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$1 BILLION ANNUAL ECONOMIC IMPACT 26,000 EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS 15,000 SAVANNAH ALUMNI 141 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 3 CAMPUSES

ONE UNIVERSITY

chatham county

Beyond the Beans

Bitty and Beau’s founder, Amy Wright, helps people gain independence through employment.

A Family Affair Dr. Kathleen Benton “juggles” family and work life as the new CEO at Hospice Savannah.

Hooked at an Early Age

warriors in the fight

Their mission is to cure and improve the quality of life of patients and their families.

Captain Judy has been chartering a straight course for more than half a century.

STATESBORO • SAVANNAH • HINESVILLE • ONLINE

H o m e t o w n L i v i n g at i t s B e s t


Galloway &

Galloway

A Professional Corporation Accidents • Bankruptcy • Custody • Divorce Real Estate • Corporations • Probate • Wills

MICHAEL DAVIS St. Andrew’s Class of 2011

BEGINNINGS MATTER

“My entrepreneurial spirit started at an early age, and St. Andrew’s gave me the confidence to continue my education, starting my own business.” - Landscape Business Owner

GallowayLaw.com 842 US Highway 80 W, Pooler, GA 31322 | 912-748-9100

Age 3 - Grade 12 International Baccalaureate World School 601 Penn Waller Rd, Savannah, GA 31410 | (912) 897-4941 | www.saslions.com


a great place

to live, work and play

100 US HW 80, Pooler, GA 31322 (912) 748-7261 | www.pooler-ga.gov


Our team of board-certified gastroenterologists perform the latest diagnostic testing in gastroenterology, including colonoscopies, endoscopic ultrasounds and flexible sigmoidoscopy. We employ modern techniques to treat many conditions, such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, GERD, hemorrhoids, constipation and hepatitis.

Savannah Office: 1139 Lexington Ave. | Savannah, GA 31404 | 912-303-4200 | Pooler Office: 140 Traders Way | Pooler GA 31322 | Hardeeville - Satellite Office | 1010 Medical Center Drive, Suite 100 Hardeeville, SC 29927 | (843) 591-1390 | www.savannahgi.com


We Help When It Hurts

Specializing In Prevention, Detection & Management Of Digestive Diseases

The Board-Certified Gastroenterologists of CDLH: L:R - Rodney S. Cohen MD, Charles W. Duckworth, Ryan C. Wanamaker MD, Edward Rydzak MD, Mark E. Murphy MD, Madeline R. Russell MD, George C. Aragon MD, Steven Carpenter MD, Mark R. Nyce MD, Brent W. Acker MD.


Chatham County

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contents 10

Beyond the Beans

Bitty and Beau’s founder, Amy Wright, helps people with Down syndrome gain independence through employment.

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A Life in Marble

Stephen Angell found a passion for art in marble sculpture.

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In the Land of Giants

Experimenting with different genres, Lulu and the Giants play everything from full metal rock to Americana and folk along the East Coast, but they always come home to Savannah.

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A Family Affair

10 About the Cover Featured on the cover is Michelle Camposano. The photo was taken by Dream Weaver Photos. Turn to page 82 to read about Michelle Camposano and JD Fulcher’s stories.

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Dr. Kathleen Benton “juggles” family and work life as the new CEO at Hospice Savannah.

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Tunnel to Towers

Yearly Savannah race seeks to honor all of the heroes of 9/11.

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A history of trust.

Marion Leith REALTOR Associate Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 912.441.3993

Karen Henry Thomas REALTOR ABR, CMRS, GRI 912.856.6550

Jane Beare

REALTOR Associate Broker ABR, CMRS, GRI, Global Luxury Certified 912.507.5797

912.352.1222 | 6349 Abercorn St. Savannah


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Warriors in the Fight Against Cancer

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families.

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Crazy Like a Fox

For nearly two years, The Fox & Fig Café has been winning over its patrons, one meatless dish at a time.

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PulsePoint Connecting Our Community

Chatham Emergency Services are making available a free application that notifies any CPR-certified responder and/or civilian when someone nearby needs CPR.

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Hooked at an Early Age

Captain Judy has been chartering a straight course for more than a half century.

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Tiny Houses, Big Dreams

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On a mission to help formerly homeless vets enjoy a greater quality of life.

A community comes together to help others in need.

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PACKed with Love

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Planes, Trains and Lions Spotted in Pooler

An Army of Two

Savannah Salvation Army officers balance family and career.

Richard Hyde is onboard with model trains, classic autos and a miniature circus.

