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Olmsted Locks and Dam is finally set to open.


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ON THE COVER

®

OCTOBER 2018 • VOLUME 75, NO. 10

Catamaran barge at Olmsted Locks and Dam transporting a dam (shell) section. Corps of Engineers photo by Mark Wise

FEATURES 20 Focus: Yard Dollars Shipyard grants have helped dozens of small shipyards.

24 Vessel Report: Waiting for the Tide Barge operators see better times ahead.

34 Cover Story: Dam Burst Olmsted Locks and Dam is finally set to open in October.

20

BOATS & GEAR 28 On the Ways • All American launches hybrid passenger vessel for San Francisco • Conrad delivers first North American-built LNG bunker barge • Gladding-Hearn delivers 52' pilot boat to Louisiana pilots • New Incat Crowther-designed tour boat for Australia launched • VT Halter signs agreement to build second LNG bunkering ATB for Q-LNG • First of four 6,000-hp tugs for Young Brothers delivered by Conrad • American Cruise Lines new 190-passenger riverboat arrives in New Orleans • Bristol Harbor to design 400-passenger high-speed ferry for Long Island, N.Y.

44 2018 Outboard Power Guide WorkBoat’s inaugural directory of outboard engines.

50 Deck the Halls Three new winches that match different tug sizes and power ratings.

24

AT A GLANCE 8 8 9 10 12 13 14

On the Water: Modern technology — Part III. Captain’s Table: Small business and regulation. Energy Level: Time for optimism in the Gulf? WB Stock Index: Stocks lose ground in August. Inland Insider: Disappearing coal movements on the river. Insurance Watch: Getting back in safety shape. Legal Talk: The primary duty doctrine.

NEWS LOG 16 16 17 17 18 18

Foss closes Oregon shipyard and cancels Damen tug contract. New Marine Travelift boat hoist for Maine shipyard. Barges being used for Ohio River petrochemical plant construction. Coast Guard has busy summer policing illegal charters. Crowley’s new ConRo ship delivers first cargo to Puerto Rico. Environmental effects of offshore wind need monitoring.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

DEPARTMENTS 2 6 54 59 60

Editor’s Watch Mail Bag Port of Call Advertisers Index WB Looks Back

1


Editor’sWatch

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A ‘damned’ project opens

I

n 1988, a new lock and dam at Olmsted, Ill., was authorized by Congress. The project’s estimated cost was $775 million with completion expected in seven years. Thirty years and another $2 billion later, the Olmsted Locks and Dam project will finally open in October (see story, page 34). It replaces Depression-era Locks and Dam 52 and 53, which had exceeded their design lives. Decades of funding problems and innovative design changes added years and costs to the project. Barge operators are frustrated that the project took so long and that the huge cost overruns took funding away from other important navigation improvement projects. But the wait is finally over for operators who suffered through years of costly delays, as closures and slow maneuvering at L&D 52 and 53 have forced tows to wait hours and often days to pass through. For operators, the biggest issue has been reliability of the inland navigation infrastructure. In recent months, delays have gotten so bad at 52 and 53 that many barge operators have been avoiding the area completely, taking more costly and longer routes. Marty Hettel, vice president, government affairs at American Commercial Barge Line and chairman of an industry group that advises the Corps, said that since last November, delays have cost the industry $65 million. The Corps estimates that the wait time will be reduced from up to two hours at Locks 52 and 53 to about 30 minutes at Olmsted. Barge operators and others worked with Congress to change the costsharing formula to get Olmsted com-

David Krapf, Editor in Chief

pleted and free up funding for other navigation projects, Michael Toohey, president and CEO of the Waterways Council, told us. That momentum must continue. The challenge, he said, will be to continually provide maintenance funding for Olmsted, and predictable and steady funding levels to complete other priority lock replacement projects. WCI will continue to push for long-term changes in the cost-sharing formula, healthy budgets for the Corps, and for a portion of federal revenues from hydropower generation to be directed to the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. These are all healthy goals.

dkrapf@divcom.com

WORKBOAT® (ISSN 0043-8014) is published monthly by Diversified Business Communications and Diversified Publications, 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112-7438. Editorial Office: P.O. Box 1348, Mandeville, LA 70470. Annual Subscription Rates: U.S. $39; Canada $55; International $103. When available, extra copies of current issue are $4, all other issues and special issues are $5. For subscription customer service call (978) 671-0444. The publisher reserves the right to sell subscriptions to those who have purchasing power in the industry this publication serves. Periodicals postage paid at Portland, ME, and additional mailing offices. Circulation Office: 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112-7438. From time to time, we make your name and address available to other companies whose products and services may interest you. If you prefer not to receive such mailings, please send a copy of your mailing label to: WorkBoat’s Mailing Preference Service, P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to WORKBOAT, P.O. Box 1792, Lowell, MA 01853. Copyright 20 18 by Diversified Business Communications. Printed in U.S.A.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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PUBLISHER

Jerry Fraser jfraser@divcom.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF

David Krapf dkrapf@divcom.com

SENIOR EDITOR

Ken Hocke khocke@divcom.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kirk Moore kmoore@divcom.com

KAI RAYMOND PHOTO / www.kairaymond.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ART DIRECTOR

PUBLISHING OFFICES

Capt. Alan Bernstein • Bruce Buls • Michael Crowley • Dale K. DuPont • Pamela Glass • Max Hardberger • Kevin Horn • Joel Milton • Bill Pike • Kathy Bergren Smith Doug Stewart dstewart@divcom.com

Main Office: 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438 • Portland, ME 04112-7438 • (207) 842-5608 • Fax: (207) 842-5609 Southern/Editorial Office: P.O. Box 1348 • Mandeville, LA 70470 • Fax: (985) 624-4801 Subscription Information: (978) 671-0444 • cs@e-circ.net General Information: (207) 842-5610

ADVERTISING PRODUCTION & ADVERTISING PROJECT MANAGER

NOV 18 - 20, 2018

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER

Kristin Luke (207) 842-5635 • Fax: (207) 842-5611 kluke@divcom.com

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Mike Cohen (207) 842-5439 • Fax: (207) 842-5611 mcohen@divcom.com

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Wendy Jalbert 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438 • Portland, ME 04112-7438 (207) 842-5616 • Fax: (207) 842-5611 wjalbert@divcom.com

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

(207) 842-5508 • Fax: (207) 842-5509 Producers of The International WorkBoat Show, WorkBoat Maintenance & Repair Conference and Expo, and Pacific Marine Expo www.workboatshow.com Chris Dimmerling (207) 842-5666 • Fax: (207) 842-5509 cdimmerling@divcom.com Theodore Wirth Michael Lodato mlodato@divcom.com


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Bollard failure is a global problem

I

read “Coast Guard warns on bollard failures” (by Kirk Moore, WorkBoat. com, May 30). Bollard failure unfortunately is a global issue. The rate of mooring incidents is ever increasing, alarmingly so, with bollard failure being the primary cause. Considerable aggregated data shows that bollard failures have many

contributing factors, such as: cruise liners have, since 1992, practically quadrupled in size whereas supporting infrastructure has, in general, not kept pace. Currently, there is no legislation in place to enforce mandatory inspection and testing of such critical port assets. However, vessel operators, ensuring safe havens, are now beginning to ask ports: “Are your bollards safe to use, and where is your proof?” In the UK, BLT (Bollard Load

Testing Ltd.) is currently drafting on behalf of Ports, Skills and Safety Ltd. its upcoming Guidance Note SiP-024 - Inspection and Testing of Mooring Bollards. It is our endeavor to then continue, with the HSE (Health and Safety Executive, Great Britain’s independent regulator for work-related health, safety and illness) to strive toward implementing much needed legislation. I hope this will help in continuing to raise awareness of the issue. Ade Walton Director Bollard Load Testing Ltd. Tyne and Wear, England

ENGINEERED COOLING SOLUTIONS.

Rescind radar observer training requirements

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read Capt. Alan Bernstein’s August column in WorkBoat (“The best things come in small packages”) regarding the proposed rule to do away with the requirement for radar observer refresher training requirements. Like Capt. Bernstein, I have been a licensed merchant mariner for more than 40 years and have seen the regulatory burden increase over the years. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank WorkBoat and Alan for drawing attention to this issue and leading the fight to rescind this outdated requirement. Capt. Charles E. Fiorella Virginia Beach, Va.

Photo courtesy of Eastern Shipbuilding Group

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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On the Water

Modern technology — Part III

A By Joel Milton

Joel Milton works on towing vessels. He can be reached at joelmilton@ yahoo.com.

ny automatic identification system (AIS) is perfectly capable of “lying” to you. This is otherwise known as broadcasting information that is simply not true and displaying it on a screen as fact when it’s fiction. It could be that either the static or dynamic information was programmed incorrectly or not updated in a timely fashion. In fact, the towing sector has been singled out by the Coast Guard for its overall poor rate of compliance, specifically regarding the underway/moored/anchored status information. AIS transmits the “position reports” — position/ course/speed/ROT (rate of turn) information — at variable intervals depending on your activity, speed and whether your course is steady or not. The faster you move the more frequently the AIS transmits. When at anchor or moored, an AIS Class A transmits every three minutes. When underway the intervals vary from two to 10 seconds. Incorrect settings cause a lot of unnecessary data

Captain’s Table Small businesses and government regulation

M By Capt. Alan Bernstein

Alan Bernstein, owner of BB Riverboats in Cincinnati, is a licensed master and a former president of the Passenger Vessel Association. He can be reached at 859-292-2449 or abernstein@ bbriverboats.com.

8

y company, BB Riverboats in Cincinnati, operates excursion vessels and a small catering company out of our facility on the Ohio River. We are a true family-owned, small business. I took the business over from my father, and now my son and daughter are getting ready to take it over from me. Then it will be my granddaughter’s and grandson’s turn. While I take comfort in knowing that my business will be in good hands, I am increasingly concerned about the negative affect of uncoordinated government regulations. Regulations mire my small family business in paperwork and reporting. It distracts us from our core mission of serving our customers. My company is regulated by the Coast Guard, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Transportation Security Administration, the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Communications Commission, the Department of Transportation and the Department of Justice. This does not include the myriad

transmission, which uses much of the available bandwidth and “clogs the pipe.” Or it could be that your AIS is transmitting intermittently, improperly, or not at all. This is a worrisome proposition. That’s because over the last few years I’ve heard the opinion expressed numerous times by mariners — in slightly different versions — that if you’re not on AIS “then you don’t exist.” What can be taken from this viewpoint is that, from a navigation, collision-avoidance and general situational-awareness perspective, you’re functionally invisible without it due to the fact that navigation watch officers have become overreliant on AIS. If you’re not visible as an icon on a screen, then you’re just aren’t there — until you are. AIS is thus state-of-the-art technology that is misused. At this point it’s fair to wonder, is there any other kind? Regardless, when you understand the technical details of how AIS actually works, it’s hard not to be impressed by the amazing “under the hood” technology. But the phrase made famous by Ronald Reagan still applies, “trust but verify.”

of state and local government agencies which also affect our operations. The Small Business Administration has estimated that uncoordinated regulation costs small business more than $10,000 per employee annually. As you can imagine, it is a big challenge for a small business such as mine to keep up with everything. It is the main reason we belong to organizations such as the Passenger Vessel Association (PVA). PVA has, over the years, represented the passenger vessel industry in regulatory and legislative matters. The group has done an excellent job of helping to reduce the regulatory impact on passenger vessel operators. In the last few months, PVA has responded to the president’s request for regulatory areas that should be reformed, submitted comments calling for the delay of the TWIC reader rule, and to eliminate the requirement for radar endorsement recertification training. If successful, these regulatory rollbacks will provide welcome relief for my business. I believe that some regulatory oversight is necessary and even recommended in areas such as passenger and crew safety, and the environment. At the same time, I also believe that uncoordinated and rampant regulation threatens the productivity and health of small businesses. www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Energy Level

17-Dec 18-Jan 18-Feb Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18 Jun-18 18-Jul 18-Aug

WORKBOAT GOM INDICATORS JUNE '18 WTI Crude Oil 69.91 Baker Hughes Rig Count 18 IHS OSV Utilization 26.6% U.S. Oil Production (millions bpd) 10.9 Sources: Baker-Hughes; IHS Markit; U.S. EIA

More optimism in the offshore Gulf?

.

