WOO Fall 2017

Page 1

NEW SURFACE Fall 2017




E BDITOR'S LURB

In past years, the WOO team has always included a handful of participants from prior years, but this year we began with

an entirely new team. This brought new ideas to the table and created an extremely thoughtful group that wasn’t afraid to create a dialogue. Each year I have watched as the WOO becomes a year-long collaborative project, bringing together students from all years and areas of study. All members of the WOO team arrive with their own ideas and aspirations for how to best showcase the student body through artistic production. Somehow, we come to a happy consensus in the form of a beautifully designed publication full of some of the best work that Emily Carr students have to show, including extraordinary written content created by our in-house Editorial Team, and photo & social media projects curated by our Media Team. When discussing possible themes for our first Fall issue, it was clear to the entire team that we needed to touch on the dialogue surrounding our new space, and the implications for us as students and faculty that inhabit the campus. For the team, New Surface represents our experience with the transition into our new building at Great Northern Way - what critiques we have formed and a reflection of the things we wish to see at our new space.

S R O T C E R I D RT NOTE A LULA CHRISTMAN

Editor-In-Chief, WOO Publication

'

This issue was inspired by our move to the new Great Northern Way Campus and the hiccups that came alongside it. With this issue, we really wanted to place a focus on hearing what the student body has to say - observing how our presence has settled into the new campus with our anticipation for what is to come. We wanted to focus on the observing surface as a place we exist within that has been inhabited before us and that is to be made our own. “New Surface” is an extension of the ECUAD community showcasing artworks by students and staff. We want to make it evident that creatives are here to explore, learn, educate and to try to push boundaries in our fields. Creativity is explorative, expressive and doesn’t hold onto a tangible realm per-say. I would like to thank every member of the new WOO team for all of their hard work, creativity, ideas and time spent on this issue, you’re all a 10/10. Let creative minds fill this new space and shape its future for years to come, keeping in mind that our spaces are what we make of them; surfaces are only clean until they’re drawn on.

YURIY KYRZOV THREE

Art Director, WOO Publication


Allison Chan / Wavy / 31

woo editorial team

able of contents

Alexandra McKay / Space / 19

#84 June Tang / 45 A Conversation with Jaqueline Turner Chelsea Bell Eady / 29 Surface Sanya Aurora / 35 Back & Forth Monique Germain / 8 Offering Toast to Sofia Pickstone Shannon Pot / 17

Andres Imperial / Venice Beach Skatepark / 27 Brandon Wang / Find your way / 11 Brigitte Patenaude / Untitled (from the series Abject/Object) / 22 Kat Morris / Stills / 32 Brittany Garuk / Design thinking for VSB / 41

Kelly Sun / Memoir of Goytaku / 16

Camila Szefler / Iced Drink / 47

Kelsey McDonald / Soundscapes / 34

Candice Yee / Andrea / 47

Laurence Patenaude / Bulbe / 32

Cecilia Sanchez / The Colours of Nostalgia / 33

Lula Christman / Terminal / 33

Chloe Kwok / Culture Strip / 10

Marcie Rohn Esau / Restlessness / 15

Esther Lovell / Murmuration / 26

Marcus DĂŠnommĂŠ / In a Pinch / 28

Haley Perry / Consumed / 19

Mathew Wong / Snickers Satisfies / 9

Ian Macdonald/ Trashed Coral Reef / 36

Michelle Bygodt / City Distortion / 44

Jordan Utting / We Rise Together / 44

Mona Fani / Little explorers /46

Julia Pepler / Her Majesty, the Queen / 19

Monique Germain / Sleeping / 40

Jyhyun Cho / Color in the night / 43

Raymond Boisjoly / Forgotten Worlds #1 / 39 Sandra Ngo / Untitled / 7 Simon Bermeo-Ehmann / How to do everything / 12 Susie Wilson / Hell / 48 Theo Terry / Install / 14 Tony Shi / My Joruney Through the Pacific Northwest / 23 Yongming Xie /Head space / 16

FOUR

Yuriy Kyrzov / Mild Lemon / 21


M A E T E H T

DIRECTORS

EDITORINCHIEF ARTDIRECTOR EDITORIAL DIRECTOR MEDIADIRECTOR Lula Christman

Yuriy Kyrzov

Jenna Burgess

Ester Tóthová

N G I S E D

FIVE

Zoë Boudreau

Triet Pham

Damian Oriak Rodriguez

Christine Fwu

Griffin Reichl

Celia Pankhurst

Una Gill


A I D E M Tony Shi

Simon Bermeo-Ehmann

Mona Fani

Gloria Wong

Candice Yee

EDITORIAL

Shannon Pot

Monique Germain

June Tang

X

Chelsea Bell Eady

SI

Sanya Arora


Untitled. Sandra Ngo. Silk Screen Print. 2016.


