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THE WINTER ISSUE 2015

WOO IS AVAIL ABLE AT EMILY CARR UNIVERSIT Y, READ BOOK STORE

WEBSITE WOOPUBL ICAT ION.CA

+ AT SELEC T LOCAT IONS WITHIN THE CIT Y OF VANCOUVER

EMAIL WOO@ECUAD.CA

THE VIEWS E XPRESSED IN THIS PUBL ICAT ION DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLEC T THOSE OF EMILY CARR UNIVERSIT Y OR THE PUBL ISHER AND EDITORS INQUIRY MAY BE ADDRESSED TO THE DIREC T ING TEAM AT WOO@ECUAD.CA

FACEBOOK / WOOPUBL ICAT ION T WIT TER @WOOPUBL ICAT ION BLOG WOOPUBL ICAT ION.TUMBLR.COM PRINTED WITH RHINO PRINT SOLUT IONS COVER DESIGN + ORIGINAL ART WORK BY DANIEL TEL ADO

© 2015 INCLUDING ALL CONTENT FROM THE ART ISTS, AUTHORS, AND

WOO PUBL ICAT ION

EDITORS. ALL IMAGES ARE REPRODUCED COURTESY OF THE ART ISTS.

ROOM 241B-NORTH BUILDING

WOO GR ATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES SUPPORT FROM THE STUDENTS, ALUMNI, FACULT Y, STUDENT UNION, AND ADMINISTR AT IVE BOARD AT EMILY CARR UNIVERSIT Y. SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO LORI MACDONALD, EMILY CARR UNIVERSIT Y L IBR ARY, AND FR AISER PLOSS.

1399 JOHNSTON STREE T, GR ANVILLE ISL AND VANCOUVER, BC V6H 3R9


EDITORS IN CHIEF DANIEL A BUITRAGO + Y IL I LOU ART DIREC TOR

EDITORIAL DIREC TOR

DANIEL TEL ADO

JENNIFER DICKIESON

MEDIA DIREC TOR

PRINT MANAGER

STAC Y INGRAM

THAIRA BOUHID

DESIGN TEAM

ILLUSTRATORS

NATAL IE WORTH, LUL A CHRISTMAN, K YU LEE, NAIT IK MEHTA,

JUAN CISNEROS + TAMARA DE L A FLOR

DANICA NORTON + JONAS VOIGT

APPRENT ICES

MEDIA TEAM

DENNIS VALOUISKI, CHRIST INE WEI

SAM WONG, OL IVIA CHABER + L AUREN RAY

+ JORDYN TAYLOR

EDITORIAL TEAM KELLY CHEN, MEL ISSA JOHNSON, SUMMER SKINNER, BRONW YN CARERE, MAHNOOR LODHI + AMY BRERETON


A letter from the editors

The change of seasons at Emily Carr University is evidenced by a flurr y of activity. Between the close of the fall and the open of spring we straddle a space where we leave in a hurr y and return to find things different than we left them. Our changes at WOO Publication have been bittersweet. We are sad to see our Art Director, Sami Barker, leave, ever-thankful for her guidance. We are also excited to welcome Daniel Telado as our new Art Director, who brings both experience and energy. In 2014 WOO broached several goals : we launched a project to archive our future issues (and eventually past issues) on ISSUU.com, developed “The Sketchbook Project� and of course, produced our Fall issue which we are all ver y proud of. In 2015 we hope to continue to push for ward and create stability and inclusiveness in our curation of student work. This expansion means bridging the gap between print and works based in motion: Films, animation, and media arts. In all mediums we build bridges. Finding facets of our IDENTITIES through the things we make and in the creations of others. As you flip through these pages we thank you, both the readers and the talented contributors that made this exploration possible. Sincerely, Daniela + Yili

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N ATAL IE WOR T H T HE N AT UR AL HI S TOR Y OF T Y P O GR APH Y, 2014 L A SER CU T PAPER AND PR IN T

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COL E T T E C AR T IER + D OL C . IMN A MK HAO RE VEL VANCOU VER , 2014 S IGN AGE, PR IN T COL L AT ER AL , S TA MP S + WEB

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N ATAL IE WOR T H + SHER I P OE T K ER D O WHAT U L U V, 2014 BR ANDING, IDEN T I T Y + PR IN T

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MICHEL L E CL E MEN T YOU C AN ’ T K IL L ME, 2014 DIG I TAL EBO OK

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K L AUDI A NI WA R ACO ON ’ S E X HIBI T ION, 2014 G A ME

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“The Way O ut ”

— A profile of problem solver D a n i e l Te l a d o

spectrum because of my background. Like I said, creating art was something that I enjoyed doing but I couldn’t

see myself moving any further with it. I would honestly fail so hard at turning it into a career for myself. For me,

design is where I see myself developing and succeeding and only hope that wherever it leads me, I can at least incorporate some of the art skills that I’ve gained. JD: What attracts you to a design project? What do

JENNIFER DICKIESON (JD): First off I’m interested in how you got here (ECU). Was there a particular moment when you knew how you wanted to pursue design?

