Page 1

AMAC FC April 2018.qxp_FC December 06 19/03/2018 16:45 Page 1

April 2018

â„¢

B U S I N E S S

A V I A T I O N

I N T E L L I G E N C E

Once in a lifetime B747-8i This magnificent aircraft, one of only seven (7) operating worldwide, is for sale in VIP Configuration. View our documentation and technical specifications: https://www.amacaerospace.com/amac-pdf/

THIS MONTH Aircraft Comparative Analysis: Gulfstream G200 How to Tailor Jet Connectivity to Your Needs

www.amacaerospace.com

www.AVBUYER.com


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Editor Welcome April18.qxp_JMesingerNov06 20/03/2018 11:51 Page 1

EDITORIAL Commissioning Editor Matthew Harris +44 (0)20 8939 7722 Editorial@avbuyer.com

Guest Editor’s VIEWPOINT Matt Nelson

Editorial Contributor (USA Office) Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com

ADS-B: What Are You Waiting For? ver the course of 2017, Duncan Aviation’s 26 satellite avionics shops and work-away stations installed Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) systems in dozens of different models of aircraft, and performed 237 upgrades or installations. The facilities in Lincoln, Nebraska; Battle Creek, Michigan; and Provo, Utah performed an additional 83 upgrades. Although qualified shops from around the United States are making a dent in the numbers, estimates place the number of business jets that are currently ADS-B compliant at roughly 40% of the fleet. As they currently stand, the statistics show a somewhat startling number of aircraft that are mandated by the FAA to have ADS-B out equipment installed by midnight, December 31, 2019, will be vying for available MRO shop space in the remaining 20 months. As a matter of fact, the average monthly rate at which the remainder of the fleet needs modification is 390 aircraft, and rising with each month that passes (the current rate is less than half that at 190 aircraft per month). As we get closer to the deadline, there will be an increasing shortage of hangar space and qualified shops with experienced avionics technicians to upgrade your aircraft. Although reputable MRO shops will be doing their utmost to cater for the demand (in 2017 Duncan Aviation’s nationwide network of satellite facilities allotted space and labor for 300 upgrades, increasing capacity to 460 in 2018, and planning for nearly 600 in 2019), we’ve all been repeating the same message for several years: If you haven’t already done so, upgrade now. Don’t wait until the last minute - the deadline isn’t going to

O

change, and parts and labor prices are not going to drop. The message across the entire spectrum of reputable upgrade facilities is the same: there are no silver bullets on the horizon with regard to ADS-B upgrades. The OEMs have spent millions of dollars developing solutions for their platforms, and they aren’t going to develop anything at a lower cost, or that’s easier to install in the final months before the deadline.

“In fact, most vendors have already announced price increases for this year and next.” Understand, too, the objectives of a reputable MRO in light of the mandates in general. Our objective is to ensure that operators become compliant by the deadline in order to keep their aircraft flying. If aircraft are sitting on the ground, they aren’t useful to anyone. You can read more about the upcoming ADS-B Out mandate and the anticipated surge in demand over the coming months on p36 of this issue. Irrespective of the source you read, the message is the same to those who remain non-compliant: Time is running lower, costs are climbing higher, and shop-space is becoming more of a premium as the deadline draws closer. Matt Nelson, Duncan Aviation’s Satellite Operations Manager and an ADS-B and NextGen expert, has more than 30 years’ experience in avionics and more than 20 years working on business aircraft in some of the busiest airports in the US. Discover more at www.duncanaviation.com

The best aircraft for sale search anywhere, everywhere - on pc, smartphone and tablet.

4

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

ONLINE I PRINT I BROADCAST I EVENTS

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Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4000 Sean@avbuyer.com ADVERTISING Linda Blackburn (USA Sales) 1- 614 418 7064 Linda@avbuyer.com Lise Margin (USA Sales) 1-703 818 1024 Lise@avbuyer.com Maria Brabec (European Sales) +420 604 224 828 Maria@avbuyer.com Karen Price +44 (0)20 8255 4700 Karen@avbuyer.com Liam Robinson (Digital Solutions Manager) +44 (0)20 8939 7720 Liam@avbuyer.com STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli / Mark Williams +44 (0)20 8939 7726 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com CIRCULATION Sue Brennan +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sue@avbuyer.com AVBUYER.COM Jayne Jackson Jayne@avbuyer.com Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com MANAGING DIRECTOR John Brennan +44 (0)20 8255 4229 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE AvBuyer House, 34A High Street, Thames Ditton, Surrey KT7 0RY, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 Freephone from USA: 1- 800 620 8801 PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 Aircraft Index see Page 145


Basel, Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland

Auch, France

Istanbul, Turkey Bodrum, Turkey Beirut, Lebanon

OUR SKILLS, YOUR EFFICIENCY AMAC Aerospace is a world leader in Maintenance and Completion services for both narrow and wide-body VIP aviation. Our bespoke handling of VIP maintenance projects is world-renowned and our “Return to Service” are world class for completions. AMAC’s hangars are fully equipped with the latest technologically advanced equipment and manned by certified personnel. We offer a full spectrum of maintenance services and welcome the opportunity to serve you in any capacity.

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D A S S A U LT F A L C O N 7 X | S E R I A L N U M B E R 1 7 0 YEAR: 2013

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BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS | SERIAL NUMBER 9033 YEAR: 1999

C A PA C I T Y: 1 4 PA X

AIRFRAME HOURS: 8356:59

AIRFRAME CYCLES: 3452

HIGHLIGHTS

• Competitively

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Priced to Sell

Engine and Airframe Programs

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communication system (ccs) - “Office in the Sky”

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BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS | SERIAL NUMBER 9280 Y E A R : 2 0 0 8 C A PA C I T Y: 1 5 PA X

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Specifications and/or descriptions are provided as introductory information only and do not constitute representations or warranties. Verification of specifications remain the sole responsibility of purchaser. Aircraft is subject to prior sale, lease, and/or removal from the market without prior notice.

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Specifications and/or descriptions are provided as introductory information only and do not constitute representations or warranties. Verification of specifications remain the sole responsibility of purchaser. Aircraft is subject to prior s

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D A S S A U LT F A L C O N 2 0 0 0 | S E R I A L N U M B E R 2 0 8 Y E A R : 2 0 0 3 C A PA C I T Y: 1 0 PA X

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AV Buyer_APRIL_2018.indd 6

M O N A C O LONDON

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MADRID V I E N N A

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16.03.2018 12:21:20


Contents Layout April18.qxp 21/03/2018 15:02 Page 1

Contents Volume 22, Issue 4

April2018

 BizAv Intelligence

18

Business Aviation Market Summary: Market trends, indicators, assessments and forecasts, introduced by Rollie Vincent

36

What’s the Current Status on ADS-B? Mike Chase and Mike Foye report in this JETNET>>Know More feature

44

How to Hook a Prize in Today’s Used Jet Market: Dealers and Brokers discuss the shrinking market, and how to source the best of what’s left

48

How Is the Asia-Pacific Market Looking in 2018? Asian Sky Group’s Jeff Lowe discusses the region’s prospects in 2018...

 Ownership

62

66

70

74

12

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

When to Consider Fractional Ownership: David Wyndham discusses when might be right to consider Fractional Ownership of a private aircraft What’s the Impact of Buying a Used Part 135 Airplane? Jet Tolbert addresses preconceptions about used aircraft previously utilized for charter What to Know About Aircraft Finance in Asia-Pacific: FlyFunder’s Paul Sykes offers insights for borrowers and lenders into AsiaPacific’s aircraft financing market… Points of Value specific to King Airs: Jeremy Cox continues his series discussing the popular King Air series of turboprop aircraft

80

Retail Price Guide: 20-year Turboprop price guide from The Aircraft Bluebook

86

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – Gulfstream G200: How does the Gulfstream G200 compare against Bombardier’s Challenger 300 and Dassault’s Falcon 2000? Find out here www.AVBUYER.com

 Operating

95

What’s the Current Impact of UAS on BizAv? Ken Elliott discusses Unmanned Aircraft Systems and how they impact Business and General Aviation

102

Plan for Your Next Satellite Solution: Passenger data consumption is on the rise. Is now the time to plan your next satellite solution? Gogo’s Brian Wilson details how

106

How to Tailor Jet Connectivity to Your Needs: How can the available solutions be tailored to specific mission needs? Viasat’s James Person discusses…

110

What’s Your Plan About Aircraft Damage? While most hope it’ll never happen to them, Aviation Director Andre Fodor highlights why having a plan pays dividends…

114

Specifications: Aircraft performance and specifications comparisons for turboprops aged 20 years and younger

 Community News

120 Introducing the Dassault Falcon 6X:

Dassault wasted no time introducing the replacement for the Falcon 5X. Rod Simpson was in France to report…

122 BizAv Review: OEM News and

Industry Appointments from around the BizAv Community

Next Month •

• •

Aircraft Comparative Analysis: Dassault Falcon 2000LX Flight Planning: Five Most Difficult Places to Travel Which Aircraft are Most Likely to Qualify for Financing?

ONLINE I PRINT I BROADCAST I EVENTS

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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Avpro April.qxp_Layout 1 19/03/2018 11:49 Page 2


Avpro April.qxp_Layout 1 19/03/2018 11:49 Page 3


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MarketIndicators April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 12:11 Page 1

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

Business Aviation Market Overview In the Business Aviation markets, multiple indicators align that point to warmer days ahead for an industry that has been largely wallowing in the doldrums for almost 10-years following the global financial crisis. Rollie Vincent explores…

mongst the bright spots on the near-term radar are aircraft utilization levels and used aircraft inventory levels, the first of which is steadily climbing, and the second of which is steadily falling. Flight operations in the all-important US and European markets have increased systematically in the mid-single digit percentage range for much of the past year (see several detailed reports on this topic on the pages that follow). At press time, the number of used business jets being offered ‘For Sale’ had slipped to about 2,000 aircraft, representing 9.4% of the worldwide in-service fleet of more than 21,600 jets, according to JETNET records. Notably, almost half (46%) of jets currently offered ‘For Sale’ have been in service for more than 20 years, with technology obsolescence, high direct operating costs and relatively high upgrade costs relative to the remaining residual value of the asset all conspiring against a sale. With more than 15,300 business turboprop aircraft in operation worldwide, just 6.9% of the fleet was listed as ‘For Sale’ in mid-March. As with business jets, these percentages are the lowest recorded in over 10 years. Tellingly, 62% of the ‘For Sale’ turboprop fleet has been in service for more than 20 years, with all the associated challenges of aging aircraft limiting the pool of potential buyers.

A

18

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Picked Over

As we have highlighted previously on these pages, the most attractive inventory – delivered within the past five years or less – has been mostly ‘picked over’ by savvy buyers who have recognized the value opportunities that have been a feature of this extended market recovery period. Only one in 15 of the business jets currently offered ‘For Sale’ fits this definition, and only one in 14 of business turboprops. The good news for the aircraft OEMs is that this paucity of young inventory is no longer much of a factor inhibiting new aircraft sales. The not-so-good news is that, despite reasonably strong corporate profitability and the tailwind effects of the new US tax law on corporate coffers, sales of new aircraft have yet to perk up.

OEM Order Books

Firm order backlogs at the ‘Big Five’ OEMs (Bombardier, Dassault, Embraer, Gulfstream and Textron Aviation) slipped 9% in value in 2017, while book-to-bill performance (the ratio between new orders and deliveries) came in below 1.0 ratio for all of the aforementioned OEMs with the exception of Textron. Textron’s relatively strong and consistent book-to-bill performance over the past five years has been impressive, but

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


MarketIndicators April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 12:13 Page 2

Rollie Vincent is President of Rolland Vincent Associates. His aviation market analysis is second to none, and he is the creator/director of the JETNET iQ program. With a solid background in market research, economics and statistics, he has more than 30 years of experience in business, regional and international aviation, including positions with Bombardier, Cessna, Learjet, Flexjet, and ICAO. Contact him via rvincent@rollandvincent.com

must be viewed in the context of its total firm order backlog of $1.18bn (representing just 3-4 months of total production across a broad portfolio of business jets and turboprops, pistons, and military/missionized aircraft). With protectionist trade rhetoric from the US Administration now morphing into trade and tariff policy, America’s international allies and foes alike are facing the prospect of tariffs on steel and aluminium exports, something that could easily trigger a tit-for-tat reaction targeting specific US export products. Potential victims of an escalating trade conflict are as numerous as weeds in a spring garden, and include the majority of businesses and consumers on either side of the tariff.

Owner/Operator Sentiment

Despite these emerging trade concerns, business aircraft owners and operators appear to be relatively optimistic about the industry’s condition, as evidenced in the recently completed Q4 2017 JETNET iQ Survey. Optimists (those who believe that the industry is beyond the low point in the current business cycle) outnumber pessimists by a factor of about 2.8-to-1 (see below). Assuming that the current trade tensions do not erupt into an all-out trade war between friends and foes alike (where nobody wins and, in fact, everyone stands to lose), marketplace conditions favour stronger aircraft sales performances in 2018. MI www.navigating360.com

continued on page 22

OWNER/OPERATOR SENTIMENT (Q4 2017 JETNET iQ Survey – 502 Respondents) Where is the Business Aviation Industry in the Current Business Cycle?

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

19


O'Garajets April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2018 10:42 Page 1


O'Garajets April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2018 10:42 Page 2


MarketIndicators April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 12:45 Page 3

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

Flight Activity – Europe

Flight Activity - North America Reviewing Year-over-Year (YoY) flight activity for February 2018 vs. February 2017, ARGUS TRAQPak indicates that February 2018 recorded an increase. Month-over-Month (February 2018 vs January 2018), a slight decrease was recorded… The YoY results by operational category were mixed with Part 135 activity, once again, producing the largest yearly gain. Part 91 activity also recorded a slight increase, although fractional activity dropped marginally. By aircraft category, results were all positive with Large jets posting the largest gain over February 2017 activity.

Month-over-Month

February’s North American Business Aviation flight activity posted an expected decrease to finish down from January 2018. Results by operational category were all red for the month, with Part 135 posting the largest monthly decrease. Aircraft categories were mixed, with the top of the market posting gains and the lower end posting losses.

March Forecast

TRAQPak analysts estimate there will be a 4.2% increase in overall flight activity YoY in March 2018.

MI www.argus.aero

TABLE A - FEBRUARY 2018 vs FEBRUARY 2017 North America Flight Activity

PART 91

PART 135

FRACTIONAL

ALL

-1.3%

9.0%

-10.5%

2.5%

0.5%

6.3%

-1.7%

2.3%

-0.6%

7.8%

5.1%

3.6%

LARGE CABIN JET

7.3%

14.5%

-12.6%

7.1%

ALL

0.7%

8.8%

-0.6%

3.5%

TURBOPROP

LIGHT JET

MID-SIZE JET

Business aircraft usage during February in Europe climbed 4.5% YoY, to 57,037 flights, according to the latest data from WingX Advance. That’s on top of 6.6% YoY growth in January. Business jet departures in Europe rose 3%, with a decline in private flights offset by a 5% gain in charter activity in this segment for February. While Western and Central Europe experienced “robust growth” in flight activity, the UK was flat and Italy recorded only modest gains. Overall, Germany saw the strongest growth in Business Aviation flying, though mainly in the piston segment. Spain reported the largest gains in business jet activity, with an increase of +9% in this segment over the last twelve months. WingX noted that 90% of Business Aviation flights originating in Europe stayed within the region during February, with this volume up by 5% from a year ago. Flights inbound to Europe from other regions were weaker YoY, with arrivals from the Middle East down by 15% and transatlantic arrivals falling 5%. (Words courtesy of AIN) MI www.wingx-advance.com continued on page 24

TABLE B - FEBRUARY 2018 vs JANUARY 2018 North America Flight Activity

PART 91

PART 135

FRACTIONAL

ALL

TURBOPROP

-3.2%

-5.1%

-2.1%

-3.9%

LIGHT JET

-0.7%

0.0%

1.0%

-0.2%

MID-SIZE JET

1.5%

1.3%

0.1%

1.1%

LARGE CABIN JET

3.5%

-1.7%

-2.6%

0.9%

-0.3%

-1.7%

-0.3%

-0.8%

ALL

Read more BizAv Market Insights at: avbuyer.com/articles/market-insight

22

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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MarketIndicators April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 12:46 Page 4

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

Retrofit Avionics Sales Exceed $2.3bn

With the 2020 ADS-B Out mandate rapidly approaching, and as more and more aircraft operators realize the benefits of advanced cockpit systems, an increasing number of owners are opting to add retrofit avionics systems to their aircraft, notes AEA… Worldwide Business and General Aviation avionics sales for 2017 amounted to over $2.3bn according to AEA’s latest Avionics Market Report. The figure represented a 2.9% increase in sales compared to the previous year, and reverses two straight years of declining sales. Of the >$2.3bn total sales, ~$1.34bn was for retrofits to airplanes after original production and ~$984m accounted for forward-fit avionics (retrofit avionics installed by the aircraft OEM at the time of production). Actual retrofit installations saw an increase in sales of more than 20%, and 73.5% of the retrofit sales took place in North America. “Many avionics shops are telling us that aircraft owners are electing to order full-panel avionics upgrades rather than just the ADS-B equipment,” said AEA president Paula Derks. “It will be interesting to see whether the retrofit market continues to grow significantly in the next two years as the mandate draws closer.” Sales for just Q4 2017 were a fraction shy of $600m, up 0.3% over Q4 2016 sales, with just less than $340m reported for retrofit, and just under $260m for forward fit sales. MI www.aea.net

TABLE C - 2017 Year-End Worldwide Business & General Aviation Avionics Sales

T QUARTER

RETROFIT

FORWARD-FIT

TOTAL SALES

Q1 2017

$322.9M

$243.3M

$566.2M

Q2 2017

$321.1M

$257.7M

$578.8M

Q3 2017

$355.9M

$232.0M

$587.9M

Q4 2017

$339.8M

$259.3M

$599.1M

2017 TOTAL

$1.343Bn

$984.3M

$2.327Bn

T

TABLE D - Percentage of Total 2017 Sales (By Market) Q

NORTH AMERICA INTERNATIONAL

QUARTER

RETROFIT

FORWARD-FIT

Q1 2017

57.0%

43.0%

69.3%

30.7%

Q2 2017

55.5%

44.5%

72.0%

28.0%

Q3 2017

60.5%

39.5%

79.2%

20.8%

Q4 2017

56.7%

43.3%

74.8%

25.2%

2017 TOTAL

57.7%

42.3%

73.5%

26.5%

Global Jet Capital Lands More Financing Global Jet Capital has completed an inaugural securitization for $608m, marking the first asset-backed security (ABS) capital markets financing backed solely by business jet operating leases and loans. The notes were structured in three tranches: an A-rated $497m tranche; a BBB-rated $74m tranche; and a BB-rated $37m tranche. According to Global Jet Capital, the transaction was almost three times oversubscribed, generating more than $1.7bn in orders from more than 30 24

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

investors. The deal was structured and booked by Deutsche Bank Securities, with assistance from Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Citigroup and Morgan Stanley. Global Jet Capital said it will continue to service the assets. “The investor community is increasingly looking to diversify their portfolios to reduce risk and find new opportunities,” said Global Jet Capital CEO Shawn Vick. “Their response to our offering is testament to both the strong portfolio of assets we have created and the expertise of the management team. www.AVBUYER.com

We are especially pleased at the range of investors we have attracted.” Global Jet Shawn Vick, Capital plans Global Jet Capital to continue to use the ABS market as an “integral part” of its funding strategy in the future. continued MI www.globaljetcapital.com  on page 26 Aircraft Index see Page 145


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BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

ADS-B: Act Now or Pay the Price Business Aviation is an important part of many businesses, however the convenience of air travel comes with its hurdles and costs. PNC has highlighted the urgency of equipping the Business Aviation fleet for ADS-B by January 2020. Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) systems automatically transmit information on an airplane's position, speed, altitude and other data to other aircraft and FAA ground stations on a regular basis. Rather than rely on a transponder and radar alone, ADS-B Out transmits the airplane’s data once every second. ADS-B In, meanwhile, is a system that allows the airplane to receive and display ADS-B data, giving pilots information on other nearby aircraft, weather and advisories, Notices to Airmen, and important real-time notifications about temporary no-fly zones and restrictions. The combination of these features makes ADS-B a big step forward in aviation safety. When asked if ADS-B improves aviation safety, Denver-based Certified Flight Instructor, Jason Steele, replies, “Absolutely…ADS-B offers pilots more time to react to nearby aircraft, and does so without a need for radar.” (Radar takes 5-7 seconds to update locations for other aircraft, versus ADS-B’s update every second.) Essentially, ADS-B could prevent everything from aircraft getting too close together to unknowingly flying into poor weather conditions. Anything that makes flying safer is a good thing, and that's why the FAA created the ADS-B requirement. The 2020 deadline requires all

airplanes flying in airspace that requires a Mode C transponder to equip hardware that transmits ADS-B Out. This is the airspace that surrounds all large airports or any airspace over 18,000ft (and in many cases airspace over 10,000ft). Because virtually all business air travel for large companies includes flying to Class B or Class C airports or into Class A airspace, all business aircraft should be equipped with ADS-B Out before the January 2020 deadline.

Supply, Demand and FAA Mechanics

The cost for parts and installation of an ADS-B system for corporate jets can reach from five to six figures, and could rise with demand. The 2020 deadline means lots of airplanes will be adding ADS-B over the coming months. As the deadline to install ADS-B approaches, more and more pilots and airplane owners will be competing for limited parts and mechanics for installations. An ADS-B installation can take more than 24 hours of labor, and must be completed by an FAA-certified mechanic. Lots of airplanes looking for a limited supply of parts to be installed by a limited number of mechanics in a short period of time will potentially lead to higher costs, and even intense competition for time from mechanics to keep airplanes flying. Jeff Dunn, Head of Aviation Asset Management for PNC Aviation Finance, notes that “2020 is going to roll around, and there are going to be aircraft not allowed to fly”. Airplane owners should take steps to upgrade today and avoid issues. There are “not enough slots and not enough days to service the number

Jeff Dunn

of aircraft that need to be serviced” by the deadline, Dunn adds.

Act Soon to Avoid Cost and Stress

While many airplanes are going to squeeze in the repairs at the last minute, getting the upgrade done as early as possible could lead to big savings. Getting your ADS-B upgrade today not only helps you avoid the costs of taking care of it later, avoiding procrastinating and adding ADS-B will improve flight safety right away. Some aircraft owners choose to finance the ADS-B upgrade on their own while others refinance the airplane and roll the cost into one loan. (PNC Aviation Finance is standing by to help those concerned by the costs to upgrade and can help operators stay airborne by installing ADS-B with competitive interest rates and affordable payments.) “We don't want to risk aircraft not flying,” summarizes Dunn. “The more of those we can get upgraded, the better.” The worst-case scenario is that an operator waits too long, tries to get a last-minute upgrade, and can't find a mechanic or the parts to get the work done by the deadline, leading to their aircraft being grounded. Those investing in the upgrade today, however, will fly safer and can put any worries about January 2020 aside. MI www.pnc.com

Embraer: Flat Business Jet Market in 2018 Embraer expects a flat market for new business jets this year. The Brazilian aircraft manufacturer’s business jet shipment estimate for 2018 exactly mirrors those given last year: 70 to 80 Light jets and 35 to 45 Large jets… Last year, Embraer delivered 109 business jets, which was within its ‘outlook ranges’, but eight aircraft fewer than in 2016. That total included 72 Light jets (Phenom models) and 37 Large 26

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

jets (Legacy and Lineage models) versus 2016's 73 Light jets and 44 Large jets. Last year’s business jet revenues, totalling $1.485bn, missed Embraer’s estimates due to an “unfavorable mix” of aircraft deliveries. The OEM expects its executive jet division to post revenues of $1.35bn to $1.5bn in 2018. MI www.embraerexecutivejets.com  continued on page 28 

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

In-Service Aircraft Values & Maintenance Condition

Asset Insight’s market analysis of February 28, 2018 covering 92 fixed-wing models and 1,687 aircraft listed ‘For Sale’ revealed the total number of used assets continued to decline. Large jets and Turboprops led the way, while Medium jet inventory remained steady and Small jet figures posted a surprisingly high 5.9% increase. Meanwhile, ask Prices decreased an overall 1.3% to register another record low figure, as Large jet prices dropped 0.8%, Small jets dropped 2.3% (to post a record low), and Turboprops posted a 12-month low by falling 1.2%. The lone winner was the Medium jet group, whose average Ask Price increased 2.2% in February. Inventory Fleet Maintenance Condition Buyers continued to focus on higher quality assets, worsening the Maintenance Exposure and Quality Rating figures for the remaining inventory within all four aircraft groups. The tracked inventory fleet maintained its ‘Very Good’ Quality Rating, although it did post a decline to 5.220 from January’s 5.238, on Asset Insight’s scale of -2.5 to 10. The tracked fleet’s average Maintenance Exposure (an aircraft’s accumulated/embedded maintenance expense), meanwhile, increased 1.4% to $1.468m, a 12-month high (worst) figure.

Large Jets: It may not look like it but, as Asset Insight pointed out last month, the Large Jet market is stabilizing. The tracked fleet decreased by 4.2% (16 units), with aircraft of mixed asset quality transacting and the inventory pool’s Quality Rating increasing to 5.303 to maintain its ‘Excellent’ status. Ask Price decreased by a nominal 0.8%, but conspired with a substantive 1.4% Maintenance Exposure increase to worsen the group’s ETP Ratio from January’s 57.2% to 59.2%. Medium Jets: The group has maintained a ‘Very Good’ Quality Rating for the past 10 months, hitting a 90-day high figure of 5.141 in February with the ‘For Sale’ number remaining unchanged. Maintenance Exposure worsened 2.4% and, even though Ask Price improved a surprising 2.2%, the increase was insufficient to positively impact the group’s marketability as the ETP Ratio rose to 68.4% from last month’s 65.4%.

Small Jets: After decreasing by 25 aircraft in January, Asset Insight’s tracked fleet increased by 27 units in February (up 5.9%), and February’s transactions focused Maintenance Exposure to Ask on higher quality aircraft. Quality Rating Price (ETP) Ratio for the remaining inventory dropped 1.4% The ETP Ratio is a useful indicator of an to 5.288, but held within the ‘Excellent’ aircraft’s marketability. It is computed by range. dividing the asset's Maintenance Exposure Maintenance Exposure also worsened, (the financial liability accrued with respect increasing 4.2%. With Ask Price falling to future scheduled maintenance events) 2.3% to post a new record low, the group’s by its Ask Price. ETP Ratio jumped 2.9% to a 12-month ‘Days on Market’ analysis has shown worst (high) figure. Asset Insight’s that when the ETP Ratio is greater than prediction last month that prices will soon 40%, a listed aircraft’s time on the market begin to strengthen appears to have been increases. During Q4, 2017, the average slightly premature. Days on Market were 42% greater for aircraft whose ETP Ratio exceeded 40% Turboprops: In the last market review (199 versus 284 days). Asset Insight advised that highly positive The tracked inventory fleet’s ETP Ratio quantitative figures demonstrated that climbed to a 12-month high (worst) figure, good values were available to buyers. reaching 66.9% compared to January’s Obviously, serious buyers also identified 64%. this opportunity, decreasing the ‘For Sale’ Turboprops continued to post the fleet by 7.4% (23 aircraft transactions). lowest (best) ETP Ratio at 49.2%; Large The remaining inventory’s Quality Jets followed at 59.2% (a record high Rating fell 0.5%, but Turboprops stayed (worst) figure for this group); Medium Jets within the ‘Very Good’ range at 5.158. Ask worsened slightly, increasing to 68.4% Price fell to another 12-month low, and (also a record high); and Small Jets Maintenance Exposure worsened by 1.5%. worsened to 81.5% (the group’s worst 12- The combined effect raised (worsened) the month figure). ETP Ratio to 49.2% from January’s 47.3%, but that is hardly surprising, given that Market Summary higher quality assets were the ones Our tracked inventory decreased by 12 acquired. units this month. Nearly 53% of all tracked MI www.assetinsight.com T

28

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Chart A

models, and 60% of all units, posted an ETP Ratio above 40% by virtue of increased Maintenance Exposure and (except for Medium Jets) lower Ask Prices.

www.AVBUYER.com

Fleet Maintenance Condition 5.40

$ Million

$1.50

5.30

$1.47

$1.45

5.220

$1.40

5.20 5.10

$1.35 M

A

M

Quality Rating

J

J

A

S

O

Maintenance Exposure

N

D

J

F

$1.30

Quality Rating Trendline

Chart B LOW RISK AIRCRAFT MODEL ETP RATIO G650 Boeing BBJ F900LX Citation CJ4 525C F2000LX Phenom 300 G-150 F900EX EASy CL-605 Falcon2000EX Easy Pilatus PC-12 Learjet 45XR G 450 Citation CJ3 Piper Meridian Citation Sovereign 680 KingAir 350 - Post-2000 Citation CJ2+ 525A Hawker 900XP Citation XLS (MSG3) G550 Global XRS Challenger 300 KingAir B-200 - Post-2000 Phenom 100 Citation Encore Citation XLS Learjet 60XR Citation X (MSG3) Citation Mustang 510 KingAir 350 - Pre-2001 Falcon 50EX Citation CJ2 Citation CJ1+ F900EX F900B KingAir B-200 - Pre-2001 Citation Excel 560XL

2.2% 5.8% 6.4% 10.3% 11.1% 11.7% 11.8% 12.5% 14.3% 15.5% 16.7% 17.1% 18.8% 19.3% 19.4% 19.5% 22.7% 23.0% 23.4% 23.9% 24.5% 26.4% 26.8% 28.5% 28.7% 28.7% 28.8% 29.8% 29.9% 30.0% 31.4% 31.6% 33.3% 33.7% 33.8% 35.0% 38.9% 39.0%

HIGH RISK AIRCRAFT MODEL ETP RATIO Embraer Legacy 600 CL-604 Hawker 400XP Learjet 45 Citation Bravo KingAir 300 Piaggio P-180 II Hawker 850XP F900 Global 5000 Premier 1A G-200 Falcon 2000 Hawker Beechjet 400A Citation V Ultra Hawker 800XP GV CL-601-SE GIV-SP Citation V 560 Premier 1 Beech B-1900C Piaggio P-180 Falcon 50 Hawker 1000A Global Express GIV-SP (MSG3) Learjet 31 KingAir C90 Learjet 60 Citation VI Hawker 800A Hawker Beechjet 400 Citation II GIV Citation ISP CL-601-3R CL-601-3A CL-601-1A Learjet 35A Learjet 55 Falcon 20-5

42.1% 42.3% 43.1% 44.9% 46.8% 47.2% 47.3% 49.0% 49.4% 49.7% 50.8% 51.4% 52.9% 56.7% 58.8% 61.9% 64.7% 64.8% 69.0% 71.8% 72.7% 82.2% 84.5% 88.7% 89.1% 90.2% 95.6% 101.7% 113.0% 113.0% 115.9% 131.4% 132.4% 132.9% 139.0% 151.1% 154.7% 173.1% 191.1% 210.1% 224.7% 272.6%

Maintenance Exposure to Ask Price Ratio (“ETP Ratio”) as of February 28, 2018 Source: AMSTAT (www.amstatcorp.com) Asset Insight, LLC (www.assetinsight.com)

Aircraft Index see Page 145


MarketIndicators April18.qxp_Layout 1 21/03/2018 09:09 Page 7

Ask Price vs. Maintenance Exposure *

Asset Quality Rating Scale -2.500 to 10.000

Turboprops

Small Jets

Medium Jets

Large Jets

$ Millions

Ask Price Source: Amstat Asset Insight Analytics * The accrued cost of future scheduled maintenance continued on page 30

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INDICATORS

Who Sold the Most Business Aircraft in 2017? markedly from 163 in 2016. Q4 shipments were down, too, from 54 units in Q4 2016 to 44 in Q4 2017, and the company experienced a less-than-stellar Q4 surge: 31.43% of all deliveries were made in Q4 2017, versus 33.13% in Q4 2016. (Note: while the Challenger 350 was the market’s largest selling product, it was still down 16.1% from the 62 units shipped last year.)

