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Frans Hogenberg and Georg Braun, Bird-eye view of Mantua from Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

PLAN YOUR WOLF TRAP OPERA SUMMER F O R T I C K E T S , V I S I T W O L F T R A P. O R G / O P E R A

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THE ART OF PLEASURE

NOI+F POPS EXTRAVAGANZA: BERNSTEIN AT 100

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THE ART OF PLEASURE

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NOI+F AMERICAN LANDSCAPES BERNSTEIN’S SONGFEST

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IDOMENEO

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS

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IDOMENEO

VOCAL COLORS

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IDOMENEO

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BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

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IDOMENEO

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

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ARIA JUKEBOX

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VOCAL COLORS

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CONTRIBUTORS KIM PENSINGER WITMAN Vice President, Opera and Classical Programming J O ANN L A BRECQUE Vice President, Communications and Marketing ERICK HOFFMAN Director, Communications SARA SHAFFER Art Director EMILY HUNT Manager, Publications LIZ SUMMERS Graphic Designer

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ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

LISTEN, WILHELMINA! LISTEN, WILHELMINA!

BERNSTEIN AT 100 A CELEBRATION

RIGOLETTO

MASTER CLASS

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

THE BEST OF

WAGNER’S RING

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TABLE OF CONTENTS WOLF TRAP OPERA 2018 WOLF TRAP FOUNDATION FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS W E LCO M E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 RIGOLETTO ..................................................................... 6 IDOMENEO ..................................................................... 12 ROMÉO ET JULIETTE ..................................................... 18 UNTRAPPED .................................................................. 24 T H E S E V E N D E A D LY S I N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 THE ART OF PLEASURE WITH STEVEN BLIER .................................................... 28 A R I A J U K E B OX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 9 CHRISTINE GOERKE 2018 FILENE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE ........................... 30 A LU M N I A R O U N D T H E WO R L D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 FILENE ARTISTS ........................................................... 35 F E L LOWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 9 STUDIO ARTISTS .......................................................... 40 G U E S T A R T I S T S , S TA F F & A P P R E N T I C E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 O R C H E ST R A & C H O R U S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 W I T H A P P R E C I AT I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 9 NSO & MORE ................................................................. 53 T H E B E S T O F WA G N E R ’ S R I N G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4

SP E C IAL THANKS TO DA N AND GAYLE D’ANI ELLO, WO LF TRAP 2018 SEASON UNDERWRI TER S

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WELCOME

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s someone who grew up in an Italian-American and operaloving household, I am thrilled that Wolf Trap Opera is bringing a memorable and quintessential opera by the Italian master, Giuseppe Verdi, to the Filene Center this year. In an unforgettable night of revenge, betrayal, and shocking power clashes, Wolf Trap Opera and the National Symphony Orchestra will present some of Verdi’s most iconic music during the company’s first production of Rigoletto. New presentations of art and performance often provide a fresh, sometimes unexpected lens that can change how we view the original story. Wolf Trap Opera’s summer season at The Barns does just that— putting classic operas into new perspectives with productions that are brimming with drama. Widely considered Mozart’s first great opera, Wolf Trap’s new and contemporary version of Idomeneo emphasizes the devastating sacrifices and long-lasting effects that war brings to societies. Also at The Barns this summer, Gounod’s music soars in Roméo et Juliette and Wolf Trap’s new production makes this timeless and tragic tale of two lovers fresh for modern times. With the continued strength and artistic brilliance of Wolf Trap Opera, I remain grateful for our loyal patrons and the generous support of devoted donors who allow Wolf Trap Opera to consistently showcase artistically compelling productions. Thank you.

Sincerely,

DAN D'ANIELLO Chairman Wolf Trap Foundation Board of Directors

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elcome to Wolf Trap Opera’s 2018 season. Over the past few years, we’ve seen tremendous growth and vitality in WTO’s artistic programming and young artist training. In our most ambitious summer yet, WTO will feature four new productions, three performances with the National Symphony Orchestra, seven UNTRAPPED performances across the D.C. area, and even an opera for children. This year, WTO is welcoming back acclaimed soprano and WTO alumna, Christine Goerke, as our Filene Artist in Residence. We are also delighted for the homecoming of three internationally renowned WTO alumni— Simon O’Neill, Alan Held, and Eric Owens—who will join Christine and the National Symphony Orchestra at the Filene Center for an exhilarating presentation of highlights from Wagner’s epic Ring cycle. Following a successful first year of UNTRAPPED, WTO is expanding its local partnerships to continue sharing opera in new spaces and unusual places. We’re excited to collaborate with Halcyon’s By The People festival for a stunning company premiere of Kurt Weill’s The Seven Deadly Sins, in addition to joining the National Orchestral Institute + Festival and The Phillips Collection for a series of distinctive performances. Sincerely, With an extraordinary group of talented singers and increased performance opportunities, WTO is cultivating the next generation of young artists and celebrating the passion of opera. Wolf Trap Opera’s engagement with young artists and community partners is largely thanks to the commitment from our patrons, donors, and volunteers. Thank you for your continued support.

ARVIND MANOCHA President and CEO Wolf Trap Foundation

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ach summer, Wolf Trap Opera delivers performances characterized by sparkling vocalism and inventive storytelling. Our patrons enjoy the high quality of WTO's productions, and they are often surprised to learn that these performances don’t sit at the core of WTO’s mission. In truth, they are actually a beautiful result of our primary goal: to identify and promote the best of the next generation of opera artists. In 1971, Wolf Trap’s founder Catherine Filene Shouse formed Wolf Trap Opera to give young artists a chance to experience the demands of a performing arts career. In the ensuing decades, WTO grew to offer one of the nation's best residencies for career development and performance opportunities for emerging professional singers. And indeed, our alumni’s strong presence on major world stages is a testament to the program’s success. WTO’s recipe for this success is a result of the company's culture. As we keep our eye on the outcomes desired for our artists, we do so by never losing sight of five essential values. Our commitment to PERSONALIZATION starts with an artist-centric approach to programming. Once we identify the best candidates for each year’s group of Filene Artists, we tailor our repertoire directly to their strengths. We embrace TRANSPARENCY as a key aspect of our culture, fostering clear and frank communication between artists, administrators, and opera aficionados. We value CONNECTIVITY, creating opportunities for our singers to forge relationships with the people who will help shape their careers. We strive to help our artists find the perfect balance between the dependability and consistency embedded in PROFESSIONALISM and the boundary-shattering excitement of ARTISTRY. These five core values (below, left) intersect to influence the programming and activities (below, center) that form the structure of WTO summer residencies, and produce the outcomes (below, right) that enhance our artists’ careers.

Our singers create performances of unusual strength and beauty, and it gladdens me to see that our audiences are inspired and entertained. Even as you revel in the drama of Rigoletto, the lushness of Roméo et Juliette, and the power of Idomeneo, rest assured that the work happening behind-the-scenes, in rehearsals, practice studios, and meeting rooms, is preparing our artists for even greater things to come.

Sincerely,

KIM PENSINGER WITMAN Vice President Opera and Classical Programming

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WOLF TRAP FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS MRS. MELANIA TRUMP Honorary Chair MR. DANIEL A. D’ANIELLO Chairman MR. ARVIND MANOCHA President and CEO MRS. HILLARY D. BALTIMORE Vice Chairman and Secretary Mr. C.E. Andrews Ms. Patrice K. Brickman Ms. Teresa Carlson Mr. Enrico A. Della Corna Ms. Lynn R. Dillon Mr. Ric Edelman Mr. Vincent L. Ferraro Ms. Virginia McGehee Friend Mr. Gregory S. Gallopoulos Mr. Gil Guarino Mrs. Margaret Gupta Mrs. Janet Hill Mr. Donald Irwin IV Mr. Richard Jeanneret

The Hon. Broderick D. Johnson The Hon. Dirk Kempthorne Mr. John E. King Ms. Anne R. Kline Mr. Matthew Korn Ms. Nancy J. Laben Mr. David H. Langstaff Ms. Jennifer Lowe Mr. Mark C. Lowham Dr. Gary D. Mather Mrs. Terri McClements Mr. Thomas W. Minnick Ms. Ramona Mockoviak Dr. Mark G. Mykityshyn Mr. Christopher J. Nassetta Mr. Reed W. Neuman The Hon. Sean O’Keefe Mr. Patrick S. Pacious Mr. Charles L. Prow Mr. Dion Rudnicki Mr. Srikant Sastry Mrs. Danielle O. Saunders

Mr. Fredrick Schaufeld Mr. Mark A. Simione Mr. Robert Van Hoecke Mr. John B. Veihmeyer Ms. Kathy Warden Mr. Bruce D. Wardinski Mr. John B. Wood

OTHER OFFICERS MS. BETH BRUMMEL Chief Operating Officer MR. STEPHEN D. KAHN General Counsel

PRESIDENT EMERITUS MR. TERRENCE D. JONES

DIRECTOR EMERITUS THE HON. NORMAN Y. MINETA

FOUNDER MRS. JOUETT SHOUSE (1896-1994)

FORMER CHAIRS OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mr. Edward R. Carr (1969) Mr. I. Lee Potter (1970) Dr. Elizabeth May (1971) Mr. C.R. Smith (1972) The Honorable Melvin R. Laird (1973–74) Mr. J. William Middendorf, II (1975–76) Miss Barbara M. Watson (1977) Mr. Douglas R. Smith (1978–79)

Mr. Edward B. Crosland (1980–81) The Hon. Robert Keith Gray (1982–83) Mr. William F. Bolger (1984–85) Dr. John L. McLucas (1986–87) Mr. Earle C. Williams (1988–89) The Hon. Najeeb E. Halaby (1990–91) Mrs. James M. Beggs (1992–93) Mr. David A. Berenson (1994–95) Mr. Stuart C. Johnson (1996–97)

Mr. K. David Boyer, Jr. (1998–99) Mr. Thomas W. Hoog (2000–01) Dr. Edward H. Bersoff (2002–03) Mr. John C. Backus, Jr. (2004–05) Mr. Walter M. Oliver (2006–07) Mr. Gerald L. Kohlenberger (2008–09) Mr. Gary H. Tabach (2010–11) Mr. John C. Lee IV (2012–13)

WOLF TRAP ASSOCIATES BOARD MRS. PAMELA NORTHAM Honorary Chair MR. REED W. NEUMAN Chairman MR. RYAN MILLER Vice Chairman and Secretary

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Mrs. Jennie Bishof Mr. Enrico C. Cecchi Mrs. Karen Cleveland Mr. Jon D. Craver Mr. Steven Day Ms. Christina Gadrinab Ms. Glenda A. Harvey Mr. Jeffrey R. Houle Mrs. Carolyn E. Howell

Mr. Loren B. Hudziak Mr. George Lowden Mr. Tim Meyers Ms. Patricia Nicoson Ms. Margaret D. Parker Mr. Michael Polmar Mrs. Patricia Reed Mr. Jonathan Shames Ms. S. Whitney Zatzkin


Ph ippe Cha Phi Phil Chapero peron, pero n, Set desig desig sign n fo or Rigo Rig lettto, 18 885. 8 85

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O L E T T O MUSIC BY GIUSEPPE VERDI LIBRETTO BY FRANCESCO MARIA PIAVE BASED ON VICTOR HUGO’S PLAY LE ROI S’AMUSE A NEW PRODUCTION NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, GIANANDREA NOSEDA, MUSIC DIRECTOR FRI, AUGUST 3 AT 8:15 PM FILENE CENTER

SPECIAL THANKS TO VIRGINIA MCGEHEE FRIEND, PERFORMANCE SPONSOR

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CAST IN ORDER OF VOCAL APPEARANCE Duke of Mantua

Piotr Buszewski

Matteo Borsa, a courtier

Nicholas Nestorak

Countess Ceprano

Melina Jaharis*

Rigoletto, the Duke’s jester

Kidon Choi

Marullo

Johnathan McCullough

Count Ceprano

Nicholas Newton*

Count Monterone

Joshua Conyers

Sparafucile, an assassin

Patrick Guetti

Gilda, Rigoletto’s daughter

Mané Galoyan

Giovanna, Gilda’s nurse

Anastasiia Sidorova*

A Herald

Andrew Gilstrap*

A Page

Esther Tonea*

Maddalena, Sparafucile’s sister

Zoie Reams

Men and Women of the Court

Wolf Trap Opera Chorus *Studio Artist

CREATIVE TEAM Conductor

Grant Gershon

Director

Crystal Manich

Scenic Designer

Erhard Rom

Video & Projections Designer

S. Katy Tucker

Costume Designer

Court Watson

Lighting Designer

Mark Stanley

Wig & Makeup Designer

Anne Nesmith

Chorusmaster

David Hanlon

MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Assistant Conductor

David Hanlon

Musical Preparation

Nicolò Sbuelz, Christopher Koelzer, Nathan Raskin

Italian Coach

Nicolò Sbuelz

Assistant Director

Andreas Hager

Production Stage Manager

Rachel Henneberry

Assistant Stage Manager

Jordan Braun

Supertitle Coordinator

Christopher Koelzer

Supertitle translations created by Kim Witman for Wolf Trap Opera 

Members of AGMA appear through the courtesy of the American Guild of Musical Artists, AFL-CIO.

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THE STORY ACT I The Duke of Mantua is notorious for his unscrupulous lifestyle, and his court jester Rigoletto is well-known for mocking the men upon whose wives the Duke has preyed. When Marullo announces that Rigoletto is harboring a secret mistress, the men are keen to use this information to get revenge. Count Monterone confronts the Duke, who has exploited his young daughter. Rigoletto mocks the father’s outrage, and Monterone lays a curse on both the Duke and the jester. Rigoletto begins to fear for the safety of his own daughter Gilda, whom he has kept hidden (and who the courtiers mistakenly believe is his mistress). The assassin Sparafucile offers his services; Rigoletto is tempted but declines. The Duke has noticed Gilda at church, and he is determined to have her. He tells her that he’s a poor young student, and she falls in love with him. The men from the Duke’s court gather in the street, scheming to kidnap Rigoletto’s “mistress.” They fool Rigoletto into helping them by convincing him that they are abducting Count Ceprano’s wife. Too late, Rigoletto realizes what’s been done, and he remembers Monterone’s curse. I NT E R MI SSIO N AC T I I The Duke is thrilled to learn that his men have brought Gilda to him. Rigoletto enters the palace in a rage, but is soon reduced to begging the men for pity. They are astonished to learn that the young woman is his daughter. Gilda tells her father of her abduction and of the shameful behavior of the Duke and the men of the court. She is fearful and ashamed, but she still begs forgiveness for him. Rigoletto swears that he will get revenge. AC T I I I Rigoletto hires Sparafucile to murder the Duke, and Sparafucile’s sister Maddalena lures the Duke to a tavern. The plan is to commit the murder and deliver the body to Rigoletto as proof.

Samu uel Holland uel d Rous, Verdi – Rigol Riigoletto, g Act III – Gilda’s Desp pair, 1917.

For the past month, Gilda has continued to see the Duke, and she is convinced that she loves him. Rigoletto forces her to watch the Duke seduce Maddalena in the tavern. He then sends her to change into men's clothing so that they may flee from town without being noticed. Maddalena urges Sparafucile to spare the Duke and alternatively kill Rigoletto. Sparafucile agrees instead to kill the next person to come through the door. Gilda returns, and seeing her chance to save the Duke, she knocks. Sparafucile brings Rigoletto a body in a sack. Rigoletto believes he has had his revenge, but then hears the Duke’s voice and realizes that the curse has been fulfilled.