DT: In terms of what attracts me to a project, it’s hard to say. The past three years, I’ve had such a wide variety of

DANIEL TELADO (DT): There’s a quote by Charles James

projects thrown at my face. But because of that, I try to

that really reflects how I went about design: “All creative

be more critical in what I want people to see me produc-

work begins by doing something with the hands. Cre-

ing and designing, and what I present to them usually

ation is simply a problem and design is the way out.” Getting to this point was an indirect process for me. I always knew that I wanted to go into a creative field, specifically design. But as soon as the time came to start deciding, I realized, “oh shit, I actually don’t know anything about design.” So I started off with what I did know: I could draw and paint and it was something that I really enjoyed to do. I enrolled in the Fine Arts program at Langara College, working mainly within the technical aspects of “creating” art - from painting, various meth-

lends itself to urban/contemporary lifestyle oriented work. I feel that, working within that context, I can always find different sources of inspiration by being observant of what’s happening around me and figure out a way to infuse that into my designs. I always consider the actual content of it first. You always have to establish that, be critical of it, and design for it. From there you can start to conceptualizing how you’ll go about designing it, making sure that what’s you’re going for is appropriate and would resonate with people.

ods of printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and drawing.

JD: Has there ever been a project/challenge that

Producing within those realms was something that I

changed you forever?

loved and weirdly came naturally to me. At the time, it was the best thing I could’ve done for myself. I found that it was so important for me to understand and learn how to do these things before I could pursue design. My final year there, that’s when I started to fully concentrate on the design side of things and I had a group of professors who understood the direction I was headed and were so supportive. I was actually given early acceptance to a different design school through Portfolio Day, but it’s pretty apparent which one I chose. Regardless of where I went, I’m happy being in the design field. I’m not only able to work on solving visual communication problems and challenges but to also match that with how I would potentially navigate the end result on a broader

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you usually consider first?

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DT: I’m not quite sure if there has been a specific project or challenge that has changed me, but there have been opportunities that changed the way I design. If you look at my portfolio, what’s there and how it looks, that’s not how I used to go about designing things. The moment


it can be a burden and exhausting because, let’s face it, people will hold you to a quality that they expect from you. But at the end of the day you have to live with what you make. It’s not someone else’s work, it’s yours. So make it the best it can be. If you can’t, that’s alright-be resilient and just know that you’ve set these standards as something to aim for. JD: And of course, I have to ask this one: What do you that I moved to New York for a semester, that’s when things changed. I saw what was happening there, who I was surrounded by and what they were doing, it got me excited. And in the end, I guess it must’ve inspired the direction of my designs and what/who I strive to design for.

plan to do post graduation? DT: I’ve always wanted to work in design for retail. Maybe it’s because I’ve worked on the other end of it for some time and have had to understand the narratives behind so many brands and the people who contribute to it But it interests me, the ability to create and develop experi-

JD: What has been your biggest fail so far? Greatest

ences that are extensions of a brand and articulate it to

triumph?

a subculture. That whole concept expands into so many

DT: Anything that has had to do with an App or a Web component I can’t even comprehend. It’s like a whole other world of constrictions and conventions. If you want

different forms that you’ll always be producing something different on a micro and macro level. It keeps it new and exciting. •

the specifics of my failure-an eBook. It was my first time dealing with that form so I had to teach myself how to do it. Instead of simplifying it for myself I tried to be more experimental and overall was just not having it. Needless to say, it sucked (in my eyes). But, hey, you can only learn from your mistakes and failures...and what I’ve learned is that eBooks will be the death of me (I’m joking, kind of). Maybe in the future I’ll attempt another one, I just need to recover from that experience. As for triumphs? I think getting through my senior thesis project would be a pretty big triumph JD: If you could go back in time four years and give yourself advice what would it be?

Interviewed by: Jennifer Dickieson

DT: Have high standards for yourself and surround yourself with people who do good (great) work. I think it’s

important to hold yourself to a level of quality and surround yourself with people that reflect that. Not in the

sense that you should achieve a level of snobbery by always maintaining an exclusive group of creatives-but

in the sense that keeping that kind of company only inspires you to want achieve a level of work. Sometimes


DANIEL T EL AD O W Y T HE INDUS T R IE S, 2014 BR ANDING S Y S T E M

DANIEL T EL AD O T WEN T Y F IF T EEN, 2014 DIG I TAL PR IN T

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K E VA N D ’AGO S T INO EP O CHÉ, 2015 BR AND, IDEN T I T Y, PR IN T DE S IGN, + AR T DIREC T ION

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C R Y S TAL CHAN T HE A TO Z T Y P O GR APH Y, 2013 MOT ION DE S IGN WATCH I T ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015 IN C RE AT ING AN EDUC AT ION AL P IECE, I T UR NED MY AT T EN T ION TO LO OK ING AT T HE P OT EN T I AL OF K INE T IC T Y P O GR APH Y: HOW MIGHT IN T EGR AT ION OF PAC ING, C YAN AND M AGEN TA S T IMUL AT E ME MOR Y RE T EN T ION? T HE A TO Z OF T Y P O GR APH Y I S AN AL PHABE T OF T Y PE IN MOT ION A S A VEHICL E TO IN SP IRE L E AR NER S — ONE L E T T ER AT A T IME. E X HIBI T ED A S PAR T OF T HE 2013 T Y PE MUSEUM AT E MILY C ARR .