According to GAMA, aircraft shipments were up 2.5% at 2,324 units in 2017 from 2,268 in 2016. Billings were down by 4.2% from $21.1bn in 2016 to $20.2bn. This is indicative of continuing softness in the upper-ends of the jet market, notes Mike Potts… Total jet deliveries were up slightly at 676 units (an increase of 1.3% over the 667 jet total in 2016), and falling within the 675 to 680 bracket we previously predicted. Turboprop sales were down 3.3% from 582 units in 2016 to 563 in the year just finished, and piston sales finished 6.5% ahead after a surprisingly strong Q4 finish, with deliveries totalling 1,085 units, up from 1,019 in 2016.

The Jet Market

#3 – Gulfstream: Sitting firmly in third place with 120 units (down from 121 in 2016) was Gulfstream. The company has adjusted its production to meet the market downturn since 2014, heavily impacting the top-end products Gulfstream specializes in. Nevertheless, Gulfstream’s deliveries throughout 2017 were consistent at 30 units per quarter. Obviously no Q4 sales surge was experienced, but that’s indicative of a very solid order book allowing the company to balance short-term ups and downs in the market and achieve a very consistent delivery schedule.

The Turboprop Market

The turboprop market continues to exhibit greater weakness than GAMA’s numbers would imply. Traditional business turboprops, not counting the agricultural airplanes, came in at 387 units, compared with 431 a year ago – a reduction of 10.2%. In raw numbers this was a little stronger than the 375 to 380 units we predicted for 2017, so the condition of the market is hardly a surprise. For Q4 only, business turboprop shipments were down from 150 units in 2016 to 124 in 2017. Among the nine business turboprop OEMs reporting to GAMA, seven showed weaker results for Year-End 2017, while only two had improved results. Looking at just Q4, only one turboprop OEM exceeded its previous year totals and two matched the prior year.

Looking at the specifics of the jet market, of 10 OEMs reporting to GAMA this year four were ahead of last year, one was even and five had reduced sales. For just Q4 2017, again four were up (though not the same four), five were down, and one was even. These numbers indicate a bunching of the market where nobody did very badly compared with last year, but nobody did especially well either. The best-selling jet last year was Bombardier’s Challenger 350 (56 deliveries), followed closely by Cessna’s Latitude and Embraer’s Phenom 300 (54 each), the new Hondajet (43) and the Citation M2 (39). All are essentially new products, giving credence to the notion that new aircraft designs will pave the road to market improvement. With the new Pilatus PC-24 just coming onto the market and the Citation Longitude and Gulfstream G500 expected to deliver this year, it will be interesting to see whether the jet market can rise back above the 700-unit delivery level in 2018.

#1 – Beechcraft and Pilatus: The leading position for turboprop shipments in 2017 was shared by Pilatus and Textron’s Beechcraft division (86 units each). However, both were well off their 2016 pace, with Pilatus down from 100 units and Beechcraft down from 106. Nonetheless, for Q4, Beechcraft was the only turboprop OEM to show an improvement, reporting 31 for Q4 2017, up from 28 the year before. Pilatus had a slightly stronger Q4 with 32 deliveries, but this total lagged the 39 units reported in Q4 2016. Thus, both companies experienced a good Q4 surge with Pilatus sales at 37.2% of the annual total and Beechcraft’s at 36%.

Business Jet Market top Three by Deliveries

In Conclusion

#1 – Cessna: Leading the jet market by a wide margin in 2017 was Cessna (180 shipments), up two units from a year ago. Cessna finished Q4 with 58 deliveries in both 2017 and 2016, indicating the company experienced a fairly typical Q4 sales surge in the range of 32.5%. #2 – Bombardier: Second-placed Bombardier (140 deliveries) had the roughest ride in the 2017 jet market. Deliveries were off

Top Turboprop OEMs (by Deliveries)

While there are bright spots to be garnered from 2017, the general tenor of this market continues to be pervasively flat, with both jets and turboprops performing well below expectation. Perhaps 2018 will prove to be the year when jets accelerate beyond the 700-unit mark once again while the business turboprop market regains the firm footing it once enjoyed. We’ll keep an eye on the results as they unfold… MI www.gama.aero

Read the full GAMA analysis at: www.avbuyer.com/articles/market-insight/who-shipped-the-most-business-aircraft-in-2017-112105 30

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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Mandates April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 11:55 Page 1

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MANDATES

What’s the Current Status on ADS-B?

With less than two years until the mandate requires it, what is the current status and outlook for ADS-B? Mike Chase and Mike Foye report in this JETNET>>Know More feature.

T

he Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires all aircraft flying in controlled airspace to be equipped with ADS-B Out technology to modernize the US national airspace system. When the mandate was first created in 2010, the FAA estimated that it would apply to up to 6,000 US Air Carrier aircraft and 100,000 to 160,000 US General Aviation aircraft/helicopters (of which nearly 100,000 aircraft still need to equip in less than two years). Many aircraft owners have been slow to react hoping the FAA may extend the mandate beyond 2020 or that the price of the equipment will fall. The impact of a potential grounding of noncompliant aircraft, however, will be both costly and time consuming with potential loss of residual value. The ADS-B Out 2020 mandate has created very interesting circumstances and conditions that our industry is working feverishly to navigate. However, this is not just a US issue. Australia was the first to require ADS-B Out coverage and Europe will require it on used aircraft by June 7, 2020 (June 8, 2016 saw Europe’s mandate for new aircraft come into effect). Following is what JETNET’s statistics and conversations reveal of ADS-B Out in relation to the Business Aviation industry. 36

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

How Many Aircraft are Compliant?

Chart A (overleaf) shows the number of business jets and business turboprops in operation as of February 2018. The fleet percentages of ADS-B Out compliant aircraft are 38% for business jets and 13% for business turboprops, per the JETNET Evolution database. Although not depicted in the Chart, according to JETNET commercial jet airliners are the only group currently with over 50% compliance. Turbine helicopters show the lowest percentage of compliancy at 7%.

What is the Status of the Unequipped Aircraft?

Since April 2017, JETNET has been tracking the number of business jets that are becoming ADS-B compliant. The number averaged 176 jets per month, until January/February 2018 when it climbed to over 200. If this average is maintained over the remaining months before the mandate comes into effect, that would still leave around 33% of the business jet fleet not compliant by January 2020. To reach the number of all business jet aircraft being compliant, the average would need to be more than double the January/February 2018 number. 

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MANDATES

Business Turboprops and Helicopters lag even further behind. This is a time that buyers of used aircraft should be very careful to check on the ADS-B Out status of an aircraft they’re considering for purchase. Currently only 34% of the 2,089 business jets ‘For Sale’ are compliant.

What is the Cost of the Equipment and Installation?

By way of anecdote, in Q4 2017, the owner of a non-compliant older business jet (>30 years) sold his jet and the subject of ADS-B Out did not arise in the negotiations. Therefore the new owner will need to take care of the ADS-B Out installation. Two options are available with estimated costs ranging from $40k to $80K: Option 1: Transponder upgrade at $80,000 with separate WAAS/GPS receiver at $60,000, per existing Aircraft Manufacturers List (AML) STC. Option 2: Most customers are leaning towards installing the panel mount Garmin system to meet the mandate requirements. The cost ranges between $40,000 and $50,000. Nevertheless, JETNET received reports from one repair station that just completed an ADS-B Out installation on two King Air 200s for an estimated cost under $20,000 each. The down time was four days for each aircraft. The type of ADS-B Out solution will depend on an aircraft’s age and model. What is good for one model may not be for another. The following website can be used to obtain an approximate ADS-B Out quote (www.CMDFlightSolutions.com)

List of Repair Stations

JETNET found 4,011 repair stations in the US and 871 outside the US on the FAA Part 145 repair station database. However,

only 1,198 of these repair shops can install ADS-B Out equipment. Each state/territory has at least one repair station. Table A (opposite page) ranks the Top 20 (74% of the total) repair stations by US state/territory. The state of Florida leads the list with 135 locations capable of ADS-B installation. There are an additional 290 international locations not depicted, giving a total of 1,488 locations worldwide.

Impact on Flight Hours

According to the FAA Business Jet report there were near record levels of 4.487m international and domestic operations in 2017. Prior to the great recession in 2007 there were 4.825m. The low point of 3.449m was recorded in 2009, and over the following eight years that number slowly inched back up to within 7% of the 2007 record operations level. To estimate the number of operations reported by the FAA as a result of this ADS-B Out mandate is clearly impossible at this time, but flight operations will depend on many variables including good maintenance and refurbishment practices. The numbers of aircraft removed from service for parting out will also continue to grow as we approach, and pass the ADS-B deadline.

What is the Backlog?

The backlog of ADS-B work ranges anywhere from two to six months, per Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA).

Installation Done: Does It Work?

Note: Not all installed ADS-B Out systems have been tested. The FAA has a tool called Compliance Monitor for checking ADS-B functionality once installed, and determining whether the installed system is working properly. Learn more at: http://adsbperformance.faa.gov/PAPRRequest.aspx

Chart A - ADB-S Out Status* for Bizjets & Turboprops (February 2018) Compliance Yes 13%

No 56%

Business Jets 21,624

Yes 38%

7% Business Turboprop 13,322

6% No 80% Yes

Unknown

No

Yes

Unknown

No

*In-operation fleet count changes daily

38

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Mandates April18.qxp_Layout 1 21/03/2018 09:12 Page 3

Table A - Top 20 US States by Number of ADS-B Capable Repair Stations

Rank

State

Locations

1

FL

135

2

CA

127

3

TX

121

4

AZ

46

5

PA

45

6

GA

43

7

IL

39

8

WA

35

9

NY

34

10

CO

32

11

OH

28

12

OK

25

=

VA

25

14

NC

24

=

OR

24

16

AL

22

=

SC

22

18

MI

21

19

IN

20

=

WI

20

In Summary

With such a short time left to comply with the ADS-B mandate, aircraft owners and operators should now realize this matter is becoming pressing, and the supply of authorized avionics shops performing this installation will be in great demand throughout 2018 and 2019. Even though ADS-B Out is being mandated, the good news is the safety factor that can be realized - especially the improved situational awareness when ADS-B Out is coupled with ADS-B In receiving traffic and weather information. Expect some turbulence along the way, but blue skies are forecast for the future. We leave you with some sage advice from those well placed in the industry to comment on ADS-B Out installation over the coming months. • “Currently, Duncan Aviation does not have any issues with ADS-B Out equipment shortages because we planned ahead and worked with the avionics 2020 deadline. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

“However, while Duncan Aviation still has capacity at our full-service and satellite avionics locations for 2018 into 2019, we have started to sell slots for business jet ADS-B installation work to take place in 2019.” Steve Gade, VP of Aircraft Sales and Business Development, Duncan Aviation •

“The most important result of the installation that we recently completed for two King Air 200 business turboprops is that the system was tested and was found to be 100% operational with the FAA Compliance Monitor tool.” Andy Johnson, President of Aerospace Instrument Support Inc.

“As of last fall JETNET iQ respondents reported 32.8% of their aircraft were now complaint plus 11.2% more that had a shop visit scheduled. So that’s just 44% now or soon to be compliant. This gives us concern that there is simply not enough capacity within the MRO community to complete the remaining 56% in the coming months.” Paul Cardarelli, JETNET Vice President of Sales

“ADS-B Out was not an issue six months ago. However, today it has become an issue. Those aircraft that have ADS-B Out installed will sell first.” Brad Harris, Dallas Jet

“Today ADS-B Out is not a deal-breaker. However, it could be as we move closer to the deadline. A recent sale of a Challenger 604 was slotted for an installation of ADS-B Out in four months after further research found that the aircraft had ADS-B Out equipment but a software change from version 1 and version 2 is required.” Rene Prewitt, Jack Prewitt & Associates

“Don’t wait - procrastinating aircraft owners may find themselves unable to schedule the required install, or pay a substantial premium to an avionics shop willing to expand capacity to meet demand.” Michele Husnay, JETNET Director of Research

“The 2020 ADS-B mandate for the US reminds me a lot of the RVSM mandate 12 years ago. Having the ‘right’ equipment in an aircraft is one thing, certifying that equipment and aircraft with the FAA and having them sign off on it is a completely different story.” Jason Lorraine, JETNET Sr. Tech/Sales Specialist. T

www.AVBUYER.com

Mike Chase (president, Chase & Associates) offers highly sought-after aviation market research expertise. Contact him via mike@avbuyer.com

Mike Foye is director of marketing, JETNET and can be contacted via mfoye@jetnet.com JETNET, meanwhile, the ultimate source for information & intelligence on business and commercial aircraft worldwide, can be contacted via www.jetnet.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

39


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Project1_Layout 1 22/03/2018 14:44 Page 1


Avjet FP March.qxp_Layout 1 22/02/2018 10:19 Page 1


Avjet multi April.qxp_Layout 1 21/03/2018 15:17 Page 1

1997 Bell 430 SN 49048

2007 Gulfstream G150 SN 240

2016 Global 6000 SN 9744

2000 Boeing 757-256 VIP SN 29306

LOS ANGELES MARC J. FOULKROD +1 (818) 480-9964

SALES | ACQUISITIONS | CONSULTING AVJETGLOBAL.COM

WASHINGTON D.C. ANDREW C. BRADLEY +1 (410) 626-6162


BizAv Buying &Selling April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 11:14 Page 1

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INSIGHTS

How to Hook a Prize in Today’s Used Jet Market As the used jet market continues to evaporate, how can buyers act fast to make the most of the remaining inventory at this time? Dave Higdon speaks to a selection of Dealers and Brokers…

o far, this year’s used aircraft sales market is proceeding without looking much like most of 2017. Thanks to a combination of fewer retirements, muted new airplane sales (producing fewer trade-ins) and a boost in used aircraft sales, the market quietly shifted toward a seller's bias in the closing month of 2017. That trend appears to have continued into 2018. In its February report on the 2017 market, JETNET noted the best year ever for used jet sales, with 2,668 transactions. “A period of transition is now in play, wherein the pendulum swings (from) in favor of the buyer to the seller. The pristine used jets that were on the market a few years ago have become more challenging to locate.” A cross-section of dealers and brokers anticipate that same challenge is likely to continue through this year and into 2019. Older jets garner less demand and lower prices but tend to cost more to operate and maintain. Nevertheless, the scarcity of late-model used jets may stop and even reverse what had been a counter-intuitive decline in asking prices over the past couple of years.

S

44

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

A Threshold Crossed?

The used jet inventory began its steady decline well before clearing the traditional 10% fleet ‘For Sale’ bar that separates a buyer's market from a seller's market. What’s more, it appears that the inventory has continued to slowly decline through the early months of 2018. The inventory falling below 10% does mark progress, albeit slow, steady and tepid. But considering the inventory peaked at nearly 18% in July 2009 it is nevertheless a milestone. Still in demand are last year's sales leaders, the Large Cabin jets, which accounted for about 37% of 2017's sales. Light jet sales grew to account for another 36% of the sales total. Conversely, sales of used Mid-size jets declined to account for about 22%. With new business jet sales, remaining stable to within about 25 units (plus or minus) for a few years now, forecasts of little to no growth over the next couple of years means replacements to feed the used aircraft marketplace are not likely to ease the demand with significantly increased supplies.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


BizAv Buying &Selling April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 11:56 Page 2

Dave Higdon is a highly respected aviation journalist who has covered all aspects of civil aviation over the past 35 years. Based in Wichita, he has several thousand flight hours, and has piloted pretty much everything from foot-launched wings to combat jets. Contact him via Dave@avbuyer.com

Tapping the Next Layer

“The problem is that so many buyers want a used aircraft that’s like one of the new ones. The available options for fulfilling that wish continue to decline,” noted one West Coast broker. “Today's best candidates, offering a reasonable performance and competitive price, increasingly require buyers to consider something a little older, a little cheaper, and to spend the difference on upgrading the aircraft.” Those types of options are more plentiful in today’s market, a Southeast broker added. Judging by the avionics sales reported by the Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) recently, upgrading is big business right now. According to AEA's 2017 YearEnd avionics sales report, retrofit sales of $1.34bn were more than 26% ahead of forward-fit sales ($984.3m). Thus, 2017’s retrofit sales reported by AEA were up 2.9% from 2016, and were the highest in the five years that AEA has been reporting global GA avionics sales. “The one element leveling things a bit between aircraft over-10, and those under-10 years of age is the mandates situation (i.e. ADS-B),” explained an East Coast dealer. “Also, nobody seems to want analog anymore.” Many analysts, brokers and dealers believe the mandates are driving the growth in retrofit avionics sales. Fortunately, a large percentage of older business-turbine aircraft enjoy avionics upgrade options. Beyond the avionics, however, many older jet and turboprop aircraft also qualify for powerplant upgrades which, though maybe not matching today’s newest engine performances, still deliver reductions where they count (i.e. in fuel consumption and maintenance cycles). “Where we find some success is in aircraft eligible for both panel and powerplant upgrades – and they're usually relative bargains for their age,” the West Coast broker revealed. If upgrades to glass avionics and latermodel powerplants aren't available, however, buyers at least look for assurances that their prospective purchase already has qualified for solutions to ADS-B. Ditto for text-based Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

communications for aircraft needing Controller-Pilot Datalink Communications (CPDLC) or that are likely to fly transoceanic routes, where FANS is in play. “For some older airframes ADS-B, CPDLC and FANS solutions are in short supply; for some, no solutions exist,” the Southeast broker noted. “Some customers who were likely to buy those aircraft and ‘run them out’ are hitting a wall if they can't at least get the aircraft ADS-B-compliant.”

Get Ready to Act – Fast…

Through most of 2017 and continuing into 2018, business aircraft use has shown something of a rebound in the US, Canada, Europe and South America, according to reports. “Interest in flying corporate continues to drive a steady flow of inquiries to our desk,” a Northeast broker said in early March. “We're constantly looking for new prospective solutions for our clients, and there are things they can do to help themselves be ready should the right candidate appear. “First, don't wait before you start working with a dealer or broker. If a new or additional business aircraft is a possibility for your operation anytime in the next 12 months, begin working with an expert now. “Second, establish a baseline of requirements. (What are your seating needs? How about range and amenities such as in-flight connectivity, entertainment, communications and such?) Most importantly, what is your budget? “Finally, meet with your finance providers, share your plan and get prequalified for the prospective transaction. Then you will be ready to strike.” Once you've established your goals for an airplane purchase, JETNET explains, “The sage advice for buyers is to act now. The counsel of ‘just wait a few months— the price will come down’ may not present itself as we break into the seller’s market environment.” As one broker put it, “Don't let unreasonable expectations deprive you of a suitable candidate. It may not be there next week…” T www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

45


+41 22 787 08 77 trading@sparfell-partners.com www.sparfell-partners.com Exclusively Mandated

AIRBUS A380-800

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2006 EMBRAER LEGACY 600

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Deal Pending 2015 EMBRAER LEGACY 600 S/N 1216

1997 DASSAULT FALCON 900EX S/N 12

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9’016 TT, MSP, HAPP, CAMP, 14 Passengers


2003 FALCON 50EX S/N 334

1983 DASSAULT FALCON 200 S/N 482

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1993 KING AIR B200 S/N BB-1462

2001 CESSNA CITATION CJ2 S/N 17

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3’698 TT, Engines 995 Hrs, FAA, New VIP Int., Wi-Fi, 8 Pax.

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1979 CESSNA CITATION I S/N 500-0392 13’748 TT, EASA, CESCOM, Refurbished in 2014, 6 Pax.

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2008 AGUSTA WESTLAND AW139 S/N 31116 4’900 TT, Pop-Out Floats, Auxiliary Fuel Tank, 11 (+2) Pax.

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2003 BELL 427 S/N 56039

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$1’550’000


BizAv Market Insights 2 April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 14:11 Page 1

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INSIGHTS

48

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


BizAv Market Insights 2 April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 14:12 Page 2

How is the Asia-Pacific Market Looking in 2018? There were plenty of positive signs in Asia-Pacific at the end of 2017, not least those noted by

Asian Sky Group whose analysis of the region’s Business Aviation fleet is comprehensive.

AvBuyer caught up with Managing Director Jeff

Lowe to discuss the region’s prospects in 2018...

J

eff Lowe arrived in Hong Kong in 1997 at a time the country’s business jet fleet consisted of a single aircraft. Since then, he has amassed more than 20 years of Asia-Pacific market experience and insights, and was even involved in the introduction of the first Gulfstream into China. Today overseeing operations of Asian Sky Group, a Business Aviation consulting company, Mr Lowe is well positioned to comment on the many facets of the market there. We spoke with him in the lead up to ABACE2018.

AvBuyer: Last October, Asian Sky Group noted a number of positive trends within the Asia-Pacific business jet sales market. Do you see those positive aircraft sales trends continuing to improve as we move into 2018? If so, which do you see improving more, and which less? Lowe: Most definitely we see the market trends continue to improve as we move into 2018. Asian Sky Group’s analysis and metrics indicated a very positive trend reversal in the used jet sales market as early as a year ago at the beginning of 2017. We reported in each subsequent quarter on these improving market conditions as, uninterrupted, they went from strength to strength as the year progressed. Now it is pretty much universally held that the market, especially for jets, is in great shape at the moment. Optimism, utilization, purchase intentions, market dynamics to name a few: they are all at high points. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

AvBuyer: You noted supply and demand balance towards the end of 2017 in relation to the positive trends you were seeing. How close to the line are we between a buyer’s and seller’s market in Asia-Pacific? How has this changed over the past year? Lowe: We are definitely moving into “seller’s market” territory. For some model types, availability of used aircraft is already under 5% of the fleet ‘For Sale’. This is a big change from the past year where we saw an oversupply of used aircraft and over 10% of the fleet ‘For Sale’. So buyers entering the market are frustrated because inventory levels are lower with fewer choices, and prices are firming. Three Gulfstream models – the G650, G550 and G280 which are currently in production – have very low inventory levels. Four percent (or less) of each fleet is currently ‘For Sale’. AvBuyer: What are the major regulatory issues right now in Asia-Pacific that are likely to impact aircraft sales (both new and used) within the region in the foreseeable future? Lowe: I don’t know if you’d call it a ‘regulatory’ issue, but over the next 20 years commercial passenger traffic in the Asia-Pacific region is forecast to increase by 1.8 billion (the same amount for the rest of the world combined). More passengers means more aircraft which means more movements and less access – slots and parking – for Business Aviation. Within the next two years alone Beijing Capital,

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

49


BizAv Market Insights 2 April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 16:23 Page 3

BIZAV INTELLIGENCE T MARKET INSIGHTS

Manila and Singapore will reach runway capacity. Hong Kong is already over capacity. Terminals are no better, with eight of the top 14 airports in Asia already classified as “full”. So, from a capacity perspective there does not appear to be light at the end of the tunnel, at least for now. Capacity constraints will only get worse before they get better, which will directly affect business jet sales. If I can’t get to where I want to go when I want to go with my business jet, the value disappears and I might as well fly commercial. AvBuyer: Is the MRO and support side able to keep up with current levels of business jet owners in the region? Lowe: In a word, no. In the US, airports dedicated to Business Aviation activity and the FBOs and MROs that support it are in abundance – there are 2,069 airports with runways longer than 5,000ft; 3,384 FBOs; and approximately 2,500 MROs. To put that in context, for every six business jets there is a Business Aviation airport; for every five an MRO facility; and for every four an FBO. These are envy-inducing ratios, making the US market the standard bearer for the industry worldwide. In Asia-Pacific, we can only look at the US numbers and hope for that kind of future. At the end of 2016 the Asia-Pacific business jet fleet stood at 1,155 jets. Yet despite the size of the fleet and the vastness of the region (almost five times the size of the US), there were a mere 76 MROs and 61 FBOs; equal to only 15 business jets per MRO and 19 per FBO. This, one could say, is a significant imbalance – but it is also the opportunity the region presents. AvBuyer: Can you give us a note on the corporate helicopter sector in the region? How is that segment growing, and what are the projections for that in the year to come?

Lowe: We are even now seeing improving conditions in the rotary market, but most definitely not in the corporate helicopter segment. With oil and gas down, operators have swarmed into the onshore market, making it very crowded, which is proving to be a challenge for the industry to support. Forest protection and firefighting, agricultural spraying and power line maintenance are taking the highest percent of the flight hours. The big opportunities are in firefighting and EMS with a pent up demand for heavy machines for firefighting and heavy lifting. Forest protection and firefighting alone in China will need over 100 helicopters with 50 middle to heavy helicopters within the next five years. Over the next 10 years, EMS will be a huge growth market. And power grid companies still need more aircraft for live line maintenance. Essentially, 2018 is shaping up to be an interesting year for the whole industry. AvBuyer: Back to the business jets to conclude. What will be the ‘Top Five’ countries within the region during 2018? Any dark horses? Lowe: The ‘Top Five’ looks like it will be: China, Malaysia, Hong Kong, India and Taiwan with Malaysia definitely being the dark horse. China’s fleet grew 8.4%, but Malaysia’s 27.7%! T Jeff Lowe is Managing Director of Asian Sky Group (ASG), headquartered in Hong Kong with offices throughout Asia. ASG has a highly experienced aviation team in the Asia-Pacific region providing a wide range of independent services for both fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. More information from www.asianskygroup.com

Are you looking for more Business Aviation Market Insights? Visit https://www.avbuyer.com/articles/market-insight 50

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


IAG April.qxp 19/03/2018 12:15 Page 1

Dassault Falcon 2000 SN 224 • 2C Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul Recently Completed • ADS-B Out • GoGo Biz • 2005 In-Service Date • 2 Corporate Owners Since New • MSP Gold - Engines, APU • Dry Bay Mod Complete • 10 Passenger Interior

Piaggio P-180 Avanti II SN 1232 • Lowest Time Avanti II On Market • One Corporate Owner Since New • 2013 In-Service Date • 60 Hours Total Time • ATG 5000

Bombardier Learjet 75 SN 45-507 • One Corporate Owner Since New • 2015 In-Service Date • 725 Hours Total Time • Garmin Iridium (Cockpit) • Aircell ATG 5000 GoGo Biz • MSP Gold - Engines, APU • Smart Parts Plus

Managing Partners Cass Anderson and Jeff Habib +1 212 888 7979 info@iagjets.com www.iagjets.com


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Project1_Layout 1 22/03/2018 14:46 Page 1


JSSI April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 11:21 Page 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

SPONSORED

What Are the FAQs JSSI Receives From the Broker Community? When the time comes to transition a used jet, questions often arise about the maintenance program. How will it impact the buyer, seller and transaction itself? JSSI answers some of the commonly asked questions it receives from the dealer broker community…

T

he hourly cost maintenance programs provided by Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI), create a comprehensive plan allowing clients to accrue for scheduled maintenance events, cover unscheduled maintenance event costs and provide access to a global network of expert Technical Advisors. These maintenance programs not only provide operators with the peace of mind that comes with a predictable maintenance budget but actually enhance the value of the 54

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

aircraft. Indeed, they’ve become a key feature when it’s time to sell. Naturally, then, questions come to mind when an aircraft broker or dealer is working on a transaction involving an asset enrolled on a maintenance program. Recently, JSSI conducted a focus group with an audience of aircraft transaction specialists to learn more about what maintenance program details they need in order to secure the deal in a timely fashion. Following are some of the FAQs that came up along with the answers provided by JSSI...

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


JSSI April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 11:23 Page 2

FAQ #1: What type of coverage does this aircraft have and what is the “pro-rata”?

FAQ #2: Can the owner transfer the program to an aircraft buyer? If so, how does this work?

Answer: The first thing the aircraft dealer needs to know is the type of coverage that is on the aircraft. JSSI offers a large variety of coverage options across engines, APUs, airframes and the avionics package. In the early years, JSSI’s focus was on in-service engines. The company pioneered the pro-rata formula approach to create an alternative to paying a large buy-in for prior hours flown. All JSSI engine programs allow full buy-in for hours and cycles consumed by an in-service aircraft; or the customer can defer the buy-in, establish a pro-rata amount and participate in paying for the event when it occurs. If the buy-in funds are paid, the pro-rata associated with scheduled maintenance events are eliminated and the engines are covered 100 percent by JSSI, subject only to contract exclusions. Today, many aircraft engines have been enrolled onto a JSSI program from the day they entered service and can be fully vested for scheduled maintenance without any pro-rata discussion. Knowing the program coverage details for the aircraft is an important factor and should be clarified before moving toward the aircraft transaction.

Answer: When owners sell a JSSI-covered aircraft, they have the option of transferring that coverage to the purchaser. With the aircraft owner’s permission, JSSI will share all pertinent information needed to transfer coverage, including (but not limited to) a full explanation of the program, the assets that are currently enrolled, pro-rata percentages if applicable, pricing and details of any upcoming scheduled maintenance events. To assist with valuations, a pro-rata elimination fee can be provided along with assistance with answering questions and clarifying details with the seller and the purchaser to help ensure client and broker satisfaction.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

FAQ #3: Can the owner transfer the program to a new aircraft purchase? Answer: JSSI clients may opt to maintain their rights to accrued maintenance reserves and apply them to JSSI coverage on a replacement turbine aircraft of any make and model. It is also important to note that JSSI allows the client up to 36 months after the aircraft sale to complete the transfer of their reserves to the replacement aircraft. This option offers added flexibility when an aircraft is placed on the market. 