SUNG IN ITALIAN WITH PROJECTED TRANSLATIONS RUNNING TIME 2.5 HOURS INCLUDING ONE INTERMISSION PRE-PERFORMANCE DISCUSSION ON THE FARMHOUSE LAWN AT 7:15 PM FIRST PERFORMED AT LA FENICE IN VENICE ON MARCH 11, 1851 WOLF TRAP OPERA PREMIERE

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Rigoletto, Rigo R ig g etto gole t , Past tto, P Paast Pas a and aan dP Presen Pr Pre ent en n Present BY CRYSTAL BY CRYS CRY YSTA L MANICH, Y MANIC CH,

DIRECTOR DIR RECTO RE OR R

Pe Performing erformi ming and d directin d directing cting op opera pera era in the t 21st cen century n ury takes ntu kes a sig significant gnifica gni cant amoun amount moun nt of carefu n careful ul thou thought ou oug ught and con consideration. nsideration. ns While W hile e researching res g Rigoletto, one on finds dss that Ve Verdi e di er sstruggled st ruggle led often en with w th censorship. censorsh hip. His opera operas era we eras were ere simila e similar ar to o Shake kespe speare’s plays ys in that most violence, e, ssu uch a u ass rape, rape Shakespeare’s such to ook place o plac place offstage. offstage. e. The Th choicess a direc ctor must fac ace ea are took director face ho ow o w to make ake the actionss of of vi viole ence cle e ear, while not n allowi owing how violence clear, allowing 21stt century 2 c centur desensitization des desen nsitizati zation n or judgment jud dgmentt to destr destroy stroy the Shakespearean Sh S hake espearean p ean subtlety subtl ubtl btlety that th hat Verdi Ve erd di so cleverly cleverly y cultivated. ed. IIn the e #MeToo # and an nd d #Times #TimesUp sUp Up er e era, ra, the qu question uesti stion of how ho to o portray po orrtray this ort th story ry y becomes be become ecome me es of utmost e uttmo o importance. ost im mpo portan ortance. ance. Our O ur produc production ducti ction on n of o Rigoletto Rigolettto strives striv ve to merge ves merge ge the t p ps sychologica al wit al th the ph hysical, and a elev vate the e st stor ry to psychological with physical, elevate story a an nother dim mensio on.. Rigo Rig olett etto is i a ball of contradicti dictio ions. ons He another dimension. Rigoletto contradictions. p pr rocures women w men for th he Duke ke’s plea ea e at th easure the royall palace, ce, procures the Duke’s pleasure an nd n d yet, yet, he canno ot se ee these wo omen nh hav ave fathers wh ho o love lo and cannot see women have who th hem m in i th the same e way w thatt he lov lloves ves his da ves a aughte te er Gilda. Gilda. The them daughter cu urse se that the an gry g y father, fath Monte e one, er eron on hurls hu u at urls at Ri Rigoletto to is curse angry Monterone, th he perfect device devi vic vi c for perpetuating ce perpetuatin ting regret ting reg eg egret d self-evaluation. ssel elf-evalu f-evaluatio tion. the and Rigoletto R Ri i o is n t full-time full-tim ull-time fatherhood fath therh hood d and a d Gilda G Gilda has h only new to be b een en in hiss care c f three mon for nths tths hs a aft t hav ter a ng avin ng b been en raised ra in been months after having an n orphan orpha nag age ge wit th nuns. nun Rig goletto’s mind min nd be b eco ec com om mes clu luttered d orphanage with Rigoletto’s becomes cluttered an nd tortu ured the t moment nt Monterone M Monteron Mo n holds u ne p a proverb prov rbial and tortured up proverbial m irror to his con onsscious iousness. Perh erhap haps ap if Monte e one’s curse ero urse, e, or or mirror consciousness. Perhaps Monterone’s curse, da amn mnat ation, on, hadn ’’tt so deeply y awak waken k kened Rigole etto’s doubts et ts, he damnation, hadn’t awakened Rigoletto’s doubts, wo ould have prote te ec cted his dau ug ughter inste nstead ste of b becoming g as would protected daughter instead m uch o of a victim ctim off the t Duke as she. much By y tod oday’s y’s standards, standa ards, s, Gilda Gild may ay seem se n ca she sh really today’s naïve. How can be b eliieve thatt the elie t D Duke loves es h her de d espite tthe fact, fo for all intent ents believe despite intents an a nd p purpose urposes,, he is her er abu user? er? G Gilda is 16 1 and n new to the and purposes, abuser? cit c ty; he er fatherr keeps ke ee eep e her locked eps ep lo ocked d up p, and she ha has been raised raise ed city; her up, un u naw ware re of the ex x stence of xist o sex sex. Sh he has no o reason r on to t dou oubt a unaware existence She doubt yo ou ung man’s u un ma pled ed dge ge off llov ov ve. Her mi isguida isguid uidan ance nce ce e is not an a atte a ttempt mpt young pledge love. misguidance attempt by y Hugo ugo or Verd rdii to to po portra ay a stupid stu up p woman, pid wom man, but rather man er herr Verdi portray a ac ctions are re ty typ pical of someone pica som meone in n her er c circ cumstan stance. actions typical circumstance. Th T here is no o explan nation as a to why y tthe Duk ke behaves haves as a he e does, does es, There explanation Duke bu ut his act u ctions ons are a e very ar ry much h in i line e with w h men me who use usse their eir but actions po ower o wer for ffo self-gratification. self gra self-gra atifi atific fication. Thiss o operra opera a is i not, not, therefore therefo the e orre, e, about a power therefore, su uperfi erficial al forces f rath her he e about er ut the fallibility ffallib bility ty of o superficial at work,, but rather hu um manity and nd the t e domino domin effect of o choice ch and c cir circ r rc rcumstanc nce. humanity circumstance. The design Th sign of tthiss production duction ac accent ntuates t es e th h se hes se the em in emes accentuates these themes Ve V erdi’ opera erdi’s pera. The e characters,, though though h in Ren enais ena a ss s anc a ce g garb, Verdi’s opera. Renaissance be ehav lik ehave ke real re people p have e always behaved. b haved. d. Th d. he e center c er unit behave like The on n the sta tage moves m mov ves to reflect refle reflec ct a fluid d psycholog g cal prog gic progre ressio on, stage psychological progression, w hile vid h ideo proje jections ction allow w the he ea au audience to ge g et inside while video projections get Ri gole olet etto’s mind mind. T Through a conte c ontemp mporary lenss we illuminat ate a Rigoletto’s contemporary illuminate sto ory that th hat can be b contextualiz c o t t lized no matter matte atte what atter wha at the cent at ntury. story contextualized century. 9


Court Watson, Rigoletto Costume Sketch, 2018.

Rigoletto’s Cautionary Tale BY MARK THOMAS KETTERSON There is an emblematic moment in the final scene of Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto that every opera lover knows and waits for. The Duke is heard offstage in a brief reprise of his canzone “La donna è mobile”—and Rigoletto realizes that his plan to avenge the rape of his daughter Gilda has failed, and the libertine Duke has walked away scot-free. It is among the most famous interludes in the operatic canon. Early in the work’s history, it was also one of the most chilling. Over the 20th century however, as Rigoletto settled into the position of a beloved, thrice-familiar repertory piece, the frisson of the moment attenuated and has often merely drawn a knowing chuckle from the audience. Then last autumn, on the opening night of the opera at a leading American company, something happened. The familiar melody was heard, the expected titter almost began; but there was a collective shifting within seats, and an uncomfortable muttering from the house, as though the audience had discovered something very disturbing. 10 0


Something had changed, and it wasn’t Rigoletto. The public environment in recent weeks had been exploding with a burgeoning stream of reports of sexual harassment in the arts, corporate world, and beyond. Victims were making their voices heard, and the #MeToo movement was providing a supportive forum in allowing survivors of abuse to break through barriers of fear and shame. The media was having a field day, but we didn’t need them— it was happening right in front of us. That Rigoletto’s powerful, privileged Duke entirely sidesteps behavioral consequence just didn’t seem so amusing anymore. Not that Rigoletto was ever a stranger to controversy. The opera was based upon Victor Hugo’s Le Roi s’amuse (The King Amuses Himself). First performed at the Théâtre-Français in 1832, Hugo’s drama relates the tale of the tortured hunchback Triboulet, jester to King Francis I, who is driven mad upon the discovery of the rape of his beloved daughter Blanche by his libertine master. Reports of Le Roi’s opening night are all over the map and cannot be divorced from the politics involved, as the French censors detected unflattering allusions to King Louis-Phillippe and immediately shut the production down. It is unknown when Verdi encountered the play, but he and Hugo were spiritual cousins in that both realized the sway of their respective art in making social commentary. Moreover, the composer was discovering his own unique musical voice. Hugo’s play seemed an ideal vehicle for Verdi’s emerging transformation of operatic convention beyond the cumulative traditions of bel canto and the long-established structures of the Italian ottocènto form, towards a goal of heightened musical/ dramatic consolidation.

It has often been observed that male characters in bel canto sing of lust and revenge, while females sing of longing and loss. Rigoletto floridly reflects its bel canto antecedents in that regard, but there was a bold new complexity of character. In Rigoletto himself we have a thirst for vengeance tempered with filial love in the most prototypical of Verdi’s trademark father/daughter relationships. Even the Duke was a surprise, a tenor “hero” who isn’t a hero at all.

through such a lens, her death takes on the aura of a principled martyrdom that engenders moral salvation (something she shares with another Hugo-inspired character, Les Misérables’ Jean Valjean). When examined in light of current events, her fate emerges less a matter of individual loss of innocence than that of willful destruction of basic morality and goodness by the surrounding social/political system. It is dangerous to apply revisionist wisdom to classics, but Gilda’s experience of being victimized in a palatial environment in which everything revolves around keeping a powerful, charismatic figure happy

Gilda is the only character with a consolidated moral compass and the strength to follow it. Gilda however has historically been viewed more stereotypically as a wilting, late bel canto heroine and the passive agent of her father’s tragedy, which is misguided. Gilda is a tough assignment musically and theatrically; rather a lyric-coloratura showdown against a tsunami of testosterone as she is pitted onstage opposite two of opera’s most vital and virile males. She displays incredible spirit and selfdetermination and, though her actions are questionable, she fields reserves of courage beyond anything evidenced by the men. She is also the ethical heartbeat of the opera. Gilda is the only character with a consolidated moral compass and the strength to follow it. Her final words are interesting: “God, forgive them.” One almost senses that she sacrifices herself in absolution of the sins of her father, the Duke, and the corruption that surrounds them. When viewed

is not foreign to modern experience. That scene is played out in highpowered modern offices every day. The costumes aren’t as lavish, but the dynamics remain more similar than we might comfortably wish to acknowledge. Perhaps if Gilda had been less isolated, and had the support that contemporary women can find in resources like #MeToo, she would have made different decisions. But then we would not have Verdi’s Rigoletto. So let us wallow in the wealth of glorious melody that the opera has given us. But let us also discourse upon its cautionary tale of the potential for the abuse of privilege and power. No doubt both Verdi and Hugo would have reveled in that conversation.

Mark Thomas Ketterson is the Chicago correspondent for Opera News. He has also written for Playbill, the Chicago Tribune, Chicago magazine, and the publications of the Ravinia Festival, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera, and Washington National Opera at Kennedy Center.

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Ivan Aivazovsky, Ship in a Stormy Sea off the Coast, 1895.

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M E N MUSIC BY WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART LIBRETTO BY GIAMBATTISTA VARESCO

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A NEW PRODUCTION FRI, JUNE 22 AT 7:30 PM SUN, JUNE 24 AT 3:00 PM WED, JUNE 27 AT 7:30 PM SAT, JUNE 30 AT 3:00 PM THE BARNS AT WOLF TRAP

SPECIAL THANKS TO ED AND ANDY SMITH, PERFORMANCE SPONSORS

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CAST IN ORDER OF VOCAL APPEARANCE Ilia, a Trojan Princess

Madison Leonard

Idamante, Idomeneo’s son

Megan Mikailovna Samarin

Elettra, Princess in exile

Yelena Dyachek

Arbace, the King’s advisor

Duke Kim*

Idomeneo, King of Crete

Ian Koziara

High Priest

Senhica Klee*

A Voice

Cory McGee*

Men and Women of Crete and Troy

Wolf Trap Opera Studio *Studio Artist

CREATIVE TEAM Conductor

Geoffrey McDonald

Director

Omer Ben Seadia

Scenic Designer

Ryan Howell

Costume Designer

Amanda Seymour

Lighting Designer

Robert H. Grimes

Wig & Makeup Designer

Anne Nesmith

Chorusmaster

David Hanlon

MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Musical Preparation

David Hanlon, Nicolò Sbuelz, Nathan Raskin

Italian Coach

Nicolò Sbuelz

Continuo Pianist

David Hanlon

Assistant Director

Andreas Hager

Production Stage Manager

Madeline Levy

Assistant Stage Manager

Julie Marie Langevin

Supertitle Coordinator

Nathan Raskin

Supertitle translations created by Kim Witman for Wolf Trap Opera

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THE STORY B AC KGR OU ND Idomeneo, the King of Crete, is returning home after fighting in the Trojan War. Prior to his arrival, a ship containing prisoners of war was threatened by a storm, and on it was the Trojan princess Ilia. She was saved from drowning by Idomeneo’s son Idamante, and they fell in love. The Greek princess Elettra has taken refuge in Crete; she also loves Idamante. AC T I Ilia is torn between her love for Idamante and her hatred of his father Idomeneo, whose forces killed her family during the war. Idamante declares his love for Ilia by announcing that he will release all Trojan prisoners. This action is condemned by the jealous Elettra. The king’s advisor Arbace brings news that Idomeneo’s boat was near harbor, but has gone down in a storm. Idomeneo has survived, but as he prayed for safety, he promised to sacrifice the first person he sees after reaching land. This person is his son. Having been gone ten years, Idomeneo doesn’t recognize Idamante at first. Once he does, he flees in horror, leaving his son distraught and confused. AC T I I Idomeneo realizes that Ilia has fallen in love with his son. As Idomeneo searches for a way to save his son’s life, he decides that Idamante should leave immediately to escort Elettra back to her home country. As they prepare to leave, a storm arises. Idomeneo confesses that he is responsible for this destruction, and that it is a punishment for breaking his vow. I NT E R MI SSIO N AC T I I I

Photo o by Ro Ron Scherl/Redferns, erl/Redfer Idomeneo, San Francisco ancisco Opera Ope House, design by Jean-Pierre Ponne elle.

Ilia and Idamante express their love for one another, and Elettra desires revenge. Still fearing for his son’s life, Idomeneo insists that Idamante be exiled. Idamante can’t understand why his father has rejected him, and he goes out to prove his own worth in battle. Crete continues to be plagued with violence and destruction, and the High Priest urges Idomeneo to bring about lasting peace. Idomeneo confesses the bargain he made with Neptune. Wanting to appease his father, Idamante agrees to sacrifice his life, but Ilia offers her own life in exchange. A Voice proclaims that Idomeneo will be released from his vow if he abdicates the throne, leaving Idamante and Ilia to reign. Peace is restored.

SUNG IN ITALIAN WITH PROJECTED TRANSLATIONS RUNNING TIME 3 HOURS INCLUDING ONE INTERMISSION INSIDE THE OPERA PRE-SHOW TALK BEGINS ONE HOUR BEFORE CURTAIN AT THE CENTER FOR EDUCATION AT WOLF TRAP EDITED FOR THE NEUE MOZART-AUSGABE BY DANIEL HEARTZ BY ARRANGEMENT WITH EUROPEAN AMERICAN MUSIC DISTRIBUTORS COMPANY, U.S. AND CANADIAN AGENT FOR BAERENREITERVERLAG, PUBLISHER AND COPYRIGHT OWNER. FIRST PERFORMED AT THE CUVILLIÉS THEATRE OF THE RESIDENZ IN MUNICH ON JANUARY 29, 1781

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8LI7EGVMÁGI Of War BY OMER BEN SEADIA,

DIRECTOR

A devastatingly drawn-out war has finally come to an end, and after surviving years of combat, Mozart’s Idomeneo finds himself at a desperate juncture. With a glimpse of home just over the horizon, he vows to make a deadly sacrifice to ensure his safe return. Idomeneo is a triumphant hero thought to have been killed in battle, but he washes up on shore confused, battered, and morally bewildered. His homecoming is overshadowed by his terrible oath, and the warrior finds no peace. Combat has taken a heavy toll on him physically, emotionally, and psychologically, and the safe haven he returns to now seems foreign and frightening. In Idomeneo’s heart and mind, the war still fiercely rages on. We perceive war as a singular traumatic event waged on a distant battlefield, but it has a long-lasting effect on those who fight it and, more importantly, those who are left behind. As an aging warrior, Idomeneo is confronted with his own mortality. He fears the conflict he fought to keep at bay will soon claim not only his life, but the life of the future generation—his son, Idamante. Idomeneo is in search of a long-lasting solution, without which another battle is inevitable. He struggles with the idea of sacrificing something dear to him for the greater good, but he is not alone in his dilemma. Each of the principal characters in Mozart’s opera is asked to sacrifice something so great that it threatens to alter their very being and test their character. Idomeneo is forced to learn that the only way to achieve true peace is by striving for a crucial change—one that is beyond his reach. This opera asks fundamental questions about what we are willing to sacrifice in times of peril. These questions were as relevant in Mozart’s time as they are for us today.

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, score for Idomeneo, 1780.