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Bringing

life

to your

Cerec In-Office Porcelain Restorations Sedation Dentistry Invisalign Orthodontics

Richard M. Thomas, Jr., D.M.D (912) 234-1944 | www.dentaldesignsavannah.com | 300 Bull Street Savannah, GA 31401

Personalized patient specific care in the heart of Historic Savannah.

smile


From the Publisher

the Publisher

Chatham County

albany

P u b l i s h e r With You In Mind Publications

Jay and Patti Martin

From the Publisher

alban

e d i to r Renee Corwine

C r eat i v e | D e s i g n Caffeine Generated Graphics, LLC

Mandi Spivey

P u b l i s h e r With You in mind Publications

Stacey Nichols

e x e C u t i v e e d i to r s Jay and Patti martin o f f i ce M a n age r Nikki Burkhalter

W

P u b l i s h e r With You in mind Pub

landon and mandi spivey

e x e C u t i v e e d i to r s Jay and Patti martin

“We get to play baseball!” landon and mandi s A s s i s ta n t C r e At i v e | D e s i G n mandi spivey I had the opportunity to watch the movie, “The Rookie” stacey nichols M a n age r s June Dixon featuring Dennis Quaid. This movie was based on a true story C r e At i v e | D e s i G n mandi spivey Laura McCullough about a real life pitcher named Jim Morris. When the above stacey nichols O f f i C e m A n AG e r laura mcCullough words were uttered a teammate had just asked Morris “why nning our holiday schedules through magical time mood?” An hour earlier, Jim had called are you inthis such a good P h otog r ap h e r s Dawn McDaniel O f f Owens i C e m A n AG e r laura mcCullough yself stopping to savor so many moments this season. s i s tA n t his wife and let her know that he was quitting theA sminor th delicious marshmallows stuck to our lips, late night As we are festively planning our holiday schedules through this magical time Weaver Photos m A nson, AG e r s June dixon Dream good movie on the couch, findingteam the perfect to league andtree headed home. He missed her,myself his good of year, i have found stopping to savor so many moments this season. A s s i s tA n t Love Eric ter from the kids while helping dig out the ornaments nikki Burkhalter hot chocolate nights with delicious marshmallows stuck to our lips, late night food, etc. – everything was too hard! m A n AG e r s June dixon y heart overflows with gratitude for our family. family snuggles with a good movie on the couch, finding the perfect tree to Rebecca Galloway Photographynikki Burkhalter As Morris (Quaid) walked back decorate to the and clubhouse turn the laughter to from the kids while helping dig out the ornaments h OtO r A Poverflows h e r s with Antgratitude hill Photography and stringgame thePlights. heart for our family. ce blossom this year as shegear grows in, intohe the walked most his by a little league inmyG progress. Ryan Lee Photography as we also welcomed a new little nephew who made his David Parks Photography He paused to watch for a few minutes. He saw several of the P h OtO G r A P h e r s Ant hill Photography We have watched a niece blossom this year as she grows into the most fall. All around us, we are surrounded by loved ones. adorable toddler, as we also little nephew who made his erica new s. love players laughing and smiling. These kidslittle were playing awelcomed game David Parks Photogra by C ov eones. r P h oto Michelle Camposano, beautiful entrance this fall. All around us, we are surrounded loved ave a similar theme ofthat how family impacted so theyhas loved playing .... and so was he. His circumstances millie mac Photography eric s. love le people you will read about in their stories. Family by Dream Weaver Photos issue seems to weave of how family has impacted so shae Foy Photography theoursame hour ago; but, his a similar theme millie mac Photograp o we become and whowere we teach childrenthat to be.they were an this of these incredible people you will read about in their stories. Family s. Peggy Bryant, Bishop frederick Williams, so perspective hadand changed. He wasmany reminded of the joy he hadshannan blanchard Photography shae Foy Photograph shapes who we are, who we become and who we teach our children to be. stories of where they came from that brought them to Gary, ms.to Peggy Bishop frederick Sale Williams, and so while playing baseball. Jim MorrisCoach wasDamien promoted theBryant, majors s Dottie Hicks shannan blanchard P many more share their stories of where they came from that brought them to shortly after that. Where he excelled as a relief pitcher. C ov e r P h oto Officer travis Goodson, Landon Spivey where they are today. nating realization of all is Ithat family is created through have found myself muttering about a meeting, a C ov e r P h oto Officer travis Goodso Photo by David Parks Michael Lane tance. family and love is a choice, whether born into or Perhaps the most fascinating realization of all is that family is created through commitment; even going to a grandchild’s baseball game two Photo by David Parks Photography more than one circumstance. family and love is a choice, whether born into or Patti Martin hours away. OR I can remind myself that I get to meet new Photography chosen. year, i hope we all remember to count our blessings, as Randy Montague and interesting people; I get to do a job I thoroughly love. And A l ewe s allKeisha Cory for the little moments...the ones we will look back on As we move into a new year, ishope remember to count our blessings, as mostonof I get enjoy s A l e s Keisha Cory hose that remain imprinted ourall, hearts thatto carry us my grandchildren! often as we remember, for the little moments...the ones we will look back on Patti martin theand years.get it’s those that remain imprinted on our hearts that carry us life. Patti martin I hope you are able to enjoy thisthrough issue to be Contributing landon spivey through the seasons of life. landon spivey to families people you may not have ever had the ou and the love you allintroduced pour out onto our Wri te r s D. Annette Sasser We are so grateful for you and the love you all pour out onto our families raging emails and ideas all sent our way. hope you opportunity toWe meet otherwise. C O n t r i B emails u t i n Gand ideas all sent through readers, encouraging our way. We hope you David Pena gratitude to each advertiser that is listed on page 192 COntriButinG I’ll close now as I am getting ready and watch one of advertiser that is listed on page 192 will jointo usgo in extending gratitude ation possible to the community at no charge. Wri tetoreach s Chehaw.org Eric Love which make this publication possible to the community at no charge. Writ e r s Chehaw.org my grandsons “PLAY BALL!!!”

