Page 1

WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

January 2012

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The Sales Transaction Dissected • Turboprop Review (Part 2) Business Aviation and the Boardroom: pages 44 - 75


A PRE-OWNED FALCON: FOR US, IT’S NOT A SALE. IT’S A LONG-TERM COMMITMENT. When you’re looking for a pre-owned Falcon, you don’t want a transaction. You want a relationship. You want people with deep Falcon experience and a personal commitment to helping you make your best choice. Who work with you at every step – from finding your specifications to smoothing your final purchase – and even after. Because, just as there is nothing more comfortable than a Falcon, there should be no one more comfortable than a Falcon customer.

2001 Falcon 2000

s/n 133 • 5033 h. total time 10 passengers conf • EU-OPS 1 compliant • Eng on CSP, APU on MSP • Aero I Sat Com Pristine condition

2005 Falcon 2000EX EASy

s/n 063 • 2073 h. total time C check, Winglets installation and new paint in process • EU-OPS 1 compliant • Swift 64 Sat Com • Eng on JSSI, APU under MSP


2006 Falcon 2000EX EASy

s/n 089 • 1000 h. total time One owner since new, corporate operation. Pristine condition HUD, AERO H+ SAT COM, 3 FMS, 3 IRS, 3 VHF, EASA certified

1993 Falcon 900B

s/n 120 • 7887 h. total time 15 passengers • EU-OPS 1 compliant • C check, paint and complete Interior Refurb in 2011 • Eng and APU on MSP, Fwd & Aft lav

1997 Falcon 900EX

s/n 017 • 8114 h. total time Two owners since new 12 passengers • Fwd & Aft lav 2 C check, landing overhaul Paint & interior refurbishment in 2010

2004 Falcon 900EX EASy s/n 128 • 3686 h. total time One owner since new • JAR-OPS 1 14 passengers • Fwd & Aft lav C check complied in 2010

2010 Falcon 900EX EASy

s/n 232 • 2656 h. total time 14 passengers • EU-OPS 1 • Falcon Care, HUD, EFVS • Satcom TV, Fwd & Aft lav

2007 Falcon 7X

s/n 003 • 1125 h. total time JAR-OPS 1 compliant 14 passengers • Under Falcon Care • HUD, Engines & APU under • ESP/MSP gold

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556


Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS ACJ . . . . . . . . . . . 148,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 19, 33, 53, 69, Super 27-100 REW. .53, Super 27-200 REW. .53, Super 727-100 . 53, Super 727-100-REW. .10, Super 727-200 . 69, 737-200VIP . . . . 69, 737-300 VIP . . . . 140, 737-500 VIP . . . . 140, 757-200 . . . . . . . 53, 757-200ER . . . . . 89, MD 87 . . . . . . . . 53, MD 87VIP . . . . . 69,

BOMBARDIER CRJ 100SE . . . . 148, CRJ 200 . . . . . . 148, Global 5000 . . . . 10, 69, 148, Global Express . 10, 141, 148, Global Express XRS. 7, 17, 23,

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16, 77, 103, 148, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 601 . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 109, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 13, 16, 23, 57, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 140, 601-3A/ER. . . . . 79, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 79, 111, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16, 21, 28, 65, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 77, 78, 148, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69, 103, 148, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 65,

Learjet 25B . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 25D . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 95, 103, 109, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 37, 65, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 95,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 27, 42, 109, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 59, 148, 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 37, 103, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 109, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 13, 37, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 37, 93, 95, 109, 136,

CESSNA Citation ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 27, 111, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 28, 29, 36, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 59, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 27, 83, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 28, 29, 31, 59, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 35, 51, 59, 109, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132, 148, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 16, 23, 27, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 109, 135, 141, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 24, 148, 500 Eagle. . . . . . 24, CJ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 28, 29, 31, 59, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 147, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 59, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 24, 27, 28, 29, 43, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 137, Encore . . . . . . . . 27, 103, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 16, 24, 148, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 109, 111, Mustang . . . . . . . 27, 63, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 83, Sovereign. . . . . . 31, 65, 69, 109, 138, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 16, 24, 31, 35, 53,

Grand Caravan 208B . . . . . . . . . . 29,

DORNIER Dornier 328 . . . . 143,

EMBRAER ERJ 135 . . . . . . . 89, ERJ 145 . . . . . . . 89, Legacy 600 . . . . 27, 28, 63, 65, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, Phenom 100 . . . 99, 109, 141, Phenom 300 . . . 42, 69,

AIRCRAFT

IN THIS ISSUE PAGE

FAIRCHILD Merlin IIIB . . . . . 27,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 57, 83, 133, 146, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147, 148, 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 20Cargo . . . . . . . 28, 20F-5BR . . . . . . . 28, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 17, 33, 42, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 146, 148, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 23, 63, 78, 146, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 146, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 140, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 31, 109, 146, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 77, 146, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 11, 31, 146, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 3, 65, 132, 146, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 2, 17, 65, 103, 2000EX EASy . . 2, 3, 11, 16, 147, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 11,

GULFSTREAM IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 69, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 23, 28, 33, 57, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 23, 57, 78, 89, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93, 109, 139, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 17, 39, 57, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 89, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 17, 35, 43, 83, 109, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 10, 18, 20, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 7, 18, 69, 103, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130, 131, 141, 148,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400A . . . . . . . . . . 13, 24, 57, 59, 148, Premier 1 . . . . . . 43, Premier 1A. . . . . 13, 29, 31, 109,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 28, 36, 93, 103, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143, B100 . . . . . . . . . . 28, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 25, 27, 31, 99,

LITHIUM P WER Welcome to the Future Aerolithe Cirrus France www.aerolithe.fr Air & Ground Ltd. UK www.airandground.com Air Part Supply Ltd. UK www.airpart.co.uk

www.STARTPAC.com 4

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 143, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 31, 143, E90 . . . . . . . . . . . 25, F90 . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 28, 31, 144,

Hawker 125-EMS . . . . . . 69, 600A . . . . . . . . . . 111, 800 . . . . . . . . . . . 134, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 99, 111, 142, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 65, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 13, 17, 28, 29, 109, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 43, 59, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 95, 147, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 13,

IAI Astra Classic . . . 83, Astra SP . . . . . . . 147, Astra SPX. . . . . . 37, 83, 136, Westwind I . . . . . 42, 57, Westwind II . . . . 42,

MITSUBISHI MU-2K . . . . . . . . 91, MU2-K Dash 10 91, MU-2 Marquise . 91, MU-2 Solitaire. . 91,

PIAGGIO Avanti II . . . . . . . 31, P180 Avanti . . . 109,

PILATUS PC12 . . . . . . . . . . 25, 109,

PIPER Meridian . . . . . . . 25, Saratoga. . . . . . . 59,

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 59,

SOCATA TBM 700A . . . . . 99, TBM 700B . . . . . 28, 99, TBM 700C1 . . . . 28, TBM 850. . . . . . . 109,


• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

01.12

AIRCRAFT

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND AW 109C . . . . . . 31, AW Grand . . . . . . 31, AW 109E Power 63, 144, AW139 . . . . . . . . 77,

PAGE

EC130B4 . . . . . . 63, EC 135T1 . . . . . . 5, 69, EC T135T2+ . . . 31,

SIKORSKY

BELL

S-76A++. . . . . . . 69, S-76B . . . . . . . . . 69, 147, 148, S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 79, S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 144,

206L1 . . . . . . . . . 43, 206L3 . . . . . . . . . 63, 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 142, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 142, 412EMS . . . . . . . 142,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 69, AS 355 N . . . . . . 31, EC 120B . . . . . . . 31, 144,

Aircraft Engine /Support . 55, Aircraft Perf & Specs. . . . . 91, 111, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 61, 71, 85, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 111, Mods-Parts-Spares . . . . . . 4, 105,

The Global Aircraft Market Online

1998 Eurocopter EC135 T1 Police role equipped with FLIR camera, thermal imaging capability and microwave downlink. Equipped with HEMS floor and could be reconfigured if required. Fully maintained by Eurocopter from new, Fresh 800hr check. Can be supplied with new EASA Annual Review Certificate or Export C of A. For further deatils please contact Mark Wooller.

February 2012 issue - copy deadline: Wednesday 18th January

Call: +44 (0) 1372 224488 mark.wooller@ibagroup.com www.ibagroup.com

Gulfstream Pre-Owned Contact Lynn Beaudry lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com (912) 965-4000 • Fax: 965-4848

Gulfstream 550 S/N 5026

2794 TT, 16 seats, Aft galley with Fwd and Aft Lavs $34,500,000

www.GulfstreamPre-Owned.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

5


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An aircraft deal is pieced together with many components. Sometimes it can be as easy as child’s play but most of the time, well . . . not so much. Many transactions today may include challenging contract negotiations, foreign agency coordination over import/export requirements, prepurchase inspection or cosmetic refurbishment oversight, and other such complex issues. How a transaction is managed throughout the entire process can make a substantial difference in the final result. If a deal is not handled properly, it may never get off the ground. At IntelliJet International, we have managed many complicated deals to a successful conclusion. Our team members possess the knowledge and experience critical to ensure success. So when your aircraft transaction is preparing to take flight, make the IntelliJet choice. Call us today.

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World Aircraft Sales

iPad Edition

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL Deputy Editor Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com US Contributor Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com ADVERTISING Frances Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Frances@avbuyer.com Carla Kopenski 1- 800 540 3792 Carla@avbuyer.com

The World of Aviation at your finger-tips p ad ap p i S A ar. Our Wery popul ds is v downloa . 3000 e launch c n i s

AVBUYER.COM AvBuyer.com Manager Nick Barron nick@avbuyer.com

Web Administrator Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com

View jets for sale this month worldwide on your iPad

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), January 2012, Vol 16, Issue No 1 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & Disc’s submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com

Web Marketing Manager Jayne Jackson Jayne@avbuyer.com

avbuyer.com/worldaircraftsales

8

STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

ACCOUNTS Errol Miller 1- 800 620 8801 Errol@avbuyer.com MANAGING DIRECTOR John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 Enquiries outside USA & Canada +44 (0)20 8255 4000 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 was@avbuyer.com PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


Contents

Volume 16, Issue 1 – January 2012

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 44

Politics and Corporate Jets:

46

The Sign of a Well-Managed Company: Helping define General

44

As those seeking public office campaign, don’t be misled by the rhetoric - politicians value Business Aviation very highly themselves.

Aviation, and more specifically Business Aviation, and how its use is the sign of a well managed company.

48

Business Aviation Justified: To say that “you cannot justify your use of Business Aviation economically” would expose a fundamental misunderstanding of your core enterprise. Here’s why…

52

Visionary Thinking: How does a board see into the future with respect to planning a long-term travel solution? Does it really take visionary thinking, or some simple business basics?

56

Insurance Refresher Course (Part 2): Concluding part to our

56

refresher course on the risk management/insurance issues raised within this column during 2011.

60

IRS Record Keeping Requirements: If and when the IRS demands an audit, strict adherence to record keeping will be worth its weight in gold.

64

Should Your Aircraft Fly Part 135: Corporations looking for a degree of separation between themselves and their aircraft need to consider carefully before getting their own Part 135 operating certificate.

68

Are You Thinking of a New Jet:

72

The Medium Jet Value:

When considering your company’s medium-term travel requirements, the in-development aircraft options should be factored. A look at the benefits of Medium Jets, and a listing of Blue Book values for models going back 20 years.

72

Main Features 38

Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Phenom 300: How does the performance of the Embraer Phenom 300 stand up against Cessna’s Citation CJ4 and Citation Encore +?

80

Turboprop Review (Part 2 of 2): A review of the in-production twin-engine turboprops most prominent within the Business Aviation market today.

86

The Finishing Touch: A profile of Daniela Boutsen’s new department that seeks to add la touché finale to the cabins of medium and long-range jets.

94

The Sales Transaction Dissected: An insight into the complexities of the Aircraft Sales Transaction, and advice against not using qualified professionals to assist.

100

Sierra Industries Profile: A review of Sierra Industries, and the many modification, update and upgrade programs offered by the company for older Citation models.

106

NBAA Fuel Strategies: Top ten tips from NBAA on how to save money at the fuel pump - some obvious, some not so obvious that can add up to thousands in savings annually.

119

Challenges From Washington: As Congress and Washington pose preelection, what hope for FAA and other essential aviation issues to be resolved?

Viewpoint BizAv Round-up Aviation Leadership Roundtable Navigating 360 AIReport Aircraft Performance & Specifications Tables 123 Pre-Owned Aircraft Sales Trends

125

BARR Update: A discussion of the Block Aircraft Registration Request program; the FAA’s attempt to dismantle it; and its restoration in December 2011.

Next Month’s Issue

128

Singapore Airshow Preview: A look ahead to Asia-Pacific’s ‘gateway event’

Safety Matters - CFIT Awareness Dealer Broker Market Update Ten Questions For Matt Zuccaro

scheduled to take place this February. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Regular Features 14 22 76 88 110 112

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

9


VIEWPOINT

Kick the Tires & Light the Fires by Gil Wolin ope. Not anymore. Not that it was ever like that, really… at least, not for the last half century or so. As an industry, Business Aviation has done a terrific job of staying ahead of the safety curve; of implementing new technology – from more efficient and reliable third-generation turbofan engines, to full-motion simulators, to RNAV, and today, Electronic Flight Bags and iPads in the cockpit. Until recently, those safety and efficiency improvements included Reduced Vertical Separation Minima (RVSM), which significantly reduced flight and hold times, thanks to more precise navigation via improved air data computers and altimeters. But a purported improvement to FAA information management via the Internet called WebOPPS has thrown a rather large adjustable spanner into the works. RVSM lowered the required vertical separation between aircraft to 1,000 from 2,000 feet for aircraft flying between FL290 and FL410, and has been in place since as early as 1997. By expanding the airspace available for jet operations, RVSM dramatically reduced flight delays and forestalled extended time en route – thus conserving fuel and reducing commensurate hourly maintenance expense… kind of like adding several extra lanes to the M1 or turnpike at rush hour. But in order to use these additional “lanes” and conduct flights in RVSM airspace, N-registered aircraft must secure FAA authorization: for Parts 121 and 135 operators, these are operation specifications (OpSpecs); and for Part 91 operators, Letters of Authorization (LOAs). The FAA’s local Flight Service District Offices (FSDOs) can issue either authorization based upon the operator proving that the aircraft is properly RVSM-equipped and the crew properly trained to use that equipment. Simple enough for Part 121 commercial airlines – all flight crews are employed and trained by the airline, and the aircraft is equipped, operated and maintained by that carrier. But issuing Part 91 LOAs and Part 135

N

14

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

OpSpecs for RVSM is a bit more complex. In both situations, the FAA allows for operational control of one aircraft to be held by multiple entities – albeit sequentially, not simultaneously. Many Part 91 aircraft are co-owned by several entities, each exercising operational control when its respective owner flies, and each with its own LOA issued based upon proving to the FAA that the aircraft is properly RVSM equipped and maintained, and the respective crews properly trained. The aircraft charter industry is built upon that ability to have operational control of a specific aircraft to be held by multiple entities – that is, for the aircraft owner to have operational control when the aircraft is performing Part 91 owner flights, and the management company to have it when the aircraft flies Part 135 charter trips. Enter WebOPPS, stage right. Where the old manual system allowed a FSDO to issue multiple RVSM authorizations per aircraft, this new FAA electronic information management system allowed for the issuance of only one RVSM authorization (LOA or OpSpec) at a time for each aircraft. The FSDO may inspect and approve multiple operators per aircraft, but WebOPPS, by configuration, could issue only one authorization per aircraft. This design flaw meant that aircraft owners and operators who wanted to comply with the RVSM regs couldn’t legally do so if they shared the use of a specific aircraft with another owner or operator. Imagine the impact on fleet-wide fuel burn, if the 4000+ business turbines currently on Part 135 certificates and also flown by their owners, could only use RVSM airspace (above 29,000 feet) half the time – not to mention the cost per charter hour, if the owner opted to use that single RVSM authorization for his/her own Part 91 flying. Fortunately the NBAA is on top of this issue – well above FL290. Mike Nichols, Vice President - Operations, Education & Economics, and Mark Larsen, Project www.AvBuyer.com

Manager Operations & Web Development, are working directly with the FAA Flight Services group to resolve the problem. Their common goal is to preserve the system that the FAA approved, which has worked so well for everyone for more than a decade. So stay tuned, and stay in touch with NBAA. Curiously, RVSM authorization problems have been compounded by seemingly inordinate delays by local FSDOs in approving same. This has been a hot topic on NBAA’s AvManager Air Mail board. Some offices move quickly, others have taken three weeks or more to approve simple transfers from one owner to the next upon sale of the aircraft. Given the current slowdown in transactions as compared with a few years ago, my guess is the lack of stable FAA funding, combined with budget cutbacks, has prompted more than a few of the more senior and experienced FSDO folks to take an earlier-than-expected retirement, leaving those offices short-handed. First WebOPPS and then Congressional inaction… and we haven’t touched on the contract pilot training issues, let alone the EU Emissions Trading “scheme.” It seems the only fires that need to be lit are under bureaucratic bottoms in Washington. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on almost forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Art of the Transaction A well-executed aircraft transaction is a work of art. It requires a guiding hand to shape the myriad details that bring both buyer and seller together for a successful outcome. At J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, you’ll experience this kind of skillful, hands-on approach at every phase of the transaction.

+1.303.444.6766 • www. jetsales.com

Successfully Closing the Gap Between Buyer and Seller Since 1974


NEW TO MARKET

2011 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20329

1995 CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5302

ASKING $21,500,000 | Ferry Time Only

ASKING $7,950,000 | 5815 Hrs TTAF, 2342 Landings

BRAND NEW AIRCRAFT, AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY TEXT JM20329 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

6/12/24/48/96/192/240 MO INSPECTION-NOVEMBER 2011-DUNCAN AV. TEXT JM5302 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

1989 CHALLENGER 601-3A S/N 5050

1999 CITATION X S/N 93

ASKING $3,500,000 | 8066 Hrs TTAF 4345 Landings

ASKING $5,950,000 | 6869 Hrs TTAF, RRCC, APU on MSP

300HR/12MO/24MO/48MO-SEPTEMBER 2011-PENTASTAR AV. TEXT JM5050 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

DOC 10 & 11 SEPT. 2011, GOOD OPTIONS TEXT JM93 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

NEW TO MARKET

1994 CITATION V ULTRA S/N 279

UNDER CONTRACT

2003 CITATION EXCEL S/N 5329

ASKING $1,795,000 | 5664 Hrs TTAF, 6043 Landings

1932 Hrs TTAF, 2072 Landings

GNS-XLS, TCAS II, EGPWS, GOOD COSMETICS TEXT JM279 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

APU, DUAL FMS, GREAT PAINT & INTERIOR TEXT JM5329 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

2005 FALCON 2000EX EASy S/N 57 ASKING $16,250,000 | 5454 Hrs TTAF, 4043 Landings, 100% JSSI 1 U.S. OWNER, 3 FMS, HUD, GREAT P&I, 10 PASSENGER TEXT JM57 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


1997 FALCON 2000 S/N 48

1981 FALCON 50 S/N 55

ASKING $9,850,000 | 5749 Hrs TTAF, 2866 Landings, CSP

ASKING $2,350,000 | 9,299 Hrs TTAF, 7,257 Landings, MSP Gold

3 FMS, HUD, GREAT P&I, 10 PASSENGER TEXT JM48 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

UNIVERSAL VISION SYSTEM, EFIS, 3D ENGINE UPGRADE, C-CHECK & GEAR OH 2/25/10, DRY BAY MOD C/W TEXT JM55 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

1999 GULFSTREAM GIV-SP S/N 1381

ASKING $42,500,000 | 1678 Hrs TTAF, 693 Landings, RRCC

ASKING $12,950,000 | 3552 Hrs TTAF, 1570 Landings

HUD, EVS, HIGH SPEED DATA, SAT TV, SOFTWARE 7

FWD GALLEY, JAR-OPS/EASA TEXT JM1381 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM9203 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

UNDER CONTRACT

2004 GULFSTREAM G200 S/N 91

. .S U AM GS IN RE IN W FST OW O N UL SH G R O AT F V SA

2006 GLOBAL XRS S/N 9203

1999 HAWKER 800XP S/N 258425

2301 Hrs TTAF, 998 Landings, ESP Gold

ASKING: $3,650,000 | 4846 Hrs TTAF, 3264 Landings, JSSI 100%

1 U.S. OWNER, GREAT CONDITION TEXT JM91 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

WELL EQUIPPED, WINGLETS TEXT JM425 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

WANTED – IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION GULFSTREAM G550 • GULFSTREAM G550 WANTED FOR IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION FOR A U.S. BUYER • FORWARD GALLEY, UNDER 1000 HRS TTAF • SIGNED EXCLUSIVE ACQUISITION AGREEMENT • BUYER PAYS OUR COMMISSION • NO FINANCING REQUIREMENTS

FILE PHOTO

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

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2011 BBJ

2006 G450 SN 4044

1987 GIV SN 1029

1987 GIV SN 1022

2005 G550 SN 5097

1985 Challenger 601 SN 3048

Los Angeles: (818) 841-6190 Washington D.C.: +1 (410) 626-6162

AVJE T.COM sales@avjet.co m


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BizAv Round-Up NEWS IN BRIEF

01.12

AW609

Aero-Dienst took delivery of a brandnew Embraer Phenom 300 just one month after expanding its business jet fleet with an additional CJ3. Based in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany, the company won the new aircraft management customer whose aircraft will now be operated out of Dusseldorf with immediate effect. / More from www.aero-dienst.de

A J Walter Aviation has chosen Hong Kong for the location of AJW Capital Partners Ltd., its funding arm for the aviation sector. Ian Malin, Treasurer & Chief Investment Officer outlined, “AJW expects the market for its spares supply and management solutions to continue to grow significantly.” / More from www.ajw-aviation.com

Embraer’s large Legacy 650 has been type certified by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) with the revised Validation Type Certificate Data Sheet, paving the way for customers to register and operate the Legacy 650 in China. Meanwhile, the first Phenom 100 built at the company’s new Melbourne, Florida assembly facility made its first flight last month. The aircraft flew to an altitude of 41,000 feet and to speeds up to its Maximum Operating Mach number with zero anomalies. / More from www.embraer.com

Esterline CMC Electronics has received Type Certification from Transport Canada for its third-generation SureSight Enhanced Vision System (EVS) sensor the CMA-2700. The company claims the CMA-2700 offers the highest resolution available for an EVS sensor and four times the resolution of currently certified EVS sensor systems.

AW609 TILTROTOR: AGUSTAWESTLAND COMPLETES PROGRAM ACQUISITION  AgustaWestland has finalized the transaction with Bell Helicopter Textron for the acquisition of the 609 tiltrotor program. All legal and regulatory approvals have now been successfully completed. The development of the AW609 tiltrotor program is now moving forward under full AgustaWestland control and civil certification is expected in late 2015/early 2016 with deliveries following immediately afterwards. Further, AgustaWestland has plans to intro-

duce a new generation satellite based navigation system and mission avionics to enable all weather operations and increase the aircraft’s operational capabilities. A new state-of-the-art avionics architecture will provide the pilot with increased situational awareness and a reduced workload. The tiltrotor concept is the answer to the growing need for an aircraft matching the vertical capabilities of the helicopter with the speed, range and alti-

tude capabilities of fixed-wing aircraft. AgustaWestland is investing in the next generation of rotorcraft technologies and the AW609 and future tiltrotor concepts are part of the company’s innovation commitment. Preliminary orders for approximately 70 AW609s have been placed by around 40 customers in over 20 countries to perform a range of commercial and government roles. / More information from www.agustawestland.com

/ More from www.cmcelectronics.ca

Eurocopter has made its first inroads

ExecuJet Aviation Group opened two new FBOs in Australasia. The Wellington FBO - ExecuJet Aviation Group’s first facility in New Zealand - opened on November 16, followed by a new FBO in Melbourne, Australia on November 18, complementing the Group’s established Melbourne MRO facility.

Flight Display Systems’ authorized dealer RUAG Switzerland has successfully completed the first European installation of the Select Aircraft Cabin Management System on a Dassault Falcon 50. The RUAG Switzerland aircraft cabin retrofit includes many of Flight Display Systems’ most popular products.

/ More from www.eurocopter.com

/ More from www.execujet.net

/ More from www.flightdisplay.com

22

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

into the South Western region of China, signing an agreement with Xilin Fengteng for the sale of two helicopters for use in multiple General Aviation missions. Xilin Fengteng will take delivery of one EC120B and one EC135 helicopter by mid-2012.

continued on page 26 Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

$GNN#XKCVKQP6GZCU &CNNCU6GZCU 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

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Citation 111

Citation V11

1996 Citation VII | 650-7074

Citation XLS+

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-6012

Citation Ultra

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

Citation 11

1983 Citation III | 650-0019

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation Bravo

1999 Citation Bravo | 550-0897

Citation 1SP

1994 Citation II | 550-0732 #NUQ#XCKNCDNG

Citation 500LW / 500 Eagle

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255

Beechjet

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG

1976 Citation 500 Eagle | 500-0295

1995 Beechjet 400A | RK-107

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG4-

(QT(WNN5RGEU#FFKVKQPCN2JQVQUQP'ZENWUKXG.KUVKPIUD[$GNN#XKCVKQPRNGCUG8KUKVQWT9GDUKVGCVYYY$GNN#XKCVKQPEQO


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Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

$GNN#XKCVKQP6GZCU &CNNCU6GZCU 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

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King Air 350

King Air B200

1998 King Air 350 | FL-221

King Air B200

1982 King Air B200 | BB-1040

King Air B200

1981 King Air B200 | BB-917

King Air E90

1974 King Air E90 | LW-59

Pilatus

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG.9

1998 Pilatus PC-12/45 | 195

2003 King Air B200 | BB-1807

King Air B200

1982 King Air B200 | BB-990

King Air 200

1976 King Air 200 | BB-169

King Air F90

1981 King Air F90 | LA-137

Meridian

2008 Piper Meridian | 4697324

(QT(WNN5RGEU#FFKVKQPCN2JQVQUQP'ZENWUKXG.KUVKPIUD[$GNN#XKCVKQPRNGCUG8KUKVQWT9GDUKVGCVYYY$GNN#XKCVKQPEQO


BizAvRound-Up Flying Colours announced its first turboprop Blackhawk modification project. A privately owned King Air C90 will undergo a full XP135 Engine conversion at Flying Colours’ Peterborough facility. The scope of the work will also feature additional routine maintenance inspections along with interior modifications. In addition, Flying Colours delivered its fourth Chinese registered aircraft - a Challenger 850 business jet - to charter company Lily Jet. The aircraft enters service immediately and will be available for third party charter. Flying Colours worked directly with Lily Jet to have the aircraft fully certified with the CAAC (Civil Aviation Administration of China). A further three 850s destined for China are currently undergoing completion. These are anticipated to be ready for delivery this year. / More from www.flyingcolours.com

2 PILATUS PC-12 NG

1,100TH PC-12 PILATUS CELEBRATES MILESTONE DELIVERY 

Gulfstream’s G650 received its provisional type certificate from the FAA, clearing the way for the company to begin interior completions of the ultra-large-cabin, ultra-long-range business jet in preparation for customer deliveries in the second quarter of 2012 as planned. The OEM also celebrated the opening of its new Beijing office in the China World Tower at the end of last year. Located in the middle of Beijing’s Central Business District, Herman Chai, regional sales vice president, Far East Asia, Gulfstream, heads the China sales office. Leda M.L. Chong, senior vice president, Asia-Pacific region, General Dynamics, is also headquartered there. / More from www.Gulfstream.com

Hawker Beechcraft has placed the Hawker 200 on hold owing to the recession. With certification flights imminent, Chairman and CEO Bill Boisture told company workers the market isn’t strong enough yet to welcome a new light jet.

milestone aircraft to Frontline Aviation. Since its introduction to the market in 1994, the PC12 program has greatly exceeded all expectations originally set for it by Pilatus, and we anticipate continued popularity of the PC-12 NG for many years to come.” The versatile PC-12 NG performs many roles worldwide, including ex-

International Airport, Shanghai Hawker Pacific was awarded its Part 145 certificate by General Administration of Civil Aviation of China in November.

updates and interactive features for the breakthrough 400XT aircraft. / More from www.nextantaerospace.com/iphone.html

Vertical Markets LLC a company NBAA produced an important new guide for owner-pilots of business aircraft. The NBAA Reimbursement of Flight Expenses for Owner-Pilots Handbook helps Members understand the federal accommodations and limitations for both private and commercial owner-pilots, including requirements relating to humanitarian or non-profit flights. / More from www.nbaa.org

Hawker Pacific signed an agreement

Nextant Aerospace, maker of the

with the Shanghai Airport Authority on the opening of the first authorized service center for an OEM in China. The new Shanghai Hawker Pacific (JV) Business Aviation Service Centre represents a unique partnership between private industry and the Chinese government. Located at Hongqiao

400XT, the world’s first completely remanufactured business jet, recently announced that it has launched a dedicated, contentrich iPhone application for the aircraft. With an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch, users have access to comprehensive specifications, comparisons, range maps, videos, news

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

/ More information from www.pilatus-aircraft.com

/ More from www.hawkerpacific.com.au

/ More from www.hawkerbeechcraft.com

26

ecutive transport, commuter, medevac, police and border surveillance, cargo transport, military liaison, and regional airliner. The PC-12 fleet has amassed 3.3 million flight hours of operating experience, including thousands of hours in some of the world’s harshest environments.

www.AvBuyer.com

specializing in marketing solutions for the Business and GenKANDI SPANGLER eral Aviation industries was launched last month by Kandi Spangler, who recently left Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI) as its vice president, marketing to start the new company. “We live in a fiercely competitive environment,” Spangler outlined, “and companies in the aviation industry need a focused go-to-market strategy if they want to achieve their sales goals and objectives. / More from www.verticalmarketsllc.com

LILY JET’S COMPLETED CL850

In a recent ceremony at Pilatus Business Aircraft’s facility in Broomfield, Colorado, the Swiss aircraft manufacturer delivered the 1,100th unit of its flagship single engine turboprop PC-12. Thomas Bosshard, CEO of Pilatus Business Aircraft Ltd commented, “We are extremely pleased to have the honor of delivering this

continued on page 30 Aircraft Index see Page 4


1999 Citation X 750-0080, 3000 Hours, 50% JSSI, New P&I

2008 Legacy 600 S/N 1054, 1000 Hours, Rolls Royce Corp Care

2001 Citation CJ2 525A-0027, 2431 Hours, TAP Elite, Belted Lav

THE MARKET OUTLOOK IS BRIGHTER Our experts have the latest info... Call us today for an update

2000 Citation Encore 560-0539, 2358 Hours, TCAS II, EGPWS

Also AAvailable vailable 2007 Citation Mustang 2003 Learjet 45 1998 Citation Bravo 1984 Citation III

Scan to view our full inventory

1981 King Air B200 1979 Citation I/SP 1979 Merlin IIIB


1999 Challenger 604, S/N 5415, 7272TT, Smart Parts Plus SPEC, FDR, 110v Outlets, 12 pax, Airshow, Entertainment System, Owner Financing Available, Asking $9,000,000.00

2004 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 841, 3007 TT, Engines on JSSI Platinum, JAR Ops, Steep Approach Mod, 13 pax Interior, Asking $12,800,000.00

