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WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

February 2012

Jetcraft Corporation is pleased to present its exceptional Global and Challenger opportunities: 2004, 2007 Global 5000 2000, 2001 Global Express 2011 Global XRS 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 Challenger 300 1998, 1999, 2003, 2005 Challenger 604 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012 Challenger 605 2003, 2007, 2008 Challenger 850

For additional Jetcraft inventory and information, please see pages 25, 97 and back cover.

• Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 48 - 77 • Ten Questions for HAI


The difference between a pre-owned jet and a pre-owned Falcon A pre-owned Falcon is an asset that’s been highly prized by previous owners. Nobody knows that better than the people who built it: us. That’s why we’re your best source for a pre-owned Falcon. Using our unique expertise, we make sure each one lives up to the rigourous standards of the best-flying business jets in the sky.

2001 Falcon 2000

s/n 133 • 5033 h. total time 10 passengers conf • EU-OPS 1 compliant • Eng on CSP, APU on MSP • Aero I Sat Com Pristine condition

2005 Falcon 2000EX EASy

s/n 063 • 2073 h. total time C check, Winglets installation and new paint in process • EU-OPS 1 compliant • Swift 64 Sat Com • Eng on JSSI, APU under MSP


2006 Falcon 2000EX EASy

s/n 089 • 1000 h. total time One owner since new, corporate operation. Pristine condition HUD, AERO H+ SAT COM, 3 FMS, 3 IRS, 3 VHF, EASA certified

1993 Falcon 900B

s/n 120 • 7887 h. total time 15 passengers • EU-OPS 1 compliant • C check, paint and complete Interior Refurb in 2011 • Eng and APU on MSP, Fwd & Aft lav

1997 Falcon 900EX

s/n 017 • 8114 h. total time Two owners since new 12 passengers • Fwd & Aft lav 2 C check, landing overhaul Paint & interior refurbishment in 2010

2004 Falcon 900EX EASy s/n 128 • 3686 h. total time One owner since new • JAR-OPS 1 14 passengers • Fwd & Aft lav C check complied in 2010

2010 Falcon 900EX EASy

s/n 232 • 2656 h. total time 14 passengers • EU-OPS 1 • Falcon Care, HUD, EFVS • Satcom TV, Fwd & Aft lav

2007 Falcon 7X

s/n 003 • 1125 h. total time JAR-OPS 1 compliant 14 passengers • Under Falcon Care • HUD, Engines & APU under • ESP/MSP gold

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556


Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS ACJ . . . . . . . . . . . 148,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 83, 85, 91, Super 27-100 REW. .91, Super 27-200 REW. .91, Super 727-100 . 91, Super 727-100-REW. .18, Super 727-200 . 37, 737-200VIP . . . . 37, 737-300 . . . . . . . 83, 737-300 VIP . . . . 141, 737-500 VIP . . . . 141, 757-200 . . . . . . . 91, 757-200ER . . . . . 51, MD 87 . . . . . . . . 91, MD 87VIP . . . . . 37,

BOMBARDIER CRJ 200 . . . . . . 148, Global 5000 . . . . 18, 25, 37, 148, Global Express . 18, 148, Global Express XRS. 7, 17, 148,

Challenger CRJ . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 16, 19, 32, 89, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 601 . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 63, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 16, 20, 32, 33, 37, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 601-3A/ER. . . . . 13, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 13, 83, 105, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 12, 16, 19, 20, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 25, 28, 37, 83, 89, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 148, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 25, 83, 89, 97, 148, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 148,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 41, 53, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 63, 83, 89, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 20, 41, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 41, 63, 85, 87, 127,

CESSNA Citation ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 59, 105, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 28, 29, 40, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 79, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 59, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 29, 79, 148, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 61, 63, 79, 125, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 16, 59, 99, 148, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 20, 63, 143, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 25, 26, 148, 500 Eagle. . . . . . 26, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 46, CJ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 59, 63, 105, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 133, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 22, CJ2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 29, 55, 59, 79, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 26, 128, 147, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 55, 79, CJ4. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 28, 29, 47, 59, 132, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141, Encore . . . . . . . . 59, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 26, 55, 147, 148, Mustang . . . . . . . 71, 83, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 37, Sierra . . . . . . . . . 83, Sovereign. . . . . . 37, 43, 55, 63, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 26, 38, 91, 131, V Ultra . . . . . . . . 16, 55,

Grand Caravan 208B . . . . . . . . . . 28, 143, 144,

DORNIER

AIRCRAFT

IN THIS ISSUE PAGE

FAIRCHILD Merlin IIIB . . . . . 59,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 7, 33, 47, 146, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 20Cargo . . . . . . . 28, 20F-5BR . . . . . . . 28, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19, 28, 46, 47, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 83, 85, 146, 148, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 46, 71, 99, 146, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 146, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 3, 19, 55, 63, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131, 146, 147, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 11, 146, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 19, 55, 146, 147, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 3, 19, 46, 89, 124, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 2, 17, 89, 147, 2000EX. . . . . . . . 148, 2000EX EASy . . 2, 3, 16, 18, 147,

GULFSTREAM IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 37, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 32, 63, 83, 85, 99, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 22, 51, 63, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 148, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 11, 17, 18, 32, 37, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 63, 83, 125, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 33, 51, 83, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 25, 148, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 38, 47, 63, 83, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 18, 22, 83, 141, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 7, 17, 23, 37, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 123, 124, 143, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, Twin Commander . 21, Twin Commander 690A. 21, Twin Commander 840. 21,

Dornier 328 . . . . 141,

Learjet 25B . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 25D . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 63, 87, 89, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 41, 89, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 59, 63, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 55, 79, 148,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT EMBRAER

Beechcraft

ERJ 135 . . . . . . . 51, ERJ 145 . . . . . . . 51, Legacy 600 . . . . 28, 33, 37, 71, 89, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, Phenom 100 . . . 21, 63, 69, Phenom 300 . . . 37, 46,

400A . . . . . . . . . . 26, 32, 79, Premier 1 . . . . . . 126, Premier 1A. . . . . 29, 55, 63,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 28, 33, 40,

LITHIUM P WER Welcome to the Future Aerolithe Cirrus France www.aerolithe.fr Air & Ground Ltd. UK www.airandground.com Air Part Supply Ltd. UK www.airpart.co.uk

www.STARTPAC.com 4

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

B100 . . . . . . . . . . 28, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 12, 27, 55, 59, 69, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 55, E90 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, F90 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 28, 55,

Hawker 125-EMS . . . . . . 37, 400XP . . . . . . . . . 29, 600A . . . . . . . . . . 105, 700 . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 700A . . . . . . . . . . 38, 800 . . . . . . . . . . . 130, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 69, 105, 142, 850B . . . . . . . . . . 89, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 17, 20, 28, 32, 33, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 97, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 79, 83, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 87, 129, 147, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 20,

IAI Astra Classic . . . 47, Astra SP . . . . . . . 147, Astra SPX. . . . . . 41, 47, 127, Westwind I . . . . . 32, 46,

MITSUBISHI MU-2K . . . . . . . . 5, MU2-K Dash 10 5, MU-2 Solitaire. . 5,

PIAGGIO P180 Avanti . . . 63,

PILATUS PC12/45. . . . . . . 27, 63,

PIPER Meridian . . . . . . . 27, Saratoga. . . . . . . 79,

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,

SOCATA TBM 700B . . . . . 28, 29, 69, 143, TBM 700C1 . . . . 28, TBM 700C2 . . . . 69,


• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

02.12

AIRCRAFT

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND AW 109C . . . . . . 55, AW 109E. . . . . . . 95, AW 109E Power 71, 144, AW Grand . . . . . . 55, AW139 . . . . . . . . 11,

PAGE

Aviation Companies, Inc.

EC 135T1 . . . . . . 37, 105, EC T135T2+ . . . 55, SA315B . . . . . . . 144,

SIKORSKY S-76A++. . . . . . . 37, S-76B . . . . . . . . . 37, 83, 147, 148, S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 13, 144,

BELL 1983 MU-2 SOLITAIRE

206L3 . . . . . . . . . 71, 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 142, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 142, 412EMS . . . . . . . 142,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 37, AS 355 N . . . . . . 55, AS 365 N2 . . . . . 95, EC 120B . . . . . . . 95, 144, EC130B4 . . . . . . 71,

Aircraft Engine /Support . 57, Aircraft Perf & Specs. . . . . 103, 122, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 67, 73, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 105, Mods-Parts-Spares . . . . . . . 4,

S/N 454SA, N19GA, 4820TT, 1860/1860 SOH (Honeywell), 50/50 SPOH, GNS-530W w/TAWS, 2 tube EFIS-40, Avidyne EX-500 MFD, SPZ-500 A/P, TCAS, XM Weather, New Paint & Interior. U.S. $795,000.

1980 MU-2 SOLITAIRE S/N 424SA, N82AF, 7485TT, 385/385 SOH, 75/75 SPOH, GNS 530 WAAS, Avidyne Fligh Max, 7500-hr, inspection, New P&I (2010) to customer specs., U.S. $675.000.

1974 MU-2K Dash 10 on MSP - Price Reduced S/N 305, N50K, 6370TT, 1180/1180 since -10 (MSP), 750/750 SPOH, Dual Garmin 430’s, RDR-2000, M4-D A/P, New Paint (2009). U.S. $535,000.

1974 MU-2K S/N 285, N11SJ, 4630TT, 2350/2350 SOH, 525/525 SHSI, 230/230 SPOH, Garmin 530W, RDS-81 Color Radar, M4D A/P, New Paint & Interior (2009). U.S. $345,000.

The Global Aircraft Market Online

March 2012 issue - copy deadline: Wednesday 15th February

1973 MU-2K S/N 240, N64LG, 6100TT, 4655/4655 SOH, 1100/1100 SHSI/SGBI, 920/775 SPOH, Garmin G-600, Dual GNS-430W’s, Dual GTX-320 TXP’s, TCAS, XM Weather. U.S. $295,000.

234 Air Park Blvd., Aiken, SC (USA) 29805-8921 Tel: USA +1 803-641-9999 • Fax: USA +1 803-641-4040 www.air1st.com • Email: mike@air1st.com

Gulfstream Pre-Owned Contact Lynn Beaudry lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com (912) 965-4000 • Fax: 965-4848

Gulfstream 550 S/N 5026

2794 TT, 16 seats, Aft galley with Fwd and Aft Lavs $34,500,000

www.GulfstreamPre-Owned.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

5


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An aircraft deal is pieced together with many components. Sometimes it can be as easy as child’s play but most of the time, well . . . not so much. Many transactions today may include challenging contract negotiations, foreign agency coordination over import/export requirements, prepurchase inspection or cosmetic refurbishment oversight, and other such complex issues. How a transaction is managed throughout the entire process can make a substantial difference in the final result. If a deal is not handled properly, it may never get off the ground. At IntelliJet International, we have managed many complicated deals to a successful conclusion. Our team members possess the knowledge and experience critical to ensure success. So when your aircraft transaction is preparing to take flight, make the IntelliJet choice. Call us today.

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World Aircraft Sales

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World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL Deputy Editor Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com US Contributor Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com ADVERTISING Frances Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Frances@avbuyer.com Carla Kopenski 1- 800 540 3792 Carla@avbuyer.com

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AVBUYER.COM AvBuyer.com Manager Nick Barron nick@avbuyer.com

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World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), February 2012, Vol 16, Issue No 2 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & Disc’s submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com

Web Marketing Manager Jayne Jackson Jayne@avbuyer.com

avbuyer.com/worldaircraftsales

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STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

ACCOUNTS Errol Miller 1- 800 620 8801 Errol@avbuyer.com MANAGING DIRECTOR John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 Enquiries outside USA & Canada +44 (0)20 8255 4000 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 was@avbuyer.com PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


Contents

Volume 16, Issue 2 – February 2012

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 48

Optics:

50

Looking Good: By bringing the ebb and flow of commerce to locations not

48

Essential to economic development, Business Aviation should present a positive image. Your role as a business aircraft operator is to help others see what you see.

served by the airlines, business aircraft account for about $150B of annual activity within the US economy.

52

The Business of Business Aviation: When shareholders or the media ask about your company’s aviation department, what is your response?

56

How much does this aircraft cost to operate: When looking at

64

aviation-related costs, it helps to know what results you are looking for and who is doing the looking.

60

Election Campaign Lift: If you’re thinking of offering your aircraft to aid the election campaign of a preferred candidate, first understand the rules and regulations.

64

Warranties & Buying Choices: Warranty provisions should be considered carefully when Boards assess whether to acquire a new or previously owned aircraft. Here’s why…

68

Insuring for Indirect Exposure (Part 1): An illustratration of the importance of non-owned aircraft liability coverage and risk management strategies for a corporation.

72

The Large Cabin Jet Value:

A look at the benefits of Large Cabin Jets, and a listing of Blue Book values for models built over the last twenty years.

Main Features

72

42

Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Bell 206B-3 JetRanger: How does the performance of the Bell 206B-3 JetRanger stand up against its competition?

80

Dealer Broker Market Update: A selection of recent and current market insights from those who know the pre-owned aircraft sales market best of all - Dealers and Brokers.

92

Ten Questions For Matt Zuccaro: HAI’s president Matt Zuccaro speaks to World Aircraft Sales Magazine, offering his insights and thoughts on the state of the rotor-wing world.

100

Election Time & TFRs: It’s election year, which means Temporary Flight Restrictions will pop up like dandelions throughout the year. So how can you stay ahead and clear of them?

106

Safety Matters - CFIT: Dave Higdon offers case studies of previous Controlled Flight Into Terrain accidents to highlight how they could have been avoided.

114

Global Market Update - Asia Pacific: Mike Vines offers a snap shot of the main industry news coming from Asia Pacific over the past quarter.

120

Lightening-Quick Market Reactions: Andrew Bradley looks at current and past down-markets, asking ‘is this time really different?’ An interesting answer emerges…

Regular Features 10 14 78 84 88 98 112

Viewpoint BizAv Round-up Aviation Leadership Roundtable Finance & Lease Feature Regional Sales & Use Tax Forum AIReport JETNET >KNOW MORE

134

Marketing Today: David Heitman outlines the need for a successful aviation company to have thought out its Internal Branding if it’s to truly flourish.

Next Month’s Issue

136

On The Road Again: The story of a group of industry professionals, 15

Plane Sense On Engines Developing Markets - Russia Businessliner Review

motorbikes and a 900-mile trip between Las Vegas and Sedona, Arizona. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

9


VIEWPOINT

Battle Fatigue by Gil Wolin o quote that line spoken by Elliot Ness to Al Capone in the 1987 movie The Untouchables, “Never stop, never stop fighting ’til the fight is done!” This has been echoing in my mind for several months now. It’s been one battle after another: with lawmakers, with governments, and – unfortunately – even within our own aviation community. We cannot stop, cannot rest, nor can we remain silent, lest we allow the Forces of Darkness to hobble corporate aviation’s return to economic health. No sooner do we beat back the attempt to destroy one of Business Aviation’s most important benefits – passenger security – by eliminating BARR, than another attack manifests itself in the guise of fair allocation of costs. Most recently it was the current White House’s rejection of our industry’s petition entitled ‘Take Aviation User Fees Off the Table’, signed by more than 9,000 members of the aviation community. Logic never has been the government’s long suit, and neither has memory. The current administration wants to “ensure that everyone is paying their fair share” of the cost of our “world-class aviation system” by implementing a $100-per-flight fee for use of air traffic services. You know, the new and improved one that the Federal Excise Tax implemented in 1970 was supposed to have paid for by now. Instead, we have no NextGen, and a forty-year-old FET-fueled Trust Fund has been long since drained to pay the FAA’s current system operating costs. For some reason, the White House feels that a per-gallon tax on jet fuel paid by corporate turbines that is five times that paid by the commercial airlines, is not our Fair Share. But what can we expect from a White House that has decided to make corporate aviation its personal punching bag, and Symbol of ‘All-That-Is-Wrong-WithThe-Private-Sector’? Until now, we’ve been left to fight this particular battle on our own, led by our trade associations and their joint No Plane No Gain (NPNG) campaign. But NPNG speaks only to the rational business reasons to operate business aircraft, and provides

T

10

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

no appropriate response to the oftenvitriolic attacks voiced by the current administration. Fortunately we are no longer alone. Congressman Mike Pompeo, from Kansas’ Fourth District (which by no small coincidence includes Wichita, “The Air Capital of the World”) just launched a website: www.AMERICAFLIES.us to gain signatures for a letter petitioning President Obama to stop this ongoing criticism of General Aviation. The site also has a link for visitors to tell their stories in support of the industry. The posts are manifold, and movingly describe aviation careers, and generations and lives committed to building wings for pilots and their passengers the world over. Not to mention the more than 1.2 million jobs, and more than $56 billion contributed to the economy.

Never stop, never stop fighting ’til the fight is done! On another front – safety – we see a curious bifurcation in the FAA’s decision to revise the Part 121 Duty Day, presaging its rewrite of its Part 135 counterpart. The new rule increases the required minimum pilot rest from 8 to 10 hours before each flight duty period, leaving it up to the pilot to inform the carrier if he or she feels too fatigued to fly. It also limits the number of hours a pilot can fly weekly and monthly, as well as increases the number of consecutive hours off required in a seven-day period from 24 to 30. But this new rule does not apply to all 121 operators; it applies only to passenger carriers, not to freight carriers. It seems that the ‘Powers That Be’ feel it’s OK if we lose a couple of tired pilots and some boxes, but it’s quite another story if we lose 150 paying passengers due to flight crew fatigue. www.AvBuyer.com

Most curious about this implementation is that the basis for the new FAA rules for passenger carriers was testimony provided by, and research done on (wait for it… cargo pilots! The decision is based on a study of circadian rhythm disruptions experienced by cargo pilots – primarily those flying for UPS and FedEx – who fly extended routes and cross multiple zones daily and nightly. As was observed by the FedEx pilots, apparently cargo pilots are fine as guinea pigs for studying fatigue, but should be exempt from the impact of the findings. What is more obvious is that the exemption of cargo pilots from the new duty day regulations is more about economics than safety. Maybe someone should ask the FAA what happens if a 750,000 pound aircraft carrying auto parts augers into a densely populated area, due to lack of adequate crew rest. In the words of disappointed NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman, “A tired pilot is a tired pilot, whether there are 10 paying customers on board or 100, whether the payload is passengers or pallets.” Tired? You’d better believe it. Angry? You betcha! Energized? Beyond belief. “Never stop, never stop fighting ’til the fight is done!” ❯ Gil Wolin draws on almost forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2011 Challenger 300 Delivery Position Airframe TT - 0 $22,000,000 * MSG-3 Maintenance Program * Part 91 Compliant * Collins Pro Line 21 4-tube EFIS * Floor Plan 4 -AFT Left hand Divan

Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Falcon 900C SN 200 Airframe TT - 3288.4 $19,250,000 * One Fortune 100 Owner since New * Engines enrolled on MSP Gold * New Paint & Interior 2010 * Honeywell Primus 2000 Five Tube EFIS * APU enrolled in Honeywell MSP Photos by FGL & Associates

2002 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1476 Airframe TT - 1985 $15,500,000 * Sperry SPZ-8400 6-tube EFIS * Honeywell Primus-880 * Collins TDR-94D Mode S Transponders with Flight ID * Aircraft enrolled in Gulfstream CMP Systems Maintenance Tracking * One Fortune owner since new Photos by FGL & Associates

2000 Challenger 604 SN 5433 Airframe TT - 3809.3 $10,300,000 * Engines enrolled in JSSI Complete Maintenance Program * Pro Line 4 Avionic System with Precision Plus Upgrade * Honeywell Mark V EGPWS * Collins 6-Tube EFIS * Airshow 4000 Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 510.2 $10,750,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2001 Challenger 604 SN 5488 Airframe TT - 3351.3 $9,995,000 * Smart Parts Plus Supplement Engine Agreement * MX Tracking: CAMP * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System with Precision Plus * Dual Collins GPS-4000S * Airshow Genesys

Photos by FGL & Associates

2007 Citation XLS SN 5736 Airframe TT - 1712 $6,995,000 * MSG 3 Maintenance Program * Dual Honeywell Primus 1000 3-Tube EFIS * Honeywell Primus 880 * Garmin GDL-69 for XM Weather * ST-3100 Aircell Telephone System

Photos by FGL & Associates

1989 Gulfstream IV SN 1115 Airframe TT - 13,614 $5,700,000 * Enrolled in Gulfstream CMP Maintenance Tracking * MSG-3 Inspection Program * Airshow 400 With Network Provisions * Honeywell SPZ-8000 Avionics Suite * RVSM

Photos by FGL & Associates

2008 King Air B200GT SN BY-40 Airframe TT - 478 $4,595,000 * Collins ProLine 21 and Integrated Flight Information System * RVSM Ops Capable * Raisbeck Crown Nacelle Wing Lockers * Raisbeck Dual Aft Body Strakes * One owner since new, Always hangared

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

1995 Challenger 601-3R SN 5185 Airframe TT - 9437 $4,995,000 Engines on Condition w/JSSI Coverage * One Fortune 200 Owner Since New * -150 APU Upgrade * Stc'd CMC Electronic Flight Bags * Honeywell MCS 6000+ SATCOM

Photos by FGL & Associates

1992 Challenger 601-3A/ER SN 5103 Airframe TT - 7610.9 $3,850,000 * Enrolled in CAMP * Airshow Genesys Network * Pro Line II EFIS System * Honeywell Primus 880 * Dual Honeywell Laseref

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Sikorsky S76C+ SN 760498 Airframe TT - 4171.8 $2,995,000 * Gearboxes are enrolled in Sikorsky PAP * Honeywell SPZ 7600 System * Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar * Universal UNS-1D+FMS * Equipped with Emergency Flotation System

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Cessna CJ SN 0344 Airframe TT - 2219.7 $1,700,000 * Enrolled in TAP ELITE & PROPARTS * Sperry SPZ-5000 IFCS/ SIlver Crown Radios * BF Goodrich WX-1000E Stormscope * Precise Pulse Light System * RVSM

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


BizAv Round-Up NEWS IN BRIEF

02.12

AVIATION PARTNERS’ BLENDED WINGLETS ON A BBJ MODEL

Bombardier Business Aircraft president, Steve Ridolfi and Kansas Governor, Sam Brownback announced details of the further expansion of Bombardier's Learjet site in Wichita, including expansion of the Flight Test Center; the establishment of a Center of Excellence of Engineering and Information Technology; new facilities for paint and production flight test as well as a delivery center. Further, Bombardier has received a firm order for five Challenger 850 jets from an undisclosed customer, worth approximately $156 million US. / More from www.bombardier com CL850

innovative LIFE CYCLE COST 2012 Volume I. The most comprehensive aircraft budget and financial analysis tool available, LIFE CYCLE COST provides aircraft owners, operators, flight department managers, and aircraft consultants with extensive ownership and operating cost data for more than 400 jet, turboprop, helicopter and piston aircraft. / More from www.conklindd.com

Embraer rolled out its Legacy 500 at the end of December from the production hangar at the São José dos Campos headquarters, in Brazil. Important ground tests are now scheduled prior to the aircraft’s first flight in the third quarter of 2012 including initial systems evaluations leading to the first engine run, and then to the ground vibration tests (GVT), and the full regimen of ground tests. In addition, the first Embraer Lineage 1000 was delivered to an un-named Chinese customer - an important milestone for the Company’s presence in that market. / More from www.embraer.com

14

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

3 BILLION GALLONS OF JET FUEL SAVED 32.2 MILLION TONS OF EMISSIONS SAVED BY API WINGLETS  Aviation Partners, Inc. (API) announced that as of 2:56 pm PST on Sunday, January 15, 2012 its Blended Winglet Technology had saved the world’s commercial and business aircraft operators an estimated three billion gallons of jet fuel. This represents a global reduction in CO2 emissions of more than 32.2 million tons. Aviation Partners’ Winglets are now flying on more than 5,000 individual airplanes, and on more than 20 airplane

types worldwide. API’s Blended Winglets are an addition to the airplane wing tip that efficiently adds effective wingspan and reduce the drag caused by wingtip vortices. By reducing drag, Blended Winglets, increase fuel efficiency and boost range. One of the unique features of API’s technology is that it can be installed during production or retrofitted to in-service aircraft. API expects the amount of fuel saved to grow exponentially to

ExecuJet Aviation Group concluded 2011 with a presence at 16 bases worldwide. Five FBOs were added in Spain during last year (at Barcelona, Gerona, Ibiza, Palma and Valencia), two in Australasia (Melbourne, Australia and Wellington, New www.AvBuyer.com

more than seven billion gallons in the next 4-5 years. Joe Clark, CEO of API and Chairman of APB (Aviation Partners Boeing) commented, “We are proud to be the world leader in the field of fuel savings for the airlines and private aviation. We look forward to adapting our new technology to both existing airplanes and new production designs in the near future”. / More information from www.aviationpartners.com

Zealand), and one in the Middle East region (Istanbul, Turkey), plus a further German base in Frankfurt and its first full service base in the UK at Cambridge Airport. / More from www.execujet.net

Conklin & de Decker has released its

continued on page 24 Aircraft Index see Page 4


The Art of the Transaction A successful aircraft transaction is truly a work of art. There are subtle details and vast complexities that make up the big picture. If addressed with dexterity and vision, the result is a masterpiece. At J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, you will experience this kind of artful, hands-on approach at every phase of the transaction.

Successfully Closing the Gap Between Buyer and Seller Since 1974

+1.303.444.6766 • www. jetsales.com


2011 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20329

1995 CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5302

ASKING $21,500,000 | Ferry Time Only – New Aircraft

ASKING $7,950,000 | 5831 Hrs TTAF, 2351 Landings

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Dual FMS with V-Speeds • Datalink w/graphical weather maps • Airshow 4000 w/Worldwide package • Aircell ATG 5000 standalone high speed internet • Quiet Cabin package • Floor Plan 4: forward cabin includes a four place club seating area and the aft cabin includes a three place divan and a two place club seating area

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Smart Parts Plus • APU on MSP • Precision Plus avionics upgrade • Triple Collins FMS 6000 • Dual Litton LN-101 IRS • Airshow Genesys • Great paint and interior • Major inspections including the 6/12/24/48/96/192 and 240 month c/w 11/11 at Duncan Aviation

TEXT JM20329 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM5302 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

1989 CHALLENGER 601-3A S/N 5050

1999 CITATION X S/N 93

ASKING $3,500,000 | 8074 Hrs TTAF, 4351 Landings

ASKING $5,950,000 | 6894 Hrs TTAF, 4397 Landings, RRCC

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Triple Collins VHF 422D COMS • Mode S XPNDR w/enhanced flight ID • Inspections c/w 10/11 at Pentastar Aviation including the 12/24/48 month and the 300 hour inspections • WSI Weather • RAAS • Triple laserefs • Dual flight bags • Airshow 400 • Sirius Satellite Radio • Aircell FFONE

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: APU on MSP • Document 11 complied with 9/11/11 • Aileron re-gearing modification c/w • Magnastar C 2000 FFONE w/3 handsets • Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 FMS w/6.0 software and CD 810 displays • Sirius Satellite Radio • Currently on a 135 certificate TEXT JM93 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM5050 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

1994 CITATION V ULTRA S/N 279

PRICE LOWERED

ASKING $1,795,000 | 5664 Hrs TTAF, 6043 Landings

NOW ASKING $15,250,000 | 5454 Hrs TTAF, 4083 Landings, 100% JSSI

2005 FALCON 2000EX EASy S/N 57

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: GNS-XLS FMS w/ Mod 6 upgrade • Mark VII EGPWS • TCAS II w/Change 7 • BF Goodrich Stormscope • AFIS • CVR • Currently operating Part 135

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: One U.S. owner since new • Large corporate operator • Excellent maintenance history • EASy Step 3 • HUD • Triple FMS • FDR • 10 passenger configuration • Beautiful paint and interior

TEXT JM279 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM57 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


1981 FALCON 50 S/N 55

1997 FALCON 2000 S/N 48

UNDER CONTRACT

ASKING $9,850,000 | 5750 Hrs TTAF, 2866 Landings, CSP

9,299 Hrs TTAF, 7,257 Landings, MSP Gold

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: HUD • Triple FMS • FDR • Great paint and interior • 10 passenger configuration • Great maintenance history

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: 3D engine upgrade • APU on MSP • C-Check & Gear O/H c/w 2/25/10 • Universal Vision system • EFIS • Dry Bay Mod c/w 2/25/10

TEXT JM48 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM55 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

PRICE LOWERED

2006 GLOBAL XRS S/N 9203

1999 GULFSTREAM GIV-SP S/N 1381 ASKING $12,950,000 | 3552 Hrs TTAF, 1570 Landings AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Engine midlife times 928 hrs / 928 hrs • Airshow Genesys • Currently operating on a commercial (charter) certificate • Triple Honeywell LRNAV • Great pedigree & maintenance history • JAR-OPS and EASA approved • 48 month detailed landing gear inspections recently c/w 9/11

TEXT JM9203 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM1381 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

UNDER 1999 CONTRACT HAWKER

800XP S/N 258425

ASKING: $3,650,000 | 4846 Hrs TTAF, 3264 Landings, 100% JSSI AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS with Windshear • Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 FMS with 5.2 software and CD 820s • Honeywell SAT AFIS • Long range oxygen system • Aviation Partners Incorporated winglet installation TEXT JM425 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

. .S U AM GS IN RE IN W FST OW O N UL SH G R O AT F V SA

NOW ASKING $41,000,000 | 1678 Hrs TTAF, 693 Landings, RRCC AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Always registered and based in the U.S. • Easy sale process • Excellent pedigree and condition • HUD • EVS • Triple FMS • High speed data with wireless LAN • Tailwind 500 Satellite TV • CES (Collins) Software 7 upgrade • High service bulletin compliance

WANTED – IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION GULFSTREAM G550 • GULFSTREAM G550 WANTED FOR IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION FOR A U.S. BUYER • FORWARD GALLEY • UNDER 1000 HRS TTAF • SIGNED EXCLUSIVE ACQUISITION AGREEMENT • BUYER PAYS OUR COMMISSION • NO FINANCING REQUIREMENTS

FILE PHOTO

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


2009 EMBRAER PHENOM 100 N777BF, s/n 50000041, Only 300 Hours Since New, Still Under Factory Warranty, Enrolled on Embraer’s EEC Enhanced Airframe Program and P&W ESP Gold Engine Program. Premium Passenger Door, AirCell Sat Phone and Fresh 12/24 Month Inspection by Eagle Creek Aviation

