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Portfolio Project Title Transport Organisation Date etc Statement Portfolio


a leading global design practice

We are positioned across Australia and into Asia.

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Our capability is an attitude more than a set of skills. Our attitude is one of collaboration‌ always challenging and asking our clients the right questions. We are design focused, yet people centric.� 3


WOODHEAD COMPANY PROFILE 1 2 Victoria Avenue, Perth, WA 2 Southern Cross University, Building A, Gold Coast Campus, QLD 3 Community CPS, Adelaide, SA

Company Profile Architecture and design is a process, a journey of discovery with our clients. The constraints of space and time and commercial imperatives are a given, the difference at Woodhead is we see them as a catalyst to spur innovation. What We Do

Design and the Market

What we do is about exploring the future; asking the right questions, observing and listening to make sense of how to plan for the potential. We revel in complexity and understand that great results are a product of exhaustive rigour, research and proven processes and technologies.

We exist to design, however design excellence is an outcome of a commitment to rigor, research and innovation. Design does not exist in isolation; it requires an understanding of our clients and the markets they operate in. Research, processes and collaboration are fundamental to our success, as is our ability to deliver projects with technical accuracy and proficiency.

Our services are Architecture, Interior Design and Planning providing Property Advisory, Design and Project Delivery consultancy services.

Where We Operate Woodhead is an Australian company operating globally through a series of networked studios and partnerships; our practice draws depth from our geographic reach yet is locally infused with experience and character. We understand success will manifest itself through tangible projects that embody our values, evidenced by our client testimonials and our peer recognition.

Business Sustainability Whilst we exist to design, we only exist if we have a sustainable business platform that ensures practice and procedures are conducted within regulatory guidelines. The growth of business is predicated on achieving profit in order that we can reinvest in the organisation. A critical aspect of the structure is the management of risk and the continuous pursuit of quality. Business activity supports the Woodhead strategic business plan and goals, and contributes to a positive reputation and image by utilising high quality processes.

People and Culture How We Operate Our organisational structure is based on the interwoven activities of design, business and people. These spheres of practice coexist seamlessly to ensure the ‘Project’ sits at the centre of what we do and is the basis upon which success is measured.

Woodhead prides itself on the professional achievements of our people. We acknowledge individual contribution, and as a company we are committed to nurturing professional development through a range of activities including; study tours, corporate training, research projects, and providing an office culture based on continual improvement and learning. Woodhead supports policies and systems and processes that create equal opportunities for all and where people have the resources, assistance and support to achieve the highest personal and professional level.

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RETAIL

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INDUSTRIAL

TRANSPORT

HEALTH

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HEALTH

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EDUCATION

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TRANSPORT

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WOODHEAD KEY PROJECTS

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Woodhead works across several key portfolios, including; Commercial, Education, Industrial, Health, Hospitality, Residential, Retail, Transport, and Workplace.

COMMERCIAL

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WORKPLACE

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RESIDENTIAL

HOSPITALITY

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Adelaide Desalination Plant, Port Stanvac, South Australia

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Animation City, Guangzhou, China

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Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, Adelaide, South Australia

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Sydney International Airport Terminal 1 Redevelopment, New South Wales

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Changi International Airport Terminal 1 Upgrade, Singapore

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2 Victoria Avenue, Perth, Western Australia

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Development Bank of Singapore (DBS), Singapore

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Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria

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Southern Cross University Building A, Gold Coast, Queensland

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Place on Brougham, North Adelaide, South Australia

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Gowings and State Theatre - QT Hotel Conversion, Sydney, New South Wales

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The passenger’s ‘total journey experience’... Woodhead has substantial expertise in large multidisciplined consortia projects prevalent within the industry, in complex project delivery methodologies, and a thorough and balanced understanding of this specialist industry.”

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WORKPLACE TRANSPORT PORTFOLIO STATEMENT

Transport Portfolio The ‘total journey experience’ is a concept approach that focuses on the needs and experiences of the passenger at every stage of their travel process. Woodhead considers and caters for the passenger in all experiential areas from drop-off to departure, arrival to pick-up. This strategy supports a feeling of human scale and integrates functional planning with passenger facilities. This ‘total journey experience’ is a concept approach that focuses on the needs and experiences of the passenger at every stage of their travel process. The establishment of a ‘sense of place’ or brand is a key initiative for every Woodhead aviation and transportation project. This design concept aims to support the business plan of our client in a manner that is expressive of, and identifiable by either the project location or the brand image. Woodhead has the expertise and experience required to deliver airport terminal design and master planning. Having worked on international projects and in countries such as China, India, Singapore, Europe as well as Australia. Woodhead provide their clients with designs informed by current industry trends in both thinking and technology. With an ability to identify suitable world class benchmarking for various projects, clients can objectively determine the success and quality of the design they are achieving.

Our Team Woodhead has the people, knowledge and skills to expertly execute transport and infrastructure projects to their fullest potential. Woodhead has demonstrated experience working with a variety of specialist transport, mixed use and urban design professionals from leading national and international design firms. Our team has an understanding and capability for complex infrastructure projects, as well as established relationships with industry leaders and government agencies. These leaders are supported by a network of Woodhead personnel, particularly focused on the portfolios of transport, retail, residential, commercial and urban design. Woodhead has extensive experience in the transport and infrastructure sector, covering a wide range of project types, sizes and complexities from large airport terminals to ancillary works and station upgrades. The following projects have been recently completed or are currently being worked on in the transport sector.

Woodhead also has substantial expertise in large multidisciplined consortia projects prevalent within the industry; in the complex project delivery methodologies and a thorough, balanced understanding of this specialist industry.

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CBD Metro: Martin Place Station, Sydney, New South Wales

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Adelaide Airport Plaza, Adelaide, South Australia

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Changi International Airport Terminal 1, Singapore

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Project Name, Soekarno HattaLocation, International State,Airport Country Terminal 3, Jakarta, Indonesia


01 Aviation Woodhead Project Experience


The ‘Total Journey Experience’ Woodhead Thought Leadership - Transport

The transport node, whether it be a domestic or international airport or multi modal station, has existed as an evolutionary control at the edges of regions or borders.

As such the node has performed a variety of functions ranging from service industries to authority procedures. This variety of stakeholders has many functions to address, which when combined represent the overall brand and experience of the transport node. As designers we work with transport node owners and managers to ensure that where possible the built form experience is consistent with thier brand. This may extend from the architecture through to interior design, advertising, graphic design, uniform design through to information technology. This consistent approach towards design provides the passenger with a coherent “total journey experience” throughout their incoming and outgoing experiences as a traveller. The airport was once seen as an extra to the fabric of the city and its growth. Innovative civic and transport leaders are now seeing airports and their surrounding and supporting infrastructure, often referred to as airport cities, as the catalysts of urban growth and regeneration; a key part of the “c21st polycity concept”. Woodhead consider and cater for the passenger in all experiential areas from drop-off to departure, arrival to pick-up. This strategy supports a feeling of human scale and integrates functional planning with passenger facilities.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Woodhead consider and cater for the passenger in all experiential areas from drop-off to departure, arrival to pick-up. This strategy supports a feeling of human scale and integrates functional planning with passenger facilities.

The establishment of a ‘sense of place / brand’ is a key initiative for every Woodhead aviation and transportation project. This placement is aimed at supporting the business plan of our client in a manner that is expressive and identifiable of either the location of the design or the brand image.

We endorse a culture of “research, collaboration and innovation” as an integrated part of our design process. Our approach to aviation and transport projects combine these key principles:

Woodhead has 20 years of diverse experience in the Aviation and − clarity and legibility of function and wayfinding Transport industry, having completed over 100 projects worldwide. − provision of a sense of place or brand identity − an enhanced human scaled “total journey experience” These projects range from international passenger facilities through to cargo and catering facilities, and represent 15% of our − the provision of passenger focussed facilities − the resolution of complex functional requirements and the annual company turnover. provision of quality public places. We have 50 key personnel with aviation and transport expertise − These principles combine to support the business plan of our and a thorough and balanced understanding of this specialist client. industry. We have substantial expertise in large multi- disciplined consortia prevalent within the industry and in complex project delivery methodologies. Woodhead has worked on major infrastructure projects with major clients including: − − − − − − − − − −

Sydney Airports Corporation Limited Virgin Airlines Cairns Port Authority Airport Authority of Hong Kong Changi Airports Group Singapore Macquarie Airports Group British Aerospace Beijing Capital Airports Authority Singapore Airlines Qantas Airways Limited

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In the design of contemporary airports, we need to look deeper when preparing an authentic cultural interpretation for the future that addresses the airport’s civic function.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Soekarno Hatta International Airport Terminal 3 Jakarta, Indonesia Woodhead is the lead designer for the Architecture and Interiors for the new 380,000m2, 25 million pax Terminal 3 at Soekarno Hatta International Airport in Jakarta. The Woodhead consortium won the commission against three other international design, engineering and contractor consortia. Angkasa Pura 2, the ultimate client, described their desire to send a message to the world of Indonesia’s technological, political and cultural aspirations and evolution through the design of Terminal 3. An underlying message of national unity and a celebration of Indonesia’s cultural diversity draws on many of the award-winning attributes of the existing T1 and T2 buildings and reinterprets these influences in a contemporary terminal building. Everywhere people are challenged to express their local and regional cultural identity and to engage with an increasingly globalised world. In the design of contemporary airports, we need to look deeper when preparing an authentic cultural interpretation for the future that addresses the airport’s civic function. The concept for the interiors seeks to integrate artwork and cultural references into the structure and materials. A further expression of cultural diversity unified into one gigantic work of art.

There is a transformation from roof and columns to an integrated sculptural form, merging landscape with the composition of the building in an expression of balance between human activity and the natural world. Construction is due to be completed and the new terminal building fully operational by the close of 2015. Client

Angkasa Pura 2

Completion

End 2015

Project size

380,000m2

The terminal is for Garuda’s expanding international and domestic fleet of aircraft and is a model of efficiency and comfort overlaid with the curation of Indonesia’s unique cultural and environmental experiences for passengers.

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The elliptical skylight, measuring 77m long by 23m wide, is the key component of the forum design. With the forum being a column free space, the skylight is framed on a large primary grid with a lattice of skylight steelwork below the glass. The large louvre blades are designed to provide as much natural light as possible while minimising the amount of direct sunlight that interfaces with retail and food and beverage tenancies, yet also reducing the need for artiďŹ cial lighting in the daytime.â€?


