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September 29 - October 5, 2011 worcestermag.com

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A tempting taste of Worcester’s culinary culture


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WORCESTERMAG.COM • SEPTEMBER 29, 2011


Kirk A. Davis President Gareth Charter Publisher x153 Doreen Manning Editor x235 Jeremy Shulkin Senior Writer x243 Steven King Photographer x278 Brittany Durgin On-line Editor x155 Rachel Bryson-Brockmann, Vanessa Formato, Paul Grignon, Janice Harvey, Josh Lyford, Gary Rosen, Janet Schwartz, David Wildman Contributing Writers Veronica Fish Contributor Tammy Griffin-Kumpey Copy Editor Interns: Jacky Cheng, Pamela Fahlbeck Don Cloutier Production Manager x380 Kimberly Vasseur Art Director/Assistant Production Manager x366 Ross Acerbi x350, Becky Gill x350, Morgan Healey x366, Stephanie Pajka x366, Stephanie Mallard x366, Graphic Artists

CONSUMER WARNING: Reading Krave on an empty stomach may result in an uncontrollable urge to grab a table for two at a local restaurant.

Jennifer Shone Advertising Sales Manager x147 Lindsay Chiarilli x136, Joan Donahue, Aimee Fowler x170, Account Executives Erin Johnson Classified Manager Carrie Arsenault Classified Advertising Specialist Worcester Mag is an independent news weekly covering Central Massachusetts. We accept no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. The Publisher has the right to refuse any advertisement. LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES: Please call 978.534.6006, email sales@centralmassclass.com, or mail to Central Mass Classifieds, Leominster Plaza, 285 Central St., Suite 202B, Leominster, MA 01453

DISTRIBUTION: Worcester Mag is available free of charge at more than 400 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $1 each at Worcester Mag offices. Unauthorized bulk removal of Worcester Mag from any public location, or any other tampering with Worcester Mag’s distribution including unauthorized inserts, is a criminal offense and may be prosecuted under the law. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $47 for one year, third class mail. First class mail, $125 for one year. Send orders and subscription correspondence to Worcester Mag, 101 Water St., Worcester, MA 01604. ADVERTISING: To place an order for display advertising or to inquire, please call 508.749.3166. Worcester Mag (ISSN 0191-4960) is a weekly publication of The Holden Landmark Corporation. All contents copyright 2011 by The Holden Landmark Corporation. All rights reserved. Worcester Mag is not liable for typographical errors in advertisements.

EDITORIAL: 508.749.3166 SALES: 508.749.3166 E-MAIL: editor@worcestermag.com Worcester Mag, 101 Water St. Worcester, MA 01604 worcestermag.com ERB PHOTOGRAPHY

inside stories Krave is our way of tempting you with the delectable side of Worcester. In this issue we are putting the spotlight on Worcester’s burgeoning dining scene – through both the food and those who inspire menus throughout the city. Here you’ll find a resourceful look at comfort foods throughout the area, a new way to think about breakfast and profiles of seven of our city’s finest chefs – and trust me, narrowing down that giant list to only seven was tough. Plus, you’ll find an interview with Worcester’s own Scott Erb and Donna Dufault of Erb Photography – who are renowned for their drool inducing photos of food. We hope to ignite your taste buds through our issue of Krave, and hope you close our pages with a newfound respect for Worcester’s dining scene.

4 6 8 9 9 9 13 31

City Desk 1,001 Words Worcesteria Rosen Report Letters People on the Street Krave Night & Day

35 36 38 40 45 54

Film Eat Beat Weekly Picks Venues/Clubs Classifieds 2 minutes with…

ABOUT THE COVER Photo by Erb Photography Design by Kimberly Vasseur

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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WOO-TOWN INDE X

A weekly quality of life check-in of Worcester

{ citydesk }

September 29 - October 5, 2011 â– Volume 37, Number 4

For the children Should 17 year olds be able to vote in local elections? Jeremy Shulkin President Barack Obama cites Worcester’s University Park Campus School as a national model and uses it as an example of how No Child Left Behind punishes good schools. Other than mislabeling it a charter school, we give him an A on this one. +3

A

fter a Worcester preliminary election that saw only 8.69 percent of the city’s 95,000 registered voters make their way to a polling place, a proposal has been submitted to the Worcester City Council that would ask for a November MCAS results show most level IV schools hold the line, a relief for the state, nonbinding referendum on whether which ďŹ lled up its turnaround school plate or not 17-yearold “American last year. +1 citizens who This week in crime: alleged criminal are residents leads police on dangerous car chase in the city of through city streets, ending with police Worcesterâ€? shooting him in the chest (he survived); should be 19 year old arrested on drug-trafďŹ cking allowed to vote charges. -4 in elections for City Council Fire burns three-story building and School on Vernon Street, injuring none but Committee. Those displacing 10. -2 rights would not be extended Worcester Housing Authority wants all tenants to have a job or be in school to statewide or in an effort to pare down their waiting list federal races. and encourage chronic public-housing The charter families to move out. As they wait for change question permission from the feds, it’s too early comes via to tell if it’s an innovative solution that mayoral and atbeneďŹ ts all, or a way to pass on the large candidate problem. 0 William “Billâ€? Coleman. It’s Wings of Freedom lands World War his second of the II era planes at Worcester Regional campaign season, after Airport. Not to be upstaged by aircraft half-a-century old, Jet Blue teases that the city council shot down his idea on Worcester’s airport is on their “radarâ€? for September 15, which would have asked ights. +2 voters if they wanted a full charter WPS superintendent Melinda Boone speaks at the Black Families for Education Conference, railing against lowering graduation standards and pointing out the problems with using the court system to teach discipline. +1

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  WORCESTERMAG.COM â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

to be stakeholders in their community,â&#x20AC;? he explains. While this idea is new to Worcester,

itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not new to Massachusetts. Students at Lowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth-oriented United Teen Equality Center (UTEC) have spearheaded a two-year long initiative that has put a bill before the state legislature that would allow the city a binding ballot question on whether or not local 17 year olds can cast ballots in municipal elections. Youth organizer Geoffrey Foster is â&#x20AC;&#x153;cautiously optimisticâ&#x20AC;? about it passing, even though the window of opportunity is quickly closing. All ballot questions have to get through the legislature by Oct. 3, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoping Gov. Deval Patrick will sign off on it by Friday, Sept. 30. Foster says UTEC students have always been politically active, including hosting candidate forums for city council and school committee that are as entertaining as they are informative, and often draw higher turnouts than other debates. The initiative grew out of this about two years ago, after students wanted to be involved even more in the electoral process, especially when it came to electing members to the school committee â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the body that most closely governs their day-to-day lives. Lowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill has made its way through the Election Laws subcommittee to Worcester Representative Vincent Pedoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Committee on Bills in the Third Reading, the last stop before

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Festival of Ale brings more than 20 breweries to the Higgins Armory, Worcester Cinematic shows 11 short ďŹ lms at the Lucky Dog, and Massmouths turns the Sahara into a Worcesterthemed story marathon. +3 This week: +4 Last week: -2 Year to date: +20

review via a nonbinding ballot question. According to Coleman, a number of 16, 17 and 18 year olds work on local campaigns and get â&#x20AC;&#x153;fired up with passionâ&#x20AC;? and want to vote; and giving them that right would be both empowering and encouraging to those who feel left out of the process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want young people

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{ citydesk } Worcester ACLU chapter to see â&#x20AC;&#x153;renewalâ&#x20AC;? Civil-liberties organization staying local Jeremy Shulkin

T

he head of the Massachusetts American Civil Liberties Union, Carol Rose, said this week that the organization will begin its search for a new Worcester County chapter executive director shortly, with the organization â&#x20AC;&#x153;getting ready to postâ&#x20AC;? the job vacancy on its website. This should come as relieving news to those who have followed the Worcester County chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shakeups over the previous few years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; most notably with the July departure of former executive director Ronal Madnick, who served in that capacity since 1981. While Madnick and the state ACLU still wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t outright share what led to Madnickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resignation of the position, both Madnick and Rose seem content with how the arrangement has sorted out since. Madnick is still a member of the ACLUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worcester County chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steering committee, and has the ability to speak freely on civil-rights issues â&#x20AC;&#x201C; something heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken advantage of at two of the three previous City Council meetings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still a member, I still support the organization, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do whatever I can to help the organization, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll encourage others to do so,â&#x20AC;? says Madnick. Madnick is involved in other civilliberties causes too. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a board member of Centro Las Americas and Mass. Citizens Against the Death Penalty, president of the Massachusetts chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, and a director of the Jane Fund of Central Massachusetts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a lot on my plate,â&#x20AC;? he offers. The Worcester chapter will also present Madnick with a Lifetime Achievement Award at its annual dinner on Thursday, Oct. 27. Rose is quick to say that Madnickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s departure wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change the organization

D A M N E D LI E S and STATISTICS

th

7

Worcesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s placement on a Wall Street Journal top-10 list showing the American metro areas with the highest growth in percentage of adults with college degrees. Worcesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree holders grew 5.8 percent in the last decade, beating out Pittsburgh and New York and trailing Boston and Baltimore.

of the Worcester chapter, or shift more oversight to the Boston ofďŹ ce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to see an even stronger presence going forward,â&#x20AC;? offers Rose, calling this a â&#x20AC;&#x153;redoubling of effortsâ&#x20AC;? and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong renewal.â&#x20AC;? The Worcester ofďŹ ce has remained open since July, with all the board members

still in place and the ACLUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ eld director, Whitney Taylor, acting as interim executive director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re fully committed to having a strong presence across Massachusetts and in Worcester,â&#x20AC;? because of the large population in Worcester County. She says the top issues for the area will

revolve around police accountability, over-incarceration, secret surveillance, technology infringing on liberties, and public-records reform â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as exempliďŹ ed in the Telegram & Gazetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal battle with the city and Worcester Police Department over terminated ofďŹ cer Mark Rojasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records.

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E B O T T ERE? N A W EN H SE

Contact jshone@worcestermag.com

{ citydesk }

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There are few places on earth where my children are happier than the Higgins Armory.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser, author of the best-seller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Triumph of the City,â&#x20AC;? at a Research Bureau-organized lecture at Assumption College.

1,001 words

After Worcester city councilors Kate Toomey and Michael Germain expressed interest in the idea, ďŹ&#x201A;oor debate ended without a vote when Councilor Paul Clancy held discussion on the item. As Tuesday was the last day questions could be added to the local November ballot, Colemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initiative will not appear on it. After the meeting Clancy called this â&#x20AC;&#x153;the last minuteâ&#x20AC;? and said the council would have to vote on something with little information, and wondered why it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t brought to the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention sooner.

V E R BATI M

By Steven King

going up to a vote in front of the entire House. The UTEC teens and Coleman have an ally in Peter Levine, director of the Tufts University-afďŹ liated Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE). Levine testiďŹ ed on their behalf in front of the House elections subcommittee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;18 is a terrible year to start voting,â&#x20AC;? he says, noting that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same year that ďŹ rst year voters move out of their communities to live in other communities where 18 year-olds generally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t vote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would make sense that if they would get into the habit when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 17 theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more likely to do it when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 18.â&#x20AC;? He says evidence has shown 17 year olds are as apt at making voting decisions as those who are older, and would encourage more civics and engagement lessons in schools. Levine believes these changes would set a precedent for the rest of the country, but notes that Iowa allows 17 year olds to vote in presidential caucuses as long as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll turn 18 before election day. Candidate Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team made a huge push in high schools, which led to him capturing Iowa in January 2008. Levine notes those seeking the Republican nomination this year would be wise to do the same. Pedone says despite the idea coming out of the subcommittee with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;favorable report,â&#x20AC;? some concerns have arisen from the Secretary of State and city and town ofďŹ cials. More research is needed, he says, particularly because lowering the voting age would also lower the age in which someone could run for ofďŹ ce from 18 to 17 and create and â&#x20AC;&#x153;administrative nightmareâ&#x20AC;? for municipal clerks who would have to keep two different voter rolls, one for state and federal elections and one for local voting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are legal questions, constitutional questions that need to be answered,â&#x20AC;? Pedone cautions. With reports still needed from the Secretary of Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not optimistic his ofďŹ ce will receive all the necessary information to make a decision before the October 3 deadline.

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{ worcesteria } MAYORAL RACE STAYS AT FOUR, JUST NOT THE FOUR YOU EXPECTED: Phone

calls flew back and forth between city hall, city councilors, union heads and some higher-up political offices (ones with familiar Irish last names) on Tuesday over whose names would appear on the November ballot for mayor. In what one observer called a “pissing contest,” political factions throughout the city discussed the implication of splitting votes between Mike Germain and Joe Petty and how that would play to Konnie Lukes’ favor. At the end of the day – the final day for at-large candidates to declare their intention to run only for council and not for mayor – Germain withdrew. “It’s not the right time,” he said Tuesday night, but added “the time is going to come.”…In a surprise to politicians and election watchers, candidate Carmen Carmona left her name on the list as a mayoral candidate as well. Despite a somewhat under-the-radar campaign, Carmona hung with Kate Toomey, Lukes and Joe O’Brien in six of the 10 precincts in innercity wards 8 and 10 but finished 11th out of 14 citywide. Reached Wednesday morning, Carmona called her decision to run for mayor “recent” – as in she decided to leave her name on the list on Tuesday.

Jeremy Shulkin

BEHIND THE SCENES:

Guy Glodis’ post-electedoffice career now includes a stint as a political operative, as the former state senator and sheriff has found himself helping out the Stephen Buchalter and George Russell campaigns for city council. Glodis said that he’s “indebted to both of them” for their support during his campaigning days. As for his take on how the campaigns are going: “I don’t want to read too much into the preliminary numbers.”

COMING SOON TO A $500 MILLION DEVELOPMENT NEAR YOU: Wondering how an

insurance agency moving just a few blocks and a proposed cancer center will attract hoards of afterwork crowds to downtown’s CitySquare? The city hears your concern. According to a short exchange Tuesday night between City Councilor Rick Rushton and City Manager Michael O’Brien, within the next 60 days city councilors will be notified of potential investment in the project by a residential developer and a “full-service hotel.”…The tone of that conversation changed a shade when Rushton asked a follow up—“Is the chiller coming this year?”—in reference to the missing piece that has kept the common’s ice-skating rink from, well, being an iceskating rink. “I’m just hoping at some point we’re going to see some skating at city hall,” he added, still believing “it’s a good idea.” O’Brien said he’d transmit new city-common developments in the form of a report.

WORCESTER GOP GOING STATEWIDE?: A State House News Service article

last week mentioned that Worcester-area Republicans Peter Blute, Brent Andersen and Karyn Polito are all interested in or have been approached about the soon-to-bevacant MassGOP chairmanship. Jennifer Nassour, the current head of the party, will step down in October to have her third child. Last January, Worcesterite Bill McCarthy ran against her for the post, losing by a vote of 50 to 16.

WHOSE HOUSE? ABBY’S HOUSE: Worcester abolitionist Abby Kelley Foster will get some well-deserved recognition this week when she’ll be inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame along with Coretta Scott King, Billie Holiday and eight others in Seneca Falls, N.Y. Local actress starring in the one-woman show “Yours for Humanity – Abby” and Worcester Women’s History Project member Lynne McKenney Lydick will pick up the award dressed up as Foster and address the crowd with words pieced together from her letters and speeches. DOWN DOWNING STREET: The traffic study asked for by community residents to measure the impacts of closing Downing Street for a Clark University pedestrian plaza has been erected, which means the cut through between Main and Park is closed to traffic. So far, the study has proven one long-held hypothesis: college students still carry the “Jackass” gene. Witness accounts detail students pushing each other down the Downing Street in shopping carts. Remember kids, if it’s not on YouTube, it didn’t happen. Got a tip? Send it to jshulkin@worcestermag.com or call 749-3166, x243. Follow Jeremy Shulkin on Twitter @JeremyShulkin and find more news items at worcestermag.com/blogs/dailyworcesteria.


The Rosen

Report

Worcester voters have spoken in a whisper

Gary Rosen

N

inety-one percent of Worcester’s registered voters did not participate in last week’s preliminary election. That’s an insult to the candidates, and it’s also an indication that too many adults missed out on civics education in school. That the incumbents were the first six finishers in the preliminary was no surprise. In previous columns, I criticized the challengers for a lack of visibility, not raising issues and failing to engage the voters. Konnie Lukes was the biggest winner in the atlarge race. In 2009, after serving three years as mayor, Lukes lost all 50 precincts to Joe O’Brien, and she also finished a distant fifth for council. Her strong second-place finish last week (a few votes behind popular Kate Toomey) indicates that the voters once again are open to electing Lukes the contrarian as mayor and school-committee chair. But some powerful people and their supporters will do whatever it takes to prevent that from happening. With Joe O’Brien out of the mayor’s race, at-large councilor Rick Rushton (who narrowly lost to Lukes in 2007), was the first mayoral choice of the liberal McGovern, Murray and O’Brien political machine. However, Rushton, who finished sixth last week declined their offer, so the machine recruited its second choice, at-large councilor Joe Petty. Petty, who finished a respectable fourth in the preliminary, is a consensus builder but, by his own admission, lacks charisma. His last two campaign slogans were The Quiet Man and Just an Average Joe. Petty will try to paint Lukes as a divider who is too cozy with the local Tea Party. And he’ll criticize her for following the city charter and being a ceremonial mayor. Lukes will accuse Petty of being a puppet of the aforementioned political machine, and she’ll say that his job in Boston will make him

Letters For better or worse

In the Sep 15th issue, Mary Reynolds wrote in to state that you were contributing to the “dumbing down of America” by printing a couple naughty words in your “People on the Street” segment in the previous issue. I disagree. You were simply doing your job. Wardell Washington was asked his opinion on a subject, and you printed his answer. I actually applaud you for not censoring or omitting his response. For better or for worse, certain words have moved into our vernacular, and whining about it won’t change that. I believe that these words only have an impact because we let them. In fact, maybe hearing more of them would rob them of their power. Honestly, what is the point of being offended by words in the first place? Sincerely, NATE GOR C Z Y N S K I Dudley

Fresh Air Fund

an ineffective mayor in Worcester. Where some at-large challengers finished surprised a lot of people. Mike Monfredo, a former assistant city clerk, unexpectedly came in seventh. He recently sued the city for improperly eliminating his position and laying him off. The electoral success of the likable Monfredo showed that holding one’s campaign sign at key intersections is much more effective for an at-large candidate than door knocking. The strong eighth-place finish of Bill Coleman has him well-positioned for the November election. But to crack the top six, he needs to recruit some volunteers and raise some money. And Coleman’s run for mayor is ill-advised. He risks losing many at-large votes from the people who will be supporting Lukes or Petty for mayor. Three challengers had disappointing preliminary finishes. Business owner Steve Buchalter, who just missed being elected to the council in 2009, finished in ninth place while politically well-connected Jim Kersten finished tenth. Their campaigns were too low profile. Even with November’s expected 20 percent voter turnout, it will be difficult for either of the two to recover. The last place finish of Clark University senior, Devin Coleman, was unexpected. He brought youth, enthusiasm and energy to an otherwise listless atlarge campaign. While canvassing my neighborhood a few days after the preliminary, Coleman stopped by my house. He believes that the incumbents are vulnerable on some issues, and he expects to be much more vocal and aggressive in the next few weeks. On November 8, the at-large and four competitive district races will bring out special-interest groups such as the municipal labor unions, retirees, Stand for Children, Neighbor to Neighbor and the local Tea Party. But our voices can be much louder than theirs if we turn out in droves on Election Day. Let’s do it! just how special summer is in Southern Massachusetts. Fresh Air Fund hosts, volunteers and local supporters dedicated their time and efforts to help these inner-city youngsters experience simple summertime pleasures, including afternoons of swimming, fishing at sunset and roasting s’mores over a campfire. None of this would be possible without Victoria CoxLanyon, your local Fresh Air Fund volunteer leader, who works throughout the year to make sure host families and children have the opportunity to enjoy memorable summertime experiences together. I invite you to join Victoria Cox-Lanyon and the local Fresh Air Fund committee to help spread the word about the wonderful opportunity of hosting next summer. The Fresh Air Fund, an independent, not-for-profit agency, has provided free summer vacations to over 1.7 million New York City children from low-income communities since 1877. For more information on how you can help to continue this wonderful tradition of volunteering, please call Victoria Cox-Lanyon at 508-4761194 or visit www.freshair.org. Sincerely, J EN NY M OR G E N T H A U Executive Director

commentary | opinions

slants rants& ON THE

EOPLE STREET When you go out to eat, what’s your standby dish? AS K E D O N M A I N ST R E E T

Italian food. Anything with pasta and sauce.

