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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE WOCN® SOCIETY

ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019

We’re Back and In It For You!

We know how much our members loved our magazine In It For You. To satisfy our members and reduce paper, we are going green by bringing back In It For You in a new, completely digital, format.

Join us in Nashville for WOCNext 2019 Page 6

Striving Toward Excellence with the Pediatric Ostomy Population: A Personal Journey Page 9

www.wocn.org


PLANT THE SEEDS OF AND HELP G R OW THE SPECIALTY OF WOC NURSING Visit foundation.wocn.org to Fund the Future of WOC nursing. All donations will provide educational scholarships to students attending a WOCN Accredited Program.

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IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019

foundation.wocn.org


ISSUE 7 • SPRING 2019

TA B L E O F CONTENTS THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE WOCN® SOCIETY

IN SIDE

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PRES I D E N T ’ S M E SSA G E

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9 ST R I V I NG TOWAR D E XCE L L E N C E W I TH TH E P E DI AT R IC OSTOMY P OPUL ATI ON : A P E R SON AL J OUR NE Y

WOCN S O C I E T Y ’ S A NNUA L EL EC T I O N

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F UND T HE F U TU R E OF W OC NUR S I NG

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WOCN E X T 2019

A SK T HE W OC N U R SE

mission The WOCN Society is a professional community dedicated to advancing the practice and delivery of expert healthcare to individuals with wound, ostomy, and continence care needs. We support our members’ practice through advocacy, education, and research.

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IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019

In It For You is a publication of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®) 888-224-9626 (WOCN) www.wocn.org info@wocn.org


WOCN SOCIETY BOARD AND COMMITTEE CHAIRS

D E PA R T M E N T

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

BOARD President Kelly Jaszarowski, MSN, RN, CNS, ANP, CWOCN President Elect Stephanie Yates, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, CWOCN Secretary Christine Berke, MSN, APRN-NP, CWOCN-AP, AGPCNP-BC

Director Kevin Emmons, DrNP, RN, APN, AGPCNP-BC, CWCN, CFCN

Message from the President

Director Trudy Huey, MSN, RN, CWOCN Director Jody Scardillo, DNP, RN, ANP-BC, CWOCN

K E LLY JA SZ A RO WSK I, M SN, RN, C NS, A NP, C WO C N

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he Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®) is constantly working to support its members by promoting educational, clinical and research opportunities to advance the practice and guide the delivery of expert healthcare to individuals with wound, ostomy and continence care needs. I am proud to have the opportunity to lead the WOCN Society in this exciting time in healthcare and in the WOC nursing specialty. In 2018, the Society and the WOC nursing specialty celebrated its 50th anniversary. With the future in mind, we will continue to focus on the strategic pillars and goals established for the Society’s advancement: education, research, member engagement and public policy.

Treasurer Vittoria (Vicky) Pontieri-Lewis, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN Director Diane Bryant, MS, RN, CWOCN

Ongoing education is critical for our practice. Last year, the Society released the Ostomy Care Associate (OCA) Program to support the certified ostomy nurse and provide an extension of quality patient care. If you are interested in learning more about the program or becoming a Course Coordinator to teach individuals about ostomy care, please visit wocn.org/ocaprogram. This year, we have a strong lineup of industry supported webinars that will provide members with a wide range of WOC knowledge and techniques, and will offer members a chance to earn free contact hours. A new podcast channel called “WOCTalk” has been launched and serves as a resource to learn more about advocacy, education and research that supports the practice. The Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing (JWOCN) remains a respected avenue for showcasing the research of our colleagues and industry leaders in the field to enhance the clinical practice. We are always looking for ways to engage our members. A “Call for Volunteers” for members to work on committees, task forces and special projects on a national level was recently sent out. We are excited for members to bring new ideas and contributions so that we can better serve you and advance your professional development. The public policy and advocacy task force has been hard at work acting on behalf of the Society as the authoritative voice to those in Washington who are making regulatory and legislative decisions that directly impact healthcare policy decisions.

I am proud to have the opportunity to lead the WOCN Society in this exciting time in healthcare and in the WOC nursing specialty.