A Turning Point For Mozart BY ROGER PINES Idomeneo was the tenth completed opera of Mozart’s career—not bad for a composer who celebrated his 25th birthday only two days before the premiere! But this opera left the previous nine in the dust. Suddenly Mozart was bringing vivid personalities to life with a wrenching emotional power he hadn’t begun to approach before. The work was neglected during Mozart’s lifetime, and indeed, German and Austrian audiences heard it sporadically through the 19th century. A new lease on life finally came with Glyndebourne’s 1951 production. Today the rarity of performers with both the technique and the interpretive depth for the principal roles has contributed to keeping Idomeneo on the edge of, rather than entrenched in, the standard repertoire.

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stiltedness and verbosity. Mozart was not pleased: once the composer left for Munich, he communicated with Varesco using his father Leopold as intermediary. If Idomeneo isn’t exactly a “magic” title at the box office, one can’t blame the music. On the other hand, perhaps the dramatic content may at first glance seem unrelieved in its resolute seriousness. But look at what the piece is really about: the private agony of public personalities, communicated as powerfully as would be the case with Verdi decades later. Emotions throughout affect the listener profoundly, unlike those of so many works in the era of opera seria, of which Idomeneo is both summit and turning point. Mozart’s opera seria predecessors took noble, historical personages and plugged them into dramatic situations focusing on love, betrayal, duty, and honor. The structure was rigid: aria, recitative, aria, with few ensembles and generally no chorus. Mozart created a hybrid: Italianate melodic flow imbuing a work in which chorus and ballet figured prominently, with recitative and aria colored by a unique fluidity. Mozart valued dramatic continuity: in any scene of ldomeneo, notice how often an aria doesn’t end formally, but moves directly into the ensuing recitative. The recitative itself may be very aria-like, moving from orchestra to keyboard accompaniment and back again, aligned perfectly to the drama. The composer longed to create a new opera, but comedy didn’t interest him at the time. He was ecstatic when the Elector of Bavaria asked for an opera to celebrate the 1781 carnival season. Mozart began work on Idomeneo in Salzburg, using a libretto by Giambattista Varesco. A Jesuit priest and poet, Varesco was chaplain for the city’s archbishop, who employed Mozart as court organist. Varesco based his libretto on that of Antoine Danchet, written for a work premiered in Paris in 1712: Idoménée, André Campra’s tragédie en musique. Unlike Mozart’s version, it ends tragically: Crete’s hapless king kills his son after going insane. Danchet’s text inspired Varesco to flights of highflown lyricism, but also to occasional 17

Idomeneo premiered successfully on January 29, 1781, at Munich’s Residenztheater, and featured several singers well acquainted with Mozart. He carefully tailored the title role’s music to suit the aging voice of 66-year-old Anton Raaff. The tenor was still dexterous in florid passages, hence the magnificent showpiece “Fuor del mar.” Had Mozart not stood his ground with Raaff, we wouldn’t have the thirdact quartet, Idomeneo’s musical high

country’s enemy). Later, in “Zeffiretti lusinghieri,” the girl’s feelings for Idamante could hardly be more lovingly expressed. And finally, when Ilia proves her love by offering herself to be sacrificed, she becomes a woman, noble in her intentions and deeply touching. Elettra is a forward-looking role, its lacerating rage and jealousy— revealed through virtuosic, wideranging vocalism—on a previously unimaginable scale. The Munich audience must have been stunned by the amazingly “modern” sound of Elettra’s first aria. Think of those immense leaps, alternating with passages of desperate breathlessness —what a telling aural depiction of a heart beside itself! But if this woman

The work deals with matters of life and death, in which eloquence is the keynote. point; Raaff accepted that number reluctantly, having expected another flamboyant coloratura aria for himself at this moment in the drama. Although a poor actor, Raaff could still offer Mozart polished technique and interpretive authority. He was surely unafraid to stand motionless for lengthy periods and pull expressiveness from some deep place inside himself. This is absolutely required of every principal in Idomeneo; there are no crutches, nothing to hold onto except one’s own musicality and emotions. Mozart was frustrated with the poor vocal schooling and onstage ineptitude of castrato Vincenzo dal Prato, who portrayed ldamante, but he was lucky in his two sopranos, sisters-in-law Dorothea Wendling (Ilia) and Elisabeth Wendling (Elettra), each a highly accomplished artist. Like Pamina, Ilia grows emotionally during the opera; already in her despairing initial utterances, she’s more than a sweetly demure ingénue. Her opening scene reveals a figure in turmoil, almost Aida-like (a princess in love with her

was to be humanized, warmth was needed, not just high-powered brilliance. Mozart provided it with the heavenly “Idol mio,” in which a softer, more feminine Elettra longs for Idamante’s love. The fifth major character is the chorus, in this case the people of Crete. They comment on and respond to events, while also throwing the emotions of the principals into the boldest possible relief. The music demands enormous dramatic intensity and varied color, from dulcet to white-hot. Idomeneo needn’t be compared with the masterpieces that followed in Mozart’s oeuvre—it absolutely stands on its own. The work deals with matters of life and death, in which eloquence is the keynote. With that quality pervading the music, a glorious evening in the theater is assured.

Roger Pines, dramaturg and broadcast co-host/ co-producer at Lyric Opera of Chicago, wrote on Rossini’s La pietra del paragone (The Touchstone) for last summer’s Wolf Trap Opera program. A frequent contributor of articles for opera-related publications and recording companies internationally, he also has appeared annually on the Metropolitan Opera broadcasts’ Opera Quiz since 2006.


Sir Frank Dicksee, Romeo and Juliet, 1884.

R É J I T

O M O ET U L E T E

MUSIC BY CHARLES GOUNOD LIBRETTO BY J. BARBIER AND M. CARRÉ A NEW PRODUCTION

SUN, JULY 15 AT 3:00 PM TUE, JULY 17 AT 7:30 PM THU, JULY 19 AT 7:30 PM SAT, JULY 21 AT 7:30 PM

THE BARNS AT WOLF TRAP

SPECIAL THANKS TO ANNE R. KLINE AND GEOFFREY POHANKA, PERFORMANCE SPONSORS

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CAST IN ORDER OF VOCAL APPEARANCE Tybalt, Juliette’s cousin

Richard Trey Smagur

Count Pâris, promised to Juliette

Joshua Conyers

Lord Capulet, Juliette’s father

Federico De Michelis

Juliette Capulet

Vanessa Vasquez

Mercutio, Roméo’s friend

Thomas Glass

Roméo Montague

Alexander McKissick

Gertrude, Juliette’s nurse

Taylor Raven

Gregorio, a Montague servant

Andrew Gilstrap*

Frère Laurent

Anthony Reed

Stephano, Roméo’s page

Annie Rosen

Benvolio, Romeo’s cousin

Kevin Bryant*

Capulets and Montagues

Wolf Trap Opera Studio

*Studio Artist

CREATIVE TEAM Conductor

Eric Melear

Director

Louisa Muller

Scenic Designer

Timothy Mackabee

Costume Designer

Amanda Seymour

Lighting Designer

Robert H. Grimes

Wig & Makeup Designer

Anne Nesmith

Chorusmaster

Jeremy Frank

MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Musical Preparation

Jeremy Frank, Blair Salter

French Coach

Marie-France Lefebvre

Assistant Director

Frances Rabalais

Production Stage Manager

Jordan Braun

Assistant Stage Manager

Kristin Kelley

Supertitle Coordinator

Blair Salter

Supertitle translations created by Kim Witman for Wolf Trap Opera

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THE STORY P R O LO GU E The story is told of the endless feud between the Montague and Capulet families, and of the forbidden love between their children. PAR T O N E Juliette Capulet is the center of attention at a masked ball at the palace. Her cousin Tybalt is showing off the Capulets’ wealth and Juliette’s beauty to Count Pâris, to whom Juliette is promised to be wed. Their disguises have allowed Roméo Montague and his friends to enter the palace undetected. Roméo recounts a worrisome dream, but his friend Mercutio makes light of it. Roméo and Juliette meet and quickly fall in love, but when they learn they are from rival houses, they realize that their love is doomed. Roméo flees after Tybalt recognizes him. Later that night, Roméo returns to the Capulet palace and declares his love to Juliette. The lovers ask Frère Laurent to unite them in marriage. Hoping that their love might reconcile their families, he carries out the ceremony. I N T E R MI SS IO N PA R T T WO Outside the palace, Roméo’s page Stephano mocks the Capulets with a song, and it provokes a fight. Roméo tries to make peace, but when Tybalt kills Mercutio, Roméo stabs Tybalt. Both families renew their vow of vengeance. The next morning, the newlyweds awake after their secret wedding night, and Roméo reluctantly leaves before he can be discovered. Lord Capulet tells his daughter that she must wed Count Pâris that same day, and that the marriage was the dying wish of her cousin Tybalt. Frère Laurent gives Juliette a sleeping potion that will make her appear to be dead, and he promises that when she wakes, Roméo will be beside her. Juliette drinks the poison, and when her father arrives to lead her to the wedding, she collapses.

Thé T Th héâtre tre Ly yriq ri ue eo on th the he e Place Place du u Châtelet, Ch hâtelet te t, 1862. 18 2

Roméo arrives at Juliette’s grave, and believing her dead, drinks poison. At that moment, she wakes. As Roméo weakens, she realizes what he has done and kills herself. The lovers die together, praying to God for forgiveness.

SUNG IN FRENCH WITH PROJECTED TRANSLATIONS RUNNING TIME 3 HOURS INCLUDING ONE INTERMISSION INSIDE THE OPERA PRE-SHOW TALK BEGINS ONE HOUR BEFORE CURTAIN AT THE CENTER FOR EDUCATION AT WOLF TRAP FIRST PERFORMED AT THE THÉÂTRE-LYRIQURE IMPÉRIAL DU CHÂTELET IN PARIS ON APRIL 27, 1867

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8LI(IÁERX 3TXMQMWQSJ =SYRK0SZI BY LOUISA MULLER,

DIRECTOR

The tragic and timeless tale of Romeo and Juliet has sparked the imagination of artists and audiences alike, starting 50 years prior to the creation of Shakespeare’s play. The story belongs neither to the 16th century of Shakespeare nor to the 19th century of Gounod, and it has been adapted to every conceivable historical and geographical context. We have chosen to bring our protagonists forward in time and make them contemporary teenagers we recognize. Romeo, Juliet, and their compatriots are young people on the brink of adulthood who bridle at the constraints placed on them by the older generation and struggle to take control of their own destinies. Each claims autonomy and agency in any way they can—through bravado, violence, and radical acts of love. While the adults ostensibly hold all the power, their interventions (Capulet’s attempt to honor Tybalt’s dying wishes by marrying Juliet off to Paris and the Friar’s efforts to end the family feud by collaborating in Romeo and Juliet’s secret wedding) fail on every count. Through their defiant choices, the young people drive the narrative throughout. I can think of no better company than Wolf Trap Opera, cast entirely with singers at the beginning of their professional lives, to tell a story about characters whose youth is so fundamental to the action. The piece bears all the hallmarks of a French grand opera, but despite its scale, at its heart the work is an intimate one. By bringing it into The Barns, placing the full-size orchestra onstage, and thrusting the action forward, we are able to heighten its intimacy and distill the storytelling to its essentials, without sacrificing any musical excitement. Gounod anchored the opera on a series of four duets for our star-crossed lovers, following Shakespeare’s structure closely and focusing on Romeo and Juliet. Through the duets, we watch their relationship develop from playful teasing, to bold declarations of love, to defiant optimism, to passionate goodbyes. We watch them grow up, knowing all the while that they will never have the chance to grow old. What is it that brings us back to this story again and again, despite knowing exactly how it turns out? I think we go along on their journey every time. We fall in love with these characters and desperately hold out hope until the end that somehow this time, things will turn out differently for them.

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Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Madame Charles Gounod, born Anna Zimmerman, nd.

Shakespeare On The Riviera BY MARY DIBBERN In April of 1865, the French composer Charles Gounod (1818-1893) left Paris, seeking the calm beauty of the French Riviera. In the town of Saint-Raphaël, on a street that now bears his name, he began to compose Roméo et Juliette, an operatic adaptation of Shakespeare’s play that would become the greatest critical success during his lifetime. Gounod quartered in the Oustalet dou Capelan (“House of the Pastor”), a small villa belonging to the retired army officer and bibliophile René Savigny de Moncorps (1837-1915). He had transformed the three-story dwelling into a residence for poets and artists and it was “a gorgeous villa with an enchanting view of the shoreline bathed in the blue waves of the Mediterranean.”1 Today we can still see a plaque on the outside wall reading “The illustrious master Gounod composed Romeo et Juliette, at Oustalet dou Capelan, in the spring of 1865.”

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GEORGES VICAIRE, LE VICOMTE DE SAVIGNY DE MONCORPS DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES BIBLIOPHILES FRANÇOIS ET DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES AMIS DES LIVRES. PARIS: LIBRAIRIE HENRI LECLERC, 1916, 15.

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The composer’s correspondence with his wife Anna (née Zimmerman) portrays a composer who habitually fled urban distractions and idle “chitchat” in order to listen attentively to his inner muse. An added attraction of Saint-Rafaël was that his librettist, Jules Barbier, also lived in a nearby house. While their close proximity means we are deprived of the letters that would have given us insight into their daily creative process, we can imagine them sitting comfortably outside under the big umbrella pines, perhaps sharing a refreshing afternoon pastis. In this lovely setting, he reported to Anna, “I awoke at sunrise

then closer and closer as if behind a thin partition; finally it emerged from the ruins of the nearby town and everything was clear; I wrote in my notebook without stopping.” Such intense concentration took its toll. A physician arrived from Paris to treat him for nervous exhaustion and he was obliged to stop for several weeks. Nevertheless, by July of 1865 he completed the opera and it received its premiere in Paris at the ThéâtreLyrique on 27 April 1867. Why Romeo and Juliet? In 1839, Gounod had attended rehearsals of Hector Berlioz’s great dramatic symphony Roméo et Juliette, which perhaps inspired him to set a portion of an Italian text Romeo e Giulietta as one of his Prix de Rome obligatory

A work without precedent over which hovers, sovereign and dominant, the great spirit of Shakespeare and sat twenty paces from the beach. I’m working on the introduction to act one, the first duet of the ball scene and Friar Lawrence’s cantilena. Four days’ work here is better than forty in Paris.” A few weeks later he explained, “For me, the sea is a true collaborator. This morning, the sea and I have written a huge section of act three.” In another letter, Gounod evoked his student days in Rome when he compared the Mediterranean to the Bay of Naples and wrote of the inspiration nearby archeological sites similar to his memories of the Roman Campagna. “I am working on the love duet from act four. It is 6:30 am, under the ruins of the Fréjus aqueduct.” He worked at a feverish pace, as if taking dictation. “I heard it [the music] for several days as if it were behind a wall;

envoies. While Berlioz’s symphony with soloists and chorus emphasized the political situation leading to a need for reconciliation between warring factions, Gounod and his librettists Barbier and Michel Carré concentrated on the love story. One outstanding feature of this opera is the four great duets sung by the title characters. Only the final duet deviates significantly from Shakespeare’s play. Juliette awakens before Romeo’s death, allowing a final scene between the lovers; this love-death scene might be seen as a French response to the denouement of Wagner’s 1865 setting of Tristan und Isolde.

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QUOTED IN STEVEN HUEBNER, THE OPERAS OF CHARLES GOUNOD. OXFORD: CLARENDON PRESS, 1990, 160. 3 QUOTED IN LE COURRIER MUSICAL.

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With his three greatest operas—Faust, Mireille, and Roméo et Juliette— Gounod created a new operatic genre, intermediate between the grandiose “grand opera” and the more superficial, formulaic opéra-comique. His combination of dramatic realism combined with a characteristically light touch successfully eludes French comic opera’s deliberate superficiality. In 1862, an anonymous Belgian critic had asked Gounod the rhetorical question, “When will you give us that Roméo et Juliette that seems made for you and that only you can give to the French stage?”2 The critical reception of Roméo et Juliette resoundingly confirmed that earlier statement. “I left the Théâtre-Lyrique touched and overjoyed,” wrote Eugène Tarbé in Le Figaro. “Work without precedent over which hovers, sovereign and dominant, the great spirit of Shakespeare,” exclaimed Monreno in Le Ménestral. “A work in which knowledge and inspiration are revealed to the same degree,” penned composer Ernest Reyer in La France musicale. The work’s success led to many performances in increasingly important French venues. At the Opéra-Comique, Roméo et Juliette became the first opera performed with sung recitatives. In 1888, it entered the repertoire of the Opéra with the addition of a ballet, and later was revived for the 1889 Universal Exposition. Gounod’s eloquent melodies, lavish orchestration, and deep sensitivity to dramaturgy had a lasting impact upon successive generations of composers. Henri Duparc wrote in 1918, “[Gounod] was an innovator in the sense that his extremely personal music had an immense influence on the composers who came after him.”3 Roméo et Juliette, performed worldwide for over a century, remains one of the jewels of the operatic repertoire.