Marc LeBlanc WINCHENDON

A nice filet mignon with a baked potato and maybe a green salad.

Earl Philbrook WORCESTER

A nice beef… well done.

James Kamau WORCESTER

Chips and salsa, I love it with margaritas.

Vicki Cabezas WORCESTER

Chicken broccoli ziti, it’s delicious.

Adam Teixeira BOSTON

PHOTOS BY STEVEN KING

Tell us how you really feel Letters to the editor should be legible, signed and brief (preferably no more than 200 words). A daytime telephone number must be provided for verification. Worccester Mag reserves the right to edit letters for length, clarity, libelous or offensive material and style. Send letters to: Letters, Worcester Mag, 101 Water St., Worcester, MA 01604 or E-mail: editor@worcestermag.com, or fax: 508-749-3165

This year, 111 New York City children found out once again SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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ERB PHOTOGRAPHY

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Krave is made to order this year. With a yearning to know more about Worcester’s culinary culture, we dug deep into the urban food scene with a focus on local cuisine for this annual issue. As you peruse these pages, you’ll discover the many faces and talents responsible for putting Worcester on the food radar for so many — both locally and nationally — in recent years. So read on, raise a glass and be proud. Sláinte!

Chef Profiles Paul Booras: Flats .................................................... 12 William Nemeroff: The People’s Kitchen.............. 14 Alec Lopez: Armsby Abbey ..................................... 16 Alina Eisenhauer: Sweet ......................................... 18 Wilson Wang: Baba Sushi....................................... 20 Paul Wilson: Pepper’s Fine Food Catering ........... 22 Steve Champagne: Mezcal ..................................... 24 One pancake to rule them all............................................. 15 The many facets of comfort food ..................................... 21 Behind the lens of Erb Photography................................. 26

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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PHOTOS/STEVEN KING

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Paul Booras Flats

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12

Paul Booras has tapped into Central Massachusetts’ growing passion for local, sustainable foods with the creative offerings at Flats. In a short time, Booras has gained a loyal following and also connected at the community level through involvement in farmers’ markets, stART on the Street, and the Worcester Green Jobs Coalition. How did you wind up in the restaurant business? Some kids cuts lawns, others paint houses...I started washing dishes. My father dropped me off at a local restaurant the summer I turned 13, after I told him I didn’t want to work with him anymore because I wanted to make money. I think he was ripped at me. I walked in the back door, asked the chef if he needed help, and he pointed to the dish pit. I scrubbed pots for 12 hours and walked home at 11:30 p.m. My parents were worried sick about me—meanwhile, I felt like I had made a stand. I stayed there for over a year and rose through the ranks—I guess I got the kitchen bug there. It’s not very glamorous, like TV makes it seem nowadays. You have to love it. What’s the toughest part of being a chef? We live in a universe parallel to our non-food service friends and family members. Chefs tend to socialize with one another because of the long, late hours. The lifestyle makes it difficult to conform to normal, civilized folks: working nights and weekends, having split days off and holidays on. We are often misunderstood and judged for our questionable outlets...late night cocktails, gluttony, debauchery. We work hard and play hard. We often find ourselves huddled at a bar stool with others that smell of the craft—charred onions, garlic, fish oils and wood smoke. We tend to be brutally honest; chefs aren’t known for having the best soft skills. Kitchens are unforgiving places and those that succeed develop a thick skin early...but like a well-aged wheel of Parmigiano-Reggiano, if you break the skin, it reveals a complexity and character that’s easily loved, coupled with pockets of sweetness.

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

What’s the most fun part of being a chef? The organized chaos. There’s nothing like working the line on a Saturday night, transforming pristine raw materials into edible art. Some chefs persevere and become great, others crack and crumble. The instant gratification is addictive; every plate is special. Great chefs take their craft very personally. It’s the pleasure of creation—the guest is a focus, but to most chefs is just there for the ride. Why else endure the long hours, burns, scalding steam and oil and substandard compensation? We’re nuts...and we love what we do. We are artisans, martyrs, junkies for gratification. Important to us all is the mutual respect of our brothers and sisters—those with cuts and scars—we are soldiers and our craft develops enduring bonds. This reward is unique. Any new ingredients or techniques you’re especially excited about right now? Smoke, pork fat, and flours made from grains and legumes. I’m sort of old school and never go into molecular food science. I gravitate to old-world flavors and techniques. I’ll choose a campfire over an induction range every time. Food is primal to me. I have been spending free time curing and smoking handmade sausages and hams...maybe psychologically I’m preparing for the winter. I’m in an enduring love affair with pork fat. When you go out to eat someone else’s food, what do you crave? I don’t go out much...when I do it’s all about the company. I always get the new server or the wobbly table. My days off are generally shared by the chef whose restaurant I am patronizing, so I have been conditioned not to expect much. Honestly, I’d rather spend the money on raw ingredients and have people come to my house. Sometimes I want to enjoy their company, other times I want to enjoy my craft—just cook from the heart. That’s my escape...the friends are there to help relish in the excess. What three things are always in your refrigerator at home? Whole-grain mustard, organic eggs, and Sambal Oelek. Flats Organic Pizza, 75 Maywood St., Worcester, 508-752-1701, flatsrestaurant.com — Marc Cochon


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William Nemeroff The People’s Kitchen 14

PHOTOS/STEVEN KING

chefprofile }

As a chef, William Nemeroff sees it as his job to not only provide honest crowd favorites and comfort food, but also to inspire and educate the guests that come to the People’s Kitchen, located on the second floor of 1 Exchange Place in Worcester. “It has been a pleasure seeing the response to our style of food,” Nemeroff remarks, noting that the recent growth in artisan restaurants in Worcester causes all of the other chefs and restaurants to “work harder and get more creative.” If there is one thing that The People’s Kitchen has become known for, it is for its creativity with an ever-changing menu. Consistent with each menu is a collection of cheeses and charcuterie that the chef chooses each week. “We always select a soft, semi-soft, semi-hard, hard and a bleu (…) as well as three charcuterie items.” Creativity is not limited only to the cheeses and meats, as Nemeroff notes that a request on the restaurant’s Facebook page for “chicken-fried hamburger with Latin sauce,” became a challenging, but delicious “chicken-fried steak with a spicy tequila mojo.” With items like this, some diners may have a difficult time choosing, so the chef recommends a special selection on the chef’s board, which includes all of the cheese and charcuterie items from a particular week as well as fresh bread. Coming up, the People’s Kitchen is featuring Salametto, “a dried pork salami from the famed producer Fra Mani in California,” a house-made beef-and-ginger sausage, and Serrano ham from Spain. While the People’s Kitchen brings in the finest meats from around the world, the restaurant also has a local and homegrown focus, which Nemeroff admits can be a challenge. “It has been a struggle to serve local produce and meats. It seems the producers only have a limited supply.” Despite the challenge, he adds that “this benefits us because our menu changes weekly. We can bring in just enough to serve for the four days the menu runs.” The difficulty, though, is worth it, as “the

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

difference is amazing; you can taste the freshness and the care in which the farmers take in the growing of their product.” By only selecting growers and farmers who have the same integrity that he has, as a chef, Nemeroff finds the relationship between growers, like Schultz Farm in Rutland, and the restaurant to be a symbiotic one, as “they appreciate the care and respect that we give their product as well.” Even with an ever-changing menu and the most fresh, local produce, the People’s Kitchen still has to differentiate itself from other restaurants in the city. Nemeroff thinks that this differentiation comes with its beef claiming that he “doesn’t think you can get a true 21-day dry-aged strip loin steak for $27,” other than at The People’s Kitchen. The People’s Kitchen also takes a head-to-toe approach with its meat, wasting as little as possible, noting that a lot of the sausages and cured items are made in-house. While the hand-selected beef is outstanding, he affirms that even with the cycling menu at The People’s Kitchen, “we do always find a place for the crowd favorites, like chop suey and pub-style fried calamari with fried pickles and house-made ranch,” which will be featured on the menu. With creative and exciting new dishes appearing next to favorite old-standbys, the chef says that “it is a pleasure seeing the response to our style of food.” While he adds that he sees the Worcester dining scene as a work in progress, it is without a doubt that The People’s Kitchen and Nemeroff are moving Worcester in the right direction. The People’s Kitchen, 1 Exchange Place in Worcester, 1nichexchange.com/the-peoples-kitchen.

— Michael Murray


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pancakes! }

ONE PANCAKE TO RULE THEM ALL T

If you still doubt its importance, take note that the pancake appears in not one, but two Shakespearean plays. So it comes as little surprise that the City of Worcester features a compelling array of pancakes, unique in their own special ways. While few pancakes could hold their batter to those made by my mother, I nevertheless set out upon Worcester—this city of hills—to find one pancake that would rule them all. The Country Kettle, just minutes from Worcester in West Boylston, sits appropriately next to a major fork of Routes 12, 140, and 110. Channeling the “forkiness” of its location, The Kettle serves up some of the most original and delicious breakfast dishes this side of I-495. While its specials menu changes every few months, a tantalizing S’mores Pancake had been calling out to me on nearly

Mike Murray

he clearest way to tell how important something is to a culture is to count the number of words that exist to describe it. Without a doubt, the thing that has more names than almost any other food is, fittingly, the pancake. In English, we have the flapjack, griddlecake, johnnycake, the hotcake, and many more regional favorites; the French have their crêpes, Indian cuisine has poodas, pajeon in Korea, Eastern Europe has pala-inke, and there are so many variations in every culture and cuisine that the pancake is obviously one of our most beloved treasures.

continued on page 17

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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Alec Lopez Armsby Abbey

chefprofile }

PHOTOS/STEVEN KING

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While passively listening to news radio or reading the newspaper throughout the last several years, it is impossible to avoid the incessant chatter about business and profits. Every political debate, from Worcester City Council to a national presidential primary has some mention of profits, jobs and executive compensation. It is refreshing, then, to talk to Alec Lopez, one of the proprietors of Armsby Abbey, and have him tell you that “this isn’t about business or profits, it’s about passion.” Passion is what has typified Armsby Abbey since opening three years ago on 144 North Main Street in Worcester. The restaurant and bar has not only won Best Beer Selection accolades three years in a row from Worcester Magazine, but also carries some heavy national gravitas as well: Ratebeer.com ranks the Abbey as one of the top-20 bars in the world; famed beer author Andy Crouch mentions Armsby in his latest book “Great American Craft Beer: A Guide to the Nation’s Finest Beers & Breweries,” and Wine Enthusiast magazine lists Armsby Abbey first in its collection of “beer trailblazers.” While the worldwide acclaim speaks for itself, we wanted to get the first-hand scoop from Lopez on what sets Armsby Abbey apart, and Lopez affirms that it all begins with beer. “Pairing beer with food is one of our specialties, and we’ve been doing it since we opened. We actually incorporate beer into the cuisine at every opportunity be it soups, sauces, braises and dressings.” Casual fans of beer may be daunted by a list of 20-something ever-changing taps and hundreds of bottles, so when asking Lopez what he feels is an essential pairing, he replied that “one of my all-time favorite pairings is fresh tomato and a bright, fresh IPA or wet, hopped lager. If you look at any of our menus there is a recommended beer pairing under each item,” affirming that “we take this very seriously.” While Armsby has made a name for itself with the best beer selection in the region, it has also cut out a niche as one of the first

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

restaurants in the area to strive to have a menu featuring locally grown and raised foods. On the importance of locally grown and raised foods, Lopez says that this is “the only sustainable model,” adding that their “goal is for you to know where every last bite you’re eating comes from and to take comfort that it was raised with great care.” When asked if he thinks that this trend is catching on around the city, Lopez says that the scene is improving, but that “[Worcester] still has a long way to go.” Alec recognizes that Worcester has plenty of options, but that the quality of a dining scene should not merely be about options, but rather, about quality options, of which he thinks Worcester only has a few. While his outlook is wavering now, he still has great hope for the future, noting that one area in need of dire improvement in the city is in mobile food. “The most painful part about our dining scene in my opinion is the lack of a mobile food culture. I travel extensively and see this exploding all over the U.S., but here in Worcester we have the most asinine regulations on food vendors.” Lopez doesn’t squarely place blame solely with city regulations or restaurant owners, but also with the diners themselves. With the same passion that is the hallmark of Armsby Abbey, Lopez challenges Worcester-area diners: “We’re eating dangerous, mass-produced, chemically and genetically altered food”; it is time to “demand to know where your food is coming from and be prepared to pay for it!” The Armsby Abbey, 144 Main St., Worcester, 508.795.1012, armsbyabbey.com — Michael Murray


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every visit. Admittedly, the s’more is not this food enthusiast’s favorite sweet treat due in no small part to a long-harbored resentment against marshmallows, based on their awkward spelling (“-mallow” seriously?). Regardless, my s’mores pancakes arrived: two large, piping-hot pancakes with drizzled chocolate, topped with mini marshmallows, sprinkled with cinnamon & sugar, served with syrup and butter. At first glance, I thought that these were merely normal pancakes with unique toppings, but upon tearing into the treat, I found that the marshmallows were baked directly into the batter, making a gooey, gloopy, and delicious mess. The slight hint of graham cracker complemented and mellowed the overwhelming marshmallow, but the rich drizzled chocolate helped bring the meal together. Admittedly, pancakes of marshmallow, sweet chocolate, with butter and syrup proved to be a little too much, which my server reminded me is generally the case, but the Country Kettle’s excellent brewed coffee helped wash it all down. While I would probably not eat this treat often, it was a great diversion from the pancake norm. Food challenges and eating challenges have received a lot of press lately, and

pancakes! }

Worcester has heeded their popularity, with several restaurants offering prizes for finishing some of their most remarkable meals. One restaurant on that list in Jan’s Kitchen on 580 West Boylston St. in Worcester, set back from the road in a small strip-mall. This unassuming counter-only diner serves up delicious breakfast sandwiches and outstanding omelets, but has made a name for itself by serving something that looms large in the Worcester breakfast world: a 13-inch, dinner-plate sized giant pancake. The walls in Jan’s are scattered with photos of those who have both survived the pancake challenge and those who had seen better pancake eating days. I approached the 13-inch pancake with some trepidation, incorrectly assuming that the size of the pancake made up for a disappointing taste or quality. Thankfully, I was wrong, as Jan’s 13-incher is fluffy and hot all the way through, even in center, which could probably be measured at over an inch of thickness. Served with plenty of butter and maple syrup, the pancake is a mouthful, but finishing this behemoth immortalizes Worcester diners on Jan’s Wall of Fame. While my strategy of eating from the inside to the edges was continued on page 19

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305 SHREWSBURY ST., WORCESTER 508.373.2248 SWEETWORCESTER.COM

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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Alina Eisenhauer Sweet

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Sweet, 305 Shrewsbury St., Worcester, 508-373-2248, sweetworcester.com. — Taylor Nunez

PHOTOS/STEVEN KING

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If you are a dessert enthusiast or pastry fiend living in the Worcester area, it is likely you are familiar with the exquisite and critically acclaimed dessert bar, Sweet, located on Shrewsbury Street. While acquainted with the tasty treats at Sweet, maybe you are unfamiliar with the woman behind the operation? If so, let me introduce you to Alina Eisenhauer. A Great Barrington native, Eisenhauer grew up watching her mother cook, developing and nurturing her love for the craft. Despite her passion for culinary, when it was time for college Eisenhauer opted not to go to school to become a chef, but instead headed to Fitchburg State College, where she studied for a career in television. Although Eisenhauer admits that she’s always had an obsession with cooking, she says she feared what studying at a culinary school would do for her infatuation with it. Having worked in restaurants since a teen, Eisenhauer was well aware of the anxiety and trials. “I loved to cook ever since I was little, but it was my stress relief, and it was fun,” explains Eisenhauer, while pointing out that, in those days, careers in cooking weren’t portrayed as they have been today. “At that time, pastry schools weren’t as common and being a chef wasn’t what it is now. It wasn’t this great job. People didn’t look up to you.” During college, Eisenhauer discovered more talents and fascinations. For example, a career in fitness was sparked with an internship position at Fitcorp, a leading chain of fitness centers in Boston. Eisenhauer made the move from Fitchburg State to Northeastern University in Boston to study physiology. She garnered much success in the fitness realm, competing in pageants like Miss Fitness America, Miss Fitness USA and the Miss Galaxy pageant. Despite her hard work and achievements in this area, Eisenhauer found that she was still drawn to cooking. In the end, the lure of the kitchen won her over; she created an entrepreneurial role that lifted her culinary love to a professional level, and Sweet was born. Since opening Sweet, Eisenhauer has become a famous figure in the food world, appearing on Food Network shows “Chopped” and “Cupcake Wars” in addition to doing a demo video with chef extraordinaire Bobby Flay for Hellman’s Holiday Recipes. Most recently, Eisenhauer competed on Food Network’s “Sweet Genius” this past Thursday, a show all about dessert challenges. There are many ways that Sweet separates itself from surrounding eateries, but one big way is Eisenhauer’s commitment to the farm- to-table movement. Living in the Berkshires from the age of 12 on, Eisenhauer grew up with the idea that food should be fresh, not processed. “I think that is huge,” she explains. “It’s about eating real food.” Professionally and personally, Eisenhauer promotes the benefits of the lifestyle. “Farm to table is the best thing you can do. It tastes better, 100 percent. The sooner your food gets to you from your source, the better it tastes.” Eisenhauer says the farm-to-table movement is also embraced by some of her peers in the Worcester dining scene, but she recognizes that it may be a slow process for the community to see the benefits of farm-to-table cuisine. “Some people will only understand it because they come into our restaurant and they think the food is really great.” Though Eisenhauer prides herself on buying local and fresh, she chooses quality above everything else. Since “Cupcake Wars” business has been booming for the Sweet staff, this winter, Eisenhauer hopes to make sure she has a ready staff able to handle it all. All staff members at Sweet are educated on the farm-to-table ideology to wholly understand its importance in the Sweet philosophy of baking and business. For a mom and wife, Eisenhauer keeps herself busy but never loses focus for her passion. Where does she get her drive? “I do not do anything halfway. I am harder on myself than anyone else,” Eisenhauer admits. And with success like hers, it’s obvious her hard work is paying off. If you haven’t experienced Sweet for yourself, be sure to stop by for a taste.

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011


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partially successful, on this particular day, I was bested by the gargantuan flapjack. I was without worry, though, because my Worcester pancake adventure required one more stop. Worcester’s Kenmore Diner stands in the shadow of both past and present. Diners are constantly reminded by the idle buzz that there is a hulking six-lane highway looming ominously over the small restaurant. But, more importantly, is the shadow of a tragic recent history, as photos line the walls of the Kenmore from what it looked like before December 3, 1999, when the Worcester Cold Storage Building fire claimed the lives of six local heroes. While few minds were on pancakes on the days following the fire, the official re-opening of the Kenmore three months later attempted to mark at least some return to normalcy for Worcester residents. The Kenmore serves two stacks of pancakes, a typical order of three buttermilk pancakes, but also a stack of three blueberry pancakes for a little more than $5. After gorging myself silly on the chocolaty-marshmallowy-pancakes from the Country Kettle and the largest pancake I had ever eaten from Jan’s Kitchen, I was eager to switch to a more health-

pancakes! }

conscious alternative, and the Kenmore’s blueberry pancakes come packed with more than a day’s serving of mini blueberries. While the nutritional value of the pancake is hotly debated, there is still no argument over the deliciousness of a well adorned fruit-filled pancake, topped with more butter than I could handle. The Kenmore’s pancakes are not award-winning, and they did have some trouble staying together when skewered with utensils, but there is something uniquely Worcester to any dish served at the Kenmore: it makes you feel as though you’ve tapped a vein into the history of the city—although, I will relent, that feeling could have also been my veins and arteries begging me to stop eating so many pancakes. After several days of syrup, butter, batter and pancakey goodness, my odyssey came to an end. Worcester is packed with diners, nooks and breakfast spots, so it would be a disservice to the jack flappers around this proud city to pick only one top pancake. If you have a favorite pancake in Worcester, drop us a line or leave a comment on WorcesterMag.com.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US BEST OF WORCESTER IN 2009, 2010 & 2011 — THREE YEARS AND 31 WINS! ALSO VOTED #5 Best Place in the World to Have a Pint by Beer Advocate. Top 25 Greatest American Beer Bars by Andy Crouch. Top 50 Best Beer Bars in the World by Ratebeer.com.