COMMITTEE CHAIRS Accreditation Committee Kathleen McLaughlin, DNP, RN, CWOCN Education Committee Zoe Bishop, BSN, RN, CWOCN Finance Committee Vicky Pontieri-Lewis, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN Forum Moderator Committee Trudy Huey, MSN, RN, CWOCN Membership Committee Jennifer Anderson, MBA, MSN, RN, CWCN, CFCN, CWS, DAPWCA, FACCWS National Conference Planning Committee Sunniva Zaratkiewicz, PhD, RN, CWCN

Nominations Committee Carolyn Watts, MSN, RN, CWON Ostomy Care Associate Advisory Committee Gisele Castonguay, APRN, CWOCN Public Policy & Advocacy Coordinator Kate Lawrence, MSN, RN, CWOCN Scholarship Committee Carole Bauer, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, OCN, CWOCN Wound Treatment Associate Advisory Committee Janet Ramundo, MSN, RN, CWOCN, CFCN Corporate Development Committee Laurie McNichol, MSN, RN, CNS, GNP, CWOCN, CWON-AP,

This is an exciting time for our Society. I remain committed to advocating for and promoting the WOC nursing practice. Thank you to each and every one of you for what you do to promote WOC nursing! 4

IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019


ELECTION U P D AT E

The Results Are In! The results for the WOCN Society’s 2019 Annual Election are in. Congratulations to the newly elected and re-elected members of the Board of Directors and Nominating Committee. This year's election also included approval of proposed amendments to bylaws, which passed.

President Elect Dea Kent, DNP, RN, NP-C, CWOCN

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Director Derik Alexander, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN, CFCN

Director Diane Bryant, MS, RN, CWOCN

e are confident that each of these individuals will enhance the WOCN Society with integrity, leadership and knowledge.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the voting process. Your votes are important to us! We rely on your help to shape the strategic direction of the Society. We also want to commend everyone who ran for a position, and we encourage anyone interested to run next year.

Nominating Committee, Area #1 Nicole Kindel, BSN, RN, CWOCN

Thank you to everyone who participated in the voting process. Your votes are important to us! We rely on your help to shape the strategic direction of the Society.

This year’s election ran from January 11, 2019, to March 6, 2019. Only Full, Honorary-Lifetime and Retired members were eligible to vote. Each newly elected individual will be sworn into their position at WOCNext 2019 in Nashville.

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Nominating Committee, Area #3 Emilee Bartolo, BSN, RN, CWOCN

IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019


The WOCN Society’s Annual Conference is Now

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fter celebrating the 50th anniversary of the WOCN Society and the WOC nursing specialty, the National Conference Planning Committee (NCPC) couldn’t help but wonder what was next for our annual event. We took the time to really focus on prior events and the educational needs of WOC nurses and other like-minded clinicians. What feedback from attendees can we

incorporate into future events? What types of learning models do our attendees enjoy? Where is the industry heading? What are the most recent trends we should be incorporating in to our event? Motivated by the ever-changing healthcare landscape and the increase of innovation and technology in healthcare, we set out to shake up the way we would incorporate information sharing,

L E A R N M O R E AT W O C N E X T. O R G

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education and attendee experience in 2019 and beyond. The result was WOCNext, an event for WOC nurses and other healthcare professionals dedicated to providing expert care to patients with wound, ostomy and incontinence needs. From networking opportunities, schedule flexibility, varied educational formats and increased opportunities for product knowledge, there is something for everyone at WOCNext 2019.


Preview: Q&A with National Conference Planning Committee Chair, Sunniva Zaratkiewicz, PhD, RN, CWCN WHAT GOES INTO PLANNING A BIG EDUCATIONAL EVENT LIKE WOCNEXT?

WHAT’S NEW THIS YEAR FOR ATTENDEES?

So much more goes into planning than I ever realized prior to joining the National Conference Planning Committee (NCPC). It’s a full year of meetings and the dedication of many volunteers and WOCN staff who make the event happen. The amount of time that each track co-chair puts into finding just the right topics and speakers, the time in communication with speakers and the broader NCPC, is no small commitment. Most impressively, everyone involved is dedicated, patient, and willing to work hard to ensure we provide the best possible content and experience for attendees.

T H E ME S: HOW W E R E T HE T H E ME S DE C IDE D?

WHAT WAS THE THOUGHT PROCESS BEHIND REB RANDING THE WOCN SOCIETY’S CONFERENCE FOR 2019 (AND BEYOND)?

• Quality Measures of patient-centered, safe, effective, timely, efficient and equitable care.

We heard from our members that they were looking for innovations and change. We took these recommendations and dedicated focused time on the committee, in which we discussed adult learning theory and recent industry trends, along with relevant and novel research. These conversations and collaboration allowed us to reframe the way we did things in the past in a way that retains the well-respected integrity of the event and incorporates new and innovative approaches to information sharing and education.

