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Wolf: Author Sandi Ault Visits Winchester ....... 3 Wolf Behavior 101 ................................. 7

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Education: Intern Wolf Camp Journals ........... 17 Wolf Puzzle ........................................... 19 Research: The Intern Experience at WERC ..... 21 Meet the Interns ................................... 22 Center: 2007 Summer at the Visitor’s Center .. 27

WWW.WOLFCENTER.ORG

FALL 2007


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S LETTER

No organization can operate without a dedicated staff, board of directors, and team of volunteers and interns. WERC is blessed to have some of the finest and most committed in all those categories. With various backgrounds in business, engineering, wildlife management, and more, we blend personalities together with the hope of serving the mission of the Wolf Education & Research Center.

BO A R D O F D I R E C TOR S Douglas Christensen, Idaho Chairman of the Board Doug.Christensen@wolfcenter.org Roy Farrar, Idaho Board of Directors Roy.Farrar@wolfcenter.org Sally Farrar, Idaho Board of Directors, Secretary Sally.Farrar@wolfcenter.org Sharon Lander, California Board of Directors, Treasurer Sharon.Lander@wolfcenter.org Dennis Olson, Montana Board of Directors Dennis.Olson@wolfcenter.org

WE R C S TA F F

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t’s been an exciting summer season as we continue to dialogue with area leaders and officials regarding the preservation of a wonderful species, the Gray Wolf. WERC finds itself in an interesting position. We are emerging as a voice in the wilderness on issues surrounding a vilified creation. Whether it is our Director of Education, Nick Fiore, speaking to radio stations and in classrooms across the region, or our interns conducting tours at the Visitor’s Center in Winchester, WERC continues to demonstrate great stewardship of your generous support by becoming the resounding voice of reason. The summer has brought some exciting developments at the Center. Our intern experience has produced some lasting impressions on both interns and the folks who met them. Whether children from schools are writing or teachers who have had their lesson plans enhanced by our programs, WERC continues to see our important role in shaping the minds and hearts of future biologists, future naturalists, and most importantly, future voters. Change always begins with a vision. Our vision for the Wolf Education & Research Center is to amplify our voice throughout this region. Amplify it for the purpose of changing the direction and benefit of our citizens--human and otherwise.

Chris Anderson Executive Director Chris.Anderson@wolfcenter.org

Jeremy Heft Wildlife Biologist Jeremy.Heft@wolfcenter.org

as we honor those who have gone on before us? Walk the Discovery or Meadow Trail and you’ll find the voice of our future as we promote and build interpretive signs and markers. And in the early morning before the heat has crept over the hill, if you’re patient, you might hear the voice of the present in the howl of three surviving wolves, the remaining voices of the Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce.

Chris Anderson, Executive Director Wolf Education & Research Center

Randy Stewart Education & Assistant Randy.Stewart@wolfcenter.org

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As you stand on the Weyekin Trail, close your eyes and listen. Do you hear the voices of our past

Please join me as this issue celebrates this summer’s accomplishments by our staff and interns. We’ve got a challenge ahead of us but with your persistent help, we’ll continue to be your voice in the fight to preserve these Wolves and all of our self-respect as we care for this planet and its inhabitants.

Nick Fiore Director of Education Nick.Fiore@wolfcenter.org

Photo credits courtesy of Aaron Frizzell Photography.

the profound introduction to the natural world and repeat our teaching, perhaps build on it.

WERC’s Education Program is a voice for hope and change. Young minds may not carry our banner for dozens of years but one day will remember

u r P.S. Make your voice heard by understanding the have included in facts. For your convience, we have the d e’s own own published p b Idaho Fish, Game, and Wildlife’s on, n, or o rather rath r lack la of, on evidence of wolf depradation, page 13.

YOU C A N SEN D YOU R T H OU GH T S TO W ER C AT IN FO @ W O LFC E N TE R . O R G


A VISIT WITH THE SAWTOOTH PACK .. 3

SAWTOOTH PACK UPDATE

WOLF BEHAVIOR 101 ................................. 7

EXPLORE THE FACTS ................................. 11

Wolf Education & Research Center W E R C I S D E D I C AT E D T O P R O V I D I N G U P T O D AT E I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T T H E U N D E R S TA N D I N G O F W O LV E S .

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The Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce live on twenty acres of rolling timberland with meadows and streams. These wolves serve as ambassadors for their wild cousins by educating the public.

A Vis it wi th th e S a w to ot h Pack: Wo lv es o f th e N e z P e rce by Sandi Ault

I make my living writing about wolves. Or about one wolf in particular—Mountain—who is one of the star characters in my WILD Mystery Series. So I make it a point to learn all that I can about wolves. The staff of the Wolf Education and Research Center were kind enough to welcome me recently to the facility in Winchester, Idaho, to talk with them and learn from them. To chat at length with educator Randy

Stewart, who shared a wealth of knowledge and information with me. And to visit the legendary Sawtooth Pack, Wolves of the Nez Perce, on a guided tour led by intern Matt Christman. The Sawtooth Pack’s legend in my research long preceded this meeting. I first learned about them when the Discovery Channel aired a film made about the formation of this pack. Through the eyes of the camera, I watched as

WERC MISSION

The Wolf Education and Research Center is dedicated to providing public education and scientific research concerning the gray wolf and its habitat in the Northern Rocky Mountains. The Center will provide the public with the rare opportunity to observe and learn more about the wolf in its natural habitat. It is our goal to be an inclusive organization that offers factual and balanced information. We seek to enhance public awareness of threatened species in the region and to develop, in concert with residents, ways to coexist with these species.

3 / WERC / FALL 2007

these wolves were raised from pups. I engaged with and alert. She moves toward Matt carefully, turning them as they grew. My heart stirred as they were her head like a satellite dish to scan the sight, scent, released into their wild sanctuary on the Nez Perce and sound signals from the small group of hushed Reservation, where they now reside. Through the onlookers behind the man whose smell and shape broadcast of this documentary, thousands—perhaps are familiar to her. She starts to turn away, then stops even millions—of Americans learned about the true and looks once more at the kneeling intern. Months nature of the wolf. The of Matt’s respectful care are film demonstrated in a revealed in Motoki’s next way we had never seen decision. She clearly trusts before how strong, lovhim, but—rightfully—is not ing, complex, and wellsure of the rest of us, who defined the social bonds wait breathlessly to see are between members what she will do next. The of a pack. We saw the woods are silent, not even beauty of their wild and our breathing is audible. spirited way of life. And Motoki pads directly past so, without knowing Matt within arm’s length, it, the Sawtooth Pack a guarded greeting that Motoki Near Fence became ambassadors to acknowledges their relationthe world, demonstrating ship. She trots toward a the priceless treasure grassy place on a rise just this species represents. above the classroom and retreats again into the shadows where she can observe us, but we cannot easily And so I came to see these legends in person, to pay see her. A chipmunk climbs boldly onto a log just on my respects to the ones who have passed beyond the the other side of the fence and chatters at us, breakridge of time, and to celebrate the ones who remain. ing the stillness. While I study and photograph wolves wherever I can, this visit with the Sawtooth Pack represented more Randy Stewart, the on-site staff education coordinathan mere research. It was a journey of the heart. tor, approaches now on his daily morning walk to Following is my journal entry from the tour: inspect the fences. He apologizes for interrupting our tour, but we are delighted that his mission brings the As we approach the “classroom” on one side of male wolves toward the classroom area. Matt tells the wolves’ sanctuary, a light breeze stirs the tall us it is customary for the wolves to follow the staff birch forest and we hear loud popping sounds as on their fence inspections, as the animals are curidry limbs snap in the ous about all happenings canopy above us. A in their territory. I see the Matt & Motomo raven scolds from afar. two males in the meadow, The previous day’s heat and again I recognize the has dissipated, and this signs of trust: they know morning it is crisp and Randy and are excited by cool and there is an air his presence. They draw of excitement as all of close and view the group in nature rouses from the the classroom with a watchlethargy of high summer ful eye. Matt takes a knee and welcomes this first at the fence again to put hint that fall will soon be himself at eye level with the upon us. two males. Motoki lies in the shadows, nestled in tall, dry grass under low-hanging birch boughs. Her amber eyes watch us with curiosity. When Matt kneels against the fence in the shady classroom, the alpha female hesitates, then approaches cautiously, sniffing the air, her ears upright