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MICHEL L E CL E MEN T LO C ATOR T Y PE SPEC IMEN, 2014 PR IN T

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L UC INDA MCGROAR T Y C A S SE T T E, 2013 F IL M WATCH T HE V IDEO ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015 I BEC A ME AWARE OF A GENER AL T REND IN T R ADI T ION AL IN T ER IOR DE S IGN PR AC T ICE: F IR M S F O CUS T HE IR AT T EN T ION ON EF F IC IENC IE S, T HE ME ANING OF SPACE I S OF T EN OVERLO OK ED. ME ANING I S E S SEN T I AL TO T HE DE S IGN OF A SUCCE S SF UL SPACE. F IL M I S AN E XCEL L EN T MEDIUM TO T EL L S TOR IE S -T HERE ARE NUMEROUS S IMIL AR I T IE S BE T WEEN T HE PRODUC T ION OF A F IL M AND T HE DE S IGN OF A SPACE, HOWE VER F IL M RE ADILY L END S I T SEL F TO S TOR Y S IMPLY BEC AUSE OF I T S S C R IP T. I WROT E A S C R IP T F OR A SHOR T F IL M T HAT TAK E S PL ACE ALONG E A S T ER N AVENUE, A HIGHLY INDUS T R I AL I ZED S T REE T IN TORON TO. T HE S TOR Y BEHIND T HI S F IL M, EN T I T L ED ' C A S SE T T E ', PROV IDE S CON T E X T AND SUBSEQUEN T LY A SEN SE OF ME ANING TO T HI S ARE A .

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V IC TOR I A S IM AN S JAH + JAY DE CHANGE T Y PE 2T Y PE, 2014 PR IN T

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E MI WEBB T HE ACC IDEN T SER IE S, 2014 CER A MIC S

JACK MORR I S W INNING I S F OR LO SER S, 2014 S CUL P T URE

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S IE G AL , SUK HDEEP GRE WAL , MICHAEL A RECHT S CHAF F NER , S TA S K R AKOV L EL , 2014 WO OD VENEER L A MIN AT ION

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S TAC Y INGR A M S T R IPE Y M AN, 2014 35MM PHOTO GR APH

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K A I T L INE WE IBE, HOI AN, 2014 DIG I TAL PHOTO GR APH Y

N AT IK MEHTA E VER Y T HING, 2014 DIG I TAL PHOTO GR APH Y

JUL I A PEPL ER MOVE MEN T, 2014 35MM PHOTO GR APH Y

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S A M WONG K I T S IL ANO, 2014 DIG I TAL PHOTO GR APH Y

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S A M WONG SK Y P ILOT: SE A TO SK Y, 2015 DIG I TAL PHOTO GR APH Y

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OL I V I A CHABER F LOUR I SHING, 2014 F IL M PHOTO GR APH Y

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S YAF IQ JA AFAR N AG A S A SR A , 2014 ANIM AT ION

"N AG A S A SR A" I S A F RE SH E X PER IMEN TAL TAK E ON T HE ' SHAD OW PUPPE T S ' GENRE AND M AK ING I T IN TO A 2D ANIM AT ED SHOR T. I T WA S C RE AT ED W I T H A MI X T URE OF 2D HAND C R AF T ED CU TOU T S OF BACKGROUND S AL A ‘ DIOR A M A’; T HE ANIM AT ION I S PRO JEC T ED ON TO I T AND T HEN F IL MED. WHAT YOU SEE I S T HE F IN AL RE SULT OF 2 MEDIUM S SE A ML E S SLY IN T EGR AT ED TO C RE AT E SUCH ANIM AT ION. I T TO OK ME ABOU T 4 MON T HS TO PL AN AND COUN T L E S S F IL MING IN T HE S T UDIO TO GE T T HE T IMING OF T HE ANIM AT ION, T HE MOVE MEN T OF T HE DIOR A M A BACKGROUND S A S I C AP T URE US ING MY C A MER A . MO S T OF T HE CU TOU T BACKGROUND S ARE C RE AT ED F ROM S C R ATCH, WHIL E T HE CHAR AC T ER S ARE MODIF IED F ROM T HE T R ADI T ION AL ‘ WAYANG K UL I T ’ (SHAD OW PUPPE T S) AND G I VEN A DIG I TAL L IF E. WATCH T HE V IDEO ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015

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AN TO SH C IMO S ZKO L IMIN AL I T Y, 2014 S ILVER- GEL AT IN PR IN T S

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JENNIF ER MO ORE C I T Y C YCL ING, 2014 S CUL P T URE W I T H PRO JEC T ION M APP ING

"T HROUGH HE IGHT ENING OUR AWARENE S S AND APPREC I AT ION OF T HE V I SUAL EL E MEN T S OF OUR EN V IRONMEN T WE M AY BE MORE L IK ELY TO EN JOY A GRE AT ER SEN SE OF OVER AL L WEL L BE ING AND CON T EN TMEN T...PER S ON AL LY, C YCL ING

WATCH I T ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.COM/ W IN T ER 2015

AROUND GR AND C AN AL D O CK - DUBL IN, WHIL S T L I S T ENING TO MY IP OD, I S A ME AN S BY WHICH I M AY F UL LY RE ABS ORB AND E X PER IENCE T HE V I SUAL I T Y OF T HE SPACE, F O S T ER ING A SEN SE OF PURE CON T EN TMEN T." - JENNIF ER MO ORE

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PROPHEC Y SUN CONDEN S AT ION AND OT HER MOMEN T S, 2015 IMMER S I VE IN S TAL L AT ION W I T H PRO JEC T ION S