2011 CESSNA CITATION CJ4

TWIN COMMANDER 1000

N163M, s/n 525C-0035, 75 Hours Since New, Beautiful Paint and Interior, Collins ProLine 21 Avionics, Second Collins FMS-3000 Flight Management System, WX-1000E Lightning Detection System, XM Radio, HF-9000 HF Provisions

N695CT, s/n 96096, Only 4601 Airframe and Engine Hours Since New, Dash Ten Engines on Honeywell MSP, Dual Garmin GNS-530W’s, Hartzell Wide Chord Q-Tip Props

2008 CESSNA CITATION CJ3

TWIN COMMANDER 840

N711BE, s/n 525B-0212, Motivated Seller, 500 Hours and One Owner Since New, TAP Elite, Collins ProLine 21 Avionics, Collins TCAS-4000 TCAS II, Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS, AirCell St-3100 Iridium Phone and Jeppesen Electronic Charts

N97WT, s/n 11709, Only 409 Engine Hours SMOH (5000 Hour TBO) and 5872 AFTT, Dash Ten Engines, Garmin GNS-530W, GNS-430W, Beautiful Paint and Interior

CESSNA CITATION S/II

TWIN COMMANDER 690A

N500ZB, s/n S550-0023, 120 Engine Hours Since Hot Section Inspections and 1954 Engine Hours Since Overhauls, Freon Air Conditioning, Current Part 135

N449LC, s/n 11187, Grand Renaissance Refurbishment, Dash Ten Engines, 21" Camera Port, Meggitt Magic EFIS and 2100 Digital Autopilot, XM Weather, and Wide Chord Q-Tip Props

www.eagle-creek.com | 317.293.6935 | 317.297.9341 Eagle Creek Airport | 4101 Dandy Trail | Indianapolis, IN 46254


1999 CL604 SN 5411

2006 G450 SN 4044

1987 GIV SN 1029

1987 GIV SN 1022

1985 Challenger 601 SN 3048

2007 CJ 1+ SN 525-0632

Los Angeles: (818) 841-6190 Washington D.C.: +1 (410) 626-6162

AVJE T.COM sales@avjet.co m






  

 













 









  

 

 

 

 

Global Sales & Acquisitionss Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162 Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190





AV VJET T.COM

 



















 



 







World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190







  

 

  

    

 



  

 






BizAvRound-Up

2

Gulfstream has enhanced the services available to operators with the addition of a mobile support vehicle and a renovated customer lobby at its Brunswick, Georgia, facility. / More from www.gulfstream.com

/ More from www.heliasset.com

Raisbeck Engineering announced that the Civil Aviation Administration of China recently approved two Raisbeck King Air performance systems, the dual aft body strakes and the Crown wing lockers. First applications of the modifications in China are on a King Air 350, the Seattle-based company said. Other applications for Raisbeck mods–including current and upcoming performance systems on the Learjet 31/35/36/60 and all other King Air models, are currently working their way through the CAAC. / More from www.raisbeck.com

Safe Flight Instrument Corporation has donated $50,000 to Corporate Angel Network in support of the charity’s 30-year program of arranging free flights to treatment for cancer patients using empty seats in business aircraft. / More from www.safeflight.com or www.corpangelnetwork.org

The Jet Business has opened its doors in London, UK. Potential buyers can be educated on the widest range of business jets - new and pre-owned - available on the market today. With floor to ceiling screens running the length of the showroom, a bespoke iPad application powers the showroom’s technology and compares and contrasts the various aircraft types to an individual’s profiles, while full-time analysts and business intelligence teams create the information engine which delivers unique market data. 24

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

KESTREL FOR WISCONSIN TWO MANUFACTURING/ASSEMBLY PLANTS IN SUPERIOR  As reported in Business North, Kestrel Aircraft Corp. formally announced that it will operate two manufacturing/assembly plants in Superior, Wisconsin, confirming a story that had been circulating since late December. “We’re talking 600 new jobs,” Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said at the announcement at Richard I. Bong Municipal Airport. That’s the most associated with any new development since World War II, according to Superior Area Chamber of Commerce President

Dave Miner. “Six-hundred is a reasonable number and we hope to eventually have even more,” added Kestrel chairman and CEO Alan Klapmeier, who also co-founded Duluth-based Cirrus Aircraft. Superior’s effort to recruit Kestrel began in July last year, according to Mayor Bruce Hagen. A package of generous incentives helped lure Kestrel to Superior. Construction will begin on Kestrel’s Winter Street composite plant this spring and in 2013 on the Bong Airport

Full size 1:1 cabin cross-sections and floor plans of the majority of jets can be displayed. The Jet Business has no affiliation to any OEM and is already being heralded as a game changer in executive aircraft trading by the OEMs, clients and industry authorities. Its fully immersive experience for prospective buyers is designed to guide them through the whole transaction process. / More from www.thejetbusiness.com

www.AvBuyer.com

assembly plant. Its headquarters will remain in Brunswick, Maine, where it has a 10-year lease on 93,000square-feet of hangar space at the former Naval Air Station. It’s unclear what aspect of manufacturing would occur in Maine versus Superior. In an October 20 story, however, The Reader Weekly reported the Maine facility might be used for a separate Kestrel division that will refurbish aircraft made by other firms. / More information from www.kestrel.aero

SHOWROOM AT THE JET BUSINESS

Heli Asset, a global helicopter sales & acquisition service provider for operators & lessors worldwide is to be launched at HAI’s Heli Expo Convention in Dallas this month. The company is exhibiting at booth #4605, where Emmanuel Dupuy, managing director and partner Alain Regourd will welcome all enquiries.

continued on page 30 Aircraft Index see Page 4


FEATURED INVENTORY

A plane for

2007 CHALLENGER 605 - SN 5705 Turnkey Challenger 605, Recent Inspections

EVERY MISSION. When you come to Jetcraft to acquire an aircraft, we’ll start with a question: What’s your mission? Are you looking for an office in the sky, a luxury getaway jet or a helicopter? With our large inventory of new and preowned models, our broad customer base and unmatched global network,

2007 GULFSTREAM 150 - SN 235 A Deal That Won’t Be Beat!

we can fit your needs perfectly. And with almost 50 years’ experience, we’ll do it quickly. Talk to us and see. Our mission is fulfilling yours. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

2008 CITATION XLS+ - SN 560-6006 Stunning Cosmetics, Highly Optioned

1997 CHALLENGER 604 - SN 5351 One Corporate Owner, Six-Tube Collins Pro-Line 4 Avionics

1993 CITATION VI - SN 650-0231 August 2011 Document 8 Inspection

2007 GLOBAL 5000 - SN 9226 Pristine Condition, Value Priced


MaiP1HĹżEG

$GNN#XKCVKQP9GUV

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

$GNN#XKCVKQP6GZCU &CNNCU6GZCU 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

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Citation V11

1996 Citation VII | 650-7074

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation 11

1994 Citation II | 550-0732

Citation Jet

2007 Citation CJ2+ | 525A-0345

Citation 500 Eagle

1976 Citation 500 Eagle | 500-0295

Citation XLS+

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-6012

Citation Ultra

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

Citation 11

1979 Citation II | 550-0047

Citation 1SP

1985 Citation ISP | 501-0687

Beechjet

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36 #NUQ#XCKNCDNG4-4-

(QT(WNN5RGEU#FFKVKQPCN2JQVQUQP'ZENWUKXG.KUVKPIUD[$GNN#XKCVKQPRNGCUG8KUKVQWT9GDUKVGCVYYY$GNN#XKCVKQPEQO


MaiP1HĹżEG

$GNN#XKCVKQP9GUV

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

$GNN#XKCVKQP6GZCU &CNNCU6GZCU 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

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King Air 350

King Air B200

1998 King Air 350 | FL-221

King Air B200

1982 King Air B200 | BB-1040

King Air B200

1981 King Air B200 | BB-917

King Air E90

King Air B200

1982 King Air B200 | BB-990

King Air 200

1976 King Air 200 | BB-169

King Air F90

1976 King Air E90 | LW-186

Pilatus

2003 King Air B200 | BB-1807

#NUQ#XCKNCDNG.9

1998 Pilatus PC-12/45 | 195

1981 King Air F90 | LA-137

Meridian

2008 Piper Meridian | 4697324

(QT(WNN5RGEU#FFKVKQPCN2JQVQUQP'ZENWUKXG.KUVKPIUD[$GNN#XKCVKQPRNGCUG8KUKVQWT9GDUKVGCVYYY$GNN#XKCVKQPEQO


2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258674, 3052 TT, MSP Gold, Support Plus, JAR Ops, TCAS II, CAMP, 8 pax interior, Airshow, Asking $5,200,000.00

2004 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 841, 3007 TT, Engines on JSSI Platinum, JAR Ops, Steep Approach Mod, 13 pax Interior, Asking $12,800,000.00

2001 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258503, 3159.7 TT, Engines/APU on MSP, TCAS II, TAWS-A, Dual NZ-2000’s, L/R Oxygen, Honeywell EFIS, Asking $3,950,000.00

1999 Challenger 604, S/N 5415, 7272TT, Smart Parts Plus SPEC, FDR, 110v Outlets, 12 pax, Airshow, Entertainment System, Owner Financing Available, Asking $9,000,000.00

1981 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 428, 11042 TT, MSP, Collins EFIS86, APS85, GTCP36-150 APU, TR’s, Gear O/H & C Check c/w 9/10, TCAS 2, Asking $1,395,000.00

1981 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 410, 11259 TT, Engines on JSSI, TR’s, GTCP 36-150 APU, Universal MFD, TCAS 2, C Check c/w 7/11, Fresh Gear O/H, Asking $1,395,000.00

1979 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 416, 11764 TT, MSP Gold, GTCP 36-150 APU, EFIS-86C, Aft Baggage, C Check c/w 4/09, TCAS 2, TAWS-A, Asking $1,395,000.00

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 7977 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $2,200,000.00

Also Available Citation V, S/N 560-0112 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0216

Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Falcon 20 Cargo, S/N 31 Falcon 10, S/N 82 Learjet 35A, S/N 138 King Air 350, S/N FL-278 King Air 200, S/N BB-473

King Air 200, S/N BB-263 King Air B100, S/N BE-9 King Air F90, S/N LA-45 King Air C90, S/N LJ-601 Grand Caravan, S/N 208B-0958 Socata TBM700C1, S/N 244 Socata TBM700B, S/N 193


2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 605 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,995,000.00

2004 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0204, 2806 TT, Engines on Power Plan, Pro Parts, Three-Tube, Garmin 530’s, UNS-1L, Skywatch, Fresh Doc 10, Asking $3,400,000.00

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0891, 5452 TT, On Power Advantage Plus and Pro Parts, Freon Air, Phase 5 c/w 5/10, Belted Potty, Asking $2,095,000.00

2007 Premier 1A, S/N RB-181, 1873 TT, TAP Elite, Support Plus, TCAS II, Custom Paint and Interior, Electronic Charts, Asking $2,625,000.00

1990 Citation V, S/N 560-0059, 6190.6 TT, ESP Gold, TCAS 2, 5-Tube EFIS, TAWS-A, RVSM, Fresh Phase 1-5, New Paint, JAR Ops, Price Reduced to $1,595,000.00

1979 Citation II, S/N 550-0094, 9425 TT, 2224/2278 SMOH, TCAS 2, TAWS-A, 8.33/FM Imm., JAR Ops, Delivered with Fresh Phase 1-5, Price Reduced to $599,000.00

1979 Citation II, S/N 550-0082, 10055 TT, 2775/2351 SMOH with new impellers, Garmin 530/430’s, Phase 5/10000 hr c/w 2/11, New Paint, Asking $695,000.00

2002 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232, 1140 TT, KMD850 MFD, Air Conditioning, RVSM Compliant, Mode S w/ Diversity, Asking $1,450,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BizAvRound-Up

3

JSSI’s FIRST EUROPEAN BROKER-DEALER SUMMIT 

LOU SENO

Citation Ten Takes To The Skies

Cessna’s Citation Ten prototype made its first flight last month. The flight lasted more than two hours and included tests of stability and control, handling qualities, functional operations including the autopilot and autothrottle system, engine operability and avionics before landing at Wichita, Kansas Mid-Continent Airport (ICT) where Cessna's main manufacturing facility is located. "It took a significant amount of work by a large number of people to get us to this milestone, and I am happy to report that the aircraft performed exceptionally well and handling characteristics were excellent; just 30

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

Last month, Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI), the world’s largest independent provider of hourly cost maintenance programs for aircraft engines and airframes, hosted its first European Broker-Dealer Summit at Tag Farnborough Airport, UK. The more than forty, by-invitation-only, attendees, were all senior executives representing a broad section of the European Business Aviation Community, aircraft sales and acquisition specialists, aircraft operators, finance and insurance corporations. The Summit comprised two highly informative sessions presented by JSSI CEO, Lou Seno, Chief Administrative Officer; Susan Marr, VP Technical Services; George Kleros; and Greg Martin, VP Business Development (EMEAA) Session 1: Comprised a detailed description of the JSSI Programs available today, including the

new Platinum Program, as well as program enhancements such as Supplemental Lift and compressor washes. Guidance was also provided on valuing the JSSI Program at the time of an aircraft sale. Session 2: This session was an open forum discussion with a focus on the JSSI-Broker/ Dealer relationship and opportunities that mutually benefit their respective businesses. “At JSSI we’re always looking for new ways to keep our clients flying efficiently and cost effectively, anywhere in the world,” Seno outlined. “That’s why we introduced JSSI Platinum in the Spring of 2010. “We didn’t stop at JSSI Platinum. We know that when engines go in for overhaul, owners can find themselves without their aircraft for up to three months. And so JSSI introduced ‘Supplemental Lift’ during last

as predicted," said Michael Voigt, Cessna's engineering test pilot who flew the Ten prototype. "All systems functioned as expected including the Garmin G5000 avionics system. We are looking forward to a successful flight test program and FAA certification." Federal Aviation Administration type certification is on track for mid-2013 with first aircraft deliveries planned for the second half of 2013. "Our first flight, was a great success. We have a great team working on this project and I know they will take this dominant aircraft up a notch," said Kelly Reich, business leader for the Cessna Citation X and Ten.

year’s NBAA Convention. This provides reimbursement for charter aircraft to keep owners flying, in the event that rental engines are unavailable while their own engines are in the shop for overhaul.” Early this year it became evident that JSSI Supplemental Lift wasn’t enough. Its clients needed more access to loaner engines. The only way to solve the problem was for JSSI to expand the small rental engine pool by investing in two Rolls-Royce BR710 engines that will be available for its clients. Additional news of interest is that JSSI has been elected as a new member of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), and Seno has been invited to serve on the GAMA Board of Directors. / More information from www.jetsupport.com

“The Hawker 900XP is ideally suited to the Russian market and with this certification we believe the aircraft will be in great demand with charter companies and those with a corporate or private fleet in the region,” said Sean McGeough, HBC president, Europe, Middle East and Africa. “The aircraft is capable of transporting eight passengers and two crew members at a distance of 5,069 km, making it possible for the majority of Russia to be accessed from any point. Furthermore, the Hawker 900XP can reach any point in Europe from Moscow or St. Petersburg.” / More from www.hawkerbeechcraft.com

WELL SUPPORTED SUCCESS:

/ More from www.cessna.com

Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) received type certification for the Hawker 900XP midsize business jet from the Interstate Aviation Committee (IAC) Aviation Registry in Russia. In addition to Russia’s approval, the Hawker 900XP has achieved type certification from more than 50 other countries around the world. www.AvBuyer.com

HAWKER 900XP

continued on page 34 Aircraft Index see Page 4


EXPECT EVERYTHING YOU’D EXPECT FROM A NEW JET (EXCEPT THE PRICE)

Who’s a better source for a pre-owned jet than its makers? We bring it back home, inspect, renew and thoroughly restore to OEM standards. You can even customize your paint and interior package. So, it’s not pre-owned. It’s totally re-owned. All yours. All Bombardier original, with a program full of warranties, training, factory re-delivery and support that makes buying from the OEM the only way to fly. (Things a broker can’t provide.) Take a look at the full line of pre-owned aircraft on our website. Then call us for a closer look at just how much more than a jet you get with our pre-owned program. Put the Bombardier back in your business plan. www.bombardierpre-ownedaircraft.com • 972-960-3810 WARRANTY • TRAINING • FACTORY RE-DELIVERY • SMART PARTS • FIELD SUPPORT • CARBON OFFSET OPTION

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Market Indicators

4

ARGUS VIEW

/ More from www.argus.aero

BRIFO VIEW While helicopter buyers have traditionally been financially conservative and cost-conscious, the next decade will usher in a new era of tightened purchase scrutiny, predicts Brian Foley, president and founder of BRiFO. He still foresees plenty of sales to be had, "but most, if not all will require an indisputable, virtually airtight business-case justification. This could prolong the sales process, so smart buyers and sellers will plan further ahead.” In addition, Foley advises rotary-wing manufacturers to provide better evidence that fleet replacement or growth is a sounder financial choice than it might appear at first glance (as is buying new vs. used). This could include such things as reduced ownership costs or showing how a 34

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

JETNET VIEW JANUARY - NOVEMBER 2011: INVENTORIES DOWN, PRICES YET TO BOTTOM OUT  JETNET has released details for the first eleven months of 2011’s pre-owned business jet, business turboprop and helicopter markets. Preowned business aircraft inventories continued to decline in November, but asking prices - especially for jets - have yet to find a bottom. Business jet inventory in November stood at 14.0% of the in-service fleet (down 1.1% from a year ago). In the first 11 months of 2011, jet sale transactions increased by 9.6% compared to the same period in 2010 however, in the same timeframe, average asking price dipped 14.1% to $4.537m, and average days on the market

swelled by nine days to 334. The turboprop market appears to be gaining a better footing. Inventory of pre-owned turboprops settled in at 9.9% in November (down from 10.8% in 2010). Turboprop sale transactions rose by 12.4% in the first 11 months compared with the same period in 2010, while the number of days on the market decreased by 12 days to 327. Average Asking price was the only negative in the turboprop segment, though it fell by only 3.2% versus a year ago, to $1.311m. Turbine and Piston Helicopter Full Sale Transactions have declined by double-digit

new model's additional utility can cut expenses or increase revenue - all the classical quantitative arguments. Foley sees these economic pressures affecting virtually every segment of the market in some way. In spite of this more challenging climate, Foley is very optimistic for the industry, saying, “We anticipate future helicopter sales www.AvBuyer.com

percentages, at 10.9% and 18% respectively after eleven months of 2011, versus 2010. The percentage of the Turbine and Piston helicopter fleet for sale in November 2011 was below 7%. One million dollars separates the average asking prices for Turbine helicopters, at $1.277m, and Piston helicopters, at $223k. While the average asking price for turbine helicopters is declining, the piston helicopter average asking price has increased by 8.3%, and was the only pre-owned aircraft market sector to show an increase. / More from www.jetnet.com

will trend upward nicely over the next few years. But that's contingent upon the manufacturers' ability to help customers with all the necessary information and justification needed to make their numbers work. Value will remain the future quest and mantra guiding helicopter purchases - you can quote me on that.” / More from www.brifo.com continued on page 40 Aircraft Index see Page 4

December business aircraft flight activity slowed down over the holidays, according to ARGUS. TRAQPak data indicates that in December 2011 business aircraft flight activity declined from November 2011, falling 6.1% from the previous month. A look at the individual operational categories shows a decrease across the board led by Part 91, which was down 8.9% from the previous month. Fractional activity followed, down 3.4%, and Part 135 finished down 2.3%. All aircraft categories were down monthover-month with large cabin aircraft showing the most significant decline, off 8.1% from November. Mid-Size cabin aircraft activity was down 7.5%, followed by small cabin jets (down 5.8%). The largest individual market decrease was in the Part 91 large cabin market which posted a 10.2% month-overmonth decrease. Large cabin fractional saw an increase up 4.3% over November. Comparing year-over-year results (December 2011 vs. December 2010) overall aircraft activity declined 2.2% from 2010. Comparing the operational categories, the Part 91 market remained positive with a 2.1% increase over December 2010. The Part 135 and fractional markets both experienced a year-over-year decline, off 8.4% & 3.6% respectively. Aircraft category results were generally negative for December 2011. All aircraft segments, with the exception of small cabin, posted a year-over-year decrease that was led by large cabin aircraft, down 6.3%. Mid-size cabin followed, down 2.3%, and turboprops were down 2.4%. Small cabin aircraft showed slightly positive, up 0.6% from December 2010. Reviewing individual categories, Part 91 small cabin jets showed a significant improvement over 2010 with a 9.4% increase year-over-year.


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aerosmithpenny.com

BizAvRound-Up

5

ARRIVALS

Dave Eickhoff or Bob Nygren 8031 Airport Blvd. Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061 Phone: (713) 649-6100 • Fax: (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com

1990 Citation II, S/N 550-0636

Maurício Botelho - the former Embraer CEO has resigned as the company's chairman for ‘personal reasons’. Botelho was responsible for Embraer's quick acceleration into the regional jet market and spearheaded the company's business jet strategy. He joined Embraer as an aerospace outsider after serving as top executive of Odebrecht, a Brazilian engineering conglomerate even larger than Embraer. Hermann Wever, vice-chairman of Embraer's board of directors will temporarily assume the chairmanship.

Christopher Ellender Gulfstream Aerospace has appointed Ellender as a senior regional sales manager for Product Support Sales. Ellender is based at the Gulfstream facility in Luton, England.

Bill McLeod – is the

new vice president, North American Sales, Central Division for Debi Costantino – has been Gulfstream appointed Charter Travel Coordi- Aerospace. Based in Washingnator on behalf of Freestream ton, D.C., McLeod reports to Aircraft USA, one of the world’s Scott Neal, senior vice president, largest aircraft brokerage firms. Sales and Marketing.

John R. O'Neal sadly passed away recently after losing his battle with cancer. John, a 33-year veteran with Eagle Aviation had lasting friendships with a huge number of colleagues throughout the Business Aviation community, and will be very sadly missed by all who had dealings with him.

Total Time: 6187, Sperry 3 Tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS, Global GNS XLS w/GPS, Thrust Reversers, Freon A/C.

1997 King Air 350, S/N FL-170

EVENTS

Total Time 2108 since new, 3074 Total Landings. All Mandatory AD’s and SB’s complied with Phase IV, recent Hot Section.

INDIAN BUSINESS AVIATION EXPO Feb 8 – 10 Delhi, India

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW Feb 14 – 19 Changi Center, Singapore

/ www.miuevents.com

/ www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

NBAA: BUSINESS AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION CONF Feb 9 – 10 Delray Beach, FL, USA

NBAA: LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Feb 22 - 23 San Diego, CA, USA / www.nbaa.org

/ www.nbaa.org

aerosmithpenny.com 40

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

HELI-EXPO 2012 Feb 11 – 14 Dallas, TX, USA / www.rotor.com/heliexpo

www.AvBuyer.com

BUSINESS AIRPORT WORLD EXPO Feb 22 – 23 Cannes, France /www.businessairportworldexpo.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


6

BizAvRound-Up

BUSINESS JET INTERIORS WORLD EXPO Feb 22 – 23 Cannes, France

FIDAE Mar 27 – Apr 1 Santiago, Chile

/www.businessjetinteriorsworldexpo.com

INDIAN BUSINESS AVIATION EXPO Feb 22 - 23 Delhi, India / www.miuevents.com

US CORPORATE AVIATION SUMMIT Feb 23 – 24 Miami, FL, USA / www.aeropodium.com

/ www.fidae.cl

SUN ‘N FUN FLY-IN Mar 27 – Apr 1 Lakeland, FL, USA / www.sun-n-fun.org

2008 Lear 60XR sn 337 - 2265 TTAF On ESP Gold, 4-4 Tube EFIS System, TCAS II w/ change 7, APU, EGPWS, Thrust Reversers, EASA/ JAR OPS, RVSM, FDR-, Dual Universal UNS-1E w/ GPS, CAMP, New to Market !

AEA (AIRCRAFT ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION) Apr 3 - 6 Washington DC, USA / www.aea.net

BBGA CONFERENCE Mar 6 TBC St. Albans, Herts, UK

SIBAS (SHANGHAI INT’L BUSINESS AVIATION SHOW) Apr 11 – 13 Shanghai, China

/ www.bbga.aero

/ www.shanghaiairshow.com

ABU DHABI AIR EXPO Mar 6 - 8 Abu Dhabi, UAE / www.adairexpo.com

CYGNUS AVIATION EXPO Mar 7 - 9 Las Vegas, NV, USA / www.cygnusaviationexpo.com

WOMEN IN AVIATION CONFERENCE Mar 8 – 10 Dallas, TX, USA / www.wai.org

NBAA: INTERNATIONAL OPERATORS CONFERENCE Mar 12 – 15 San Diego, CA, USA / www.nbaa.org

INDIA AVIATION 2012 Mar 14 – 18 Hyderabad, India / www.india-aviation.in

HAC (HELICOPTER ASSOC OF CANADA CONVENTION) Mar 16 - 18 Ottawa, Ontario, Canada / www.h-a-c.ca

AVIONICS EUROPE Mar 21 – 22 Munich, Germany / www.avionics-event.com

ABACE2012: ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONF. & EX. Mar 27 – 29 Shanghai, China / www.abace.aero

AIRCRAFT INTERIORS EXPO Mar 27 - 29 Hamburg, Germany / www.reedexpo.co.uk

NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REG FORUM Apr 12 Van Nuys, CA, USA / www.nbaa.org

AERODROME INDIA Apr 12 – 14 Mumbai, India / www.pdatradefairs.com

1980 Learjet 35A sn 348 - UPGRADED -2C Engine Mod

GENERAL AVIATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST Apr 17 – 18 Dubai, UAE

12,800 TTAF, MSP, RVSM, 8.33 Spacing.

Exceptional Buy!

/ www.miuevents.com

REGIONAL AIRLINE CONFERENCE (RAC 2012) Apr 18 - 19 Porto, Portugal

1982 Learjet 55 sn 59 - MSP Gold, TCAS II, JAR-OPS,

/ www.eraa.org

New to Market !

AERO FRIEDRICHSHAFEN Apr 18 – 21 Friedrichshafen, Germany / www.aero-expo.com

1981 Learjet 35A sn 395 - 7400 TTAF, ‘Big 3’ Cargo Door, Dee Howard TR’s, MSP Gold, Beautiful 8 Place interior w/walnut- New 2009 –Paint New 2009. Amazing Airplane!

AIRPORT INFRA EXPO Apr 24 – 26 Sao Paulo, Brazil / www.airportinfraexpo.com.br

NAFA: (NATIONAL AIRCRAFT FINANCE ASSOC. CONFERENCE Apr 24 - 27 Savannah, GA, USA / www.nafa.aero

Astra/Gulfstream SPX sn 80 - Motivated seller REDUCED!! Low Time, with APU and recent C Check Insp! Priced to Sell!

MEDITERRANEAN BUSINESS AVIATION SUMMIT Apr 27 Sliema, Malta

Also Available: Lear 55 sn 63, Lear 55 sn 58, Lear 35A sn 348, Lear 35 sn 51, Lear 25B sn 201, Lear 35A sn 672, Lear 35A sn 240, Lear 35A sn 188, Lear 25D sn 363, Lear 35A sn 384, Lear 35A sn 473, ’Lear 35a sn 654

/ www.aeropodium.com

ld 35A Lear 35A sn155, Lear 36A sn 37, Lear 55 sn 091, Sold SoLear Sold Sold 35 sn 11, Lear Sold ld 35 sn 011, Lear ld 31A sn 68,SLear sn 462,SoLear ld 74, old 31A Sold 55 sn 118 SoLear Sosn ld sn 95, Lear ld sn 120, Lear ld sn 352, LearS35A Lear old sn 473, So55 So55 So25G Lear 35 sn 616, LearS60 ld sn 83, Lear ld sn 128 Lear old sn 154 Sold So35A So55B

NBAA: MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE May 1 - 3 Nashville, TN, USA

a JETRADE company

/ www.nbaa.org

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

2004 Lear 60SE sn 275 - 2265 TTAF On ESP Gold, 4-4 Tube EFIS System, TCAS II w/ change 7, APU, EGPWS, Thrust Reversers, EASA/ JAR OPS, RVSM, FDR-, Dual Universal UNS-1E w/ GPS, CAMP, New to Market !

Tel: 703 312 1000 Fax: 703 312 1355 Email: sales@nextjets.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

41


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BELL 206B-3 JETRANGER III

BELL 206B-3

MD 500E

ENSTROM 480B

Bell 206B-3 JetRanger III by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of new and preowned Single-Engine Turbine helicopters in the $1.07-1.9 million price range for the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Bell 206B-3 JETRANGER III helicopter. We’ll consider the usual productivity parameters - payload/range, speed and cabin size - and cover current market values. The field in this study includes the

I

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

MD 500E, Enstrom 480B, and Eurocopter EC-120B.

BRIEF HISTORY Table A (overleaf) shows the history of the Bell 206 single turbine series helicopter starting in 1966. The 206B-3 Jetranger III replaced the 206B Jetranger II in 1977 and was produced right up until 2010. There are currently 1,956 206B-3 helicopters in operation, and 2,471 that were manufactured during that timeframe - the largest number of a single model of all 206 model series built. www.AvBuyer.com

The 206B Jetranger II aircraft could be modified to a model 206B-3 Jetranger III by the completion of Service Instruction 206-112 (including the installation of the Allison 250C20B engine). One crew and four passenger seats are available on the 206B-3. Also, shown in Table A, the Bell helicopter 206 series makes up 65% of the 9,648 Bell Helicopters produced. Overall, Bell has produced 43% of all the Commercial Western manufactured helicopters (which totals 22,688, per JETNET records in November ❯ 2011). Aircraft Index see Page 4


$8,995,000

2006 Citation Sovereign s/n 680-0105 • Engines on ESP Gold • APU on MSP • Aircell Axxess II Satcom • XMR 100-01 weather/radio • Due maintenance complied with through June 2012 • Previously operated Part 135 • Eight passenger • Trade-in aircraft considered

Specifications subject to verification upon inspection, aircraft subject to withdrawal from the market.

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Te l i n U S : 2 0 1 . 8 9 1 . 0 8 8 1

AIRCRAFTSALES@LEAS.COM

W W W. L E A S . C O M


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BELL 206B-3 JETRANGER III

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A -

As we mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The data contained in Table B (left) is published in the B&CA May 2011 issue, but is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. The Bell 206B-3 ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 208 pounds has the lowest payload capability in this field of study.