2001 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258503, 3159.7 TT, Engines/APU on MSP, TCAS II, TAWS-A, Dual NZ-2000’s, L/R Oxygen, Honeywell EFIS, Asking $3,950,000.00

1983 Gulfstream GIII, S/N 404, 15,256 TT, 712/685 SMOH (c/w 3/06 & 12/05), EDZ-800 EFIS, TCAS 2, 72 Month c/w 2/10, Gear O/H c/w 1/08, Price Reduced to $1,599,000.00

1976 Falcon 10, S/N 82, 12,914 TT, MSP Gold on -2C Engines!, TCAS 2, RVSM, TR’s, C Check c/w 4/07, Good Paint and Interior, Price Reduced to $595,000.00

1981 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 428, 11042 TT, MSP, Collins EFIS86, APS85, GTCP36-150 APU, TR’s, Gear O/H & C Check c/w 9/10, TCAS 2, Asking $1,595,000.00

2003 Socata TBM700C1, S/N 244, 1885 TT, Dual Garmin 530’s, Skywatch, KMD-850 MFD, Freon Air, “N” Registered/Europe Based, Asking $1,525,000.00

2002 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232, 1140 TT, KMD850 MFD, Air Conditioning, RVSM Compliant, Mode S w/ Diversity, Asking $1,450,000.00

Also Available Citation V, S/N 560-0112 Citation V, S/N 560-0051 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326

Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0094 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Falcon 20 Cargo, S/N 31 Learjet 35A, S/N 138 King Air 350, S/N FL-278

King Air 200, S/N BB-473 King Air 200, S/N BB-263 King Air B100, S/N BE-9 King Air F90, S/N LA-45 King Air C90, S/N LJ-601 Socata TBM700B, S/N 193


2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 605 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,995,000.00

2004 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0204, 2806 TT, Engines on Power Plan, Pro Parts, Three-Tube, Garmin 530’s, UNS-1L, Skywatch, N1 Computer, Asking $3,400,000.00

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0891, 5452 TT, On Power Advantage Plus and Pro Parts, Freon Air, Phase 5 c/w 5/10, Belted Potty, Asking $2,095,000.00

2007 Premier 1A, S/N RB-181, 1873 TT, TAP Elite, Support Plus, TCAS II, Custom Paint and Interior, Electronic Charts, Asking $2,625,000.00

1990 Citation V, S/N 560-0059, 6190.6 TT, Engines in ESP Gold, TCAS 2, 5-Tube EFIS, TAWS-A, RVSM, Fresh Phase 1-5, JAR Ops, On Cescom, Asking $1,695,000.00

1989 Citation II, S/N 550-0597, 5981 TT, 2453 SMOH, TR’s, Freon, Honeywell EFIS, Phase 1-5 c/w 10/10, MFD, TCAS I, New Paint/ 6/10, Asking $995,000.00

1979 Citation II, S/N 550-0082, 10055 TT, 2775/2351 SMOH with new impellers, Garmin 530/430’s, Phase 5/10000 hr c/w 2/11, New Paint, Asking $695,000.00

2002 Grand Caravan 208B, S/N 208B-0958, 2970.9 TT, Nine Passenger Executive Interior, KMD-850 MFD, Cargo Pod, Freon Air, CESCOM, Price Reduced to $1,195,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


Market Indicators

3

THE MARKET FOR BUSINESS JET AIRCRAFT 2011-2020 Forecast International recently released its latest research on The Market for Business Jet Aircraft 2011-2020. Here we briefly summarise key points from this excellent and comprehensive piece of research. Forecast International maintains that while the worst of the downturn is certainly over, the business jet market has yet to enter full recovery mode. Much of the market, specifically the light and mid-size jet segments, remains stagnant at best. The top end of the market is showing signs of life, as demand is improving for large-cabin and long-range business jets. In the midst of continuing uncertainty in the general economy, the business jet market is limping along. Business jet deliveries will be lower in 2011 than in 2010, but some improvement should occur in 2012. Greater improvement will have to wait until 2013. The business jet market is especially sluggish in the key regions of North America and Europe. In both of these regions, a dip back into economic recession is not out of the question. In the U.S. in particular, uncertainty about the economy and about future governmental tax and regulatory policies is resulting in corporations sitting on big cash reserves. Corporate profits, normally a prime leading indicator of business jet demand, are presently quite healthy, but company officials are reluctant to engage in large capital expenditures. Still, this robust level of profits, combined with operator surveys regarding future purchase expectations, indicates that considerable latent demand seems to exist 30

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 2012

for business jet aircraft. While the U.S. is, and will remain, the largest geographic market for business jets, its share of the global market has declined considerably in recent years. At the present time, non-U.S. customers account for some 45-50 percent of business jet sales and for some manufacturers, they account for much more than 50 percent. Market demand is strong in the Middle East, Asia and parts of Latin America. Business jet manufacturers have used the market downturn to reorganize operations, reduce their cost structures, and consolidate their market positions. Each of the Big Six OEMs has at least one new model in development. Some of these new aircraft are clean-sheet designs such as the Gulfstream G650, the Learjet 85, the Embraer Legacy 450 and Legacy 500, and the HondaJet. Others are extensively upgraded versions of existing aircraft. These include such models as Cessna's Citation Ten, Embraer's Legacy 650, and Hawker Beechcraft's Hawker 200. For methodological purposes, this market analysis divides the business jet market into eight categories, ranging from Very Light Jets to corporate-configured airliners. While Forecast International has limited the number of such classes to eight, it observes that the market has actually become so diverse that 10 or even 12 classes would not be unreasonable. Manufacturers are launching new models into ever more narrow sub-niches in their pursuit of sales and market share. www.AvBuyer.com

THE FORECAST Forecast International projects that business jet production in the 2011-2020 time period will total 10,907 aircraft. The value of this production is estimated at $230.3 billion in constant 2011 U.S. dollars. Production is forecast to total 683 units in 2011, and then rise to 728 units in 2012. This increase is expected to mark the start of a gradual, though long-lasting, recovery in build rates extending through the remainder of the forecast timeframe. During the forecast period, the top three manufacturers in unit production are projected to be Cessna, Embraer, and Bombardier. Cessna is projected to capture a 29.5 percent share of the market on production of 3,218 business jets. Second is Embraer, which is expected to produce 1,855 business jets for a 17 percent market share. Bombardier takes third place with production of 1,712 business jets, a 15.7 percent market share. (Fourth, fifth, and sixth places are taken by Gulfstream, Hawker Beechcraft and Dassault, respectively.) When the market is calculated in terms of monetary value, the manufacturers of the larger, high-value business jet types rise to the top of the rankings. In production value, Gulfstream takes the top spot with $58.3 billion worth of production, a share of 25.3 percent. In second place is Bombardier, with $51.6 billion worth of production and a 22.4 percent share. Dassault, Cessna, Embraer, Hawker Beechcraft and Airbus take the next five spots. / More information from www.forecastinternational.com continued on page 32 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Market Indicators

4

BRIFO VIEW

/ More from www.brifo.com

JP MORGAN VIEW According to J.P.Morgan's Business Jet Monthly report, overall demand looks weaker amid expectations for decelerating global economic growth, though the high end of the market remains far more vibrant than the lower end. Among recent data points, Bombardier’s Q3 book-to-bill of 0.7x fell from the prior three quarters, but orders are lumpy and 2011 is still shaping up well at 1.3x. Other less than robust indicators include a fourth consecutive month of higher used inventories—though used pricing improved— and a second consecutive decline in flight ops. Hawker is slowing development of the Hawker 200, reflecting pressure on lighter jets, and anecdotally J.P.Morgan did not sense much optimism at the Dubai Air Show. Light jet weakness has been a persistent 32

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

ARGUS VIEW During November 2011 flight activity dropped from October 2011, according to ARGUS TRAQPak, but showed an increase year-overyear. November 2011 business aircraft flight activity was down 1.5% over October, although a more specific look at the operational categories shows Part 135 activity was up 0.4% from the previous month, followed by fractional activity (up 0.1%). The Part 91 market posted a decline from the previous month, down 2.8%. Generally, activity by aircraft category trended down from October however; large cabin aircraft did show a month-overmonth increase (up

0.4%). Mid-size cabin aircraft were down 0.2%, followed by small cabin aircraft which were down 3.4%. The largest singled month-over-month increase was in the Part 135 large cabin market which posted a 7.3% increase month-overmonth. Comparing year-overyear results (November 2011 vs. November 2010), aircraft activity showed a slight increase (up 1.0%). November 2011 flight activity was higher than November 2008 and 2009 too. The Part 91 market stayed positive, up 4.0% from November 2010. The Part 135 market on the other hand remained down year-over-year (off

theme and increased US activity appears needed to turn it around. Emerging markets have supported large jet demand, and a softening EM GDP growth outlook is worth watching, yet J.P.Morgan expects demand to remain solid. Used inventory of in-production models increased 30 bps in November to 11.1%., the first month above 11.0% since April. By category, Heavy, Medium, and Light jet inwww.AvBuyer.com

3.3%), followed by fractional activity which was down 0.6%. Aircraft category results finished mostly positive in November. All aircraft segments (with the exception of large cabin) posted a yearover-year increase led by small cabin aircraft, up 2.1%. Mid-size cabin increased 2.1%, and turboprops were up 1.1%. Large cabin aircraft finished the month down 2.8% from November 2010. Just like last month, the Part 91 small cabin segment saw the largest year-over-year gain for an individual market segment with an increase of 10.5%. / More from www.argus.aero

ventories were up 0.2%, 0.1%, and 0.6%, respectively. Average price increased to $10.71 million in November and has now recovered ~1% from this cycle’s low of $10.62 million, set in July. Price behavior was mixed, with Heavy and Medium jet prices increasing 0.1% and 2.5%, respectively, and Light jet prices decreasing 0.9%. / More from www. jpmorgan.com continued on page 36 Aircraft Index see Page 4

Since the conclusion of the recent Dubai Air Show, market analyst Brian Foley called attention to the 6% shrinkage of the region's business jet fleet over the last year and what it means. "The Middle Eastern business jet population has declined from 550 to 516 aircraft in the last 12 months," Foley said. "It represents a fleet contraction of roughly 6%, mostly in large and midsize business jets with an aggregate value approaching threequarters of a billion dollars that were either sold, grounded or repossessed. That seems quite startling - particularly when linked to the localized upheavals, conflicts, leadership changes and general unrest since the socalled Arab Spring. But that link doesn't seem to hold. “Instead, what we've observed is simply residual fallout from the worldwide economic recession - certainly not a cause for celebration, but still a sign of normal economic behavior as opposed to the repercussion of political events, and that's a very healthy signal." Together with previously reported cancellations and postponements of aircraft orders, this adjustment has been painful for some but probably also necessary for the community as a whole, which seems to be stabilizing itself nicely even ahead of politics. Some of Foley's contacts are already reporting brisk business activity led by mid-size firms involved in construction, retail, telecommunications and, of course, oil. "This shakeout has removed some unsustainable elements and helped consolidate the Business Aviation sector. Ultimately it will make for a healthier and more even environment going forward," Foley added.


1983 G-lll S/N 485 tQBTTFOHFSDPOmHVSBUJPO tQBTTFOHFSDPOmHVSBUJPO t/FXJOUFSJPS+BOVBSZ t/FXJOUFSJPS+BOVBSZ t(VMGTUSFBN$.1NBJOUFOBODF t(VMGTUSFBN$.1NBJOUFOBODF USBDLJOH  USBDLJOH t-/"7$FSUJmFE"QQSPBDI"1 t-/"7$FSUJmFE"QQSPBDI"1 

1982 F FALCON ALCON A 50 S/N 107 10 'SFTI"JOTQFDUJPO tt'SFTI"JOTQFDUJPO  +BOVBSZ  +BOVBSZ  'SFTI"GU%VDUJOTQFDUJPO tt'SFTI"GU%VDUJOTQFDUJPO  +BOVBSZ  +BOVBSZ  t4VQFSNJETJ[FMPOHSBOHF t4VQFSNJETJ[FMPOHSBOHF  KFUXJUIUISFFFOHJOFMBZPVU KFUXJUIUISFFFOHJOFMBZPVU 5PUBM)PVST  t5PUBM)PVST  t t3FHJTUSBUJPO'(-4+ t3FHJTUSBUJPO'(-4+ t&OHJOFT"16DPWFSFECZ.41 t&OHJOFT"16DPWFSFECZ.41

2014 BBJ S/N S/N TBD tt(SFFO%FMJWFSZ.BZ (SFFO%FMJWFSZ.BZ t+""3FHJTUSBUJPO t+""3FHJTUSBUJPO t'PSFJHO"WJBUJPO"VUIPSJUZ t'PSFJHO"WJBUJPO"VUIPSJUZ ttUp Up to 9 BVYJMJBSZGVFMUBOLT 9BVYJMJBSZGVFMUBOLT tt$PNQMFUJPONBOBHFNFOUJODMVEFE $PNQMFUJPONBOBHFNFOUJODMVEFE tt'VMMZDVTUPNJ[FEUP 'VMMZDVTUPNJ[FEUP  BDDPNNPEBUFCVZFS BDDPNNPEBUFCVZFS tt-POH3BOHFGVFMTZTUFN -POH3BOHFGVFMTZTUFN t0OMZPOFPOUIFNBSLFU t0OMZPOFPOUIFNBSLFU

Please allow us to match you with the perfect aircraft air craft for your needs and d budget. W We e look forward forwar d to your phone callll or email inquiry inquiry. y.

 8)VCCBSE4UOE'MPPS 8)VCCBSE4UOE'MPPS $ $IJDBHP *-64" IJDBHP *-64" UUIFKFUDPMMFDUJPODPN IFKFUDPMMFDUJPODPN 1 1' ' JJOGP!UIFKFUDPMMFDUJPODPN OGP!UIFKFUDPMMFDUJPODPN

e provided provided as introductory introductory information. They do not constitute rrepresentations SpeciямБcations and/or descriptions ar are epresentations or warranties of rely on your own inspection of the aircraft. aircraft. The Jet Collection. You Yo ou should shou rely


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The Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition is co-hosted by The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and The Shanghai Exhibition Center, in Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority.


The Value We Add Is Confidence Citation Ultra 1998 Citation Ultra, SN 560-0492 Only 1447 Hours Since New 20 Hours Since Phase 1-5 Inspections Obsessive To Detail Owner Triple GPS – Ready For Immediate Service

Gulfstream G200 2006 Gulfstream G200, SN 143 Low Price, Late Vintage Very Low Time – 856 TTAF Recent Major Inspections Priced To Sell - $9,995,000 USD

Citation V11 1992 Citation VII, SN 650-7016 Exceptional Climb and Cruise Performance Two U.S. Corporate Owners Since New MSG-3 Maintenance – MSP Gold Engines Price Reduction - $2,250,000 USD

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BizAvRound-Up

5

ARRIVALS

Dave Eickhoff or Bob Nygren 8031 Airport Blvd. Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061 Phone: (713) 649-6100 • Fax: (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com RANDY BOLINGER

CAROLINE DANIELS

JANINE IANNARELLI

1990 Citation II, S/N 550-0636 Randy Bolinger Gulfstream recently named Bolinger as director of Marketing Services. He reports to Bill Shira, vice president, Marketing and Sales Support.

Horst Brockmueller – has

Total Time: 6187, Sperry 3 Tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS, Global GNS XLS w/GPS, Thrust Reversers, Freon A/C.

1997 King Air 350, S/N FL-170

joined Oriens Advisors as an investment and Business Aviation expert. In this new role Brockmueller will further bolster the services Oriens provides by actively engaging with and supporting clients who are seeking funds, looking to restructure existing businesses or need advice on how to move their existing business to the next level.

acquired Gulfstream in 1990 for $800 million. During his sevenyear tenure, he revamped the management team, created new product lines, introduced aircraft fractional ownership and launched the then-flagship GV. After turning around the company, he sold Gulfstream to General Dynamics for $5.6 billion in 1999.

John Hayes - West Star Aviation has named Hayes general manager at its Dallas Love Field facility.

Janine Iannarelli, founder and president of Houston-based aircraft brokerage firm Par Avion Ltd was one of 18 women choCaroline Daniels - the sen for the Outstanding Texas Board of Directors of the General Aviation Manufacturers Business Leader award by the Association (GAMA) has elected Fort Worth Business Press. Selections are made on the basis San Francisco business leader of significant accomplishments Daniels, as Chairman of the in the areas of business, educaBoard. Ms. Daniels previously tion, nonprofits, health care and served as GAMA’s Vice Chair government. and as Chairman of both the Safety and Communications Christoph Meyerrose Committees, and will serve as who has been the Managing the first female Chairman. Director of Lufthansa Technical Teddy Forstmann - the man Training in Hamburg for over ten years, is to become the new who was credited with turning around Gulfstream Aerospace in Managing Director of Lufthansa the 1990s, died recently. His in- Bombardier Aviation Services vestment firm, Forstmann Little, (LBAS) in Schönefeld, Berlin.

Total Time 2108 since new, 3074 Total Landings. All Mandatory AD’s and SB’s complied with Phase IV, recent Hot Section.

aerosmithpenny.com 36

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

CHRISTOPH MEYERROSE

www.AvBuyer.com

ROY NG

MARK PAOLUCCI

Aircraft Index see Page 4


6 Andreas Kaden - who has held this position for thirteen years, will be taking over at the helm of Lufthansa Technical Training in Hamburg.

Roy Ng - Gulfstream has named Roy Ng as regional manager, International Sales. He will work closely with International Sales regional vice presidents Peter Hoi and Herman Chai, and report to Roger Sperry, regional senior vice president, International Sales. Mark Paolucci – Cessna senior vice president, Sales retired last month after 32 years with the company. Tim White

BizAvRound-Up has been promoted to vice president, Sales-the Americas. White will lead the sales force in North America, Central America and South America. Trevor Esling has been promoted to vice president, Sales for EMAA (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia). Esling will lead the sales force in Europe, Russia, Africa, Middle East, India, Asia Pacific and China.

2008 Lear 60XR sn 337 - 2265 TTAF On ESP Gold, 4-4 Tube EFIS System, TCAS II w/ change 7, APU, EGPWS, Thrust Reversers, EASA/ JAR OPS, RVSM, FDR-, Dual Universal UNS-1E w/ GPS, CAMP, New to Market !

Andy Patsalides - is the new director of Marketing at the Gama Group. In his new role Patsalides is based at Gama’s Farnborough Airport, UK HQ and will report directly to Group CEO Marwan Khalek.

EVENTS

2004 Lear 60SE sn 275 - 2265 TTAF On ESP Gold, 4-4 Tube EFIS System, TCAS II w/ change 7, APU, EGPWS, Thrust Reversers, EASA/ JAR OPS, RVSM, FDR-, Dual Universal UNS-1E w/ GPS, CAMP, New to Market !

1980 Learjet 35A sn 348 - UPGRADED -2C Engine Mod

2012

12,800 TTAF, MSP, RVSM, 8.33 Spacing.

NBAA: BUSINESS AIRCRAFT NBAA: SCHEDULERS & DISPATCHERS REGISTRATION CONF CONFERENCE Feb 9 – 10 Jan 15 – 18 Delray Beach, FL, USA San Diego, CA, USA / www.nbaa.org

BAHRAIN INT’L AIRSHOW Jan 19 – 21 Bahrain /www.bahraininternationalairshow.com

U.S. SPORT AVIATION EXPO Jan 19 – 22 Sebring, FL, USA / www.sport-aviation-expo.com

AIME2012 – AIRCRAFT INTERIORS MIDDLE EAST Feb 1 – 2 Dubai, UAE / www.aime.aero

MRO MIDDLE EAST (MRO ME) Feb 1 – 2 Dubai, UAE / www.mrome.aero

NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REG FORUM Feb 2 New Orleans, LA, USA / www.nbaa.org

INDIAN BUSINESS AVIATION EXPO Feb 8 – 10 Delhi, India / www.miuevents.com

/ www.nbaa.org

HELI-EXPO 2012 Feb 11 – 14 Dallas, TX, USA

1982 Learjet 55 sn 59 - MSP Gold, TCAS II, JAR-OPS, New to Market !

/ www.rotor.com/heliexpo

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW Feb 14 – 19 Changi Center, Singapore / www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

NBAA: LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Feb 22 - 23 San Diego, CA, USA

1981 Learjet 35A sn 395 - 7400 TTAF, ‘Big 3’ Cargo Door, Dee Howard TR’s, MSP Gold, Beautiful 8 Place interior w/walnut- New 2009 –Paint New 2009. Amazing Airplane!

/ www.nbaa.org

BUSINESS AIRPORT WORLD EXPO Feb 22 – 23 Cannes, France /www.businessairportworldexpo.com

Astra/Gulfstream SPX sn 80 - Motivated seller -

BUSINESS JET INTERIORS WORLD EXPO Feb 22 – 23 Cannes, France

Also Available:

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INDIAN BUSINESS AVIATION EXPO Feb 22 - 23 Delhi, India

REDUCED!! Low Time, with APU and recent C Check Insp! Priced to Sell! Lear 55 sn 63, Lear 55 sn 58, Lear 35A sn 348, Lear 35 sn 51, Lear 25B sn 201, Lear 35A sn 672, Lear 35A sn 240, Lear 35A sn 188, Lear 25D sn 363, Lear 35A sn 384, Lear 35A sn 473, ’Lear 35a sn 654 ld 35A Lear 35A sn155, Lear 36A sn 37, Lear 55 sn 091, Sold SoLear Sold Sold 35 sn 11, Lear Sold ld 35 sn 011, Lear ld 31A sn 68,SLear sn 462,SoLear sn ld 74, old 31ASo Sold 55 sn 118 SoLear ld sn 95, Lear ld ld ld Lear 55 sn 120, Lear 25G sn 352, Lear 35A sn 473, o o o So55 S S S Lear 35 sn 616, LearS60 ld sn 83, Lear ld sn 128 Lear oldsn 154 Sold So35A So55B

a JETRADE company

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If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Exceptional Buy!

Tel: 703 312 1000 Fax: 703 312 1355 Email: sales@nextjets.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

37


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EMBRAER PHENOM 300

PHENOM 300

CITATION ENCORE+

CITATION CJ4

Embraer Phenom 300

by Michael Chase

n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of pre-owned business jets in the $6.4-$8.9 million range for the purpose of valuing the new and pre-owned Embraer Phenom 300. The current New/Used percentage split for the Phenom 300 aircraft is 60% new and 40% pre-owned. Across the following paragraphs, we’ll consider the usual productivity parameters payload/range, speed and cabin size, and cover current and future market values. The field in this study includes the Cessna Citation CJ4 and Citation Encore+.

I

38

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

BRIEF HISTORY Embraer’s Phenom 300 has a capacity for six passengers in its normal configuration with a single pilot. Interior configurations also offer options of a side-facing seat and belted toilet. The Phenom 300, powered by two Pratt & Whitney PW535E engines first flew in May 2008. It earned FAA Certification in December 2009 and first delivery to a private customer took place that same month. An early indicator of future success for the Phenom 300 is its selection by leading fractional providers Flight Options and NetJets. Flight Options placed a significant 10-year, 300-aircraft order (with 50-options), www.AvBuyer.com

while NetJets ordered up to 125 ‘Platinum Edition’ Phenom 300s. NetJets plans to start taking delivery of its Phenom 300s in late 2012 or early 2013.

PAYLOAD AND RANGE The data contained in Table A (overleaf) is published in the B&CA, May 2011 issue, and also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. As we mentioned in previous Comparative Analyses, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. Embraer’s Phenom 300’s ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 942 lbs is in fact lower than the 1,000 lbs for the CJ4 and 1,170 lbs for the Encore+ aircraft. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


$12,995,000

1996 Gulfstream GIVSP s/n 1286 • Engines “hard time” and on Rolls Royce Corporate Care • APU on MSP • Honeywell avionics on HAPP • Honeywell GTCP 36-150 APU • Honeywell EO-200 Heads Up Display - Dual NZ-2000 FMS w/5.2 software • Triple Laseref II IRS • Complete interior refurbishment and complete strip and paint Dec. 2009 • ASC-469 water heater mod Dec. 2009

Specifications subject to verification upon inspection, aircraft subject to withdrawal from the market.

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Te l i n U S : 2 0 1 . 8 9 1 . 0 8 8 1

AIRCRAFTSALES@LEAS.COM

W W W. L E A S . C O M


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EMBRAER PHENOM 300

CABIN VOLUME

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max Payload Range IFR (nm)

Phenom 300

17,968

5,353

2,216

942

1,937

1,277

Citation CJ4

16,950

5,828

2,118

1,000

2,142

1,485

Citation Encore+

16,830

5,400

2,390

1,170

1,792

1,035

Model

SOURCE: CONKLIN & DE DECKER, ORLEANS, M.A, USA; B&CA MAY 2011 AND AUG. 2011 OPERATIONS PLANNING GUIDE

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME Phenom 300

325

Citation CJ4

311

Citation Encore+

307

According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Embraer Phenom 300 at 325 cubic feet is greater than both the CJ4 at 311 cubic feet and the Encore+ at 307 cubic feet, as Chart A (left) shows.

POWERPLANT DETAILS Powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW535E engines, the Phenom 300 powerplants each offer 3,200 lbst. Both the CJ4 and Encore+ engines offer 3,400 lbst, although powered by entirely different powerplants. The CJ4 is powered by two Williams FJ44-4A engines and the Encore+ is powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW535B engines. Table B (left) shows the fuel usage by each aircraft model in this field of study. The Phenom 300 at 161 gallons per hour (GPH) leads the rest of the field as the most frugal, followed by the Encore+ at 180 GPH and the CJ4 at 186 GPH. Comparing the Phenom 300 with the CJ4 the average fuel usage shows 25 GPH (or 13.4%) less fuel burn (source JETNET).

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS 50

0

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

Cubic Feet

TABLE B - FUEL USAGE Fuel Usage (GPH)

Model

Phenom 300

161

Citation Encore+

180

Citation CJ4

186

SOURCE: JETNET

CHART B - COST PER MILE*

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

Citation Encore+

$3.76

Citation CJ4

$3.44

$2.93

Phenom 300

$0.00

$1.00

Using data published in the May 2011 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2011 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost used from the August 2011 edition was $6.04 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: The fuel price used from this source does not represent an average fuel price for the year. Chart B (left) details “Cost per Mile”, and compares the Phenom 300 to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 600nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Phenom 300 at $2.93 cost per mile is significantly more frugal than the CJ4 at $3.44 and the Encore+ at $3.76.

$2.00

$3.00

$4.00

The ‘Total Variable Cost’, illustrated in Chart C (right), is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous Trip Expense. The total variable cost for the Phenom 300 at $1,172 is considerably less than the CJ4 or the Encore+.

US $ per nautical mile

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS

* 600nm MISSION, 800LBS PAYLOAD

40

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

The points in Chart D (right) center on the www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EMBRAER PHENOM 300

same aircraft group. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in the B&CA August 2011 Operations Planning Guide and Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors: 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities.

CHART C - VARIABLE COST

Citation Encore+

$1,488

Citation CJ4

$1,425 $1,172

Phenom 300

$0

$1,200

$1,600

$2,000

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY

Price (Millions)

$10.0

$9.0

CJ4 $8.0

Phenom 300 $7.0

Encore+ $6.0

0.15000

0.25000

0.20000

0.30000

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Max P/L w/avail Fuel Range (nm)

Cabin

Average Speed Volume

Model

(Cu Ft)

Phenom 300

453

325

1,277

Citation CJ4

454

311

1,485

Citation Encore+

430

307

1,035

Vref Retail Price $

$8m New

$8.3m New

$6.4m (Used ‘09)

In Operation

% For Sale

45

11.1%

50

2%

65

3%

DATA COURTESY OF CONKLIN & DE DECKER, ORLEANS, MA, USA; JETNET; OPERATIONS PLANNING GUIDE B&CA MAY 2011.

TABLE D - FLEET BY LOCATION

LOCATION BY CONTINENT

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT BY CONTINENT (WHOLLY OWNED*) OCT. 2011

As of October 2011, the major based-at locations for the Phenom 300 were the United States (where 60% of the fleet resided), followed by South America (23%), see Table D (right).

Model

Phenom 300 Fleet %

AIRPORT PERFORMANCE

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

$800

US $ per hour

The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jet aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Phenom 300, as shown in the productivity index (Chart D), is productive compared with its competitors - largely due to the fact that the Phenom 300 offers a larger cabin and lower operating costs including a 25 GPH or 13.4% average fuel burn savings. However, the Phenom 300 ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 942 lbs is the lowest in this field of comparison and that has a bearing on the overall productivity within this field of aircraft. Of course, the lower price of the Phenom 300 at $8 million compared to the CJ4 at $8.3 million adds to its competitiveness. Table C (right) contains the average retail price from Vref for each aircraft with the latest model produced and the price year in parentheses. The average speed, cabin volume and maximum payload values are from Conklin and De Decker and B&CA magazine. The number of aircraft in-operation and fleet percentage ‘For Sale’ are reported by JETNET.

The airport performance is illustrated in Table E (overleaf) and includes airport

$400

Africa

Asia

Aus/ Oceania

Europe

North America

South America

Total

2

-

-

4

21

8

35

6%

-

-

11%

60%

23%

100%

* Exlcudes seven aircraft that are in fractional programs and one aircraft in shared ownership.

❯ www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

41


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EMBRAER PHENOM 300

TABLE E – AIRPORT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA (FT)

Model

TOFL*

Landing

TOFL**

Phenom 300

3,138

4,967

2,218

Citation CJ4

3,300

5,000

2,250

Citation Encore+

3,520

5,830

2,770

* SL ELEV., ISA TEMP. **5,000FT @25 DEGREES C. SOURCE: B&CA MAGAZINE; CONKLIN & DE DECKER

take-off field length (TOFL), Landing, and Balanced Field Length. The Phenom 300 is again competitive based on these airport performance criteria, offering the lowest take-off and landing distances of the group.

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value. There are other qualities such as terminal area performance, time to climb performance, and

www.AvBuyer.com

maximum transition to altitude levels that might factor in a buying decision, too, however. The Embraer Phenom 300 fares well against its competition, so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Phenom 300 aircraft will continue to do very well in the new and pre-owned market.

❯ For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


2008 HAWKER 850XP

Scott Rogers Tom Rogers

1- 770 - 458 - 9600

S/N 258977

sales@amjetaviation.com

775 TT, 08 Paint, 08 Interior, One USA Owner, 640 Hours, MSP Eng. Maint. Plan/Like New, HIRF Req. for Europe.

www.AmjetAviation.com 2002 PREMIER I

S/N RB-35

2008 GULFSTREAM 200 200 2008 GULFSTREAM

S/N 184

2540 TTSN, Engs. on TAP Elite, NDH, All Recommended & Mandatory 385 Hours Since New, 9 Passenger Executive Interior, EASA / EU SB’s done, No open LTA’s or AD’s, JAR-OPS Cert. OPS Compliant.

2005 CITATION BRAVO

1994 CITATION JET

1980 BELL 206L-1

File Photo

S/N 550B-1107 1837 Total Time Since New, Fresh Phase 15, Power AdvantagePlus, JAR-OPS1, TCASII w/Change 7, EPGS, RVSM Certified.

SOLD

S/N 0070 6000 Total Time Since New, TAP Elite, Excellent Condition!

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S/N 45565 Low Total Time, Beautiful Paint & Leather Interior.