Back and Forth

Monique Germain

Backwards it stood, weakened by the old walls that echoed Back to what was once white, then grey-marked

Back then by thousands of hands, thousands of people who passed through those doors, held Back through a space and a time that constricted once not fully embraced,

And that time - if not short - was long, but full of creation and lights and voices

And it now tries to move bodies through colour and endless, endless, sound - it is this sound

that finally creates towers of white

And the lines that give us this space now - this space that helps what once hindered

the students who still go

Forth, and try, and find themselves in empty expanses of white where

Forth will come time, then noise, then those thousands of steps

which always usher in grey, and

Forth from that grey comes familiar black, then from

this black bleeds

Forth colour, and light, and new, strong walls

that echo old voices which fill the space with

EIGHT

their remembrance of what is to come.


Snickers Satisfies. Matthew Wong. Colour Negative Film. 2017.


Culture Strip. Chloe Kwok. Illustration. 2017.

TEN

This is a representation of myself accepting/rejecting my Taiwanese background. As a kid, I absolutely hated learning Mandarin and going to Chinese school; I didn’t see the advantage of it. Growing older and having travelled to Taiwan a couple years ago led me to get back in touch with my roots and accept the background I could never have peace with. In this piece, I want to show vulnerability with the display of a nude woman, but more importantly a question of whether or not she was stripping or putting on clothes. It is a piece of whether she was stripping or accepting her heritage.


Find Your Way. Brandon Wang. Photography. 2017.


TWELVE

Simon Bermeo-Ehmann. How To Do Everything. Collage. 2017.


THE INSTITUTION OF THE ART SCHOOL IS NOW THOROUGHLY IMPLICATED WITHIN GLOBAL SYSTEMS OF CAPITAL, WITH THE PREVALENCE OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS WITH MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES AND THE ART WORLD'S CLOSE TIES TO THE FINANCE-INSURANCE-REAL ESTATE MARKET. "INSTALL" EXPLORES THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE COMMONS AMIDST ENMESHED ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES AND BUREAUCRACIES WITHIN A SPACE NOMINALLY INTENDED FOR CREATIVITY.


FOURTEEN

Install. Theo Terry. Digital File. 2017.


Restlessness. Marcie Rohn Esau. Acrylic. 2017.


Head Space. Yongming Xie. Digital Illustration. 2017.

MEMORY/MEM-UH-REE/N. PL. (-IES) 1 a romantic myth about fish. 2 that fish only have a seven-second memory span. 3 every lap is like seeing the world for the first time.

GYOTAKU/GYO-TA-KU/N. 1 impression of fish. 2 ancient art of printing fish as a way to record trophy catches prior to the modern day camera. / / . (, - ) 1 fish do not blink. 2 they do not close their eyes. 3 nor do they ever cry. 4 for they live in the water. 5 breath in tear.

BLINK BLINGK VT ING ED

/ / . (, - ) 1 some fish record the smell of their childhood place on their way to ocean. 2 so they may return one day.

REPLAY REE PLEY VT ING IED

SIXTEEN

/ / . (,) 1 one follows the cycle of life, 2 repeats itself one after one. 3 the others stay in the same bowl. 4 never thought of getting out.

Memoir of Gyotaku. Kelly Sun. Print Media. 2017.

RECORD RI KAWRD VT ING ED


SEVENTEEN


EIGHTEEN


TRYING TO CREATE A PORTAL THROUGHOUT THE CITY OF VANCOUVER. LEAVING ONE PLACE TO GO TO ANOTHER, MAKING A DYSTOPIAN LANDSCAPE.

NINETEEN

Space. Alexandra McKay. 35mm Colour Film. 2016.


Her Majesty, the Queen. Julia Pepler. Collage. 2017.

Consumed. Hayley Perry. Ink, Pen and Watercolour. 2017.


COOL LEMON IS A PAINTING INSPIRED BY THE CHILL VIBRANCE OF LIMA, PERU Mild Lémon. Yuriy Kyrzov. Acrylic on Canvas. 2017.


Untitled (from the series Abject/Object). Brigitte Patenaude. Toner print.