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Bell 206B-3, at 55 cubic feet, is larger compared to the MD 500E helicopter at 48 cubic feet, as shown in Chart A (left). The Enstrom 480B at 80 cubic feet has the largest cabin volume in the field of comparison.

TABLE B - PAYLOAD & RANGE Model

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel VFR Range (nm)

208

365

270

Bell 206B-3

3,200

610

818

MD 500E

3,000

403

907

504

275

174

Enstrom 480B

3,000

603

861

258

370

198

Eurocopter EC120B

3,780

730

1,113

383

383

240

DATA COURTESY OF CONKLIN & de DECKER, ORLEANS, MA, USA; JETNET; B&CA MAY & AUG 2011 OPERATIONS PLANNING GUIDE

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME 80

Enstrom 480B 67

Eurocopter EC120B

55

Bell 206B-3 48

MD 500E 0

50

100

POWERPLANT DETAILS All models except the EC-120B in this field of comparison are powered by a Rolls-Royce 250-C20 engine variant - the Bell 206B-3 utilizing a single Rolls-Royce 250-C20J powerplant. The EC-120B offers the highest power rating value of the field with 400 SHD a transmission from its Turbomeca Arius powerplant [transmission rating is a limiting factor in the total rated and usable engine power output]. The Jetranger III engine offers a transmission rating of 317 SHD, and the Enstrom 480B transmission rating is the lowest at 305 SHD. Using data published in the May 2011 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2011 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our helicopters. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost used from the August 2011 edition was $6.04 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: The fuel price used from this source does not represent an average fuel price for the year.

Cubic Feet

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

CHART B - TOTAL VARIABLE COST MD 500E

$554

$553

Bell 206B-3

$509

Eurocopter EC120B

Enstrom 480B $0

$400 $200

$400

$478

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS $600

US $ per hour

44

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

The ‘Total Variable Cost per hour’, illustrated in Chart B (left), is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense, and Miscellaneous trip expense. The total variable cost for the Bell 206B-3 at $553 has about same variable cost per hour as the MD 500E at $554. However, the Enstrom 480B has a lowest variable cost in this field of study at $478.

www.AvBuyer.com

The points in Chart C (right) center on the same group of helicopters. Pricing used in Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BELL 206B-3 JETRANGER III

1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities.

CHART C - PRODUCTIVITY $2.5

Bell 206L4

$2.0

Price (Millions)

the vertical axis is as published in the B&CA 2011 Purchase Planning Handbook. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors:

EC120B MD500E

$1.5

Bell 206B-3 Enstrom 480B

$1.0

$0.5

$0.0

The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all turbine helicopters are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious helicopter buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Bell 206B-3 Jetranger III helicopter, as shown in the productivity index is productive among the other helicopters represented. Also included in the productivity chart is the Bell 206L4 Longranger IV helicopter that shows the continued improvement in the next successive Bell 206 series helicopter model. The Long Range Cruise speed, Cabin Volume, and Maximum Payload values from Conklin and de Decker and B&CA magazine are shown in Table C (right) for all the helicopters in this field of comparison. Also shown in Table C is the B&CA price for new helicopters (where applicable) and the average retail used prices are from Aircraft Bluebook. The last two columns of information show the number of helicopters in-operation and percentage “For Sale”. The last column shows the average monthly number of sales transactions in the past 12 months. As shown, the Bell 206B-3 helicopter leads the field in VFR range at 270nm with the maximum payload and available fuel. Also, as of the end of November 2011, there are currently 117 (or 6% of the fleet) for sale with a monthly average of 12 sold. That’s the most sold, based on a monthly average compared to the rest of the field in this study.

0.0005

0.0010

0.0015

0.0020

0.0025

0.0030

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE

Max P/L In B&CA New; w/avail Fuel VFR Used Bluebook Operation Price Range (nm)

Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Bell 206B-3

113

55

270

Used ‘09

MD 500E

127

48

174

Enstrom 480B

101

80

Eurocopter EC120B

110

67

Model

% For Sale

Avg Monthly Sold

1,956

6.0%

12.4

$1.47m

350

3.4%

2.6

198

$1.07m

88

18.1%

1.1

240

$1.86m

557

11.1%

5.6

$1.3m

DATA COURTESY OF CONKLIN & DE DECKER, ORLEANS, MA, USA; JETNET; OPERATIONS PLANNING GUIDE B&CA AUG. 2011; AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK GUIDE

TABLE D

BUSINESS TYPE Table D (right) shows the ‘Top Four’ usages by business type of the Bell 206B-3 helicopter. The ‘Top Four’ business types account for 91.1% of the most common uses for the Bell 206B-3 helicopter. End-User-Owned and Charter companies account for almost 82% ❯ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

45


AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BELL 206B-3 JETRANGER III

CHART D LOCATION BY CONTINENT 1,956 IN-SERVICE, NOVEMBER 2011

of use between them. They also account for 96 out of the 117 (total) Bell 206B-3 helicopters that are currently ‘For Sale’. The remaining percentage of usages comprised Air Sprayers, Leasing Companies, Dealer Broker, Flight Schools, Air Tours and more.

LOCATION Chart D (left) shows the location by continent for the Bell 206B-3 Jetranger III helicopter. North America has the majority with 57% of the Bell 206B-3 helicopters followed by South America (11.9%) and Europe (10.7%). Combined these three locations account for nearly 80% of the fleet.

SOURCE: JETNET STAR REPORTS

46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

decision, and are beyond the scope of this article. The Bell 206B-3 Jetranger III helicopter fares well against its competition - so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Bell 206B-3 Jetranger III helicopter will continue to do very well in the pre-owned market.

SUMMARY

❯ For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that helicopter operators value. However, there are often other qualities such as service and support that factor into a buying

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIRCRAFT SALES & ACQUISITIONS 2008 Falcon 7X s/n 033 Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years. Both our acquisition and consignment services are coordinated with our support staff, who continually watch for opportunities that benefit our clients. As one of the world’s top business aircraft service companies, our 1800+ aviation experts work daily with customers

A 10 or more worldwide charter company is also for sale! 422 Total Time. 180 Landings. Engines on ESP Gold. APU on MSP Gold. 13 Passenger Interior. Collins Satellite TV. Securaplane Security System. Enhanced Vision System (Infrared). Airshow 4000. Cabin WiFi Data.

2001 Gulfstream 200

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s/n 31

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1990 Citation III

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2000 Citation Bravo

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2,450 Total Time. Power Adv Plus. TCASII. Primus 880 Radar. UNS-1LW w/ WAAS.

1996 Astra SPX

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1988 Astra Classic

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1985 Falcon 50

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See complete specs and more listings at www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Optics By providing a unique form of transportation that is essential to economic development, Business Aviation presents a positive image. Our role is to help others see what we see, opines Jack Olcott. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

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hroughout the USA over 11,000 companies own business aircraft and many thousands more employ Business Aviation through chartering or fractional ownership programs. Worldwide, the number of corporations operating their own jet or turboprop aircraft for business approaches 20,000, while charter adds significantly to the number of companies and entrepreneurs that utilize the flexibility and efficiency provided by this form of air transportation.

Thanks to excellent research and reporting by the No Plane No Gain team, a collaboration of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the National Business Aviation Association, the benefits of Business Aviation are well documented. Furthermore, those DC-based associations actively communicate with elected leaders in Congress and

policymakers in federal and state governments, educating them regarding the role that Business Aviation plays in economic development and enhanced quality of life. In Europe, the European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) has a similar focus on communicating the attributes of Business Aviation to officials regionally, including the leaders within the European Union. During the previous decade, EBAA has established a productive dialogue with European institutions such as Eurocontrol and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), educating bureaucrats as to how business aircraft provide access to economic opportunity and, therefore, are worthy of receiving fair and equitable access to airspace and airports. EBAA has been successful in elevating Business Aviation’s acceptance in Europe.

GIVEN ITS PROVEN BENEFITS, IT IS INAPPROPRIATE FOR USERS OF BUSINESS AVIATION TO BE FEARFUL OF ‘OPTICS’

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What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

At the International Civil Aviation Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations headquartered in Montreal, Canada that addresses matters affecting all aviation worldwide, Business Aviation is ably represented by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), an “association” of Business Aviation associations. While concentrating primarily on safety and technical matters affecting the operations of business aircraft, IBAC has significantly enhanced the stature of Business Aviation within the international community. Thus it is both curious and disturbing that operators of business aircraft regard image as an obstacle to growth of the Business Aviation community. Too often we hear that operators are fearful that “optics” justify a low profile. Concern persists that the public as well as policy makers see business aircraft as something other than vital tools for the productive transport of company personnel.

CHEAP SHOT AT VITAL TOOLS Surely politicians promoting a populist theme have taken cheap shots at the expense of Business Aviation, often using the words “corporate jets” in a pejorative fashion. They are quick to equate use of a business aircraft with corporate excess, when in fact a business aircraft is as essential for increased productivity as other forms of business transportation. For many business trips, the most cost-effective travel is via business aircraft.

that appreciates the value of people and time. It is essential that users of Business Aviation approach the optics of Business Aviation differently. Take a close look at how often politicians, quick to find fault with “Corporate Jets”, use them for conducting their own business (be that business towards the fulfillment of their duties as elected officials or their campaigning). President Obama, often equating “fat cat” with “corporate jets,” would be unable to do his job for the citizens of the USA without Air Force One. And his staff would be disadvantaged if they could not accompany him as he travels. In this season of primaries, candidates often are present on the same day in states that are separated by hundreds of miles. They are able to do so because of Business Aviation. Either they charter an aircraft, borrow one from interested supporters [see Chris Younger’s article on transport of elected officials in this section] or lease a business jet for the duration of their campaign. Users of Business Aviation as well as the professionals who are associated with this form of transportation know the value of a business aircraft. The companies that are the most favorable for stockholders to own—those that generate the greatest returns to shareholders in terms of capital gains and dividends—are users of business aircraft.

Perhaps concern about optics is understandable, but it is not reasonable. When time is a factor—in business, rarely is time not a factor—a business aircraft is without peer. As a community, we need to speak out about the advantages of Business Aviation whenever the opportunity presents itself.

When viewed through an undistorted lens, Business Aviation looks great. We must diligently seek to communicate the advantages of Business Aviation, seizing every opportunity to shine a bright light on our community and its vital role in economic development.

Nor is it appropriate that those who are involved with Business Aviation be fearful of “optics.” We should embrace the image of a business aircraft as being the sign of a well-managed company—one

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

“ When time is a factor— in business, rarely is time not a factor— a business aircraft is without peer.”

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Looking Good $150bn Annual Activity within the US Economy The General Aviation Manufacturers Association, in conjunction with the National Business Aviation Association, has gathered compelling data that illustrate the value of Business Aviation.

quick look reveals that by bringing the ebb and flow of commerce to the many locations that have either minimal or no airline service, business aircraft account for about $150Bn of annual activity within the US economy.

A

What the graphic below fails to show is the additional value that comes from higher productivity facilitated by Business Aviation. Without Business Aviation, Americans would be constrained to less than 500 domestic airports with any form of scheduled airline service. But in fact, most airliners operate to and from less than 50 airports. Studies reveal that the typical business traveler using scheduled service from the busiest 25 airports can expect to lose one or more hours of work-time on an average trip. Also, about a quarter of all airline flights

were delayed, diverted or cancelled in 2008, a typical year for airline travel. In stark contrast to scheduled airliners, business aircraft are able to use about 5,000 airports in the USA, business people can travel on their own schedules, and the travel environment is conducive to addressing business issues without passengers being concerned about industrial security. A business aircraft is a business office that moves. In business aircraft, employees are able to be noticeably more productive. Thus it is understandable why companies and entrepreneurs often find Business Aviation the only efficient way to obtain maximum value from business travel. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF BUSINESS AVIATION

Induced Benefits Indirect Benefits Direct Benefits Total Impact $B 0

50

100

150

200

Dollars, in Billions SOURCE: GAMA 2009

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Acquisitions Appraisals Consulting Re-marketing

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

What Business Is Your Business Aviation In ? When shareholders or the media ask about your company’s aviation department, what is your response? The answer, which comes in four parts, stems from your understanding of what is the business of your firm’s Business Aviation services, suggests Pete Agur. Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

art 1 of your answer has to do with Business Aviation’s job description for your company: specifically, how do you want Business Aviation services to help your enterprise succeed? There are two arenas in which Business Aviation can create its greatest impact for your company:

P

1. Strategic trips – A Strategic trip takes key people to meetings where new deals are done or major threats are addressed. The value of those meetings can be measured in multiples of the full cost of the travel mode. Positioning your key people effectively is at the core of Strategic trip performance. The aircraft is acting like a fire truck delivering firemen to the scene of the emergency.

That perspective is shared by many business leaders. A number of companies have established part-time or full-time shuttle runs on the company airplane to connect frequently-traveled routes that are not well served commercially. The cost and time benefits of shuttle services routinely creates substantial savings over the best negotiated airline airfares. Such use of business aircraft falls within the arena of Operational trips. U

2. Operational trips – An Operational trip has high cost benefit as compared to your commercial alternatives. On Operational trips, the incremental cost of operating the aircraft is less than the blend of airfare and time costs if traveling via the airlines. The focus is cost benefit. The aircraft is like a mail truck transporting the mail carrier as he or she delivers the mail.

‘STRATEGIC’ AND ‘OPERATIONAL’ DISSECTED The greatest impact Business Aviation can make is by supporting Strategic trips. A few years ago I was talking with the CEO of a large company who was buying his first airplane. He asked how he could be certain it achieved its highest and best use. I described to him the Strategic versus Operational use model. He replied, “Using those definitions, every trip our top management team takes is Strategic. Therefore, I want my top executives to use the airplane as much as possible.”

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Comprehensive Services

Lear 55 SN 121

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“...the policies and practices the Board establishes for your Business Aviation service must preserve and protect your brand.”

THE AIRCRAFT AND ITS CREW ARE YOUR AMBASSADORS

It is tempting to assume that when your Strategicfocused aircraft is not on a trip, it could be saving the company money by doing Operational trips. But those savings would be more than offset if your company ‘fire truck’ was out delivering mail when a fire broke out. Consider that a fire truck creates value by being available, ready to respond. That is a value created by a Strategic airplane, too. The occasional Operational trip might be better filled by ‘elastic’ Business Aviation resources like charter or fractional aircraft. If your marketplace and customer clientele are situated where airline service is unsuitable for the conduct of routine business, there may be a pressing need for an additional company aircraft dedicated primarily to Operational trips.

YOUR BUSINESS (AVIATION) Part 2: If you ask most Business Aviation professionals (i.e., manager, pilot, technician or scheduler) what business they are in, most will say, “Business Aviation.” From the Board’s perspective, that is not good enough. It is a commoditized answer that does not connect your Business Aviation service to the strategic intent or operations of its customer – your company and its leaders. The much better answer is, “We are in the XYZ business, and our role at XYZ is to provide Business Aviation service that allows the enterprise to compete more successfully. We do that by…” Any aviation professional that has his or her head and heart aligned in this manner will be much more effective for the company than someone who is merely focused on making landings equal takeoffs. Therefore, the second answer to

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“What business is your Business Aviation service in?” is; your business.

BRAND AMBASSADORS Part 3 of your answer to the question “What business is your Business Aviation service in?” is both subtle and powerful. Your Business Aviation services are an extension of your company. Your aircraft and crew are the first point of contact with many customers, shareholders and other key corporate constituents. In other words, the aircraft and its crew are your ambassadors. And even if you want to maintain a low profile, they still represent your company wherever they go. With that in mind, their appearance and behaviors must be supportive of the ambassadorial role the Board defines for them. Lastly (Part 4 answer), as instructions for your ambassadors, the policies and practices the Board establishes for your Business Aviation service must preserve and protect your brand. The Board should review and ratify Business Aviation policies that address personal use; local, state, federal and international taxation issues; and community noise abatement rules, to name only a few sensitive areas. In the end, the Board has a clear and high responsibility for defining what business your Business Aviation service is in. Otherwise, you run a risk of being branded a ‘Fat Cat’ rather than a responsible business leader. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

How Much Does This Aircraft Cost To Operate ? When looking at the aviation-related costs of your flight department, it helps to know what results you are looking for and who is doing the looking, observes David Wyndham. What an aircraft costs to operate may be a simple question, but the answer is far more complicated and dependent upon whom you ask. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

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he Chief Pilot is responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the aircraft. Regarding cost efficiency, that person is usually most concerned with fuel, an aggregate maintenance allocation and travel expenses. For a typical mid-sized business jet, those costs amount to about $2,400 to $3,200 per hour (depending on fuel cost per gallon). The Maintenance Director looks at what it takes to maintain the aircraft in an airworthy condition. He/she will dissect the "maintenance cost" item and really go into detail. Average routine maintenance accruals for the typical mid-size business jet are about $850 per hour ($250 for parts, $200 for maintenance labor and $400 for the engine reserves).

The Aviation Department Manager is concerned with the cost of the aircraft, plus the fixed overhead items such as hangar, training, insurance and salaries. Those fixed cost items for a mid-size business jet can be about $500,000 per year. For a nominal 400 hours per year operation, the Aviation Department Manager's budget for a business jet is about $1,700,000 annually, or $4,250 per hour average. All the while, the CFO is concerned with all the Aviation Manager’s costs plus acquisition costs, amortization, interest, depreciation and taxes. These costs can add from 10% to as much as 60% on to the Aviation Department Manager's budget depending on the value of the aircraft.

TIMING IS A FACTOR It gets more complicated. When did you last ask the question, “How much does it cost to operate?” The answer may vary in relation to where you are between scheduled inspection and maintenance U work.

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HOW DO YOU WEIGH OPERATIONAL COST ?

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ Give someone a very broad question and you will get a wide range of answers depending on the individual's perspective and timeframe.“

Aircraft are complex machines. In order to maintain their reliability and airworthiness, they have maintenance schedules that are far more involved than the typical automobile. Required maintenance schedules vary, but a typical one might look like this: • •

58

Routine airframe & engine checks every 500 hours or 12 months. More complicated airframe checks every 1,500 hours or three years (now we are seeing some real costs!) Engine mid-life inspection every 2,500 hours (could be costly unless engines are on a guaranteed maintenance program). Airframe heavy maintenance every eight years. Often, while undergoing heavy maintenance, the aircraft gets paint and interior refurbishment, maybe some new avionics and cabin upgrades. Costs can be $500,000 to $1.5 million depending on the “extras” added. Engine overhaul at 5,000 hours. Cost could be $500,000 per engine unless engines are on a guaranteed maintenance program. Aging aircraft inspections once the aircraft has reached 12 years of age or older.

What if the aircraft just had a major maintenance inspection, avionics upgrades, and refurbished paint and interior adding to the cost an additional $1.0 million? Due to the downtime to accomplish all that, the hours flown that year might have been only 250 hours. That cost for this one year will have consequently ballooned to $2.25 million, or $9,000 per hour! To answer the question "How much does the aircraft cost" really depends on who you ask and when you ask. Give someone a very broad question and you will get a wide range of answers depending on the individual's perspective and timeframe. None of the answers are "wrong" or "right," they are merely different. Knowing this, when you are talking about aviation costs with various professionals, you should keep in mind who you're talking with (and their unique perspective) so that you can understand the different answers you receive. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Find an Aircraft Dealer

and brokers - find one today

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Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Giving An Election Campaign Some Extra Lift ? If you are thinking of offering your aircraft to aid the election campaign of a preferred election candidate, be careful. Board Members must stay abreast of rules and regulations governing flights for candidates and elected officials to avoid unintended violations of the law, notes attorney Chris Younger. Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

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ederal and state election campaigns have moved into high gear in anticipation of upcoming primaries this winter and spring and the general election this fall. Perhaps your company has considered giving its favorite candidate a “lift” by providing the use of the company’s aircraft in connection with his or her campaign travel.

F

Many governmental entities, including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Federal Election Commission (FEC), the Internal Revenue Service

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

(IRS), the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives and the state counterparts to these agencies and legislative bodies have enacted rules and regulations governing air transportation to candidates and elected officials. In particular, the FEC issued updated rules regarding such transportation (FEC rules) that became effective January 6, 2010. Failure to comply with these rules can have unintended and often serious consequences for both individual candidates and, more importantly, business aircraft owners and operators. Therefore, it U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

1995 Cessna Citation VII

AIRFRAME: 6088 HOURS SINCE NEW 3879 LANDINGS CESCOM MAINTENANCE APU: GARRETT GTCP-36-150W (Airborne) 3199 HOURS SINCE NEW MSP

S/N 7061

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AVIONICS: HONEYWELL SPZ-8000 5 TUBE EFIS DUAL HONEYWELL NZ-2000 FMS WITH GPS DUAL COLLINS VHF-22A COMMS DUAL COLLINS VIR-32A NAVS COLLINS ADF-462 DUAL COLLINS DME-42 DUAL HONEYWELL MST-671 TRANSPONDERS DUAL COLLINS RMI-36 COLLINS ALT-55 RADAR ALTIMETER HONEYWELL PRIMUS 870 COLOR RADAR KING KHF-950 DUAL HONEYWELL AZ-810 AIR DATA COMPUTERS

FEATURES:

MAINTENANCE:

RVSM COMPLIANT (2004) BENDIX KING KGP-860 EGPWS (CLASS B TAWS) HONEYWELL TCAS II DUAL ALLIED SIGNAL AHZ-600 AHRS WULFSBERG FLITE PHONE VI FAIRCHILD COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER LEAD ACID BATTERIES N1 DEECS FREON AIR DUAL ELECTRONIC FLIGHT BAGS WITH CHARTS AND XM WEATHER

DOC 1,5,7,8,9,10,17,19, MA AND MI ACCOMPLISHED FEBRUARY 2010

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EXTERIOR: NEW DUNCAN AVIATION PAINT 2004. MATTERHORN WHITE WITH DARK AND LIGHT BLUE STRIPES

INTERIOR: NEW DUNCAN AVIATION INTERIOR 2004. SEATS RE-DYED AND NEW CARPET 2010. 8 PASSENGER EXECUTIVE SEATING IN GREY LEATHERS. 4 PLACE CENTER CLUB, 2 AFT FORWARD FACING SEATS. 2 EXECUTIVE TABLES IN CLUB SEATING, 2 SMALLER TABLES IN AFT CABIN. DELUXE REFRESHMENT CENTER. WALNUT CABINETRY. AFT BELTED LAVATORY WITH DELUXE VANITY AND STORAGE. AIRSHOW 400

Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

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Ohio


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM is imperative that Directors understand the FEC rules before allowing a candidate for elected office to use the company aircraft.

“Directors should note that a permissible payment for a particular flight must be made in advance of the flight.”

The Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007 (Act) addressed the carriage of candidates for federal elected office and tightened the rules already in place relating to such carriage. The current FEC rules prohibit or restrict federal candidates and certain individuals traveling on behalf of such candidates from utilizing non-commercial air travel.

DIFFERENT CANDIDATES, DIFFERING RULES The FEC rules distinguish between candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives and candidates for the U.S. Senate, as well as the offices of Vice President and President. Under the FEC rules, candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives and individuals working on their campaigns are prohibited from utilizing noncommercial air transportation in connection with the campaign activities of that candidate. However, in certain very limited circumstances, the FEC rules permit individuals associated with such campaigns to utilize non-commercial air transportation where the purpose of the flight is not connected with the candidate’s campaign. Candidates for the U.S. Senate, Vice President and President are permitted to utilize non-commercial air transportation under the FEC rules provided that they timely reimburse the provider of such flight for the transportation provided in accordance with the terms of the rules. Under the FEC rules the reimbursement amount must be equal to the amount that it would cost the candidate to charter a comparable aircraft for the same trip. Where multiple individuals are passengers on a particular flight and they represent multiple candidates’ election campaigns, the FEC rules specify how to allocate the reimbursement amount between each such candidate. Press and government personnel who accompany a candidate may reimburse the service provider directly. Specifically, the method for making such allocations based on a pro-rata portion of the reimbursement amount as determined, is based on the number of individuals on such flight who represent a particular candidate. The FEC rules contain two important exceptions to the foregoing requirements (which are also available to House candidates). These exceptions create “carve-outs” that permit candidates to accept noncommercial air transportation using governmentprovided aircraft and using aircraft owned by the candidate, or his or her immediate family members. Where a candidate utilizes aircraft owned by such candidate or his or her family members, the FEC rules provide that the candidate’s campaign must reimburse the candidate or the family member for the costs of operating the flight in question. Also, if the candidate is using a fractional or “time-share”

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aircraft, such use may not exceed the time allocated to the candidate or his or her family pursuant to such arrangement. If the use does exceed the allowable flight hours allocated to such candidate or his or her family, the FEC rules relating to non-family owned aircraft apply as if the aircraft were not owned by the candidate or his or her family member(s). Directors should note that a permissible payment for a particular flight must be made in advance of the flight; otherwise, the flight could be considered a campaign contribution that could violate Federal election law. Furthermore, the FEC rules also contain specific record-keeping requirements that must be followed by both the candidate for federal office and the provider of non-commercial air transportation to such candidate. Finally, Directors must also consider rules in addition to the FEC rules that a company must follow when providing non-commercial air transportation to candidates for Federal office. These include IRS and FAA requirements, rules of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate, along with the requirements of various state and local authorities. Please keep in mind that this article serves as a general and broad overview of the FEC rules and does not constitute legal advice or a legal opinion. Therefore, it is always advisable to consult with qualified aviation counsel when considering whether to provide such transportation to a candidate for elective office. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Year

Model

Serial No.

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1990

Challenger 601-3A

5066

1994

Citation Jet

525-0075

1995

Citation Jet

525-0122

1987

Citation Jet

525-0198

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

2004

Citation XLS

560-5534

2005

Citation Sovereign

680-0015

1993

Citation VII

650-7034

1982

Falcon 50

116

1995

Falcon 900B

153

1982

Gulfstream III

III-349

2000

Gulfstream G200

014

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

1987

Gulfstream GIV

1006

1998

Gulfstream GIVSP

1354

2005

Hawker 800XP

258704

1995

Learjet 31A

106

1999

Learjet 45

052

1996

Learjet 60

85

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2010

Phenom 100

50000112

2001

Piaggio Avanti P180

1048

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050

1996

Pilatus PC-12/45

156

2007

Premier IA

RB-209


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Buying New Or Used: What role in the decision does a warranty make ? Warranty provisions should be considered carefully when Boards assess whether to acquire a new or previously owned aircraft, cautions Jay Mesinger.

Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

W

arranties in concept provide the purchaser with significant benefits, but understanding precisely what is offered and what role those benefits play in the overall ownership experience is complicated. Cost of ownership, obviously, is reduced when the manufacturer pays for broken items (which OEMs agree to do subject to the terms of the warranty contract). Different aspects of the aircraft, such as avionics, airframe, engines and interiors, however, have different warranty benefits. The aircraft and components are generally five-year items, for example, while the avionics are usually three year items. Cosmetics (i.e., cabin interior and external finish) run for one to two years of coverage.

NON-WARRANTY CONSIDERATIONS Warranty benefits must be balanced against nonwarranty considerations, including new technology, depreciation and corporate culture. Perhaps your company needs features that are not available in older aircraft, thus diminishing the attractiveness of a previously owned machine regardless of price. Particularly interesting may be the 50 percent accelerated bonus depreciation that is available on new aircraft purchased in 2012. Corporate culture regarding equipment purchases also is a consideration. In the old days corporations had a plan to rotate aircraft at the end of their useful depreciation life, which in many cases matched with the end of the warranty life. As economic conditions have changed over the years this approach to replacement has shifted and now allows for a much longer utilization period for the owner. In fact many companies have shifted to seven years and beyond; some corporations are keeping the planes as long as U

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SAVINGS MUST BE BALANCED AGAINST ACQUISITION COSTS

Aircraft Index see Page 4


About Us... ‘Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter” commented Bill Quinn, Managing Director of Charleston Aviation Partners.

Business Aircraft Transaction Specialists

INTEGRITY … Managing Director Charleston Aviation Partners LLC 103 Palm Boulevard, Suite 2-B Isle of Palms, SC 29451 +1 843 886-3313 (office) +1 843 743-6500 (mobile) +1 843 410-5698 (Fax) billquinn@charlestonaviation.com

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We are committed to represent your interests and only your interests.

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We will personally oversee every detail of the transaction associated with the sale of your aircraft or helicopter.

FOCUS … We only list one model of aircraft or helicopter at a time, which will offer you more value.

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‘Details are important’


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“Warranties will lower direct costs. However, the value of the warranty is only part of the equation.”

they are meeting the mission, so economic factors have established a new base-line in the purchase decision. Now the idea of buying new or used is primarily based on the differentiation between the life-cycle cost of a new aircraft and that of similar low-time used equipment. This change is taking place within even the largest corporations. As long as the mission is being fulfilled, the idea of new may not be quite so appealing in spite of warranties. This situation became particularly acquit as the price of used aircraft tumbled in 2008 and is still burdensome for original equipment manufacturers. There has been little recovery from that drastic pricing adjustment. The idea of prices rising for preowed aircraft is still way off in our future. Manufacturers are therefore working hard to add benefits to their new products, creating new value propositions for buyers. This is why we see a few of the manufacturers introducing new models, such as the Gulfstream G650 and the Bombardier 6000, 7000 and 8000. These aircraft offer new cockpit designs and features, all of which are meant to create compelling reasons for the buyer to come back to the idea of buying new.

only part of the equation. Savings must be balanced against acquisition costs. Furthermore, there are companies that provide aftermarket parts and labor coverage for avionics and engines, so the buyer can (for a fixed hourly amount) provide that same budgetary protection to their costs as a warranty. Emerging markets like China, Asia, the Middle East and India do have a real desire to buy new, and I am sure that this is in part driven by the idea of a full warranty being in place. However, in larger part I believe this is a cultural factor based on new wealth buying new products. A warranty is real, it does provide value, and it can be measured by fleet actuarial averages. This being said, in today’s market new aircraft warranties often do not make the buying difference that they did in preceding years when the price of new and late-model used aircraft were closer together. This market phenomenon is a conundrum that is being deliberated daily by the buyer as well as the manufacturer. I do not think we are at the end of the story yet. There is more time and market stabilization that must take place for warranties to have the significance they once held in the decision to purchase new aircraft.

