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CONNECTING& INSPIRINGWOMEN

WOMEN OF DENVER QUARTERLY SUMMER2019

ENTREPRENEUR FEATURE TIFFANYFIXTER, OWNEROF PIZZABILITY SHARESHER ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNEY PAGE4

HOWSHEDID THAT STORIESFROM POWERHOUSE FOUNDERS PAGE14

Reaching an 800 Credit Score AFINANCIAL TRANSFORMATION PAGE12

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www.TheWomenOfDenver.com


WHAT'S INSIDE COVER STORY 4 | ENTREPRENEURFEATURE: Tiffany Fixter, Pizzability +Brewability

LOCAL 7 | BUSINESSSPOTLIGHT: Michelle Moore, ElleRate

4 14 | HOWSHEDIDTHAT: Stories fromPowerhouse Founders

MONEY 12 | Reaching an 800 Credit Score: AFinancial Transformation Story

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12 Cover Photo Nari Ro Photography

SUMMER 2019

Editorial Contributors Krystal Covington Phylecia Jones Copy Editor & Proofreader Alexandra Coughlin Correll Publisher & Layout Designer Krystal Covington

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Social Media facebook.com/Womenofdenver twitter.com/womenofdenver instagram.com/thewomenofdenver Advertising For advertising inquiries contact Krystal@TheWomenofDenver.comor call 720-515-3078. Ads start at $150.


Letter From the Founder PASSION IS NEVER ENOUGH As a leader I have the opportunity to hear many stories -- both good and bad. I learn about people who are winning, the tactics they used, and what makes themstand out. I also get to hear stories of those who are struggling, facing challenges at every turn, and unsure if they can keep fighting the good fight. The work I do is for both. Women of Denver provides a platformto showcase women who are winning, thriving, and excited to share; and those stories support and guide those who need a little extra insight into tools and strategies that can help themget their feet under them. This quarter we hosted our summer summit, which was focused on life as a startup founder or member of a startup team. We heard stories fromthree powerful and successful women, all of whomreminded us of the importance of both structure and financial prowess to succeed. Each business was different, but the most important steps were the same: 1) Start with a compelling vision for how your life and business will be structured. 2) Create business systems that allow your business to be managed strategically. 3) Know where your cash flow will come fromand be prepared for expenses and expansion. 4) You don't have to accept the first offer. Believe in abundance, not scarcity. The most important reminder for me was that passion is never enough to run a successful business. Passion gives us the energy to move forward, but it takes teamwork, strategy, and money to truly succeed. Here's to all of the female founders out there making an impact and creating opportunities for others.

Krystal Covington FOLLOW@KRYSTALGOLEAD 3 Ryan Kane, Hashtagitude

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Entrepreneur Feature

TIFFANY FIXTER The Owner of Brewability & Pizzability Shares Her Entrepreneurial Journey

Contributed by: Krystal Covington, Founder of W 4omen of Denver, www.KrystalCovington.com Photo credit: Nari Ro Photography 4 thewomenofdenver.com


While delivering magazines to one our members in Cherry Creek, I found myself lost, knocking on a door, not realizing that Vive+ wasn?t open that day. In my haste to find an entry, I mistakenly opened the door to a restaurant that was under construction with someone busily working inside.

TF. As a former teacher and day programdirector, I knew I wanted to create employment for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Craft beer is a hot industry in Denver and I wanted to combine my passions together: hence, I created Brewability Lab and now Pizzability. I wanted to do a social enterprise because I think it is important for customers to know this is a real business. We are not here for pity. We want to be a part of the community, but in order to thrive, we must have customers.

Quickly throwing the door closed while attempting to run fromthe scene of my mistake, I tried to get down the block, and was called back. Tiffany Fixter, the owner of Brewability Lab, was inside preparing for the grand opening of her new venture, Pizzability, and wanted to see how she could help.

WOD. What are a few examples of things your restaurants do to provide a venue conducive to helping differently abled individuals?