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

55


JSSI April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 14:33 Page 3

SPONSORED CONTENT

FAQ #4: What about minimum flight hours… how can that impact the sale? Answer: When a business jet is put on the market ‘For Sale’, it is common to see flight hours diminish. Sometimes the owner stops flying altogether and meeting minimum flight hour requirements can then become a concern. JSSI aims to make it easy for clients to access current flight hours from the MyJSSI online portal. It is important to know that these flight hours are cumulative in nature and any outstanding gap, per their contract, can be wrapped into the sale of the aircraft. Another enhancement introduced by JSSI to the dealer community last year was the ability to suspend minimum flight hours on non-calendar driven engines for up to 12 months when the enrolled aircraft is on the market. During this time, if an unscheduled event happens the dealer has an option to either pay out of pocket for the repair or pay the accrued minimums and have JSSI cover the repair. The dealer must enter into a contract to be eligible for this option, however. FAQ #5: What should I know about JSSI coverage before scheduling a pre-purchase inspection? Answer: Before scheduling a pre-purchase inspection (PPI), the parties involved will create a sales agreement that should include details about the PPI. This agreement should cover many maintenance details, including how - or if - a borescope of the engine will be conducted during the PPI. It is important that all parties involved have a full understanding of this agreement before proceeding. There have been many late nights where dealers and brokers have contacted a JSSI representative, while a PPI is in progress,

56

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

asking for help or clarification on the program coverage for the aircraft in question. If there is an engine borescope scheduled as part of the PPI, it is important to know whether the aircraft hull insurance provider accepts any adverse findings, such as foreign object damage (FOD), if the borescope is performed outside of an incident. Performing a pre-purchase borescope may not be considered an “event” and if the hull insurance provider does accept the findings under this elective inspection, the parties need to understand what the underwriter is contracted to cover. It is critical that the seller, or seller’s representative, contact JSSI to fully understand allowances under their specific contract and the conditions under which the program coverage will be applied. During any FOD event there are items that will not be covered by an insurance provider. JSSI engine programs fill these gaps in FOD coverage. If a normal wear or tear item is found during a FOD repair event, JSSI will do what is necessary to return the aircraft back into service.

Summary

The above are the most-commonly asked questions that JSSI receives from the dealer community, but there are many more that can be answered via the newly added Broker tab on the JSSI website, through which brokers can complete a simple form without any log-in process and receive a response within 24 hours. This is designed to give active dealers and brokers a single point of contact at JSSI to work with them directly when an enrolled aircraft transaction is in progress and time is of the essence. More information from www.jetsupport.com/brokers T

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Boutsen April.qxp_Layout 1 19/03/2018 12:01 Page 1

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FOR

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Jeteffect 8 aircraft April.qxp 20/03/2018 11:54 Page 1

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Challenger 300 • S/N 20419

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Jeteffect 10 aircraft April.qxp 20/03/2018 11:59 Page 1

Learjet 40XR • S/N 2090

Citation X • S/N 11

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Citation Excel • S/N 5158

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Piaggio Avanti II • S/N 1214

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• 562.989.8800 • 561.747.2223 • 214.451.6953 • 334.502.0500 • 571.933.7393 • www.jeteffect.com


Fractional April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 14:15 Page 1

OWNERSHIP T FRACTIONAL

When to Consider Fractional Ownership of a Jet

Think of Fractional Ownership of an aircraft as you would a time-share in real estate. If you only use the asset for a limited time, why buy one and leave it unused most of the time? David Wyndham discusses when might be right to consider Fractional Ownership of a private aircraft… he Fractional Ownership provider ultimately offers its clients access to Business Aviation at a reduced purchase price (proportional to your projected usage). In addition to offering the aircraft itself, the provider takes care of the crew and manages every aspect of the aviation operation. Each fractional owner purchases an interest in a specific aircraft, based upon 800 occupied hours per year for each whole aircraft. Thus, each owner is guaranteed 50 occupied hours annually for each 1/16 share that they purchase (although helicopter shares can be a small as 1/32). Hours are billed by block time (i.e. actual flight time plus 12 minutes) and aircraft availability is guaranteed with as little as fourhour’s notice, unless during a pre-defined high demand travel period. (By comparison, a short notice call to a charter provider may not get you an aircraft when you need it.) Although they purchase a share of a specific aircraft, each share-owner has access to an entire fleet of aircraft within the fractional provider’s fleet, thus ensuring that if their specific aircraft is unavailable when they need it, they will be able to access another aircraft. The fractional owner can also choose to use a different aircraft type from the one actually purchased, as needed, by exchanging hours at given interchange ratios for different aircraft types. Indeed, depending on the share size and contract, Fractional

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Ownership allows for using simultaneous aircraft. If you have a large enough share size, you may be able to book two aircraft at the same time. In addition to the acquisition cost (or monthly lease payment), the fractional owner will pay a monthly management fee to the provider in proportion to their share size. An hourly fee covers the operating expenses and other nominal fees. Even though the occupied hourly fee includes fuel, there is usually a fuel cost adjustment to cover fuel price fluctuations. This fuel cost adjustment can be significant and must be considered along with the hourly fee when comparing program costs. Within each program is a defined Primary Service Area (PSA). Flights outside the PSA may incur additional service charges and positioning fees for the aircraft. This is also true for jet card programs. If a business owns the fractional interest, that shared asset can qualify for depreciation and other tax benefits when used for business purposes. If the tax benefit is not needed, leases are available. Fractional contracts can run for three to five years. Pricing, except for the fuel cost adjustment, is set by contract with built-in inflation factors. Fractional providers may offer two-year deals, but they tend to be one-off offers (as opposed to standardized listing). If your flying needs are stable, a multi-year contract may make sense.

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


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David Wyndham is co-owner & president of Conklin & de Decker where his expertise in cost and performance analyses, fleet planning and life cycle costing are invaluable. He’s formerly an instructor pilot with the US Air Force. Contact him via david@conklindd.com

Fractional Ownership: When Does it Make Sense?

A fractional aircraft owner can start at 50-hours per year and add hours in 25-hour increments – so if you have a guaranteed 50 hours travel requirement over the next two-three years, that would provide the entry point to begin considering Fractional Ownership. When comparing prices for traditional charter and jet card programs, the costs favor Fractional Ownership when you are likely to require mostly one-way travel and can plan on using the service for 75 to 150 hours annually. If you require between 150 and 250 annual hours of use on a regular basis, you may wish to consider whole aircraft ownership. Depending on the aircraft type, its operating costs and other variables, the difference between owning and operating a quarter share of a new aircraft offered by the fractional provider and owning a used aircraft in excellent condition can be very competitive. In the past, Conklin & de Decker has calculated costs for several prospective fractional owners. One client even had a requirement for 125 hours annually, but had a very predictable flying schedule. After obtaining a proposal from a management company that would help offset his ownership expenses with charter revenue when he was not using his aircraft, that client found whole aircraft ownership, as opposed to Fractional Ownership made sense in his case. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Another client mostly flew in Mid-size business jets, but also needed a Large Cabin jet for some of their travel needs. The client opted for a fractional contract for a jet in each category. Although the two fractional contracts cost more than it would to own and operate one Mid-size jet, they were able to meet all of their travel needs without owning two aircraft, or owning one and supplementing their travel needs with a jet card/fractional contract. The above example should highlight that, even if the total cost to own and operate your own aircraft calculates as less than Fractional Ownership, there will often be other considerations that should factor in your decision. Take each case based on its own merits.

In Summary

Overall, Fractional Ownership offers an excellent first step into the benefits of owning an aircraft. The fractional provider handles all the details, while the share owner has access to experienced flight crews and mechanics. Indeed, if the typical mission profile calls for considerable one-way flying, the costs can be low compared to the other options. As with all aspects of aircraft ownership, there are plenty of considerations specific to each prospective user that will require in-depth assessment. T

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Corporate Concepts LH page April.qxp 22/03/2018 14:27 Page 1

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Entertainment System ■ 14 Seats with Forward and Aft Lav. ■ Fresh Major Inspections, October 2017 ■ Current FAR Part 135 ■ For Sale – Long Term Lease – Trades Considered

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Nineteen Passengers with Forward and Aft Lavs New Softgoods in August 2017 SWIFT Broadband and GoGo Biz Internet Vision and Talk & Text Options

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Corporate Concepts RH page April.qxp 22/03/2018 14:28 Page 1

Corporate Concepts International, Inc. 2010 Falcon 900EX EASy II

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■ Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold - Airframe

Open to All Offers ■ Latest year model and highest serial number Falcon 900EX EASy on the market. ■ Fourteen passenger interior with forward and aft lavatorys ■ Swift Broadband and GoGo internet systems provide worldwide connectivity. ■ Full EASy II upgrades including FANS-1/A, ADS-B out, CPDLC, HUD and Synthetic Vision.

on Falcon Care ■ Satellite TV system with dual receivers ■ For Sale – Long term leasing also considered ■ This EX can be modified to be a LX with the addition of winglets for additional range and higher future residual value ■ Full details and photos available at www.flycci.com

See www.flycci.com for further details on this and other aircraft


Buying & Selling 3 April.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 14:18 Page 1

OWNERSHIP T BUYING & SELLING

Jet Tolbert is President of American Aircraft Sales. Established in 1968, it is a premier brokerage firm which has been a trusted partner since corporations first began utilizing jet aircraft to grow their businesses. With offices in the US, Latin America sales team and a partner office in Zurich, Switzerland, American Aircraft Sales is an active NBAA, IBAC, EBAA & ABAA member.

What’s the Impact of Buying a Used Part 135 Jet? A used aircraft ‘For Sale’ that has previously been utilized for Part 135 charter operations can mean different things to different buyers. Jet Tolbert addresses some of the preconceptions…

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ome buyers may assume that purchasing an aircraft previously used for charter means it will be ready to go straight into charter service and begin generating revenue for them. Other buyers may harbour reservations over the quality of the interior. What is the truth about used aircraft previously engaged in charter, and what should a potential buyer keep in mind when considering their purchase? 66

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The Pros of ex-Part 135 Aircraft

It is a fact that the FAA requires aircraft operated on a Part 135 charter certificate to meet a high standard of compliance. From a maintenance perspective that means the aircraft must comply with maintenance items that would only be recommended under Part 91 operations. Furthermore, the current operator must show traceability for parts, keeping certifications and tags in addition to the maintenance records that are required for non-charter aircraft. As regards the interior, all components of the aircraft must be fire-retardant to a standard that the FAA considers safe, and the records must substantiate this, in accordance with a stricter guideline than for Part 91. 

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Aradian April.qxp 19/03/2018 12:04 Page 1

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Buying & Selling 3 April.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 14:21 Page 2

OWNERSHIP T BUYING & SELLING

Simply put, an aircraft operated under Part 135 must meet more stringent maintenance and operational standards that may only be the recommendation for operators of private Part 91 aircraft.

The Cons of ex-Part 135 Aircraft

On the flip side of the argument, the less connection the passengers have with the airplane, the less likely they are to take care of it during travel, leading to faster deterioration of the interior and amenities. Likewise if the crew is changed regularly, there exists the potential for a diminished sense of ownership from the pilots operating the airplane, along with a possible lack of accountability. If this has indeed been the case in the aircraft ‘For Sale’, these factors will result in higher costs (from brake wear, to fuel consumption, to other maintenance items). The reason the airplane was put onto a Part 135 certificate could also impact the way it has been operated and maintained which will ultimately lead to varying levels of quality in the asset when time comes to sell. As an example, an owner who used the charter revenue as a means to offset their cost of ownership may seek to lower the maintenance costs in the short-term, thus a prospective buyer could find there are deferred maintenance items and cosmetics that are serviceable, rather than exceptional. An owner who is not using their aircraft very often could be less inclined to invest in the upkeep of cosmetics in the same way an owner using their aircraft more often might be more inclined to invest in their asset. The prudent buyer will need to be thorough in assessing this aspect of their prospective purchase.

Questions for the Discerning Buyer

Note from the above that the underlying issues essentially revolve around the condition of the aircraft. The discerning buyer would be well advised to obtain the ownership history of the aircraft, and establish how much the current owner has been using it (versus the amount of time it has been available for Part 135 hire). Why did the current owner make it available for charter? Is the owner upgrading to another airplane, or getting out of the business? Answers to these types of questions will help provide a fuller picture of the aircraft, adding a little more color and dimension to your understanding of the asset.

Ascertaining Value

While it is true that the very pristine gems at the highest end of the market are likely to have a history of private use only, the vast majority of Part 91 and Part 135 aircraft could fit into a similar value category, with some slightly above and others below the standard. The Part 135 aircraft that can demonstrate a good history is going to be worth more than the privately-operated aircraft that can’t. The only real way to identify the best value will be to identify all of the factors surrounding condition and determine the impact on costs going forward. This is a time-consuming process, but a good advisory team will help you see the wood for the trees, overcome misperceptions, and purchase an aircraft you can be truly happy with – whether formerly Part 135 or Part 91. T

“ ...the vast majority of Part 91 and Part 135 aircraft could fit into a similar value category, with some slightly above and others below the standard.”

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Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/ownership

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


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OWNERSHIP T FINANCE

What to Know About Aircraft Finance in Asia-Pacific Whether you’re a prospective borrower looking to the international aircraft financing community, or an international lender looking at potential business in the region, FlyFunder’s Paul Sykes offers insights into Asia-Pacific’s aircraft financing market… aving amassed several years’ experience as an aircraft financier with AirFinance, GE Capital and RBS Aviation Capital (among others), Paul Sykes and a team of experienced financiers recently launched FlyFunder, an online platform connecting prospective borrowers and lenders around the world. Designed to facilitate, expand and revolutionize the interaction between General Aviation buyers and financiers, FlyFunder fills a perceived communication and connection void between specialist aviation financiers, the buyers of aircraft, the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), and the sales agents who want to sell their aircraft. At a time eyes turn to the Asia-Pacific Business Aviation market with ABACE just around the corner, AvBuyer spoke with Sykes to get his insights into the Asia-Pacific lending market.

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AvBuyer: What are the common types of financing applied for in Asia-Pacific, and how do you see this changing (if at all) as the market (particularly the used aircraft market) continues to grow and mature there? Sykes: Firstly, to define Asia-Pacific as a single region is difficult as there are so many different countries and cultures lying within that area. There are some jurisdictions that are well catered for by their local financing community (such as Australia, Singapore and Malaysia) and others where it is very difficult to find even an offer, let alone a financing solution for an aircraft. There are of course countries with sanctions or at least some political unrest such North Korea and Myanmar, and international lenders have a strong preference for solid and historically-stable countries. Local currency lending is a no-go in

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countries with a history of volatile exchange rates, and borrowing in dollars can cause as many problems for the borrower as it can the lender, with native cost bases in local currency. In my experience loans are less common in some of the less developed countries, simply because finance leases offer debt lenders additional security in the event of a repossession, since the title is already held outside the borrower. Some countries, such as Japan, have a strong preference for leasing, particularly via structures that allow equity investors to obtain tax benefits. China, too, has a whole host of relatively new aircraft leasing companies, largely owned (or partly owned) by larger institutions that have tapped into the demand for Large Cabin, Long Range jets though more increasingly smaller utility assets such as helicopters, too. In terms of how things might change, I think the leasing companies will become even savvier to local demands and will play a more active role than previously on smaller aircraft, maybe via partnerships with international expert lenders and export credit agents. The used market should remain strong for the next few years, but mainly for the smaller aircraft that are perhaps more functional than those purchased purely for leisure flying. Aside from the cost benefit of buying a used aircraft, there is so much less hassle buying an aircraft that is already in situ within the region. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

AvBuyer: What are some of the myths and preconceptions about borrowing and lending within Asia-Pacific? Sykes: The preconception is that it is difficult and I cannot say that is not the case! There are definitely more cultural (and often language) hurdles to overcome on both sides than you would face in a US or UK transaction, for instance. But it is much easier than you might think with the right advice and appropriate partners within the region. There are many experienced brokers with a great presence in Asia-Pacific, and transactional law firms who can help you navigate through the various potholes along the way. So while I had heard that it is harder to do business in Asia as an international player, I have personally been very pleasantly surprised by their willingness to engage with international lenders. AvBuyer: How wide-spread/sophisticated is the market for aircraft financiers within the Asia-Pacific region at this time? Is there room for new international lenders to broaden the offerings available to borrowers there – and if so, how? Sykes: Geographically the aviation requirements are diverse, with Archipelagos such as the Maldives or Philippines having very niche requirements for STOL aircraft and floatplanes. There is the other end of the spectrum with demand for the

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OWNERSHIP T FINANCE

“...the coverage from both international and local lenders is better for Large Cabin aircraft with some of the gaps for smaller aircraft being filled by export credit agencies and captive financiers...” major countries in the region, and with US and UK law. US Dollar lending is also broadly acceptable, so it is possible to lend into some unfamiliar territories with a few familiar deal characteristics. AvBuyer: How does a borrower in Asia-Pacific ensure they can maximise their chance of getting a lender outside of their own region?

Ultra-Long-Range and Large Cabin jets in China and dotted throughout the rest of Asia-Pacific for corporates with multinational business interests. At the moment the coverage from both international and local lenders is better for Large Cabin aircraft with some of the gaps for smaller aircraft being filled by export credit agencies and captive financiers such as Longview (Viking) and TFC (Cessna and Bell). There is definitely room for international lenders to access more of the developing markets, but having a local presence gives a significant advantage over those who do not have ‘boots on the ground’. Some regions are still very much a ‘face-to-face’ culture and the idea of doing business without meeting in person is very alien to them.

Sykes: As a starting point, I would advise definitely not to take the attitude, “That is just how we do things here”. If there is an easier way to spook lenders I have not yet heard it. Most international lenders have a genuine interest in doing business in Asia-Pacific, and while there will definitely be some differences in the way deals are concluded, there will need to be some flexibility on both sides to reach agreement. It is good practice at the start of discussions to ask what can and cannot be negotiated, thus not burning any unnecessary energy trying to negotiate things that are non-negotiable. Finally, try and be as transparent as possible and understand that when a lender asks for information, it is to ensure that you are capable of making repayments and meeting the obligatory KYC requirements set by regulated institutions. T More information from www.flyfunder.com

AvBuyer: What are some of the nuances of doing business within Asia-Pacific that international lenders entering that market should be aware? Sykes: It is often more difficult to conduct due diligence on your borrowers, predominantly because there is less transparency around wealth and ownership. Something as simple as obtaining audited financial statements can become a very drawn-out process, with non-disclosure agreements and senior management sign-offs required. Admittedly this is more typical for China and some parts of South East Asia. It’s partly a cultural matter, and lenders must be prepared to see audits conducted by local firms and often (and obviously) in local language and currency. Negotiation can be something of an art form in some regions, and lenders may wish to have an idea on acceptable pricing and increase the initial offer with a view to eventually settling on a ‘reduced’ price. It is also important to get reliable local legal advice relating to repossession and enforceability of a guarantee should the worst happen. The Cape Town Treaty is ratified by most of the Are you looking for more Business Aircraft Finance articles? Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/finance-biz-av 72

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


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OWNERSHIP T VALUES

Points of Value Specific to King Airs What are the specific points of value in the used Beechcraft King Air marketplace? Jeremy Cox spotlights this popular turboprop series with an eye on their values today… n average, approximately 11 used retail transactions occur each year for each King Air model. There have been a total of 4,034 used transactions since January 2010, showing this legendary aircraft series still has plenty of market appeal today. Following, we spotlight some of the points of value specific to the King Air aircraft series, including details on how one model in a series differs from another.

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King Air 350 Models

The standard King Air 350 model is a derivative of the King 74

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Air 300. It offers approximately 40cu.ft greater cabin volume over both the King Air 300 and 200; its wings are longer and stronger (enabling it to accommodate increased payload weights) and its wings feature winglets. Like its smaller King Air 300 sister-ship, the King Air 350 is powered by two 1,050shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-60A turboprop engines. With 544USG of fuel, the King Air 350 will comfortably fly 1,580nm, with healthy reserves remaining. Dual Aft Body Strakes were installed as standard equipment in 2001, and the avionics suite was Collins' EFIS 85 until 2004, when Rockwell Collins’ Proline 21 became standard.

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Jeremy Cox is Vice President at JetBrokers, Inc, a National Aircraft Appraisers Association (NAAA) Senior Certified Aircraft Appraiser, as well as a NAAA Qualified Buyer’s Agent. Jeremy has been a Director of Maintenance for several different companies and employed by several airframe OEMs’ independent Service Centers. Contact him viajcox@jetbrokers.com

The following models were developed within the King Air 350 series: • The King Air 350C was built with a 52x49” Cargo Door. The standard Air-Stair Door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door. • The King Air 350i became the standard model in 2008. The upgrades that denote it as a 350i include: iPod, iPhone, and iPad docking; Collins Venue CMS; an Advanced Sound Damping system; electrochromic window darkeners; and cabin design improvements. In 2017, Collins Proline Fusion became the new standard avionics suite. • First made available in 2007, the King Air 350ER model is either a 350, 350C, or a 350i that is equipped with LongRange Fuel Tanks giving it >40% additional fuel over a non-ER aircraft. To accommodate the extra fuel the MGTOW was increased from 15,000lbs, up to 16,500lbs. The ER model has been sold in great numbers to both US, and foreign militaries.

King Air 350 Series Retail Values

Following is a thumbnail of residual King Air values for selected models, chosen based on ‘Average Year of Manufacture’ of all available resale aircraft on the market The residual value of a 2013 King Air 350iER is indicated to be at about 74% of its new price, based upon a List Price in 2013 of $7.275m, and a retail value today of $5.4m. The 2018 list price of a current production King Air 350iER is $7.384m. The residual value of a 2000 King Air 350 is currently at about 44% of its new price. (The 2000 List Price was $5.26m and the current retail value is $2.3m.)

300, wing attachment went from clevis bolts in ‘tension’ (mounted, and tightened end-on pointing towards the wing) to a new ‘in-shear’ arrangement. The King Air 300LW (Light Weight) variant is identical to the standard model, except for the MGTOW being restricted to 12,500lbs. This variant was created for countries that would not certify the aircraft above 12,500lbs.

King Air 300 Retail Value

The residual value of a 1987 King Air 300 is currently at about 44% of its new price. (The 1987 List Price was $2.967m, and the current retail value is $1.3m.

King Air 250

There is only one version of the King Air 250, meanwhile. It was new in 2011, and is the current production version of the venerable 200 series, but with factory Winglets, Ram Air Recovery as standard, and new turbo-fan propellers. The King Air 250 utilizes the PT6A-52 powerplant (de-rated to 850shp each, but with the same hot section as the -60As utilized on the King Air 300, and a larger compressor) which powered its older sister, the King Air B200GT. The majority of the fleet are equipped with the Rockwell Collins’ Proline 21 avionics suite. However, just like the King Air 350, in 2017 the standard suite changed to Proline Fusion.

King Air 250 Retail Value

The residual value of a 2013 King Air 250 is currently at about 62% of its new value, based on a 2013 List Price of $6.02m, and a current retail value of ~$3.7m. The 2018 list price for a King Air 250 is $6.085m.

King Air 350 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 350 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…) • • • • • •

ER Tanks Cargo Door TCAS 4000 (II) WAAS/LPV FMS Flight Data Recorder Brake De-Ice

King Air 200 Models

Introduced in 1974, the standard King Air 200, utilizes 850shp PT6A-41 powerplants, providing it with 1,600nm range and an MGTOW of 12,500lbs. This particular model has proven popular

$500,000 $450,000 $60,000 $50,000 $35,000 $10,000

King Air 300 Models

The standard King Air 300 model is based on the King Air 200, but utilizes the more powerful 1,050shp PT6A-60A engines that are found on the 350. This shortened the range of the King Air 300 over the King Air 200 (1,500nm versus 1,600nm), but enabled it to carry more weight. MGTOW was increased up to 14,000lbs on the King Air 300. The additional power also resulted in a cruise speed increase (300ktas versus 275ktas) and much improved climb performance in the King Air 300 model. Four-blade Hartzell propellers are standard and the King Air 300 incorporates a damage tolerant multi-element wing spar. With the development of the King Air Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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King Air 250

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over the years with many variants being introduced to the market at different points. • •

• •

The King Air 200C incorporated a 52x49” cargo door. The standard air-stair door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door. The King Air 200T (new in 1976) is a special missions King Air, primarily designed for Maritime Surveillance. It is a standard model, with Tip Tanks added, and a 360-degree search radar system. The King Air B200 is identical to the King Air 200, except for having a shortened, but widened center pedestal in the cockpit allowing more avionics to be installed. Additionally, the engines were upgraded from the PT6A-41 to the -42 powerplants. Deliveries started in 1981. Beginning in 1994 the B200 incorporated the new damage tolerant multielement wing spar that was first introduced on the King Air 300, and in October 2003 the standard Collins EFIS 84 avionics suite was changed to Proline 21. The King Air B200C has a 52x49” Cargo Door. The standard air-stair door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door. The King Air B200SE, introduced in 1995, is identical to the B200 except for it being equipped with Collins EFIS 84. The ‘SE’ designation was dropped after 12 months and it went back to the ‘B200’ designation. Finally, the King Air B200GT (new in 2008) is identical to the late model, Proline 21-equipped B200, except for the engines being upgraded to the PT6A-52.

King Air 200 Series Retail Values

The residual value of a 1979 model King Air 200 is currently at about 60% of its new price (the 1979 List Price was $1.34m), based on a current retail value of $800k. Meanwhile, the residual value of a 2008 King Air B200GT is currently at about 49% of its new price of $5.268m. The current retail value is $2.6m.

King Air 200 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 200 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…) • • • • • • • •

Blackhawk Conversion BLR Winglets Wing Lockers High Floatation Gear High Floatation Gear Doors Dual Aft Body Strakes Enhanced Performance Leading Edge Ram Air Recovery

$850,000 $50,000 $45,000 $20,000 $20,000 $18,000 $20,000 $35,000

MGTOW of 10,600lbs and has 373USG of useable fuel. The King Air A100 is the same as a standard King Air 100 except for having a higher MGTOW of 11,500lbs and an additional 94USG fuel capacity. The propellers were upgraded to four-blade models. Most A100 aircraft were delivered with the PT6A-34 engine (750shp) while three A100-1 models were built using 850shp PT6A-41 engines. The King Air B100 is the same as the A100 except for having Garrett TPE331-6-252B engines in place of the PT6A powerplants. These have a lower fuel consumption, upping the range of the B100 by 350nm. MGTOW also increased to 11,800lbs.

King Air 100 Retail Value

The residual value of a 1970 King Air A100 is currently at about 62% of the 1970 List Price of $650k. The current retail value is $400k. Meanwhile, the residual value of a 1978 King Air B100 is about 64% of its 1978 List Price of $981,300. The current retail value is ~$625k.

King Air 100 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 100 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…) •

King Air B100 with Dash 10 Engine

$100,000

King Air 90 Series

Finally, at the smaller end of the King Air series, the King Air 90 was essentially a pressurized cabin, turboprop powered version of the Beech Queen Air (the Beech Model 88 was used as the basis, and was pressurized, but powered by two Lycoming IGSO-540 380hp piston engines. Aboard the original King Air 90, which first delivered in 1964, the three-blade propellers were not reversible, and useable fuel was 384USG. MGTOW, meanwhile, was 9,000lbs. Also in the King Air 90 series: • The King Air A90 (new in 1966) is the same as a King Air 90 except for the installation of PT6A-20 (550shp) engines, which also added the capability for reversible propellers. The MGTOW is also higher at 9,300lbs. • The King Air B90 (1968) is essentially an A90 with an overall wingspan increase of 5ins, allowing for an increased MGTOW of 9,650lbs. An additional cabin side window  was also added.

King Air 100 Series Models

There are three versions of the King Air 100. The standard King Air 100 began delivering in 1969; the King Air A100 was new in 1972 and the B100 was introduced in 1976. The King Air 100 offers an additional 50ins fuselage length over the King Air 90 series aircraft, and seats eight in the cabin. It also features a larger rudder and dual main landing gear wheels. Powered by the PT6A-28 (680shp), the King Air 100 has an 76

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

King Air B100

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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VALUES April18.qxp_Layout 1 21/03/2018 10:17 Page 4

OWNERSHIP T VALUES

• • •

• • •

The King Air C90 (1971) is the same as a B90 except for a tapped engine bleed air system for cabin pressurization, instead of relying on the engine driven Roots compressor. This system came from the King Air 100. Starting in 1975 the engines were upgraded to PT6A-21. Introduced in 1972, the King Air E90 was the same as the original C90, except for the PT6A-28 engines (680shp) which allowed an increase in MGTOW up to 10,100lbs. New in 1982, the King Air C90-1 is the same as the post1975 model C90 except it incorporated a stronger horizontal stabilizer, and the same air-stair door as the King Air 200. The King Air C90A is the same as the C90-1, but with the new damage tolerant multi-element wing spar (wing bolts went from ‘tension’, to ‘shear’ mountings), aerodynamically improved engine cowlings, and an electro-hydraulic landing gear actuation system.The C90A delivered new from 1984. Introduced in 1992, the King Air C90B is the same as the C90A except for four-blade props, better cabin soundproofing, King Air 350 interior styling, three-position flaps, and Collins EFIS 84 avionics. The King Air C90SE is the same as the C90B except for three-blade propellers and panel mounted Bendix-King avionics. The space normally taken up by the remotely located avionics system boxes is a baggage compartment. The SE, new in 1994, was built in response to competing single engine turboprops. It was lower priced than the C90B. The King Air C90GT is the same as the C90B except for PT6A-135A engines (750shp de-rated down to 550shp). It was new in 2006. Delivering new in 2008, the King Air C90GTi is the same as the GT, except for having Rockwell Collins’ Proline 21 as the standard avionics suite. The King Air C90GTx is the same as the GTi, except for having factory Winglets, and an increased MGTOW up to 10,485lbs. It is the current production model, and in 2017 the standard delivered suite was changed to Collins Proline Fusion.

King Air C90SE

$2.6m. A 2018 model King Air C90GTx is priced at $3.87m. The residual value of a 1976 King Air E90 is approximately 77% of its List Price of $752k, and it currently retails for approximately $575k. The residual value of a 1981 King Air F90 is currently at about 60% of its original List Price of $1.478m. The current retail value is $880k.