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Sydney International Airport Terminal 1 Sydney, New South Wales Designed by Woodhead, the expansion of the departures level of the International Terminal encompasses a diverse range of activities within a main piazza ‘The Forum’ creating an integrated and dynamic passenger experience. The Forum defines the travel experience as a civic place of dwelling, where travellers can pause and reflect on their journey. The creation of this space evolved into the heart of the terminal, producing a signature place of international quality which captures and embodies the light and spaciousness of Sydney. The International Terminal is a key infrastructure asset for Sydney and handles about 45% of all of Australia’s international passengers. The design form ensures all passengers departing Sydney leave with a positive impression and enjoy a uniquely Australian experience. The upgrade and expansion of the International Terminal 1 involved: − adding 7,300 square metres to the departures level to provide world class passenger facilities including; single focused airside retailing environment featuring a naturally conditioned marketstyle “Forum” for passengers dwell time, − centralised outbound immigration and security control, − single focused landside food-court and retailing environment, − a new outbound and early baggage handling system − additional and upgraded aeronautical facilities including aerobridges, aircraft parking and taxiway improvements to accommodate a wider range of aircraft

− redevelopment of approximately 30,000 square metres of the existing departures level including new seating throughout − an additional 120 metres of moving walkways − improved way-finding signage and upgrades to bathrooms, ceiling and floor finishes. − provision of premium check-in and processing facilities, − increased airline lounge facilities, all designed in line with the parallel programs allowing A380 aircraft provisions. − Environmental initiatives include the use of recycled water for toilet flushing and in cooling towers, and energy efficient displacement air-conditioning in the Forum retail space. Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited

Completion

2010

Project value

$450m

Project size

Redevelopment of existing terminal and additional 7,300m2 to the departures level.

Awards

Shortlisted, INSIDE awards, 2011 World Architecture Festival in Barcelona

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We are particularly pleased with the passenger response to the recent launch of the retail development at Terminal 2, with almost 90% of passengers expressing satisfaction in recent surveys and signiďŹ cantly increased quality of service ratings across categories such as the range of food and beverage outlets; the overall appearance and cleanliness of the terminal and the overall terminal experience.â€? Kerrie Mather, CEO Macquarie Airports


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Sydney Airport Terminal 2 Sydney, New South Wales The Sydney Airport Corporation Limited commissioned Woodhead to upgrade the existing Terminal 2 retail facilities, including internal refurbishments and an external expansion of the building envelop.

The airside extension to the building caters for the projected increases in passenger demand. This terminal provides facilities for regional carriers including Virgin Blue, Jetstar and Qantas.

The initial concept was to keep the ceiling free of any services. The new clean ceiling panels also served as acoustic panelling throughout the project.

The new terminal space focuses on enhancing the current retail, food and beverage facilities on offer. Vertical circulation points and passenger flows have been reorganised to better integrate with the retail facilities, including a new food court. The project team worked with the client and consultants to develop the design solution to achieve best practice results for the client and stakeholders, and improve the reputation of the airport globally.

The retail shops are located to provide an ‘intimate’ shopping experience and the ceiling lines and floor finishes from the main concourse extend into the shops where possible to draw customers in.

The design incorporates the principals of ‘light’ and ‘height’, giving the space an open and welcoming passenger experience. The main entrance to the departures concourse level does not favour any one airline tenant, but navigates departing passengers into a central retail zone, maximising retail sightlines. The design is vibrant, dynamic and energetic to correspond with the airlines that are utilising the terminal for their operations. The height restrictions within the existing building together with the required services (lighting, security, public announcement equipment, return air ducting, etc) were resolved though a simple ceiling design that allowed these disparate items to be housed in a manner that provides an aesthetically clean and maintenance friendly format.

The client is pleased with the resulting increase in retail sales, which impacts positively on the airports profitability. The client has also received informal feedback on the success of the retail areas and food court precinct, from both staff and passengers. Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (SACL)

Completion

2007

Project value

$20m

Awards

Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Emerging Assets Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Tourism & Leisure Development

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The model was shared collaboratively between architect, engineers, cost consultants, lighting consultants, landscape architects and steel fabricators.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Adelaide Airport Plaza Adelaide, South Australia This large scale structure has been designed as both a screen to a multi-deck carpark and as a landscape device to give spatial definition to the new plaza at Adelaide Airport.

It serves as a memorable gateway experience for arrival and departure. The truss frame structure is a three dimensional, twisting form which has an elegant stainless steel woven mesh wrapping around two sides. At night the frame and mesh will be dynamically lit to enhance the arrival and departure experience.

The model was shared collaboratively between architect, engineers, cost consultants, lighting consultants, landscape architects and steel fabricators. It was used directly in the concept and detail design, visualisations, documentation drawings as well as being sent out as a 3D file to all tenderers.

The innovative use of parametric software was crucial to the conception and development of the design, through to documentation and beyond. The key to its success was the strategy taken to construct, use and share the 3D model within the design process. Research was conducted to find out how other models had been built and shared at this scale. Our model was built in a way that allowed continual refinement and change without the need for rebuilding. Manipulations of form automatically changed the structure to follow the shape.

This process allowed for continuous, integrated feedback and refinement, and a much faster timeframe for design and documentation than that of a traditional workflow. Client

Adelaide Airport

Completion

2012

Project value

$80m

The structure was set up to allow (for example) spans between structural nodes to be updated simply by inputing the span in the parameter callout. All programmed structural nodes would update their span distances without the need for direct modelling. Automatic schedules were set up to give information such as surface area directly to the quantity surveyors.

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The refurbishment of Changi Terminal 1 continues the vision of updating an Asian icon that will reinforce Singapore’s position as the contemporary leader in the region and the world’s No. 1 airport.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Changi Airport Terminal 1 Singapore In 2003 Woodhead were commissioned as architects/interior designers by Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG) for the upgrading of Changi Terminal 1. Changi International Terminal 1 was completed in over 180 defined phases with a number of sub stages within each phase, over 5 years whilst still maintaining 95% capacity. The purpose of the project was to revitalise the ‘Grand Dame’ of Changi Airport, a building held in the hearts and minds of the people of Singapore. The architectural and interior design is focused on the idea of the “tropical city”. Landscape, technology and movement are key elements of this idea and are realised in the elevated green walkways to the kinetic rain sculptures used throughout the terminal to provide passengers with a truly unique ‘Changi Experience’. A significant 11,150m2 expansion to the airside provided for a mixture of high quality public and retail spaces, introducing a ‘piazza’ space with un-obstructed 9m high glazing looking directly onto the apron with outdoor landscape areas and refurbishment of all Gate Hold Rooms. This space will become the heart of the airport, providing a place to enjoy the ‘Changi Experience’. Further to this is the design of a new landside level 3 dining experience with direct connections to a new 80m landside viewing gallery and light well which spans the length of the terminal and provides natural light deep into terminal plan.

Operational and functional opportunities were implemented as well such as revitalising the departure drop off area; remodeling the departure check-in area with the provision of new glass lifts, inclined travelators and better vertical circulation; a more simple and centralised departure immigration process, a more efficient arrival immigration experience and extension of the baggage belt areas. The refurbishment of Changi Terminal 1 continues the vision of updating an Asian icon that will reinforce Singapore’s position as the contemporary leader in the region and the world’s No. 1 airport. Client

Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG - formerly CAAS)

Completion

2012

Project value

S$500m

Project size

11,150m2 expansion

Awards

Shortlist - 2012 World Architecture Festival.

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The interior design is calming and spacious, and based around a 21st century airport model, reflecting the airport’s economic importance together with a civic focus for the city and region, a ‘Singaporean Sense of Place’.”


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Changi Airport Terminal 3 Singapore Singapore’s Changi International Airport is regarded as one of the world’s most popular airports. Woodhead, responsible for the new Terminal 3 interior architecture, has applied a project philosophy designed to create a memorable airport experience, capture the Singaporean sense of place and reinforce user friendliness and amenity. The interior design is calming and spacious, and based around a 21st century airport model, reflecting the airport’s economic importance together with a civic focus for the city and region. The terminal adopts an intuitive layout concept promoting ease of orientation.

Client

Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG - formerly CAAS)

Completion

2008

Project value

S$1.75b

Four guiding design principles led the design process; clarity, natural lighting, external views and maintainability. The design approach encompassed two distinct zones: landside – accessible to the public, and airside – accessible only to travelling passengers.

Project size

380,000m²

Awards

2008 Winner Mixed Use Buildings, MIPIM Asia Awards

The project accommodates over 130 retail and food and beverage outlets, both landside and airside, and facilitates over 22 million passengers each year. Terminal 3 features a unique five-storey vertical garden, the ‘Green Wall’, spanning 300m across the main building and viewable from both the Departure and Arrival halls. Together with the rest of the terminal the detailed interior design provides a rich tactile experience that sees passenger flow integrated with retailing, airport facilities and themed landscaping.

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The work completed by Woodhead established a clear vision for Avalon Airport and a basis from which to drive their proposed growth as a potential second International Airport for the Victoria region and Melbourne city.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Avalon Airport Masterplan Avalon, Victoria Woodhead was invited by Avalon Airport to review and analyse the key growth opportunities that they had identified would enable them to develop a sustainable vision for their master plan.

This vision was to create the opportunity to operate and develop Victoria’s next International Aviation Airport hub up to the year 2030. The master plan exercise looked at the alignment and positioning of various zones for airport related commercial growth, aligned with the growth of the terminal including landside and airside expansion. Key also to the operations and commercial viability of the airport site is the Linfox freight operations and part of the planning included for an intermodal freight site. The master plan took into consideration operational requirements for hangars, freight facilities, aircraft parking, airport roads and car parking required to be progressively upgraded over the next 20 years; incorporating potential new infrastructure and public transport services to increase the ease of travelling to the airport. A key trigger for the airport’s potential growth is the proposed Avalon Airport Rail Link which will provide a direct rail link for passengers to the airport from the Melbourne-Geelong rail line. Woodhead also participated in the consultations with the Victorian Department of Transport in determining the potential type, route and interface for the future rail link and its airport station.