The laundry room as a site of inquiry. A starting point to think of objects and how they feel. Bottles, plugs, wood grain, signs. Colours, shapes, and forms performing like their human friend. Swerving, bending, looped, and drooped. Broom red, bin mustard, garbage bag blue. Trying to feel as they do. Playful pathos. Abject/Object. The human presence in Abject/Object creates a tense yet playful interaction between the animate and the inanimate. Conventions are questioned as the objectsare stripped of their perfunctory use value. A parallel to human emotion is made. I see objects and the way we choose to interact with them, as a way into larger ideas about purpose, adapting, and

TWENTY TWO

belonging.


My Journey Through the Pacific Northwest. Tony Shi. Photography. 2017.

TWENTY THREE


PÄTCH WOO

1

2

2’6”

3

4

5

6 x46

7

8



TWENTY SIX

Murmuration. Esther Lovell. Letterpress on Napkins. 2017.


Venice Beach Skatepark. Andres Imperial. 35mm Photography. 2017.


In a Pinch. Marcus Dénommé. Relief print on canvas & fabric. 2017.

IN A PINCH " IS RELIEF PRINTED PATCH THAT DEPICTSAND A CAREFREE SIGNAL WITH SOME TWISTED MANGLED HAND UNDERTONES. PERFECT FOR YOUR BEST DENIM. TWENTY EIGHT

"


Conversation with with AA Conversation Jacqueline Turner Turner Jacqueline

Chelsea Bell Eady C: Jacqueline Turner is the author of four books including Seven Into Even and The Ends of the Earth, as well as a professor of writing at ECUAD. I have a couple of questions about your writing, and I am sure the students at Emily Carr would be very interested to know, especially those who have taken classes with you or are looking forward to taking classes with you. The Ends of the Earth is a collection of poetic critiques on personal and profound world events contextualized as an apocalypse. Your writing evolves from news and media impressions to slingshot into the deeply personal. Could you describe your process in constructing this compelling work?

J: The way that I constructed The Ends of the Earth was to work off of popular media sources, especially at a time around 2012 when people were talking a lot about the idea of the apocalypse, because I was curious to see how language was operating under those conditions. I looked through a lot of online sources and I used those sources as jumping off points into a poetic project that was also, as you say, very personal. I was thinking, how do people consolidate those kinds of larger ideas that are sort of massive and huge and hard to process; how do they consolidate them in terms of their everyday lives, and how do they consolidate them in terms of language, and what happens to language when we talk this way, and what does it change? Because in all of my work I’m interested in using poetry as kind of a lens through which to figure out what’s happening for me, but even more importantly how that relates to what’s happening in the larger world. Playlist: Song: Stadium Love; Album: Fantasies; Artist: Metric C: I have something that might seem kind of off topic, but I think it actually goes along well with this. How might poetry and creative writing be expressed in a visual art or design practice?

J: I think writing does operate slightly differently here at Emily Carr than it might work in other places, other universities, other contexts, because people come with the idea of the potential of writing as a material practice like any other. I think people here often approach writing the way they approach their other creative practices like painting, or they have that language, they have those kinds of analogies that they can make to writing from other creative practices that they’re involved in. That connection makes for a really dynamic environment to work in as a prof especially, because students are coming to writing from amazingly creative perspectives. Also students here come at the work with a strong sense of critique, so the culture of critique is really helpful in terms of the writing workshop, because people come ready to accept the information and the impressions people are giving them about their work, but they also come ready to give that feedback. The reciprocity that happens in the writing class is really strong here and those conditions produce some incredibly dynamic work. Playlist: Song: Ha Ha Ha Armegedon; Album: The Punk Singer; Artist: The Julie Ruin C: To quote you in Seven Into Even, “You have found your place in language”. How do you contextualize your writing practice in relation to your work with student writers?


G N I S U N I D E T S E R E T N I M I AETRY AS KIND OF A LENS PO J: I’m always thinking about my own poetic work, but I’m also thinking, as I’m reading things, about how those texts would play in the classroom. Or, I’m thinking about how language operates for me and my practice, but then how might it operate for other writers in the writing classroom. One thing I try to do for myself is use forms and structures as generative devices or ways to produce work beyond my own intention and ideas. I try to give that approach to students as well, so that they feel like writing is something they can inhabit. It can be generative for them, too. I think that oftentimes students come at writing from a position of not being able to write, or having writers block, or always hating writing, or whatever it is, so I want to open up language, because, as that quote suggests, I really feel like I process my understanding of the world through my place in language. I became a poet when I found myself in the work of other writers. I want students to have that opportunity too, so I make people read things that they probably wouldn’t read otherwise, because they don’t necessarily know where they are going to find their place in language. I’m trying to open that experience up. Playlist: Song: Regina I Don’t Want To Fight; Album: Summer of Lust; Artist: Library Voices C: Each of your books incorporates a different organizational system; in Seven into Even, the writing is broken into seven ‘books’ that each have their own poetic form, while in The Ends of Earth, the writings of others are often referenced. How do you develop your systems for creating the end product?