SOLD

CITATION XLS, S/N 560-5517 | 2008 HAWKER 850XP, S/N 258895 | 2001 AGUSTA 109E POWER


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Politics and Corporate Jets Jack Olcott expects the subject of company aircraft to resurface as those seeking public office choose to leverage the public’s limited knowledge of Business Aviation. But don’t be misled - politicians value this form of transportation themselves. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

44

P

olitical rhetoric is not always the stuff of logic. Too often the person running for office (or the team handling the candidate) selects words or themes that are meant to resonate with the current mood of the voters, hoping that emotion rather than reason will be remembered on Election Day. Unfortunately the character of presidential campaigning as the USA prepares for November 6th this year seems perilously close to leveraging the nation’s economic anxiety for political gain at a time when voters need constructive ideas and effective leadership. In particular, the gratuitous use of the words “corporate jets” as a surrogate for greed and excess is inflammatory and inappropriate. Far from being worthy of wrath from the Occupy Wall Street crowd and upheld as an object to be vilified by those who want the occupiers’ vote, business aircraft are tools for enhancing the productivity of a

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

company’s two most important assets—people and time. And they are effective tools: Our nation’s most successful and admired companies use business aircraft along with airlines, trains and cars to satisfy their travel needs. When companies have access to efficient transportation, jobs are created in towns and cities throughout the nation. Business aircraft link rural locations to worldwide markets. Factories are situated where labor is available and cost of living is attractive. Individuals who never ride on a “corporate jet” are the beneficiaries of a company’s use of Business Aviation.

PREYING ON MISUNDERSTANDING Politicians who make facetious references to the company aircraft are appealing to the lack of knowledge the average voter has regarding Business Aviation. For the most part, voters are

Aircraft Index see Page 4


What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

BUSINESS AVIATION: THE POLITICIANS RELY ON IT TOO !

unaware of the fact that no other item of capital equipment is subject to closer scrutiny. Operations of business aircraft are reviewed in detail by the federal government, by local authorities and by shareholders. Use of IT systems (unlike business aircraft) is not regulated by the federal government. There are no federal laws that address the personal use of the company’s computer servers or email infrastructure. Upgrading laptop computers and smartphones for executives goes virtually unnoticed, except for a possible reference in the business press to a company enhancing its productivity systems. In fact, the company that insisted upon using electric typewriters, manual filing systems and the postal system exclusively would be shunned by investors and would be cannon fodder for the business press. The benefits of business aircraft are well known to politicians. They use them when campaigning and, if elected, to meet their official travel needs whenever possible. Consider the role that Business Aviation plays for the Commander in Chief. President Obama logs many hours on the biggest of all business aircraft—Air Force One. Is hypocrisy a requirement for those seeking elected office? Like other nations throughout the globe, the USA is burdened by a public debt that many economists feel is dangerously unsustainable. We need ideas that generate an atmosphere where the appropriate mix of spending restraints and revenue enhancements combine to reduce the ratio of national debt to Gross Domestic Product. Singling out “corporate jets” as a centerpiece of reform is provocative without being constructive.

BLOCKING CORPORATE ESPIONAGE It is encouraging, however, that in the midst of the machinations of Washington, DC, some semblance of sanity surfaced as a rare display of bipartisanism Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

restored the Block Aircraft Registration Request (BARR) system. Congress overwhelmingly voted to enable companies the option to not have the Nnumber of their aircraft displayed on the radar coverage that is available to the public. Information such as aircraft N-number, altitude, airspeed, destination and estimated time of arrival are still available to FAA controllers, but public websites will not show such data. The BARR was enacted about a decade ago as public websites gained access to the FAA radar feed of aircraft movements. Flight activity of company aircraft has been used to glean insightful and potentially valuable information about a firm’s strategic plans. Before links between FAA radar data and public websites were available, investment specialists interested in getting an edge on mergers, sales and major expansion plans of their target would go to exceptional means to know where the company aircraft was headed. A typical means was positioning listeners with radios able to pick up communications between the FAA Control Tower’s clearance delivery and the aircraft as the investment researcher parked at hotspots for Business Aviation such as Westchester County Airport.

“ The benefits of business aircraft are well known to politicians. They use them when campaigning and, if elected, to meet their official travel needs whenever possible.”

Although the system of blocked registration data worked well for many years, the program was weakened earlier in 2011 when the federal government limited participation to only those companies that submitted detailed proof of valid security concerns. The added level of bureaucracy, which was enacted in early August 2011, was considered unwarranted by a pivotal number of Senators and Congressmen who moved to restore the BARR to its original form. Therein lay a rare, but welcome example of reason prevailing in a matter related to “corporate jets.” Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation: The sign of a well-managed company Airlines are easily identified by just about everyone. So is Military Aviation. But all the rest—that vast spectrum of flying usually referred to as General Aviation or simply GA—is hard to define with precision, observes Jack Olcott. Usually it is identified by what it is not—not the airlines and not the military. A encompasses activities that range from ultra-light craft that adventurers take aloft to experience bird-like flight to highly sophisticated business jets that carry entrepreneurs to emerging markets throughout the globe non-stop. Thus it is understandable that the public may have little knowledge of the role that nonairline, non-military aviation plays in the overall economy of our country.

G

For the record, all of General Aviation contributes about $150 billion annually to US economic output, according to research conducted by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the National Business Aviation Association. Nearly 70 percent of all General Aviation activities have a commercial component, either directly by offering services for hire (such a charter, flight instruction, agricultural support or other special purpose activities) or indirectly by providing transport of people and goods for industry. The segment of GA that serves the transportation needs of industry is sufficiently large to have its own designation— Business Aviation. The average “corporate jet” is far from large, at least by the standards of airliners. Typically it has suffi-

PASSENGER JOB CATEGORY

Managers, Technicians, Sales & Service Staff Top Management

cient size to carry about six to eight passengers and is flown by two professional aviators. Headroom ranges from about five feet in most light and many medium jet cabins to just over six feet on all but the very largest business aircraft. These aircraft are designed to provide purposeful transportation, and they do yeoman service. Over three-quarters of all passengers on business aircraft are middle managers or technical specialists. The majority of companies operating business aircraft are relatively small companies; their average employee count is fewer than 500 and seven out of ten operators have fewer than 1,000 employees. Time spent traveling onboard a company aircraft is devoted mostly to work-related activities. No one wants to be seen reading the latest hot novel in the presence of his or her professional peers. Business aircraft are indeed offices that move, and the focus is on business. The company that appreciates the value of people and time uses Business Aviation - the sign of enlightened management. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

COMPANY SIZE

500 or fewer employees Between 500 & 1,000 employees Over 1,000 employees

SOURCE: THE REAL WORLD OF BUSINESS AVIATION: A SURVEY OF COMPANIES USING GENERAL AVIATION AIRCRAFT. HARRIS INTERACTIVE, INC. 2009

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation Justified To say that “you cannot justify your use of Business Aviation economically” would expose a fundamental misunderstanding of your core enterprise, your growth strategies, your culture, and how you apply your most critical resources, Peter Agur Jr. outlines. It’s like telling a community it cannot afford fire trucks because they cost too much per mile driven. Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

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our enterprise’s strategy probably seeks to create additional revenues while managing the resulting costs. That means your future success is revenue-based. Therefore, deepening market penetration, developing markets, and expanding products and service lines are all critical to you achieving your goals.

Y

Those outcomes rely on the leadership, guidance and influence of your key people. Getting those key people more places, more quickly and more often shortens your business cycle and raises revenues, dramatically. Your entire organization, top

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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to bottom, can understand and support that. Don’t be surprised by the source of that support. If growth is your goal, Business Aviation is your vehicle. Years ago I was on an airliner en route to meet with the Chairman of GM. Sitting next to me was a fellow wearing a GM windbreaker. I asked him what he did. He said he worked at a headlight plant and was on his way to Detroit to bring samples of new designs for a car under development. I asked him if he knew GM had company planes. He did. He had ridden on GM’s shuttle aircraft when he worked at another plant. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


About Us... ‘Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter” commented Bill Quinn, Managing Director of Charleston Aviation Partners.

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William J. Quinn

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“But there are two less obvious costs this CEO and CFO should also consider: the economic cost of time, and the less tangible costs of lost opportunity.”

PRODUCTIVE BUSINESS TRIP? CAN YOU AFFORD TO WASTE TIME IN THE AIRLINE LOUNGE?

I asked his thoughts about their executive jets. He responded very quickly, “I’m glad they use them. The more trips those folks take the more deals they do, and that allows us to build more cars and trucks.” He clearly understood how and why Business Aviation was used by GM. Most impressive of all: He was a union shop steward. To that GM employee’s point, today I am working on a project for an international investment banking firm. Even though they have been long-term users of Business Aircraft, they have asked for a “clean sheet” analysis of all their air travel options for their top leadership team. Their business is spread over four continents. Like most companies creating and nurturing strategic alliances and markets, the CEO is directly involved in every deal. In other words, their CEO is critical to revenue creation. Like most financial executives, his CFO can see the power of savings. After all, theoretically, every dollar saved goes directly to the bottom line as an incremental increase in profit. Practically, that is not the case. A dollar not invested in Business Aviation is partially offset by the added cost of airline fares, hotels, et al. But there are two less obvious costs this CEO and CFO should also consider: the economic cost of time, and the less tangible costs of lost opportunity.

LOST TIME AND LOST OPPORTUNITY The economic cost of the CEO’s time is easily calculated. A CEO being paid $5 million (well below the average for FORTUNE 500 CEOs) who puts in a 50 hour week is being paid more than $2,000 per hour. Conservatively, door-to-door travel time on Business Aviation takes about three hours per domestic leg and four hours per international leg less than on the airlines. In this particular case, displacing the CEO onto the airlines for his international and transcontinental trip legs alone adds 220 travel hours to his annual schedule. That is

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equivalent to more than four weeks of productive time lost to check-in, security, connections, customs and immigration, baggage claim, and added ground travel. It does not take into consideration the reduced productivity en route due to the lack of privacy and effective work environment on the airlines. The 220 added travel hours of top executive time costs the company well over $400,000. That does not include the parallel costs for his traveling companions or the unscheduled delays which occur on about 25% of all airline flights. It is apparent that the airline “net net savings” are much smaller than they initially appear. Moving the CEO off of Business Aviation and onto the airlines also incurs some unintended consequences. The CEO is now spending 9% of his time (220 hours/2,500 hours) getting on and off the airlines rather than doing business. Since top executives’ time tends to be inelastic (there is no more time available), that translates to a 9% reduction in the CEO’s productivity. In the end, something has to give. When faced with this issue most executives frankly admit they would travel less, going to fewer meetings. The ultimate impact on the company is that fewer deals get done, and those that do get done take longer. What does that cost the company? Probably a lot more than the difference between the cost of traveling on the airlines versus using Business Aviation. Economically, think of Business Aviation as your company fire truck. It is taking firemen and women to either stoke the engine of your enterprise with new revenues or to remote sites to put out fires that threaten the company. Either way, you wouldn’t send them on public transit, would you? That is Business Aviation justified. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Visionary Thinking A ‘visionary’ is one with unusually keen foresight; a person given to audacious, highly speculative or impractical ideas. It is hard to think that a company or governance board would build strategic plans based on this definition, suggests Jay Mesinger. So how does a board see into the future with respect to planning a long-term travel solution? Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

A

s with any of the long-term planning a company has to do to stay out ahead of its competition and stay profitable well into the future, finding a long-term travel solution is dependent on well thought-out ideas and analysis, thereby avoiding any confusion between tactical and strategic planning. Let’s imagine that a Board of Directors for a company that serves a regional marketplace is at the start of the process of flight department development. Clearly during the initial phase of the idea of building a flight department, the thought of overbuying an aircraft that falls way outside of the established Mission Profile could be labeled as “audacious thinking!” Thus, by using good counsel and current and nearterm utilization models to determine the best aircraft or Business Aviation solution to meet the needs

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of that moment, the directors may have determined that the acquisition of a turboprop would fulfill those regional travel needs. So when would be a good time for the Directors to dust off the profile work and re-analyze their travel needs? When is it too early to not be labeled a distraction as opposed to a plan? I believe that the time is right the moment the winds of utilization start to shift, based on a clear discussion of change in the overall company business model or marketplace expansion. The good news is that the flight department does not lead the discussion. It is not a speculative discussion based on audacious thinking; it is a strategic discussion by nature and falls within the overall scope of corporate planning for product and market place expansion. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM THE BASIC APPROACH CAN OFTEN BE THE MOST AFFECTIVE

“So it is really not ‘visionary’ nor is it ‘enlightened’ planning and thinking that is required in the process of planning long-term travel needs...”

Remember: the original goal of the flight department, even in its regional reach, was to get out ahead of competition, to be in front of the client and provide the finest in face-to-face service. This priority will not change. What will change is the distance required to fly to perform and meet these goals. So as a company starts to develop its product or service reach and then builds overall budgets to help analyze the decision to expand the flight department, work should begin. After all, a large part of the budget process will include moving the people around these new regions.

BACK TO BASICS This may be the first time the company has developed a product or provided a service offering that is international in reach. With new markets emerging, the distances may not be simply across a land border to be international - it could be halfway across the world. Many companies we are dealing with are now expanding into China or other parts of Asia, and as such, these destinations provide myriad challenges and cultural adaptations. The flight department will also be faced with many operational changes and challenges. Although just like the corporate analysis that will take place with respect to SWAT analysis or budget-crunching, the flight department will also create these same evaluation tools.

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The department will be asked by the Directors to go back to the basics; to take the new city pairs and frequencies and create a new Mission Profile plan thereby establishing which Business Aviation solution (or combination of solutions) work best to carry the company and its offerings into their bright new future. So it is really not ‘visionary’ nor is it ‘enlightened’ planning and thinking that is required in the process of planning long-term travel needs, but rather it’s good old basic fundamentals. Directors do not want to get out ahead of themselves. They will not want to prematurely add costs or capacity to their aviation solutions. They will instead want the growth of the flight department and its ability to fulfill the established mission to follow the path that is established on the bigger corporate plan by aligning with the current and nearterm growth of the business and the actual analyzed need for transportation. It can be intoxicating to think about this current aviation market and buy opportunistically, but beware that over-buying ahead of need just to capture what might look like a once-in-a-lifetime price is not the path to success. Buying based on solid planning and established need will never be the wrong approach. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Insurance Refresher Course (Part 2) We closed 2011 by reviewing the risk management and insurance issues brought forth in this column over the first six months of last year. As we launch into 2012, Stuart Hope offers a review of ideas rendered in Insurance articles to feature here over the final six months of 2011. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS (ERP): Your actions in the initial hours following a serious aircraft accident may well determine the survival of your flight department. If you have previously taken the time to put together an ERP, even if not perfect, you will be ahead of the game. You will have already decided who the company media spokesperson will be, and have a written statement prepared addressing first and foremost, concern for the families involved, the company’s high safety standards for the aircraft and pilots, and the company’s intention of full cooperation with authorities.

If you have not yet started an ERP, there are resources available to help. Many aviation insurance companies post sample ERP templates online. Depending on the size of your flight department, your insurer may be willing to send their expert in Emergency Response Planning to assist you in creating a plan or helping you improve the one you have in place. Periodic testing is imperative as phone numbers, procedures and personnel will all change. Discover the bottlenecks by doing annual mock drills. U

FORWARD-PLAN YOUR INSURANCE STRATEGIES

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTRACT REVIEW

“ Never focus exclusively on the primary coverages (Liability, Medical Payments, and Physical Damage/Hull) with little or no thought given to ancillary coverages until a loss occurs.”

We have all become dangerously accustomed to signing contracts in everyday business dealings without even a cursory reading. The importance of providing your insurance broker and attorney a copy of any aviation contracts prior to execution cannot be overstated. Generally, Purchase Agreements, Hangar Leases, Bank Financing Documents, Aircraft Leases, Replacement Engine or Parts Leases and Maintenance Agreements all contain clauses that require you to meet certain insurance conditions. If you don’t comply, you may find yourself in a nasty breach-of-contract lawsuit simply because you didn’t dot your “i’s” and cross your “t’s.” In the future, when evaluating any contract related to your aircraft, contact your broker and attorney during the contract review process (if not earlier).

MURPHY’S LAW As broad as insurance contracts are, land mines are present. Our nemeses (Mr. Murphy) lurks in the background - thus it is advisable to know how policies can be individually customized to “Murphyproof” the contract. The one area of the aircraft policy that seems to generate a disproportionate number of claim denials is the Approved Pilots clause. The best choice in your effort to bullet-proof your policy in this area is an approved pilots clause that reads: “Any pilot approved by the named insured ” [without a written requirement for annual recurrent training]. Note: even with this version, it is still the expectation and intent of the insurer that all primary pilots will complete annual recurrent training approved by the insurer. This clause is typically reserved for their best accounts; accounts that operate late-model equipment; whose pilots are engaged at a minimum in annual simulator-based recurrent training for the specific make and model aircraft they fly; and whose flight departments proactively embrace safety initiatives and operate at the highest professional caliber.

IGNORE ANCILLARY/OPTIONAL COVERAGE AT YOUR PERIL Never focus exclusively on the primary coverages (Liability, Medical Payments, and Physical

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Damage/Hull) with little or no thought given to ancillary coverages until a loss occurs. Three types of ancillary protection that warrant attention follow: War Risk Related Perils Coverage: When you purchase War coverage, you are buying out thirty two (32) perils normally excluded in your aviation insurance policy. In addition to the War peril, you add back coverage for some other significant risks including Terrorism, Hijacking, Riots, Revolution, Sabotage, Confiscation, Seizure and Appropriation to name a few. Guest Voluntary Settlement (GVS) Coverage: This coverage is very similar in scope to Accidental Death and Dismemberment coverage. It allows the Named Insured to offer a specified amount of monetary compensation to passengers for certain injuries arising from aviation operations, regardless of any negligence. GVS Coverage is an added benefit for employees that allows them to “double-dip.” A properly structured Workers’ Compensation policy should be the sole remedy for employees injured on the job, however if the employee is injured during the company’s aviation operations while acting within the scope of their employment, the employer can also offer compensation via GVS Coverage. Extra Expense for a Temporary Substitute Aircraft: This coverage pays the extra expense for renting/chartering a substitute aircraft while your aircraft is out of service due to a covered loss. It does not respond like your auto policy, which typically pays the full cost of renting a substitute vehicle while yours is being repaired. This coverage only pays the difference between the normal operating cost of your aircraft and the replacement aircraft you are chartering or renting. There are maximum daily benefits, a maximum time period for this coverage and deductibles, all of which can be negotiated. In concluding, remember this: The Japanese word ‘kaizen’ means continuous improvement. Use the risk management and insurance reviews of the last two issues as a starting point of your own kaizen.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


“The Citation & Conquest Specialists” Columbia, South Carolina Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

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2004 LEARJET 45XR, S/N 45-243

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1991 CITATION V, S/N 560-1118

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

IRS Record Keeping Requirements If and when the IRS demands an audit, strict adherence to record keeping will be worth its weight in gold, notes attorney Chris Younger.

Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

s is the case with governance of any operating business, owners of business aircraft must maintain adequate records to support the tax treatment of their income and loss with respect to their involvement with Business Aviation. Those records must be retained for an adequate amount of time in the event they are needed in connection with an income tax audit.

A

Additionally, Directors should be aware of unique record keeping requirements pertaining to use of business aircraft. As a general rule, business aircraft owners should retain tax records for a minimum of six years following the date that the owner files the income tax return to which those records relate. The typical limitations period prohibits the IRS from challenging the contents of a tax return more than three years after it is filed. In certain instances, such as where income is understated by a substantial amount, this time period can be expanded to six years. Of course, there are exceptions to this rule, such as where a taxpayer engages in fraud or fails to file a tax return. In those situations, there is no applicable statute of limitations. However, assuming that those exceptions do not apply, following the general six year rule should be adequate.

ADDITIONAL RULES OF THUMB In addition to these “rule of thumb” recommendations, business aircraft owners should always keep all records relating to an aircraft, including those pertaining to the purchase and sale of the aircraft, until six years after the owner sells or otherwise disposes of the property. The purpose for such retention is to ensure that the owner can support

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the amount of any gain or loss reported as a result of the sale of its aircraft and any concomitant tax basis adjustments to the aircraft that affect the amount of such gain or loss. Business aircraft owners also face certain unique tax record keeping requirements. For example, they must create and retain records relating to SIFL (Standard Industry Fare Level) income inclusion U Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“A business aircraft owner should also ensure that certain records are created in a manner that will enable the owner to effectively utilize them in the event of a tax audit.”

amounts and personal loss deduction limitations. (SIFL is an amount specified by the federal government to determine the value of personal travel on the company aircraft.) These records include items that must be created contemporaneously with the flights to which they relate. If a business aircraft owner fails to create such records contemporaneously with the relevant flight, the IRS may have a basis to question or challenge the veracity of the information contained in those records during an audit by, for example, arguing that a business aircraft owner created records merely to support its tax position in an audit.

AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT COMPANIES A business aircraft owner should be able to access flight, financial and tax records relating to ownership and operation of its aircraft. If a business aircraft owner hires a management company to maintain certain records (e.g., flight logs, passenger manifests, flight related activity and maintenance costs), the owner should ensure that its agreement with the management company gives it the right to access these records as necessary even after the termination of the agreement between the owner and

62

management company. Among the recommended provisions to guarantee access to such records would be a covenant by the management company that it will retain those records for an adequate period of time after their creation. A business aircraft owner should also ensure that certain records are created in a manner that will enable the owner to effectively utilize them in the event of a tax audit. This is especially true for records that are used as back-up to support SIFL income inclusion amounts and deduction limitations resulting from use of the aircraft for personal entertainment. Since the process can be complex, a business aircraft owner should consider retaining a qualified aviation tax consultant who has expertise in collecting and organizing the information needed to correctly calculate these items. Seeking legal counsel regarding record keeping will ensure that owners of business aircraft are prepared in the event of an IRS audit.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Should Your Aircraft Fly Part 135 ? The risks of operating a business aircraft are very low, but they are not zero, warns David Wyndham. In the event of an accident, an owner can face a significant liability issue - thus a corporation may look to insulate itself from some of the risk by having a degree of separation between itself and the aircraft. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

I

nsulating oneself may involve having the company aircraft placed into a single-purpose entity, a flight department company (Bizplane1, LLC). In the case of the business aircraft, the regulation governing a commercial operation is FAR Part 135. Without this certificate, our hypothetical flight department's pilots can have their licenses revoked for providing illegal charter. This issue even comes into consideration if a senior executive wants to reimburse the company for personal use of the business aircraft. If the parent company wants to have the additional liability protection that separation may provide, having the aircraft in a Part 135 charter entity is

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one way to do it. The aircraft operator has command and control of the aircraft in FAA terms. Thus, the parent corporation has that level of separation for risk management and the CEO can charter the airplane for personal use if so desired. So why not just get your own Part 135 operating certificate? Let us count the reasons. The process can be time and money consuming.

OBTAINING & MAINTAINING PART 135 The FAA has very specific requirements for obtaining and maintaining a commercial operating Part 135 certification. In order to become certified that U these requirements are met, there is a lengthy

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AL NG DE DI N PE


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ With the execution of specific management and charter agreements, the parent company can charter its own aircraft.“

review and approval process. Issuing new Part 135 certificates is not the FAA's primary mission and with budget restraints the process can be very long - 18 to 24 months long!

OPERATING & MAINTENANCE SPECIFICS The Part 135 operator also must have very specific aircraft operating and maintenance procedures in place, and they must be fully documented and approved by the FAA. The organizational structure of the operator is mandated by the FAA to have certain positions such as chief pilots and directors of maintenance. These positions must comply with certain experience and training requirements. The operator must comply with drug testing and record-keeping too.

OWNERS’ CITIZENSHIP A possible issue with some corporations owning a Part 135 operation is the actual owners' citizenship. The Part 135 rules stipulate that the entity's ownership as well as several of the major management positions be held by US citizens. If your corporation does not meet the FAA defined citizenship requirement, it cannot own a Part 135 operation.

ALTERNATIVE SEPARATION... There is, however, another way to achieve separation: You can place the aircraft with an existing charter company, and the aircraft can still be in a

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separate LLC owned by the parent company while the crew can be employees of the existing charter company. With the execution of specific management and charter agreements, the parent company can charter its own aircraft. In this case, the charter-management agreement can also allow the charter operator to charter out your aircraft while not in use by your company. This chartering can generate some revenues to offset the costs of owning an aircraft. For this procedure to work well, there needs to be a clear understanding between all parties involved, however, not only for legal and operation purposes, but also for financial considerations. To make the operation legal to the FAA, the crew does need to be under the control of the charter company, not the aircraft owner/parent company. While the primary means of risk management for a business aircraft are training and insurance, the option to operate the aircraft under Part 135 may be one to consider if additional risk management strategies are desired by your company. . Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Thinking of a New Jet? Are you planning to invest in a new company aircraft, asks Dave Higdon? Mission needs drive model options, while financial aspects drive a budget that balances purchase price, operational costs and tax impacts. The best options fall near the intersection where the mission and finance lines cross. Following is a review of Light and Medium-size aircraft expected to be available in the near future. o enjoy the broadest available choices of business aircraft, in addition to considering the current-production aircraft models you should look at aircraft in development. Forward thinking enlarges your pool of choices.

T

If cabin space is important to your mission needs, the HondaJet should be of interest to you (as should its 1,180-nautical mile range, carrying four).

LIGHT & MEDIUM TWIN ENGINE JETS

Cessna’s newly announced Citation M2, meanwhile, is a light jet designed to fulfill the function that the CJ1 once did. Offering six seats, and traveling approximately 60 knots quicker than the smaller Citation Mustang, the 1,400-nautical-mile Citation M2 is priced lower than the CJ1. The M2 is due in the latter half of 2013.

Among the in-development light jets to watch is Honda’s HondaJet on-track for certification late in 2012. HondaJet offers plenty of interior space thanks to its distinctive engine mounts – pylons on the upper-wing - that free the cabin from heavy structure typically required for fuselage-mounted engines.

Cessna is also updating its Citation X, re-branding it the Citation Ten. The major differences include new engines, state-of-the-art avionics, and, most important to a prospective business traveler, a longer fuselage. Certification of the 3,245-nauticalmile Citation Ten is also expected during 2013.

[Note: all range statements are IFR with NBAA reserves.]

HONDAJET

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U


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“When considering your own company’s medium-term travel requirements, these options should be factored in to your planning...”

CESSNA’S M2

Bombardier is breaking the mold in Business Aviation with its upcoming Learjet 85, which will become the first all-composite business jet. (Use of composites give the aircraft a lighter weight, allow for slicker aerodynamics, and provide greater cabin space – in this case, approximately 18 percent more room than its closest competitor.) The Learjet 85 (with ability to cover up to 3,000 nautical miles) is designed to cater to mission needs that fall between Bombardier’s existing Learjet 60XR and Challenger 300 models. Certification is currently scheduled for 2013. Embraer offers the Legacy 450 and larger, longerlegged Legacy 500 - two new players in the upper medium-cabin jet segment once certified. The Legacy 450 offers a range of 2,200 nautical miles (carrying eight), while the latter offers 2,800 nautical miles range flying the same payload. These two models should be certified by 2013. Somewhat further out in 2015, Cessna expects to certificate its newly announced Citation Latitude, a medium-size jet with a new cabin. This model is a modified version of the proven Citation Sovereign and will utilize the same modern avionics as the Citation Ten.

LIGHT SINGLE ENGINE JETS For six decades airframe designers have studied ways to create a single-engine jet in the Business Aviation arena. Single engine aircraft hold plenty of appeal, including jet performance at lower cost, turbine reliability, single-engine simplicity, and singlepilot flight ease. Today, there are several concepts of single-engine business jets working at various stages of

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development. Renewed development work on two designs in particular have raised hopes for that first-ever single-engine business jet to be certified in the near future. Both are reviewed below. Diamond Aircraft, recently backed by investment from Medrar Financial Group, expects near-term certification of the Diamond D-Jet the company has been working on for several years now. The D-Jet offers a five-seat capacity, and should be certified for single-pilot operations. Designed for business trips ranging ideally between 350 to 700 miles, this jet design is attractively priced below $2 million. Cirrus Aircraft has also announced the revival of its Cirrus SJ50 Vision single-engine jet, following the company’s acquisition by China Aviation Industry General Aircraft (AVIC). The projected performance is very similar to that of the D-Jet; the SJ50 will also seat five, operate with a single pilot, cater for business trips between 350-700 miles and is currently priced under $2million.

ACQUISITION PLANNING LONG TERM The above review of light and medium jets expected to come on to the market in the near- to medium-term includes models expected to enter service over the next four years. When considering your own company’s mediumterm travel requirements, these options should be factored in to your planning as you weigh the right jet to provide transportation for your all-important company employees. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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THE AIRCRAFT REGISTRY OF CHOICE $UXEDKDVDQLQWHUQDWLRQDOUHSXWDWLRQDVDWD[HIÀFLHQWMXULVGLFWLRQZLWKKLJKUHJXODWRU\VWDQGDUGVLQFRPSOLDQFH with ICAO and rated Category 1 by US-FAA International Aviation Safety Assessments (IASA) Program. 6RPH$GYDQWDJHVDQG%HQHÀWVRI5HJLVWHULQJDQ$LUFUDIWLQ$UXED High regulatory and safety oversight standards Unparalleled customer service and technical support Tax-Efficient No income taxes, No corporate taxes, No VAT, No excise tax, No sales tax, No import tax, No stamp tax Corporate aircraft entitled to purchase tax-exempt-fuel in the EU Accession of the Cape Town Convention Secure mortgage register Stable legal and political jurisdiction ProfessionalOHJDODQGÀQDQFLDOVHUYLFHVZLWKH[SHUWLVHLQDYLDWLRQ Neutral nationality registration prefix P4Impeccable 20 year track-record and well-earned international reputation

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Medium Jets Value Among the genius aspects of private aviation, the broad spectrum of solution options stands as a remarkable achievement. Neither too big, nor too small (and not too expensive), Medium Jets can be just the right fit for many an operator. rom Entry Level Jets (under 10,000 lbs take-off weight) through Light Jets and on to the heady realm of the VIP-configured airliners, something undoubtedly exists that will accommodate your requirement for speed, range and capacity – especially for capacity.

F

Of all the business jet categories, none does more to balance capability with utility than the Medium Jet segment (loosely defined by aircraft with a maximum take-off weight between 20,001-40,000 lbs); no segment provides more options, either. Medium Jets, as their label indicates, fall between the Light Jet and Large-Cabin Jet segments in numerous ways, while leaning closer to the Large-

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Cabin segment in several specific areas. Not too big, not too small, nor too expensive: Medium Jets can be just the right fit for many an operator.

CABIN VALUE A smaller Medium Jet can only improve incrementally on the cabin space of the largest Light Jets, while the largest Medium Jet could dwarf the volume of that same Light Jet model. Medium Jets also tend to cruise at the upper-end of the private jet speed range – between Mach 0.78 and Mach 0.85 - with one Medium Jet, Cessna’s still best-in-civil-aviation Citation X capable of cruising at Mach 0.92. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

If there’s a contest to identify a give-back element to the Medium Jet segment, most would opt for runway flexibility. And that’s only fair. Runway requirements for Medium Jets are generally longer than the average length needed by a Light Jet. But Medium Jets typically can use a significant percentage of the secondary airports serving most of the 150 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. In general the average Medium Jet can reach most of the U.S. non-stop from almost anywhere in the U.S., thanks to their legs-capability. Medium Jets typically can fly from several hundred miles to more than 1,000 miles farther than the Light Jet average. That range capability also gives the crew the flexibility to string together a sequence of stops that total the same distance. Using the latter approach makes it possible for a Medium Jet to cover multiple stops and get home at the days’ end – without buying fuel along the way.