Pianist Mary Dibbern has been the Music Director of Education for The Dallas Opera since 2012. Her career began in Paris, France, where she resided and worked for many French and international opera companies since 1978. She has written eight books on French opera and song repertoire for Pendragon Press and is a recording artist for Toccata Classics, Harmonia Mundi France, and Magelone. Her editions of French music are published by Eschig and Musik Fabrik in Paris and Classical Vocal Reprints in the US.


The Barns and Filene Center are the two places Wolf Trap Opera can most easily be found, and these venues form the cornerstone of WTO’s mission: to promote the most promising emerging talent through performance-driven training in high-quality professional productions. While WTO keeps the center of its programming on these home stages, it continues to reach into the greater Washington D.C. community with the UNTRAPPED initiative, now in its second year. Not only does UNTRAPPED allow WTO to participate in different kinds of events—full performances in non-traditional spaces, concert performances with a symphony orchestra, artist-driven song recitals—it enables Wolf Trap Opera singers to experience art forms that have slightly different performance parameters and expectations. Addressing the specific demands of communicating in a non-traditional space, becoming savvy about performing with a symphony orchestra, speaking passionately and concisely from the stage in a recital setting, keeping preschoolers engaged and entertained—are all critical aspects of developing a thriving classical vocal career. SPECIAL THANKS TO DAN AND GLORIA LOGAN, 2018 UNTRAPPED SERIES SPONSORS

UNTRAPPED: HALCYON’S BY THE PEOPLE “We believe that we are more alike than different, stronger together than apart, and more connected than it may seem. We believe in the power of human creativity and compassion. By The People is a new, inclusive, international arts and innovation festival that facilitates connection and celebrates creativity.” – Halcyon Wolf Trap Opera is pleased to partner again with Halcyon as they present the inaugural season of By The People, a citywide festival. This year’s collaboration will include a pop-up deconstructed recital on June 23rd at Union Market and will feature a special new production of Kurt Weill’s The Seven Deadly Sins at Dock 5. This work premiered in 1933 during a time of tremendous political and social upheaval. The practical Anna I (a singer) and the impulsive Anna II (a dancer), set out across America to seek their fortune and create a new home. During their seven-year journey they are tempted by each of the biblical deadly sins. Disillusioned, they eventually give up their dreams and ideals, and return to their family. For more information about By the People, visit bythepeople.org.

Pop-Up @ Union Market SAT, JUNE 23 AT 12 PM Arrive at noon to receive your map and marching orders, and then begin your scavenger hunt-style wander, enjoying favorite arias from the opera repertoire while exploring one of the hippest areas of town.

The Seven Deadly Sins SAT, JUNE 23 AT 8:00 PM SUN, JUNE 24 AT 2:00 PM MUSIC BY KURT WEILL LIBRETTO BY BERTOLT BRECHT FEATURING DANCERS FROM HONG KONG BALLET RUNNING TIME: 60 MINUTES CAST Anna I Anna II Family

Annie Rosen Ye Feifei Piotr Buszewski Nicholas Nestorak Johnathan McCullough Anthony Reed

CREATIVE TEAM Director/Choreographer Musical Director Featured Visual Artist Costume Designer Lighting Designer Wig & Makeup Designer

Septime Webre Joseph Li Sir Michael Craig-Martin Kristen Ahern Alyssandra Docherty Emma Tremmel

MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Musical Preparation Assistant Director Production Stage Manager Assistant Stage Manager

Joseph Li, Christopher Koelzer Susan Li Nathan Brauner Kira Robbins

MORE INFORMATION AND TICKETS AT OPERA.WOLFTRAP.ORG/UNTRAPPED

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UNTRAPPED: THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

The Phillips Collection

2018 marks a return to The Phillips Collection (TPC) for two unique installments of Vocal Colors on June 28 and July 19. In these recitals, WTO artists pair their personal musical responses with the items from TPC’s formidable collection, drawing intriguing parallels between visual and aural art. Past performances have paired artworks with spirituals, Joni Mitchell tunes, children’s songs, as well as beloved Lieder and chanson; the evenings are always entertaining and thought-provoking. Tickets will be available through TPC beginning in May. PHILLIPSCOLLECTION.ORG/EVENTS

Vocal Colors THU, JUNE 28 AT 6:30 PM

THU, JULY 19 AT 6:30 PM

Mané Galoyan, soprano Thomas Glass, baritone Patrick Guetti, bass Nathan Raskin, piano

Madison Leonard, soprano Megan Mikailovna Samarin, mezzo-soprano Ian Koziara, tenor Joseph Li, piano

UNTRAPPED: CHILDREN'S THEATRE-IN-THE-WOODS Listen, Wilhelmina! Wolf Trap Opera returns to Children’s Theatre-in-the-Woods in July for encore performances of the mini-musical Listen, Wilhelmina!, featuring artists from the 2018 Wolf Trap Opera Studio. Wilhelmina, Wallis, and Winston the Wombats are ready for their very first concert at Wolf Trap! So many new things — The stage! The instruments! The maestro! But what is the audience supposed to do? With help from Ranger Nat, these three wombats learn how much fun music-making can be when they open their ears to listen. With a score reminiscent of Carl Stallings’s wonderful Looney Tunes melodic universe, Listen, Wilhelmina! was written expressly to meet the developmental benchmarks of preschool children and is a perfect way to introduce the youngest music fans to the concert experience. MUSIC BY DAVID HANLON LIBRETTO BY KATHLEEN KELLY FRIDAY, JULY 20 AT 10:30 AM SATURDAY, JULY 21 AT 10:30 AM

CAST Wilhelmina Wallis Winston Ranger Nat

Laura Corina Sanders Theresa Kesser Senhica Klee Cory McGee

CHILDREN’S THEATRE-IN-THE-WOODS TOTAL RUNNING TIME: 45-60 MINUTES

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CREATIVE TEAM Conductor Director Scenic and Costume Designer

Joseph Li Mo Zhou Valérie Thérèse Bart

MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Inscape Chamber Orchestra Pianist/Coach Production Stage Manager

Josephine Riggs Susan Li


UNTRAPPED: NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL INSTITUTE + FESTIVAL Partnerships are critical to the success of the UNTRAPPED initiative, and Wolf Trap Opera is thrilled to partner again with the National Orchestral Institute + Festival. NOI+F’s young professional musicians are in a similar demographic to WTO artists, and they are selected by a similar national audition tour. It’s common to hear glad shouts of recognition between singers and instrumentalists at the beginning of the first collaborative rehearsal, as their paths have often crossed at music schools and other summer festivals. Both of this summer’s NOI+F performances are part of the Leonard Bernstein at 100 worldwide celebration. NOI.UMD.EDU

Pops Extravaganza: Bernstein at 100

American Landscapes Bernstein's Songfest

SAT, JUNE 2 AT 8 PM | THE CLARICE

SAT, JUNE 16 AT 8 PM | THE CLARICE

Maestro John Morris Russell leads members of the Wolf Trap Opera Studio in excerpts from the musical theater and operatic works of Leonard Bernstein.

Maestro James Judd conducts this performance, which will be recorded by Naxos for future distribution.

Esther Tonea, soprano Nicole Thomas, mezzo-soprano Ricardo Garcia, tenor Nicholas Newton, bass-baritone

Vanessa Vasquez, soprano Taylor Raven, mezzo-soprano Zoie Reams, mezzo-soprano Alexander McKissick, tenor Joshua Conyers, baritone Patrick Guetti, bass

MORE INFORMATION AND TICKETS AT OPERA.WOLFTRAP.ORG/UNTRAPPED

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THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER RECORDING SESSION AT THE BARNS, NOVEMBER 2017

UNTRAPPED: STREAMING AND RECORDING Can’t get enough of Wolf Trap Opera’s performances? You’ve got options!

Streaming Video Relive your favorite Barns opera performances by visiting www.wolftrap.org/streaming. The HD video of August 2017's double-bill of Bastianello and The Juniper Tree is available now through September 2018, and the June 2018 production of Idomeneo will become available in October. WOLFTRAP.ORG/STREAMING

Radio This spring, Classical WETA 90.9 FM is airing Wolf Trap Opera performances from the 2017 season as part of their Saturday afternoon Opera House series. Live performances of last summer’s La pietra del paragone (The Touchstone) aired on May 12, and Bastianello and The Juniper Tree will air on May 19.

Audio Recordings After the 2017 production of The Fall of the House of Usher, WTO was approached by Orange Mountain Music (Phillip Glass’s recording label) to see if WTO would be interested in partnering with them to make a recording of the opera. In November 2017, WTO quite literally got the "band" back together and spent an intense three days in The Barns with Grammy-winning producer Blanton Alspaugh, the Inscape Chamber Orchestra, and the original cast. The CD will be available for purchase later in 2018—stay tuned for details! SPECIAL THANKS TO THE LINCOLN AND THERESE FILENE FOUNDATION, PROGRAM SPONSOR

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THE ART OF PLEASURE STEVEN BLIER

DIRECTOR, PIANIST, & ARRANGER

WITH JOSEPH LI, PIANO LAURA CORINA SANDERS*, SOPRANO ZOIE REAMS, MEZZO-SOPRANO PIOTR BUSZEWSKI, TENOR JOHNATHAN McCULLOUGH, BARITONE THU, MAY 31 AT 2 PM FRI, JUNE 1 AT 7:30 PM THE BARNS AT WOLF TRAP

The times are turbulent, but music is an anchor. This program delves into the pleasures of the senses, the glory of the human voice, and the beauty of love. And yes, we’ll also have a few songs about less noble pleasures—who doesn’t need a laugh right now? While songs themselves may not save the world, they heal listeners with calmness, courage, and a sense of connection. The program will contain art songs and popular songs by Piazzolla, Fauré, Schubert, Arlen, Szymanowski, Bernstein, Guastavino, and Villa-Lobos. - STEVEN BLIER RUNNING TIME 2 HOURS, INCLUDING ONE INTERMISSION MUSIC & PRODUCTION STAFF Stage Director Frances Rabalais Musical Preparation Joseph Li

*Studio Artist

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2017 FILENE ARTISTS

ARIA JUKEBOX THE AUDIENCE GETS TO CHOOSE! SUN, JULY 22 VOTING AND RECEPTION AT 2 PM PERFORMANCE AT 3 PM

This engaging choose-your-ownadventure concert is perfect for opera newbies and sophisticated aficionados. Don’t miss your chance to help choose the repertoire—come to the 2 p.m. pre-show reception to join in the fun! Engage in some good-natured competition with your fellow audience members as you debate the merits of Verdi over Rossini and compare well-loved chestnuts with bucket list rare arias.

THE BARNS AT WOLF TRAP RUNNING TIME 2.5 HOURS, INCLUDING ONE INTERMISSION Featuring the 2018 FILENE ARTISTS Kim Pensinger Witman, piano SPECIAL THANKS TO REVADA FOUNDATION, 2018 YOUNG ARTIST SHOWCASE SPONSOR

For a complete roster of 2018 Filene Artists, please see page 35.

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This is how it works: each singer lists multiple arias in their “jukebox,” and the selection with the most votes is included in the performance. The singers find what they’ll be singing moments before they step onstage, and the result is a one-of-a-kind concert encompassing a surprising range of styles and composers.


CHRISTINE GOERKE 2018 FILENE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Each summer, Wolf Trap Opera welcomes back one of its distinguished alumni to work with the company's singers on both artistic and practical preparation for their careers. The 2018 Filene Artist in Residence is acclaimed soprano Christine Goerke. Ms. Goerke has appeared in many of the most important opera houses of the world including the Metropolitan Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Paris Opera, Teatro alla Scala, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Teatro Real in Madrid, and the Saito Kinen Festival. She has sung much of the great soprano repertoire, beginning with the Mozart and Handel heroines and now moving into dramatic Strauss and Wagner roles. Ms. Goerke has also appeared with a number of the leading orchestras including the New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Radio Vara, BBC Symphony Orchestra at the BBC Proms, and the Sydney Symphony. Ms. Goerke’s recording of Vaughan Williams’ A Sea Symphony with Robert Spano and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra won the 2003 Grammy Award for Best Classical Recording and Best Choral Performance. Her close association with Robert Shaw yielded several recordings including the Brahms’ Liebeslieder Waltzes, Poulenc’s Stabat Mater, Szymanowski’s Stabat Mater, and the Grammy-nominated recording of Dvořák’s Stabat Mater. Other recordings include the title role in Iphigenie en Tauride for Telarc and Britten’s War Requiem, which won the 1999 Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance. During the 2017-2018 season, Ms. Goerke returned to the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera and Houston Grand Opera for Elektra, the Lyric Opera of Chicago for Die Walküre, and the Royal Opera House for Lohengrin. Future seasons include Brünnhilde in the full Ring Cycle at The Metropolitan Opera (2018-2019) and Lyric Opera of Chicago (2020). Ms. Goerke was the recipient of the 2001 Richard Tucker Award and was named Musical America’s 2015 Vocalist of the Year. She performed the roles of Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni and Nireno in Giulio Cesare as a 1995 Filene Artist.

PUBLIC MASTER CLASS SAT, JULY 21 AT 3 PM SPECIAL THANKS TO THE LINCOLN AND THERESE FILENE FOUNDATION, PROGRAM UNDERWRITER

CENTER FOR EDUCATION CHRISTINE GOERKE WORKS WITH WOLF TRAP OPERA’S YOUNG ARTISTS. FREE, NO RESERVATION REQUIRED 30


AN INTERVIEW WITH

CHRISTINE GOERKE WOLF TRAP OPERA (WTO): What do you remember most about being at Wolf Trap? CHRISTINE GOERKE (CG): I remember the drive down from New York. I was SO excited and proud, but also a nervous wreck, knowing how insanely talented the other singers were. I was determined to work hard and soak up every bit of information that I possibly could. I had nothing to worry about…I had the most incredible summer. Fun, thought-provoking, educational, trying, sweaty (it’s hot in layers of silk outside in August...), and wonderful. WTO: What did Wolf Trap mean for your developing career? CG: Wolf Trap is so widely respected. Its young artists not only have opportunities to work with incredible coaches, directors, colleagues, but they also have amazing chances to develop new roles and repertoire in a place that garners them the right kind of exposure. I was given repertoire that truly stretched my abilities. I wasn’t sure I’d be able to do the things that were being asked of me, but with supportive colleagues holding my hand the entire time, I knew I could do anything I set my mind to. That summer (1995) I learned that there has to be a healthy balance of laughter and hard work. That one must come in the door with a strong sense of character and musical choices…and then know that everything will change. It’s the nature of professional collaboration. WTO: It’s incredible that you sang Mozart and Handel for us. Did you ever imagine you’d be a top Wagnerian? CG: I loved singing Mozart and Handel. Amazingly, though, folks had been throwing around the words “Dramatic Soprano” since I was 24 years old. It never really hit me that it might have been a possibility until one fall when suddenly the Mozart and Handel didn’t feel right anymore. After I had left the stage one night while singing the Third Norn at The Metropolitan Opera, Jane Eaglen was on stage singing Brünnhilde, beginning the prologue duet with Siegfried. I distinctly remember standing in the wings, teary-eyed, thinking, “if I could sing this just once, even if it wrecks my voice, it would be worth it...” A few years later when everything fell into place, I felt like the luckiest woman alive. WTO: What most excites you about being back at Wolf Trap this summer? CG: I love working with talented young singers. It’s incredible to see the lightbulb turn on over their heads when they figure something out, and I absolutely love how much I end up learning by working with them. I’m also really jazzed to get back on the stage of the Filene Center where I sang my first Don Giovanni and tear into some Wagner with folks that I adore. And finally, I’m excited that my daughters will be joining me. It’ll be amazing to have them spend some time where Mom got her start!

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ALUMNI

AROUND THE WORLD

REPORT FROM THE MET WTO alumni were well-represented on The Metropolitan Opera roster in 2017-2018.

PHOTO CREDIT: THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

Ailyn Pérez (’06) made her Met role debut in the title role in Thaïs, and she reprised her Wolf Trap Opera roles of Juliette (Roméo et Juliette) and the Countess (Le nozze di Figaro). My summer at Wolf Trap Opera was such an important time in my artistic development. The sense of collaboration and artistic independence we had at Wolf Trap was a gift to us all early in our careers, and that WTO experience remains central to my collaborative approach.

