis indicates a slump which was certainly precipitated by further Euro Zone tensions, especially affecting demand in Germany. The overall picture is gloomy, but there is growth, in selective aircraft types and on specific routes.”

Market Indicators - May 2013

/ More from www.wingx-advance.com

AEA View The Aircraft Electronics Association introduced its first Avionics Market Report during its recent annual AEA International Convention & Trade Show. The first phase of the report revealed total avionics sales amounted to nearly $6.3 Billion for yearending 2012. This announcement marks the first phase of the report, which includes one total number: The collective sales figure for both forward-fit and retrofit, as received from participating manufacturers. The report will eventually expand and become a quarterly report. In 2014, the report will be enhanced to include dividing the numbers into domestic and international sales, fixed-wing versus rotorcraft, airplane categories and

subscription sales. To-date, 20 of the leading aviation electronics manufacturers have committed to participate in the report, but additional manufacturers will continue to be invited to contribute sales data. The total year-end 2012 avionics sales as represented by the 20 manufacturers was $6,279,317,197.54. The amount (using net sales price, not manufacturer's suggested retail price) includes all aircraft electronic sales, including all component and accessories in cockpit/cabin/software upgrades/portables/non-certified aircraft electronics; all hardware (tip-to-tail); batteries; and chargeable product upgrades from the 20 participating manufacturers. The amount does not

/ More from www.aea.net

Market Indicators - May 2013 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

include repairs and overhauls, extended warranty or subscription services. The second phase of the report will expand further to report not only the dollar amount of sales, but both certified and noncertified aircraft electronics units sold.

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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BizAv Round-Up

05.13

ABACE ROUND-UP Beechcraft announced an order from Nakanihon Air Service in Japan for a King Air B200 to be used for multi-purpose missions. The company also announced an order for a King Air C90GTx turboprop from Qingdao Jiutian International Flight Academy (JTFA), one of two Civil Aviation Administration of China-certified, CCAR141-certificated domestic flight schools in China. / More from www.hawkerbeechcraft.com

brated the completion of the first BBJ for China's Nanshan Jet at a ceremony held at the Show. Nanshan Jet's BBJ, a modified 737-700, is the first BBJ for a Chinese customer designed with a traditional business jet interior that includes a bedroom suite with a queen-size bed and seating for 28 passengers. Previous BBJs delivered to Chinese customers were designed specifically for use as charter airplanes in the region. This airplane was completed by Lufthansa Technik's U.S. subsidiary, BizJet. The company plans to deliver six green BBJs this year, four of which are destined for Asia and three of those are Chinabound. / More from www.boeing.com

HUGE SUCCESS FOR ABACE2013 ABACE 2013 broke the records on all fronts according to show organizers NBAA and the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA). Attendance was up more than 20 percent from ABACE 2012, with 7,714 people walking through the door at this year’s show, which was held at Shanghai Hongqiao Airport, China. There also was a healthy increase in the numbers of exhibitors and static-display aircraft, NBAA said. The

final exhibitor count totaled 180, up 15 percent from last year. A quarter of the exhibitors were companies from AsiaPacific. In addition, there were 13 chalets, a 44percent climb from last year. The static-display ramp was chock full, with 34 aircraft (25 percent more than last year) available for viewing by attendees. “We are pleased to see the continued excitement about the future of Business Aviation in China, and across the

bers. Minsheng International Jet, NetJets China, Hawker Pacific and MetroJet join the organization’s charter members.

Dassault revealed that China is now the China Corporate Jet Alliance founded last year as the “China Business Jet Shanghai Alliance” to promote the sustainable growth of the Business Aviation market in China, welcomed four new mem134

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

second largest market in the world for the long range Falcon 7X, behind the United States. Dassault expects to deliver about ten Falcon 7Xs in China this year and has a backlog of about 20. The company continwww.AvBuyer.com

broader Asian region, as demonstrated by the numbers for this year’s event,” said NBAA president and CEO Ed Bolen. “It’s clear that, once again this year, Shanghai assumed the center of the world’s Business Aviation stage. We look forward to building on this year’s show with even greater success in 2014.” ABACE will return to Hongqiao next April 1-3. / More information from www.abace.aero

ues to invest in the Chinese market as evidenced by establishing a ‘wholly owned foreign entity’ to represent the Falcon brand in the growing Chinese market. The subsidiary, known as ‘Dassault Falcon Business Services (Beijing) Co. Ltd.’, is based in Beijing where Jean Michel Jacob is the General Manager and John Rosanvallon Chairman. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

Boeing Business Jets (BBJ) cele-

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Project1_Layout 1 20/03/2013 14:07 Page 1


BusAviationNewsMay12_Layout 1 23/04/2013 11:49 Page 2

2

BizAv Round-Up Deer Jet has Launched the first fractional aircraft program in China. The company, which has 30 business jets in its charter and management fleet, is currently selling shares in a Gulfstream G450 and G550. Due to current government restrictions in China, fractional share customers will need to book flights at least three days in advance, however. / More from www.deerjet.com

Gulfstream is the first business jet manufacturer to offer factory service in China. The company made the investment as its fleet has grown to more than 105 aircraft in China and Hong Kong. Gulfstream Beijing is a joint venture between Gulfstream and two subsidiaries of Hainan Airlines Group, Hainan Aviation Technik (HNAT) and Beijing Capital Airlines Co. Ltd. (Deer Jet). Deer Jet operates a charter aircraft fleet that includes more than 40 Gulfstream aircraft. HNAT offers aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul services.

LINEAGE 1000 FOR CHINA LEGACY 450 & 500 PROGRAMS ON TRACK 

/ More from www.gulfstream.com

Embraer signed a deal for a Lineage 1000 ultralarge executive jet with a previously undisclosed Chinese customer. Delivery of the aircraft is scheduled for May. The deal boosts Embraer’s overall order book in China to 29, including six Lineage 1000s.

The company also announced that the Legacy 500 is on track to enter service in the first half of 2014. Development of the Legacy 450 is also proceeding on time, with the first flight expected during the second half of 2013. As part of its efforts to

achieve program maturity prior to the Legacy 500 entering service, Embraer signed an MoU with Hawker Pacific in Singapore, adding the company to its growing network of service providers. / More from www.embraer.com

Metrojet announced its expansion into the China market with a joint-venture agreement with Zhuhai Hanxing General Aviation Co., Ltd. (a member of the Hanxing Group). The agreement with China-based Hanxing Group, represents Metrojet’s first operations in the rapidly growing China Business Aviation market. Metrojet Hanxing, the new venture, offers aircraft maintenance and aviation services, with an MRO facility, located at Zhuhai Airport. / More from www.metrojet.com

Nextant Aerospace’s 400XT launched its new air ambulance conversion module for the 400XT model. The company also named Jet Aviation Singapore as its new authorized service center in Asia, and also appointed China Great Wall Industry Corp. as its exclusive sales agent for the greater China region. The new China dealer has placed an initial order for up to 18 400XTs (including three firm orders and

Minsheng Leasing Asia’s biggest business jet leasing firm, has now launched its own aircraft operating unit. The company recently purchased Beijing-based charter provider Citic General Aviation, which operated a Dassault Falcon 900DX, 2000 and 7X, and is in the process of rebranding it into a new subsidiary known as Minsheng International Jet. Over the next five years Minsheng plans to increase its fleet size to 400 aircraft with an investment of roughly $16 billion and is committed to establishing the biggest charter fleet in China. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

/ More from www.nextantaerospace.com

Rockwell Collins’ HGS Flight app for the iPad, first unveiled in 2012 to allow users to experience the company’s Head-up Guidance System (HGS) with synthetic vision, was made available with a Mandarin language option. The company also announced that its Ascend Aircraft Information Manager (AIM), the secure data transfer system for Pro Line Fusion, Pro Line 21, and Pro Line 4-equipped aircraft is available for Cessna Citation XLS+ operators. / More from www.rockwellcollins.com

Universal Weather and Aviation expanded its growing global presence in Asia with the official opening of its new 24/7 Hong Kong-based trip support office, Trip Support Services Asia. / More from www.universalweather.com

/ More from www.msfl.com.cn

136

15 options) potentially worth $89 million.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BusAviationNewsMay12_Layout 1 23/04/2013 11:52 Page 3

3

BizAv Round-Up Global Jet Sales, a private aircraft brokerage firm based in St. Petersburg, Florida, has entered into a Strategic Business Partnership with OrientSKYs, a private jet charter network with head offices located in Bangkok, Thailand. Through this alliance OrientSKYs will be able to offer Asian buyers and sellers access to Global Jet Sales’ suite of services, including exclusive inventory, appraisal services, proprietary research and marketing, and a specialized and experienced staff to facilitate Asian private jet sales and acquisitions. / More from www.jetsearch.com

Heli Asset, the Paris-based international helicopter brokerage firm, has launched quarterly reports providing a snapshot of pre-owned markets of the four largest OEMs. / More from www.heliasset.com

UPPING THE ANTE FASTEST BIZJET IN THE WORLD ROLLS-OUT  fleet flagship, however. The New Citation X provides a lengthier cabin and a longer range of 3,242 nm. The increased range translates into an aircraft which can easily handle the flight from New York to London. The cockpit is equipped with the groundbreaking Garmin G5000 integrated

avionics package, featuring three 14" PFDs and four touch screen controllers for data entry and systems control. Cessna expects certification later this year with customer deliveries starting shortly thereafter. / More information from www.cessna.com

GENERAL ROUND-UP Bombardier recently launched its newest and most convenient cost-perflight-hour parts coverage program for business aircraft operators. The Smart Parts Preferred program builds on Bombardier's successful Smart Parts Plus program to bring parts replacement cost protection, and budget predictability. The Smart Parts Preferred program offers a range of sought-after new features developed in response to feedback from customers, including flight-hour price commitments over a longer term, more component coverage, enhanced program transfer features at aircraft resale and simplified program administration. / More from www.bombardier.com

Dassault Aircraft Services (DAS) has expanded its footprint of service with a new satellite service station in Van Nuys, Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

O’Gara Aviation Company, a leading aircraft brokerage and sales firm, has changed its name to OGARAJETS. “While the name is new, our mission endures,” said OGARAJETS Chairman and company Co-Founder John Foster III. “We are still committed to the values and virtues on which the company was founded 33 years ago. But as my sons Johnny and David have taken on the leadership of the company over the last several years, it made sense to rebrand the organization to lay the foundation for the next 30 years. Their unique skills, proven success and vision for the future have taken the company further than we’d ever envisioned. Along with the new name, the company also revealed its new logo. Reminiscent of the sun rising over the horizon it represents the company’s continued ascent as industry leaders over the last several years, particularly as it has entered multiple global markets. Furthermore, OGARAJETS launched an entirely new, expanded website. Read more from OGARAJETS on page 92 of this edition. / More from www.OGARAJETS.com.