King Air 90 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 90 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…) • • • •

Blackhawk Conversion BLR Winglets Wing Lockers Dual Aft Body Strakes

Finally, there are two versions of the King Air F90: The standard King Air F90 (new in 1979) and the King Air F90-1 (new in 1983). The F90 is the same as an E90 except for having the T-Tail similar to the King Air 200, the same nose, and windshield as the 200, and PT6A-135 engines that produce 750shp, and drive four-blade Hartzell props. The F90-1 is very similar to the standard model, except for upgraded PT6A-135A engines.

$700,000 $50,000 $45,000 $18,000 T

King Air C90GTx

King Air 90 Series Retail Value

The residual value of a 1967 King Air A90 is currently at about 77% of its 1967 List Price ($420k), and currently it retails at ~$324k. At $700k, a 1985 King Air C90’s residual value is currently at about 46% of its 1985 List Price of $1.52m. Residual value of a 2007 King Air C90GT is currently about 58% of its new price, based on a 2007 List Price of $2.952m. The current retail value is $1.7m. A 2013 King Air C90GTx currently has a residual value at about 68% of its $3.834m 2013 List Price. Current retail value is Are you looking for more Business Aircraft Ownership articles? Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/ownership 78

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


General Aviation April.qxp_Layout 1 19/03/2018 12:12 Page 1


Values Intro.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 12:33 Page 1

OWNERSHIP T RETAIL PRICE GUIDE

Turboprops Give More... Prop Advances keep these Workhorses Competitive The top-selling turboprops tend to be aircraft that are continually popular among owners needing fuel-efficient, multi-mission types, as we explore below…

W

hile exceptions exist, turboprop airplanes offer a common set of attributes that make them an attractive proposition. The powerplants are responsible for most – turboprop engines benefit today from propeller designs that are far more sophisticated than just a decade ago, resulting in lower maintenance costs; longer overhaul cycles; improved climb and cruise performance; and - in turn - reduced noise levels in the cabin. In addition, specific fuel consumption numbers continue to improve – an attractive attribute given today’s depressed oil prices, with the practical effect of allowing the use of higher power-levels without suffering a proportionate increase in fuel consumption/costs. That, in turn, contributes to improvements in take-off, climb and cruise speed. Another advantage offered by many turboprops is the single-pilot operational simplicity, engineered into even the multi-engine turboprops. The only exceptions to the sum total of these benefits exist among the unpressurized models that are available and form a small, important and dynamic segment of the turboprop market. Today’s turboprops offer a broad range of 80

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

turbine performance, propeller cost-effectiveness (some with at - or near to - Light jet cruise performance capabilities) with cabin and cockpit accoutrements that rival the best of the fanjet strata. And on trips of up to 300 nautical miles, the difference in travel time between a jet and a turboprop is negligible.

Turboprop Price Guide

The following Turboprop Retail Price Guide represents current average values published in The Aircraft Bluebook–Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1998 through Spring 2018 (20 year period). Values reported are in US$ millions, with each reporting point representing the current average retail value published in the Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Piaggio Avanti P180 reported in the Spring 2018 edition of the Bluebook shows US$3.7m for a 2012 model, US$3.2m for a 2011 model, and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. Note: For additional assistance and interest, Conklin & de Decker Performance and Specification data for these Turboprops can be referred to,  beginning on page 114 of this issue.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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Retail Values.qxp_RPG 21/03/2018 09:04 Page 1

OWNERSHIP T RETAIL PRICE GUIDE

Turboprops: Average Retail Price Guide MODEL YEAR $

2017 US$M

2016 US$M

2015 US$M

2014 US$M

2013 US$M

2012 US$M

5.0

4.4

4.0

3.5

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

3.0

2.9

2.5

2.4

1.650

1.6

1.525

1.425

MODEL BEECH KING AIRS KING AIR 350I

6.5

6.0

3.3

3.2

KING AIR 350 KING AIR 250

5.250

3.5

3.3

3.2

3.1

KING AIR B200

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.7

KING AIR B200GT KING AIR C90GTX

3.6

2.7

2.4

2.2

2.0

1.8

2.7

2.6

1.750

1.7

KING AIR C90GTI KING AIR C90GT KING AIR C90SE KING AIR C90B CESSNA CARAVANS 208 GR. CARAVAN- EX

2.375

2.275

2.175

2.075

1.975

208 GR. CAR-675/G1000

1.925

1.875

1.850

1.825

1.925

2.275

2.175

2.075

1.975

1.875

1.825

1.725

1.625

208B GR. CARAVAN 208B SUP. C/MASTER EX

1.375

208B SUP. C/MASTER/G1000

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.675

1.575

1.475

1.375

208B SUP. C/MASTER

1.350

208 CARAVAN-675/G1000

1.775

1.725

208 CARAVAN-675

1.275

208 CARAVAN PIAGGIO AVANTI - P180

7.2

6.4

5.2

4.7

4.2

3.7

3.2

3.0

2.8

2.6

PILATUS PC-12/47E NG

4.7

4.3

4.1

3.9

3.7

3.6

3.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

PILATUS PC-12/47

2.9

PILATUS PC-12/45 PIPER M600

2.7

2.4

PIPER M500

1.9

1.8

PIPER MERIDIAN-PA46-500TP QUEST KODIAK-100

2.2

2.1

SOCATA TBM 930

4.0

3.5

SOCATA TBM 900

3.8

3.3

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.450

1.350

1.3

1.175

1.075

2.0

1.8

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.3

1.250

1.2

3.1

2.8 2.5

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

SOCATA TBM 850 SOCATA TBM 700C2/EFIS SOCATA TBM 700B/EFIS

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

82

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Retail Values.qxp_RPG 21/03/2018 09:05 Page 2

RETAIL PRICE GUIDE T OWNERSHIP

What your money buys today

Spring 2018 2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

MODEL YEAR $ MODEL BEECH KING AIRS KING AIR 350I

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.5

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.950

1.875

1.8

KING AIR 350

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.550

1.450

1.4

KING AIR B200

KING AIR 250 KING AIR B200GT KING AIR C90GTX KING AIR C90GTI 1.5

1.450

KING AIR C90GT 1.4

1.350

1.3

1.250

1.2

0.775

0.750

0.725

KING AIR C90SE

1.150

1.1

1.050

KING AIR C90B CESSNA CARAVANS 208 GR. CARAVAN- EX 208 GR. CAR-675/G1000

1.325

1.250

1.125

1.075

1.050

1.0

0.950

0.9

0.875

0.850

208B GR.CARAVAN 208B SUP. C/MASTER EX 208B SUP. C/MASTER/G1000

1.3

1.250

1.2

1.150

1.1

1.050

1.0

0.950

0.900

0.875

208B SUP. C/MASTER 208 CARAVAN-675/G1000

1.225

2.4

1.175

2.3

1.075

2.125

1.050

2.050

1.0

1.975

0.950

1.9

0.900

1.825

208 CARAVAN-675 0.850

0.825

0.800

208 CARAVAN

1.750

------

1.675

PIAGGIO AVANTI - P180 PILATUS PC-12/47E NG

2.8

2.7

PILATUS PC-12/47 2.6

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

PILATUS PC-12/45 PIPER M600 PIPER M500

0.975

0.925

0.850

0.775

0.725

0.675

0.625

PIPER MERIDIAN-PA46-500TP

1.175

QUEST KODIAK-100 SOCATA TBM 930 SOCATA TBM 900

1.750

1.650 1.450

SOCATA TBM 850 1.4

1.350

1.3

SOCATA TBM 700C2/EFIS 1.250

1.2

1.150

1.125

SOCATA TBM 700B/EFIS

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 14:50 Page 1

OWNERSHIP T AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE

Aircraft Comparative Analysis Gulfstream G200

In this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, Mike Chase provides information on three popular used business jets for the purpose of valuing the Gulfstream G200.

GULFSTREAM G200

ow does the used Gulfstream G200 compare in the market today? Over the following paragraphs, we’ll consider productivity parameters (payload, range, speed and cabin size) and cover current market values. The field in this study includes the Bombardier Challenger 300 and Dassault Falcon 2000. The original Galaxy 1126 first flew on Christmas day 1997 and is a Super Mid-size jet. By December 1998 it had received certification from the US and the Israeli aviation authorities. Deliveries began in 1999. Powered by a pair of 5,700lbst Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306 powerplants, this Galaxy model was designed with a new, wider fuselage with seating configurations for 8-10 passengers and a standup cabin. Attached to the fuselage were strengthened Astra SPX wings with integrated winglets. When General Dynamics (GD) announced the acquisition of Galaxy Aerospace Company from Israel Aerospace Industries, it included the type certificates for the entire family of aircraft, which were subsequently placed with Gulfstream which it had also previously acquired. General Dynamics chose to rename the Astra and Galaxy models the Gulfstream G100 and G200, respectively. Under the arrangement, IAI would continue to manufacture the G100 and G200 aircraft in Israel and fly the jets for interior completion to Gulfstream in the US. The final G200 rolled off the production line in December, 2011 after a total 250 units had been built over the years. In 2005, Gulfstream had started designing a follow-on G250 aircraft which was later renamed the G280 and began deliveries in 2012.

H BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

DASSAULT FALCON 2000

Worldwide Appeal

Mike Chase’s analytical and consultancy services are highly valued within the Business Aviation industry. He is founder and president of Chase & Associates, and works closely with several respected sources to compile his unique Aircraft Comparative Analysis feature. Contact Mike via mike@avbuyer.com

86

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Of 250 G200s built, there are still 245 in-operation globally: 237 are wholly-owned while eight are in shared ownership (none are in fractional ownership programs). Just less than 10% of the G200s are leased, and just over a quarter of the in-operation G200s (28%) are in fleet ownership. The largest fleet operators are US-based Clay Lacy, EJI and Jet Linx, each with four Gulfstream G200s. North America is home to the largest G200 fleet percentage (72%), followed by Asia (13%) and then Europe (9%), accounting for a combined 94% of the world’s fleet. According to JETNET, as of January 2018 the Gulfstream G200 fleet comprised of 22% having one owner since new vs 78% being sold on the used jet market. The fleet percentage ‘For Sale’ (as of this writing) is 13.1%, with 87.5% under an exclusive broker agreement. Average days on the market for the G200 is currently 265 days.

Status of ADS B-Out Equipage

Of the 245 Gulfstream G200 jets worldwide, 93 (38%) are ADS-B Out equipped, leaving 62% of the fleet yet to comply. The FAA has mandated that all US-operated business jets must comply with this new requirement by January 1, 2020.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 14:50 Page 2

$4.8 Million (2007 Model)

HOW MANY

EXECUTIVE SEATS

GULFSTREAM G200

vs. BOMBARDIER

8

$7.6 Million (2007 Model)

8

Challenger 300

vs. DASSAULT Falcon 2000

10

$7.5 Million (2007 Model)

WHICH OF THESE Super-Mid-Size JETS WILL COME OUT ON TOP HOW MUCH

RUNWAY

Boeing BBJ2 Challenger 300 Bombardier

DO I NEED?

(Balanced field length, ft)

HOW FAR

2000

3000

4000

PAYLOAD CAN WE TAKE?

(Nautical Miles. 4 Pax) 3,530 3,340

Dassault Falcon 2000

5,100

3,130

Gulfstream G200

(Lbs)

Dassault Falcon 2000

5,910

HOW MANY

OPERATION?

EACH MONTH?

230

245 454

NEW/USED SOLD 5 (9.6%)

CRUISING SPEED?

(Knots)

430 459

Bombardier Challenger 300

3,350

HOW MANY

UNITS IN

7000

LONG RANGE Gulfstream G200

4,050

Challenger 300

6000

5000

WHAT’S THE

HOW MUCH

CAN WE GO?

Challenger 300

4,950

Dassault Falcon 2000

1000

Gulfstream G200

6,991

Gulfstream G200

5 (13.9%)

6 6 (5.5%) (5.5%)

12-Month Average Figure

Dassault Falcon 2000

430

WHAT’S THE

COST PER HOUR?

Gulfstream G200

$2,862 $2,784

Challenger 300 Dassault Falcon 2000

$3,583

(% = Global Fleet For Sale)

Sources used: Conklin & de Decker, JETNET, Aircraft Bluebook.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

 87


AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 15:46 Page 3

OWNERSHIP T AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE

Table A - Payload & Range

Payload & Range

Gulfstream G200 Challenger 300 Falcon 2000 38,850 35,450

35,800

15,000

MTOW (lb)

14,045

12,155

MAX Fuel (lb)

4,050

1,105

5,910 3,350

1,095

3,130

3,065

650

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

MAX Payload (lb)

2,841

MAX P/L w/Avail. Fuel IFR Range (lb)

Source: Conklin & de Decker

Chart A - Cabin Cross-Section Challenger 300

7.20 ft

Falcon 2000

7.17 ft

6.20 ft

6.08 ft

6.25 ft

Gulfstream G200

7.70 ft

Source: UPCAST JETBOOK

Chart B - Range Comparison

88

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Gulfstream G200 Challenger 300 Falcon 2000

www.AVBUYER.com

3,530 nm (w/4Pax) 3,340 nm (w/4Pax) 3,130 nm (w/4Pax)

As we have mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Gulfstream G200 ‘Available Payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 650lbs is considerably less than that offered by the Challenger 300 (1,105lbs) and the Falcon 2000 (1,095lbs), see Table A (left).

Cabin Cross-Section Views

Chart A (middle left) shows a cabin cross-section comparison with the Gulfstream G200 offering less width (7.2ft) than the Falcon 2000 (7.7ft) but slightly more than the Challenger 300 (7.17ft). However, the height of the Gulfstream G200 (6.25ft.) is greater than the Challenger 300 (6.08ft) and the Falcon 2000 (6.2ft). The Gulfstream G200 cabin length is greater (24.5ft) than the Challenger 300 (23.7ft), though the Falcon 2000 has the longest cabin in the study (31.2ft). According to Conklin & de Decker, the Gulfstream G200 has the smallest cabin volume at 869 cubic feet compared to the rest of the field. By comparison, the Challenger 300 offers 930cu.ft and the Falcon 2000 1,028cu.ft.

Range Comparison

As depicted by Chart B (bottom, left) using Dallas – Love Field Airport as the origin point, the Gulfstream G200 shows more range coverage (3,530nm) than the Challenger 300 (3,340nm) and the Falcon 2000 (3,130nm). Each business jet’s range covers all of North America, Central America and the northern part of South America. Note: For jets and turboprops, ‘Four Passengers with Available Fuel’ represents the maximum IFR range of the aircraft at Long-Range Cruise with four passenger seats occupied. NBAA IFR fuel reserve calculation for a 200nm alternate is assumed. The lines depicted do not include winds aloft or any other weather-related obstacles.

Aircraft Index see Page 145


AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 15:44 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE T OWNERSHIP

Chart C – Variable Cost

Powerplant Details

The Gulfstream 200 is powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306A turbofan engines each with 6,040lbst. The Challenger 300 is powered by two Honeywell HTF7000 turbofan engines with 6,826lbst each, and the Falcon 2000 is powered by two General Electric CFE 738-11B turbofans each offering 5,918lbst.

Gulfstream G200 Challenger 300

$3,583

US $ per hour $0

$2,000

$4,000

Source: Conklin & de Decker

The ‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart C (top, right) sourced from Conklin & de Decker and is defined as the Cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous Trip Expense. The Total Variable Cost for the Gulfstream G200 computes at $2,862 per hour, which is 20% less than the Falcon 2000 ($3,583), but is more than the Challenger 300 ($2,784).

Table B - Aircraft Comparison Table Gulfstream G200 Challenger 300 Falcon 2000

430

459

430 869

Aircraft Comparison Table

Long Range Cruise Speed

Table B (middle, right) contains the 2005 model used prices for each aircraft, as sourced from Vref. The average speeds and ranges are from Conklin & de Decker, while the number of aircraft in-operation, the fleet percentage ‘For Sale’ and average sold are as reported by JETNET. The Gulfstream G200 had 13.9% of its fleet ‘For Sale’ as of January 2018. By comparison, the Challenger 300 had 5.5% of its fleet listed ‘For Sale’ and the Falcon 2000 had 9.6% ‘For Sale’. The average number of used transactions (sold) per month is five each for the Gulfstream G200 and Falcon 2000, and an average of six per month for the Challenger 300.

930

1,028

3,530 3,340

$7.15 3,130

4 PAX w/Available Fuel IFR Range nm

Used 2005 Vref Price $US Mil.

6

13.9% 9.6%

245

$4.00

Cabin Volume cu.ft

454

$6.90

5

5.5%

230

In Operation

5

Average Sold Per month*

% For Sale

*Average Full Sale Transactions in the past 12 months; Source: JETNET Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; B&CA; Vref; JETNET

Chart D - Maximum Scheduled Maintenance Equity Gulfstream G200

Assumed Annual Utilization: 330 Flight Hours Average Maximum Maintenance Equity: $3,939,511 Pct of Avg Max Mtnc Equity vs. Aircraft Age

80%

Pct of Max Mtnc Equity

70%

Maximum Scheduled Maintenance Equity

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

$2,784

Falcon 2000

Total Variable Cost

Charts D (bottom, right) displays the Maximum Maintenance Equity the Gulfstream G200 has available, based on its age. The Maximum Maintenance Equity figure was achieved the day the aircraft came off the production

$2,862

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

7

8

9

10

11

12

Source: Asset Insight (www.assetinsight.com)

www.AVBUYER.com

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Aircraft Age (Years)

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

89


AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 16:18 Page 5

OWNERSHIP T AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE

Table C - Part 91 & 135 MACRS Schedule MARS Schedule for PART 91 Year Deduction

1

2

3

4

5

6

20.0%

32.0%

19.20%

11.52%

11.52%

5.76%

MARS Schedule for PART 135 Year Deduction

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

14.29%

24.49%

17.49%

12.49%

8.93%

8.92%

8.93%

4.46%

Source: NBAA

Table D - MACRS Depreciation Schedule 2011 Gulfstream G200 - PRIVATE (PART 91) Full Retail Price - Million $6.600 1

2

3

4

5

6

20.0%

32.0%

19.2%

11.5%

11.5%

5.8%

Year Rate (%) Depreciation ($M)

$1.320

$2.112

$1.267

$0.760

$0.760

$0.380

Depreciation Value ($M)

$5.280

$3.168

$1.901

$1.140

$0.380

$0.000

Cum. Depreciation ($M)

$1.320

$3.432

$4.699

$5.460

$6.220

$6.600

Asking Prices & Quantity

2011 Gulfstream G200 - CHARTER (PART 135) Full Retail Price - Million $6.600 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

14.3%

24.5%

17.5%

12.5%

8.9%

8.9%

8.9%

4.5%

Year Rate (%) Depreciation ($M)

$0.943

$1.616

$1.154

$0.824

$0.589

$0.589

$0.589

$0.294

Depreciation Value ($M)

$5.657

$4.041

$2.886

$2.062

$1.472

$0.884

$0.294

$0.000

Cum. Depreciation ($M)

$0.943

$2.559

$3.714

$4.538

$5.128

$5.716

$6.306

$6.600

Source: Vref

line (since it had not accumulated any utilization toward any maintenance events). The percent of the Maximum Maintenance Equity that an average aircraft will have available based on its age assumes an average annual utilization of 330 flight hours, and that all maintenance is completed when due.

Depreciation Schedule

Aircraft that are owned and operated by businesses are often depreciable for income tax purposes under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS). Under MACRS, taxpayers are allowed to accelerate the depreciation of assets by taking a greater percentage of the deductions during the first few years of the applicable recovery period (see Table C - top). In certain cases, aircraft may not qualify under the MACRS system and must be depreciated under the less favorable Alternative Depreciation System (ADS) where depreciation is based on a straight-

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

line method, meaning that equal deductions are taken during each year of the applicable recovery period. In most cases, recovery periods under ADS are longer than recovery periods available under MACRS. There are a variety of factors that taxpayers must consider in determining if an aircraft may be depreciated, and if so, the correct depreciation method and recovery period that should be utilized. For example, aircraft used in charter service (i.e. Part 135) are normally depreciated under MACRS over a seven-year recovery period or under ADS using a twelve-year recovery period. Aircraft used for qualified business purposes, such as Part 91 business use flights, are generally depreciated under MACRS over a period of five years or by using ADS with a six-year recovery period. There are certain uses of the aircraft, such as non-business flights, that may have an impact on the allowable depreciation deduction available in a given year. www.AVBUYER.com

The US enacted the 2017 Tax Cuts & Jobs Act into law on December 22, 2017. Under the new Act, taxpayers may be able to deduct up to 100% of the cost of a new or used aircraft purchased after September 27, 2017 and placed in service before January 1, 2023. This 100% expensing provision is a huge bonus for aircraft owners and operators. After December 31, 2022 the Act decreases the percentage available each year by 20% to depreciate qualified business jets until December 31, 2026. Table D (left) depicts an example of using the MACRS schedule for a 2011 model Gulfstream G200 business aircraft in private (Part 91) and charter (Part 135) operations over five- and seven-year periods, assuming a 2011 list price for a Gulfstream G200 at $6.6m (per Vref). The current used market for the Gulfstream G200 aircraft shows a total of 34 aircraft ‘For Sale’ with 13 displaying an asking price ranging from $2.495m up to $5.95m. We also reviewed the used Challenger 300 market (27 ‘For Sale’) with eight asking prices ranging between $5.7m and $10.29m. There were 19 Falcon 2000s ‘For Sale’ with six asking prices ranging from $3.5m to $6.995m. Each aircraft serial number is unique. The Airframe hours (AFTT) and age/condition will cause great variations in price. Of course, the final negotiated price remains to be decided between the seller and buyer before the sale of an aircraft is completed.

Productivity Comparisons

The points in Chart E (overleaf) are centered on the same aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in the Vref Pricing Guide. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the  multiple of three factors: Aircraft Index see Page 145


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AirCompAnalysis April18.qxp_ACAn 21/03/2018 14:52 Page 6

OWNERSHIP T AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE

1. Four/Eight Passenger Range (nm) with available fuel 2. The long-range cruise speed flown to achieve that range 3. The gross cabin volume available for passengers and amenities

Summary

Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value. There are other qualities that might factor in a buying decision, however. The Gulfstream G200 continues to be popular today. Those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison useful. Our expectations are that the Gulfstream G200 will continue to do well in the used market for the foreseeable future. Of course, if the Gulfstream G200 is not outfitted with ADS-B Out, it cannot be placed in operation after December 31, 2019 as mandated by the FAA. T

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Chart E - Productivity Comparison $10.0

Price (Millions)

Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the Gulfstream G200 displays a high level of productivity. Selecting a 2005 model aircraft (a year all three aircraft in our field were in production together), the Gulfstream G200 business jet can be acquired at a lower price than a 2005 model Challenger 300 or Falcon 2000 (per Vref). The G200 also offers longer range, but it has a smaller cabin volume compared to the Challenger 300 and Falcon 2000. In addition, the G200 has the lowest ‘Available Payload with Maximum Fuel’ number in this field of study. The Falcon 2000, meanwhile, has the largest cabin volume but the highest variable costs and less range, while the Challenger 300 has the lowest variable cost per hour of the competitors. Operators should weigh up their mission requirements precisely when picking which option is the best for them.

$8.0

Challenger 300

Falcon 2000 $6.0 $4.0 Gulfstream G200 $2.0 1.0000

1.2000

1.4000

1.6000

1.8000

2.0000

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

Read more Aircraft Comparisons at www.AvBuyer.com/articles/jets-comparison

.COM The BEST AIRCRAFT FOR SALE SEARCH anywhere, everywhere - on pc, smartphone and tablet.

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


Wright Brothers May.qxp_Layout 1 18/12/2017 11:56 Page 1


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Avionics April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 15:10 Page 1

AIRSPACE T OPERATING

Ken Elliott is a highlyrespected industry authority on avionics as a member of the NextGen Advisory Council sub-committee and Technical Director, Avionics at Jetcraft. Contact him via ken.elliott@jetcraft.com or www.jetcraft.com

What’s the Current Impact of UAS on BizAv? Ken Elliott discusses Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and how they impact Business and General Aviation. In a three-part series he covers the current, near and long-term status of the industry, respectively.

I

t is important to begin with an understanding that currently, and for the foreseeable future, the term UAS refers to an Unmanned Aircraft System. This refers to an Authorized Operational System (AOS) and not an aircraft in isolation of its operation. An AOS consists of:

• Platform (aircraft) • Payload (passengers/cargo/sensors or other tasking devices) • Remote Pilot (command and control, including the datalink to the platform and its payload) • Operational Approval by defined areas within specific airspace(s) Note: While the term UAS is used for commercial drones, Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle (UAV) refers to Military drones. Also, the term ‘drone’ is used interchangeably with UAS within the unmanned industry. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Once the operator moves from Hobbyist to Commercial operations (or as the UAS crowd like to term it ‘Enterprise’), the rules of the game require the AOS approach. The Operational System must demonstrate risk mitigation over a wide front of considerations, ensuring safe operations throughout the flight regime, including over people. While today, a high percentage of UAS are what we term sUAS (small UAS) that will change. In fact, the pressure for change is tremendous. A good way to look at the different categories of UAS and the reason for the pressure for change is shown in Figure 1 (overleaf). If it were not for the guidance of rules, it may only be the limitation of battery power that dictates the limits of airspace flown by a sUAS. We address both sUAS and UAS here because some manned aircraft flight departments are already engaged in commercial sUAS operations while most flight departments will be monitoring the future implementation of the larger UAS. Indeed, for the overall manned Business and General Aviation community, there is a gradual integration process underway that is both inevitable and transforming. 

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Avionics April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 15:11 Page 2

OPERATING T AIRSPACE Figure 1: A Simplistic Representation of UAS Size and Operational Categories

(This demonstrates the pressure for any size platform to push the envelope of their operating limitation) <400’

Rule sUAS <55LBS

Part 107

Visual Line of sight only <400’

Part 107 with Waiver

sUAS <55LBS

Extended Visual Line of sight Within different categories of airspace

Part XXX

UAS <55LBS

Beyond Visual Line of sight

Hobbyists under Part 101 Some UAS are operating under Part 91 with special authorizations

Learning to Get Along

Recent concerns raised by the Flight Safety Foundation and others are centered on recreational sUAS used exclusively, or mostly, by those operating under Part 101 (Section 336) rules. For commercial operations there is a tremendous amount of effort being applied to beef up safety-related compliance, especially where FAA Part 107 rules are being extended via waivers. There is almost universal consensus on the need to tighten and enforce the rules applicable to the thousands of drone operators using Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) quadcopters and having no background or training in aviation. Those operators with Pilot Licenses, however, are obviously less of a risk. Drones operating under the Public Safety, Government, State and Industrial applications umbrella are also very carefully managed. There is an important need for a demarcation of ‘drone anxiety’ perception, so that all drone ‘operations’ are not lumped into the same basket of potential bad apples. Manned and Unmanned are two seemingly disparate flying communities that will learn to operate together in the same

airspace. When they do so, it will probably not be that much different than the collaboration that exists today between fixedwing and helicopter operations, or private and commercial air transport activity. Current aviation communities are continuously figuring out reliable and consistent means to use the same trade space, with their different priorities, while operating on-time and within budget. Unmanned Aircraft Systems currently operate from a fixed point, typically without a runway, flying out to a line of sight limit and then returning to the same point (following the remote pilot’s position). Until tasks and missions move into the carriage of people and cargo, this flight pattern will continue. It is a very different model to manned aircraft, where flying between places that can accommodate an airport is the norm. It is important to understand the crucial differences in how UAS operate, where it is more about endurance and not about range. It is also more about 3D versatility, engaging in rapid dynamic movement, as opposed to the more predictable and methodical trajectory of manned aircraft.

Figure 2: How sUAS Flight Plans Look Compared to Manned Fixed-Wing Flights (This will change as they become larger UAS, capable of moving people and cargo)

Manned

Unmanned

(medium to ultra long distances flown)

Mission 1

Owned Facility

+

(local ops to short distances flown)

+

Destination 1

+

+

Destination 2 96

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

+

+

+

Part 91 Operation

Mission 4

+

Mission 3 www.AVBUYER.com

Part 107 and 1XX Operation

+

Mission 2 Aircraft Index see Page 145


Avionics April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 15:11 Page 3

Figure 3: An Urban Airspace User Perspective from Package and Services Delivery Provider Amazon

Integrated Airspace

500ft/152m

400ft/122m

200ft/61m

2TGFGƂPGF Low Risk Location

No Fly Zone High-Speed Transit Low-Speed .QECNK\GF6TCHƂE

Even on-demand people movement and package delivery flights will initially look like that shown in Figure 2 (below) for mission-based unmanned activity. But for autonomous multiple passengers or freight transport, operating over longer distances, the flight patterns will begin to revert to those we are familiar with today, when using manned fixed-wing aircraft. In a sense, current unmanned flight patterns are a more localized version of helicopter operations. Figure 3 (above), meanwhile, highlights how package and services delivery provider Amazon has an interesting perspective on the urban demarcation of airspace and in turn, a different perspective on drone operations. Amazon proposes a 100ft buffer between high speed transit, to include package delivery and the fully integrated airspace, while allowing for adequate blocked space around airports, approach and terminal areas. High speed transit operates between 200-400ft (above ground level – AGL) and low speed local traffic (one presumes vehicles such as ‘flying cars’, are limited to a 200ft AGL).