Tiffany greeted me with warmth, confirmed that she knew who I was and was familiar with the magazine. After offering to take the delivery off my hands, she provided me a tour of her new restaurant, sharing the innovative strategies she?d implemented to create a supportive environment for both patrons and staff.

TF. Our menu and point of sale are visual, which makes ordering easy for our staff as well as our customers who are non or low-level readers. We built a sensory wall which includes a light-changing bubble wall, marble panel, wiggle seats, noise canceling headphones, fidgets and more. These adaptive items are free to use while dining or working within Pizzability.

While I?d heard of Brewability and had the location on my list for a possible Women of Denver event, I hadn?t actually visited yet and knew little about its social enterprise mission. Through Tiffany?s tour, I was astounded to find that her businesses are run by adults with disabilities ranging fromautismto blindness -- a population often believed to be unhirable.

We also have adaptive dining items available to staff and customers to make dining out more accessible for children and adults who need those accommodations. We have weighted silverware, bendable silverware, adaptive cups, plate guards, EZPZ mats, etc. We also cut up and blend food on request.

Through her background in special education, Tiffany became familiar with the tactics required to engage and support those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In both of her businesses she?s created systems that allow her teamto work effectively using tools specially designed to allow themto provide services independently.

WOD. Is Brewability your first business? If not, what other businesses have you launched in the past? TF. My first business was an iPhone app called ?My Video Schedule.?It was a video based scheduling app which used video models and pictures to motivate and educate individuals with autismon daily living tasks. It is no longer on the market due to financial constraints with constant updates. I amnot a developer, and each change was very expensive. Ultimately, larger educational apps copied the concept and I was unable to compete with the market.

I?ll have to be honest in saying that I?mtruly in awe of the uniqueness of her endeavor, and as a lifelong volunteer and ?giver? I admire a woman who creates pathways to help others achieve. Even more inspiring were the responses Tiffany provided to the questions I asked in our interview. I believe deeply in the power of authenticity when it comes to women supporting each other. If we?re not honest about our journeys, challenges, and needs we can?t learn fromeach other or help one another. Tiffany is generous with what she shares, providing incredible insight for those desiring to follow in her footsteps.

WOD. How did you acquire the capital and other resources required to get started in business? TF. I?ll be very honest. My credit score is terrible. I have been turned down by so many banks and loan officers, I couldn?t tell you how many ?no?s?I?ve actually received. It is hard. It hurts. It is a constant struggle.

While knowing someone else?s journey can?t save us from mistakes, it can certainly help us navigate with a bit more confidence that we can tackle anything that comes our way.

When I decided to do the brewery, I wanted to trial the idea by doing a Kickstarter to see if the community would support it. We were able to raise $34,000, but unfortunately I did not start my business in the same fiscal year as the fundraiser so it all went back in taxes. Yet, I amvery blessed. My parents own three businesses in Estes Park and were able to help me purchase the Brewery, formerly Caution Brewing Company, that I found on the market as a turn-key.

To follow are a few highlights of the Q&AI had with Tiffany and the wisdomshe shares. WOD. Social enterprise is a model I love to promote because it blends social impact into the typical profit model of business. What inspired you to start a social enterprise business? 5

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WOD. Is Brewability your first business? If not, what other businesses have you launched in the past? TF. My first business was an iPhone app called ?My Video Schedule.?It was a video based scheduling app which used video models and pictures to motivate and educate individuals with autismon daily living tasks. It is no longer on the market due to financial constraints with constant updates. I amnot a developer, and each change was very expensive. Ultimately, larger educational apps copied the concept and I was unable to compete with the market.

our leasing office. While this has been frustrating to move a brewery, it will end up being better in the long run. We found a turn-key brewery and building, and are in the process of purchasing it in order to maintain longevity and a stable, sustainable business. The new space is large enough to accommodate a small commercial kitchen. Our future plan is to integrate both businesses in order to reduce overhead and increase customer visit longevity.