amily a merry Christmas and the hAPPiest neW YeAr es!

God Bless!!! John 10:10

Jessica Fellows

Jessica Fellows June b. Anderson Karen Cohilas Karen Cohilas © Chatham County Living is published Kate deloach View our magazines FREE online at:three times a year by With You in Mind Publications.Kate deloach Keisha Cory withyouinmindpublications.com Keisha Cory www.withyouinmindpublications.com rachel Price P.O. Box 55 • Glennville, GA 30427 rachel Price Wishing you and your family a merry Christmas the hAPPiest neW YeAr June and b. Anderson full of love and memories!

Jay and Patti Martin

gazines FREE online at:

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Albany living magazine© is All published Albany magazine© is publishe rights reserved. Copies or reproduction of this publication in wholeliving or in part Sales: (912) 654-3045 semi-annually by With You in mind Public semi-annually by With You in mind Publications. is strictly prohibited without expressed written authorization from the publisher. to yours, Email: jay@wyimpublications.comFrom our familywww.withyouinmindpublications.com www.withyouinmindpublications.com Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein. Boxnotice. 55 • Glennville, GA 30427 P.O. Box 55 • Glennville, GA 30427 withyouinmindpublications.com Advertising is subject to omission, errors, and other changesP.O. without (912) 654-3045 (912) 654-3045 8

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sales: (912) 293-5900 All rights reserved. Copies or reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is strictly prohibited without expressed written authorization from the publisher. email: landonspivey.wyim@gmail.com every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein. Advertising is subject to omission, errors, and other changes without notice.

All rights reserved. Copies or reproduction of this publication in w is strictly prohibited without expressed written authorization from every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information con Advertising is subject to omission, errors, and other changes wit


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Beyond

the Beans

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BY DAVID PENA | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY BITTY & BEAU & RYAN LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Bitty and Beau’s founder, Amy Wright, helps people wih Down syndrome gain independence through employment.

f

When you first enter Bitty and Beau’s Coffee Shop at 319 West Congress Street, you immediately know that this is not your ordinary, run-of-the-mill coffeehouse. Founder Amy Wright says that the attention to detail and emphasis on customer relations are what makes the difference at Bitty and Beau’s. “We love to make everyone feel welcome when they come in the door. That’s where the smiles start, and it sets the tone for the experience they are about to have,” she says. And while the coffee they serve is truly

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amazing, it’s really the staff who makes the difference, most of whom will be employed for the first time in their lives. “Our team really takes time to get to know all our customers, and they help us to tell our special story on a daily basis,” Amy adds. Amy’s story began three years ago when, along with her husband Ben, she started the coffee company in Wilmington, North Carolina. Named after their two youngest children who have Down syndrome, the couple’s business venture hires adults with developmental disabilities to help staff each of their three locations. “From the beginning, our company

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has been very mission-driven,” explains Amy. “My husband and I have four kids, and our two youngest, Bitty and Beau, who are 14 and 9, have Down syndrome. However, we really weren’t creating the shop just to have jobs for them; we were actually hoping to raise some awareness in our community about the need to employ people with intellectual disabilities. We think Bitty and Beau’s just helps to better the community as a whole.” The original shop (aptly named Beau’s Coffee Shop) opened in January of 2016 in


Founder Amy Wright says that the attention to detail and emphasis on customer relations are what makes the difference at Bitty and Beau’s. “We love to make everyone feel welcome when they come in the door. That’s where the smiles start, and it sets the tone for the experience they are about to have,” she says.