AUG. '18 66.50 16 31.8% 11.0*

AUG. '17 47.39 17 25.9% 9.5

*Estimated

GOM RIG COUNT

GOM Rig Count

By Bill Pike

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I

admit that I have wobbled about future oil prices and activity levels in the U.S. Gulf, primarily because I haven’t seen any clear indication that the oil and gas industry is clearly moving in a positive or negative direction. Recent shifts in underlying economics and timing indicate that things might finally be changing for the better, leading to more offshore activity. Most important, there has been a fairly steep drop in costs and shortened timelines for offshore developments, especially in deepwater. In Royal Dutch Shell’s quarterly report in late July, CEO Ben Van Beurden and CFO Jessica Uhl discussed this. Shell’s most recent deepwater development in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Vito, will enter the construction phase with a forward-looking breakeven price below $35 bbl., after the company reduced costs by 70% from the original concept. Kaikias, also in the deepwater Gulf, is another good example of Shell’s strategy. It took approximately four years from discovery to first production earlier this year, a year ahead of schedule. And since Shell took the final investment decision (FID) in early 2017, Shell has reduced costs by around 30%, lowering the forward-looking, break-even price to less than $30 bbl. Appomattox has seen a similar 30% cost reduction post-FID. And, following the completion of the pre-drill campaign and the sail away of the facility for offshore installation in June, the project is on track to begin production in 2019. Shell said that over the past two years, the company has reduced unit operating expenses in the Gulf of Mexico by more than 20%. Shell is certainly not alone in this achievement. Lower development prices, shorter development times, the recent decline in U.S. petroleum stockpiles and strong

18 16 17 12 JULY 18 '18 67.90 18 15 18 28.3% 15 11.0* 16

20 15

8/17

8/18

10 5 0

1

2

3

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demand from an expanding economy should increase the pressure to return to the offshore market. That bodes well for the offshore

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service vessel industry, and day rates in particular, especially in light of the recent restructurings that have streamlined the OSV fleet.

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WorkBoat Composite Index Stocks dip 36 points

T

he WorkBoat Composite Index lost 36 points in August, or 1.7%. For the month, losers topped winners 19-11. Top percentage gainers included Gulf Island Fabrication. In August, the company reported second quarter earnings of 4 cents a share, beating consensus estimates by 13 cents. The positive results were largely attributed to the gain on the April sale of the company’s Ingleside, Texas, shipyard to a subsidiary of Buckeye Partners for $55 million, along with strong performance by Gulf Island’s services division During its Aug. 10 earnings call, STOCK CHART

Kirk Meche, president and CEO of the Houma, La.-based fabricator and shipbuilder, said the company received two additional tug awards related to an existing contract for docking tugs. This gives Gulf Island active orders for 10 tugs with two options remaining. Also during the second quarter, Oregon State University exercised an option to build a second research vessel, and the second and final OSV was delivered to Tidewater in early August. Tidewater lost about 7% in August. The company reported a loss of 44 cents a share in the second quarter, missing estimates by 2 cents a share. During the OSV operator’s earnings call in August, president and CEO Source: FinancialContent Inc. www.financialcontent.com

INDEX NET COMPARISONS 7/31/18 8/31/18 CHANGE Operators 337.04 333.59 -3.45 Suppliers 3496.18 3423.68 -72.50 Shipyards 3125.78 3108.10 -17.68 Workboat Composite 2153.91 2117.74 -36.18 PHLX Oil Service Index 151.19 144.15 -7.04 Dow Jones Industrials 25415.19 25964.82 549.63 Standard & Poors 500 2816.29 2901.52 85.23 For the complete up-to-date WorkBoat Stock Index, go to: workboat.com/resources/tools/workboat-composite-index/

PERCENT CHANGE -1.02% -2.07% -0.57% -1.68% -4.66% 2.16% 3.03%

John Rynd said the company continues to believe that it may be in the “early stages of the market recovery.” In recent months, he said, the working offshore rig count has been trending in a positive direction and recent contract awards, tendering activity and customer dialogue, “all point to higher demand for offshore capital equipment, including rigs, OSVs and FPSOs.” However, Rynd said, the overall OSV market remains highly fragmented and it “continues to be burdened, at least on paper, by excess capacity.” With few exceptions, OSV operators’ balance sheets are “stressed, industrywide costs are too high, and access to capital is very limited.” However, access to capital should not be a problem for Tidewater or a combined Tidewater-GulfMark, he said. In the Gulf, the strong seasonal spot market drove quarter-to-quarter improvements in vessel utilization and average day rates in Tidewater’s America segment. Vessel revenues in the Americas segment was up approximately $6.5 million, or about 25%, quarter-toquarter. Vessel utilization at 82% was up about 7% quarter-to-quarter and average day rates of $16,000 were up about 10% quarter-to-quarter. — David Krapf

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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Inland Insider Coal-less waterways?

I By Kevin Horn

Kevin Horn is a senior manager with GEC Inc., Delaplane, Va. He can be contacted at khorn@gecinc.com.

remember seeing railroad coal trestles in suburban northern New Jersey towns in the 1950s where coal was discharged from the bottom of the rail car and then moved to residences by local delivery truck. This coal, used for heating, was mostly displaced before World War II by cheaper cleaner oil, which in turn was displaced by cheaper cleaner natural gas. A similar displacement of coal for electricity generation by natural gas has been well documented. The extent of coal’s market share of electricity generation by states served by the Mississippi River System (MRS) paints an interesting picture for the future of coal-related waterborne commerce. The MRS has 17 states that are directly served by 25,000 miles of navigable waterway. Direct transfer of coal from barges to utilities is possible for these 17 states that have utilities adjacent to a

navigable waterway. Thus, coal’s share of electricity generation in these “waterway-served” states should be relatively high. A map showing coal’s market share of state electricity generation published in The Wall Street Journal recently indicates that there are relatively few states served by the MRS with very high shares of electricity generated by coal. Of the 17 MRS waterway-served states only three, West Virginia, Kentucky and Missouri, show very high shares of electricity generated by coal, in the 75% to 100% range. Three more states, Ohio, Indiana and Wisconsin, are in the 50% to 75% range. The others are in the zero to 50% range. States in the coal bread basket, where coal electricity generation accounts for a 50% or more share, are adjacent to the MRS. States on the east side of the MRS have less proximity to western low sulphur coal, which is rail based and thus should be more oriented to barge transport. Therefore, coal versus natural gas development in these states, particularly West Virginia, Kentucky and also Ohio and Indiana, will be important for the future coal share moved by the MRS.

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

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Insurance Watch Getting back in safety mode

F

By Chris Richmond

Chris Richmond is a licensed mariner and marine insurance agent with Allen Insurance and Financial. He can be reached at 800-439-4311 or crichmond@ allenif.com.

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all is transition time for shipyard and vessel employees. Summer employees have left and many of the jobs that they were doing now must be handled by full-time year round staff. This is “get back to the basics” time for safety. Sometimes summer employees handle the more mundane and boring jobs, which are often the dirty or more dangerous jobs. In the fall, when the full-time crew goes back to doing these jobs on a regular basis, they often view these tasks as easy and let down their guard. By holding regular safety meetings to review the way to correctly and safely do things, you can help prevent avoidable claims. You don’t have to go it alone. You can ask your USL&H (U.S. Longshore and Harbor) carrier to send a loss control person or team to help you get your crew back into safety mode. And on vessels, ask your ocean marine agent to get a safety team together to get your workers in safety shape.

Here is a quick check list to get you started: • Check with your agent, often they can provide you with resources from insurance companies to help lead safety refresher classes. • Explain to your safety team (either land based or on the vessel) what they need to do to help. • Break the meetings up into smaller groups and rotate the instructors so your crews don’t get bored. • As an alternative, think about holding a shorter meeting once a week for a month. That way crews can bring questions that have come up since the last meeting. • Make sure your employees understand that a safe workplace has a direct effect on the premium your business pays for insurance. Money saved on insurance could be spent elsewhere at your facility. • Document that you had the meetings and keep notes of what went right or wrong. Make absolutely certain that your insurance company and the Coast Guard are aware that you held a safety meeting. It will reflect well on you. Safety shows your employees that you truly care.

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Legal Talk

The primary duty doctrine

A

By Tim Akpinar

Tim Akpinar is a Little Neck, N.Y.based maritime attorney and former marine engineer. He can be reached at 718-224-9824 or t.akpinar@ verizon.net.

recent lawsuit shed light on a maritime law concept known as the primary duty doctrine. The matter arose when an engineering officer was injured in the course of relamping a Military Sealift Command (MSC) vessel. Ordinarily, two people are assigned to replace burned out light bulbs throughout the ship. Because it was Sunday and other engineering personnel had the day off, the claimant was asked to perform the task alone. He injured himself tripping over a threshold to the ship’s tech library while carrying a ladder, tools, and fluorescent bulbs. His lawsuit was based on negligence, unseaworthiness, and maintenance and cure. The defendant, the United States as operator of the Navy’s MSC, made a motion for summary judgment. That means it asked the court to rule that there was no material issue of fact. For the claim of unseaworthiness, the engineering officer argued that such duty was violated by failing to

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provide safe and properly working illumination in the tech library and failing to warn him about the threshold. In response, the U.S. argued that the officer’s injury was caused by his decision to enter a dim room without using a flashlight and without leaving a free hand to break his fall. For the Jones Act claim, the U.S. argued that it used reasonable care to maintain a reasonably safe workplace. It argued that it was under no duty to instruct the officer about stepping over a threshold to enter a dim room. The U.S. also raised the primary duty doctrine. It argued that in this circuit, the doctrine would deny recovery where a ship’s officer has actual knowledge of an unsafe condition, is assigned to correct the condition as part of his customary job duties, and is injured by the unsafe condition. In other words, if the officer knew a bulb was burned out in the library and it would be dim, he can’t recover for an injury arising out of that condition. The officer argued that the doctrine would apply only when the claimant’s injuries result solely from his own negligence. The court ultimately ruled in favor of the U.S.

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OCTOBER 2018

NEWS LOG Jessica Hathaway

NEWS BITTS

Foss Maritime

NEW BOAT HOIST FOR MAINE SHIPYARD The Arctic-class tug Nicole Foss was the last vessel built at the Foss Rainier yard.

Foss closes Oregon yard, cancels tug contract

F

oss Maritime closed its Rainier, Ore., shipyard in late July, laying off 10 workers and cancelling an agreement to build new Damen Shipyards Groupdesigned tugboats there. Foss continues to provide shipyard services at its Seattle base, and the decision to close the Rainier facility was a “business decision based on multiple economic factors,” according to Foss spokesman Loren Skaggs. The Foss Rainier shipyard was acquired by Foss with its purchase of Brix Maritime almost 25 years ago and was converted to handle new vessel construction 15 years ago. Since then 23 vessels were built there, including the Dolphin-class tugs that dominate the Foss harbor services fleet and the big offshore Arctic-class boats. The last to be built at Rainier was the 121'×31'×20', 7,268-hp Nicole Foss, delivered in June 2017. The tug was the last of three Arctic-class tugs built at Rainier. Foss Rainier was to be the site for the construction of the first four of at least 10 azimuth stern drive (ASD) tugs, under a memorandum of agreement that Foss and Damen announced in late 2017. 16

The companies planned to produce a new version of the Damen ASD 2813 design, with modifications to meet the needs of the U.S. ship assist and escort market. The agreement specifically called for the boats to be built at Rainier, and thus it “is out of date and has therefore been cancelled,” said Skaggs. However, “Foss and Damen are still in discussions about a number of potential projects. Foss is still committed to building new ASD 90 tugs for fleet replenishment.” While primarily looking toward its own needs, Foss entered the talks with Damen with an eye to supplying new vessels for other U.S. tug operators. Netherlands-based Damen has been building such partnerships since opening its North American office in Houston in 2016. In late August Young Brothers, an independent subsidiary of Foss based in Honolulu, took delivery of the Kãpena Jack Young, a Damen-designed 123'×36'6", 6,000-hp tug built by Conrad Shipyard, Morgan City, La. It is the first of four tugs Conrad is building for Young Brothers’ Hawaii operations. — Kirk Moore

P

ortland Shipyard in Portland, Maine, christened a new 330-metric ton Marine Travelift boat hoist acquired with the help of a $1 million federal Small Shipyard Grant. “Not only can we service larger commercial and recreational vessels that currently call Portland Harbor their home port, we will attract vessels from all over the North Atlantic,” said shipyard owner Phineas Sprague. Sprague called the project “the culmination of a 42-year dream to evolve into a shipyard for Portland.” “What is different is that we specifically designed this lift for the local Casco Bay Lines ferries and the landing craft that service the island,” said Sprague. “Until now, larger fishing vessels, tugs, ferries, yachts, and schooners needed to bypass or leave Portland Harbor for service and repair because of our limited hauling capacity. Not anymore. Portland Harbor is open for business.” — K. Moore

Coast Guard cites misconduct, negligence in duck boat sinking Coast Guard investigators found evidence that “misconduct, negligence, or inattention to the duties” of the captain contributed to the deaths of 17 people when an amphibious tour boat sank on