California. This new facility can provide troubleshooting and line maintenance for all Falcon 50, 900 and 2000 series models as well as the 7X. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Raisbeck Engineering’s revolutionary Raisbeck/Hartzell Swept-Blade Turbofan Propellers have entered service on King Air B200, BB-1723. The installation was performed by Landmark Aviation of Norfolk, Virginia. This aircraft is also the first installation of the EPIC PLATINUM Performance Package with the new Swept-Blade Props. Previously, the aircraft was outfitted with the then-current Raisbeck Power Props last Summer, but the Owner and Pilot decided to go with the new Swept-Blade prop based on look and impressive performance. / More from www.raisbeck.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

Cessna rolled out its first production unit of the New Citation X at the company's Wichita, Kansas, facility. The New Citation X is best known for its top speed of Mach 0.935, making it the fastest civilian aircraft in the world. The increased speed is not the only improvement for the Cessna

OGARAJETS Rebranded

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4

BizAv Arrivals

Ryan McGinn - Bombardier Flexjet appointed McGinn as sales director for the New York City territory, where he will sell fractional jet ownership, jet cards and charter brokerage services to clients in the area.

Jay Heublein

Oliver Hewson

James Liang

Mary Lynn J. Rynkiewicz

Matthew Boyle - has been recognized with the Flight Safety Foundation's Business Aviation Meritorious Service Award for his decades of work in safety. Boyle was nominated by his colleagues at Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation for his expertise in safety, and his willingness to share his knowledge within Dassault. Jay Heublein - Nextant Aerospace, maker of the Nextant 400XT, bolstered its global sales team with the promotion of Heublein to executive vice president, Global Sales and Marketing. The company also announced the hire of senior aviation executives Peter Walker as vice president of sales for Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific, and Richard Lang as U.S. regional sales director. Oliver Hewson - Gama Group recently announced the appointment of Hewson as commercial manager, Gama Aviation FZE, with the task of further developing growth throughout the MENA region. James Liang – long-time Gulfstream employee, has been appointed regional sales manager for Product Support Sales in Asia. He is based at the Gulfstream Product Support Asia office in Hong Kong and reports to Jeff Hill, director, International Product Support Sales.

Sameer Rehman - has been named director of international trade support for commercial sales and marketing at Bell Helicopter. Rehman was previously managing director for the Textron subsidiary’s commercial business in Asia Pacific. To succeed him, Bell promoted C.M. Hwang, formerly commercial business development manager for Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Singapore. Mary Lynn J. Rynkiewicz - joined the General Aviation Manufacturers Association last month as director of communications. Rynkiewicz comes to GAMA from the NextGen Institute, where she served as communications and contract manager.

Mark Saxton - formerly regional sales director at Embraer Executive Jets, has joined TWC Aviation as director, aircraft sales and acquisitions.

Firoz Tarapore - StandardAero has appointed Tarapore as interim president and CEO. He replaces Rob Mionis, who resigned from the company. Tarapore has been a director and member of the executive committee of StandardAero since 2007 and will continue to serve as a board member. Pat Waddick – has been promoted to executive vice president and COO for Cirrus Aircraft.

David Welch – is promoted to vice president of sales for Uvaldebased SkyWay Aero.

BizAv Events 2013 NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION TAXES SEMINAR REG AIRLINE ASSOC., CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW NIGERIAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE EUROPEAN HELICOPTER SHOW EXPLORING AIRCRAFT OPERATING COSTS SEMINAR HELIRUSSIA 2013 EBACE: (EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION) AIRCRAFT REPOSSESSION CONFERENCE AEROEXPO UK JETNET IQ GLOBAL BUSINESS AVIATION SUMMIT NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REGIONAL FORUM CANNES AIRSHOW ROTARY OPERATIONS CONFERENCE MIDDLE EAST CORPORATE AVIATION SUMMIT NBAA: FLIGHT OPERATIONS MANUAL WORKSHOP PARIS AIR SHOW NBAA: MANG FUNDAMENTALS FOR FLIGHT DEPTS Events in RED indicate Business Aviation related.

May 3 May 6 - 9 May 7 May 9 – 11 May 14 - 15 May 16 – 18 May 21 – 23 May 31 May 31 – Jun 2 Jun 4 – 5 Jun 6 Jun 6 – 8 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 17 – 18 Jun 17 – 23 Jun 19 – 20

Washington, DC, USA Montreal, Canada Lagos, Nigeria Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Dallas, TX, USA Crocus Expo Moscow, Russia Geneva, Switzerland London, UK Sywell, Northants, UK New York, NY, USA White Plains, NY, USA Cannes, France London Heliport, UK Abu Dhabi, UAE Washington DC, USA Le Bourget, France Washington DC, USA

/ www.nbaa.org / www.raa.org / www.nbac.com.ng / www.eurohelishow.com / www.conklindd.com / www.helirussia.ru / www.nbaa.org/www.ebace.aero / www.aeropodium.com / www.expo.aero/uk / www.jetnet.com / www.nbaa.org / www.cannesairshow.com / www.miuevents.com / www.aeropodium.com / www.nbaa.org / www.paris-air-show.com / www.nbaa.org

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com Whilst selecting from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 138

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


John Hopkinson Ultras April 23/04/2013 10:50 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell Primus GNS-XL FMS System Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Albinati Citation CJ2 May 23/04/2013 10:58 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citation Jet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0422 HB-VPB 1012 1004

No damage history Engines Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 on TAP ELITE FADEC Controlled • LH: S/N 216252 - 1012 TSN, 1004 CSN • RH: S/N 216177 - 1012 TSN, 1004 CSN Program Coverage and Maintenance Status Aircraft scheduled maintenance performed exclusively by Jet Aviation Zurich since new Aircraft under Cesscom (CAMP) maintenance tracking service Airframe under Cessna Proparts program coverage Engines under Williams International TAP ELITE coverage Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays • AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3000 • ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 • IFIS 1 Collins IFIS 6.0 • FMS 2 Collins FMS-3000 (incl. DME II) • GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel Receiver • RTU 2 Collins RTU-4220 • NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 • ADF 1 Collins ADF • DME 1 Collins DME-4000 • VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing

• XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94D Mode S • TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II • EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with Runway Awareness and Advisory System (RAAS) • Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 • ESIS GH-3000 ESIS • ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT (121.5/243/406 MHz) Additional Equipment • HF System HF-9000 • Aircell Flitefone (2 Handsets) • Lightning Detection Sytem WX-1000E • Turbulence Weather Radar WXR-852 • Cockpit Voice Recorder DK-120 • Data Link • Cabin Briefer PBS250 • Annunciator Voice System • Electronic Check List • Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Interior Configuration • Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats • Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables • RH Fwd Refreshment Center • Dual Aft Dividers Assembly with sliding doors • One Aft Potty Belted Seat Colors • Beige leather seats - Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut • Goldy Plated Hardware Finish Exterior Overall light beige with brown stripes Asking price: USD $4,600,000

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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Tel: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


Albinati Global Express May 23/04/2013 11:00 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2005 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9145 HB-JEX 3596 1248

• Aircraft scheduled maintenance performed by Innotech Aviation Montreal and Jet Aviation Geneva and Basel branches • 4C inspection performed at Jet Aviation Basel in July 2010 • 8C inspection due in July 2015 • No damage history Engines (under RR Corporate Care) Rolls Royce Deutschland BR 700-710A2-20 • LH: S/N 12405 - 3516 TSN 1210 CSN • RH: S/N 12406 - 3596 TSN 1248 CSN APU (under JSSI) Honeywell RE 220 (GX) S/N P-264 Time: 2553 TSN / 3120 CSN Avionics • Communications Triple Honeywell RCZ 833E • Navigation Dual Honeywell RNZ 851 • ADF Dual Honeywell P2000XP • RMU Dual Honeywell RM 855 • Transponder Dual Honeywell P2000XP, Mode S • Radar Honeywell WU 880 • IRS Triple Honeywell Laser Ref III • HF Dual Collins HF 9031A with Selcal • GPS Dual Honeywell HG2021 & GNSSU • FDR Honeywell SS FDR QAR • CVR Honeywell SS CVR • Triple Honeywell Flight System Management W/CD 820 CDU

Special Features • Aircraft under CAMP maintenance tracking service • Aircraft under Bombardier Smart Parts Plus coverage • Cabin Altitude Reduction for Passenger Comfort (4’500 Feet) • Honeywell RT 950 TCAS II, Version 7.0 • Honeywell Mark V Enhanced GPWS • Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM (6 Channel)/2 Channel Iridium • RVSM, 8.33 MHz Spacing and FM Immunity Certified • Heads Up Display (HUD), EVS, RAAS • BATCH 2+ • Artex ELT 110-406 Emergency Locator Beacon • Teledyne Datalink System Interior (refurbished in February 2011) • Twelve passenger configuration and a threeplace divan 9G certified (see, floor plan) in beige leather and brown nubuck • Forward lavatory and crew rest area • Fully equipped galley and annex • Aft private lavatory, storage closet and baggage compartment • Cabin entertainment system with flat screen video monitors, satellite TV for Europe and USA, WLAN Internet, DVD and an airshow • Electric window shades • EMTEQ system lighting retrofit • AIMS soundproofing system Exterior White top, light beige bottom with gold accent stripes

FORWARD WARDROBE FORWARD LAVATORY CREW AREA GALLEY

HANDSET AND IRIDIUM PHONE

21.3" MONITOR RECEPTACLE FOR PLUG-IN MONITOR RECEPTACLE FOR PLUG-IN MONITOR

HANDSET AND IRIDIUM PHONE THERAPEUTIC OXYGEN OUTLET

RECEPTACLE FOR PLUG-IN MONITOR (2)

ENTERTAINMENT CABINET THERAPEUTIC OXYGEN OUTLET

HANDSET

RECEPTACLE FOR PLUG-IN MONITOR

21.3" MONITOR END CAP (IF INSTALLED) RECEPTACLE FOR PLUG-IN MONITOR AFT LAVATORY AFT WARDROBE

Asking price: USD $25,250,000

BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT

C bi F

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: E-mail: Web:

i hi

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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Florida Jet Falcon 900B April 23/04/2013 11:02 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Falcon 900B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