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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th ORCESTER W 35 Anniversary Issue! COMING SOON... { news | arts | dining | nightlife

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For more information, contact your advertising representative: 508-749-3166 • w w w.wo r c e s t e r m a g .c o m • s a l e s @ wo r c e s t e r m a g .c o m

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Wilson Wang Baba

chefprofile }

Wilson Wang’s work at Baba has attracted considerable acclaim, including four WBC Best Chef awards and four consecutive Worcester Mag Best of Worcester Awards. Wilson shared some thoughts with his characteristic enthusiasm and good humor. How did you wind up in the restaurant business? I studied computer science in China, and came to the United States to get into IT. But I got a restaurant job in Framingham and fell in love with it – especially with sushi. I had the chance to study under master sushi chef Ting San at Oishii in Chestnut Hill. He taught me technique, but also how to treat people, how to be honest. I started my own place in Worcester since there wasn’t much sushi here then. I wanted to offer something different, with influences not just from Boston, but also Shanghai, Tokyo and New York. The sushi scene here is a lot better now, I think – better technique, better ingredients. I’ve been here for more than 10 years now. I love Worcester a lot; Worcester changed my life, gave me success. And it’s hard to be successful here – I’ve seen a lot of tears, a lot of failed businesses. But Worcester still has room for innovation – who will be next? What’s the toughest part of being a chef? Food knowledge. You need to know a lot to keep customers happy – a lot of chemistry. Also, you’ve got to understand U.S. culture to succeed here. This is not 100 percent Japanese sushi – that wouldn’t work here. You need to know how American customers will like it: fresh fish, a lot of fish with less rice. Presentation is important –but the most important thing is the taste. Tuna needs to taste like tuna. Salmon needs to taste like salmon.

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

We get our fish fresh from Boston every morning. Quality, quality, quality. Everything must be clean, clean, clean! And it’s all about friendship, friendship, friendship. You go to the sushi chef you trust. It’s raw! You are fighting bacteria. Trust is important. What’s the most fun part of being a chef? When a customer says something was delicious, I feel great. You’ve got to enjoy the process. Doing a perfect job at anything is hard. For me, seeing an empty plate come back is what being a professional chef is all about. Food is an important part of the economy. It’s part of being human. What advice would you give to a young chef just starting out? First, you’ve got to love being a chef. You need passion. If you don’t love it, don’t do it! Second, you need to focus. Focus on what you want to be good at. Learn, learn, learn! There’s lots of room to grow. Worcester needs serious noodles and dumplings. It needs shabu-shabu. It needs authentic Szechuan. There’s so much room! And remember—to be a chef is to be a performer, an entertainer. When you go out to eat someone else’s food, what do you crave? Everything! I go to Bocado, to Mezcal, to Ceres. There are lots of good places to eat in Worcester. I learn when I eat at these places. Also, I watch The Food Channel, and get ideas from that. Everyone in the industry should watch this channel. Chef Morimoto and Chef Sakai are my favorites. These are the ones I want to learn from. You can learn a lot about culture and people through food. What things are always in your refrigerator at home? A lot of fruit, a lot of veggies. Raw fish. Caviar! I love a couple of slices of bread with caviar. I love a bowl of noodle soup with a glass of wine. Baba Sushi, 309 Park Ave, Worcester, 508-752-8822, babasushi.com

--Marc Cochon


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THE MANY FACETS OF COMFORT FOOD

Trisha J. Wooldridge

C

omfort food is one of those things best defined as, “I know it when I see it.” Or, better yet, “I know it when I taste it.” There are things all comfort foods share: they are deeply satisfying, they are warming, they are simple, and they taste good. After that, though, the idea of comfort food gets a little complex because “comfort” is in the stomach of the eater.

CLASSIC COMFORT

continued on page 23

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For many people, comfort food is the classic American diner experience. Home-cooked mac-and-cheese, meatloaf, spaghetti and meatballs are some of the most popular examples. “Comfort food makes you go, ‘Aaah!’” describes Ann Jenkins, one of the owners of Annie’s Clark Brunch on Main Street, Worcester, who also points out that the comfort experience should start even before you order. “When you walk into [the diner], it should smell great. You get

a ‘hi’ and a smile when you come in the door.” Her favorite is mashed potatoes, which she makes with no animal products so as to serve that comfort food to any patron. Mike Richard, one of the family managers of the Parkway Restaurant and Bar on Shrewsbury Street, defines comfort food as something “people know is fresh, homemade, reasonably priced, and they know exactly what it is — nothing too fancy.” He also says that many familiar Italian dishes, including the diner’s beloved pasta fagioli and chicken parmesan, have become staple “American” comfort foods. “Comfort food is good, solid and fattening,” says Kim Kniskern of Miss Worcester on Southbridge Street, which has been cited as the number-one diner in the country and featured on The Learning Channel and Food Network. “It makes you feel full, and you enjoy eating it.” She also points out that breakfast foods are an important part of the comfort cuisine,

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Paul Wilson Pepper’s Fine Food Catering

chefprofile }

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

When Pepper’s catering chef Paul Wilson is asked to describe his career, he says simply: “Really, it’s all I’ve ever done.” The Jaffrey, NH, native learned the craft at a young age watching his father help community organizations put on public breakfasts and similar events. When he was only 13 years old, Wilson’s parents purchased a hotdog stand for him and his brother and sister to run. Wilson fondly remembers the three summers he spent working at the hot-dog stand, calling the experience “a great learning tool,” that taught him and his siblings responsibility, how to deal with the public and how to make change without the help of a register. Despite discovering his passion for cooking early on, as a highschool student, Wilson imagined he would venture off to college to study music—that is until a fate-changing visit with his guidance counselor, where he met a representative from Johnson & Wales University. “Within an hour he had me convinced I should to go

Johnson & Wales,” recalls Wilson, who graduated from the university with a degree in hotel and restaurant management. Wilson is now in the catering business, but he was a successful restaurant owner of the Brass Pineapple in Winchendon for 15 years. Because of this experience, Wilson is able to see the advantages of being a chef for a catering company. “In a restaurant, you prep your whole menu and then you open, unlock the doors and hope that people walk in. In catering, you know well in advance what you’re going to do. We know exactly what we need, how much food we’re ordering and producing, and how much food is going out the door.” It’s that peace of mind that drew Wilson to the catering world, but the chef still faces challenges. “It’s challenging producing the amount of food that has to be produced for, say, 10 different jobs and all different types of menus,” acknowledges Wilson. Unlike a restaurant, Wilson has to prepare food to be properly packed and transferred to a location, whether it’s a person’s garage, back yard or back room in a banquet hall. Wilson’s title extends beyond “chef”: he is an active member of the American Culinary Federation and has served as president of the Massachusetts Culinary Association’s Worcester County Chapter, though it is inactive at the moment. “It’s sad, but there’s nobody else interested in stepping up,” explains Wilson, who expressed disappointment about the lack of involvement, adding that the American Culinary Federation can really better chefs whether it’s with education, certifications or charity work. Wilson has also been a judge for Worcester’s Best Chef competition since its inception and is able to really look at the Worcester dining scene (though he admits, as a busy father to a seven year old, he does not get to dine out as much as he’d like). Wilson is happy to see the Niche Hospitality Group doing something different and unique with its menu items at its restaurants—The Citizen and Mezcal to name a few—because Wilson has found that many restaurants in the area offer the same type of menu options. “It’s almost like because somebody decides a trend is going on, everyone decides they have to do the same thing,” he describes. While some Worcester restaurants are offering similar foods, Wilson has been diversifying and broadening his offerings: Indian food. After serving Indian food at a few weddings, Wilson discovered the entertainment in exploring something new. “It takes a lot of researching and experimenting in the kitchen, playing around with the spices and the heat of different spices. Learning a new food has been fun.” With years of experience (five of them in his current position as chef at Pepper’s Catering), Wilson knows this is what he was meant to do. “I know in one shape, form or another, I will always be in the food service industry,” a fact that will make those who have experienced Wilson’s creations delighted. Peppers Fine Foods Catering, 43 Hudson St. Northborough, 508.393.6844, pepperscatering.com. — Taylor Nunez

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011


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continued from page 21

such as pancakes, omelets and French toast.

COMFORT OF HEALTH

While many people think of calorieand fat-laden deliciousness as comfort food, others want that same experience without the need for plus-size clothing. At the same time, people who require special diets also want to enjoy comfort food. Justin Szostakowski, owner and operator of Isadorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Main Street in Oxford, offers a menu of organic and often vegan-friendly foods to cater to this demographic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soup is a great comfort food,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really simple, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great for when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sick.â&#x20AC;? He also points out that the warming properties of squash and pumpkin make them great comfort foods. For vegetarians, vegans and those on specific menus, like gluten-free or diabetic, comfort foods have a whole other dimension of security. As both chef Steven Jones of Belmont Vegetarian Restaurant on Belmont Street and Elaine Courtney, general manager of Nancy Chang on Chandler Street, point out: There is comfort in knowing what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eating is safe.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;People can come in at night or for lunch to get a plate of their favorite food,â&#x20AC;? says Jones, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and it makes them feel comfortable. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a comfort zone because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of their lifestyle.â&#x20AC;? The barbeque, mac and cheese, and sweet-and-sour pepper steak top the list of the most served foods for Belmont Vegetarian. Courtney adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comfort food makes you feel good all over. Any walk of lifeâ&#x20AC;Ś no matter what health issue someone has, they can get food.â&#x20AC;? While the most popular item she sees ordered is the Chicken Mango dish, she also says that starches, Pad Thai, and fried items are frequent comfort foodsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Nancy Chang prepares them as healthy as possible.

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Steve Champagne Mezcal

chefprofile }

24

PHOTOS/STEVEN KING

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Despite lovingly cooking Sunday breakfast for his parents as a child and making dinners for his high-school sweetheart and future wife, Steve Champagne decided to get a degree in mechanical engineering. Fortunately for Worcester’s Niche Hospitality Group and the fans of its restaurants, Champagne changed focus, followed his passion for food, and attended the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts. His adventure into the sciences, however, benefits his life as an executive chef. “A lot more goes into running a kitchen than people realize,” he explains. He should know; he currently runs Mezcal Tequila Cantina—now with two locations, Bocado, and The People’s Kitchen. “Engineering is a more disciplined field. You have to be organized.” In addition to running the kitchens, Champagne’s experience in science and technology help him engineer better food. “You learn why things happen [when you’re cooking.]” Designing food for the different restaurants is a good marriage between both his passion for food and his organized mind. He carries a notebook everywhere so he can jot down ideas, and then uses those ideas to plan menu items that he later tests in the kitchen. “All chefs read cookbooks, cooking magazines, watch cooking shows, and eat at other restaurants to get new ideas,” he describes. “We write down flavor combinations, like lobster and cheese, or different sauce ideas, and we save them until the right time.” For example, he currently has the combination of mustard-curry oil in his notebook. It travels from page to page because it’s something he wants to explore further; it would be a bold, unusual taste. In fact, bold and unusual tastes are what Champagne loves most and something he features in all of the restaurants. One of his favorite dishes at Bocado, for example, is chicken thighs braised in broth with orange juice, fennel and green olives. “It’s been on the menu since we [opened Bocado.] I like the simplicity of the dish while being complex on the palate.” Besides working as a chef, he gardens, grills, and just adores any food-related activity. His favorite part of his job, however, goes beyond food and into the culture of the kitchen. “I love working with kitchen teams, with people who are proud of the concept and product [in a restaurant]. I’ve worked with guys and girls in a kitchen and developed relationships and deep friendships.” On top of that, he also loves the “immediate satisfaction” of working in a kitchen. “People come in, enjoy the food, and then you go home.” In other jobs, it may take months to see the fruits of a project; in a restaurant, you see the gratitude right away. Related to working with a team, finding the right team to make a restaurant successful is both a challenging and satisfying element of the job, which he favors. “You have to… get a staff that has the passion you have. Kitchens are hard work, so you want people who want to be passionate, who want to excel at what they do,” Champagne explains, noting that the right team includes everyone from kitchen staff to those who bus the tables. The importance of community, culture and teamwork is part of what Champagne admires about being part of the whole Niche Hospitality Group. In addition to being active in community-service projects around Worcester, such as donating meals every Monday for the Hope Lodge, everyone has a “big family life.” Champagne, himself, celebrates 23 years of marriage and two children. He and his wife work off hours in an effort to keep a strong family at the center of their life. “There’s always balance,” he says. Whether it’s science and passion, family and work, bold flavors and traditional menus, or just finding and working with the best staff possible, Steve Champagne indeed, has balance— and it’s served up for any patron who wants to visit a Niche Hospitality restaurant. Mezcal Cantina, 166 Shrewsbury St. Worcester, 508-926-8308, mezcalcantina.com. — Trisha J. Wooldridge

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011


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executive chef for Niche Hospitality Group, which includes Mezcal Tequila Cantina on Shrewsbury Street. “There is a texture, a chew, to burritos, flour tortillas, creamy cheese and guacamole… There’s a richness of it. It’s velvety on the tongue and soothing. You’re satisfied, and it fills you up.” Inocente Soto, owner of Tacos Parrilla Mexicana on Millbury Street, shares another important thing to remember about comfort food. “It depends on the person,” she says, and shares the example about how picante or spice can make a big difference to someone’s comfort level and satisfaction. “I’m from Mexico, and I don’t like a lot of spice, but someone who likes a lot of spice will feel good if they eat a spicy dish. It depends on what they prefer.” Some of the most popular food items at Tacos Parrilla are the authentic tacos, burritos, and pupusas—little pancakes filled with cheese or meat.

COMFORT IN ASIAN COOKING Asian cuisine is not usually the first thing people think of when thinking about “comfort food,” but that perception is changing. “Comfort food is a dish that is traditionally prepared that anchors a nostalgic and sentimental appeal,” explains Enrique Gutierrez of the Ginza Restaurant Group and Tim Lin, the manager at Millbury’s Feng Asian Bistro and Hibachi. “Asian-inspired dishes have long been part of America’s dining experience.” They cite popular dishes, such as General Tso’s

2

Chicken, which has been around since the ’70s in New York, and ramen, “The dish is a staple at college.” In addition to the food, itself, Gutierrez and Lin echo the sentiments of the other “comfort” restaurants: the entire experience—from customer service to developing dishes that customers crave—is what creates the comfort. Another example of Asian comfort food is Vietnamese pho, the hearty soup growing in popularity around Worcester. While more and more people are discovering the cuisine, the pho has always been a comfort staple. “A lot of Vietnamese eat [pho] for breakfast, because it is soothing and warm,” shares Liem Pham, manager of Pho Dakao on Park Avenue. In addition to the soup, bún dishes—vermicelli noodles with meat, salad, and fish sauce—are popular. They fit the bill as comfort food because they are so simple, warming—particularly the soup, offer great flavor, and completely satisfy. Comfort is in the stomach of the eater; comfort food satisfies an individual’s physical need for nourishment, but more so, it provides emotional sustenance. Whether it’s Diner Americana or a more exotic fare, comfort food feeds your heart and soul, as well as your body.

Come Discover...

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comfort }

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photography}

BEHIND THE LENS OF ERB PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS/ STEVEN KING

26

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

Scott Erb and Donna Dufault are not restaurant owners. They don’t work in a local kitchen, create stunning menus or put on chef’s whites – yet they have been instrumental in bringing the Worcester dining scene into the public limelight. They are Erb Photography, whose imagery has showcased the work of area restaurants through billboards, marketing, advertising, menus and more throughout the city. Those delectable and drool-inducing photos are products of a craft that takes years of experience, talent and drive to produce. We took some time in between shutter clicks with the photographic king and queen of Worcester to discover a little about their recent food niche and who the folks are behind the lens.


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When did you come to Worcester – and why?

When did you start your own business as Erb Photography? Donna: In 1998. Scott started it then, but he was mostly assisting other photographers and doing fine-art photography. That was the best way to learn the business. We highly recommend assisting if you want to get into photography. Learning from established photographers was invaluable and you get to learn all the things they don’t teach you in college.

How did your interest in food photography grow?

Donna: Time is the big challenge; we don’t “doctor” the food in any inedible ways. So it’s only unsullied for a short span of time. We need to work fast to make sure we get it while it is fresh and beautiful. Also, there are some food items that aren’t very photogenic or very colorful, such as some soups. It’s our job to find a way to style it in such a way that doesn’t change the integrity of the chef’s presentation, but looks good for the camera too.

Tell us about your Worcester centric work. Donna: We LOVE the Worcester dining scene! We’ve had some of our favorite

What is your most visible piece of work that Worcesterites might recognize? Donna: We have had some of our images on billboards along Rt. 290, so my guess is that many folks have seen those. But if you visit any local restaurant from the Beechwood Hotel to the Broadway Diner you’ll see images we’ve made over the years.

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Donna: Food photography was an accident. We were eating at our favorite sushi place and realized the marketing of that restaurant just did not reflect the high quality of the food we were being served. In fact, the food was outstanding and the marketing was awful, amateurish, and the photos were just snap shots. We talked the owner into letting us shoot three dishes for him, just to show him the difference professional photography can make. When we showed up to do the shoot, he gave us the smallest space down in the basement to do the shots. It almost wasn’t possible, but somehow we managed, through holding lights and a contortionist balancing act. We pulled it off. Out of curiosity, the chefs came down to see what we were doing and they all started smiling and laughing. They were surprised at what we had managed to pull off. They are the ones who got the owner down there to see the images. He was impressed and hired us to come back to do more. Needless to say he gave us the whole restaurant to work in the next time we came back to shoot. He was really, really happy with what we did, and he’s hired us several times over the years to come back and shoot new things for him. About a week after those first shots, an ad agency in Norwood called us asking to see any food work we had done. We showed them the sushi images and they hired us on the spot. The rest fell into place after that. We realized just how much we loved working with these talented chefs. They felt about their food like we felt about our photography. Passionate.

What are the challenges of photographing food?

C hi ne se a nd Asi a n Spe ci a l t i e s

Donna: We came to Worcester 13 years ago. We moved here from Rochester, N.Y. I grew up in Charlton, but went away to college in Rochester and stayed there a few years after college to work. That’s when and where I meet Scott. I came back to the area and specifically to Worcester 13 years ago. I came back here to be near family, but I wanted to be in a city. Scott came along for the ride.

shoots here locally. Clients like Michael Covino at the Niche Group really “get” what we are doing and he lets us “do our thing” creatively. One of our all-time favorite shoots was done at The Peoples Kitchen. They gave us all access to the chefs in the kitchen there for four full hours. What came out of that is the very personal art imagery that adorns the walls at The Peoples Kitchen restaurant, and it’s some of our favorite work of all time. There are really amazing chefs in Worcester, with so much talent. They are gems in this city. The fact that we get to spend time documenting and crafting images for them is such a pleasure.

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Tell us how important it is for restaurants/caterers/ food related businesses to have good, quality photos in their marketing? Scott: We know that having great photos is an enormous way to do justice to the chefs, owners, and staff (anyone who puts their heart into a business), who should understand that it’s an investment and an asset to have beautiful images to be able to show off what they have created. And

continued on page 28

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508-459-4240

www.EVODINING.com 234 Chandler Street • Worcester, MA 01609

Monday (Closed), Tuesday-Thursday (11am-10pm) Friday (11am-11pm), Saturday (8am-11pm) Sunday (8am-10pm) * Kitchen closes 1 hour prior to closing

K{

rave

photography}

continued from page 27

Come In For Octoberfest

EVO-Fest All Month Long Enjoy

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3

reasons to come see for yourself...

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner! EVO Is The Evolution In Dining & Now In Catering! Think Of Us For Your Next Lunch Meeting, Holiday Party or Gathering!

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the goal should be to do it in the best possible way. Professional photographers can really make the difference when it comes to lighting, composition and positioning a business’ best features.