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


NTSB

The Stretch Duck 7 is under examination by NTSB investigators.

cording to the NTSB. – K. Moore

New plastics plant gives barging a boost on the Ohio Thirty miles northwest of Pittsburgh along the Ohio River, barges have been busy ferrying construction equipment to a new petrochemical plant being built by Shell Chemical. Construction of the $6 billion ethane cracker is in full swing, and most of the plant’s major components have been arriving by water to two docks built to handle barge deliveries. “The facility is being built modular, meaning that many components are built at fabrication facilities and then shipped to the site,” said Merritt Lane, president and CEO of Canal Barge Co., Inc., New Orleans, one of the barge lines contracted to move equipment up the Ohio. Lane said cargo is moving in a combination of deck and open hopper barges, and most of it will be used in the chemical manufacturing process. In June, Canal Barge delivered a 300' tower that weighed about 2,000 tons. The plant is being built in Monaca,

Shell Chemical

Table Rock Lake, Mo., July 19. Federal prosecutors filed a motion with the federal court in Kansas City, Mo., seeking to delay the discovery process in civil lawsuits that have been filed in connection with the deadly sinking, the Associated Press reported. The process involves lawyers sharing documents and information, and prosecutors said that should be delayed until the criminal investigation is completed. Lawyers involved in the civil cases — including for defendants Ride the Ducks Branson and its corporate parent Ripley Entertainment — are not entitled to know about the substance of the government’s case while the criminal investigation is ongoing, prosecutors contend. The boat Stretch Duck 7 was carrying 29 passengers and two crewmembers for what should have been a 20-minute ride on the lake near tourist hub Branson, Mo., when a powerful thunderstorm swept across with winds exceeding 70 mph. The Coast Guard and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the accident. NTSB officials have said Table Rock Lake was under a severe thunderstorm warning that had been issued about half an hour before the duck boat entered the water that evening. Video recordings recovered from Stretch Duck 7 showed an unidentified person on the boat before it departed telling the crew to take passengers on the lake portion of the tour first, ac-

A new ethylene plant in Pennsylvania will use nearby natural gas production to make plastic. www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

Pa., not far from supplies of natural gas that will be shipped by pipeline from the Marcellus and Utica shale formations. It will convert natural gas to ethylene and then into plastics that are used in a wide variety of goods from food containers to automotive parts. Lane said that the plant’s plastic products will likely move by rail and truck, but the project “features the flexibility and importance of waterborne movements.” Barge operators are expecting new business opportunities from the many auxiliary companies that are expected to settle there to be near the plant. “These secondary, downstream sites that will use the plastic materials to make other things may be an outbound barging opportunity,” said Peter Stephaich, chairman and CEO of Campbell Transportation Co., Pittsburgh. Construction began in 2017 and is expected to be completed in 2020. — Pamela Glass

Coast Guard thwarts illegal charters From Florida to Arkansas, an aggressive enforcement campaign stopped illegal charter operators this summer, the biggest a 147' luxury yacht near Miami, Coast Guard officials said. The 147'×28'9" Golden Touch II was carrying 47 passengers off Nixon Beach on Key Biscayne near Miami in August when it was stopped and boarded by a crew from the Coast Guard Miami station. The voyage was terminated, and in addition to violations for exceeding passenger capacity and failure to have 17


a valid certificate of inspection, the operator was also issued violations for failing to have a stability letter for the vessel, and a drug and alcohol program for its crew, according to a Coast Guard statement. Similar violations, with potential fines totaling $41,456, were also handed out to other operators around the country. Units in the Coast Guard 7th District began cracking down on unlicensed Florida charter operations in 2015, with the rise of online advertising and ridesharing apps for smartphones that enterprising boat operators use to connect with customers. “Tragically people have lost their lives on illegal charters,” said Capt. Ladonn Allen, chief of Coast Guard 7th District prevention department. “The unsafe atmospheres that these types of companies and unlicensed captains, who knowingly engage in illegal activity, create on their boats show a complete disregard for passenger safety and have been responsible for multiple deaths in Florida alone.” — K. Moore

Crowley ConRo ship delivers first cargo

Crowley Maritime

Crowley Maritime Corp.’s new 720'×105'×59' container/roll on-roll off (ConRo) ship El Coquí delivered its first cargo from Jacksonville, Fla., to the company’s modernized Isla Grande Terminal in San Juan in July — a historic milestone in the company’s transformation of its U.S. mainland-

Puerto Rico logistics services. “Increasing supply chain velocity while reducing customers’ landed costs was the core reason for our $550 million investment in this important service,” Tom Crowley, company chairman and CEO, said in a statement. “Bringing this new ship, and soon its (sistership), to reality is one of the final steps to making this vision a reality.” El Coquí, one of the world’s first ConRo ships powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), has a cruising speed of 22 knots and can carry about 2,400 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) of containers in a wide range of sizes and types — including 53'×8'6" high-capacity containers and refrigerated containers. Within the ship is an enclosed, ventilated and weather-tight Ro/Ro deck that can protectively carry up to 400 cars and larger vehicles. Besides full loads of dry cargo containers, the inaugural cargo also included various equipment and automobiles, trucks and SUVs, as well as refrigerated “reefer” containers for produce. “The diverse cargo carrying capabilities, as well as the ability to carry in-demand 53-foot containers, means that these high-performing ships will greatly benefit customers shipping goods between the mainland and the island,” said John Hourihan, senior vice president and general manager, Puerto Rico services. — Ken Hocke

Crowley Maritime’s El Coquí delivered its first cargo to Puerto Rico July 30.

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Deepwater Wind

NEWS BITTS

OCEAN SCIENCE LAGGING BEHIND OFFSHORE WIND POWER

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onstruction could begin on East Coast offshore wind energy projects in the next couple of years, but the state of science to monitor their environmental effects is lagging badly, experts said at the annual American Fisheries Society meeting. “We’re talking about building projects in a few years … yet we lack a built, on-the-ground monitoring program,” said Andrew Lipsky, a planning officer who leads research into offshore wind energy with the National Marine Fisheries Service Northeast Fisheries Science Center. From Massachusetts to Maryland, state governments are aggressively promoting offshore wind power development, setting renewable energy goals, and striking deals for power purchase agreements. The commercial fishing industry shares some of the same concerns as the maritime transportation sector, including navigation safety, ensuring turbines are spaced widely enough to allow maneuvering, and misleading radar echoes that can be generated by turbine rotors. Advocates organized the Responsible Offshore Development Alliance to bring together diverse East Coast fishing fleets and operators to more effectively engage the wind industry and federal and state regulators. Their goal is to “get better outcomes,” said Anne Hawkins of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP, a Washington, D.C., law firm that represents scallop fishermen who have sued in federal court over New York offshore wind proposals. — K. Hocke

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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Shipyards

Yard Dollars Marad grants have helped scores of small shipyards since 2008.

By Dale K. DuPont, Correspondent

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en years ago, the Maritime Administration (Marad) gave 19 shipyards a boost amid the recession with $9.8 million in grants to fund everything from mobile cranes and welding equipment to router tables and pipe benders. This year about $20 million went to 29 yards, continuing the Small Shipyard Grant Program that supporters say is still needed to modernize yards and spur U.S. manufacturing. Critics, however, say it’s a taxpayer funded handout. With the grants, yards have added equipment that they might have delayed purchasing, avoided outside financing, added workers and tackled larger projects that they otherwise would not have been able to take on. But the application can be tedious, the timeline tight and the competition stiff. Marad averages more than 100 applicants seeking grants for more than 11 or 12 times the amount of money available, said David Heller, director of the office of shipyards and marine engineering. The agency covers 75% of the cost and the yards the other 25% (or more to possibly help their chances). Grants can go to yards at a single location with up to 1,200 production employees. Shipyards must spend the money on what’s been agreed to. And, “they have to spend their money first before they can access any federal funds,” he said. They must send Marad invoices and cancelled checks before being reimbursed. Marad doesn’t analyze market conditions but

requires pro-forma financial statements. “We just make sure the company is stable,” Heller said. “This isn’t a needs-based program.” Since the program began in 2008, a total of $203.8 million — including $98 million under the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act — has been given to 216 yards for capital improvements and training projects. Congress didn’t provide funding in 2014 or 2015. The program has been authorized for another three years, and funding is year to year. The secret to a good application, several people said, is to read the directions. Section 2 — the most critical part — asks for a quantitative analysis of the proposed project’s benefits including manhours and dollars saved as well as details of the cost complete with vendor quotes. Yards do their own applications or hire consultants to help. Marad wants to see numbers on how yards are going to become more efficient, Heller said. The application process is “a lot of hours,” said Jim Roussos, vice president of operations, Dorchester Shipyard Inc., Dorchester, N.J. “It’s not like other government paperwork. The questions asked and the information they seek is appropriate.” ‘VITAL’ GRANTS One of the first recipients, All American Marine Inc., said its grant was unexpected but welcome. The Bellingham, Wash., company received www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

David Krapf

Eastern Shipbuilding has received several small shipyard grants.


WorkBoat file photo

$285,000 for metal cutting machinery and boat transfer equipment. The yard was awarded grants under the 2009 recovery act and in 2013. “We were able to advance our growth timeline as a result of the grants, which, on a cumulative basis, has allowed us to double our workforce, expand our capacity, become more efficient, and enabled us to build bigger vessels,” said CEO Matt Mullett. More importantly, he said, the 2009 act “provided funding opportunities to other quasi-governmental agencies seeking new vessels. We benefited as a result and did not experience a downturn in business.” And while confident they could have secured outside financing, “it would have tied up some of our credit facility and thus lessened our flexibility in meeting market demands.” “The grants are vital,” said Roussos, whose yard got $232,585 this year for two electric air compressor systems and electrical upgrades, and $945,800 in 2013 for a floating drydock. “We’re really expanding our sphere of influence in large part because of the drydock.” Small local yards are “an important

Metal Shark received a Small Shipyard Grant in 2016 for a portable work shelter and a Marine Travelift transporter.

component of keeping local maritime traffic safe … Without yards like ours, there’s no place close by for fishing boats, tugboats and barges to go to,” he said. And with no place to go, maintenance may be delayed. “In the next few months, with this grant, we can transform the shipyard into an environmentally friendly and more efficient shipyard.” He expects to add three or more employees to his workforce of 30 and cut project times by about 20%. Yards benefit but the government wins as well when shipyards stay afloat and offer more competitive service, said former Maritime Administrator David Matsuda, who now runs the consulting firm Matsuda & Associates LLC, Washington, D.C., and helps yards with

applications. The program, which accelerated a lot of capital spending, is not meant as a lender of last resort. While at Marad, Matsuda was the final word. “We liked to see outcomes,” he said. “We liked to think that’s what we were buying.” Asked why some yards have gotten multiple grants, he said Marad takes a fresh look at applicants each year. It helps, however, if the yards do a good job with the grants they’ve received. Carl Setterstrom, a naval architect and former Marad official who also helps yards with their applications, advises them to “make sure you answer everything they ask for.” About half of all applications have been done by the yards without outside

TARIFFS START TO HIT SOME SHIPYARDS

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

The tariffs “have generated a higher level of uncertainty as to aluminum pricing conSafe Boats is one of several tained in the fixed price boatyards that are being affected by contracts we are bidsteel and aluminum tariffs. ding, and have directly resulted in price increases,” said Matt Mullett, president and CEO, All American Marine, Bellingham, Wash., a builder of passenger vessels. On noncompetitive bid contracts, the company requires a clause that protects them on aluminum price increases. On competitive, fixed-price contracts, they’ve had to hedge the price of aluminum to cover possible increases, Mullett said. “The net result is a higher cost to the buyer.” Conrad Industries Inc., Morgan City, La., noted a big increase in steel prices early this year and said in its annual report that prices “may continue to rise as a result of recently imposed tariffs, which may cause an increase in our costs and lead potential customers to delay projects.” “We have seen an increase in our cost of materials. We use 100% U.S. steel,” said Jason Johnson, director of North American sales for Marine Travelift, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. “We do our best to absorb it. We’re hoping that it’s just temporary.” — D.K. DuPont

David Krapf

T

ariffs are starting to bite shipyards as they face higher materials costs and brace for more impact in their next round of contracts. In March, the Trump administration slapped a 25% tariff on steel and 10% on aluminum to reduce imports and help domestic industries. Other countries have retaliated, worrying U.S. yards. Even before the tariffs were official, domestic steel prices were rising thanks to higher demand in a strengthening economy. The cost of hot-rolled band increased to $1,000 per metric ton in June 2018, up 49.5% from a year earlier, Commerce Department statistics show. “It’s terrible, I’m already over budget,” said Jim Roussos, vice president of operations, Dorchester Shipyard Inc., Dorchester, N.J., who recently received a Small Shipyard Grant. “When you get the grant, you source all the materials you’re going to need.” But materials are 25% higher than when he applied. “We’re scrambling to find different suppliers,” he said. “The tariffs are a terrible thing for business.” Across the country, the sentiment’s the same. “They have definitely been painful,” said Richard Schwarz, CEO of Safe Boats International, Bremerton, Wash., who has seen a significant increase in aluminum prices since the beginning of the year. “In the short term, we have very limited options.” The company has a robust international market, so there’s a chance of retaliation from abroad if a trade war escalates. “It certainly has the potential to affect our ability to sell into other markets,” Schwarz said.