IN T HE IN S TAL L AT ION, ' CONDEN S AT ION AND OT HER MOMEN T S ', I T R AN SF OR MED A WORK SPACE IN TO AN IMMER S I VE SEN S OR Y L AND S C APE. PRO JEC T ED ON TO CE IL ING S, SPR INK L ER P IPE S, R AF T ER S, AND AG A IN S T T WO WAL L S, ' CONDEN S AT ION AND OT HER MOMEN T S ', I S A V I S ION, BA SED ON NEGOT I AT ION S BE T WEEN T HE DRE A M SPACE, AN E T HERE AL , H Y PN AGO G IC RE AL M T HAT TAK E S PL ACE IN T HE T R AN S I T ION AL S TAT E F ROM WAK EF UL NE S S TO SL EEP, AND

S C IN T IL L AT ION. OBS CURED T HROUGHOU T T HE IL L UMIN AT ION S I S A F IGURE C ARR Y ING A WE AT HER BAL LO ON W I T HIN L USH EN V IRONMEN T S, CON JUR ING CON T R ADIC TOR Y IM AGE S OF PAR ADI SE AND W IL DER NE S S. T HE S OUND COMP O S I T ION E MERGE S A S A LO OP ING ARR AY OF A MBIEN T T E X T URE S, VO C AL ME ANDER ING S, AND N AT UR AL EN V IRONMEN TAL RE VERBER AT ION S. ' CONDEN S AT ION AND OT HER MOMEN T S ', I S A PAR T IC IPATOR Y

E VER Y DAY RE AL I T Y. I E X PLORE T HE M AT ER I AL I T Y OF A

E X PER IENCE. UP ON EN T ER ING T HE SPACE, T HE V IE WER I S

WE AT HER BAL LO ON US ING I T A S A ME TAPHOR F OR T HE

PROMP T ED TO APPROACH T HE IN S TAL L AT ION IN S IL ENCE, TO

EN TANGL E MEN T BE T WEEN WAK ING L IF E AND T HE DRE A M.

E X PLORE T HE ARE A ABOVE, TAK E NOT E OF T HE BUIL DING

NOT ONLY A T ECHNOLO G Y F OR S C IEN T IF IC M APP ING, CHAR T-

S OUND S, AND ENCOUR AGED TO L I S T EN, S I T, L IE D OWN OR

ING AND E X PLOR AT ION, USED IN T HE E X PLOR AT ION OF T HE

WAL K WHIL S T E X PER IENC ING T HE CE IL ING PRO JEC T ION S.

SK IE S ABOVE US, T HE WE AT HER BAL LO ON C AN AL S O BE AN

T HE V IE WER I S EN T ICED TO CLO SE T HE IR E Y E S AND E X PLORE

AR T I S T IC OB JEC T T HAT T R AVER SE S T HE SURFACE OF T HE

T HE S OUND S C APE IN AND T HROUGH T HE IR BODIE S. T HE

E AR T H IN A DANCE BE T WEEN L AY ER S OF CON S C IOUS AND

V IE WER I S ENCOUR AGED TO IMMER SE T HE M SELVE S IN T HE

UNCON S C IOUS MOVE MEN T S, BE T WEEN T HE R AT ION AL AND

E X PER IENCE, TO IN VOK E T HE DRE A M S TAT E, AND DELVE

IN T UI T I VE OR IL LO G IC AL .

IN TO T HE V UL NER ABL E REL AT ION SHIP BE T WEEN MOT HER-

RE MINI S CEN T OF C AT HEDR AL CE IL ING S OF PA S T T IME S, T HE V IDEO F O OTAGE OVERL AP S, WE AVE S, BL EED S AC RO S S T HE CE IL ING SPACE AND ON TO ONE ANOT HER , IN A PR I S M AT IC DI SPL AY OF GR ADAT ION S, COLOUR , S OUND AND

HO OD, IDEN T IF Y AND T HE DA ILY IN T ERPL AY AND PERCEPT ION OF A S C AL E T HAT I S BE YOND T HE BODIE S ABIL I T Y TO CON T ROL . WATCH I T ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015

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A M ANDA ARC UR I IN T HE VAL L E Y, BY T HE R I VER , UNDER T HE BR ID GE, 2014 DIG I TAL PHOTO GR APHS

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M A X IME C Y R-MOR TON BRONCO, 2013 16MM F IL M WATCH I T ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015 “… PEOPL E F EEL UN SE T T L ED WHEN T HE COMMUNI T Y AND T HE PL ACE T HE Y BELONG TO I SN ' T CL E AR TO T HE M. HOW ONE SHOUL D BE, F EEL , AND BEHAVE C AN S OME T IME S BE UNCL E AR AND T HI S L ACK OF CL AR I T Y I S UNCOMF OR TABL E F OR T HO SE WHO FAL L OU T OF T HE COMMON AND L IMI T ED C AT EGOR IE S OF F ERED BY S O C IE T Y. I L IK E CON VE Y ING T HI S LO S S AND MY S T ER Y IN MY WORK IN HOPE S OF ONE DAY F INDING AND SE T T L ING ON AN IDEN T I T Y I 'M COMF OR TABL E W I T H…. MY OWN JOUR NE Y TOWARD S T HI S PUSHE S ME TO A SK QUE S T ION S L IK E WHE T HER GENDER I S A S O C I AL CON VEN T ION OR S OME T HING T HAT AC T UAL LY E X I S T S, WH Y IDEN T I T Y I S S O IMP OR TAN T, AND MY OWN INNER T RU T H. I T ' S A TOP IC T HAT I D ON ' T T HINK I ' L L E VER GE T T IRED OF, NOT E VEN AF T ER I ' VE F IGURED MY SEL F OU T.” - NICOL E S I TAN SK I