A COMPONENT OF VALUE? Let’s now focus on warranty as a component of value. The idea of a lowered cost of operation as a result of the warranty is real. Warranties will lower direct costs. However, the value of the warranty is

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Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Insuring For Indirect Exposure - (Part 1) A tragic accident that occurred in 2006 illustrates the importance of non-owned aircraft liability coverage and risk management strategies for a corporation, warns Stuart Hope.

Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

In January of 2006 a senior financial advisor of a large investment firm flew his personal aircraft on a business related trip with three passengers, one of which was a client. The owner/pilot of the aircraft failed to maintain the appropriate airspeed on approach to the destination airport, causing the aircraft to stall and nose-dive into the ground. There were no survivors. The client’s family sued the pilot’s estate claiming pilot negligence, but also sued the investment firm alleging that it improperly allowed its employees to use private aircraft flown by nonprofessional pilots on behalf of company business. For the purpose of our example, we will look only

at the lawsuit against the investment firm. The plaintiff’s attorney alleged the internal policies of the owner/pilot’s employer were flawed and deficient because the firm failed to have any written policy prohibiting employees from using private aircraft to transport customers. The plaintiff’s attorney stated their investigation failed to find any other financial institution of comparable size that permitted employees who are amateur pilots to fly customers on company business. He then commended the investment firm for changing their internal policy after the fact so that such a tragedy could never occur again. The lawsuit took 3.5 years of litigation and was finally settled for $15 million USD. U

DON’T GET CAUGHT SHORT ON YOUR PROTECTION

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1989 HAWKER 800A

2012 PHENOM 100

S/N 440 8,650 Hours Total Time Since New, Engines on MSP Gold, 5-tube EFIS, RVSM,

JULY 2012 DELIVERY POSITION!

Fresh E & F inspection at Raytheon Tampa. Aircraft located in South Florida. Aircraft priced aggressively as Owner is Ready to Sell!

Still time to spec out options and customize paint and interior. Owner motivated as next progress payment is due shortly.

2008 KING AIR B200GT

2002 TBM 700B

Only 150 Hours Total Time Since New. Aircraft loaded with $275K in options including BLR winglets, Raisbeck Crown Wing lockers, HF with Selcal, Aircell ST3100 Flite Phone, and aft jump seat.

S/N 234 Only One Owner and 1,050 TTSN. Equipped with desirable Pilot Door Option, 2-Tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530W’s, KMD-850 MFD, EGPWS, GDL-69 Real Time Wx, WX-1000E Stormscope, Annual and Long-life Gear Inspection c/w November 2011.

2005 TBM 700C2

2001 TBM 700B

S/N 317 Only 1175 TTSN and Two Owners Since New. RVSM Equipped, 2-Tube EFIS40, Dual Garmin 530s, KMD-850 MFD w/TAS & TAWS, Gaseous O2 System, WX-500 SS, and King RDR-2000 Radar. Annual Inspection and Long Life Gear Inspection c/w February 2011.

S/N 200 1,541 TTSN, 684 SHS, 371 SPOH, Honeywell/Garmin Avionics including 2-Tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s, KGP-560 EGPWS, Sandel SN 3308 EHSI, WX-1000E Stormscope, Annual and 10-Year Inspection c/w January 2012 and NDH.

S/N BY-48

CALL TODAY! 561.433.3510 CONTACT J.P. HANLEY PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL

jp@caijets.com PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

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PHONE: 561.433.3510


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ To a non-pilot jury member, this assertion makes sense whether true or not, so you’d better have your insurance house in order.”

LESSONS LEARNED The first lesson is that plaintiff’s attorneys are VERY good at making a “jury of your peers” believe your company’s operating policies are totally negligent. They do so by crafting their case very carefully. It’s a war of words. Notice how they make an employee who uses his or her private aircraft on company business practically negligence per se? The well qualified pilot in this case is suddenly an “amateur” simply because he also owns the aircraft. To a non-pilot jury member, this assertion makes sense whether true or not, so you’d better have your insurance house in order. Furthermore, a large corporation could easily have an employee who owns an aircraft and uses it on company business without the company having any knowledge of that fact.

non-owned aircraft. Whether you purchase a standalone policy or already have coverage under your owned aircraft insurance policy, the important point is that the structure of the non-owned coverage must match the exposure. Often the definition of a non-owned aircraft limits the coverage. For example, it can apply only to fixed wing (not rotor-wing) aircraft, limit the maximum covered seating capacity to eight seats or less, stipulate who the approved pilots must be, and what the approved use is in order to be valid. If not written to reflect the unique exposure of your company, you might find yourself facing an uninsured lawsuit. Be sure to purchase as high a liability limit as you can reasonably afford. Like all liability policies, you only find out if you bought an adequate limit after the loss has been settled. The average aviation wrongful death claim per person is now somewhere north of $5 million USD.

YOUR PROTECTION If your company decides it will allow employees to operate privately owned aircraft on company business, you should have a two-pronged insurance approach: 1) Have a written policy in force detailing exactly what coverage the employee-owner must carry. The firm’s policy should prescribe a minimum acceptable liability limit; mandate that the employer company be named as additional insured; and that the insurance contract be primary without right of contribution from any insurance the employer may carry. 2) Your firm needs to purchase a Non-Owned Aircraft Liability policy. If your company already operates an aircraft, you will have some form of coverage for use of

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If your company decides to use the risk management technique of risk avoidance and simply prohibit use of privately-owned aircraft on company business, again you will need to institute a written policy communicated clearly and often to all employees. Understand this process doesn’t relieve you of liability. If an employee doesn’t get the message or simply disregards the policy, you still have an exposure. Thus you should consider purchase of a NonOwned Aircraft Liability policy for protection. Contact your aviation insurance broker to discuss your exposure in detail and take action now. Be careful out there. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Large Cabin Equation As Louis Sullivan so aptly said, ‘Form follows function’ Some missions call for more than a Light or Medium Jet. Sometimes it takes a larger jet to handle a large job - hence the ongoing appeal of the Large Cabin jet. ize often is used as a measure of quality or desirability. While the saying goes, “good things come in small packages”, the pragmatic view would be that some big things need equally big packages - and so it is with Business Aviation.

S

Some days, the mission commands an aircraft of larger capacity. In respect to that, this month our value examination focuses on Large Cabin business jets.

THINKING BIG WHEN SIZE MATTERS People deal with the concept of size on a fairly routine basis - usually with little thought to the relativity of the concept. What constitutes small to one may appear large to another; what amounts to huge on my scale might only tip the scales toward medium for you.

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In aviation, one usually deals in such relativities with reference to weights. For the purpose of this month’s focus on Large Cabin jets we categorize aircraft weighing roughly between 40,000 pounds and 80,000 pounds (the latter figure once constituting the upper limits of business turbojet and turbofan jet airplanes). The advent of the additional, more niche-focused Ultra-Long-Range airplanes and the Businessliner segments have since stretched those limits. Note: In some cases, aircraft in our Bluebook Value Analysis (following) may weigh marginally more than the 80,000 lbs limit for this category but are included as derivatives of an airplane that is firmly established as a part of our Large Cabin category. In such cases, they are likely to have gained some weight through adaptations and modifications over time. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“Dedicated office spaces and a flying conference room are all possible on board this category aircraft. “

PERFORMANCE CONSIDERATIONS Large Cabin jets offer plenty in their favor. First, however, if there’s one defining negative element of the Large Cabin jet and its upsize kin it’s in the runway lengths they typically require. Runways longer than 6,000 ft (ideally longer than 7,000 ft) make access comfortable, particularly when the airport elevation is high or on days when the temperature is warm. As density altitude increases, so do runway requirements – but that’s not unique to the larger jets. Many paybacks counter-weigh the runway numbers. The key elements of this category’s appeal include speed, cabin size and range. Speed & Range: The main differentiator between Large Cabin jets and their purpose-built Ultra-LongRange counterparts generally stem from the larger fuel capacities and the higher gross weights the latter category needs to go enormous distances. Otherwise, the average Large Cabin and Ultra-LongRange airplanes share more in common than they differ, with similar cabin sizes and comparable cruise speeds. Speeds ranging between Mach 0.75 and Mach 0.85 are the overall trend for the Large Cabin segment. Range capabilities typically up to, and into the 4,000nautical mile range make Large Cabin jets effective non-stop continent- and ocean-crossing machines: and the fewer the stops, the shorter the overall trip time. Size: Where the Large Cabin airplanes really excel (as the name would suggest) is in their cabin capacities. A cabin for this category of jet typically will stretch into 30, even 40 feet (or slightly more), enabling operators to enjoy a wider array of finishing options and office-like features than jets in the smaller segments. Perhaps the nature of your business requires a couple of distinct, mostly private spaces where different groups can work independently en route. A Large

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Cabin business jet would definitely be a solution. Dedicated office spaces and a flying conference room are all possible on board this category aircraft. Alternatively, the length of travel may require a sleeping section walled off from the rest of the cabin. At this size, if you can imagine it, interior designers and completion shops can likely fulfill your vision. Naturally, the size and range capabilities don’t come cheaply; you’ll need a larger fuel budget, more hangar space, a larger maintenance budget and - for safety and utility - a crew of three: two on the flight deck, and a professionally trained Flight Attendant for the cabin. Essentially, for the company with the need and budget, the Large Cabin business jet will rarely, if ever prove too small – and will only occasionally be too large for an airport you’d prefer. For cases like those, you can always charter – just as the small aircraft operators do when they need to up-size for the occasional trip.

LARGE CABIN JET PRICE GUIDE The following Large Cabin Jets Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1992 through Winter 2011. Values reported are in USD millions. Each reporting point represents the current retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Dassault 900B values reported in the Winter 2011 edition of Bluebook show $10.8m USD for a 1993 model, $11.4m USD for a 1994 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. With the reader’s knowledge of aircraft, equipment, range and performance, the following Guide allows the reader to determine the best value range for consideration. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

U


BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM LARGE CABIN JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - WINTER 2011 What your money buys today 2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER

31.2

28.0

26.0

21.0

19.0

18.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605

30.8

25.0

23.0

19.0

18.0

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

2002 US$M

14.2

13.5

12.6

12.0

11.0

26.0

25.0

24.0

23.0

MODELS

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604

15.0

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3A

DASSAULT FALCON 7X

50.1

48.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900LX

42.4

40.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY

38.0

47.0

42.0

41.0

33.5

29.5

27.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900EX DASSAULT FALCON 900DX

31.0

27.0

23.0

22.0

21.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900C

21.8

21.0

20.0 20.0

19.2

18.7

17.7

13.7

12.7

12.2

11.7

11.2

24.0

23.0

22.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900B

EMBRAER LEGACY 650

30.24

27.5

EMBRAER LEGACY 600

27.45

24.5

19.5

16.2

14.7

EMBRAER LEGACY

GULFSTREAM G450

39.0

35.0

32.0

29.0

27.0

GULFSTREAM G400 GULFSTREAM G350

20.0 34.0

29.0

27.0

25.0

GULSTREAM G300

22.0

20.0

19.0

18.0 14.5

GULFSTREAM G1V-SP

19.0

14.0 15.5

GULFSTREAM G1V

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Aircraft Bluebook Data - Carl Janssens, Editor: carl@jetappraisals.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation LARGE CABIN JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - WINTER 2011 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

10.1

9.7

9.1

8.7

8.3

7.8

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

1993 US$M

5.5

5.3

5.0

1992 US$M

MODELS BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 850ER BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605 BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 604 BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3R

5.8

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 601-3A

4.7

4.4

DASSAULT FALCON 7X DASSAULT FALCON 900LX DASSAULT FALCON 900EX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 900EX

20.0

19.3

17.8

16.9

16.4

15.9

14.9

17.0

15.8

14.8

13.8

14.5

14.0

13.6

13.1

12.2

11.9

11.4

10.8

10.3

13.8

13.0

12.5

12.0

11.5

10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

DASSAULT FALCON 900DX DASSAULT FALCON 900C DASSAULT FALCON 900B

EMBRAER LEGACY 650 EMBRAER LEGACY 600 EMBRAER LEGACY

GULFSTREAM G450 GULFSTREAM G400 GULFSTREAM G350 GULSTREAM G300 GULFSTREAM G1V SP

14.5

GULFSTREAM G1V

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Aircraft Bluebook Data - Carl Janssens, Editor: carl@jetappraisals.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012 77


THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Optics Are Alive And Well o Plane No Gain (NPNG) and the Alliance for Aviation Across America (AAAA) are two fabulous initiatives designed to help everyone understand the incredible value to our country of Business Aviation. Jobs are created to support our industry and small and mid-size corporations benefit measurably through their use of aviation in the day-to-day operations of their businesses. Small town USA benefits from the use of these invaluable business tools because of the location of many smaller regional airports and their ability to serve these small communities. On and on goes the list of reasons that Business Aviation makes a huge impact on the American economy. These two incredible initiatives were started after the ‘Big-Three’ Auto Makers testified before congress on November 19th, 2008. That was the day our world in Business Aviation stood still. That was the day that just when our industry thought we understood all the challenges faced, we discovered another major challenge to comprehend and overcome: Optics! NPNG and the AAAA went to work battling the issue of optics. The success of these and other efforts by so many, little-by-little began to turn the tide. In time, the companies that had pulled back from considering buying or using business aircraft began to come back into the fold. The idea of business aircraft being real tools of commerce and business began to gain favor again in board rooms across America. It seemed as though we were back in business. Of course there is never room to rest on ones laurels, and NPNG and the AAAA continue daily to churn out the successes in legislation, jobs and small town America. After all, once we get traction why slow the pace again? These initiatives are not cheap and organizations like NBAA and GAMA continue to make these investments a priority in their annual budgets. This wonderful work and their corresponding benefits do not go unnoticed to the associations’ respective memberships. We are clearly all in this together. But that’s not the end to the story… Not even close to the end! Like each one of you reading this article, I have unique windows

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

into the sentiment of our industry. We all have our own circles of influence and our individual client-bases that act as our windows on the world. Board rooms all over the country are still couching every aviation decision against the consideration of optics. Maybe not with the same all-or-nothing concern they did in 2008 and 2009, but still with a cautious eye towards stockholder and stakeholder concerns. Parking the airplane should never be an outcome of these optics conversations, but most certainly a renewed discussion of size and type of plane to operate could be. For example, would a turboprop be better used than a small jet for regional flights? How about not buying a new airplane just yet, but continuing to operate the older one? These are the questions of today’s optics, and they are still being asked out of a fear of sending the wrong message. Unfortunately, this is a discussion that can lead down a path of continued reduced utilization, and this is what keeps our industry alert to the matter. So how should we react to the pressure that seems to come from all sides?

...we must not feel backed into a corner, but rather amplify the true values and benefits of Business Aviation to the greater economy. We should begin as an industry to act offensively, not defensively. Being on the back foot just makes us look weak and off-balance. Every time a politician singles us out as the problem in our economy and society we must not feel backed into a corner, but rather amplify the true values and benefits of Business Aviation to the greater economy. Jobs, jobs, jobs are what people are looking for, and we are providing plenty of them. We are stimulating economic growth and increasing GDP, and the industry should be praised for that - not made a pariah. The more of us who stand tall and speak clearly to that end, www.AvBuyer.com

the faster and stronger our message will be received. In many cases, many of us already spread this message. For those who have yet to do so, it is simple. Don’t wait to be attacked for using business aircraft to begin to build the offensive strategy. Start today. Be sure you are aware of, and getting the weekly information provided by the No Plane No Gain and Alliance for Aviation Across America (websites www.noplanenogain.org, www.aviationacrossamerica.org, or call their offices and ask for inclusion). Opt for more than being placed on an email list; ask these organizations how you can help by either setting up an event in your area or writing a check to help support the cause. Also, if business ever takes you to Washington, D.C., make appointments with your representatives and speak to them face-to-face. The message of the importance of Business Aviation will resonate so much stronger in person, and I assure you they (or their legislative aides) will be accessible to you. Alternatively, pick up the phone and call your representatives’ local offices to see when they will be visiting and make an appointment to go introduce yourself and tell them how important Business Aviation is to you. Tell them to join the General Aviation Caucus in Congress. Tell them our economy and jobs depend on Business Aviation! Congratulations for being on the offensive. Thank you for taking action today! ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and now joins the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


“The Citation & Conquest Specialists” Columbia, South Carolina Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

2008 CJ3, S/N 525B-0226

2002 CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

2004 LEARJET 45XR, S/N 45-243

2006 HAWKER 850XP, S/N 258805

2000 CESSNA CITATION VII, S/N 650-7110

1991 CITATION V, S/N 560-1118

1988 CITATION II/SP, S/N 551-0591

1999 BEECHJET 400A, S/N RK-247

1981 SABRE 65, S/N 465-56

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DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE

Dealer Broker Market Update: Consensus View: 2011 wasn’t all bad, but it won’t be missed... by Dave Higdon

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n 2010, according to the forecasts, the market recovery was supposed to start in 2012. In 2011 surety fell by the wayside in favor of a sense of gloom at the possibility of recovery moving further out, past 2012 into 2013. Now the market is full-tilt into 2012 and based on the signs of the last few months, the Business Aviation market - both preowned and new-production segments continues to cruise near the bottom of the trough. Yet some indications, weak and sometimes ambivalent as they may be, point toward an end being in sight. Developments in the world’s ostensible biggest potential market could help raise the tide for both new and pre-owned turbine-aircraft sales.

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By a wide array of measures and observations, business flying grew slightly and somewhat unevenly last year, with observations of an increase of between 1 percent and 3 percent overall. Private aircraft experienced stronger overall growth – about 4 percent to 5 percent – because the total gains reported factored in declines in both fractional-operated FAR Part 91 ops and Part 135 charter. Indeed, the overall gains year-over-year for 2011 came despite declines in all areas at different times of the year. “From the perspective of operations, we’re seeing a little encouragement,” noted the ramp manager of one major Midwest FBO that caters to a large, diverse general aviation cross-section – much of it turbine. “We’d been seeing more work for our Aircraft Index see Page 4


© GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE CORPORATION PHOTO

upgrades and enhancements to older aircraft in the past two years [this FBO offers modifications to a popular turboprop twin]. “Now we’re seeing some of those planes coming in for upgrade on-spec; that is, the owner wants to sell and feels the best price comes with an airplane that’s up-to-date on everything from airframe to panel and powerplants. So how are pre-owned aircraft sales in general? “Well, they’re better than in 20092010, but nothing like in 2007 – before things started tapering off in the market.” Among the other encouraging signs: a decline in the pool of pre-owned turbine aircraft for sale, some recovery in new-unit sales in latter 2011, and continuing encouraging signs in the economy generally. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

SOME COMMON SENSE OUTLOOKS… Many who were shrewd enough to acknowledge the decline when it first began in preowned sales back in 2007 see some signs of encouragement in today’s economy. Manufacturing activity has begun to grow. The Gross Domestic Product is now up for two straight years, with 2012 promising to be even stronger. Corporate profits overall (which ran record highs in 2010) repeated that standing in 2011, with major banks, financiers and manufacturers all recording huge gains in their black ink. The corporate coffers of America reached an alltime high approaching $3 trillion in uncommitted cash reserves last year. Unemployment continued to decline, falling to 8.5 percent in December 2011 – and www.AvBuyer.com

would have been down even more were it not for a bump in the release of public sector workers by, predominantly, state governments – many of them espousing the cuts as the path to creating more private-sector job opportunities, while not actually realizing the gains. Even consumer confidence gained some ground in the latter part of 2011 – despite a year with Congress and the White House in a year that should set records for rancor and discord. Among the observers who see some gains this year is David Wyndham, vice president and co-owner of Conklin & de Decker. “There is still economic uncertainty,” Wyndham admitted, “but, most economic forecasts point to slow growth in 2012. The US is forecast for about 2.8% growth in GDP. “With corporate profits up, we should see that translate into some hiring in 2012 and we have already seen more interest in acquiring aircraft,” he noted. The consensus observation for the coming year: Continued strong sales among large cabin jets, with sales flat for mid-size and small jets, and for turboprops. Perhaps the best news in three years for the pre-owned aircraft sellers: expectations remain for values to hold, and for prices to remain flat throughout the year. “We’re already getting less pushback on prices,” noted a West Coast broker, who six months ago reported that no price seemed low enough for prospective buyers. “For the past few weeks when we’ve quoted a price we get more questions about condition, viewing the airplane, and similar. We receive fewer remarks about what the caller saw as a price ‘elsewhere’ in the market. That’s not a bad thing – particularly when we tell them that financing is more available than two years ago.” Indeed, while lenders still take longer and demand more of prospective buyers, interest rates remain lean and options for financing more plentiful than in 2009 and 2010. “Two or three years ago, even a deal with 40 percent down-payment often faced concerns about the airplane’s residual value at the end of the loan term,” explained another dealer in the Southeast U.S. “We started pointing people towards their associations for some deals – and some popular lenders ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE have all but run out of money to lend in the last quarter of 2011.” An aviation attorney who works the financial deals for dozens of buyers annually reported a significant up-tick in buyers asking his firm to help them find financing after a manufacturer’s finance wing virtually stopped writing new notes after the third quarter. “We had to scramble to get them financed before the end of the year so they could take advantage of the tax treatments in affect. We got them all done – but it was tight…and despite how good it was for us financially, aside from the goodwill generated for my firm, I’d prefer not to face that again in 2012.” That special treatment – 100 percent depreciation available in the year of purchase – drops to a bonus of 50 percent extra this year. But there are indications that in a rare moment of agreement, the White House and opposition members of Congress may come together to extend that 100-percent possibility through 2013. “It’s not like it set the world on fire,” remarked the attorney. “A number of our clients who qualified can’t effectively use all 100 percent in 2011, but they get to choose from there how they use the balance they don’t apply to their 2011 returns – and besides, every little bit helps.”

The unheralded aspect of the Great Recession was how few companies actually sank into red ink compared to how many merely saw profits decrease. With two years of record profits among so much of America’s business, it’s clear that profits alone don’t spur aircraft buying – at least not any more. One consultant to prospective businessaircraft buyers summarized, “Need has always been the best driver, and until more companies need something their current planes can’t deliver, don’t expect the kind of market of the 2006, 2007, 2008 years.

The sum total of input from financers, consultants, contract attorneys, dealers and brokers carries the emotional feel of a crowd that just emerged from the storm shelter.

THE YEAR IN PREVIEW The sum total of input from financers, consultants, contract attorneys, dealers and brokers carries the emotional feel of a crowd that just emerged from the storm shelter after a long time hiding from the maelstrom: They’re happy to have the drama behind them; happy to have survived; and happy to be done with the past couple of years. “Most of all, I’m happy to be seeing a year start off with a little bit of enthusiasm, a tiny tinge of optimism, and a sense that we’ve weathered the worse,” one broker outlined. “From that perspective, it all looks better for 2012 – better than 2011, at least, if not better than 2008. Better than 2008? Who knows if that will ever happen.” But a few gains here, a few more there; a steady return to economic and employment growth… it’s all got to help. Said Wyndham, “I think 2012 will be a positive year overall. Slow and steady wins the race (and) it is still a good time to buy. If you are waiting to sell, it may be a while before prices recover much more than they have (save, again, for newer, large cabin business jets).” As for depending on a return to profitability to spur a major up-tick in jet sales, you shouldn’t hold your breath, according to most.

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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FINANCE & LEASE

How To Survive An IRS Audit Failure to elect grouping of aircraft company & operating company. by Jonathan Levy here are many valid business reasons to separate aircraft ownership from the operating companies it serves. These often include liability protection, ownership differences and managerial issues to name a few. Although it is often beneficial to segregate ownership for non-tax reasons, it is important to avoid inadvertently causing the aircraft entity to be treated on a “stand-alone” basis for passive activity income tax purposes. Simply stated, a loss from a passive activity usually cannot be used to offset income from other sources. Fortunately, the law recognized that business reasons might dictate separation and provides that a taxpayer may group his various activities for passive activity purposes. Prior to this year, the law did not mandate making a specific grouping disclosure on your tax return but recognized taxpayers’ ability to group. Starting in 2011, individuals were required to comply with new disclosure rules for specifying their trade-or-business “activities,” and how their various companies group together to perform those activities. For individuals who use multiple companies in conjunction to carry out a single activity, failure to properly disclose may lead each company to be viewed as separate, which will likely negatively impact the ability to utilize loss deductions to reduce their personal tax liability.

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DEFINING AN “ACTIVITY” A rule of thumb to understand what is meant by a trade-or-business activity is to ask how someone might answer the question, “What business are you in?” A given person might answer with a single activity (e.g., “I sell cars” or “I practice medicine”), or by listing multiple activities (e.g., “I practice law and I also teach piano lessons”), or even with zero activities (e.g., “I’m retired”).

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The answer does not relate to whether the activity is carried out through a business entity (LLC or corporation), or conducted personally. A single activity may be spread out across many business entities and, likewise, a single entity could be involved in multiple activities. The first step to making a proper disclosure is to identify the activities the individual is engaged in, and what companies (if any) each activity is performed through. Companies may be included in this picture if they are taxed as (1) S corporations, (2) partnerships, (3) certain C corporations,1 or (4) as part of your individual return (e.g., Schedule C). Each person who owns (directly or indirectly) a stake in an aircraft used to support another trade or business should determine if it is beneficial to group the activities, and if so make an affirmative election to do so in their www.AvBuyer.com

2011 and subsequent individual returns. Groupings that were in place prior to 2011 do not need to be disclosed. This means that if you were undertaking an activity through a particular set of companies prior to 2011, they need not be disclosed to the IRS. Any change to the grouping—e.g., addition or removal of a component—that occurs during or after 2011 does need to be disclosed. The test for whether grouping is appropriate is whether the total group makes up a logical economic unit for measurement of gain or loss. The main factors are (1) similarities and differences in the types of trade or business grouped, (2) the extent of common ownership and control, (3) the similarity in geographical location, and (4) interdependence between the grouped entities. Many companies have numerous ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


2014 BBJ S/N TBD

1986 G-lll S/N N 485

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Please allow us to match you y with the perfect aircraft air craft for your needs and d budget. We We look forward forward to your phone ca callll or email inquiry. inquiryy.

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FINANCE & LEASE addresses that can be truthfully provided as their business address. Where possible, it makes sense to list the same address for multiple members of a group. As to the “similarity” test, do not be unduly concerned that this prevents grouping of an aircraft entity with another company so long as the aircraft is used to support that company. Case law is quite favorable on this issue.

THE EFFECTS OF GROUPING Two main results flow from the decision to group or not group activities. The first impact is whether components of the aggregated activity is “active” or “passive” for tax purposes. If a passive activity generates losses, those losses cannot be used to offset other active income until the passive activity is disposed of, at which time the unused losses become active. A trade-or-business activity can become passive as to an individual in either of two ways. It is passive if (1) it is a “rental” activity (as specifically defined in the rules) or (2) the individual does not “materially participate” in the activity (special tests apply, which are generally based on the amount of time the individual devotes to the activity). Grouping can affect both “rental” characterization and material participation. Take, for example, two companies that are both owned by an individual (a physician), but that are taxed as separate taxpayers. One of the companies owns an aircraft which it rents to the other company (the medical practice) for use in that company’s business. If the two companies are viewed separately, then one is involved in an active medical practice, while the other is a rental business. All rental businesses are passive (except for certain real estate rental), which would make the aircraft business passive. On the other hand, if the two companies are grouped together, then the aggregate formed by the two of them is in the medical business (with the aircraft company simply providing support for the other company). As a result, the aggregate is probably active. One important caveat to add is that, if either of the two companies is a C corporation, then the aircraft company will still be viewed as being in the rental business and still passive—grouping will not impact the rental issue. Grouping in this case would also affect the material participation test. Perhaps the owner spends 2,000 hours per year working in the medical practice, but only 100 hours per year in the aircraft company. If the two are viewed as separate, the 100 hours may not be enough to consider the individual as materially participating in the aircraft company. In this case, the individual would be passive as to the aircraft company (due to lack of material participation). On the

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

other hand, if the two are grouped, then the owner would be viewed as spending 2,100 hours in the collective activity, which would be enough to show material participation. The power of grouping is that it can convert an aircraft company that, viewed in isolation would be passive, into an active business through grouping with another active business. However, there are also some risks. If the aircraft is in a situation where it would otherwise be active, but it is grouped with a passive business (real estate rental is a likely contender) that could convert the aircraft from active to passive. A further negative effect is that, if the aircraft is determined to be passive, then it is beneficial for the aircraft to be viewed

separately, not as part of another grouped activity. This is because, when you “dispose of the activity,” any previously unused passive losses are converted to active and can be used against your other income. However, by broadly grouping with aircraft it becomes more difficult to dispose of the activity—i.e., it may require more than simply selling the aircraft. This is a further reason to avoid grouping the aircraft company with any passive activities. Although most aircraft owners will find it beneficial to group for passive activity purposes, obviously that is not always the case. The new disclosure requirements mandate that those who fail to disclose new groupings will almost certainly have each entity viewed separately. Every aircraft operator who has an opportunity to group should make a careful decision on the matter, not an election to separate by default. For a suggested form for the election please visit www.advocatetax.com.

www.AvBuyer.com

The power of grouping is that it can convert an aircraft company that, viewed in isolation would be passive, into an active business through grouping with another active business.

FOOTNOTE: 1. A C corporation qualifies if it is either closely held or a personal services corporation. For this purpose, a corporation is “closely held” if at any time during the last half of the taxable year more than 50 percent in value of its outstanding stock was owned, directly or indirectly, by or for not more than five individuals. For this purpose, an individual is deemed to own shares owned by certain family members and related companies, and certain trusts, groups of trusts, and foundations are counted as “individuals.” The definition of a personal services corporation is complex, but generally relates to a C corporation for which the principal activity is performance of services that are substantially performed by employee-owners.