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Portions of the proceeds will go to Breast Cancer Research Foundation

hair / color / waxing feather extensions / hair extensions 373 Shrewsbury St., Worcester • 508-796-5601 tangledsalon.com • tangledinworcester@yahoo.com WORCESTERMAG.COM

• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

Donna: Look, food photography is hard. We have this goal to create images that capture a passionate chef’s creations. We have to know how to make that look delicious. We need to make someone look at that image and want to go to the restaurant and order that food for themselves. We have to do that chef’s work justice. Anything less than that goal - anything else - is not worthy. And it takes time, knowledge and experience to be able to make images that get someone’s mouth watering. Let’s be truthful here, a snap shot from a cell phone is not going to make that happen...

How do the both of you work together when on assignment? Donna: We consider ourselves a team. It’s one thing that sets us apart of other photographers out there. When folks hire us they get the benefits and expertise of two trained photographers instead of one. Scott is really the technical expert-the gear and lighting expert--as well as having Photoshop skills. Scott: Donna is all about the details. She makes sure we have everything we need to make a shoot run smoothly. She is the manager of production. Together we do the creative work. We discuss angles, light, composition, color, contrast...etc. There have been occasions when we each have an assignment and go off on our own, but it is rare. We love working together on projects and feel we rely on one another to make great images happen.


night day& Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2011

art | dining | nightlife

In the moment

Joint exhibition at the Sprinkler Factory Paul Grignon

A friendship that spans 20 years culminates in a collaborative effort of two diverse artists as Lisa Barthelson and Carrie Crane present their show, Barthelson Crane, now showing in the main gallery at 38 Harlow St. The exhibit that begins on Oct. 1 will allow one to witness their fascinating creations, which utilize a myriad of mediums. Barthelson and Crane have each chosen a different path in their respective art, but their commitment and camaraderie has enabled them to put together this eclectic body of work. The duo offered each other support, encouragement and critiques, sounding boards that propelled them to complete and display their current work, diligently producing their art right up to opening day. This will be their first joint show, and Barthelson will exhibit recent work from her ongoing 2D and 3D mixed-media Family Debris series. Crane will showcase work that continues her exploration of layered, map-like portraits of imagined places. Deadlines. That one word was the impetus for these two talented friends to embark upon this quest to showcase their latest art to the public. As Crane explains, “About a year ago, we decided that doing a show together would give us that necessary deadline to work toward and allow us the opportunity to create art we had been imagining in our heads.” That imagined art began several years ago, when both artists started to explore new bodies of work that incorporated new materials and ideas. As Barthelson readily admits, “I am a materials junkie. I look at everything as a potential art medium, material to be used and transformed.” She will exhibit 17 pieces, encompassing a wide swath of varied interests, from installations that incorporate discarded household objects, to encaustic works that repurpose items that were once coveted must-have purchases, now relegated to the junk pile. Barthelson re-invents, re-presents this multitude of bric-a-brac into creations that are, in her words, “…mysterious, whimsical and dark vignettes within vignettes; our family’s history and one person’s perspective of motherhood and childhood.” Two distinctive works from her Family Debris series perfectly illustrate these ideas. In both Emerge and Empty Rooms, these two creations starkly capture the playful innocence of childhood, startling constructions that entice the viewer to stop and ponder these out of context images.

Barthelson presents in “Emerge” a veritable “I Spy” cornucopia of items once destined to the dustbin as wax, found objects and abandoned toys all populate the surface in a hodgepodge fashion. Cookie cutters, porcelain dolls, plastic insects, a trove of items from yesteryear protrude from the surface. In “Empty Rooms,” she depicts a more orderly collection of dollhouse furniture, each item preserved forever. Both works tend to make one pause and reflect upon such remembered discarded objects of youth, a glimpse of bygone days, and canvases that will certainly elicit a wistful smile. “With my work, I want people to give more forethought to how we all fit into the larger world. These works are meant to make you look, absorb and react.” Crane has evolved from being primarily a landscape painter to creating 3D pieces consisting of acrylic paintings on two to three layers of Lexan or Plexiglas. These works were inspired by her interest in geography and cartography as well as aerial or satellite imagery. “The common theme in both the old and new work is that of place and landscape,” she says. “I try to create places in which people want to spend time, reminding the viewer of the tenuousness of our natural world.” The message is to “…treasure what we have, to look closely and take some time, not only within my work but in the world as well.” Crane has shifted her emphasis from intimate to a much larger scale. In “Blue, from Franke,” Crane has created a painting of tremendous depth as the multicolored layers of Plexiglas feature a seemingly imagined topography, a world that beckons exploration. Another piece depicts what appears to be an aerial view of Munchen, Germany, and within its intricate design a small, dotted line seems to capture the routes traveled. The cascading layers present intriguing points of view, while the cast shadows add texture and volume, a three-dimensional map that warrants further inspection. Both artists are elated to exhibit within the interior of the Sprinkler Factory, a spacious venue that will allow them to showcase their latest work, a place that will provide a more complete picture of where they are now. Barthelson and Crane: here now at the Sprinkler Factory Gallery, Second Floor, 38 Harlow St., Worcester. Opening reception: October 1, from 5-8 p.m. Show runs through October 30. For more information, go to sprinklerfactory.com or contact the artists directly at lisabarthelson.com and carriecrane.com

Above: overflow, an installation, family debris series by Lisa Barthelson Below: Blue, from Franke by Carrie Crane

SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

31


night day &

{ arts }

The 24-hour Comic Challenge Vanessa Formato

When you hear the word “endurance,” you probably don’t think of drawing. Instead, you might imagine a marathon runner breaking through the tape, arms raised skyward, victorious. Leave it to Worcester to redefine the marathon in a way that speaks to its creative side as the Worcester Art Museum challenges locals to create a comic book in just 24 hours.

“We hope to have the studios bustling with artists sharing ideas and inspiration with one another,” says Worcester Art Museum’s associate director of education Katrina Stacy. The 24-Hour Comic Challenge remains mostly unchanged since 1990 when artists Scott McCloud and Steve Bissette conceived of it as a

32

dare: complete from scratch a full 24page comic in just one day. This year’s marathon will mark the fourth time that the Worcester Art Museum will host the global event. “[The first time I took the challenge] I was really surprised where the story went,” says Andy Fish, who has been participating in these marathons since 2004. “I began the day doing a humorous story about the Easter Bunny and ended up doing a film noir-ish thriller.” Fish, who just completed his 13th graphic novel for MacFarland Press, is a career artist, teaching classes not only at Emerson but at the Worcester Art Museum as well. This year, the museum is giving him his own studio space, where he thinks he’ll be getting experimental. The artists who choose to take the challenge at the Worcester Art Museum will find themselves well-equipped for the long haul: there’s plenty of studio space available for traditional media artists as well as computer laboratories and WiFi for those who are producing web comics,

and a $5 admission fee ensures there will be refreshments (yes, coffee). Kids can sign up for three- or eight-hour-long challenges, but can also stay the whole day with an adult chaperone. When the challenge is over, the comics will be exhibited in the Higgins Education Wing from October 2-29. Though it would seem that more experienced artists would have the upper hand, new ones shouldn’t shy away. “One of my favorite comics was produced by a woman who claimed to have never drawn a comic before,” says Stacy. “It was so beautifully conceived that she clearly had an eye for narrative and illustrated humor.” “So much of American culture is taking what is considered low-brow and elevating it to an honored art form, like rock ‘n’ roll,” freelance illustrator Veronica Fish says. “The art and the storytelling [in comics] can be read through your own prism. You can cast your own set of voices, hear your own soundtrack—like a movie you can adapt and personalize.” Andy Fish’s comic from a previous 24 hour challenge.

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For the artists who know and love this event, the importance of the 24 Hour Comic Challenge in many cases comes down to the personal journey. Jim Riel, a former political cartoonist, is yet to achieve the 24-page goal, but his participation has brought him a better understanding of himself as an artist and competitor. “[The challenge] helps you figure out what you do well,” Riel says. “It’s not so much about what to do on your best day, it’s what you still manage to get done on your worst day—or in this case, as you get more tired.” For Veronica Fish, last year’s challenge became unexpectedly intimate as her thoughts turned to her sister’s near-death experience with anorexia. Shaping her comic around family dynamics in the face of crisis, Fish found the process deeply therapeutic, helping her cope with a heartbreaking experience. Maybe this, too, is the kind of victory these marathoners are looking for: the kind you can’t mark with broken tape. 24-Hour Comic Challenge, October 1-2, 9 a.m.-9 a.m. To register, call 508793-4433 or 508-793-4334 or visit worcesterart.org; $5 entrance fee; space is limited. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester.


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33


night day

STEVEN KING

&

{ book/screen }

Holden author goes Hollywood Vanessa Formato

One morning in 2004, Matthew Quick had a heart attack—metaphorically speaking; at 30 years old he had a secure job as a high school English teacher, a wonderful wife and more unfulfilled dreams than he could bear to carry. Quick’s wife, author Alicia Bessette, convinced him to quit his job, sell the house and move into his inlaws’ basement in a bid to pull him out of a deep depression by letting him, at last, become a writer. It seemed insane at the time, but not anymore: Quick’s first novel, “The Silver Linings Playbook,” is hitting the big screen. “To say I was shocked would be a gross understatement,” Quick says of the day Hollywood CAA Agent Rich Green called him with a movie deal. “I have a wonderfully smart literary agent in NYC— Doug Stewart at Sterling Lord Literistic— and he has made a lot happen for me. I’m very grateful.” “The Silver Linings Playbook” is the story of recently released mental patient Pat Peoples, who “thinks his life is a

34

movie produced by God,” and his struggle to “win his estranged wife back by becoming physically fit and emotionally supportive.” Quick wrote the novel while still battling depression, and many of the characters and situations reflect how closely mental illness has affected his life, from the “depressed and at-risk teens” he worked with in the education system to his time working in a neural-health lockdown unit. “It’s important to talk about this stuff,” Quick says. “I hope my books afford some people the ability to at least feel less alone. I hope my books spark a dialogue.” Bradley Cooper, of “The Hangover” fame, will be starring as Peoples, which thrills Quick not only because of Cooper’s resume, but because of his hometown. “Most exciting to me is that Cooper is a Philly guy, so he will definitely get the local flavor of the book,” says Quick, who is originally from Philadelphia. Much like Quick’s family, Peoples is an obsessive Philadelphia Eagles fan. “The fact that it’s being shot in Philly really makes me happy.”

The casting as a whole is a thing of beauty, from the choice of Jennifer Lawrence to star opposite Cooper as depressed-and-widowed Tiffany to Robert De Niro—who is also producing the film—as Peoples’ father, to Chris Tucker as Danny, one of Peoples’ companions from the institution, who Quick notes “will be a scene stealer” if the casting sticks. Quick is equally thrilled, if not star-struck, by the fact that director and screenwriter David O. Russell adapted the novel for the silver screen. “It was interesting to see how David O. Russell preserved the heart of my story by blending different parts into shorter carefully crafted scenes,” says Quick of the screenplay he saw for the movie. “He’s a master.” Though novelists are usually kept uninvolved with film adaptations, he hopes that he’ll be allowed on set at some point. Though he has his day-to-day doubts about the future just like any artist—any

person, really—it’s difficult for Quick not to feel hopeful. “As the movie creeps closer and closer toward the big screen, it’s hard not to believe in possibility,” Quick says. “Like Pat Peoples says throughout the book, ‘look up and you can catch a silver lining just about every day.’ I wrote those bits about silver linings in my in-laws’ unfinished basement while I was technically unemployed. Back then, nice people were calling me a hopeless dreamer. Most people thought I was an idiot. And now major Hollywood players are backing the story and characters that emerged from that unfinished basement: if that can happen, what else?” “The Silver Linings Playbook” is slated to hit theaters in 2013.

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night day &

{ film }

Peter Yarrow

A gamble worth making 50/50 Grade: A – David Wildman

Generally when I can put into words exactly what mashup of genres is occurring in a film, it isn’t a good thing. Usually it means some sort of obvious gimmick is at hand. In the case of “50/50” what we have is pretty clearcut: it’s a Seth Rogen stoner buddy comedy meets cancer flick. Wait a second, cancer flick? So the “Pineapple Express” runs straight into “Terms of Endearment”? I suppose “The Big C” has plowed the ground for this kind of thing but it still sounds like something potentially worse than a train wreck. It sounds like it could be flat out offensive. There’s no doubt first time screenwriter Will Reiser as well as Director Jonathan Levine (who wrote and directed the excellent indie stoner flick “The Wackness”) are treading a thin line here. Cancer is a grim subject and such a widespread phenomenon that many people are going to have had close personal experiences with it, through relatives or even themselves. There’s really nothing funny about it, other than perhaps the notion that those suffering from the disease can legally get high. Aha! 50/50 takes this dark gag and runs with it as far as it possibly can. Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays Adam, a level-headed regular guy-type who works as an on-air reporter for a Seattle radio station. Kyle, his quintessential asshole buddy and co-worker is of course played by Rogen, doing his usual filterless cad-with-a-heart-of-gold routine. At the opening we’re in familiar tasteless territory with Kyle’s graphic critique of Adam’s sex life. Kyle’s new girlfriend Rachael (Bryce Dallas-Howard) has just moved in but is withholding the nookie. Soon Adam’s problems

are much bigger: he’s diagnosed with some rare back cancer. Suddenly his flimsy relationship is forced to carry a weight it was far from ready for. Meanwhile, Adam’s therapist Katherine (Anna Kendrick) is a sweet young thing. Now the dude’s tribulations include his relationship crumbling while he’s falling for his therapist, dealing with pitying fair-weather friends, his buddy Kyle playing off the pathos to score chicks, and his mother (Anjelica Huston), going crazy with concern. Oh yes, and of course there’s the whole impending death thing. Probably none of this would have worked without the stellar job GordonLevitt does as the longsuffering rock solid center of this maelstrom. He’s an excellent actor with a brainy persona that always seems to be downplaying an innate propensity towards mischief (see his stellar performance in “Brick”). The film could easily have taken advantage of the emotional potency of the subject of cancer, but GordonLevitt’s performance and the well-balanced script keeps the melodrama at bay with his even-keel likeability, building to an explosion at just the right moment. Meanwhile Rogen’s character, though a modern buddy movie cliché, manages to temper the laughs with a sense of poignancy beneath his dickhead surface. Later on when Adam discovers Kyle owns a wellthumbed book about how to deal with a friend with cancer, it’s a truly moving moment, and one that the film works hard to earn. The whole thing builds up to the inevitable operation where the outcome is in doubt, and the fact that you find yourself caring, and entertaining the notion that he might not make it despite this being partly a comedy, is testimony to a film that feels effectively realistic throughout. It helps that the supporting performances are good, especially Huston who works some gravitas into her constantly panicking mom role, and veteran character actors Philip Baker Hall (“Magnolia”) and Matt Frewer (forever “Max Headroom” to me) as two cancer patients Adam and Kyle befriend. It’s hard to believe a genre that tends to wear bad taste as a badge of honor can treat such tricky subject matter tastefully and with such grace. I think it will be a long time before such a feat is repeated.

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35


eat beat

night day

Mueng Thai

&

FOOD ★★★1/2 AMBIENCE ★★1/2 SERVICE ★★★★ VALUE ★★★★

STEVEN KING

231 Main St., Marlborough

Authentic Thai cuisine at an affordable price Michael Brazell

Worcester area diners do not need to go far for quality Thai cuisine, with a number of restaurants in Worcester and several in the surrounding towns, but Mueng Thai, just a few minutes off of 495 in Marlborough, is a quick 20-minute drive. Mueng Thai masks its size by a small storefront which holds about a dozen tables within, and it has garnered a reputation for authentic and delicious Thai food. The large menu is reasonably priced, with both Thai and other assorted Asian

dishes, and many items are marked for spiciness. My co-diner Taylor and I started our meal with an order of Thai crab rangoons and Thai rolls. The eight crab rangoons ($5) were lightly fried, packed with a sweet cream-cheese crab stuffing, while the four Thai rolls ($4.50) were small, cigar-shaped veggie-filled rolls that were nearly too hot to eat. Both were served with a sweet-and-sour sauce that was delightfully tangy, and though our Thai rolls weren’t very remarkable, the Asian-style crab rangoons were a perfect beginning to our meal. I also started with the tofu tom yum soup—a traditional hallmark of Thai food. The tom yum soup at Mueng Thai was delicious, loaded with mushrooms, sprouts, lemon grass, and giant chunks of tofu that expertly absorbed the hot and sour soup, which was pleasingly spicy. Fighting annual autumn allergies, I was eager to let a spicy curry help my sinus pressure, so I ordered the red curry over white rice, served with pork. The curry was spicy, thick and sweet, with a creamy consistency that the sticky white rice sopped up delightfully. Served in a large

Seafood Fest... We just haddock keep it going!

bowl with bamboo shoots, carrots, peppers and other assorted vegetables, the curry came loaded with plenty of pork, which was disappointingly overcooked and overly chewy. Taylor ordered chicken pad Thai, which came delivered with an unorthodox fried and battered chicken that was also overcooked and tough. Thankfully, the tasty egg-fried Thai noodles more than made up for the chicken, with a delicious peanut flavor that was never overwhelming. Both orders were large and at reasonable prices, with the chicken pad Thai and pork curry both running about $10. We also ordered two Thai hot teas and a couple of beers from Thailand, called Chang, that were pretty average light lagers, but at only a couple of bucks a piece, we had to try them. Visiting the restaurant on a weeknight, the two of us walked in and were seated immediately. Lavishly adorned with Thaiand Asian-inspired decorations, Mueng Thai feels comfortable without being

WE HAVE THE NFL PACKAGE!

{ dining}

stuffy, though some of the decorations seemed slightly mismatched with mixes of spiritual knick-knacks and tropical island themes. Service was prompt and friendly, and our host exuberantly showed us an assortment of exotic fish, including one peculiar fish that he excitedly demonstrated could be petted like a dog. While this display was rather unexpected, the charming wait staff and prompt service made us feel welcome. Parking at Mueng Thai is mostly relegated to on-street parking in downtown Marlborough, so this could be an issue earlier in the evening, but a public municipal garage is available just a few blocks down Main Street. While Worcester and the surrounding towns have a number of options for Thai cuisine, Mueng Thai in Marlborough is worth the short drive, serving good, authentic Thai food at more than reasonable prices.

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36

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• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

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night day

eatbeat

Major League Roast Beef & Wings 503 Washington St. (Rt. 20) , Auburn 508-832-4300 A good place for take-out, especially for casual parties, tail-gating, or game nights, Major League Roast Beef & Wings is not a restaurant y made for dining in, though there is seating available among local team jerseys and framed classic sports moments. The roast beef is mild to bland; specialty sandwiches with sauces or other condiments are better options. The wings are meaty and delicious with the restaurant’s sauces, so make sure you get a platter to try a few flavors. The Suicide Buffalo definitely comes closer to living up to its name than in most restaurants, so be warned. Meat is also the main item, so it’s not a place for vegetarians or vegans. Value is pretty good, and gets better the more you order – so it’s definitely worth it for feeding a party. Yong Shing 90 Auburn St., Auburn Yong Shing has moved to a new location in Auburn, right next door to the town’s McDonald’s. Try foregoing that Big Mac for an

&

{ recommended} evening and check out Yong Shing — the décor is clean and modern, the food as good as ever. The restaurant has a particular skill for combining the right sauces and glazes to complement any dish. The General Gau’s chicken commands the diner’s attention and the Empress Trio is a triple-play combo of chicken, pork and shrimp. Wash it down with any of the light Chinese beers on the menu. The bar area features Karaoke Sing-Along, Friday-Saturday, 9 p.m.1 a.m. Viet Thao 68 Stafford St., Worcester 508-752-8426 A delightful Vietnamese restaurant with fresh food and complex flavors is sure to please most patrons. While there is next to nothing on the menu targeting vegetarian/vegan diners, the options are delicious and healthy with most food steamed or grilled and an abundance of fruit and vegetables. Everything from appetizers to desserts is made to give a full dining experience of appearance, smell, taste and texture. Competitive pricing also makes Viet Thao a place you can revisit many times. Take-home is available.