CONSIDER A MEDIUM JET IF… This capability to avoid refueling on a multi-leg trip is called “tankering”, and it makes the Medium Jet a more-suitable solution than a Light Jet for the operator who regularly needs to fly 2,000 nautical miles or more on a leg – or who may cover that much in a day or two flying multiple legs. While on average faster than the Light Jet average, a Medium Jet’s superior speed generally provides only a few minutes of gain on the typical Business Aviation trip of 350 to 500 miles, but the difference will be notable on legs as long as the average Light Jet’s typical maximum range. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

“Medium Jets deliver plenty of added space and comfort over the typical Light Jet – but at costs still significantly below those of the Large Cabin segment.”

There’s no disputing the advantages of space in the comfort equation, particularly when applied to longer trips. That is ultimately where the Medium Jet’s basic advantage comes into play. Medium Jets deliver plenty of added space and comfort over the typical Light Jet – but at costs still significantly below those of the Large Cabin segment. Indeed, Medium Jets generally can match their Large Cabin kin in terms of speed and, to a point, range - while providing reasonable office amenities that are competitive with most larger aircraft. It is little wonder that the Medium Jet segment is the biggest selling, deepest segment across the business aircraft market.

MEDIUM JET PRICE GUIDE The fo llo w ing Med ium Jets Retail Price Guid e rep resents current values p ublished in the Aircraft Bluebo o k – Price Digest. The stud y sp ans m o d el years fro m 1992 thro ugh Winter 2011. Values rep o rted are in USD m illio ns. Each rep o rting p o int rep resents the current retail value p ublished in the Aircraft Bluebo o k by its co rresp o nd ing calend ar year. Fo r exam p le, the Learjet 45XR values rep o rted in the Winter 2011 ed itio n o f Bluebo o k sho w $5.0m USD fo r a 2004 m o d el, $5.5m USD fo r a 2005 m o d el and so fo rth. Aircraft are listed alp habetically. With the read er’s k no w led ge o f aircraft, equip m ent, range and p erfo rm ance, the fo llo w ing Guid e allo w s the read er to d eterm ine the best value range fo r co nsid eratio n. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM MEDIUM JET AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - WINTER 2011-1992 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE 2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

24.75

22.0

18.5

16.3

14.8

13.7

12.8

12.3

12.0

CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680

17.5

15.5

13.4

11.5

11.0

10.5

10.0

9.5

CESSNA CITATION X 750

21.67

18.5

15.5

13.1

12.1

11.1

10.1

9.1

CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560

12.45

10.5

9.7

8.7 7.0

6.3

6.1

5.7

MODELS BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

2002 US$M

CESSNA CITATION V1 650 CESSNA CITATION V11 650

CESSNA CITATION XLS 560

7.8

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560 DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX

4.9 32.1

DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY

27.0

25.0

22.0

23.0

19.0

17.5

24.0

21.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY

8.6

8.1

4.5

4.3

20.5

20.0

18.5

17.5

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

17.0 16.0

15.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000

15.2

13.7

13.2

13.0

12.0

11.0

DASSAULT FALCON 50EX

11.2

10.7

10.2

9.7

9.2

8.7

9.5

8.8

8.3

7.9

5.7

5.4

5.1

4.8

5.0

4.6

4.1

4.0

3.8

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280

24.0

GULFSTREAM G200

23.32

16.5

13.0

11.0

10.5

10.0

GULFSTREAM G150

15.050

12.8

10.5

9.5

8.5

7.5

GULFSTREAM G100

6.0

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX GULFSTREAM /ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000

22.9

18.0

16.0

14.0

16.024

11.5

10.0

9.0

9.0

7.8

HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE

7.0

6.3

HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE

5.5

HAWKER 800XP HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750

13.309

10.0

8.5

7.0

LEARJET 60XR

14.1

10.0

8.9

7.8

LEARJET 60SE/XR

6.6

LEARJET 60SE

5.4

4.8

4.3

LEARJET 60 LEARJET 45XR

13.150

9.9

8.1

7.2

LEARJET 45 LEARJET 40XR

10.6

8.0

6.3

5.4

LEARJET 40

6.5

5.8

5.5

5.0

4.4

5.5

5.0

4.7

4.4

4.0

4.8

4.4

4.0

4.3

4.0

3.6

3.6

3.2

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation MEDIUM JET AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - WINTER 2011-1992 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE 2001 MODELS

US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

1993 US$M

1992 US$M

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

2.7

2.5

2.3

2.1

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 CESSNA CITATION V1 650 CESSNA CITATION V11 650

4.1

3.6

3.5

3.1

2.9

7.7

7.2

6.5

6.0

5.5

5.0

4.1

3.8

3.5

3.2

DASSAULT FALCON 2000

10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

8.5

8.0

7.5

DASSAULT FALCON 50EX

8.2

7.7

7.2

6.9

6.5 4.9

4.8

4.7

4.4

4.3

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.5

3.7

3.6

3.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

3.1 2.9

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.8

2.6

2.5

CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680 CESSNA CITATION X 750 CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560 CESSNA CITATION XLS 560 CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560 DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280 GULFSTREAM G200

7.3

6.9

6.7

4.4

4.0

3.6

GULFSTREAM G150 GULFSTREAM G100 GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX

3.4

3.3

3.2

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000 HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE HAWKER 800XP

3.8

3.6

3.5

3.4

3.3

HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750 LEARJET 60XR LEARJET 60SE/XR LEARJET 60SE LEARJET 60

3.6

3.4

3.3

3.1

3.4

3.3

3.2

3.1

3.0

2.9

LEARJET 45XR LEARJET 45 LEARJET 40XR LEARJET 40 AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

A New Year And A New View appy New Year! I hope the holidays were filled with family, joy and celebration for all. As we wave goodbye to 2011 in the rear view mirror and start to look ahead, I thought it might be interesting to be sure as an industry that we are looking through the same front windshield; especially the aircraft sales professionals and consultants we work with day-to-day. What is ahead for us and our clients in 2012? Much will be taking place. On a macro level, 2012 will be an election year, and this always brings extra market discussion. If the current administration wins what will be the effect? If a new political party is elected, how will that affect markets? Already the conversation is focused around those varying outcomes. But additionally, what will happen if Europe continues to dominate the global economic conversation? Will there be a trickle effect to our slow, but steady recovery? How will this affect both aircraft prices and transactional activity? Some could look at all of the above items and wonder what there will be to celebrate? You know me though - I am already looking for the glass that is half full. Of course, you could be looking for the glass that is half empty, but you’ll find it is the same glass. It is all about perspective. I believe that our clients who place their trust and confidence in us are looking for honest, fact-based answers, not philosophical rhetoric. Having discussed the roadblocks, let’s discuss the facts and see whether, by the end of this article, we as a group of professionals can spot the glass that is half full, aided by answers that are fact-based. Often what can begin to happen when economic uncertainty creeps into a market is a tendency for buyers to take a ‘wait-and-see’ approach to purchases. They of course are waiting for a downward market correction. Think back to the 2008 time-frame: this exact phenomenon occurred. To the credit of the ‘wait-and-see’ group, they achieved 50-70 percent-worth of reductions from the high point of 2007. Today with the uncertainty of Europe we should expect some to adopt that same

H

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

approach. One thing to remind buyers today, however, is that given the huge correction in the past few years there is just not another 5070 percent of correction left to happen, and for the most part the slower pace of sales is already dialed in as a factor for what buyers are paying today. Simply put: real buyers who create certainty for sellers in being able to complete a transaction are getting the most favorable pricing without needing to wait. For our sellers who approach us for market wisdom, the best thing we can tell them is to be ready and willing sellers when that credible buyer comes knocking. There are just not as many knocking in this environment. They may also experience closing schedules that seem protracted due to an extended financing timeline, but when someone is real and committed to buying, the seller needs to make sure they don’t let the next seller have the buyer’s business! The greatest value we can add to the seller today is to help them understand the market they are selling into - and this market, except for a very few high-end segments, is all price driven. Sellers should not mistake ‘price driven’ for having to take huge additional discounts if their aircraft are already priced correctly for today’s market. Our value to buyers comes in helping them know the right price to pay and not mistaking a price-driven market for one that is still ripe for huge further discounting. I really believe our market is already adjusted for today’s economic undercurrents. As far as a change in political leadership is concerned, I would not put much hope in any dramatic change in either transactional activity or prices regardless of the outcome. A key indicator to watch this year will be inventory levels. The inventory of most categories of aircraft is stabilizing and this is due largely to owners once again finding value in the aircraft. Possibly their individual business is improving and selling this business tool is not as pressing a need as it once was, whereas putting it back to work is the new priority! Many of the optics-generated listings are coming off the market for that very reason. Although higher than the ‘for sale’ inventory levels of better days, the key indicator www.AvBuyer.com

will be stability in those levels for 2012. It is important to note once again that buyers today seem less driven by manufacturer loyalty and more by price value. In past years, buyers would develop a mission profile then go to the favored manufacturer and make a selection. Today, a buyer is more likely to choose a category of aircraft then go to a market and make the best buy from that chosen category. Thus, sellers must look - as a buyer will - at the comparable aircraft, based on desired size, range and type. So, for example, if you own (and are considering selling) a Hawker 800XP, you must also look at the Hawker 800, Learjet 60, Learjet 45, Citation III, VII and Excel as well as the Astra markets to see what is also available for sale. All of a sudden there are over 230 aircraft potentially competing for the same buyer, even though there are just 44 Hawker 800XP aircraft that are for sale today. That represents a significant difference in the competitive landscape to be considered by both buyer and seller. So you need to look ahead and be ready in 2012. Then in 12 months time, we can all be looking back on a great year! ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and now joins the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2011 Challenger 300 Delivery Position Airframe TT - 0 $22,000,000 * MSG-3 Maintenance Program * Part 91 Compliant * Collins Pro Line 21 4-tube EFIS * Floor Plan 4 -AFT Left hand Divan

Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Falcon 900C SN 200 Airframe TT - 3288.4 $19,250,000 * One Fortune 100 Owner since New * Engines enrolled on MSP Gold * New Paint & Interior 2010 * Honeywell Primus 2000 Five Tube EFIS * APU enrolled in Honeywell MSP

Photos by FGL & Associates

2000 Challenger 604 SN 5433 Airframe TT - 3809.3 $10,300,000 * Engines enrolled in JSSI Complete Maintenance Program * Pro Line 4 Avionic System with Precision Plus Upgrade * Honeywell Mark V EGPWS * Collins 6-Tube EFIS * Airshow 4000

Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 510.2 $10,750,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2001 Challenger 604 SN 5488 Airframe TT - 3351.3 $9,995,000 * Smart Parts Plus Supplement Engine Agreement * MX Tracking: CAMP * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System with Precision Plus * Dual Collins GPS-4000S * Airshow Genesys

Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Dassault Falcon 50EX SN 333 Airframe TT - 3465 $8,695,000 * Engines enrolled in MSP * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System w/ 4-tube EFIS * Honeywell IRS LASERREF IV * TCAS II with Change 7 * Securaplane Security System

Photos by FGL & Associates

2003 Dassault Falcon 50EX SN 332 Airframe TT - 3332 $8,695,000 * Engines are enrolled in MSP * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System w/ 4-Tube EFIS * Honeywell SAT AFIS * Securaplane Ultra-Lite Security System * Single Fortune 100 owner since new

Photos by FGL & Associates

1989 Gulfstream IV SN 1115 Airframe TT - 13,614 $5,700,000 * Enrolled in Gulfstream CMP Maintenance Tracking * MSG-3 Inspection Program * Airshow 400 With Network Provisions * Honeywell SPZ-8000 Avionics Suite * RVSM

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

1995 Challenger 601-3R SN 5185 Airframe TT - 9437 $4,995,000 Engines on Condition w/JSSI Coverage * One Fortune 200 Owner Since New * -150 APU Upgrade * Stc'd CMC Electronic Flight Bags * Honeywell MCS 6000+ SATCOM

Photos by FGL & Associates

1992 Challenger 601-3A/ER SN 5103 Airframe TT - 7610.9 $3,850,000 * Enrolled in CAMP * Airshow Genesys Network * Pro Line II EFIS System * Honeywell Primus 880 * Dual Honeywell Laseref

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Sikorsky S76C+ SN 760498 Airframe TT - 4171.8 $2,995,000 * Gearboxes are enrolled in Sikorsky PAP * Honeywell SPZ 7600 System * Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar * Universal UNS-1D+FMS * Equipped with Emergency Flotation System

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Cessna CJ SN 0344 Airframe TT - 2219.7 $1,700,000 * Enrolled in TAP ELITE & PROPARTS * Sperry SPZ-5000 IFCS/ SIlver Crown Radios * BF Goodrich WX-1000E Stormscope * Precise Pulse Light System * RVSM

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


TURBOPROP REVIEW (PART 2)

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


n the December issue, we reviewed the major in-development and in-production single engine turboprop aircraft models. This month we continue our review of turboprops with a look at some of the contenders in the twin-engine sector. Deep into the bush or far from dry land out over water, the speed gain of doubling horsepower twin propjets retain their appeal with a segment of the owner/pilot market and, in particular, corporate and charter operators. For some owners some missions beg for nothing less than two powerplants; for others, a second engine adds comfort and electrical-source redundancy. Indeed, twins often provide payload benefits to the operator too. All these benefits come at a cost – namely the increased costs of feeding and maintaining two powerplants, hull-insurance premiums and pilot qualifications. No question, they have a place, they have their advantages and fans. But no one in this reporter’s memory ever complained about that second engine once it became the only engine… Following is a review of today’s twinturboprop players.

I

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP: THE KING AIR SERIES Come 2013 and 2014 expect Hawker Beechcraft to fete the world with the story of its King Airs - arguably the dominant propjet twin line dating back to its introduction in 1963 and first deliveries in 1964. Indeed, 2013 will represent nearly 50 years of this particular family of airplane… time flies and King Airs have flown through nearly half of the history of flight. From the original King Air 90 the line has expanded and contracted, and today offers three in-production models. Between them they bridge the markets of the owner/pilot ready for a first turbine with the worlds of big business and demanding military ❯ requirements.

Twin Town: Turboprops for those who need more... by Dave Higdon

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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TURBOPROP REVIEW (PART 2)

KING AIR 350i AND (INSET) ITS CABIN

Today’s King Air models have all-glass cockpits with the hugely popular Pro Line 21 integrated avionics suite from Rockwell Collins in the three panels (Rockwell Collins reports more than 4,000 installations of Pro Line 21). The King Airs could serve as a case study in the success of embracing a philosophy of continuous improvement matched by no other airplane line. Here’s a review of the current production models.

KING AIR C90GTx Today’s incarnation of the original King Air 90 is the speedy, nimble C90GTx, which owes its existence to the groundwork laid with the original King Air design - one that over time progressively improved to better performance, capability and utility (with three 8-by-10-inch displays in its Pro Line 21 package, as an example). Today’s C90GTx sports a pair of PT6A135 engines making an easy 550 shp. Efficient to a fault, the -135s can power the C90GTx to a top cruise speed of 272 knots, to altitudes as high as FL300, and with utility and flexibility to carry four passengers and crew 1,200 nautical miles – with the available fuel. By filling the fuel tanks more and losing just a little payload, and by relaxing the power setting, more range is possible. As rugged and reliable for remote operations as it is sophisticated for corporate work, the C90GTx retains the excellent flying characteristics and handling that make it a confident ride for the single pilot facing tough conditions.

airplane. Customers of the old King Air 200 offered feedback aplenty on their likes and dislikes, along with the equipment their dream King Air would incorporate, and the manufacturer responded. The company refined, revised and polished the changes to create today’s King Air 250 – an evolved airplane which reflects those customer opinions. Thanks to new winglets, new cowl design, new propellers, a thrust-enhancing ram-air recovery system, but the same 850shp PT6A-52 powerplants the King Air 250 needs 16 percent less runway (down to 2,111 feet) and less time to climb to altitude, while also offering a moderate gain in speed: condition dependent, between two and 10 knots. The runway performance gain opens up about 1,100 more runways to the King Air 250 than were accessible to the King Air

200GT. Fuel efficiency is also up slightly enabling a higher 1,600 miles maximum range. In addition to all of this, the King Air 250 offers cruise capability up to FL350 – higher than all but a couple of propjets. Deliveries since certification was received in June 2011 have started.

KING AIR 350i The crown of the King Air line arguably belongs to the King Air 350i - a big, rugged, fast propjet that retains the rugged reliability and capability of its progenitor, the King Air 90. This is a big airplane boasting a maximum take-off weight of 15,500 pounds – but with speed, distance, space and cost numbers that would turn the head of many of the larger light jet owners. (The MTOW of the 350i is 15,500 lbs. The 350iER has a MTOW of ❯ 16,500 lbs.)

KING AIR 250 Today’s King Air 250 shows what an OEM can do in improving an established performer by revising technologies inside the

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

KING AIR C90GTx

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT SALES & ACQUISITIONS 2008 Falcon 7X s/n 033 Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years. Both our acquisition and consignment services are coordinated with our support staff, who continually watch for opportunities that benefit our clients. As one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top business aircraft service companies, our 1800+ aviation experts work daily with customers

A 10 or more worldwide charter company is also for sale! 422 Total Time. 180 Landings. Engines on ESP Gold. APU on MSP Gold. 13 Passenger Interior. Collins Satellite TV. Securaplane Security System. Enhanced Vision System (Infrared). Airshow 4000. Cabin WiFi Data.

2001 Gulfstream 200

and prospects. For more information or a proposal, contact Aircraft Sales.

s/n 31

4,600 Total Time. JSSI Engine Program. 9 Passenger Interior.

1987 Citation S/II

s/n 550-0130

8,500 Total Time. 1,826 TSOH. 139 TSHSI. Priced to Sell.

1990 Citation III

s/n 650-0178

5,850 Total Time. MSP Gold. SPZ-8000 EFIS. Dual 1K+. TCASII. Duncan Paint 2009.

2000 Citation Bravo

402.475.2611 800.228.4277 www.DuncanAviation.aero

s/n 0949

2,450 Total Time. Power Adv Plus. TCASII. Primus 880 Radar. UNS-1LW w/ WAAS.

1996 Astra SPX

s/n 85

4,423 Total Time. 2,783 Landings. (2) UNS-1C+ FMS. Eight Passenger Interior.

1988 Astra Classic

s/n 19

8 Passenger Interior Completed by Duncan Aviation July 2007. C Check c/w July 2011.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. Full Details Coming Soon!

1984 Falcon 50

s/n 146

9,560 Total Time. Dash 3D. MSP. 9 Passenger. 2011 Paint by Duncan Aviation.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 153

Two Fortune 500 Owners Since New. 12,900 Total Time. JSSI Engine Program.

See complete specs and more listings at www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales


TURBOPROP REVIEW (PART 2) much mileage on as little fuel. With a maximum range of 1,450 nautical miles the P-180 Avanti II can consume less than half the fuel of other propjets – and 40 percent less than the closest jets. Aside from the high-speed abilities of engine and airframe – a ‘smooth-as’ composite aluminum structure – the combination also allows a fully-loaded P-180 to operate with as little as 2,868 feet to clear a 50-foot obstacle; landing takes barely an additional 10 feet.

❯ More information from www.piaggioaero.com

VIKING AIRCRAFT: TWIN OTTER SERIES 400

PIAGGIO P-180 AVANTI II

Offering a 313-knot maximum cruise speed and maximum-climb rate approaching 2,800fpm the King Air 350i is competitive with many jets on trips of up to two hours. Its ability to use runways under 3,500 feet to get out of, and into an airfield simply enhances the appeal of the King Air 350i. With full fuel tanks the 350i can still lift more than 1,400 pounds of payload which means you can fill seven of the nine cabin seats and top up with fuel enough for a 1,500 nautical mile business trip – non-stop. The Extended Range 350iER features additional fuel tanks in the engine nacelles as well as a 1,000 lbs. increase in maximum take-off weight which provides the ability to carry a full fuel five passenger payload across the continental U.S at its lower latitudes – more than 2,200nm.

turn five-blade props into 850shp of power, flat rated to ISA+28°C and combine to provide the motive force behind the Avanti II’s remarkable speed and fuel efficiency. Nothing else with propellers approaches the Avanti II’s 400-plus-knots top cruise speed - although its long range cruise speed of 320 knots places it second in the field. Further, the Avanti II can carry 2,000 pounds in the cabin when at its maximum fuel capacity – and still cover major mileage. The P-180 can take you as high as FL410 which is pure jet territory. Conversely, no other propjet can cover as

For many a happy year workers in Downsview, Ontario assembled some of the world’s most renowned bush and utility airplanes – de Havilland Canada’s Caribou, Buffalo, Beaver, Otter and its twin-engine kin the DHC-6 Twin Otter. Though de Havilland Canada went away many years ago its legacy lives on in two aircraft – the Dash 8 Q400 regional airlines, made today by Bombardier Aircraft, and the 400-series Twin Otter, made in Western Canada by Viking Aircraft. This high-wing model enjoyed considerable popularity as a regional airliner in the early 1980s due to its stellar short-field capabilities, its rugged durability and its 19-seat cabin, the most-popular size of that time. Flying on two PT6A-35 engines, the Twin Otter can operate out of short spots, maneuver solidly at anywhere between 80 and 160 knots, and operate with oversize tires, skis, straight and amphibious floats.

❯ More information from www.vikingair.com

VIKING’S TWIN OTTER

❯ More information from www.hawkerbeechcraft.com

PIAGGIO AERO: P-180 AVANTI II Nothing else in the realm of propjets delivers performance quite like the Piaggio P-180 Avanti II. That applies to its per-mile operating costs, its range and its velocity – all numbers that are good enough to inspire a little envy in other propjet owners and even a handful of jet operators. Of course, these stand-out areas only serve to reinforce why the Piaggio P-180 Avanti II embraces its unique configuration – which blends an advanced design with a finely finished cabin, and performance on a par with Italian names like “Ferrari” – the company which owns the design. The pair of P&WC PT6A-66B powerplants

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


THE FINISHING TOUCH

Boutsen Aviation’s Aircraft Interior Design by Mike Vines

DANIELA BOUTSEN

t’s very difficult not to be captivated by the sheer enthusiasm that Daniela Boutsen exudes for her Aircraft Interior Design department based at the familyrun Boutsen Aviation operation in the Principality of Monaco. Daniela’s operation is best described as the ‘finishing touch’ to the luxury cabins of medium- to long-range business jets. “We deliver professional advice, acquisition and after sales of l’art de la table, which includes chinaware, crystal and flatware, but also table linen, bed linen, plaids, amenities and all the small items and equipment that gives ‘la touché finale’ to the cabin,” she explained. “We represent the best and most prestigious manufacturers; Christofle, Bernardaud, Baccarat, Cristal Sèvres, Hermès, Haviland, Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur, b.home, Slabbinck and Theresienthal, just to name a few.” Boutsen Aviation (which is headed by exFormula 1 race driver Thierry Boutsen) already has a very successful cabin completion/refurbishment management department alongside aircraft sales/acquisitions and asset management arms, but Daniela identified her

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niche market approximately a year ago. At that time, Boutsen Aviation was overseeing the completion of two ACJs for an undisclosed customer. “The question was asked, ‘where can we get the right cutlery, chinaware, glasses and ancillaries for the bedroom and the bathroom?’” Daniela recalled. After plenty of research, she found this niche market needed improvement. “I found that most of the completions companies and constructors were pre-occupied with the major parts of their programs, and less thought was given to those final little details. Until now no one has had the time or the energy to concentrate on this, but it’s this paying attention to detail and those final touches that are so important to discerning customers when they sit in their aircraft for the first time.” www.AvBuyer.com

WARM RECEPTION Her department was launched at last November’s Dubai Airshow and is already showing signs of bringing in business. Daniela was delighted with the response from the recent Dubai Airshow. “People were very pleased to meet someone willing to take on this work. The designers from completion and management companies were very enthusiastic about my company activity, because I’m doing something that few others want to do. For them it’s time consuming work and extra stress having to research these items at the end of a long completion program.” Another advantage for completion center designers is that by working with someone like Daniela at an early stage they can Aircraft Index see Page 4


integrate her elements into their renderings. “Some people have already asked me, ‘Can I use your services even if I’m not buying an airplane from Boutsen Aviation?’ Definitely: We’re currently writing offers from potential business that we picked up in Dubai. There are not so many companies doing what I’m doing - possibly only two or three, but I want to do it better; I want to do it professionally, with good taste, and with passion.

we have set up an after sales operation which can arrange to stock some items to speed replacement to within a very short timeframe,” Daniela revealed, adding that she can also advise flight cabin attendants on cleaning and storing items.

“I found that very often it is the flight attendant’s job to go to a department store and buy these kinds of items for the aircraft. Problems often come a few months later after something gets broken. They will go back to the store for a replacement and find the item is no longer stocked.” To overcome this problem, Daniela only orders from the “top branded” companies. “The most important thing that I look for in a supplier is sustainability of product so that I can buy that same product in three, four or five years’ time without a problem. I’m dedicated to finding the right articles specifically for each customer,” she emphasized. “Replacing breakages is one of the biggest problems facing the operation, so

“When I first started work after I left school I worked for three years at Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur (KPM) Berlin which was established in 1763 - and this is where my love for fine porcelain was born,” she explained. The legendary King of Prussia, Frederick the Great, gave KPM its name and symbol, and the company continues to produce classic porcelain from past ranges as well as continuing to lead modern design trends. Yet even with these prestigious ranges, Daniela pointed out that a high degree of personalization is still possible (as proven by the hand-painted Airbus decoration incorporated into the table wear of DC Aviation’s Airbus ACJs).

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

ESTABLISHED QUALITY Some of the companies that Daniela sources from have literally existed for hundreds of years - some even dating to before the 1800s.

www.AvBuyer.com

THE PERSONAL TOUCH “I like face to face contact with my customers,” Daniela outlined. “The procedure is that once a request comes in, I’m very happy to jump immediately into a customer’s airplane and discuss with them what they’d like to have - what their specific needs are. “I then make compositions of potential table place settings either in situ or by supplying detailed photographs before I make them a business proposal. If that is successful, we

enter deeper discussion.” Since Boutsen Aviation opened its doors in 1997 with just the husband and wife team of CEO Thierry (in charge of sales) and Daniela (research, events and marketing) the company has sold over 200 aircraft and helicopters (new and pre-owned) and has grown to become one of the most respected European companies in its field. The couple also have the distinct advantage of being able to converse in five different languages. Asked how big her business is going to get - could it eventually be bigger than Boutsen Aviation - Daniela smiled, “I hope so! We sit in the same office, and now we are challenging each other, no?” ❯ More information from www.boutsen.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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NAVIGATING 360

Costs Are King Demand for more value at the negotiating table. by Rolland Vincent s we mark the fourth full year since the onset of the U.S.-led ‘Great Recession’ [a period we have called the value era in Business Aviation] indicators from around the industry are that times have changed. Is it any wonder that companies that can provide products and services that remove cost uncertainty are able to sell their services now as well as ever? In early 2009, we commented on how aviation industry leaders and their customers were yearning for insights into how to read the markets, and how to plot their strategies for a return to growth. They needed help peering through the fog, and in taking a longer view of the current environment. In many ways, things have not changed; the fog remains over the industry in many traditional markets. Whether in fact a fog or unexpected turbulence, the conditions for investing in new aircraft are quite unprecedented. Aircraft owners and operators that are in the position to capitalize on opportunities should realize that things will not remain as they are for long. If nothing else, election-year politicking and House-cleaning in the United States and the strong support for the Euro in Germany,

A

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CHART A - INHIBITORS TO PURCHASE Do not need additional aircraft

26%

Purchase price

13.5%

Inability to sell current aircraft

11.2%

Balance sheet considerations

8.8%

Operating cost

8.4%

Availability of financing

6.5%

Trade-up costs

6.4%

No available capital for aircraft purchases No compelling aircraft meets my organization’s needs Waiting for future model

6.1% 4.7% 3.3%

Using alternative flight solutions

2.7%

Public opinion (optics of Business Aviation)

2.4% Source: JETNET iQ Q3 2011 Global Business Aviation Survey

France and other European capitals are facts of life. Business, if it has learned nothing else, is best practiced by nimble organizations peopled with leaders that are able to www.AvBuyer.com

bend and not break, and that recognize the competitive advantages of staying ahead of the game with access to the latest technologies, information and intellectual capital. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Acquisitions Appraisals Consulting Re-marketing

Gulfstream V s/n 627

Gulfstream IV s/n 1124

Boeing 757-200ER

ERJ-135 & 145â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Available

+1 202-682-4000

slancaster@bristolassociates.com

www.bristolassociates.com


NAVIGATING 360

For those serving the needs of Business Aviation customers, it would be well to know what is on their minds during these unsettled market conditions. With many companies flushed with cash, running leaned-out operations, and flying older aircraft, why have they not returned to the table to buy new equipment? Whereas many would contend that acquisition costs, performance and cabin considerations are paramount in many business aircraft purchases, the latest market intelligence from JETNET iQ suggests that customers have other priorities on their minds. In their leaner organizations, many have reduced their flying (in the U.S. it’s about 20% below where it was at the 2007 peak); some have parked their aircraft or put them up ‘for sale’. Much of the current ‘for sale’ fleet today consists of 20-plus-year-old aircraft that are unlikely to fly much more. These are aircraft where the majority of remaining residual value is in the engines, and even that is primarily for spare parts. It is the aircraft younger than 20-years-old in which we are most interested. Many companies, whether operating Part 91 or Part 135-type services, have extended their aircraft replacement cycles, deferring new aircraft purchasing until such time as demand improves and underlying residual values recover. In the high-end jet market, the Gulfstream GV/500/550 segment has returned to pre-Recession levels in terms of the proportion of the in-service fleet available for sale, with prices stabilizing. The inproduction medium jet and light jet markets are also settling down from an inventory perspective, but prices remain very weak in historical terms. The pre-owned business turboprop market appears to have largely recovered, but new production is at a lower level than before (in fact it’s about 36% down on a units basis in the first nine months of 2011 vs. the same period in 2008).