Motomo, the eldest of the pack and the alpha male, advances toward the classroom, while Piyip, the sub-dominant male, bypasses us and heads toward his sister, Motoki, on the rise. But the alpha draws close and lies down in the grass to one side of us to scope his surroundings. Matt FALL 2007 / WERC / 4


kneels quietly, not moving. Motomo determines the situation is safe. He gets to his feet stiffly, clearly feeling his age. As he begins to move toward the fence, his limbs find their rhythm and his movement grows more fluid. Matt speaks softly as the alpha approaches: “Hey, Motomo. Hey, buddy.” Motomo doesn’t waver; he draws close and greets Matt affectionately, licking Matt’s fingers and cheek through the fence—a sign of fondness normally reserved for pack members. The greying alpha male then turns and sits down, his back to the fence. He raises his right, rear paw and scratches idly at his cheek a few times. Then he rises—and with amazing spryness— trots quickly up to the knoll toward Piyip and Motoki. A pair of ravens loudly reproach the wolves, filling the sky with a blasting chorus of complaint. Piyip, the sub-dominant male and brother of the female Motoki, moves down to the meadow and now gazes through the high grass at us. His distinctive facial markings, with an elongated black stripe down his nose, make him look younger than his eleven years. He playfully approaches and then retreats several times. Matt kneels at the fence and speaks softly, “Hey, Piyip, it’s okay, buddy. It’s okay.” A solitary crow caws continuously. Piyip comes to the fence but pads quickly past Matt, almost tauntingly. Matt tells us this one’s a little trickster and loves to play. As Piyip retreats to the tall grass again, we hear a throaty vocalization from one of the wolves on the knoll. Matt says it sounds like Motoki. We stand and look toward the open field and see the alpha pair move down into the meadow, and then suddenly the three wolves begin to frolic together, playing. I see Piyip turn and quickly reverse direction, then Motomo’s ears hover like sails above the grass as he trots after the younger male. Suddenly, the three are running together, and my pulse quickens. The Sawtooth Pack is celebrating life, the beauty of this day, the cool mountain morning, and the pure joy of being alive.

5 / WERC / FALL 2007

As they disappear into the woods above us, I am overcome with sadness. Will I ever see these noble legends again? Will they make it through another winter? Already, their advanced age makes them somewhat remarkable. Motomo is fifteen, an age almost unheard of for a wolf. And Motoki and Piyip are eleven. All of them have achieved or surpassed the normal life expectancy for wolves in captivity, and have lived well beyond a typical lifespan for wolves in the wild. I finish my tour with a visit to the Weyekin Trail, named for the deceased female omega of the Sawtooth Pack, her name meanPiyip’s Face ing “Spirit Guide.” Near the end of the trail is a memorial and the final resting place for the remains of the Wolves of the Nez Perce who have returned to the earth. Beyond it, beneath a welcoming tree, a bench looks out on a glade, providing a spot to sit and reflect. I leave a tiny, almost indiscernible offering to the Sawtooth Pack members who have gone beyond the ridge, and my heart feels heavy with sorrow at the passing of these legends, these diplomats to the world for their kind, these teachers and healers of the human spirit. The Sawtooth Pack is nearing an end. But the legacy of these amazing ambassadors is alive and flourishing through the good work of the Wolf Education and Research Center, and hopefully through the efforts and support of those who have visited and learned from this exemplary model of respect for life’s many forms. And I look now to the future with hope: •

To the future of Idaho and its neighbor states and their battle for dominance and territory—a battle not unlike that among wolves for alpha position within a pack, and for territorial boundaries between packs. In this battle, the wolf has become the scapegoat for the real issue of who owns and rules the land, and whether or not we are willing to share it and its management for the good of all life.

To the future of the Wolf Education and Research Center, an organization that has quietly and effectively managed to keep the channels of communication open and to work hard to educate and promote for the future of wolves. WERC stands as a model of cultural interface not only between communities (local, tribal, regional, national and international, scientific and lay) but between the species of humans and wolves. And to the fu-

for that instant when I felt what it was like to have the heart of a wolf. I came away changed, and even more deeply committed than I already was to do what small part I can to help wolves to survive. Like WERC, I recognize that this is not going to be a mere matter of legislation—although that, too, is important. The survival of wolves depends upon a change of heart on the part of the human race, an evolution in thinking. I know of no more successful model for achieving this than the Sawtooth Pack, Wolves of the Nez Perce have been and continue to be.

On the Knoll I am grateful to the Wolf Education and Research Center for the role they play in this hoped-for evolution, and for the support, protection and sanctuary they have given to the Sawtooth Pack. I am grateful for the opportunity to have had this experience and to do research there. A special thanks to Chris Anderson, Randy Stewart, Matt Christman, and to all the staff at WERC for their help, kindness, and generous sharing of information.

S a n d i Au l t

ture mission of WERC, which will hopefully entail another, similar endeavor to the one which has so successfully given sanctuary to the Sawtooth Pack, Wolves of the Nez Perce. My visit to the center and my up-close experience of the remaining members of the Sawtooth Pack was an adventure I won’t soon forget. My writer’s spirit was nourished by it in a way that is not easy to describe. The wolf, more than any other animal except perhaps the bear, carries the memory of the wild for us. For just an instant, as I watched Motoki, Motomo and Piyip playing in the meadow, I imagined what it must be like for these great heaven beasts. In my mind’s eye, I shifted and grew tufted ears and a thick coat of hair, my nose elongated and my vision changed. I heard the call of the ravens as a celebration of the morning from my winged hunting guides, felt the cool grass against my side as a tender caress from the plant beings, the golden sun on the meadow as a loving gift of Life. My soul stirred as I remembered the feeling of connectedness we all once had with the Earth when we lived by our senses and instincts.