J: Structure is incredibly important to me; it’s almost more important than anything that I might fill the structures with, so all of my projects have some kind of structure that guides my writing process. It’s not even about how poems might be structured into a book, it’s more about how I write into the structures that I create. It started because when I was writing my first book, Into the Fold, I had small children, and I was being continually interrupted, and I felt like I didn’t have the capacity to sit down and enter into this sort of lovely, luxurious space of writing. I just had quick moments all the time, and so I developed my first form as a triptych, and I set some constraints and then I just wrote into that form. I could sit down and write a triptych, and I could take whatever I had that day and put it into that form, and that became a quick, generative strategy for me. So then, I continued using these sorts of numerical structures, as they are already available, like 7 parts in Seven into Even. 7 is a pretty ready-made structural number to

THIRTY

work off of, so I just used that structure as a way to propel ongoing poetic work.


THIRTY ONE

Wavy. Allison Chan. Acrylic on Canvas. 2017.


Stills. Kat Morris. Illustration. 2016/2017

Bulbe. Laurence Patenaude. Drypoint, Watercolour & Clay. 2017.


The Colours of Nostalgia. Cecilia Sanchez. Digital Photograph. 2017.

THIRTY THREE

Terminal. Lula Christman. Print & Packaging. 2017.

. Ú R E P O . T O C T I N X E É W M E N I C IONIONCELIVED


SOUNDSCAPES

“SoundScapes” is a promotional system that includes posters, video ads, and music videos that can be applied to various musical works. The video component engages viewers in a way that employs senses other than those which are typically used for experiencing music.

Soundscapes. Kelsey McDonald. Mixed Media. 2017.

" " is an exercise in data visualization through print and video. This particular iteration illustrates the soundscapes of the song “Marine” by Francis Dhomont. This poster is designed as a promotional ad for the song’s data visualization video.

The visual form that the data visualization has taken is derived from the concept of acousmatic music that Dhomont uses in his music. Acousmatic sound is sound one hears without seeing an originating cause; it encompasses the “concept of reduction” (epoche) which is meant to move attention away from the physical object responsible for auditory perception and toward the sound itself. I translated my auditory experience of the song into a visual experience by mimicking the layers of instruments and sounds from “Marine”.

THIRTY FOUR

Watch the video at vimeo.com/kelsdanielle/soundscapes


surface surface

HANDS GLIDE OVER THE NEW SURFACE, THE WHITE WALLS PRISTINE, UNTOUCHED, TOO PURE. I remember the comfort of the old surface, the coarse, splintered texture, the little hills under my fingertips, each having its own identity. The walls stained by all the times we touched them, memories made every time we passed through them. Here we are now, in a new surface. A new canvas, a blank slate. Unchained, uninhibited. Breaking through the shackles of the past, Marking the unmarked, Making the uncomfortable, comfortable. Here’s to a new beginning, to a fresh start, to embrace the future, and to let go of the past, though it still holds a special place in my heart. It’s time to make these white walls ours, Adding to them our ups and downs, Where we look only to the future, And make these walls our own.

Sanya Arora


THIRTY SIX

Trashed Coral Reef. Ian MacDonald. Wire Trash. 2012.


Patrik Anderson Working at ECU since 1999 Q: What are your top 3 galleries? A: Trapp Gallery, Various Locations. Trylowsky Gallery, Vancouver. Larseglass, London

F O S E C A FEMILYCARR

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @facesofemilycarr

THIRTY SEVEN

FACES OF EMILY CARR IS A STUDENT RUN PROJECT OPERATED BY the WOO Publication Media Team. FEC is a series of short posts published across social media featuring students, faculty, staff, & our friendly neighbors that occupy the space within & around ECUAD. The goal of FEC is to showcase the diversity of our community, further engaging with those around us by hearing one another’s stories. Features are published throughout the week and include a photograph and portions of a quick conversation with a fellow community member.

Look out for us around campus throughout the semester!