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M AR IK A VANDEK R A AT S SUBMERGED, 2014 OIL ON C AN VA S

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G ABR IEL L E S T RONG UN T I T L ED, 2014 CER A MIC

HA IGE WU INK Y ME, 2014 V IDEO WATCH I T ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2014 IN SP IRED BY ZEN, I BEL IE VE T HAT T HE T E MP OR AL S ARE ALWAY S CHANG ING, WHIL E T HE SEL F I S E T ER N AL . T HE V IDEO I S A REF L EC T ION ABOU T MY UNDER S TANDING ABOU T T HE REL AT ION SHIP BE T WEEN T HE SEL F AND T HE E X T ER N AL WORL D. I CON S IDER MY SEL F A SEPAR AT E UNI T F ROM T HE WORL D, AND BY SEE ING AND ENG AG ING W I T H T HE WORL D F ROM A T HIRD -PER S ON PER SPEC T I VE, I RE AL I ZE WHO I A M. MUS IC : DHAR ANI BY S A DINGDING

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To w a r d s a New School of Ar t: Critiques in Many Forms J U S T I N L A N GL OI S I S A N A S S I S TA N T P R O F E S S O R I N T HE FAC ULT Y O F C ULT U R E + C O MMU N I T Y. HE I S T HE C O - F O U ND E R O F BR O K E N C I T Y L A B – A N O N - P R O F I T O R G A N I Z AT IO N T H AT O P E N S T HE SPAC E F O R C I V IC C H A N GE T HR O U GH R E S E A R C H A ND S O C I A L P R AC T IC E . J U S T I N I S PA S S IO N AT E A B O U T T HE I N N O VAT I V E P O S S IBIL I T E S O F C O MBI N I N G A R T I S T IC , C U R AT O R I A L A ND D E S IG N ME T H O D O L O G IE S .

An excerpted conversation between Justin Langlois and Daniela Buitrago

DANIELA BUITRAGO (DB): What should art schools do in

order to stay relevant?

JUSTIN LANGLOIS (JL): Art schools could take many dif-

ferent approaches to staying relevant in a larger society.

One of the things that could happen is the re-structuring

of the classroom environment and of the critique process. Students should get out of the classroom; they should take their work to public spaces. It’s obviously a challenge to make that happen because you have to work

with other institutions to accommodate class-based

activities in those public spaces, but imagine we could take the classroom to bus stations, parks, rooftops, malls, theatres…and so on.

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DB: And for the critique process, which is the best approach for students and teachers to generate successful critiques? JL: Critiques are a space for conversation. The more conversation there is among students and teachers the better the feedbacks gets. Students should be taught how to address a critique, they need to know how to prepare for a critique, what to keep in mind during one and what to do after with all the feedbacks and opinions given during the critique. In an ideal world we would have more time for critiques, so we could have the chance to observe an artwork from a wider range of different perspectives, and students could have more the opportunity to both write and verbally express their critical opinion about the work. But, critiques can also get very tedious for students if they last for hours. So, what could be done? What if we could change the structure of classes so critiques don’t take place one day for all the students, but somehow distribute critique time during different classes so we have both time for each student and enough motivation from students to give feedback. DB: I feel that foundation classes could encourage better critiques from students by teaching us methodologies and have more of a teacher presence. I even think that students would be able to give better critical opinions if they are taught for the first two years more skill focused classes and theory so when they get to third and fourth year they have more knowledge that could be beneficial for critiques and for art works themselves; so the two last years are more about concepts. What do you think about that? JL: Well that is interesting and it is an approach that some institutions take, but from a faculty perspective, at least from my perspective anyways, I can tell you that I am less concerned about the quality of skills demonstrated in the work in a class like Creative Process, at least to a point, because if you are interested in what you are doing, somehow you are going to find a way to do things more skillfully eventually. I think the time I have with students is better spent trying to talk through what is at stake in their ideas. This isn’t to the exclusion of a discussion around the skill demonstrated in their work, but it is about focusing on the part of their creative process that is harder to develop on their own. Material skills are often a matter of having enough time to work at them, to practice them. However, the one thing we lack across the school is time. So, on one hand if we imagine a situation in which students have access to all the information they need and all the tutorials they could want, we immediately bump into a lack of time to actually invest in the exploration of those skills. When you multiple that by three or four classes and add in the time they may have to be at work, or just having time to digest all of this, it doesn’t seem very viable. It’s funny how quickly things can get so complicated. •

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PAT R ICK BR AVO

OUROBORO S, 2014 MI X ED MEDI A

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ANDRE W TAV UKC I YAN PANDE MONIUM 0 01 + 0 02, 2014 INK ON PAPER

“ T E ACHER S CON T INUE TO A SK US TO PR IOR I T I ZE T HE S A ME OL D, S TAL E M AYONN A I SE AF T ER T EL L ING US T HAT AR T HI S TOR Y I S INC REDIBLY BI A SED AND IN ACCUR AT E IN I T ’ S PR IOR I T I Z AT ION S. S O I ’M BI T T ER ABOU T AN YONE F ORCED D OWN OUR T HROAT S IMPLY BEC AUSE T HE Y WERE PR I V IL EGED ENOUGH TO BE INCL UDED IN AR T HI S TOR Y. T HI S D OE SN ’ T ME AN I D ON ’ T EN JOY A LOT OF WORK , ONLY T HAT I D ON ’ T ACCEP T T HAT BI A S.” - M AHNO OR LOHDI