Woodhead also developed conceptual ideas on the development of the terminal, its precincts and associated land use. Using international references as benchmarks the terminal proposal allowed for future expansion of the terminal to allow for more and larger aircraft, utilization of existing facilities as part of a cohesive and centralized terminal plan, integrated curb drop-off and pickup, and a landside plaza development adjacent to commercial, retail and parking zones. The work completed by Woodhead established a clear vision for Avalon Airport and a basis from which to drive their proposed growth as a potential second International Airport to serve both the Victoria region and Melbourne city. Woodhead’s work has formed the basis of Avalon Airport’s published Master Plan 2012. Client

Avalon Airport Australia Pty Ltd

Completion

2012

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The project’s design period was very short with a six month period from August 2011 to February 2012 for the delivery of the design concept to completion of the detail design.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Bengalaru Airport Terminal 1 Expansion Bangalore, India Bangalore International Airport Ltd. started works in mid-2011 to develop and expand its existing International Terminal from 72,000m2 to 134,000m2. This would take the terminal capacity from 10.6 million passengers per annum (mppa) to over 17mppa, with the flexibility to expand to 20mppa. Woodhead won a limited international bid to provide interior design services for Larsen & Toubro. The architectural component was designed by HOK directly to the Bangalore International Airport. Woodhead provided the interior for the terminal’s public areas, creating a ‘sense of place’ that reflected the character of Bangalore as a modern city respectful of its traditional past. Woodhead also resolved the design and treatment of the roof soffit and column cladding externally and internally. The design created a terminal that utilized colour, texture and materials within key areas of passenger interaction and orientation, respecting the flowing form and space of the original architectural intent. Woodhead developed their concept through to detail design, working closely with Bangalore International Airport and GVK on the development and approval of the interior and retail design and coordinating operational and functional requirements, way-finding and signage, art works, and bespoke passenger services facilities into a coherent composition.

Code F capability for A380 operations during this upgrade. There is an increase of contact stands from the 8 Code C (B737/A320) or 4 Code D/E (B777, A330, B747) to 15 Code C or 7 Code E and one Code F (A380). Check-in counters will increase from 53 to 83. Baggage reclaim belts will increase from 9 to 13 including 2 extremely large island type belts for international operations. There is a significant increase in passenger seating with provision increasing from 2,300 to 5,300 (excluding airline lounges and F&B outlets). The design created strong visual elements such as the check-in hall portal and curved bulkheads and balustrades in the second floor mezzanine at both ends of the expansion. The western side (domestic) will be used for airline lounges and a transit hotel; the eastern side will house a relocated and increased immigration and international area. Client

Larson and Toubro Limited

Completion

2013

Project value

$30m Interiors.

Project size

62,000m2

Along with the terminal there will be an expansion of the airside. Expansion of the apron has already commenced which will take capacity from 42 to 64 Code C stands, with taxiways upgraded to

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Indira Gandhi Airport New Delhi, India Woodhead was appointed as architect, interior designers and retail planners for the new US$700+m airport in Delhi, India. In association with Larsen and Toubro Limited and Meinhardt Engineering, the project will be constructed in time for the 2010 Commonwealth Games in New Delhi.

The new airport includes 40 gates, check-in facilities and the ability to operate both domestic and international flights. The architecture features expansive spaces, with the Interior design focused on creating a unique ‘Indian’ sense of place. The design concept celebrates New Delhi’s geographic location at the foothills of the Himalayas and takes references from Indian Art and Iconography. Visitors are greeted in the arrivals hall by a carved stone wall with Rangoli, symbols of welcome, and carved Indian National symbols juxtaposed onto an abstracted version of Lutyens New Delhi street map. The overall design concept focuses on passenger comfort and experience. Client

Larson and Toubro Limited

Completion

2010

Project value

US$700m


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Xi’an International Airport Xi’an, PR China Xi’an, located in the People’s Republic of China, is world renowned as the home of the terracotta warriors and a famed walled city.

Woodhead’s design for Xi’an Airport is underpinned by the following five principles: − Balance: Axiality - planning derived from the Xi’an ancient city plan − Courtyard Planning: the use of courtyard planning to inform the exterior and interior layouts − City Wall: the prominence of the wall as the primary architectural and urban space making device − City Plan: the use of the abstracted city plan to enliven detailing of wall textures and floorscapes − Sky: the roof and ceiling are designed as a diffused and dappled layer representing the position of sky to wall as found in the Xi’an city Woodhead has designed qualities which are unique and essential to Xi’an and blended them with international best practice airport planning to create a long term, resonant airport design solution, reinforcing Xi’an’s historic importance and future goals. Client

Airport Master Planning Consultants Pty Ltd

Completion

Design Competition

Project value

US$100m 29


Hefei Anhui International Airport Anhui, PR China Our design meets forecast demand requirements, has logical staging, maintains a balance in capacity, is environmentally sustainable and is convenient, flexible and economic to operate. The overall terminal has been modified into 3 linear concourses. A central [main] concourse with attached check-in and baggage reclaim facilities and two linear satellites, connected via an APMS.

The design of this terminal blends 3 key themes: − World class aviation planning − The use of abstracted design elements found in the indigenous art works of the Chinese Anhui Province − An architectural expression of flight, speed and movement The concourses, separated into linear satellites, are moved further apart to provide optimal apron operations. This design results in: − Aircraft gates to suit staging; − a central widened section which can be a focus for retail concessions, airline lounges and services; − facilitates hubbing operations without the need for passengers to return to the main terminal or transfers between flights, − Ability to reduce the complexity of the Automated People Mover System (APMS) with only one station being required for the concourse; − Space under the widened section for ground support equipment and ramp handling; − The staging of the island concourses is relatively simple with additional sections being added in response to demand. Client

Hefei Anhui Airport, PR China

Completion

Design competition


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Kolkata International Airport Kolkata, India Woodhead was the only Australian company invited to enter a global design competition for the new Kolkata (Calcutta) International Airport in India.

The design concept is a blend of: − the industrial steel language found in Kolkata’s Howrah Bridge − the masonry richness of the city’s architectural fabric − the vibrance of the people and their traditional sari dress form The new terminal has been designed with a truss system enabling expansion. It also allows for internal expansion by providing future capacity for baggage carousels, the development of airside retail and the extension of departures and arrivals concourses, additional gates and increased freedom of passenger movement. In the first stage of development, the most economically viable option is to build the terminal up to the major vertical circulation point in the centre of the building. This would allow the terminal to function as ‘departures only’. The existing terminal would accommodate arrivals and offer seamless passenger circulation. The second phase of development would see the completion of the terminal and demolition of the existing facility. Client

Kolkata International Airport

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Project Name, Changi International Location, Airport State, Terminal Country 3, Singapore


02 Airport Retail Woodhead Project Experience


Adding Retail Value to Airports Woodhead Thought Leadership As the world embraces the technological age into the C21st the sense of small scale intimacy, place making and physical or cultural differentiation are becoming less detectable. The world’s experiences are becoming more homogenous as time progresses. Human nature in contrast still yearns and strives for unique experiences that are particular to certain places and cultures.

These unique experiences are central to the making of cultures and memories and are rooted in the geographies, climates, histories and people of any place. Our design projects endeavour to create the subtle connection between context, place making and built form in order to weave our built form into the community in-which it exists. Airports worldwide are increasingly aware of the impact and value of retail; as a source of revenue, to reinforce brand identity, and to cater to passenger needs. But how do airport operators best incorporate retail into their terminals?”. What design principles should be applied to add value and how can these principles be applied to airports of all different shapes, sizes, locations, cultures and passenger types. Outlined in the following text are some of the fundamental issues faced by airports when integrating commercial initiatives into a process driven environment, including design principles that may be implemented into an airport’s planning strategy to add value to both the earning potential and the positive passenger experience. Originally, airports were designed for the sole purpose of facilitating incoming and outgoing passengers; terminals were rated according to their processing efficiency, through-put and capacity.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

As the demand for global air travel increases, especially into the growing middle classes and third world countries, passenger needs are more varied and passengers themselves are much more discerning. The contemporary airport operator is searching for new ways to optimise income production and service in order to meet these expectations and remain competitive in the airport marketplace.

A study by Omar & Kent (2001) at Gatwick Airport using a sample of airport users showed that “impulsive shopping at the airport is induced and, or, encouraged by both marketing and the airport environment. It revealed that 35% of airport users are converted purchasers; however a total of 65 percent of users do not visit the shop or browse with no intention of buying.” Indeed, in an era where we all claim to be time poor the airport’s captive nature provides an ideal place to dwell, enjoy and spend.

Retail Planning Retail planning is at its worst considered peripheral to airport design and conducted in isolation to stakeholder groups. Terminal architecture, engineering and facilities planning issues are often decided on prior to consultation with the commercial and retail managers. However much of the skill in airport retail design is in the coordination and understanding of the critical requirements of each user group and stakeholder in a cohesive and integrated sense. The use of a cohesive project master plan is fundamental to the success of any new or existing retail environment and must begin with a collaborative and balanced approach. A master plan requires the right team in place and needs to be undertaken with strong collaboration and regular consultation with the airport and the many relevant stakeholders. Key points that should be addressed within a master plan are: − Vision – the collective airport management team holds the key to the success of the airport’s future. − Brief – the formation of a clear and detailed brief is vital. A good brief will develop with collaborative input from airport stakeholders. − Collaboration – a good design can not be implemented in isolation. − Reliable information – local and global information is essential as well as a clear understanding of the region’s growth, culture and profile, and best practice procedures. − Regional understanding – a master plan for an Indian airport may face different challenges than a master plan for an Australian airport as well as a very different “sense of place”. − Team – a balance of commercial and operational requirements is key, and both commercial and operational stakeholders require sound representation. A robust, collaborative master plan at the project’s inception is critical for the successful implementation of commercial initiatives, processing initiatives and the establishment of a spatial environment that creates a lasting positive impression upon passengers. Remember the romance of travel?

Revenue Creation The challenge to all retailers remains “how to get people to spend?” Good shop design and clever marketing campaigns will only go part of the way. The balance between good customer service, value and ease of movement through an airport are crucial for enticing passengers to spend.

Wayfinding Retail design that is vibrant and enticing should never be in conflict with clear passenger wayfinding. Passengers should not be overloaded with too much information. Confusion and anxiety are minimised by using effective signage in conjunction with clear sight-lines. Passengers who shop within airports are more often ‘on a mission’ and are influenced by lack of time, premeditation, rapid impulse decision-making and sensitivity to occupant volumes. They are either unmotivated or less conscious of pricepoint. The clarity, visibility and accessibility of the retail product are therefore essential in creating a successful and legible retail environment.