The Castle Restaurant 1230 Main St., Leicester 508-892-9090 This Leicester mainstay remains a destination restaurant for those who crave fine dining in a one-of-a-kind setting: a replication of the Morro Castle in Havana, Cuba. The experience is more civilized than in the Morro’s hey-day, thanks to the expertise and nurturing of the Nicas family. Our reviewer traveled to The Castle for lunch, and found the food as delicious as ever, with he and his companions sampling the roast turkey, tortellini with chicken and braised lamb shank. Everything from appetizers to desserts is top-notch. As a

special treat, you might want to try the Spanish flaming coffee, if for no other reason than to say you’ve drunk Spanish flaming coffee. Mingle of any of The Castle’s signature dishes with the right choice of wine, and you’ve got a knight, er, night to remember.

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

37


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Take a peek at the week ahead! Want to see your listing here? Visit our website at worcestermag.com, click on night&day, then select Calendar and submit your event. Really want to catch our attention? Add to our online database and pester our editor at editor@worcestermag.com.

>Thursday 29 Experience 2011: A Bass Odyssey, Part V, a packed night of house, dubstep, electro and nu disco featuring performances by DJ Big Spoon, Aequus, and DJ Food Science. Free for 21+; 18+ only $5; 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. The Raven, 258 Pleasant St. 508-304-8133. Cinemageddon! featuring two free movies projected onto the wall outside of Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner await you tonight. Wait, did I just say free movies? Free popcorn? What are you waiting for? Grab a blanket and your fuzzy Hello Kitty hat and c’mon down! 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. The Fitchburg CultureFest brings the Fitchburg State University campus and city together for an evening of music, food and celebration. Building on its inaugural success as a music festival last year, the family-friendly CultureFest combines performances by up-and-coming bands with local artisans and vendors to highlight the tapestry that is Fitchburg. Free; 4-9 p.m. Fitchburg Riverfront Park, 40 Commercial St., Fitchburg. 978-3459602. Tonight at Beatnik’s you’ll find Iza Jane on the stage from 8-11 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Flock of Assholes, the ultimate ’80s tribute band is back with guests the amazing ’70s rock band Midnight Whistle Exam featuring members of Flock and D.Dark. $5; 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook. Metal Thursday fills the halls of Ralph’s with the solid sound of metal tonight with Graveheart, Rattlehead, Kaustik, and Ravage. $7; 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543, metalthursday.com.

>Friday 30 World famous organist David Higgs will appear in concert at All Saints Church tonight. According to Will Sherwood, dean of the Worcester chapter of the American Guild of Organists, Higgs’ appearance is the kick-off event of the Chapter’s 2011/12 concert season; a reception will follow. The concert is free and open to the public but premium seating is available for $20/couple via WorcesterAGO.org; 8 p.m. All Saints Church, 10 Irving St.

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Green Drinks Worcester guest speaker this month is Brad McNamara and the featured organization is Net Impact, an international nonprofit organization with a mission to inspire, educate and equip individuals to use the power of business to create a more socially and environmentally sustainable world. Spanning six continents, its membership makes up one of the most influential networks of professionals and students in existence today. Free; 7-10 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-9268877, greendrinks.org, clarkunetimpact.wordpress.com. NV Concepts presents youngin’ Mac Miller over at The Palladium. $25 door; 7-11 p.m. 261 Main St. 508-797-9696. Our favorite rock & roller Jason James & The Bay State Houserockers will blow off the doors over at JJ’s Sports Bar and Grill from 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 380 Southwest Cutoff, Northborough. 508-842-8420. Check out Sawmill, The Silence, Satellites Fall, and 99 Moon tonight; 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Ric Porter & The Sons of The Soil perform 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877.

>Saturday 1 Narragansett Beer and local favorite Ralph’s Diner partner for a Worcester Oktoberfest celebration featuring music, traditional fare, craft-beer tastings and games. Founded by a group of eight German immigrants, the original Narragansett brewery once held elaborate annual events to celebrate Oktoberfest. Reviving this tradition, Narragansett and Ralph’s welcome fans and friends to an Oktoberfest celebration featuring Narragansett Lager and Narragansett Fest tastings and specials, Narragansett Beer Bratwurst and other traditional foods, live performances by popular area bands plus games, giveaways, and ‘Gansett Girls! Free; 2-7 p.m. Ralph’s Diner, 148 Grove St. 2nd Annual Chakra FEST at Great Brook Farms is a day of music, art and energy. Vendors, energy-workers, artists, card readers and musicians will gather together to create an amazing day. Also, there will be generous raffles throughout the day and the proceeds will benefit the Second Chance Fund for Animal Welfare. Free; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Great Brook Farms Cafe, 356 Main St., Bolton. 978-779-6680, 5thChakraRecords.com, SecondChanceFund.org

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• SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

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The Bridgefest community fair will feature a 5K run/walk, arts and crafts vendors, food vendors, children’s activities, K9 demonstrations and pet activities as well as live entertainment. All proceeds will benefit health and wellness initiatives at The Bridge of Central Massachusetts, a vital leader in providing comprehensive human services in collaboration with multitalented and diversely challenged individuals and their families. Family friendly and open to all ages; free; 5K registration fee is $25; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beaver Brook Park, Chandler St. and Mayfield St. 508-755-0333, thebridge. kintera.org. During the Chrome and Classic Car Show, all antique-car enthusiasts are encouraged to participate as a part of Fitchburg State’s Family Weekend. Gaetz Arena Parking Lot; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fitchburg State University: Wallace Civic Center, 160 Pearl St., Fitchburg. 978-665-3163, fitchburgstate.edu. Steez Promo Presents Dub Nation Mass Vol. 2 Datsik over at The Palladium tonight for $20; 8-11 p.m. The Palladium, 261 Main St. 508797-9696. With a mixture of Irish, folk, rock, soft rock and country, not to mention a touch of reggae, comedy and of course some original songs, The Brennan Brothers offer something to please everyone. With a list of songs that spans six decades, including drinking songs, ballads, sing-alongs, and clap-alongs, it’s always a great time for people of all ages. No cover; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fiddlers’ Green Pub & Restaurant, 19 Temple St. 508-7923700, terrybmusic.com. For a night of jazz, stop by Nick’s to hear The Benny Sharoni Quintet at 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030.

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picks

&

{ opt }

Jubilee Gardens blends jam band, pop, folk, world and a little bit o’ country over at Sahara Cafe & Restaurant. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. 143 Highland St. 508-798-2181, jubileegardens.com.

of the Chapman Dining Commons. Proceeds from the evening support QUEST, the Quabbin Education Foundation for Students and Teachers, and its mission to enhance opportunities for students in our region. $30; 7-9 p.m. Cultural Center at Eagle Hill, Chapman Dining Commons, 242 Old Petersham Rd., Hardwick. 413-4776746, centerateaglehill.org.

>Sunday 2

>Tuesday 4

RRI Rise & Run Road Race is an early morning run through historic Sturbridge. 10K, 5K and 1 mile, races begin at 10:30 a.m. Family fun activities through 1p.m. as well. All proceeds to support the RRI Autism Resource Center and supportive and adaptive equipment for people with developmental disabilities. $20 race day; 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Sturbridge Town Common, Main St., Sturbridge. 508-347-8181, rehabresourcesinc.org/roadrace.htm.

Beatnik’s Indie Art Market is a stomping ground for art lovers to buy, trade, show or sell local handmade pieces. Come on in for some great drinks and homemade fare, then feel free to browse around and buy some original art and homemade items by some of the most unique artists and crafters in the area. This event is free for artists to join and free for customers to attend. Held the first Tuesday of every month from 6-9 p.m.; email beatniks@ charter.net to reserve your spot. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508926-8877.

Costumed interpreters will represent Grafton historical figures and will relate events of their lives at the 2nd Annual Grafton History Cemetery Tour. Tours begin promptly every half hour, starting at 1 p.m.. Rain date is Sunday, October 9; $8 general admission, $5 for Grafton Historical Society members. 1-4 p.m. Riverside Cemetery, 56 Millbury St., Grafton. 508-839-0000, graftonhistoricalsociety.org. During the Blessing of Animals ceremony, hear readings from Scripture, prayers for pets, and experience the individual blessing of each animal. After the program refreshments and treats will be served. Free; 1-2 p.m. Sacred Heart - St. Catherine of Sweden Church, 600 Cambridge St. 508-755-2774. Walk for PKD and raise funds for research for Polycystic Kidney Disease. This disease is one of the most common hereditary diseases and leads to kidney failure. There is no cure. Come and walk with us and enjoy live music, raffles and kids’ activities; 2-5 p.m. Blessed Sacrament Church, 551 Pleasant St. 413-582-0247, pkdcure.org/WorcesterWalk. MT Booking presents Kings Destroy from New York, Pilgrim, and a few more; 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543.

>Monday 3 Tastefully Quabbin is a third annual event of culinary delights. Many of the finest restaurants and other businesses in the region will showcase their signature items in the gracious atmosphere

Nick’s Anniversary Party features special and secret guests that you’ll just have to show up to discover their identities; 7 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. The Legend...The Music...The Voice is Diana Ross and the concert event of the year. $67/$87/$117; 8-10 p.m. Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, 2 Southbridge St. 877571-7469, thehanovertheatre.org.

>Wednesday 5 Frederick Douglass: Stories Are A Tellin’, a one-man play by Guy Peartree, kicks off a multiyear commemoration of the Sesquicentennial of the United States Civil War. The commemoration is sponsored by the History and Political Science Department of Worcester State University; a 7:30 p.m. performance in the Ghosh Science Center (Room 102) will be open to the Worcester community-at-large; free. Worcester State University, Sullivan Auditorium, 486 Chandler St. 508-929-8078. An Abbreviated History of Games: Jeff Anderson, SVP, Majesco Entertainment This talk by Jeff Anderson, senior vice president, social & mobile, Majesco Entertainment, is part of the Franklin M. Loew Lecture Series at Becker College and is open to the public. Seating is limited; RSVP to lectures@becker. edu; free; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Becker College, Weller Academic Center, Room 210, 61 Sever St. 508-373-9460, becker.edu/lectures

POWERSHOT INSTANT REBATE /%:KHDWRQ

Mister Smartass Theater 3000 is a live comedy/movie show, which will present “The 4-D MAN” tonight. This event is always free on the first Wednesday of the month at the Lucky Dog Music Hall. Doors open at 8:30 p.m. You’ll want to bring a lawnchair and some snacks to fulfill that drive-in atmosphere, and regardless of the actual weather, our local forecast always calls for free pizza and cheap beer. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook.

>Thursday 6 11th Annual Harvey Ball Join Worcester Historical Museum as it presents the 2011 Harvey Ball Smile Award, the “Harvey,” to Myles and Jean McDonough for their many commitments and contributions to the greater Worcester community. The evening will be filled with cocktails, dinner, the music of Dale

weekly pic

DJ Flx-Lutha spins from 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. at Jillian’s Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900.

night day LePage and the Bobby Gadoury Trio, the award presentation, and live and silent auctions. Join them in honoring two of Worcester’s great residents in style on the eve of World Smile Day. $125; 5:30-9 p.m. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St. 508-753-8278, worcesterhistory.org. Heads up for SkyWatch: Jupiter and the Waxing Gibbous Moon, where you’ll hear all about the Juno spacecraft exploring Jupiter’s icy moons and the new nuclear-powered rover, Curiosity, headed for Mars this fall. Then head outside to see Jupiter for yourself, along with the waxing gibbous Moon and lingering views of colorful double stars. NASA ambassadors will even show you how to star hop across the cool autumn night skies from your own backyard. $10 adults, $6 children; 7-8:30 p.m. EcoTarium, 222 Harrington Way. 508-929-2700, ecotarium.org.

Send your Worcester related smartphone picture and description to editor@worcestermag.com with the subject Weekly Pics to be included in this segment. Like now.

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

39


night day &

{ listings}

music >Thursday 29

Good Times with Your Friend DJ Steve. 9-2 a.m. Hotel Vernon - The Ship Room/Kelley Square Yacht Club, 1 Millbury St. Lawrence Strauss: Songs to Help You Through the Week. Free. noon-1 p.m. The Registry Restaurant, 264 Park Ave. 508-794-9644. Happy Birthday Uncle Jessie @ The Palladium (upstairs). Anchorlines Ballast Sleepwalkers With Words Tickets $10 adv., $12 door. 6:30-11 p.m. Palladium, The, 261 Main St. 508-797-9696. Trio Winds US Air Force Band of Liberty.. Program to be selected from the following: Bluesmasters IV, op. 38 Don Stewart Divertimento no. 3, K. 439c W. A. Mozart Allegro edited by Jerry Kirkbride Moderato Adagio Menuetto Rondo Binks’ Waltz Scott Joplin arranged by Earl C. North Sonata in A minor George Phillip Telemann transcribed by Don Stewart Largo Vivace Affettuoso Allegro Sinatra Favorites arranged by Brent Beech Three Pieces Walter Piston Allegro scherzando Lento Allegro The Stars and Stripes Forever John Philip Sousa arr. by CMSgt Larry MacTaggart/SSgt Chris Stahl bandofliberty.af.mil facebook.com/ usafbandofliberty Comprised of members of The New England Winds, the recently-formed “Trio Winds” presents an exciting and diverse program that strikes a great balance between masterworks of the Baroque and Classical periods, ragtime and jazz, contemporary literature and patriotic favorites. FREE. 6:307:30 p.m. Jacob Edwards Library, Reading Room, 236 Main St., Southbridge. 508-764-5426. Acoustic Thursdays. 7-11 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Open Mic Night W/ Bill McCarthy. Free. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Junior’s Pizza Grille, 346 Shrewsbury St. 508-459-5800. Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 8-11 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Iza Jane. 8-11 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Live Jazz. 8-11 p.m. The Mill, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. Maria Muldaur & her Bluesiana Band. $24 day of show. 8-11 p.m. Bull Run Restaurant, Sawtelle Room, 215 Great Road, Shirley. 978-425-4311 or tickets.bullrunrestaurant.com.

2011: A Bass Odyssey part V 21+ free. We got a packed night of house, dubstep, electro and nu disco. 21+ FREE 18+ five bucks show kicks off at eight thirty and ends at one thirty. DJ BIg Spoon, Aequus, and DJ Food Science. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. The Raven, 258 Pleasant St. 508-304-8133. Flock of Assholes, the ultimate 80’s tribute band.w/ guests the amazing 70’s rock band Midnight Whistle Exam.(members of Flock. and D.Dark). $5. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on facebook. Live Band Karaoke w/ Fingercuff. We Aint Yo Momma’s Karaoke.no cover. 8:30 p.m.-midnight Scioli’s Pizza Bar, 146 South Main St., Milford. Audio Wasabe. Free. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. DJ Brian Spinnin’ & Scratchin’ The Hottest Dance Music. No Cover Charge. 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Days End Tavern, 287 Main St., Oxford. 508-987-1006. Jim Devlin. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Cigar Masters, 1 Exchange Place. 508-459-9035. Metal Thursday.With Graveheart, Rattlehead, Kaustik, & Ravage. $7. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543 or metalthursday.com. Worceter’s Lovely Ladies take the stage for Sirens of Song. No Cover. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Jay Graham Live. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Funky Murphy’s Bar & Grill, 305 Shrewsbury St. 508-753-2995. Andy Cummings Live. $3. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Hooligan’s, 29 Blossom St., Fitchburg. 508-272-5092. Holy Cross Night. Draft beer specials every week. 10 p.m.1:45 a.m. The Grey Hound Pub, 11 Kelley Square. 508-754-6100. James Keyes. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439.

>Friday 30 Leon Legacy, The Grand Arkanum. The Raven, 258 Pleasant St. 508-304-8133. Top 40 Dance Night w/ DJ Fast Track. Club Gallery, 150 Point St., Providence. 401-751-7166. “Vinyl-Ly Friday Party”. We have the turntables, you love Vinyl.After a long week of work you need to let it go.from 5:30-8:30 you bring your vinyl and all of your friends to a FREE party hosted by us and you.We’ll supply free pizza and even give a stamp for

UPCOMING EVENTS

you and your party to stay the rest of the night on us.Free. 5:308:30 p.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or luckydogmusic.com. Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 6-10 p.m. Black Sheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8484. Dave & Don Duo at 1790. 6:30-9:30 p.m. 1790 Restaurant & Tavern, 206 Turnpike Road, Westborough. 508-366-1707. BBQ & Blues Fridays with Big Jon Short. Come out to enjoy some of the area’s best BBQ and some Delta and Hill Country Blues. bbqstack.com bigjonshort.com no cover. 7-10 p.m. Smokestack Urban Barbecue, 90 Harding St. Bill McCarthy.Free. 7-11 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. NV Concepts presents Mac Miller. Tickets $20 adv., $25 door. 7-11 p.m. Palladium, The, 261 Main St. 508-797-9696. Open Mic. Whether you sing, dance, do drama, write poetry or whatever.... your Christ Centered gift participation is welcome. Always a fun and interesting evening.Free. 7-9:30 p.m. Mill Church Cafe, 45 River St., Millbury. 508-864-5658 or millchurch.org. Arizona Doug & Scott Marshall. Free admission. 7:3010:30 p.m. Verona Grille, 81 Clinton St., Shrewsbury. 508-8539091. Bret Talbert’s Acoustified Time Machine. Singer / Guitarist for local legends Public Works and Hothead, Bret travels through decades of various rock, pop & country favorites (including a few of his own) - Acoustified.Free. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Tavern on the Common, 249 Main St., Rutland. 508-886-4600. LaDonna Musicale Presents: Passionate Enemies: Women Composers at the Rival German Courts of Frederic the Great and the House of Hapsburg. Music by Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine, Anna Bon, Camilla de Rossi, Maria Teresa Agnesi, and Maria Antonia Walpurgis. facebook.com/ clarkarts. Free and Open to the Public. 7:30-9 p.m. Clark University: Traina Center for the Arts, Razzo Hall, 92 Downing St. David Higgs Organ Recital. The concert is free and open to the public, and a reception for Dr. Higgs will follow. Premium seating is available at $20/couple at WorcesterAGO.org. Free & open to the public; premium seating available at $20/couple. 8-9:30 p.m. All Saints Church, 10 Irving St. 508-752-3766 or WorcesterAGO.org. Luther “Guitar Jr” Johnson. $22 day of show. 8-11:30 p.m. Bull Run Restaurant, Sawtelle Room, 215 Great Road, Shirley. 978-425-4311 or tickets.bullrunrestaurant.com.

Metal Friday’s sponsored by Hurt Reynolds. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Vegas Lounge, 5 Summer St., Lunenburg. 978-400-7524. Sean Ryan. 8-11 p.m. Barbers Crossing (North), 175 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8438. Little Red & The Riders - Reunion. $10. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gilrein’s, 802 Main St. 508-791-2583. Ready, Set, Flo. with guests Hands of Time, Chris Kazarian, and The Grand Arkanum. $6. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or facebook. com/ReadySetFlo. A Ton of Blues. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. The Pumphouse, 340 Main St., Southbridge. 508-765-5473. Auntie Trainwreck. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385 or find them on facebook DJ Pete the Polock. Come see this Worcester legend. Free. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 3-G’s Sports Bar, The Music Room, 152 Millbury St. 508-754-3516. Friday Frenzy with Blurry Nights & DJ Soup - DJ B-Lo. Dance, Hip Hop and top 40 tracks. Lounge opens at 9:00 pm - Dance Club opens at 10:30 pm. Coat Room available with attendant. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Fusion, 109 Water St. 508-756-2100. Jason James & The Bay State Houserockers. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. JJ’s Sports Bar and Grill, 380 Southwest Cutoff, Northborough. 508-842-8420. Jim Porcella. No Cover. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Ladies Night - Top 40 Dance Party. FREE. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Speakers Night Club, 19 Weed St., Marlborough. 508-480-8222 or speakersnightclub.net. Mike Lynch. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Celtic Tavern, 45 Belmont St., Northborough. 508-366-6277. Pete the Polak, DJ. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 3-G’s Sports Bar, 152 Millbury St. 508-754-3516. Sawmill, The Silence, Satellites Fall, and 99 Moon. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Sean Fullerton. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Cigar Masters, 1 Exchange Place. 508-459-9035. Sin City. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. 978-537-7750. Tigerlily. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. Ric Porter & The Sons of The Soil. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.