140 N140FJ 6628.7 3078

Engines & APU Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1C Engines enrolled on MSP Gold with DEEC’s Engine 1: Engine 2: Engine 3: S/N: P101218 P101222 P101220 Hours: 6508 5938 6508 Cycles 2998 2736 2998 APU Garrett GTCP 36-150F S/N: P257 Hours: 3370 TT MSP Avionics Autopilot Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS Comm Triple Collins VHF22C with 8.33 spacing Navs Dual Collins VIR 32 with FM immunity ADF Dual Collins ADF 60 DME Dual Collins DME 42 Transponder Dual Collins TDR 94D w/mode S & Enhanced Flight ID HF Dual King KHF 953 with SELCAL EFIS Honeywell EDZ 820 5 tube IRS Triple Honeywell LASEREF II RAD ALT Honeywell RT-300 WX Radar Collins WXR 870 w/2 RCU’s TAWS Allied Signal MK V w/Windshear & Terrain Display Phone Dual Line Aircell Access Iridium Satphone TCAS Collins TTR-920 w/Change 7

FDR CVR FMS

Fairchild F-800 Universal CVR-30A Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 with 5.0 software Data Loader DL-950 ELT Airtex C406-1 GPS Dual 12 Channel WiFi GoGo High Speed Internet Interior/Exterior Interior refurbished – Completion Date: April 2013 A 14 passenger interior features a forward four place club, mid cabin four place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite the credenza with a kibitzer, and aft dual three place berthable divans with a privacy bulkhead. Forward galley with bulkhead pocket door, a forward and aft lavatory. The interior was refurbished with new soft goods, wood veneer, and plating, as well as a new single cup coffee maker. In addition, new MCCI switch panels. A state-of-the-art entertainment system includes a 17” HD monitor in the aft cabin and 17” HD monitor in the forward cabin, with a Blue Ray DVD/CD player for each monitor, new speakers and amplifiers, iPod docking station, and audio switches, Airshow 400 Moving Map System. New up wash, down wash, lav indirect, and galley LED Lighting. The iCABIN in-flight entertainment and cabin management system allows you to simultaneously stream movies to up to 16 iPads. A new dual line Aircell Access Iridium satellite phone system with GoGo high speed internet installed to help you get more done in the sky. Exterior paint is in like new condition, repainted by Standard Aero SPI

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Florida Jet Hawk800 May 23/04/2013 15:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2004 Hawker 800XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

258694 N694FJ 2572.8 1881

Engines Honeywell TFE 731-5BR-1H, MSP w/Dee Howard T/R LEFT: P107935 TSN 2572.8 CSN 1884 RIGHT : P107939 TSN 2572.8 CSN 1884 APU: Honeywell GTCP 36-150(W), S/N P805, TSN: 2941, MSP Avionics: COMM: Dual Collins VHF-422C HF COMM: Collins HF-9000 SELCAL: Coltech CSD-714 NAV: Dual Collins VIR-432 LG RANGE NAV: Dual Collins FMS 6000, 3.3.1 Software/GPS 4000S ADF: Dual Collins ADF-462 DME: Dual Collins 442 RADAR: RTA-858 AUTO PILOT: FGC-3000 TRANSPONDER: Dual Collins TDR-94D: Enhanced Flight I.D. VOICE RCDR: Universal CVR-120 TCAS II: Collins TCAS 4000

Equipment Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics, Collins ALT-4000 Radio Altimeter, ADC-3000 Air Data Computers, AHC-3000 Attitude Ref System, Honeywell Mark V EGPWS, Honeywell AFIS, Collins IFIS 5000 Paperless Cockpit, Dual File Servers, Aircell 3100 Iridium Phone, Airshow 400, Long-Range Oxygen System, Artex 406 MHZ ELT, Jumpseat, MDC 4000 Checklist. Pulse Lights, Four (4) 750 Liter Oxygen Bottles, XM Weather, Vision Safe EVAS, Collins DBU 5000, Logo Lights, Rosen SunVisors. Empty Weight 15,880 Interior 9 Passenger seating (5 seats, belted lav and 3 place divan), Audio International CD/DVD Player, Airshow 400, Two 13.8 inch LCD monitors, (4) 110 Vac outlets, TIA Microwave, Coffee maker, Seats and Divan recovered and Carpet replaced July 2011. Exterior June 2011 Overall Matterhorn White w/Cumulus Grey and Ming Blue Ming Stripes. Inspections E, F, G & 96 Month Items Complied with January 7, 2013 By WestStar C of A Issued October 22, 2004 One owner since new. No damage history. Impeccable records.

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

143


Wentworth 757 May 23/04/2013 11:05 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Aggressively priced for immediate sale

1990 Boeing 757-200 Exec Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

24923 N1757 7303 2636

Lowest Timed 757 in the World! MSG-3 yr. C check interval Engines Rolls Royce RB211-535 E4-37/16B 7230/7302 Hours SNEW 2569/2623 Cycles SNEW Features Privately Operated SNEW Exceptional Ownership history Winglets 255,000 MGTOW Pegasus RNP 0.3 FANS-1 Approved IS&S Flat Panel Forward Looking Windshear Kevlar Cockpit Door 10 yr. Gear O/H August 2010 Genesys Airshow Aircell GoGo Internet Belly Quad Camera Aerocon Airstairs Aux fuel tanks immediately available RVSM, MNPS and RNP-10 Certified ACARS Printer

Avionics Triple Collins (EFIP-701E) EFIS Triple Honeywell IRS Dual Honeywell FMS Sundstrand FDR Fairchild A-100 CVR Allied Signal MK-V Honeywell MCS-6000 6 channel SATCOM Triple MMR/GPS Dual Honeywell 906 Air Data System Exterior White upper/dark blue lower fuselage with red and blue stripe. Hangared. Excellent condition. Interior 40 passenger executive interior in a three cabin layout. Mid-cabin lounge, five three place 16G divans convert to beds for sleeping, three fourplace double club groupings with articulating conference/coffee tables. Ten 360 degree swivel DeCrane Master seats . Sleeper seats throughout. Mid-cabin and aft galleys. Three lavs including mid-cabin executive lav. Interior tour available at www.Wentworth.Aero.

Wentworth & Affiliates, Inc. P.O. Box 60478 Potomac, MD 20859

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Tel: +1 (301) 869-4600 Fax: +1 (301) 869-2700 E-mail: sales@wentworth.aero Website: www.wentworth.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wentworth 900EX May 23/04/2013 11:09 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2C Check and Gear Overhaul ongoing at Duncan Aviation

Falcon 900EX Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

91 7835 5381

NEW $4M ‘MOLORI’ DESIGNER INTERIOR PAINT & AVIONIC UPGRADE JUNE 2012 BY DUNCAN

lower blue and sweeping gold stripes. Engines TFE731-60-1C Enrolled on Honeywell MSP APU Honeywell GTCP 36-150 (F)

EASA REGISTERED THROUGH 2012 Aviation Partner Winglets reduces fuel consumption and extends the range by 5-7% over the standard 900EX. All new communications, inflight entertainment and cabin management systems including: Swift broadband internet with Wi-Fi, iPad mounds, 2 channel Aircell Axxess Satphone, worldwide Airshow 4000, tail mounted camera that displays on forward & aft 19” HD monitors, and plug-in monitors. 13 passenger designer interior with Duncan PSU Panels, and new sound insulation package. Fully berthing aft divan and Jetrest lounger mattresses convert the aft cabin into a plush, private, and quiet bedroom. Honeywell Cabin Management System controls new LED lights, new translucent/blackout cellular pleated shades, and new Alto Audio surround sound entertainment systems. Forward Galley has all new surfaces, glass, faucets, sinks, metal plating, stemware, silverware, and china. Gorgeous burled birdseye maple woodwork throughout. New paint with upper white,

Avionics Primus Elite 5-LCD Displays EFIS with Enhanced Vision System Primus 880 Color Radar Triple Collins COMMS Dual Collins NAVS Dual Collins DME, ADF, TPDR Triple FMZ-2000 with GPS Triple Laseref III Allied Signal CVR and FDR TCAS-II Features Dry Bay Mod RVSM, CAT II, NAT-MNPS AZ-840 Micro Air Data Systems DL-900 Data Loader Dual Collins RTU-4220 Dual Baker B-1045 Cockpit Audio 3-Frequency ELT Standby JET Altitude Horizon

Wentworth & Affiliates, Inc. P.O. Box 60478 Potomac, MD 20859

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (301) 869-4600 Fax: +1 (301) 869-2700 E-mail: sales@wentworth.aero Website: www.wentworth.aero WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

145


2 Starbase 13 Lear60XR 423 WAS May13 24/04/2013 15:43 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2013 Lear 60XR Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

423 N760AA Factory New

• Factory New, AVAILABLE TODAY • Pratt & Whitney Engines on MSP Gold • Full Factory Warranty • Bombardier Smart Parts • Airshow Cabin Information System • Touch Screen Cabin Management • Aircell Axxcess SATCOM Phone System • High-Speed Broadband w/Wi-Fi (option) • Seven Place Executive Interior • Trades Welcome A Turn-Key aircraft management program with Guaranteed Charter income is available if desired.

Starbase Jet Aviation www.starbasejet.com

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Contact: Blair Descourouez Cell: (214) 354-2738 blair@starbasejet.com Contact: Randall Mize Cell: (214) 676-6975 rmize@starbasejet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


2 Starbase 98 Lear60 143 WAS May13 23/04/2013 11:20 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Lear 60 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

0143 N143AA 4850 3283

• No Damage History • Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold • Bombardier Smart Parts • 12 Year Completed July 2010 • In-Flight Phone Satcom Aircell Axxess • Airshow 400 • Titanium Flap Brackets • Three Rotor Brakes with Smart Stems • Beautiful Eight (8) Passenger Interior • Private Enclosed Lavatory • Trades Welcome A Turn-Key aircraft management program with Guaranteed Charter income is available if desired.