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Shipyards consultants, and “they’re successful as well,” he said. “I always advise my clients that even good applications don’t get funded.” Marad’s Heller said they aim for geographic diversity, and “we try to fund new applications if we can.” Glasstech Corp., Miami, fit that category, this year becoming the first

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for 20%-30% of their business, and he hopes it will move closer to 50% with the new equipment. He also expects to add 15 to 20 more employees to his 45-person workforce. New equipment also extends the life of existing inventory, said Garrett Rice, chief financial officer at Master Boat Builders Inc., Coden, Ala. This year the yard received $1.3 million for a 182-ton capacity crawler, 55-ton mobile crane and 30-ton rough terrain crane. “It’s a great benefit. It allows us to improve efficiencies,” which means more jobs. Shipyards are highly capital intensive businesses, he said. And while smaller yards build smaller vessels, they still need expensive equipment. Suppliers have benefitted as well. “Through the years, it’s been a very important program for our company and our clients,” said Jason Johnson, director of North American sales, Marine Travelift, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. “There are examples where clients have told us that without the assistance of the grant program they would not have proceeded with the purchase.” Yards have suggested a few changes to the program. Dorchester’s Roussos said Marad should carve out a portion of the money for work with a $50,000 or $100,000 cap “aimed at making smaller amounts available to yards our size.” All American’s Mullett proposes a longer period to respond to a grant solicitation than the current average of about five weeks. The Heritage Foundation has a different view of the program. Marad “and the laws it implements are steeped in protectionism and subsidies,” a recent position paper notes. “For example, its subsidies to small shipyards are a taxpayer-funded handout to politically favored firms that may not be efficient or competitive.” But for owners like Russell Steiner of Steiner Shipyard Inc., Bayou La Batre, Ala., who got a $1.8 million grant for a 400-ton Marine Travelift hoist, “the program was great. It allowed us to keep on going and working.” And, “if the program works right, the government gets its money back.”

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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Barges

Waiting for the Tide Barge operators position for better times.

By Kirk Moore, Associate Editor

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onsolidation and scrapping have been hallmarks of the inland barge sector for over three years. Now some inland operators see hope in petrochemical growth. Like the inland barge market, the coastal tank barge sector is suffering symptoms of overcapacity and stiff competition, with lower utilization and pricing and longer idle times. One bright spot is renewed interest in container-on-barge services, especially on the Mississippi River and between Mid-Atlantic and Northeast ports. Short-sea movements on flat deck barges are being promoted to help shippers avoid trucking costs and delays. It is attracting support from the Maritime Administration. Similarly, short-haul barge service to avoid congested highways is receiving more attention from port operators. Port and Marad officials are pushing more use of cross-harbor services in New York. In late 2017, New York New Jersey Rail LLC, a subsidiary of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, took delivery of its first new rail car float in decades from Metal Trades Inc., Yonges Island, S.C. The 370'×59'×14' barge is the first of two, able to carry up to 18 60' rail cars

between Jersey City, N.J., and Brooklyn, N.Y. The second barge is scheduled for delivery in October, said Megan Dean of Metal Trades. The project has attracted inquiries from people interested in similar barge applications, she said. “There’s a lot of interest in intermodal transportation and how this barge works.” On the inland waterways system, the decline of coal worsened problems of oversupply from an earlier barge-building boom. The overhang in inland barge supply contributed to the spring 2018 closing of builder Jeffboat, one of the biggest inland shipyards in the U.S. BARGES BOTTOM OUT Jeffboat, owned by American Commercial Lines, needed to build the equivalent of 250 hopper barges a year and employ 600 to 800 workers to be profitable, ACL president and CEO Mark Knoy said of the decision to close. The numbers were working up until 2017, he said. Knoy summed up the trend as “cheap steel, cheap money and the unintended consequences of accelerated depreciation,” while coal cargo was dropping on the rivers. The resulting loss of demand began idling more barges. www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

Columbia Group

The heavy deck barge Columbia Elizabeth provides container-on-barge services between East Coast ports.


Corps of Engineers

The inland barge industry has lost some 60 million tons annually of coal cargo.

pricing for long-term contracts and spot pricing. On the plus side, Kirby pointed out that “petrochemical movements grew throughout 2017, benefiting from a favorable pricing environment for our customers’ products and new petrochemical capacity coming on-line during the second half of 2017.” That’s expected to continue for the next few years, driven by the increase in U.S. oil and gas production. Optimism over new petrochemical capacity is warranted, but there will be limits to barge traffic growth, Dibner cautioned. “The issue there is a great deal of the demand is going to be local, or move by pipeline,” he said. “There is reason for hope that there will be some products that move by barge. ” COASTAL SLOWDOWN For coastal operators, overcapacity has continued to challenge the market in 2018. “There’s been clear signs things are getting tougher for coastal barge

Cummins Inc.

Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to keep coal-fired power plants running, power companies are committing to long-term investments in natural gas, said Brent Dibner, a maritime industry consultant at Dibner Maritime Associates, Chestnut Hill, Mass. “It is a valid view that the (barge) industry has to move on from the loss of coal,” Dibner said, noting that in recent years “the industry has lost 60-million-odd tons of cargo. It just disappeared.” One example is Tampa Electric’s plan to spend $853 million to convert its Big Bend Power Station in Apollo Beach, Fla., to gas and stop using barged coal by 2023. “Just one closing, Tampa Electric, represents nine million tons a year, just gone like that, boom,” said Dibner. “On the rivers we’re seeing the shift to gas. The utilities have their eyes open. They’re recognizing the world is going through a major shift.” An analysis by River Transport News found that deliveries of jumbo hopper barges fell from 976 in 2016 to 277 in 2017. Tank barge construction posted a smaller decline, from 112 newbuilds in 2016 to 85 in 2017, but still the third straight production drop. But some operators see better times ahead. While it continues to scrap older barges, Houston-based Kirby Corp. sees a gradual upturn in the inland tank barge trade, and longer-term prospects with an anticipated 30 new petrochemical plants coming on line in the next couple of years. In their annual report to shareholders, Kirby officials said expanding tank barge fleets ran headlong into the collapse of oil prices and growing pipeline capacity since 2014. “As a result, much of the industry’s new inland and coastal tank barge capacity, which was specifically built for crude oil and natural gas condensate service, was redirected into the petrochemical, black oil and refined petroleum products markets, creating an oversupply of tank barges,” the company wrote. That drove down

operators,” Dibner said, as vessel tracking services and reports from public companies tell of fewer movements and longer inactivity. That was not seen in the past, he said. Kirby reported that utilization rates in its coastal business declined to the low- to mid-60% range in late 2017. With other companies still building new vessels, Kirby retired 12 tank barges — including some that would have required retrofitting with expensive ballast water treatment systems — and 21 tugboats. The company says its strategy is that “our coastal fleet will be smaller, younger, more reliable and therefore more competitive.” Meanwhile, Vane Brothers Co., Baltimore, and Reinauer Transportation Companies LLC, Staten Island, N.Y., two East Coast coastal operators, are adding to their ATB fleets. The Assateague, the first of three new 110'×38'×17', 4,400-hp tugs being built for Vane by Conrad Orange Shipyard, Orange, Texas, was delivered in February. It is mated with the

Conrad Orange Shipyard delivered the Assateauge and Double Skin 801, the first of three ATBs for Vane Brothers.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

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80,000-bbl, 405'×74'×32' barge Double Skin 801. At Senesco Marine LLC, North Kingston, R.I., Reinauer built what Senesco says is the largest ATB built to date in the Northeast — the 124'3"×40'×24', 8,000-hp tug Bert Reinauer, and the 515'4"×73'7"×41', 150,000-bbl. RTC 165. On the Gulf Coast, the first liquefied natural gas (LNG) bunker barge built in North America was delivered in August by Conrad Industries Inc. to JAX LNG LLC. The 232'×48'8"×15'8" Clean Jacksonville provides bargeto-ship LNG bunkering operations to TOTE Maritime Puerto Rico’s Marlin-class ships, the 3,100-TEU Isla Bella and Perla Del Caribe. Built at Conrad Orange Shipyard, the barge underwent successful gas trials at an LNG facility at Port Fourchon, La., before entering service at the Port of Jacksonville, Fla.

Q-LNG Transportation

Barges

VT Halter is building an ATB to carry marine bunkering LNG for Q-LNG Transportation.

Close behind is Quality Liquid Natural Gas Transport LLC (Q-LNG), New Orleans. The company is building the LNG bunkering ATB Q-Ocean Service, a 5,100-hp, 128'×42'×21' tug, and the 324'×64'×32'6", 4,000-cu.-meter barge Q-LNG 4000 at VT Halter Marine, Pascagoula, Miss.

In late August Q-LNG announced it had signed an agreement with VT Halter to build a second, 8,000-cu.-meter LNG bunkering ATB to service the oncoming generation of LNG-fueled ships now being built for the cruise line industry. Q-LNG will service those vessels at cruise ports in Florida and the Caribbean.

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On TheWays

ON THE WAYS

All American Marine

All American launches hybrid excursion vessel for San Francisco

Tour boat is powered by a lithium-ion hybrid electric propulsion system.

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he Enhydra, a lithium-ion battery powered electric passenger excursion vessel, was launched in August by All American Marine Inc., Bellingham, Wash. The yard is building the vessel for Red and White Fleet, San Francisco, The 128'×30' aluminum monohull was designed by Nic de Wall of Teknicraft Design, Auckland, New Zealand. With a capacity of 600 passengers, it is the largest hybrid powered passenger vessel to be built in the U.S. under Coast Guard Subchapter K rules. It follows the recently delivered Seastreak Commodore, a Tier 3 diesel powered New York commuter ferry that was the first U.S.-built Subchapter K vessel for 600 passengers. In contrast, the Enhydra is specifically designed for silent running harbor tours of San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate Bridge. Guests will experience views of the bay and cityscape from all three decks, with snack bars on each level, while the electric drive quietly motors them past the sights. The first passengers will ride this fall. “It’s currently going through sea trials and we hope to turn over the keys at the end of the month (August),” said All American Marine CEO Matt Mullett. The second deck has a full, wrap-around panoramic viewing deck, with access to an enlarged-bow foredeck. The third level is entirely open with outdoor seating. Initially the Red and White team investigated steel mono28

hull designs for the new vessel, but All American officials said they showed that there would be considerable savings in building and maintenance costs with an aluminum design, while ensuring a robust hull structure. San Francisco’s public ferry system is recapitalizing its fleet with an emphasis on low-emission vessels, and Red and White has been working for some time on feasible hybrid power. They found it in propulsion system integrator BAE Systems, which supplied its HybriDrive hybrid-electric propulsion system. It includes a generator, propulsion power converter, house load power supply and control system. The generator is mounted to a variable speed Cummins QSL9 410-hp diesel engine. The system offers parallel hybrid powering of the AC traction motor from either the generator, the batteries, or both. The motor is coupled to the propulsion shaft via a reduction gear for thrust and increased propeller efficiency. With this configuration, torque is immediately available for the propeller, and the speed can be precisely controlled, according to All American. BAE’s HybriGen system has fewer engine operating hours and is more streamlined than a conventional drive, requiring fewer parts, and saves both fuel and maintenance costs. The hybrid system also uses battery power from two 80-kW lithium-ion battery packs from Corvus Energy in www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Conrad Industries

Canada, supplied under its next-generation Orca Energy line. A key feature of the Enhydra’s design is its capability to expand the size of the batteries, with a goal of achieving complete zero-emissions operations in the future as charging infrastructure advances and battery technology improves. As built, the current battery system can meet any power demands of the Enhydra, while providing silent, emissions-free sightseeing cruises. The HybriDrive system automatically uses full electric battery operation at slower speeds and when maneuvering in and out of the harbor, driving two Veem Star 4-bladed propellers. At higher speeds, the generator will automatically engage and augment the additional power demands of the traction motor. — Kirk Moore

LNG bunker barge will fuel two containerships working out of Jacksonville, Fla.