WHY ARE CUSTOMERS NOT PURCHASING? Simply said, many believe that they have more aircraft – or at least as much aircraft – as they need for their existing operations. In Q3 2011, 26% of JETNET iQ respondents said that they did not need additional aircraft. Interestingly - and conversely - 74% of respondents did not say this. Results from JETNET iQ’s Q3 2011 Global Business Aviation Survey, conducted in late summer 2011, confirm that the costs of operating business aircraft are now paramount in the minds of business

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

CHART B - PURCHASE CRITERIA RATED BY IMPORTANCE TO DECISION-MAKERS AND INFLUENCERS 19.4% 18.7%

Operating costs

12.7%

Purchase price

10.6% 9.9% 8.9% 7.8% 8.1% 6.6% 7.8% 8.1% 5.6% 5.2% 7.5%

Range # of passenger seats Dispatch reliability Cabin comfort Manufacturer reputation

3.0%

Runway performance

4.9% 3.2% 4.4% 5.3% 3.8% 4.4% 3.4% 3.5% 3.5%

Customer service & support Speed Payload Cabin size Baggage capacity

Decision-makers / Influencers (N=265) All Respondents (N=506)

1.5% 2.6% 9.4% 10.3%

Other

Source: JETNET iQ Q3 2011 Global Business Aviation Survey

aircraft owners and operators when it comes to new aircraft purchases. In fact, economic considerations – direct operating costs (DOCs) and purchase prices – combine to account for at least 30% of the decision on a weighted average basis (Chart B). With more than 1,500 fixed-wing turbine aircraft owners and operators responding from almost 80 countries to date since Q1 2011, the results are consistent, whether the data are sorted by decision-makers/influencers vs. all others, or even by size of aircraft in operation. Whether this is a temporary, recession-led phenomenon or a ‘Say/Do’ gap is difficult to determine at this point without further information over time, but what is clear is that customers have other things on their minds than “throttles to the firewall.” Notably, 70% of the aircraft flown by the Q3 2011 survey sample of 506 respondents are jet-powered, which is considerably higher than the 58%/42% mix of jet-to-propeller aircraft in the active fleet, according to the latest JETNET databases (see Chart C, comparing the inner circle for the world fleet with the outer ring representing the survey sample). With Jet-A fuel prices hovering above $6.00 per USG in U.S. FBOs, and, of course, much higher almost everywhere else outside the Arabian Gulf region, the concern for Direct Operating Costs is understandable. All other things equal (which is never), the company that can provide the lowest www.AvBuyer.com

operating cost aircraft will usually win the hearts – and wallets – of customers. In any event, in a scenario with higher fuel prices, emissions taxes and higher user fees, the pressure is mounting on aerospace manufacturers and their supply chains to bring aircraft with more value to the negotiating table. Are you doubtful? Witness the impact that new entrants such as Embraer are having on incumbent airframers, causing them to re-evaluate their entire product strategies. And coming soon: the Legacy 450/500 will bring full fly-by-wire and auto-throttle technology to the Mid-size and Super Mid-Size business jet segments. Within the aerospace supply chain, consider the innovations that Garmin (the fishfinder company?) is bringing to the front office of business aircraft. Garmin had $1.4 billion in cash on its balance sheet on September 24, 2011 - no debt, no off-balance sheet arrangements, and 19% net profit margins (including a very respectable 12% in its aviation segment). Garmin’s aviation business segment grew top-line revenues by 12% Year-Over-Year through Q3 2011. The company appears to be in the midst of displacing both Rockwell Collins and Honeywell as Cessna’s avionics supplier of choice for both Part 23 and Part 25 models, and is firmly established with Embraer as supplier of the Prodigy flight deck on both the Phenom 100 and 300. Aircraft Index see Page 4


NAVIGATING 360

CHART C - RESPONDENT FLEET TYPES IN OPERATION

In the aviation services business, Signature still has just 106 worldwide locations, and pumps only 7-8% of all business aircraft Jet-A in the USA. Is there opportunity in the marketplace for these and others to capture additional growth? Do birds fly? Do jet engines make noise? Do pilots prefer externally-serviceable lavs? Do Business Aviation customers seek better value for their money?

❯ Rolland Vincent is President of Rolland Vincent Associates. He has more than 25 years of experience in business, regional and international aviation, including with Bombardier, Cessna, Learjet, Flexjet, and ICAO. With a background in market research, economics and statistics, he has held senior leadership positions in marketing, strategy, business development and consulting. ❯ More information from www.rollandvincent.com

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1980 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 791SA, N888WW, 6510TT, 0/0 SOH (Standard Aero), 0/0 SPOH, GNS530 w/TAWS & XM Weather, SPZ-500 A/P, Stormscope, TCAS. U.S. $795,000.

1980 MU-2 SOLITAIRE S/N 424SA, N82AF, 7485TT, 385/385 SOH, 75/75 SPOH, GNS 530 WAAS, Avidyne Fligh Max, 7500-hr, inspection, New P&I (2010) to customer specs., U.S. $675.000.

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1974 MU-2K S/N 285, N11SJ, 4630TT, 2350/2350 SOH, 525/525 SHSI, 230/230 SPOH, Garmin 530W, RDS-81 Color Radar, M4D A/P, New Paint & Interior (2009). U.S. $345,000.

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1990 Gulfstream IV s/n 1145

5950 TTAF Hours, 300/300 SOH by Dallas Airmotive, 6 Tube EFIS SPZ-8000, TCAS II w/Change 7, 8.33 Spacing, FM Immunity No Damage, Excellent Pedigree, High ASC Compliance!

2010 King Air 350i s/n FL-726

N8126L. ONLY 52.4 Hrs TTSNEW Airframe & Engines-3600 TBO, 70 Cycles/Collins Proline 21 Avionics Suite, IFIS, GH-3100 ESIS, TWR-850 Radar, RVSM Capable, Collins TCAS-4000/TCAS II, Tracked on CAMP, Complete Records and NDH.

2008 Lear 60 XR

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AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS DISSECTED

The Sales Transaction Dissected and Explained

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

I

1. From the Buyer’s Perspective: The path to nirvana is found by purchasing the youngest, lowest-total-time, latest model, damage history-free aircraft, with the best equipment, highest possible modification status (with the cleanest maintenance records and the most tasteful cosmetics) - all for the very lowest possible price, of course. [That’s unless you believe - like most people do (it’s humannature, after all) - that you will only buy an aircraft if you can ‘steal it’ and disregard the other factors that will ensure the highest possible resale value later on.] 2. From the Seller’s Perspective: Simply to get absolutely the highest possible price that you can, for the least amount of discount and/or concessions at pre-buy; complete the deal; and walk away with a smile on your face. ❯

by Jeremy R.C. Cox 94

n truth, my first thought upon being tasked with writing the following article, was that the topic seemed pretty unnecessary. Surely anyone reading this publication already has a good understanding of the aircraft sales transaction process, I mused. Furthermore, several of my friends and family objected because they believed that I would be giving away trade secrets. I thought long and hard about the composition of this piece, and came to the conclusion that many of the objections raised were without any real substance, as I shall explain… First, although the paperwork necessary to complete a transaction is clearly uniform (as defined and required by the Federal Aviation Administration), no two deals are the same. The variables can take on a very distant similarity to each other - but each is as unique as the people that are brought together in the making of a ‘deal.’ Second, there really are no trade secrets to reveal! A successful sales transaction can be defined in two ways:

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


HA WKER: 900XP - yyear ear 2008 HAWKER:

Airframe Air frame TT.T: .T: 649 hrs (a (att D Dec. ec. 2010) Avionics: C Avionics: Collins Pro ollins P ro Line 21

SN: HA -56 HA-56

Landings: 576 Eng Engines ines & APU on MSP

BOMBARDIER: LEAR LEARJET JE T 60XR - yyear ear 2010

Airframe Air frame TT.T: .T: 75 hrs Landings: 57

SN: 387

Avionics: Collins Pro Avionics: C ollins P ro Line 21 EFIS R VSM compliant compliant RVSM

JE T 31A - yyear ear 1998 BOMBARDIER: LEAR LEARJET

A Airframe ir frame TT.T: .T: 4292 hrs Landings: 4601

SN: 167

Engines: Honeywell Engines: Honey well TFE731-2-3B Honey well MSP pr ogram Honeywell program

BOMBARDIER: LEARJET ear 2005 LEARJE T 40 - yyear

Air frame TT.T: .T: 1818 hrs Airframe Landings: 1234

Engines: Honeywell Eng ines: Honey well TFE731-20AR-1B arts A ir frame par ts P rogram: Smar Airframe parts Program: Smartt P Parts

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AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS DISSECTED

THE ART OF THE DEAL The 500BC Chinese Emperor Sun Tzu is credited for the later embodiment of the anachronism “Business is War.” As evocative and stirring as this assertion is, the very best sales professionals on this planet never achieve the pinnacle of their profession by taking this as sacrosanct. Every successful negotiator and deal maker knows that if both parties involved in the opposite ends of a transaction don’t walk away from their deal genuinely believing that they won, then the transaction is on a sea voyage of dangerous and shallow waters. The ability to bring two Type A personalities together and to lead them through the closure of a sane, effective and winning transaction is truly an art. People that own their own Business Aircraft are highly skilled, intelligent, successful, and above all, savvy people. Obviously they are at the pinnacle of their chosen business, and yet their judgement can become clouded when it comes time to trade their jet. Part of this failing is fuelled by the presence of the internet. Since it has penetrated into every aspect of our modern lives, the internet has provided us all with an unnatural belief that we are instantly ‘brilliant’, because with a few key-strokes we have access to the collective brain of humanity along with all of its random thoughts,

ideas and prejudices. Unless you are watching the used aircraft market and trading within it every working day, how can you possibly put together and complete the absolute best possible deal you can make? Without wishing to labour the point, picture the Chief Executive of a Fortune 500 company that is one of the top manufacturers of industrial ovens (for example). This business leader possesses a commercial pilot’s license and was previously an ex-military fighter - and the internet has led them to believe that buying and selling their own jet is small potatoes, and easily accomplished in its entirety. Does our sample business leader do all of his own corporate tax accounting, or compose all of his corporate business legal contracts? Does he weld, inspect and approve for shipment every oven that his company sells? Of course not! He hires and pays professionals for that. So why would he choose to go-italone when it comes to the sale or purchase of a jet? Recognizing the possibility of offending with this assertion: None of you are an expert in the Aircraft Market, hence my simple Health Warning: Brok ers are good for your financial health. With that assertion made, let’s review some of the finer issues that impact the Aircraft Sales Transaction.

NEGOTIATING To achieve 100% success in making a deal, a detailed and systematic process of identification, comparison, analysis and selection should have been completed, with the end result being three thoroughly vetted ‘best candidate’ aircraft decided upon before any negotiation is started. The intent is to ensure that your knowledge and expectations regarding the candidate aircraft is founded on fact resulting in you, the buyer knowing as much about each purchase candidate Aircraft as does each seller. Then your negotiations may confidently proceed. Before you execute an offer to purchase or Letter of Intent, you should have firmly established what the maximum number is that you are willing to pay for the aircraft (along with what your ideal number is); and what you consider to be ‘a steal.’ Emotion often sits on your shoulder whispering in your ear. This must be brushed off. When you are ready to buy, you should never let your decision-making powers be driven by emotion, lest you immediately start out from a weakened position and risk overrunning the maximum price established prior to the start of the process. The chances are that you will regret an emotion-fuelled purchase.

PRICING AND VALUE There are several rules regarding price and value that must be understood: • • • •

The Best Valued Aircraft is not necessarily the Lowest Priced Aircraft; In this Post-Global Financial Crisis environment, “wholesale” no longer exists; An Aircraft is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it; Don’t buy from friends. They are as green as you are when it comes to the used market. One, or both of you will likely live to regret entering into the transaction; No aircraft left production being better built (from a value standpoint) than all of the others. Many sellers, especially if they also crew their own aircraft, have a deeprooted conviction that their aircraft is better than most other similar aircraft, because they are emotionally attached. Reference the sheer number of used aircraft that are languishing unsold because the owner can’t face up to the true market value.

During the critical process of buying the right jet, if well executed, you will have found the ‘next aircraft to sell’ in the market of that moment. There is a good chance that someone else has gone through the same process that you have been through, has also

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS DISSECTED concluded that your top choice is also their first pick. Consequently, you may find it is under contract if you don’t move swiftly. When you are ready to make an offer, you must be ready to back that piece of paper up with immediate action. Don’t believe that you can negotiate the best price and then put the transaction into limbo because you now have to search out, and secure a lender that will provide a loan for the purchase price. All of your financing and/or liquidizing of capital should have been completed long before you sent your offer to the seller. Whenever I receive an offer for one of my exclusive listings, and the document specifies that the purchase is predicated on financing approval, I almost always advise my selling client to disregard this offer as one to be taken seriously. The bottom line is that if you don’t yet have the money to buy the aircraft, why are you making offers? Finally, for every one of us that is looking to purchase anything, the Holy Grail is to negotiate a price so low that it is valued by the seller to ridiculously below the prevailing market conditions, or where you find a seller who is faced with financial ruin (or other circumstance) that forces an immediate sale at any price. This does indeed happen occasionally but it is very, very rare. Armed with this knowledge you should know what your starting number will be: Don’t make the mistake of offering a ridiculously low number if you are approaching a seller who is of equal (or better) strength than you in the marketknowledge department. You will not be taken seriously now, and probably will never be able to redeem yourself with that particular seller. If you do take the auction approach to your offers, you will most likely rocket past your maximum limit in a very short space of time indeed.

THE CONTRACT Understand this: It is absolutely impossible to write a contract that totally eliminates all possible liability. Just getting out of bed in the morning sets us all along a path that hides a plethora of liabilities. It is therefore inconceivable that any aircraft sales contract should be more than 25 pages in length. I have safely bought numerous aircraft for clients with a five-page agreement. Unfortunately I have had to endure 50 and 60 page contracts on some deals - all because the in-house attorney of the buying company didn’t take the smarter approach by hiring an aviation attorney. It can feel at times as though some attorneys bill their clients by the word, as well as by the hour! If you insist on using in-house counsel, at least allow your broker to supply them with Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

All of your financing and/or liquidizing of capital should have been completed long before you sent your offer to the seller.

some example contracts to expedite their understanding of aviation jargon and the accepted legal practices that pertain to an aircraft purchase.

ESCROW Under the Law of Contract, the elements of a valid contract or agreement are an offer, an acceptance, and an exchange of consideration. If one person offers to sell something, the other party agrees to purchase it and money changes hands - thus a valid purchase agreement has been made. A vitally important step in an aircraft sales transaction is essentially the buyer showing both capability and willingness to perform on his/her promise by putting up an ‘in good faith’ or ‘earnest’ deposit. In the U.S., the absolute best place to lodge a refundable deposit is with an FAA-recognized escrow www.AvBuyer.com

company. Virtually all of these companies are located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma - the same vicinity of the FAA’s Aircraft Registration Department. Some buyers choose to escrow their money and have the required FAA paperwork administered by an aviation attorney in Oklahoma. Always do your homework first by making certain that the holder of your earnest money is both contractually obligated to return your money to you and not to any other person if the deal ever goes south, and that your deposit is bonded and insured against any subsequent insolvency of the holder. The best escrow companies can also provide you with a formal and accurate title and lien search report, as well as all FAA and International Registry filings on your behalf. Title insurance, like in a real-estate purchase, ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS DISSECTED

either ‘Cosmetic’ or ‘Un-airworthy.’ If the agency is unable or unwilling to provide this ruling then you have chosen the wrong agency to perform the pre-buy.

is available to you - but think long and hard about buying any aircraft that has such a questionable ownership history that the purchase of title insurance is necessary.

THE PRE-BUY INSPECTION It is alarmingly common for the folks that obstinately choose to be their own expert in an aircraft sales transaction to entirely skip the vital Pre-Buy inspection. Many live to regret it - especially if a messy can of worms emerges later (during the ownership of the buyer that you sold to and the statute of limitations on major legal action has not been surpassed). The pre-buy inspection is the ultimate litmus test that must be passed before the deal is closed. This inspection protects both the Buyer and the Seller in a lot of ways. Often, though, the most unfortunate party in this process is the inspecting agency chosen for this task because they end-up not getting paid, while both parties are mad at them. This situation is totally unnecessary, but unfortunately is all-too-common if a Broker is not involved. Many Repair Stations will not even refer to the inspection that they perform on behalf of the buyer as “a pre-buy” or “prepurchase” inspection (their attorneys have told them not to). A properly orchestrated pre-buy inspection should never leave any party involved financially injured if the transaction goes awry and is called off due to unexpected findings. As a seller, never let your aircraft go to pre-buy unless: • All parties (buyer-seller-inspecting agency) fully understand and agree as to what the complete work-scope is going to be (beware piecemeal inspections); • The agency is paid-in-full for the entire work-scope prior to the work being started; • A clear, unbiased and cogent determination is made of what items that will be found as a result of the inspection are

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

• It is easier for an agency to provide an accurate report of a formal inspection accomplished (one specific to the aircraft and normally mandated by the manufacturer as required during the normal maintenance and inspection cycle) as opposed to a haphazard list of known problem areas inspected as a stand-alone procedure If you are selling, I beg you to not let your aircraft go to pre-buy with known problems unless you have alerted the inspecting agency that you are having them fixed while it is there for the pre-buy. The chances are almost certain that the problems are discovered and that you will be giving a much bigger discount (or paying more money in repairs than you ever would if you had either corrected on your own, or disclosed the fault beforehand). Trust me on this point. In addition, remember that your purchase agreement is likely committing you to warrant that the aircraft is going to be delivered in an Airworthy Condition. If you sell it with a known defect, are you not exposing yourself in the future?

THE PAPERWORK In concluding this article, I will leave you with a list of the necessary elements of the paper-trail required to complete a successful Aircraft Sales Transaction. These include, but are not necessarily limited to, all of the following documents: • • • • • •

Aircraft Specification; Offer to Purchase or Letter of Intent; Escrow Deposit Confirmation; Purchase Agreement; Title and Lien Report; Pre-Buy Report; www.AvBuyer.com

• •

• •

• • • • • •

Aircraft Technical Acceptance (makes the Deposit ‘Hard’ subject to the Seller fixing the Un-airworthy discrepancies found during the pre-buy); Power of Attorney for the Escrow company to act for the buyer in the filing of registration with International Registry (if applicable, but likely); Pay-off and release notices if the Aircraft is subject to any Liens; Application for FAA Aircraft Registration (FAA Form AC8050-1.) Don’t forget that the ‘pink slip’ must be carried on board the aircraft after closing; Declaration of International Operations (if applicable); An FAA Aircraft Bill of Sale (FAA Form AC8050-2 supplied and signed by all Sellers – if the aircraft is a fractional share aircraft, this Bill of Sale can have 16 or more signatories); Warranty Bill of Sale; Trust Agreement (if applicable); Aircraft Delivery Receipt that also includes a Notarized Fuel Receipt; Closing Statements and Instructions from both the Buyer and the Seller; Insurance Certificate or Statement of Coverage (optional); and Subscriptions Transfers and Enrollment Agreements (if applicable).

❯ Jeremy Cox draws on a wealth of experience as a pilot, an aircraft engineer/mechanic and an aviation writer. He currently serves as Vice President at JetBrokers, Inc - a professional aircraft sales company. ❯ More information from jcox@jetbrokers.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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SIERRA INDUSTRIES PROFILE

Sierra Industries: Texas’ powerplant upgrade powerhouse. by Dave Higdon inancial resources aside, many aviation veterans like to note, the best deal in a new airplane tends to boil down to the best mission-appropriate used airframe available upgraded and updated to today’s standards. “These days there’s so much more available to upgrade panels, upholstery and power,” one veteran owner/operator often tells prospects. “If you can buy new, spend a lot of money and feel rich, more power to you. Maybe the depreciation helps. Alternatively, one can renew something with the space or lift needed, get equal performance in the air and at the fuel pump, and be rich on the savings. “Depreciation remains a helpful enticement – but the difference in spending could pay for flying it for years to come.”

F

MARK HUFFSTUTLER, SIERRA INDUSTRIES

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While modifications and upgrades exist for every level of business-turbine aircraft, no other segment offers operators more potential and more options for this approach than the light jet segment. And within the light jet segment nobody offers more options than Sierra Industries. Those options include not only Sierra’s well-known engine swaps for Citations, but a wide range of airframe improvements to Cessna jets and piston products, too.

THE CITATIONS OF WEST TEXAS About 85 miles west of downtown San Antonio in Uvalde, Sierra’s powerplant upgrades evolved out of the company’s 1983 origins as an FBO focused on both flight operations and an aircraft-maintenance center with - as the company puts it - “a toehold in the modifications industry”. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


SIERRA INDUSTRIES PROFILE Under the management of company president Mark Huffstutler, Sierra earned STC approval for a number of modifications for selected single- and twin-engine aircraft. Sierra began adding to its modification depth in 1986 through a series of product-line/STC acquisitions (first among them the rights to the Eagle and Longwing airframe modifications for early Cessna Citations). Sierra next acquired the rights to a line of Citation modifications originated by Branson Industries, as well as Robertson R/STOL’s line of performance and safety-enhancement modifications, and followed up in 1999 by acquiring the highly-regarded line of aircraft performance enhancements originated by the Dee Howard company just east of Uvalde in San Antonio. From its humble roots of five products Sierra’s offerings grew significantly to lay claim in the present day to the title of ‘world’s largest modification center specializing in Cessna Citations’. Sierra offers more than 300 products – safety, performance and aircraft-enhancement modifications and improvements. Yet this just touches on the modifications and product STCs of Sierra… Today, Sierra is part of the SkyWay Group, an umbrella organization that offers shared aircraft ownership through FlighTime Business Jets, Capital Wings, and other services based in Texas, and just this year the company added fourth and fifth hangars to its facilities, to keep up with the demand of the markets it serves.

SIERRA SERVICE SPECIALIZATION When a company embarks on a growth plan so focused on a single line of products, it’s

SIERRA STALLION

common within aviation for that same company to become an expert-level shop for maintenance at all levels of the core product. That translates at Sierra into a shop highly experienced in the care and feeding of Cessna’s earliest Citations – with more than 1,500 of the 500- and 501-series airplanes built by the Wichita planemaker. Sierra’s Citation maintenance expertise runs from regular, routine work through to the various phase inspections required over the aircraft’s lifespan (and in the case of Cessna’s earliest 1970s-1980s Citation models, that’s a long lifeline). Structural repair, brakes, wheels, air conditioning and avionics

THE WILLIAMS FJ44 RE-ENGINING PROGRAMS ARE APPROACHING THE 60 MILESTONE

installs along with repair are also part of the company’s repertoire, and Sierra offers engine overhaul and upgrades for the Citations’ original JT15D powerplants. Upgrading from Dash-1 JT15D Pratt & Whitney Canada powerplants to the Dash 1A or Dash 1B provides the operator with airframe authority to utilize engines to higher fan speeds at altitude for faster climb and cruise - and it’s here that Sierra began its journey in Citation engine magic: specifically the 1992 STC it earned, and calls the Eagle 400. Sierra markets the Eagle 400 as “a cost effective means of getting Citation II performance for a fraction of the cost of a new airplane.” Under the Eagle 400 STC the company installs owner-purchased JT15D-4 engines which provide a major gain in performance. The modification also includes the company’s Eagle wing modification (plus the Longwing upgrade for Model 500s), which results in increased gross take off weight of 12,500 pounds, a new FL430 service Ceiling, the required Spar Modification (if due) and a full exterior repaint. The gains of this overall package include improved cruise and climb performance and long-term maintenance savings in a package which, accrording to Sierra, is an attractive alternative to the high cost of overhauling the stock JT15D-1 powerplants. Yet Sierra’s biggest claim-to-fame takes Citation performance to an even higher level with an entirely different engine...

SON OF THE CITATIONJET In the late 1990s Williams International introduced today’s nearly ubiquitous light-jet engine – the FJ44. Embraced quickly by both

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Challenger 300 SN 20051

Lear 55 SN 121

Lear 31A SN 35

King Air 350 SN FL‐281

Acquisitions: Gulfstream 550 ‐ Challenger 605 ‐ Falcon 2000 ‐ Cit Encore


SIERRA INDUSTRIES PROFILE Cessna and Swearingen Aircraft, this new turbofan boasted a greatly reduced parts count, simpler construction and both fuel specifics and power-to-weight unlike anything previously available. The engine launched the CitationJet family and the multiple incarnations that followed and almost as quickly as the first CitationJets hit the ramps of the world, Sierra embarked on a program to re-engine early Citations with all-new STCs. The Stallion program installs Williams FJ44-2A engines (2,300 lbst) to Citation 500 and 501 airframes, resulting in an added 400 nautical miles of range, substantial gains in climb performance, maximum-fuel payload, fuel efficiency and increased climb and cruise speeds. The Eagle II variant adds the Eagle wing modification, with an extra 730 lbs of fuel capacity. Sierra’s Super II/S-II program was rooted in research from the early 1980s when the company examined upgrading the Series 550 Citation II to the Dash-5 JT15D from the JT15D-4 version, but the program was idled until the company began work on its first Williams re-engine program for the Sierra Eagle II. Following the success of the 500/501SPbased Eagle II and Stallion programs, Sierra set its sights on the Citation I’s successors, the Citation II and SII. These aircraft required a more powerful engine and the FJ44-3A with 2,820 lbs thrust was a perfect candidate. The Citation 550-based Sierra Super II received an STC in 2008, followed by

SIERRA SUPER II

the Super SII in 2009. Sierra’s Super S-II is its most-recent upgrade path, re-engining S550-series Citation S-IIs with Williams’ FJ44-3A powerplants. Performance gains are comparable to the Super II, with a range-boost to 2,300 nautical miles and the ability to climb directly to FL430 (in less than 25 minutes), while hitting cruise speeds as high as 420 knots true. The FJ44 Eagle II was certified in 2002 and

G501SP COCKPIT OFFERED BY SIERRA

its sibling, the Stallion, in 2006. A common denominator to Sierra’s FJ44 modification programs is the service and maintenance option available to operators: Williams’ renowned Total Assurance Program (TAP). Williams’ TAP program typically saves operators more than a quarter-million dollars in engine-maintenance expenses by the time it reaches TBO over that required for the original JT15D powerplants - and that doesn’t address the fuel-cost savings incurred from the higher fuel efficiency, shorter climb times and increased cruise speeds of Sierra’s FJ44 and airframe modification packages.

ENGINE UPGRADES BY THE NUMBERS Sierra Industries’ Williams FJ44 re-engining programs are rapidly approaching the 60 aircraft milestone with the input of two more legacy Citation aircraft for modification. The 58th aircraft getting the Sierra/Williams treatment is a Citation S550 and the 59th is a Citation I getting Sierra’s Stallion FJ44-2A package. With both of these aircraft scheduled for completion before the end of 2011, Sierra expects to start its 60th shortly. “We’re gratified by the support for our Williams FJ44 re-engining programs in today’s challenging aviation market,” Huffstutler noted. “Sierra’s hard-won expertise in legacy aircraft modification is recognized by OEM firms like Hawker Beechcraft, resulting in contracted technology development for the newly approved Hawker 800XPR and upcoming 400XPR retrofit programs.”

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


' U L F S T R E A M s # H A L L E N G E R s F a l c o n ( A W K E R s , E A R s " E E C H J E T s G l o b a l E x p r e s s

G501SP SIERRA CITATION Last fall Sierra Industries added yet another jewel to its crown of Citation upgrades: an STC to upgrade the Citation 501-series jets with Garminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s widely used G1000 integrated avionics package. Employing a three-screen package, Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s G501SP upgrade uses 10.4 or 12inch displays, while adding dual solid-state VHF nav and comm, radios, dual WAAS GPS, and dual air- and attitude-sensing hardware to replace the analog equipment in the original 501 and 501SP airframes. New weather radar is also part of the package, as well as Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s autopilot interface and a glareshield-mounted annunciator package. The G501SP package required a substantial amount of work by Sierra before gaining its STC. According to Huffstutler at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NBAA Convention, development time spanned about two years starting with the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial overtures to Garmin through the FAA eventual award of the STC. But the gains of reworking the aircraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entire avionics package, the cockpit, panel and support hardware are multiple, in both operational and utility terms. For example, with the G1000 system 501SPs can operate by WAAS GPS, gaining both navigation and approach options unavailable otherwise. According to the company, the upgrade gives the G501SP or G501 about a 100pound advantage over their respective analog counterparts. The G501SP package and all its associated wiring and hardware amount to about 50 pounds installed. To recap, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operational gains, maintenance gains, utility gains - all for a package priced at about $284,000, exclusive of any options (which, incidentally, are plentiful).

SIERRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VALUE FOR NEW JET BUYERS Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expertise in buying and selling Citations is also available to prospective owners. A prospective owner/operator can work with Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales staff to locate available, qualified Citation airframes - and pick and choose the options desired. The buildyour-own approach covers everything from the airframes available to engine options, modifications, maintenance, avionics, paint, interior and a few miscellaneous options. The end result is a jet that works with the prospectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specifications. Sierra goes further under a five-point customer assistance program to help cover the many steps to ownership. This includes financing, training, insuring, optional warranty coverage and an optional buy-back program. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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Among the maintenance options is Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fly-Thru Maintenance Program which provides clients often with a reengined FJ44 Citation model for use while Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s technicians service the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jet. (Sierra also offers the Fly-Thru Maintenance Program for customers with a Citation in a www.AvBuyer.com

INFO INFO CRSJETSPARESCOM CRSJETSPARESCOM CRSJETSPARESCOM CRSJETSPARESCOM

major phase inspection or other significant maintenance or modification work.) It seems thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no end to the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest to improve options for owners, pilots and operators, so watching for what comes next at Sierra will always be a smart idea.

â?Ż More information from www.sijet.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 2012

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NBAA FUEL STRATEGIES

NBAA’s Ten Critical Strategies: Long-Term Fuel Savings. ith aircraft fuel prices recently rising above $8 per gallon at some U.S. airports, it’s obvious that fuel is the largest variable cost of operating a turbine aircraft today. Although the record-high prices for 100LL and Jet A have come down recently, production and refining costs will continue to keep both wholesale and retail prices at levels we never anticipated just two years ago. There are a variety of steps, though—both short-term and long-term—that flight departments can take to save critical dollars on their fuel bills.

W

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

STRATEGY #1: Negotiate fuel discounts at your home base.

STRATEGY #2: Compare fuel prices at alternate destination airports/FBOs.

Efforts to shop around for the best fuel prices should begin at home. While it’s critical to shop for good prices at destination airports, most business aircraft operators will find that their best price leverage is at their home base. Many Fixed Base Operations (FBO) tenants can qualify for discounts based on the volume of fuel purchased at their home base…discounts that frequently are not advertised, but which always can be requested.

Naturally, when flying to an airport that has several FBOs, you should compare the fuel prices at the competing service locations. In addition, it makes sense to consider using alternate airports if the fuel price spread between the FBOs at the various airfields in a location area is substantial. Many areas, especially larger metropolitan areas, offer a range of fueling choices, both in terms of airports and FBOs. For example, at regional airports outside the Los Angeles area, the price spread on Jet A can be

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


NBAA FUEL STRATEGIES categories (including Fuel Dealers, Fuel Discount Programs, Fuel Resellers, Fuel Suppliers, and more). Of course, picking a destination airport/FBO is based on a variety of operational factors—proximity to your passengers’ final destination, runway length and type of navaids, FBOs and their minimum fees, level of safety precautions (e.g., marshalling aircraft), etc. Therefore, fuel price is just one of the considerations in choosing which airport and FBO to use. Nevertheless, if the people in the back of the aircraft are flexible, the fuel (and other) savings might be dramatic.

STRATEGY #3: Fuel contract programs and credit card rebates. A good strategic approach to consider is enrolling in one (or more) contract fuel programs with an FBO chain or a nationwide fuel supplier. A simple, online search can show you which suppliers serve the destinations you most frequently visit. Another strategy is to purchase fuel using a credit card that offers discounts or rebates. Even if it requires an annual fee, the savings usually will more than offset the cost - but remember, interest charges on roll-over balances will completely offset the discounts and rebates, so consider this option only if you will pay-off the entire balance each month. The Products and Services section of the NBAA website provides a comprehensive list of companies that offer both fuel contract and credit card rebate programs.