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“If you can get businesses to just begin to tuck in one or two people [with IDD], you start to have a substantive impact on the unemployment rate. You can truly change the culture.” - Amy Wright

“My husband and I have four kids, and our two youngest, Bitty and Beau, who are 14 and 9, have Down syndrome. However, we really weren’t creating the shop just to have jobs for them; we were actually hoping to raise some awareness in our community about the need to employ people with intellectual disabilities. We think Bitty and Beau’s just helps to better the community as a whole.”

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Wilmington and was run by 19 employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities. With over 80% of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) unemployed nationwide, Beau’s Coffee sought to create opportunities for people with IDD to become more included and valued in their community. In July 2016, Beau’s Coffee was renamed Bitty & Beau’s Coffee since Beau’s 12th birthday wish was to have his younger sister’s name included in the business’s moniker. In February 2018, a second shop was opened in Charleston,


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in love with the city

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“We’ve always loved this city and see a lot of similar qualities between Charleston, Savannah and Wilmington. There’s a good mixture of community support and tourism in each of the cities (where the businesses are located). When we were searching for a location for our third shop, we had a great response on our social media from Savannah. We also like being in a place where we can reach lots of people with our mission, and Savannah has really embraced us,” explains Amy.


The shop on Congress Street currently employs 20 people, 16 of whom have IDD, and Amy and Ben hope to grow that number over time. “We have a great managerial team in place there, and Ben and I try to visit our three locations at least once a month. But what all of our shops have done is given the public a way to interact with (people with IDD) and see that value that we as parents already see on a daily basis.”

South Carolina to rave reviews. The North Carolina couple has now brought their unique business, as well as the opportunities it creates in the special needs’ community, to Savannah. The newest location of Bitty & Beau’s Coffee officially opened its doors in January on West Congress Street, offering a variety of specialty drinks and a sense of inclusion that is even more special than the lattes and cappuccinos they serve daily. “We’ve always loved this city and see a lot of similar qualities between Charleston, Savannah and Wilmington. There’s a good mixture of community support and tourism in each of the cities (where the businesses are located). When we were searching for a location for our third shop, we had a great response on our social media from Savannah. We also like being in a place where we can reach lots of people with our mission, and Savannah has really embraced us,” explains Amy. Savannah patrons braved the cool January weather and turned out by the dozens with a line of folks stretching down the block in order to be some of the first to be served at the special coffeehouse. Amy and Ben were very pleased with the turnout, but were not altogether surprised, given the community support that Savannah has been known for. “Since the beginning, Savannah has embraced what we’ve been trying to do through our business. We also love the customers who walk in who’ve never heard of us before because we really feel like we make an impact with the way they see people with disabilities,” explains Amy, who has no plans of slowing down any time soon. “We have many more in the pipeline coming,” Amy says. The shop on Congress Street currently employs 20 Hometown Living At Its Best