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Beatnikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. The Throttles. 10 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439.

>Saturday 1 Oakham Oaktoberfest feat. Beatles For Sale the Tribute. Beatles For Sale comes to Oakham, MA for the ďŹ rst time at â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oaktoberfestâ&#x20AC;? 2011 noon-2 p.m. Wright Memorial Field, Ware Corner Road, Oakham. 508-882-5284. Assumption College Chorale Concert. The Assumption College Chorale will perform. Free and open to the public. 2-3:30 p.m. Assumption College: Chapel of the Holy Spirit, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7304. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Raucous Rocking Oktoberfest.Outdoor Party with Narragansett Beer.FREE Admission. Live Music, Games, Beer, Brauts, and More.2-7 p.m. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Assumption College Band Concert. The Assumption College Band will perform. Free and open to the public. 3:30-4:40 p.m. Assumption College: Testa Science Center, Testa Atrium, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7304. David Bazin: Live Acoustic Classic Rock & Blues on Saturdays. Come on down on Saturdays on the patio (weather permitting or inside if necessary) 6:30-10 p.m. Grille 57, 57 Highland St. 508-798-2000. Acoustic Saturdays. 7-11 p.m. The Mill, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. Bill McCarthy & His Guitar. MySpace.com/ BadClownProductions. 8-11 p.m. The Mill at 185 West Boylston Street, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. Ordinary Heart. A talented acoustic/folk rock trio with wonderful harmonies. Come help them celebrate their band anniversary party.Pass The Hat. 8-10 p.m. Jakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub, 536 Main St. 508-757-5257. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Live Music. 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Black Sheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8484. Steez Promo Presents Dub Nation Mass Vol. 2 Datsik $20 adv. 8-11 p.m. Palladium, The, 261 Main St. 508797-9696. The Great Escape - Tribute to Journey. $3 after 9:30pm (subject to change). 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Speakers Night Club, 19 Weed St., Marlborough. 508-480-8222. The Groove Devils - Movinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; & Groovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the Olde

Post OfďŹ ce Pub.. Join us for a night of R&B Blues, Chicago, West Coast Jump, Swing, a little Latin ďŹ&#x201A;avor and more. 8-11 p.m. Olde Post OfďŹ ce Pub, Located at Route 140 and Ray Street, 1 Ray St., North Grafton. 508-839-6106 or myspace.com/groovedevils. Kung Fu Grip With Day One And Spider Rockets from NYC. Female-fronted, high energy, creative alternative/poprock covers. $7. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or ďŹ nd them on facebook. Live Music in the Pub: Brennan Brothers. No Cover. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fiddlersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Green Pub & Restaurant, 19 Temple St. 508-792-3700 or terrybmusic.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;GOâ&#x20AC;? is back.w/Louder My Dear, The Susan Constant, and Elsewhere. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. A Night of Jazz w/ The Benny Sharoni Quintet. 9 p.m.2 a.m. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. DJ Flx-Lutha. 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Jillianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. Pop Rocks. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Days End Tavern, Main Level, 287 Main St., Oxford. 508-987-1006. Sin City. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. 978-537-7750. Spinsuite Saturdays - Top 40. Fusionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge opens at 9:00 pm and Dance Club opens at 10:30pm. Coat room with attendant available. No Cover Charge. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Fusion, 109 Water St. 508-756-2100. Hip Hop Dance Party with DJ HappyDaze Sat.Nights. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Days End Tavern, 287 Main St., Oxford. 508987-1006. McAllister Drive. 11. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. FireďŹ&#x201A;yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marlborough, 350 East Main St., Marlborough. 508-357-8883 or ďŹ reďŹ&#x201A;ysbbq.com. Fungus Amungus. 10 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Beatnikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Jubilee Gardens. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Sahara Cafe & Restaurant, 143 Highland St. 508-798-2181 or jubileegardens.com.

bvccband.org. Ton of Blues. 2-8 p.m. Black Sheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8484. Peter Yarrow. Adults $25/seniors $22/under 18 $7. 3-5 p.m. Fitchburg State University: Percival Hall, Percival Auditorium, 160 Pearl St., Fitchburg. 978-665-3347 or ďŹ tchburgstate.edu/cultural. Blue Grass Jam Session. A true â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bluegrassâ&#x20AC;? jam and is not a Celtic, folk, old-time, or country music jam. This all-acoustic jam features the traditional bluegrass instrumentation of banjo, guitar, mandolin, ďŹ ddle, dobro, upright bass, and vocals. No Cover (Worcester students earn WOO Points). 4-8 p.m. Worcester Hibernian Cultural Centre, 19 Temple St. 508-792-3700 or grassjam.org. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presents: Big Jon Short. bigjonshort.com 5-8

p.m. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439. Hot 100 Dance party featuring DJ Master Sun every Sunday at the Dog. $5. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or ďŹ nd them on facebook. Kings Destroy [NY], Pilgrim + more. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. The Human Juke Box Andy Cummings. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Reggae Fusion Sundays with DJ Nick. Worcesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest running REGGAE night hosted by DJ Nick and Guest DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spinning the HOTTTEST Reggae, Hip Hop and Top 40 every

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{ listings}

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41


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{ listings}

Sunday. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Fusion, 109 Water St. 508-756-2100.

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>Monday 3 Driftinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sam Politz 7pm, then Karaoke with Audra 9pm till Close. 7 p.m.-2 a.m. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030.

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A Labor and Civil Rights Songfest, presented by the Earth and Spirit Singers. Songs include music of working people, from Joe Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pie in the Skyâ&#x20AC;?, to Woody Guthrie to contemporary writers. Come and sing and learn about the songs of change that mobilized farm workers, miners, the civil rights movement and carried an optimistic vision for America. JimScottMusic.com, call: 508-755-0995, or email: Jim@ JimScottMusic.com suggested donation of $5 to $10. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church of Worcester, 90 Main St. 508-755-0995 or JimScottMusic.com. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anniversary Party. Performers TBA. 7 p.m.-2 a.m. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Open Mic Night w /Bill McCarthy Open Mike. openmcc@verizon.net 7-11 p.m. Greendaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. Northboro Area Community Chorus. The Northborough Area Community Chorus is a non-proďŹ t 4-part chorus, representing 15 local communities. Currently in itsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40th year, the chorus performs 2 concerts per year, one in December & one in May. $10 per year dues. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Algonquin Regional High School, Bartlett St., Northborough. 508-393-8943. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Totally Tuesdazed... Tunes in the Diner every Tuesday Night. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chadwick Square Diner,

148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Big Jon Short. bigjonshort.com no cover. 8-11 p.m. Armsby Abbey, 144 North Main St. 508-795-1012 or armsbyabbey.com. Open Mic. open mic plus poetry comedy the clubs kitchen is open free. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. English Social Club, 29 Camp St. 508791-4149. Scott Riccuiti, Michael Thibodeau & John Donovan. 8-11 p.m. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439. T.J. Peavey. A veteran, accomplished and eclectic singer, songwriter and guitarist. Pass The Hat. 8-10 p.m. Jakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub, 536 Main St. 508-757-5257. Terry Brennan. 8 p.m.-midnight Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879 or terrybmusic.com.

>Wednesday 5 Girls Night Out. Free. Billiards & Gamecards & Appetizers & Desserts. All Females (ages 2-92) Receive: Free Billiards All Night $5 GameCard Complimentary Appetizer Buffet Chocolate Covered Fruit ALL AGES UNTIL 9PM.After 9PM, 18+. Free. 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Jillianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. Periphery @ The Palladium (upstairs). The Human Abstract Textures The Contortionist Behold Oblivion MummiďŹ ed In Circuitry Tickets $13 adv., $15 door. 6-11 p.m. Palladium, The, 261 Main St. 508-797-9696. Night Of Barnburning Bluesâ&#x20AC;?, Every Wednesday, hosted by Sean Fullerton. 7-10 p.m. South Side Grille & Margarita Factory, 242 West Broadway, Gardner. 508-479-2309 or seanfullertonmusic.net. Sam James. 8-11 p.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508755-0879. Clayton Willoughby. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030.

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DEP: Home heating laws change for those with oil Oil burner must have safety valve or protective sleeve to prevent spills by Oct. 1 Homeowners in Massachusetts who have oil-burning heating systems will have to comply with a new safety and environmental law starting on Oct. 1. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) states the new requirement mandates that all oil-burning heating systems either have an oil-safety valve or a protective sleeve on the oil supply line if the oil supply line is in contact with concrete, the earth, or other floor surfaces. “Taking a simple, preventive measure now will reduce the number of leaks and spills of home heating oil from residential heating systems, and result in fewer costly cleanups across the state,” said MassDEP Commissioner Kenneth Kimmell. “It will also result in fewer releases that have the potential to impact homes and contaminate our soil and groundwater resources.” The section of law, under Massachusetts Homeowner Heating Safety Laws – passed by the legislature in 2008 and

Paula Savard

Gail Lent

ABR, CRB, CRS, GRI

ABR, CRS, GRI

Sandra DeRienzo

amended in 2010 – applies to owners of one- to four-unit residences heated with oil. The measure also gives homeowners the ability to voluntarily purchase oil leak insurance coverage. The cost of the leak prevention upgrades generally ranges from $150 to $350 per system, and must be installed by a licensed oil burner technician, according to the DEP. Kimmell states that it is not uncommon for most homes to be in compliance already as homes with oil burners constructed since 1990 are likely to already have the oil safety devices in order to be consistent with the fire safety code. Also, many older homes in which the heating system has been substantially repaired or upgraded, or where a new oil tank has been installed, may also already be in compliance because of the fire safety codes. Kimmell and the DEP tout that in addition to preventing costly, environmentally-damaging oil spills, a key

Tracy Sladen

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Yasmin Loft

benefit of the Massachusetts Homeowner Heating Safety Law requires insurance companies that write homeowner insurance policies to make available to all homeowners in compliance with the safety provision and coverage for leaks from home oil heating systems. There is no requirement for homeowners to buy the insurance, however homes with the proper leak-protection must be given the option to buy this insurance coverage. Preventable residential oil leaks occur each year in Massachusetts, according to Kimball, but added that in recent years the number of these leaks has been steadily declining; which may indicate the success of the oil safety valve or oil line protective sleeve

Paula K. Aberman Associates, Inc. 2086 Main Street, Lancaster www.abermanassociates.com

Orange $139,900

5 br Victorian. Town has as single family, but property is double metered with commercial use on both sides. Detached Garage with Automatic openers, replacement windows, spacious and gracious. Easy to schedule a visit.  Aberman Assoc Inc Paula Savard 978-5374971 x 14  www.paulasavard.com

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978 537 4971   0 for the operator  We open ALL our houses to you EVERY Sunday from 11-3pm. Just CALL FIRST and let us know which one you are interested in.  All listings are viewable on www.paulasavard.com.

Leominster $149,900

Cider Hill re-sale. Small well kept complex of 40 Units. Townhouse style with walk out lower level. Finished family room with dry bar leads to patio area facing nice wooded bufffer offering privacy. Second floor newly remodeled with updated carpet, fresh paint and recessed lighting in MBR . Master bedroom with balcony and Atrium Door. Wake up to a beautiful view of sky and trees. Cats OK no dogs. Aberman Assoc Inc. Gail Lent 978-537-4971 x 15  www.gaillent.com

Norm Doherty

Anna Mary Kraemer

Colleen Baker

Tara Sullivan

Located at the end of the complex, this condo offers so much!! Convenience to Rts 2 and 190 as well as all area amenities, yet private enough to hear the crickets at night.....An inground pool and tennis courts for summertime fun~ 2 large, bright bedrooms plus a loft for an office, family room, or maybe just extra storage? Neutral colors throughout--move in ready..... All appliances stay, including barely used stove and washer/dryer....enclosed patio and storage shed.....very easy to show! Aberman Assoc Inc Tracy Sladen 978-537-4971 x 17

Lancaster $169,900

2 bedroom 1 bath townhouse..Small complex in the heart of South Lancaster. End unit townhouse. All rooms spacious. Living room with Brazilian Cherry flooring, large eat in kitchen, Master Bedroom with double closets. Full lower level with heated family room (additional 225 sf not included in living area). Building has a new roof, all windows are newpro replacement with a lifetime warranty. Owner managed this is a NON-SMOKING building. Sorry no pets. Aberman Assoc Inc Gail Lent 978-537-4971 x 15 www.gaillent.com

Southbridge $189,900

Lancaster $178,000

3 br 1 bath ranch. Spacious farmhouse style single story home. Originally used as a carraige house before being converted. Open concept living room and dining room. Attached barn has option for future expansion of the house or lots of additional space for the craftsperson/hobbiest. Well located for the commuter. Quick access to Rt. 2 or Rt. 495.  Aberman Assoc Inc  Gail Lent 978-537-7971 x15  www.gaillent.com

GRI

Leominster $124,900

Leominster $124,900

Same family owned home for more than 40 yrs, you can raise your family here, too. Eat-in, cabinet kitchen w/convenience of 1st fl laundry and full bath, spacious formal dining room w/ bay window, living room and entrance foyer complete the first level. Second level features 3 bedroom, walk in -hall closet and full bath. added features include replacement windows, vinyl siding, paved driveway and level back yard. Add your own cosmetic touches and this could be the home you are seeking. Aberman Assoc Inc. Sandra DeRienzo  978-537-4971 x 42

Gail Watson

installations in preventing such leaks. The deadline for homeowners to bring their heating oil systems into compliance with the leak prevention requirements is Sept. 30. For more information on the Homeowner Heating Safety Law, turn to: http://www.mass.gov/dep/cleanup/ laws/hhsl.htm. - Submitted Article

Leominster $179,900

Opportunity knocks! Two family in Leominster with almost 1/2 acre of land in need of TLC......great investment! Aberman Assoc Inc. Tracy Sladen 978-537-4971 x 17

Spacious center entry Cape with large living room, formal dining, eat-in kitchen, first floor family room and excercise room with sliders to deck to above ground pool and hot tub. Three spacious bedrooms with 2 full baths up. Master bedroom has bath with hot tub. First floor laundry. Exterior stone wall enhances entry with KOI Pond and water fall. One car garage plus detatched unit for car storage. Very private wooded dead-end street. Owners are relocating and looking for a quick sale. Aberman Assoc Inc Anna  Mary Kraemer 978-537-4971 x 25 www.annamarykraemer.com

Leominster $199,900

Just call it “HOME!”. Wonderful Cape Cod located on a dead end street. Bright and open kitchen with ceramic floor, adjoining dining room with bow window and HW floor. MBR & Living room with HW floors. Two spacious bedrooms on second floor with built-in’s. Beautiful New 22 x 12 deck leads to level back yard. New vinyl sided storage shed. Major systems including roof, boiler, indirect hot water heater all updated in the last 5-7 yrs. Semi-finished walk out basement. EZ access to Rt.2 & I-190 Aberman Assoc Inc  Gail Lent 978-537-4971 x 15 www.gaillent.com

Lancaster $269,900

2 units up/down. Rare one owner opportunity near AUC. Currently both units are owner occupied. both will vacate at closing.. Split entry floor plan  Aberman Assoc Inc Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x 14 www. paulasavard.com

Leominster $319,900

4 br 2 1/2 bath. Young classic l shaped brick end Cape on quiet cul de sac near Whalom. 3 fireplaces, huge country kitchen great room with ajoining screened porch and deck. Private 1/2 acres Country living, city benefits..Some notice appreciate Aberman Assoc Inc  Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x 14 www.paulasavard.com

S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11 • W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

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Homes put under agreement up both year-to-year and month-to-month WALTHAM, Mass. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; September 6, 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Massachusetts Association of Realtors (MAR) reported today that the number of singlefamily homes and condominiums put under agreement in August went up for the fourth straight month compared to the same time in 2010. On a month-to-month basis, the number of single-family homes and condos put under agreement were also up from July.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despite fluctuating economic news, Massachusetts homebuyers are making smart decisions about the real estate market,â&#x20AC;? said 2011 MAR President Laurie Cadigan, broker-owner of Barrett & Company in Concord. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They see low interest rates and attractive pricing and fundamentally know that home ownership matters to their personal and economic well being.â&#x20AC;?

The number of single-family homes put under agreement in August was up 7.14 percent compared to the same time last year (4,117 homes in 2010 to 4,411 homes in 2011). This is the fourth straight month of year-over-year increases. On a month-to-month basis, single-family homes put under agreement were up 3.7 percent from 4,253 homes in July.

The number of condos put under agreement in August was up 11 percent compared to August 2010 (1,435 units in 2010 to 1,587 units in 2011). Similar to single-family homes, this is the fourth straight month of year-over-year gains. On a month-to-month basis, condos put under agreement were up 1.9 percent from 1,558 units in July. - Submitted Article

Amount of time it takes to complete Getting in Worcester South Homes a short sale continues to be lengthy Worcester South Homes is a monthly real estate section that is geared to feature the local homes on the real estate market and the news of area real estate agents. Please let us know your news. To submit information or for questions please contact, Josh Farnsworth, News Editor at The Millbury-Sutton Chronicle, through e-mail at editor@millburysutton. com or by phone at 508-865-1645.

Plan for the Expected â&#x20AC;&#x201D; But Prepare for the Unexpected To enjoy a comfortable retirement lifestyle, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to have adequate ďŹ nancial resources in place. And that means you must plan for the expected â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but prepare for the unexpected. In planning for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;expectedâ&#x20AC;? aspects of your retirement, consider these factors:  t:PVSWJTJPOPGZPVSSFUJSFNFOUMJGFTUZMFÂ&#x2030;8IBUEPZPVXBOUUPEPEVSJOHZPVS SFUJSFNFOU ZFBST  4QFOE NPSF UJNF XJUI ZPVS GBNJMZ  7PMVOUFFS  0QFO ZPVS PXO CVTJOFTT :PVSFYQFDUBUJPOTPGZPVSSFUJSFNFOUMJGFTUZMFXJMMEJDUBUF UPBMBSHFFYUFOU  your savings and investment strategies.  øt:PVSFYQFOTFTÂ&#x2030;0ODFZPVWFFTUBCMJTIFEBWJTJPOGPSZPVSSFUJSFNFOUMJGFTUZMF  you can begin to estimate the expenses you expect to incur during your retirement years. øt:PVSJODPNFÂ&#x2030;ø:PVDBOFYQFDUUPSFDFJWFJODPNFGSPNBWBSJFUZPGTPVSDFT4PDJBM Security, pensions, part-time employment and investments, such as your IRA, 401(k) Lisa M Casillo BOEBOZUBYBCMFJOWFTUNFOUBDDPVOUTZPVNBZIBWF:PVMMOFFEUPFTUJNBUFBCPVUIPX much income all these sources could provide. øt:PVSXJUIESBXBMSBUFÂ&#x2030;*GZPVSJOWFTUNFOUTBSFHPJOHUPQSPWJEFBTJHOJmDBOUQBSUPGZPVSSFUJSFNFOUJODPNF ZPV OFFEUPDBSFGVMMZNBOBHFBOOVBMXJUIESBXBMTGSPNZPVSQPSUGPMJPø:PVSXJUIESBXBMSBUFJTLFZJOIFMQJOHUPFOTVSFZPVS portfolio provides for your needs as long as you need it. øt:PVSQPSUGPMJPSFMJBODFSBUFÂ&#x2030;3FMBUFEUPZPVSQPSUGPMJPXJUIESBXBMSBUFJTZPVSQPSUGPMJPSFMJBODFSBUFÂ&#x2030;IPX NVDIZPVSFMZPOZPVSQPSUGPMJPUPQSPWJEFJODPNF'PSJOTUBODF JGZPVXJMMOFFE QFSZFBSJOSFUJSFNFOU BOE  XJMMDPNFGSPNZPVSQPSUGPMJP ZPVSSFMJBODFSBUFXJMMCF  EJWJEFECZ  ø:PVSSFMJBODFSBUF XJMMIFMQEFUFSNJOFIPXTFOTJUJWFZPVSTUSBUFHZNJHIUCFUPPVUTJEFFWFOUT TVDIBTNBSLFUnVDUVBUJPOT 8IJMFZPVOFFEUPCFGBNJMJBSXJUIUIFTFFYQFDUFEFMFNFOUTPGZPVSSFUJSFNFOU ZPVBMTPNVTUCFQSFQBSFEGPSUIF unexpected aspects, such as these:   t-JWJOHMPOHFSUIBOZPVFYQFDUÂ&#x2030;)PXMPOHZPVDBOFYQFDUUPMJWFJTTPNFXIBUPGBNZTUFSZ*GZPVXFSFUPMJWF MPOHFSUIBOZPVBOUJDJQBUF XPVMEZPVCFmOBODJBMMZQSFQBSFE 5PIFMQNBLFTVSFZPVSNPOFZMBTUTUISPVHIPVUZPVS MJGFUJNF ZPVNBZOFFEUPDPOTJEFSJOWFTUNFOUTUIBUDBOQSPWJEFZPVXJUIBMJGFUJNFJODPNFTUSFBN"OEZPVSMPOHFWJUZ XJMMPCWJPVTMZBMTPBGGFDUZPVSBOOVBMQPSUGPMJPXJUIESBXBMSBUF t*OnBUJPOÂ&#x2030;"UBOBWFSBHFJOnBUJPOSBUFPGUISFFQFSDFOU ZPVSDPTUPGMJWJOHXJMMEPVCMFJOBCPVUZFBST5IBUT XIZ FWFOJOSFUJSFNFOU ZPVXJMMOFFETPNFHSPXUIPSJFOUFEJOWFTUNFOUT TVDIBTRVBMJUZTUPDLTUPFOTVSFZPVDBO NBJOUBJOZPVSEFTJSFESFUJSFNFOUMJGFTUZMF#VUJGUIFVOFYQFDUFEIBQQFOT BOEJOnBUJPOUBLFTPGGBUBNVDIIJHIFSUIBO average level, you may need to consider a greater amount of investments that offer the potential for rising income. ø t )FBMUI DBSF Â&#x2030; &WFO BGUFS ZPVSF PO .FEJDBSF  XIJDI XPOU DPWFS FWFSZUIJOH  ZPV OFFE UP QSFQBSF GPS UIF VOFYQFDUFE TVDIBTBMFOHUIZJMMOFTTPSUIFOFFEGPSTPNFUZQFPGMPOHUFSNDBSF:PVNBZBMTPXJTIUPiTFMGJOTVSFw to a certain extent by setting aside funds in a liquid, stable account. #ZQPTJUJPOJOHZPVSJOWFTUNFOUQPSUGPMJPGPSCPUIUIFFYQFDUFEBOEUIFVOFYQFDUFE ZPVDBOHPBMPOHXBZUPXBSE enjoying the retirement lifestyle you seek. So plan ahead â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and make the necessary adjustments as time goes by. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This article was submitted by Lisa Casillo, Financial Advisor, Edward Jones, lisa.casillo@edwardjones.com, 325 Main St, Worcester, 508-363-3900â&#x20AC;?