Sense of Place As part of the vision of the airport a sense of place or unique memorable travel experience may be reinforced. Retail area theming, with integrated advertising and public art, reinforce the identity of the airport while creating a vibrant shopping precinct. The design should be iconic and identifiable with the airport’s location. Some examples of this may be seen in the refurbishment of Australia’s Sydney Airport prior to the 2000 Olympic Games, designed to be an expression of vibrant Sydney. Vancouver Airport’s use of indigenous artworks expresses a cultural sense of place, and Hong Kong Airport’s recent retail upgrade engaging a vibrant abstraction of the Nathan Road, Kowloon experience. In Sydney, the design solutions include the use of local materials natural timbers for building details, colours that are reminiscent of the outdoor lifestyle, and themed or precinct focussed retail hubs. The ongoing success of Sydney Airport’s retail offer is seen in the 13.1% increase in retail revenues in the first six months to 31 December 2004.

Comfort Above all, the passenger’s comfort and amenity is primary, especially to alleviate anxiety, increase comfort and maximise propensity to spend. As such, the design should focus around the experiences and facilities that a passenger will require when moving through the facility. Diverse facilities, such as toilets, baby change rooms, quiet areas and entertainment, must be clearly defined, convenient and integrated with the overall design concept. General seating areas should be close to and compatible with retail. The retail experience should support passenger wayfinding with clear and logical signage balancing both wayfinding and retail needs.

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Design Airport commercial zones are becoming more integrated, more akin to a contemporary urban marketplace or streetscape modelled on the proven forms of mixed-use piazzas or traditional streets. Passengers cannot be expected to hunt for retail or refreshment - it must be placed where it will not be missed. Retail tenancies need to interact, take part in and invigorate the overall design environment of the passenger. A common retail theory is to pack stock wall to wall in the hope to increase sales. This unfortunately leads to blockages to the product on display and restricts circulation into the shop. With this in mind, the retail plan should accommodate appropriate levels of storage, in close proximity to the point of sale, and allocate sufficient circulation zones within the retail environment. This strategy reduces clutter, opens space and reduces the required retail floor areas.

Access to views can dramatically increase commercial activity especially on landside food and beverage and appropriately placed viewing decks. Outdoor spaces offer additional viewing platforms, as well as a refuge for smokers and transit passengers, and should be integrated with the retail experience. Changi Terminal 1 in Singapore has an open air cactus garden with an iconic bar and is a classic example of an external integrated retail space and tropical experience. It is unique, memorable and popular. Many terminals may in fact already have great assets that only require minor upgrading. Commercial teams must be sensitive to what the market expects and recognise that some of the ‘quirks’ may not follow the latest directions but add diversity and texture to an environment. More retail space is not necessarily better retail space.

Retail Design Optimising the Existing Architecture A retail layout that best suits the requirements of the commercial brief will often mis-align with the terminal architecture and reveal a number of volumetric challenges. Higher space is best suited to main thoroughfares and retail, while lower spaces suit more intimate seating and hospitality zones. The commercial solution for Hong Kong Airport’s East Hall retail remodelling necessitated a total revision of the high and low space ideology within the terminal in order to optimise the use of the existing spaces. High spaces were filled with design icons, which reinforced branding and advertising, and enhanced the wayfinding within the multilevel terminal. Natural light is desirable for circulation and dwell zones wherever possible, however retail is better served by artificial lighting and more often resents natural lighting. The lighting in airports often lacks the intensity and contrast needed to separate commercial areas from other activities. This reduces clarity and adds to passenger confusion. Increasing the lux levels at shop fronts to over 1,000 lux can ensure the retail offer stands out and contrasts with the adjacent environments. Views to the airfield are precious and are critical ‘dwell anchors’ as people are attracted to and love looking at the “theatre of aeroplanes”. Food and beverage tenants are well suited to these areas, and should be integrated as drawcards into the retail precinct.

Traditionally the shop front has been a device to keep the weather out, create protection from theft, and showcase the product inside the shop to an optimum level. Airport terminals are amongst the most secure environments in the world. Due to this increased security, some of the traditional barriers such as windows and doors may be manipulated or removed all together, especially in scenarios of 24 hour operations or multi concession ownership. There is an emerging trend for primary circulation paths to be integrated within retail concessions. This provides 100% footfall and increases passenger exposure to the retail offer. This is occurring worldwide especially in duty free environments where the passenger is immersed in a totally integrated retail space. These “walk through dutyfree” stores have proven a bonus in experiential terms and also revenue increases. Shop front materials must be durable and often of a design that allows individual retail expression. Tenancy fitout guides must clearly outline acceptable finishes and materials to ensure a level of quality that will withstand the rigours of the retail environment. Most modern terminals will coordinate both hard and soft floor finishes. Hard finishes, such as granite or reconstituted stone, are often best suited in high wear areas such as shopfronts, concourses and baggage areas (check in and baggage reclaim). These finishes are often of a reflective finish to provide higher light intensity in these areas.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Softer or warmer finishes, such as carpet and timber, are well placed in quieter zones such as gate lounges and food and beverage areas, as these finishes absorb sound and light, often more appropriate for the often more intimate dwell zones.

− − −

− − −

The retail offer should cover all market segments, for example sell low cost beers as well as premium beers. The product mix should include the usual airport goods with a focus upon high information intensity / high margin products that are retailed in an exciting environment.

It is critical to get shopfront lighting correct. This zone can be split into two main areas – the primary shopfront zone and the tenant Small Terminals zone. The primary shopfront zone can help unify the shop edge Typical retail design issues encountered in smaller passenger with a light and signage portal. The tenant zone lighting reflects terminal environments include; the personality and needs of the retailer. Seating, food and beverage and concourses may have less intense lighting, which − Low or fluctuating throughput – challenging for retailers during highlights only features, kiosks and wayfinding opportunities. quiet times. Empirical models indicate that a good lighting design, often simply − Small spaces – often concessions need to be smaller and the more than less light, will enhance retail sales. offer can be cramped. − Small retail mix – often a smaller range of products. Large Terminals − Smaller sustainable tenants – can be difficult to attract larger Typical retail design issues to be faced in larger passenger brands. terminal environments include; − Multi brand shops – necessary for survival. High throughput – areas can be big and impersonal so that retail − Gift shop mentality – cluttered multi product souvenir shops. tends to be passed by in the process, if not correctly designed. These are popular in many tourist destinations. Offerings can be Large spaces – designers are always looking for new ways to low on sophistication and service – a single operator may control retail with out a ceiling; objects within large spaces. two or all of the outlets, which are often overstretched and at worst under serviced. Creating interest in multiple locations – rigorous management programmes must ensure that all areas are performing at their − Long quiet times – closed roller grilles give any terminal a closed best. Promotional and entertainment zones with a good food and down feel. beverage mix help connect a larger terminal. In conclusion, the primary issues to be considered when adding Wayfinding – long travel distances increase passengers’ speed retail value to an airport are; through the terminal. Building layouts should be clear and − Maximum exposure is to be focused in the high payoff post signage available to stop passengers getting lost. security and immigration retail areas; Longer busy hours – this can be tuned for higher exposure for − Maximise retail areas in centralised passenger zones; longer times − The integration of retail, food and beverage, and passenger Complex processing – passengers are often trapped in queues facilities to create a vibrant mixed use environment; rather than shopping. − The creation of legible spaces; Staging issues – upgrades and refurbishment can take extended periods of time due to the size of the terminal. Retail outlets need − Integrate clear wayfinding principles within retail environments; to remain fully functional throughout the construction period. − Clear and improve sight lines; High costs – maintenance, operations, high staff numbers. − Minimise multi-level retail environments; Successful retail design ensures an increase in passenger footfall − Ensure effective queue strategies and processing before and after retailing. and dwell times with a correspondent increase in spending. The most successful airport retail revenue environments in the world The successful integration of retail into an airport will enhance are condensed in format, with approximately 0.7 to 1.5m2 of the passenger journey experience and differentiate the airport retail per 1,000 passengers. Any airport seeking to improve from its competitors with the constant reinforcement of a desired their retail return should be aspiring to maximise gross sales per brand identity and sense of place. All experiential areas of the passenger, retail income per passenger, gross sales per square airport, from kerbside to departure, should focus upon passenger metre. comfort, ease of use and resonate with local colours, textures, icons, artworks and images. The successful addition of “retail “Precinctualisation” is an important consideration, whereby retail value” to an airport comes from the balance of meeting passenger is collocated with the food and beverage provisions. Food and processing and facility needs whilst reinforcing positive travel beverage acts as an anchor for retailing to cluster around, with experiences and simultaneously generating revenue. seating designed to allow people to eat food within the shopping precinct - the resultant increase in dwell times in retail precincts can add 5% to sales. Some basic retail design principles can be applied. The food and beverage should constitute 30-35% of the retail floor space, duty free 25% of the retail floor space, and the remainder consisting of specialty stores and currency exchange facilities. 37


Woodhead has collaborated across three studios to complete its first project in Istanbul. Woodhead Sydney has worked together with Woodhead’s Italian studio and local architects Toner to create the new duty free retail precinct at the Sabiha Gökçen International Airport.


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Setur Duty Free Sabiha Gökçen International Airport, Istanbul Woodhead has collaborated across three studios to complete its first project in Istanbul. Woodhead Sydney has worked together with Woodhead’s Italian studio and local architects Toner to create the new duty free retail precinct at the Sabiha Gökçen International Airport. Commissioned by retailer Setur, the dutyfree fitout is designed to interact, integrate and take part in the overall airport environment. The “open” model approach to retail planning draws the passenger into the retail space in a less invasive way. The retail zones blend seamlessly with the architectural form of the airport terminal, creating a continuous environment for the passenger. The design concept is modelled on the dynamic curvatures found externally and internally on aircraft as a metaphor for an extended travel experience. Designing a project across the globe provided our team with a valuable professional and cultural experience. Woodhead plan to use this knowledge to continue to develop project opportunities in worldwide.”

Signage and Wayfinding In an additional commission, Woodhead’s graphic design team was commissioned to develop an expandable dual language (Turkish / English) wayfinding system for the new Sabiha Gökçen International Airport terminal. The signage form was influenced by one of the terminal’s feature architectural elements a striking wave-like curved roof. A complete signage suite was developed to respond to the various surrounds. The end result is a world class integrated signage and wayfinding system that will service the annual 25 million passengers, and beyond. Client

Setur Duty Free

Completed

2010

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A main piazza ‘The Forum’ creating an integrated and dynamic passenger experience. The Forum defines the travel experience as a civic place of dwelling, where travellers can pause and reflect on their journey.