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people, 16 of whom have IDD, and Amy and Ben hope to grow that number over time. “We have a great managerial team in place there, and Ben and I try to visit our three locations at least once a month. But what all of our shops have done is given the public a way to interact with (people with IDD) and see that value that we as parents already see on a daily basis.” Bitty and Beau’s menu includes coffee, frappes, smoothies as well as an assortment of delicious baked goods. They also have their own line of merchandise which includes hats, mugs, clothing, aprons and more. “People who want to get behind our mission and support us love to go home with a t-shirt or a hat,” Amy says proudly. Still based out of Wilmington, Bitty & Beau’s Coffee Company currently employs around 80 people with IDD, and the company has been featured on The Today Show, Rachael Ray, CNN, Good Morning America, and People Magazine, just to name a few. Additionally, Amy was named 2017 CNN Hero of the Year for her and her husband’s efforts. “What we’ve tried to show is that people with IDD can be interacted with and do a good job and be part of a viable business,” says Ben. “If you can get businesses to just begin to tuck in one or two people [with IDD], you start to have a substantive impact on the unemployment rate. You can truly change the culture.” Amy concurs, saying that the ‘Bitty and Beau’s experience’ can have a lasting effect on the shop’s patrons as well as surrounding businesses. “Our staff really takes the time to forge relationships with our customers, and they share why our shop matters to them. They talk openly about the challenges they face in the business world. They really enlighten our customers, who, in turn, may just walk away from the experience thinking differently about their own business and how they might incorporate someone with a disability,” she says. Amazingly, only 17.5 percent of American adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities are employed, a fact that galvanized Ben and Amy three years ago to create Bitty and Beau’s Coffee Shops, not only for their kids but for anyone who’s been unfairly stigmatized in the business community. “It’s the total experience that sets us apart from other businesses,” says Amy. “I just love seeing the positive transformations that take place in our employees’ lives. Along with our kids, they have made this a labor of love for us; something that we feel is really a calling in our lives. We want to continue to elevate the conversation about people with disabilities and help the public to view them in a whole new light. Ben and I make a great team, and we’re looking forward to big expansion plans. We feel like we’re just getting started, so look for more Bitty and Beau’s shops in the near future in your neck of the woods.” CCL 18

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Savannah avannah Framing raming COMPANY, COMPANY, INC. INC.

Where you’ll find personalized service Where you’ll find personalized service from a trusted and experienced framer from a trusted and experienced framer dedicated to quality workmanship. dedicated to quality workmanship. 5401 WATERS AVE. SAVANNAH, GA, 31404 • 912-352-4064 • WWW.SAVANNAHFRAMING.COM 5401 WATERS AVE. SAVANNAH, GA, 31404 • 912-352-4064 • WWW.SAVANNAHFRAMING.COM


helping children

reach their full potential Chatterbox helps children like Noah Wooten find the words to communicate and learn more.

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Ten-year-old Noah Wooten has striking blue eyes, the kind you notice right away. However, behind those big blue eyes there once was a little boy who couldn’t find the words to communicate adequately. As a result, he frequently had tantrums because he lacked the ability to find words to convey his basic needs and wants. So, when Noah’s mother Jennifer was faced with his autism diagnosis eight years ago, she recalls that it was quite a challenging time for the entire family. “He had meltdowns almost all the time,” she says, “and he was frequently

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sent home from several preschools for being unable to control his outbursts. Needless to say, it was a very difficult time for him and for us.” Noah soon began seeing a neurologist, who referred him to speech and occupational therapy for his language delays and sensory processing disorder related to his autism. These therapies began not only to address issues like the inability to talk or respond to his name when called, but also to address food aversions which left him with a severely limited diet. Soon after, Jennifer and her


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husband began taking their son to Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy in Pooler to begin therapy sessions. “Noah has spent two to three days a week at Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy since he was three years old,” explains Jennifer. “It has honestly been a second home for him for over half of his life. Their tireless work on every aspect of Noah’s growth has been the catalyst for (his ability to become) who he is today.” At the age of eight, Noah began receiving physical therapy to address gross motor skills, which included riding a bike and pumping his legs in order to swing on a swing set - things that are often taken for granted in the typical development of children. Gradually, Noah’s family watched as he made huge strides during his therapy. Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy, LLC is an outpatient pediatric therapy clinic with two offices located in Pooler and Richmond Hill, Georgia. With over 30 therapists and office staff to serve their patients, the clinic’s mission has always been to provide easily accessible speech, occupational, and physical therapy services to children in the greater Savannah area. “Their tireless work on every aspect of Noah’s growth has been the cornerstone of who he is today,” says Jennifer. “I can’t say enough about how their work with Noah has allowed him to find his voice and introduce himself to the world.” “I want to help educate and raise awareness for the signs and symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder and what parents can do if they have concerns,” says owner Beth Fleming, who is also a Pediatric Speech Pathologist at Chatterbox Pediatric. “This developmental disorder affects one out of every forty children. My hope is to help educate parents about how speech, occupational and physical therapy can help their children and feel empowered to seek a referral if they are concerned. The earlier they can begin therapy, the better.” Jennifer Wooten concurs, adding, “Early intervention is absolutely the key to helping children with autism on the path to being their best selves, whatever that may be. You have to remember that autism is a spectrum disorder, and every family’s journey is different.” Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy was originally founded on the principle that their most important consideration is to conduct the practice in ways that are most conducive for a child’s developmental needs. Chatterbox provides treatment for a variety of disorders and delays that include sensory processing disorder, feeding issues, speechlanguage delays, oral motor weakness and delays, selfhelp, fine motor and gross motor delays. “The therapists care about all of the kids. You will never walk into a place where the employees are happier and truly love their jobs,” adds Jennifer. Chatterbox in Pooler joins with Joye Psychology twice yearly to provide free developmental screenings, which include Autism screening. Follow our Facebook page for future dates of screenings at www.facebook.com/ chatterboxpediatrictherapy/