Starbase Jet Aviation www.starbasejet.com

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Contact: Blair Descourouez Cell: (214) 354-2738 blair@starbasejet.com Contact: Randall Mize Cell: (214) 676-6975 rmize@starbasejet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

147


Northern Air N412ET December 23/04/2013 11:23 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1134 N412BT 4091 3319

Engines Left Engine 3885 Right Engine 3885 Both engines 0 since overhaul at Pratt Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 L FMS • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • Radio Altimeter

Exterior Overall Snow White with Black Metallic, Silver Plat Met Interior Fire-blocked Seven passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for an eighth passenger. Left and Right executive tables with Sienna leather inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Willow leather with Mink lower sidewalls, and finished Topaz Kayawood gloss laminate. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • Ski Tube • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Air N959RP February 23/04/2013 11:24 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 2408 1949

• Extended Range Fuel • Fresh A-D check at Bombardier Wichita Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660

• ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

149


AeroAir May 24/04/2013 15:33 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Challenger 601-3R Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5191 N605T 6085 2801

Engines Left: S/N: 807347 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN Right: S/N: 807348 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN APU Garret GTCP36-150: 1545 Hours On MSP Avionics Honeywell Primus II System; Honeywell AFIS/VHF SATCOM; Dual Honeywell HF; Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt; Dual Honeywell RCZ-833J Coms; Honeywell WU 880 Radar; Dual Honeywell RNZ-850 VHF Navs; Dual Honeywell DI-851 DME; Dual Honeywell Mode S Transponders; Baker Audio Amplifier; Dual NZ-2000 FMS w/Update; Honeywell Mark V EGPWS; L3 TCASII, TCZ-910 w/Change 7; Fairchild A100A CVR; Fairchild F1000 FDR; Honeywell SPZ 8000 Autopilot; Heads Up CMS-400 Voice System; 406Mhz Elt. Interior New in 2004: 10 place with normal four place forward club, aft four place divan across from two place club, or 12 place with second four place divan

installed in place of aft two place club. Galley has forward w/convection oven, microwave oven, coffee maker, large cold storage, separate clean ice drawer. Phone is Aircell system, 3 lines (1 is dual Aircell/Iridium), conference calling capability, (Aircraft is provisiioned for Honeywell MCS 3000 Sat-Comm), FAX/Printer Cabin Information System is Airshow Genises w/Briefer. Entertainment has DVD six disk changer with 2 screens 14" & 15", and CD player w/10 disk changer and full rnage speaker system w/subwoofer. Also forward jump seat. Aft lav with 10 gal water system. Emergency equipment consists of fourteen life vests, two twelve man life rafts. Interior and exterior exceptionally well cared for. Exterior New in 2004. White top with blue bottom and three silver pin strips down the side. Maintenance CIMMS enrolled since new. SMART PARTS with SUPPLEMENTAL AVIONICS coverage. Empty Weight: 25503 BOW: 26597

Make Offer - Owner Motivated to Sell

Aero Air, LLC 2050 NE 25th Avenue Hillsboro, OR 97124-5964

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Tel: +1 503 640 3711 Fax: +1 503 681 6513 Email: nralston@aeroair.com www: www.aeroair.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Chuck Collins Gulfstream G400 May 23/04/2013 11:27 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2003 Gulfstream G 400 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1504 N902L 3,220.4 1,381

Engines Eng #1: 3.220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Eng #2: 3,220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Avionics Collins Pro Line IV Avionics Suite with Honeywell SPZ 8400 Flight Control System w/6-Tube EFIS system, Altitude Alert and Preselect, Dual Honeywell AZ-810 Digital Air Data Computer Triple Collins Pro Line IV VHF 422 Communication Transceivers with 8.33 MHz Dual Collins Pro Line IV VIR 432 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receivers w/FM immunity Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 FMS w/dual GPS and triple LaserRef II IRU Dual Collins Pro Line IV TDR 94D Xpdr Dual Collins Pro Line IV ADF 462 Dual Collins Pro Line IV DME-442 Dual Honeywell HF-9000 HF Systems Dual Collins AA-300RadioAltimeters Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Fairchild 1000 FDR Flight Data Recorder Honeywell Primus 880 Radar w/Turbulence Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM Honeywell TCAS 2000 TCAS II Honeywell HUD-2020 Heads Up Display AlliedSignal (AFIS) BF Goodrich ADI-335 Attitude Indicator

Price – Motivated Seller

SATCOM MCS 7000 EVS Enhanced Visual System Honeywell Heads up Display Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Gold, Orange and Blue with factory horizontal Stripes, Painted in October 2008 by Gulfstream Aerospace, Paint is Excellent Interior Gulfstream Aerospace best selling Executive 14 passenger floor plan. This FAR Part 135 fireblocked interior’s main cabin features forward 4 place club, mid-cabin 4 place divan opposite 2 captain chairs in club and aft 4- place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite credenza. All oversized swiveling captain chairs were used in the club arrangements thorough out and are appointed in buckskin glove leather. The 4 – place conference group is appointed with chamois leather chairs. The berthing 4 place divan is finished in a designer walnut fabric. The pilot and copilot seats are gray leather with gray sheepskin. • Forward and aft Lavatories? • Large Aft Cabin Galley • Airshow w/personal monitors a Dual Coffee Makers • Two 17” Video monitors a Microwave Oven • Three 110 V electrical outlets a High Temp Convection Oven • Fax and Printer a Cold Storage Compartment • Jump Seat The interior is exceptionally clean, in excellent condition and shows as new with no defects

CHUCK COLLINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. Premier Jet Complex * McClellan-Palomar Airport, 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214 Carlsbad, California 92011 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 760-929-0302 Cell: +1 760-420-7400 Email: Chuck@CCAJets.com http://www.chuckcollinsassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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FAI MAY13 23/04/2013 11:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

UNIQUE AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AVAILABLE

2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: 9013 Registration: D-AFAU Airframe TT: 5846 Landings: 1879 • EU OPS 1 • New Paint in 2012 • 8C & Gear Inspections C/W June ‘10 • Batch 2+ Upgrade Engines Rolls Royce BR700-710A2-20 S/N 12117 & 12118 APU Honeywell RE-220 S/N P-110 AVIONICS • Honeywell Primus II Avionics Package • Six Tube 8 x7 DU-870 Color EFIS Display, 2 PFD / 2 EICAS / 2 MFD • Triple Honeywell Laseref IV Inertial Reference System • Triple AZ-840 Micro Air Data Computers (MADC) • Dual NZ-2000 Integrated Flight Management System w/Dual HG-2021 Channel GPS • Triple IC-800 Integrated Avionics Computers (IAC) with EFIS revisionary capability • Primus 880 Color Weather Radar w/Lightning Sensor • TCAS II RT-950 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (Change 7 incorporated) • Engine Indication/Crew Alerting System (EICAS) • Dual Primus II RM-855 Integrated

NAV(COM/Ident Radios w/VOR/ILS/MKR/ ADF/DME/VHF Comm and Enhanced Mode S Diversity Transponders (Dual RCZ-833 K and Dual RNZ-851) 8.33 kHz channel spacing and FM Immunity compliant • Dual Collins ALT-4000 Radio Altimeter • Thales IESI Standby Attitude Indicator • Collins HF-9031A HF Communication System • Single Coltech CSD-714 SELCAL • Dual Honeywell CD-820 CDU s • Honeywell EGPWS w/RAAS & Windshear Detection • Honeywell Digital Flight Data Recorder (25 Hrs) • QAR (Quick Access Recorder) • Honeywell Cockpit Voice Recorder (120 Min.,) • Honeywell DL-950 Data Loader • Artex 406 Hz Emergency Location Transmitter w/GPS • Emergency Vision Assurance System (EVAS) • MCS-6000 SATCOM (6 channel, 5 voice, 1 data) INTERIOR • 9 + 1 (crew rest seat) Certified Pax Original Interior for Take-off and Landings • FWD/RH Crew Rest area with 1 Rear Facing Seat • FWD/LH Full Galley • Jump Seat • FWD double Club with 4 Electrically Controlled Single Seats and Pull-Out Executive Tables • MID LH/RH Storage Cabinets • MID/LH 3-Place Divan [not certified for takeoffs/landings] • MID/RH 3-Place Divan EXTERIOR • Overall White w/Brown Stripe Design.

FAI rent-a-jet AG Flughafenstarbe 100 (Hangar 6) 90268 Nuremberg - Germany

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Tel: +49 (0) 911 36009 375 or +1 561 771 1322 Fax: +49 (0) 911 36009 5375 Email: JetSales@fai.ag www.rent-a-jet.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


BarePlanes WAS May13 23/04/2013 11:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

PRICE REDUCED...$2.175M!! 2003 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1046 N900GF 5494 4454

Engines LH 850 TSOH RH 850 TSOH Enrolled ESP Enrolled Proparts Enrolled Cescom Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS, • Dual 196B Comm with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 K • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 ELT • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • WX950 Stormscope

Interior Fire-blocked eight passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted lav seat for a ninth passenger. Left and Right executive tables in the center club. Exterior Matterhorn White with Las Vegas Gold, Seminole Red, and Nordic Grey stripes. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • 406 ELT • KHF950 Provision

Greg Bare Bare Planes. LLC

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 918 361 9035 Fax: + 44 (0) 1582 400098 Email: greg@bareplanes.com www. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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AirResource Astra May 23/04/2013 11:51 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1990 Astra 1125SP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

45 N916CG 5753 3251

• Specially equipped Astra SP features a Pro-Line 21 Avionics Suite with all the Options and APU • Spacious Stand-up Cabin w/Super Soundproofing • Enclosed Belted Lavatory for Privacy • Non Stop Anywhere in the Continental USA • Part of the Gulfstream Family Engines Honeywell TFE731-3C-200G - MSP GOLD Engine #1: 5651 TTSN, 2: 5644. APU: Honeywell GTCP36-150W - MSP TTSN: 790 Avionics Collins-IDS-3000 (Proline 21 Retrofit) with Upgraded Version 6 Software Dual Collins VHF-22D COMMS (8.33 Spacing) Dual Collins VIR-32 NAVS Dual Collins RTU-4210 Radio Control Heads Collins TCAS TTR-4000 w/Change 7 Collins APC-85 Autopilot Dual Collins Flight Director Dual Collins TDR-94D Enhanced Mode “S” EGPWS KGP-860 Dual Universal UNS-1EW FMS w/SCN 1000.X (WAAS) Dual Collins HF w/SELCAL Iridium SATCOM w/Dual Handsets

Dual Collins ADF Jepp View Electronics Charts Dual Collins DME (3) XM Recievers TWR-850 Radar w/Turbulence Detection Collins Radar Altimeter RVSM/RNP Fairchild GA 100 VCR UNS UL-701 Data-Link 406 ELT Standby Airspeed, Altimeter and Attitude Insts. Features Increased MTOW 24,650 lbs Single Point Refueling Iridium SATCOM w/Dual Handsets Pre-Wired with server installed for High Speed Internet Access Capability Removable Long Range Fuel Tanks Long Range 02 XM Receivers 13 Pax FAR 135 Approved Life Raft Aircraft Security Lock Kit Crew Intercom, Super Soundproofing NDH, Hangared Since New Interior Beautiful customized interior completed new in 2008 by Duncan Aviation. The Executive eight passenger layout features six single seats and a two-place forward divan. The belted Lavatory seat offers a 9th passenger seating option. Forward Refreshment Center, Rosenview LX Moving Map, upgraded Soundsystem, iPod Music/Movie Interface, Eight 110v Cabin Outlets and is Fireblocked.