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Sydney International Airport Terminal 1 Sydney, New South Wales The Sydney Airport Terminal 1 Redevelopment celebrates the joy of travel and articulates the importance of public spaces.

Designed by Woodhead, the expansion of the departures level of the International Terminal encompasses a diverse range of activities within a main piazza ‘The Forum’ creating an integrated and dynamic passenger experience.

Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited

Completion

2010

Project value

$450m

The Forum defines the travel experience as a civic place of dwelling, where travellers can pause and reflect on their journey. The creation of this space evolved into the heart of the terminal, producing a signature place of international quality which captures and embodies the light and spaciousness of Sydney.

Project size

Redevelopment of existing terminal and additional 7,300m2 to the departures level.

Awards

Shortlisted, INSIDE awards, 2011 World Architecture Festival in Barcelona

The project incorporated; − − − − −

upgrading and provision for more streamlined check-in facilities, single focused landside food-court and retailing environment, single point of outbound immigration and security control, provision of premium check-in and processing facilities, single focused airside retailing environment featuring a naturally conditioned market-style “Forum” for passengers dwell time, and − increased airline lounge facilities, all designed in line with the parallel programs allowing A380 aircraft provisions. Environmental initiatives in the International Terminal include the use of recycled water for toilet flushing and in cooling towers and energy efficient displacement air-conditioning in the Forum.

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The retail street concept is supported by stylised ‘lanterns’ which reflect the famous views along Nathan Road Kowloon and offer a similar function by creating a backdrop for integrated advertising and retail signage.”


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

East Hall Retail Chek Lap Kok Airport, Hong Kong The reconfiguration and expansion of the new East Hall Terminal at Chek Lap Kok Airport Hong Kong is designed to revolutionise the existing shell by adding retail value and an improved passenger experience.

Woodhead has transformed the terminal’s East Hall precinct into an integrated environment supporting a diversity of passenger services and amenities. An additional 9,000m2 of commercial space is introduced via two identical split-level extensions to the East Hall’s diagonal facades.

Client

Airport Authority Hong Kong / Meinhardt (HK)

Completion

2003

Project size

9,000m2

The design concept creates a Hong Kong ‘sense of place’ inspired by the vibrant and energetic Hong Kong cityscape, while respecting the integrity of the terminal’s existing architecture. The retail street concept is supported by stylised ‘lanterns’ which reflect the famous views along Nathan Road Kowloon and offer a similar function by creating a backdrop for integrated advertising and retail signage.

Awards

World’s Best Airport Award – Gold Award, Skytrax 2005

The design ensures that the retail spaces are conducive to generating revenue. The master plan curbs the primary passenger flows increasing dwell time within the retail environment. Centred on an internal communal ‘Piazza’ space, the master plan is serviced by restaurants, retail and passenger amenities over two levels. The primary vertical circulation, post security, places passengers into the newly engineered central space. The expansion and retail works harmonise with the airport’s dynamic over-arching structure, invigorating the unique space.

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Woodhead’s retail masterplan realigns the vertical circulation points and passenger flows to improve integration with and enhance the retail, food and beverage offer.”


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Sydney Airport Terminal 2 Sydney, New South Wales Woodhead has combined aviation and retail planning expertise in to achieve a successful design outcome for the $20 million upgrade of Sydney Airport’s Terminal 2. The project team worked with the client to develop the design philosophy. The design incorporates the principals of ‘light’ and ‘height’, giving the space an open and welcoming feeling. The main entrance to the departures concourse level does not favour any one airline tenant, but navigates departing passengers into a central retail zone, maximising retail sightlines. The design is vibrant, dynamic and energetic to correspond to the airlines that are utilising the terminal for their operations. Relocated escalators encourage passengers to move through the retail precinct en-route to lounges and concourse areas, strategically increasing footfall and leading to superior revenue potential by the retail offer.

Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited

Completion

2007

Project value

$20m

Project size

4,500m2

Awards

Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Emerging Assets Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Tourism & Leisure Development

The retail precinct comprises a combination of shops, food and beverage and seating, encouraging travellers to extend their dwell time in the retail zone. The project incorporates an airside expansion of the building envelop, in the form of a curved façade, to provide new passenger public spaces and cater to expected increased passenger demand. The security zone and processing is also reinforced as a result of the retail reconfiguration. Terminal 2, one of Sydney Airport’s busiest terminals, handles over 10 million passengers a year. The redevelopment has provided passengers with improved facilities, additional retail outlets, new floor surfaces, more effective signage and an abundance of natural light, ensuring the whole journey is a memorable and pleasurable one. 45


Project Name, Wynyard Walk,Location, Sydney, New State, South Country Wales


03 Rail Woodhead Project Experience


The impact of air & rail travel on the growth and form of the C21st city. Woodhead Thought Leadership The movement of people is no longer limited to road and sea as transit by rail and air has become commonplace, with massive changes in the speed and scale of travel.

The development of the railway and the airport have had an enormous impact on the growth and form of the city. This paper examines the emergence of the inter modal transport hub and the inter-relationship between this hub and the city. It is the premise of this study that the future of the city lies with an integrated approach towards inter modal hubs of rail and air transport.

The City: Pre-Industrial Revolution The pre-industrial city was characterised by its small size (rarely in excess of 100,000 people), a lack of land use specialisation and little social or physical mobility. The city was largely a pedestrian construct with burgeoning ideas of mass travel considered peripheral to the human scale of the city; often typiďŹ ed by Ebanezer Howard’s Garden City Movement. Buildings were low scale and utilitarian, communication was by word of mouth and trusting relationships and the family were central to societal structure. A person’s sense of the world was constrained to their locality and their sense of identity derived from their family unit and the village.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Architecture expressed the industrial age and the romance of travel as goods and people moved great distances for the first time and the railway station emerged as a new building type.” The City Changed: C19th Rail Travel Industrialisation brought unprecedented change to the city as railroad tracks usurped waterfronts and cemeteries and carved routed within the urban fabric. A legion of surveyors inscribed standard plans for towns and cities along railroad lines across much of the American continent during the nineteenth century. In Europe, people found comfort in its storied medieval towns as a recipe against the effects of the Industrial Revolution on city-form – the ugliness, the dehumanisation and the fraying of social bonds, the sacrifice of urban values to speculative profit and efficient traffic. There was a clash of scales as cities moved from the pedestrian age into the machine age and tried to merge like with unlike. Architecture expressed the industrial age and the romance of travel as goods and people moved great distances for the first time and the railway station emerged as a new building type. The railroad age was an era of migrant movement worldwide as new worlds beckoned and railroads were of profound strategic and economic importance, with the strength of country and empire closely linked to the strength and effectiveness of its transportation system. Communication became more rapid as the telegraph cable acted as a link between the old world and the new, allowing the swift dissemination of information to colonial outposts. The invention of the elevator by Elisha Otis in 1853 had a significant effect on building form and the city skyline. The elevator offered the possibility of high density accommodation on a restricted site and led to the office skyscraper – a privatised skyline dominating the public monuments of government and culture.

The City Remote: C20th Air Travel As buildings soared upwards so did the aeroplane, heralding the twentieth century with a new building typology – the airport. Airports were initially planned as separate, remote entities due to their perceived incompatibility with the qualities of urban living. The initial utilitarianism of the jet age gave way to an expression of the aerodynamic aesthetics of the era. The evolution of mass travel allowed people to travel the world and communication was now ‘par avion’. A sense of nationhood also developed with the spirit of flight, however, individual values were also beginning to challenge traditional family values.

The principle of the remote airport of the early twentieth century is a proven fallacy. As services industries developed around the airport, the airport was incrementally enveloped by growth of the urban centre that it initially sought to be separate from. This growth may be attributed, in part, to the importance of the airport as a catalyst for urban expansion and population growth.

The City Connected As the city connected with the airport, the romance of travel gave way to economic rationalism where airports were more focused on mass passenger processing and ease of mobility than human scale. The computer age had further increased people’s perception of the world and its immediacy while the disposable culture of the era enhanced the demand for the airport and its services. The form and shape of the airport was now recognising people as consumers rather than simply passengers.

The City Integrated Generation X is now experiencing total connectivity as part of the global village. The expansion of societal boundaries through the innovation of transportation and communication has challenged assumptions about identity and caused a certain amount of dislocation. The trend of valuing community has prompted airports to offer a sense of place and brand identity as the integrated airport acts as a civic focus for the region. There is a movement towards a more human scale in airport design with passengers expecting convenience, comfort, friendly assistance and a diversity of experiences. Failure to recognise the essential inter-relationship between city and airport has resulted in cities that are socially and economically imbalanced. The successful twenty-first century airport must be considered as an integrated and sustainable component of the urban form, physically and economically intertwined. The inter modal hub is a microcosm of the city that it belongs to, with a mix of features – retail, accommodation, transport, entertainment, commerce – that reflect its position as part of an integrated whole.

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The design addresses a number of deďŹ ciencies within the existing stations and their adjoining precincts, with the primary objective of providing easy access from the precinct to platform.â€?


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Stations Easy Access Upgrade 2013 Artarmon and East Hills, New South Wales Woodhead has provided architectural services for a concept design study commissioned by Transport for NSW (TfNSW) under its Transport Access Programme. The brief required the team to address a number of deficiencies within the existing stations and their adjoining precincts, with the primary objective of providing easy access from precinct to platform. Working in collaboration with lead consultant AECOM, Woodhead has played a pivotal role in developing options meeting the key project objectives, providing a safe, efficient and inclusive customer experience within highly constrained urban settings.

Client

Transport for NSW (TfNSW)

Completion

Concept Design

Project value

$18-20m approx.

At Artarmon the brief required a solution to be developed that addresses both current and projected future expansion functionality, including provsion for a possible quadruplication of the rail line. Woodhead’s role included leading presentations to key stakeholders and assisting in the evaluation of options under multi criteria analysis in order to deteremine a preferred option for each site.

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To create a ‘passenger first’ solution that moves people quickly and safely, while reducing the impacts on nearby residential and environmental areas.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Perth Stadium Station 2013 Perth, Western Australia Woodhead are Master Architects in association with Populous for the new Perth Stadium.