Tacofino Pink Truck Every Friday at ECU from 11-2pm “It’s in the excellent battered ling cod sitting in delicately flavoured chipotle mayo under fresh lettuce and tomatoes.”

Gurjap Kaur 2nd Year Illustration Q: What is most important to you? A: For me, it’s pretty significant in this political climate that I have the privilege to say whatever I want to say, in my art and in my daily life. It’s definitely not like that for everyone, which is really shitty, because being able to use your voice should be seen as a right, not a privilege. But unfortunately our world doesn’t exactly abide by that. So I hope I can continue to use

THIRTY EIGHT

my voice to help dismantle that prerogative.


Forgotten Worlds #1. Raymond Boisjoly. Silver gelatin print. 2006.

THIRTY NINE

Forgotten Words, a series of images created using double exposures, encompasses a wildnerness scene in relation to the work of Erich Von Däniken. Erich Von Däniken is a proponent of Ancient Astronaut Theory which is based on themes of alien visitation and assistance in the building of human civilization.


Sleeping. Monique Germain. Coloured Pencil. 2016.


DESIGN THINKING

design thinking for VSB

FORTY ONE

Brittany Garuk

Design thinking provides students with a motivating and engaging learning experience. Through projects that help students learn by experiencing and facing challenges, design thinking accommodates a variety of student’s different interests and abilities so that they can focus on growing their own personal initiative. Learning through design thinking helps students develop their personal interests, skills and learning styles; by responding to a variety of different learning styles, student’s own personal styles will emerge.

The Vancouver School Board has already acknowledged the importance of arts in education through their policy manual, where it is stated the value of “the arts as an area where students develop aesthetic sensitivities, intellectual stimulation and self expression through skill attainment in dance, art, music, and drama”. They state that “the arts provide a unique vehicle for perceiving. An arts education program stimulates ideas, thought, language, perceptions, and understanding which are essential to a student’s education”.

This campaign introduces these ideas to parents who have the ability to encourage the school board to explore and implement the project. The flyers show a diagram that explains design thinking and its relationship to empathy, along with showing the name of the project “Design Thinking for VSB”, and the address for the design thinking website. Through the website, more can be learned about design thinking, how it benefits learning, how it fits into the goals of the Vancouver School Board, and examples of successful integration of design thinking into other educational systems. Using data from the 2016-17 school year from public elementary schools in Vancouver, the website shows a map and table that compare in each school the number of English Language Learners and Indigenous students to the total number of students. By considering the people around us, empathy can begin.

Introducing design thinking into the current elementary curriculum would fit into the Vancouver School Board’s values and goals for 2021 which they have stated in their Strategic Plan Overview. At the elementary level, children are learning how to live within a world full of people who are all different from one another; by learning in a way that teaches children compassion, empathy and consideration for people other than themselves, a community may be created that will grow to be more accepting and considerate of others as a whole.


FORTY TWO

Brittany Garuk. Design Thinking for VSB. Poster & Website. 2017.


I EXPLORED THE DIM FOREST AND BEAUTY OF NATURE IN THE NIGHT TIME. I EXPRESSED THE RESTLESS ONGOING LIFE OF BIRDS, TREES, AND FLOWERS IN THE SILENCE OF THE WORLD.

FORTY THREE

Colour in The Night. Jyhyun Cho. Acrylic paint. 2017.


City Distortion. Michelle Bygodt. Analog Photography. 2017

This project focuses on the city, and particularly the street as a place of high dynamism and action, alienation, and a place where objects, architecture and humans meet and coexist. The constructivism movement of the early 20s fascinates me as it influenced and continues to influence all fields of art and design. The works of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy inspired me to create this project. His photographs look almost surreal due to the play on perspective. As an experimental artist interested in reflections, I tried creating a similar emotion in my photographs using distortion and capturing subjects with the idea of creating a second street within the street itself. The photograph of the ‘Man in the Mirror’ is a photograph within a photograph, thus challenging our perception of what we see versus what is actually there. In the mirror is what we think people in the streets are - distorted, lost, repellant - when in fact the man sitting next to mirror is just a person, like us.

We Rise Together. Jordan Utting. Micro liner ink pen. 2017.

We Rise Together was created to emphasize the need for women to work together in order to succeed. It is meant to encourage women to see each other as allies rather than enemies thus unifying them.