❯ Jonathan Levy, Esq. is Legal Director, Advocate Consulting Legal Group, PLLC. Advocate Consulting Legal Group, PLLC is a law firm whose practice is limited to serving the needs of aircraft owners and operators relating to issues of income tax, sales tax, federal aviation regulations, and other related organizational and operational issues. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BOMBARDIER BUSINESS AIRCRAFT & SIKORSKY REPRESENTATIVE

Airframe T.T: 3455 hrs Engines enrolled on CSP

SN: 161

BOMBARDIER: LEARJET 31A - year 1998

SN: 167

Landings: 2943 EU OPS1 Certified

HAWKER: 900XP - year 2008

Airframe T.T: 649 hrs (at Dec. 2010) Avionics: Collins Pro Line 21

SN: HA-56

Landings: 576 Engines & APU on MSP

BOMBARDIER: LEARJET 60XR - year 2010

Airframe T.T: 75 hrs Landings: 57

2001 FA LCO N 2000

SN: 387

Avionics: Collins Pro Line 21 EFIS RVSM compliant

Airframe T.T: 4292 hrs Landings: 4601

Engines: Honeywell TFE731-2-3B Honeywell MSP program

BOMBARDIER: LEARJET 40 - year 2005

Airframe T.T: 1818 hrs Landings: 1234

Engines: Honeywell TFE731-20AR-1B Airframe parts Program: Smart Parts

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REGIONAL SALES & USE TAX FORUM

Regional Sales And Use Tax Forum Update on the Southeastern United States. by Christopher B. Younger his column is the second installment in the fourth annual series of quarterly columns describing recent changes to aviation-related state sales and use tax issues and, where pertinent, other aviation related tax issues in various regions of the United States. As was the case with the last series of quarterly columns, we focus on a particular region of the United States each quarter – namely the Northeastern, Southeastern, Midwestern and Western States. In this month’s column, we review any recent changes to state sales and use taxes in the states located in the Southeastern region of the United States; namely Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Additionally, we will discuss whether or not each state has an exemption from its sales and use tax for casual, isolated or occasional sales of aircraft. An exemption for casual, isolated or occasional sales of aircraft typically permits a buyer of a used aircraft to take delivery of, and/or use such aircraft in a state with such an exemption without paying that state’s sales or use tax provided that the

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

specific conditions of the exemption are met. Those conditions, which vary from state to state, typically require that either or both of the seller and buyer not be habitually engaged in the sale of aircraft or, in some instances, of any tangible personal property, that the seller and buyer be affiliated business entities or, in the case of individual buyers and sellers, that they have a certain family relationship with one another. Following is a summary of aviation-related sales and use taxes within the individual states along with details of any changes introduced - or due - within said state.

ALABAMA With respect to sales of aircraft, Alabama has a state-wide general sales tax of 2%, plus potential additional local taxes, which can amount to a combined total sales/use tax of up to 5%. Although Alabama has an exemption from its sales and use taxes for the casual or isolated sale of tangible personal property by persons not engaged in the business of selling, the exemption does not apply to the sale of aircraft. Aircraft are considered a type of motor vehicle that is taxed at a special 2% www.AvBuyer.com

rate, plus authorized municipal or county sales taxes.

ARKANSAS Arkansas has a state-wide general sales tax of 6%, plus potential additional local taxes, which can amount to a combined total sales/use tax of up to 11%. Counties and municipalities may only assess their sales tax on the first $2,500 of gross receipts for the sale of an aircraft. State sales tax is not due if the total gross receipts or gross proceeds from the sale of an aircraft is less than $2,000. The border city of Texarkana imposes a special tax rate of 7%, which consists of the state rate (6%) plus an additional 1%. Sales of aircraft are specifically excluded from the Arkansas exemption for occasional sales of tangible personal property.

FLORIDA All aircraft sold and/or delivered in Florida are subject to Florida's 6% sales tax unless the transaction is specifically exempted by law. Furthermore, if the aircraft is delivered into a county that imposes a discretionary sales sur❯ tax, then dealers must also collect this tax. Aircraft Index see Page 4


AL NG DE DI N PE


REGIONAL SALES & USE TAX FORUM

However, discretionary sales surtax applies only to the first $5,000 of the aircraft purchase price. Sales of aircraft are specifically excluded from the Florida exemption for isolated sales of tangible personal property.

GEORGIA Georgia has a state-wide general sales tax of 4%, plus potential additional local taxes, which can amount to a combined total sales/use tax of up to 8%. The Georgia exemption for casual sales of tangible personal property is limited to $500 of total sales by a seller in a twelve month period and is therefore unlikely to apply to the purchase and sale of most aircraft.

KENTUCKY Kentucky imposes state-wide sales/use tax at a 6% rate. Kentucky exempts from its sales tax occasional sales in Kentucky of aircraft and from its use tax the storage, use, or other consumption in Kentucky of aircraft transferred to the purchaser by means of an ‘occasional sale’. The term ‘occasional sale’ includes a sale of tangible personal property not held or used by a seller in the course of an activity for which a Kentucky seller's permit is required. A seller qualifies as a ‘retailer’ requiring a permit when the seller makes more than two retail sales during any 12-month period.

LOUISIANA Louisiana imposes a state-wide sales/use tax rate of 4% on aircraft, plus additional local (parish) taxes that can be nearly equal to the state rate. Louisiana exempts from its sales and use tax occasional or isolated sales of aircraft. The exemption of such sales depends upon whether the seller is in the business, or holds itself out to be in the business, of selling tangible personal property.

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MISSISSIPPI

VIRGINIA

Mississippi imposes a statewide sales/use tax rate of 3% on aircraft purchases. Although Mississippi has an exemption from its sales and use taxes for occasional sales of tangible personal property, the exemption does not apply to the sale of aircraft. Aircraft are considered a type of motor vehicle that is taxed at a special 3% rate.

Virginia imposes a special 2% aircraft sales and use tax on aircraft purchases, and aircraft required to be registered in Virginia. Occasional sales of aircraft are not exempt from the Virginia aircraft sales and use tax.

NORTH CAROLINA Sales at retail of aircraft, including all accessories attached when the purchaser takes delivery of its aircraft, are subject to sales tax at a rate of 3%, with a maximum $1,500 tax. Sales of aircraft are not subject to North Carolina local sales tax. Sales of aircraft by individuals or other sellers that are not engaged in the business of selling aircraft constitute occasional or isolated sales and are not subject to North Carolina sales or use tax.

SOUTH CAROLINA South Carolina imposes a statewide sales and use tax rate of 5% on aircraft purchases with a maximum tax of $300. Casual or isolated sales of aircraft by persons not engaged in the business of selling at retail are not taxable.

TENNESSEE The state-wide Tennessee sales and use tax rate is 7%, plus 2.75% of the sales price in excess of $1,600 and up to $3,200. Additionally, local sales/use tax rates of between 1.5–2.75% also apply to the purchase. Although Tennessee exempts occasional and isolated sales of tangible personal property from its sales and use tax, the exemption does not apply to occasional sales of aircraft. However, sales of aircraft between married persons, lineal relatives, spouses of lineal relatives, or siblings are excluded from taxation. www.AvBuyer.com

In concluding this month’s Regional Sales & Use Tax Forum, you are advised to keep in mind that the above serves as a general and broad overview of state sales and use tax laws and does not constitute legal advice or a legal opinion. Therefore, it is always advisable to consult with qualified aviation counsel when considering any questions regarding the application of sales and use tax in a particular situation, or to a particular transaction. In the April 2012 Issue of World Aircraft Sales Magazine, we will take a state-by-state look at the Midwestern United States, including Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin. ❯ Christopher B. Younger is a member of the Business Aircraft Group at GKG Law, P.C. He is a tax and FAA specialist concentrating in the areas of corporate aircraft transactions and aviation taxation. ❯ Mr. Younger can be reached at the firm’s Washington, DC office, 1054 31st Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20007, telephone: (202) 342-5295, facsimile: (202) 342-5203, e-mail: cyounger@gkglaw.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


TEN QUESTIONS FOR MATT ZUCCARO

HAI Lifts Out Of Ground Effect Zuccaro offers his perspectives. by Dave Higdon il platform support; environmental protection; executive transport and personal flying: Helicopters, arguably more than any other element, embrace the broadest spectrum of General Aviation operations (over 50 different helicopter mission types exist overall, according to Matt Zuccaro). Possibly this is simply because no fixed-wing aircraft can match the flexibility of the rotor-wing flying machines. Zuccaro, president of the Helicopter Association International (HAI), brings far more than association-management or lobbying experience to HAI. With nearly 40 years experience flying helicopters in the mid-Atlantic region; operating aviation businesses flying; and maintaining and servicing helicopters, Zuccaro understands rotorcraft from the hover up. When you look at HAI, its make-up - its membership base and its level of involvement - no other aviation association is as narrow or as broad at one time. This is a most-diverse, yet most-focused aviation organization, and later this month it gathers for what Zuccaro rightly describes as “the largest trade event for helicopters in the world,” to which 60 to 65 helicopters and more than 18,000 attendees are expected to flock. Heli-Expo 2012 will run from February 11-14 at the Dallas Convention Center, the home of many past successful Heli-Expos. Before Zuccaro was drawn away for more advance work on Heli-Expo, World Aircraft Sales Magazine prevailed on him for a timely Ten Questions Interview.

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MATT ZUCCARO, PRESIDENT, HAI

WAS: The words “down” or “flat” seem the mostcommon business denominators for most of General Aviation, whether FAR 91 ops or the on-demand commercial segments of fixed-wing aviation going back three years now and counting. What’s the business experience been like within the helicopter community? Zuccaro: I think in general, on a comparative basis, we’ve performed much better. One reason is the diversity of the vehicle itself and the 55-plus missions it can perform. It’s easier for helicopter operators to re-purpose their aircraft into other lines of business. What I mean is if you’ve got a fixed-wing charter and fuel goes up and business goes down you’re pretty much a victim of those conditions. But if you’re doing, say, helicopter tourism, you can take that same aircraft and instantly do other things: aerial photography, geographical survey, personnel transport, power line patrol and such. That ability, that flexibility, tends to minimize the impact for the helicopter. That said, not every area has gotten by without impact. There are four areas we’ve seen downturns in. Corporate aviation is one of the four core areas; as business goes up and down, so goes corporate helicopter use like the fixed-wing segment. Tourism flying has suffered because of international tourism being down… Publicaircraft - with communities having less money, reduced funds for police or firefighting - have cut back or delayed orders for new helicopters, or changed lift to piston from turbine helicopters. And the Electronic News Gather (ENG) segment has been hit. There it was a matter of insufficient straight ad www.AvBuyer.com

dollars to support ENG versus the options – and the options are pooled aircraft agreements among stations. The good news is that all four segments seem to be showing some gains again. Tourism is gaining, corporate flying is gaining; public service is still struggling against public budgets; and ENG, pooling and downgrading has helped. Looking forward, I think everything is pretty promising.

WAS: As an Association built around helicopters, do you find much tension between the various memberships; between the end-users and the companies who make the aircraft and systems – or is the integration so solid it serves up only benefits? Zuccaro: It’s not perfect, but in a general slate of issues there is consensus among the stakeholders. Everybody agrees on safety; and the other is operating costs and the economy of helicopters. We all work to create an environment that gives us the freedom to operate in the airspace as we need, too. Do we have tensions? Of course we do. But that’s part of what we deal with. At HAI, we view ourselves as a leader and organizer around the primary issues; in other areas we try to serve as facilitator to bring all the sides together and look for the solution that supports the common good. WAS: For much of aviation’s history the United States held the position of dominant market, a designation that’s been shifting to other markets for fixed-wing aircraft. Is the helicopter market experiencing a similar shift these days? Aircraft Index see Page 4


                                                                         


TEN QUESTIONS FOR MATT ZUCCARO Zuccaro: It’s a global economy and a global market - there’s no doubt about that. There are overseas manufacturers that have established their markets and penetrate here, and the same can be said for the U.S. manufacturers, selling all around the world. I don’t think anybody’s got a lock on anything – it’s a fair, competitive, global market.

WAS: While we’re still looking at market changes, China and India seem to hold the most attention both for their huge potential and for their concerted efforts to accelerate the development of private aviation. Are helicopters finding a place in these two potentially explosive developing markets? Zuccaro: I think those are true – and I might add that South America is seeing gains. It’s an extremely aggressive market in South America, and its growing. The only thing constraining the markets in India and China is the pace their governments have set in opening the airspace for operations. I think it’s probably one of the most exciting times there, and both nations need helicopters for the unique capabilities they bring. The nations do need to prepare for the helicopters with technicians to maintain them, instructors and pilots, and infrastructure support to have that growth happen in a constructive and productive manner. We have been to India and are intent on returning to India to support our affiliates there. South America is another region with rapid growth and a high level of activity; the lack of infrastructure actually promotes the use of helicopters.

WAS: With more than 3,100 members among the operators, pilots and suppliers engaged in what you’ve said are more than 55 types of operations, is there a segment that most frequently drives HAI’s engagement with governments?

South America is another region with rapid growth and a high level of activity; the lack of infrastructure actually promotes the use of helicopters.

Zuccaro: We’ve got six classes of membership

WAS: What could commercial application of

and the major one is the operators themselves, then the associate members – manufacturers and suppliers and such – then the pilots, the maintenance techs and the students. The big drivers are the operators themselves because they are impacted most by local constraints and regulations. That’s what drives us most in our government relations work. We also take into account similar problems the manufacturers have dealing with regulations in their attempts to service the pilots. We find issues at times effecting pilots and maintenance techs, and we work to make sure the climate is suitable for our students. But there’s no doubt: what drives us most is probably the operators. It’s not as though we’re just dealing with these issues domestically; we’re international and deal with similar issues all across the world.

advances in tilt-rotor technology and Sikorsky’s recent success in breaking into the 250-knot realm mean for the helicopter community, operationally and business-wise?

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low-altitude infrastructure to fly point-inspace IFR approaches. That enhances everything we do, particularly emergency medical flights and searchand-rescue. We expect the civilian version of tilt rotor in the next couple of years and it should bring home many of these benefits.

Zuccaro: We’re trying to preserve the vertical lift capability of the helicopter, but give it the capabilities in speed and lift of fixed-wing aircraft of similar cabin size. You have the tilt-rotor technology already in place and other developments ongoing. All aim at the same things: increased range, increased speed, increased payload – and the ability to be treated the same in IFR as fixed-wing aircraft in the transition. But we want to be able to do that away from airports. We’ve established low-level IFR routes. We have medical operators that have established their own IFR infrastructure, but we want the federal government to recognize this importance and develop the www.AvBuyer.com

WAS: Two years ago a technological revolution arrived in the Gulf of Mexico when a large percentage of the region’s helicopters became visible to Houston Center controllers via ADS-B. The helicopter community, operators, suppliers and HAI, all played a huge role in creating the ground-based infrastructure needed to make this a reality. What’s been the experience of ADS-B in the Gulf since? Zuccaro: The scenario you had before was no infrastructure in the Gulf. Houston Center couldn’t see anyone; the operators had all that investment in all of that infrastructure, and the lift that they couldn’t effectively use in IMC. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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TEN QUESTIONS FOR MATT ZUCCARO Houston couldn’t see IFR flights so they’d block out airspace for IFR flights that on a bad day could shut down 90 percent of normal operations. And then you had the safety of the individual flights with no ability to track them much off shore. FAA and HAI signed a letter of agreement to work together with the operators and energy producer. The deal was that the FAA build the network; the off-shore operators give free lift for personnel to get out to the platforms; the platform owners themselves give free space for the ADS-B equipment that needs to go into service. The result was Houston’s ability to see all the way out into the Gulf and the ability to communicate out there. Now it typically takes about 15 minutes to get an IFR clearance for a flight between shore and platform. Another note – without inferring a direct causal connection: ADS-B started in the Gulf in January 2010; in 2010, the offshore operators in the Gulf had no reportable accidents. The operators are adding ADS-B equipment to more of their aircraft; we view the next phase of this ADS-B revolution as trying to get this level of service and equipment for EMS helicopters, so they can leave a hospital IMC and en route they can take the terrain information and create a non-precision approach to that needed site, then reverse the process back to the hospital IMC. I’ve got someone that can do that with software already.

WAS: Following up, with elements of the fixedwing communities not yet come to grips with its potential and, especially, its apparent inevitability, what could the fixed-wing community learn from the experiences of off-shore helicopters with ADS-B? Zuccaro: We have different needs and we expect different results. We were starting in the Gulf from a point where we had nothing. The fixed-wing community is starting with a worldwide system in place for IFR. The gains you can expect will be smaller. The other difference is the gains they look for are primarily economic - saving fuel with more-direct routing and approaches, as well as moving more traffic. UPS is using ADS-B successfully in Louisville (Kentucky) and they’re increasing capacity with it. The bottleneck in general is runways. Infrastructure is limited; airport acceptance rate and the availability of gates have to be addressed for the full benefits of ADS-B to be experienced in fixed-wing aviation among the commercial operators.

lic agencies. What brought these concerns to the point of inspiring the NTSB hearing and to your call for a working group to focus on the issues?

Zuccaro: I think it was a result of the accident investigation of the S-61 operating for the Forest Service where the NTSB could not determine who had operational control and who had responsibility for maintenance of that aircraft. The FAA admitted it doesn’t have a precise definition of public aircraft to apply and that it doesn’t do oversight of public aircraft. The NTSB is not comfortable with the results of that inquiry and not knowing who’s in charge and who’s looking out for the maintenance. We at HAI decided to reach out and start this working group when we saw that the regulatory agencies weren’t interested in doing so. The first meeting is at HAI and we hope to make some progress from this process. The commercial operators are in the middle of this cloud – the public aircraft are exempt but they can hire commercial operators to fly for them and declare them public aircraft for the purposes of maintenance and surveillance.

theaters of Vietnam; and your hold instructors’ ratings for both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. What aspect of vertical flight holds such appeal that helicopters came to dominate your career and lead you to the HAI post?

Zuccaro: The ability to have a varied operating environment. One day you could be landing on somebody’s roof or a marine pier, and the next day shooting an approach to JFK. With all those missions, the helicopter does a tremendous amount of public good. And there are so many things you can do that you can’t do in a fixed-wing aircraft. For example, when I flew for the Port Authority (of New York & New Jersey) I got to fly the test landings at the helipad on top of the World Trade Center, the highest helipad in the world at the time… how many fixedwing pilots get to do that? Coming out of the military with a lot of helicopter experience and some fixed-wing experience, this seemed the right way to go. But don’t get me wrong; I enjoy every minute of instructing and flying fixed-wing. The professionalism and challenges are very similar.

❯ More information from www.rotor.org

WAS: In a recent presentation to the NTSB you added significant weight to the discussion about public-use aircraft, their oversight and the lines separating their regulation and the regulation of non-public contractors who provide the lift for pub-

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WAS: You have nearly 40 years of experience in the private sector flying the airways of the Northeast Corridor and New York City; you have time flying helicopters under fire in the combat www.AvBuyer.com

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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2012 Outlook: Your guess is as good as mine! by David Wyndham ust before Christmas I had my biannual eye exam. I started needing readers a year or so ago. My distance vision remains a solid 20/17. (I'm the guy in the restaurant holding the menu at arm's length). While my distance vision would be helpful in the cockpit to look for traffic, things do not seem too clear when I look into 2012. The economic news in 2011 was decidedly mixed. The economy as a whole saw some improvement. Of significant note is that US manufacturing activity hit a six-month high in December and recorded its 29th consecutive month of growth. Along with that, corporate profits hit all-time highs in 2010 and into 2011. As an example, General Electric posted worldwide profits of $14.2 billion and JP Morgan Chase profits rose 47% this year to $4.8 billion. Retail sales this past Holiday season were also up, indicating consumers are willing (and able) to spend more than last year. Not all is rosy, however. Unemployment is still too high. The US housing market is still in a decline, despite the increased spending on construction. US GDP is still sluggish (with under 2% growth estimated for 2011). In Europe, the crisis in Greece and Italy and its resultant stressors on the EuroZone remain high. Asia is not showing as much growth as predicted, although the Middle East seems to be doing well despite the political turmoil. In our industry, aircraft sales were up and the inventory of used models decreased, especially for the high-end turbine market. Fractional sales and charter activity rose overall versus 2010, as did activity at many FBOs and MROs. While aircraft deals are closing, they still take a lot of effort: I've had more than one broker claim that they have never worked so hard to close a deal as they did this past year. Conklin & de Decker saw an increase over 2010, but it was still an up-and-down year. Some weeks we were extremely busy and others, we'd call each other to make sure the phone still worked. We did finish strong and remained profitable thanks to hard work.

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2012? MIXED, BUT POSITIVE…

We expect the large cabin jets to sell well in 2012, but mid-size and smaller jets, not so well. Turboprops look to remain flat for sales. I think the turboprop market will remain flat; not terrible, but not great.

choose, and at very attractive prices. Regarding aircraft built in the last five years the large-cabin jet market is getting tighter, so don't look for any special deals on popular largecabin business jets. On the finance side, cash is still king. The requirements for full financial disclosure, excellent credit and building the relationship with your financial institution remain unchanged. Interest rates remain very reasonable for those who do get financing. Look for some financial institutions to offer specialized types of financing or leasing that fit within their core market. Fuel costs should rise a little (unless Iran gets cranky in the Straights of Hormuz), so fuel costs should be stable this year. We still need more people entering our industry, but I am not sure about the job situation improving a lot. I think 2012 will be a positive year overall. Slow and steady wins the race. It is still a good time to buy. If you are waiting to sell, it may be a while before prices recover much more than they have (save again for newer, large cabin business jets). So, do what you know how to do well, and keep away from magic beans and snake oil salesmen. Show focus and diligence!

The helicopter market is its own unique beast: Much of it is tied into the price of oil. Talk to me after Heli-Expo and I'll let you know what the consensus is there. The helicopter manufacturers seem upbeat as they press forward with new or improved models. Asia in general needs helicopters, and it needs them badly. But, lacking infrastructure and trained pilots, growth in the region will be slow. If you might be in the market for a new aircraft in 2012, I still think that the buyer has the advantage. If you are looking at earlier than mid-1990s for turbine aircraft there are still a lot of aircraft from which to

❯ David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker. The mission of Conklin & de Decker is to furnish the general aviation industry with objective and impartial information in the form of professionally developed and supported products and services, enabling its clients to make more informed decisions when dealing with the purchase and operation of aircraft. With over 1,800 clients in 90 countries around the world, Conklin & de Decker combines aviation experience with proven business practices. ❯ More information from www.conklindd.com; Tel: +1 508 255 5975. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

There is still economic uncertainty, but most economic forecasts point to slow growth in 2012. The US is forecast for about 2.8% growth in GDP. Asia will be leading the growth (China at 9.5% and India 7.8%). Keep an eye on South and Latin America also. Their markets are relatively small, but they have survived quite well through the past few years. With corporate profits up, we should see that translate into some hiring in 2012 and we have already seen more interest in acquiring aircraft. We expect the large cabin jets to sell well in 2012, but mid-size and smaller jets, not so well. Turboprops look to remain flat for sales. I think the turboprop market will remain flat; not terrible, but not great. There are some good aircraft out there for sale and I think selling prices should remain stable. The piston market will be the last to recover, so don't look for any surge in used prices!

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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ELECTION TIME & TFRs

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Presidential Election Year: TFRs to pop-up like dandelions. by Dave Higdon ust when many an operator felt a bit celebratory on hearing that LASP is still weeks, probably months, from release by the TSA, along came a New Year’s reality: 2012 brings with it some extras that American aviators face only on a quadrennial basis: A Presidential election. 2012 does indeed still hold the dubious promise of that long-expected Large Aircraft Security Program (LASP) proposal emerging from the Transportation Security Administration [another event last experienced in 2008], but not before the United States Secret Service (USSS) makes its influence felt in the airspace and at airports across the nation. Unlike the expected LASP proposal, which insiders counsel covers a far-narrower reach than the 2008 proposal, the Secret Service-inspired campaign Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs) impact any and all aircraft with the bad timing to encounter one. Over the following paragraphs, we seek to offer some perspective on what to expect by examining what transpired previously in 2004 and 2008.

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TFR BASICS Veteran pilots are likely to have some experience with TFRs back in the days before they gained their current reputation for wreaking havoc on flight plans and schedules. The FAA used them for decades – but only for special, temporary circumstances: around sites of aerial firefighting; over natural disasters, such as tornado-impact areas and the like. Presidential TFRs also existed – but as much-smaller areas active only when Air Force One was moving, or about to move. Then came the terror attacks of Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

September 11, 2001, and the security forces embraced the TFR for purposes beyond air safety and airspace protection. Starting late in 2001 and advancing through the next couple of years, security officials sought FAA TFRs for a far-broader set of circumstances and encompassing significantly larger swathes of airspace – and for longer periods of time. That’s all well and good as long as aviators know what they face - but early on in this evolution those same security apparatchiks seeking the TFRs resisted efforts to publicize those locations until they went into effect – while still holding responsible any aviators who violated the TFR – even when the TFR was neither known to, nor defined for the pilot. This institutional resistance was applied to both planned and pop-up TFRs, and followed similar thinking as restrictions on over-flying the nation’s nuclear-powered electrical generation plants. While flying over one was a violation, security authorities cited “National Security” justifications for withholding location data from maps and databases. In essence, the federal government was saying, “Don’t go where we won’t tell you that you can’t go.” The efforts of the Aircraft Owners & Pilots Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association and the Experimental Aircraft Association helped inject some common sense into the information side. Ultimately, the FAA even established a TFR resource page – useful for everything TFR except those established after your briefing...and which ATC often didn’t know until the TFR went out. So there’s still little-to-no help from controllers in avoiding those pop-up TFRs! www.AvBuyer.com

2008: PRESIDENT/ PRECEDENTS OF THE USA During his years as the 43rd president, George W. Bush logged 1,020 days on vacation, or observing holiday breaks at one of three recurring locations: his ranch in Crawford County, Texas; the presidential retreat at Camp David, Maryland; or at his parents’ getaway lodge at Kennebunkport, Maine. The TFRs imposed around his movements post-9/11 cut off access to (sometimes) dozens of airports; the impact of all three TFRs effectively grounded general aviation flights at airports within 30 miles, effecting hundreds of operators. The Obama Administration has sought to reduce the impacts [considerable when he’s visiting his home in Chicago] mitigating some, but not all of the issues of access, movement and commerce within the inner no-movement 10-mile ring of these 30-mile TFRs, where outside the inner ring Squawkand-Talk is the rule. Applied over Chicago, that same standard 10-mile diameter inner circle covers about 80 square miles of no-fly airspace with the outer 20-mile ring covering 625 square miles as squawk-and-talk airspace requiring advance notice and special IDs. The total of nearly 710 square miles blankets 21 different Chicago-area airports. In 2008 these 21 airports were home to more than 1,600 based aircraft. So far, President Obama has split his more-conservative vacation days between Chicago, Martha’s Vineyard and his native Hawaii. The decline in vacation days, according to FBO operators, pilots and businesses serving these regions, has been helpful to their financial health - although issues still remain that cut into some of their business volume. So has the USSS’ willingness ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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ELECTION TIME & TFRs that 30-mile ring moved with it and at bus speeds – which wasn’t especially fast. Over the span of the trip the airports impacted by this traveling, snake-like stretch of restricted airspace numbered several score. Staying abreast of the tour’s progress, its stops and starts, proved a challenge for aviators within the region. But again, with past as prologue 2012 means there’s more to come with today’s primary campaigns for the GOP nomination leading to the two parties’ nominating conventions and then through the general-election campaign come fall. Fortunately, pilots and crew don’t have to face the potential violation catalysts alone, though. There’s help aplenty.

WHERE, WHEN, HOW MANY & HOW LONG?

to work toward access within the inner 10mile ring for businesses based within them – again, with issues still remaining that cut into revenues. At best, these stationary, repeat TFRs remain as irritating, confining and devastating as ever for those effected, but they do hold one advantage over the TFRs that travel with the president and vice president (and which will soon also nation-hop with the Republican nominees for those offices); namely their predictability and stability. Regulars flying near or under recurring TFRs have a better chance of recognizing boundaries than aviators flying airspace that becomes one of those traveling TFRs for the campaign - or worse still, one that pops up with little to no advance warning. Note that campaign-related TFRs will be a regular (if not exactly routine) part of life through November 7 – the day after the general election. On that day, two of the four White House contenders will stop qualifying for Secret Service protection and end the TFRs for their daily trips and appearances. If past is prologue, expect scores, maybe hundreds of TFRs to come and go in the ensuing months.

fashioned bus tour spanning three days between August 15-17 - a route stretching a couple hundred miles from Minnesota down the Mississippi through eastern Iowa before wrapping up in northwest Illinois. The 30-mile-wide standard-issue Presidential TFR added the challenge of onagain-off-again mobility to the typical issues of identifying archaic landmark-based definitions that typify the NOTAMs issued for the TFR. When the president’s bus moved,

With the campaign season in full swing, some of the GOP hopefuls will afford themselves of the protections of the U.S. Secret Service, the Treasury Department Agency tasked with protecting presidents, vice presidents and their families. When that happens some of their flights will begin to receive the protection of TFRs. “It’s almost becoming routine with the last three presidential cycles,” explained Bob Lamont, NBAA’s director, air traffic services and infrastructure. “The White House residents have liked to use the airplane a lot.” The big unknown factor is how many GOP candidates will begin to get service – usually a VP-level TFR until nominated Lamont explained. “Once there’s a GOP ❯

THE MOVING PRESIDENTIAL TFR IN EFFECT DURING AUGUST 15-17, 2011

CAMPAIGN-SEASON PRESIDENTIAL TFRs Some pundits and political observers point to August 2011 as the kick-off of the 2012 election campaign. That was the month Republican contenders began flooding into Iowa for the Iowa Straw Poll of mid-month, while the incumbent embarked on an old-

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ELECTION TIME & TFRs nominee, the chances are you’ll see some type of TFR activity around that person for every flight, as well as for their VP candidate.” Four candidates making five, sometimes six or even seven appearances a day for about 90 days could add up to somewhere between 1,500 and 2,000 total campaign TFRs between the end of the nominating conventions and the general election on Tuesday, November 6. Some will be easier to deal with than others. “Moving bus tours are very hazardous for trying to predict when and where they’re going,” Lamont noted, anticipating that there will be further bus tours this campaign season, along with the innumerable number of flights flown with the candidates aboard.