44

WORCESTERMAG.COM

â&#x20AC;˘ S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11

WALTHAM, Mass. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; September 13, 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Massachusetts Association of Realtors (MAR) today announced that Realtors members were more confident about the market in August 2011 compared to the same time last year according to the most recent Realtors Market Index. They also saw improvement over this past July. The August Realtors Price Index (RPI) was down from both August 2010 and the previous month. When asked about short sales, over 30 percent of the respondents who completed a short sale in the past 12 months reported that it takes on average more than six months or more to close the transaction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Based on the results of the survey and hearing from Realtors members in the field, the further we got away from talk about the debt ceiling the better everyone felt about the market in August,â&#x20AC;? said 2011 MAR President-Elect Trisha McCarthy, broker with Keller Williams Realty in Newburyport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Realtors still believe that short sales are taking too long and the length of time to complete the transaction is hurting the market.â&#x20AC;? In August 2011, the Realtors Market Index was 28.57, which was up 40.3 percent from the August 2010 score of 20.36. This is only the second monthly year-over-year increase since May 2010. On a month-to-month basis, the August RMI was up

6.27 percent from the 26.89 score in July 2011. Measured on a 100point scale, a score of 50 is the midpoint between a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strongâ&#x20AC;? (100 points) and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;weakâ&#x20AC;? (0 points) market condition. In August 2011, the Realtors Price Index was 39.92, which was down 4.48 percent from the August 2010 RPI of 41.79. This is the third straight month of year-over-year decreases. On a month-to-month basis, the RPI was down less than one percent (-0.67 percent) from the July 2011 RPI of 40.19. Realtors members were asked in August how many of their transactions in the past 12 months had been short sales. Of those who answered yes, 33 percent reported having completed 1-2 short sales; 10 percent reported 3-4 short sales; 8 percent reported 5-10 short sales; and 4 percent reported 10 or more short sales. Nearly half (46 percent) responded that they did not have short sales in the past 12 months. For those Realtors who completed a short sale, 22 percent reported it took an average of 1-3 months to close on the home; 46 percent reported it took 4-6 months to close; 25 percent reported 6-12 months to close; and 7 percent reported it took over 12 months on average to close a short sale. - Submitted Article


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(978) 728-4302

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cornering the Marketâ&#x20AC;?--itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fringe beneďŹ t. - By Matt Jones

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Š2010 Jonesinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0472.

S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11 â&#x20AC;˘ W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

47


CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

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ITEMS UNDER $2011

where Quality still Matters. Valet Parking Attendants Needed. Work @ various locations in the Worcester Area. Full-time and Part-time positions available. BeneďŹ ts included for Full-time including medical and dental. Fun outdoor work with potential for advancement! Must drive standard. Customer Service experience is a plus. Between base+tips valets earn $11+ per hour. Call 877-455-5552 or visit www.valetparkofamerica.com/ employment

4 Aluminum Wheels. 4 lugs, exc. cond. Came off 03 Hyundai Sonata, 16". $300.00 978-502-8031 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Newtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dairy Toy (milk) truck bank Replica of Original trucks, Asking $40 978-534-8632 Appliances GE Profile Micro & Elec Range, Kitchen Aid D/ W & Whirlpool Refridg. All for $1,050 508-886-6959 Clarinet Excellent Condition with stand $200 Call 508-886-6003

Hub Caps Approx 20 Hub Caps $20 for all 508-852-2348 KYB Shock Absorbers for 1999 Chevy S10 Front, New pair $40 Call Dan 978537-8603 Mahogany Coffee Table 30" X 47" Shaker Legs, w/ Two Drawers. Perfect Condition $35 508-615-7178 Maple Bedroom Set Full bed/End Table 5 Drawer Bureau $400/BO 978-464-2776 Metal Shelving Unit 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; lemon yellow. Shelves are adjustable. Great for storage or garage $75 508-829-9275

Super Treadmill Only 250 hours, heart rate monitor, on board diagnostics, $500 978-466-8875 VHS and DVD Movies over 1,000, rack included $150 978-808-0171 Violin- Refurbished Chinese half size, $150 with no bow or $200 with new bow 508-791-1832 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Red Sox Pack worth $600 yours for $200 All Med T-Shirt, Jersey, Pants,Jackets 508-756-1832 WANTED TO BUY WANTED: WORCESTER PORCELAIN LICENSE PLATES

1914-1930 Diamond & Rectangular Versions WILL PAY UP TO $500 FOR PLATES IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Please call or email Eric at 818-645-6172 or erict4456@earthlink.net

Guide to

Antiques & Collectivles

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh My Goshâ&#x20AC;? Antiques & Collectibles Found at The Cider Mill

Growing multi-media publisher seeks selfmotivated advertising sales representatives for a variety of roles. Candidates must have at least two years experience in sales (preferably in print/interactive media), be a self-starter, possess strong interpersonal skills, be able to work independently and also offer collaborative on support to the team. You will Dbe onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tresponsible op als! flmaintaining for building a book of business, p o i fl uwith r g creative S E current accounts, and working tastes even yo be FREE tt er tohcreate advertisements and programs for wit A DELIVVERY!team a Coke clients. E 011453 HOUS We offer an innovative, entrepreneurial O P E N June 9, 2011 Menu! M , ay PM Thursd 00 -7:00 work culture with Ă&#x20AC;exibility and great aat 6am 5: income mpus ner Ca potential. Interested candidates shouldGardsubmit a brief cover letter and resume to gcharter@ holdenlandmark.com Wraapp TE

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15 Waushacum Ave., Sterling 978-422-8675 Open 7 Days a Week 11 am to 5 pm Thursdays 11 am to 8 pm

HELP WANTED LOCAL

AC

48

3 Piece Coffee table set Glass top, Black Raught Iron, $75 or Best offer 978342-7283

Hard Rock Maple Dining Room Set Table w/ 2 leafs, 6 capt chairs & hutch. Gd cond $300 508-835-3712

Queen Bed Frame wood head and foot board with rails $75 973-650-1333

P

MERCHANDISE

Four Cadillac Escalade Rims P265-70-R17 mounted on GoodYear tires $400 508434-0316

Nova Walker Brand New, on wheels with a seat, storage, fold-able. $50 508-340-0076

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Eastern BMX Bicycle For Sale, New, Never used Asking $250 508-450-0332

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HELP WANTED

Dining Room Table Set Bev tinted glass top 4 chairs wicker back metal frame $100/B.O. 508-886-0135 508-886-0135

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Vaillancourt Folk Art is one of the countries leading producers of Chalkware figurines and Holiday collectibles. Our unique retail gallery is looking for a part-time salesperson for the holiday season. Sales experience and weekend availability are required. To schedule an appointment please call Valerie or Bette at 508-476-3601.

ITEMS UNDER $2011

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HELP WANTED

ITEMS UNDER $2011

ACCEPTE

HELP WANTED LOCAL

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EMPLOYMENT

(978) 728-4302

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www.centralmassclass.com

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CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

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Call Carrie at 978-728-4302 to place your ad ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY & REACH

ASK about double blocks (size 3.75" x 1.75") and COMBO pricing into our other zone and reach 50,000 households in 26 towns in Central Mass each week. FREE line ad included with each block purchased.

30, 000 households each week! Add another Zone and reach 50,000 households! Call Erin at 978-728-4302 for more information. Deadline: Monday, Noon.

Appl ian ce Repa ir

Bed Bugs

Girardi and Sons

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sniffs out Bed Bugs

Snow Plowing â&#x20AC;˘ Rubbish Removal Metal Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Appliance Repair

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Moving to a new home? College kids home for the Holidays? Travelling a lot and staying in hotels? Concerned about bed bugs?

FENCE & STONE

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K&C CLEANING

Full-House Maid Service â&#x20AC;˘ OfďŹ ce Cleaning Seasonal Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘ References Available Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Bonded & Insured Katia & Carlos Wanzeler P.O. Box 3092, Worcester, MA 01613 774-275-2007 â&#x20AC;˘ k_ccleaning@hotmail.com www.kandccleaningservice.com

â&#x20AC;˘ FENCE ALL TYPES - Cedar, Vinyl, Chain link, Post and Rail, Ornamental, Pool, Temporary Security Rentals â&#x20AC;Ś â&#x20AC;˘ STONE HARDSCAPES - Stone walls, Walkways, Patios, Concrete Work, Pool Patios, Excavation â&#x20AC;Ś

Worcester, MA â&#x20AC;˘ 774-253-9985

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Fina ncia l Adv isor

Fl oo r Cov er ing

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GET ANSWERS to Your Financial Questions.

Flooring <HDUVLQ%XVLQHVV

B RADâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOME I MPROVEMENT

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Invited... At Edward Jones, we Presentation: Economic Update believe Ă&#x20AC;nancial education is an important Presenter: Jon Burke, Regional Direct Vice President part of achieving your goals. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Organization: Goldman Sachs weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to invite you to our upcoming Dinner will be served program. At this unique event, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn Wednesday October 5, 2011 about important investment strategies. The Olde Post OfďŹ ce Pub, 1 Ray St. & Rte. 40, North Grafton, MA 01536 Call Beth Dustin at 508-363-3900 by 09/28/2011 to reserve your seat for this event. Lisa M. Casillo The investments in variable annuities are offered by prospectus. You should consider the investment objective, risks, and charges and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus Financial Advisor contains this and other information. Your Edward Jones ďŹ nancial advisor can provide a prospectus, 325 Main St. which you should read carefully before investing. Worcester, MA 01608 www.edwardjones.com 508-363-3900 Member SIPC

Average Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landscaping Full property management company â&#x20AC;˘ C ommercial & Residential

We are a local Worcester landscape company offering services such as: Mowing, Fall Clean-ups, Debris Removal, Site Work, Concrete Repair, Chimney Repointing, Hardscapes, and Pruning.

Joe Kaminski â&#x20AC;˘ 774-670-8278 â&#x20AC;˘ www.averagejoeslandscaping.com

Water Damage COMPLETE REPAIRS & PAINTING Call Jim Charest 508-865-4321 â&#x20AC;˘ 508-277-9421

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& 6

CARPET & LINOLEUM 6T<GV,QVWDOOHGZLWK3DG %HUEHU3OXVKRU&RPPHUFLDO Free Metal Included Call Tom

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Fall Clean-ups â&#x20AC;˘ Prunning & Trimming Patio â&#x20AC;˘ Walkway â&#x20AC;˘ Retaining Wall â&#x20AC;˘ Steps Sprinkler Systems â&#x20AC;˘ Sod â&#x20AC;˘ Mulch FREE ESTIMATES! All Work Guaranteed

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find us on Real Estate â&#x20AC;˘ Jobs â&#x20AC;˘ Auto â&#x20AC;˘ Services

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CL ASSIFIEDS

Remodeling & Repairs Kitchens & Baths â&#x20AC;˘ Windows & Doors Finished Basements â&#x20AC;˘ Decks RooďŹ ng

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508-835-1644 for free estimate

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Central Mass Classifieds!! Rubbish Remova l

Scr a p Met a l R emova l FREE SCRAP METAL REMOVAL

DUMPSTER SPECIALS 10 yd. - $230 â&#x20AC;˘ 15 yd. - $300 Home Clean-outs Landscape Clean-ups Demo Rubbish â&#x20AC;˘ Appliances â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give us a call & weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll talk trash.â&#x20AC;?

508-864-7755

Free pick up of all unwanted scrap metal from your business, home or yard. Appliances, Lawn Equipment, Auto Parts, Anything Metal

The Scrap Guy 508.410.4437 mayer8104@hotmail.com Steel, Copper, Brass, Aluminum

S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11 â&#x20AC;˘ W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

49


CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

www.centralmassclass.com Yard Sales & Flea Markets

Yard Sales & Flea Markets

Yard Sales & Flea Markets

GAAMHA, INC. Art & Craft Expo October 1, 2011 10 am to 3 pm 208 Coleman Street Ext. Gardner, Mass. Appearing 12pm-2pm Country Singers Dave Young & Angela West (Of Showdown) Local Artists, Crafters & Businesses. Come Join the Fun!

HOLDEN Mount View Middle School. 270 Shrewsbury St. Sat. Oct. 1st, 8am-1pm. Giant Yard Sale and Free Car Wash. Something for everyone! To benefit Mount View Middle School’s Kids in the Kommunity.

SUTTON 61 Hutchinson Rd. Sat. Oct. 1st, 9am-3pm. (Rain date Oct. 2nd) Books, furniture, household items, electronics, toys, games, puzzles, and much more!

PRINCETON 315 Mirick Rd. Sat. Oct. 1st, 8am-2pm. Barn Sale. Clothing, holiday, furniture, art, garden, toys, sports, kitchen, household items. .

MILLBURY Saint Brigid Church Hall 59 Main St. Oct. 1st, 6am-3pm. Books, toys, household goods, small furniture items. Concession stands, select vendors, and decorative items.

ROCHDALE, 11 Hankey St. Sept. 30th & Oct. 1st, Fri & Sat. 8AM-1PM. No early birds. Multi-family Tag & Bake Sale. Something for everyone of all ages.

We Buy Unwanted & Junk Vehicles

HOLDEN MULTI-FAMILY High Ridge Road, Saturday. October 1st, 9-3 Furniture, Antiques, household, toys, clothes, collectibles and MORE!!! 508-829-3598

HEALTHCARE SERVICES Adoption/Pregnancy Pregnant? We Can Help in Worcester! Free abortion consultation, free pregnancy test, ultrasound available. 888-310-7217 anytime or www. problempregnancy.org Elder Home Care LAETIFICARENOW Parent Sitting Services at reasonable rates! 774-262-2151

SCRAP METAL ACCEPTED

REAL ESTATE

Auto/RV

Commerical Property

1999 Wilderness 28’ Single slide 5th wheel travel trailer. Rear kitchen. Queen bed. Sleeps 6. Awning. 1 owner. Exc. cond. Asking $6695.00 508-886-8820

WEBSTER FOR RENT 2500 sf & 7500 sf free standing buildings. Loading docks, nice offices. Also 2500 sf with loading dock good for small machine shop. 9000 sf for light manufacturing or storage. 1000 sf 2nd flr space good freight elevator, space is good for any small shop. Owner will give you price you can’t refuse. Call 508-753-3670. WORCESTER 3rd floor space. Total 8000 sf or will divide 4000/4000. 20’ ceilings, cement floor, large freight elevator loading dock to this space. Owner will give you price you can’t refuse Call 508-7533670

USED AUTO PARTS

508-792-6211

USED & NEW AUTO PARTS

91 DAY GUARANTEE

FREE Nationwide Parts Locator Service

• Foreign & Domestic • Early & Late Model • Engines • Transmissions • New Radiators Toll Free1-800-992-0441 Fax 508-882-5202 • Gas Tanks • Wheels • Tires • Balancers Off Rte 122 • 358 Coldbrook Rd., • Exhaust Manifolds • Window Motors Oakham, MA www.amherstoakhamauto.com

Amherst-Oakham

50

AUTO RECYCLING Worcestermag.com

Worcester No.

508-799-9969 • s e p t e m b e r 2 9 , 2 0 11

1975 Mercedes-Benz 450SL Maroon with black interior, hard & soft tops. Excellent condition. $9,995 508-7690619 1993 Honda Accord New rebuilt 3k engine, clutch, tires, batt, new glass, full power. Must Sell! $2500 978 -874-0546 or cell 978-6026841.

2004 Honda CR-V 30,000 miles. Excellent condition. 508-791-2042 leave message.

Boats 1996 17ft. Boston Whaler 90HP Mercury w/ new trailer. $10,800.00 Call 508-886-6405

2006 Chevrolet Aveo LT 5sp. trans. 4 dr hatchback. Fully loaded. Cruise, sunroof, pwr windows, pwr locks, cd player, rare spoiler, alloy wheels. Low miles, 35k. $7,500.00 978-5346727 2006 Nissan Altima Sedan, special edition, low mileage. Silver ext/Black int $14,000 or BO. 508-826-0197

Campers/Trailers 1995 Chateau Travel Trailer 27’ft. Queen bed w/ exit door. Walk thru BA, w/ 2 sliding doors. Nonsmoking. A/C, Heat. New tires, awning, blue interior. Nice. $4600.00 508-757-4753 2008 Fleetwood Niagara Pop-up camp, exc cond, 2 kings, flush toilet, shower, 3way fridge, stove, micro. Pop out din area to bed. 508 -395-1558 $12,500.

SEE MORE ON LINE

www.TheLandmark.com

Car For Sale? Truck for Sale? RV? SUV? Run your ad until it sells!!

Trust us to do it once and do it right.

Deposits conveniently taken over the phone.

2011 Chevrolet Malibu Low mileage. Never seen winter. Many options. Factory coverage. Must sell. $17,900.00 OR B/O 508-769-4546

Autos

Auto/Motorcycle

Worcester, MA

Over 40 Acres! Over 3000 Vehicles!

Patriots Tailgate RV 1989 Coachman 57k orig. miles. Good tires, runs well. Painted logos. Perfect for season ticket holders. $3500.00. 508-723-6258

Autos

2008 Suzuki GSX 650/K8. All black with silver and red trim. Less than 850 miles. Cover, new battery, and lock. $5500.00 508-7926080

ROTHERS BROOKS

Autos

AUTOMOTIVE

2008 Honda Metropolitan Scooter Black and gray. Mint cond. 469 miles. Asking $1650.00. Includes helmet. 207-289-9362 OR 207-4501492.