A Note on Platforms

Unmanned airframes are better seen as platforms because they typically carry payload. The payload can be permanent, reusable or expendable. Today, platforms are mostly assigned to missions or tasks with interchangeable add-on payloads. Tomorrow they will be considered for more permanent payloads, utilizing standard weight and balance for seats and cargo containers. Interestingly, there is another dynamic underway and it is also moving at a fast pace. We are beginning to witness the blurred mix of what may be termed ‘EEP’ or Energy, Engine and Propulsion that melts away the rigid lines of separation between fixed-wing, rotorcraft, turbine, gas powered, manned, remote pilot, no pilot, etc. Technologies that are Hybrid, VTOL and Electric are transforming the future of platforms. Whether manned or unmanned, we have a swarm of innovative aircraft and platforms about to join our skies. Given the variety of technologies behind UAS development and the number of services they can be applied to, it is hardly surprising there are hundreds of manufacturers in the unmanned aircraft sector. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

500ft/152m

400ft/122m

200ft/61m

The clear majority are building quadcopters below 55lbs weight and Chinese manufacturer DJI tops the list, far outpacing all other manufacturers. DJI includes payload sensors (typically cameras), and data link communications, all for a fraction of traditional aviation prices. Many platform and payload providers are startups with working capital capped at between $1m-5m and if their venture does not reap rewards quickly, they are either history or sold within a couple of years. Traditionally, anything unmanned that resembled a traditional helicopter or fixed wing aircraft has been deployed in either the military, government or for public services. That is now not the case. There is a plethora of manufacturers across the world who are developing rotor and fixed wing platforms, including VTOL and hybrid arrangements. The big aerospace players such as Airbus, Boeing and Textron have dedicated divisions to the task, each having advanced programs in place. Along with others such as Amazon, Uber, Insitu, PrecisionHawk, Google, Kratos, Leonardo, Volocopter, SureFly (the list goes on) there is a push to develop platforms that carry people and cargo as well as traditional commercial UAS services. Because of technology blurring, it is difficult to differentiate between traditional flight operations and the emerging new. Not only will the technologies be hybrid but so will the operations. For example, it is likely that some aircraft will operate both with and without pilots, depending upon where and how they fly. Operating drones will swarm in synchronized formations, utilizing Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) datalink, as they weave seamlessly through an airspace using 4D Performance Based Navigation (4D PBN), along with all the other aircraft. Essentially, 4D PBN ensures aerial vehicles arrive at specific points in 3D space at predetermined times by managing the precise performance (and therefore speed), ensuring an accurate arrival and adequate spacing. Platforms will develop incrementally in both their ability and their autonomy, closely aligned to what is enabled by airworthiness and air traffic authorities. However, that does not remove the tremendous pressure from industry to advance at a fast pace. Those astute safety organizations, such as the widely respected Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) will ensure brakes are applied as necessary. 

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Avionics April18.qxp_Finance 21/03/2018 09:16 Page 4

OPERATING T AIRSPACE

Table A: UAS Platform Delineation OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY ALTITUDE & ENDURANCE

SIZE QMicro UAS (<4.4lbs) QSmall UAS (<55lbs)

QLow Altitude, Close Range

QMedium UAS (>55lbs, <1,320lbs)

QMedium Altitude, Long Endurance (MALE)

QLarge UAS (>1,320lbs)

QHigh Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE)

APPLICATION

TYPE QFixed-Wing QRotorcraft QMulti-Rotor QHelicopter QVTOL Hybrid

QModel (Hobby/Recreational) QCivil (Business/Commercial/ Enterprise) QGovernment (Local/State/Federal) QMilitary

There are several ways to delineate the many types and uses of unmanned aircraft systems, including those in Table A (above). When viewed from a package delivery perspective, the perspective of platform delineation also differs, for example, that of delivery provider Amazon (see Figure 4, below). Amazon’s view delineates by platform capability, measuring airspace access as a level of operational complexity. On the other hand, when viewed from an on-demand, people moving perspective, the focus shifts to an airspace transition between areas of urban concentration and to platforms delineated by range and performance using hybrid VTOL. A study of Uber’s late 2016 Elevate White Paper (https://www.uber.com/elevate.pdf) reveals a well thought out approach to many considerations necessary for such an undertaking. Uber’s paper assumes piloted and non-piloted (autonomous) platforms, again representing an example blurring between the familiar world of fixed-wing or rotorcraft manned aircraft, moving into hybrid-VTOL, while incrementally transitioning from manned to unmanned.

Command and Control

Being remote from the pilot, UAS require both command and control. The pilot both commands the maneuvering of the platform and remains in constant control of its movement,

including an ability to recover, or return to home-base. The Europeans like to use the term Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) for unmanned platforms. Significantly, RPAS requires the use of a certified pilot, remotely in control. Of course, this also applies elsewhere, even though the term UAS is being used. What it does not refer to is autonomous, or ‘without humans in the loop’. Figure 5 (overleaf) clearly demonstrates the removal of the traditional cockpit into a remote-control ground station. The remote control can be anything from a sophisticated joystick to a full cockpit-like facility. The complexity of the remote pilot ground station is dictated by the flight and mission requirements and may include additional personnel for monitoring and real-time data analysis.

Onboard Equipment

For most sUAS, onboard equipment may include: • Energy-Engine-Propulsion (EEP), i.e. Battery, Motors and Propellers • Stability and Geo Reference • Air Data and Autopilot • Communication as Datalink (Wi-Fi Internet) • Navigation (GPS) • Any Aerodynamic Surface Movement Control (with fixed-wing sUAS for example)

Figure 4: Amazon’s Delineation of Drones ³

Airspace Access

³

Vehicle Capability

Best Better + Non-Collaborative SAA

Better Good + Internet Connected Vehicles Automatically Separate

Good Basic + Internet Connected Ground Station; Operator Responsible for Separation

Basic Radio Control

³ Concept of Operation Complexity

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www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


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Avionics April18.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 15:13 Page 5

OPERATING T AIRSPACE

On-Demand People Mover (Uber’s Hybrid-VTOL Concept)

The above list provides for line of sight operations, so may be considered baseline equipage. Once you move into UAS and gain approval to operate beyond line of sight, however, the equipage expands to provide the ability to: • Detect and Avoid • Track and Monitor • Recover and Avoid Loss of Link • Identify • Have Advanced Datalink • Have Vehicle to Vehicle (V2V) Datalink • Have Advanced Wi-Fi Internet • Have Advanced Navigation • Have Cyber Security • Operate Over 24-hour Period and in all Weather Some of the equipment necessary to provide these capabilities is only just being developed along with the standards defining the requirement.

Payload Matters

The need to handle payload drives the size and performance requirements of the platform. The energy source, engine and method of propulsion (EEP), are all crucial to the performance and therefore a limiting factor for payload capacity and weight. For quadcopters and the services, they provide, payload is not currently a major concern. They are not carrying humans or anything significant in the way of cargo. Mostly they are carrying sensors capable of measuring, monitoring, videoing and mapping which mostly entails the use of a camera (visual or thermal). For the new rotor, fixed-wing, hybrid and VTOL UAS there is an obvious tendency to follow a more traditional aircraft design, to carry humans and cargo, or be equipped with more capable sensors and radars (including LiDAR), as found in the special missions environment of today. Payloads satisfy missions and for commercial or enterprise drones, the mission list is extensive, but do tend to fall under main industrial categories, including: • Oil and Gas • Rail • Mining • Mapping • Search and Rescue • Construction • Agriculture • Environment • Insurance

drones and seeking ways to implement them as integral to their existing operations. As industry discovers and expands the use of drones, and as the Amazons, Googles and Ubers mingle with the Airbus, Boeings and Textrons on the trading floor, there will be enormous pressure to adopt and utilize drones as UAS just about anywhere. Our regulators are feeling the pain and the White House has added to what has already been inflicted with its initiation of a new UAS Integrated Pilot Program (IPP), set to begin the testing of drones by several state, local, or tribal government entities, beginning sometime after May of 2018. Canada also has plans for a proof of concept trial program involving carefully monitored tests by selected drone teams. These tests are necessary to enable the regulators to provide realistic yet safe guidance for UAS operations, based on data received from actual in-service testing. Next time, we will consider the medium-term operational aspects of UAS, and expand on the incremental process of UAS airspace integration. Stay tuned… T

Figure 5: Onboard and External or Remote Cockpits

Interestingly drones are being used off-shore by the oil and gas industry for platform inspection and now are being launched from ships for maritime work. There are even submersible drones, including those used for game changing military advantage (as announced recently by Russia and likely being explored elsewhere).

Summary

We are entering the grey area of flight operations that entails the implementation of both hybrid manned aircraft and a variety of different unmanned platforms. Furthermore, these new machines will need to operate in flight regimes that are not typical of those flown throughout the authorized airspace today. Corporate and General Aviation operators are finding uses for 100

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


2014 Dassault Falcon 7X

2003 Global Express

s/n 212

s/n 9082, N782SC

Low TT – 570 TT, Option 1 Floorplan, Available Immediately

Turnkey, only 5,050 TT, fresh 12C insp., new P&I, new Ovation CMS, worldwide internet, RRCC, MSP, HAPP, CAMP – delivery Q1, 2018

2006 Citation Encore

1996 Falcon 2000

s/n 697

s/n 6 • M-CKSB

2600 TT, fresh HSI’s in progress, No Damage

7,300 TT/4500 TC, MSP Gold, Winglets, New P&I Refurb 2016, WAAS, ADS-B Out, TCAS 7.1, Worldwide Internet, New Cabin Ent. System, NDH

2002 Citation Bravo

1990 Gulfstream GIV

4300 TT, good engine times, TCAS II, TR’s, 2014 Paint / 2014 Interior, no Damage.

8,700 TT/3800 TC, 700/700 SOH engines, Fresh ARCS, Fresh 72 month inspection, Gogo 4G Internet, Excellent cosmetics, ADS-B Out, TCAS 7.1

1994 Lear 60

2008 King Air 350

9300 TT, Engines on JSSI 100%, Dual UNS-1E FMS, 2013 cosmetics, N reg.

1800 TT, Fresh HSI, Fresh Phase 1-4 at HBS Tampa

s/n 1041

s/n 1144 • N41SC

s/n 0028, N206HY

s/n FL-584 • N585SC

GLOBALLY INTIMATE. Brokerage | Acquisitions | Sales | Management n +1 (954) 377-0303 | e acsales@scross.com | d www.scross.com | f i

03-18_scross.indd 1

3/7/18 2:40 PM


Connectivity 1 April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 15:32 Page 1

OPERATING T CONNECTIVITY

Jet Connectivity: How to Plan for Your Next Satellite Solution Increased data consumption by today’s

passengers will exceed your current cabin connectivity system if you’ll let it. Gogo’s Brian Wilson explains why now’s the time to plan for your next satellite solution…

sk any Commercial Information Officer (CIO) of any leading aircraft charter or management company what passengers feel about their current connectivity experience and the most common answer will almost certainly sound like this: “They seem to like it, but they also wish it was faster…” Such companies spend a lot of time tracking the profile of their passengers. What is becoming apparent is that they’re getting younger; they’re obsessed with their personal devices; and they are easily frustrated by a bad experience. Their dependency on social media, video streaming, applications and cloud services severely impacts the available bandwidth of today’s on-board satellite systems. Coupled with increased use of Virtual Private Networks (VPN) for security reasons, growing Facetime and video conferencing, you can easily end up with a saturated system or a “Wi-Fi inoperative” discrepancy. This sense of unfulfilment is shared across individual operators (both business and private owners). The need for more speed and bandwidth will always challenge the aircraft

A

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industry because passengers expect the same experience in the air that they have in the office or at home. Unfortunately, aircraft regulatory procedures (and the certification process) will always result in the aircraft experience lagging ground-based experiences. Yet, if you have the right airframe and budget, viable solutions are available. Now may well be the time to plan your next upgrade.

Introducing Ku- and Ka-Band

The most common satellite solution on board Mid-size to Large Cabin aircraft over recent years has been SwiftBroadband (SBB). Providing international data and voice services to 1,000+ business aircraft, the limitations in data rates of SBB has repositioned it as a function of safety services today. Given that Wi-Fi is not a luxury but a necessity, the data and bandwidth requirements demanded by today’s international passengers can only be met by a Ka- or Ku-band solution. Both Ka- and Ku-band are satellite based solutions using geostationary satellites orbiting 22,000 miles above the earth.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Connectivity 1 April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 15:32 Page 2

Brian Wilson is the Director, Key Accounts at Gogo Business Aviation, an industry-leading provider of in-flight connectivity and entertainment solutions. Prior to Gogo, he sat on numerous Dealer Advisory Boards along with being a member of the AEA Board of Directors.

Ku works in the range of frequencies from 12-18 Gigahertz (GHZ) while Ka has the frequency range of 26-40 GHZ. Their symbols equate to K-under and K-above the K frequency band of 18-26 GHZ. Irrespective of what some might claim, Ku and Ka are simply two different frequency bands. Both are very capable of streaming and of internet data rates that exceed the normal passenger requirement on today’s business aircraft.

Ku- and Ka-Band: The Planning Process

The typical system consists of a tail mounted parabolic antenna and two to three Line Replacement Units (LRU). For the purpose of this discussion, we will focus on the tail mounted antenna because it can alter both the installation costs and downtime required to perform the upgrade, due to the necessity for a radome to be installed on the tail to both house the antenna and protect it from the elements. Understanding the Radome: Determining whether you have the correct radome is an important factor during the planning process. The word radome is a blending of the words radar and Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

dome, and every aircraft today that has an onboard weather radar system has a radome mounted on the nose. Each radome is constructed of specific materials that minimally diminish the electromagnetic signal passing through it to the antenna. Thus, a bad radome or an incorrect one will severely impact the performance of the system. ‘Transmissivity’ is the industry word for this phenomenon. Visually, you can identify whether an aircraft has a radome on the tail by either the bullet-shaped style, or the enhanced ‘camel hump’ style. Technically, you can determine the radome type by identifying what systems are currently installed on your aircraft. Many aircraft today operate with SBB, Satellite TV and early-generation Ku-band systems, and a majority of these configurations will have required a tail-mounted antenna enclosed by a radome. The costs to install a new radome is well over a $100k and requires hundreds of hours of sheet metal work, adding a few days to the aircraft’s downtime. Some new in-production Large Cabin jets have Ka-band radomes, but for aircraft already in operation, the likelihood is 

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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OPERATING  CONNECTIVITY



that you will need a new Ka-band radome. For Ku-band solution-seekers, in most cases the existing radome should be a workable one. Additional Antennas: Once you’ve established the facts about the radome, the next phase of planning is to determine if another antenna could fit under it. Two antennas are quite common and are unlikely to be an issue, but once you require a third the challenges begin. If your airframe can only fit two antennas, then a decision to remove either the TV or SBB will need to be made. Do keep in mind that both the Ka- and Ku-band solutions are subject to ‘rain fade’ and cannot be used for safety services. Thus, it’s possible that the SBB system must remain.

Ku- and Ka-Band Monthly Rates

Comparing and understanding the monthly service plans for these two satellite solutions is as easy as dissecting the terms and conditions of your variable annuity. Service providers tend to focus on how fast their data-rates will deliver while quoting the lower tiers of the pricing structure. As we assess the reality, we must first understand two terms: 1. Maximum Information Rate (MIR) 2. Committed Information Rate (CIR) MIR represents the best-case data rate that you could ever achieve. If the MIR is 15Mbps, that is the highest data rate your passengers will ever experience, under perfect conditions. The CIR rate, meantime, represents the minimum data speed the service provider promises to always deliver. (Early providers used to refer to CIR as the Guaranteed Information Rate (GIR) to emphasize the bottom rate of functionality.) These terms and pricing matrix apply to both the Uplink and Downlink data speeds. The most important point to remember is that in almost all service pricing plans, the MIR being advertised will almost certainly be tied to the most expensive option in the plan. It is natural that most operators will want to save some costs and pick a lower tiered plan, however. Be aware that both the MIR and CIR rates will decrease. Additionally, be aware that 104

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Visually, you can identify whether an aircraft has a radome on the tail by either the bullet-shaped style, or the enhanced ‘camel hump’ style.

there are no unlimited plans so if your pick a lower option and your passengers stream a lot of data, you will be exposed to ‘overage’ fees. It is essential for you to match the right pricing structure that allows data speeds that will satisfy your passengers without breaking your budget.

Closing Thoughts…

Typically, the types of installations discussed above are planned during a maintenance event because the downtime can be 1218+ days. The downtime is ultimately predicated on how many shifts your preferred MRO or OEM has in place. On the subject of your installation facility, be sure that it is experienced in these sophisticated upgrades. Proper tooling and training is needed to ensure the job is done correctly and both the aircraft and installation personnel are safe. The proper facilities have tail stands specifically designed for your aircraft (undertaking this type of work with scissor lifts is illadvised). In most cases the leading edge of the vertical fin will need removal to enable cabling to be added and/or substantiate the conduit for the cables. Installation costs will exceed half a million dollars (excluding the costs associated with the radome), and it is advised you request three proposals from accredited installation facilities helping you get the best price and downtime. It’s also a good policy to have one of the crew members present during the ground and test flying of the system. There is very little clearance between the antenna and the inside of the radome. No matter what maneuver the aircraft is performing, the electronically steered antenna is designed to rotate and stay locked onto the satellite. Be cognizant on your early flights to make sure the system is performing properly on all headings and flight profiles to ensure the antenna signal is not being partially blocked or obstructed inside the radome. You paid for superior performance, so your passengers will expect only the best! 

www.AVBUYER.com

Are you looking for more Connectivity articles?

Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/jet-connectivity Aircraft Index see Page 145


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Connectivity 2 April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 15:22 Page 1

OPERATING T CONNECTIVITY

How to Tailor Jet Connectivity to Your Needs What questions should operators

be weighing up as they make their

cabin connectivity selection? How can the available solutions be tailored to specific mission needs? Viasat’s James Person offers insights…

T

he decision to purchase a used business jet requires the assessment of a myriad of factors — everything from the airplane’s technical specifications to the color of the carpet. Whether it’s an owner-flown Entry-Level jet or an Ultra-Long-Range, Large Cabin jet, the airplane must fit the mission needs of its owners, operators and passengers. Of course, for an aircraft to be fully mission-capable it is now an expectation that passengers and crew will be able to connect to ground-based data services and the internet while cruising comfortably at 41,000 feet. Whether the need is to access email and social media, or streaming content and teleconferencing, the passengers’ need for connectivity is a non-negotiable. Business and personal lives don’t just stop when boarding an airplane anymore. So, if meeting the mission needs of your passengers is your central 106

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

goal, the on-board connectivity must come close to matching the experience on the ground. Yet getting that capability has become a challenging decisionmaking process for many owners and operators. In-flight connectivity has seen significant advances in recent years with new technologies promising previously unheard-of capabilities. Established and robust Ku-band satellite services are now being joined by advanced Ka-band satellites, such as the ViaSat-2 system. New Air-to-Ground (ATG) services are also being developed, including a high-bandwidth, focused-beam technology. So how do you begin tailoring the cabin connectivity solution aboard your airplane to your mission needs? With the increasing number of options available, the first step in deciding on a system and provider should begin — just as in the purchase decision — with the airplane itself.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Connectivity 2 April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 15:23 Page 2

James Person is Director of Global Business Development, Business Aviation and VVIP Markets for ViaSat. He has led the business development efforts in these segments, since joining the company in 2013. ViaSat has been active in both segments for more than a decade, selling both Ku- and Ka-band service plans.

Tip #1: Connectivity to Match the Aircraft

The physical specifications of the aircraft are a key element of the connectivity decision. A smaller aircraft can usually only accommodate blade-type antennas, such as those used by ATG or low-speed L-band services. While more compact satellite antennas are on the horizon, today, only aircraft in the size range of the Cessna Citation X and above can be fitted with a Ku, Ka or hybrid satellite antenna. The antenna is just one part of the equation, however. There needs to be space for the electronic components that complete the solution, whether located inside or outside of the pressurized cabin. The electronics may be rack-mounted or located in a baggage compartment, and consideration has to be given for the wiring that connects all of the systems. Regardless, operators should always consult with their maintenance provider to determine what equipment can be installed in their jet. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Tip #2: Technology to fit the Need

A very viable and satisfactory solution for smaller aircraft that fly over the continental US can be an ATG service, which utilizes a network of ground-based towers. But once a Mid-size or LargeCabin jet heads out to sea on a trans-oceanic route, ATG simply ceases to work. That’s when satellite comes into play. A satellite solution will keep an airplane connected from ramp to ramp, at any altitude, almost anywhere in the world, and Ku- and Ka-band satellite services can provide a stable, high-bandwidth connection. The newest evolution of the Ku-band network requires only a small antenna to be installed on the top of the jet’s tail fin. Wiring from the antenna feeds the system’s electronics, made up of just three Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) located in the cabin or in the airplane’s avionics bay.  Various satellite providers have different equipment

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OPERATING T CONNECTIVITY

requirements downstream of the antenna. Some will require five or six LRUs, or perhaps larger components that can only be installed in the luggage compartment. Thus, an operator should carefully evaluate the technology footprint, and the trade-off against avionics or baggage space. (If the equipment can live outside the pressurized cabin and not take up valuable luggage space, that’s a win — and something nearly every principal will find interest in.) The ability to easily upgrade a satellite service is another important factor to consider. It makes little sense to commit funds and resources to a solution that doesn’t show a clear upgrade path, or one that isn’t future-proofed. At the same time, an upgrade has to be easy. It shouldn’t require the near disassembly of an airplane to install new equipment and wiring. Does the provider recognize the importance of minimal aircraft downtime, and does this reflect in ‘forward compatible’ equipment that will make future upgrades (for example from Ku- to Ka-band service a relatively simple process)? Owners and maintenance teams should also evaluate the available support and service packages. Nobody wants to have a lengthy aircraft on ground (AOG) situation.

Tip #3: Selecting Coverage and Capacity

Perhaps surprisingly to some, coverage, though important, shouldn’t be the key factor in deciding an in-flight connectivity service provider. (Naturally, it’s important to know about the

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

number of satellites in the network, or where the signal in a satellite’s network can be received — because you want to ensure where you typically fly will be covered in the footprint.) But possibly even more important than that is the capability of the network, its speed and its capacity. This is critical because the satellite’s network footprint could be global, but if the service provider doesn’t have enough capacity, you won’t be able to be productive. Capacity is what enables principals, the cockpit and crew to do more in-flight. There are hundreds of communications satellites in orbit, with thousands more planned for future networks in low-, medium- and high geosynchronous altitude orbits. Service providers both own and lease this orbital capacity. It’s important for corporate aircraft operators to find out how that “space segment” translates into capacity, and what applications you can perform with that capacity — especially in congested air corridors. Additional questions might include: • • •

What kind of redundancy is built into the coverage? How responsive is the operator to outages? Are there new satellites in orbit (or soon to be launched) that will improve overall coverage and capacity?

Operators need to be thinking long-term, because it’s too expensive to install one system today, only to have to replace it in a few years’ time.

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Connectivity 2 April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 15:28 Page 4

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1-800-535-8767 1-503-861-2288 sales@lektro.com Tip #4: Knowing the Data Costs

Along with the evaluation of technology, a savvy owner should look closely at the on-going costs for data connectivity. Just as in the mobile phone sector, there are different plans available from service providers. Optimizing the plan to meet the aircraft’s mission is critical, while recognizing that plans for different technologies and services may vary from a per-megabyte usage model to monthly flat-rate packages. Flat-rate packages are far easier to build into a budget, in large part because of the challenge of determining the expected consumption of data, based on the variable size of emails, attachments and websites. If you plan to do any kind of video streaming or teleconferencing on board, you’re going to need a robust service that offers plenty of data. For private or corporate operators, flat-rate monthly packages tend to be recommended because they remove surprise overage charges. For charter operators, hourly options are often preferable.

Summary

Aero connectivity is an exciting, fast-moving part of aviation giving new opportunities for advanced safety-of-flight services, and an enhanced passenger experience. The key is to recognize your application needs first to ensure you’re asking the right questions when evaluating a long-term connectivity partner. T

Are you looking for more Connectivity articles? Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Viasat Pushes the Boundaries The importance of capacity is that the more you have, the more passengers and crew can do in the air and in congested airspaces. According to Viasat, through its Ka-band network, the company is focused on offering vast capacity in space for the total aviation market across Business, Commercial and Government segments. Currently offering nearly 500Gb per seconds (Gbps) of total network capacity from North America, across the Atlantic Ocean and Europe, Viasat continues to build its next-gen global satellite constellation comprised of three ultra-high-capacity satellites. Named the ViaSat-3 constellation, Viasat claims that each satellite will bring an estimated 1,000 Gbps of capacity to provide truly global Ka-band coverage. More information from www.viasat.com

Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/jet-connectivity

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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OPERATING T MANAGEMENT

What’s Your Plan About Aircraft Damage? 110

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


Flight Planning.qxp_Finance 20/03/2018 15:38 Page 2

With a focused approach on global excellence and creativity, Andre Fodor has managed flight operations for the U.N. and Flight Options as well as being a senior demonstration pilot and instructor for Embraer Aircraft. He is currently the Aviation Director at Johnsonville Sausage.

How would you manage damage occurring to your aircraft? While most hope it will never happen to them, Aviation Director Andre Fodor highlights why having a plan pays dividends…

t is a fact of life that things go wrong from time-to-time. Humans are fallible, causing safety protocols to fail (or worse, be disregarded) which in turn cause accidents to happen. But how would you respond if that accident resulted in damage to your aircraft? The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) within this Flight Department is to slow down and think twice – especially when engaged on long duty days. Having arrived in Europe after an uneventful Atlantic crossing we taxied over to a leading FBO for parking. As the aircraft approached the ramp area the marshals attempted to park it very tightly. The space they ushered us towards was clearly inadequate for an aircraft with a large wing-span such as ours. So the crew refused the marshalls’ orders and parked in a better-suited area. Following shutdown, they explained their decision to the FBO management as avoidance of an unnecessary component of risk. Next morning, the aircraft was scheduled to depart and was towed ramp-side. As the crew completed the pre-flight checks, another aircraft taxied onto the ramp, was marshalled tightly nearby, and during its final turn struck the horizontal stabilizer of our aircraft. Game over for two aircraft!

I

Managing Incident Fallout

Following the immediate anger and disbelief of our crew and the “what happened?” exclamations from the ramp personnel, the pilots quickly followed ‘incident protocol’ to safeguard all evidence of negligence and damage. The first practical objective, however, was to source a recovery aircraft to take our passengers to their meetings. Since one component of effective Flight Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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Department management is to have supplemental lift, the passengers were on their way to their meetings without any significant disservice. However, the next steps in the incident fallout were less quickly resolved. Given a busy international flight schedule in the following months, the primary focus became returning the aircraft back to flying status. One might expect the negligent party’s insurer to be ready and willing to help repair damages. Alas, if that is your expectation, you could find your aircraft grounded for a long time. It is likely to be up to you to get the ball rolling. While it might be preferable not to file a claim through your insurer (be aware that this could result in rate hikes and the loss of claim-free preferential rates), by at least alerting them of the incident you will be able to file a claim with them to recover the costs if you encounter difficulty with the insurer of the at-fault party. As a part of the incident fallout plan, our Director of Maintenance was booked onto the next flight to the aircraft’s location. In the course of securing photographic and video evidence (from multiple angles) the crew was able to supply plenty of detail to both the Director of Maintenance and the OEM’s engineering team to begin formulating the best repair plan. A hangar was also secured where the aircraft could be stored and kept out of sight, and maintenance could be performed.

Formulating Your Plan

It can’t be stressed enough about the importance of developing an incident fallout plan that will provide you with an action framework in the event of the worst happening. By design, it should April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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OPERATING T MANAGEMENT

exist to get things moving quickly towards a speedy resolution. Within the plan, team members should have specific tasks and assignments, and a clear notification tree should exist. Within a smaller Flight Department, for example, one person might be responsible for logistics (i.e. transportation, lodging and meals) while another would be tasked with documenting the entire process (from initial damage to final repair and return to service). Good documentation will help validate damage recovery and complement the logbook entries that will ultimately tell the story of the occurrence and how the aircraft was made whole again. If you find yourself needing to action such a plan, remember, silence and discretion are golden. Discussion of the incident with friends and/or over social media, for example, could lead to lengthier settlements, lower recoveries or worse - outright denial of your insurance claim. Beyond the initial shock and anger, a positive outlook will be essential. The OEM or a major repair shop will probably be involved, parts will need to be procured and express-shipped, and new frustrations will undoubtedly arise. These must

be met with a ‘can-do’ attitude as your team is challenged to keep the process moving forward. Likewise, be positive when engaging the negligent party to be expeditious in settling your recovery claim. If they’re reputable and honorable, they will want to make things right quickly. For your part, accept that the resolution of a claim takes time. Insurers don’t write checks without due diligence. They’ll review receipts, logbook entries, engineering reports and pictures before settling.

…And Don’t Forget the Team…

Importantly, as a Flight Department Manager, understand that your team has been injured too. Everyone in your department dedicates time and energy to safe flight operations and in keeping the aircraft in ‘as new’ a condition as possible. It’s impossible not to take it personally when the aircraft gets damaged. Harness this element as the team thrives under the joint goal of returning the aircraft to flying status and celebrating the success of being well prepared and cohesively working together to overcome a big problem. T

“If you find yourself needing to action such a plan, remember, silence and discretion are golden.”

Are you looking for more Flight Department Management Visit www.avbuyer.com/articles/flight-dept-mgt

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


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ACSpecs Intro.qxp_AC Specs Intronov06 21/03/2018 15:03 Page 1

OPERATING T SPECIFICATIONS

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Turboprops

T

he AvBuyer Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft - Turboprops – appears opposite, to be followed by UltraLong Range & Large Cabin Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

Description of Cost Elements The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. Specifications - General CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). Weights: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. Specifications Performance Range: • Range (4 Pax) - The maximum IFR range of the aircraft with four passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum www.AVBUYER.com

VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft.

Balanced Field Length BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW). Landing Distance (Factored) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. Rate of Climb (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. Cruise Speed (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. Engines The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 145


AircraftPer&SpecDec16.qxp_PerfspecDecember06 21/03/2018 14:56 Page 1

BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR C90 B BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR C90 BEE GT CHC RAF T KI NG AIR C90 GTi BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR C90 GTx BLA CKH AWK KING AIR C90 XP1 NEX 35A TAN T AE ROS PAC E G9 0XT SMY RNA AIR KING AIR POW BEE ER 9 CHC 0 RAF T KI NG AIR 200 KING AIR 200 RAIS BEC K BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR B20 0

SPECIFICATIONS T OPERATING

$930.80

$1,055.78

$1,040.02

$1,032.17

$1,088.75

$743.08

$803.31

$1,444.82

$1,455.74

$1,135.56

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

CABIN WIDTH FT.

12.4

12.4

12.4

12.4

12.4

12.4

12.4

16.7

16.7

16.7

CABIN LENGTH FT.