AirResource Group P. O. Box 3874, Little Rock, AR 72203

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Exterior Customized paint scheme completed at Duncan Aviation in 2008 featuring a Medium Grey Base with Black, Gold and Red Trim. Maintenance Gulfstream CMP - Computerized Maintenance Tracking Program A Check completed June 2012 at Duncan Aviation Horizontal Stab Trim Actuator Overhaul Complete April 2013

Tel: +1 501 219 4690 E-mail: cheri@AirResourceGroup.com Website: www.AirResourceGroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AeroSmith Penny May 23/04/2013 11:52 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1337 N52MK 4504 2573

Airframe & Engines Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Engines: Mid-Life Inspection C/W at Rolls-Royce Canada: 17/Sep/2007 L/H Engine S/N: 16795 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 Cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life R/H Engine S/N: 16796 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life Honeywell GTCP 36-100 (G) APU S/N: P-741, on JSSI Avionics HAAP and Corporate Jet Support Maintenance Programs Standard Honeywell SPZ 8400 Cockpit Package w/NZ 2000 Navs Triple Honeywell HG1075 Inertial Reference Units Dual Honeywell FMS and Single Lasertrak Nav Display Collins Nav/Comm Package with Three Comm’s, w/Dual Collins RTU’s Collins TDR 94 Transponders with Eight Parameter Enhanced Surveillance SAT AFIS Equipped with Printer Magnastar & Honeywell SATCOM 6000, One Cockpit and Three Cabin Handsets G-Monitor Computer Heads-up Checklist Flight Data Recorder 2 Hour Voice Recorder

Features & Equipement Airshow Genesis Moving Map/Info Four External Video Cameras Dual Hi-Def/Blue Ray DVD Players Audio System with iPod Dock and Remote Control Game Port Connections and LAN Connections Throughout Eight Rosen Video Monitors; VCR/DVD/Camera/Game and Airshow Available Six Club Seat Rosen Monitors Updated to 6500 Series in March 2007 Interior The 13 passenger executive interior was designed for functionality and flexibility with three separate seating areas making it ideal for entertaining or conducting business. The aircraft is configured with a forward crew lav as well as an aft passenger lavatory. The forward cabin contains four single seats in a double-club configuration with two pull out writing tables and four 5.6 inch video monitors. Exterior Matterhorn White base with Super Jet Black underside, Coral, Cashmere and Gray striping. New April 2012 Maintenance 72 Month inspection done 2010

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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IBA December_Guardian Jet Chall 1076 oct 23/04/2013 11:58 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2005 Boeing BBJ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

34303 HB-JJA 34410 3649

Engines Engine Type & Model CFM56-7B27 No 1 Engine Serial Number 893466 No 1 Engine Hours Since New 34410 No 1 Engine Cycles Since New 3649 No 1 Engine Cycles to First Limiter 8051 No 2 Engine Serial Number 892480 No 2 Engine Hours Since New 34410 No 2 Engine Cycles Since New 3649 No 2 Engine Cycles to First Limiter 8051 APU APU Type & Model Honeywell GTCP131-9B APU Serial Number P-6927 APU Cycles Since New 8552 APU First limiter Due at 30,000 cycles Avionics 822-0299-001 ADF (DUAL) 2100-1020-00 326234 CVR 967-0212-002 DFDAU 2100-4043-00 DFDR 4081600-930 DEU (DUAL) 822-0329-001 DME (DUAL) 965-1690-052 EGPWS 176200-01-01 10-62225-004 FMC (DUAL) 822-0330-001 HF (DUAL) 822-0297-001 Marker Beacon (DUAL) 822-1293-002 TCAS (ACASII) 822-1047-003 VHF (TRIPLE)

622-5135-802 Weather Radar 822-1338-003 ATC (DUAL) 822-1338-003 ATC (DUAL) 241-280-056-014 EVM 822-1604-101 FCCA 822-1604-101 FCCB HG2050AC07 IRU (DUAL) 822-1152-002 MMR (DUAL) 0802070501 TRU #1 (TRIPLE) 285A1010-6 Yaw Damper #1 (DUAL) Inspection Maintenance Schedule and Status The aircraft and all major components and systems have been maintained in accordance with the PrivatAir Maintenance Programme. This programme is aligned with the Boeing MPD. The aircraft recently underwent a 6yr check during February and March 2012 The aircraft is planned to undergo a 24month check in May 2013 Interior Interior Configuration and Optional Equipment 44 Business Class Leather Seats – 60inch pitch Forward and Aft Galley 3 Lavatory, 1xForward, 2xAft 5 Attendant Seats, 2xForward, 3xAft Forward safety equipment stowage 7 Aux Fuel Tanks – current FH:FC ratio in excess of 9:1 Further fitment details available upon request to confirmed interested parties Remarks Weight Data Maximum Ramp Weight 77,791 Kg

International Bureau of Aviation IBA House #7, the Crescent, Leatherhead, Surrey, KT22 8DY, UK

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Maximum Take Off Weight 77,500 Kg Maximum Zero Fuel Weight 57,153 Kg Maximum Landing Weight 60,781 Kg Basic Empty Weight 43,116 Kg Fuel Capacity 30,608 Kg Landing Gear LH Main Landing Gear Cycles Since New 3649 RH Main Landing Gear Cycles Since New 3649 Landing Gear Cycles Since New 3649 Next Limiter (ALL) 10 year limit due 08/2015 Ben Jacques, Commercial Manager Tel: +44 (0) 1372 224488 Mobile: +44 (0) 7584 528 126 E-mail: ben.jacques@ibagroup.com www.ibagroup.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente Citation XLS May 23/04/2013 12:18 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

www.mentegroup.com AV I AT I O N

TECHNOLOGY

SOLUTIONS

2005 Cessna Citation XLS

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Precise Pulselites HF-1050 Provisions Av Visor Plus, LED wing, navigation and strobe lights Interior Six premium grey leather executive seats are complimented by a two-place side facing divan opposite entry door and belted seat opposite the lav. Burl cabinetry, grey headliner, grey sidewalls, neutral lower sidewalls and grey carpeting, extended galley with ample storage and ice cooler. Three 110-volt outlets. Exterior Matterhorn White with Starlight Silver, Ocean Blue Metallic and Columbia Blue Pearl striping. Inspections/Maintenance CESCOM-CAMP DOC 44 c/w May 2012

560-5575 N75XL 4,954.2 4,574

• FRESH ENGINES • DELIVERS ON ESP GOLD Engines PW545B: L/H: 4954.2 HRS TSN R/H: Completion in July 2013 APU Honeywell RE100XL 808.5 HRS TSN, 1789 CSN Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 Dual XS-852 Mode “S” Enhanced XPDR Honeywell Primus 1000 A/P Honeywell Primus 880-Color Radar

Dual Honeywell RCZ-833 Comms Heads Up Technologies Automated Pax PBS-250 Dual Honeywell NV-850 Navs TCAS II w/ change 7 Honeywell DF-850 ADF Honeywell Mark V TAWS A EGPWS with RAAS Dual Honeywell DM-850 DME AirCell ST-3100 Satcom Phone Dual UNS-1Esp 803 Software UniLink UL-701 COM Data Management System Features & Equipment RVSM Artex C406-2 ELT MSG-3 maintenance as of July 2008 8.33KHz & FM-Immunity RG-380E/44LA3 Lead Acid Concorde Battery L3 FA2100 CVR Cockpit Speaker Mute Switch

Mente Group, LLC 15301 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 1010 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

157


Cordner Aviation Group May 23/04/2013 12:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1986 BAe146-100CJ Registration: N114M Airframe TT: 17501.4 Landings: 13,580 Engines & APU ALF502-R5 and Garrett GTCP-150 Avionics ADF: Collins 51Y-7 ADI: Sperry Air Data Computer: Sundstrand ASI : Smiths ATC Mode S: Collins Attitude Heading system: Honeywell Audio: GEC Autopilot: Smiths Batteries x 2: Concorde sealed Lead Acid Clock: Davtron Cockpit Voice Recorder: Fairchild Digital Flight Guidance Computer: Smiths DME 1,2 an 3: Collins Flight Data Recorder: Plessey FMS: UNS-1D (2) Generator Control Unit x 3: BAE SYSTEMS EGPWS: Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Heading/Speed: HSI - Collins Integrated Drive Generators 3: BAE SYSTEMS ILS: Cat 2 Passenger address system: Collins Radio Altimeter: Collins 860F-4 Radio Selector Panel: Sigma Static Inverter: Marathon Power TCAS 2: Collins TTR-920 TRU: FR-HiTEMP LIMITED

VHF Comm: Collins 618M-5 VHF Nav: Collins 51RV-5B VOR/Marker: Collins VSI: TCAS/VSI - Collins Weather Radar: Collins VRT701X Exterior Overall clean white – with triple mid-level colour corporate coding – dual recognition/branding lights fitted at rear tail plane Interior By Innotech, Canada - a uniquely designed, luxuriously constructed configuration of the perfect size and atmosphere for up to 27 passengers in VIP standards of comfort and ambience. Four (4) sofa locations spread cleverly throughout the executive style cabin amongst eight (8) principal seating positions, dining areas and hi-low coffee/ card tables offering a very spacious yet intimate cabin environment. A unique wet bar and large cabin galley area allows for excellent opportunities to entertain larger parties. A large VVIP bathroom is located at the rear of the cabin. Soft leather extremely comfortable seating all around with a rich colour pallet for the cabin including fine wood bulkheads and tables/trims will appeal to the Executive and business requirements as well as family and friends in an inclusive style layout. The opportunity also exists for this aircraft to skip a technology generation for IFE and have the very latest mobile technology fitted to enhance the entertainment experience at a fraction of the previous technology costs

Cordner Aviation Group Stewart Cordner | President Finsterberger Strasse 12621, Berlin, Germany

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Interested parties to verify information/images which may change without notice

Tel: +49 (0) 174 388 8828 E-mail: sales@cordneraviationgroup.com www.cordneraviationgroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


SwanAvition WAS May13 23/04/2013 12:28 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2010 Hawker 4000 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

RC-44 TC-NRN 844.10 375

Engines Engine Model: PW308A LH SN#: PCE CE-0102 LH TSN: 844.10 hrs LH CSN: 375 RH SN#: PCE CE-0101 RH TSN: 844.10 hrs RH CSN: 375 Engines and APU enrolled on JSSI APU Model Honeywell GTCP 36-150(HH) SN#: P-138 TSN: 726 Hrs CSN: 375 AVIONICS Honeywell Primus EPIC COMM: Dual Honeywell 7510763-855 w/8.33 spacing NAV: Honeywell Primus EPIC FMS: Honeywell Primus EPIC AUTOPILOT: Honeywell Primus EPIC FLIGHT DIRECTOR: Honeywell Primus EPIC RADAR: Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar ADF: Honeywell Primus EPIC DME: Honeywell Primus EPIC RMI: Honeywell Primus EPIC FDR: L3 Communications Corp 2100 TRANSPONDER: Dual Mode S Honeywell RADIO ALTIMETER: Honeywell RT-300 TCAS: Honeywell TCAS 2000 CVR: SSCVR HF: Collins HF-9000 w/ SELCAL