Conrad Industries delivers first LNG barge built in North America

C

onrad Industries Inc. has delivered the Clean Jacksonville, the first LNG bunker barge constructed in North America. The 232'×48'8"×15'8" barge was built in Orange, Texas, at Conrad Orange Shipyard for JAX LNG LLC, which will operate the barge. LNG gas trials took place in Port Fourchon, La. The barge has an 8' draft and a single GTT 2,200-cu.-meter membrane tank.

It features large service and work spaces for equipment operators and a large hose handling crane. The Clean Jacksonville will provide barge-to-ship LNG bunkering service for TOTE Maritime Puerto Rico’s two LNG-fueled Marlin-class containerships, the 3,100-TEU Isla Bella and Perla Del Caribe. The ships, which entered service in late 2015 and early 2016 respectively, have been using an innovative truck-to-ship bunkering operation. Fueling time for the barge-to-ship service to each TOTE ship will be under five hours.

BOATBUILDING BITTS

S

Sterling Marine

entinel Boat Co., Wetumpka, Ala., has delivered a 64.8'×28'×8' passenger/tour boat to Apostle Island Cruises, Bayfield, Wis. Designed by Sterling Marine, Fairhope, Ala., the Archipelago is a composite catamaran powered by twin Caterpillar C18s, producing 803 hp at 2,100 rpm each. The Cats connect to ZF 5-bladed nibral KCA props through ZF marine gears with 1.74:1 reduction ratios. The engines/gears are iso-mounted for a smoother, quieter ride. Seatorque provided the enclosed shaft systems. The vessel’s top speed is 26 knots and cruise speed is 21 knots. Quality Liquefied Natural Gas Transport LLC (Q-LNG) has signed an agreement with VT Halter Marine to build an 8,000-cu.-meter LNG bunkering vessel. It will be the second LNG articulated tug/barge (ATB) from VT Halter for Q-LNG. VT Halter is currently building the U.S.’s first offshore LNG ATB unit for Q-LNG. It

65' passenger vessel built in Alabama.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

is made up of a 324'×64'×32.6' barge and a 128'×42'×21' tug. The U.S.-flag ATB will be ABS classed and built to International Gas Carrier Code requirements. It is designed to carry 4,000 cu. meters of LNG. Fincantieri Marinette Marine (FMM), Marinette, Wis., recently delivered the 387.6'×57.7' littoral combat ship (LCS) 11, the Sioux City, and LCS 13, the Wichita, to the Navy. With a draft of 14.1' and a 40-plus knot speed, Sioux City is the sixth Freedom-variant LCS designed and built by the Lockheed Martin-led industry team. The vessel completed sea trials that included surface and air detect-to-engage demonstrations of the ship’s combat system. LCS 13 went through acceptance trials earlier this summer and will be commissioned this winter. The Kāpena Jack Young, the first of four 123'×36.5' twin-screw tugs being built by Conrad Shipyard, Morgan City, La., for Young Brothers is underway to Hawaii after completing sea trials. Young Brothers, Honolulu, is an independent subsidiary of Foss Maritime, Seattle. The Damen USA-designed tug is powered by twin GE 8L250 engines turning 6,000 hp. The Kāpena Jack Young completed sea trials at Port Fourchon, La., and transited the Panama Canal in late August en route to Molokai. Elliott Bay Design Group (EBDG), Seattle, recently updated the design of a purpose-built 87'10"×25' landing

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On TheWays

Landing craft is working in the San Juan Islands.

craft delivered in 2017. The Nordland II was originally designed by EBDG and built by Latitude Marine Services (LMS), La Conner, Wash., for San Juan Ferry & Barge. EBDG again partnered with LMS to update the design of the Nordland II. The design revision incorporated a midbody hull addition and refined pilothouse design to increase deck cargo space and make it easier to load large vehicles. The vessel’s unique bow ramp permits vehicles and heavy lift equipment to drive onto the deck from any beach access. The landing craft re-entered service at the beginning of the year, providing freight transportation throughout the San Juan Islands. American Cruise Lines’ new 342'×59'×8', 190-passenger riverboat the American Song completed sea trials in August and headed to New Orleans. Guilford, Conn.based ACL said the new boat is the first modern riverboat in U.S. history. American Song, built by Chesapeake Shipbuilding, Chesapeake, Md., was expected to arrive in New Orleans in early September. Its inaugural cruise from New Orleans to Memphis, Tenn., will leave the dock on Oct. 6. The vessel will cruise a full schedule of eight-day Lower Mississippi River cruises for the rest of the year and then will be repositioned to the West Coast in 2019 for ACL’s Columbia-Snake River cruises beginning in March. Bristol Harbor Group Inc. (BHGI) has been awarded a contract by Sayville Ferry Service, Sayville, N.Y., to design a 400-passenger aluminum monohull high-speed ferry. The boat, which will provide service from Sayville across the Great South Bay to Fire Island, N.Y., will also haul cargo. The new design will be based on an existing vessel and will comply with Subchapter K regulations. Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport, La., delivered the 154'×25' Robert Ward, the 30th fast response cutter (FRC) to the Coast Guard in August. The new patrol boat is part of the Coast Guard’s Sentinel-class FRC

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program. The new cutter will be the second of four FRCs to be stationed in San Pedro, Calif. The vessel’s commissioning is scheduled for February 2019 in California. To build the FRC, Bollinger uses a proven, in-service parent craft design based on the Damen Stan Patrol Boat 4708. The cutter has a displacement of 353 tons, a flank speed of 28 knots, state-of-the-art command, control, communications and computer technology, and a stern launch system for the vessel’s 26' cutter boat. The Robert Ward is powered by twin 20-cylinder MTU diesels producing a total of 5,762 hp. Vigor Alaska expects to lay off 50 to 80 workers at its Ketchikan, Alaska, shipyard during the fourth quarter as the company completes the construction of a pair of new ferries for the Alaska Marine Highway System. The first of two Alaska-class ferries, the 280'×70' Tazlina was launched in May and christened Aug. 11, the first state ferry built in Alaska. The 300-passenger, 53-vehicle vessel will be followed in coming months by the Hubbard, scheduled for completion in March 2019. The Tazlina is slated to enter service in May 2019. Austal USA completed acceptance trials in August in the Gulf of Mexico on the 338'×93'6" Burlington, an expeditionary fast transport (EPF 10) vessel. The Burlington is slated for delivery to the Navy in the fall and is the 10th ship in Austal’s 12-ship portfolio valued at over $1.9 billion. Austal’s EPF program has delivered nine ships with three more under construction at the shipyard’s Mobile, Ala., facility. The 338' Spearhead-class EPF is designed to provide high-speed, high-payload transport capability to fleet and combatant commanders. Also, the littoral combat ship Charleston (LCS 18), the ninth 421'6"×103.7' Independence-variant LCS built by Austal USA, completed acceptance trials in July in the Gulf. LCS 18 will be the third Independence-variant LCS delivered to the Navy in 2018. Each aluminum LCS is powered by twin 12,200-hp MTU 20V8000 diesels and two 29,500-hp GE LM2500 gas turbines.

American Cruise Lines

Elliott Bay Design Group

BOATBUILDING BITTS

The 190-passenger American Song arrived in New Orleans in September.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


On TheWays “Thanks to the commitment of our partner, JAX LNG, we have developed strong standards for landside LNG bunkering that will continue to be the hallmark of our barge-to-ship bunkering operations,” Peter Keller, executive vice president of TOTE, said last year after JAX LNG received approval from the Coast Guard for the operation of their waterfront LNG facility and to provide barge-to-ship LNG bunkering operations for TOTE’s Marlin-class ships. Bristol Harbor Group, Bristol, R.I., handled the design and engineering of the barge, with help from Conrad and GTT, the French company that developed the LNG cryogenic membrane containment technology used for the project. The new barge features a bunker mast design, called REACH4, which was developed by GTT for simple and safe LNG transfer to ships. “It is the first time the GTT membrane system has been installed in a

non-self-propelled barge in the U.S.,” Johnny Conrad, president and CEO of Conrad Industries, said in a statement. “It is the first time an LNG bunker mast of this type has been built.” During the early stages of the design, Bristol Harbor Group participated in a HAZID/HAZOP workshop as well as a Waterway Sustainability Study and a Waterway Sustainability Risk Assessment which were the first steps towards obtaining Coast Guard approval. Being a first-of-a-kind vessel, the designers worked with all parties involved throughout the process to obtain ABS and Coast Guard approvals. “The broad collaboration between TOTE, Conrad, the myriad project stakeholders, and U.S. regulators led to the successful design, construction, and commissioning of this unique and groundbreaking project,” Philippe Berterottiere, chairman and CEO of GTT, said in a statement. — Ken Hocke

All American Marine is proud to introduce the Enhydra for the Red and White Fleet in San Francisco. A lithium-ion powered vessel with the BAE Systems HybriDrive system, we are excited about a commitment to a more sustainable tomorrow across the maritime industry, because we are building it today.

www.ALLAMERICANMARINE.com

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Gladding-Hearn delivers pilot boat to Louisiana

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he Assistant, an aluminum 52'6"×16'11"×4'8" pilot boat built by Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corp., Somerset, Mass., was delivered to Delta Launch Services LLC, Metairie, La., in August. Delta Launch took delivery of the Assistant in Rhode Island and ran it home on its own bottom. Often Gladding-Hearn sends a boat to its homeport with a hired captain and crew, but having the boat delivered by the crew that will be working it “gives the crew time and experience on the boat before it goes to work,” said Tim McAuliffe, engineering liaison with Gladding-Hearn. This is the fifth C. Raymond Hunt designed St. John’s-class pilot boat Gladding-Hearn has built for Delta Launch Services, beginning in 2003 with a contract for two boats, the William H. Johnson and the Nola. The Bar Pilot was delivered in 2007 and the sistership to the Assistant, the Mississippi Delta, in 2013. The Assistant had a design speed of 24 knots but hit 26 knots during sea trials, powered by its two 671-hp Caterpillar C-18 Tier-4 diesels matched up to Twin Disc MGX-5136A gears with 2:1 ratios turning 5-bladed Bruntons nibral props. McAuliffe said Delta Launch “is a unique pilot organization” in that the pilot boats are Coast Guard-inspected for 12 passengers. The inspection is required because Delta Launch “carries passengers for hire. They have an arrangement with other pilot associations, transferring pilots between different zones. Most pilot organizations are carrying only their own people.” Seating is limited to six Llebroc pilot chairs aft of the helm station. Delta Launch is the operating company for the Associated Branch Pilots. The pilots operate in the Southwest Pass on the Lower Mississippi River. Down below are four berths, a settee and a head. Heating and cooling for the wheelhouse and fo’c’sle are done with

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Gladding-Hearn

Aluminum pilot boat will work at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

three reverse cycle air conditioning units. Onboard power for this and other services comes from a 12-kW Northern Lights genset. When the Assistant pulls next to a vessel, the pilot will disembark via a platform on the wheelhouse roof. For rescue work there’s a winch operated rotating davit over a recessed platform at the transom. Gladding-Hearn has three more pilot boats under construction — one for Louisiana’s Lake Charles Pilots, another for pilots in Southeast Alaska, and the third to the Saint Lawrence Seaway Pilots. — Michael Crowley

Incat Crowther designed tour boat for Australia

T

he Incat Crowther-designed aluminum 109'4"×29'7"×10'8" Spirit of the Wild, a new 192-passenger tour boat for Gordon River Cruises, Tasmania, was launched earlier this year. The vessel is the first in Australia to operate in the World Heritage-listed Tasmania wilderness with Incat’s silent drive, used when the tour boat cruises the Gordon River. In this mode, the vessel runs on electric power, providing quiet cruising. Built by Richardson Devine Marine, Goodwood, Tasmania, the new boat, with a draft of 5'3", is fitted

with a pair of MTU 10V2000M72 main engines, producing 1,004 hp at 2,250 rpm each. The mains turn fixed pitch propellers through ZF 3311 PTI gearboxes. In addition, the boat has a hybrid electric system — a pair of ABB e-motors, driving hybrid-ready ZF gearboxes. Particular attention was paid to the mounting of the engines and gears to reduce vibration and noise. The main engines’ modest rating is tailored to local manning requirements. In open water, the vessel will use boost mode from the hybrid system, which matches motor speed to engine speed to seamlessly add electric power. In this mode, the vessel operates at 25 knots. “She’s designed around a great passenger experience with large triangular windows, top-notch fit out and excellent noise levels,” Stewart Marler, Incat’s marketing coordinator, said in an email. “We think she’s probably one of the more ‘out-of-the-box’ designs we’ve done of late.” — K. Hocke

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

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Dam Burst

The most expensive lock and dam project in U.S. history to open to Ohio River barge traffic in October.