(978) 728-4302

For Sale Mazda 3, Clean. Low miles. FAST! New tires. 5 Speed Manual Red with Black interior. Rims, Navigation, Premium Package Call for appt. 666-666-666

For Sale Subaru Mint Condition. Low miles. Garaged. New tires. New wipers. Need to see. Black with tan interior. Must see to believe. Call for appt. 555-555-5555

Private Parties Only Deadline Monday @ Noon (We monitor daily for scammers.)

Only $20 for six lines for all six papers until it sells! Reaching 125,000 readers in print AND online! Carrie at 978-728-4302


E B O T T ERE? N A W EN H SE www.centralmassclass.com

YARD SALE & FLEA MARKET DIRECTORY GAAMHA, INC. Art & Craft Expo October 1, 2011 10 am to 3 pm 208 Coleman Street Ext. Gardner, Mass. Appearing 12pm-2pm Country Singers Dave Young & Angela West (Of Showdown) Local Artists, Crafters & Businesses. Come Join the Fun!

MILLBURY Saint Brigid Church Hall 59 Main St. Oct. 1st, 6am-3pm. Books, toys, household goods, small furniture items. Concession stands, select vendors, and decorative items. HOLDEN Mount View Middle School. 270 Shrewsbury St. Sat. Oct. 1st, 8am-1pm. Giant Yard Sale and Free Car Wash. Something for everyone! To benefit Mount View Middle Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kids in the Kommunity.

Contact jshone@worcestermag.com

CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

CALL 978-728-4302 TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!

$18.00 FOR ALL 5 PUBLICATIONS & ONLINE

*5$)721)/($ 0$5.(7,1& OPEN EVERY SUNDAY OUTDOOR/INDOOR

7am - 4pm â&#x20AC;˘ Acres of Bargains â&#x20AC;˘ Hundreds of Vendors â&#x20AC;˘ Thousands of Buyers â&#x20AC;˘ 42nd Season PRINCETON 315 Mirick Rd. Sat. Oct. 1st, 8am-2pm. Barn Sale. Clothing, holiday, furniture, art, garden, toys, sports, kitchen, household items. .

ROCHDALE, 11 Hankey St. Sept. 30th & Oct. 1st, Fri & Sat. 8AM-1PM. No early birds. Multi-family Tag & Bake Sale. Something for everyone of all ages.

Rte. 140, Grafton/ Upton town line Grafton Flea is the Place to be! Selling Space 508-839-2217 www.graftonflea.com

LOOK at

ADVERTISING WORKS! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brunelle and Sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landscaping has been advertising in the Central Mass ClassiďŹ eds of Worcester Mag for many years, and more recently in all of Holden Landmark Corp. publications. We continue to advertise weekly because of the increase in business that this advertising brings! The sales staff is friendly and mindful of our needs and changes of the season, and they are very easy to work with. Need Landscaping services? Call Brunelle and Sons at 508-775-1088.

Need to promote your business? Call Carrie at 978-728-4302 to advertise in the Central Mass ClassiďŹ eds. Thank you.â&#x20AC;?

(978) 728-4302

Health, Mind & Beauty Need a friend? Call Dial-A-Friend

508.852.5242

Inspirational Messages Recorded Daily

what

24 Hours Everyday

s s sif ie dr ! t he C la fe f o o t ha v e

SUTTON 61 Hutchinson Rd. Sat. Oct. 1st, 9am-3pm. (Rain date Oct. 2nd) Books, furniture, household items, electronics, toys, games, puzzles, and much more!

Colleen and Dennis Brunelle, Brunelle and Sons Landscaping, Spencer, MA

508-885-1088. Items Under

$2011

SEPTEMBER FUN PHOTO CONTEST

To advertise contact Carrie @ 978-728-4302

Treasure Chest ofCENTRAL FR MASS EE CLASSIFIEDS Ads!

FR EE!

in the

SUBMIT ITEMS UNDER $2011 FOR FREE!

HOW COOL WERE YOU THIS SUMMER? CONTEST WINNERS!

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all you need to do! 3 ways to submit... 1. Mail completed form to Central Mass Classifieds, 285 Central Street Suite 202 Leominster 01453 2. OR FAX the completed form to 978-534-6004 3. OR Email the info with name/address/phone number to sales@centralmassclass.com

NO PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED FOR FR EE ADS PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY... We are not liable for misinformation due to ad being illegible:

TREASURE CHEST - ITEMS UNDER $2011

Have you advertised in the Central Mass ClassiďŹ eds before? Please check one. ___ Yes ___ No Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________ Town ______________________________ Zip ______________ Phone _______________________ Email Address (optional) ______________________________________________________________ Ad Text: (approx 20 characters per line includes letters, spaces, numbers, punctuation) _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

PLEASE R EA D TH E RU LES:

Sherry Rotondo of Rutland, MA

Brian Guagnini of Shrewsbury, MA

THANK YOU TO ALL WHO ENTERED!

Maximum 4 lines (approx. 20 characters per line). We reserve the right to edit if ads come in that are too long. NO phone orders accepted. See ways to submit above. Merchandise Ads Only - NO autos, snowmobiles, RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, trailers, boats, ATVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, etc. We have a special rate for these ads ($20 till it sells). NO business Ads accepted for this section. If we suspect the ads are being sent in by a business, we reserve the right to refuse. Limit 1 ad per name/address/phone number every 2 weeks. Ads will run for 2 weeks. Limit 1 item per ad (group of items OK if one price for all and under $2011) Price must be listed in ad.

DEADLINE FRIDAY 5 PM to begin following week â&#x20AC;˘ HAPPY TREASURE HUNTING! S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11 â&#x20AC;˘ W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

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CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

MILITARY HERO OF THE WEEK George A. Dansereau enlisted in the U.S. Army in Worcester on April 1, 1943 at the tender age of 18. His birth date being January 25, 1925. He was initially assigned to the Fort Benning, GA. Jump School, 101st Airborne Division. He participated in the Normandy Invasion and jumped as part of the ďŹ rst wave at 0100 Hours. He was wounded in Caratan France and he jumped into Vechel, Holland on September 16, 1944 and also fought in the Battle of Bastone as an infantryman on December 16, 1944. He returned home on December 18, 1945 and was married to Lois I. Lazerick on September 21, 1946. George worked 37 years for the Wyman Gordon Company in Worcester retiring in 1991. He lived in Worcester and surrounding towns his entire life. He and Lois raised 3 children; their two sons also served their country in the U.S Navy and the U.S. Army in Vietnam. They currently reside at Colony Three Retirement Homes in Worcester.

Home Of The Free, Thanks To The Brave

MILITARY HERO OF THE WEEK Is there a special service person in your life?

The Central Mass Classifieds would like to feature members of our Armed Forces on a regular basis. If you have a special service person in your life, please email ejohnson@leominsterchamp.com with some information, photo, brief summary of his/her service, and we will be happy to recognize them in the Central Mass Classifieds. The brave men and women of the United States Armed Forces should be remembered all year long. Call Erin at 978-728-4302 or email ejohnson@leominsterchamp.com for more information. God bless our troops.

52

WORCESTERMAG.COM

â&#x20AC;˘ S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11

(978) 728-4302

LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES WORCESTER HOUSING AUTHORITY ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

September 29, 2011 SEALED BIDS shall be received at the Purchasing OfďŹ ce, 69 Tacoma St., Worceseter, MA 01605 IFBs maybe picked up at the location above or will be mailed/emailed to you . Please email purchasing@worcester-housing.com or call (508) 695-3203, TDD (508) 798-4530. Bidders are responsible for ensuring they have received any/all addenda prior to submitting a bid. Separate awards will be made for each IFB. WHA reserves the right to reject any all responses, in whole or in part, deemed to be in their best interest. Award of all contracts is subject to the approval of the WHA Executive Director or Board of Commissioners. The Operating Agency shall indemnify and hold harmless the WHA and its ofďŹ cers or agents from any and all third party claims arising from activities under these Agreements as set fort in MGL c.258, section 2 as amended. Bid No. 11-10

Release Date 9/29/2011

11-34 9/29/2011 Re Cappoli Chief Procurement OfďŹ cer

Project Title Bid Surety RFP - Telephone Answering Services N/A Pre-Proposal Conference - 69 Tacoma St., Worcester, MA RFP - Wireless Local Area Network Furnish & Install N/A Pre-Proposal Conference - 69 Tacoma St., Worcester, MA

TOWN OF SUTTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Sutton Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, October 5, 2011 at 7:30PM, at the Sutton Town Hall, 4 Uxbridge Road, Sutton, MA. The purpose of this hearing is to review a Notice of Intent submitted to the Conservation Commission by Randall Swigor, Whitinsville Water Company, Whitinsville, MA. The project consists of installation of water pipe between surface water reservoirs to protect and maintain public water supply, on Map 38 & (44), Parcels 12-15 & (10, & 14) off 503 Mendon Street, Sutton MA. This notice is publicized in accordance with the provisions of General Law Chapter 131, Section 40 commonly known as the Wetlands Protection Act, and the Sutton Wetlands and Riverfront District Administration Bylaw. 9/29/2011

Bid Opening 11:30 a.m., October 13, 2011 11:30 a.m., October 6, 2011 10:00 a.m., October 13, 2011 10:00 a.m., October 6, 2011

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main Street Worcester, MA 01608 Docket No. WO11D2644DR DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING Lydia Tetreault vs. John Louis Tetreault 7RWKH'HIHQGDQW7KH3ODLQWLIIKDVÂżOHGD&RPSODLQWIRU'LYRUFH UHTXHVWLQJWKDWWKH&RXUWJUDQWDGLYRUFHIRULUUHWULHYDEOH EUHDNGRZQ7KH&RPSODLQWLVRQÂżOHDWWKH&RXUW$Q$XWRPDWLF 5HVWUDLQLQJ2UGHUKDVEHHQHQWHUHGLQWKLVPDWWHUSUHYHQWLQJ \RXIURPWDNLQJDQ\DFWLRQZKLFKZRXOGQHJDWLYHO\LPSDFW WKHFXUUHQWÂżQDQFLDOVWDWXVRIHLWKHUSDUW\SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. <RXDUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGDQG UHTXLUHGWRVHUYHXSRQLydia Tetreault, 32 Puritan Avenue #2 Worcester, MA 01604 \RXUDQVZHULIDQ\RQRUEHIRUH 11/23/2011,I\RXIDLOWRGRVRWKHFRXUWZLOOSURFHHGWRWKH KHDULQJDQGDGMXGLFDWLRQRIWKLVDFWLRQ<RXDUHDOVRUHTXLUHGWR ÂżOHDFRS\RI\RXUDQVZHULIDQ\LQWKHRIÂżFHRIWKH5HJLVWHURI WKLV&RXUW Witness, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. 'DWH$XJXVW Stephen G. Abraham Register of Probate 


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CENTRAL MASS CLASSIFIEDS

(978) 728-4302

LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 Docket No. WO11P2816PM CITATION GIVING NOTICE OF PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF CONSERVATOR OR OTHER PROTECTIVE ORDER PURSUANT TO G.L. c. 190B §5-304 & §5-405 In the matter of: Mary F Briddon RESPONDENT (Person to be Protected/Minor) Of: Millbury, MA To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Scott L Briddon of Millbury, MA, in the above captioned matter alleging that Mary F Briddon is in need of a Conservator or other protective order and requesting that Scott L Briddon of Millbury, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Conservator to serve Without Surety on the bond. The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondent is disabled, that a protective order or appointment of a Conservator is necessary, and that the proposed Conservator is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court. You have the right to object to this proceeding If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 10/18/2011. This day in NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date. IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the abovenamed person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: September 20, 2011 Stephen G. Abraham Register of Probate 9/29/2011

TOWN OF SUTTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Sutton Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, October 5, 2011, at 7:15PM, at the Sutton Town Hall, 4 Uxbridge Road, Sutton, MA. The purpose of this hearing is to review a Request for Determination of Applicability submitted to the Conservation Commission by Jen Hager, and Evan Kent, Town of Sutton, Sutton, MA. The project consists of Maintenance of existing trail system (4 trails) to include minor clearing, clearance trimming, removal or mitigation of rocks, roots and other obstacles in trail bed, two crossings with puncheon bridges and or flow structures, and installation of signage and pervious parking at the farm and along Central Turnpike. Also cut one new trail for advanced trail users, on Map 23 (30), Parcel 24, (59, 61), for Shaw Farm off Shaw Lane, in Sutton. This notice is publicized in accordance with the provisions of General Law Chapter 131, Section 40 commonly known as the Wetlands Protection Act, and the Sutton Wetlands and Riverfront District Administration Bylaw. 9/29/2011

MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain Mortgage given by Neil K. McCoy to Navigant Credit Union dated November 15, 2007, recorded with Worcester County Worcester District Registry of Deeds, Book 42072, Page 330, the undersigned being the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said Mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at:9:00 a.m. on Monday, October 24, 2011, upon the hereinafter-described premises, known as and numbered 193 Horne Way, Unit 2, Building 31 of the Brierly Pond Condominium, Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, all and singularly the premises described in said Mortgage, to wit:Building 31, Unit 2, 193 Horne Way (the “Unit”) of the Brierly Pond Condominium in Millbury, MA, (the “Condominium”) created pursuant to Chapter 183A of the Massachusetts General Laws by Master Deed dated October 21, 2002 and recorded with the Worcester District Registry of Deeds in Book 27826, Page 317, as amended of record (the “Master Deed”), together with (a) 0.69879 percentage interest in the common areas and facilities of said Condominium as provided for in said Master Deed, (b) such rights and easements appurtenant to the Unit as may be set forth in any documents governing the operation of the Condominium, including without limitation the Master Deed, Declaration of Trust dated October 21, 2002 and recorded in Book 27826, Page 341, and any administrative rules and regulations adopted pursuant thereto (the “Condominium Documents”). For title see Deed dated 11/15/2007, recorded at Book 42072, Page 327. Said premises are sometimes known as and numbered as 193 Horne Way, Unit 2, Building 31 of the Brierly Pond Condominium, Millbury, Massachusetts. The above-described premises shall be subject to all easements, restrictions, municipal or other public taxes, assessments, liens or claims in the nature of liens, outstanding tax titles, building, zoning and other land use laws and all permits and approvals issued pursuant thereto, including, without limitation, orders of conditions, and existing encumbrances of record created prior to said Mortgage, if there be any. Said premises are to be sold subject to the right of redemption of the United States of America, if any there be. TERMS OF SALE: The highest bidder shall be required to make a deposit of $10,000.00 to the holder of said Mortgage, in cash or by certified or bank cashier’s check at the time and place of said sale of said premises. The balance of the purchase price is to be paid to said holder in cash, by certified check or bank cashier’s check, and thereupon the deed shall be delivered, in thirty (30) days from the date of sale at the firm of Cunningham, Machanic, Cetlin, Johnson, Harney & Tenney, LLP, Attorneys for said holder, 220 North Main Street, Natick, Massachusetts. The successful bidder shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Terms of Sale. The description of the premises contained in said Mortgage shall control in the event of an error in publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the time and place of sale. Navigant Credit Union Present Holder of Said Mortgage By its Attorneys, CUNNINGHAM, MACHANIC, CETLIN, JOHNSON, HARNEY & TENNEY, LLP Robert F. Tenney CUNNINGHAM, MACHANIC, CETLIN, JOHNSON, HARNEY & TENNEY, LLP 220 North Main Street Natick, MA 01760 (508) 651-7524 MSRE: #311791 9/29, 10/6, 10/13/2011

ANSWERS TO TODAY’S PUZZLES

S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 11 • W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

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Two minutes with...

Lori Leinbach FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR OF CULINARY UNDERGROUND OF SOUTHBOROUGH, CHEF LORI LEINBACH IS A FORMER GRADE SCHOOL TEACHER AND A GRADUATE OF THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF CULINARY ARTS. A MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CULINARY PROFESSIONALS, AMERICAN FEDERATION OF CHEFS AND WOMEN CHEFS AND RESTAURATEURS, LEINBACH HAS COMBINED HER ADMIRATION OF TRADITIONAL HOME COOKING WITH HER LOVE OF TEACHING BY FOUNDING A SCHOOL FOR THE NON PROFESSIONAL CULINARY HOBBYIST. CULINARY UNDERGROUND AIMS TO INSPIRE THE SKILLS OF A HOME CHEF THROUGH CLASSES FROM EVERYTHING SUCH AS CHEESE MAKING TO FRENCH MACAROONS TO GREAT WEEKNIGHT FISH. WE TOOK A FEW MOMENTS (ABOUT 2 MINUTES ACTUALLY) TO PICK THE BRAIN OF LEINBACH AND FIND OUT WHAT SHE’S COOKING UP.

How old were you when you fell in love with cooking? Probably around 9 or 10, just hanging around the kitchen watching my mother cook.

Dr. Lisa M. Giarrusso & Gregory Livanos Diplomates, American Board of Orthodontics

Practice Limited to Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 100 MLK Jr. Blvd. Worcester, MA 01608 (508) 753-2489

276 Main Street Spencer, MA 01562 (508) 885-2749 www.tightbite.com

When did you realize you could make a living as a Chef? I’ll let you know when that happens!

What attracted you to teaching culinary arts? I love teaching and I love food – you can’t find a better gig.

CHILDREN’S DENTISTS of Worcester

What inspired you to open Culinary Underground?

How many instructors do you have on staff?

The realization that people don’t learn to cook at home at mother’s knee – mother’s been in the workforce for 40 years.

Four permanent, and some guest chefs with certain specialties – like Greek cooking.

What is your typical student looking for? Confidence.

About how many classes are taught at CU? We offer at least 4-5 classes per week, not including private classes.

Can anyone learn to cook? Yes, but only if they’re motivated!

Where do you find inspiration for a class?

Biggest fear most of your students have that are easily overcome?

Usually in the produce section or at the farmer’s market: if the fennel is nice that week, I’ll build a meal around it.

Knife skills, hands down. People are afraid of their knives, but they gain a lot of confidence with proper technique and practice, practice, practice!

What is the most popular class at Culinary Underground? Our Very Basic cooking series that’s designed for beginners. Couples Nights are very popular, too.

What is the one culinary rule you’d like all of your students to walk away with? Rules are meant to be broken! You’ll learn more from making a mistake than playing it safe. Learn more at culinaryunderground.com -Doreen Manning

KeatingEnterprises,Inc. “More Than Just Another Landscaper”

Dr. Daniel Moheban certified, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

Dr. Manouch Darvish www.childrensdentistofworcester.com 200 Lincoln St. • Worcester, MA 01605 • 508-756-6264

Taking Care of All Your Little Things. 54

WORCESTERMAG.COM • SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

Design • Construction & Maintenance Snow Operations • Sweeping 44 Years of Landscaping Design Construction & Maintenance Excellence Michael J. Keating, President 9 Halmstad St., Worcester

508.753.6415

www.keilandscaping.com


SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

55


NFL NETWORK AND NFL REDZONE.

I T ’ S A F OOT B A L L WON D E R L AN D.

CHARTER TV® in HD

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The NFL season. It’s like Christmas for football fans. And to make it even merrier, Charter is now offering NFL Network and NFL RedZone. Give yourself the gift that keeps on hitting today.

Call 1-888-GET-CHARTER or visit charter.com/nfl.

*with 2-year agreement and qualifying bundle purchase.

Also ask about getting

©2011 Charter Communications. Offer good thru 10/31/11. Offer valid to qualified residential customers only who have no outstanding obligation to Charter. *Early termination fees apply; total package price Year 1 $99.97/mo and Year 2 $119.97/ mo; standard rates apply after 2 years. If customer terminates agreement early, a prorated early termination fee of up to $150 is due (except in MO and LA). MO and LA only: Fee of up to $150 applies if TV and/or Internet service is terminated early; If phone service is terminated, no early termination fee will apply; however, discounted rates will end and standard rates will apply; for complete details, visit charter.com/PGpolicy. Installation, taxes, fees, and surcharges extra; equipment may be required and charges may apply. Programming lineup may vary. Charter HD receiver required for HD service; TV must be HD capable. Services are subject to all applicable service terms and conditions, which are subject to change. Trademarks belong to their respective owners. Services not available in all areas. Other restrictions may apply. ©2011 NFL Enterprises LLC. NFL and the NFL Shield design are registered trademarks of the National Football League.

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

SEPTEMBER 29, 2011

Worcester Mag September 29, 2011  

Worcester Mag September 29, 2011

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