AOPA/NBAA/FAA HELP Thankfully information flow and timeliness have improved over the past several years. AOPA offers TFR information as quickly as any source at its web home, http://www.aopa.org/tfr/. The FAA, meanwhile, has TFR information available through flight service and DUATS-based briefings. “I don’t anticipate any changes in how the government structures TFRs this year,” Lamont stressed, “but I do expect a lot more volatility and a lot more short-notice changes (to TFRs).” NBAA, in anticipation of more campaign-flying than ever, plans to up the ante on its assistance, Lamont explained. “We’ll be setting up a new webpage on our home site to detail TFRs on a live basis,” he said. NBAA wants the page to serve as a one-stop source with the most-current information, along with tips and tricks for dealing with what’s likely to be numerous daily TFRs. “The TFR page will be a bit more proactive than our airspace alerts that we push to subscribers,” he offered. “We’re tinkering with the possibility of having a separate space for dealing with getting TFR information ‘pushed’ out to members.” The ‘push’ would use e-mail and alerts to smartphones and tablets. While not yet active, the page will provide detailed information on location, size, height and time through a plain-language translation of the FAA’s Notice to Airmen activating the TFR, Lamont said. Look for it later this year at

passes without news of one or more infractions – infractions that generally incur an aerial escort to an airport convenient for the authorities to check out the violator. The ultimate penalty can be a shootdown, if authorities fail in their efforts to contact the pilot and they determine the encroaching aircraft is a true threat. Thankfully, this penalty has yet to be invoked. Other penalties have occurred, however, ranging from hours of uncomfortable questioning, to actual enforcement actions by the FAA for violating the TFR. Most violations to date proved to be innocent mistakes by ill-informed pilots – but there were instances in which the ultimate action was being contemplated… In most cases the subject aircraft is escorted to a landing spot – sometimes of its own picking – where authorities will detain, interview and act on the pilot’s action…usually a warning and a good scare. Either way, it’s not the way to impress the folks in the back cabin, and is a huge hit on time and schedules. We conclude by noting that the smart step in preparing for even routine flights during this period is to have a resource card outlining Intercept Procedures to hand. AOPA’s Air Safety Institute offers a useful print-your-own version at the following address: http://www.aopa.org/asf/publications/intercept.pdf. ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

PRESIDENTIAL TFRs VS OTHER TFRs As pointed out by Bob Lamont, NBAA’s director, air traffic services and infrastructure, TFRs come in several flavors, with the Presidential and Vice Presidential TFRs differing significantly, as set out in FAR 91.141 and its subparts. FAR 91.137 sets out the authorities and definitions of TFRs for other concerns, such as natural disasters, relief and recovery flights, and sporting events such as the Super Bowl. Each of these can have its own definitions and own size issues that vary according to the individual circumstances. The VIP or Presidential TFR version is always 30 miles in diameter with an inner ring 10 miles across and up to FL180. The outer 20-mile ring is accessible to pilots willing to comply with the requirements set by the USSS and administered by the FAA and TSA. In some instances the inner 10 miles is also accessible, but only through a preparatory stop so security agents can conduct their special screening of the aircraft and its passengers before it heads to the inner ring – squawking a specially assigned transponder code. Vice-Presidential TFRs, meantime, are generally only three miles across with access restricted below 3,000 feet.

www.nbaa.org/ops/airspace/alerts.

PENALTIES OF TFR PENETRATION Pilots are required to take special steps to traverse the outer 20-mile rings of TFRs, to transit the National Capital Region’s restricted airspace, and other restricted areas of varying size – such as the P-40 zone over Camp David. Yet hardly a month

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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SAFETY MATTERS - CFIT ALERT

CFIT Alert: The tricks that trip-up trips. by Dave Higdon o pilot should get caught between the ‘rock’ of a sense of urgency and the ‘hard place’ of terrain while trying to save a few minutes of time by avoiding airspace or a clearance. That ‘get home at all costs’ attitude is a close cousin to the Homesick Angel Syndrome covered previously in these pages, and is the motivating force behind too many pilots’ decisions to press ahead with a flight, or corner-cutting action mid-flight when all of

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their professional instincts scream “STOP!” This month, we focus on those accidents in which pilots fly themselves into terrain – under control… normal-flight accidents that belie any claims of complete preparation. These pilots fulfilled most of their pre-flight information needs: weather; fuel load and other obvious operational requirements – weight, balance, route and more… The hapless subjects of the following case studies all knew the route’s heading, the needed course to arrive at a specified latiwww.AvBuyer.com

tude and longitude. Yet in each of our examples the crew failed to fully appreciate the third dimension of their preferred route: altitude. CFIT (Controlled Flight Into Terrain), is among a pilot’s oldest nemeses. In each illustrative case highlighted here, the terrain might easily have been avoided by spending a few minutes more time – waiting on a clearance, deviating to avoid the terrain, or climbing more aggressively. CFIT accidents such as these occurred because of human Aircraft Index see Page 4


Viewed in perspective, the flight was already more than 90 minutes late; the 10-15 minutes needed to depart with the clearance in hand would have been inconsequential in the larger scope of the planned travel.

available, but only if heeded by the human side of the man-machine interface. If these sound like events you’d expect of low-time pilots, history suggests that even the best go astray this way. In all three cases featured here, our flight crews were all highly experienced and properly equipped for their flights – all were night flights in areas of rapid changes in terrain elevation. Frustratingly, these accidents continue to happen – and too often. It doesn’t have to be this way; indeed, it shouldn’t be this way. Take note of the lessons in these following examples. They point toward practices that can preclude CFIT accidents.

EXAMPLE 1: LAST STAND FOR A COUNTRY BAND

issues, not technological failures or lack of information that would have otherwise made a difference. In the newest of our three following examples the cockpit offered technology that could have warned the crew of their impending encounter with terrain; in the oldest of our examples, earlier versions of today’s advanced Terrain Avoidance and Warning System technologies was on-board. Irrespective, the details illuminate an important detail: Technology can help if Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Country music star Reba McEntire played before a packed house on the evening prior to March 15. The after-concert activities stretched longer than the time planned for by the crew of the Hawker Siddeley 125 the band was using. As part of the original planning for the post-show flight with McEntire’s manger and seven band members, the flight crew repositioned the HS-125 to Brown Field from Lindbergh Field to avoid being trapped by a curfew at Lindbergh. Subsequently the pilot filed an IFR flight plan with an expected launch time of midnight local time. The pilot also received an oral briefing of the instrument departure procedure planned for the flight since he lacked a printed copy of the SID. In the greater scheme of General Aviation, departure times are necessarily flexible, to fit the needs of the people using the airplane. In this case the departure time bent backward – to after 1:00a.m. local time. With the original midnight departure long past, that original flight plan “clocked out” and was no longer available when the crew sought the clearance. www.AvBuyer.com

The pilot opted to depart VFR on a northeast routing and pick up the nowunavailable IFR clearance. The flight eventually departed at 1:41a.m. local time on a northeast heading, after the pilot asked the briefer about the viability of clearing terrain while staying below the 3,500-foot floor of the San Diego Terminal Control Area (TCA, now Class B airspace) and clear of the mountains at 3,000. Thinking the pilot meant 3,000agl, the briefer agreed it would keep the flight clear of terrain; the flight would need ATC clearance from San Diego Departure to transit the TCA. Having found no IFR flight plan, the controller was focused on re-entering the flight plan data taken orally from the flight crew. Moments after departure the HS-125 struck a mountainside at 3,300msl; the flight was barely eight nautical miles from the airport. In contrast with the carpet of metropolitan-city lights of San Diego, the mountains opposite the coast are, in general, as black a hole as the ocean on a moonless night. It’s unlikely the crew ever saw the mountain. Viewed in perspective, the flight was already more than 90 minutes late; the 10-15 minutes needed to depart with the clearance in hand would have been inconsequential in the larger scope of the planned travel. It’s highly likely that waiting on the process of re-filing the plan and the clearance before departure, and using the planned SID filed for the trip, would have kept the Hawker well clear of those mountains. McEntire’s manager, seven band members and the crew of two on the flight deck, would not have suffered the CFIT accident. Reba McEntire’s 1991 tour ended that night. She continues to tour today, but only because she wasn’t on that plane, that night. ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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SAFETY MATTERS CFIT ALERT EXAMPLE 2: CIVIL AIR PATROL FLIGHT AND THE MOUNTAIN Two highly experienced former air-transport pilots were flying a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Cessna T182T on a night cross-country flight across a region with which both were familiar through years of living and flying there. The year-old Turbo Skylane sported a Garmin G1000 with - the NTSB report noted - a “Terrain Proximity Page” on the Multifunction Display (MFD) providing the pilot with terrain elevation relative to the airplane's altitude, current aircraft location, range-marking rings, a heading box and obstacles. Yet, the report noted, the airplane lacked the Garmin TAWS option. With more than 25,000 hours of flight time, the PIC had also completed G1000 training for the CAP airplane; the rightseater, with 28,000 hours, had not completed the G1000 training. Nevertheless, both had flown extensively throughout the region and should have been very familiar with the mountains just west of Las Vegas. After departing North Las Vegas Airport (VGT) the crew kept the aircraft low to avoid requirements to obtain a clearance to enter the McCarran Class Bravo and turned southwest before starting to climb from 2,800 once out from under the Bravo – but they kept the climb shallow to remain below its outer rings. Between 1905:29 local time and the loss of radar contact at 1917:29 the airplane covered nearly 30 miles while climbing barely 4,500 feet to just above 7,000msl. Law enforcement officers and other witnesses saw a fireball on Mount Potosi, about 1,000 feet below its peak at 8,514msl. While this crew filed and opened a VFR flight plan for the trip to Rosamond Skypark in California’s Antelope Valley, the crew’s cruise-climb configuration kept their ascent at less than an average of 400fpm. The decision to avoid seeking Bravo Clearance so as to keep the T182T below the Las Vegas Class B until well along the journey, along with the shallow climb conspired to create a CFIT outcome fatal to both of the seasoned aviators. As history would have it, Mt. Potosi is in fact the site of another CFIT accident from 55 years earlier. On that occasion a DC-3 crash killed actress Carole Lombard (33), her mother, her press agent, and 19 other people. That Trans Continental & Western DC-3 was returning the passengers to Los Angeles from a war-bond promotion tour when it clipped a rocky ledge on Mt. Potosi, flipped into the face of a cliff and exploded.

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The decision to avoid seeking Bravo Clearance...along with the shallow climb conspired to create a CFIT outcome

EXAMPLE 3: SUPERSTITION MOUNTAIN VS COMMANDER Finally we highlight a recent CFIT disaster involving a Rockwell 690A Turbo Commander. Turbo Commanders possess the capability to climb steeply at good speed – and good high-elevation performance – and go high and fast. With two experienced aviators on board this particular Turbo Commander (owned by the FAR Part 135 company that the two pilots headed) along with their A&P maintenance technician and the pilot’s three small children, the flight out of Mesa, Arizona’s Falcon Field (FFZ) took up the direct heading to its destination, Safford Regional Airport (SAD) in Safford, Arizona. FARs dictate a basic TAWS system for a www.AvBuyer.com

turbine twin such as this, but with only the Class B system required it’s unlikely to have helped here; Class B systems generally offer only Mode 1 and Mode 3 warnings – both of them descent-based; TAWS A, with the addition of Mode 2 and Mode 4 warnings, would have offered the look-forward capability needed to warn of high terrain ahead and impending terrain collision. The expected flight time was about 45 minutes. Taking a dog-leg route around the highest terrain would have still kept the flight at under 50 minutes. Realistically, a pilot familiar with the region could arguably make the trip VFR without ever talking to a controller. For whatever reason (or reasons) the pilot kept the Commander at 4,500 msl, ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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SAFETY MATTERS - CFIT ALERT

however - 500 feet below the 5,000-foot floor of the Phoenix Class Bravo on an easterly heading after taking off from FFZ’s Runway 4 - and in so flying, the pilot obviated the need for a clearance to transit that airspace. Taking the direct heading while remaining below the Bravo on a night flight (even in 40-mile Visual Meteorological Conditions) essentially set up the CFIT scenario. The aircraft flew into the side of Superstition Mountain at an elevation of about 4,650msl – a few hundred feet below its 5,057-foot peak. With no lighting to define it, the Superstition Mountain-side probably never appeared to the pilots. Even if the Commander began climbing once clear of the Bravo’s outer ring, the timing and rate likely would have been insufficient to clear Superstition Mountain. Getting cleared to transit the Class B would have allowed the flying pilot to climb above the mountain. The squawk remained “1200.” The preliminary investigation reports no signs indicating an attempt to maneuver away from the mountain; and the impact marks supported the straight-and-level-toimpact scenario. That explosion signifies that this CFIT – set up by decisions made to save time and hassle – claimed another six lives on the evening before Thanksgiving Day.

rush to depart and waiting on that IFR clearance would have in all likelihood changed the outcome. For the CAP pilots of the T182T, going ahead and asking for Class B clearance might have set up the flight for a little vectoring and a climb with terrain avoidance in mind. Alternatively, simply maximizing the climb rate when permitted would have had the same effect – changing the outcome to a non-event. As for the tragedy that befell the Turbo Commander occupants, an aggressive climb once clear of the Phoenix Bravo could have provided the needed terrain clearance – as would departing on a heading more southeast than direct-to. The two pilots – one of them the father of the three children – regularly flew the trip, and presumably knew the terrain issues well. Sadly, in all three examples the crew made otherwise sound decisions voided by their unwillingness to risk a violation by busting the airspace limits and then asking forgiveness. At least, pursuing that last approach would have left them alive to

argue the point, but as these accident scenarios played out, all three left the pilots no room for error. The same can be said of another accident that involved another Commander, a 690B, which three years ago suffered a CFIT on approach to the airport at San Juan, Puerto Rico. In this case weather was an issue, but the pilot was on an IFR flight plan and in contact with controllers – yet failed to heed the controllers’ warning about minimum vectoring altitudes in the mountainous area outside of San Juan. As we see from the fourth incident here, even taking all the best steps counts for nothing when pilots fail to execute according to conditions – ATC, weather and terrain. Trying to save time by hedging your bet on any one of these elements can be a one-way flight into the CFIT statistics book.

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com.

TERRAIN - PLAIN AS DAY, PERHAPS INVISIBLE BY NIGHT

LIFE SAVING LESSONS Three accidents; three high-time flight crews; eighteen dead; all three tragedies avoidable. Deciding to depart VFR without a planned IFR clearance is, and will remain commonplace in private aviation. Some Part 91 and 135 operators may - by company policy - prohibit such operations, but they clearly have a role and can be flown safely. In reality, in none of our three examples was weather a factor, so IFR wasn’t a requirement for flying below FL180. In all three cases, conditions were severe-clear Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), but at night. In all three cases, the need or desire to avoid the delay or hassle of obtaining clearance through Class B airspace helped set up the aircraft for its terrain encounter. In two of the three incidents, the delay in using, or opening an IFR flight plan also contributed to the set-up concluding with the accident. But in all three fatal accidents, full awareness of the terrain, of how to avoid the terrain, and acting appropriately on that information would have helped the crew avoid their tragic outcomes. For the Hawker 125, simply fighting the

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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JETNET >>KNOW MORE

Market Trend Analysis Pre-owned helicopter market trends. by Michael Chase & Marj Rose n this month’s JETNET >>KNOW MORE feature, we’ll take a closer look at the helicopter markets ahead of the upcoming Heli-Expo 2012 in Dallas, Texas from February 12 to 14. Starting with the fleet numbers as of November 2011 the 27,168 total number of in-operation western-manufactured commercial helicopters are split, with 18,007 (or 66% of the fleet) turbine, and 9,161 (34% of the fleet) piston helicopters, according to JETNET.

I

MARKET SHARE With piston helicopters accounting for approximately 33% of the commercial helicopter market, Robinson has by far the largest piston market share in terms of units in operation with over 7,756 (85%) of the market. Robinson has also recently started producing a turbine helicopter. Within the Turbine helicopter market, both Bell and Eurocopter dominate market share in units (40% and 41%, respectively). The other OEMs, including the joint ventures, make-up the remaining 19% of the turbine helicopter market.

NEW VS USED TURBINE HELICOPTER MARKET The economic melt-down in the past two years has impacted all aviation sectors including the Helicopter industry. The Helicopter market survival tactics have called for doing more with less, resulting in making improvements in existing helicopters while looking at markets outside the United States and Europe for growth opportunities. The opening of airspace in China was welcome news. Brazil also found offshore

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oil drilling in the Atlantic which created a need for larger and more capable helicopters because of the longer range to the various sites. Most credible forecasts of the Helicopter market expect growth in 2012 as a result of pent-up demand for replacements. New helicopter orders are based on the health of the pre-owned helicopter market. Typically, someone who wants to purchase a new helicopter has to sell their existing one and so the cycle goes. New helicopter sales are driven by strong economic activity, corporate profitability, wealth creation and business investment. Table A (top right) shows the breakdown of New versus Used Turbine Helicopters within the worldwide helicopter fleet. New is defined as those helicopters that are still owned/operated by the original buyer. Pre-owned aircraft comprises over 12,072 (67%) turbine helicopters in operation today.

lion in the first 11 months of 2011 compared to USD $1.617 billion in the same period of 2010, resulting in the dollar value decreasing by 13%. Table C (right) is a comparison of the month of November 2011 versus November 2010, as well as the 11 months year-to-date January to November 2011 versus the same timeframe for 2010. The key metrics to understand about the current Pre-owned Turbine helicopter market are: • • • •

To summarize the current Worldwide Preowned Turbine Helicopter market after 11 months of 2011 vs 2010 would be: •

SINGLE VS FLEET OPERATORS Another important characteristic of the Turbine Helicopter Market is that 66% are fleet operators (i.e. they own two or more turbine helicopters as shown in Table B, right).

PRE-OWNED TURBINE HELICOPTER MARKET

As of November 2011, there were 1,216 (6.8%) of the 18,007 Turbine Helicopters ‘For Sale’ worldwide. In the first 11 months of 2011, there were 1,105 Turbine Helicopters sold worldwide which is a decrease of 10.9% compared to the same period in 2010. An estimate of the pre-owned Turbine Helicopter market value is USD $1.411 bilwww.AvBuyer.com

Number of units For Sale and percentage; Number sold (Full Sale Transactions); How long on the Market? Average Days before sold; Average Asking Prices in $USD.

Slightly fewer ‘For Sale’ inventory (down 2.1%); Double digit decline of 10.9% in ‘Full Sale Transactions’ (# Sold); An average of almost two months longer to sell – 71 days longer on the market (411 days, January to November in 2011) over one year; Average asking prices down by 2.1% to $1.277 million USD in 2011.

AVAILABILITY OF FINANCING The current situation in the Turbine Helicopter industry is very similar to the Business Jet industry in that financing is available to companies and individuals with solid balance sheets, strong growth of company revenues and profits, etc. Debt financing requires larger down-payments Aircraft Index see Page 4


JETNET >>KNOW MORE

TABLE A

today. The 100% financing of the past has disappeared since the economic meltdown.

UNITED STATES-BASED TRANSACTIONS

Source: STAR REPORTS JETNET/AvData Nov.2011

TABLE B

* - Wholly owned aircraft only ** - ‘Unknown’ is an aircraft that has either obtained a CofA and the owner/operator is not known or the aircraft has been exported or imported and the new registered owner/operator is not known. Source: JETNET/AvData Nov2011.

Table D (bottom left) represents US-based transactions only, and compares the Turbine Helicopters and Business Jets with financed vs cash transactions by quarterly periods (2Q 2005-4Q 2011 for helicopters and 1Q 2000-4Q 2011 for Business Jets). The amount of funds financed averaged $1.1 million for Turbine helicopters, and accounts for just for 22% of all transactions. The dollar amounts financed ($1.1m) vs cash ($1.2m) are nearly the same but a significant difference exists in the percentages that are paid by cash today (88% is paid by cash). While these transactions are based on averages in the United States only, they may be similar in other regions of the World, Europe included.

CONCLUSION The Helicopter industry is hoping for an upbeat year of activity and there are certainly indications present that we will see improvements in 2012. Fewer units for sale on the pre-owned market and lower asking prices should help spark transactions and elevate some of the pent up demand that we mentioned earlier. We are ‘cautiously optimistic’ for this market along with 18,000 HAI attendees this month! The 2012 recovery? Handle with care.

TABLE C

❯ For more information: • Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

• Marj Rose is president of MarketLift, Inc. and can be contacted at P.O. Box 595036 Dallas, TX 75359; Mob: 214-862-8992, Web: www.market-lift.com

Source: JETNET

TABLE D

• JETNET can be contacted at 101 First Street, Utica, NY 13501; Tel: 800-400-2298; Web: www.jetnet.com or www.avdatainc.com * You can now follow JETNET on Twitter at www.twitter.com/JETNETLLC

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

* - FAA Registries without debt instruments or lease are presumed to be cash Source: JETNET Star Reports.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA-PACIFIC OVERVIEW

Asia-Pacific Overview Increased Bizav capacity at Narita Airport. by Mike Vines lying business jets into Tokyo’s Narita International Airport can be a very frustrating experience, but now thanks to Japan’s Airport Capacity Improvement Plan, total movements are increasing from 190,000 to 230,000 per year, freeing up more Business Aviation slots. The allowable cap of Business Aviation movements was just 26 per week, but since 30th October last year that number was increased to 18 per day thanks to the lobbying of the Japanese Business Aviation Association (JBAA) and an enlightened atti-

F

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tude adopted by the Japanese Government concerning the advantages of Business Aviation to the Japanese economy. According to Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, 45% of all overseas branch offices in Japan are in Tokyo and the Greater Tokyo Metropolitan area. These number around 10,000 companies. Narita Business Aviation landing slots are still currently banned at peak times, but the increase in daily slots is nevertheless a vast improvement on the situation before - and in further good news for the airport, it is to be the first in Japan to open a dedicated FBO in www.AvBuyer.com

March this year. The facility is expected to enable faster passport control, and ensure privacy along with speedy access to the Tokyo area, according to the Japanese authorities. Business jet parking stands are available within 100 yards of the FBO, and the number of business jet stands available rose from 10 at the start of 2010 to 18 by November 2011. The FBO itself will offer full concierge facilities including handling, ground transportation, hotel reservations, customized tours, dutyfree sales, a well appointed passenger lounge, customs, immigration and full quarantine facilities. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA-PACIFIC OVERVIEW CHINA China’s Minsheng Financial Leasing Co (MFLC) recently announced another $1.2 billion-worth of orders, this time for Dassault Falcon and Embraer Legacy aircraft. The Dassault Falcon MoU is for 20 Falcon 7X and 20 Falcon 2000S models, and insiders believe

TOP, FLYING COLOURS-COMPLETED CL850 FOR LILY JET BELOW, SERGE DASSAULT WELCOMES MINSHENG ORDER

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all are due to be delivered within five years. This MFLC order comes on top of an existing order for five Falcon 7Xs. Minsheng added an order for 13 Embraer Legacy 650s within hours on the same day at the NBAA Convention late last year. Since then, Embraer’s Legacy 650 has been type certificated by the CAAC with a revised Validation Type Certificate Data Sheet paving the way for customers to register and operate the Legacy 650 in China. (Movie star Jackie Chan, who is Embraer’s newly appointed brand ambassador, will shortly join Embraer’s Legacy 650 family of users.) MFLC is even breaking its own prediction of ordering 100 business jets within five years of its involvement in the industry. Before these latest announcements Minsheng had 87 aircraft on firm order with around 30 delivered already. Ernest Edwards, President of Embraer Executive Jets, estimates that Chinese business jet customers will order 680 new aircraft worth around $20 billion over the next ten years. MFLC chairman Mr. Kong Linshan is even more optimistic and expects deliveries over the same period to be around 1,000. To temper this, operators within China perceive a severe shortage of qualified pilots and infrastructure enhancements will have to be addressed to meet any major influx of business and corporate aircraft. Canada-based Flying Colours Corp delivered its fourth Chinese registered aircraft - a Bombardier Challenger 850 business jet - to Shenyang-based air charter company Lily Jet recently. The 17 seat VIP configured aircraft is available for third party charter. The completion included a state-of-thewww.AvBuyer.com

art cabin management system, broadband enabling WiFi, a high definition camera system, a mid-cabin custom desk and colored LED lighting in the restrooms, and Flying Colours worked directly with Lily Jet to have the aircraft fully certified with the CAAC (Civil Aviation Administration of China). A further three Challenger 850s destined for China are currently undergoing completion at Flying Colours’ Canadian and US facilities and will be delivered this year. This latest delivery followed two similarly equipped Challenger 850s delivered by Flying Colours to BAA Jet Management Ltd’s Shenzhen base last year. Flying Colours is to expand operations outside North America for the first time, and has partnered with Metrojet of Hong Kong to provide interior refurbishment for a range of mid-size to large business jets. Ratification of this MoU is expected in midyear with the structure and logistics for the new base expected to be announced in late 2012. Elsewhere, Stephen Taylor, Boeing Business Jet’s President has outlined how China has fast become a very important region. Beijing Airlines’ first BBJ is in completion, scheduled to enter service early this year. And Beijing-based Deer Jet is awaiting delivery of its second BBJ while a third is in completion. Korean Airlines and Metrojet of Hong Kong are already operating the aircraft type there, Boeing says. Boeing Business Jets has also delivered a BBJ to charter operator Nanshan Jet of China. The interior completion of the 28seat configured aircraft will be done by Lufthansa Technik's U.S. arm, BizJet International. This will be the first BBJ to join Nanshan Jet's seven-ship fleet which includes Challenger 605, Global Express XRS, Gulfstream G450 and Gulfstream G550 aircraft. Finally, GippsAero of Australia has signed with Jinggong Aviation (based in Xi’an) as its sales, distributor and support representative in China. GippsAero is working with the CAAC to gain Chinese certification for its rugged GA8 Airvan and its turbocharged derivative the GA8-TC-320.

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND The news from ‘down-under’ this quarter follows the expansion of ExecuJet’s FBO chain in Australia and New Zealand. This fast growing company added to its growing worldwide FBO/MRO and aircraft sales operations by adding FBOs to its existing MRO operations at Melbourne Essendon and Wellington International. The company was invited by Wellington International Airport to manage the new Aircraft Index see Page 4


GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA-PACIFIC OVERVIEW facility and encourage more Business Aviation activity in New Zealand’s capital. A 2,000 square meter hangar will also enable ExecuJet to house a number of large corporate aircraft and provide line maintenance, aircraft charter and management. Wellington’s existing resident ground handling company Capital Jet Services has become ExecuJet’s strategic partner here under the deal. Capital Jet Services also has handling operations at Christchurch International Airport and at Queenstown Airport, and partners an FBO at Auckland International Airport with Air Center One. At Melbourne the new 1,000 square meter FBO boasts an integrated lounge area, and maintenance workshops complementing a private hangar facility which spans over 2,700 square meters. As at most of its other hubs the company also offers aircraft management and charter services alongside its maintenance facility. The facility is also an Authorized Service Centre for Hawker Beechcraft, Gulfstream, Bombardier and Embraer business jets. “Over the last six months business in Australia and New Zealand has been very positive across all aspects of our services,” summarized Darren McGoldrick M.D., ExecuJet Australasia. “Maintenance has seen a steady flow of regular work along with some major inspections, modifications and upgrade work. Charter has been constantly busy too, with a high demand for longrange business jets.”

Last year ExecuJet Malaysia became a Bombardier Authorized Line Facility for all models, and ExecuJet believes this latest approval is very important for its Malaysian base given the increasing numbers of Cayman registered aircraft operating within Southeast Asia.

EXECUJET FACILITIES AT MELBOURNE (ABOVE) AND WELLINGTON (BELOW)

MALAYSIA Weststar Aviation Services of Malaysia has signed a contract for ten AgustaWestland helicopters. The contract is valued at approximately $150 million. Weststar will be the first operator worldwide to benefit from the commonality in design across the AW139, AW169 and AW189 family of new generation helicopters. As well as possessing the same high performance flight characteristics and safety features the helicopters share a common cockpit layout and design philosophy and maintenance concepts that will be more effective for customers operating helicopter fleets from 48.5 tons. ExecuJet Malaysia, based at Subang Airport, Kuala Lumpur has gained the first direct Cayman Islands Aircraft Maintenance Organization approval in Malaysia, known as an OTAR Part 145 (Option 2). This will permit ExecuJet Malaysia to work on Cayman-registered Bombardier Global Express, Challenger 300, Challenger 604/605 and Gulfstream GIV/SP aircraft, and compliments the approvals granted by the Malaysia DCA, the Philippines CAAP and the Isle of Man CAA. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

KAZAKHSTAN Eurocopter has delivered the first of six EC145s to the Kazakh Ministries of Defense and Emergencies for search and rescue and medical evacuation missions. A total of 45 of the helicopters are to be purchased, and will be assembled by the new joint venture Eurocopter Kazakhstan Engineering, in which Eurocopter and Kazakhstan Engineering have a 50/50 share. The remaining helicopters are to be delivered by the end of 2016. The new joint venture company will assemble and customize EC145s at its facilities near Astana International Airport in Kazakhstan. The company will also enable Eurocopter to provide its customers in Kazakhstan and Central Asia with better local services for helicopter maintenance as well as training for pilots and technicians. Eurocopter is convinced that the venture will place it in an excellent position for future development locally, offering corporate and VIP equipped helicopters. www.AvBuyer.com

Over the last six months business in Australia and New Zealand has been very positive across all aspects of our services. - Darren McGoldrick, ExecuJet

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LIGHTNING-QUICK MARKET REACTIONS

Is This Time Really Different ? A reflection on the current business cycle. by Andrew C. Bradley ur industry has been closely tied to domestic and global business cycles since General Business Aviation first appeared on the scene nearly fifty years ago. During that time we’ve endured multiple recessionary periods as well as equal instances of business expansion—the traditional Boom and Bust cycle as it is known. We have often heard the cliché that “this time is different” with regards to the business cycle. The most famous example of this paradigm was a BusinessWeek article in 1979 entitled “The Death of Equities” predicting stock prices had permanently plateaued. I remember in the late summer of 1987 reading predictions that the Dow would hit 3,000 as the business cycle no longer existed in a traditional sense. A few weeks later—Black Monday—the Dow crashed to 1,700 in the largest one-day rout in percentage terms to this day. Fast forward to 1996 when the then Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan sensed financial markets were overvalued and made his “irrational exuberance” speech. The market quickly shrugged this off as a relic of old school economics and ignored his plea. A few months later the entire Asian continent was facing a complete financial meltdown and the US faced a recession. Other examples like the internet bubble in 2000, in which billion-dollar business deals were done in bars on napkins continued the theme of things being different this time, only to come crashing down weeks or months later. Last, but not least, there’s the financial housing bubble of 2005-2008 when even the brightest minds—since called into serious question—pontificated that housing prices would go up indefinitely. This last bust segment of the most recent business cycle proves that the traditional economic cycle is alive and well, and it’s not going away anytime soon. That being said, there is something different this time around that has important implications for our industry.