STRATEGY #4: Consider self-service fueling. Some facilities offer discounts for self-service fueling, an option you might consider at both your home base and certain destinations. Often these discounts can save up to $0.50 per gallon, or as much as $500 per fill-up for a medium jet. However, remember that many FBOs impose minimum fuel purchases and ramp fees for visiting aircraft; charges that can offset the self-service savings. a dollar or more per gallon, so it pays to do some research. A few phone calls provide a good comparison, but you may want to check out one of the online fuel resource guides. NBAA Members can turn to the Products & Services portion of their Member Directory to find the resources they need in this process: www.nbaa.org/prodsvcs. There you will find a range of NBAA Member Companies that offer guidance in comparing fuel prices, searching options by airport identifier or zip code, and determining average regional prices. To help in your selection, you can search these fuel resources by a number of Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

STRATEGY #5: Modify the way you fly. One of the simplest ways to save money on fuel is to make minor changes in the way you fly. Here are a few obvious examples: •

• • •

Minimize the amount of time you run the engines and auxiliary power unit while on the ground. Request higher altitudes and direct routings from ATC. Alter your climb and descent profiles. Reduce cruise speeds, especially on shorter trips where the time lost en route will be minimal. www.AvBuyer.com

Change your operating profile when flying dead-head legs.

STRATEGY #6: Carefully calculate on-board fuel requirements. Carefully calculating the amount of fuel you need for a particular mission makes good sense, too. Buying more fuel at home base often can help keep your average fuel costs down. However, the extra weight of a heavier fuel load means the aircraft will take longer to climb and burn more fuel initially. Whether or not it makes sense to tanker fuel depends on other factors too, such as aircraft performance, trip length and the price of fuel at your home base versus your destination. And, don’t forget to consider longer-term costs that may be affected by carrying extra fuel, including wear and tear on airframes and engines, aircraft performance profiles and environmental considerations.

STRATEGY #7: Weight reductions. Obviously, reducing the weight of an aircraft will lower the amount of fuel consumed and save money. Taking inventory of all the items routinely carried in the cockpit and cabin may reveal opportunities to reduce weight by eliminating nonessential items. Following are a few examples. Use an electronic flight bag (EFB) so you can carry fewer paper charts and approach plates. Crew manuals and aircraft system descriptions also can be stored on some EFBs. Of course, paper cannot be completely eliminated from the cockpit, as regulations still require flight crews to carry certain information in hard copy formats. Take a look at the galley. Are excess food and drinks aboard? Is heavy china dinnerware needed on every flight, especially on short trips during which meals may not be served? Can plastic cups be used instead of heavier glassware? Can you cut back on the amount of potable water and ice you carry? Are there other excess items on board? What about outdated reading materials? Can personal computers and other A/V equipment that aren’t used frequently be removed? Take a good look around to see what your passengers don’t need. Lots of things probably can be eliminated to reduce weight and save fuel costs.

STRATEGY #8: Aircraft maintenance and fuel efficiency. Obviously, well-maintained aircraft use less fuel. For example, be sure to check aircraft control rigging, especially if the airplane has been painted recently or has undergone WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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NBAA FUEL STRATEGIES major maintenance. For jet aircraft, rigging checks are required frequently under continuous airworthiness inspection programs. Operators of piston-powered aircraft should make sure their engines are properly tuned, and control rigging is checked during annual inspections. Removing debris and deposits from powerplants also enables the engines to run more efficiently and burn less fuel. Remember that operating practices and maintenance procedures can sometimes interact to adversely affect fuel consumption. For example, flying at the right speed can optimize fuel efficiency, but if the airspeed system is not properly maintained, the airspeed the pilot is seeing on his instruments may not be the actual airspeed. Be sure to maintain the static port to prevent erroneous airspeed readings and to ensure that the pilot can maintain the most fuel-efficient speed.

STRATEGY #9: Aerodynamic maintenance and improvements. There are a number of maintenance procedures and aerodynamic improvements you can make to improve fuel efficiency and save money. Here are a few examples: Examine landing gear doors and body-to-wing fairing seals to ensure that they are not contributing to excessive drag. Check for gaps between fairings and exterior panels. Misalignment of body panels, doors and closure panels can result in higher fuel bills. For example, if a door is inset up to a quarter inch, it may not affect airworthi-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

ness, but the additional drag can guzzle more fuel. Also, misaligned door seals affect air conditioning, adding to fuel costs. Remember that wet or dry washing of the airframe also enhances aerodynamic efficiency, and coatings can be applied to aircraft exteriors to reduce drag. While some airlines have removed exterior paint to save weight, experts warn that this can make the airframe more susceptible to corrosion, so this may not be an option for business aircraft operators. Original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket suppliers offer numerous fuelsaving aerodynamic improvements for virtually every type of business aircraft. Winglets, for example, not only save fuel, they enable aircraft to fly higher, farther and faster. There are also money-saving options such as performance-enhancing propeller systems, body strakes and more efficient wing leading edges and flaps. Remember, however, to consider the overall cost/benefit factors when considering making major upgrades to business aircraft, especially in older aircraft. While many new systems can improve fuel efficiency significantly, operators need to determine whether spending six figures or more is worthwhile, especially when considering aircraft age, annual miles flown and other factors.

STRATEGY #10: Is a private or co-op fuel farm an option for you? If your flight department operates a larger fleet of business aircraft—or if you can part-

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ner with other major operators at your home base—you might realize significant savings by building your own fuel farm. This allows you to purchase fuel at wholesale prices. NBAA estimates that you need to consume at least 250,000 gallons of fuel per year to make this viable. In addition, you need to carefully evaluate the costs of building and maintaining the farm, as well as the regulatory and environmental issues in the area. Opportunities to save fuel and reduce operating costs abound for business aircraft operators. These ten “tips” (some obvious and some not-so-obvious) are just the start. If you carefully review your flight requirements, procedures and strategies, you can save literally thousands of dollars per year, making Business Aviation an even more viable and cost-efficient option for your company. ❯ For a comprehensive list of companies offering fuel-saving products and services, visit http://data.nbaa.org/prodsvcs/directory/search.cfm

The preceding white paper (reproduced from Business Aviation Insider) represents just one of the many resources NBAA offers its Members to help operations be more efficient and cost-effective. Become an NBAA Member to enjoy a wealth of benefits and services including safety and operational tools, legislative and regulatory advocacy, unparalleled networking opportunities, education and career development opportunities and business management resources. ❯ Visit www.AscendwithNBAA.org to join today.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Year

Model

Serial No.

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1990

Challenger 601-3A

5066

1994

Citation Jet

525-0075

1995

Citation Jet

525-0122

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

2004

Citation XLS

560-5534

1993

Citation VII

650-7034

2005

Citation Sovereign

680-0015

1982

Falcon 50

116

1990

Falcon 900B

088

1995

Falcon 900B

153

2000

Gulfstream G200

014

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1986

Gulfstream GIV

1006

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

1998

Gulfstream GIVSP

1354

2005

Hawker 800XP

258704

1995

Learjet 31A

106

1999

Learjet 45

052

1996

Learjet 60

85

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2010

Phenom 100

50000112

2001

Piaggio Avanti P180

1048

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050

1996

Pilatus PC-12/45

156

2007

Premier IA

RB-209

2009

Socata TBM 850

519


AIREPORT

A&P On Staff: Three reasons why you need them. by David Wyndham ike a lot of Americans, we were on the road for Thanksgiving. Like a lot of Americans, we also ate too much. On our drive home we passed a Jeep that had dropped its gas tank, spilling fuel on the road. No fire thankfully. If that person had their Jeep up on a lift from time to time, the mechanic would have noticed the rusty connections thus saving the owner from riding part-way home in a tow truck. Here is the condensed version: If you operate a turbine business aircraft and reliability is a key metric to you, unless you have 24/7 maintenance at the airport you will need an A&P (Airframe & Powerplant mechanic) on your staff.

L

can be cost effective to have the service center perform the maintenance rather than employ a full-time maintenance person especially if that service center operates around the clock (or close to it). If you don't have that luxury, however, following are three reasons for having an A&P on your staff.

1. NO ONE KNOWS YOUR AIRCRAFT BETTER THAN YOUR OWN A&P: Your on-staff A&P will get to know the maintenance that was performed, the issues that the aircraft may have had in the past, and who/where to get the answers from when maintenance questions arise. This is important in keeping the aircraft reliable and ready for flight when needed.

EXAMPLES OF THE ABOVE One of our clients has a 30+ year-old twin turboprop. They operate with a limited budget, but that budget does include a fullytrained A&P. Dispatch reliability for this client is in excess of 95% and downtime (due to unscheduled maintenance) is far lower than you'd expect from an old aircraft. Another operator we know of has the complete set of maintenance manuals for their airplane. Many of those pages have notes and annotations representing the years of accumulated knowledge on how to maintain the aircraft. In these - and many other cases - having the A&P on staff provides a level of skill and knowledge that enables the operator to maximize the utility of their aircraft. If there is a service center at your home station and it provides quality service and is knowledgeable about your aircraft model, it

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

2. THE IN-HOUSE A&P UNDERSTANDS YOUR MISSION: Being your employee, you’re A&P is fully dedicated to keeping your aircraft airworthy and safe. You will not get a better level of service than having a great employee as your A&P.

3. ON-TIME/ON-BUDGET DEDICATION: When your aircraft is in for heavy maintenance, you’re on-staff A&P is your advocate in keeping the aircraft maintenance on time and within budget. While a good service center will make every effort to get the job done on time, the personal attention from your own A&P will make that much more likely to happen.

DEGREE OF NEED The older and more complex your aircraft,

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the more critical it is to have the A&P on your staff. As with any aircraft, there may be minor issues that can delay your departure. The A&P being immediately available will enable a high level of dispatch reliability. In-house maintenance staff gives you the dedicated response, on your schedule, and is there to serve only you. I've heard from a number of operators that their A&P's salary was paid for at the first major inspection. Having the A&P on staff is cheap assurance for an on-time departure - and that further enables the executives to conduct their business in the most efficient manner. ❯ David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker. The mission of Conklin & de Decker is to furnish the general aviation industry with objective and impartial information in the form of professionally developed and supported products and services, enabling its clients to make more informed decisions when dealing with the purchase and operation of aircraft. With over 1,800 clients in 90 countries around the world, Conklin & de Decker combines aviation experience with proven business practices. ❯ More information from www.conklindd.com; Tel: +1 508 255 5975. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Chuck Collins & Associates, Inc.

Not just a tug.

Visit ~ www.ccajets.com E-mail ~ sales@ccajets.com Phone ~ (760) 929 0302 Fax ~ (760) 929 0304 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214, Carlsbad, California 92011

1978 Cessna Citation ISP s/n 501-0082 6900 TT; 1590 SMOH / 1979 SMOH; IFR; 2007 Paint; 2007 Int; 1978 Citation ISP 6,899 since new 1590/3432 SMOH 2007 P & I TRs

8800 Series

It’s a

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1997 Cessna Citation Jet s/n 525-0201 3323 TT; 71 SOH / 71 SOH; IFR; 2005 Paint; 2005 Int; 7 Seats; 1997 Citation CJ sn 525-0201 3323 TAP Elite

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

1995 Hawker 800A On CAMS, 9415.1 Hours Time Since New (July 6, 2011), Engines on MSP, 8,323 Landings Since New RVSM

1974 Hawker 600A-731 s/n 256029 883 SMOH / -- / 3561 SMOH; 883 / 655 SHSI; 7 Seats; HS 600 FAN, MSP, N1 DEEC's, RVSM, Pro Line, HF and much more

1994 Bombardier/Challenger 601-3R 5970TT, GE on Point Engine Program, APU MSP, S-Galley, Paint and interior 2006

Acquisition

v

Brokerage

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

v

Consultation www.AvBuyer.com

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❯ February Issue:

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: SMALL JETS

Turboprops

❯ March Issue: Businessliners

❯ April Issue:

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Ultra Large Cabin & Ultra Long Range Jets

❯ May Issue: Large Jets

he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost

T

numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Small Jets – appears overleaf, to be followed by Turboprops next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. If there are any other ways in which we

DESCRIPTION OF COST ELEMENTS

baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.).

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs.

CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.).

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door.

WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight.

BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the

SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know. ❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixedwing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For singleengine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing dis-

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tance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEED

AVIATION EXHIBITION 2012 28 JUNE – 1 JULY

• Over 180,000 visitors over four days • Gain exposure to a vast and diverse audience from around the world • A range of exhibitor packages available For more information about exhibiting email exhibitions@goodwood.com or call +44 (0)1243 755081 To book tickets call +44 (0)1243 755055 or visit

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BO M BA RD IE R LE BO AR M BA JE T RD 24 IE D R LE BO A M RJ BA ET RD 24 IE E R BO LE M AR BA JE RD T 25 IE R D LE BO AR M BA JE T RD 31 IE R BO LE AR M BA JE T RD 31 IE A R LE BO AR M BA JE T RD 31 IE A/ R ER LE BO AR M JE BA T RD 35 IE A R CE LE A SS RJ NA ET CI 36 TA A T I CI ON TA 50 TIO 0 N BR AV O

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: SMALL JETS

SMALL JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$3,605.61

$3,605.61

$3,455.64

$2,301.85

$2,299.37

$2,299.88

$2,660.99

$2,646.39

$2,204.14

$1,745.97

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.35

4.35

4.35

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.7

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.9

4.9

4.9

4.95

4.95

4.95

4.9

4.9

4.9

4.8

CABIN LENGTH FT.

9

9

12

12.9

12.9

12.9

12.9

10.5

12.7

15.75

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

192

192

259

268

271

261

268

202

205

278

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.16

4.2

4.16

4.16

4.16

3.75

4.16

4.2

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

40

40

40

30

40

30

40

27

40

28

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

46

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

5

6

6

6

6

6

4

5

7

MTOW LBS

13500

13500

15000

15500

17200

17700

18300

18300

11500

14800

MLW LBS

11880

11880

13300

15300

16000

16000

15300

15300

11000

13500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

7830

7830

8600

11203

11203

11247

10310

10310

7250

9375

USEABLE FUEL LBS

5628

5628

6098

4124

4124

4653

6198

7400

3645

4824

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

342

342

802

243

1873

2000

1992

790

755

801

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3570

3570

2800

1397

2297

2253

3190

3190

1150

1925

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

850

850

895

1211

1211

1480

1930

2425

730

1290

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1100

1100

1200

1337

1337

1600

2125

2550

900

1720

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4300

4300

4600

3800

3800

3800

6300

5300

3950

4160

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

5333

5333

4333

4200

4200

4200

4333

4333

3583

4295

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

6800

6800

6830

5480

5110

4890

4340

4340

2900

3190

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

2100

2100

1910

1890

1610

1515

1280

1280

800

845

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

475

475

475

462

462

462

470

470

355

405

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

439

439

443

441

441

441

436

436

332

405

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

410

410

418

417

417

417

424

424

310

335

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

CJ610-6

CJ610-6

CJ610-8A

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

JT15D-1

PW530A

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

114

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


CJ 2 CI TA TIO CE N SS CJ NA 2+ CI TA TIO CE N SS CJ NA 3 CI TA TIO CE N SS CJ NA 4 CI TA TIO CE N SS EN NA CO CI RE TA TIO CE N SS EN NA CO CI RE TA + TIO CI N TA I/I TIO SP N II/ IIS P

CJ 1+ CE SS NA

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

CJ 1

CI TA TIO N

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N CE SS NA

SMALL JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$1,431.43

$1,459.54

$1,515.06

$1,615.43

$1,718.33

$1,956.32

$2,029.75

$2,037.43

$2,105.82

$2,081.23

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.8

4.75

4.75

4.3

4.7

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.8

4.83

4.83

4.9

4.8

CABIN LENGTH FT.

11

11

13.58

13.58

15.67

17.3

17.33

17.33

12.7

15.75

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

198

198

248

248

283

311

307

307

205

263

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

8

-

4

-

-

6

28

28

40

36

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

51

45

70

65

65

71

43

43

17

41

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

5

6

6

6

7

7

7

5

7

MTOW LBS

10600

10700

12375

12500

13870

16950

16630

16830

11850

14100

MLW LBS

9800

9900

11500

11525

12750

15500

15200

15200

11350

13500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

7050

7035

7900

8000

8585

10242

10525

10460

7400

8650

USEABLE FUEL LBS

3220

3220

3932

3930

4710

5828

5400

5400

3780

4970

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

430

545

668

695

775

1000

905

1170

820

680

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1350

1365

1400

1700

1925

2118

2075

2390

2100

2350

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

775

895

1075

1192

1374

1802

1410

1494

910

1220

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1161

1245

1530

1626

1891

2142

1736

1792

1020

1520

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4220

3990

3820

3810

3440

3430

3920

3920

3600

4580

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4407

4135

4628

4702

4203

3957

4195

4182

3500

3583

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3230

3290

3870

4120

4478

3945

4740

4620

2719

3130

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

850

906

1160

1004

1090

1270

1440

1400

826

930

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

381

389

413

413

417

454

430

430

345

355

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

381

389

413

413

417

454

430

430

345

355

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

307

307

344

351

348

373

372

372

310

321

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-1A

FJ44-1AP

FJ44-2C

FJ44-3A-24

FJ44-3A

FJ44-4A

PW535A

PW535B

JT15D-1A

JT15D-4

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

115


DE VE LO PM EN T DE FJ 44 V EL DA CI O SS TA PM AU TIO E NT LT N FA FJ II 55 44 LC DA 0 ON C I SS TA 10 AU TIO LT N SI FA IS L CO EM 55 N 0 BR 1 AE 00 R PH EN OM 30 0

CL IFF OR D

CL IFF OR D

V

UL TR A

CI TA TIO N

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

S/ II CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

CE SS NA

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

JE T

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: SMALL JETS

SMALL JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$1,517.99

$2,239.53

$2,286.34

$2,265.82

$1,817.51

$1,917.43

$2,956.27

$2,851.80

$1,708.14

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.8

4.7

4.8

4.8

4.7

4.7

4.9

4.9

4.92

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.83

4.8

4.83

4.83

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

5.08

CABIN LENGTH FT.

11

15.75

17.33

17.33

15.75

15.75

12.7

12.7

17.17

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

186

263

292

292

263

263

251

251

325

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.8

4.8

4.86

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

2

2.6

2.6

2.38

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

4

36

26

26

36

36

13

12

11

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

51

41

41

41

41

41

28

28

74

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

7

7

7

7

7

6

6

7

MTOW LBS

10400

15100

16300

15900

14100

15100

18740

18740

17968

MLW LBS

9700

14000

15200

15200

13500

14400

17640

17640

16865

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

6950

9000

9950

9400

8650

8950

11585

11585

11783

USEABLE FUEL LBS

3220

5603

5771

5770

4970

5800

5912

5912

5353

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

330

697

779

930

580

550

1243

1243

942

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1450

2200

2250

1800

2350

2250

1975

1975

2216

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

750

1430

1259

1220

1622

1974

1520

1520

1692

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1130

1840

1651

1644

2480

2225

1620

1620

1937

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4010

4150

3510

3740

4580

-

4450

4450

3474

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4333

4500

3833

3750

3583

4500

3375

3375

3741

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3311

3000

4230

3684

-

-

4600

4600

4050

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

868

906

728

1139

-

-

1535

1535

1026

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

377

386

400

397

415

415

490

490

453

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

364

386

400

397

400

415

452

452

453

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

302

312

372

350

370

383

433

433

383

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-1A

JT15D-4B

JT15D-5D

JT15D-5A

FJ44-3A

FJ44-3A

TFE 731 -2-1C

TFE 731 -2-1C

PW535E

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

116

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BE EC HC HA RA W KE FT R BE BE EC EC HJ HC HA ET RA W 40 KE FT 0 R B EE BE CH EC HC JE HA T R W 40 A FT KE 0A R DI BE AM EC ON HC HA D RA W 1A KE FT R H AW BE EC KE HA HC R W RA 20 KE FT 0 R HA BE W EC KE HC HA R R 40 W AF KE 0X T R PR P BE EM EC IE HC NE R I RA XT AN FT T PR AE EM RO IE SP R AC IA E 40 0X T

HA W KE R

SJ 30 SY BE RJ ET

SMALL JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$1,614.11

$2,449.30

$2,298.23

$2,366.79

$1,737.68

$2,173.82

$1,638.96

$1,615.28

$1,740.70

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.8

4.8

4.8

5.4

4.8

5.4

5.4

4.8

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.7

4.9

4.9

4.9

5.5

4.9

5.5

5.5

4.9

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.5

14.4

15.6

15.6

13.6

15.6

13.6

13.6

15.6

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

191

292

305

305

315

305

315

315

305

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

3.9

4.16

4.16

4.16

4.167

4.2

4.16

4.167

4.2

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.41

2.41

2.41

2.125

2.4

2.125

2.125

2.4

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

-

12

31

20

22

31

23

23

31

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

53

33

25

33

55

25

55

55

25

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

7

7

7

6

8

6

6

8

MTOW LBS

13950

15780

16100

14630

13800

16300

12500

12500

16300

MLW LBS

12725

14220

15700

13200

12600

15700

11600

11600

15700

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

9000

10400

10915

9830

9320

10985

8565

8600

10531

USEABLE FUEL LBS

4850

4900

4912

4260

3650

4912

3611

3670

4912

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

200

550

473

610

930

603

414

320

1057

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1500

2070

2085

1720

1680

2015

1435

1400

2469

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1786

1140

1180

1140

1074

1180

850

850

1852

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2338

1580

1519

1200

1462

1519

1340

1340

2108

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

6117

4700

4600

5050

4346

4600

4650

4650

4600

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4583

4500

5083

4583

5343

5025

5208

5208

4045

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3663

3960

4020

3050

-

4020

4000

4000

5000

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

793

1110

560

761

-

560

948

948

995

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

461

458

406

461

450

461

461

471

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

460

446

449

406

426

450

426

426

460

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

447

396

410

368

370

410

370

370

405

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-2A

JT15D-5

JT15D-5

JT15D-4D

FJ44-3AP

JT15D-5R

FJ44-2A

FJ44-2A

FJ44-3AP

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

117


SA BR EL IN ER SA SI BR ER E RA 40 A IN DU ST SI RI ER ES RA FJ 44 IN DU EA ST GL SI R E IE ER II S 50 RA FJ 1S 4 IN 4 P DU ST AL ST RI LIO SI ES ER N RA FJ 50 44 IN 1S DU SU P ST PE CE RI R ES II SS 55 NA FJ 0 4 4 CI SU TA TIO PE EC R N LIP SI M IS SE US 55 AE TA 0 NG RO S PA EM CE BR EC AE LIP R PH SE EN 50 HO OM 0 HA N -4 DA 10 20 A 0 HOIRC ND RA AJ FT ET

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: SMALL JETS

SMALL JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENTRY LEVEL

$3,335.47

$1,776.56

$1,776.56

$1,837.67

$1,910.00

$1,013.19

$856.12

$1,130.03

$1,141.31

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.6

4.3

4.3

4.7

4.7

4.5

4.16

4.92

4.94

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.25

4.9

4.9

4.8

4.8

4.58

4.66

5.08

5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

15.8

12.7

12.7

15.75

15.75

9.8

7.6

11

12

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

330

205

205

263

263

144

160

208

-

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

3.9

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

3.8

3.9

4.86

-

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.3

2

2

2

2

2

1.96

2.04

-

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

43

40

40

36

36

6

16

11

-

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

17

17

41

41

57

-

60

66

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

6

5

5

7

7

4

3

5

5

MTOW LBS

19612

12500

12500

14100

14400

8645

6000

10472

9963

MLW LBS

17500

11350

11350

13500

13500

8000

5600

9766

-

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

11200

7400

7400

8650

9000

5550

3834

7132

-

USEABLE FUEL LBS

7122

4580

3780

4970

5603

2580

1698

2804

-

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1600

910

1670

580

697

600

502

580

-

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1600

2750

2750

2350

2200

1200

1088

1312

-

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1000

1650

1230

1662

1800

716

574

926

1035

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1160

1800

1400

2480

2300

1068

964

1124

1304

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5900

3600

3600

4580

4580

3380

-

4376

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4583

3500

3500

3583

4500

3683

5015

4122

-

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4700

4000

4000

4500

4300

3010

2665

3061

3990

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1100

1500

1500

1780

1640

870

826

852

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

480

395

350

415

415

340

-

390

420

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

428

365

385

400

415

340

370

390

420

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

409

345

350

365

375

319

-

333

-

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

JT12A-8

FJ44-2A

FJ44-2A

FJ44-3A

FJ44-3A

PW615F

PW610F-A

PW617F-E

HF120

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

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CHALLENGES FROM WASHINGTON

The Battle Of 2012: Congress & Washington pose; a pox on progress for aviation issues? by Dave Higdon couple of days before Thanksgiving I was enjoying a relaxed, off-the-record breakfast discussion with one of the aviation community’s most respected leaders as a the start of three days of visits with association executives. A day earlier Congress’ so-called ‘Super Committee’ ended amid failure to agree on a package of budget and tax issues to meet a goal of $1.4 trillion in deficit reduction over the next 10 fiscal years. When my breakfast host noted the impli-

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cations for Congress to make progress on aviation issues, the conversation became somewhat muted... “You know, you’re supposed to debate big things in Washington; that’s Congress’ role - to debate the big issues, decide on a course of action a majority can sign on to, and get it done.” Examples of such successful debates include the multi-year effort to pass civil rights, environmental and Medicare laws…all big things. “Now Congress can’t even agree on small things… the given things www.AvBuyer.com

that must be addressed for the nation to function.” There was no disputing this point: Evidence abounds in and out of Washington – and perhaps nowhere more so clearly than in the start of the fifth fiscal year during which the FAA will lack a full authorization bill to roadmap its next few years. In fact, the stalemate ran so deep that it brought about a partial shutdown of the agency last July. Another shutdown appears likely since the stalemate remains. ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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CHALLENGES FROM WASHINGTON

ROADBLOCKS YEARS LONG Congress, the FAA, and the aviation community several years ago agreed on underlying funding issues. Nothing in the pending legislation related to the existence, operation and plans of the FAA causes heartburn among the major parties involved. Nonetheless, said the insider, “Congress can’t even seem to agree on a relatively routine thing – reauthorizing and funding the FAA.” So what’s the hold up? Politic fights over issues unrelated to the FAA, its missions, its needs or services. It’s been more than four years since the last authorization expired – and talks on renewing the FAA’s authority started in 2005! Within seconds the insider summed up the impact of Washington’s seeming devotion to dysfunction – at least, in this case, a single-issue dysfunction dating back more than six years… That’s six years with two administrations and three Congresses - yet no agreement on the relatively simple issue of authorizing and funding an agency essential to the health, safety and progress of diverse, related manufacturing industries, a mode of commercial transportation, the qualifying and licensing of its main practitioners, and the operation of the interstate aerial traffic system that ties together all the individual states and practically every corner of the earth. In the interim, the agency responsible for all of the above (and more) has stumbled

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It’s been more than four years since the last authorization expired – and talks on renewing the FAA’s authority started in 2005! along through 22 stop-gap funding measures and a partial shutdown in July, leaving the FAA beset with political, policy and fiscal constraints. And this situation is, unarguably, the resolute result of American lawmakers’ irresolution. Conversations on and off the record with numerous aviation officials, both inside and outside of Washington, reveal a non-partisan frustration with the refusal to act and move on lest that movement cede to someone else any sense of advantage that would remove the issue from the stacks of congressional poker chips used to assure nothing happens if that progress lets any of the opposite party gain anything resembling progress. “So here we are, 22 continuing resoluwww.AvBuyer.com

tions, headed for a 23rd, and the FAA still can’t count on being funded; on the amount of those funds; or on its very authority to exist for more than a few more weeks,” the insider summarized. Only in the peculiar world of Washington, D.C. could political wrangling over non-FAA, non-aviation issues so plague the prospects of the passing of required operating authority and funding. As of this writing, what looked and sounded promising is now all out the window and the partisan parsing apparently rolled back the debate to where the issues stood in July 2011.

HOW WE GOT HERE At midnight the clock runs out on the FAA’s authority to collect and spend aviation taxes and fees and to operate and manage its systems, by which point the time clock on efforts to pass an FAA reauthorization has already ticked off two whole years. Congress spent those two years debating, holding hearings, listening to testimony and hearing from lobbyists (lobbyists with commercial aviation interests as well as a large number representing general aviation interests…users, predominantly). On one side commercial aviation (represented by the politically savvy Air Transport Association of America) engaged in a public relations campaign every bit as retail as a campaign for office. That’s in addition to its lobbying of lawmakers and their staffs. User fees were the mantra of the adminisAircraft Index see Page 4


CHALLENGES FROM WASHINGTON

tration of the 43rd president of the United State, George W. Bush. Private aircraft users were portrayed as being comprised solely of rich travelers with a penchant for early tee times; their private jets muscling their way past lines of poor belittled airliners packed (we were to assume) with passengers suffering delays so that the private jet could get its small cadre of wealthy passengers to their destination on time. The ATA didn’t settle for some blue-sky rhetorical vision: Instead the association commissioned cartoon advert spots featuring anemographic-airliner characters and ran them regularly on airline terminal monitors. The association wanted to inspire its customers with a sense outrage at business operators that ATA hoped would beget those angry passengers to call their lawmakers in Washington. But the spots also reminded viewers (both Business Aviation veterans and typical airline users) of their sentence to suffer the indignities of cattle-car human mailing-tube trips. The spots served as much as a reminder of what airline passengers disliked as about some perceived injury at the hands of business jet travelers. Who wouldn’t, one non-General Aviation user asked a writer, prefer the relative humanity and convenience of a private airplane over a commercial system that’s designed more for the carriers’ convenience? In the airlines’ rhetoric, those private users were flying free in the system created Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

for the airlines; or at least the private users weren’t paying their full share… The opposition to the airline’s views covers the ramp of non-commercial aviation groups: The National Business Aviation Association; the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association; the National Air Transportation Association; the Experimental Aircraft Association; the National Association of State Aviation Officials; and a new, more grassroots voice among the veterans, the Alliance for Aviation Across America. Ultimately, the outlines of acceptable funding levels and mechanisms emerge; users – General and Business Aviation, commercial passenger and cargo – look ahead to higher fuel taxes and other tweaks in exchange for a legislative proposal that advances and accelerates progress on the FAA’s top priority: NextGen, the ordained successor to today’s 1960s-based air-traffic control system. Essentially, the battle royal over the administration’s airline-industry supported pitch to rewrite how the FAA is funded contributed to Congress’ failure to pass needed reauthorization legislation before the prior law expired. So at 12:01 a.m., October 1, 2007, the FAA’s spending and operating power shifted to the back-up system – a so-called ‘continuing resolution’: a stop-gap measure that (typically) continues an agency’s authority to work and tax temporarily while Congress works out a final solution. [You read that corwww.AvBuyer.com

rectly: On October 1, 2007, the FAA went onto the life-support system of a CR, as they’re called!] At the end of this month, the 22nd CR is due to expire. As of this writing – three months into the fifth fiscal year without a long-term authorization – action remains as in doubt as ever. But for reasons vastly unrelated to FAA none of them germane to authorizing and funding FAA programs. “It’s madness,” said my breakfast guest. “We’re into our fifth year without an FAA authorization. If we no longer can accomplish the small, the relatively simple things, how can we ever expect to resolve the big issues?” Rest assured FAA is working some big issues. At least, they’re trying to work them, within the constraints of being unable to count categorically on whether monies will be available, and how much.