218

218

218

218

218

218

218

303

303

303

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

48

48

48

48

48

54

54

54

54

54

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

CREW #

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6

6

6

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

10100

10100

10100

10485

10100

10500

10100

12500

12500

12500

MTOW LBS

9600

9600

9600

9700

9600

9700

9700

12500

12500

12500

MLW LBS

7210

7200

7200

7235

7150

7235

7000

8550

8550

8820

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

2573

2573

2573

2573

2573

2573

2573

3645

3645

3645

USEABLE FUEL LBS

377

387

387

737

437

752

587

395

395

125

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2950

2306

2306

2143

3010

2143

3160

1850

1850

2180

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

640

-

-

903

739

-

-

1075

858

920

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

940

981

981

1152

1174

-

-

1490

1500

1580

MAX. RANGE N.M. (4 PAX)

4519

4519

4519

3888

4000

-

-

5300

3800

5300

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3692

4007

4007

4002

4000

-

3417

4333

3167

4417

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

2010

1953

1953

1953

1950

-

2500

2450

2500

2448

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

495

474

474

474

475

-

-

740

720

745

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

250

270

270

274

270

-

280

289

289

290

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

234

-

-

274

270

-

250

272

284

283

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

195

206

206

204

206

-

217

225

228

226

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PT6A-21

PT6A-135A

PT6A-135A

PT6A-135A

PT6A-135A

H80

H80

PT6A-41

PT6A-41

PT6A-42

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES #

ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

115


AircraftPer&SpecDec16.qxp_PerfspecDecember06 21/03/2018 14:57 Page 2

KING AIR B20 0 RA ISBE CK BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR B20 BLA 0GT CKH AWK KING AIR B20 0 XP BEE 61 CHC RAF T KI NG AIR 250 BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR 350 BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR 350 ER BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR 350 i BEE CHC RAF T KI NG AIR 350 iER CES SNA 208 CAR AVA N 208 CAR AVA N/C ARG O PO D

OPERATING T SPECIFICATIONS

$1,145.73

$1,216.24

$1,339.69

$1,223.94

$1,239.27

$1,253.87

$1,235.76

$1,247.84

$523.02

$527.33

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.5

4.5

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

5.3

5.3

CABIN LENGTH FT.

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

19.2

19.2

19.2

19.5

12.75

12.75

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

303

303

303

303

344

344

344

344

271

271

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.2

4.2

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.23

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.23

4.08

4.08

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

54

55

54

55

56

56

56

55

32

32

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

16

16

16

-

-

84

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

6

6

6

7

8

8

8

8

9

9

MTOW LBS

12500

12500

12500

12500

15000

16500

15000

16500

8000

8000

MLW LBS

12500

12500

12500

12500

15000

15675

15000

15675

7800

7800

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

8820

8760

8820

8830

9885

10400

10000

10585

4940

5120

USEABLE FUEL LBS

3645

3645

3645

3645

3611

5192

3611

5192

2224

2224

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

125

185

125

115

1604

1008

1489

823

871

691

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2180

2240

2180

2170

2615

2600

2500

2415

2860

2680

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

858

960

975

636

1440

1878

1440

1635

325

100

MAX. RANGE N.M. (4 PAX)

1570

1650

1498

1575

1550

2311

1550

2365

835

768

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3800

3640

3800

3925

3300

5105

3300

5105

2055

2260

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3500

4437

4437

4625

4140

4760

4143

4770

2508

2508

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

2500

2450

2500

2437

2700

2400

2700

2400

1234

1175

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

710

745

710

682

622

337

622

337

-

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

292

305

311

310

320

303

320

303

186

186

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

292

298

311

301

310

303

310

265

175

175

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

232

226

232

232

234

238

234

238

147

147

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

PT6A-42

PT6A-52

PT6A-61

PT6A-52

PT6A-60A

PT6A-60A

PT6A-60A

PT6A-60A

PT6A-114A

PT6A-114A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

116

AVBUYER MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 2018

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Aircraft Index see Page 145


208 B GN D CA RAV AN/ CAR G PO D CES SNA 208 B GR AND CAR AVA CES N SNA 208 B GR AND CAR AVA 208 N EX B GR AND CAR AVA N EX /CAR BLA G PO CKH D AWK CAR AVA NX P42 A DAH ERSOC ATA TBM 700 C2 DAH ERSOC ATA TBM 850 DAH ERSOC ATA TBM 900 DAH ERSOC ATA TBM 910 DAH ERSOC ATA TBM 930

AircraftPer&SpecDec16.qxp_PerfspecDecember06 21/03/2018 14:57 Page 3

$533.33

$529.02

$561.76

$568.06

$710.27

$652.49

$731.71

$702.91

$700.01

$700.01

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.1

4.1

4.1

4.1

4.1

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.3

4

4

4

4.1

4

CABIN WIDTH FT.

16.75

16.75

16.75

16.75

16.75

10

10

10

10

10

CABIN LENGTH FT.

352

352

352

352

352

143

143

143

143

143

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

3.9

3.9

3.9

3.9

3.9

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.08

4.08

4.08

4.17

4.08

3.5

3.5

3.5

3.5

3.5

DOOR WIDTH FT.

32

32

32

32

33

30

30

30

-

30

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

112

-

-

111.5

112

5.9

5.9

5.9

35.9

5.9

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

CREW #

9

9

9

9

9

5

5

5

2

5

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8750

8750

8807

8807

9062

7394

7394

7394

7394

7394

MTOW LBS

8500

8500

8500

8500

9000

7024

7024

7024

7024

7024

MLW LBS

5440

5270

5305

5498

5350

4889

4780

4829

4829

4829

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

2224

2224

2247

2247

2224

1887

1956

1956

1956

1956

USEABLE FUEL LBS

1121

1291

1290

1097

1523

654

694

645

645

645

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

3060

3230

3195

3002

3650

1143

1252

1203

1203

1203

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

465

529

494

365

627

1000

967

989

989

989

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

731

789

739

685

734

1200

1364

1474

1474

1474

MAX. RANGE N.M. (4 PAX)

2500

2420

2742

2742

2195

3100

3110

2823

2823

2823

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

2625

2625

2800

2625

2625

3750

3750

3750

3570

3750

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

925

975

1331

1275

1215

1570

2005

2005

2005

2005

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

186

184

194

185

189

292

320

324

324

324

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

182

182

187

178

189

290

316

318

318

318

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

156

156

162

155

155

255

255

252

252

252

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

PT6A-114A

PT6A-114A

PT6A-140

PT6A-140

PT6A-42A

PT6A-64

PT6A-66D

PT6A-66D

PT6A-66D

PT6A-66D

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

ENGINES #

ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

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April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

117


AircraftPer&SpecDec16.qxp_PerfspecDecember06 21/03/2018 14:58 Page 4

46T P QUE ST A IRCR AFT KOD IAK

PIPE RM ERID IAN PA

PIPE RM 600

PIPE RM 500

PILA TUS PC-1 2 NG

PIAG GIO AVA NTI P18 0 PIAG GIO AVA NTI P18 0 EV O PIAG GIO AVA NTI P18 0 II PILA TUS PC-1 2

PAC IFIC AER OSP ACE

P-75 0- X STO L

OPERATING T SPECIFICATIONS

$510.09

$1,357.56

$1,334.82

$1,343.42

$796.46

$749.99

$534.54

$552.86

$521.58

$516.78

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.7

5.8

5.8

5.8

4.75

4.83

3.9

3.92

3.9

4.5

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.6

6.1

6.1

6.1

5

5

4.2

4.13

4.2

4.8

CABIN LENGTH FT.

13.2

14.9

17.5

17.5

16.9

16.92

12.3

12.33

12.3

15.5

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

220

393

393

393

356

356

164

165

106

248

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

3.9

4.4

4.4

4.4

4.5

4.42

3.8

3.83

3.8

4.1

DOOR WIDTH FT.

4

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

4.1

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

27

16

16

16

34

40

20

20

20

38

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

44.15

44.15

44.15

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

1

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

10

6

6

6

7

7

5

4

5

5

MTOW LBS

7500

11550

12100

12100

10450

10450

5092

6000

5092

7255

MLW LBS

7125

10945

11500

11500

9920

9921

4850

5800

4850

6690

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

3300

8000

8500

8500

6565

6782

3634

3730

3663

3975

USEABLE FUEL LBS

2210

2802

2802

2802

2704

2704

1140

1140

1140

2110

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1990

798

848

848

1226

1009

360

1180

331

1220

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

4200

1800

1300

1300

2475

2257

1216

1120

1187

2515

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

378

980

752

752

1340

1309

213

633

489

524

MAX. RANGE N.M. (4 PAX)

753

1440

1364

1364

1660

1635

754

1278

1091

845

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

1683

3100

3500

3500

2450

2450

2680

2902

2000

1720

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

2075

4550

4417

4417

2783

2783

3650

2623

1950

1933

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

1067

2950

2600

2600

1680

1920

1570

1556

1556

1338

-

756

680

680

-

-

-

-

-

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

163

390

363

363

261

280

260

274

267

180

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

151

354

346

346

261

268

230

260

262

154

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

141

310

314

314

209

209

175

184

225

133

1

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

PT6A-34

PT6A-66

PT6A-66B

PT6A-66B

PT6A67B

PT6A-67P

PT6A42A

PT6A-42A

PT6A-42A

PT6A-34

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

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T


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119


Community News April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 16:02 Page 1

COMMUNITY NEWS T DEVELOPMENT

Introducing Dassault’s Falcon 6X

Dassault Falcon wasted no time in introducing the replacement for the Falcon 5X, announcing an enhanced jet for a similar price. Rod Simpson was present for the introduction of the new Falcon 6X. DASSAULT FALCON 6X

INITIAL SPECIFICATIONS E XT E R N A L D I M ENS I ONS Overall Length

84ft 3ins

Height

24ft 6ins

Wingspan

85ft 1in

IN T E R N A L D IM ENS I ONS Overall Cabin Length

40ft 4ins

Cabin Width

7ft 2ins

Cabin Height

6ft 6ins

Cabin Volume

1,843cu ft

W E I GH TS

MTOW

77,460lbs

Maximum Landing Weight

66,190lbs

Maximum Fuel Weight

33,790lbs

120

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

ccasionally, promising aviation projects can turn into a nightmare. Such was the case for Dassault whose Falcon 5X, originally rolled out at Bordeaux amid a fanfare of music and light in June, 2015 found itself disadvantaged by its flawed engines. The continuing technical delays to Safran’s Silvercrest powerplants finally forced Dassault’s patience to run out and, in December, 2017 the company finally decided to cancel the Silvercrest contract and move on. With remarkable speed, the Falcon 5X has been re-imagined and now emerges as the bigger and better Falcon 6X. The new aircraft addresses the same market as the Falcon 5X but justifies its new title by offering quite a bit more. At the formal launch in Paris on February 28, Dassault’s Chairman and CEO, Eric Trappier explained: "We wanted to further push the boundaries with this new aircraft to provide the best flight experience possible

O

www.AVBUYER.com

using today’s know-how. This strategy has been endorsed by our customers and, while some 5X orders have been switched to other Dassault models such as the Falcon 7X or 8X, we are very confident that others will be willing to wait until the Falcon 6X is ready. “Indeed, we already have purchase contracts under discussion with several clients.”

More than a new Engine…

Having flown the Falcon 5X prototype with Silvercrest test engines, Dassault has made progress in verifying the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft - but finding a new powerplant was not so easy. The Silvercrest turbofans offered a combination of light weight, performance and fuel efficiency unmatched by any competing engines. Fortunately, a solution is at hand with Pratt & Whitney Canada’s well established PurePower PW800 which has accumulated over 20,000 test hours and has a reputation for maintainability and reliability. Yet it’s not as simple as just hanging new Aircraft Index see Page 145


Community News April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 16:03 Page 2

engines on the existing 5X airframe. Whereas the Silvercrest was an 11,450lbst engine, the PW812D proposed for the Falcon 6X is in the 13,000-14,000lbst category and is larger and heavier. According to Dassault’s Senior Vice President, Civil Aircraft, Olivier Villa, “We want to maximize the use of the Falcon 5X technology but the new engines mean we must redesign and strengthen various parts of the fuselage, particularly around the pylon area.” The Falcon 6X also has a longer 84ft 3in fuselage (compared with 82ft 7in for the Falcon 5X) with an addition ahead of the wing allowing for a 20-inch increase in cabin length and an additional belly fuel tank. Also introduced to the pressurized tank system is an OBIGGS active inerting system which reduces the danger of fuel ignition by injecting nitrogen into the empty tank spaces. Quite apart from the structural changes to the fuselage, there are also revisions to the highly efficient Falcon 5X wing which has been redesigned to minimize the effects of turbulence and enhance the safety of the aircraft’s operations. The structural architecture has been changed and the already complex arrangement of control surfaces (including three leading edge slats and a curved trailing edge with flaps and airbrakes) has been further enhanced with the addition of flaperons - not used before on a business jet. These can work as flaps or ailerons and they are claimed to improve control during approaches, particularly with steep descents. Because of the aircraft’s fly-by-wire systems these surfaces are automatically deployed using the Falcon’s next generation digital flight control system.

There are new designs for the cabin seating and fittings and the cabin will be well illuminated with 14 windows on each side. In terms of passenger comfort the pressurization is set at 3,900ft at FL410 and the cabin should be as quiet as the Falcon 8X with a high level of air quality. Further illumination in the galley area is provided by a skylight window in the roof which will be welcomed by cabin crew and is a first among business aircraft. ▲ The PW812D powerplant will be utilized by the Falcon 6X

▲ An easy-access cockpit incorporates EASy III avionics with the FalconSphere II EFB

▼ The Falcon 6X's cabin will offer 15% more volume than its direct competitor

Internal Changes

From the passenger’s perspective, Dassault claims the Falcon 6X’s cabin is wider than even the Gulfstream G650 at 86ins and offers an inch more cabin headroom. It has 15% more cabin volume than its direct competitor, the Gulfstream G500. The new cabin dimensions have given the opportunity for new internal layouts for 12, 13, 14 or 16 passengers with an aft restroom and alternative entry area layouts with the option of a crew rest area in addition to the galley. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Performance Enhancements

The redesign has allowed Dassault’s team to increase the range of the Falcon 6X by 300 nautical miles to 5,500nm - which gives it a significant advantage over its direct competition. With eight passengers and a cruising speed of Mach 0.8 the aircraft can fly from Paris to Cape Town or Tokyo; Beijing to Melbourne or San Francisco. The maximum cruising speed is 0.9 Mach. At the front of the aircraft there is an all-new cockpit which is wide and affords easy access. The Falcon 6X has Dassault’s third generation EASy III all digital flight deck together with the FalconSphere II electronic flight bag, and there will be dual head-up displays (HUDs) to display the FalconEye CVS (Combined Vision System) which brings together both enhanced vision and synthetic vision capability.

Enhanced Jet, Same Price?

With all these improvements to the original Falcon 5X design, the big question is whether the price has also increased. Not so, says Eric Trappier: "The Falcon 5X was priced at $45m in 2015 values and this aircraft will have a 2018 price tag of $47 million - so, almost the same price." As for the Falcon 5X prototype "its engines will be returned to Safran and many components will be used to create the prototype Falcon 6X", Trappier explains. Timing for the program sees the prototype Falcon 6X flying in early 2021 and certification in 2022. "Of course, I am not happy with the delay to our original program," Trappier summarizes, "but this aircraft will have a 30-year life and I believe customers will wait for it - and be very happy with the outcome." More information from www.dassaultfalcon.com

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121


Community News April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 16:05 Page 3

COMMUNITY NEWS T REVIEW

OEM Bites

Aerocor LLC has introduced a Certified Pre-Owned Program for the Eclipse 500 and 550 models. “We know how stressful buying a jet can be, and we’ve seen how easy it is to make costly mistakes,” said company cofounder Gavin Woodman. “We designed Aerocor Certified Pre-Owned to take the guesswork out of the process, delivering a vetted aircraft with predictable maintenance costs.” More information from www.aerocor.com

Bell announced the Bell 407GXi, incorporating new avionics, an upgraded engine, and new executive interior design options. Garmin’s G1000H NXi Integrated Flight Deck is installed, and Rolls-Royce M250C47E/4 dual channel FADEC turbine engines will deliver exceptional hot and high performance, fuel efficiency and cruise speed of 133kts. Bell rebranded from Bell Helicopter during February. More information from www.Bellflight.com

Bombardier announced a dozen new product enhancements for Learjet 40/45s, Challenger 300/604s, and Globals, including avionics upgrades that elevate situational awareness or meet regulatory compliance, as well as cabin improvements. These are available for installation at any of Bombardier’s nine service centers worldwide. More information from www.businessaircraft.bombardier.com

122

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Airbus Secures H125 and EC145 Orders Airbus Helicopters signed deals for at least an additional 17 helicopters at Heli-Expo 2018 and earlier announced a fleet order from Metro Aviation. mong the orders received were seven H125 and three H130 singles from Heliflite China. In addition, Helicopter Travel Munich signed an agreement for four H125s, Noevir Aviation booked a single H125 and Japan's Auto Panther and Nakanihon Air Service opted for an H130 and H135, respectively. Meanwhile, Metro Aviation announced a $125m fleet order for 25 EC145e medium-twins. Deliveries have already begun and are scheduled to continue over the next four years to Metro.

A

…and Partners with Fly Blade

Additionally, Airbus Helicopters and Fly Blade have signed a strategic partnership

to develop new premium on-demand helicopter flight experiences, paving the way for ‘enhanced urban air mobility solutions to benefit the future of vertical flight’. “Airbus continues to develop the future of the urban air mobility market, and this partnership is the next logical step in our quest to offer customers the full spectrum of urban air travel solutions,” explained Matthieu Louvot, executive Vice President, Customer Support and Services, Airbus Helicopters. “By partnering with Blade, we are setting a strong foundation for the… successful deployment of electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) systems.” More information from: www.airbus.com/helicopters

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OEM Bites

Dassault president and CEO Eric Trappier said 2018 revenues are anticipated to be on par with last year’s total of $5.94bn, up from $4.4bn in 2016. “We see some sign of a timid recovery in the Business Aviation market, as the prices on the secondhand market have stopped falling and sales of used Falcons are better,” he noted.

More information from www.dassaultfalcon.com

SkyCourier Completes Initial Wind Tunnel Tests Textron has completed initial wind tunnel testing of its new twin-engine Cessna SkyCourier turboprop. The company anticipates first flight of the SkyCourier in 2019 with entry into service in 2020.

R

esults from comprehensive wind tunnel tests will provide performance and aerodynamic characteristics and structural load data, further finalizing the aircraft design. The company has said there is tremendous interest from operators looking for a modern solution in the large twin-utility space. “The flexibility and mission potential for the Cessna SkyCourier is attractive to a wide variety of operators,” said Brad Thress, senior vice president, Engineering.

“The feedback we’re gathering from the Customer Advisory Board is extremely important as we develop an aircraft that is reliable, efficient and meets the diverse requirements of an array of mission profiles.” In other Cessna news, the Citation Longitude has successfully circumnavigated the globe. Throughout its world tour, the Longitude traveled more than 31,000 nautical miles, flew 27 legs and visited 12 countries. More information from: www.txtav.com

The BEST AIRCRAFT FOR SALE SEARCH anywhere, everywhere - on pc, smartphone and tablet.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

ONLINE I PRINT I BROADCAST I EVENTS

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Kopter has won firm orders for 23 of its all-composite SH09 light single helicopters, and options for 11 more at the recent Heli-Expo. The deals at list prices are worth $119m, if all options are exercised.

More information from www.marenco-swisshelicopter.ch

XTI Aircraft Company, is on schedule and on budget as it completes the ducts and fans for its 60% scale flying prototype and moves toward ground testing those components. The TriFan 600 is a six-seat aircraft that will have the speed, range and comfort of a business jet and the ability to take off and land vertically, like a helicopter.

More information from www.xtiaircraft.com

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Community News April18.qxp_Layout 1 20/03/2018 16:09 Page 5

COMMUNITY NEWS T PEOPLE Tom Bell replaces Marion Blakey as president and CEO of Rolls-Royce North America. The appointment follows the decision of Blakey to retire at the end of June after serving a three-year term. Bell will also continue as president, Defence, Rolls-Royce.

Tom Bell

James Dent

James Dent has been appointed vice president, flight operations at National Jets. Dent, brings more than 50 years of aviation experience to his new position.

Ryan Robertson joins C&L Aviation Group as sales manager for Component Repair as the company continues an expansion of its component repair and offerings.

Chad Doehring was named vice president operations at Duncan Aviation’s Provo, Utah, location. Joining the Duncan Aviation senior leadership team he will work closely with Provo COO Bill Prochazka.

Jason Schwab is the newly appointed president of JSSI Advisory Services. In this new role, Schwab will lead the company's growing range of aircraft consulting services and subscription products.

Michael Donahoe accepted the role of vice president, US and Latin America sales, Hopkinson Aircraft Sales. Brad Kutz joined Wipaire as vice president, engineering. Kutz most recently was a senior systems engineer for Rockwell Collins. Karl Mills has been named charter manager for the UK at TAG Aviation Europe.

Chad Doehring

Michael Donahoe

Larry Roberts has been appointed senior vice president of US business development on behalf of Swiss Helicopter maker Kopter Group, responsible for sales and marketing of the company's SH09 turbine single in North America.

Oakleigh Thorne is the new president and CEO at Gogo, succeeding Michael J. Small. Thorne's appointment follows the mutual decision by Small and the Gogo board of directors for Small to step down as president and CEO, and as a director of the company.

Brandon Mitchener

Larry Roberts

Tom Vice was named Aerion’s president and COO. Vice is the former president of Northrop Grumman’s Aerospace Systems sector. Jason Schwab

Brandon Mitchener, CEO at the European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) for the past 11 months, has left the association.

Victoire Totah has been named TAG Aviation Europe’s business development director for the French region.

Michael O’Donnell becomes president of the Aviation Practice Group at SterlingRisk Insurance. O’Donnell, who joined SterlingRisk in 2011, most recently was executive vice president of the group and has served in the aviation insurance industry since 2002.

Nick Weston, CEO at Weston Aviation, has been elected to the position of BACA deputy chairman. He will share the role with Volker Meissner of ARGUS International during a transition period as BACA moves forward to its next stage of development. T

Oakleigh Thorne

BizAv Events NBAA: Maintenance Conference May 1 – 3 Albuquerque, NM, USA www.nbaa.org

The Elite London May 11 - 12 Wycombe Air Park, Bucks, UK www.theeliteevents.com

EBACE: Int’l Aircraft Transactions May 28 Geneva, Switzerland www.nbaa.org/www.ebace.aero

Corporate Jet Investor Asia Jun 13 - 14 Singapore www.corporatejetinvestor.com

Business Aviation Safety Summit May 10 - 11 Chicago, IL, USA www.flightsafety.org

NAFA: Conference May 16 – 18 Coronado Island, CA, USA www.nafa.aero

EBACE: (European Bus. Av. Convention) May 29 – 31 Geneva, Switzerland www.nbaa.org/www.ebace.aero

Isle of Man Aviation Conference Jun 13 Isle of Man, UK www. isleofmanaviationconference.com

NBAA: Business Aviation Taxes Seminar May 10 - 11 Dallas, TX, USA www.nbaa.org

HeliRussia May 24 - 26 Moscow, Russia www.helirussia.ru

CBAA Convention & Exhibition Jun 12 – 14 Waterloo, Ontario, Canada www.cbaa-acaa.ca

Global Business Aviation Workshop June 14 Montreal, Canada www.aeropodium.com

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www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Products & Services April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2018 11:04 Page 1

PRODUCTS & SERVICES Airbus Helicopters Teams with Thales and Helisim

Airbus Helicopters, Thales and Helisim have announced they will join forces to construct a new, state-of-the-art helicopter pilot and maintenance crew training center in Texas. The Airbus Helicopters Training Center in North America will be located at the headquarters of Airbus Helicopters Inc. in Grand Prairie. Helisim, a joint venture of Thales and Airbus Helicopters and a leader in helicopter training, will develop and operate the simulation center, which will include the first H145 and H175 Level D simulators in North America. These Reality H Simulators built by Thales will enable pilot training for two of Airbus Helicopters’ newest, most high-tech civil helicopters which are now entering wide use in the Americas. “The opening of this new facility near Dallas represents a major international expansion of Helisim,” said Christian Cochini, CEO of Helisim. “Our 18 years of experience in simulation training for Airbus Helicopters’ wide range of aircraft, representing nearly 200,000 simulated flight hours, combined with AH Inc. expertise will allow us to offer safe and efficient training www.airbus.com/helicopters

AMAC Head-of-State Airbus A330

The Airbus A330 has arrived at AMAC’s Basel facility in Switzerland for a C-check in conjunction with a full IFE upgrade to large 4K monitors, new switch panels and further enhancements for the passengers’ comfort during operations will be performed by AMAC Aerospace’s experienced Airbus team. AMAC’s in-house developed STC (Supplemental Type Certificate) for the KA band installation on A330-200 aircraft will be re-used when installing a KA band system on the head-of-state aircraft. In addition, AMAC will refurbish the seats and the aircraft is undergoing an ‘Obsolesce Program’, where all the obsolete parts and components of the aircraft are removed and will be replaced with current state-of-the-art parts and equipment www.amacaerospace.com

Blackhawk Announces 400-Hour TBO Extension for XP140 Engine+ Upgrade

Blackhawk Modifications recently announced a Time Between Overhaul (TBO) baseline extension from 3600 hours to 4000 hours for the Cessna Caravan XP140 Engine+ Upgrade. With this 400-hour TBO increase, the Hot Section Inspection (HSI) interval is also extended from 1800 hours to 2000 hours. Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) announced in Service Information Letter (SIL) #PT6A-259 that these TBO and HSI extensions are retroactive, meaning that all existing PT6A-140 engines operating today can take advantage of the increases. The extended TBO and HSI intervals will allow Caravan operators to save on operating expenses with less frequent maintenance needed on the engine. In addition to the extension, TBO harmonization is also offered for operators with a mixed fleet of PT6A-114/A and PT6A-140 engines. Those with a valid P&WC-recommended TBO extension for PT6A-114/A engines may apply this recommendation to PT6A140 engines in their fleet www.blackhawk.aero

Duncan CJ3 Pro Line Fusion Upgrades Underway

A year after Duncan Aviation delivered the first Citation CJ3 aircraft equipped with the Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion integrated avionics upgrade, the company say they have seen great demand and is spooling up additional installation locations to make the upgrade even more convenient for customers. The first eight aircraft were completed at Duncan Aviation’s facility in Lincoln, Nebraska. Next month, Pro Line Fusion installations will also be in work at Duncan’s Battle Creek, Michigan, and Provo, Utah, locations. The company has 11 CJ3 upgrades completed or in work with a total of 25 commitments www.Duncanaviation.aero

FAI Completes Bombardier Interior Projects

The most recent interior projects completed by Nuremberg-based FAI Technik include installing an XRS cabin on a Bombardier Global Express. The conversion took 6,000 man-hours and also included a 180-month inspection and paint work. FAI also recently performed a full cabin refurbishment on a Challenger 604 for Air Independence, a German GA operator. That project included a combined 96-and 192-month inspection and new paint. FAI is also now in the process of refurbishing the cabin of a Global Express for the same customer. In addition, the aircraft’s avionics will be upgraded to Batch 3 Honeywell avionics, and ADS-B Out technology and high-speed internet will be installed. In other news, FAI Technik achieved revenues of €9.7m (US$12.1m) in 2017, a 40% increase over the previous year. “We are extremely pleased to close the year with record results,” said Siegfried Axtmann, FAI Group chairman. “Our excellent performance was driven by our ability to expand our capacity to meet a growing demand for MRO services. I am very proud of our organization as we continue to develop our MRO business.” www.fai.ag

www.AVBUYER.com

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Products & Services April.qxp_Layout 1 22/03/2018 11:04 Page 2

PRODUCTS & SERVICES Gulfstream,s New Resource for Faster Resolution of AOGs

Gulfstream announced it has created a center dedicated to the resolution of aircraft-onground (AOG) issues, providing Gulfstream operators with an unprecedented level of integrated support and ensuring faster return to service of their grounded aircraft. The nearly 2,400 square-foot/223 square-meter center is located in the 679,199-sf/63,100-sm Gulfstream Savannah Service Center, the world’s largest and most technically advanced maintenance facility built specifically for business jets, and is staffed by an enterprise-wide team of experts dedicated to predicting, preventing and resolving maintenance or logistics issues that would prevent an aircraft from making its next flight. “This is the first time we’ve concentrated such a broad team of multidisciplinary personnel together in a space solely dedicated to AOG situations,” said Derek Zimmerman, president, Gulfstream Product Support. “Co-locating technical experts with crossenterprise resources, including logistics, materials and purchasing support, will lead to more coordinated responses to customers, expedite resolution of issues and get aircraft back in the air faster than ever.” Calls or messages that come into the Technical Operations Contact Center, if designated an “AOG” condition, are routed to the center, where experienced team members have Gulfstream’s vast worldwide resources at their fingertips. These include: multiple Field and Airborne Support Teams (FAST) aircraft to deliver mission-critical parts, tools and/or technicians; more than 150 field service representatives and FAST-dedicated technicians, including 12 mobile repair teams with specially equipped vehicles; more than $1.6 billion in spares inventory at over 20 locations; and a network of more than 30 company-owned and authorized service centers and warranty facilities. “Our AOG center is the next evolution of what our Technical Operations department has had in place for years,” Zimmerman said. “Continuously improving our services is part of our effort to meet and exceed the expectations of our growing worldwide fleet.” www.gulfstream.com

Gulfstream to Expand in Appleton

Gulfstream announced its plans to construct a new service center at Wisconsin’s Appleton International Airport to support its growing customer fleet. This additional Gulfstream Appleton facility, which will complement the existing hangar and office space, is expected to begin operations in the second quarter of 2019 and create approximately 200 jobs. Gulfstream will develop an approximately $40 million, nearly 180,000-square-foot/16,723-square-meter maintenance, repair and overhaul facility northeast of the airport terminal. The new building will include a hangar, offices, back shops and support 126

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

space. The expansion will boost the number of employees at Gulfstream Appleton to more than 1,000. Groundbreaking is scheduled for the second quarter of 2018. A company site since 1998, Gulfstream Appleton is home to a service center and large-cabin completions facility spread over more than 315,500 sf/29,310 sq m. In 2017, employees there completed 582 aircraft visits, including road trips, to support customers at regional airports. www.gulfstream.com

Honeywell RECON Raises the Bar

Honeywell delivers a great leap forward in Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) capabilities with RECON. The newgeneration solution taps into the power of the connected helicopter to monitor the health and safety of the drive train and report faults before they can become serious problems. RECON can acquire and process data eight times faster than its predecessor systems and send information to ground operations and maintenance crews in real time. With RECON, Honeywell HUMS experts have built on a 30-year legacy of innovation to create a modular, flexible and scalable solution to meet the needs of any operator – whether you're flying military or commercial missions. The bottom line is improved safety and availability, whether you fly one helicopter or a whole fleet. RECON can reduce in-flight cancellations by up to 30 percent, test flights by 20 percent and scheduled maintenance by up to 10 percent. www.honeywell.com