The Wolf Education & Research Center receives many guests from all over the world and from various walks of life. Recently, the Center welcomed a wellknown author Sandi Ault from Estes Park, Colorado, in her quest to gather information and background on the subject of wolves. Sandi Ault is best recognized for her popular mystery novels, Wild Indigo and Wild Inferno, that are set in the North American Southwest. She is researching her third novel, Wild Sorrow. Sandi is also a Wolf enthusiast and supporter of WERC and we’re excited to welcome her to our family. You can learn more about her writing at www.sandiault.com.

In a nanosecond, I was back in my two-legged body and navigating the human landscape, but I am richer FALL 2007 / WERC / 6


CACHE BEHAVIOR J Heft, WERC

Ever wonder why dogs bury bones in the backyard? The reason is simple: to store and protect the bone or food item from scavengers. Not many scavengers in your neighborhood? Well, most dogs will continue to exhibit this behavior because it is an instinct that has been transferred from over 12,000 years of breeding the current domestic dog away from gray wolves. In the wild, wolves have many competitors for their food, especially ravens and other avian scavengers. In an attempt to protect food that cannot be consumed immediately, wolves have adopted a behavior known as caching. To cache is to bury food in a shallow depression thus preventing avian scavengers from detecting the item. Wolves then return and unearth the item later for a snack between kills. The Sawtooth Pack caches food constantly, nearly every feeding, and the amounts per cache vary from a small mouthful up to 15 pounds or so. The process of caching is simple. A wolf tears a small fragment from a carcass and trots off to a secluded area, usually with moderate to dense tree cover, digs a depression suitable for the item, then places the item in the hole and uses their nose to cover the meat with the freshly dug dirt. The wolf then tamps down the food grave with their nose. It is easy to see when individuals have been caching as they have the telltale “brown nose” from tamping down the cache site. So the next time your dog has dirt over their nose pad you now know why. A word of caution regarding cache sites -- all wolves aggressively defend their cache sites against all others. This poses the single greatest danger to handlers of any captive pack, and thus all dog owners should exercise caution when investigating any potential cache site. Amani, even though alone, exhibited the most frequent cache behaviors among the Sawtooth Pack, probably due to the ample amount of food he received. He subsequently must protect the food from the ever-present ravens. Ultimately, the behavior can be summed up as “bury it or lose it.” 7 / WERC / FALL 2007

FALL 2007 / WERC / 8


BREEDING BEHAVIORS

As most humans in the Northern Hemisphere tend to seek shelter indoors and limit activity during winter, wolves are at their most active. There are two main reasons for this higher activity period this time of year. First, gray wolves are built for cold weather, so as the chill seems to bite into human nerves, wolves do not feel the same effect. The double layer of fur in wolves seal out the cold temperatures and snow, creating a comfortable environment for wolves. On the contrary, the high temperatures of summer are oppressive to the heavily furred canines. Thus, winter is a more active time of the year for them. The second reason wolves are more active in winter is because it’s their annual breeding season. Wolves breed only once a year, during the winter months so the pups will be born in the spring, when food is plentiful and the weather less severe. The season begins in late December and proceeds until late February or early March. Most of this period is simply behavioral preparation for mating, which only occurs for a few days up to two weeks at the completion of the season. Wolves actually begin an increase in sexual hormone production around October, but obvious breeding behaviors begin to show in December as a general increase in dominance among the hierarchy. Both alphamale and alpha-female step up their dominance frequency and severity toward all submissive members in an effort to reaffirm their breeding rights. This increase is a major reason why the Sawtooth Pack has experienced most hierarchy changes during winter. As the season progresses, the alpha-female will then begin to solicit attention from the alpha-male, or other males. She does this by performing behaviors that appear to be playful. She will approach the alpha-male and paw at his back or head, place her head across his back, or just simply stand or walk next to him, usually touching. In the beginning, the alpha-male usually returns a snap or growl in response to her advances. Other females may do the same behavior toward the alpha or other males, but are usually disciplined if caught by the alpha-female. Then, the females of the pack begin their estrus cycle, usually within a few days of one another. Once this occurs, the males of the pack begin to pay attention to the female advances. The alpha-female then increases her “flirtatious” advances toward the alpha-male, plus performs the 9 / WERC / FALL 2007

ultimate sexual solicitation behavior of pushing her rump against the alpha-male’s rump or side and curling her tail to the side (exposing her genitalia). This posture only occurs during peak breeding season and an excellent indicator of the next stage of the season, actual mating. Once the alpha-male catches on to her indications, he will then begin to reciprocate the play-like behaviors of placing his head over her back and sparring with her while both are standing on their hind legs (an action that resembles dancing).

…more

SCENT-ROLLING

WOLF BEHA VIOR 101

Scent rolling is the act of pressing the body against a strong-smelling object or scent. This behavior usually begins with the wolf pushing a cheek against the object, and then sliding on it until the side of the chest has cleared the object. The wolf will likely stand and repeat the process several times on each side of the body.

Soon after, he will then pair bond to the alpha-female, which is an act of guarding her from all other males who may attempt to mate with her. She is fertile at this stage. During this time, no other wolf is permitted within a close proximity to his chosen mate. Usually, the other pack members avoid the alpha-pair during this time and observe the two from a distance.

SCRAPE BEHAVIOR

Have you ever noticed your dog scratching the ground after urinating and wondered why the heck do dogs do that? Well, once again, this behavior, known as a scrape, is a residual behavior tied over from the dogs’ ancestor, the gray wolf.

Mating occurs over several occasions each day for anywhere between two days to two weeks. The intercourse process is exactly the same act as domestic dogs perform. When ovulation is complete and intercourse ceases, the alpha-pair no longer exhibit solicitation behaviors toward one another and essentially all dominance and hierarchy behaviors return to normal very quickly, even overnight sometimes. Wolves commonly perform this behavior with any strong or unique-smelling object within their territory, such as a smelly carcass (food), urine or feces from another animal outside the pack, or any other pungent odor encountered that is not a regular scent within their territory.

After the season is complete, all wolves seem to be exhausted and then enter into a very low energy period of the year, springtime. At the completion of the 63-day gestation period, packs with a successful breeding season welcome new pups into their family in April or May.

any interested dog owner is: “Does your dog typically scent-roll on your property more so than off your property?” If so, the motivation is likely a territorial marker. In some dog breeds, scent rolling is simply a rudimentary, or useless hereditary, tie-over from their ancestors, wolves. Regardless if domestic dogs perform scent rolling or not, the behavior is an important survival tool for gray wolves.