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G ABR IEL L E S T RONG

UN T I T L ED, 2014 OIL ON C AN VA S

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JE S S IC A MOLC AN

ME AT E AT ER , 2015 OIL ON C AN VA S

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JENN Y SEONGR Y UNG L EE AN AN X IE T Y SER IE S, 2014 PA IN T ING, DR AW ING + S IL K S C REEN

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R AY T SE T HE L IMI TAT ION OF PROF I T ( IN T HE ME MOR Y OF T HE MIL K S C ANDAL S OF 20 0 4 AND 20 0 8, CHIN A), 2014 CER A MIC S

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JUAN C I SNERO S IM AGE SL AVE S, 2014 AQUAT IN T

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Y IFAN JI ANG M AND O GR A M (A M ANDAR IN WR I T T EN IN M ANDAR IN F ROM A M ANDAR IN ON A M ANDAR IN), 2015 PEN ON M ANDAR IN

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K L AUDI A NI WA CHIL DREN ’ S BO OK IL L US T R AT ION S, 2014 AC R Y L IC + S OF T PA S T EL ON PAPER

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COL IN TAN T HE HUN T, 2014 DIG I TAL IL L US T R AT ION

“BANK S Y NE VER G AVE BL EK L E R AT T HE C REDI T HE DE SERVED AF T ER BANK S Y TO OK D OZEN S OF HI S S T REE T AR T DE S IGN S TO BECOME FA MOUS IN T HE UK EUROPE AN A MER IC AN S T REE T AR T S CENE. BL EK DID I T BE T T ER . BL EK DID I T IN T HE 70 S IN PAR I S.” - M ARCUS DÉNOMMÉ

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IRENE HWANG GOING F UR T HER , 2014 DIG I TAL IL L US T R AT ION

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JA MIE BAL E BAL ANC ING L AND S C APE S, 2015 AC R Y L IC ON PLY WO OD

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ZOR A S AUER T E IG A L IF E IN L ANGUAGE S I D ON ’ T UNDER S TAND, 2013 INK + WAT ERCOLOR

ZOR A S AUER T E IG COL L I S ION, 2013 INK

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F R ANCE S SE MPL E T E A S TOR IE S, 2014 F IL M WATCH T HE V IDEO ON WO OPUBL IC AT ION.C A / W IN T ER 2015 “ T HE T E A S TOR IE S” I S A RE T EL L ING OF T HE M AN Y S TOR IE S MY MOT HER HA S TOL D ME WHIL E DR INK ING HUNDRED S OF CUP S OF T E A ON MY V I S I T S TO HER HOUSE OVER T HE Y E AR S. US ING S CUL P T URE A S A S TAR T ING P OIN T F OR A V IDEO...[ I ] EDI T ED RECORDING S OF MY MOT HER T EL L ING HER S TOR IE S, S ING ING S ONG S AND PL AY ING HER M AND OL IN I MERGED PHOTO S, NE W S REP OR T S AND S TOP ANIM AT ION CL IP S TO C RE AT E A S TOR Y BEG INNING W I T H HER GR ANDPAREN T ’ S AND ENDING WHEN WE C A ME TO C AN ADA .

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A SHO R T S TO R Y BY L IL I WAT S O N

Under Tw e l v e Feet

1970 I N A M E R I C A : the death of Rubén Salazar, of Joplin and Hendrix, the birth

of Sabbath and 3,731,386 babies. Nixon will both invade and withdraw from Cambodia during his European tour. This is the last year to see cigarettes advertised on television and the first year to see PBS. Calif­ornia would prevail as the most populated American state and in Oklahoma - twenty-seventh on the list - three teenagers in a 1969 Camaro would drive in and sink to the bottom of the Foss Reservoir. When taking the car out as a sixteen year-old my mother would without fail watch me drive away and every time would be waiting in the living room for my return. This steadfast behavior that I thought overbearing was something instilled in her at a very young age out of experiences unfamiliar to me. It wouldn’t be until 1989 that airbags were mandatory to passenger vehicles in the United States and in my mother’s graduating class there were at least five faces missing from the years prior. The thought of my mother’s furrowed brow in the rear view mirror preoccupies my mind as I file and archive today’s photographs from the lab. The rusted skeleton of a Camaro was lifted from the Foss Reservoir earlier this week, along with the remains of three teenagers. Samples of steel and bone have been sent to the forensics lab and won’t come back with results for several weeks, but the analyst on site estimated that it had to have been there for at least thirty years. Sifting through the images, I linger over the headlights that are still intact, the sagging of worn tires, the windows shut tight. Maybe it had rained that night. The bones in question will not reveal their occupants until the end of the month, but police have begun to notify families associated with cold cases prior to 1975 within the counties of Custer and Washita. An eerie thought to me, the vanishing of someone for years only to be found in your backyard, under twelve feet of water. Moving from one statistic to another, the bones of these bodies bring forth a mystery out of another mystery. Delicately slipping the photographs into sleeves, I close the doors on what can only be thought of as the cabinet that never quite shuts, hanging stagnant in plain sight. •

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MONIQUE MOT U T-F IR T H

MIL K S AND ME AT S, 2014 INK JE T PR IN T

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A L I C I A M A R I E L AW R E N C E