Global Jet’s Unique Fleet Addition

Global Jet begins a successful 2018 with the addition of another aircraft joining their charter fleet in Moscow, a Global Express XRS configured for 12 passengers in the utmost comfort. Designed to present a unique and stylish interior, this aircraft with its 6,200 nautical mile range is able to accomplish transcontinental and intercontinental flights, thanks to its powerful Rolls-Royce BR700-710-A2-20 engines. The cabin is divided into three sections enabling passengers to appreciate every second of their flight by savouring food and relaxation in the forward and middle cabins, and enabling ample work space in a tranquil environment in the aft cabin. The aircraft features a large one-sided galley opposite a crew rest area and provides two lavatories. The beautifully designed interior has been created with excellent taste to appeal to the most discerning passenger. This aircraft is one of a kind and its uniqueness will provide an unforgettable flight experience, the company says. www.globaljetconcept.com

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Jetsense Aviation Citation Falcon 50 March.qxp_Empyrean 19/03/2018 16:09 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Priced at $1,295,000 USD 1989 Falcon 50 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

0188 N188FJ 6310 4600

 6,310 Hours TTAF (One Of The Lowest Time Falcon 50’s On The Market)  Landing Gear Overhaul Complied With July 2011, Next Due July 2023  1C, 2C, & 4C Complied With In July 2013 by West Star Aviation  Part 135 Operated and Maintained  Beautiful Paint And Interior  5-Screen Collins ProLine II  Fresh Prebuy Airframe Maintenance Tracking Enrolled on CAMP Engines Honeywell TFE731-3-1C Position: 1 2 S/N: P76652 P76640 THSN: 6310 Hours 6310 Hours TCSO: 4600 Cycles 4600 Cycles TSO: 3974 Hours 3983 Hours TSHO: 1160 Hours 1160 Hours Program: MSP Gold MSP Gold Position: 3 S/N: P76655 THSN: 6040 Hours TCSO: 4413 Cycles TSO: 2294 Hours TSHO: 940 Hours Program: MSP Gold

APU Description Honeywell GTCP36-100(A) Serial Number P-296 Total Time Since New 3793Hours Avionics COLLINS PROLINE II SUITE Autopilot / Flight Director 2 Collins APS-85 Air Data Computers 2 Collins ADS-82 Cockpit Voice Recorder 1 Fairchild A100A Cockpit Displays 5 Collins EFIS-86C-14 Flight Management System 2 Global GNS-XLS w/GPS (approach certified) Global Positioning System 2 GNS-XLS Transponder 2 Allied Signal MST-67A w/Mode S VHF Communication 2 Collins VHF-22B w/8.33 spacing Radar Altimeter 1 Collins ALT-55B Navigation Radio 2 Collins VIR-32 w/FM immunity Traffic Collision Avoidance System 1 Allied Signal TCAS-II w/change 7 General Specifications Seating 2/9 Baggage (CuFt Ext/Int) 90 / 25 Cabin Height (Ft) 5’10” Cabin Width (Ft) 6’1” Cabin Volume (CuFt) 833.92 Interior Galley Location - Forward with microwave, coffee maker, and oven Lavatory Location - Aft (Belted) Exterior Base Paint Color(s) - Matterhorn White Stripe Color(s) - Gold and Green

Jet Sense Aviation, LLC Contact: Brett Forrester Contact: Pat Mitchell 550 N. Rand Road, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047 Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (847) 550 4660 Email: brett@jetsenseaviation.com Email: pat@jetsenseaviation.com www.jetsenseaviation.com April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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Jetsense Aviation Hawker 850XP April.qxp_Empyrean 19/03/2018 16:11 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Priced at $2,695,000 USD 2006 Hawker 850XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

258752 N752MT 7184.5 4153

 One Corporate Owner Since New  Part 135 Operated & Maintained  Fresh G (48-Mo.) Inspection  Gear Overhauled 2015  Collins ProLine 21  ATG-5000 WiFi  WAAS/LPV Engines Honeywell TFE731-5BR-1H LEFT ENGINE RIGHT ENGINE S/N: P-129157 P-129156 THSN: 7082.9 Hours 7113.8 Hours TCSN: 1145 Cycles 1145 Cycles TSO: 2877.3 2877.3 TSHS: 668.8 699.7 Program: MSP MSP APU Honeywell GTCP36-150(W) S/N: P-872 TTSN: 3728 Hours Program: MSP Avionics Autopilot / Flight Director 2 Collins FGC 3000 Air Data Computers 2 Collins ADC 3000 Attitude and Heading Reference 2 Collins AHC 3000 Cockpit Voice Recorder 1 Universal 120 Flight Data Recorder 1 Honeywell Flight Management System 2 Honeywell FMC

6000 with WAAS/LPV Global Positioning System 2 Collins GPS 4000A Global Proximity Warning System 1 Honeywell MK V EGPWS Transponder 2 Collins TDR-94D Mode S High Frequency Radio 1 Collins HF 9000 Electronic Standby Instruments 1 Meggit MK2 Radar Altimeter 1 Collins ALT 4000 Communication Radio 2 Collins VHF 4000 Navigation Radio 2 1—Collins NAV-4500, 1— Collins NAV-4000 Traffic Collision Avoidance System 1 Collins TTR 4000 General Specifications Seating 2/10 Baggage (CuFt Ext/Int) 0/50 Cabin Height (Ft) 5’9” Cabin Width (Ft) 6’0” Cabin Volume (CuFt) 736 Seats Full Range (NM) 2462 Balance Field Length (Ft) 5,499.98 Landing Distance (Ft) 2,910.05 Average Block Speed (Kts) 419 Normal Cruise Speed (Kts) 419 Long Range Cruise Speed (Kts) 392 Fuel Usage (Gal/Hr) 287 Service Ceiling (Ft) 41,000 Interior Number of Passengers 10 Including Belted Lav Galley Location Forward Lavatory Location Aft (Belted) Exterior Base Paint Color(s) Matterhorn White Stripe Color(s) Yellow and Blue

Jet Sense Aviation, LLC Contact: Brett Forrester Contact: Pat Mitchell 550 N. Rand Road, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047

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www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +1 (847) 550 4660 Email: brett@jetsenseaviation.com Email: pat@jetsenseaviation.com www.jetsenseaviation.com Aircraft Index see Page 145


Sky Aviation Holdings Beechcraft 400A April.qxp 22/03/2018 10:51 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1997 Beechjet 400A Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

RK-148 N337TC 3581 3320

Powerplant Pratt Whitney JT15D-5 2858.27 Hours SINCE New, cyc: 2143, s/n PCE-JA0677 2858.27 Hours SINCE New, cyc: 2143, s/n PCE-JA0678 1052:09 Hours since Hot Sections 748 hours remaining to overhaul on ESP Gold Lite engine plan Avionics Rockwell Collins Pro Line Rockwell Collins FMS-5000 Rockwell Collins VHF-422C Rockwell Collins VIR-432 Rockwell Collins GPS-4000 Rockwell Collins APS-4000 Rockwell Collins ADC-850D Rockwell Collins WXR-840 Rockwell Collins ADF-462 Rockwell Collins DME-442 Rockwell Collins ALT-55B Mode S Transponders w/ Flight ID Rockwell Collins TCAS II TTR 920 Honeywell Mark VIII Fairchild A100S Fairchild F-1000 Artex

Entertainment 18” LCD Bulkhead Monitor, “In Arm” Monitors in Single Seats, ASXi Interactive w/Network, Dual DVD/CD Player Interior • 7 Passenger • FWD Galley • AFT LAV • TIA Microwave Oven; TIA Convection Oven; and TIA Coffee Maker; Pull-Out Work Surface; and Custom Thermal Coffee Jugs • Single Jet Bed w/Pump; Single Sky Lounger; Spare Carpet; and Foot Rests • New interior March 2018 Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue Stripe Color New Paint March of 2018

Sky Aviation Holdings LLC Pompano Beach Airport, 751 NE 10th Street, Pompano Beach Florida, 33060, United States Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (954) 246 4133 Cell: +1 (954) 270 3333 www.skyaviationholdings.com

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Sky Aviation Holdings Hawker 800XP April.qxp 22/03/2018 10:51 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2004 Hawker 800XP (Proline 21) Airframe TT: Landings:

8,913 5,601

Engines Honeywell TFE731-5BR-1H on MSP TBO 2,500 / 5000 964 hrs since MPI and CZI 2316 hrs since MPI and CZI APU Honeywell GTCP 36-150 (W) 5,120 hrs since new Interior Sister ship is shown Aircraft is in paint and interior 8 Passenger interior, Forward 4 club seats, aft forward facing seat, aft 3 place divan, Forward baggage and galley, aft closet, Airshow CD-DVD, 110 VAC Outlets. . Cabinetry is high gloss Black veneer

SISTER SHIP INTERIOR

• Dual Collins ADF-462 • Dual Collins DME-442 • Dual Collins ADC-3000 • Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S • Dual Collins FMC-6000 w/ dual GPS • Collins FGC3000 • Collins TWR-850 • Dual Collins HF9031 w/selcal • Universal CVR120 • Artex 406 ELT • Collins TCAS 4000 • Collins ALT-4000 RADL • Mark V EGPWS Maintenance Engines on MSP Airframe on Avtrak Part 135 maintained G inspection 4-2016 Next due 4-2020 Gear OH 5-2016 Next due 5-2028 E-F inspection at delivery ATG-5000 Wi-Fi high speed RVSM

Exterior Matterhorn White, Black, Charcoal Grey and Silver stripes Avionics Collins Proline 21 • Dual Collins FDU-3000 • Dual Collins VHF-422C Comms • Dual Collins VIR-432 Navs

Sky Aviation Holdings LLC Pompano Beach Airport, 751 NE 10th Street, Pompano Beach Florida, 33060, United States

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www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +1 (954) 246 4133 Cell: +1 (954) 270 3333 www.skyaviationholdings.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


JetPro Texas Beechcraft King Air B200 - 2 April.qxp_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 20/03/2018 15:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2003 Beechcraft King Air B200 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

BB-1833 N375JP 5,949 4,595

510 hours on new BLACKHAWK XP61’s Collins TCAS-4000 TCAS II Garmin 400 GPS Recent outstanding paint and interior, Steller history Has both, two place couch and single “sixth” seat PRICE REDUCED, TRADES ARE WELCOME! Engines Under Factory Warranty Two Pratt and Whitney Canada PT6A-61 –1346 SHP Each (Flat rated) S/N TSN TCSN Left: PCE-HA0224 510 338 Right: PCE-HA0225 510 338

Avionics Collins EFIS 84 System Collins APS-65 Autopilot Dual Collins VHF-22C Coms Dual Collins VIR-32 Nav Dual Collins TDR94D Transponders Collins ADF-60A Dual Collins DME-42 Collins TCAS-4000 TCAS II Garmin GNS-400 GPS Honeywell Mk VI EGPWS Collins WXR-270 Color Weather Radar Collins ALT-55B Radio Altimeter Collins ALI-80A Altimeter Full Copilot’s Instruments L3 FA2100-1020 CVR Artex C406-2 ELT Interior Pewter leather interior with charcoal thick pile carpet. Refurbished woodwork throughout including interior tables and furnishings. Two place side facing couch fitted and a single seat option available. Interior refurbished August 2014 Price: Reduced $2,249,000

Propellers Hartzell Model HC-E4N-3 Heated Four Blade Overhaul c/w 8/2014 TSO: 510 CSO: 338

Please contact: Don and Sam Starling

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +1 (254) 848 9192 Mob: +1 (254) 716 2981 E-mail: sales@jetprotexas.com www.jetprotexas.com April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE 131


Dassault Falcon 900EXy February.qxp 20/03/2018 09:33 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1997 Falcon 900EX Serial Number: Registration: Airframe: Landings:

10 N910EX 8843 4706

Engines #1 Engine s/n P112138: 8275 Cycles: 4467 #2 Engine s/n P112140: 8612 Cycles: 4617 #3 Engine s/n P112139: 8330 Cycles: 4508 Engine Type Honeywell TFE731-60 (on MSP Gold) APU APU s/n P292: Honeywell GTCP-150F (on MSP) Maintenance Inspections complied with: Z/3A inspections at DAS-Reno November 2017. 1C & 3C; Detailed Inspections of Landing Gear; Dry Bay Modification November 2015 at DAS-ILG. Inspections Due: 1B Inspection at 10,070 hours. Exterior Matterhorn White with Red and Silver metallic stripes (New November 2015 by DAS-ILG). Interior Light Tan leather seats, Qtr. Maple with High Gloss and stain (White-wash effect), Satin brushed nickel plating, light Tan ultra-suede window line and headliner with custom LED light inserts (Refurbished 2004 – Garrett-SPI). Blue cloth divans and Navy Blue carpet February 2013. Seating 14 passenger; 4 forward club seats, 4-place

mid-cabin dining group with opposing credenza (Kibitzer seat), two 3-place aft divans, aft lavatory, folding third crewmember seat Avionics Flight Director: dual Honeywell Primus 2000 Autopilot/Auto: Throttle Honeywell Primus 2000 Flight Management System: triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 (6.1 TOLD) with USB loader - LPV Global Positioning System (GPS): dual Honeywell GLSSU (12 channel) – WAAS / SBAS Communication (VHF) Transceivers: triple Collins VHF-422C (8.33 spacing) Navigation (VHF) Receivers: dual Collins VIR432 (FM Immunity) Automatic Direction Finders: dual Collins ADF-462 Distance Measuring Equipment: dual Collins DME-442 Distance Measuring Equipment: dual Collins DME-442 ATC, Transponder: dual Collins TDR-94D (Enhanced Mode S with Flight ID) Color Weather Radar: Honeywell Primus 880 with dual Controllers TCAS II: Collins (Change 7.1) Additional Equipment Tri-Frequency ELT, 115/60hz AC outlet system, Honeywell LSZ 860 Integrated Lightning Sensor, XM Radio, Airshow Genesys with cockpit display, Baker Entertainment Cabin Management system dual CD/DVD players, two 21.3 inch LCD monitors, 15 inch pop-up LCD, Microwave, Pulse Land Lights, Devore “Tel-Tail” two light recognition system Asking Price: Make Offer

www.dassaultfalcon.com

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www.AVBUYER.com

Mark Verdesco: Director, Pre-owned Aircraft Sales USA Tel: + (1) (201) 541-4556 Tel: + (1) (201)-541-4620 E-mail: preowned@falconjet.com www.dassaultfalcon.com/preowned Aircraft Index see Page 145


GainJet March.qxp 20/03/2018 09:35 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Boeing 737-400 LR With only genuine quick change Aux fuel tank system on the market today (Available for Boeings & Other types) Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

25423 47,578 Hours 34,487 Cycles

• Long Range “Quick Change” Auxiliary Fuel Tanks system installed • Quick, Line-Replaceable fuel tanks (LRTs) • Certified with an FAA STC. • Allows for up to 9-hour intercontinental flight range • Flexibility to adjust configuration to suit the mission: • Add more tanks for longer range • Remove tanks for more cargo space • More info, please visit www.longrange.aero • Full cabin refurbishment in 2014 • 64 passenger VIP configuration • Maintained and utilized to the highest standards • More info, please visit www.gainjet.com/vip-boeing-b737-400-2 Engines Engine 1. CFM56-3C1. ESN: 725160 TSSV: 442 Hours CSSV: 182 Cycles

Engine 2. CFM56-3C1. ESN: 725369 TSSV: 442 Hours CSSV: 182 Cycles

APU Honeywell GTCP36-280B TSN: 21,878

Exterior Elegant and discrete livery

Cabin & Features Fully refurbished in 2014 64 passenger VIP configuration - ensuring lavish comfort for all passengers. Seat pitch: 52 inches 3 high-quality lavatories 30 AC power outlets in the cabin Nespresso Machine

Avionics Triple VHF-Comm w/8.33 kHz spacing ACARS w/provisions: Dual Arinc758 CMU Solid State Cockpit Voice recorder System (2hrs recording) Control Surface Position Indicator Aspirated TAT probes for FMC Operation

Gainjet Aviation Group Vouliagmenis Ave. & 1 Themistokleous St. Glyfada. 16674. Athens, Greece Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AvBuyer.com

Contact: Tel: +30-210-963-6101 Email: andrew@gainjet.com www.gainjet.com April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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Jet Speed April.qxp_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 20/03/2018 09:37 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Gulfstream G200 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

204 5910 3671

WAAS Enhanced Navigation / ADS B Upgrade ADS B Upgrade MSP Gold APU Program Rockwell Collins CASP Avionics Program Recent Inspection Package Completed Aircell ATG 5000 High Speed Internet Aircell Axxess II Satcom System 2014 Exterior Paint 2014 Executive Seats Recovered Gulfstream G-CMP Maintenance Tracking Airshow 400 Inflight Information System CD / DVD System Aft Mounted Monitor Engines Pratt and Whitney 306A Engines ESP Gold Engine Program # 1 PCE-CC0337 TSN 6596 CSN 4126 # 2 PCE-CC0428 TSN 5910 CSN 3671 APU Honeywell GTCP36 150 APU 3759 Hours. MSP Gold Avionics Collins Pro Line 4 EFIS Avionics Suite WAAS Enhanced Navigation and ADS B Upgrade Dual Collins ADC-850 Air Data Computers Dual Collins AHC-3000 Attitude Heading Reference System Collins FCC-4005 Auto Pilot - Dual Collins

FMC-6100 Flight Management Computers with Dual GPS 4000 Dual Collins RTU-4220 Radio Tuning Units Dual Collins VHF-4000E Comm Computers Collins NAV-4500 (VOR/ILS) Computer Collins NAV-4000 (VOR/ILS/ADF) Computer Dual Collins DME-4000 Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode “S” with Flight ID Collins TCAS 4000 Traffic Alert Collision Avoidance System with Change 7.1 Collins TRW-850 Weather Radar Collins ALT-4000 Radio Altimeter Dual Honeywell KHF-950 HF Radio w/ SELCAL Honeywell Mark V EGPWS Connectivity Gogo Biz ATG 5000 High Speed Data Aircell Axxess II SATCOM System Interior & Entertainment 11/2014 Executive Seats (6) Recovered, Interior Completed December 2008 by Gulfstream Dallas. Fireblocked 9 Passenger Executive Interior Features 4 Executive Club Chairs/Pullout Tables. The Left Aft Cabin Features a 3 Place Divan Opposite a 2 Place Executive Club. Forward Galley and Aft Lav. Exterior New Paint, June 2014 by Aerosmith Aviation, Overall Matterhorn White. New Custom Accent Stripes September 2016 by Rose Aircraft in Ming Blue and Titanium Silver Metallic

Jet Speed Aviation Inc. Latrobe, Pennsylvania United States

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www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +1 (724) 520 1270 Cell: +1 (724) 244 6558 E-mail: Charlie@JetSpeedAviation.com www.jetspeedaviation.com Aircraft Index see Page 145


Mente April.qxp 22/03/2018 10:49 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2010 Gulfstream G550

E-mail: info@mentegroup.com Tel: + 1 (214) 351-9595

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior 12 seats + 1 Crew Rest ▪ FWD Cabin - Dual Two Place Club Seats (4) w/ Stowable Tables ▪ MID Cabin Dual Two Place Club Seats (4) w/ Stowable Tables ▪ AFT Cabin - Four Pace Conference/Dining (4) and Credenza ▪ Galley - AFT Full-Service Galley w/ Gasper Chilled Storage, One Microwave, ▪ One Enflite High-Temp Oven, Two TIA Coffee Makers ▪ LAVS - FWD Dedicated Crew LAV and Full AFT LAV ▪ Crew Rest Area - Enclosed FWD Dedicated Crew Rest Area ▪ Electric Window Shades ▪ Therapeutic Oxygen System ▪ 30 Gallon Pressurized Water System Exterior Matterhorn White with Blue and Gold Stripes

5290 N3M 3183 1240

• ONE U.S. FORTUNE 100 OWNER SINCE NEW • ENGINES ENROLLED ON ROLLS-ROYCE CORPORATE CARE • AFT GALLEY WITH CREW REST AREA CONFIGURED FOR 12 PASSENGERS • SWIFT BROADBAND HIGH SPEED INTERNET • ENHANCED NAVIGATION ASC-84 (FANS1/A) • SYNTHETIC VISION PRIMARY FLIGHT DISPLAY • RAAS, ADSB-OUT AND TCAS 7.1 APU ▪ Honeywell RE-220 ▪ Serial Number P-623 ▪ Total Time 1,326 Hours

Engines CorporateCare ▪ BR700-710C4-11 Left Right ▪ Serial Numbers 15689 15688 ▪ Hours 3,176 3,176 ▪ Cycles 1,242 1,242 ▪ Engines are On-Condition/Task Oriented Avionics & Connectivity Honeywell PlaneView Suite ▪ (4) Honeywell DU-1310 Flat Panel Display Units ▪ (2) Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers ▪ (3) Honeywell MC-850 Multifunction Control Display Units ▪ (3) Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules ▪ (1) Honeywell WU-880 Weather Radar receiver/Transmitter Antenna ▪ (2) Honeywell WC-884 Weather Radar Controllers ▪ (1) L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) ▪ (2) Mason Cursor Control Devices

2009 Beechcraft King Air 350 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

FL-613 N598AC 2434 4156

• ADS-B OUT • NACELLE WING LOCKERS • ONE OWNER • ALWAYS U.S. BASED • COLLINS/XM GRAPHICAL WEATHER • PART 91 • TEXTRON SUPPORT PLUS Engines PT6A-60A ▪ LH S/N PCE-PK1032 2434 hrs 4156 cy ▪ HSI c/w Dec 2014 1805 hrs 3120 cy ▪ O/H due 3600 hrs

▪ RH S/N PCE-PK1030 2434 hrs 4156 cy ▪ HSI c/w Dec 2014 1805 hrs 3120 cy ▪ O/H due 3600 hrs Props: LH RH ▪ O/H c/w Dec 2013 Dec 2013 ▪ O/H next Dec 2018 Dec 2018 Avionics ▪ (2) ADC - Collins ADC-3000 ▪ (2) AHRS – Collins AHC-3000 ▪ (1) Avionics Package – Collins Pro Line 21 ▪ (2) Comm Radios – Collins VHF-4000 ▪ (1) CVR – L3 FA2100 ▪ (1) Database Unit – Collins DBU-5000 ▪ (1)) DME – Collins DME-4000 ▪ (1) ELT - Artex C406 ▪ (1) FMS – Collins-3000 ▪ (1) GPS - Collins GPS-4000A ▪ (1) IFIS – Collins ECH-5000

Mente Group, LLC 15301 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 1010 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: info@mentegroup.com Tel: + 1 (214) 351-9595

▪ (2) NAV Radios – Collins NAV-4000, NAV-4500 ▪ (1) Radio Altimeter – Collins ALT-4000 ▪ (1) TAWS – ACSS ▪ (1) TCAS – L3 TCAS I ▪ (2) Transponder - Garmin GTX-3000 w ADS-B Out ▪ (1) Weather Radar – Collins TWR-850 ▪ (1) XM Weather Receiver – XMWR-5000 Interior & Entertainment Eight single-club seats plus a belted LAV in hazelnut leather. Four pull out cabin tables with leather working surface. ▪ Left-hand forward refreshment center includes one hot liquid dispenser, two cup dispensers, pull out work surface, two general storage drawers, and a ice chest drawer ▪ Belted flushing toilet, internally serviceable Exterior Matterhorn White with Cobalt Blue and Starlight Mica Yellow stripes

Tel: +1 214 351 9595 E-mail: info@mentegroup.com www.mentegroup.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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AvionMar April.qxp 21/03/2018 15:12 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2011 Bombardier Challenger 605 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

5856 3,147 1,010

• ENROLLED ON SMART PARTS PLUS • THE ENGINES ARE FULLY COVERED BY GE ON-POINT • APU ON MSP Interior New 2011 Having a 9 Passengers + Flight Deck Crew + Jump Seat Configuration with Private Large Aft Lavatory and with Forward Galley. The Forward Cabin has 4 Chairs in Club with Pullout Tables and the Aft Cabin has a 3-Place Sidefacing Divan opposite 2 Chairs in Club with a Pullout Table.

Exterior Matterhorn White with Gamma Grey, Blue and Titanium SIlver Avionics Collins 4 - Tube 10x12 - Inch / Pro Line 21 Comm: Dual Collins w/8.33 kHz Weather Radar: Digital Color RTA 854 COMM: CMU 4000 Cockpit Voice Recorder: CVR L3 FA2100 (120 Minute) DME: Dual Collins DME - 4000 EFIS: Collins 4 - tube 10x12 - Inch LCD Flight Data Recorder: FDR L3 FA2100 (25 - Hour) Flight Director : Collins 4 - tube 10x12 - inch Flight Phone: Iridium IRS: Dual IRS Navigation Radios: Dual Pro Line 21 TAWS

Dual VOR/ILS/MKR Nav Receivers TCAS: Collins TCAS - II with Change 7.1 Modification Transponder: TDR 94D Dual Enhanced Mode S ADF: Dual NAV - 4000 Hi Frequency: Dual (HF - 9031A) FMS System consists of the following components: Two CDU - 6200, Two FMC - 6000, Two GPS - 4000 3rd Inertial Reference System Datalink with Iridium Interface Cockpit Touch Screen Monitor Manuals Enhanced Maps on MFD 2nd Refuel / Defuel Panel Avionics Bay Light Features CPDLC and Change 7.1 Mod to TCAS System, EASA Certification, Runway Awareness Advisory System (RAAS)

2007 Challenger 605 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

5705 2837 1422

• ADS-B out upgraded • ENROLLED ON SMART PARTS PLUS • ENGINES ON GE POINT • APU ON MSP GOLD • DUAL POWER OUTLETS • 96 INSPECTION WITH DUNCAN, US • WOOD RESTORATION + NEW SOFT GOODS IN 2016 Interior Twelve (12) Passenger Configuration Forward Galley with Microwave Oven & High Temp oven; Forward Cabin Configuration: Four (4) Place Club Setting with Fold - Out Tables Aft Cabin Configuration: Four (4) Place Conference Grouping Opposite a Four (4) place Divan

Aft Fully Enclosed Lavatory with in - flight access to baggage Emergency Medical Kit: Defibrillator; LED Cabin Lighting Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with gold and black stripes Other Equipment ELT Artex 406 ELT EICAS Lightning Detection System 3D Map & Long Range Cruise Increased Baggage Capacity: 900lbs baggage capacity Vertical Tail Fin Camera ADS - B Out Avionics The Challenger 605 is equipped with an integrated, Rockwell Collins Pro-Line 21 avionics suite. A general summary of this aircraft’s avionics suite is as follows (Items in bold indicate optional/added equipment):

AvionMar GmbH Hauptstraße 166 A- 9210 Pörtschach am Wörthersee

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

EFIS: Four AFD 5022 Adaptive Flight Displays ESIS: Single Integrated Stand-by Instruments FMS: Dual FMC - 6000 Flight Management Systems IRS: Triple Honeywell Laseref V GPS: Dual Collins GPS - 4000A Navigation Units ADC: Dual Collins ADC - 850E Air Data Computers NAV: Dual Collins NAV - 4000 DME: Dual Collins DME - 44 ADF: Dual Collins ADF - 462 A/P: Dual Honeywell Autopilot system with Auto - throttle VHF COM: Dual Collins VHF - 422C VHF Communication System Connectivity & Entertainment In Flight Phone Iridium ICS - 200 Satcom System Dual Display/TV Monitor(s) 21” Bulkhead LCD Monitors Airshow System Airshow ASX Dual CD/DVD Player(s) Multi Regional Dual DVD/CD Player CMS Rockwell Collins Cabin Entertainment System (CES)

Cell: +43 (0)664 548 31 39 Office: +43 (0) 4272 44 7 66 Email: stefan.duller@avionmar.com www.avionmar.com Aircraft Index see Page 145


Jack Ethan April.qxp_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 20/03/2018 09:38 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citation CJ2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

525-0423 N525JN 2542

• EXCELLENT CONDITION • NO DAMAGE HISTORY • ALWAYS HANGERED • OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS THE AIRCRAFT HAS CONTINUOUSLY BEEN OPERATED BY TWO PERMANENT CREW AND HAS CARRIED NO PASSENGERS AS THE OWNER IS ALSO A PILOT BY HIMSELF. • NO PETS AND COMPLETE SMOKE-FREE CABIN SEATS • CABIN REFURBISHED IN MARCH 2017. • AMAZING AIRCRAFT • TOP OF THE LINE GOGO SAT-PHONE AND FULLY PAID ENGINE PROGRAM • RVSM APPROVED Engines Engines: Williams FJ44-3A-24, Engine Program: TAP Blue, Total Time Since New: 2542.9/2542.9, Total Cycles: 1826/1826, SHSI: 184/184 Avionics FDS: Collins Proline 21A/P: Collins Proline 21XPDR: Dual Collins TDR 94D Model S w/Enhanced SurveillanceDME: Collins Single DME 4000ADC: Dual Collins ADC 3000FMS: Collins FMS 3000 w/GPSENCAL: L# GH 3000 ESIS Electric

Standby Instrument Sys.RADAR: Collins WX 800 RadarGPS: Single Collins GPS-500LRNAV: Dual Collins AHC 3000CVR: L3 FA2100RADAR: Collins ALT 4000ELT: Artex C406 ELTTCAS: TCAS II, Collins Proline 21 ICFS-5000 3-Screen EFISCOMMS: Dual Collins VHF 4000 w/8.33 SpacingNAVS: Dual NAV 4000 w/ ADFFDS: Collins Proline 21 Additional Equipment XM Weather, Ni-Cad Battery, Cockpit Voice Recorder, Electronic Charts, Pulse Light System, ST-3100 Aircell Phone System (2Handsets), Mark VIII Enhanced GPWS, HF Provisions, Maintenance:Enrolled in CESCOM, Maintenance Tracking Citation Service Centre Maintained Interior 6+1 Passenger Completed in Light Brown, forward cabin refurbished March 2017Reclining Leather Seats w/2 Executive Writing Desks Oatmeal Carpet White Lower Sidewall HighGloss Burl Wood Veneer Cabinetry Complete Fwd Deluxe Refreshment CenterAft Flushing Lavatory Compartment w/Mirrored Divider Cabin SpeakersPower Outlets & SATCOM Exterior Exterior:Excellent ConditionWhite w/Navy Blue & Gold Accent Stripes Price: CALL!