THE AUTUMN OF OUR DISCONTENT Readers involved in operating, managing or running a business will likely recognize the problem: you want to improve, expand or streamline. You’ve identified the infrastructure improvements needed, the technology to support those changes and a budget to make it so, but your financial backers won’t support you with concrete plans – neither with a solid monetary amount, nor a solid timeframe. Instead, you are told “here’s a little to keep ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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CHALLENGES FROM WASHINGTON you going. Come back in a few months.” Our insider noted the politics of Washington today operate under rules easily described as “attrition warfare.” That’s what makes it frustrating here and in everything the US needs to address – “compromise” has become a dirty word and no one wants to give an inch because that means the other side may gain an inch. The following two issues remain the biggest barricades to FAA reauthorization: • An embattled labor-law decision of the Department of Labor. Aside from the fact that an airline and its supporters in Congress are the biggest critics of the law, there’s no FAA involvement or issue here. • The Essential Air Service (EAS) program. A product of airline deregulation, EAS guarantees limited levels of service in markets airlines otherwise won’t or don’t serve – and it is again under fire as an unneeded drain on precious dollars. EAS may be a DOT issue, arguably, but an FAA issue? Not remotely. House members acknowledged in July that they inserted the EAS language in an attempt to gain leverage

on the labor issue in the Senate – by targeting the cuts largely at two states, both represented by Democratic Senators. Going into November, House Transportation Committee chairman John Mica (R-Fla.), was opining that disagreements between House and Senate lawmakers could be resolved, clearing the way for a four-year extension of funding and programs for the FAA while leaving the most-vexing issues for another day – or, critics noted, legislation more germane to the issues. Over the week of Thanksgiving the message changed, with Mica conceding that his party leadership supported no such deal-making. As Mica noted – and seconded by his Senate counterpart, Transportation Committee chairman Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) – the Florida Republican had been overruled, and the issue returned to its perpetual status – in limbo. Then, in early December, another bump occurred on the path to FAA reauthorization: the resignation of FAA Administrator J. Randolph Babbitt. Days before resigning (midway through what was expected to be a five-year term) Babbitt was cited in Virginia for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Against the backdrop of the presidential election, with significant work remaining on other Fiscal 2012 issues, the prospects of the Senate confirming a Babbitt replacement appear grimly dim. Senate Republicans, with the ability to block anything, are expected to want to wait for 2013 in the hope there will be a fellow party member in the White House in place of President Obama, who appointed Babbitt. At the time of writing (mid-December) the prospects of a 23rd Continuing Resolution appeared dubious, and observers warned that a second partial shutdown of the FAA is possible. In the midst of a presidential election campaign, the prospects of the political protagonists embracing solutions instead of stalemate also continue to dim. So moving ahead in 2012, stand by for CR number 23 and a year (or longer) with an acting FAA Administrator. Progress at the FAA never looked less likely.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com.

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January 2012

Aircraft Index see Page 4


PRE-OWNED A/C SALES TRENDS

Pre-Owned Aircraft Sales Trends So when is the right time to jump in and buy? by Fletcher Aldredge o you ever yearn for the good old days when the worst thing we had to fear was nuclear war with the Soviets? Those were the days when the government had our best interests at heart; you know, teaching us to ‘duck and cover’ and stuff like that. Now the blitzkrieg of economy crushing, cancer-causing news seems never ending. The aircraft resale market remains in a state of cautious optimism... sometimes without the optimism. That will come as no surprise to anyone with a TV set. The export market, often credited with propping up General Aviation, has cooled somewhat. A stronger U.S. dollar has moved some Brazilian buyers to the sidelines. Brokers worry that buyers from other countries could also back off. There is one aspect of today’s market that is positively surprising. For those airplanes that are priced right, the market remains active. Furthermore, if you happen to have a low-time airplane with a top pedigree that is

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Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

priced right, the market can be almost hot. How does the word ‘hot’ fit into such a stagnant economy? We’ll revisit this question later.

segment that need the transportation, but not the loan. Piston Twin prices were generally off again, but only by 0.6% to 0.7%. Many Twins just can’t get any cheaper unless they go to salvage.

PISTON SINGLES AND TWINS There is activity in the Piston Single- and Twin-engine aircraft segment, but the real buyers seem more discerning and knowledgeable than ever. There’s no use telling most buyers that the airplane has a fresh overhaul unless there is good documentation from a big name shop in the logbook. An illegible signature from a roving mechanic just won’t do it. Some buyers won’t consider anything unless it has a low-time factory re-man. Activity is directly proportional to aircraft quality. The Vref Light Single Index slipped 1.4% in value during the recent quarter. We may be in another stalemate phase where buyers are waiting for prices to get even better. We say ‘buy now’ or you might be left with the dregs. Complex Single prices eased down just 0.3%. There are still enough buyers in this www.AvBuyer.com

TURBOPROPS AND JETS Price rules! Even though availability on some models continues to wear away, buyers still control the market. When activity slows, sellers respond with lower prices. There are exceptions, but this tells us that there are either too many airplanes ‘for sale’ or not enough real buyers. Demand continues for those late model, low-time airplanes which are priced for today’s market. However, some of the older, out-of-production airplanes appear to be priced for tomorrow’s market. Some owners of Citation IIs, IIIs, Astras and Lear 55s (to name a few), just want out. In order to get the airplane off the books, they are slashing prices to well below market value. These best buys of the year are a ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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PRE-OWNED A/C SALES TRENDS GA AS WE KNOW IT

great place for the first time jet owner to start. It is important to remember, however, that an aircraft with fresh inspections is worth a lot more than one with everything due. Turboprops continue to be the most stable segment with no change in the Vref Turboprop Index for the recent quarter (see VrefOnline.com for all eight indices.) The Light Jet Index fell 3.6% in value. Mid-Size jets were down an average of 7.4%. And, the Large Jet Index lost 8.1%. That is more than four years of eroding prices. It is most incredible to think many people predicted this would all be over in 2010.

Ever wonder how, or why some Bonanzas, CitationJets and Lear 45s (and many others) sell right away, and others just sit on the market? It’s because, there are smart buyers out there who are not waiting for a recovery. And, many smart sellers have priced their airplanes right. Who are these people stepping up to spend millions in such a desperate-looking economy? We don’t know if they are one-percenters, but they are definitely job creators – in aviation and probably elsewhere too. Obviously, these buyers get the same paralyzing news the rest of us see, but while the average person runs for the hills, today’s savvy buyer sees opportunity. It’s plain and simple enough: the world will survive – and in that world, airplanes will play an ever-expanding role. So, if you want to sell, get realistic on your asking price. If you want to buy, jump in now. There are some impressive deals! The worst you have to fear is not the end of the world, but death by pundit.

IF NOT 2010, WHEN?! Speculation about a real recovery is kind of like foretelling The Second Coming. Many expect it to happen, but no one has been successful at picking a date. As expected, some proclaim the recovery will return just after the Presidential election (less than a year away… hooray!). Others are a bit gloomier (or should we say a bit more realistic?). Even the most optimistic individual realizes the Global Economy is in a precarious phase. As we’ve said, the 24/7 media and its TEOTWAWKI blatherings are difficult to ignore.

❯ More information from www.vrefpub.com or www.vrefonline.com

...there are smart buyers out there who are not waiting for a recovery. And, many smart sellers have priced their airplanes right.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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details

The global marketplace for business aviation. News - Aircraft listings Editorial www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BARR UPDATE

BARR Restored: FAA restores privacy screen for General Aviation travelers. by Greg Cirillo fter an ill-advised effort to allow nearly unrestricted public access to real-time private aircraft routing, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was compelled by U.S. lawmakers to restore the long-standing policy that permits any private aircraft traveler to restrict disclosure of their aircraft movement. In a six month period, the policy rotated 360 degrees, and in the process generated heated debate over the privacy rights of General Aviation travelers, as weighed against the public’s interest in access to routing data collected by the FAA in furtherance of its air safety mission. Following, we discuss the Block Aircraft Registration Request (BARR) program’s evolution since its inception in 2000; the FAA’s June 2011 attempt to dismantle the program; and the program’s restoration in December 2011.

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THE BARR PROGRAM’S EVOLUTION The BARR program would not exist but for the advent of the FAA’s collection of Traffic Situation Display (TSD) information, which includes aircraft location, destination, estimated time of arrival, airspeed, altitude and registration number. Beginning in 1997, with the growth of the commercial internet and proliferation of private flight tracking services, the TSD information was made available to the public through the two-data feeds called the Aircraft Situation Display to Industry (ASDI) and National Airspace System Status Information (NASSI)1. While the new tracking technology allowed the FAA to better manage airspace, flight tracking services commercialized the information by bundling and selling it via subscription services. The service was (and is) valued by the media, travel services and financial institutions tracking aircraft held as collateral for loans. In an attempt to ensure the data feeds were not being misused, the FAA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) ❯ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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BARR UPDATE with direct subscribers to the ASDI and NASSI data feeds. The MOA applies to the transmission, receipt, utilization and redistribution of ASDI and/or NASSI data by subscribers and the FAA. In further response to security, privacy and confidentiality concerns, the FAA adopted the BARR program in 2000, which allowed aircraft operators to screen their information from subscribers to the ASDI and NASSI data. The screening was implemented by simple request and did not require the aircraft operator to satisfy any particular standard. The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) administered the BARR program requests on behalf of the FAA and would aggregate the requests and forward them to the FAA and certain data-feed subscribers on a monthly basis.

BARR PROGRAM LIMITED On March 4, 2011 the FAA issued a “Notice of proposed modification to the FAA/Subscriber MOA and request for comments2.” In this notice, the FAA proposed to modify the MOA (the agreement between the FAA and data-feed subscribers) to restrict the ability of aircraft owners and operators to

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“opt out” of the publicly-available data feeds. The proposed new FAA program would limit BARR submissions to only individuals with a “certified security concern.3” For obvious reasons, the General Aviation industry erupted in protest. The FAA’s reason for withdrawing BARR protections was that the federal Privacy Act4 does not protect the ASDI information from being made publicly-available. Hundreds of comments opposing the FAA’s plan were submitted. By a vast majority, the comments reflected significant concerns with the implications on privacy, confidentiality, security and personal safety that could result from the FAA’s proposed changes. Despite the torrent of opposition, on June 3, 2011 the FAA published a notice officially dismantling the BARR program effective August 2, 20115 and limiting participation to operators demonstrating a valid security concern.

before the Federal Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit was scheduled for December 2, 2011. On November 18, 2011, while the case was pending (and prior to oral argument), H.R. 2122 was signed into law and the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act 7 reinstated the “old” BARR program through the end of Fiscal Year 2012 (September 30, 2012). At first, the BARR program was in limbo, between the FAA’s still-effective policy, and the new law. The FAA promptly took the practical step of withdrawing its new BARR requirements and restoring the prior policy8. The BARR program is now back to it’s pre2011 format, and aircraft owners and operators are again able to request that their aircraft information be withheld from flight tracking programs without submitting, and establishing a certified security concern.

NEW BARR REQUESTS RESPONSE TO FAA’S BARR LIMITATION In a coordinated effort, the NBAA and the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) filed a federal appeal of the FAA’s decision on June 22, 20116. Oral argument

www.AvBuyer.com

The FAA has already begun receiving and accepting BARR without a certified security concern9. For those aircraft owners and operators seeking to “opt out” of having aircraft information made available to the public, a letter containing the following information

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BARR UPDATE should be sent to the ironic email address CertifiedSecurityConcern@faa.gov 10: 1. Aircraft owner or operator name and contact information; 2. Tail number(s) to be blocked and aircraft identification information (make, model, serial number); and 3. Desired level of blocking. The desired level of blocking should be carefully considered by aircraft owners and operators. There are two options that an operator can choose. The first option, ASDIlevel blocking, allows aircraft owners and operators to track their own aircraft through the flight tracking service of their choice. In order for an operator to track their

own aircraft under this option, the operator should contact their ASDI provider and request that the operator selectively unblock the aircraft for that operator only. Note that some ASDI providers may charge for this service. The second option is FAAlevel blocking, which eliminates all access to the aircraft information. For more information on the new process to submit a BARR submission visit the NBAA’s website at http://www.nbaa.org/ops/security/barr/new-process/.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR BARR? While the BARR program appears to be back to its former configuration, the FAA has yet to finalize all the details of the BARR program’s reinstatement. According

to the FAA, a permanent policy will be posted in the Federal Register for public comment early next year.

❯ For more information, please

contact Greg Cirillo, Wiley Rein LLP, 703.905.2808 or gcirillo@wileyrein.com. Mr. Cirillo is a transactional, commercial attorney practicing at Wiley Rein LLP representing businesses, entrepreneurs and high net worth individuals in a wide range of transactions GREG CIRILLO including venture formation, finance, corporate control, licensing, succession planning, mergers and acquisitions. * Special thanks to Amanda Kastl for her assistance in preparing this article.

FOOTNOTES: ASDI data remains fully and readily available to the FAA and certain other government agencies at all times. 76 Fed. Reg. 12209 (March 4, 2011). See “Change Will Require Release of More Private Aviation Flight Plan Data,” Summer 2011, available at http://www.wileyrein.com/publications.cfm?sp=articles&id=7275&newsletter=15. 5. U.S.C. 552a. 76 Fed. Reg. 32258 (June 3, 2011). National Business Aviation Association and Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association v. FAA, No. 11-1241 (D.C. Cir. 2011). See The Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 112-055, § 119A (2011), available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-112hr2112enr/pdf/BILLS-112hr2112enr.pdf. See “The FAA Announces Changes to the Blocked Aircraft Registration Request (BARR) Program,” FAA Press Release, Dec. 2, 2011, available at http://www.faa.gov/news/press_releases/news_story.cfm?newsId=13259. 9. According to the NBAA’s website, operators currently blocking their movements as part of the FAA’s Certified Security Program will not have a gap in their “blocked” status. See http://www.nbaa.org/ops/security/barr/. 10. Requests can also be mailed to the following address: FAA Certified Security Concern, ATO System Operations Services, Room 1002, 800 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20591.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today avbuyer.com/dealers Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2012

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Singapore Airshow 2012

Looking ahead to Asia-Pacific’s ‘gateway event’. he Singapore Airshow, is among the world's Top Three aviation events, and is the largest aerospace and defence event in Asia. This year’s Airshow promises to be bigger than preceding Shows when it takes place on February 14-19th. More exhibitors are confirmed than at this time in the lead up to the previous event with approximately 900 companies from 50 countries signed-up to display their wares. There will be 21 national/group pavilions including US, Germany, France, UK and--for the first time at the Singapore Airshow--a Japanese Pavilion. The Asia-Pacific region is currently riding a wave of growth, and Singapore is strategically positioned as a gateway into this thriving

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region. Naturally Singapore Airshow attracts companies from around the world that recognize the business potential in Asia and view the Show as the ideal platform to debut their commercial aircraft and business jets as well as the latest aerospace and defense products and technology. In addition to the increasing number of exhibitors, Singapore Airshow has consistently drawn strong attendance with more than 43,000 trade attendees from 133 countries recorded in 2010 - a number that Jimmy Lau, Managing Director, Experia Events (Singapore Airshow’s organizing body) expects to increase next month. “We continue to receive strong support with over 70% returning exhibitors bearing testimony to the strong vote of confidence we www.AvBuyer.com

receive year-on-year from our partners and exhibitors,” he told World Aircraft Sales Magazine during the lead-up to the event. “Our exhibitors and partners acknowledge that this is a key show in the global aerospace and aviation calendar that offers strategic networking opportunities and insights into the latest trends, technologies and best practices in the aerospace and defence industry. Singapore Airshow draws a strong base of high-level delegations, senior government officials and leading industry players as it also serves as a valuable platform for leadership and insightful exchange of views on current and future issues facing the aviation industry.” Key events such as the Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit (SAALS) and the Aircraft Index see Page 4


PHOTO

Business Forums continue to entrench the event’s strong reputation as a networking powerhouse for high-level delegations, leading industry players, senior aircraft manufacturers and airline executives. “There will be two high-level conferences held at the Show - namely SAALS and the Asia Pacific Security Conference (APSEC),” Lau promised. “SAALS is a collaborative effort by the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS), Experia Events, IATA and the Singapore Ministry of Transport (MOT), and it will provide a platform for airlines, airport operators, air navigation service providers and manufacturers to dialogue with government and regulatory leaders to address a wide range of issues such as building a successful and sustainable future, climate change and security challenges. “APSEC meanwhile will gather highlevel executives from the aerospace and defence industries to examine strategic issues shaping peace and security worldwide.” Singapore Airshow 2012 also sees the return of Business Forums, presented by top aerospace buyers, high-level executives from government agencies and industry leaders, and these are designed to give visitors and exhibitors the chance to understand the procurement opportunities and strategies to tap potential business prospects and joint ventures in the key markets of China, India and Southeast Asia. “The India Business Forum will be chaired by Dr C.G. Krishnadas Nair, Society of Indian Aerospace Technologies and Industries (SIATI) and will focus on three key topics - among them, ‘The Growth of Civil Aviation in India & Opportunities’ and ‘Development of Airports and Infrastructure & Investments in the Sector’,” Lau revealed. “The Chairman for the China Business Forum is Mr Ng Pock Too from New Board Technology, while the Southeast Asia Business Forum will be chaired by Dr Aloysius Tay of the Association of Aerospace Industries Singapore (AAIS) and will focus on Procurement Trends, Aircraft Financing and Flight Services Training. “Elsewhere, following its successful debut at the 2010 event, Singapore Airshow 2012 will once again feature the Green Pavilion,” Lau added. “This Pavilion will provide exhibitors with an excellent platform to showcase the latest green initiatives, share best practices and market ideas. This year the Green Pavilion will also feature ‘Deminars’ - seminars and demonstrations supported by IATA.”

© EXPERIA EVENTS PTE LTD

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2012

models set to make their Singapore Airshow debuts this year are the Airbus ACJ318, Hawker’s 900XP and Gulfstream’s G280. Other OEM’s models will also be strongly represented including aircraft from ATR, Bell Helicopter, Beriev, Boeing, Bombardier, Dassault, Diamond, Embraer, Pilatus, Piper and Sikorsky. MRO services is an aspect of Commercial and Business Aviation that needs to develop in the emerging regions of China, India and Southeast Asia to facilitate the projected growth of business jet deliveries there over the coming years. “As more companies outsource their MRO activities to Asia to reduce cost, Singapore Airshow acts as an opportune platform for MRO Providers to network and

OEM/MRO PARTICIPATION The Show will offer a dedicated Business Aviation area and among the business jet Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

JIMMY LAU, MD, EXPERIA EVENTS

www.AvBuyer.com

showcase their comprehensive range of MRO capabilities to the international aviation community,” Lau observed. “Based on studies by Frost & Sullivan, cost-reduction activities will drive companies to outsource MRO activities to the AsiaPacific region, which will also become a major outsourcing region with a projected spending set to hit US$13 billion by 2015. “Key MRO providers showcasing their services at Singapore Airshow 2012 include Eurocopter, Safran, SIAE, ST Aerospace, Goodrich, GMF Aeroasia, Lufthansa Technik, SR Technic, Dallas Airmotive and Abu Dhabi Aircraft Technology.” So with everything seemingly set for another successful Singapore Airshow 2012, how does Mr. Lau see the business climate for the aerospace industry in the Asia-Pacific region, and how will this be reflected at the Singapore Airshow? “Singapore’s aviation industry is a vast inter-connected network of players, including home-grown and international aviation OEMs, industry associations and services,” he summarized. “Last year, Singapore's total output for the aerospace sector hit $7.2 billion. According to estimates by Frost & Sullivan, the Asia-Pacific region is expected to account for 30% of the forecasted US$1.65 trillion in global defence spending in 2016.” Singapore Airshow 2012 will be held at the purpose-built Changi Exhibition Centre (CEC), located 20 minutes from the Central Business District and 10 minutes from Changi Airport. The event’s trade days will take place from Tuesday 14th February (12 noon-5pm), and Wednesday 15th-Friday 17th (9.30am-5pm). ❯ More information from www.singaporeairshow.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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2008 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5192 N323BD 1262 798

Engines BR700-710C4-11 Engines are on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Left: S/N 15487 1262Hours 798 Cycles Right: S/N 15488 1228 Hours 786 Cycles APU Honeywell RE-220 APU is on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Serial Number: TBD 712 Hours Avionics Honeywell PlaneViewTM Avionics Suite Four (4) 14” Multi-Function Displays (MFD) Dual Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Honeywell Head Up Display / Visual Guidance System Goodrich EBDI-4000 RMI Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS) Triple Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules Third Honeywell MT-860 Nav/Com Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Goodrich GH-311 Standby Att/Alt/Asp Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel Dual Honeywell MRC-855A Mod Radio Cabs Triple Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionic Unit Honeywell RT-951 TCAS 2000 System Triple Honeywell NZ-2000 Flight Management Systems

EGPWS with Windshear Detection Triple Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V IRSs L3 Communications Cockpit Voice Recorder L3 Quick Access Recorder (uQAR) Honeywell MCS-7000 Satellite Communications Digital Flight Data Recorder Securaplane System with 3 cameras Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Gulfstream Broadband Multi-Link (BBML) Maintenance 12-MOS / 500 hr. Inspection CW: July, 2011; Due: July, 2012 / 1670.9 Hrs. 24-Month Inspection CW: August, 2010; Due: July, 2012 48-Month Inspection Due: July, 2012 72 Month Inspection Due: July, 2014 Gross Weight: 90,500Lbs. Operating Weight: 47,996 Lbs. Empty Weight: 47,145 Lbs. Interior Original Installation 2008 By Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah. Beautiful eighteen passenger executive interior with berthing for seven, featuring a well appointed, spacious forward galley. A forward four-place club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious mid cabin boasts another four-place club. Aft of the second four-placed club is a four-placed conference grouping and credenza. The aft section of the aircraft poses dual side facing three-placed divans. Seating is tastefully finished in light earthy leathers. Interior is complemented by luxurious Mark Payne, Partner MENTE Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320 Addison, TX 75001

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carpeting found throughout the cabin. Forward galley poses ample storage, (2) Coffee Makers, Microwave, and a spacious cold box refrigerator. Exterior Original Paint 2008 By Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah. Additional Features: Enhanced Sound Proofing Sigma In Flight Phone Handset installed next to VIP seat (January, 2010) Mark Payne, Partner Tel: +1 214-351-9595 Cell: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com www.mentegroup.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Lowest priced G550 on the market 2004 Gulfstream G550 Serial Numbers: Airframe: Landings:

5028 3,184 1,152

Engines BR700-710C4-11 Left: S/N 15159 3,184 Hours 1,152 Cycles Right: S/N 15158 3,184 Hours 1,152 Cycles Engines are not on a Program APU Honeywell RE-220 S/N P339 1,782 Hours APU is not on a Program Avionics Artex ELT C406-2 Interior Honeywell PlaneViewTM Avionics Suite Four (4) 14” Multi-Function Displays (MFD) Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Dual Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Honeywell Head Up Display / Visual Guidance System Goodrich EBDI-4000 RMI Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS) Triple Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules Third Honeywell MT-860 Nav/Com Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Goodrich GH-311 Standby Att/Alt/Asp Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel Dual Honeywell MRC-855A Mod Radio Cabs Triple Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionic Unit

Honeywell RT-951 TCAS 2000 System Triple Honeywell NZ-2000 Flight Management Systems EGPWS with Windshear Detection Triple Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V IRSs L3 Communications Cockpit Voice Recorder L3 Quick Access Recorder (uQAR) Honeywell MCS-7000 Satellite Communications Digital Flight Data Recorder Securaplane System Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Additional Features Plane View Cert “F” 2 AFCS Maintenance 72 Month Inspection CW: July 9, 2010 Interior Original Installation: June 21, 2004 By: Gulfstream Aerospace, Appleton Partial Refurbishment: March 5, 2008 By: Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah Beautiful fourteen passenger executive interior with berthing for six, featuring a forward fourplace club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious mid cabin boasts a two-place grouping opposite a divan. The aft section of the aircraft has a four-place-conference grouping and credenza adjacent to a well appointed galley. The aircraft also offers a crew rest area with one seat. Seating is tastefully finished in light earthy leathers. Interior is complemented with matching earth Mark Payne, Partner MENTE Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

tone carpeting found throughout the cabin. Exquisite cabin lighting and complimentary sidewall touches. Custom galley with additional storage, 2 Tia Coffee Makers, Sharp microwave, and a BE Aerospace convection warming oven Exterior Last Painted Mar 11, 2008. By: Savannah Air Service Center Colors: Chevron White with Red, Dark Gray and Light Gray stripes

Mark Payne, Partner Tel: +1 214-351-9595 Cell: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com www.mentegroup.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Cessna Citation VII Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

7005 5639.6 3338

Engines MSP Gold Honeywell TFE731-4R-2S w/ N1 DEEC’s Left: P102110; 5,561.1 Hours; 3,292 Cycles Right: P102115; 5,595.8 Hours; 3,309 Cycles Last Hot Section Completed: Left: 4,181.0 Right: 4,181.0 Last Overhaul Completed: Left: 4,181.0 Right: 4,181.0 APU P-165. Honeywell GTCP 36-150W 2,920 Hours Inspection Status All ADs and Major SBs Complete. Repair Documents 1,3, 20, 23, 28, 30, 42 and 43 completed April 22, 2010 / 5,576.3 Repair Documents 9 & 35 complete Aug 11, 2010 / 5,622.9

Aircraft Programs Engines enrolled 100% Honeywell MSP Gold ProParts Maintenance. Aircraft enrolled on Cescom Avionics Dual Honeywell SPZ-8OOO (5 Tube EFIS) Dual Honeywell AHZ-8OO Autopilot Honeywell Primus 880 Color Radar Collins ALT-55B Radar Altimeter Dual Universal UNS-1 B+ w/ GPS 1000 FMS Dual AZ-B10 Air Data Computers Dual Honeywell RMU-850 Radio Management Units Dual Honeywell RCZ-851 Communication Units Dual Honeywell Mode S Transponders w/ 8.33 Dual Honeywell RNZ-850 Navigation Units Dual Honeywell AHZ-600 AHRS Additional Features Thrust Reversers

Honeywell TCAS 2000 (ACAS II) with Change 7 Fairchild GA-1 00 Cockpit Voice Recorder Honeywell LSZ-B60 Lighting Sensor System Single Point Refueling. Concord Lead Acid Batteries RVSM. Honeywell Mark VII EGWPS Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Flight Phone EROS Oxygen Masks. Secure A Plane Security System Battery Charging Provisions from Ground Power Interior Eight Passenger fireblocked interior with a center club configuration. A forward two-place side facing divan and two single forward facing seats. Appointed in neutral beige leather seats and complimented by soft beige window panels, neutral taupe carpet, Carpathian Elm Burl wood veneers and gold plating. The forward refreshment center has ample storage along with a forward storage closet and aft lavatory.

Two Corporate Owners Since New

1998 Dassault Falcon 900EX Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

35 N913SN 6912.4 3302

Engines MSP Engine Program APU Allied Signal GTCP 36-150F 3967.1 hours since new Last HSI – 2558.8; Next Due: 7058.8 Avionics/ Additional Equipment Pimus Elite Cockpit Upgrade ($800K) XM Graphical Weather Flight Dynamics Cat III HUD Dual Collins TCAS 94-TCAS II w Change 7 Airshow Genesys

Electronis Charts w Dual Honeywell Servers Lightening Sensor DC-820 FMS Upgrade (120k Option) Honeywell MARKV EGPWS Honeywell SSCVR CVR (32 Parameter) Honeywell SSFDR Flight Data Recorder (120 Minute Recording) MagnaStar UHF/Satcom Phone w/fax Triple Collins VHF-422/A Comms w 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins: TDR-94D Transponders w Mode S Dual Bendix-King KHF-950s Cabin DVD Player with 4 Rosen monitors Triple Honeywell Lazeref III Selcal Coltech CDS-714 Decoder One EICAS Multi-Function Display Dual Baker B1045 Audio Control Pannels Triple Honeywell FMZ 2000 w dual GNSSU GPS

Mark Payne, Partner MENTE Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320 Addison, TX 75001

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Dual Collins DME-442 Dual AA-300 Honeywell Radio Altimeter FM Immunity Comms@ Navs Aircraft Programs HAPPS Avionics Program CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program MSP Engine Program RVSM Certified Interior 12 Passenger configuration with Aft Lavatory-Soft goods completed Nov. 2010. Forward 4 Place club seating w Mid Cabin double club and dinning group. Private aft cabin with 3 place couch across from club seating. Fwd Jump Seat. Exterior New paint in December 2009. White base overall with black and yellow stripes. Slant style Eng. Markings.