The pushboat Steve Golding and its tow pass through Olmsted's locks on July 25, 2018, during Olmsted Locks and Dam media day.

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


By Pamela Glass, Washington Correspondent

I

Anne Mulhall, Corps of Engineers

Corps of Engineers

n Olmsted, Ill., a tiny hamlet of just over 300 residents in southern Illinois, just off the corn fields along the Ohio River Scenic Byway and across the river from Kentucky, sits a long overdue, $3 billion federal project. The project has been called both a boondoggle and an engineering marvel and is expected to end years of traffic jams along one of the busiest spots in the inland waterways system.

About 6,500 vessels moving between the Mississippi, Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee rivers transport 90 million tons of cargo through this stretch of the river each year, more than any other segment of the inland waterways. Barge operators have endured years of costly delays here, as closures and slow maneuvering at Locks and Dams 52 and 53 have forced barge tows to wait hours or often days to pass through. At one point last year, there were 74 towboats and 842 barges queued up waiting their turn.

Olmsted Locks and Dam in July 2017.

The Olmsted Locks and Dam will officially open in October to commercial navigation after nearly 30 years in the making, slowed by decades of funding hiccups, Congressional gamesmanship, and innovative design changes that have added millions of dollars and years to the project. The new structure will replace nearby Depression-era Locks and Dams 52 and 53, located between Paducah, Ky., and Cairo, Ill., that are crumbling and constantly closed for maintenance and repairs. Olmsted’s much-anticipated completion is bringing a big sigh of relief to the nation’s barge industry and industries like agriculture and energy that depend on river transportation.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

NAVIGATION DELAYS “The types of inefficiencies we’ve been experiencing (at Locks 52 and 53) are killers for us,” Dan Mecklenborg, senior vice president and chief legal officer, Ingram Barge Co., told reporters during a recent tour of Olmsted organized by the Waterways Council Inc. The biggest issue for barge companies, he said, is reliability of the infrastructure. Delays have gotten so bad in recent months that many operators are avoiding the area all together, taking more costly and longer routes, according to Marty Hettel, vice president government affairs at American Commercial Barge Line and chairman of an industry group that advises the Corps. Since 35


OLMSTED LOCKS AND DAM: 30-YEAR HISTORY • 1929: Locks and Dams 52 and 53 along the Ohio River completed. • 1978: Temporary 1,200' lock chamber added to Lock and Dam 52. • 1979: Temporary 1,200' lock chamber added at Lock and Dam 53. • 1988: New lock and dam at Olmsted, Ill., authorized by Congress under the Water Resources Development Act, at an estimated cost of $775 million and completion in seven years. It will replace Locks and Dam 52 and 53, which had exceeded their designs lives. • 1990s: Army Corps of Engineers analyzes the “in the dry” vs. “in the wet” dam construction methods. • 1997: Corps decides to use the innovative “in-the-wet” technique. Sections are built on land, transported to the river and placed on concrete foundations, with minimal disruption to barge traffic. This decision adds greatly to the cost and length of project. Study of the method continues for several more years. • 2002: Twin lock chambers, 1,200'x110', completed using the dry cofferdam technique. • 2004: Corps awards dam construction contract, although Congress had approved funds in 1990. • 2005: Hurricanes Katrina and Rita create a scarcity of barges and cranes, pushing up costs of construction equipment. • 2002-2007: Big jumps occur in prices of fabricated steel, cement,

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fuel, insurance and bonding. • 2012-2013: Funding shortfalls threaten to shut down the project. • 2013: Olmsted reauthorized at an estimated cost of $2.9 billion, with almost $1.7 billion already spent and $1.2 billion more authorized to complete work. • 2014: Congress changes the funding formula, shifting more of the construction costs to federal taxpayers. The 50/50 cost federal-industry cost share through the barge-funded Inland Waterways Trust Fund is changed to 75% federal, 25% industry. This assures a steady flow of funds to Olmsted without draining money for other inland projects. • 2014: Congress again changes the cost-share formula to 85% federal, 15% industry. • October 2018: Locks and dam will be operational. • December 2022: Removal of dams 52 and 53, marking completion of the project. Source: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, GAO report to Congress: Factors Contributing to Cost Increases and Schedule Delays in the Olmsted Locks and Dam Project, February 2017.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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Corps of Engineers

last November, delays have cost the industry $65 million, Hettel said. The Army Corps of Engineers estimates that the wait time will be reduced from up to two hours at Locks 52 and 53 to about 30 minutes at Olmsted. “That’s a major feat given the number of barges that go through there and given the tonnage of materials that move through this area,” said Col. Antoinette Gant, Corps Louisville District commander. “The time and reliability to assure timely movement through this area have been very important in this project.” The biggest difference is that Olmsted will include two 1,200'×110' lock chambers located on the Illinois shoreline, and a dam consisting of five tainter gates, a navigable pass section, 140 wickets and a fixed weir. When the river is low, tainter gates are lowered to force flow into the navigational section. The wickets are raised and gates

Olmsted wicket lifter testing in June.

closed, creating a pool for barges to safely lock through. When the river is high, the tainter gates are raised and the wickets are lowered, allowing barges to navigate over the dam and avoid the locks.

“The twin 1,200-foot lock chambers will pass traffic faster and will be only one stop,” said Capt. Jeremiah Nichols, Olmsted project executive officer for the Corps. “Our filling and flushing systems on that chamber are bigger so

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BIG, COMPLEX AND COSTLY A visit to the site illustrates just how massive and complicated this project is, with oversized construction equipment that has been specially designed for the unique needs of building a dam on a fast-moving river continually busy with barge traffic. One of the most impressive structures is the huge, oneof-a-kind heavy lift super gantry crane, which lifted the dam’s concrete shells, some weighing nearly 5,000 tons, and moved them to a cradle at the river’s edge. There, a catamaran barge lifted the shell off the cradle and transported

Corps of Engineers

it’s faster to lock a boat through.” Tows must now breakup their barge formations in two at the smaller, single lock chambers at Locks 52 and 53, lock through twice, and then re-fleet their barges before heading either north up the Ohio, or south toward the Mississippi River.

The huge, one-of-a-kind heavy lift super gantry crane, which lifted the dam’s concrete shells, some weighing nearly 5,000 tons.

it into the river where it was lowered onto a pre-set foundation. The Corps likens this process to playing with Legos, but you’d have to be a giant to get it all right. Olmsted was authorized in 1988 with what seemed like a straightforward objective: replace the unreliable and

crumbling locks and dams 52 and 53 with a state-of-the art structure that can accommodate today’s big barge tows. The cost then was estimated at $775 million, with completion in less than 10 years. But problems surfaced soon after involving both funding and design. Over the years, Congress failed to

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


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provide adequate annual funding support to help the project meet construction targets, and as a result construction slowed and almost stopped. Progress was eventually made on the two lock chambers, which were completed in 2002, but the dam languished amid competing construction methodologies, funding shortfalls and concerns that construction might cause long and costly delays to river traffic.

Normally, the Corps would use a cofferdam technique, in which a temporary, watertight structure would drain the riverbed to create a dry workspace for construction. But this method, called “in the dry,” would disrupt river traffic. So, in 1997, the Corps opted for a new, experimental technology called “in the wet.” This involved making large concrete sections of the dam onshore, carrying them to the river

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42

and setting them in place on concrete foundations. The Corps believed this would be quicker and less disruptive to navigation. But the Corps greatly underestimated the engineering challenges that slowed construction and escalated projected costs. This led critics to label Olmsted a “boondoggle” and a waste of taxpayer money. They criticized the Corps’ ability to efficiently deliver big public works projects. With a revised, much longer construction schedule and millions already invested, Congress couldn’t let the project fail and made some key legislative changes. In 2013, Congress reauthorized Olmsted for $2.9 billion, and a year later changed the funding formula so that taxpayers would pay 75% of Olmsted’s costs rather than the 50-50 federal-industry match under the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. That same year, Congress changed the formula again to 85-15, and barge operators agreed to a nine-cents per gallon hike in the diesel fuel tax they pay into the Trust Fund, the first increase since 1995. This infusion of funds means Olmsted will be finished four years sooner than anticipated under the new construction schedule, and at $325 million less than the estimated cost in 2012. Overall, taxpayers have kicked in $1.9 billion, while the barge industry is covering $1.1 billion, according to figures provided by the Corps. In June, the Corps said the project had an estimated completion cost of $2.77 billion, would pay for itself in a few years, and offers approximately $640 million in annual benefits to the U.S. LESSONS LEARNED The Corps says that there are many lessons learned using the “in the wet” technique to build the structures, and engineers are looking at whether this method could be used in other lockand-dam projects now in the pipeline. “We can’t keep building these the same as 100 years ago,” said Lt. Gen. Todd T. Seminole, chief of engineers and commanding general of the Corps. He added that the Corps must continue to find innovative engineering techniques

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


that speed projects and save money. During the course of the project, the barge industry developed a love-hate relationship with Olmsted. While realizing the importance of installing a modern infrastructure at that location on the Ohio, barge operators are frustrated and angry that the project has taken so long and that its massive cost overruns have siphoned precious dollars away from other important navigation improvement projects. With the average age of the nation’s locks and dams at 60 years, and with nearly 60% of them over 50 years old, there is a long list of needed repairs, maintenance and rehabilitation throughout the 12,000-mile system. Navigation projects used to take about seven years to complete, and Olmsted should have been finished in 1999, said Michael Toohey, president and CEO of the Waterways Council. With money being directed for the completion of the over-budget and behind-schedule Olmsted project, modernization of the rest of the inland system has suffered. This is why barge operators and others worked with Congress to change the cost-sharing formula to get Olmsted completed and free up funding to replace other locks and dams, Toohey said. Moving forward, the challenge will be to provide maintenance funds for Olmsted, and predictable and steady funding levels to complete other priority projects. To this end, Toohey said WCI will push for long-term changes in the cost-sharing formula, healthy Corps budgets, and for a portion of federal revenues from hydropower generation to be directed to the Trust Fund. Olmsted will be operational in October, officials said, when navigation is transitioned from Locks and Dams 52 and 53 to the new structure. But the project won’t be considered complete until the old locks and dams are removed by the end of 2022. “The sooner we can get Olmsted operational, the better the reliability is for moving the economic engine of this country, which is the inland waterway system,” said Hettel of ACBL. www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

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2018 OUTBOARD DIRECTORY

W

orkBoat has been publishing a list of diesel engines manufactured for the commercial workboat industry for decades. Our annual Diesel Directory provides readers with a list of diesel engines that can be used as a reference guide every 12 months. Now we are giving the same treatment to outboard engine manufacturers. For several years in our annual Construction Survey, the No. 1 category in number of vessels built has been patrol boats, with literally hundreds of them contracted for, under construction or delivered each year. This year there were 221 of them listed in the survey. The vast majority of these boats are powered with outboard engines. There was talk at July’s Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC) in Baltimore that centered around the advantages of outboard engines versus inboard engines in small boat applications for military use. Mike Canfield, Compsys Inc.’s managing director, said the 44

outboard is better than the inboard for a number of reasons. “If one engine goes down you have another one to get home on,” he said. (Compsys is a Melbourne, Fla., manufacturer of PRISMA preforms, lightweight structural components laminated into fiberglass composite structures.) The same is true for outboards used in other boats, whether working for police departments, wildlife agencies or any number of other workboat applications. Some outboards run on gasoline, some on diesel fuel, and some are multifuel engines. Some day, perhaps, there will be enough LNG-powered boats that we’ll publish a liquid natural gas engine directory. Who knows. One thing for sure is that engines, including outboards, continue to evolve. Over the years, they’ve been cleaned up, rebuilt, redesigned and repackaged. Look for all of that to continue. So take a look at WorkBoat’s inaugural outboard directory. We expect it to be the first of many. — Ken Hocke

Ken Hocke

A pair of Mercury 150s and Evinrude 150 multifuel engines on two RIBs at MACC.

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower (hp @ rpm)

Displacement (Cu. In.)

Bore x Stroke (Inches)

COX POWERTRAIN LTD. The Cecil Pashley Building, Unit 8, Cecil Pashley Waym Shoreham (Brighton Way) Airport, Lancing, West Sussex, UK Bn43 5FF info@coxpowertrain.com | www.coxmarine.com | +44 (0) 1273 454 424 CXO300

8

772

300 @ 4,000

266

3.3x3.92

2.992x2.500

EVINRUDE OUTBOARD MOTORS/BRP 10101 Science Dr., Sturtevant, WI 53177 800-901-3228 | www.evinrude.com E30MRL (Multifuel Engine)

2

160

30 @ 5,800 (Tiller Handle)

35.10

E55MRL (Multifuel Engine)

2

250

55 @ 5,500 (Tiller Handle)

52.7

3.601x2.588

E55MJRL (Multifuel Engine)

2

270

55 @ 5,500

52.7

3.601x2.588 3.386x3.100

C150MFEX (Multifuel Engine)

6

541

150 @ 5,500

167

C150MFEXC (Multifuel Engine)

6

533

150 @ 6,000

167

V6 74° E-TEC D.I.