PHOTO CREDIT: MARTY SOHL/THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

Tenor David Portillo sang Camille in The Merry Widow and Eduardo in The Exterminating Angel in his Met debut season. Also making their Metropolitan Opera debuts were former Filene Artists Brenton Ryan (’13,'16), Christian Zaremba (’15,’16), and Maureen McKay (’05,’06).

BREAKING BARRIERS

AILYN PÉREZ

PHOTO CREDIT: DARIO ACOSTA/ OPERANEWS

PHOTO CREDIT: SHERVIN LAINEZ

Lawrence Brownlee (’01) was named 2017 “Male Singer of the Year” by both the International Opera Awards and Bachtrack. This winter he premiered a new song cycle at Opera Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. Entitled “Cycles of My Being,” the work looks at what it means to be an African American man living in America today. 32


TRAPPER REUNIONS

PHOTO CREDIT: CORY WEAVER

The San Francisco Opera premiere of John Adams and Peter Sellars' The Girls of the Golden West featured J’nai Bridges ('15,'16; above center), Ryan McKinny ('06,'08; above left), and Paul Appleby ('09,'10). It was led by Grant Gershon— conductor of the last five productions of grand opera at the Filene Center.

PHOTO CREDIT: LYNN LANE

Elektra at Houston Grand Opera boasted an amazing number of former and current Filene Artists—Tamara Wilson (’08, above), 2018 Filene Artist in Residence Christine Goerke (’95, above foreground), Chad Shelton (’99), Anthony Robin Schneider (’17), Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen (WTOS ’17), Mané Galoyan (’16,’18), Zoie Reams (’17,’18), and Richard Trey Smagur (’18).

PHOTO CREDIT: BOB SHOMLER

Opera San Jose made news this winter by producing the premiere of a new Cinderella opera by 12-year-old prodigy composer Alma Deutscher. The performances featured Jonas Hacker (’16,’17; above left), Vanessa Becerra (WTOS ’13, above right), Mary Dunleavy (’93,’94), and Stacey Tappan (’00).

PHOTO CREDIT: PHILLIP NEWTON

The gentlemen in Seattle Opera’s 2018 Così fan tutte were all former Trappers. Above L-R: Kevin Burdette (’00,’02), Ben Bliss (’13) and Michael Adams (WTOS ’14).

2018 SUMMER FESTIVALS Don’t miss WTO alumni onstage at other summer opera festivals in 2018! Santa Fe’s Doctor Atomic cast is led by Ryan McKinny (’06,’08) as Oppenheimer and Ben Bliss (’13) as Robert Wilson, while The Cunning Little Vixen at The Glimmerglass Festival features Eric Owens (’94,’95,’14 Filene Artist in Residence) as the Forester and Heidi Stober (’06) as the Vixen.

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WTO ALUMNI AT THE KENNEDY CENTER

PHOTO CREDIT: SCOTT SUCHMAN

If you saw a Washington National Opera performance in 2017-2018, chances are good that you saw a WTO alum. Last fall’s Alcina featured Ying Fang (’13, above) and Elizabeth DeShong (’08); season opener Aida included Tamara Wilson (’08), Carl Tanner (’83), Morris Robinson ('03,'04), and Gordon Hawkins (’85), and the spring 2018 Don Carlo cast was led by Eric Owens (’94,’95) and Jamie Barton (’09).

PHOTO CREDIT: FAY FOX

2017 Marian Anderson Vocal Award Winner John Holiday (’14) appeared in a recital co-presented by Washington National Opera and the Kennedy Center Fortas Chamber Music Concerts.

A LOOK BACK: 2007 L’ÉTOILE If you were at The Barns in July 2007, you would have caught a glimpse of three young women on the brink of international careers as they created memorable magic in WTO’s production of Chabrier’s L’étoile. Sasha Cooke, Kate Lindsey, and Erin Morley have gone on to reprise many of their Wolf Trap roles on stages around the world.

PHOTO CREDIT: BILL COOPER

In addition to Lazuli in L’étoile at Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Kate Lindsey’s 2017-2018 calendar took her to the Vienna State Opera for Nicklausse in Les contes d’Hoffmann and Glyndebourne for Octavian in Der Rosenkavalier.

PHOTO CREDIT: ROBERT WORKMAN

Erin Morley debuted as Zerbinetta in Ariadne auf Naxos (her WTO 2008 role) at the Vienna State Opera. She was acclaimed as Cunegonde in the Carnegie Hall performance of Bernstein’s Candide this spring, and will return to Wolf Trap as a featured soloist on the July 27 “Bernstein at 100” concert with the National Symphony Orchestra.

PHOTO CREDIT: KEN HOWARD

Sasha Cooke’s 2017-2018 calendar boasted the world premieres of Laurine Jobs in Maston Bates’ The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs at Santa Fe Opera (above) and the title role in Nico Muhly’s Marnie at English National Opera. Concert engagements included London Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, and Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin.

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FILENE ARTISTS

The 2018 Filene Artists were the catalyst for this season’s repertoire choices, and they represent the top 2.9% of singers who applied to be considered for the 2018 roster. Wolf Trap Opera’s artist-centric approach makes a Filene Artist residency a coveted engagement for the best of the new generation of classical vocal talent. Emerging professionals who have already finished their academic or conservatory study, Filene Artists are already on their way to significant careers.

A Wolf Trap Opera residency is an essential experience in the formative years of any young singer, and it is a gift to this next generation of leaders in the field. CHRISTINE GOERKE, 2018 Filene Artist in Residence

PIOTR BUSZEWSKI, tenor Warsaw, Poland Duke of Mantua (Rigoletto) Tenor 1 (The Seven Deadly Sins) The Art of Pleasure TRAINING: Academy of Vocal Arts, The Juilliard School, Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, The Fryderyk Chopin University of Music HIGHLIGHTS: Alfredo in La traviata, Edgardo in Lucia di Lammermoor (AVA), Ernesto in Don Pasquale (Brevard Music Festival), 2017 Mario Lanza Vocal Competition First Prize, 2017 Giargiari Belcanto Competition Second Prize

KIDON CHOI, baritone Seoul, South Korea Rigoletto (Rigoletto) TRAINING: The Metropolitan Opera, Mannes School of Music, Manhattan School of Music, Hanyang University HIGHLIGHTS: Yamadori in Madama Butterfly (The Metropolitan Opera), Don Alfonso in Così fan tutte (Mannes School of Music), Title Role in Rigoletto, Marcello in La bohème (Chautauqua Music Festival), 2017 Alfredo Silpigni Vocal Competition First Prize, 2016 Opera Index Vocal Competition Award Winner

JOSHUA CONYERS, baritone Bronx, NY Count Pâris (Roméo et Juliette) Count Monterone (Rigoletto) Bernstein's Songfest TRAINING: Palm Beach Opera, Glimmerglass Festival, Des Moines Metro Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Washington National Opera, A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute, Indiana University, University of North Carolina School of the Arts HIGHLIGHTS: Sciarrone in Tosca, Yamadori in Madama Butterfly (Palm Beach Opera), Scarpia in Tosca (Vashon Opera), Falstaff (cover) in Falstaff (Des Moines Metro Opera), Don Magnifico in La cenerentola (Opera Iowa), John Sorel in The Consul, (A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute)

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FEDERICO DE MICHELIS,

THOMAS GLASS, baritone^

bass-baritone Buenos Aires, Argentina

Edina, MN

Lord Capulet (Roméo et Juliette) TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Opera Studio of Teatro Argentino de La Plata, Escuela Superior de Musica Reina Sofía HIGHLIGHTS: Achilla in Giulio Cesare, Dulcamara in L’elisir d’amore (Houston Grand Opera), Figaro in Le nozze di Figaro (Palm Beach Opera), Sciarrone in Tosca (Philadelphia Orchestra), Brander in La damnation de Faust (Aspen Music Festival, Des Moines Metro Opera), Mr. Flint in Billy Budd (Des Moines Metro Opera)

Mercutio (Roméo et Juliette) Beethoven’s Ninth Vocal Colors TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Minnesota Opera, Merola Opera Program, Rice University, Wolf Trap Opera Studio HIGHLIGHTS: Officer Krupke in West Side Story, Baron Douphol in La traviata (Houston Grand Opera), Schaunard in La bohème, Capulet in Roméo et Juliette, Gustave in Dinner at Eight (Minnesota Opera), Figaro in Il barbiere di Siviglia (Rice University)

YELENA DYACHEK, soprano

PATRICK GUETTI, bass

Sacramento, CA

Highland Park, NJ

Elettra (Idomeneo) Beethoven’s Ninth

Sparafucile (Rigoletto) Vocal Colors Bernstein's Songfest

TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Merola Opera Program, University of Southern California Thornton School of Music, Aspen Music Festival, University of the Pacific Conservatory of Music HIGHLIGHTS: Clotilde in Norma, Berta in Il barbiere di Siviglia, Dominique de Menil in Some Light Emerges, First Secretary in Nixon in China (Houston Grand Opera), Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte, Tatyana in Eugene Onegin (Aspen Opera Center)

MANÉ GALOYAN, soprano*

TRAINING: Lyric Opera of Chicago, Academy of Vocal Arts, Santa Fe Opera, The Catholic University of America HIGHLIGHTS: Mandarin in Turandot, Zuniga in Carmen, Zaretsky in Eugene Onegin (Lyric Opera of Chicago), Sciarrone in Tosca (Los Angeles Philharmonic), Nachtwächter in Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (Glyndebourne Festival Opera), Fifth Jew in Salome (Dallas Opera), Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions National Finalist 2014

IAN KOZIARA, tenor^

Gyumri, Armenia

Chicago, IL

Gilda (Rigoletto) Vocal Colors

Idomeneo (Idomeneo) Vocal Colors

TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Aspen Music Festival, Yerevan State Komitas Conservatory, Houston Grand Opera Young Artists Vocal Academy

TRAINING: The Metropolitan Opera, Glimmerglass Festival, Wolf Trap Opera Studio, Ravinia Steans Institute, Rice University

HIGHLIGHTS: Violetta in La traviata, Adina in L’elisir d’amore, Margaret Hughes in The Prince of Players (Houston Grand Opera), Smorfiosa in L’Opera Seria (Wolf Trap Opera), International Tchaikovsky Competition Third Prize 2015, Hans Gabor Belvedere Competition Prize Winner 2014

HIGHLIGHTS: Enrique in The Exterminating Angel, Fourth Sentry in Parsifal (The Metropolitan Opera), Tito in La clemenza di Tito (Aspen Opera Center), Testo in Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda (Carnegie Hall), Ezekiel Cheever in The Crucible (Glimmerglass Festival)

* returning Filene Artist ^ former Studio Artist 36


MADISON LEONARD, soprano*

NICHOLAS NESTORAK, tenor*

Coeur d’Alene, ID

Hillsdale, MI

Ilia (Idomeneo) Vocal Colors

Matteo Borsa (Rigoletto) Tenor 2 (The Seven Deadly Sins)

TRAINING: Washington National Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera, Merola Opera Program

TRAINING: Glimmerglass Festival, Palm Beach Opera, Crested Butte Music Festival

HIGHLIGHTS: High Priestess in Aida, The Rose in The Little Prince, Little Zegner Daughter in Proving Up (Washington National Opera), Madeline in The Fall of the House of Usher, Daughter in The Juniper Tree (Wolf Trap Opera), Susanna in Le Nozze di Figaro (Amarillo Opera), Monica in The Medium (Merola Opera Program)

JOHNATHAN MCCULLOUGH, baritone Los Angeles, CA Marullo (Rigoletto) Baritone (The Seven Deadly Sins) The Art of Pleasure TRAINING: Curtis Institute of Music, Glimmerglass Festival, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Aspen Music Festival

TAYLOR RAVEN, mezzo-soprano Fayetteville, NC Gertrude (Roméo et Juliette) Bernstein’s Songfest TRAINING: Los Angeles Opera, Ravinia Steans Institute, Pittsburgh Opera, Merola Opera Program, Central City Opera

HIGHLIGHTS: Moralès in Carmen, Mr. Gissing in Elizabeth Cree (Opera Philadelphia), Gonsalvo Fieschi in Die Gezeichneten (Komische Oper Berlin), Sid in La fanciulla del West (Michigan Opera Theatre), J. Robert Oppenheimer in Doctor Atomic (Curtis Opera Theatre)

HIGHLIGHTS: Vanderdendur in Candide (LA Opera), Oronte in Riccardo Primo (Pittsburgh Opera), Hannah After in As One (Pittsburgh Opera, Seattle Opera), Angelina in La cenerentola, Ottavia in L’incoronazione di Poppera (Eklund Opera), 2017 Richard Tucker Foundation Sara Tucker Study Grant

ALEXANDER MCKISSICK, tenor

Chicago, IL

Madison, CT Roméo (Roméo et Juliette) Bernstein’s Songfest TRAINING: Washington National Opera, Aspen Music Festival, The Juilliard School HIGHLIGHTS: Governor/Inquisitor in Candide (Washington National Opera), Alfredo in La traviata (Aspen Music Festival), Val in The Grapes of Wrath (Opera Theatre of Saint Louis), Ramon in La navarraise (Bard SummerScape Festival), 2017 Richard Tucker Music Foundation Sara Tucker Study Grant

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HIGHLIGHTS: Gastone in La traviata (Austin Opera), Pang in Turandot (Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre), Spoletta in Tosca (Wolf Trap Opera), Trin in La fanciulla del West (Opera Carolina), Ali in Zémire et Azor (Skylight Music Theatre), Basilio in Le nozze di Figaro (Toledo Opera), Tobias Ragg in Sweeney Todd (Glimmerglass Festival)

ZOIE REAMS, mezzo-soprano* Maddalena (Rigoletto) Bernstein’s Songfest Beethoven's Ninth The Art of Pleasure TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Glimmerglass Festival, Louisiana State University HIGHLIGHTS: Zweite Magd in Elektra, Flora in La traviata, Rosalia in West Side Story (Houston Grand Opera), Clarice in La pietra del paragone (Wolf Trap Opera), Tituba in The Crucible (Glimmerglass Festival), Sandmännchen in Hänsel und Gretel (Opera Louisiane), Bruckner’s Te Deum (Houston Symphony Orchestra)


ANTHONY REED, bass^ Alexandria, MN Frère Laurent (Roméo et Juliette) Bass (The Seven Deadly Sins) TRAINING: San Francisco Opera, Curtis Institute of Music, Wolf Trap Opera Studio, University of Wisconsin HIGHLIGHTS: Dottore Grenvil in La traviata, Der Pflege in Elektra, Il Re in Aida, Schmidt in Andrea Chenier (San Francisco Opera) Sarastro in Die Zauberflöte, Don Magnifico in La cenerentola (Curtis Opera Theater), Don Basilio in Il barbiere di Siviglia (Santa Fe Concert Association)

RICHARD TREY SMAGUR, tenor Clarkesville, GA Tybalt (Roméo et Juliette) Beethoven’s Ninth TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Ravinia Steans Institute, Des Moines Metro Opera HIGHLIGHTS: Tsarevitch Gvidon in The Golden Cockerel (Santa Fe Opera), Gastone in La traviata, Young Servant in Elektra, Count Almaviva in Il barbiere di Siviglia (Houston Grand Opera), Title Role in Peter Grimes, Pinkerton in Madama Butterfly, Tamino in Die Zauberflöte (Indiana University), 2017 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions Grand Finals Winner

ANNIE ROSEN, mezzo-soprano*

VANESSA VASQUEZ,

New Haven, CT

soprano Scottsdale, AZ

Stephano (Roméo et Juliette) Anna I (The Seven Deadly Sins) TRAINING: Lyric Opera of Chicago, Santa Fe Opera, Central City Opera, Glimmerglass Festival, Mannes College of Music, Yale University HIGHLIGHTS: Siébel in Faust (Lyric Opera of Chicago), Eve in Rev 23 (White Snake Projects, World Premiere), Title Role in Ariodante (Opera Omaha), Stepmother in The Juniper Tree (Wolf Trap Opera), Mercédès in Carmen (Deustche Oper Berlin)

Juliette (Roméo et Juliette) Bernstein’s Songfest TRAINING: Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA), University of California Los Angeles, The Catholic University of America HIGHLIGHTS: Gilda in Rigoletto, Giorgetta in Il tabarro, Donna Anna in Don Giovanni, Mimì in La bohème, Violetta in La traviata (AVA), Liù in Turandot (Des Moines Metro Opera), 2017 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions Grand Finals Winner

MEGAN MIKAILOVNA SAMARIN, mezzo-soprano*^ Whittier, CA Idamante (Idomeneo) Vocal Colors TRAINING: Houston Grand Opera, Wolf Trap Opera Studio, Aspen Music Festival, Manhattan School of Music HIGHLIGHTS: Sesto in Giulio Cesare, Carla Mae in House Without a Christmas Tree, Siébel in Faust, Maresvale/Revels in Prince of Players, Olga in Eugene Onegin, Johanna in Sweeney Todd (Houston Grand Opera), Loving Clara Schumann (Mercury Symphony), Marzia in Cato in Utica (Glimmerglass Festival), 2017 Gerda Lissner Foundation International Vocal Competition Second Prize

* returning Filene Artist ^ former Studio Artist 38


FELLOWS Coaching and Directing Fellows are emerging professionals at a point in their careers similar to that of Filene Artists, and they make critical contributions to WTO’s music and directing teams. Former Fellows have gone on to positions at leading opera companies and have developed thriving freelance careers as conductors and directors.