TAWS: Honeywell EGPWS ELT: Artex Aircraft 453-5000 ADDITIONAL: Messier Dowty Landing Gear Systems BE Aerospace oxygen masks Monorail Sunvisors Aft Lav Smoke Dedector Paperless Cockpit Observer Audio and Oxygen Life Raft Iridium Satalite Phone Equipment JAR OPS 1 Compliant, Airshow 4000 w/Airshow Briefer System, Cabin Audio/ Video Entertainment System, Rockwell Collins 2710-1-1501 15" Monitor w/ LCD portable monitors, Long Range Oxygen Bottle (2 x 22 cuft), External Fuel Panel, Interior Nine Place Seating w/ 3 place divan, A Belted Lavatory Seat, Seats Covered with grazed mercury Garret leather, Woodwork – wengw high gloss w/chrome satin plating, Cockpit Observer Chair with dedicated storage, Forward cabin Pocket Doors, Portable Oxygen bottle in cabin, Exterior Fuselage is Snow White with Blue and Gold Stripes, Price - Make Offer

Europlane Aviation Services

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Contact: Mehmet Yuksel Hocaoglu Cell: +90 533 966 89 01 Email: myh@europlane.com.tr www.europlane.com.tr WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

159


Twinjet May 23/04/2013 12:30 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1991 Dassault Falcon 50 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

222 OE-HIT 4559:02 4067

APU Honeywell GTCP-36-100 Total Hours: 2646:1 Engines Honeywell TFE731-3-1C Engine 1: TET: 4528:08 Cycles: 4043 Engine 2: TET: 4528:08 Cycles: 4043 Engine 3: TET: 4482:08 Cycles: 4010 Avionics • EFIS: Rockwell Collins 86C • FMS: Triple Universal UNS-1F (upgrade 2008) • IRS: Dual IRU Honeywell • GPS: Dual GPS Universal • Transponder: Collins TDR-94D (enhanced) • ELT: Artex C406-N • TCAS: CTL-92T (upgrade 2008) • EGPWS: Honeywell EGPWS • DMS: Dual Collins DME-42 • ADF: Dual Collins CTF 62 • Radar: WXR-800 • Radios: Triple Collins VHF COM CTL-22C w/ 8.33 spacing Dual Collins VHF NAV VIR-32 Dual Collins HF HF-9030 Additional Highlights • Absolutely Superb Interior and Exterior • One Owner Since New • Immaculate Maintenance

• 3C Inspection performed August 2009 • 220V/50Hz Power Distribution Maintenance Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP Engines: JSSI Complete Plus (Engines) APU: JSSI Complete (APU) 4C inspection due August 2015 Interior Completely refurbished in 2008, this immaculate executive interior can accommodate 9 passengers, comprising 6 club seats with executive tables and a 3 place divan. 1 jump seat (certified for take off and landing) and 2 crew seats. The seats are covered in mid-tan grained leather, with a cream headliner, Sycamore Burl veneers, a mid-blue cord carpet and gold plating throughout. There is a stereo CD/DVD system with 1 aft monitor. The aft monitor also shows Airshow 4000. The forward galley offers cabinets on either side of the cabin, comprising coffee maker, mircrowave oven and sink with hot and cold water, storage compartments and a meal container box for 9 passengers. The forward lavatory compartment, opposite main entry door, is completely self-contained with privacy doors forward and aft. There are manual shades to all windows Exterior Complete New Paint April 2004, by Jet Aviation, Basel. Overall Matterhorn White with Navy Blue and Gold accent stripes

Twinjet Aircraft Sales (UK) Limited Essex House, Proctor Way, London Luton Airport , Beds LU2 9PE, UK

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Tel: +44 (0) 1582 733615 Fax: + 44 (0) 1582 400098 Email: jk@twinjetsales.com www.twinjet.co.uk Aircraft Index see Page 4


Premier Aviation May13 23/04/2013 12:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1986 Gulfstream III Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

483 N794ME 6700 3725

• HUSH KITS ALEADY FITTED • ENGINES DUE MID 2016 • 72 MT DUE END 2015 • 13 PASSENGERS • LOW TT 6600 HOURS • APU ON MSP • PART 135 READY • WORLDWIDE OPS Engines ROLLS ROYCE SPEY MK 511-8 Engine # 1 S/N: 11386 1030 SMOH Midlife due 5/1216 Engine # 2 S/N: 11387 1030 SMOH -

Hangared in KPTK (Pontiac Michigan)

Midlife due 5/1216 Avionics Sperry 5 tube EFIS Dual Collins VIR-32 Nav Dual Collins DME-42 DME Sperry WR-800 Radar Triple Honeywell LaserNav 8.33 Khz/FM Immunity Fairchild A-100 CVR Dual Collins HF Triple Collins VHF-21B Comm Dual Collins ADF-60 Features Airshow 400 Honeywell Unilink System Stage III Hush Kits Sony VCR Nordskog Convection oven

Braun Coffee Maker APU on Honeywell MSP Satellite modem and AC power for PC’s TT3000 Universal Aero Worldwide Satcom 12 Audio International Seat Switch Panels Interior Jump seat. 5 new Erda Single Cabin Seats in cappuccino. Two Erda Double Club Seats and a 4-place Erda Divan. Cream leather headliner and window panels. Ulta Suede Sand Bulkheads. Custom wool carpets in extravagant camel and blue. New richly detailed high gloss teak woodwork. Matte finished platinum hardware. Completely refurbished cockpit in black. Airshow 400 with 20” and 14” flat-screen monitors in bulkhead fore and aft with Lexicon Remote Controller. Trash compactor Exterior Aircraft exterior is Snow White with Navy Blue and Red Velvet Stripe. Matterhorn White Wheel Wells

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2008 Hawker 900XP Serial Number: Airframe TT:

HA-0072 1070

The aircraft may be viewed in Warsaw Poland where it is based and hangared. One private owner flown by the same three pilots since new, and never chartered, the aircraft has no damage history. All base maintenance exclusively carried out by Jet Aviation, Zurich. EU Ops, RVSM and MNPS compliant. AFIS System, Paperless Cockpit FSU System w/dual EFB and Second File Server for redundancy, Cockpit Power Outlet, Additional Storage Drawers under each Club seat (4), 115 VAC Power, Drop down Armrests on all individual seats, Long Range Oxygen, Belted Lavatory Seat, 6-person Liferaft, AirCell ST3100 iridium phone w/ cordless cockpit & cabin handsets, Enhanced Mode S diversity.

Engines Honeywell TFE 731-50R engines rated 4,660 lbs. thrust each. DEEC - Digital Electronic Engine Controller with engine condition trend monitoring (ECTM). Automatic Power Reserve (APR). Note, NEVER exercised! Thrust reversers. Left Engine: Serial Number 122247 TTSN 850 hrs Cycles 651 Right Engine: Serial Number 122248 TTSN 850 hrs Cycles 651 Auxillary Honeywell 36-150[W] APU (approved for in-flight operation up to 30,000 feet) Serial Number P 1090 TTSN TBC Avionics Collins Pro Line 21 Flight Display System with two AFD3010 adaptive flight displays (pilot’s and copilot’s PFD)

Premier Aviation Weston Airport, Leixlip, Co. Kildare, Ireland

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

and two graphical AFD-3010E adaptive flight displays (pilot’s and copilot’s MFD). Pilot’s MFD incorporates an engine indicating (EI) system. Dual Collins VHF-4000 digital CNS radio transceiver with 8.33 KHz spacing Collins HF-9000 high frequency transceiver. Coltech Selcal Collins NAV-4000 VOR/LOC/GLS/ ADF/marker beacon receiver Interior The cabin is configured with seating for 8 passengers with a forward double club arrangement, a rear port side three place divan and single seat opposite. The belted rear lavatory, plus additional fold away crew seat provides a total seating capacity of three crew plus nine pax

Tel: +372 5993 6888 Mob: +353 868 298626 E-mail: AlanNee@premieraviation.ie

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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CAI Socata TBM 850 April 23/04/2013 12:40 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Daher Socata TBM 850 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

351 N351CK 725

• Will be delivered with: • Fresh Annual Inspection • Propeller Overhauled • On Long Life Gear Program • Landing Gear Actuators Overhauled Engine Pratt & Whitney PT6A-66D (3,000 Hr. TBO) 725 TTSN Propeller Hartzell 4-Bladed. 725 TTSN Avionics Garmin/King NAV/COMM: Dual Garmin GNS-530s w/WAAS AP/FD: King KFC-325 w/altitude preselect XPNDR: Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 ALTIMETER: Dual AM 250 Encoding (RVSM) DME: King KN-63 w/output to EHSI R/ALT: King KRA-405B AUDIO: Garmin GMA-340 EFIS: King EFS-40 TWO-TUBE GPS: Dual Garmin GNS-530s w/WAAS RADAR: King RDR-2000 displayed on GMX-200 MFD: Garmin GMX-200 w/Chartview TAS/TAWS: King KMH-880 displays on GMX-200 S/SCOPE: WX-500 displayed on GMX-200 Wx: Garmin GDL-69A XM Wx/Radio

Features RVSM Data Package – Certified to FL 310 Advanced Position and Traffic Package Electric pitch and rudder trims on co-pilot yoke Pulse light anti-collision system Shadin ETM 700 Engine Monitor Full Co-Pilot Instruments Freon Air Conditioning Jeppesen Chart view - Electronic Approach Charts Gaseous oxygen system XM Satellite Entertainment Package Known Icing Co-pilot side map light & approach plate holder Interior Platinum Edition Six Leather Chairs in Beige Leather Adjustable backrests & Folding Armrests Front and rear 24V DC power outlets Upper cabin panels in ultra-suede Lower cabin panels in in leather Wool carpeting Individual fresh-air vents & reading lights Pilot and Co-pilot sunvisors Bose X ship-powered headset jacks Baggage compartment behind aft seats 220 lbs. Executive Writing Table and Storage Cabinet Exterior Overall White Over Platinum Bottom with Burgundy and Metallic Gold Accent Stripes Maintenance Annual Inspection Complied with March 2012 by Image Air

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

162

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Controls Dual flight controls Electrical pitch and rudder trims on pilot control wheel Elevator, rudder, and aileronelectric trim Electrical pre-select flaps with integrated asymmetry detection system

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Welsch Av May 23/04/2013 12:53 Page 1

For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

Gulfstream III S/N 450

21st Century Primus EPIC glass cockpit, Stage III hush kits, one of the lowest total time GIII's on the market, beautiful refurbished interior 2012, Gulfstream IV features and benefits at a Gulfstream III price, worldwide transcontinental operations equipped, GCMP, 72 month inspection accomplished July 2012, excellent records.