WHAT DOES TH E NAME WOCNEXT MEAN TO YOU?

WOCNext means not only keeping the stride with an ever-changing and evolving healthcare environment, but being a leader in setting the pace that drives patient care, education, and research with an everpresent focus on the best possible patient outcomes.

We looked at national aims in healthcare quality and improvement along with feedback from our members and found the common ground that linked these. Not surprisingly, the feedback and national aims were closely mirrored. This year, the education at WOCNext will be presented under the following themes: • Wellness Behaviors, actions and interventions to promote health and well-being. • Symptom Science Understanding pathophysiology and manifestations of acute and chronic illness.

• Clinical Care Innovations Advancing practice through the integration of education and research. F O R MAT: W HAT WAS T HE GOAL F OR C R E AT IN G 3 0 ,6 0 , AND 9 0 -MINU T E S E S S IO N S? W HAT E L SE IS NE W AB OU T E D U C AT I ONAL F OR MAT S IN 2 0 1 9 ?

Higher education adopted these variations in traditional class/lecture times some time ago. As time goes on, other conferences and educational events have had success with this format as well. The themes are new and allow us to more seamlessly integrate wound, ostomy, continence, and professional practice material into current and meaningful areas of focus in healthcare. The approach is well rounded and inclusive… and, I think, fun! IN C R E A S E D PR ODU C T KNOW L E DGE : W H AT D OE S T HAT ME AN F OR AT T E N D EE S AND E XHIB IT OR S?

We have allotted more time to make one-on-one or small group appointments

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with exhibitors in order to allow attendees to meet with exhibitors regarding products that they would like more information about. This also allows exhibitors to spend the time needed to answer more in-depth questions in a setting that is a little less busy and noisy than the usual vendor hall hours. ENHANCED NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

I’m very excited about having a mixer for all attendees on the first night. Be ready for some fun ways to get to know your colleagues, meet new folks, and re-connect with others.

IS THE EDUCATION PROVIDED AT WOCNEXT JUST FOR WOC NURSES?

The education provided at WOCNext is applicable to a wide variety of healthcare clinicians; including, but not limited to, nurses, advanced practice nurses, physician’s assistants, physicians, and physical therapists. Whether you work in a hospital, clinic, skilled nursing facility, long term acute care, respite, home health, tele-health, or provide mobile health care for those experiencing homelessness. The content is equally applicable to those working in research, quality improvement, and the legal profession. There’s something for everyone at WOCNext!

WHAT ARE YOU THE MOST EXCITED ABOUT AT WOCNEXT 2019?

Between the amazing speakers and topics, networking with other WOC clinicians and researchers, getting to know new attendees, checking out the exhibitor hall, and enjoying Nashville, it’s pretty hard to decide what I’m most excited about at WOCNext 2019. Fair to say, I’m planning on enjoying every minute! For more information on WOCNext 2019, check out our frequently asked questions and visit wocnext.org.


June 23-26, 2019 • Music City Center • Nashville, TN WOCNext is the premier event for nursing professionals to convene and learn about the latest evidence-based practices and innovations in wound, ostomy and continence care.

2,000 120+ 140+ EXHIBITORS

PROFESSIONALS

NEARLY

60

55+

10 One big PRESENTATIONS

SPEAKERS

educational sessions offered in 30, 60, and 90-minute time slots

4 NEW education themes

0%s POSTER 5 e Po s t e r

wellness

hours with exhibitors

symptom science

NETWORKING EVENT

quality

clinical care innovations

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16 CE in Educational Sessions EARN MORE THAN CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS: 6+ CE in the Poster Hall 1.5 CE in Select Symposia REGISTER Pharmacology Credits 4+ BY MAY 3 to Receive the Early Bird Discount 8

wocnext.org

IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019

@wocnextconference


NURSE'S STORY

Striving Toward Excellence with the Pediatric Ostomy Population: A Personal Journey JOAN N A B UR G ES S , B S N , R N , CW OCN ,

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OCN Society member Joanna Burgess, BSN, RN, CWOCN, shared her experience about growing up living with an ostomy and her contribution to the membersonly document Pediatric Ostomy Complications: Best Practice for Clinicians. You can find the document in the WOCN Document Library. Almost a decade ago, as a wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) student at Emory University, I was mentored by Michelle Rice, MSN, RN, CWOCN, a clinician at Duke University Medical Center. I remember being intrigued by the unique needs of the pediatric population, in particular, the neonates; some of which had multiple stomas from necrotizing enterocolitis. Michelle’s unique knowledge on how to handle the delicate neonate population came from years of experience and the dedication to assisting new parents with the physical and emotional needs of caring for an infant or child with an ostomy. Therefore, it was an honor to work with Michelle and other well respected wound, ostomy and continence nurses who have specialties in pediatric ostomy care to create the WOCN® Society’s members-only document Pediatric Ostomy Complications: Best Practice for Clinicians.