Directing Fellow New Orleans, LA Director (The Art of Pleasure) Assistant Director (Roméo et Juliette) TRAINING: Louisiana State University, University of Cincinnati CollegeConservatory of Music (CCM), Pittsburgh Opera Resident Artist HIGHLIGHTS: New Orleans Opera (As One), Pittsburgh Opera (The Long Walk, As One), Cincinnati Chamber Opera (The Little Prince), CCM (Il Signor Bruschino, Mahagonny)

ANDREAS HAGER,

NATHAN RASKIN, Coaching Fellow

Directing Fellow Madison, WI

Boston, MA

Assistant Director (Idomeneo, Rigoletto) TRAINING: University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), Oberlin College HIGHLIGHTS: Gianni Schicchi (CCM), 2014 Winner OPERA America DirectorDesigner Showcase, Webby Award (Best Weird & Experimental Category), Lincoln Center Theater Director’s Lab, Opera Columbus, Opera North, Opera Philadelphia, Houston Grand Opera

Coach/Pianist & Supertitle Coordinator (Idomeneo, Rigoletto) Pianist (Vocal Colors) TRAINING: Northwestern University, Universität Wien, The Juilliard School, The Metropolitan Opera HIGHLIGHTS: The Turn of the Screw, Rigoletto, Die Zauberflöte (Chautauqua Institution), The Song Continues (Carnegie Hall), Staff Pianist (The Juilliard School)

CHRISTOPHER KOELZER,

BLAIR SALTER, Coaching Fellow

Coaching Fellow Sunnyvale, CA

Niagara Falls, Canada

Coach/Pianist (The Seven Deadly Sins) Coach/Pianist & Supertitle Coordinator (Rigoletto) TRAINING: Brigham Young University, University of Maryland, Washington National Opera HIGHLIGHTS: Il barbiere di Siviglia Assistant Conductor (Washington National Opera), Outstanding Collaborative Pianist & Grand Prize Art Song Awards (Metropolitan International Music Festival Competition)

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FRANCES RABALAIS,

Coach/Pianist (Bernstein’s Songfest) Coach/Pianist & Supertitle Coordinator (Roméo et Juliette) TRAINING: University of Michigan, University of Western Ontario, Royal Conservatory of Music HIGHLIGHTS: West Side Story, Il barbiere di Siviglia, La traviata, and Glory Denied (Houston Grand Opera), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (University of Michigan), Opera MODO, The Glimmerglass Festival, Merola Opera Program


STUDIO ARTISTS The Wolf Trap Opera Studio facilitates the transition from student to professional. Studio Artists understudy principal roles, perform small roles, and sing in the chorus. They also work with a specially curated group of master teachers to continue their artistic and practical development.

RICARDO GARCIA, tenor* San Lorenzo, CA TRAINING: San Francisco Conservatory of Music (M.M. 2018), University of the Pacific (B.A. 2016) ROLE: Pops Extravaganza (NOI+F) COVER: Roméo (Roméo et Juliette)

ANDREW GILSTRAP, bass-baritone* Nashville, TN TRAINING: University of Houston (M.M. 2018, B.M. 2016) ROLES: Gregorio (Roméo et Juliette), Herald (Rigoletto) COVER: Count Monterone (Rigoletto)

KEVIN BRYANT, tenor

KATHRYN HENRY, soprano

Georgetown, TX

Sheboygan, WI

TRAINING: Eastman School of Music (M.M. 2018), Southwestern University (B.M. 2016)

TRAINING: The Juilliard School (M.M. 2018), University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (B.F.A 2016)

ROLE: Benvolio (Roméo et Juliette)

COVER: Juliette (Roméo et Juliette)

TAYLOR COMSTOCK, tenor

MELINA JAHARIS,

Independence, MO

mezzo-soprano Winnetka, IL

TRAINING: University of Missouri - Kansas City, University of Kentucky (B.M. 2018) COVER: Idomeneo (Idomeneo)

TRAINING: Northwestern University (M.M. 2018), Lawrence University (B.M. 2015) ROLE: Countess Ceprano (Rigoletto) COVER: Maddalena (Rigoletto)

MATTHEW FLEISHER, bass*

THERESA KESSER,

Philadelphia, PA

mezzo-soprano Poway, CA

TRAINING: University of Michigan (B.M.A. 2018) COVER: Frère Laurent (Roméo et Juliette)

TRAINING: Indiana University (M.M. 2018), University of Denver (B.M. 2015, P.C. 2016) ROLE: Wallis (Listen, Wilhelmina!) COVER: Stephano (Roméo et Juliette)

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DUKE KIM, tenor Seoul, Republic of Korea TRAINING: Rice University (M.M. 2018), Chapman University (B.M. 2015) ROLE: Arbace (Idomeneo) COVER: Duke of Mantua (Rigoletto)

LAURA CORINA SANDERS, soprano San Francisco, CA TRAINING: Eastman School of Music (M.M. 2018, B.M. 2016) ROLES: Wilhelmina (Listen, Wilhelmina!), The Art of Pleasure COVER: Ilia (Idomeneo)

SENHICA KLEE, tenor*

RACHEL SHAUGHNESSY,

Highlands Ranch, CO

soprano Traverse City, MI

TRAINING: Rice University (M.M. 2018), University of Denver (B.M. 2014) ROLES: Priest (Idomeneo), Winston (Listen, Wilhelmina!)

TRAINING: Michigan State University (B.M. 2017) COVER: Elettra (Idomeneo)

COVER: Tybalt (Roméo et Juliette)

DE’RON MCDANIEL, baritone

ANASTASIIA SIDOROVA,

Cincinnati, OH

mezzo-soprano St. Petersburg, Russia

TRAINING: University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory (M.M. 2018), Oberlin Conservatory of Music (B.M. 2016) ROLE: Pops Extravaganza (NOI+F)

TRAINING: Curtis Institute (B.M. 2018) ROLE: Giovanna (Rigoletto) COVER: Gertrude (Roméo et Juliette)

COVERS: Mercutio (Roméo et Juliette), Marullo (Rigoletto)

CORY MCGEE, bass-baritone Stafford, VA TRAINING: Oberlin Conservatory of Music (B.M. 2018) ROLES: Ranger Nat (Listen, Wilhelmina!), A Voice (Idomeneo)

NICOLE THOMAS, mezzo-soprano* Las Vegas, NV TRAINING: The Juilliard School (M.M. 2018), University of Nevada Las Vegas (B.M. 2016) ROLE: Pops Extravaganza (NOI+F) COVER: Idamante (Idomeneo)

NICHOLAS NEWTON,

ESTHER TONEA, soprano

bass-baritone San Diego, CA

Buford, GA

TRAINING: Rice University (M.M. 2018), San Diego State University (B.M. 2016) ROLE: Count Ceprano (Rigoletto) COVER: Lord Capulet (Roméo et Juliette)

TRAINING: San Francisco Conservatory of Music (M.M. 2018), University of Georgia (B.M. 2016) ROLES: Page (Rigoletto), Pops Extravaganza (NOI+F) COVER: Gilda (Rigoletto)

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ALL EARS: CONVERSATIONS WITH THE STUDIO BY LEE ANNE MYSLEWSKI Director, Artistic Administration

Wolf Trap is my first opera family, providing important feedback on my technical weaknesses and supportive criticism about how to improve both my presentation (brand) and singing (product) in a very no-nonsense atmosphere. ALEKSANDRA ROMANO, mezzo-soprano (’11,’12; right, in WTO's 2011 Sweeney Todd)

First experiences are powerful and formative—many of us can trace our love of opera back to our own first touchpoints with the art form (I personally will never grow tired of hearing Pavarotti’s voice: it is the gold standard to my ears, likely due to the copy of King of the High C’s that my mother owned). It makes sense that a singer’s first professional gig would have a similarly profound impact. The knowledge and relationships these young singers encounter have the potential to set the tone for their continued engagement with the field. Over the Studio’s 11 years, we’ve been privileged to serve as that first experience for more than 100 talented musical artists. What is the best way to ensure these artists have a positive (not “easy” or “fun,” but positive) experience at their first professional program? It’s a daunting responsibility, to not only find young singers of great potential, but to also continue their education without patronizing; to challenge them without the stakes being cruelly high or unattainable; and to mentor them through the transition between academic and professional life. As we’re all aware, the career path for a professional musician isn’t a linear one. In weekly meetings with key staff, we consider the whole individual—who they are, what lights their creative fire, where they might need additional support—and help them to strategize what their career path and next steps might look like. It requires that we advise on trends, companies, and professional colleagues; but it also entails listening well and often to discern what the artist wants, what they need, and where those two things intersect (or don’t). The mentoring and conversations continue well after singers leave the program. We also solicit feedback on a regular basis from former Studio Artists. It is a particular point of pride for me that the comments we receive are focused around mentoring, listening, and ongoing conversation. That feedback, coupled with the number of former Studio Artists who go on to pursue professional careers, leads me to believe that we just might be doing something right.

Wolf Trap Studio was my first real springboard and experience at a high level company that truly gave me a “job.” I learned a lot that summer about how to work effectively, how to be professional while still having fun with my colleagues, how to be myself, and how to build relationships that are still very valuable to me today. LIV REDPATH, soprano (‘14)

A month before I was to arrive at Wolf Trap, I found myself in a wheelchair with acute onset arthritis. I remember emailing Lee Anne, who told me that the summer was for my own benefit. If I wasn’t healthy enough, I didn’t have to go, but the folks at Wolf Trap would support me either way. I was so relieved that the choice was in my hands. I did go, and it was a wonderful summer of learning and recovery. That summer set up a track of success in this career. AMY OWENS, soprano (’10,’11; Filene Artist '16,'17)

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GUEST ARTISTS

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KRISTEN AHERN

TIMOTHY MACKABEE

Costume Designer—The Seven Deadly Sins University of Maryland, Adventure Theatre, Imagination Stage, Wolf Trap Opera, Hope Summer Repertory Theatre

Scenic Designer—Roméo et Juliette Longacre Theatre – Broadway, Theatre Royal Haymarket – West End, Ford’s Theatre, UrbanArias

VALÉRIE THÉRÈSE BART

CRYSTAL MANICH

Scenic & Costume Designer— Listen, Wilhelmina! The Pearl Theatre, Guthrie Theater, Shakespeare Theatre Company DC, UrbanArias, Yale Repertory Theatre

Director—Rigoletto Buenos Aires Lírica, Pinchgut Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, Opera San Antonio, Santa Fe Opera

OMER BEN SEADIA

GEOFFREY MCDONALD

Director—Idomeneo Opera Colorado, Santa Fe Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Cincinnati Opera, The Israeli Opera, The Merola Opera Program

Conductor—Idomeneo Opera Philadelphia, The Atlanta Opera, Opera Omaha, Chicago Opera Theater, On Site Opera

STEVEN BLIER

ERIC MELEAR

Director, Pianist and Arranger— The Art of Pleasure New York Festival of Song (Artistic Director), The Juilliard School, Ravinia’s Steans Music Institute, San Francisco Opera, Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

Conductor—Roméo et Juliette Vienna State Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Arizona Opera, The Seiji Ozawa Matsumoto Festival, Wolf Trap Opera

ALYSSANDRA DOCHERTY

LOUISA MULLER

Lighting Designer—The Seven Deadly Sins BalletX, Azuka Theatre, Kun-Yang/Lin Dancers, Tiny Dynamite, Drexel University, Theatre Horizon

Director—Roméo et Juliette The Metropolitan Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera, Grand Théâtre de Genève, Opera Queensland

GRANT GERSHON

ANNE NESMITH

Conductor—Rigoletto LA Opera, Los Angeles Master Chorale, San Francisco Symphony, Santa Fe Opera, Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Opera

Wig & Makeup Designer—Idomeneo, Roméo et Juliette, Rigoletto Saito Kinen Festival, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Opera Philadelphia, Arena Stage, Ford’s Theatre

ROBERT H. GRIMES

ERHARD ROM

Lighting Designer—Idomeneo, Roméo et Juliette The Barns at Wolf Trap, Melodrama Theatre, San Antonio Little Theatre, Arena Stage, Folger Shakespeare Theatre, Wolf Trap Recordings© (Grammy nomination)

Scenic Designer—Rigoletto San Francisco Opera, Wexford Festival Opera, Seattle Opera, The Glimmerglass Festival, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Royal Swedish Opera

RYAN HOWELL

AMANDA SEYMOUR

Scenic Designer—Idomeneo Westport Country Playhouse, The Public Theatre – Studio, The Lion Theatre – Theatre Row, The Pearl Theatre, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Costume Designer—Idomeneo, Roméo et Juliette Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Opera Philadelphia, The Public Theatre, Paper Mill Playhouse, Santa Fe Opera, Wolf Trap Opera

JOSEPH LI

MARK STANLEY

Conductor—The Seven Deadly Sins; Listen, Wilhelmina! Pianist—The Art of Pleasure Houston Grand Opera, Arizona Opera, Minnesota Opera, Aspen Music Festival, Rice University, Baylor University

Lighting Designer—Rigoletto New York City Ballet, New York City Opera, Paris Opera Ballet, Boston Lyric Opera, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater


EMMA TREMMEL

SEPTIME WEBRE

Wig & Makeup Designer— The Seven Deadly Sins University of Maryland, Hartford Stage, The Theatre Lab, Signature Theatre, Wolf Trap Opera

Director/Choreographer— The Seven Deadly Sins Halcyon, Hong Kong Ballet, The Washington Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, Atlanta Ballet

S. KATY TUCKER

MO ZHOU

Video & Projections Designer—Rigoletto The Metropolitan Opera, Dutch National Opera, San Francisco Opera, LA Opera, Washington National Opera

Director—Listen, Wilhelmina! Houston Grand Opera, Santa Fe Opera, The Dallas Opera, The Juilliard School, Merola Opera Program

COURT WATSON Costume Designer—Rigoletto The Glimmerglass Festival, Gotham Chamber Opera, Central City Opera, Shakespeare Theatre Company, Ford’s Theatre

MUSIC STAFF

PRODUCTION STAFF

JEREMY FRANK

JORDAN BRAUN

Chorusmaster, Pianist/Coach—Roméo et Juliette LA Opera, Seattle Opera, Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Opera Center, The Juilliard School

Production Stage Manager—Roméo et Juliette Assistant Stage Manager—Rigoletto Lyric Opera of Chicago, Washington National Opera, Opera Colorado, The Atlanta Opera, Opera Carolina

DAVID HANLON Chorusmaster, Pianist/Coach—Idomeneo, Rigoletto Houston Grand Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, The Dallas Opera, San Diego Opera

NATHAN BRAUNER Production Stage Manager—The Seven Deadly Sins Washington National Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera, Opera San Jose, Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre

MARIE-FRANCE LEFEBVRE Pianist/Coach, French Consultant—Roméo et Juliette CCM Opera, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, The Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Cincinnati Opera

RACHEL HENNEBERRY Production Stage Manager—Rigoletto Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Utah Symphony & Opera Company, Seattle Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, Boston Lyric Opera

JOSEPH LI Pianist/Coach Houston Grand Opera, Arizona Opera, Minnesota Opera, Aspen Music Festival, Rice University, Baylor University

KRISTIN KELLEY

GRANT LOEHNIG

JULIE MARIE LANGEVIN

Music Director, Wolf Trap Opera Studio; Head of Music Staff Opera Philadelphia, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera, Houston Symphony, The Curtis Institute of Music, Rice University

Assistant Stage Manager—Idomeneo Boston Lyric Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera, SpeakEasy Stage, Moonbox Productions

JOSEPHINE RIGGS

MADELINE LEVY

Pianist/Coach—Listen, Wilhelmina!