JACK ETHAN United Kingdom

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +44 (0)7501 043638 E-mail: jack.ethan.u@gmail.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE 137


C-Air Transport Services Ltd December.qxp_Empyrean 20/03/2018 09:41 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Airbus ACJ 319 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

910 6640 2464

• One meticulous owner since new • Maintained and updated to the highest standard • Full cabin refurbishment in 2010 • 27 passengers interior • Forward stateroom • Extensive Entry Into Service (EIS) support package available with purchase • For more information and photos visit www.msn910.com Engines IAE V2527M-A5 Hours since new: 6640 Cycles since new: 2464 APU APIC 3200 Hours since new: 5624 Cycles since new: 3573 Cabin • Forward State Room with two beds and private washroom • Forward mid-section office vestibule with two single seats (RH) • Three seat divan opposite office vestibule (LH) • Mid-section club four dining (LH) • Mid-section three seat divan opposite club four

dining (RH) • Aft mid-section club four dining (RH) • Aft mid-section three seat divan opposite club four dining (LH) • Aft section eight premium economy seats • Two galleys (one forward, one aft) featuring Tia Wavejet ovens and Nespresso Coffee machines • Three lavatories (one in State Room, one mid-section and one aft) • Separate forward crew lavatory • Custom Concept Controls (CCC) Cabin Management and Entertainment System • Rockwell Collins Airshow 4000 • SBB Satcom – for cabin internet and includes Aero H for flight deck safety services • Sat-phone System • Onboard Mobile Telephone System Avionics The aircraft’s original EFIS/ECAM CRT displays and DMC computers were replaced with the Thales EIS2 (Electronic Instrument System 2) composed of 6 large active matrix Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Units and 3 Display Management Computers (DMC) in 2006. • FlySmart with Airbus EFBs • Compliances: ADS-B Out / FANS B+ / CPDLC / RNP 0.1 / TCAS 7.1 • Integrated Standby Instrument System The aircraft currently has Head Of State livery so will need to be repainted

Daniel Kunz C-Air Transport Services Ltd c/o Resource Consulting AG, Turmstrasse 30, 6300 Zug, Switzerland

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AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +41-79-295-3741 Email: daniel.kunz@c-air-tsl.com www.c-air-tsl.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


Keystone Aviation April.qxp_Empyrean 21/03/2018 12:34 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

HondaJet HA-420 Serial Number: 42000039 Airframe TT: 85 Avionics • Garmin G3000 next generation, all glass avionics system • Class leading layout with three (3) 14 inch landscape-format displays • Dual touch-screen controllers for overall avionics and system management • Radar altimeter • Jeppesen ChartView • Synthetic vision • XM Weather Datalink • TCAS 1 • TAWS Class B • Weather radar system • Surface Watch • ADS-B In and Out Cabin • Executive seating for four in classic club configuration and single side-facing seat • Fully adjustable leather seats, and stow-able executive tables (LH & RH) • Nose compartment: 9 cubic feet of space • Aft compartment: 57 cubic feet of space • Executive Seat Upgrade-Upgrades four main cabin seats to leather, installs inboard armrest and under seat storage drawers. Main passenger seats recline and are capable of sliding forward, aft and laterally • Crew seats upgraded to leather • LH Executive Table-Installs LH stowable executive table (RH standard)

• Electric Pleated Shades • Main Cabin Floor Trim Upgrade-Adds •

illuminated blue HondaJet logo trim piece on each floorboard Full enclosed externally serviceable aft lavatory with basin

Interior Moonlight interior with Cool Gray base, integrating Dark Gray accent colors. Ice Silver and Eucalyptus trim highlight the Glacier carpet interior. This color palette is consistent in the cockpit and lavatory Exterior • HondaJet Signature Scheme featuring Classic Blue with Titanium Silver Pearl • Single port fueling • Speed brake • Hot wings • Electric windshield anti-ice • Automated LED lighting • Steer-by-wire • Airstair entry • Trailing link landing gear • Anti-skid braking system Additional Features • Engines on EMC2 engine program • Airframe on P2 Flight Ready program • Factory Warranty • Two pilot and one mechanic Flight Safety training entitlements included

HondaJet Northwest Michael Parker

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 801-933-7509 Mob: +1 801-910-6920 mparker@keystoneaviation.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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P140-143.qxp 21/03/2018 15:26 Page 1

M A R K E T P L A C E

Embraer Legacy 650

Price:

$15,000,000 USD

Year:

2013

S/N:

14501163

Reg:

RA02777

TTAF:

1513

Location: Russia

Bombardier Learjet 55

Price:

$400,000

Year:

1984

S/N:

116

Reg:

N801GJ

TTAF:

10600

Price:

Please Call

Year:

1999

S/N:

258435

Reg:

ZS-MNU

TTAF:

8020

Price:

$3,900,000

Year:

2000

S/N:

122

Reg:

N577JC

TTAF:

6726

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

Tel: +27 834 127 744 E-mail: cmunro@cadg.com No Known Damage History. Total Landings: 5,504. Honeywell TFE731-5BR. L/H Serial Number: P-107337 R/H Serial Number: P107424. Garrett GTCP 36-150-P-680. Avionics Honeywell Primus II 5-tube EFIS. Dual Honeywell RCZ 851(8.33) Comms Dual Honeywell RCZ 851 Transponder. Dual Honeywell RNZ 850 Nav Honeywell DFZ-800 Autopilot. Dual Honeywell RCZ 851 DME Dual Honeywell EDZ 817 Flight Director. RVSM approved Global AFIS. Engine & APU on MSP Gold. Avionics on HAPP. Overall White with Silver, Burgundy and Charcoal stripes (repainted 2006). 8 passenger interior in Cream leather, with forward club-four

Tel: +1 (630) 577-4070 E-mail: kdanielson@calamos.com NEXT GEN READY, ADS-B upgrade completed by Cessna. ADS-B out LPV/WAS. FAR 135 Current, CESCOM Maintenance Tracking, Engines Rolls Royce Corporate Care, APU Cessna Aux Advantage, Extended Range Dual Oxygen System, Honeywell USB Data Loader, Lead Acid Batteries, 8-Passenger, Double club config. Fwd r/h galley, Espresso Machine and Coffee, Microwave. Cabin entertainment includes Airshow 400 w/Three 8” individual monitors, cockpit controller, and cabin audio, ATG 4000 WIFI. Primus 2000, TCAS 7 w/change 2, 8.33 Spacing, RVSM, Current all Maintenance, New Paint June 2016

Switzair SA, Carlo Sari Price:

Please Call

Year:

1989

S/N:

183

Reg:

HB-IYP

TTAF:

10197

Location: Italy

140

Current Part 135. EFIS; FMS; Universal UNS1C Avionics: EFIS Flight director dual Sperry. ED2-600,EFIS Display unit ED-600. EFIS dual VSI with TCAS II with change 7 Mode S transponders. Dual VHF transceivers Collins 22A. Dual Nav receivers Collins32 Radar. Sperry P-800. FMS UNS 1-C. TWAS Sandal 3400. Stand by power supply Fairchild CVR. B & D cabin DisplayAirtel 400 ELT. PAX briefing sys. Maint. Inter phone sys. 3 stations. Front relampable gear down lights. Dual radio masters. RVSM/ Bombardier solution. 21,500# GTOW. Aux cabin heater. Chip detector. Single point refueling w/ heaters. Dual Davtrons

Dragon Leasing Corp

Location: USA

Dassault Falcon 50

Tel: +1 (510) 783 3584 E-mail: Darrinperdue@800goodjet.com

Craig Munro

Location: South Africa

Cessna Citation X

Entry into Service: 28th March 2013. Low Time – Just 1513 Hours. One Owner Since New. EU-OPS 1 Certified. FANS 1/A, CPDLC & TCAS 7.1. Forward & Aft Lavatory. No Damage History. Always Hangared. Avionics: FANS 1/A CPDLC. TCAS 7.1. Honeywell Primus Epic System. EFIS Honeywell Primus Epic fitted for Pilot and Co-pilot. Radios 3 X Honeywell RCZ 833K for VHF-COM 1 & 2. HF 2 X Honeywell KRX1053 + Trimble SELCAL. Transponders 2 X Honeywell RCZ-833K VOR/ILS, ADF, DME 2 X Honeywell RNZ-851 NAV Units. Interior: Number of Passengers: 13. Galley Location: Forward Cabin.

Darrin Perdue

Location: USA

Hawker Beechcraft 800XP

Tel: +74 993 489 451 E-mail: andkuleshov@rusjet.aero

Andrew Kuleshov

www.AVBUYER.com

Tel: +41 (0) 919 214 247 E-mail: cs@switzair.com

Falcon 50 Classic - MAKE AN OFFER - MUST GO – FULL EASA COMPLIANT - Engines and APU enrolled on MSP Gold Entered in Service: 1992. Aircraft Total Cycles: 10250 cyc. Engines: TFE731-3-1C. APU: GTCP36-100A. Exterior: White with blue stripes. Interior: 10 pax (1 divan for 5 seats) + 3rd crew seat; Light brown carpet & fabric; Light brown leather seats; Walnut brier wood; Alcantara ceiling; Fwd Lav.; Interior partially refurbished June 2001 by Dassault Falcon Service. Remarks: Full EASA Compliant, All Engines and APU under full MSP Gold - RVSM EUR + NATMNPS, Approved CAT II, Approved P-RNAV, Approved RNP-1,-5,-10.

Aircraft Index see Page 145


P140-143.qxp 21/03/2018 15:26 Page 2

Cessna Citation CJ3

Fabian Voncken Price:

$3,395,000

Year:

2007

S/N:

200

Reg:

OOEDV

TTAF:

2800

M A R K E Tel: +32 (0) 495 223 625 T E-mail: fabian@stephex.com P L Full EU-Ops 1 compliant. Airframe Total Time: 2800 hours A (February 2018). Airframe Total Cycle: 2045 cycles. Enrolled on C ProParts. Upgraded to WAAS/ LPV capability. Full EU Ops1 E compliant. Steep Approach Option. Bravo/Encore Style Entry Door Steps. Aft Belted Toilet. Side Facing Seat & Cabinet Option. Under CESCOM/CAMP Since New. Interior 8 Pax Configurations. Partially painted in 2017

Location: Belgium

Sabreliner 65

David Meske Price:

Make Offer

Year:

1980

S/N:

34

Reg:

N47SE

TTAF:

8677

Tel: +1 (239) 298 5898 E-mail: dmeske@innovaaerospace.com Available Immediately Maintained At Highest Level by Sabreliner Aviation Always Hangared Engines on MSP Gold No Known Damage History All logs Since New No Known Damage History All logs Since New

Location: USA

Beechcraft 1900C

Price:

Please Call

Year:

1990

S/N: Reg: TTAF: Location: France

Rockwell Commander 112TCA

Terry Kent Price:

£79,995 No VAT

Year:

1977

S/N:

13151

Reg:

G-CNCN

TTAF:

1540

Location: UK

Airbus/Eurocopter EC 120

Tel: +33 (0) 6 86 55 86 26 E-mail: amorin@oep.fr

François Antonietti

Helicentre Liverpool

BEECH AUCTIONS AICRAFT COPR. 1900 C YEAR 06/1990 After bankruptcy AA AIRLINES. F-GPYY SN: UC-115 total time: 22243H15 LDG: 28240 aircraft without a engine. - RH TSO motor: 3324H12 - Propeller: OVH DUE 04/2021 and 04/2019 «Aircraft for sale where it is, as it is» Clermont Ferrand Airport - Center de France "Aero / BCA" hangar, rue Yuri Gagarine, 63510 AULNAT, France Aeronautical technical expert: Franck TESTARD Mob: 33 (0) 6 86 55 86 26 - testard.fr@gmail.com Master Antonietti: fantonietti@oep.fr Conditions of sale: 12% + VAT for the deposit of the auction of 10% of the estimate and the payment of banking accreditation by bank transfer

Tel: +44 (0)774 701 6264 E-mail: terrykent@blueyonder.co.uk This is an opportunity to obtain one of the smartest Rockwell Commanders on the UK reg. This beautiful 112TCA has the extended wings and auto-boost turbo system to take you upto 19,000ft (with Ox not fitted) and cruise in the airways at 40 lph doing 145kts. She has been owned by the same pilot for over 10 years and has had no expense spared on her, with a recent re-paint, new 3 bladed prop and hub, a massive panel upgrade inc; dual Aspen 1000 PFD and MFD combo with full reversion plus extended back-up battery, a GTN650, GNS430, GMA330, TAS600 traffic awareness system, S-TEC 55 fully coupled autopilot with GPS steer, JMA830 EDM with fuel flow meter, plus backup instruments she is ready for the airways.

Tel: +44 (0)151 448 0388 E-mail: gemma@helicentre.com

Price:

£590,000

Year:

1998

S/N:

1006

Reg:

G-OMEM

AOC equipped. Available with or without ongoing AOC leaseback.

TTAF:

2200

£590k + VAT if applicable.

High spec, good components. Fresh gearbox o/h. Recent black paint and tan leather interior. Hangared.

Location: United Kingdom

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

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P140-143.qxp 21/03/2018 15:26 Page 3

M A R K E T P L A C E

Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Offer/trade

Year:

1995

S/N:

Not listed

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

7,803

Location: TX, USA

Bombardier Learjet 36A

Exceptional 1995 Hawker 800A, N337WR, full true world 2600 nm range. Will consider trades for Citation CJ1, CJ2 or Bell 212, 412 or 407. Cycles: 4676. Engines: TFE 731-5R-1H Dee Howard Thrust Reversers enrolled on MSP Gold. APU: Sundstrand T-62T40C8D1 Hours: 3807 Cycles: 5902. Avionics: Honeywell Primus II. Autopilot: Honeywell DFZ 800. Flight Management System: Dual NZ-2000 w/5.2 software. Air Data System: Dual Honeywell ADZ-810. Int/Ext: Eight place fire blocked interior finished in beige leather last done 4/2002. Forward galley and aft closet. Lavatory vanity has LED Lights installed.

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Offer/Trade

Year:

1977

S/N:

36A-030

Reg:

N160GC

TTAF:

15,600

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Learjet 36A, Long range capability, as configured 2,400 nautical miles. Can be upgraded to 2,600 mile range. Recent paint and interior, RVSM. Competitively priced at US $1,375,000, may take trade on a King Air or a helicopter

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Offer

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Full EMS Medical 4 patient and 4 attendant interior. Recent ‘no expense spared’ airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’ will provide Fresh annual /Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Five Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

1991-1996

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Five, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore’. Available for immediate use. Asking $3.1M to $3.6M USD. Serial numbers: 35034, 35048, 35060, 35088 and 35096

Location: USA

WANTED We are currently buying Airbus / Eurocopter AS350B2, AS350B3, EC120, and EC130 helicopters. Fast, professional deal and removal Please contact Heli Sales New Zealand Michael Roberts • michael@jets.aero +1 786 708 8000 • mobile +64 4-280 7450 +61 8 6001 6377 • +41 43 505 17 77 • +55 31 4042-7096 142

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


P140-143.qxp 21/03/2018 15:26 Page 4

M A R K E Tel: +421 901 782 855 T SKY TRANSPORT S.r.o. E-mail: sujan@slovunit.sk P L Price: €830,000 Inc. VAT Engine Type 250-C20J A C Year: 2001 Avionics: Garmin 750H + VOR, Bendix / King KY196A, ELT, E Audio system, headsets 5xBose A20H, VFR night equipment,

Bell 206B III

S/N:

4549

Reg:

OM-JOP

TTAF:

5732

Others: VIP interior, transport chassis, protective sails

Location: Slovakia

Airbus/Eurocopter AS 355

Tel: +48 515 626 410 E-mail: piotr@plane4you.eu

Piotr Lasek Price:

Please Call

Year:

1991

S/N: Reg:

SP-SSN

TTAF:

5042

Location: Poland

Robinson R66

Very good condition, used by private company. ENGINES R20. Lot of STC done. Additional space for bag. Well maintained 48 months inspection - done 04/2017. User Private company. Engine L model Rolls-Roice 250-C20R, CAE-297041. Engine L TT 727h. Engine R model Rolls-Roice 250-C20R, CAE-297-044. Engine R TT 700h. Remaining time on main rotor blades 11722h. Int: Visual condition 9/10. Seats 6 leather seats. Ext: Visual condition 10/10 AVIONICS. NAV/COM GARMIN GNS 530. Transponder GARMIN GTX 327. AudioPanel GARMIN GMA340. Under CAMO. Kept in private hangar. All AD/SB up to date

AEROHELI INTERNATIONAL Price:

€760,000 Excl. VAT

Year:

2018

S/N:

879

Reg:

New

TTAF:

New

Tel: +49 (0) 172 367 2122 E-mail: dammes@aeroheli.de

New Helicopter - delivery June 2018, change of color and equipment until beginning of April possible. Buy from the new German Robinson Dealer! Price incl. German Registration if requested, but plus VAT if applicable! Flight Display Aspen EFD1000H. Garmin GTR225B Com. Garmin GTX335. Transponder Mode S. ELT Kannad 406 AF. 5-Point Harness Tinted Windows. Vertical Card Compass

Location: Germany

Airbus/Eurocopter AS 350B

Tel: +39 349 101 5458 E-mail: eliexpress@pec.it

Fabio Baldi Price:

Please Call

Year:

1986

S/N:

12966

Reg:

N958SF

FAA REGISTER ONLY 100H/ANNUAL INSPECTION! NO CALENDARIAL TIME! ENGINE MOD.3 800H REMAINING OTHER COMPONENT VERY GOOD TIME REMAINING!!!!!

TTAF: Location: Italy

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Par Avion Ltd

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

143


P144.qxp 21/03/2018 15:07 Page 1

I N D E X

Advertiser’s Index

The BEST

1st Source Bank...................................................73 21st Century Jet Corporation .........................146 AeroExpo UK ......................................................113 Aircraft Finance Corporation .............................13 AMAC Aerospace ..............................................1, 5 AMJET Aviation .....................................................37

Aircraft For Sale Search

Aradian Aviation ....................................................67 Asian Sky Group ..................................................25

anywhere,

Avimar...................................................................136 AVI Survival Products .......................................109 Avjet Global ..................................................42 - 43

everywhere on

Avpro ..............................................................14 - 16 Bank of Ozarks .....................................................99

pc, smartphone

Boutsen Aviation...................................................57 C-Air Transport ...................................................138

and tablet.

Central Business Jets .......................................147 Conklin & de Decker............................................85 Corporate Concepts...................................64 - 65 Dassault Falcon Jet ...............................2 - 3, 132 Duncan Aviation ...........................................52 - 53 Eagle Aviation........................................................23 EBACE ...................................................................84 Engine Assurance Program ...............................81 Elliott Jets .....................................................34 - 35 Freestream .............................................................27 GainJet Aviation .................................................133 General Aviation Services ..................................79 Global Jet Capital.................................................69 Global Jet Monaco........................................ 6 - 11 Hatt & Associates.................................................31 IAG...........................................................................51 Jack Ethan............................................................137 JetBrokers .....................................................60 - 61 Jetcraft Corporation ..........................40 - 41, 148 Jeteffect .........................................................58 - 59 JETNET ................................................................105 JetPro Texas ........................................................131

ONLINE l PRINT l BROADCAST l EVENTS

Jet Sense Aviation ..................................127 - 128 Jet Speed Aviation.............................................134 JSSI (Jet Support Services)...............................17 Keystone Aviation ..............................................139 LBAS.......................................................................91 Lektro....................................................................109

Copy date for the May Issue Wednesday 18 April

Mente Group ......................................................135 NBAA Corporate..................................................94 OGARAJETS................................................20 - 21 Par Avion ................................................................91 Rolls-Royce............................................................77 Sky Aviation Holdings............................129 - 130 Southern Cross Aviation ..................................101 Sparfell & Partners ......................................46 - 47 The Jet Business..........................................32 - 33 VREF ....................................................................119

AvBuyer (USPS 014-911), April 2018, Vol 22 Issue No 4 is published monthly by AvBuyer Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: AvBuyer Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices © Copyright of AvBuyer Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in AvBuyer Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of AvBuyer Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title.............................93

144

AVBUYER MAGAZINE – April 2018

www.AVBUYER.com

Aircraft Index see Page 145


P145.qxp 22/03/2018 13:13 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale • AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS ACJ319 . . . . . . . . 46, 138 ACJ380-800 . . . . 46

BAE AVRO RJ70. . . . . 60

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 33, 40, 57 737-400LR . . . . . 133 747-8i . . . . . . . . . 46 747-8i . . . . . . . . . 1 757-256 VIP. . . . 43 787-900 . . . . . . . 148

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 59 XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 15, 59, 147 CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 57 CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 137 CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 23, 37, 141 Bravo . . . . . . . . . 37, 59, 101 Excel . . . . . . . . . . 20, 23, 35, 52, 52, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Encore . . . . . . . . 101 P210 . . . . . . . . . . 60 T182 Turbo . . . . 23, Columbia 400SLX . . 23 Mustang. . . . . . . . 57, Sovereign. . . . . . 15, 35, 59

CIRRUS

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 41, 148 Global 6000 . . . . 40, 41, 43, 148 Global Express . 8, 101 Global Express XRS. . 9, 27, 33, 41, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 40, 41, 52, 58, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 601-1A . . . . . . . . 15 601-3A ER . . . . . 40 601-3R . . . . . . . . 40 601-3ER . . . . . . . 91 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 40, 52, 52, 57 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 40, 41, 136, 148 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 148 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 60 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 40, 41, 148

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 60 36A . . . . . . . . . . . 142 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 58 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 58, 59 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 140 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 16, 37 75. . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 51, 148

CESSNA Citation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 II . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 61, 148 III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 147 V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 61 X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 140

SR22GTX . . . . . . 23 SR22TGTS . . . . . 60

DAHER SOCATA

PAGE

IAI

Legacy 600 . . . . 46 Legacy 650 . . . . 41, 60, 140, 148 Lineage 1000 . . 69 Lineage 1000E . 33 Phenom 100 . . . 52 Phenom 300 . . . 35, 37

Astra . . . . . . . . . . 60

GULFSTREAM III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 79 IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 101, 148 IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 14, 57, 58, 67 V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 27, 35, 42, 64, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 58, 60, 67 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 20, 52, 58, 134 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 32, 41, 67 500 . . . . . . . . . . . 32 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 33, 57, 67, 135 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 41, 148 650ER. . . . . . . . . 20

PIAGGIO Avanti II . . . . . . . 59 Avanti P-180 . . . 59 Avanti P-180II . . 51

PIPER Cheyenne II . . . . 57 Cheyenne III . . . 60 Merdian . . . . . . . 23

ROCKWELL Commander112TCA. . .141

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 141

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT King Air

DASSAULT FALCON 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 25, 41, 52, 57, 64, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101, 146, 147, 148 20C-5 . . . . . . . . . 60 20F-5BR . . . . . . . 37 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 127, 140, 146 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 15, 47, 79,146 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 47 900 . . . . . . . . . . . 146 900B . . . . . . . . . . 15, 58, 64, 91, 146 900C . . . . . . . . . . 32, 146, 147 900EX . . . . . . . . . 46, 132, 146 900EX EASy . . . 15, 91, 146, 147, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 900EX EASyII . . 65 900LX . . . . . . . . . 2, 146 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 11, 27, 51, 57, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, 91, 101 2000EX. . . . . . . . 91, 147 2000EX EASy . . 3, 32 2000LX . . . . . . . . 6 2000LXS. . . . . . . 2, 91 2000XLS. . . . . . . 52

328 . . . . . . . . . . . 57

PAGE

EMBRAER

TBM850 Elite. . . 35 TBM930 . . . . . . . 35

DORNIER

AIRCRAFT

200 . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 60, 61 250 . . . . . . . . . . . 35 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 60, 67, 101, 135 B200 . . . . . . . . . . 37, 67, 131 C90 . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 67

Beechcraft Duchess . . . . . . . 23 Premier IA . . . . . 52

Hawker 400A . . . . . . . . . . 129 400XP . . . . . . . . . 69 800A . . . . . . . . . . 79, 142 800SP. . . . . . . . . 60 800XP . . . . . . . . . 20, 31, 35, 58, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79, 130, 140 800XP2. . . . . . . . 61 850XP. . . . . . . . . 52, 128, 148 900XP . . . . . . . . . 35, 67, 79 1000A . . . . . . . . . 35 1000B . . . . . . . . . 16 1900C . . . . . . . . . 141 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 52

AW109E Power . 16, 47 AW139 . . . . . . . . 47 A119Koala . . . . . 67

BELL 206BIII . . . . . . . . 143 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 142 407 . . . . . . . . . . . 67 412 EP . . . . . . . . 67 412EMS . . . . . . . 142 427 . . . . . . . . . . . 47 430 . . . . . . . . . . . 43

EUROCOPTER/AIRBUS AS350 B . . . . . . . 143 AS355. . . . . . . . . 143 AS365N1 . . . . . . 16 EC 120 . . . . . . . . 141 EC 130 T2 . . . . . 16 EC 135 T2+ . . . . 16 EC 135 P2 . . . . . 25 EC 135 P2+ . . . . 16

ROBINSON R66 . . . . . . . . . . . 143

HONDA

SIKORSKY

JET . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 67 HA420. . . . . . . . . 139

S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 16, 25, 41 S-92A . . . . . . . . . 16

The best aircraft for sale search anywhere, everywhere - on pc, smartphone and tablet

Advertising Enquiries see Page 4

www.AVBUYER.com

April 2018 – AVBUYER MAGAZINE

145


21st Century May.qxp 27/04/2017 08:45 Page 1

Tri-Jets have earned a stellar reputation among owners and operators and usually command higher resale values than the competition. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter, providing a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. The Falcon 900LX pictured above is considerably more capable than the Falcon 900EX. Revolutionary and the world's first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. Evolving from the remarkable success of the 7X; The Falcon 8X has a longer cabin with 30 unique interior layout configurations to choose from, superb fuel efficiency and a range of 6,450 nm.

AVAILABLE: FALCON 900B

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ April.qxp_CBJ November06 19/03/2018 16:48 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

TEL: 52.55.5211.1505

TEL: (952) 894-8559

CELL: 52.55.3901.1055

FAX: (952) 894-8569

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

D L SO 2009 FALCON 7X SN 041

2015 FALCON 2000LXS SN 293

Single Owner, “C” Check/Paint/Refurbished Interior by Duncan October 2017, Preferred Interior with NO Crew Rest and Dual Aft Divans

Single U.S. Owner, Nearly $3 Mio in Options, Preferred 10 Pax Interior

2002 FALCON 900C SN 194

2008 FALCON 2000DX SN 603

Single Owner, Recent “C” Paint/Interior By Dassault Wilmington, Preferred Fwd Crew Lav and Dual Aft Divan Configuration

3,000 Hours since new, Pratt and Whitney ESP Gold; Honeywell HAPP and MSP, Falcon Service Center “C” check in 2014, 10 Pax Interior with Wifi

CITATION XLS+ SN 6157

CITATION III SN 072

Engines enrolled in Power Advantage, Airframe enrolled in ProParts and APU enrolled in Aux Advantage, Aircell Aviator 300 (Swift broadband w/ Worldwide Coverage), Eight plus 1 passenger executive configuration

MSP Gold Engines, HAPP Avionics Program, Camp maintenance tracking, Doc 1 & 3 Completed 12/2017, All AD’s & SB’s complied with

www.cbjets.com ALSO AVAILABLE: Falcon 900EXy SN238 (Lease Only)


This being the aviation industry, you’d think more companies would share our

51,000

The smoothest connection to your next aircraft.

2006 DASSAULT FALCON

foot view. 900EX EASy S/N 158

• 4,195 Hours; 2,752 Landings

• Engine & APU Enrolled on MSP Gold Up here, the air and the competition are rare. Our birds-eye view of the

• EASy II w/ FANS 1/A and ADS-B Out

aircraft brokerage market comes from our unmatched combination of nearly 50 years’ experience and a large, global network of partners and customers. That means you have more buy, sell and trade options. put a tailwind on your transaction. Call us and see. You’ll love the view.

2006 BEECHCRAFT HAWKER

www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters 919-941-8400 850XP S/N+1 258790

• 4,107 Hours; 2,521 Landings • Engines & APU Enrolled on MSP Gold • EU OPS Certified

2015 BOEING 787-900 S/N 37109

2012 GULFSTREAM G650 S/N 6013

• Green Boeing Completion • Ferry Time Only •A  vailable for Viewings in Europe

• 2,186 Hours; 640 Landings • Enrolled on RRCC and PlaneParts • G650 Enhancement Package

2008 BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 605 S/N 5745

2010 BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20293 • 1,950 Hours and 1,303 Landings 1998 Beechjet 400A • Fully Enrolled on Programs 2007 Challenger 300 • GoGo ATG-5000

ALSO AVAILABLE

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

• 5,239 Hours; 2,333 Landings • Engines Enrolled on Program • 96 Month Completed May 2016

2011 Challenger 300 1997 Challenger 604 2005 Challenger 604 2007 Challenger 605 2002 Citation Excel 1993 Citation VI 1994 Citation VII

I N FO @ JETC RAF T. CO M

4-2018_AVBuyer_Back Cover_Smoothest Connections.indd 1

ALSO AVAI L ABLE DOWNLOAD OUR 2015 CHALLENGER 650 FEATURED INVENTORY JETCRAFT APP 2008 CHALLENGER 605 2013 CHALLENGER 605 2011 CHALLENGER 300 2008 CHALLENGER 850 2009 GLOBAL XRS 2011 GLOBAL 5000 2015 GLOBAL 5000 2015 GLOBAL 6000 1991 CITATION II 2014 GULFSTREAM G650 Search aircraft listings Sort by manufacturer 1988 GULFSTREAM GIV 2006 Citation XLS 2000 Global Listing Express brochures 2010 FALCON 7X 2003 CRJ 200 2001 Hawker 800XP Recent Jetcraft news 2015 LEARJET 75 1997 CRJ 100SE 2002 LearView 45 upcoming events 2010 LEGACY 2008 Falcon650 2000DX 2010 Lear 45XR 2003 Falcon 2000EX 2003 Legacy 600 1990 Falcon 50 2012 Lineage 1000 1991 Falcon 50 1996 Sikorsky S-76B 2000 Falcon 50EX 2012 Falcon 7X

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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Better perspective on market trends. And worldwide connections that

A passionate team of aviation experts, our strategic approach and action-oriented thinking have made us the global leader for aircraft sales and ownership services. With our worldwide network and inventory, industry connections and regional presence, we are the difference between getting an aircraft… and getting your aircraft.

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AvBuyer Magazine April 2018  
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AvBuyer Magazine April 2018 edition