− − − − − − − −

The $298 million integrated train, bus and pedestrian approach Bridge entry will support a cultural shift of reliance on cars and move, within an − A new Swan River pedestrian bridge between the Peninsula hour of an event finishing, up to 50,000 people, or 83 per cent of and East Perth will take pressure off Windan Bridge and divert a capacity crowd. pedestrians away from East Perth’s high-density residential area. − It will improve connections between the two areas and attract The multiple transport options reflect passenger behaviour and locals and visitors to the precinct outside of event days. demands – to create a ‘passenger first’ solution that moves − Enhancing existing infrastructure people quickly and safely, while reducing the impacts on nearby residential and environmental areas. − Extension of and additional lane to Victoria Park Drive road bridge over expanded rail network. Key features of the responsive and robust transport solution, to be − Improvement of Great Eastern Highway and Victoria Park delivered by late 2017, include: Drive intersection to accommodate increased bus and vehicle Dedicated train services movement. Six-platform Stadium Station for specific destinations for easy − Coach, taxi and ACROD drop-off facility near the new Perth transfers. Stadium. Nearby stowage for up to 117 railcars to keep a continuous flow Client Perth Stadium of trains following events. Additional stowage between Great Eastern Highway and Victoria Completion 2017 Park Station for 24 railcars for full-attendance events. Project value $298m Upgraded East Perth Station to accommodate additional passengers on event days. Various enhancements to network systems and infrastructure in and around Perth Station. Complementary bus services Dedicated new Perth Stadium bus facility able to load up to 20 buses at any given time to service suburban areas without rail services. CBD bus shuttle from Nelson Avenue in East Perth, enabling spectators to access more than 40,000 inner-city car bays. 53


It’s dramatic ribbon form a celebration of technological innovation in the spirit of Sydney’s most iconic structures. The scheme is a fusion of public art, architecture, urban design and lighting.”


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Wynyard Walk Sydney, New South Wales Woodhead provided architectural services to the Watpac/Ferrovial consortium to develop a competitive design for Wynyard Walk, a large infrastructure project linking above and below ground infrastructure from the historic Wynyard Station to the new Barangaroo Development. Woodhead’s scope included architectural design of four key elements; a major station entry portal incorporated into the base of a commercial office building, a pedestrian tunnel, a new city square and a pedestrian bridge. The scheme celebrates the striated form of Sydney’s sandstone geology which is expressed through its banded horizontality.

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

2012 Design Consortium Bid

Project value

$170m

The pedestrian tunnel is designed to pass below existing basements of surrounding buildings and linking back above ground adjacent to Barangaroo. A dramatic glazed portal defines the entrance to the tunnel from a new pedestrian plaza that is the confluence of several key pedestrian linkages. From this plaza an elevated footbridge connecting towards Barangaroo is proposed, it’s dramatic ribbon form a celebration of technological innovation in the spirit of Sydney’s most iconic structures. The scheme is a fusion of public art, architecture, urban design and lighting. Existing structures, below ground services, asset boundary challenges and heritage buildings all collide in this highly constrained inner CBD project.

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The architectural expression of the station entries integrates with the predominantly two-storey format of the context.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Rozelle Station Sydney, New South Wales The Rozelle station precinct and design will create a community icon that reconnects the precincts north and south of Darling Street while maintaining the valuable community infrastructure role played by Victoria Road. The architectural expression of the station entries integrates with the predominantly two-storey format of the context.

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

2012 Design Consortium Bid

To identify the station, an architectural language has been developed that offers a civic identity, and a more open and welcoming architecture that contrasts with the largely masonry structures of the surrounding context. This architectural language will both connect to the Metro-wide station identity, and be adaptable to the Rozelle context. All three station entrances are located at corners, thus creating the opportunity for gateways to the north and west. Thus their visual prominence becomes their address. The station entrances will create an architectural dialogue with each other, using the metro-wide language of light and airy glazed structures that will assist in linking the communities either side of Victoria Road. The distinctive location of the site at the top of a hill will enable a more three-dimensional landscape to be developed, creating steps and terraced spaces suitable for a cafe and performance space.

57


A key urban design strategy for the new station development is to provide a major public space as a key southern focus of the city of Sydney.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Central Station Sydney, New South Wales Central Station, with its stately walls and iconic clock tower, its spacious concourse and its elevated location, is part of one of Australia’s most significant heritage sites. A key urban design strategy for the new station development is to provide a major public space as a key southern focus of the city of Sydney. This space will provide core functional access to the station and integrate the new metro station with the many existing transport networks and multi-level pedestrian environments in a safe and memorable civic format and urban language.

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

2012 Design Consortium Bid

The new design will complement and contribute to the iconic heritage language of the Central Station precinct by protecting the heritage facade and clock tower, and reinforcing the importance of the west forecourt. The station will also actively reconnect with Belmore Park through a commercially oriented upgrade of Eddy Avenue, providing more space for pedestrian movement and passenger amenities. Central Station will be a major setting for public art, with extensive use of sandstone. Public Art initiatives will include artworks in sandstone, reflecting the existing architectural texture of the historic buildings. Decorative inlay terrazzo floors in the old ticket office are part of a traditional migrant craft very specific to Sydney, and there are opportunities to revive this skill, using terrazzo as a decorative medium for colours, themes and narratives.

59


The services building will flank the southern edge, but – turning a liability into an asset – it will become a significant canvas for a major installation of public art.”


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Town Hall Station Sydney, New South Wales A driving strategy of the new Town Hall Square Station is to support a new Town Hall Square. This square will become an iconic location within the centre of Sydney and comprise mixed-use developments to enrich a vibrant, international, safe and dynamic urban culture. The existing above- and below-ground retail environments will be enhanced by the urban solution of the station, offering convenience and amenity to regular passengers and the people of Sydney using this precinct. The importance of the pedestrian will be highlighted by spacious provision of widened footpath spaces, more efficient linkages with the existing Town Hall station and easily legible and safe sub-surface links to surrounding existing – and future – commercial and urban developments. Services and ventilation functions will discretely blend with the adjacent architectural fabric in Bathurst Street, thus preserving Town Hall primarily as a pedestrian domain.

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

2012 Design Consortium Bid

A key initiative is to organise the necessary structures of entrance and escape stairs and air vents to optimise people’s use of the square, while offering newly-found distant views to Town Hall, Hyde Park and Uniting Church. Below ground, the organisation of vertical circulation and public concourse will create views of the city above. The organisation of above ground structures will define the edges of the space and create barriers to traffic and shelter from the sun. The services building will flank the southern edge, but – turning a liability into an asset – will become a significant canvas for a major installation of public art. 61


The strategy informing the urban design solution also allows a degree of public urban commodity at ground level and immediately below ground level adjacent to the iconic MLC Centre.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Martin Place Station Sydney, New South Wales Martin Place is one of the strongest east-west links in the city. The transport node of Martin Place connects to the city’s eastern and southern suburbs. The new metro system will integrate seamlessly with the existing rail system below ground and the substantial bus network above ground along Elizabeth, Castlereagh, Pitt and George Streets. Another urban strategy sees these streets being developed as a primary pedestrian north-south connector (Pitt Street), a high fashion promenade (Castlereagh Street) and a generous bus interchange area (Elizabeth Street).

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

202 Design Consortium Bid

The strategy informing the urban design solution also allows a degree of public urban commodity at ground level and immediately below ground level adjacent to the iconic MLC Centre. The strategy of minimisation and careful placement of entries to the new station precinct in this area will enhance its current civic amenity. The key initiative is to minimise the above ground structures and organise them in a way that enhances the ceremonial route on the central east-west axis. We believe this strengthens pedestrian connectivity at grade and allows better functionality in the ticket hall below. Our approach was to allow the strength of the existing space to ourish, and continue its role as an imposing, historic and even solemn urban realm as a decorative medium for colours, themes and narratives.

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Both station entries, express a consistent approach to materials and detailing, providing a strong identity and aligns with the sustainability aspirations of the City of Sydney’s Barangaroo development.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Barangaroo / Wynyard Station Sydney, New South Wales The Barangaroo-Wynyard precinct has a double signiďŹ cance for Sydney; its cultural and physical connections to Wynyard Station and its site environs, and its links to the growing western edge of the CBD.

The Barangaroo entrance will help the city achieve its vision of sustainability by providing a convenient connection to the Metro through a sequence of legible spaces and interchange with CityRail via the proposed links.

Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

202 Design Consortium Bid

The Wynyard entry will provide a seamless interchange facility with Wynyard CityRail station and will connect to a new pedestrian tunnel that links with the commercial institutions around Westpac Plaza. The Barangaroo entry will be part of a major new masterplan consisting of residential, commercial, leisure, hotel and retail uses, in conjunction with a network of new green spaces. Both entries, through a consistent approach to materials and detailing, will provide a strong identity and address while respecting their old and new contexts. This aligns with the sustainability aspirations of the City of Sydney for the new Barangaroo development.

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The station precinct encourages the retention of historic streetscapes and the activation of both Miller Street and the adjacent corner of Mount Street through small-scale community-focused retail and commercial opportunities supporting a predominantly civic-scaled station entrance.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

CBD Metro: Pyrmont Station Sydney, New South Wales The Pyrmont station precinct comprises two distinct station entry precincts, which connect into a contiguous station below ground.

The station precinct encourages the retention of historic streetscapes and the activation of both Miller Street and the adjacent corner of Mount Street through small-scale communityfocused retail and commercial opportunities supporting a predominantly civic-scaled station entrance. The station entrance is designed to minimise impact on the existing heritage context and existing community, both during construction and as a ďŹ nal architectural intervention; to reinforce the historic streetscapes and encourage activation and safe street level usage. Union Square will remain the focus of the precinct community with the entrance integrating sensitively with the existing fabric and scale of developments

The station entrance is situated at the end of a terrace of established shops and therefore maintains the built edge that forms the southern enclosure to Union Street. Its palette of materials, predominantly clear and translucent glazing, will ensure a strong contemporary identity and address, without standing out as gratuitously iconic. Client

Transport for NSW

Completion

202 Design Consortium Bid

At Pyrmont west a design objective will be to celebrate the drama of the cliff backdrop from the entrance and ďŹ rst escalator shaft. We envisage double-height glazing and a glazed roof to accentuate the setting and provide a light, airy and welcoming space within. The transparency will sit in contrast to the predominantly brick facades on Miller Street. We propose linking the existing landscaped footpath below the escarpment with a shared surface to Mount Street. Planting and seating along its edge will engender a sense of calm and provide a degree of passive summer shade to the retail units.