If you have a story you would like to share please email us at share@wocn.org. Working with the WOCN Society’s Pediatric Ostomy Task Force of the Ostomy Committee and collaborating on the Pediatric Ostomy Complications: Best Practice for Clinicians was a personal experience for me and an undertaking that I dedicate to my father, who was the primary caregiver of my ostomy in my growing years. In Boston 1965, when I was just three years old, something that was suspected to be a simple urinary tract infection quickly turned into a diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder. My original surgical treatment was a cystectomy and creation of ureterosigmoidostomy, generically known as a “wet bladder.” However, due to multiple kidney infections I experienced from the procedure, the creation of an ileal conduit quickly followed. All of this occurred during a period of time when there was no ostomy nurse at Boston Children’s Hospital to teach and support my family, and there was no access to online resources. My father’s recollection of the experience was that the nurses seemed frightened to care for me. He remembers being handed a brown paper bag containing a few 9

IN IT FOR YOU | ISSUE 7, SPRING 2019

ostomy supplies at the time of my hospital discharge. He recalls returning home and fumbling through the packaging of an unassembled seven-piece pouching system. Through trial and error, he eventually mastered how to assemble the pouch, but he couldn’t figure how to keep it on me! To his relief, the packaging contained the phone number for the ostomy supply company Torbot, located in Rhode Island. My father and I quickly made the four hour trip from Boston to Rhode Island and met with the founder of Torbot, an ostomate, who showed my father how to care for my urostomy. My father was so overwhelmed with finding a confidant in the ostomy world, he even bought me a lifetime supply of products “just in case they ever stopped making them.” Growing up with an ostomy became a part of my life, it seemed normal and was all I ever really knew. The only problem I can remember was an occasional itchy skin condition, sometimes causing me to scratch to the point of bleeding. This bleeding incident happened once in the first grade, and I remember my teacher was terrified as she scooped me up in her


NURSE'S STORY

arms and ran down the hall to the school nurse. There was no doubt the problem with my skin came from the layers of bonding cement that was used to keep my ostomy pouch in place. The only remedy then was to apply karaya powder to the skin, which stung and was painful. There were also metal clips on my ostomy belt that would dig into my sides, but I learned to live with the fear that without the belt my pouch would leak or fall off. Despite these few irritations, I don’t remember feeling limited because of my ostomy. I continued to do the things I loved, such as swimming and dancing. I had close friends who knew about the secret that I wore under my clothes. I remember my mother would coach me on how to discreetly change my clothes at slumber parties so no one would notice my pouch. This skill served me well in my later years of junior high and high school gym classes, where I was expected to change clothes in front of other young women in the locker room. I admit, I did feel very alone. I remember wishing and longing to know someone like me – someone else who wore an ostomy pouch. Since childhood, I have connected with several adults who also grew up with an ostomy and were treated during my era. That feeling of being alone would have been greatly alleviated, for both my family and I, had us ostomates known how to connect with one another.

ongoing process by dedicated companies and researchers. Today, we have much more knowledge concerning the care of the pediatric patient and have many more products available to ease the challenges that face this population. As an ostomy patient and ostomy nurse, I currently share my story across the country. I am continually reminded of the need to reach out to families who have children living with an ostomy and connect them to the resources they need to aid the emotional and physical aspects of ostomy care. I am also reminded that we need more ostomy nurses caring for the pediatric population. These families sometimes search for weeks, months or even years looking for help. In creating the Pediatric Ostomy Complications: Best Practice for Clinicians document, it is the hope of the WOCN Society Pediatric Ostomy Task Force that these best practices will give ostomy nurses, and any nurse who works with pediatric ostomies, the confidence

Today, we have much more knowledge concerning the care of the pediatric patient and have many more products available to ease the challenges that face this population. needed to take on the challenges the pediatric population faces, from stoma to peristomal complications. When nurses feel empowered, parents will ultimately feel empowered to take on the responsibility of their child’s care with greater ease. The WOCN Society looks forward to hearing your comments about the Pediatric Ostomy Complications: Best Practice for Clinicians document, and encourage you to keep track of your own personal stories and suggestions as the WOC community continues to strive for success for the pediatric ostomate.