6

537

300, 250, 250 High Output (H.O.),

210

3.854x3.000

167

3.386x3.100

158.2

3.601x2.588

105.4

3.601x2.588

79.1

3.601x2.588

225 H.O., 200 H.O. @ 5,400-6,000 rpm V6 66° E-TEC D.I.

6

530, 496

200, 175, 150, 150 H.O. @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

V6 60° E-TEC D.I.

6

418

150, 135 H.O. @ 5,300-6,000 rpm

V4 60° E-TEC D.I.

4

390

115 H.O., 115, 90 H.O. @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

E-TEC D.I.

3

320

90, 75, 60 H.O. @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

E-TEC D.I.

2

232

60, 50, 40

52.7

3.601x2.588

E-TEC D.I.

2

150

30,25 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

35.2

2.992x2.5

E-TEC D.I.

2

181

15 H.O.

35.2

2.992x2.5

V6 60° E-TEC D.I.

6

428

105, 60, 40

158.2

3.601x2.588

E-TEC D.I.

3

334

3.601x2.588

52.7

3.601x2.588

@ 5,300-6,000 rpm 105, 60, 40 @ 5,000-5,500 rpm E-TEC D.I.

2

247

105, 60, 40 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

HONDA MARINE 4900 Marconi Dr., Alpharetta, GA 30005-8847 770-497-6400 | www.marinehonda.com BF75EFI

4

359

75 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

91.4

3.0x3.5

BF90EFI

4

359

90 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

91.4

3.0x3.5

BF100

4

359

100 @ 5,500-6,300 rpm

91.4

3.0x3.5

BF60

3

239

60 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

2.9x3.1

BFP60

3

256

60 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

2.9x3.1

BF40

3

214

40 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

49.4

2.8x2.8

BF50

3

214

50 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

49.3

2.8x2.8

BF115

4

478

115 @ 4,500-6,000 rpm

144

3.43x3.9

BF135

4

478

135 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

144

3.4x3.9

BF150

4

478

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

144

3.4x3.9

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

45


Model

Cyl.

Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower (hp @ rpm)

Displacement (Cu. In.)

Bore x Stroke (Inches)

BF200

6

588

200 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

212

3.5x3.7

BF225

6

589

225 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

212

3.5x3.7

BF250

6

600

250 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

219

3.5x3.78

MERCURY MARINE W6250 Pioneer Road, P.O. Box 1939, Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1939 920-929-5040 | www.mercurymarine.com 350 Verado

6

668

350 @ 5,800-6,400 rpm

159

300 Verado

8

600

300 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

250 Verado

8

600

250 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

300 CMS SeaPro

8

527

300 @ 4,800-5,600 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

300 AMS SeaPro

8

600

300 @ 4,800-5,600 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

250 SeaPro

8

527

250 @ 4,800-5,600 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

225 SeaPro

8

527

225 @ 4,800-5,600 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

200 SeaPro

6

483

200 @ 4,600-5,400 rpm

207

3.6x3.4

300 Pro XS

8

505

300 @ 5,600-6,200 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

250 Pro XS

8

505

250 @ 5,600-6,200 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

225 Pro XS

8

505

225 @ 5,600-6,200 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

200 Pro XS

8

505

200 @ 5,600-6,200 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

175 Pro XS

6

470

175 @ 5,400-6,000 rpm

207

3.6x3.4

300 Four Stroke

8

527

300 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

250 Four Stroke

8

527

250 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

281

3.6x3.4

225 Four Stroke

6

475

225 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

207

3.6x3.4

200 Four Stroke

6

475

200 @ 5,000-5,800 rpm

207

3.6x3.4

175 Four Stroke

6

475

175 @ 5,000-5,800 rpm

207

3.6x3.4

150 Pro SX

4

456

150 @ 5,200-6,000 rpm

183

4.0x3.6

115 Pro XS

4

359

115 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

150 Four Stroke

4

455

150 @ 5,000-5,800 rpm

183

4.0x3.6

115 Four Stroke

4

359

115 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

90 Four Stroke

4

359

90 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

75 Four Stroke

4

359

75 @ 4,500-5,500 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

150 SeaPro

4

455

150 @ 4,800-5,300 rpm

183

4.0x3.6

115 SeaPro

4

363

115 @ 5,000-5,500 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

90 SeaPro

4

363

90 @ 5,000-5,500 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

75 SeaPro

4

363

75 @ 5,000-5,500 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

80 Jet

4

378

80 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

65 Jet

4

378

65 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

128

3.5x3.2

60 EFI Four Stroke

4

247

60 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

50 EFI Four Stroke

4

247

50 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

40 EFI Four Stroke

3

204

40 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

747 cc

2.56x2.95

40 Four Stroke

3

204

40 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

46

40 Four Stroke

4

260

40 @ 5,500-6,000 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

30 EFI Four Stroke

3

172

30 @ 5,250-6,250 rpm

526 cc

2.4x2.36

60 SeaPro

4

260

60 @ 4,500-5,500 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

40 SeaPro

4

260

40

995 cc

2.56x2.95

40 Jet

4

267

40 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

35 Jet

4

267

35 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

995 cc

2.56x2.95

46

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower (hp @ rpm)

Displacement (Cu. In.)

Bore x Stroke (Inches)

OXE DIESEL Laborde Products, 74257 Hwy. 25, Covington, LA 70435 • 7410 Miller Road 2, Building 4, Houston, TX 77049 800-628-9882 | labordeproducts.com | ccerullo@labordeproducts.com OXE 150 Diesel

770

150 @ 4,100

122

OXE 200 Diesel

4

770

200 @ 4,100

122

RAIDER OUTBOARDS INC. 1855 Shepard Dr., Titusville, FL 32780 321-403-3585 | www.raideroutboards.com | george@raideroutboards.com Raider 40

2

148

40 @ 5,200-5,800 rpm

30.07

Raider 50

3

178

40 @ 5,000-5,800 rpm

42.5

SEVEN 7 MARINE W186 N11676 Morse Dr., Germantown, WI 53022 877-777-0330 | www.seven-marine.com 527

8

1,094

527 @ 5,800 rpm

376

4.065x3.622

577S

8

1,094

577 @ 5,700 rpm

376

4.065x3.622

627SV

8

1,094

627 @ 5,600 rpm

376

4.065x3.622

SUZUKI MOTOR OF AMERICA 3251 E. Imperial Hwy., Brea, CA 92821-6795 714-996-7040, ext. 2322 | www.suzuki.com | dgreenwood@suz.com DF350A

6

727

350 @ 5,700-6,300 rpm

267.9

3.74x3.82

DF350A

6

747

350 @ 5,700-6,300 rpm

267.9

3.74x3.82

DF300AP

6

639

300 @ 5,700-6,300 rpm

245.8

3.81x3.46

DF300AP

6

659

300 @ 5,700-6,300 rpm

245.8

3.81x3.46

DF250AP

6

639

250 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

245.8

3.81x3.46

DF250AP

6

659

250 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

245.8

3.81x3.46

DF200AP

4

531

200 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

175

3.81x3.81

DF175AP

4

531

175 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

175

3.81x3.81

DF150AP

4

531

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

175

3.81x3.81

DF250

6

606

250 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

220.5

3.75x3.35

DF225

6

606

225 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

220.5

3.75x3.35

DF250SS

6

606

250 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

250

3.81x3.46

DF200A

4

529

200 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

200

3.81x3.81

DF200SS

4

529

200 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

200

3.81x3.81

DF175

4

522

175 @ 5,500-6,100 rpm

175

3.81x3.81

DF150

4

522

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

150

3.81x3.81

DF150SS

4

522

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

150

3.81x3.81

DF140A

4

405

140 @ 5,600-6,200 rpm

124.7

3.40x3.50

DF115A/SS

4

405

115 @ 5,600-6,000 rpm

124.7

3.40x3.50

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

47


Model

Cyl.

Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower (hp @ rpm)

Displacement (Cu. In.)

Bore x Stroke (Inches)

DF90A

4

352

90 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

91.8

3.0x3.30

DF70A

4

352

70 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

91.8

3.0x3.30

DF60A

3

229

60 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

57.4

2.85x2.99 2.85x2.99

DF50A

3

229

50 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

57.4

DF40A

3

229

40 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

57.4

2.85x2.99

DF30AT

3

158

30 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF25AT

3

158

25 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF30ATH

3

163

30 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF25ATH

3

163

25 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF30A

3

143

30 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF25A

3

143

25 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

29.8

2.80x2.68

DF20AT

2

120

20 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

20

2.38x2.24

DF9.9BT

2

120

9.9 @ 4,700-5,700 rpm

20

2.38x2.24

TOHATSU AMERICA CORP. 670 S. Freeport Parkway, Suite 120, Coppell, TX 75019 469-771-3740 | www.tohatsu.com MFS40

3

209

40 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

52.84

2.75x2.95

BFT250

6

613

250 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

218.6

3.5x3.8

BFT225

6

589

225 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

211.7

3.5x3.7

BFT200

6

584

200 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

211.7

3.5x3.7

BFT150

6

478

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

143.6

3.4x3.9

BFT115

4

478

115 @ 4,500-6,000 rpm

143.6

3.4x3.9

MD115

4

392

115 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

107.9

3.46x2.86

BFT90

4

366

90 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

91.3

2.9x3.5

MD90

3

337

90 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

77.3

3.39x2.86

BFT75

4

364

75 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

91.3

2.9x3.5

MD75

3

337

75 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

77.3

3.39x2.86

BFTW60

3

262

60 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

2.9x3.1

BFT60

3

243

60 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

2.9x3.1

MFS50

3

209

50 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

52.9

2.76x2.95

MD50

3

205.7

50 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

42.5

2.68x2.52

MD40

3

205.7

40 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

42.5

2.68x2.52

MD35JET

3

196.2

35 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

42.5

2.68x2.52

MFS30

3

157

30 @ 5,250-6,250 rpm

32.09

2.4x2.36

MFS25

3

157

25 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

32.09

2.4x2.36

MD25JET

3

196.2

25 @ 5,150-5,850 rpm

42.5

2.68x2.52

40 @ 2,400 rpm

80 @ 2,400 rpm

40 @ 2,400 rpm

80 @ 2,400 rpm

TORQEEDO INC. NORTH AMERICA 171 Erick St, Unit D-2, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 469-771-3740 | www.tohatsu.com Deep Blue 40 RL/RXL

Deep Blue 80RL/RXL

Deep Blue 40 TL/TXL

Deep Blue 80 TL/TXL

48

306 without battery 306 without battery 306 without battery 306

www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower (hp @ rpm)

Displacement (Cu. In.)

Bore x Stroke (Inches)

YAMAHA MOTOR CORP. USA 1270 Chastain Road, Kennesaw, GA 30144 866-894-1626 | www.yamahaoutboards.com F350C

8

763

350 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

323

3.7x3.78

F300

6

562

300 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

256

3.78x3.78

F250

6

551

250 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

256

3.78x3.78

F225

6

551

225 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

256

3.78x3.78

F425 XTO Offshore

8

952

425 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

341

3.78x3.78

F200

6

608

200 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

201

3.7x3.17

F200

4

487

200 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

171

3.78x3.79

F175

4

483

175 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

171

3.78x3.79

F150

4

478

150 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

165

3.70x3.79-3.78x3.79

F115

4

377

115 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

110

3.19x3.5

F90

4

353

90 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

110

3.19x3.5

F75

4

353

75 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

110

3.19x3.5

F70

4

253

70 @ 5,300-6,300 rpm

61

2.56x2.95

F60

4

247

60 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

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F50

4

247

50 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

61

2.56x2.95

F40

3

214

40 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

747 cc

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F30

3

214

30 @ 5,000-6,000 rpm

747 cc

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3.15x3.15

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2

392

50 @ 3,500-4,000 rpm

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49


Deck Equipment

Deck the Halls A peek at three new winches to meet different tug sizes and power ratings.