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The concept of the bridge emerges from the idea of enlarging the overhead concourse, required to access the various platforms to such a degree that it can become the main passenger concourse itself.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

High Speed Station Naples - Afrologa, Italy Woohead Interplan in collaboration with Zaha Hadid The New High Speed Station Napoli Afragola is a bridge above the tracks.

The key challenge of the architectural scheme is to create a well organised transport interchange that can simultaneously serve as a new landmark to announce the approach to Naples, thus a new gateway to the city.

Collaboration

Woodhead Interplan in association with Zaha Hadid

The concept of the bridge emerges from the idea of enlarging the overhead concourse, required to access the various platforms to such a degree that it can become the main passenger concourse itself. Providing an urbanized public link across the tracks, the task is to give expression to the imposition of a new through-station that can also act as the nucleus of a new proposed business park linking the various surrounding towns. The bridge concept further allows two strips of extended park-land to move openly through the site alongside the tracks opening and connecting the site to the surrounding landscape and business park. The architectural language proposed, geared towards the articulation of movement, is pursued further within the interior of the building, where the trajectory of the travellers determines the geometry of the space. The station will be designed according to the new guidelines introduced by the RFI, Rete Ferroviaria Italiana, for the 13 major stations on the national rail system.

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PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Pompeii Station Campania, Italy Woodhead Interplan is commissioned in association with Peter Eisenmann Architects New York, Interplan Srl and Guido Zuliani, as the consultants for the Pompeii Railway Station redevelopment.

The project is located adjacent to the world renowned historic site at the foot of Mt Vesuvius and is part of the Campagina Region’s transportation rejuvenation currently under design development.

Collaboration

Woodhead Interplan in association with Peter Eisenmann

The design for the mixed use development focused on passenger experience is widely based on the historic Greek and Roman grid structures found within ancient Pompeii.

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The transit station has been designed to minimise maintenance through appropriate detailing and selection of durable materials & ďŹ nishes.â€?


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Bull Creek Station Melville, Western Australia Bull Creek station is one of the three stations for the Package D component of the South West Metropolitan Rail extension.

The station comprises five key infrastructure elements; bus interchange, railway station, pedestrian footbridge, park ‘n’ ride and kiss ‘n’ ride. Parking for 628 cars has been provided to meet forecast demand. The station building is supported over a 150m platform located between the two carriageways of the Kwinana Freeway. Access to the station platform occurs via pedestrian movement through the bus interchange from the western car park and pedestrian / cycle links to the surrounding areas via the vertical circulation core. The station platform building form is derived from the functional and spatial requirements. The rectangular roofed portal frames enclose the train platform together with a linear highlight roof reflecting the transition from concourse level to platform level.

The platform is illuminated for safety and amenity and the structure utilities feature lighting which emphasise design and structure reinforces the termination to the entry building and provides a strong, visual connection of the path of travel for patrons and surrounding residences. The bus shelter canopies are designated to allow protection from prevailing western weather. The solid walls of the northern bus canopies have appropriate scale and provide a noise barrier to Leach Highway. The transit station has been designed to minimise maintenance through appropriate detailing and selection of durable materials & finishes. Client

Perth Transport Authority

The varying coloured wall cladding materials highlight the linear forms of the lower platform roof and concourse roof. The metal and glazed cladding wraps around the station, providing upper and lower level protection. The central section of the roof is raised to increase the public volume on the concourse level, express pedestrian movements and highlights views. The low level glazing allows strong passive surveillance for patrons and incorporates natural light with aspect.

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The design is focused on the experience of the user; a celebration of human scale and the focus on tactility in design reinforces a sensory experience derived from, and unique to Xining.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Xining Railway Station Xining, PR China The Xining Station is designed as the gateway to the city and integrates into the existing urban fabric but also the surrounding natural landscape. The design is focused on the experience of the user; a celebration of human scale and the focus on tactility in design reinforces a sensory experience derived from, and unique to Xining. The station is planned to focus people’s activities together to encourage social communication. The design is spatially driven toward experiences that encourage sensory awareness and social interaction.

Completion

Design Competition

The interior of the station is conceived as a fluid complex of unified spaces. Linguine forms and fluid lines create an interior that is welcoming, legible and sculptural. A strong connection has been made between the station and the public square that it fronts. It is this methodology that will truly create a stunning public space. The fluid form of the roof is an interpretation of the natural erosion that occurs in the surrounding mountainside. Fitting neatly into the site, the dynamic building form will become an icon for Xining. The platform areas are simple yet elegant. The roof structure covers the entire platform enclosing sections to provide shelter and opening in others to provide natural light and ventilation. The landscape is inspired by the geometry of the building and together with the public areas play a critical part in the integration of the station into the urban environment.

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Key architectural issues include the design of a new underpass. This will allow easier and faster passenger transfers between the platforms at Perth Station and Perth Underground.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

PTA Masterplan for the Link Project Perth, Western Australia The Rail Master Plan Project for Perth Station comprises of five key infrastructure components to facilitate development of the Northbridge Link by EPRA. The project sees the under-grounding of the Perth to Fremantle train lines between Perth Station and Milligan Street allowing introduction of a modern pedestrian underpass, removal of existing western overpass and timber footbridge and re-alignment of the Roe St. Principal Shared Path.

The possible future Roe Street master plan has been considered with the introduction of a new station entry point along Roe St. Remediation treatments to Celebration Place were designed, ensuring activity within the space, whilst allowing for future development of the site.

Key architectural issues include the design of a new underpass. This will allow easier and faster passenger transfers between the platforms at Perth Station and Perth Underground. The underpass would be finished to a high-grade to increase passenger comfort. A passenger link to the Horseshoe Bridge allows for complete access to Perth Station.

Client

Perth Transport Authority

Extensive modifications to platforms will be undertaken, which include upgrades and extensions to existing platforms and construction of new platforms. The platform works will provide opportunities for increasing passenger movement and accessibility, which involve upgrades to the existing eastern concourse and eastern egress. Future pedestrian movements have been considered in the design of the Master Plan with the proposed development of Celebration Place and redevelopment of Forrest Place being included in the design process of the master plan. The continuation of pedestrian access between the two new public realms is made possible with a pedestrian link underneath the Horseshoe Bridge.

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Cockburn Central Station Thomsons Lake, Western Australia Cockburn Central Station is a major bus and rail transfer station located north of the Beeliar Drive and the Kwinana Freeway interchange in Western Australia.

The station has been designed to integrate with the proposed Cockburn town centre development with the transit interchange being a vibrant regional hub, serving bus and train commuters and bringing shoppers, workers and residents to and from the Cockburn Central town centre. The train station will handle around 5460 boardings a day, as well as offer ‘Park & Ride’ facilities. It is the public transport focus for the area, with local and regional bus routes stopping between the station and the town centre. Key features of the station are:

Client

Perth Transport Authority (PTA)

− A 150-metre island platform, concourse and roof over the concourse area of the station. The station ncludes a passenger lift, two escalators and stairs to the platform from the concourse; − Pedestrian access footbridge link across both carriageways of the Kwinana Freeway; − Bus canopies and bus shelters; − Approximately 600 car parking bays, 400 of which are on the western (town centre) side and 200 on the Eastern side of the freeway; − Principal Shared Path (PSP) connected to the existing PSP and integrating with the station design; − Pedestrian and cycle facilities and full universal access standards.


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Bassendean Station Bassendean, Western Australia Woodhead was commissioned to undertake the masterplanning for upgrade works to the existing station, including a new bus interchange facilities platform and extended parking facilities.

A key issue was access across Guildford Road to connect with the existing Old Perth Road mall. Three access options were developed in full discussion with Westrail, MRD and Bassendean Council – underpass, overpass and on grade crossing. Local pedestrian routes and bike routes were integrated with the new facility. Town planning considerations such as public safety were also addressed. Client

Perth Transport Authority (PTA)

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Clarkson Transit Station Clarkson, Western Australia Master planned and designed by Woodhead, the station includes a 6 bus terminus and interchange, kiosk, bus shelters and landscaping. Designed for convenient pedestrian, cycle & wheelchair access, with escalators, lift and kiosk inside and constructed from an assemblage of steel, metal and glass.

There is a universal taxi stand plus convenient access to car dropoff/ pick-up, as well as park‘n’ride bays for 800 vehicles. Environmental issues include the protection of passengers from sun, wind and rain. The large span arched entry wall & tower, provide a dynamic frontage and focal point. The building harmonises with its surrounds, providing a strong landmark element with a true village ‘main street’ statement. The station ties the convenience of a multi-modal rapid transit system with increased density and activity in a station precinct, the first implementation of a shift in transit oriented development in Western Australia. Client

Perth Transport Authority (PTA)


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Perth Station Works Perth, Western Australia The main Rail station in Perth was amended to accommodate the extension of the rail system north and south of Perth.

A major feature of the project is the introduction of controlled public access to Station Platforms by the use of “smart� card technology and secure barriers. The planning provides for an accessible design that allows environmental protection for patrons and secure ticket zones. Extensive stakeholder discussion was required in the integration of new works with existing infrastructure to improve the urban design and creation of public spaces.

Client

Perth Transport Authority (PTA)

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Project Name, Leichhardt BusLocation, Depot, Sydney, State, Country New South Wales


04 Bus Stations and Depots Woodhead Project Experience


The architectural design uses curved hightech metal forms derived from buses to reinforce the transport functions within the building. The car park and bus concourse are all naturally ventilated.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Adelaide Central Bus Depot Adelaide, South Australia In association with Denton Corker Marshall, Woodhead responded to the client brief to create a modern, transport hub style bus terminal on Franklin Street in Central Adelaide. This new station far exceeds the previous facilities providing the public with modern amenities, setting a high standard for busterminal design in Australia.

Collaboration

Woodhead in association with Denton Corker Marshall

Client

Adelaide City Council

The design provides an architectural landmark offering an immediate sense of place and orientation for the traveller. The building environment is light, airy, and welcoming with sensory impact.