Washington Concert Opera, Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Florida Grand Opera, New York City Opera

Production Stage Manager—Idomeneo Seattle Opera, Hawaii Opera Theatre, Opera Colorado, Wolf Trap Opera

NICOLÒ SBUELZ

SUSAN LI

Pianist/Coach, Italian Consultant—Idomeneo, Rigoletto Sarasota Opera, Merola Opera Program, Aspen Music Festival, Accademia del Teatro alla Scala, Opéra de Lyon

Production Stage Manager—Listen, Wilhelmina! Assistant Director—The Seven Deadly Sins Houston Grand Opera, Opera in the Heights, Sarasota Opera, Aspen Opera Center, New Orleans Opera

Assistant Stage Manager—Roméo et Juliette Atlanta Opera, San Diego Opera, Des Moines Metro Opera

KIRA ROBBINS The American Guild of Musical Artists (AFL-CIO), is the labor organization that represents professional singers, dancers and production personnel in opera, ballet, and concert, for the purposes of collective bargaining.

Assistant Stage Manager—The Seven Deadly Sins Penn State Centre Stage, Keegan Theatre, TEDxPSU, 1st Stage Theater, Statesmen Theatre

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GUEST FACULTY

HOUSING HOSTS

DEBORAH BIRNBAUM

We are grateful to the following individuals for hosting our Wolf Trap Opera 2018 artists in their homes.

Breath Technique Consultant The Metropolitan Opera, Houston Grand Opera, The Glimmerglass Festival, Washington National Opera

ELIZABETH BISHOP Voice Consultant The Metropolitan Opera, Washington National Opera, San Francisco Opera, Potomac Vocal Institute

JASON FERRANTE Voice Consultant New York City Opera, Wexford Festival, Bard Summerscape, Florida Grand Opera

LANCE LADUKE Entrepreneurship Coach Carnegie Mellon University, Boston Brass, Duquesne University, United States Air Force Band

ANDREA DORF MCGRAY Acting Consultant Washington National Opera, Maryland Opera Studio, Ash Lawn Opera, Aspen Music Festival & School

AARON URBANEK Freelancing and Taxes Consultant Manhattan School of Music, Opera North Carolina, Chautauqua Festival, Verismo Inc., H&R Block

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Mary Aldacushion David & Cathy Bobzien Jerry Bridges & Sally Turner Jan Childress Ellen Dykes & Alan McAdam Grace Jones Ann Jones Linda Kauss & Clark Hoyt Jina & Steven Kim Carlos & Maureen Mariño Donn Milton & Rebecca Bowerman Ruth & Eugene Overton

Sandra Saydah Karen Sorenson & Peter Gaus Sarah Spicer Judith Stehling & Edgar Ariza-Niño Donna & Edward Stoker Mary Suib Stephanie & Fernando van Reigersberg Paul & Pat Ward Ron & Judy Wilgenbusch Jody & Steve Winter

COMING IN FEBRUARY 2019 Washington Concert Opera & Wolf Trap Opera present the D.C. area premiere of

LE VIN HERBÉ (THE LOVE POTION) Swiss composer Frank Martin’s chamber opera based on the tragic tale of Tristan and Isolde will be presented in concert at The Barns on February 9 & 10, 2019. Tickets will be available in August.


STAFF WOLF TRAP FOUNDATION LEADERSHIP ARVIND MANOCHA President and CEO BETH BRUMMEL Chief Operating Officer SARA BEESLEY Vice President, Program and Production BERNARD BERRY, III Senior Director, Ticket Services CHRISTOPHER J. ECKERT Vice President, Operations GEORGIA GRENA Vice President, Finance

TECHNICAL STAFF

DESIGN ASSISTANTS

JEREMIAH BROPHY Master Electrician

MICHAEL KOHLER Video & Projections Design Programmer, Rigoletto

GUS REDMOND Shop Foreman/Master Carpenter KASEY HENDRICKS Props Master PALLAS BANE Charge Artist CAMILLE PETRILLO Scenic Artist MARY GRANT Carpenter DEANNA MECKEL Carpenter

ELIZABETH SCHILL HUGHES Senior Director, Human Resources

COSTUME STAFF

SARA P. JAFFE Vice President, Development

SUE CHIANG Costume Shop Manager

SHANNON KELLY Senior Director, Government Affairs

KIMBERLEE VANDENBURG Design Asst/Draper

AKUA KOUYATE-TATE Vice President, Education

KIANA VINCENTY Design Asst/Stitcher

JO LABRECQUE Vice President, Communications and Marketing

RACHEL SCHULDENFREI Draper

BLAKE MANNS Assistant Video & Projections Designer, Rigoletto MARTHA MOUNTAIN Assistant Lighting Designer, Rigoletto MELISSA SIBERT Assistant Wig & Makeup Designer, Idomeneo, Roméo et Juliette, Rigoletto

APPRENTICES WTO Apprentices are part of Wolf Trap Foundation’s Internship and Apprenticeship program. Having honed their skills through academic training, they now receive hands-on experience in a professional setting, as well as mentorship from Wolf Trap Opera staff. EMILY BOISSEAU Props, Hampton University KEVIN BOLT Technical Theater, Montclair State University

AMY VANDER STAAY First Hand

DAVID BRYANT Technical Theater, North Carolina A & T State University

COURTNEY WOOD First Hand/Wardrobe

ALEC CASTRO Arts Administration, Indiana University

KIM PENSINGER WITMAN Vice President

NOELLE GRAETA Stitcher/Wardrobe

LEE ANNE MYSLEWSKI Director, Artistic Administration

CLAUDIA BROWNLEE Stitcher/Wardrobe

AITANA GARRISON Stage Management, University of Maryland

MORGAN BROPHY Manager, Artistic Operations

MARIE SCHNEGGENBURGER Crafts

TEHVON FOWLER-CHAPMAN Coordinator, Company Management

DOROTHY DRIGGERS Draper/Crafts

ROBERT H. GRIMES Production Manager, The Barns at Wolf Trap

STEVEN SIMON Draper

WOLF TRAP OPERA ARTISTIC & ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

TIMOTHY MCCORMICK Assistant Production Manager and Technical Director

ED DAWSON Tailor

ORCHESTRA STAFF

GARRY SIKORA House Manager

PHIL SNEDECOR Contractor

GRANT LOEHNIG Head of Music

MARCIA FARABEE Librarian

JENNIFER KASNADI Costumes, University of Maryland LILLIAN KOMAROW Wigs and Make up, James Madison University ABBY MAGEE Technical Theater, Syracuse University ESTEFANIA PEREZ-VERA Scenic Painting, Virginia Tech ATIYA STRANGE Communications, Hampton University SAVANNAH VALIGURA Stage Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison

RACHEL STANTON Rehearsal Administrator

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ORCHESTRA & CHORUS IDOMENEO VIOLIN 1 David Salness, concertmaster Laura Miller Patti Hurd Sarah Sherry Laura Knutson

CELLO Kerry Van Laanen, principal Todd Thiel

HORN Evan Geiger, principal Chandra Cervantes

BASS Jeff Koczela, principal

TRUMPET Tim White, principal Phil Snedecor

VIOLIN 2 Paula McCarthy, principal second Doug Dube Tim Macek Jennifer Himes

FLUTE / PICCOLO David Lonkevich, principal Beverly Crawford

VIOLA Jennifer Rende, principal Cathy Amoury Chiara Dieguez Tiffany Richardson

OBOE Fatma Dagler, principal Margaret Owens CLARINET Kathy Mulcahy, principal Annie Ament BASSOON Eric Dircksen, principal Ben Greanya

TROMBONE Bryan Bourne, principal Jeff Gaylord John McGinness TIMPANI Bill Richards, principal FORTEPIANO David Hanlon CONTINUO CELLIST Lori Barnet

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE VIOLIN 1 David Salness, concertmaster Laura Miller Xi Chen Allison Bailey Christina Constantinescu Laura Knutsen Doug Dube Sasha Mikhlin

CELLO Lori Barnet, principal Kerry Van Laanen Todd Theil Sean Neidlinger

HORN Geoff Pilkington, principal Chandra Cervantes Evan Geiger Wei-Ping Chou

BASS Ed Malaga, principal Jeff Koczela

TRUMPET Tim White, principal Phil Snedecor

VIOLIN 2 Sally McLain, principal second Paula McCarthy Patti Hurd Simon Rundlett Jennifer Himes Elise Blake

FLUTE / PICCOLO David Lonkevich, principal Beverly Crawford

TROMBONE Bryan Bourne, principal Jeff Gaylord John McGinness

VIOLA Jennifer Rende, principal Tiffany Richardson Stephanie Knutsen Megan Yanik

CLARINET Kathy Mulcahy, principal Jeremy Eig

OBOE Fatma Dagler, principal Margaret Owens

BASSOON Chris Jewell, principal Jeff Ward

HARP Caroline Hudson, principal TIMPANI Bill Richards, principal PERCUSSION John Spirtas

RIGOLETTO CHORUS Andrew Bawden, Jay Bitner, Alexander Bodenham, Eduardo Castro, Cosmo Clemens, Keith Craig, Cornelius David, Joshua Hong, Nicholas Houhoulis, Young Joo Lee, James Myers, Matthew Ogden, Sean Pflueger, Jim Shaffran, Daniel Sherwood, Antony Zwerdling

Steinway and Boston are the preferred pianos for Wolf Trap performances and education facilities. The instrumentalists employed in these productions are members of and represented by D.C. Federation of Musicians, AFM Local 161-170.

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Photo: Karli Cadel

8

July 7 - August 25 Cooperstown, NY Tickets start at $26 www.glimmerglass.org (607) 547-2255

WEST SIDE STORY

THE CUNNING LITTLE VIXEN

THE BARBER OF SEVILLE

SILENT NIGHT

Bernstein/Laurents/Sondheim

Janáček

Rossini/Sterbini

Puts/Campbell

july 7 - august 24

july 8 - august 25

july 14 - august 25

july 15 - august 23

THE BARNS AT WOLF TRAP 2018 HOUSE RULES 1.

All patrons, regardless of age, must have a ticket.

2.

Patrons must sit in the seats for which they have tickets.

3.

Resale of tickets on Wolf Trap Foundation property is strictly prohibited by Wolf Trap Foundation policy.

4.

Outside food or beverages may not be consumed inside the facility.

5.

Food is not permitted inside the theatre. Beverages are permitted inside the theatre.

6.

The Barns is a smoke-free facility. Smoking, including e-cigarettes, is permitted only in the designated area outside the main entrance.

7.

The use of recording equipment and cameras (with or without flash) during performances is prohibited unless coordinated through management and authorized by the artist(s).

8.

Late arrivals are normally seated between movements, acts, or numbers at the discretion of management and at the request of the artist(s).

9.

With the exception of service animals assisting disabled persons, pets are not permitted.

10. Patrons may not stand in or block aisles or sightlines at any time during performances. 11.

Disturbing fellow patrons with loud conversation or inappropriate behavior is not permitted and may result in removal from the performance without a refund.

12. All cell phones and electronic devices must be silenced during the performance. 13. Firearms are prohibited. 14. Violation of The Barns at Wolf Trap House Rules may result in removal from the performance without refund and/or prosecution.

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WITH APPRECIATION Wolf Trap Foundation is deeply grateful to each of the following individuals for supporting the Foundation through 2018 membership gifts, sponsorships, fundraisers, and endowment giving between April 15, 2017 and April 13, 2018. To donate, please contact Wolf Trap Development at 703.255.1927 or visit wolftrap.org/give.

INDIVIDUAL DONORS 2018 SEASON UNDERWRITERS

$10,000 TO $14,999

Dan and Gayle D'Aniello

Anonymous (2) Madeleine Abel Beth B. Buehlmann Teresa Carlson Michele Duell and Richard Duffy Shelly and Jack Hazel Clark Hoyt and Linda Kauss John and Tracie Jacquemin/ The Jacquemin Family Foundation Janet and Jerry Kohlenberger Charla and Howard Levine James Lynch and Anne Woodard Lynch James and Cheryl MacGuidwin Ray and Colleen McDuffie Ann McPherson McKee, Gift in Remembrance of Burtt & Rebecca Gray McKee and Douglas & Ann McKee Seeley Ramona Mockoviak Michelle Newberry Patsy and Howard Norton Charles and Angela Prow Dr. James Roth Gerry and Lynn Rubin Dion and Michelle Rudnicki Kevin L. Rusnak and Donald R. Dechow Jr. Theresa and John B. Wood Greg and Janne Young

$250,000+ Shashikant and Margaret Gupta David M. Rubenstein

$100,000 TO $249,999 Anonymous Hillary and Tom Baltimore Dan and Gloria Logan/Revada Foundation Gary D. Mather and Christina Co Mather Michael Saylor Karen and Fred Schaufeld

$50,000 TO $99,999 Jean and Ric Edelman Virginia McGehee Friend Sue J. Henry and Carter G. Phillips Robert M. and Joyce A. Johnson John and Susie King Anne R. Kline and Geoffrey Pohanka John C. Lee, IV and Cindy Lee Grace and F. Chapman Taylor Deborah F. and David A. Winston Robert and Lisa Van Hoecke

$25,000 TO $49,999 Anonymous C.E. and Jean Andrews Mark and Jennie Bishof The Scott and Patrice Brickman Family Foundation Calvin and Janet Hill Matt Korn and Cindy Miller The Martore Family Stephen and Betsy Mundt Diane and Tim Naughton Laura and Sean O'Keefe Norma and Russ Ramsey Estate of Henry J. Schalizki Ed and Andy Smith The Virts-Miller Foundation The Webber Family The Anthony and Beatrice Welters Family Suzanne and Glenn Youngkin

$15,000 TO $24,999 John and Lynn Dillon Craig and Valerie Dykstra Kimberly Engel and Family Gil and Janice Guarino Don and Angela Irwin Broderick Johnson and Michele Norris Nancy Laben and Jon Feiger Gen. (Ret.) Lester L. and Mina Lyles Arvind Manocha and Gideon Malone Roger and Kyle Mody/The Mody Foundation Kevin and Kate Robbins Danielle and John Saunders JoAn D. Tolley Bruce and Christine Wardinski

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$5,000 TO $9,999 Anonymous (18) Dr. and Mrs. Duane A. Adams Dr. Tonya Adams and Mr. Rodway Newman Ramon and Marissa Alcala Melinda Ampthor Gary and Mary Ann Amstutz Mrs. Benjamin P. Astley Marvin E. Ausherman Jay and Terry Bachmann Russel and Ann Bantham Richard Bates/The Walt Disney Company The Honorable and Mrs.+ James M. Beggs Thomas A. Belles and Carla Minosh Judith H. Bishop David Borowski and Kerry Cadden Harlan W. and Mary M. Bowers Beth Brummel and Michael Beresik Shawn and Gail Cali Drew and Therese Caplan Marcia and Frank C. Carlucci III Enrico and Andrea Cecchi Brian and Allayne Chappelle The Chaskin Family Jay W. and Heidi A. Chesky Brian J. Christianson Cynthia A. and Robert A.+ Clohan III Kenneth W. Coan/Sevila Coan Financial Group of Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Kathy and Jim Connor Jeff and Jacqueline Copeland David Samuel Daley

Dan and Bekki Danner David L. Denny and Laurie Scott Denny Tami and Jeff Dierman Sarah and Max Duckworth Diana and Douglas Dykstra Dr. James and Diane Ecklund Randall Eliason and Cherie Kiser Vincent Ferraro and Laura Forte Dr. and Mrs. Gerald W. Fischer Rachel and Bob Foster Russell Frey J. H. Gaddis Greg Gallopoulos Cathy A. German James N. Glerum and Diane Morales Glerum Bonnie L. Goldschmidt and Michele Shimek Katherine Goudreau and Don Mesecher William and Jacqueline A. Gravell Nancy J. Griffith Marge and Joe Grills Marlene and William Haffner Steve Hale Glenda and Stephen Harvey Robert H. and Brenda Hawthorne Peter J. Henry/Capstone Realty, LTD. Loren B. Hudziak Lisa and Richard Jeanneret Eric and Heather Kadel Mr. and Mrs. Joel S. Kanter/Kanter Family Foundation Ashok and Stuti Kaveeshwar Sean M. Kelley Governor and Mrs. Dirk Kempthorne Laura, Jess, Mike, and Tim Kennedy Jenna and Wyatt Korff Ross and Kaye Kory Jonathan and Gayle Kosarin David and Mary Beth Lane John and Cindy Langan Sheri A. Layton Karen Lee Matt Lerner/Frederick Coin Exchange James Lintott and May Liang Gigi and Mike Louden and Dabney Hart Chip and Katie Lowry Clark and Kathleen Manning and Family Tim and Bernadette Manning Philip and Sandy+ Marcum Dana and David Martin Scott and Patricia McMullan Susan and David McMunn Susie and Josh Metz Tim and Sherry Meyers Robert T. and Angela C. Myers Chris and Paige Nassetta Reed and Pat Menster Neuman Marcia L. Newbill Patricia Nicoson BooďŹ e and Joe O'Gorman Christine and Gregory Parseghian Carol S. Popowsky Eileen Rader