Mark Payne, Partner Tel: +1 214-351-9595 Cell: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com www.mentegroup.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

2010 Falcon 7X Serial Number: 106 Registration: PR-BTG Airframe TT: 392 Landings: 168 Enrolled on FalconCare Engines #1 Engine s/n PCE-CH0335: 392 CYCLES: 168 #2 Engine s/n PCE-CH0334: 392 CYCLES: 168 #3 Engine s/n PCE-CH0323: 394 CYCLES: 169 APU s/n P-220: Honeywell GTCP36-150FN (on MSP) Engine Type Pratt & Whitney Canada PW307A (on ESP) Exterior Upper fuselage White and lower fuselage light Grey with Navy Blue and light Grey custom stripes Interior Cream colored leather seats, Beige carpet, Chablis ultraleather headliner, Flat Cut Figured Anigre veneer, 24k gold plating Seating 14 passengers (legal 13 pax seats due to HIC): 4-place forward club, 4-place mid-cabin dining group with opposing credenza, two aft 3-place divans, forward galley, forward and aft lav’s, crew rest area, third crewmember seat Avionics Honeywell Primus Epic System. Flight Display System (w/four 14 inch LCD’s, two Cursor Controls and two keyboards) Honeywell EASY. Flight Management Systems triple Honeywell EASY. Central Maintenance Computer Honeywell EASY. VHF Communications (VHF Data Radio – “VDR”) triple Honeywell TR-866B. VOR/ILS/Marker

Navigation Systems/GPS dual Honeywell NV875X. DME Systems dual Honeywell DM-855. ADF Systems dual Honeywell DF-855. Mode S Transponder Systems dual Honeywell XS-857A. Color Weather Radar System Honeywell Primus 880. TCAS II System ACSS TCAS 3000 (w/ Change 7). Radio Altimeter System dual Honeywell KRA405B. Enhanced GPWS with Windshear Honeywell EASY. Head-Up Guidance System Rockwell Collins HGS-5860. Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) Rockwell Collins EFVS-5860. High Frequency Communication Systems dual Honeywell KHF-1050. SATCOM Aero H+ / Swift Broadband Honeywell MCS-7120. Micro Inertial Reference Systems triple Honeywell Laseref V. Voice and Flight Data Combined Recorder Honyewell. ELT (Tri-frequency) System w/NAV Interface Honeywell Rescu 406AF. Additional Equipment Honeywell: LSS-860 Lightning Sensor System, Data Loader, Attitude Heading Reference System, three AV-900 Flightdeck Audio Systems, SELCAL, Attitude Heading Reference System, Standby Instrument Display. Honeywell EASY: Modular Avionics Units (MAU), Uplink Weather capability, Communications Management Function (CMF), Electronic Jeppesen Charts. Rockwell Collins FCMS: Airshow 4000, two 21 inch LCD monitors, 8.4 inch side-ledge LCD monitors, dual DVD player. Goodrich Air Data Smartprobes, flightdeck printer, Securaplane VCU-05 Video Camera Control System with Flightdeck Video Interface, Goodrich Ice Detectors, Brother Fax/Printer/Scanner

www.falconjet.com/preowned

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

USA Tel: + (1) 201 541 4556 E-mail: preowned@falconjet.com FRANCE Tel: +33 1 47 11 60 71 dominique.cruchon@dassault-aviation.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Price: Make offer 1989 Hawker 800 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

NA-440 N295JR 8650 5900

Engines Garrett TFE 731-5R MSP Gold ENGINE PROGRAM Avionics HONEYWELL COMMS: DUAL HONEYWELL RCZ-833B NAVS: DUAL HONEYWELL RNZ-850 AP: HONEYWLL DFZ-800 FMS: DUAL HONEYWELL FMS-2000 W/GPS ADC: YES DME: DUAL HONEYWELL RNZ-850 XPNDR: DUAL HONEYWELL TCZ-833B MODE S ADF: DUAL HONEYWELL AT-850 HF: HONEYWELL KHF-950 W/SELCAL RADAR: PRIMUS 870 EFIS: HONEYWELL EDZ-818 5-TUBE EGPWS: MARK VI TCAS: TCZ-910 VERSION 7 RALT: HONEYWELL AA-300 CVR: UNIVERSAL CVR-30-B Features THIS HAWKER 800A HAS BEEN PROFESSIONLLY OPERATED AND MAINTAINED. THE ROOMY EIGHT PLACE CABIN WITH AIRLINE STYLE FULLY

ENCLOSED AFT LAVATORY ENABLE PASSENGERS TO TRAVEL IN LUXURIOUS COMFORT. WITH A RANGE OF 2,300 NM, EXCELLENT PAYLOAD AND FLEXIBILITY MAKES THIS ONE OF THE MOST ATTRACTIVE MIDSIZE JET’S IN TODAY’S MARKET. THE AIRCRAFT IS RVSM CAPABLE, HAS DEE HOWARD THRUST REVERSERS, PULSE SAFETY LIGHTS, DEVORE TEL-TAIL LIGHTS RADOME, TAXI/LANDING LIGHTS, FM IMMUNITY WITH 8.33 CHANNEL SPACING. Interior EIGHT PLACE INTERIOR COMPLETED IN BEIGE LEATHER WITH A ONE FORWARD THREE PLACE DIVAN AND FIVE EXECUTIVE STYLE CLUB CHAIRS, FORWARD (FITS TWIO GOLF BAGS) AND LARGE AFT CABIN BAGGAGE SPACE (CAN FIT EIGHT FULL SIZE GOLF BAGS) ACCESS THRU LAVATOR, SLIM REFRESHMENT CENTER, CD PLAYER, AIRSHOW 100, FLITEFONE VI WITH TWO HANDSETS, AFT FULLY ENCLOSED AIRLINE STYLE LAVATORY AND JUMPSEAT. Exterior OVERALL WHITE WITH GOLD AND BLACK ACCENTS. Maintenance ON HONEYWELL "HAPP" AVIONICS WARRANTY PROGRAM, ENGINES ENROLLED ON MSP GOLD WHICH COVERS ALL SCHEDULED AND UNSCHEDULED ENGINE MAINTENANCE INCLUDING CORE

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

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INSPECTIONS. ON CAMP COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE TRACKING SYSTEM, FRESH ANNUAL, E & F CHECKS AND 12 YEAR LANDING GEAR OVERHAUL COMPLIED WITH BY RAYTHEON TAMPA OCTOBER 2011. 48 MONTH INSPECTION/G CHECK COMPLIED WITH SEPTEMBER 2009 BY STARPORT IN ORLANDO, FL, LOGBOOK RESEARCH SHOWS AIRCRAFT HAD HAIL DAMAGE AND AN APU FIRE.

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Best XLS Value…Period. 2005 Citation XLS w/Fresh Hots! Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

560-5549 N727MH 2380.0 2071

The Citation XLS offers the comfort and capacity of a mid-size jet while still retaining the short field performance and operating efficiencies of many light jets. The stand up cabin comfortably accommodates eight passengers, with a ninth smaller seat located in the aft area. This aircraft also offers a fully enclosed lavatory partitioned by sliding wood doors. Additionally, the XLS offers the largest external baggage compartment in its class. JAA / EASA Approved FDR. Engines PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA (PW-545B) Serial Number 560-5549 Left Right TBO 5000.0 hrs 5000.0 hrs Total Time Since New 2380.0 hrs 2380.0 hrs Total Cycles Since New 2071 2071 APU Honeywell RE-100XL APU Total Hours Since New 1467.2 hrs MSG-3 Maintenance Program Avionics Dual Universal Navigation Corporation UNS1espw with version 802.2 Software. Dual GPS, Uni-Link with embedded VHF, Loran Sensor, and Permanent Data Transfer Unit. Honeywell P-1000+ Integrated Flight Director / Autopilot /EFIS Avionics System Dual Honeywell RCZ-833K Integrated Comms with Dual RM 850 Radio Management Units Dual Honeywell RNZ 850 Integrated Navigation Unit

Single Honeywell DF 850 ADF Single AlliedSignal (Bendix/King) KTR-953 HF Radio Dual Honeywell 850 DME Honeywell RT 300 Radio Altimeter Dual Honeywell XS 852B Transponders Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar System Dual Digital AHRS Systems (Altitude / Heading Reference System) TCAS II with Change 7 Honeywell Dual IC 615 Computers Honeywell EGPWS with Wind Sheer Detect & Terrain Display Aircell with two cabin handsets and one cockpit handset Artex ELT Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) Airshow 400 with dual DVD players Dual AZ-950 ADCs Safe Flight AOA / Stall Warning Computer Dual LCR 93 AHRS Additional Features Dual UNS-1espw (WAAS Enabled) Thrust Reversers. RVSM Compliant 8.33 Khz Spacing Samsung Tablet EFB with Bluetooth Connection for GPS and XM Weather Passenger Cabin Briefer Cockpit Speaker Mute Selector Switch Pulse Light System with Remote Switch Right-Hand, Externally Serviceable Lavatory with Sink 76 Cubic Foot Oxygen Bottle Installation Remote Cabin Temperature Control Six Headsets for DVD Players Aircraft to be Delivered with Fresh Hot Section Inspection Price Reduced to $5.495M

Aviation Consultants Inc William R. Borgsmiller, President 945 Airport Drive San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 805-782-9722 x705 Cell: +1 805-801-5047 Fax: +1 805-888-2818 E-mail: wborgsmiller@acijet.com www.acijet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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Great Buy

2008 Learjet 60XR Serial Number: 337 Airframe TT: 638 Landings: 340 Engines L/RH: 638 Hours 340 cycles APU: 333 Hours Avionics F/DIR : Collins Pro Line 21 IFCS EFIS : Collins 4-tube COMMS : Dual Collins w/8.33 kHz Dual AHRS DME : Dual Collins TPDR : Dual Mode S TCAS-II w/change 7 L.R.N : Dual FMS, Dual GPS

Factory Warranties, Smart Parts, JAR OPS Compliant

EGPWS 121.5/243.0/406.025 MHz ELT EICAS control Rosemount Ice Detection System Dual FSU with Electronic Charts Options Second Honeywell KHF-1050 Long Range Comm Collins TWR-850 RADAR Enhanced Weather Radar Rosemount Ice Detection System Cockpit Voice Recorder (Exchange) 3D FMS Maps Rockwell Collins Datalink (with 3rd VHF) Dual FSU with Electronic Charts Enhanced Map Overlays (Dual FSU Configuraiton) Universal Weather (Dual FSU Configuration)

Interior Executive Floorplan B (Eight Passengers), Done in beige glove leather, Aft 4 place club, Forward 3 place divan, Aft belted lavatory, Beige Wool carpet Burled high-gloss cabinetry, Brushed Gold plated hardware, Full forward galley with microwave, Airshow 410 Next Generation, Airshow World-Wide Map Coverage, 15.1" (38 cm) Forward Video Monitor, Cabin Video System - Single DVD, Passenger Audio/Video Inputs (each), XM Radio (U.S. only), Wood Veneer Package - High Gloss, Microwave Oven (28V DC), ICS-200 Iridium phone (wireless handsets), Dual Hot Liquid Containers, Exterior White w/ Lear 60XR factory scheme.

Priced to Sell

Astra SPX Serial Number: 80 Airframe TT: 4,460 Landings: 1400 Airframe Status CAMP. 3,719.1 hrs / 2051 Cycles Engine Status Garrett TFE731-40R-200G MSP Gold Engine #1 3686.2Total Time 2022 Total Cycles Engine #2 3541.6 Total Time 1966 Total Cycles APU Garrett GTCP-36-150. TT: 1400.0 MSP Avionics EFIS: Collins Pro-line 4 TCAS: Collins TCAS II

Low Time, with APU and recent C Check Insp! FMS: Dual UNS-1C’s COM: Dual Collins VHF-422B FDS: Collins FCC-4000 XPNDR: Dual Collins TDR-94D ADC: Dual Collins ADC-850C HFCOM: King HF 950 RADAR: Collins TWR 850D CVR: Universal 30B ELT: 406 Compliant Interior Duncan Aviation Seven Passenger Custom Interior. Forward four place club seating with rear forward facing seat opposite two place club seating finished in Aeristo tan leather, accented in gold plating. High density medium beige carpet

1408 N. Fillmore Street, Suite 3, Arlington, VA 22201

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throughout aircraft. Side panels finished in beige fabric, with slight hints of black to accent carpet and seats. Headliner is covered in a light crème ultra leather with tone on tone fabric window lining. Galley is completed with a high gloss Sepele redwood with work top finished in a subtle variety of beige to coordinate. Entertainment package installed consisting of forward 10.4” monitor, DVD system equipped with wireless headsets, and Rosen FliteView airshow system that will zoom to street view. Exterior Custom Duncan Aviation Paint. Matterhorn White with Medium Concorde Blue Stripe and Las Vegas Gold.

Tel: 703 312 1000 Fax: 703 312 1355 Email: sales@nextjets.com www.nextjets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

2003 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1046 N900GF 4175 3471

Engines Left Engine 3708 Right Engine 3621 Enrolled in ESP Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS, • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 K • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • WX950 Stormscope

Exterior Matterhorn White with Las Vegas Gold, Seminole Red, and Nordic Grey stripes. Interior Fire-blocked eight passenger executive interior in a center club confi guration with an aft belted seat for an ninth passenger. Left and Right executive tables in the center club. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • 406 ELT • KHF950 Provision

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

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2008 Cessna Citation Sovereign Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

0213 G-TLFK 428.4 386

Engines Pratt & Whitney PW306C s/n PCE- CG0427/PCE-CG0428 On JSSI APU Honeywell R-100 s/n P-363 on JSSI 589.4 TT-471 Cycles Avionics Honeywell Primus Epic 4-Tube EFIS COM Dual Honeywell TR-65A NAV Dual Honeywell NV-875A ADF Dual Honeywell DF-855 XPDR Dual Honeywell XS-857A Mode S w/EHS FMS Dual Honeywell GPS Dual Honeywell Lightning Sensor Honeywell LSZ-860 TCAS II Honeywell CAS-67A TCAS II w/ Change 7 RADAR Honeywell Primus 880 RADALT Honeywell RT-300 EGPWS Honeywell EGPWS w/ Windshear HF Honeywell HF-1050 w/Coltech CSD-714 SELCAL CVR/FDR L3 Com FA 2100 120 minutes w/FSK Additional Equipment RVSM Capable - Aircell ST3100 Satcom w/ 2 Cabin & 1 Cockpit Handsets & Intercom – 7 i.e. 220VAC Electrical Outlets – LCD Video Monitor (10.4”) - Dual Disc DVD w/ Remote – Airshow 4000 w/ European Map – Provisions for Video Monitor in Sideledge at Each Pedestal Seat SELCAL - Second HF 1050 Provisions - Life Raft

Mooring Ring - Kit For Baggage Door Threshold Stainless Still Cover - Pylon Work Lights Pulselight System w/ TCAS Interface & Tail Flood Light Combination - CMF w/ VHF Datalink Radio Including Uplink Graphical Weather - Honeywell RH Chart Case Data Management Unit - Extended Range Oxy System – Kannad 406AF ELT Interior 9 Pax Fireblocked VIP Interior in Townsend Leather, Satin Almond Gold Quaker City Plating and Carl Booth High Gloss Wood Veneer - LH Fwd Side Facing Seat - 4 Fwd Club Seating w/ LH/RH Sideledge Stowable Executive Tables – 2 LH Aft Club Seating w/ 1 Executive Table – Full Recline and 180 Degree Swivel Capability Cabin Seats – RH Aft Three Place Couch w/ Dual FlipDown Armrests - RH Fwd Extended Refreshment Center w/ Microwave Oven and Entertainment System – Electric Operated Pleated Fabric Window Shades – PSU Indirect Lighting – Dropped Aisle Accent Lighting – Chime Unit – Mirage Plus Hemisphere Headliners – Townsend Leather Sidewalls – Aft Cabin RH Non Belted, Flushing, Externally Serviceable Toilet – Cabin Dividers w/ Sliding Doors – Aft Cabin LH Vanity – Aft Cabin Bulkhead Closet Exterior Overall Snow White w/ Harvest Gold, Ming Blue & Tibetan Gold Stripes Remarks MTOW 30,300 lbs – BOW 17,950 lbs – NDH – All Logs Since New – One Owner Since New – Maintained by Jet Aviation Zurich – On CESCOM – Engines & APU on JSSI US$ 12,250,000.00 + VAT If Applicable

Boutsen Aviation 41, rue Grimaldi MC-98000 Monaco

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +377 93 30 80 02 Fax: +377 93 30 80 05 aviation.sales@boutsen.com www.boutsen.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

1991 Gulfstream IV Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

1170 N765RM 6850

• GIV with new interior and paint and newly overhauled engines • Brand new APU-150 on MSG-III program. • Forward galley with microwave and convection oven • Front and rear lavatory. Engines Newly overhauled engines hung last year! Less than 15 hours on newly overhauled engines 15 SOH / 15 SOH Avionics/Radios Dual GPS navigation Honeywell Avionics SPECS contract RVSM certified Enhanced GPWS equipped RTU's equipped Dual HF's Airshow 400 External 360 degree camera for display of inflight viewing on all monitors Modifications/Conversions New Full cabin LED lighting system

Engineered Kibitzer seat New Gulfstream G400 Wide Cabin interior shell Additional Equipment Securaplane Security system with video camera tied to alarm system and displayable on aircraft monitors Low level satellite radio telephone SIRRUS radio system for in cabin real time entertainment (2) 24" and a single 1`5" side wall monitor APU 150 on MSP TT is 6044 New windshields Interior Phenomenal Brand new Custom Interior: New custom carpet,Custom lower and upper sides, Newly covered seats and divans, Newly re finished wood throughout. New engineered Kibitzer seat Exterior White Matterhorn with gold, black and titanium stripes Year Painted: 2011 Inspection Status MSG-III current through next 18 months Recently underwent extensive pre-buy expection at Gulfstream Savannah. Aircraft Located in: Dallas, Texas

M5 Holdings Contact: Richard Malouf

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Email:

+1 (469)348-8870 malouf@swbell.net

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

139


Marketplace Boeing 737-500 VIP

Tel: +44 (0)1531 633 000

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1991

S/N:

25419

TTAF:

37643

Reg:

N419CT

Location: United Kingdom

This 737-500 has undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work including a heavy C check, installation of winglets and conversion to VIP configuration in December 2010. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. The exterior has been painstakingly stripped and repainted and the interior has been finished to a very high VIP standard. Price: Make offer

Boeing 737-300 VIP

Email: trevorw@euroav.com Tel: +44 (0)1531 633 000

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1990

S/N:

24570

TTAF:

53457

Reg:

N470AC

Location: United Kingdom

This Boeing 737-300 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work and has been converted to a VIP configuration in February 2011. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. Winglets have been fitted to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call

Bombardier/Challenger 601-3A

Email: trevorw@euroav.com Tel: +44 (0)7881914734

Direct Aviation Year:

1990

S/N:

5067

TTAF:

5623.46

Reg:

VP-CFT

Location: United Kingdom

20 year inspection completed 2010, due 14th Jan 2030. Landing gear overhaul last complete on the 22nd Apr 2010, next due 15 April 2020, next replacement due in 4785 cycles. Artex 406 ELT. AFIS/GDC reporting. Iridium Satellite Phone. RVSM compliant. Fwd looking camera. Role change from 2 settees to I settee and 2 chairs (port side). Price: Make offer ✈

Dassault Falcon 100

Email: StevenM@direct-aviation.com Tel: +1 423 553 6737

Astec Industries Year:

1988

S/N:

219

TTAF:

7907

Reg:

N485AS

Location: USA, TN

7212 Landings, Eng 1 - 7767 - 20 since MPI, Eng 2 - 7815 - 20 since MPI, MSP Gold, DEEC's, Collins EFIS 85, GNS-XLs - w/ RNAV 1/2/1, Cabin Flight Display, LED Cabin Lighting, Ext Aft Baggage, 2006 P&I by Eagle Aviation CAE Price: USD $1,100,000 ✈

Email: jeichem@astecindustries.com

Start selling your aircraft today with ‘Sell My Aircraft’ at AvBuyer.com

Challenger 300

Capital Jet Group Year:

2006

S/N:

20091

TTAF:

832

Reg:

N391W

Location:

USA

Tel: +1 703 917 9000

This low time standout has had one U.S. corporate owner since new delivery Sept. 2006. Tastefully completed tan leather 8 passenger double club interior. Many extras, including over water flight kit, increased baggage capacity, avionics & cabin upgrades, 16G belted lav seat. Engines/APU on MSP, airframe on Smart Parts+, significant warranty remaining. Always hangared, NDH, never chartered. No better maintained 300 for the money. Call or email for additional information.

Your aircraft for sale advert will appear: • on AvBuyer.com IMMEDIATELY • in World Aircraft Sales Magazine (print & digital) • in the next AvBuyer Weekly Aircraft E-mail listing

140

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

Email: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace Embraer Phenom 100

Year:

2010

S/N:

147

TTAF:

255

Reg:

OO-GJP

Location: Belgium

Optional equipment; wheater radar, DME, 2nd transponder with diversity, ELT/NAV, ADF, chart view, electronic checklist, TCAS1, cockpit flood lights, sheepskin covers,sun visors, life vests, smoke goggles, premium pax door. Price: USD $3,050,000 ✈

Bombardier Global Express

Email: johan@dtt.be

Capital Jet Group, Inc Year:

2003

S/N:

9064

TTAF:

3353

Reg:

N264A

Location: USA

Tel: +1 703 917 9000

Dollar for dollar, no long-range aircraft beats the Global Express combination of range, speed, cabin & cockpit comfort, short field capability. One Fortune 500 operator since new delivery 2/2003, never chartered. Tastefully done forward galley interior with crew rest area and long range flexibility. Rolls-Royce CorporateCare, APU MSP, and Smart Parts Plus minimize budget uncertainty. High Mod/SB status including 98000 MGTOW. Triple NZ-2000 FMS, triple Laseref IV IRU, HUD, EVS, RAAS, DirecTV. - FOR LEASE - Call for details.

Citation XLS

Tel: +32 (0)516 10 100

Degroote Trucks & Trailers

Email: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Year:

2007

S/N: TTAF:

2,250

Reg:

Tel: +49 821 7003 100

EU-Reg., EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS-400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German Commercial Certificate. CAMO+, Top condition!

Location: Europe ✈

Gulfstream G550

L & L International Ltd Year: S/N:

5082

TTAF:

2404

Reg:

N709DW

Email: info@beechcraft.de Tel: +1 305 754 3313

Landings: 875, Avionics: Honeywell Primus II Epic Integrated Radio System with Dual Honeywell, MRC 855A Modular Radio Cabinets and Honeywell MT-860 Third NAV/COMM Cabinet, AUDIO: Triple Honeywell AV 900 Audio Panels, FDS: Honeywell Primus Epic System with Dual Auto throttle, Interior: 18 passengers, FWD Galley.

Location: USA ✈

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: marc@L-Lint.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

141


Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

TTAF:

6615.3

Reg:

N337WR

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA jetphotos.net

Bell 206L4

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

TTAF:

1700

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not do

justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners. US $1,975,000.

Reg: Location: USA

Bell 412 EMS

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

TTAF:

15265

Reg:

N554AL

Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’. Fresh annual / Export C of A. Price US $3,875,000 ✈

Bell 212

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

S/N: TTAF: Reg: Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Start selling your aircraft today with ‘Sell My Aircraft’ at AvBuyer.com

Challenger 300

Capital Jet Group Year:

2006

S/N:

20091

TTAF:

832

Reg:

N391W

Location:

USA

Tel: +1 703 917 9000

This low time standout has had one U.S. corporate owner since new delivery Sept. 2006. Tastefully completed tan leather 8 passenger double club interior. Many extras, including over water flight kit, increased baggage capacity, avionics & cabin upgrades, 16G belted lav seat. Engines/APU on MSP, airframe on Smart Parts+, significant warranty remaining. Always hangared, NDH, never chartered. No better maintained 300 for the money. Call or email for additional information.

Your aircraft for sale advert will appear: • on AvBuyer.com IMMEDIATELY • in World Aircraft Sales Magazine (print & digital) • in the next AvBuyer Weekly Aircraft E-mail listing

142

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

Email: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace Dornier 328

EPSN Year:

1998

S/N:

3095

TTAF:

2011

Reg:

PH-EVY

Location: Netherlands

Tel: +31 629 560 272 Aircraft in Executive lay-out 12 pax. Exceptionally wide corporate cabin arrangement with forward kitchen and aft Wardrobe/Lavatory room (wider then e.g. G V or Falcon 900). Kitchen with oven, coffeemaker, wash bin, ample stowing cabinetry. Cabin with moving map display, video/audio system. Wardrobe / lavatory area with large wardrobe space. With access to the aft baggage compartment. Fresh Phase V inspection, Fresh LG Overhaul. EASA JAR/OPS1 equipped. Dual S-Transponder. RVSM mod c/w. Price: make offer

Beechcraft King Air C90GTi

Email: hwac@kpnmail.nl

B-Air Charter GmbH & Co. KG Year:

2009

S/N:

LJ 1935

TTAF:

530

Reg:

D-ISBC

Tel: +49 (0)711 700 0438

Collins Proline 21, Dual TDR-94D Transponders (Mode S), WX Weather, aft cabin partition,no Damage History, Support Plus Parts and Labor, Raisbeck epic kit with wing lockers Price: USD $2,900,000

Location: Germany ✈

King Air 350

Universal Avionics Systems Year:

1997

S/N:

FL-158

TTAF:

3095

Reg:

N10UN

Location: USA, AZ

Email: moomens@uasc.com

Leppington Pastoral Company Year:

1997

S/N:

LJ-1464

TTAF:

2027

Reg:

VH-JEO

Location: Australia

Tel: +1 (0)520 295 2300

2,020 Total Cycles, Engines: 3,095 SNEW, 1,272 SHSI, 3,600 TBO, Propellers 3,095 SNEW, 560 SOH (Overhaul completed at 2535), One Owner since new. RVSM Certified, Raisbeck Dual Aft Body Strakes, Skywatch, WXR-850, Dual Electronic Flight Bag computers, No Damage History. Full warranty offered on all Universal Avionics Systems equipment. All Mandatory ADs and SBs complied with. Maintenance tracking by CAMP Systems. Universal Avionics Cockpit Suite. Price: Reduced to $2,499,000USD

Beechcraft King Air C90B

Email: stefan.bendl@b-aircharter.de

Tel: +61 2 47734291

Collins Pro-Line II w/Collins 4î EFIS-84 Flight Control System. Avidyne EX500 Multi Function Display. Honeywell KMH 880 Multi Hazard Awareness System. Shadin Fuel Flow Monitor. 950 HF Radio. Lead Acid Battery. Bendix/King KHF950 HF Radio. Cleveland Wheels & Brakes STC. Bendix/King KLN-90B GPS. Loral/Fairchild A100A Cockpit Voice Recorder. EXTERIOR: Matterhorn White with charcoal, Green and gold accent stripes. INTERIOR: Floor covering,carpet protector are Heatherwine Vienna Metro Grey seats. Price: Please call

Email: mark@greenfields.net.au Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

Find an Aircraft Dealer

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

143


Marketplace Beechcraft King Air F90-1

Tel: +44 (0)12446 76082

Hansen Group Year:

1980

S/N:

LA0088

TTAF:

8500

Reg:

N6VJ

Location: Denmark

10/10 aircraft with new engines and propellers. Garmin 430 and 530 TAWS dual mode S. High float landing gear with full encl. doors. 7 pax aircraft w belted potty. New leather interior and paint. Always hangared. No dammage history. All logs. The price is FIRM, but you will get an imacculate aircraft. Prepurchase inspection in Europe. Delivery worldwide. Price: USD $1,050,000 no VAT ✈

Eurocopter EC 120B

Email: Kolby@hansen.mail.dk Tel: +39 (0)348 737 7374

Mataneg Year:

2005

S/N:

1396

TTAF:

1300

Reg:

HB-ZFY

Location: Switzerland

Thales H 321 EHM.- Gyro-Horizon. UI 9560 Turn and Bank Indicator. Honeywell KCS 55A Gyro-Compass with Honeywell KI 525A. Garmin GNS 430 - VHF/VOR/LOC/GS GPS. Honeywell KY 196ASC+ VHF/AM. Garmin GTX 328 Transp. Mod S. Shadin 8800 T Altitude Encoder. Kannad 406 AF-H Emerg. Locator Transmit. Garmin GMA 340H ICS. Chronometer thomen. GPS AV Map. Air conditioning. Electrical ground power recept. Fuel flowmeter. Stylence pack. Inspection 6 years done in March 2011. Price reduced. NO INTERMEDIATE. USD $1,100,000

Agusta A109E Power

Email: triggianese@tesmed.com Tel: +44 (0)1509 856 464

East Midlands Helicopters Year:

2008

S/N:

11721

Always hangared, maintained to the highest standard for CAT flights. Immediately available with lease back/aircraft management available.

TTAF:

870.2

Reg:

G-EMHC

Price: Make offer

Location: United Kingdom ✈

Sikorsky S76C+

Email: sales@helicopter-services.co.uk

K-R Aircraft Year:

1997

S/N:

760470

TTAF:

4697

Reg:

N241KK

Tel: +1 909-783-1718 Available for immediate sale with the best market price, #1 EG: 1088, #2 EG: 1250 TSO, FLIR 2000 HP Ultra Media Camera, 4 Tube Honeywell EDZ 705 EFIS, Cabin Audio, 12 PAX Seats, Trimble GPS, 406AF ELT, KFS-576A Transponder, RDR-1400C WX Rader, NDH Excellent records with Fresh Annual /Export C of A.

Location: USA ✈

Email: KAZKRAIR@aol.com

Start selling your aircraft today with ‘Sell My Aircraft’ at AvBuyer.com

Challenger 300

Capital Jet Group Year:

2006

S/N:

20091

TTAF:

832

Reg:

N391W

Location:

USA

Tel: +1 703 917 9000

This low time standout has had one U.S. corporate owner since new delivery Sept. 2006. Tastefully completed tan leather 8 passenger double club interior. Many extras, including over water flight kit, increased baggage capacity, avionics & cabin upgrades, 16G belted lav seat. Engines/APU on MSP, airframe on Smart Parts+, significant warranty remaining. Always hangared, NDH, never chartered. No better maintained 300 for the money. Call or email for additional information.

Your aircraft for sale advert will appear: • on AvBuyer.com IMMEDIATELY • in World Aircraft Sales Magazine (print & digital) • in the next AvBuyer Weekly Aircraft E-mail listing

144

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

Email: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace Par Avion Ltd

+1 832 934 0055

Alberth Air Parts

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011

Find an Aircraft Dealer

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 18th January Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................146

Corporate Concepts............................................67,69

LeaseConnexion.........................................................23

ABACE .........................................................................34

CRS Jet Spares.......................................................105

Lektro..........................................................................111

AeroSmith/Penny .......................................................36

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe ...........................2-3,133

M5 Holdings .............................................................139

AIC Title Services.......................................................85

Dominion Aircraft .....................................................103

Mente Group ...................................................130-132

Air 1st Aviation............................................................91

Duncan Aviation..........................................................83

New Jet International .................................................95

AMJET Aviation...........................................................43

Eagle Aviation .............................................................59

NextJet ..................................................................37,136

Aviation Consultants ...............................................135

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................65

Northern Air...............................................................137

Avjet Corporation.................................................18-21

General Aviation Services ........................................57

O’Gara Aviation Company .......................................35

Avpro ......................................................................10-13

Goodwood ................................................................113

Par Avion ......................................................................42

Bell Aviation...........................................................24-25

Guardian Jet...........................................................77-79

PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales ................................63

Bombardier ..................................................................47

Gulfstream Pre-Owned ...............................................5

Rolls-Royce .................................................................55

Boutsen Aviation................................................31,138

IBA Group ......................................................................5

Southern Cross Aviation...........................................93

Bristol Associates ......................................................89

Intellijet International .........................................FC, 6-7

Start-Pac.........................................................................4

Central Business Jets .............................................147

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................15-17

The Jet Collection ......................................................33

Charleston Aviation Partners...................................49

JetBlack Aviation ......................................................101

The Registry of Aruba................................................71

Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................27

JetBrokers..............................................................28-29

VREF Aircraft Values ..............................................111

Chuck Collins & Associates..................................111

Jetcraft Corporation .................................................BC

Welsch Aviation ..........................................................51

Conklin & de Decker..................................................91

Jeteffect .....................................................................109

Wentworth & Affiliates...............................................53

Corporate AirSearch Int’l.................................99,134

Leading Edge Aviation ..............................................39

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................61

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – January 2012

145


When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. In addition, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with 8 passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ Falcon 7X ultra-long range business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


General Offices

Vienna Office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Austria

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +43 660 549 1099

FAX: (952) 894-8569

FAX: +44 20 7900 2890

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

EMAIL: erich@cbjets.com

2004 FALCON 2000EX EASy S/N 40

FALCON 900B S/N110

1700 TT, C Check and Dry Bay Mod completed 2010 by Duncan, Pratt ESP Gold Engines, Palatial 10 Place Interior, Large Monitors, External Camera System

Meets All EASA / Transport Canada / FAA Approvals; 3C Inspection completed 2010, Owners 900EX Easy has Arrived, MSP Gold, Forward Galley or Normal Galley with Forward Lav.

Information Coming Soon MSP Gold, Forward Galley or Normal Galley with Forward Lav, Aft Lav, RVSM

2007 CITATION CJ2+ S/N 349

2009 FALCON 7X

Owners New CJ4 Has Arrived, 704.2 TT, William Rolls Royce Tap Elite Engine Program, Cescom, Citation Serviced Exclusively Since New

800 Hours TT, Jar Ops 1 Compliant, 14 PAX, Under Falcon Care, Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold Program, Honeywell HAPS

2008 HAWKER 900XP S/N 033

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

853.31 Hours, MSP Gold, EASA / JAR Ops / FAA Certified, Standard 8 Place Interior, Dual FMS, Dual GPS, Dual AHRS, Etcâ&#x20AC;Ś

3322.1 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 760344 Fortune 100 Owned, 8 Place Executive, Fully Loaded EFIS Cockpit, Freon Air -conditioning


World Aircraft Sales Magazine Jan-12  

World Aircraft Sales Magazine, January 2012 Issue

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