110 PIPEMAKERS CIRCLE, STE 115 | POOLER, GA 31322 2451 B HWY 17 SOUTH | RICHMOND HILL, GA 31324 912-988-1526 | WWW.CHATTERBOXPEDS.COM

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Louann Bronstein loves helping her clients with a spectrum of business transactions and deal structures.

returning to her passion

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“There’s nothing like being at the barn on my horse, Phoenix, when the sun takes a certain angle over the pond and the day begins its transition to dusk,” says corporate attorney Louann Bronstein, who has a passion for all things equestrian. “The stable where I ride is in metro Savannah, but it’s so serene that it could be in the English countryside.” Louann says she returned to her passion about five years ago when her son took up the sport. “Watching Quentin learn to ride brought back some of my fondest childhood memories of growing up in rural North Carolina,” she recalls. Even though she has had some “humbling defeats” in the show arena, Louann enjoys testing her skills in horse shows. Louann and Quentin recently showed in the 103rd Aiken Horse Show in Hitchcock Woods.


e

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d

“There’s nothing like being at the barn on my horse, Phoenix, when the sun takes a certain angle over the pond and the day begins its transition to dusk,” says corporate attorney Louann Bronstein, who has a passion for all things equestrian. “The stable where I ride is in metro Savannah, but it’s so serene that it could be in the English countryside.”

Apart from her talents in the equestrian world, Louann has been with the firm of HunterMaclean for nearly two years. In that time, she has handled a wide variety of commercial transactions. Her mergers and acquisitions practice represents the full spectrum of business transactions and deal structures. “I represent international clients,” she explains. “I enjoy getting to know them, understanding their business, and helping them solve problems.” Louann believes she found the perfect match when she joined HunterMaclean in 2017. Louann, her husband Gary, and Quentin relocated from Atlanta, where she had spent most of her legal career with an international Am Law 100 firm. This experience provided a solid background for all types of corporate work. “It’s not easy to find the opportunity to pair sophisticated legal work with a desirable work-life balance, but being at HunterMaclean strikes the right note with me,” she says. “This leaves me time to pursue my equestrian dreams and, in doing so, spend valuable time with my son.” Louann attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, graduating with a degree in Psychology. She

then attended Georgia State University College of Law, graduating magna cum laude. Since that time, Louann has had a broad corporate law practice with a sub-practice focus on mergers and acquisitions and funding. She works with major corporations, middle market, and closely held companies, ranging from start-up companies to internationally-known corporations. After twenty years of counseling business clients, the transition to become a student was not the easiest, and Louann credits Jackson Regen, her trainer, for his patience while helping her gain the confidence to hone her riding skills. “Coaching others and helping them grow is difficult, and an understanding of how to connect with people and find solutions that work for them is key to success,” she explains. With offices in Savannah and Brunswick, HunterMaclean is a business law firm representing companies across the Southeast and throughout the United States. Louann and her colleagues at HunterMaclean are committed to serving their clients as well as their community, helping to bring prosperity to both. To learn more, please visit www.huntermaclean.com or call (912) 236-0261.

200 EAST SAINT JULIAN STREET | SAVANNAH, GA 31401 TEL: 912.236.0261 | FAX: 912.236.4936 Hometown Living At Its Best

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Marble

A Life In

Stephen Angell found a passion for art in marble sculpture

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Story By: D. Annette Sasser | Photos Provided by Stephen Angell and Dream Weaver Photos

Stephen Angell was the fourth among five sons born to OBGYN Specialist, Dr. John Angell, and his wife, Ashby Lippitt. The five brothers attended Country Day School in Savannah. “After graduation I went to college in Sewanee with plans to major in photography,” said Stephen. “My first venture into the visual arts was through the lens of photography. But the Art program at Sewanee was limited so I transferred to the University of Georgia. It was there I discovered my love of marble.” Hometown Living At Its Best