Many visitors ask why wolves and subsequently their dogs perform such a behavior. For wolves, the answer is simple: olfactory camouflage. We believe wolves are essentially transferring the scent of the different odor to their bodies so when hunting their prey may not smell wolf, rather the benign rolled-upon scent, when in close proximity of the hunting pack. This camouflage has obvious benefits for hunting wolves, as they may be able to gain closer access to their prey. Another theory for evolution of scent rolling is to transfer the scent of the rolling wolf onto the object chosen, thus “marking” it as an item within their territory. Gray wolves likely utilize both of these advantages as a motivation to perform scent rolling. So, why do dogs perform such a behavior? Some breeds may scent-roll for the same reasons wolves do, especially to mark their territory. A pertinent question to

The act of scratching the ground in a backward motion, usually with the hind legs, and sometimes also with the front, is typically performed by dominant wolves, but may also be done by mid-ranking individuals depending on the circumstances. Wolves do this scraping as a type of marking behavior, such as to announce a territory boundary to an opposing pack, or to claim a food item as their own. Wolves have scent glands located between the pads of their paws, so every scrape they perform leaves a characteristic scent of that individual. Hence, dominant wolves tend to use this behavior to announce their status among their own pack, or perhaps a rival pack that may cross into their territory. Domestic dogs probably use the behavior for similar reasons, or simply may conduct scraping due to instinct and not possess a current motivation. The Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce are often noticed scraping after a dominant member urinates, after the alpha-female, Ayet, displays dominance over Motoki, and usually when fresh food is available.

Have a canine behavior you are curious about? Send possible future Wolf Behavior 101 topics to jeremy.heft@wolfcenter.org. FALL 2007 / WERC / 10


E X P LO R E T H E FA C T S IDF&G continues to propose to kill 75% of the wolf population in the Clearwater Drainage, Region 2 Hunting Area.This action will take place upon delisting of the wolf from the ESA or if changes to article 10J are approved by USF&WS.

WOLF EDUCATION & RESEARCH CENTER Help keep WERC in the forefront of the fight to preserve Wolves around the region and world by supporting the Wolf Education & Research Center and the effort to provide public information and research by:

Adopting a Wolf .........................$25 Annual Donation OR Adopting the Sawtooth Pack ....$50 Annual Donation

Adoption Certificate 8.5” x 11” Image of Wolves Quarterly Sawtooth Legacy News Bumper Sticker

* adoptions auto renew as memberships after first year

Become a Member of the Pack by donating to WERC:

IDF&G’s reasons are that the four most used hunting zones, (shown on this page) are losing elk to wolves. According to IDF&G’s own reports wolves did not habituate this region until the year 2000.

SAWTOOTH PACK GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

City ______________________________________ State ___________________Postal Code ________ Country ___________________________________

Email _____________________________________ • • •

Even with a growing wolf population, zones are showing an increase or a steady elk population and in fact elk populations were decreasing even before wolves were on the scene.

Quarterly subscription to the Sawtooth Legacy News Unlimited Admission for Member or Family Personalized Member packet that includes an 8.5” x 11” image of each member of the Sawtooth Pack Discounts on Merchandise

Individual .......... $150.00 • • • • • •

11 / WERC / FALL 2007

__________________________________________

Family .........$125.00

SAWTOOTH PACK ALPHA MEMBERSHIP

Source - Idaho Department of Fish & Game Data 2007 Sightability Report (Lewiston, ID office) - Project W-160-R-33 July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006

Address ___________________________________

Phone ____________________________________

Individual .......... $75.00

The Selway Zone, which has the most significant problems, if looked at by unit (individual units not shown), is a conundrum for IDF&G. Two units are holding steady with two units having difficulties - all have a wolf population present. The question - how does IDF&G attribute the drop in elk population to wolves?

Share your appreciation for wolves and the wilderness with the friends and family on your gift list or become a Member today and your tax-deductible donation will help deliver educational messages about wolves to people around the world. It will also help us continue to care for the ambassadors of wolf conservation, the Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce. Name _____________________________________

Both Donations Include: • • • •

GIVE A GIFT OF ADOPTION OR MEMBERSHIP

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Quarterly subscription to the Sawtooth Legacy News Free Unlimited Admissions for you and your guest Personalized Member packet including an 8.5” x 11” image of each member of the Sawtooth pack Two Wolf Education & Research Center T-Shirts (4 for Sawtooth Legacy Family) Discounts on Merchandise Limited quantity print of the Elder Eight

SAWTOOTH LEGACY LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP Lifetime Membership......................................$2,500.00 Lifetime Family or Corporate Membership ..$5,000.00 In addition to the Alpha Membership items, a Legacy Membership recognizes your investment in the future of WERC and our ability to expand our educational programs and role in Wolf Conservation in Idaho and the World. This membership includes a customized plaque recognizing your shared investment in our ability to carry out our mission. This membership includes unlimited visits for the Member and up to 5 guest per year.

My donation enclosed is:

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one time gift of $____________ monthly pledge of $_____________ Adopt a Wolf $25.00 Adopt the Sawtooth Pack $50.00 General Membership $_____________ Alpha Membership $_____________ Lifetime Membership $_____________

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Please make checks payable to: Wolf Education and Research Center 111 Main Street, Suite 150 Lewiston, Idaho 83501 Fax: 888-422-1110 Credit Card# _____________________________ Exp. Date ____________ CSV Code _________ Signature ________________________________ The Wolf Education & Research Center is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

FALL 2007 / WERC / 12


BOARD MEMBER PROFILE Denny Olson’s formal training as a biologist and geologist, as well as teaching nature for over 20 years in the north woods and mountain west, has given him expertise in many disciplines. He has done research on beavers, hares and loons, and received an M.S. Degree, (magna cum laude) from the University of Minnesota. From those scientific beginnings he forged an unlikely union between science, humor, and drama, and established a national reputation as an innovative performer and educator. Denny has trained thousands of naturalists, teachers and students in acting techniques, designed practical instructional evaluations, lectured on Native American storytelling as a teaching tool, and conducted workshops nation-wide. He has performed his humorous alter-egos (Critterman’s Unhuggables, Wolfman, The Grizz, Dr. Death, Prof. Avian Guano, Dr. Loonacy, The Lost Voyageur, The Mad Herbalist) over 3000 times, in 49 states, for over 2 million people. Included in these totals are over 80 conference keynotes, 50+ national park presentations, and 30+ universities.

Become a M em ber of t he Pack Today ! Become a Member today and your tax-deductible donation will help deliver educational messages about wolves to people around the world. It will also help us continue to care for the ambassadors of wolf conservation, the Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce. SAWTOOTH PACK GENERAL MEMBERSHIP Individual .......... $75.00 • • • •

Family .........$125.00

Quarterly subscription to the Sawtooth Legacy News Unlimited Admission for Member or Family Personalized Member packet that includes an 8.5” x 11” image of each member of the Sawtooth Pack Discounts on Merchandise

SAWTOOTH PACK ALPHA MEMBERSHIP Individual .......... $150.00 • • • • • •

Family .........$250.00

Quarterly subscription to the Sawtooth Legacy News Free Unlimited Admissions for you and your guest Personalized Member packet including an 8.5” x 11” image of each member of the Sawtooth pack Two Wolf Education & Research Center T-Shirts (4 for Sawtooth Legacy Family) Discounts on Merchandise Limited quantity print of the Elder Eight

SAWTOOTH LEGACY LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP Lifetime Membership......................................$2,500.00 Lifetime Family or Corporate Membership ..$5,000.00 In addition to the Alpha Membership items, a Legacy Membership recognizes your investment in the future of WERC and our ability to expand our educational programs and role in Wolf Conservation in Idaho and the World. This membership includes a customized plaque recognizing your shared investment in our ability to carry out our mission. This membership includes unlimited visits for the Member and up to 5 guest per year.