As a former teacher and day program director, I knew I wanted to create employment for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

TF. Absolutely. I have partnered up with many ability positive non-profits as well as many women owned small businesses. I have collaborated with Mary Sims, who owns an inclusive, accessible non-profit, ?Guided by Humanity Yoga?, as well as Alexandra Connell, who owns an online adaptive fashion line and accessories for children and adults of all abilities called PattiandRicky.com.

WOD. How did you acquire the capital and other resources required to get started in business? TF. I?ll be very honest. My credit score is terrible. I have been turned down by so many banks and loan officers, I couldn?t tell you how many ?no?s?I?ve actually received. It is hard. It hurts. It is a constant struggle.

We have received funding fromthe Rocky Mountain Human Services Mill Levy programand partnered with other Mill Levy recipients. We gain trainees and employees from Wings LLCPASAand Laradon Services. I partnered up with Access Gallery to create our custom hand-painted plates. The sensory wall and sensory roomwas a collaborative project with Pima Medical Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Dawn from EZPZadaptive mats also donated their products.

When I decided to do the brewery, I wanted to trial the idea by doing a Kickstarter to see if the community would support it. We were able to raise $34,000, but unfortunately I did not start my business in the same fiscal year as the fundraiser so it all went back in taxes. Yet, I amvery blessed. My parents own three businesses in Estes Park and were able to help me purchase the Brewery, formerly Caution Brewing Company, that I found on the market as a turn-key. One of my customers told me of a turn-key Pizzeria in Cherry Creek. I jumped at the price and location. I applied for Mill Levy funding and received enough to feel confident in pursuing another business. My parents once again have been the only people to financially back me. While Mill Levy helped me get the business off the ground, funding was cut this year. We are now dependent on sales, where we are starting to see noticeable growth. WOD. In Denver's economy right now, many brick and mortar businesses have said it's hard to stay afloat due to the rent and tax burden. What actions are you taking to continue to thrive in business over the next 10 years? TF. It is extremely difficult to stay afloat and I can identify with those struggling businesses. Our lease at Brewability is being non-renewed due to not being a ?typical?business according to

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WOD. Are there local programs or organizations that have helped you build your business?

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Pizzability is located at 250 Steele St #108, Denver, CO80206.


PUTTINGA MEGAPHONE TO WOMEN'S VOICES AND CHOICES

When it comes to buying, women are the boss. According to the stats, women drive the world economy, which has led to considerable innovation as more brands begin to focus on our dollars, creating new products and offerings to serve our needs. But while new products are being developed for women, putting women?s voices first in the innovation process is still a rarity. For Michelle Moore, changing this trend has become a personal quest, and the central mission of her new company, ElleRate. ElleRate is a platformthat allows women to rate businesses on measures that matter. Through the platform, women can discover, review, share and support products, services, and workplaces that reflect their values. This helps women put the collective power of their dollars behind companies that put their needs first. Workplace ratings can help shine a light on where a company can improve its efforts, as many of the challenges businesses face when prioritizing women customers potentially lie in the lack of gender diversity and support for women inside these organizations. ?I thought if I could help businesses understand, on a deeper level, how to engage with women to earn more of their favor, trust, advocacy and business, then everyone wins,?said ElleRate Founder, Michelle Moore. "Women will get more of what they want and need to make their lives work more smoothly, be taken more seriously, and to be incorporated into the innovation process.? 7

The platformis currently in development with a crowdfunding campaign set to launch on iFundWomen - Acrowdfunding ecosystem designed specifically for female entrepreneurs, which provides access to the capital, coaching, creative services, and connections needed to launch and grow. Only 1% of all companies, regardless of the gender of the founder, will ever raise venture capital, and that leaves the other 99% to either max out their credit cards or take out bank loans,?said Sarah Sommers, Co-Founder & Marketing Director at iFundWomen. ?Crowdfunding is the best option for early-stage female entrepreneurs to raise capital for their businesses in order to prove demand for their product or service and avoid going into debt funding the earliest days of their startup.? Michelle believes that through the amplification of her network more women will feel empowered to express their voices and choices, and gain confidence in flexing their significant economic muscle to ?vote with their pocketbooks?for the companies that best serve them. ElleRate is planned to launch in late summer 2019. Sign up for updates at ElleRate.net and learn more about the campaign at

PREPARE TO POWER SHOP AT

ELLERATE.NET


The women featured in this profile are members of Women of Denver. To join visit www.JoinWOD.com.