O

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THEN AND NOW We are now more than three years removed from the events that could have heralded another Great Depression, and which for all intent and purposes was the greatest financial meltdown in recent modern history. We saw www.AvBuyer.com

it first hand in our own industry as General Business Aviation came to a complete standstill in the months following Lehman’s Brothers collapse in September 2008. Three years on, we have weathered the storm but the outlook continues to look Aircraft Index see Page 4


LIGHTNING-QUICK MARKET REACTIONS suspect with out-of-control spending here in the US coupled with high unemployment and a still-shaky real estate market, a huge debt crisis in Europe, continued instability in the Middle East and constant fears that the Chinese economy will slow, throwing the world economy back into recession. In the financial markets the cliché “investors have a short memory” seems to no longer hold true, be it applied to stocks, bonds, business deals or aircraft purchases. It appears that people do in fact now have a long memory and recent events are beginning to lend credibility that this time really is different from a psychological perspective. Looking back on the recessionary periods of our industry over the past twenty years shows that up until the 2008 crisis General Business Aviation activity has lagged the general business environment by about six months or more. The last three years have shown that aircraft buyers and sellers no longer lag the overall global economic outlook by six months. In fact it is no longer measured in months or even weeks. It comes down to days or minutes as economic “headline” news seems to hold sway over buyers and sellers by the minute. Since the 2008 crisis the number of aircraft deals that have fallen apart at the last minute has soared in our industry as both buyers and sellers react instantaneously to positive or negative news in the market place. This is in stark contrast to pre-2008 crisis years. I can recall as late as August of 2008 how tight the GV, G450 and G550 markets were on the eve of Lehman’s collapse. Even during the crisis, deals still occurred for a brief period of time in the winter of 2008. Avjet closed two Boeing Business Jet deals during that time and purchased a GV and G-IVSP for clients. Several other GV’s traded over the Christmas break in 2008. All this despite clear warning signs as early as mid-2007 that the US economy was heading toward a crisis. Unemployment was going up at least 1218 months prior to September 2008. Real Estate prices were quickly beginning to reverse course, default rates were starting to quickly gain pace, and the Federal Reserve was warning Congress that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were in dire circumstances. Bear Sterns collapsed in March of 2008. The warning signs were present, yet for the most part General Business Aviation was soaring with ask prices on Global XRS aircraft nearing $70.0m and G550s selling for $10.0m USD above new pricing. In the GV, G450 and G550 markets inventory was in the low-single-digits and buyers were scrambling to pay premiums to find aircraft. I remember attending NBAA right in the thick of the crisis and everyone was caught completely off-guard. How did this Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

happen? Can this really be true? Even well after the fact people still couldn’t grasp the severity of what was transpiring to send our industry into a tailspin.

TEMPERED BY THE HOUR Fast forward to the present: What I term “Economic Headline News” tempers sellers’ and buyers’ sentiment not by the month, week or day, but seemingly by the hour. All one needs to do is look at the “Big Picture” economic indicators quarter-by-quarter to see their immediate impact on our aircraft markets. During the latter half of 2010 when the crisis had subsided and US GDP growth as well as global growth seemed to be picking up, many of these markets which had been dormant earlier in the year came to life immediately following news of better growth prospects. The Global Express market which had been dormant for much of 2010 was on fire in December of 2010. Along with better economic prospects for 2011 this sales run extended well into the first few months of 2011 with more sales of Global Express aircraft taking place during the first six months of last year than the previous two years combined. The same occurred in the G-IV and G-IVSP markets where inventory of G-IVSPs reached a low of a half dozen aircraft by early summer of last year. (The G450 market as well as the G550 market were also very active in the first half of last year.) Yet almost as quickly as the positive headlines news spurred sales of large cabin aircraft, the quick reversal to negative news quickly stalled sales of these same aircraft. In www.AvBuyer.com

early June of last year the European Debt Crisis re-emerged in conjunction with the US Debt Crisis Ceiling and ensuing S&P downgrade—the first in our history. Suddenly the growth optimism gave way to extreme fears of another global meltdown and a stalling US economy. Sales of Global Express aircraft ground to a halt with only one or two sales taking place over the next few months. The G-IV market which had been on fire earlier in the year saw inventory rise from a low of around 30 aircraft for sale to over 45 for sale as prices plunged by more than $1.0m USD across the entire model line. Several deals fell apart. One notable deal saw the buyer walk away hours before closing, leaving his deposit behind in response to US economic news that seemed to be getting worse daily. In the G-IVSP market inventory tripled in less than four months from six aircraft to over twenty aircraft for sale. Prices quickly plunged and sales completely stalled. Buyers were in no mood to commit to utilizing capital in the wake of questions concerning the US economy and problems in Europe. Similar reactions and inactivity quickly caught the Global XRS and G450 markets, and to a lesser extent the G550 market. Negative headline news no longer took six months to impact our business - more like six hours.

‘THE NEW NORM’ Such market swings have been the norm since early 2009 and have proven that aircraft buyers and sellers alike have a very long ❯ memory and still harbor massive fears of WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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LIGHTNING-QUICK MARKET REACTIONS what transpired in 2008/2009. Interestingly enough US economic conditions began to quickly change direction around Thanksgiving of last year as unemployment began to reverse course and housing numbers began to stabilize. The looming debt crisis in Europe seemed to stabilize with investors returning back to the US stock market as prospects for the US economy looked brighter heading into 2012. Even President Obama’s dismal approval ratings began to reverse course. While Europe still faces massive uncertainty, and a March 20th deadline for Greece to re-finance its debt approaches, just last Friday rating agencies downgraded several European nations. The outlook seems to be a bit more positive, and analysts believe at least in the near-term that financial disaster has been placed on hold. As a result, aircraft activity redirected just as quickly. During the weeks of December and early January a half-dozen Global Express aircraft have either already traded or are under contract. The G-IV market saw four transactions over the past thirty days and the G-IVSP market currently has five aircraft under contract which is more than during the entire

July-November timeframe last year when the US economic headline news looked dismal. In today’s world we all have access to fasttraveling information on our Blackberrys, iPhones, iPads, Satelite TV as well as various other electronic devices. Information and capital travel at the speed of a keystroke. Our industry is no longer insulated or immune from this phenomenon. Now, more than ever, buyers and sellers require professional representation in the purchase or sale of their aircraft. On the buyer’s side, timing is everything in getting the best deal in terms of the purchase price and the correct aircraft that meets their mission requirement. On the seller side, we have seen poorly-written contracts or other hurdles leading to buyers fleeing deals at the first sign of a negative headline. On both sides of the transactions the buyer’s or seller’s commitment in today’s environment is very low. Economic and political “headline news” has instant ramifications with regard to complex aircraft deals. Ten years ago what happened in Beijing was of little relevance. Now ordinary Americans review the latest Chinese economic data on CNBC the moment it is released.

Now, more than ever, a professional broker is an important element in today’s aircraft transaction, keeping deals together and leveraging both industry-specific aircraft knowledge with general economic knowledge to the financial benefit of buyers and sellers. ❯ Andrew C. Bradley is senior vice president, Global Sales & Acquisitions at Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter and management solutions. The company is headquartered in Burbank, California, and maintains a global presence in Washington D.C., Seoul, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Moscow and other locations around the globe. To learn more about the company, visit www.avjet.com

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

™ ™

™ ™ ™

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Morgan Barrieau Tel: +1 860-306-1460 E-mail: mbarrieau@mentegroup.com

2008 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5192 N323BD 1262 798

Engines BR700-710C4-11 Engines are on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Left: S/N 15487 1262Hours 798 Cycles Right: S/N 15488 1228 Hours 786 Cycles APU Honeywell RE-220 APU is on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Serial Number: TBD 712 Hours Avionics Honeywell PlaneViewTM Avionics Suite Four (4) 14” Multi-Function Displays (MFD) Dual Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Honeywell Head Up Display / Visual Guidance System Goodrich EBDI-4000 RMI Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS) Triple Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules Third Honeywell MT-860 Nav/Com Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Goodrich GH-311 Standby Att/Alt/Asp Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel Dual Honeywell MRC-855A Mod Radio Cabs Triple Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionic Unit Honeywell RT-951 TCAS 2000 System Triple Honeywell NZ-2000 Flight Management Systems

EGPWS with Windshear Detection Triple Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V IRSs L3 Communications Cockpit Voice Recorder L3 Quick Access Recorder (uQAR) Honeywell MCS-7000 Satellite Communications Digital Flight Data Recorder Securaplane System with 3 cameras Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Gulfstream Broadband Multi-Link (BBML) Maintenance 12-MOS / 500 hr. Inspection CW: July, 2011; Due: July, 2012 / 1670.9 Hrs. 24-Month Inspection CW: August, 2010; Due: July, 2012 48-Month Inspection Due: July, 2012 72 Month Inspection Due: July, 2014 Gross Weight: 90,500Lbs. Operating Weight: 47,996 Lbs. Empty Weight: 47,145 Lbs. Interior Original Installation 2008 By Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah. Beautiful eighteen passenger executive interior with berthing for seven, featuring a well appointed, spacious forward galley. A forward four-place club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious mid cabin boasts another four-place club. Aft of the second four-placed club is a four-placed conference grouping and credenza. The aft section of the aircraft poses dual side facing three-placed divans. Seating is tastefully finished in light earthy leathers. Interior is complemented by luxurious Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

carpeting found throughout the cabin. Forward galley poses ample storage, (2) Coffee Makers, Microwave, and a spacious cold box refrigerator. Exterior Original Paint 2008 By Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah. Additional Features: Enhanced Sound Proofing Sigma In Flight Phone Handset installed next to VIP seat (January, 2010) Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

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Lowest priced G550 on the market

2004 Gulfstream G550

Mark Payne Tel: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

EGPWS with Windshear Detection Triple Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V IRSs L3 Communications Cockpit Voice Recorder L3 Quick Access Recorder (uQAR) Honeywell MCS-7000 Satellite Communications Digital Flight Data Recorder Securaplane System Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Interior Original Installation: June 21, 2004 By: Gulfstream Aerospace, Appleton Partial Refurbishment: March 5, 2008 By: Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah Beautiful fourteen passenger executive interior with berthing for six, featuring a forward four-place club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious mid cabin boasts a two-place grouping opposite a divan.

5028 3,329 1,195

Engines BR700-710C4-11 Left: S/N 15159 3,184 Hours 1,152 Cycles Right: S/N 15158 3,184 Hours 1,152 Cycles Engines are not on a Program APU Honeywell RE-220 S/N P339 1,782 Hours APU is not on a Program Avionics Artex ELT C406-2 Honeywell PlaneViewTM Avionics Suite Four (4) 14” Multi-Function Displays (MFD) Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel

Dual Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers Triple Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels Honeywell Head Up Display / Visual Guidance System Goodrich EBDI-4000 RMI Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS) Triple Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules Third Honeywell MT-860 Nav/Com Honeywell Primus 880 Weather Radar Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Goodrich GH-311 Standby Att/Alt/Asp Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel Dual Honeywell MRC-855A Mod Radio Cabs Triple Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionic Unit Honeywell RT-951 TCAS 2000 System Triple Honeywell NZ-2000 Flight Management Systems

Two Corporate Owners Since New

1998 Dassault Falcon 900EX

Chad Collins Tel: +1 972-955-6779 E-mail: ccollins@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Dual Collins DME-442 Dual AA-300 Honeywell Radio Altimeter FM Immunity Comms@ Navs Aircraft Programs HAPPS Avionics Program CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program MSP Engine Program RVSM Certified Interior 12 Passenger configuration with Aft Lavatory-Soft goods completed Nov. 2010. Forward 4 Place club seating w Mid Cabin double club and dinning group. Private aft cabin with 3 place couch across from club seating. Fwd Jump Seat. Exterior New paint in December 2009. White base overall with black and yellow stripes. Slant style Eng. Markings.

35 N913SN 6912.4 3302

Engines MSP Engine Program APU Allied Signal GTCP 36-150F 3967.1 hours since new Last HSI – 2558.8; Next Due: 7058.8 Avionics/ Additional Equipment Pimus Elite Cockpit Upgrade ($800K) XM Graphical Weather Flight Dynamics Cat III HUD Dual Collins TCAS 94-TCAS II w Change 7 Airshow Genesys

Electronis Charts w Dual Honeywell Servers Lightening Sensor DC-820 FMS Upgrade (120k Option) Honeywell MARKV EGPWS Honeywell SSCVR CVR (32 Parameter) Honeywell SSFDR Flight Data Recorder (120 Minute Recording) MagnaStar UHF/Satcom Phone w/fax Triple Collins VHF-422/A Comms w 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins: TDR-94D Transponders w Mode S Dual Bendix-King KHF-950s Cabin DVD Player with 4 Rosen monitors Triple Honeywell Lazeref III Selcal Coltech CDS-714 Decoder One EICAS Multi-Function Display Dual Baker B1045 Audio Control Pannels Triple Honeywell FMZ 2000 w dual GNSSU GPS

Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation VII

Brian Hammer Tel: +1 817- 832-6442 E-mail: bhammer@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

Honeywell TCAS 2000 (ACAS II) with Change 7 Fairchild GA-1 00 Cockpit Voice Recorder Honeywell LSZ-B60 Lighting Sensor System Single Point Refueling. Concord Lead Acid Batteries RVSM. Honeywell Mark VII EGWPS Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Flight Phone EROS Oxygen Masks. Secure A Plane Security System Battery Charging Provisions from Ground Power Interior Eight Passenger fireblocked interior with a center club configuration. A forward two-place side facing divan and two single forward facing seats. Appointed in neutral beige leather seats and complimented by soft beige window panels, neutral taupe carpet, Carpathian Elm Burl wood veneers and gold plating. The forward refreshment center has ample storage along with a forward storage closet and aft lavatory.

7005 5639.6 3338

Engines MSP Gold Honeywell TFE731-4R-2S w/ N1 DEEC’s Left: P102110; 5,561.1 Hours; 3,292 Cycles Right: P102115; 5,595.8 Hours; 3,309 Cycles Last Hot Section Completed: Left: 4,181.0 Right: 4,181.0 Last Overhaul Completed: Left: 4,181.0 Right: 4,181.0 APU P-165. Honeywell GTCP 36-150W 2,920 Hours Inspection Status All ADs and Major SBs Complete. Repair Documents 1,3, 20, 23, 28, 30, 42 and 43 completed April 22, 2010 / 5,576.3 Repair Documents 9 & 35 complete Aug 11, 2010 / 5,622.9

Aircraft Programs Engines enrolled 100% Honeywell MSP Gold ProParts Maintenance. Aircraft enrolled on Cescom Avionics Dual Honeywell SPZ-8OOO (5 Tube EFIS) Dual Honeywell AHZ-8OO Autopilot Honeywell Primus 880 Color Radar Collins ALT-55B Radar Altimeter Dual Universal UNS-1 B+ w/ GPS 1000 FMS Dual AZ-B10 Air Data Computers Dual Honeywell RMU-850 Radio Management Units Dual Honeywell RCZ-851 Communication Units Dual Honeywell Mode S Transponders w/ 8.33 Dual Honeywell RNZ-850 Navigation Units Dual Honeywell AHZ-600 AHRS Additional Features Thrust Reversers

Two Corporate Owners Since New

1993 Gulfstream IV‐SP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1227 N600VC 7490.9 3616

Engines Rolls Royce TAY 611‐8 Engines enrolled in JSSI Platinum at 87% Left: S/N 16570 7397.6 Hours 3549 Cycles Right: S/N 16550 7405.6 Hours 3559 Cycles APU Honeywell GTCP 36‐100 4742.0 Hours Serial Number P‐618 Last HSI c/w @ 4614 Hours Avionics Honeywell Pro Line 4 Dual Honeywell SPZ‐8000 Digital IFCS/Pro Line 4 Honeywell MCS‐6000 SATCOM

Triple Collins VHF ‐422D Comm's w/8.33 MHz Spacing Dual Honeywell AA‐300 Radar Altimeter Dual Collins VIR 432 Nav's w/FM Immunity Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 Dual Collins ADF‐ADF 462 ADFs Honeywell Primus 870 Color Radar System w/Turbulence Detection Dual Collins DME‐ 442 DMEs Honeywell LASERTRAK Dual Collins TDR‐94D Enhanced Mode "S" Transponders w/Flight ID Dual Collins HF 9032 HF Radios Dual Honeywell NZ‐2000 FMS with 6.0 Software CSD‐714 SELCAL Additional Features AFT galley, FWD crew lav and refreshment center VCR, DVD, & Cassette Players RVSM/RNP‐5 & RNP‐10 Certified Dual DVD Players Airshow 400 Sony 10‐Disc CD Changer

Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

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www.AvBuyer.com

Mark Payne Tel: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com Electric Window Shades High Temp Oven Facsimile Machine Microwave Portable Halogen Fire Extinguishers Coffee Maker Forward 15" LCD Bulkhead Monitor Devore Vertical Recognition Lights 15" Pop‐Up Monitor in Credenza JSSI Platinum Engine Program Details: Interior Eleven (11) passenger executive interior featuring a forward three (3) place divan opposite a two (2) place club. ALL NEW VENEER by Duncan Aviation BTL in June 2011 ‐ Owner spent over $500K replacing all the cabin veneer Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Black & Gray Accent Striping. New Paint January 2010 – Duncan Aviation BTL.

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

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2001 Hawkerbeech Premier 1 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

RB-0027 912 1.051

Engines Williams FJ 44-2A S/N 1073 TT 912 / TC 1.051 S/N 1064 TT 912 / TC 1.051 Equipment Collins Proline 21 Dual VHF 422C 8.33KHz Dual NAV VIR-432 Dual FMS FMC -3000 Dual Mode S TPX TDR 94D ADF 462 ELT Artex 406 Mhz Dual GPS -4000A Radio Altimeter ALT-4000 Weather Radar RTA – 800 EGPWS Mark V CVR 2100-1010-51 ACAS Collins TTR – 4000 Dual Airdata Computer ADC-3000 DME 422 Satphone installed Engine Program Tap Elite All Mandatory Service Bulletins Many Options Motivated Seller - Price: Make Offer

Air Alliance GmbH Airport Siegerland, D-57299 Burbach, Germany

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +49 2736 4428 13 Fax: +49 2736 4428 50 Mobil: +49 177 88 6 8824 Email: mueller@air-alliance.de www.air-alliance.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Great Buy

2008 Learjet 60XR Serial Number: 337 Airframe TT: 638 Landings: 340 Engines L/RH: 638 Hours 340 cycles APU: 333 Hours Avionics F/DIR : Collins Pro Line 21 IFCS EFIS : Collins 4-tube COMMS : Dual Collins w/8.33 kHz Dual AHRS DME : Dual Collins TPDR : Dual Mode S TCAS-II w/change 7 L.R.N : Dual FMS, Dual GPS

Factory Warranties, Smart Parts, JAR OPS Compliant

EGPWS 121.5/243.0/406.025 MHz ELT EICAS control Rosemount Ice Detection System Dual FSU with Electronic Charts Options Second Honeywell KHF-1050 Long Range Comm Collins TWR-850 RADAR Enhanced Weather Radar Rosemount Ice Detection System Cockpit Voice Recorder (Exchange) 3D FMS Maps Rockwell Collins Datalink (with 3rd VHF) Dual FSU with Electronic Charts Enhanced Map Overlays (Dual FSU Configuraiton) Universal Weather (Dual FSU Configuration)

Interior Executive Floorplan B (Eight Passengers), Done in beige glove leather, Aft 4 place club, Forward 3 place divan, Aft belted lavatory, Beige Wool carpet Burled high-gloss cabinetry, Brushed Gold plated hardware, Full forward galley with microwave, Airshow 410 Next Generation, Airshow World-Wide Map Coverage, 15.1" (38 cm) Forward Video Monitor, Cabin Video System - Single DVD, Passenger Audio/Video Inputs (each), XM Radio (U.S. only), Wood Veneer Package - High Gloss, Microwave Oven (28V DC), ICS-200 Iridium phone (wireless handsets), Dual Hot Liquid Containers, Exterior White w/ Lear 60XR factory scheme.

Priced to Sell

Astra SPX Serial Number: 80 Airframe TT: 4,460 Landings: 1400 Airframe Status CAMP. 3,719.1 hrs / 2051 Cycles Engine Status Garrett TFE731-40R-200G MSP Gold Engine #1 3686.2Total Time 2022 Total Cycles Engine #2 3541.6 Total Time 1966 Total Cycles APU Garrett GTCP-36-150. TT: 1400.0 MSP Avionics EFIS: Collins Pro-line 4 TCAS: Collins TCAS II

Low Time, with APU and recent C Check Insp! FMS: Dual UNS-1C’s COM: Dual Collins VHF-422B FDS: Collins FCC-4000 XPNDR: Dual Collins TDR-94D ADC: Dual Collins ADC-850C HFCOM: King HF 950 RADAR: Collins TWR 850D CVR: Universal 30B ELT: 406 Compliant Interior Duncan Aviation Seven Passenger Custom Interior. Forward four place club seating with rear forward facing seat opposite two place club seating finished in Aeristo tan leather, accented in gold plating. High density medium beige carpet

1408 N. Fillmore Street, Suite 3, Arlington, VA 22201

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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throughout aircraft. Side panels finished in beige fabric, with slight hints of black to accent carpet and seats. Headliner is covered in a light crème ultra leather with tone on tone fabric window lining. Galley is completed with a high gloss Sepele redwood with work top finished in a subtle variety of beige to coordinate. Entertainment package installed consisting of forward 10.4” monitor, DVD system equipped with wireless headsets, and Rosen FliteView airshow system that will zoom to street view. Exterior Custom Duncan Aviation Paint. Matterhorn White with Medium Concorde Blue Stripe and Las Vegas Gold.

Tel: 703 312 1000 Fax: 703 312 1355 Email: sales@nextjets.com www.nextjets.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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2008 Cessna Citationjet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0385 HB-VOP 1439 1409

Engines on TAP Elite Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 FADEC Controlled LH: S/N 216179 1439 TT / 1409 CSN RH: S/N 216178 1439 TT / 1409 CSN Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays. AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3050 ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 IFIS 1 Collins IFIS-5000 FMS 2 Collins FMS-.3000 (incl. DME II) GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel RTU 2 Collins RTU-4200 NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 ADF 1 Collins ADF DME 1 Collins DME-4000 VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94 Mode S TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with RAAS Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 ESIS GH-3000 ESIS CVR Provisions for installation of L3 connection FA 2100 CVR ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT MDC 1 Collins Maintenance Diagnostic System

Additional Equipment Gnd Com Dispatch Switch (powers 1Radio, 1 RTU and both audio panel) Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Tail Log Lights Nose Landing Gear in/protection boot Installation Jeppesen Electronic Charts on MFD Crew Seat Sheepskin Slipcovers 110V Ac Universal Electrical Outlet w/500W Inverter Monorail Sunvisors – Entry Step Upgrade to Airstair Style Steep Approach Option Interior Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats. Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables. RH Fwd Refreshment Center. Aft Divider Assembly with sliding door Aft Low Boy storage cabinet with drawer One Aft Potty Belted Seat. Townsend Leather Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut Brushed Aluminium Hardware Finish. Exterior Overall white with dark grey stripes JAR OPS 1

Asking Price: Make Offer

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Mob: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 +41 (0) 79 2005265 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

2008 Hawker 900XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

HA-0038 HB-VPJ 1158 1043

Engines on MSP Gold HONEYWELL / TFE 731-50R LH: S/N P122180 1158 T SN / 1043 CSN RH: S/N P122181 1158 TSN / 1043 CSN APU on MSP HONEYWELL / GTCP36-150 W S/N: P-1018 1253 TSN Avionics Collins Proline 21 Integrated flight control System with 4 EFIS LCD Displays Collins IFIS-Paperless Cockpit Integrated Electronic Checklist Enhanced Map Overlays AHRS Dual Collins AHC-3000 Autopilot Dual Collins FGC 3000 ADC Dual Collins ADC-3000 FMS Dual Collins FMS-6000 GPS Dual Collins GPS-4000A with WAAS NAV Dual Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 ADF Collins ADF DME Dual Collins DME-4000 VHF Dual Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing HF Dual Collins HF-9000 High frequency Radio XPDR Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S TCAS II Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with Runway Awareness and Advisory System (RAAS) RADAR Collins TWR 850

SSFDR Honeywell solid state FDR CVR Universal Cockpit Voice Recorder CVR-120 ELT Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ESIS Meggitt Electronic Standby Instrument System MK.2 MDC Collins Maintenance Diagnostic System Selcal Additional Equipment Airborne Telephone Systems: AirCell ST3100 iridium phone with cordless cockpit & cabin handsets Cabin Information & Entertainment Systems: Collins Dual Digital Video Disc Player with 2nd 15” LCD monitor Airshow 4000 w/ Flight Deck Controller Outlets 220 VAC power Interior Height (8) Cabin passenger’s seats, featuring 5 individual seats with two fold-out executive tables and a 3-place divan Belted lavatory seat Beige colored carpet. White ultrasuede headliner. Leather beige color seat Exterior Top fuselage and upper wing Matterhorn white color Belly and bottom wings granite color with two stripe granite colors On CAMP & Support Plus JAR OPS 1 Asking Price USD $8,950,000

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Mob: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 +41 (0) 79 2005265 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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S H O W C A S E

Price: Make offer 1989 Hawker 800 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

NA-440 N295JR 8650 5900

Engines Garrett TFE 731-5R MSP Gold ENGINE PROGRAM Avionics HONEYWELL COMMS: DUAL HONEYWELL RCZ-833B NAVS: DUAL HONEYWELL RNZ-850 AP: HONEYWLL DFZ-800 FMS: DUAL HONEYWELL FMS-2000 W/GPS ADC: YES DME: DUAL HONEYWELL RNZ-850 XPNDR: DUAL HONEYWELL TCZ-833B MODE S ADF: DUAL HONEYWELL AT-850 HF: HONEYWELL KHF-950 W/SELCAL RADAR: PRIMUS 870 EFIS: HONEYWELL EDZ-818 5-TUBE EGPWS: MARK VI TCAS: TCZ-910 VERSION 7 RALT: HONEYWELL AA-300 CVR: UNIVERSAL CVR-30-B Features THIS HAWKER 800A HAS BEEN PROFESSIONLLY OPERATED AND MAINTAINED. THE ROOMY EIGHT PLACE CABIN WITH AIRLINE STYLE FULLY

ENCLOSED AFT LAVATORY ENABLE PASSENGERS TO TRAVEL IN LUXURIOUS COMFORT. WITH A RANGE OF 2,300 NM, EXCELLENT PAYLOAD AND FLEXIBILITY MAKES THIS ONE OF THE MOST ATTRACTIVE MIDSIZE JET’S IN TODAY’S MARKET. THE AIRCRAFT IS RVSM CAPABLE, HAS DEE HOWARD THRUST REVERSERS, PULSE SAFETY LIGHTS, DEVORE TEL-TAIL LIGHTS RADOME, TAXI/LANDING LIGHTS, FM IMMUNITY WITH 8.33 CHANNEL SPACING. Interior EIGHT PLACE INTERIOR COMPLETED IN BEIGE LEATHER WITH A ONE FORWARD THREE PLACE DIVAN AND FIVE EXECUTIVE STYLE CLUB CHAIRS, FORWARD (FITS TWIO GOLF BAGS) AND LARGE AFT CABIN BAGGAGE SPACE (CAN FIT EIGHT FULL SIZE GOLF BAGS) ACCESS THRU LAVATOR, SLIM REFRESHMENT CENTER, CD PLAYER, AIRSHOW 100, FLITEFONE VI WITH TWO HANDSETS, AFT FULLY ENCLOSED AIRLINE STYLE LAVATORY AND JUMPSEAT. Exterior OVERALL WHITE WITH GOLD AND BLACK ACCENTS. Maintenance ON HONEYWELL "HAPP" AVIONICS WARRANTY PROGRAM, ENGINES ENROLLED ON MSP GOLD WHICH COVERS ALL SCHEDULED AND UNSCHEDULED ENGINE MAINTENANCE INCLUDING CORE

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

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www.AvBuyer.com

INSPECTIONS. ON CAMP COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE TRACKING SYSTEM, FRESH ANNUAL, E & F CHECKS AND 12 YEAR LANDING GEAR OVERHAUL COMPLIED WITH BY RAYTHEON TAMPA OCTOBER 2011. 48 MONTH INSPECTION/G CHECK COMPLIED WITH SEPTEMBER 2009 BY STARPORT IN ORLANDO, FL, LOGBOOK RESEARCH SHOWS AIRCRAFT HAD HAIL DAMAGE AND AN APU FIRE.

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell GNS-XLS FMS Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior.

Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale One Year Cescom Enrollment Zero Engine Option

1996 Dassault Falcon 900B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings: • MSP Gold • EGPWS • 406 ELT • Airshow 400 • Satphone • TCAS II w/change 7 • RVSM Certified • Paint & Interior 2006 • New Carpet 2006 • Immaculate Condition • With Complete History

152 N18FX 7,480 3,826

Airframe Inspection Status A, A+ Due: June 2012 2A, 2A+ Due: June 2012 3A Due: February 2013 4A+ Due: June 2012 B Due: 8711 Hours 2B Due: 8711 Hours 3B Due: 8711 Hours C, 3C Due: June 2013 2C, 4C Due: June 2019 Landing Gear Due: June 2019 SB F900-390 C/W – This extends all “A” inspection intervals to 8 Months/400hrs

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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S H O W C A S E

2003 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1046 N900GF 4175 3471

Engines Left Engine 3708 Right Engine 3621 Enrolled in ESP Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS, • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 K • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • WX950 Stormscope

Exterior Matterhorn White with Las Vegas Gold, Seminole Red, and Nordic Grey stripes. Interior Fire-blocked eight passenger executive interior in a center club confi guration with an aft belted seat for an ninth passenger. Left and Right executive tables in the center club. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • 406 ELT • KHF950 Provision

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


S H O W C A S E

2001 Cessna CJ1 Serial Numbers: Registration: Airframe: Landings:

525-0435 G-CJAD 2020 1580

Engines LH Engine Model: Williams International FJ-44-1A on Pwr adv RH Engine Model: Williams International FJ44-1A on Pwr adv LH Engine Total Time: 1965/ TBO:3500/ Cycles:2935 RH Engine Total Time: 2020/ TBO:3500/ Cycles:2935 Avionics Coms: Honeywell KY-196 Comms/8.33 KHz TCAS: Honeywell CAS-66 TCAS I Navs: Honeywell KN53 Navs/FM Immunity Collins Pro Line 21 IFCS DMEs: Honeywell KN63 DME/Chelton DM441B DME RVSM: Capable ADF: Honeywell KR-87 ADF EFIS: Collins Pro Line 21 2-Tube EFIS Transponders: Dual Garmin GTX-330D Mode ‘S’ Autopilot & FDS: Collins Pro Line 21 Autopilot Weather Radar: Collins RTA-800 Colour Radar FMS – Universal UNS-1K FMS/GPS Radar Altimeter: Collins ALT-55B Rad/Alt ELT: Artex 406 MHz

Options Thrust Attenuators, Oxygen System, EROS Crew Oxygen Masks, Skitube baggage compartment, Sunshield covers, Rosen Sunvisors. Engines on power advantage fully paid. JAR OPS & EASA Compliant. B&D Cabin Information Display. Cockpit Curtain Exterior & Interior Overall White with Dark Brown, Gold and Coral Red Accent Stripes. Exterior in very good Condition. Five place executive interior having a forward side facing seat and a club four setting with fold out sidewall tables. All seats upholstered in light tan leather with the upper sidewalls in a co-ordinated patterned design. Carpet is beige wool loop with the headliner matching the colour of the seats. The woodwork is finished in medium tone Khayawood veneer with the seatbelts and hardware in brushed aluminium. A forward ‘Deluxe’ refreshment centre is located at the front of the cabin opposite the side facing seat. Electrical Outlets located in the club four area. Lavatory with flush toilet at the rear of cabin. Interior in very good condition.