His books, Way of the Whitetail, Shared Spirits: Native Americans and Wildlife, and Cougars -- Solitary Spirits have been critically acclaimed. Wolf: Wisdom Warrior (a companion book to Shared Spirits) and a children’s book, Special Gifts, were released in 1999. “Critterman’s World” appeared weekly for four years on the statewide NBC Montana Today Show. 13 / WERC / FALL 2007

FALL 2007 / WERC / 14


LITTLE PAW - COLORING PAGE COLORING PAGE ....................... 18

I A O H

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The Wolves Den for Children

WOLF PUZZLE WORD SEARCH .................. 19

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Wolf Education & Research Center W E R C I S D E D I C AT E D T O P R O V I D I N G T R A I N I N G I N I T S E D U C AT I O N P R O G R A M S .

education

Education at WERC comes in many forms. Educating adults is just as important as educating young people. Visit the website at www.wolfcenter.org to stay tuned on new education programs for children.

I nt ern Wol f Ca m p Journa l s Chiji Ochiagha, Summer 2007 Intern

especially anticipating finding signs of wolves.

Wolf Camp Journal Entry #4 “Wolves are not vegetarians, and neither are most of you.” That got a laugh out of the kids I was teaching about wolves and set a good mood for the rest of my time as an instructor for the Wilderness Awareness School through the Wolf Education & Research Center. That week we were going to be tracking animals in the Frank Church Wilderness, and while we all were excited to be out in the wilderness, looking at animals and searching for the signs they left behind as they traveled, we were 17 / WERC / FALL 2007

After my talk to them about wolves, none of them seemed to have any real fear of wolves, but they had probably never actually had a real fear of wolves and were all very open minded. Wolves are less dangerous than mountain lions, bears, and even deer, yet people are still afraid of them. Dogs may get the prize for attacking the most humans as far as non-human animals go: every year in the U.S., 5 million people, or about 1 out of 50, are bitten by a dog, and 10-15 people are killed

by dogs. I’m from Minnesota, where wolves never went extinct, and they are essentially a non-factor in most people’s minds. They don’t attack people and the damage they cause to the deer and moose populations, as well as the livestock, is minimal to insignificant. But the kids I was with were all well informed and weren’t afraid of wolves.

www.wolfcenter.org

The kids and I really hoped to see Continued on page 20...

FALL 2007 / WERC / 18


WOLF PUZZLE - WORD SEARCH wolves or at least hear them even, but that never happened. For us, it was exciting enough that we eventually did find wolf tracks and took a few casts of large wolf prints. None of us really expected to see wolves but we would have all liked to.

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wolf Piyip pack dominance predator mating den

Sawtooth Motomo howling wilderness tracking beta territory

WERC Motoki Alpha canine pups omega

We saw two black bears during the trip, and that was great, but it really makes you think about how wolves live at higher densities than black bears and yet are seen by people less frequently. They really are elusive animals. Thus it was that amid a week of hiking, singing songs, and kids throwing rocks as heavy as they could lift into a roaring river that awe was found in thinking about the lives of the creatures we tracked and how lucky we were to be able to walk in their footsteps.

Wolf Camp Journal Entry #3 Chris Smith, Summer 2007 Intern

Recently in camp, most of the drama in the animal world has centered on raising young. As most parents know, this can be a time of great play, worry, constant harassment, and sometimes loss. This morning I watched five tiny Red Squirrels running around in a stand of trees. Usually Red Squirrels don’t tolerate another squirrel within 200 yards and boisterously chase intruders completely out of their territory. These juvenile squirrels completely tolerated their littermates, often climbing within ten feet of each other and chasing each other only a short distance in play, then stopping. On one occasion, a squirrel sat on top of a limb, while his sibling tried to unseat him from the bottom. The one on top realized his brother’s tail was within reach and pulled up on it, lifting his brother completely off the tree and holding him upside down for a second before the upside down squirrel grabbed the tree, pulled away, and chased his brother half way up the next tree. The deer in camp have had fawns for nearly three months now, and at least two separate families reside in camp. One morning at 6:30 I was awakened by a line of five deer, starting with motherfawn-mother-fawn-fawn. The two fawns in the rear suddenly bolted after each other in a playful chase, while their mother looked worriedly in my direction. Possibly one mother had twins and the other a single fawn. The doe in front was noticeably larger than the other doe, perhaps indicating she was a

19 / WERC / FALL 2007

yearling from last year that had rejoined her mother with her own fawn. Outside the cookshed is a Ponderosa Pine snag with several one inch diameter holes. Throughout the last month, I’ve watched two adult nuthatches making routine trips, in and out of one of these holes, sometimes as often as one per minute. That could mean 60 trips in a single hour…something that makes our troubles of feeding our own children seem miniscule. About a week ago, an adult landed five feet from our porch and gathered some Snowberry stem fibers before flying back inside the hole to add to her nest. I believe their young are almost ready to leave the nest, as signaled by their tiny begging cries which have steadily increased in volume as their bodies have grown over the past three weeks. Everywhere else throughout the woods, small nuthatch “flocks” have recently appeared, as other pairs have fledged their young and now forage as family units. As for other young, the list goes on and on. The Pacific Slope Flycatchers who nested our deck recently fledged their young, after making sneaky swoops under our deck for the past three weeks to feed young. The Mountain Chickadees that I watched peck out rotten wood from the underside of a branch (again outside our cookshed), have disappeared after a week of entering and exiting their hole. Perhaps a predator discovered their nest. The long-eared Owls also have at least one owlet, which back in late May was flying around behind his hunting parents calling with a distinctly different, slightly whinny, single “whoo….whoo…whoo.” The nest predators have also been under attack lately. Several weeks ago, I watched a group of Gray Jays move through the trees, alternately getting dive-bombed and driven out of the territories of first nuthatches, then Western Tanagers, then chickadees as they continued moving through the trees. Predators that eat baby birds are not well liked at this time of year, and either get mobbed, or in the case of our Cooper’s Hawk, create bird alarms that can stretch for over 100 feet into the forest. The death of a baby bird may seem sad to us, but to the Cooper’s Hawk, the lives of its own babies depend on the death of others…just as we humans depend on the death of other animals to support our own children. FALL 2007 / WERC / 20


THE INTERN EXPERIENCE .......... 21

WERC RESEARCH

MEET OUR INTERNS ................................. 22

BECOMING A PART OF WOLF CAMP ..... 25

Wolf Education & Research Center CONTRIBUTE TO WERC BY BECOMING AN INTERN, V O L U N T E E R I N G O R D O N AT I N G !

research

Your support is crucial and we appreciate your demonstration of confidence in us. Help WERC in the forefront of the fight to preserve Wolves around the region and world.