June Tang As you step on the bus, you let out a small sigh – a sigh of satisfaction and also of relief. Today you don’t have to walk to school, today you are finally riding on the 84 – Emily Carr’s new best friend. Leaning against the glass, you take some time to observe the space. A lot – and seriously – a lot of people from UBC you think to yourself. That makes sense, because this is the bus to UBC. This has always been the bus to UBC. Even back on the island, you have always thought of the 84 as something very distant. It

#84 #84

was physically distant, as this bus never dropped you off 5 minutes away from Emily Carr as did the 50. It was also spiritually remote because the inhabitants of this bus belong somewhere else – somewhere much further away. You put on your earphones to avoid any potential conversations, or even just to erect walls – invisible walls. You often find yourself alone even though you are always surrounded with people. You try to avoid talking to anyone, by not taking a seat, or blasting music into your ears. Then again, who would you talk to? You know nobody, and everyone is too busy doing their own thing. Here on the 84 you are a guest, here you feel a sense of detachment from the space. Although you only spend about 5 minutes on the bus, you are fully aware of your position on the vehicle. You are merely a guest, and you have barely adjusted yourself to the customaries of this space. The bus starts moving; inertia gets you to lean harder onto the glass, right next to the exit door. You can see people from afar running towards the bus, some of them stop as they realize they are not going to make it. You take a sip of coffee and turn to observe the bus. It is another sunny day, and the 84 seems to be glowing more brightly than usual. You may think that moving from Granville Island to Great Northern Way is just going to a different location, but the move is more significant than that. It is not as simple as getting onto a bus and waiting at the designated stop. The move is bigger, it changes you. It changes your habits, and also a part of you. You no longer rush to the bus stop, hoping the 50 will not leave you. You no longer hate how crowded the bus was, the way it tried its best to host as many people as it could. You no longer walk through the trees, along the water or with the fear of getting hit by cyclists (well, maybe the last one you can still look out for). Instead, you walk a shorter distance. There is a sense of uniformity, as the only way to the new campus is now via the 84. You all take the 84 now, whichever way it is going. You can walk with your friends, and if you are like me, you like to guess the routes they took before to this bus. You still think the bus stop should be placed right in front of the school, but the walk to school is now shorter and more bearable. You’ve reached Thornton street, so you pull the cord. You get off and wave to your friends who are getting on the bus. They have finished their classes for the day as you are just getting to yours. The new Great Northern Way campus is a few steps away, and you comfortably walk to school. Though you are a guest now, you will be an inhabitant of the 84 soon enough. Though you might feel strange in this new space, you will

FORTY FIVE

learn to love it—the way you loved the Granville Island campus. Watch out for the cyclists!


FORTY SIX

Little Explorers. Mona Fani. Digital Art. 2016-17

LITTLE EXPLORERS IS A SERIES OF ILLUSTRATIONS ON PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN ON THE APOLLO 11 SPACE MISSION IN 1969.


andre

Candice Yee

From Andrea’s bedroom door, I shivered Mom’s absent finger tracing my name into my back the nail dulling the coffee going cold my hand, left swinging palm open sometimes she’s Andrea, sometimes she’s Mom. Andrea’s crumbled form slunk against the headboard, resting, the TV humming, my coffee spilling her invasive voice first sweet and singing and soothing then leaving a dark taste in my mouth. Oh, Andrea. I begged for a gun to my head as she handed me the mug. She left no room

Iced Drink. Camilla Szefler. Ebroidery. 2017

FORTY SEVEN

for milk.


Hell. Susie Wilson. Pen, ink & digital collage. 2017

3

AM.

FORTY EIGHT

HELL IS A PUBLIC WASHROOM AT


WOO

is available at Emily Carr University and Read Bookstore.

The views expressed in this publication do not reflect those of Emily Carr University or the editors and publisher. Inquiries can be addressed to the Directors at woo@ecuad.ca © 2017 including all content by the artists, authors and editors. All images are reproduced with the permission of their artists. Woo assumes all work published here is original and the work is the property of the submitting students. All artwork titles and student names are trademarked or copyrighted by their respective

olophon

owners. Woo gratefully acknowledges the support of students, alumni, faculty, and the Emily Carr Students’ Union. website

woopublication.ca email woo@ecuad.ca

facebook twitter

woopublication

@woopublication

instagram

@woopublication @facesofemilycarr

Printed with Hemlock Printers. The typefaces used in this publication are: Apercu — designed by Colophon Type Foundry Hand drawn typeface — designed by Celia Pankhurst This issue is limited to 350 copies. woo publication

B2175 — 520 E 1st Ave, Vancouver, BC V5T 0H2