Price: $2,250,000 USD inclusive of paid EEC European VAT

History- maintenance and records: Maintained on CESCOM with Pro Parts. HSI on engines c/w 2/09 Location Lugano - LSZA - Switzerland JETFINA SA Via Nassa 29, 6900 Lugano, Switzerland

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Office: Mobile 1: Mobile 2: E-mail: Web:

+41 91-9214603 +41 76-5069030 +41 76-4122695 info@jetfina.com www.jetfina.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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MARKETING TODAY - INTERNAL BRANDING

Internal Branding Big influence, but oft-neglected. by David Heitman ave you ever noticed when walking into a company’s office or hangar for the first time how within minutes you detect a refreshing level of enthusiasm and commitment among the people you meet? There is something positive animating the whole environment. If so, what you’re sensing is the employees’ collective loyalty to the company and its brand. The effort to consciously cultivate this experience is known among communications professionals as internal branding—a concept predicated on the belief that your employees are just as important an audience as your customers and prospects. As with all branding efforts, authenticity is key. If a company attempts to instill excitement around brand attributes and virtues that it really doesn’t possess, it only generates cynicism among employees. Mission statement posters that claim one thing while management attitudes and behaviors say another, end up breeding low-level negativity — a passive aggressive attitude that ultimately seeps out into interactions with customers. It’s like a low-grade fever that passes from employees to customers, and never quite gets cured. On the other hand, brand loyalty is equally contagious. Customers can’t help but be swept up in the excitement when a company is living out the highest virtues of its brand

H

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every day. To create this positive flywheel effect within an aviation business, internal branding must be reinforced 1) from the inside out; 2) from the top down; and 3) from the bottom up.

FROM THE INSIDE OUT "Our internal branding is really all about our company’s culture. It grows from the inside out,” says Steve Gade, vice president of sales and marketing at Duncan Aviation. “We set expectations from day one with all new employees regarding our brand values, beginning with an orientation that includes a dialogue with our chairman, president or the most senior leader at each hiring location.” Another way that Duncan Aviation reinforces its brand is by sharing company-wide each Friday how various customers have mentioned the positive experiences they’ve had with specific employees. “Our people thrive on this positive feedback,” Gade says. “It encourages us all to be our best.”

FROM THE TOP DOWN Internal branding goes far beyond what the marketing department can deliver. Unless an organization’s top leadership is actively and consciously cultivating the brand within the organization, the effort will never reach its full potential. For aviation business leaders to assure that such internal branding is given www.AvBuyer.com

proper attention, it is good to set aside some time annually to take a pulse on the company culture, and to talk to customers about what they are experiencing. The late Steve Jobs was known for periodically manning the customer service phones at Apple just so he could hear this kind of firsthand feedback. His commitment to delivering the Apple brand experience across all customer touch-points is what has made the company so fanatically beloved and so immensely profitable. When I work with company leaders on their branding or re-branding efforts, one of the exercises involves asking questions such as: 1. What is the first word that should come to mind when people hear your company mentioned? 2. What are the core brand values to which you are willing to hold fast, even if it means losing business? 3. What is the greatest compliment your fiercest competitor would have to pay your organization? 4. What is the most frequent compliment you hear from your customers? 5. What behaviors are most rewarded in your organization? 6. Would all your employees give the same answers to the questions above? Aircraft Index see Page 4


MARKETING TODAY - INTERNAL BRANDING Simple questions like these provide muchneeded clarity on the path to developing a coherent, authentic and relevant brand. It then remains to give creative expression to it, both within and outside the company.

FROM THE BOTTOM UP There’s a world of difference between employees giving passive assent to a company’s brand virtues and actively finding ways to reinforce them in their daily lives. The sure sign of a company's successful internal branding effort is overhearing employees talking about the brand virtues in conversations with each other and with customers. And because you’ll never find employees more receptive to imbibing the brand than when they are first hired, orientation is a crucial time to be highly intentional about internal branding. Rather than viewing this opportunity as some sort of passive corporate “indoctrination” process, new-hires should be encouraged to apply the brand in their everyday work, and even be empowered to challenge company policies, procedures and experiences that are inconsistent with the brand.

football team that is continuously reminded of its identity by its colors, logo, mascot and other accoutrements. It takes time, attention and accountability for a busy aviation company to maintain this level of visual brand consistency; but it will enable the organization to communicate to its employees and customers that the brand really matters. Thus any employees who have a role in producing communications should work out of a brand standards guide that specifies correct logo usage, approved color scheme, typeface, etc. That way, every communication effort produced for both internal and external audiences reflects a unified look and feel. (There are few things that suggest chaos and disorder more than having multiple versions of a logo used in company communications.) To employees and customers alike, visual brand consistency conveys the precision and discipline that stand behind the company’s services—virtues that are particularly important in the aviation community.

A complex mission statement will never fire the hearts and imaginations of employees. They won’t be able to remember it, let alone apply it to their daily lives.

BUILD BRANDING FROM THE BOTTOM UP

KEEPING THINGS SIMPLE As with all marketing efforts, simplicity is crucial to success with internal branding. A complex mission statement will never fire the hearts and imaginations of employees. They won’t be able to remember it, let alone apply it to their daily lives. But a clear, simple brand is a clarion call that enables employees to reinforce it with customers every day. For example, Ritz-Carlton's legendary mantra, ‘ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen’ is a simple but elegant encapsulation of the hotel’s internal brand. Because it is so simple, it requires the conscious, intelligent application by all employees. It doesn’t tell people what to do. It tells them who they are as employees of the Ritz-Carlton. You only need to stay at a Ritz property once to realize that this internal branding effort is working. Perhaps the most powerful tactic in this area is to encourage employees to treat each other like customers. Such internal reinforcement of the brand among co-workers will result in a greater consistency of the brand experience for customers.

VISUAL BRANDING We live in a highly visual culture where sophisticated graphics infuse everything from the television we watch to the packaged products we buy. So as employees daily come into contact with their company’s visual brand elements—logos, color schemes, iconic images— these visual cues can subconsciously communicate staying power, strength, and structure as opposed to chaos and disorder. It’s like a Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

AMBASSADORS OF AN EMBASSY In aviation, strict adherence to checklists, protocols and standards of professionalism are indispensable. The same is true of internal branding. Ultimately, the goal of internal branding is to make every employee a brand ambassador—someone who is loyal to the brand, who defends and promotes it to those outside the organization, and whose day-today decisions are defined by the freedom and empowerment to apply the brand. As Steve Gade at Duncan Aviation says, “Our customers tell us that we have something different going on here. That’s how we know we are doing things right.” www.AvBuyer.com

❯ David Heitman is president of The Creative Alliance, a public relations and branding firm specializing in business aviation marketing. He can be reached at david@thecreativealliance.com. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

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ON THE ROAD AGAIN

TOP, THE ADVENTURERS; BOTTOM (LEFT) MONTEZUMA, AZ, AND (RIGHT) THE GRAND CANYON

On The Road Again When gentlemen and ladies take to their motorcycles. by Kay Carfagna 136

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

illie Nelson’s ‘On The Road Again’ lyrics aptly describe a certain motorcycle-riding, funloving gang of aviation executives who take to the road together once or twice annually. Frequently a planned motorcycle ride occurs around an aviation event such as NBAA because so many of the ride participants would be traveling to that event location anyway. In the scope of their day jobs, we would refer to them as gentlemen and ladies, but

W

www.AvBuyer.com

when they break out the helmets, leather jackets, and motorcycle boots, a perceptible transformation occurs. The engines kick-in and the deep-throated rumblings of Harley Davidsons and the finely-tuned humming of powerful, sleek BMWs fill the air. The ride is on. The fall motorcycle trip this year was organized and led by Joe Carfagna, Sr. of Leading Edge Aviation Solutions. On the first day of the 5-day, 900 mile-trip winding to Sedona, Arizona and back, 23 riders and 15 ❯ motorcycles rode down Las Vegas’ famous Aircraft Index see Page 4


D E D I C A T E D T O H E L P I N G B U S I N E S S A C H I E V E I T S H I G H E S T G O A L S.

SHARED MISSION. SHARED PASSION. If there’s anything our Members love as much as flying, it’s knowing that when they fly for business, they’re making the most of every hour. That is, after all, why they joined the National Business Aviation Association. We offer literally hundreds of programs and services to help Members fly as safely and efficiently as possible. And, ultimately, to help their businesses succeed. If you have a passion for flying, and productivity, join the Association that not only shares your interests, but also works to protect them. Join today at www.nbaa.org/join/was or call 1-866-363-4650.


ON THE ROAD AGAIN Strip and out of town. We rode 35 miles south to Hoover Dam and on into the desert heading toward Kingman, Arizona (another 65 miles). It was hard to appreciate the stark beauty of the surrounding desert because of the buffeting winds and cold temperatures, but we hunkered down and kept a steady pace on the way to our first destination, Kingman AZ. Kingman has acquired a rather unfortunate association with Timothy McVeigh, but the nicer and more lingering memory is that this is the town where Interstate 40 and Historic Route 66 cross. Naturally we could not miss riding on Route 66. Route 66 is on the seedy side today and is no longer part of the U.S. highway system, but at one time this Chicago to L.A. two-lane road was the route for those migrating west seeking a better life - especially after the 1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dust storms damaged the prairie lands. Today Route 66 offers a nostalgic ride that tells a distinctly American story. Our own journey on Route 66 continued to Seligman where we again made a brief stop. Skipping Williams in favor of reaching Sedona before sundown, we headed for the Interstate through Flagstaff and connected with Route 89A - a road passing through thick pine forests, before spectacularly descending into Oak Creek Canyon (the southern entrance to Sedona and the red rocks country). The ride through Oak Creek Canyon is a thrilling one, encompassing lots of hairpin turns and amazing views of the scenic canyon. On reaching the bottom of the gorge we were on a 13 mile approach to Sedona

JEROME, AZ

surrounded by amazing beauty. A hot shower to warm up and a change of clothes at our Sedona hotel transformed us once again into gentlemen and ladies for the evening. Among the list of things to do in, and near Sedona were a hot air balloon ride, a motorcycle/van ride to the Grand Canyon, jeep trips to see the red rocks and a visit to nearby Jerome (an old mining town). Unfortunately our weather was still tough and the balloon ride was not a possibility.

RED ROCKS Many of us went on the guided jeep tours of the unique red rocks of Sedona. These sandstone rocks began to form when Sedona was a delta under the sea. After much erosion from the nearby mountains the delta filled in.

The land rose because of the movement of the tectonic plates, and the action of the water over time created spectacular rock formations. The red color is caused by the high iron that was in the sea that passed through the porous sandstone of these formations. The spectacular orange-red tones become even more vivid as the sun moves along the rocks.

GRAND CANYON & JEROME A ride (by van or motorcycle) to the south rim of the Grand Canyon, an excellent vantage point to see the majesty and aweinspiring expanse of this natural wonder, took about two hours. Another shorter day trip was a motorcycle ride to the old mile-high copper mining town of Jerome which seemed to cling to the mountainside as you approached. Jerome has a restored settlement and an interesting museum showing the mining life there in its heyday between 1880 and 1940. Also on exhibit are various mining tools, train engines and ore cars.

MONTEZUMA PARK Another day presented the chance of a 25mile ride south to Montezuma Park which has a spectacular, 5-storey cliff dwelling built by the Sinaqua Indians around the 14th century. The dwelling is carved into a towering white limestone cliff about 70 feet off the ground and consists of 20 rooms. Our time in Sedona passed quickly, and all too soon it was time to pack up the motorcycles and head back to Vegas. Our choice was to ride hard, make time and get back only with needed stops. That evening the adventurers became gentlemen and ladies again, swapping the leathers, well worn boots and helmets for business suits and dresses, ready to embark on another busy few days at the NBAA Convention.

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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SAVE THE DATE! NBAA Regional Forums: Supporting Business Aviation at the Local Level NBAA Business Aviation Regional Forums bring an array of business aircraft owners, operators, manufacturers and customers together for a one-day event at the most esteemed airports and FBOs in the nation. Let NBAA help you meet your business objectives on a regional basis. Plan now to exhibit at the 2012 NBAA Business Aviation Regional Forums. Learn more at www.nbaa.org/forums

2012 Regional Forum Dates 'FCSVBSZo/FX0SMFBOT -"t-BOENBSL"WJBUJPO "QSJMo7BO/VZT $"t58$"WJBUJPO.BHVJSF"WJBUJPO +VOFo5FUFSCPSP /+t'JSTU"WJBUJPO 4FQUFNCFSo4FBUUMF 8"t$MBZ-BDZ"WJBUJPO


Marketplace Boeing 737-500 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1991

S/N:

25419

TTAF:

37643

Reg:

N419CT

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

This 737-500 has undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work including a heavy C check, installation of winglets and conversion to VIP configuration in December 2010. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. The exterior has been painstakingly stripped and repainted and the interior has been finished to a very high VIP standard. Price: Make offer

Boeing 737-300 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1990

S/N:

24570

TTAF:

53457

Reg:

N470AC

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

This Boeing 737-300 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work and has been converted to a VIP configuration in February 2011. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. Winglets have been fitted to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call

Cessna Citation Bravo

Year:

2000

S/N:

550-0906

TTAF:

5410

Reg:

HB-VNZ

Doysa VIP Aviation Year:

2011

S/N:

4212

TTAF:

257

Reg:

TC-DYO

Location: Turkey

Engines: Rolls Royce Tay MK 611-8C Left Engine: S/N: 85429, Total Time: 257 hours, Cycles: 213, Right Engine: S/N: 85430 Total Time:257 hours Cycles: 213, Honeywell Primus Epic System, Redundancy by Triple Honeywell Avionics, Engines enrolled on Rolls-Royce Corporate Care, G-CMP Maintenance Tracking, Excellent Maintenance Status. Please e-mail for further details. Price: USD 29,900,000

EPSN Year:

1998

S/N:

3095

TTAF:

2011

Reg:

PH-EVY

Location: Netherlands

Email: yikilmaz@doysaair.com Tel: +31 (0) 629 560 272

Aircraft in Executive lay-out 12 pax. Exceptionally wide corporate cabin arrangement with forward kitchen and aft Wardrobe/Lavatory room (wider then e.g. G V or Falcon 900). Kitchen with oven, coffeemaker, wash bin, ample stowing cabinetry. Cabin with moving map display, video/audio system. Wardrobe / lavatory area with large wardrobe space. With access to the aft baggage compartment. Fresh Phase V inspection, Fresh LG Overhaul. EASA JAR/OPS1 equipped. Dual S-Transponder. RVSM mod c/w. Price: make offer

✈ www.AvBuyer.com

Email: martin.bernegger@jetaviation.ch Tel: +90 (0) 212 426 3003

Dornier 328

Tel: +41 (0) 58 158 8600

JAR/EU-OPS1 compliant, MAINTENANCE: Phase 5 & Refurbishment 11/2010, Engine Overhaul & Paint 2008. Fully enrolled on ProParts & Power Advantage Program. Maintenance tracking on CescomCamp. CABIN: Standard Cabin configuration for up to 8 Passengers. Center Club Seating with fold out tables. Fwd Refreshment Center. Flushing Toilet. AVIONICS: Primus 1000 Integrated Avionics System. RVSM, EHS/ELS compliant. UNS1-L FMS, approved for RNP-10, RNP-5/BRNAV, RNAV, V/LNAV, PRNAV. Certified for Steep Approach. Price: Please call

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Email: trevorw@euroav.com

Jet Aviation Business Jets AG

Location: Switzerland

Gulfstream G450

Email: trevorw@euroav.com

Email: hwac@hwac.demon.nl WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

141


Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

TTAF:

6615.3

Reg:

N337WR

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA jetphotos.net

Bell 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

TTAF:

1700

Reg: Location: USA

justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners. US $1,975,000.

1981

S/N:

33017

TTAF:

15265

Reg:

N554AL

Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’. Fresh annual / Export C of A. Price US $3,875,000 ✈

Bell 212

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not do

Bell 412 EMS

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

S/N: TTAF: Reg: Location: USA

142

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace Citation XLS

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Year:

2007

S/N: TTAF:

2,250

Reg:

Tel: +49 821 7003 100

EU-Reg., EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS-400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German Commercial Certificate. CAMO+, Top condition!

Location: Europe ✈

Gulfstream G550

Email: info@beechcraft.de

L & L International Ltd Year: S/N:

5082

TTAF:

2404

Reg:

N709DW

Tel: +1 305 754 3313

Landings: 875, Avionics: Honeywell Primus II Epic Integrated Radio System with Dual Honeywell, MRC 855A Modular Radio Cabinets and Honeywell MT-860 Third NAV/COMM Cabinet, AUDIO: Triple Honeywell AV 900 Audio Panels, FDS: Honeywell Primus Epic System with Dual Auto throttle, Interior: 18 passengers, FWD Galley.

Location: USA ✈

Socata TBM 700B

Danish Air Transport Year:

2002

S/N:

237

TTAF:

1800

Reg:

N700VB

Location: Denmark

Tel: +44 (0) 7729 299 275 AVIONICS: King KR-8, Drum Autopilot: King KFC-325 3-Axis, King EFIS-40 2-Tube Color/Garmin King KAS-297 Dual Garmin GNS530, King KCS-305 King KDI-574, Honeywell EFIS-40 2-Tube Color, King KLN-90B(IFR), Honeywell EFIS-40 Tube Color Navigation Radios: Dual Garmin GNS-530 King KRA-405 Dual Garmin GTX 330D Stormscope: Bf Goodrich WX-500 TCAS: BF Goodrich Skywatch SKY-899 King RDR-2000. INTERIOR: VIP Leather, Refreshment Cabinet, CD Player, Bose Headset Wiring. MAINTENANCE: LDG & 600 hr Completed 10/2010

Socata TBM 700B Year:

2002

S/N:

230

TTAF:

1426

Reg:

N324JS

Tel: +44 (0) 7957 106 952 An extremely well presented and cared for Example of a Socata TBM 700 B with recent Hot Section Inspection, Socata Service Centre Maintained, Annual Inspection Completed Dec 2011. Complete and Original Logs. No Exceedences. Always Hangared. VAT paid in Europe. Garmin 530, KMD 850 MFD, EFIS-40 EHSI & EADI, Annual 31 Dec 2012, Gear Inspection & Long Life Enrolled, Garmin 330 Mode S, Prop 260SN, Interior Flawless, 2 Drink /Storage Cabinets, 6 Place Bose, Crew/Pac Music. Full Detail www.jtair.net/n324js. Price: Please Call

Email: mail@jtair.net

Air Vendee Investissement Year:

1998

S/N:

725

TTAF:

6018

Reg:

F-OHQU

Location: Caribbean Nations

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +33 (0) 251 477 789

Airplane TSN 6018 CSN 12833, Engine Pratt and Whitney Canada Type PT6A-114A, Serial Number PCE-PC0973, TSN 3140 CSN 15999, TSO 0 TSHSI 0, ENG LLP CSN (according to PWC report), Propeller McCaulley, Type 3GFR34C703-B, Serial Number 010759, TSN UKN TSO 0 FH, Interior: 2 crew / 8 pax Seats Leather/Grey Floor color / Material Woodply, Exterior: All White with no marks, Avionics: ADF King KR87, VHF1 COM King KX165-25 VHF2 King KX165-25, DME King KN63-0, ELT Socata ELT96 (406MHz). Price: USD 1,000,000

✈ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Email: chris@dat.dk

JT Air Ltd

Location: United Kingdom

Cessna Caravan 208B Grand

Email: marc@L-Lint.com

Email: carole.guicheteau@groupedubreuil.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

143


Marketplace Cessna 208 CaravanB

Privatejet International GmbH Year:

2008

S/N: TTAF:

720

Reg:

D-FROB

Location: Germany

LOW TIME, Glass Cockpit. Beauty in every Single Engine Turbine Fleet. Well Maintenained, low time flown. Engine: Type: Pratt and Whitney PT6A-114A, HP: 675 HP, TSN: 710 hours (10/2011), Propeller: Type: McCauley 3GFR34C703/106GA-O, TSN: 720 hours (10/2011), Avionics: Garmin 1000 + Additionals, Weather Radar: Garmin GWX-68 4 Color Digital WX, Additional Equipment & Features: Additional Intercom Installed for Passenger Seats No. 3 + 4,TKS: Anti- Icing Sys,Oxygen System: 17 Port 115 cu / ft, Air Condition: Freon, Parachute Kit incl. Outside Steps & Handles, Aero Twin Exhaust. Price: USD $1,600,000

Eurocopter SA 315B

1979

S/N: TTAF:

14200

Reg:

HB

Location: Switzerland

Tel: +41 (0) 71 966 60 62 Time since overhaul 4000 h (last major inspection 04/2004), last T2 inspection done in July 2011 (10100 h), TBO 4800 h (special Eurocopter programm). Avionics:King KX 125 VHF COM/NAV, Mode S XPDR King KT73, ELT 406 AF-H, Intercom Senehi Avionics, Tactical radio FM AP2299/07 with scanner, 2 Headsets Peltor. Options: Cargo Hook Sling, Rescue Hoist fixed parts, 2nd Landing Light, Skis, Dual Controls, Monitoring for vertical Ref Operation, Cargo Mirror, Utility basket LH & RH, Bubble.

Agusta A109E Power

Email: trevorw@euroav.com

ASCOB Year:

Email: info@ascob.ch

East Midlands Helicopters Year:

2008

S/N:

11721

TTAF:

870.2

Reg:

G-EMHC

Tel: +49 (0) 4215 257 1111

Tel: +44 (0) 1509 856 464

Always hangared, maintained to the highest standard for CAT flights. Immediately available with lease back/aircraft management available. Price: Make offer

Location: United Kingdom ✈

Sikorsky S76C+

K-R Aircraft Year:

1997

S/N:

760470

TTAF:

4697

Reg:

N241KK

Email: sales@helicopter-services.co.uk Tel: +1 909-783-1718

Available for immediate sale with the best market price, #1 EG: 1088, #2 EG: 1250 TSO, FLIR 2000 HP Ultra Media Camera, 4 Tube Honeywell EDZ 705 EFIS, Cabin Audio, 12 PAX Seats, Trimble GPS, 406AF ELT, KFS-576A Transponder, RDR-1400C WX Rader, NDH Excellent records with Fresh Annual /Export C of A.

Location: USA ✈

Eurocopter EC 120B

Mataneg Year:

2005

S/N:

1396

TTAF:

1300

Reg:

HB-ZFY

Location: Switzerland

Tel: +39 (0) 348 737 7374 Thales H 321 EHM.- Gyro-Horizon. UI 9560 Turn and Bank Indicator. Honeywell KCS 55A Gyro-Compass with Honeywell KI 525A. Garmin GNS 430 - VHF/VOR/LOC/GS GPS. Honeywell KY 196ASC+ VHF/AM. Garmin GTX 328 Transp. Mod S. Shadin 8800 T Altitude Encoder. Kannad 406 AF-H Emerg. Locator Transmit. Garmin GMA 340H ICS. Chronometer thomen. GPS AV Map. Air conditioning. Electrical ground power recept. Fuel flowmeter. Stylence pack. Inspection 6 years done in march 2011. Price reduced. NO INTERMEDIATE. Price: USD 1,100,000

144

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: KAZKRAIR@aol.com

Email: triggianese@tesmed.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace Par Avion Ltd

+1 832 934 0055

Alberth Air Parts

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011

Find an Aircraft Dealer

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 15th February Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................146

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3

John Hopkinson & Associates ..............................131

ABACE ......................................................................109

Dominion Aircraft........................................................53

Leading Edge Aviation ..............................................43

AeroSmith/Penny .......................................................40

Duncan Aviation..........................................................47

Lease Connexion........................................................99

AeroExpo – Sywell .................................................109

Eagle Aviation..............................................................79

Lektro..........................................................................105

AIC Title Services.......................................................73

Eagle Creek Aviation .................................................21

Mente Group ...................................................123-125

Air Alliance ................................................................126

EBACE .........................................................................36

NBAA Business Aviation Forums ........................140

Air 1st Aviation ..............................................................5

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................89

NBAA Corporate .....................................................137

Albinati Aeronautics SA ................................128-129

Freestream Aircraft USA ..........................................83

New Jet International .................................................87

AMSTAT .....................................................................115

General Aviation Services..................................32-33

NextJet..................................................................41,127

Avjet Corporation.................................................22-23

Goodwood Aviation Exhibition .............................111

Northern Air...............................................................132

Avpro ......................................................................18-20

Guardian Jet..........................................................11-13

O’Gara Aviation Company.................................38-39

Bell Aviation...........................................................26-27

Gulfstream Pre-Owned ...............................................5

Par Avion ......................................................................46

Bombardier..................................................................31

Heliasset.com .............................................................95

PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales ................................71

Boutsen Aviation ..................................................55,93

IBA Group .................................................................105

Rolls-Royce..................................................................57

Bristol Associates ......................................................51

Intellijet International .................................................6-7

Start-Pac.........................................................................4

Central Business Jets .............................................147

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................15-17

The Jet Collection ......................................................85

Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................65

JetBlack Aviation ........................................................75

Top Luxury Show.............................................118-119

Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................59

JetBrokers..............................................................28-29

VREF Aircraft Values ..............................................122

Chuck Collins & Associates..................................105

Jetcraft Corporation............................FC, 25, 97, BC

Welsch Aviation ..........................................................61

Conklin & de Decker ...............................................139

Jeteffect ........................................................................63

Wentworth & Affiliates...............................................91

Corporate AirSearch Int’l.................................69,130

JETFINA SA..............................................................133

Wiley Rein .................................................................122

Corporate Concepts ...........................................35,37

JETNET ......................................................................103

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................67

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – February 2012

145


When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


General Offices

Vienna Office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Austria

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +43 660 549 1099

FAX: (952) 894-8569

FAX: +44 20 7900 2890

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

EMAIL: erich@cbjets.com

2004 FALCON 2000EX EASy S/N 40

FALCON 900EX EASy S/N 121

1700 TT, C Check and Dry Bay Mod completed 2010 by Duncan, Pratt ESP Gold Engines, Interior 10 Place gutted in 2007, Large Monitors, External Camera System

Former Falcon Demo, Only 2400 Hours TT, Most Systems are Triple, Satcom/HUD, Over $3M worth of Options, US & EASA Certified, Owners New 7X Has Arrived

2004 FALCON 2000 S/N 217

FALCON 900B S/N 110

US & EASA Certified, 10 PAX Interior, MSP Gold, Less than 400 Hours since C Inspection

Meets All EASA / Transport Canada / FAA Approvals; 3C Inspection completed 2010, Owners 900EX Easy has Arrived, MSP Gold, Forward Galley or Normal Galley with Forward Lav.

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5192

2007 CITATION CJ2+ S/N 349

Single Owner, Pratt Power Advantage Engine & APU Program, Spectacular Cockpit including Dual NZ-2000’s and Honeywell RAAS, Aircell Access, XM Sat Weather… 9 PAX Interior

Owners New CJ4 Has Arrived, 704.2 TT, William Rolls Royce Tap Elite Engine Program, Cescom, Citation Serviced Exclusively Since New

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

2008 HAWKER 900XP S/N 033

3322.1 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod

853.31 Hours, MSP Gold, EASA / JAR Ops / FAA Certified, Standard 8 Place Interior, Dual FMS, Dual GPS, Dual AHRS, Etc…

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 347 Phenomenal Corporate Jet Cockpit, Mid Time Motors, PBH on all Gear Boxes, Estate Sale, Priced to Move

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 344 Fortune 100 Owned, 8 Place Executive, Fully Loaded EFIS Cockpit, Freon Air -conditioning


Just because you no longer have connecting flights

you no longer need connections.

The right aircraft can turn up anywhere—which means you need to know the right people everywhere. We’ve been cultivating worldwide connections for nearly 50 years, from legal and financial resources to the top aviation experts. Today our unmatched global network gives you eyes, ears and business savvy around the planet. A larger inventory of options. And fast, smooth, face-to-face transactions. Want the best value in the business? Just connect the dots. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

1990 FALCON 50 - SN 203

2007 CHALLENGER 300 - SN 20143

2010 LEAR 45XR - SN 412

Pedigree Operating History, Collins ProLine 21 Cockpit

Lowest Priced 3rd Generation Challenger 300 Available Under Factory Warranty

Highly Optioned, Aggressively Priced

2005 LEGACY 600 - SN 1450961 Pristine Condition, All Reasonable Offers Considered

2012 Airbus ACJ

2008 Challenger 850

2012 Falcon 7X

2005 Challenger 300

2000 Citation Excel

2010 Falcon 7X

1997 Challenger 604

1993 Citation V

2007 Global 5000

2000 Challenger 604

1994 Citation VII

2011 Global XRS

2005 Challenger 604

1997 Citation X

2007 Gulfstream 150

2007 Challenger 605

2008 Citation XLS+

2003 Gulfstream 550

2011 Challenger 605

2003 CRJ - 200

1988 Gulfstream IV

2012 Challenger 605

2003 Falcon 2000EX

1996 Sikorsky S-76B

2000 GLOBAL EXPRESS - SN 9062 Uncompromising Quality, Immediately Available

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I -

DOESN’T MEAN

World Aircraft Sales Magazine Feb-12  

World Aircraft Sales Magazine February 2012

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