DONNA EVANS CEOOF PHENIX GROWTH PARTNERS Donna Evans is dedicated to helping business owners and executives grow their businesses and careers. Clients hire her for her business experience, trust her for her heart, and achieve success when they take inspired action. While serving as CEOof the Colorado Women?s Chamber of Commerce for nine years, she led significant growth initiatives in all aspects of the organization. As the founder and president of Phenix Growth Partners, she has worked with large and small firms, business owners and executives and boards of directors helping themto achieve their goals. Donna has a Masters of Science in Management and her awards include CEOof the Year fromthe Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry, Outstanding Woman in Business fromthe Denver Business Journal, Woman of Distinction from the Girl Scouts of Colorado, and Extraordinary Woman fromKOSI. www.phenixgrowthpartners.com \ www.linkedin.com/in/donnaevans1

TERESA ADAMS EXECUTIVEHEADHUNTER Teresa Adams is the founder of Executive Career Consulting, a premier Denver-based boutique firmfor which she also serves as lead talent matchmaker and executive headhunter. Over the last 20 years, Teresa has created an exclusive process by which she connects people to their callings and companies to human solutions. Teresa has secured more than $90Min employment agreements for positions ranging frompresidents and COOs to civil engineers. Arecognized expert in executive search, employee development, and career-transition coaching, she has cultivated a reputation as an anti-recruiter?s recruiter who partners primarily with companies earning $3M-$75Mand professionals earning $100-$500K. Teresa is an ideal fit for both organizations and individuals seeking unconventional transformations, renewed passion, meaningful and financially rewarding work. www.ExecutiveCareerConsulting.com \ Social: @CareerExecCoach www.Linkedin.com/in/ExecutiveCareerCoach 8

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ANDI SIGLER FOUNDER, VIVEFLOAT STUDIO+ | CHERRY CREEK Leading a fast-paced career, Andi Sigler experienced first-hand the personal and professional exhaustion that comes along with life in Corporate America. While the experience gave her access to valuable business knowledge, it also helped her to recognize the value of mental and physical simplicity, which became the foundation of her business. Opening her first wellness center in 2015 at the age of 52, VIVEis now a national company specializing in Float, Cryo, Infrared, VAT, and Halo therapies. These alternative therapies provide mental and physical RESTand RECOVERYfor individuals, athletic organizations, and employee wellness programs. Visit a VIVE studio to find your mental and physical balance through the power of REST, which ultimately leads to personal and professional SUCCESS. www.VIVEFloatStudio.com \ Twitter @ViveCherryCreek

CHRISTINE DASPRO FOUNDER & CEO, CURATINGCONNECTIONS Curating Connections focuses on the development of women leaders through life-long learning, creating valuable connections, and curating impactful, thoughtful discussions with women and men to enhance workplace cultures. Christine has a passion for helping leaders grow their careers through learning, listening, sharing, and connecting. Curating Connections offers you the resources and talent to unleash leadership potential in individuals, teams, and organizations. Christine previously held the position of Chief Gratitude Officer and Vice President of Programs for The Leadership Investment. The Leadership Investment provided expert leadership development tools and supported an inspiring community of peers and mentors. Prior to that, she worked for Merrill Lynch for thirty years in New York as a Vice President and was one of the top performing relationship managers supporting the largest institutional clients residing at Merrill Lynch. www.curatingconections.com \ www.LinkedIn.com/in/christinedaspro Twitter @CurateConnects