I did I think I DID T HINK T HERE WA S NO HURR Y, F ORE VER I S A S LONG A S E VER UNENDING A S T E AR S S T RE A MING UNDER S T REE T L IGHT R AY S; T EN MINU T E S OF PERPE T UAL C R Y S TAL L INE IN OR ANGE- GOL D AF T ERGLOW AND MORE DROPL E T S C A S C ADE PA S T T HAN HUM AN S BOR N

E XCEP T T HAT HE DIDN ’ T T HINK T HI S WAY, T HOUGHT I T OU T AND F IGURE I T OF F Y E AR S T R A IL L E AV ING SURREP T I T IOUS T R ACK S OVER F O OL I SH MI S TAK E S T HAT ARE F ORK ED R I VER S OF W IND OW- C AP T URED R A IN

MY T IMED BRE AT H, COUN T BY IMME A SUR ABL E COUN T, BE YOND REF R AC T ION, AR M ON T HE W IND OW S IL L L E ANING IN TO LO OMING F ORE VER I S JUS T LONG ENOUGH

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M A NI VA NNA N VE T R I VEL

HOWL AT T HE MO ON, 2013 PENC IL ON PAPER

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JEE YO ON K IM C AT R AWBERR Y C AK E, 2015 WAT ERCOLOUR

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CL AUDI A PA S AR IBU, T I S SUER A M A , 2014 PR IN T + PACK AG ING

S A M AN T HA MOR AL E S L I T T L E T ERROR , 2014 DIG I TAL IL L US T R AT ION

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ZOE HARDI S T Y QUI T T ING S O C I AL MEDI A OR HOW I L E AR NED TO LOVE SUBVER T ING DATA S C IENCE, 2014 PERF OR M ANCE + PUBL IC AT ION

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WELCOME F R IEND S, I HAVE C AL L ED YOU HERE TODAY TO L E T YOU K NOW WH Y I ’ VE BEEN ERR AT IC AND A L I T T L E WE IRD OF L AT E. I HAVE

TO D O W I T H T HE M. I D ON ’ T W I SH TO USE FACEBO OK TO COL L ABOR AT E ON PRO JEC T S, BU T R AT HER USE A PL AT F OR M I C AN RE M A IN MORE ANON Y MOUS ON.

BROUGHT YOU A BO OK L E T T HAT HA S CHANGED T HE WAY

I AL S O A M ENG AGED IN A NE W LO OK , T HAT I S DE S IGNED

I T HINK ABOU T MY ONL INE AND C AP T URED PRE SENCE. I

TO CONF USE FACE T R ACK ING S OF T WARE. I T TAK E S A L I T T L E

HOPE T HAT YOU W IL L UNDER S TAND MY CONCER N S, AND

GE T T ING USE TO, AND I D O F EEL L IK E A T HROWBACK TO

RE SPEC T MY GUIDEL INE S ABOU T F U T URE CON T EN T. I AL S O

T HE 8 0 ’ S, BU T I T M AY BE WOR T H T HE T ROUBL E OF PEER ING

ENCOUR AGE YOU TO AC T I VELY DI S SEN T A S WEL L , S O T HAT

T HROUGH MY HA IR IF I T W IL L G A IN ME S OME ANON Y MI T Y

WE M AY CO ORDIN AT E OUR MI S INF OR M AT ION. US ING T HE GUIDEL INE S F OR PER S ON A C RE AT ION, I HAVE AUDI T ED MY S O C I AL MEDI A E X I S T ENCE AND CONCL UDED

BY BE ING OBV IOUS. I T WA S K IND OF MY MODUS OPER ANDI AN Y WAY S. I A M T EL L ING AL L MY RE AL F R IEND S AND FA MILY T HE SE

W I T H S OME IN T ERE S T ING DI S COVER IE S ABOU T MY SEL F AND

RUL E S, AND PA S S ING ON T HE BO OK L E T S. MY HOPE I S T HI S

HOW I C A SUAL LY PRE SEN T MY L IF E TO T HE OU T S IDE WORL D.

WAY OF CON T ROL L ING DATA W IL L C ATCH ON, AND WE W IL L

I HAVE BEEN AC T I VELY G I V ING AWAY MY INF OR M AT ION ON S O C I AL MEDI A F OR 7 Y E AR S AND 6 MON T HS. I HAVE BELOW AVER AGE NUMBER OF “F R IEND S” AND MO S T OF T HO SE PEOPL E I D ON ’ T AC T UAL LY TAL K TO. I A M IN T ROVER T ED, FA IRLY AGREE ABL E, S OME WHAT CON S C IEN T IOUS, QUI T E NEUROT IC AND FA IRLY OPEN TO NE W E X PER IENCE S. TO OF F SE T T HE DATA T HAT HA S BEEN G AT HERED ON ME I W IL L BE ENG AG ING IN A C A MPA IGN TO P O S T UNCHAR AC T ER I S T IC T HING S, AND CON T ROL T HE F LOW OF INF OR M AT ION ABOU T MY RE AL IDEN T I T Y.