By Michael Crowley, Correspondent

M

atching up a winch with a tugboat often requires a lot of creativity. It would be easier if winches were one size fits all, but that’s hardly the case. Most of a winch’s final design depends on the size of a tug, its horsepower rating and what the winch will be used for — factors that often change from tug to tug. Below we take a look at three new winches and one that’s been slightly modified. JONRIE INTERTECH When Bisso Towboat’s newest 100' tugboat goes into service in the fall of 2019, the Main Iron Works-built 6,008-hp ASD tractor tug will be the first to be outfitted with JonRie InterTech’s 240-series escort winch. JonRie had outfitted the previous three Bisso ASD tugs with its 230-series winches, but those were 4,500-hp tugs. The increase in horsepower required a different and stouter-built winch. Some tug operators that boost horsepower in a new tug are reluctant to pay for a larger winch, even though the vessel’s power has been increased. The problem is “that’s not a good match for the boat,” said Brandon Durar, JonRie’s president. “With more horsepower you need to do something with the winch.” In the case of Bisso’s new tug, Durar said, “I worked with them … they worked with me. We came up with something that should last longer, be

50

more efficient and more stout” when matched up with some of the large containerships the tug will be working on the Mississippi River. Some features from the 230 series are also on the new 240-series winches. The 15-ton line pull, 100' per minute line speed, 600' of 8" line, and 600,000-lb. static brake capacity haven’t changed. “But we upped everything else around it,” said Durar. The 240-series winch has stainless steel brake drums for longer surface life and larger shafting to accommodate the increased horsepower. The newest feature is the level wind drive, a Hägglunds hydraulic motor, and the winch’s main drive. “Went to a beefier, stouter hydraulic motor without clutches and gearboxes,” said Durar. “It’s direct drive.” When not being used, the level wind motor will freewheel. The level wind comes with a stainless steel slide shaft and the carriage has an extra wide chute to accommodate various sizes of eye splices. Combining the 240 series with a 6,000-hp tug, “will make this new platform a real game changer on the Mississippi,” Durar said. RAPP MARINE Rapp Marine has a pair of electric winches going on a 100' Z-drive hybrid tugboat being built for Baydelta Maritime at Nichols Brothers Boat Builders in Freeland, Wash. The tug will spend www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

Capt. Arie Nygh

The Markey winch on this tug operating out of Port Hedland, Australia, has remote access instrumentation sensors.


Rapp Marine

most of its time doing harbor assist work on the West Coast. When the tug goes in the water, probably in the first quarter of 2019, on the stern will be a single-drum towing winch with about 1,200' of 2" synthetic rope. This is a scaled down version of a double-drum towing winch that’s on Foss Maritime’s 110' tug the Caden Foss, which was launched in 2017. That was Rapp Marine’s first electric towing winch and the first electric towing winch for a U.S. tug, said the company’s sales and marketing manager Finn Moore. Since the tugboat will be doing harbor assist work, the 75-hp bow mounted hawser winch will be the primary winch. It’s a new design that features Rapp Marine’s proprietary fluid cooled electric motor. The liquid cooling system provides a more efficient continuous cooling circuit even if the motor is under full torque. The winch holds

Rapp Marine’s new hawser winch is going on a 100' Baydelta tug.

850' of 8" hawser rope, and has a brake holding strength of 300 tons at the barrel layer. Primary controls for both winches are in the wheelhouse with Rapp’s PTS Pentagon PLC control system. The touch screen’s panels include tension and wire length readouts, auto-tension capability, and automated haul-in and payout settings. You can also log in data. MARKEY MACHINERY What do you do for a customer who wants a bow winch with a line drum

that will handle 300' of 1-1/4"-dia. high performance line, plus an anchor chain wildcat sized to handle 7/8" chain on a very small foredeck? On top of that, there must be enough room left over for a deckhand to work around the winch. That was the quandary facing Markey Machinery. In the preliminary design there wasn’t enough room for the winch. That design was a standard winch concept with everything above deck. The solution was to put most of the winch’s drive components and the 20-hp electric motor below deck. “The challenge was to work closely with a naval architect to get everything we need in the winch, and the naval architect can come in with their support pieces to support major loads,” said Scott Kreis, Markey’s vice president of sales and engineering in Seattle The DESMW-14-20 winch, which in August was still being built, should

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Deck Equipment

RESCUE BOAT DAVIT RETROFITS

Markey Machinery

C

A small foredeck required this Markey bow winch’s drive components to be mounted below the deck.

be 25% to 30% smaller than if all the components were above deck. Markey has done similar winch designs, but this is “probably one of the smallest we’ve done of this arrangement,” said Kreis. “Integrating it into the tug was challenging.” Though not available on its DESMW-14-20 winch, Markey offers an option with new variable frequencydrive winches that can save time and money on repairs — remote access instrumentation. Sensors placed in a Markey winch’s power and control system allow technicians to access winch drives and data storage units via password secured cell and satellite con-

oastal Marine Equipment in Gulfport, Miss., has reportedly been successful at retrofitting several ferries with its rescue boat davit. That includes all the Woods Hole, Mass., ferries, and a number of supply boats and ATB tugs. New vessels can also utilize the davit. The Virginia Department of Transportation’s newest Jamestown-Scotland ferry, the 270' 499-passenger Powhatan, which was recently launched at VT Halter Marine in Pascagoula, Miss., is outfitted with the rescue boat davit. The rescue boat davit Coastal Marine developed was a bit of a joint venture between the company and a few of its customers. “At some point we partnered with a couple of customers, took a lot of their likes and dislikes and developed them,” said Anthony Gauthier, Coastal Marine’s vice president. There are two models, the D39 with an 11'6" slewing radius and the D50 with a 14'9" slewing radius. Both are ABS and Coast Guard certified. Being 100% electric was important. “It doesn’t have self-contained hydraulics like a lot of them do that are maintenance trouble,” said Gauthier. “And we got rid of the accumulators that a lot of people were having problems with.” Another issue, he said, is that many rescue boat davits come from outside the U.S. That can present maintenance issues when parts have to be shipped in from another country, especially with required annual Coast Guard inspections, and suddenly you have to wait “for a bearing, an accumulator or something to come across the pond.” — M. Crowley

nections. This allows monitoring such things as the “flows and pressures both in cooling water and pneumatic systems,” said Kreis, no matter how far the vessel is from Markey’s Seattle base. Because of the distance from Seattle and the time differential, remote access instrumentation was especially needed on six tugs launched in Singapore in

2017 that work out of Port Hedland, Western Australia. The tugs escort ironore carriers through a channel several kilometers long until the open sea is reached. Remote access instrumentation has been “utilized extensively in fine tuning the controls, data logging and helping the onboard engineers,” said Kreis.

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ADVERTISERS INDEX Advertiser / Page Ahead Sanitation Systems Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 All American Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Aventics Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Blount Boats Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Boschert Precision Machinery, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Bostrom, H .O . Co Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Brunswick Commercial & Gov't Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Burger Boat Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 C & C Marine and Repair LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 CITGO Petroleum Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Dacon AS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Duramax Marine LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV3 Eastern Shipbuilding Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Environmental Marine Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Farmer's Copper Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Furuno USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Harken Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Hougen Mfg ., Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Imtra Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International WorkBoat Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 JMS Naval Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Karl Senner, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV4 Louisiana Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Marine Machining & Mfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Marine Travelift Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 McDermott Light & Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Metal Shark Aluminum Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Mitsubishi Turbocharger and Engine America, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 MobileOps, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Motor-Services Hugo Stamp Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 MTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Northern Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Pacific Marine Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 51 PuraDYN Filter Technologies Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Research Products/Incinolet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 R W Fernstrum & Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 St Johns Shipbuilding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Twin Disc Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV2 Vigor Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Volvo Penta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Washburn & Doughty Associates Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Yank Marine Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Yanmar America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat

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Wendy Jalbert (207) 842-5616 wjalbert@divcom.com 59


LOOKS BACK OCTOBER 1948

• Commericial Barge Lines launched a new service in August using self-propelled barges to transport automobiles from St. Louis assembly plants to the South and Southwest. The barge line operates a similar service on the Ohio River from Cincinnati and Evansville, Ind. • Moran Towing and Transportation Co. has been

authorized by the ICC to perform general towage between ports and points on the Gulf of Mexico. The amendment to the company’s certificate was dated Aug. 23. Moran’s original certificate, amended in July 1944, authorized point-to-point operations on the Atlantic coast and the inland waterways, and between points on the Gulf and the Great Lakes, but not between Gulf ports. Moran operates 37 OCTOBER 1958 tugs and re-

cently announced that it will build five more diesel-electric harbor tugs, with deliveries beginning in December. • The U.S. is ranked fourth worldwide in the number of ships under construction or on order.

• Avondale Marine Ways Inc. built completed on Sept. 30. eight welded steel hopper barges in 56 • The 1,600-hp tug Nancy Moran days for Central Soya Co. Inc., Fort was launched recently at Jakobsen Wayne, Ind. Each 195'×35'×11' barge Shipyard, Oyster Bay, N.Y. The 100' is equipped with 11 portable welded diesel-electric tug was built for Moran steel covers over the hopper. Keel layTowing and Transportation Co., New ing for the first barge began Aug. 8, the York. The tug is outfitted with a 1,600day after the order was received, and it hp GM 567C diesel. was completed Sept. 6. After the first barge, Avondale turned out two bottoms a week, with the final barge OCTOBER 1968

• The SS Ponce de Leon recently completed a record 54.5-hour run from New York to Puerto Rico. The super trailership was scheduled to make the 1,400-mile trip in 60 hours when she was placed on the New York-Puerto Rico run in April. The time is 40% faster than other ships on the same run. The Ponce de Leon, reportedly the world’s fastest commercial cargo ves60

sel, has been exceeding that by making the trip in an average of 57.5 hours at an average speed of 25.5 knots. • The Offshore Technology Conference was established earlier this year by nine of the leading engineering and scientific societies in the United States. The first meeting of the new conference will be held in Houston on May 19-21, 1969. www.workboat.com • OCTOBER 2018 • WorkBoat


DURAMAX®

SHAFT SEAL SYSTEMS

Engineered for Optimum Sealing Performance.

The DryMax™ seal is a robust, environmentally friendly, water-lubricated stern tube seal system. Engineered to accommodate the most axial and radial shaft movement of any seal design while eliminating wear on the shaft.

Reversible DuraChrome™ mating ring gives 2X the life extending drydock intervals

Keeps seawater out of your vessel and your bilge dry. The DryMax™ engineered nitrile rubber ring rotates with the shaft and creates a hydrodynamic seal with the DuraChrome™ mating ring.

Superior sealing and wear life. The proprietary rubber polymer seal ring and the DuraChrome™ alloy mating ring have been engineered to provide optimal sealing and long wear life.

Virtually maintenance free. An inflatable seal is built into the housing allowing seal inspection and primary sealing ring replacement at sea without dry docking.

MADE IN U.S.A.

DryMax™ is ideal for vessels operating in both brown and blue water. It accommodates shaft sizes and stern tubes up to 36".

MADE IN U.S.A.

The DryMax™ seal is also available as a rudder stock seal.

For more information on DryMax™ Shaft Seal or to purchase contact: Duramax Marine at 440-834-5400 or go to DuramaxMarine.com

Duramax Marine® is an ISO 9001:2008 Certified Company

Products And Knowledge You Trust

p: 440.834.5400 f: 800.497.9283


PROPELLING

EXCELLENCE

MARQUETTE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, LLC.

SEASTREAK, LLC.

“Producing over 9300 HP in the harshest of river conditions requires tough, dependable gearboxes that stand the test of time. We’re not surprised that the REINTJES WAF 6755’s have exceeded all expectations to date. Thanks again to Karl Senner for another outstanding project.”

“Karl Senner’s products and services are unmatched in meeting the rigorous demands of our vessels and operation. Reliability is key.”

– Josh Esper | Marquette Transportation Company, LLC

– Jim Barker, President | Seastreak, LLC

STEAMSHIP AUTHORITY

AMERICAN SEAFOODS COMPANY

“Karl Senner has always been there for us with OEM parts in stock and well-trained technicians available. It’s very important for the Steamship Authority to maintain reliable schedules for the islands we serve.”

“When it came time to change the reduction gearbox on the Ocean Rover, Karl Senner, LLC helped make an incredibly big job a manageable endeavor. They were a great partner helping us outfit the Rover with a new REINTJES gearbox and even a new Alconza shaft generator. We couldn’t be happier with the results!”

– Steven Clifford | Steamship Authority

– Kevin Kiive | American Seafoods Company

Karl Senner, LLC proudly represents:

WWW.KARLSENNER.COM

WorkBoat October 2018  

In this issue: Focus: Shipyard grants have helped dozens of small shipyards. Vessel Report: Barge operators see better times ahead. Cover...

WorkBoat October 2018  

In this issue: Focus: Shipyard grants have helped dozens of small shipyards. Vessel Report: Barge operators see better times ahead. Cover...