The Intern Experience at the Wolf Education & Research Center J Heft, WERC

The operation of the Wolf Education and Research Center is a huge task with often limited resources to support the endless work. To care for a captive wolf pack 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and maintain the Visitors Center seven days a week through the entire summer requires a dedicated group of individuals. The staff and interns at WERC work long hours to fulfill the mission of WERC. With the financial limitations of a small nonprofit organization, the WERC relies upon interns to accomplish the never ending list of responsibilities at Wolf Camp. The WERC internship program began in 1996 when the facility moved to Winchester. Since that time, over 60 interns have taken part of WERC’s 21 / WERC / FALL 2007

Kim Harle,

Matthew Christman,

Summer Intern

Summer Intern

One of four interns here for the summer of 2007 at WERC, Kim Harle is native to Pennsylvania. Going into her senior year at Delaware Valley College, located in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, she majors in Small Animal Science, but possesses a great wonder for the outdoors and wildlife. At college, Kim has been a member of Del Val’s collegiate softball team for 3 years and was named co-captain for the 2006-2007 season. Outside of college, Kim enjoys hiking, kayaking, camping and exploring nature by being outdoors. After learning of this internship opportunity and all it had to offer, Kim knew this was exactly what she had been looking for and was thrilled to be accepted into the program. Kim has always had a passion for the care and well being of all animals, the wolf in particular. Living a new, unique and exciting lifestyle, she now gets to see the wolf in action. Learning first hand the social structure of the pack and the mysteries behind wolf behavior all intrigue Kim as she observes the pack daily. Building a bond with the pack and beginning to grasp concepts that were once foreign to her is what is most exciting about the internship. She sees this internship opportunity as a huge step toward her future, which she knows, will be devoted to animals in some way shape or form.

Chris Smith, Summer Intern Chris was raised in the Puget Sound region, attending school at Olympic High School near Bremerton. While growing up, Chris volunteered at the Northwest Raptor Center and took classes through the Wilderness Awareness School on tracking, wilderness survival, edible and medicinal plants, and bird language, completing his Kamana 4 Naturalist Training Program in 2006.

mission. The internship program has moved through some revisions through the years, but the goals of our internship program have always remained the same; to provide a quality educational experience for novice professionals or students while at the same time using the temporary personnel to further develop the mission of WERC. WERC interns arrive in Winchester after a usually competitive selection process from around the world, with past representation from Sweden, England, Denmark, and Switzerland. Most interns however are from the United States, with most states already represented. WERC accepts college students and graduates from nearly every academic study, but most

MEET OUR INTERNS

candidates historically have concentrated in Wildlife or Veterinary sciences fields. In the near future, WERC hopes to expand the primary and secondary education-orientated candidates and create an environmental Continued on page 23...

In the summer of 2006, Chris worked as a Wildlife Techinician for the Olympic National Forest, completing ecological surveys of timber plots for the Spotted Owl. Chris currently attends Washington State University as a sophomore in Wildlife Ecology, where he volunteers at the Captive Ungulate Facility, does taxidermy for the Conner Museum, and participates in the Raptor Club and Wildlife Society. During his free time, Chris can often be found in the woods bird watching, shooting his recurve bow, or journaling tracking animals.

Raised in the small town of Ephratah, just a few minutes south of the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York, Matthew has had a lifelong interest in the natural world around him. A 2007 graduate from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry with a Bachelors in Wildlife Science, Matthew knew that working with wolves was his calling and that Winchester’s small town atmosphere suited him. While working at WERC, Matthew hopes to develop a strong bond with the current pack and gain the necessary handling experience to continue working with wolves once his internship is completed. Although he is not exactly sure where his career is going from here, he knows that wolves will remain a part of his future. An avid outdoorsmen, Matthew spends his free time hiking, camping, fishing, hunting and playing sports such as football and baseball. A fan of ice and snow Matthew is also an avid skier and snowboarder. Matthew has also spent the last five years as a member of the New York Air National Guard, and has achieved the rank of Staff Sergeant (E-5) as an Aircrew Life Support Journeyman and hopes to soon become a commissioned officer and enter the Navigator field to begin flying for his unit.

Chiji Ochiagha, Summer Intern A Minnesota native, Chiji Ochiagha grew up in the only one of the lower 48 states where wolves were never driven to extinction. Chiji graduated in 2007 from Pomona College, located in California. While there he majored in Environmental Biology and minored in both geology and anthropology. Chiji has been involved in many research projects, including a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) grant he received from the National Science Foundation to study the effects of temperature on the foraging of the North American pika and Ochotona princeps, in Colorado during the summer of 2006. In his free time, Chiji enjoys hiking, backpacking, and camping. While at WERC, Chiji is interested in learning more about one of the few social predators in the United States. With a profound interest in nature, he is interested in educating the public about the social behavior and ecological importance of wolves. Working and socializing with the pack is one of Chiji’s favorite things to do at the WERC. Chiji is very happy to be sharing his knowledge about wolves and the natural world with visitors to WERC.

FALL 2007 / WERC / 22


education concentration among some of the interns each season. Currently, interns are taught a diverse array of topics while at WERC. Some of the typical subjects that interns study while at WERC include: captive wolf management and care, environmental education to all ages, interpretive design/development, ecological land stewardship, noxious weed management, carpentry, animal tracking, and many other disciplines depending on the interest of each intern. An effort is made to tailor the learning of each intern according to personal preferences of each intern. Nearly every intern that completes our program states that the time spent at WERC has been a life-changing experience, one they will never forget. It is common to hear from past interns several years after their departure to inform us of their careers and to share how beneficial our internship was in guiding them both in their career and life. The WERC intern program is loaded with success stories, within WERC and each past intern. Some examples of projects that interns have completed include: the creation and building of nearly every interpretive display on the WERC site, the design and building of the trail system, the 24 hour a day care and welfare monitoring of the Sawtooth Pack through every season, the building of a new observation platform (this summer), the design and performance of several top-notch behav23 / WERC / FALL 2007

ioral research projects on the Sawtooth Pack, and the building and upgrade of the remote, rustic camp in which interns live. Without the intern program, WERC would not be the caliber of facility it has become. Interns become the life-blood of our organization during their term, and then when they depart they carry WERC in their blood forever. Many past interns have used their experience with WERC as a stepping stone into their chosen professions and have been able to realize their dreams partly or completely due to the lessons and experiences learned at WERC. Some noteworthy professional placements among past interns include: wild wolf monitoring/management crews for both Yellowstone and Idaho; a few past interns currently enrolled in veterinary school; zookeepers and captive facility managers; environmental educators; local, state, and federal wildlife biologists and managers; nature preserve managers; and even a recent Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine. To further highlight this recent accomplishment of the WERC intern program, Jonathan Ball began his internship with WERC back in 1999. A recent graduate in Psychology at the time, Jonathan thought he wanted to do something with wildlife, but was not

sure exactly what or how to go about it. He realized with his background in Psychology it may be difficult to break into a wildlife career, so he took a chance and applied for an internship with WERC. We accepted Jonathan and quickly realized he had tremendous potential as a biologist and possessed the particular traits necessary to handle and care for animals. Jonathan remained in the intern program for approximately nine months (we held on to him for three terms due to his great value to WERC and potential in a future career with wildlife). Upon departure, Jonathan had decided to pursue a career in wildlife veterinary science. It was a struggle to be admitted to a vet school with Jonathan’s lack of academic background in vet science. However, Jonathan persisted and finally his break came with Tuft’s University School of Veterinary Medicine.