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JANA AXLINE, MBA, PMP FOUNDER, CHIEF PROJECT OFFICER Founder and Chief Project Officer of Axline Solutions, a leading project management consulting firm, Jana Axline, MBA, PMP, ACP, CSM, SA, DTM, works with some of Colorado?s largest and most progressive firms. Jana?s expertise stems frommore than 20 years experience in leadership and 10 years in project and portfolio management in health insurance, healthcare, investing, mining, retail, and supply chain management. An internationally recognized speaker on leadership, employee engagement and project management, Jana serves as President of the Project Management Institute Mile Hi Chapter. She authored the book, ?Becoming You,?in 2013 and is a well-recognized blogger on living your dream. She has presented to students at Aspen Academy and has initiated a mentoring programfor women in technology. Learn more at www.AxlineSolutions.com or www.linkedin.com/in/janaaxline

MARY GROTHE CHIEF EXECUTIVEOFFICER At age 22, Mary began working with a Fortune 1000 Payroll/HRcompany. Starting in an administrative role, she quickly advanced into mid-market sales, and rapidly found success by listening to her clients, always solving their needs, and putting their agenda before hers. Even in times when her sales approach was the direct inverse of what corporate was enforcing, she knew in her heart what was right, leveraging emotional, intellectual, and behavioral intelligence. After multiple #1finishes and millions in revenue sold, she founded Butterfly Creative, LLCin 2011to become a business strategist for entrepreneurs of all ages. Her vision expanded into sales strategy consulting in 2017 and rebranded as Sales BQTM. Her driving goal is to help CEOs ($1-$5M) avoid losing what many CEOs lose on their first few sales hires; over $1Mas a result of no sales infrastructure, bad hires and lack of time to manage the teameffectively. Learn more at www.SalesBQ.com or www.MaryGrothe.com

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The women featured in this profile are members of Women of Denver. To join visit www.JoinWOD.com.

KIMBERLY FRASHER DIRECTOR OF CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE Kimberly Frasher was a sales and marketing professional in the information security, retail, and advertising sectors for over a decade before taking a break to raise her daughter. In 2017 her husband and business partners began crafting a new type of auto collision center designed especially for smaller accidents and hail damage, reducing turnaround times and providing a welcome solution in a city known for severe weather. Approximately 65% of auto body customers are women, but most auto body shops are designed by and for men, so Kimberly stepped in as the Director of Customer Experience to craft a customer focus that provides a brand and shop experience that puts women first. Her quickly growing business seeks out and happily employs female repair technicians in a male-dominated industry. www.axiomrepair.com \ Facebook: @axiomrepair

KATIE WAFER FOUNDER, HYDRATEIV BAR Katie Wafer is a proud 5th generation Colorado native who is deeply involved in the Denver community. At the age of 26, Katie founded Hydrate IVBar, which offers vitamin-infused IVtherapy treatments with three locations in the Denver Metro Area. Since opening in 2016 Hydrate IVBar has serviced clients ranging from professional athletes, celebrities, and traveling musicians to business professionals and every day health conscious adults. Katie and her medical teamhave been featured on local and national news channels including Denver?s Channel 9, Channel 7, Fox 31, Colorado?s Own 2, and Colorado?s Best Show and in local print including BusinessDen, Westword, 303 Magazine and Denver Lifestyle Magazine. Hydrate IVBar received the 2017 Cherry Creek Chamber Business of the Year and has plans to expand to additional location in 2019. www.hydrateivbar.com \ Social media: @hydrate_ivbar

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REACHING AN 800

CREDIT SCORE AFINANCIAL TRANSFORMATIONSTORY Phylecia Jones, Budgetologist & Solopreneur Money Management Expert www.keepupwithmrsjones.com

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Your credit score is one of the most important numbers in your life. Ascore of 800 opens up many avenues for better loan options, approved applications, and lower interest rates. But what does it take to get there?

I have been living by a budget for a few years now. Having an effective budget is pretty hard, I have to say. Abudget made me go froman extreme of watching every penny, (exhausting, to say the least), to splurging when I felt like I?ve been a good girl for a while, (which would turn into the feeling of guilt and regret).

I had the pleasure of interviewing Lydia Thomas, a Senior Accountant and Women of Denver member, about her journey of moving to the United States fromUkraine five years ago, alone and with little money.