CORPORATE, FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT PARTNERS Wolf Trap Foundation is deeply grateful to each of the following institutions for supporting the Foundation through grants, corporate memberships, sponsorships, fundraisers, and endowment giving between April 15, 2017 and April 13, 2018. To donate, please contact Wolf Trap Development at 703.255.1927 or visit wolftrap.org/give. Patricia and Craig Reed Lola C. Reinsch/Dorchester Apartments and Towers on Columbia Pike, Arlington Dan Remaklus and Wendy Colestock Edgar and Lillian Rios/The R&R Foundation Jeannette E. Roach and WhitďŹ eld A. Russell Rick and Faith Roberts David A. Robertson Brenda and William Romenius Karl and Susan Salnoske Rebecca and William Sanders Jeff and Dawn Sanok Bernadette and Ed Saperstein Stan and Ruth Seemann John and Darcy Sekas Patrick and Kimberly Shanahan Craig and Christina Sharon Joan Sheppard Mark and Marcia Simione Jon and Pat Simons Ronald and Deborah Sindler Tina and Albert Small, Jr. Joel K. and Martha L. Smith Peter and Jennie Stathis Paul Steinwachs Kim and Gary Stewart Ashley Stow David L. Straus, Gift in Remembrance of Betty B. Straus Pam and Greg Sullivan Susan B. Sutter Martha and Brad Taishoff, Gift in Memory Steve Cowan and John Hines Peter and Ann Tanous Mark Testoni Tori Thomas Theresa Thompson Victoria Trumbower The Honorable Hans N. Tuch and Mrs.+ Tuch Herb Van Hook and Tracy Suk Katherine Ann and Caroline Morris Van Kirk Beth and John Veihmeyer Richard and Mary Wall John and Gina Wasson Sue Irish and Kenn Weir Mary B. White, Esq. Lisa and Eric Wieman June A. Williams Sean and Nancy Willson Erich and Ashley Windmuller William and Terry Witowsky Dr. and Mrs. Mark E. Wolken Jake and Whitney Zatzkin Peggy and Otto Zipf + Deceased

$250,000+

$10,000 TO $17,499

The Boeing Company Department of the Interior, National Park Service The PNC Foundation

Airlines for America Alston & Bird American Council of Life Insurers Arent Fox LLP Baker Tilly BIT Systems, Inc. Brown Advisory Capgemini Covington & Burling LLP Danaher Corporation Dominion Energy Doris M. Carter Family Foundation Dorothy G. Bender Foundation, Inc. E. & J. Gallo Winery Embassy of the Consulate General of Monaco, New York Embassy of the State of Qatar Ernst & Young Evolver, Inc. GEICO Graduate Management Admission Council Graham Holdings Company Hilton McLean Tysons Corner Hogan Lovells Host Hotels & Resorts Inova Health Foundation The Ithaka Foundation Janelia Farm Research Campus/HHMI Karin's Florist Kearney & Co. Leidos McKinsey & Company Nancy Peery Marriott Foundation, Inc. Nauticon Office Solutions Park Hotels & Resorts Playa Hotels & Resorts The Richard Eaton Foundation Service Distributing, Inc. Stratos Solutions Tangible Security The Theodore H. Barth Foundation, Inc. Vectrus Venable Foundation Vinson & Elkins LLP Washington Workplace Womble Carlyle Xerox Corporation

$100,000 TO $249,999 Anonymous Foundation County of Fairfax, Virginia Lincoln and Therese Filene Foundation National Endowment for the Arts Northrop Grumman Foundation

$50,000 TO $99,999 Amazon Web Services Booz Allen Hamilton Capital One Cox Business Deloitte Double Wood Farm General Dynamics Grant Thornton LLP Hilton Kenneth W. and Janice W. Freeman Family Foundation Lockheed Martin Microsoft Corporation Noblis Northrop Grumman Tickets.com, LLC Virginia Commission for the Arts The Volgenau Foundation WHITE64

$35,000 TO $49,999 Choice Hotels International The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation Sachiko Kuno Foundation NBC 4 Telos Corporation

$17,500 TO $34,999 American Airlines Battelle DLA Piper Enterprise Knowledge The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Hearst Foundation, Inc. The Home Depot IBM KPMG Laird Norton Family Foundation Mars Foundation National Counseling Group SAP NS2 Starr Hill Brewery SunTrust Banks, Inc. Todd Hitt | Kiddar Capital PwC, LLP

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WOLF TRAP FOUNDATION NAMED ENDOWMENT FUNDS Wolf Trap Foundation is deeply grateful to the following individuals and organizations for their generous gifts to establish endowed funds of $100,000 or more. The perpetual support provided by these funds is helping to ensure Wolf Trap’s arts and education programs thrive for generations to come. For information, please contact Wolf Trap Development at 703.255.1930 or visit wolftrap.org/endowment. Mary H. Beggs President’s Fund

Philip C. Marcum, The Sandy “Tanta” Marcum Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

Bender Foundation, Inc., The Howard and Sondra Bender Family Fund for Education

Fund for Artistic Excellence in Honor of Audrey M. Mars

Robert M. Coffelt, Jr. in honor of Annetta J. and Robert M. Coffelt, The Coffelt Fund for Wolf Trap Opera and Education

John and Adrienne Mars/Jacqueline Badger Mars/Mars Foundation, Mars Fellowship Fund for Wolf Trap Opera

Cox Communications, The Cox Communications Fund for Education Initiatives in the Performing Arts

Suzann Wilson Matthews, The Suzann Wilson Matthews Internship Fund Ann McKee Fund for Opera

Nancy K. Eberhardt, Howard and Dorothy Kahn Education Fund The Freed Foundation, The Freed Fund for Early Childhood Education in the Performing Arts

Linda B. and Tobia G. Mercuro, The Linda and Tobia Mercuro Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts The Mullaney Family, The Mullaney Family Fund for Education

The William H. Geiger Family Foundation, The Lee Anne F. Geiger Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

National Endowment for the Arts

General Dynamics, General Dynamics Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

National Endowment for the Arts/Packard Foundation, NEA Packard Challenge Fund

Shashikant and Margaret Gupta, Gupta Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

The Terry Noack Master Teaching Artists in Dance Fund

Estate of Carol V. Harford, Carol V. Harford Fund for Wolf Trap Opera in Memory of Catherine Filene Shouse Hearst Foundation, Inc. The Jacquemin Family Foundation, The Jacquemin Family Fund for Master Teaching Artists

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Packard Fund Catherine Filene Shouse Education Fund Catherine Filene Shouse Foundation, Kay Shouse Great Performance Fund Peter and Jennie Stathis, Peter and Jennie Stathis Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

The Paula A. Jameson Fund for Wolf Trap Opera Mr. and Mrs. Stuart C. Johnson, Stuart C. and Nancy M. Johnson Fund for Wolf Trap

Estate of Arthur Tracy, “The Street Singer,” Arthur Tracy Fund for Wolf Trap Opera The Trojanger Fund for Wolf Trap

Terre and Polly Jones Endowed Fund for Artistic Initiatives Alan and Carol Kelly, Alan and Carol Kelly Fund for Education

Robert and Lisa Van Hoecke, Van Hoecke Family Fund for Technology in Education Earle C. and June A. Williams Fund for Wolf Trap

The King Family Fund for Early Learning Through the Arts

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CATHERINE FILENE SHOUSE LEGACY CIRCLE Wolf Trap Foundation gratefully acknowledges these individuals who have thoughtfully expressed their commitment to preserving the legacy of Wolf Trap for future generations by remembering the Foundation in their estate plans. For information, please contact Wolf Trap Development at 703.255.1930 or visit wolftrap.org/legacy. Anonymous (39) Dr. and Mrs. Duane A. Adams Mark and Maris Angolia Jeanne Oates Angulo and Albert W. Angulo+ Jean W. Arnold Jeannie P. Baliles* Nancy A. Bartholomaei Sharon and Gary Batie The Honorable and Mrs.+ James M. Beggs* Ashley Benes David and Joan Berenson* Eleanor K. H. Blayney Thomas W. Bliss and Debra Harkins Bliss Dr.+ and Mrs.+ George P. Bogumill* Barbara A. Boinest Barbara A. and Peter P. Bonora David M. Borowski and Kerry Cadden Mr. K. David Boyer, Jr. Mary W. Brady Juli P. and John H. Briggs Mrs. Joel T. Broyhill* Nancy Broyhill Dennis and Julie Bruns Beth B. Buehlmann Edward A. and Karen A. Burka Allyson Butler Mr. and Mrs. John K. Butler Gregory S. Byrnes Marcia and Frank C. Carlucci III* James and Karen Chamberlain Denise Chen and Tim Maas Deborah M. and Michael Jay Chusmir Roy Cleland Mark Richard Clem* Mr. and Mrs. Philip M. Collins Suzanne Conrad* Jim and Kaye Cook Stephen T. Cramolini and John R. Feather II David Samuel Daley Robert D. Davis, Jr.+ and Henry J. Schalizki+ Lawrence and Sharon Deibel Laurie Parks DeLand Ronald and Linda DeRamus L. William Derrow Kristen and Christopher Eckert* Eddie and Rachel Eitches Mary Elizabeth Ewing+ Gary T. Festerman+* Marilyn Hicks Fitzgerald Michael P. Fitzgerald Mark and Lynn Freemantle Daryl and Marcia Friedman* Virginia McGehee Friend Hermione Fthenakis James N. Glerum and Diane Morales Glerum

Stephen and Barbara Goetting* Sandra Goshgarian Mark William and Jodie Monger Gray Robert H. and Linda C. Grimes* John and Dawn Grinstead Barbara Groshans Marcia Hackett Allen Raphael Halper and Kim Kunzig Halper Carol V. Harford+* Mr. and Mrs. Marion Edwyn Harrison* Robert H. and Brenda Hawthorne Holidae H. Hayes Robin Crawford Heller Kaye Ann Hellmich The Honorable Sophocles A.+ and Mrs. Aphrodite S.+ Hero* Jo and Larry Hodgin* William M. Holmes, Jr.* Clark Hoyt and Linda Kauss Alexine Clement Jackson Stuart C. and Nancy M. Johnson* Terrence and Polly Jones* Ms. Terry Lynn Jones* Barbara (Grabon) and Robert Juszczyk Ashok and Stuti Kaveeshwar* Shawn Kelley and Karen Albert Sue Leonard Mr.+ and Mrs. Robert D. G. Lewis Sally D. Liff+ Dr. Diana Locke and Mr. Robert Toense Mr. and Mrs.+ William J. Long Dennis and Pam Lucey Karyl Charna Lynn Philip and Sandy+ Marcum Mr.+ and Mrs. William H. Marumoto* Dr. R. Barbara Mattas* Mr.+ and Mrs. R. Dennis McArver* Ann McPherson McKee* Robert and Anita+ McKinley Joshua, Benjamin, and Micah Miller* RoseMarie M. Mirabella* Frances Edmonds (Mohr) and Michael D. Mohr* Ward and Barbara Morris Charles T. Moses III and Linda Hosted Moses Dr.+ and Mrs. J. Frederic Mushinski Richard and Stella Guerra Nelson* Darrell L. Netherton Dr. Norine E. Noonan* Gerson Nordlinger, Jr.+ Nicholas Nylec II and Sharon J. Nylec Edward and Susan O’Connell Philip and Marjorie Odeen* Beatriz M. Oliveira The Honorable John+ and Dr. Mollie Ottina* Stephen D. Parks, Jr. and Amy Domagala-Parks

Susan J. and Stephen D. Parks James B. Pearson, Jr.* Dr.+ and Mrs.+ Jed W. Pearson, Jr.* Carol S. Popowsky Dr. Kazuko K. Price+* Jim and Rosemary+ Prosser R. J.+ and Nancy+ Purdy* Charlene and Richard Raphael Don and Paige Rhodes Dr. Robin Rinearson Kevin and Kate Robbins Julie Carter Roberts and The Honorable James Montgomery Roberts* Lisa and Bud+ Roeder Dr. James Roth Rosanne Russo Danielle O. and John H. Saunders Alan J. Savada* Susan Sawyer David Lawrence Scally Amy E. Schaffer Ruth and Stan Seemann Ronald Segal+ and Beverly Dickerson Keith and Michelle Senglaub Keith+ and Barbara+ Severin* Mary Shedlock and Jim Mizner Wayne and Mary Kay+ Shelton* Joan Sheppard Dr. George Siemering and Vickie Watson Siemering Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Silien Mr. and Mrs. Murray Simpson Sandra and Eoin Stafford Robert E. Stovall and Deborah D. Ralston Pamela and Gregory Sullivan Rick TreviĂąo and W. Larz Pearson The Honorable Hans N. Tuch and Mrs.+ Tuch Lesley D. Turner and Curtis L. Schehr Mr. and Mrs. James M. Underhill Mr. and Mrs.+ J. Robert Vakiener Charlie and Terry Walters* Patricia Shea Ward and Paul B. Ward W. Jay and Camille Warren* Donald W. Weber, Sr. Mrs. Robert M. Weidenhammer* Margaret Miller and Richard D. Welch, Jr.* Sue Ann Westlund and James B. Zahrt Earle C.+ and June A. Williams* Miriam C. Flaherty Willis and MG Simon V. L. Willis* William L. Wingert, Jr.* Deborah F. and David A. Winston Donna Wolverton Mr.+ and Mrs.+ Harry E. Wood* Andrew Woodcock and Mary Ewell Cheryl A. Wooden and Dr. Deb Bobbitt Thomas J. Zaug * Charter Member + Deceased

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NSO & MORE

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FEATURING WOLF TRAP OPERA ARTISTS BEETHOVEN’S NINTH BRAMWELL TOVEY, CONDUCTOR YELENA DYACHEK, SOPRANO ZOIE REAMS, MEZZO-SOPRANO RICHARD TREY SMAGUR, TENOR THOMAS GLASS, BARITONE

JULY 14 SPECIAL THANKS TO DEBORAH F. AND DAVID A. WINSTON, PERFORMANCE SPONSORS

BERNSTEIN AT 100 A CELEBRATION

MICHAEL BARRETT, CONDUCTOR MISTY COPELAND & TONY YAZBECK PAQUITO D’RIVERA, CLARINET THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER & TAKE 6 THE CHORAL ARTS SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

JULY 27

ADDITIONAL NSO PERFORMANCES HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN™ - IN CONCERT STEVEN REINEKE, CONDUCTOR JULY 6 + 7

JAWS IN CONCERT EMIL DE COU, CONDUCTOR JULY 21

CASINO ROYALE IN CONCERT EMIL DE COU, CONDUCTOR JULY 22

HANSON STRING THEORY EMIL DE COU, CONDUCTOR AUGUST 4

MORE PERFORMING ARTS THE WASHINGTON BALLET GISELLE WOLF TRAP ORCHESTRA MAY 25 SPECIAL THANKS TO VIRGINIA MCGEHEE FRIEND, PERFORMANCE SPONSOR

LUDOVICO EINAUDI ESSENTIAL EINAUDI

JULY 8 HARRY POTTER characters, names and related indicia are © &™ Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. J.K. ROWLING`S WIZARDING WORLD™ J.K. Rowling and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Publishing Rights © JKR. (s18) ™ & © UNIVERSAL STUDIOS. CASINO ROYALE LICENSED BY MGM. CASINO ROYALE © 2006 DANJAQ, UNITED ARTISTS. AND RELATED JAMES BOND TRADEMARKS, TM DANJAQ. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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THE BEST OF

WAGNER’S RING NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PATRICK SUMMERS, CONDUCTOR CHRISTINE GOERKE, SOPRANO SIMON O’NEILL, TENOR ALAN HELD, BASS-BARITONE ERIC OWENS, BASS-BARITONE

A quartet of internationally renowned Wolf Trap Opera alumni join the National Symphony Orchestra to perform the most memorable and exhilarating moments from Wagner’s epic Ring Cycle.

SAT, JULY 28 AT 8:15 PM SPECIAL THANKS TO ANNE R. KLINE AND GEOFFREY POHANKA, PERFORMANCE SPONSORS

WOLFTRAP.ORG/OPERA 54 5 4


Wolf Trap Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

WOLFTRAP.ORG

1645 TRAP ROAD / VIENNA, VIRGINIA 22182

Wolf Trap Opera Summer 2018  
Wolf Trap Opera Summer 2018  
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