Completion

2007

Project value

$25m

The design team applied a distinctive mandarin orange colour palette to reference its location within the environs of Adelaide’s lively Chinatown. The strong colour also reinforces and signals the pedestrian access to the terminal from Grote Street. A series of aluminium grids make up part of the bus station facade – these create a contemporary image that draws from its transportation based use – bus station and car parking. These curved and folded aluminium arcs are perforated, creating visual interest and emphasising the best features of both old and new transport facilities. The curved canopies on the street frontage project out from the line of the glazing offering a degree of protection for pedestrians and continuing the notion of the ‘veranda’. In addition to the bus station the project provides 550 car parks over five levels and 39 ‘social housing’ residential units. The bus station houses 15 coaches and approximately 300,000 people per year pass through the doors on both interstate and intrastate travel. 85


The location of the new facility and re-use of existing heritage buildings are a result of extensive functional and site analysis by Woodhead in conjunction with STA.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Leichhardt Bus Depot Sydney, New South Wales Woodhead was commissioned to design NSW State Transit’s redevelopment of the Leichhardt bus depot. The depot was operating at capacity with 98 buses and workshop activities carried out in the heritage tram shed. Growth in commuter demand requires expansion of the depot to accommodate a minimum of 200 buses by 2007/2008. The re-development included: − − − − −

bus wash facilities; bus refuelling facilities (both CNG and diesel); workshop facilities and 20 vehicle service bays; car-parking for 125 cars; administration building (Including staff amenities) with net floor area of approximately 1800m2. The location of the new facility and re-use of existing heritage buildings are a result of extensive functional and site analysis by Woodhead in conjunction with STA. In total 17 options were examined.

The design features: − − − − − − −

efficient and logical planning for both buses and people. optimises the access and topography issues of the site resolves issues of residential / nose adjacencies Sustainability features include: passive solar design principles to building orientation and envelope recycled concrete and steel in construction − rainwater harvesting for reuse on site − low VOC / emission paint − Forest Stewardship Council Certified Timber Client

NSW State Transit

Completion

2009

Project value

$30m

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Project Name, Sydney International Location, Airport State, Terminal Country 1, Mascot, New South Wales


05 Our Commitment Woodhead Process


Environmental Sustainability and Innovation Woodhead Thought Leadership Our responsibility as architects and designers extends beyond the completion of construction as we focus upon the lifecycle of a building. This is reflected in our commitment to environmental, social and economic sustainability.

Environmental Management System Woodhead’s Environmental Management System (EMS) aims to reduce the environmental impacts that may result from our operations and from the projects we design. Our EMS has been tailored around our existing ISO 9001 Quality Assurance system, and focuses primarily on actions needed to address our Climate Friendly commitment. We look forward to achieving final EMS ISO 14001:2004 certification shortly.

Green Building Codes As an inaugural and continuing member of the Green Building Council of Australia, Woodhead continue to be actively involved in the creation of Australia’s first Green Star rating tools. In fact we were using similar rating tools on projects even before the creation of the GBCA, and we now support the GBCA in all their endeavours. Woodhead is committed to maintaining Green Star Accredited Professionals within each studio and at leadership level across the group. In addition our team has the knowledge and skills to work with and apply NABERS energy rating requirements and relevant Government and Defence sustainability guidelines.

Greenhouse Impacts from Projects Our core service is in the delivery of world-class design. The built environment has a significant impact on global warming and water use, and we believe that we can drive positive change in our industry, ultimately to the point where sustainable development is part of the solution to global warming. Our Climate commitment objectives have been incorporated into our design process, whereby every project is assessed for sustainable benefits and outcomes. These outcomes are balanced between environmental, social and economic benefits.


WOODHEAD ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Woodhead has developed a set of ‘ESD Performance Targets’ that are quantifiable measures relating to the assessment and design resolution of energy, water and materials in our projects. Example ESD Essential Requirements

Woodhead are increasingly raising the sustainability value in all of our projects – we believe that every client should benefit from improved building performance, improved user comfort, and reduced environmental risk.

Woodhead ‘ESD Performance Targets’ The ESD Performance Targets work together with a defined set of ‘ESD Essential Requirements’ to capture additional initiatives to lower the overall environmental impact of the building during design, construction and operation. Energy

Energy Appliances shall meet the following minimum energy efficient ratings; − − − − − −

Dishwasher: 3.5 stars Refrigerator: 4 stars Washing machine: 4 stars dryer: 2.5 stars Domestic air-conditioner: 4.5 stars for cooling Hot water systems shall have solar pre-boost with the system sized to provide a solar contribution of at least 50% of total annual hot water energy consumption. Where natural gas or LPG is available to the site the hot water system shall be gas boosted.

− Achieve a 20% improvement on the minimum energy efficient performance requirements using either one of the Verification Methods (Stated Values or Reference Building) described in Section J of the Building Code of Australia (BCA). Water − The 20% improvement target is generally consistent with the All taps, toilet, showers and appliances shall have a minimum AAA minimum 4.5 star NABERS rating for commercial office buildings. rating or equivalent star rating. − A building meeting the minimum BCA energy efficiency requirements should achieve an approximate 3 star NABERS Materials rating. − A 4.5 star NABERS rating represents an approximate 20% to 25% − All refrigerants and insulation shall have an Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) of zero. improvement compared to a 3 star building. − All timbers shall be sourced from either post consumer reused Water timber or from plantations complying with the Australian Forestry Standard. − Achieve a 30% reduction in potable water consumption compared − All internal paints shall be low Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) to a design reference building. (g/litre). − NSW: the residential planning scheme (BASIX) sets a water target − No PVC products shall be used in floor coverings (unless there is of 40% reduction compared to average water consumption. This no other alternative). is calculated using a complex web based database. − The simple method for calculating the water target is described in − A dedicated storage area shall be provided to allow segregation and collection of recyclable waste generated during occupancy of the Defence Water Target Calculation Methodology document. the building. Materials During demolition and construction works at least 70% of all waste by weight (except hazardous materials) should be either reused or recycled. Recorded by the contractor each month: − weight of all waste leaving the site; − weight of waste that was recycled/reused (i.e. not sent to landfill); and − destination and/or name of recycler/waste hauler. Soil stockpiled on site for reuse as fill shall not be counted in the calculation of waste. The definition and calculation of waste shall be in accordance with the current Green Star Technical Manual. 91


BIM Commitment Woodhead Thought Leadership Building: An information rich digital prototyped building.

Woodhead is committed to the continual improvement and upskilling of our team with the latest documentation and visualisation technology. Our teams are fluent in CAD and BIM authoring and coordination technology, specialist graphic design and publication packages and traditional administration processing tools.

Information: Addition and inclusion of valuable building information to the model.

The implementation of BIM (Building Information Modelling) tools and processes have made it possible to better streamline work flows throughout a building’s life-cycle, from concept /schematic design to model integration of design and construction models to facilitating the management of maintenance and decommissioning information of the built asset.

Modelling: Form and function with pre-planned intent.

BIM tools and processes enable our team to reduce risk, retain design intent and better ensure the client interest is maintained throughout the project. This also helps streamline quality control and provides a higher level of coordination between consultants. The processes adopted and the generation of coordinated models facilitates clear communication between all project stakeholders which in turn provides access to a wider range of analytic tools thereby better addressing our clients specific needs. At Woodhead, the adoption of BIM tools and processes is now our predominant and preferred method of workflow thereby ensuring quality solutions for our clients. Our BIM technology enables our teams to: − − − −

Reduce risk particularly in the bid phase of the project Retain design intent throughout the project Streamline quality control Provide design and construction certainty between consultant disciplines − Reduce conflicts on site through clash detection and comprehensive scheduling and data reporting during the design process.


WOODHEAD QUALITY AND TECHNICAL CAPABILITY

Woodhead has pioneered BIM as a key platform in the delivery of a range of large-scale facilities in Australia over the last five years. We believe that now is the time to make further advancements in the application of these tools to realise the next generation of benefits for our clients.” Jason Howden, Woodhead Group BIM Manager

BIM lessons we have learned − Technology... BIM is a process with efficiencies available through planning of clear workflow practices and procedures. − Modelling may incur more up front costs, yet; − The integrated model can provide a greater level of control all round. − There is value in working with Contractors as Consultants, however not all procurement processes will support this. − Getting the right team is an issue for all projects. With BIM implementation selecting the right team is essential. BIM is only as effective as the most ineffective link. − The level of service is superior to that of traditional service provision and therefore of greater value to the Client. Case Study: Greenskills, Perth, WA Woodhead is commissioned as lead consultant for the design and delivery of the Central Institute of Technology’s Greenskills project in Perth, WA. The new building will provide an innovative learning centre for the development of knowledge in the area of sustainable building design studies. Woodhead are collaborating with the Structural and Building Services Engineers to develop the integrated BIM model, capturing the work of all design team members, to establish and validate the building design, to enable construction documentation production, and to capture future ‘as constructed’ information, maintenance and manual requirements. The appointment includes the provision of full architectural and interior design services and coordination and integration of all sub consultants. The latest technological developments and processes were adopted to inform the move towards fully integrated project delivery.

Quality Certified by Australian Standards Woodhead operates a certified Quality Management System which complies with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008, across Woodhead Studios covered on the Certificate. Renewal: 23 February 2015. Woodhead takes the quality of its services and output seriously. Excellent outcomes for our clients are our goal, achieved by working with a Management System that provides checks and balances to our processes, ensuring consistent success. This mature Management System is certified in five Australian States and Territories, by SAI-Global, to AS/NZS ISO 9001:2008. This includes a Management Manual detailing the company’s approach to policies, objectives, management review, resources, sub-consultant appointment and improvement strategies. Core business processes from Project Initiation through to Completion are described. In addition, a range of system-specific procedures, forms and checklists provide a structure to ensure Woodhead staff work consistently and well. These relate to document and record control, required competencies, client feedback and continuous improvement action through a sophisticated internal audit program. Woodhead has a full-time Group Quality and Risk Systems Manager based in Adelaide, with a Project Delivery team in each Australian office checking the efficient management of quality – both in process and final product - throughout the company. All staff have equal access to quality-related resources over a company-wide Intranet.

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Commercial | Education | Health | Hospitality | Industrial | Residential | Retail | Transport | Workplace

Contact Contact

Karl NameTraeger Executive Director Position Title Transport Portfolio Leader Position Title 2 T TD M E

+61 # #### #### +61 8# 8223 #### 5013 #### ####803 #### +61 0# 448 327 name@woodhead.com.au ktraeger@woodhead.com.au

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Woodhead Transport Portfolio Statement  
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