BE ABL E TO BE ANON Y MOUS AND NOT WORR IED ABOU T BE ING T R ACK ED AND S OL D ON T HE IN T ER NE T. T HERE I S S O MUCH T ROUBL ING NE W S ABOU T T HE HOARDING OF DATA , AND GOVER NE MEN T SP Y ING. WHAT SEE MED L IK E CON S IR AC Y S TOR IE S NOT S O LONG AGO ARE C REEP ING IN TO OUR RE AL I T Y AT AN AL AR MING R AT E. I K NOW I M AY SEE M AL AR ME S T, BU T I A S SURE YOU T HE F EEL ING OF DI S COMF OR T G AR NERED F ROM T HI S K NOWL ED GE I S GO OD. I T ME AN S T HAT T HING S NEED TO CHANGE, AND A S WA S WR I T T EN IN T HE BO OK COMMODIF Y YOUR DI S SEN T “ REBEL L ION M AK E S NO SEN SE W I T HOU T REPRE S S ION.” HAV ING ARE WHOL E L IF E

I A SK T HAT YOU PL AY ALONG W I T H MY RUSE, AND ENG AGE

T R ACK ED AND C AT ERGOR I ZED I S REPRE S S ION TO ME. NOW

W I T H P O S T S T HAT ARE UNCHAR AC T ER I S T IC F OR ME. PL E A SE

I T S T IME TO REBEL .

AVOID P O S T ING PHOTO S W I T H ME TADATA AT TACHED, AND REF R A IN F ROM TAGG ING ME IN T HE M. T EL L ME PR I VAT ELY WHEN T HERE ARE P IC T URE S S O T HAT I C AN DEC IDE WHAT

T HANK YOU F OR L I S T ENING. ZOË HARDI S T Y DEC 4, 2014

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CHHAYA N AR AN C RO S S WORD #2, 2015 PEN AND PAPER

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M ANON F R A SER DI S T RE S SED AND S T RE S SED, 2015 IL L US T R AT ION

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“ S O M AN Y ' SUCCE S SF UL AR T I S T S ' HAVE JUS T BECOME F UL L BLOWN ' PRODUCER S '. T HE Y M AK E COMMODI T IE S F OR S AL E AND D ON ' T DE VELOP A PR AC T ICE T HAT IN VE S T IG AT E S AN Y T HING. T HAT ANNOY S ME. WE ARE SUPP O SED TO BE PRO GRE S S ING CULT URE.” - JENNIF ER DICK IE S ON

JUAN C I SNERO S IN T ERV IE W, 2014 DIG I TAL PR IN T

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i l l u s -TrAT T- i O n

An Annotated interview w i t h i l l u s t r a t o r, tattoo artist and Emily Carr Student Nomi Chi.

AB: You seem to already be a very distinguished artist [in the community]! I’ve seen your work at Ayden Gallery in International Village. What steps have you taken

to become well known?

NC: Social networking through various internet outlets has always been a part of my practice. Growing up,

I didn’t always have friends around who were interested in drawing, and I was thirsty for feedback on my work. I

AMY BRERETON (AB): What do you enjoy about your major [Illustration]?

antart, livejournal, etc - I guess I developed a following by being somewhat active within artist communities online.

NOMI CHI (NC): The illustration program has definitely felt

However, my actual career didn’t gain traction until I felt

some growing pains in the past couple of years. What

comfortable reaching out to artists in my own city: partic-

I enjoy most about studying illustration at Emily Carr is

ipating and organizing events, showing genuine interest

that, since our program doesn’t have a particular history,

in people’s work, etc.

industry focus, or aesthetic it draws interest from people who have strikingly different practices. I like that we are encouraged to think critically about illustration and the images we produce. AB: How did you know you wanted to be an artist? NC: I have always enjoyed drawing, the decision to pursue visual arts as a career emerged slowly by consistent encouragement from my family and peers. 

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would regularly post on message boards, and (ugh) devi-

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AB: What artists inspire you? NC: I could write several tomes. Lately I have been trying to whittle my eye-candy down to a bare minimum. Peter Aurisch has always been an influence of mine, same with Xoil. Alexander Grim is a new favourite. Lately I have been looking at the work of older tattooers like Percy Waters, Sailor Jerry and Vyvyn Lazonga - I want to see if I can approach traditional American tattooing with a deconstructed sense of line. But I also don’t want to keep reiterating the same tropes, you know? My boyfriend, Joel Rich, is developing a really interesting a fresh approach to tattoo imagery, which I dig. AB: You also do a lot of tattoo artwork. How did you get involved in this? NC: Tattooing is my day gig! I got involved by dumb luck: When I was 15, my mom found someone to apprentice

AB: What are your plans after graduating? NC: I want to learn how to ride a motorcycle and adopt 80 dogs. •

me. My apprenticeship itself was lackluster, and I did some really awful tattoos for a long time, but it did me a leg up. AB: How did you practice?  NC: Started on orange peels and immediately moved on to unfortunate skin-having people.  AB: What was your apprenticeship like? NC: It wasn’t great. For personal reasons I can’t really divulge details, but my mentor did not teach me much beyond the basics. For a long time I taught myself and was too shy to reach out to other people (not recom-

Interviewed by: Amy Brereton

mended). At the time there wasn’t very much accessible

information available to new tattooers. I didn’t really start

learning until I was confident enough to ask other tattooers to share their techniques and experiences with me. AB: Were you nervous doing your first tattoo?  NC: Of course! It was nerve-wracking. 

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NOMI CHI MY S T ER Y F LOW S HER W ICK ED R I VER , 2014 INK + GOUACHE ON S TONEHENGE PAPER

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WOO Publication Winter 2014  

A collection of creative works from Emily Carr University School of Art + Design

WOO Publication Winter 2014  

A collection of creative works from Emily Carr University School of Art + Design

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