Falcon 50 S/N 138

State-of-the-art flight deck with Collins Proline 21 FDS, JSSI engine program 100%, -3D engines, owner financing to qualified buyers, CAMP maintenance tracking program, dual Collins FMS 6100, Laseref V, 8.33 comms, FM immunity, MNPS, RNP 5/10, EGPWS. Owner will consider trading for a Falcon 900B, Falcon 900C or Falcon 900EX.

Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

New York

Washington DC

Texas

Georgia


P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:01 Page 3

Marketplace Dassault Falcon 7X Price:

Please call

Year:

2009

S/N:

52

Reg: TTAF:

1200

Location: Switzerland

Boeing 737 500 VIP

Low Time Falcon 7x for sale - One Owner - Over 3m USD of Options. Go for nothing less than the fighter-like-feel of this Fly-by-Wire Tri Jet! One Owner, No Dammage History, Number of Seats 14, Completed in Little Rock, Custom Rare Wood Elm Burl, Specific Marquetry Inlay in Console Tables, Metal Inlays plated with 24 K Polished Gold, Forward Double Club, Mid Cabin Double Club, and 2 Aft electrically operated Three-place Divans, Light Beige Interior.

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

European Skybus Ltd. Price:

Please call

Year:

1995

S/N:

27425

Reg:

N463AC

TTAF:

31,908

Location: United Kingdom

Gulfstream IIB

Tel: +377 99 99 49 13 Email: jlc@rigmora.com

Jean-Louis

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2011 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1995 example is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions. The aft section of the cabin is configured with a further 24 forward facing lie flat business class seats. Contact: Stefan Kondak

Candler & Associates Inc. Price: SHORT TERM LEASE Year:

1974

S/N:

180

Reg:

N180AR

TTAF:

14,200

Location: USA, TX

Cessna Citation Bravo

AvionMar Price:

$1,700,000 USD

Year:

1999

S/N:

550-0884

Reg:

D-CSWM

TTAF:

2363

Tel: +1 (210) 341 3395 Email: candlerbus@sbcglobal.net

We recently purchased an excellent and well maintained Gulfstream GIIB aircraft and are making it available for a short-term (approx. 30 month) lease through December 31, 2015, when U.S. Stage 3 noise regulations take effect. The aircraft was owned for 20 years by Mobil Oil and by a private individual here in San Antonio for the past 10 yrs. Please let me know if your organization (or any others you know) have an interest in leasing this fine Gulfstream GIIB aircraft. SHORT TERM LEASE.

Tel: +43 (0) 660 655 6370 Email: erich.engelbrecht@avionmar.com RVSM compliant and certified, EU-OPS certified and operated, Steep approach supplement. Please call for details +43 (0)660 655 6370

Location: Germany

Cessna Citation XLS

AvionMar Price:

$6.4M USD

Year:

2008

S/N:

560-5756

Reg:

OE-GSP

TTAF:

2260

Tel: +43 (0) 660 655 6370 Email: erich.engelbrecht@avionmar.com 1 owner, 1 operator since new. Airframe on ProParts, Engines & APU on JSSI Complete. 8+1 seats. Many options including oven and Espresso maker. Financing option possible in Europe. Please call for details +43 (0) 660 655 6370

Location: Austria

164

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:02 Page 4

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,375,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

6615.3

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,375,000 or consider trades for Citation CJ1, CJ2, or Bell 212, 412 or 407.

Location: USA

BELL 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

Reg: TTAF:

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

1700

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’.Fresh annual / Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Seven Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

Call for details

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

Location: USA

Bombardier Challenger 605

Evgeny Tikhomirov Price:

US$ 19,500,000

Year:

2011

S/N:

5838

Reg:

OE-IDV

TTAF:

86

Location: Austria

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +43 (0)676 887 00845 Email: busjetsale@gmail.com AVIONICS: Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 with four 10” x 12” LCD screens and integrated menu control. EFIS/IECAS with synoptic. Dual FMS 6000 with coupled lateral and vertical nav and performance calculation. Integrated Flight Information System (IFIS). 3D Map and Long Range Cruise. Lightning Detection System (LDS). Enhanced Maps on MFD. 3rd Inertial Reference System. 2nd Radio Altimeter. Datalink with Iridium interface. 24 month works have been completed

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

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P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:05 Page 5

Marketplace Gulfstream G550

L SO

D

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

SOLD

Year:

2004

S/N:

5033

Reg:

VP-BNR

TTAF:

1448

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Only 1448 hours, One owner since new, Certification Foxtrot "Basic" System upgrade, Recent 12,24 & 96 Month Inspections, 72 Month Inspection c/w August 2010, 18 passenger custom designer interior in like new condition

Location: USA

Learjet 60XR

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

2008

S/N:

338

Reg:

TBD

TTAF:

218

Location: USA

Bombardier/Challenger 601-3A/ER

The Learjet 60XR easily outpaces the competition in timeto-climb performance and operating altitude without compromising a class-leading low operating cost. Avionics: Collins Pro Line 21 IFCS; Autopilot: Flight Director Collins FGC-3000 IFCS Rockwell Collins TWR-850 RADAR Enhanced Weather Radar. Factory aircraft engine & components warranties. Interoir seven Passengers: Executive floor plan D; Airshow 4000 w/Network package, cabin video system. 15.1" Forward/Aft Video Monitors.

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

1992

S/N:

5121

Reg:

N328AM

TTAF:

9,025

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

A "no excuses" airplane. With all major inspections just accomplished. Fresh 6/12/24/60 /120 & 240 Month inspection c/w in 2011. Fresh HSI on left engine. Fresh gear overhaul and interior refurbishment

Location: USA

Socata TBM 850

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

US$ 1,850,000

Year:

2006

S/N:

360

Reg:

N874CA

TTAF:

1,646

Location: USA

Bombardier/Challenger 604

US$ 11,200,000

Year:

2001

S/N:

5520

Reg:

VP-CBR

TTAF:

2697

Location: U.A.E

166

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

Jet speeds with single engine turboprop economy. That is what you get with this superbly maintained TBM 850. Climb to 31,000 in 5 minutes and fly 1585 NM in economy cruise. Slip into 2100 foot strips. The panel and maintenance history of this aircraft is proof of exceptional pride of ownership. The panel includes the IHAS 8000 TCAS/TAWS and the WX500 stormscope and RDR Radar displayed on the KMD 850 MFD for utmost safety and comfort. Maintenance has been performed by the book and only by factory authorized technicians. Fresh Annual, Hot Section and Prop Overhaul. Long Life Gear Maintenance Program.

Mohammed Hussein Price:

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Tel: +96 894 194 791 Email: outtofly2@aol.com

A very rare low time 2001 Chalenger 604 maintained in prestige condition with a brand new Honeywell 150 APU as well as a fresh Repaint in August 2012 and a new interior retrofit in 2011. Precision Plus Upgrade, APU on MSN, FDR, CVR, Dual FMS, Safeflight Auto Throttle, Satcom, Air Show, CD/DVD players, Track and Swivel Jump Seat, 115 and 220 VAC power sources and a 10 passenger confirguration with a foward full service galley-TIA Hi-Temp Oven, TIA Microwave Oven, Coffee maker. Great Deal

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:04 Page 6

Marketplace Cessna Citation II550

Nevada Hangar 1 Price:

Please call

Year:

1980

S/N:

0192

Reg:

N192DW

TTAF:

10196

Tel: +1 (702) 236 9113 Email: ernest@barela.lvcoxmail.com Owner adjusting fleet and this extremely well maintained aircraft will be sold "as-is" on May 1, 2013 in a private sale in Las Vegas, Nevada. New carpet and upholstery in 2009. New exterior paint in 2011. New tires and brakes in 2012. All maintenance records on Cessna Cescom system. Please call 702.236.9113 for details.

Location: USA, NV

BAS GmbH

Challenger 300 Price:

US$ 10.800.000

Year:

07/2004

S/N:

20004

Reg:

D-BFJE

TTAF:

5450

Tel: +49 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com New Paint and Interior Dec 12, 96 mth. Done Dec. 12; Airframe and Engines on MSP and Smart Plus; No Damage History; only one Owner since new; CVR/FDR; SATCOM, Airshow with DVD; Microwave, Coffee-maker; 8 Pax Club Seat config; belted Toilet Seat; CAT II; MNPS; In and Out like new

Location: Germany

Premier 1A

Oleg Shulgin Price:

Make offer

Year:

2007

S/N:

RB-189

Reg:

VP-CFW

TTAF:

1555

Tel: +79 1666 96642 Email: aeroresume@gmail.com EU Ops compliant, RVSM certified, CAMP, Collins Pro Line 21, Nose and tail baggage compartments. Exterior White with Toreador Red, Aztec Yellow, Bristol Blue stripes. Interior: Six passenger Platinum leather seats with retractable headrests and armrests. Showcase Mahogany decorative laminates, Pebble Frieze carpeting, Grey Lustreheadliners. Make offers.

Location: Germany

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan

Air Alliance Price:

Call

Year:

2008

S/N:

208B2054

Reg:

D-FIMI

TTAF:

505

Location: Germany

Pilatus PC12/45

Lions Air Ltd. Price:

Make offer

Year:

2000

S/N:

349

Reg:

HB-FOQ

TTAF:

3000

Tel: +49 (0) 2736-4428-0 Email: info@air-alliance.de Engine: Pratt & Whitney PT6A-114A. 505hr. Avionics: Standard Garmin G1000 System incl.: Garmin GWX 4 Color Digital Wx Radar, TAWS- B GARMIN, Traffic Advisory System, Garmin 430 NAV/COM/GPS w. WAAS, Bendix/King KN 62 A DME, Bendix/King KHF 1050 HF-Transceiver, Bendix/King KR 87 ADF, Garmin GI 106A Indicator. Interior: Rear Bench. 4-Place Intercom - crew plus 2 passengers Options: Air Cond., Oxygen System, Anti Icing System, 300 amp Starter/Gen., Cargo-Pod.

Tel: +41 (0) 44 828 88 88 Email: r.schmid@lionsairgroup.com Very well equipped aircraft. Maintained by Pilatus Aircraft or there Service Centres and always flown by professional pilots. Managed under EASA CAMO organisation. One owner. Located Zurich International Airport, LSZH.