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The scent of sassafras hinted that spring was lurking close by despite winter’s right to carry its seasonal title for another six weeks. My friend and I followed Savannah native and marble sculpture artist Stephen Angell down a winding trail on his Coffee Bluff property through camellia trees of different colors. “The sunrise here is breathtaking,” said Stephen. “But the yard was a jungle before I moved here.” The once unkempt wooded area surrounding his home is now a picturesque haven of beauty, and the perfect place to display his marble creations. Inside his charming, waterfront home we walked through Stephen’s studio and gallery where black and white “seatable coffee tables and end tables” made of marble, granite, and stainless steel were displayed. “I love black and white together,” he said, “the tables connect or can stand alone.” We read over the titles of other pieces: “Dreamer”, “Tsunami”, “Undertow”,

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“Creative people are curious, flexible, persistent, and independent with a tremendous spirit of adventure and a love of play.� ~ Henri Matisse

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“Mascher” and “Still Life”, all created from Italian Marble, and “Thuya Totem” created from Thuya Burl found in Morocco. It was evident that we were in the presence of a unique artist. Stephen Angell was the fourth among five sons born to OBGYN Specialist, Dr. John Angell, and his wife, Ashby Lippitt. The five brothers attended Country Day School in Savannah. “After graduation I went to college in Sewanee with plans to major in photography,” said Stephen. “My first venture into the visual arts was through the lens of photography. But the Art program at Sewanee was limited so I transferred to the University of Georgia. It was there I discovered my love of marble.” At that time the art department at UGA offered an opportunity for art students to study in Italy. Stephen

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applied for the program and was accepted. “I was fortunate to be able to complete most of my degree from UGA in Carrara, Italy. It was a lucky break for me. It gave me time to be at the wonderful center of sculpture. I loved Italy so much I stayed there after graduation for another fifteen years to study marble sculpting independently. I was able to taste the whole of Italy, immersing myself in its art history.” Stephen’s adventurous nature found new life in Italy and he took advantage of his time there to explore other places as well. “I am somewhat a wanderlust,” said Stephen. “While I lived in Europe I was able to really taste the whole periphery of the south of the Mediterranean.” Stephen, who speaks fluent Italian and French, has expanded both his knowledge

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a work of beauty

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“The sunrise here is breathtaking,” said Stephen. “But the yard was a jungle before I moved here.” The once unkempt wooded area surrounding his home is now a picturesque haven of beauty, and the perfect place to display his marble creations.


and experience by traveling to places like Spain, Yugoslavia, Turkey, Greece, Israel, North Africa, and France, “in South France, I lived in a sixteenth century cabin and worked in the vineyards to help finance my travels and studies,” said Stephen. “And I really loved North Africa. I ended up living in Morocco for seven years.” One of the highlights of Stephen’s time in Italy was watching some of Italy’s finest craftsmen create a fullscale reproduction of Michael Angelo’s masterpiece of David. “Those guys were really amazing,” he said. “The whole thing was totally Math. It was precise. Ironically, the Italian craftsmen said “they were a little jealous of those of us who were artists, because all they knew how to do was replicate the artist’s work.” When Stephen first returned home to the States in 1999, He moved to his childhood refuge, the Angell Farm on Old Buttermilk Road near Millen, Georgia. “When I was a kid, I loved going to our family farm there,” said Stephen. “My father took us boys there in the summer to experience farm life. We originally had cattle, but later trees became our main product.” Even as a child Stephen relished solitude. “Marble requires focus and the farm became my paradise, a place of escape.” When he returned to the States, he knew it would be the perfect place. Stephen later moved from the farm to his Coffee Bluff home where he presently lives with his seventeenyear-old dog, Mia, a standard poodle and smaller European mix he adopted while living in Morocco. Inspired by his travels and the beauty of nature surrounding his new residence at Vernonburg, he continues to create beautiful sculptures. “I have all the marble I work with shipped from overseas,” he said. Hometown Living At Its Best

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“I found my voice in marble,” said Stephen. “My visual evolution is described by my travels,” he says. “While living in Europe, I fell in love with European origins and aesthetics. My adventure began in Carrara, Italy, sculpting, and exploring Southern Europe in dialogue with art and its origins, and has continued with years of re-nourishment, in a back-and- forth between continents.” Stephen has held private and juried group exhibitions in Atlanta, Athens, Dallas, Hilton Head, South Carolina, Morocco, Italy, as well as his hometown of Savannah. “I am fortunate to have a major creation of two figures in black and white on display in the Jepson Center in Savannah, and, also, a sculpture called Easter Island Redux in Castle Berry Square in Atlanta,” said Stephen. I have heard it said that marble is a remarkable and timeless medium (materials used to create a work of art), something Stephen understands well. “I work directly with stone,” he said. “The magic begins for me at the source. Marble is an igneous stone of sedimentary, aquatic origin. Carving stone is a de-constructive approach to conception, which is a physical and mental concentration whose focus is the language of my abstraction. It is an active discourse with what I have felt as the resounding call of human contiguity, said in stone.” Although all of Stephen’s sculptors are impressive, I could hardly pull myself away from the majesty of his