During his entrance interview, Jonathan was told that his experience with WERC was a major reason for his admittance. Jonathan has since graduated from Tuft’s as a Veterinary Doctor, with a concentration in wildlife. He continues to be a friend of WERC and often cites his experience as an intern with WERC as the stimulus and catalyst that made his career a success. As WERC continues to search for the next generation of interns, maybe we are actually searching for the next leaders in wildlife biology, veterinary science, and environmental education around the world. Are you ready for the challenge and opportunity of WERC’s prestigious intern program? For more information on our intern program and to apply visit our website or call 888-422-1110 ext. 3.

ADOPT A WOLF Share your appreciation for wolves and the wilderness with the friends and family on your gift list. You will be helping to educate the world and giving your loved ones a truly meaningful gift. Your gift will keep WERC in the forefront of the fight to preserve Wolves around the region and world. Adopt Motomo, Motoki, or Piyip for one year........$25.00 Adoptions include one wolf of the Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce. *adoptions auto renew as memberships after first year

SAWTOOTH ADOPT A WOLF

ADOPTIONS MAKE GREAT GIFTS!

You can help in the ongoing care for the Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce by adopting our three remaining wolves. Adopt the Sawtooth Pack for one year...................$50.00 Adoption includes all wolves from Alpha male Motomo, Alpha female Motoki, and Mid-ranking male Piyip. Adopt a Wolf or the Sawtooth Pack with WERC and in the first year, you’ll receive an Adoption Kit that includes: • • • •

Adoption Certificate 8.5” x 11” Image of Wolves Quarterly Sawtooth Legacy News Bumper Sticker FALL 2007 / WERC / 24


TRACKING IN THE WILDS OF IDAHO Matthew Christman, Summer 2007 Intern

“First you become a part of it, then it becomes a part of you.” This is a saying we use here in Wolf Camp and it has held true throughout this summer. Between August 12th and 18th I went on a trip. While on this trip I missed the pack, the looks they gave while watching me, the smell of their fur, and more than anything their howls at night. This is where the pack has become a part of me; if I don’t hear a howl at night I think that something is wrong. However that week I was away I was given the opportunity to become a part of something else. I was given the honor and the pleasure of accompanying the Wilderness Awareness School’s Advanced Teen Week into the Frank Church Wilderness of No Return.

during the week. I was somewhat nervous meeting a new group of people and hopefully being accepted by them. It was my understanding that many of them had known each other for quite some time. I met the group at the airport in Boise; this is where I was first introduced to the instructors. I was introduced to the rest of the group when we stopped for dinner. The introduction was brief because I was as anxious as they were to get to our final destination. We arrived late in the evening and after a brief introduction to camp, we all unrolled our sleeping bags and slept underneath the stars. We had the privilege of watching a meteor shower throughout most of the night. A recurring theme throughout the week, singing will wake you up. The first morning this happened it was a bit of a surprise for me. During the rest of the week I was woken up with the rest of the staff so I could help wake up the kids. We would then eat breakfast and divide up into our clans to plan the day’s events. Since I was there to share the knowledge of wolves’ behavior that I had gained over the summer I decided to not stay with one group the whole week. I found that this helped me connect with so many of the students and enabled me to develop more friendships. Throughout the week we did some extensive hiking in several different areas. With each group I had some great experiences. Because there were so many I’ve decided to highlight a few.

I first heard about this group while going through the interview process for this internship and it seemed really interesting. Most of my tracking experience had come from deer and turkey hunting with my father in Upstate New York. As the time grew closer to go on the expedition with the group, myself and the other interns found out when we were going to attend the school. I found myself going on the third trip between August 12th and 18th with a group of teens. I thought to myself, if they were anything like me as a teen, it was going to be an interesting week. I soon found that my first thoughts were completely wrong. When the day came to leave I was excited and a little nervous at the same time. I was excited to go because it meant some time away from the center (a mini vacation). It also meant some time to explore the rest of the state of Idaho, which I don’t have the opportunity to do 25 / WERC / FALL 2007

On the second day with Laura and Eric’s group, the creatively named Pollos (which is Spanish for chicken), after having sat down for lunch, Alissa spotted a track

“ “ First you become a part of it, then it becomes a part of you.

that we had not yet seen before. In some mud near the riverbank was a well-placed Mountain Lion track. This was the first time I had ever seen one and I promptly crossed the river to see if there were any more signs of the large cat being there. Sadly I found none.

On my second day with Jan and Emily’s group: The Three Legged Butter Bears, we did some pretty extensive hiking. Throughout this week I learned a little bit about tracking where you think and feel the animals may be. This type of tracking is not entirely based on what you see on the ground. It’s difficult to explain until you actually try to sense where something is. While driving we decided to stop near a field that had some pretty decent swimming holes in it. Instead of swimming I went with Emily and Jan and took a look around. We happened to stumble upon a dead beaver, and while examining it a strange feeling arose. The hair on the back of my neck stood an I felt e like straight up and wa watching wat something was ee lilin e to our from the tree line left. oup ass a whole who whole le decided d The group to take a look. What made this even more strange was that everyone else ng g of apprehension. appre e t the area ef a felt a feeling We left and took a break near a river, where some swam and others ate n the he river, r er, where ri w er we dinner. We decided to hike along nd I then came e across ac found some wolf tracks. Jan and und the e elk we we found fo the remains of a dead elk. Around ear but found fo fou several signs of the presence of bear nothem d wolves, still we believe that th wolves ing that resembled brought it down and the bear had scavenged the kill. noth couple e of hours h After another hiking along the river cided to o sit and and d wait wa w for the rest of the groups to we decided s. We sat sa on the side of the river nearest meet with us. nd this is where w w live elk the road and I saw my first two th tree t running from the line. e to spend the th day da with On the final day I was suppose oop Group. roup. As we roup w were Will, Lauren, and the Mango Poop sud su driving to our sites, the van in front of us suddenly hat at week was w every stopped. The most amusing site that erybody jumping j ju door in the van opening up and everybody out anyway they could. To the left of the van was a pile of fresh wolf scat in the middle of the road. All over the sides of the road were wolf tracks. We also found drag marks, which we thought could have been made from an elk dragging

a wolf that was attempting to bring it down or the wolf dragging the elk. About 200 yards from the right side of the road we found the remains of the fresh kill. A young elk had been brought down. We did not find the head or hindquarters. I assume the wolves had carried them off possibly for pups or to cache for later. After talking with some firefighters who had seen a pack in the area early that morning we attempted to continue tracking. Unfortunately with time constraints working against us we did not find the pack. I said goodbye to the group Saturday the 18th once we reached Boise. Throughout the week I learned so much from them all. Some of things I learned I’m not sure can be taught unless you’re with that group. These young adults all have bright futures ahead of them and their friends and family should be proud of them. I want to say thank you again. First, to the firefighters who were in the area working hard to keep the entire area from burning and also for allowing us to remain in the area. Second to the staff of the Wilderness Awareness School for accepting me into their group, making me feel welcome, and making me feel like I had been with them from the beginning. My last thank you goes to the students, who asked me some great questions, answered my questions, and welcomed me into their clan. I’ve walked away from this experience with pictures, memories and new friends who I will never forget. It was a true honor and pleasure to meet you all. “First you become a part of it, then it becomes a part of you”

WERC is committed to enhancing the experience of our interns and deepening their education experience. Over the years, WERC interns have contributed to programs in immeasurable ways. FALL 2007 / WERC / 26


SUMMER 2007 AT THE VISITOR’S CENTER ................. 27

VISITOR’S CENTER SAWTOOTH PACK WOLVES OF THE NEZ PERCE

WERC MERCHANDISE ...... 29

WERC in the summer of 1997 when we first started public visitation. They could not believe how tall the trees and other shrubbery had grown. Although they only saw Motomo in 1997, they were delighted to see Motomo, Motoki, and Piyip this visit. Bill equated watching for wolves to fishing in that after you caught your limit, you can relax the rest of the time. So after seeing the wolves in the morning, they were able to relax and enjoy the site the rest of the day. Of course they hoped to see pack members from the observation deck but if they didn’t, that was okay.