Joanna Burgess, BSN, RN, CWOCN is a full scope practicing Wound, Ostomy and Continence nurse at WakeMed Health and Hospitals acute care center in North Carolina. Joanna’s passion for ostomy care stems from her 53-year journey as an ostomate, after being diagnosed with bladder cancer at the age of three. Joanna’s contributions to the WOC practice include serving on the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Society™ (WOCN®) National Ostomy Committee for three years and contributed to the Wound Care Core Curriculum book, in which she wrote on the topic of lymphedema. Joanna is the 2011 Great Comebacks® award recipient and has shared her story on state, national and international levels. She is a board member for the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. (UOAA) and chairs their advocacy committee. She also was the 2016 South East Regional WOC nurse of the year.

Thank goodness we now know today how the times would change; how ostomy nursing would become a career that would involve not only care of the patient’s ostomy, but ongoing education in building confidence and independence with selfcare and emotional support. We now know that products would go through many changes and improvements and that product development would be an

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OC nurses make a significant impact in the lives of patients every day. They improve patient care across all settings through advocacy, patient and family education, research and the achievement of positive clinical outcomes. Due to the growing need for wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) nurses and a strong belief in the continued growth and success of WOC nursing, the WOCN Society launched the Fund the Future campaign. Through the generosity of inspired individuals, industry partners, endowments and regional/affiliate participation, the WOCN Society seeks to raise and disseminate funding for educational and research activities related to wound, ostomy and continence nursing. By “funding the future”, the WOCN Society is able to create and grow a lasting network of certified WOC nurses, generate a heightened awareness of the WOC specialty and further advance the quality of life for the patients that we serve.

To learn more about Fund the Future, please visit foundation.wocn.org.

Help grow the specialty of WOC nursing and further advance the quality of life for their patients by “funding the future”. Your generous gift will provide funding for future WOC nurses as they seek additional education to grow their knowledge and advance their careers. Each donation makes a huge difference by helping us to serve more people living with wound, ostomy and continence care needs.

DONATE NOW Thank you to Coloplast for helping to “Fund the Future” by supporting the preparation of future WOC nurses through an unrestricted educational grant. Thank you to the following companies who contributed to our Fund the Future campaign:

The WOCN Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization and your donation may be tax deductible. Please contact your tax professional for more information. No goods or services were provided in exchange for your donation. 11

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ASK THE WOC NURSE

ASK

the WOC Nurse

Have you ever wished for someone to talk to who “gets it?” Someone who understands what it’s like to be a WOC nurse yet who is not involved in the same work culture as you? Someone whom you can ask questions that you wouldn’t feel safe asking your work colleagues? Then this column is for you!

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s a professional WOC nursing society, we’re great about pursuing the best possible information to meet the needs of those in our care. We’re less focused on other issues that are not at the core of patient care, which nevertheless robs us of complete effectiveness. In recognition of this gap in our member services we have brought back this “Dear Abby”-type WOC nursing advice column.

moral-ethical challenges with patients and/or colleagues, inspiring those who are resistant, promoting your value as an employee and team member, motivating others to embrace current evidence-based product and treatment selections, dealing with irritating patient and/ or colleague behaviors, maintaining clinical excellence in increasingly cost conscious environments and more.

The issues and questions we invite you to ask are not necessarily clinical in nature. The range of topics you may choose to ask about are limited only by your experiences, curiosity and desires. Types of questions asked may relate to worklife balance, power struggles in the workplace, managing multiple competing priorities,

This column is an opportunity to help you deal with things you might not feel comfortable talking about out loud with others. Here we can be anonymous. In our anonymity we can be free to get at the deepest issues and concerns that are eroding the capacity for complete professional and personal fulfillment as WOC nurses.

Please consider sending us your questions or issues anonymously by filling out a form at wocn.org/askawocnurse.

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Y O U R

P R A C T I C E

with the WOCN® Society’s Publications » Available for Purchase at wocn.org/Bookstore » FREE Shipping* » Exclusive Member Discounts*

*Some exclusions may apply.

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In It For You Spring 2019  

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