Location: Zurich

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

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P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:06 Page 7

Marketplace

Eurocopter AS 355F-2

EIDISEIS NTOT COM SA Price:

Please call

Year:

2000

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

D-IHMV

TTAF:

2220

The helicopter is well equiped and is used for VFR PAX transport, and ENG missions in Greece.NO accident history. Always hangared and just completed 12y inspection. It is offered with valid C of A and is immediately available. REM TIME OF MAIN COMPONENTS,MR Blades: 16420/17733/17638, STARFLEX: 338, BEVEL RED Gear: 778, Combined GB: 778, Epicyclic: 778, TRGB: 778, TR Blades:1778,MR Servo Control:778/778/2896, TR Servo Control: 1153, ENGINE No I: HSI 1102, Overhaul 1277 ENGINE No II: HSI 438, Overhaul 1277.

Location: Greece

Eurocopter AS 350B-3

Tel: +64 (0) 274 888 431 Email: davepeel@me.com

David Peel Price:

Please call

Year:

1999

S/N:

3178

Reg:

ZK-IDQ

TTAF:

1581

All sensible offers will be considered so please tell us what it is worth in the current market , Avionics: 2x KING KY196A, KING KN53, KING KR87 ADF, KING KLN89 GPS, GARMIN KMA 24 / NAT AA80, CELLPHONE Bluetooth Kit, ELT KANNAD 406 AF-H, KING KT76A Transponder, Optional listing: Float FP (FP installed by ECF), Aero Aire Airconditioning (Original ECF).

Location: New Zealand

Price:

Please Call

Year:

1985

S/N:

7301

Reg:

I-CRMD

TTAF: Location: United Kingdom

Cessna Citation XLS

Tel: +44 (0) 207 078 9660 Email: chrismartin@elitejet.co.uk

EliteJet Private Jets

Agusta 109A MKII

WITH ZERO HOUR OVERHAULED ENGINES New interior, New VIP paint scheme (blue with silver stripes), Additional fuel tank, Artificial horizon VHFCOM/NAV/FM, Moving Terrain GARMIN Radar meteo, Transponder Vertical gyro, Autopilot Radar altimeter, VHF-COM/NAV/FM Weather Radar. Equipment list: Dual control, floats fixed parts, Engine hour meter, All weather covers, Rotor brake.

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Price:

Please Call

Year:

2007

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

EU-Reg

TTAF:

3,041

Tel: +30 (0) 210 6207069 Email: cptpap@otenet.gr

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100/145 Email: info@beechcraft.de

EU Reg, EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German commerc. certif., CAMO+, fresh HSI 08/2012!

Location: Europe

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 168

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P164-169 MB 24/04/2013 12:07 Page 8

Not just a tug.

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Business Jets, Turboprops and Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com

It’s a

8700 Series

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and lots more... 800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), May 2013, Vol 17, Issue No 5 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 15th May 2013 Advertiser’s Index 1st Source Bank ........................................................95 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................170 Aero Air ......................................................................150 AeroExpo Corporate ...............................................119 AeroSmith/Penny.....................................................155 AIC Title Services.......................................................97 Air Resource Group................................................154 Albinati Aeronautics .......................................140-141 AMSTAT .....................................................................121 Aradian Aviation .......................................................103 Avjet Corporation.................................................34-35 Avpro ......................................................................21-25 Bare Planes...............................................................153 Bell Aviation...........................................................56-57 Bloomer deVere ..........................................................73 Bombardier..................................................................53 Boutsen Aviation ........................................................85 Central Business Jets .............................................171 Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................67 Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................59 Chuck Collins ...........................................................151 Conklin & de Decker ...............................................117 Cordner Aviation group..........................................158 Corporate Aircraft Photography................................4 Corporate AirSearch Int’l .................................91,162 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Corporate Concepts...........................................48-49 Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3 Dubai Airshow ..........................................................125 Duncan Aviation..........................................................51 Eagle Aviation..............................................................31 EBACE .........................................................................70 EMBRAER Pre-Flown ........................................32-33 Europlane Aviation Services .................................159 ExecuJet Aviation........................................................45 FAI rent-a-jet..............................................................152 Florida Jets .......................................................142-143 Freestream Aircraft USA ....................................10-17 Gamit ............................................................................82 General Aviation Services ........................................61 Gulfstream Pre-Owned ......................................64-65 HELI UK.....................................................................135 Heliasset.com ...........................................................115 IBA-Int’l Bureau of Aviation ...................................156 Inada .............................................................................39 Intellijet International .................................................6-7 J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales .........1(FC), 28-29 Jet Affiliates International ..........................................37 Jet Support Services (JSSI).......................................5 JetBlack Aviation ......................................................101

www.AvBuyer.com

JetBrokers..............................................................54-55 Jetcraft Corporation...........................46-47, 172(BC) Jeteffect ........................................................................69 JETNET ......................................................................107 John Hopkinson & Associates ........................43,139 Leading Edge ..............................................................79 Lektro .........................................................................169 Mente Group.............................................................157 NBAA Corporate .....................................................131 NBAA Regional Forums .........................................127 Northern Air......................................................148-149 OGARAJETS........................................................18-19 Par Avion................................................................62-63 Premier Aviation .......................................................161 Rolls-Royce .................................................................75 Southern Cross Aviation ..........................................99 Starbase ...........................................................146-147 Tempus Jets ..........................................................40-41 The Jet Collection ......................................................71 Twinjet Aircraft Dales (UK) ....................................160 Universal Avionics ...................................................109 VREF Aircraft Values ...................................................4 Welsch Aviation........................................................163 Wentworth & Affiliates ...................................144-145 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................83 WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – May 2013

169


21st Century December 2010

17/11/10

16:47

Page 1

Tri-Jets Range Map 7X=5950nm 900EX=4500nm 900DX=4100nm 50EX=3267nm

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet in the sky; and the Federal Aviation Administration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. Aircraft safety is determined by reliability and redundancy. In the event of an engine failure a reduction of climb rate, speed and altitude occur. Critical engine-driven systems may be compromised including the hydraulic, electrical and bleed-air systems which draw their power from the aircraft’s engines. The FAA emphasizes redundancy more than the number of engines for flight safety over water; although there is a relationship between the two. Very High levels of safety are achieved with the Tri-Jets; the 900 for example has two hydraulic systems that are powered by hydraulic power from four sources; three engine-driven hydraulic pumps plus a standby pump powered electrically. The left-hand and right-hand engines provide power for the right hydraulic system; and the center engine supplies power for the right hydraulic system with backup from the standby pump. One system can supply enough hydraulic power to operate the aircraft and land safely if a system fails. An erroneous conclusion is that Tri-Jets cost more to operate than competitive twin-jets. Many long-range twin-jets use excessively large engines and supporting structure. Tri-Jets with their effective configuration, utilize smaller more fuel efficient engines. With fuel efficient engines, Tri-Jets carry less fuel than twin-jets. This results in a reduction of weight and operating costs. Smaller engines, the Tri-Jets aerodynamic improvement and lower operating weight culminates in an aircraft that burns less fuel than many heavier twin-jets. Tri-Jets have earned a stellar reputation among owners and operators; and usually have higher resale values than the competition.

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ March_CBJ November06 18/02/2013 16:50 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

ial g t i In erin f Of

ial g t i In erin f Of

CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5577

CHALLENGER 601w/3A ENGINES SN/3024

Aircraft at Duncan Aviation Now for its 96-Month Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, 2000 Hours TT, On Smart Parts Plus and MSP Gold Engine Programs, Spectacular Terence Disdale Designed 10 Place Interior

Less than 12-months Since Wallet Numbing 30-Year Heavy Check; JSSI Engines w/ less than 100 Hours Since Mid-Life, Less than 100 Hours on -150 APU, Landing Gear Overhauled, New Paint, Refurbished 12 Place Interior including Airshow 4000 System, EFIS, LaserRef’s, etc

2009 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20264

FALCON 900B SN/65

1185 TT, Iridium SAT Phone w/ Swift Broadband, MSP GOLD, 2nd IFIS FSU (Paperless Cockpit), Sliding cabin/galley Pocket Door, Deluxe Galley w/ sink, Maintained to Part 135 Standards

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, MSP Gold Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

al De ing nd Pe

al De ing nd Pe

FALCON 900B SN/60

FALCON 50 RETROFITTED TO FALCON 50EX (SB280) S/N 171

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, JSSI Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

MSP Gold on -40 Engines, Completely New Proline IV Avionics Package, 4C Heavy Check and Landing Gear OH 09/10

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5248

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Power Advantage Engine Program, w/ Fresh Engine Overhauls, Pro-Parts Airframe Program and on Cescom Since New; Dual Universal UNS-1ESP FMS; Aircraft can be delivered anywhere in the world

3597.9 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod


This being the aviation industry, you’d think more companies would share our

51,000 foot view.

Up here, the air and the competition are rare. Our birds-eye view of the aircraft brokerage market comes from our unmatched combination of over 50 years’ experience and a large, global network of partners and customers. That means you have more buy, sell and trade options. put a tailwind on your transaction. Call us and see. You’ll love the view. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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FEATURED INVENTORY

2010 Challenger 605 - SN 5821

Airframe/Engines/APU Enrolled on Programs EU OPS1 Compliant - FAR 91/135 Capable

2010 Global XRS - SN 9185

2,450 Hours - Fully Programmed Freshly out of Inspections at Bombardier (FLL)

WAS_51,000ft_04-30-13.indd 1

1988 gulfstream iv - SN 1054

ASC-190 Gross Weight Increase Dunlop Wheels & Brakes Mod / Hydro Mech. Braking 1988 Airbus A310-304 2005 Challenger 604 2010 Challenger 605 2007 Challenger 850ER 1993 Citation VI 2005 Citation X 2006 Citation XLS 2009 Falcon 2000LX 2010 Falcon 7X 2013 Falcon 7X 1987 Falcon 900B

2005 Global 5000 2014 Global 6000 2002 Global Express 2005 Global Express 2010 Global XRS 1997 Gulfstream GIVSP 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 1988 Gulfstream IV 2008 Hawker 750 2008 Hawker 900XP

2002 Gulfstream V - SN 674

Airframe on PlaneParts; APU on MSP Engine On Condition - 16 Pax Forward Galley

2008 HAWKER 900XP - SN HA-0036

392 Hours Total Time - Lowest Available One Owner - Exceptional Value - Prime Condition

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Better perspective on market trends. And worldwide connections that

4/17/13 9:58 AM

World Aircraft Sales Magazine May 2013  

World Aircraft Sales Magazine May 2013 Issue

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