VISITOR’S CENTER

An evening tour I led a few weeks ago included a couple that visited last year. After telling the group that there is no guarantee of seeing the wolves, they said that it was all right. It seems that when they visited last year and took the guided tour, all four wolves came up to the outside classroom area. In addition to hanging around, they started a group howl right in front of them. With those wonderful memories, I understood that just being at WERC this year was enough for them even if the pack chose not to be social that evening.

HOURS .................... 30

Wolf Education & Research Center T H E V I S I T O R C E N T E R I N C L U D E S D I S P L AY S & I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T T H E S A W T O O T H PA C K .

center

MOTOMO Nez Perce, He Who Goes First Guides and Naturalists are available to answer your questions and to help you gain insight to wolves, wildlife, nature, and other cultures’ views.

Many of the visitors stated that they would be back and hoped that the Board of Directors continues having this site or at least something like it. To have the opportunity to possibly see and/or hear a gray wolf are memories that last a lifetime.

Summer 2007 at the Vi sitor ’s Center R Stewart, WERC

Since the Memorial Day weekend, the Visitor Center has been open seven days a week from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm and will continue until Labor Day. For the month of September, the Visitor Center will be open on weekends from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm with guided tours available throughout the week with advance reservations. To date, we are averaging about 110 general visitors a week with an additional 19 individuals per week scheduling guided tours. The average of 134 per week is an increase over last year’s average of 122 per week. Since the last weekend in May, visitors from 32 states plus the District of Columbia along with 27 / WERC / FALL 2007

Although not everyone who visits WERC sees and/or hears the remaining members of “The Sawtooth Pack: Wolves of the Nez Perce”, most leave with a much better understanding of the true nature and behavior of wild wolves and the importance of having wolves back into the ecosystem.

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D I D YOU K N OW ?

eight countries have signed the visitor log. There is still interest for individuals from all over to come out and learn more about gray wolves.

PIYIP Nez Perce, Little Brother

The four interns we had this summer along with staff have had the privilege to talk to all of these individuals. Some were curious about what WERC was and its history while others had specific questions about wolves and the re-introduction into Western states.

mation.

Usually, each family received an information packet to help them learn more about the gray wolf and how to contact us for more infor-

Most of our visitors were first time visitors however; a small percentage are return visitors. A family I spoke to yesterday had first visited

MOTOKI Blackfoot, Shadow

Many of you have mentioned that you are also supporters of other organizations such as Defenders of Wildlife, National Wildlife Federation, and Sierra Club, to name a few. WERC applauds your faithfulness to these causes. Did you know that WERC works with many of these groups in regard to wolf issues in the Northern Rocky Mountains? WERC has spent the better part of the last two years in collaborative efforts with Defenders of Wildlife and other Idaho based conservation groups as a voice for the wolf in Idaho. WERC continues to represent the wolf at a variety of USF&WS hearings, Senator Mike Crapo’s (R-ID) Elk Collaborative, and the University of Idaho’s Open Panel Discussions concerning wolves and their socio/economic impact during the recovery. Thank you for your continued support in developing these important partnerships as we continue to be the voice for wolves.

FALL 2007 / WERC / 28


Item Little Paw Bumper Sticker $2.50 ea.

QTY

Total

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Paw Print Bumper Sticker $2.50 ea.

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Little Paw Explorer Guide $3.00 ea.

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Wolf Tracks Explorer Guide $3.00 ea.

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Wolf Poster $9.95 ea.

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Motomo Photo $4.95 ea.

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WOLF EDUCATION & RESEARCH CENTER M ERC H A N D ISE

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Motoki Photo $4.95 ea.

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Sawtooth Pack Photo $4.95 ea.

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Sawtooth Wolf Photos $17.50 (Four photos)

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To make reservations or obtain more information call (888) 422-1110 Ext. 3.

BUM PER STICKERS

Visit our website at: www.wolfcenter.org for additional information on scheduling reservations.

4” x 6” Choose from Little Paw or Paw Print

Memorial Day to Labor Day: Open daily 9:00 am to 5:00 pm for self-guided tours and general visitation. EXPLORER GU ID ES 5.5” x 8.5” Choose from Little Paw or Wolf Tracks

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Piyip Photo $4.95 ea.

VISITOR’S CENTER HOURS

Guided tours available daily 7:30 am and 7:00 pm except Sunday p.m. and Monday a.m. Call ahead to reserve your place as space is limited for each tour.

Weekends in May and September: Open from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm for self-guided tours and general visitation. Guided tours are available these weekends with twenty-four hour notice. If you would like to take a guided tour please call ahead (twenty-four hours) to book your time slot. Same day tours are difficult and may not be available.

Check out the Wolf Education & Research Center Website at:

www.wolfcenter.org FIND:

Up to Date Information on Wolves & the Sawtooth Pack Wolf Camp Journal Wolf Merchandise Available to Order Online Information about the Visitor’s Center

W OLF POSTER CALCULATE YOUR OWN SHIPPING Minimum of $3.00 or 10%, whichever is greater

All Other Times:

18” x 24” Poster

Guided tours are available outside the above listed hours with twenty-four hour notice.

$__________ PAYMENT ENCLOSED Total of all items ordered plus shipping

Regional & National Events Pack Timeline

$__________ Ship Merchandise to: Name: ______________________________ Address: ____________________________ City/State/Zip: ________________________ Email: ______________________________ Phone Number: _______________________ Mail your check or money order to: Wolf Education & Research Center 111 Main St., Rm #150 Lewiston, ID 83501 Allow 2 weeks for delivery within the US. 29 / WERC / FALL 2007

W OLF PH OTOS 8.5” x 11” Choose from ALL or individual photos of Motomo, Piyip, Motoki, or the Sawtooth Pack

Experience our interactive and informative displays and exhibits in the Visitor Center.

www.wolfcenter.org

VISIT THE WERC WEBSITE

WERC Merchandise Order Form

FALL 2007 / WERC / 30


Help Wolve s

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WOLF EDUCATION & RESEARCH CENTER 111 Main Street, Suite 150 Lewiston, ID 83501

Check us out online at www.wolfcenter.org.

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Sawtooth Legacy Quarterly - Fall 2007