How did you get over the extremes of watching every dime to feeling guilty for ?splurging?? After a while I came up with the expense vs. investment rule. Take a pair of shoes for example: If you buy a pair of cute sandals that will be your fifth pair of sandals, you will probably wear themonly a few times. This is an expense. If you buy a pair of good leather shoes that you need for your job interview that will serve you for a few years, this is an investment in your future. Following this rule helped me shop less, save more money and end up with the purchases I really needed.

Lydia knew that focusing on her finances, establishing credit, and educating herself about money was the key to reaching her dreams. In a short amount of time, she launched a successful career, quadrupled her salary, paid off a car loan, and reached a credit score of 800. Her story will not only inspire you, but give you a glimpse of what it takes to achieve a financial transformation. Lydia, you started with virtually no established credit when you moved to the United States and now you have an 800 credit score. How did you do it?

With your smart money moves, what is your biggest financial goal right now? My biggest financial goal right now is to buy a house. It is one of the most important financial decisions I will make in my life, and what I learned fromother people?s experience is that buying one is easy, but paying it off is hard.

I started working on my credit score as soon as I moved to the U.S., because I knew how important it was in order to get a good rate on a loan if I needed one. The most important rule I learned was to keep my credit card usage to a minimumand pay off the balance every month. NOTa minimumpayment, but the full balance. To fast-forward credit score growth I did not close my oldest credit card, I requested an increase of my credit line, had various credit cards and loans, and avoided unnecessary credit inquiries. It works and your credit score will move up, only if you pay off the balance regularly, or pay the monthly payment if it?s a car loan or a mortgage.

What are three simple things readers can do right now to get ahead of their finances? First, set up a direct deposit to your savings account fromyour paycheck. The psychological aspect of the ?invisibility?of such transaction does wonders. Make it $20 or $200, whatever you can afford. Second, watch your budget. Make your budget real and attainable, not ideal (otherwise you?ll get discouraged very quickly) and have Friday ?dates?with your budget and the expenses for the past week. Taking control is gratifying and reduces stress.

Coming from Ukraine to the US, what did you find different about money and personal finances? In Ukraine, there is no trust in the economic and banking system. People tend to save their money, ?under the mattress,?meaning that the best way to save is to convert the national currency into dollars or euros and keep it in cash at home. Talking about money is generally taboo and personal finance education is non-existent.

Third, get a debit card for your ?shopping?needs and have a certain amount deposited there fromyour paycheck. This will be the only money you can spend on the things you enjoy. It is a great controlling tool. Speaking fromexperience!

In the US, conversations about money are more open. There?s more information about various ways of managing finances online and in print, and there is more stability and trust in general. I learned very quickly in the States that when you have it together, do some research, and organize your finances, you are likely to succeed financially. Having a budget is very important to managing money. How has it been living on one?

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HOWSHE DID THAT

STORIES FROM POWERHOUSEFOUNDERS Krystal Covington, Founder of Womenof Denver, www.KrystalCovington.com

What makes you successful?

Amanda Gordon, Owner, Gojo Auto

I amat any given time probably the hardest working person in the room. I'mcurrently working 12 to 14 hour days at my dealership, and wouldn't have it any other way. Nothing is given to you, and you have to get your butt out there and earn it. You've got to work. My success is a direct reflection of the work that I put into it, and I want to give more than I take.

How would you describe your job/business to a 5th grader? I help people get reliable transportation so they can do their daily necessities such as getting to work, getting to the grocery store, getting to the gym, picking up their children fromschool, getting to family activities, going on family vacations, and help themnot worry about breaking down on the side of the road when having to do these daily tasks. I also help women get promoted into positions of power within the car business or the automotive space.

Becoming the first black female car dealer in the state of Colorado and one of five in the nation was an honour, as well as a disappointment. Here we are in 2019, and there's still a first black woman category in something as major as the car industry which is something that I don't take lightly. It's another reason that drives my purpose and my passion because I can't fail.

Becoming the first black female car dealer in the How did you get started in the business? state of Colorado and one of five in the nation I was going to college and working the Gap when a woman named Carmara was an honor, as well as Hughes came into my store. She originally visited for coats and blouses, but I ended up a disappointment. selling her three pairs of denimafter she

It?s my duty, my passion, and my purpose to grow the female workforce within the automotive space. Right now it's only 20% at every capacity.

The car business is not just my job, it is my life, and hopefully you'll be seeing plenty more fromme when it comes to women in the automotive industry and building a female workforce. The automotive space has so much growth and earning potential, that it's really a place where women need to look when they feel they?re underutilized. They can always come to the car business and make a decent living for themselves and their family.

stated I wouldn?t find her size. Afterwards, she invited me to work with her. I took her up on the offer and was trained by a teamof women who were selling 20+cars a month. The rest is history.

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In what way do you help advance the careers of other women in your field/industry?


that denote beauty, health, and acceptance, and the deeply harmful and unscientific beliefs so common today about food (and its restriction). My hope is that in the 1:1work I do with patients and their loved ones, in the workspace I get to create and nurture, and in my public speaking or writing, I'mable to inspire and help women in lots of ways, by means of expressing my gratitude for all that I've received.

Dr. Jennifer Gaudiani, Founder of Gaudiani Clinic How would you describe your job/business to a 5th grader? I'man internal medicine doctor who specializes in what happens to people's bodies as a result of eating disorders. Eating disorders carry the highest risk of death of any mental illness, and people who don't take in enough nutrition, or purge what they eat, or binge eat, can have a lot go wrong with their medical health.

Karen Hertz, Founder of Holidaily Brewing

How did you get started in the business?

How would you describe your job/business to a 5th grader? Having had a family member recover froman eating disorder, I've experienced the fear and also borne witness to the triumph of a full recovery. When I got to Denver in 2007, I joined the Hospitalist staff at Denver Health. Ayear into my employment, I had the opportunity to join a service within Denver Health that was the highest level of multidisciplinary internal medicine care in the country for adults whose anorexia nervosa had become so critical that they could not receive care anywhere else.

What makes you successful? Without a doubt, my privilege lies at the core of the opportunities I've had, and I think about that on a daily basis to remind myself of certain structural inequities that benefitted me, so that I amable to use this to pay it forward and do good for others. Also vital were and are my parents' support through my education, my own good health, the fortune of having fallen in love with my husband when we were in college and having his constant encouragement these past 23 years, having two wonderful daughters who inspire me and remind me to be a good role model, and having dear friends and remarkable colleagues within the clinic. In what way do you help advance the careers of other women in your field/industry? I set and personally hold strong boundaries between work and life, and I model these and ask my work mates to do the same. For women especially, who often juggle so many diverse obligations and roles outside of our professional lives, this is vital to preventing burnout and feeling whole. I have mentored young women since my training days, and in my lectures and writing I try to both model and recommend a realization of each person's unique needs, strengths, and challenges. The field I'min allows me to rail against diet culture, narrowly-defined traits 15

Some people can?t eat or drink gluten because it makes themsick, and Holidaily makes beer that doesn?t have gluten so all adults can drink it without getting sick. How did you get started in the business? Holidaily was a combination of my education, work life, and personal life. I utilized my MBAin Entrepreneurial Studies to help understand multiple aspects of the business, worked for Miller Coors for around ten years, and had beer industry experience that helped guide me as well. Lastly, after receiving a second cancer diagnosis, I was given a treatment plan that included a gluten-free diet. I decided to combine my experience, dietary restrictions, and love for beer to start a 100% certified, dedicated gluten-free brewery. What makes you successful? Knowing my strengths and weaknesses. I focus on utilizing my strengths and surrounding myself with amazing people who fill in where my weaknesses are. In what way do you help advance the careers of other women in your field/industry? 3% of breweries are owned by women, however, we are a growing force in the industry, especially in Colorado. I support women in the industry not only as (hopefully) a role model but through my involvement in groups, speaking at events, and mentorship, while encouraging all women to go for it! We have two separate female customers who have started their own food trucks since Holidaily opened. Women empowering and inspiring other women is contagious.

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