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“I found my voice in marble,” said Stephen. “My visual evolution is described by my travels,” he says. “While living in Europe, I fell in love with European origins and aesthetics. My adventure began in Carrara, Italy, sculpting, and exploring Southern Europe in dialogue with art and its origins, and has continued with years of re-nourishment, in a back-andforth between continents.” ~ Steven Angell

fountains that were set in his backyard on the Vernon River. My favorite was Abode, an equilateral pyramid created from Statuario Marble, and a prototype of a larger twenty-one foot fountain he hopes to build in the future. I could easily visualize the larger fountain of Abode sited in one of Savannah’s parks or squares; a place where Savannahians and visitors alike could sit and relax, even from the inside of the fountain looking out through the refreshing, splashing water. Creativity is a gift, a dream born in the heart. As with the remarkable sculptures of Steven Angell, when it is discovered, nurtured and explored, it is rewarding for both the artist and the buyer. Contact Information: Website: angellsculptor.com; Email, stephenangell@comcast.net; 912-925-9808  CCL

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compassion

WITH THE PATIENT IN MIND Dr. Oliver’s desire is to help patients live a stronger and healthier life. By D. A nnette Sa sser

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Some remember a time when compassion was a common quality among doctors and health professions. But in today’s rushed and time-depleted world, its often difficult to find that physician who can provide both excellent care and personal connection. It’s not that they don’t exist. There are those who practice medicine with the patient in mind, but finding that person can often be an added stress at an already difficult time. From our first appointment with Dr. David Oliver, a physician with over thirty-one years of experience, my husband John and I felt relief. We knew without a doubt we could trust him to listen and provide the best care possible. An excellent physician loved by many in this community, he cared for us both as if we were his own family. Dr. Oliver’s practice includes adult and pediatric ENT disorders, sinus disease, sleep apnea treatment, and many outpatient and office minimally invasive procedures. He has practiced in the Savannah area since 1994. I became his patient in 2005 when it was necessary for me to undergo sinus surgery. Not only was the surgery a success, I experienced his caring bedside manner first hand.


Dr. Oliver’s practice includes adult and pediatric ENT disorders, sinus disease, sleep apnea treatment, and many outpatient and office minimally invasive procedures.

Dr. Oliver’s desire to help patients live a stronger and healthier life led him to expand his practice at Coastal Ear Nose & Throat to include the Fyzical Balance Center and the Hearing Center. He continually seeks to find newer, innovative ways to help patients live the best quality of life possible. My husband John first saw Dr. Oliver for sleep apnea in 2014. Three years later, John became Dr. Oliver’s first patient to receive therapy at the Fyzical Balance Center. With the professional help of Physical Therapist Bridget Malloy, John’s gait and balance improved greatly. One year later, John was hospitalized with a severe case of pneumonia. As he struggled to recover his strength, he once again returned to Fyzical Balance Center. Physical Therapist Beth Benson helped him quickly recover so that he could return to his normal activities. Dr. Oliver’s compassion and empathy are not simply a practice for his practice. These qualities are deeply rooted in his home life. His wife and teammate, Rhonda, is also a part of all that he does as the Administrator at Coastal Ear, Nose, & Throat. He’s quite proud of his four children, Steven, Ben, Ashley, who also does allergy testing and shots at his practice, and Austin, the youngest son, who is currently a freshman at Georgia Southern University. There’s a lot of evidence today that love for nature promotes wellbeing. Dr. Oliver’s love for nature and the outdoors is perhaps another reason he relates so well to his patients. He enjoys everything from boating, fishing, paddle boarding, hunting, and various sports events. He and his wife Rhonda enjoy dancing, traveling, and even a day in the woods hunting together. One of their favorite places is the Forest City Gun Club, which Dr. Oliver feels is a hidden treasure of Savannah. Professionalism doesn’t always come with humility. Intelligence isn’t always communicated with empathy. And many of us have felt it necessary to sacrifice one for the other at times. With Dr. Oliver, my husband and I receive the old-fashioned time and attention that was once a common practice without feeling we have to compromise expert medical attention. On behalf of your patients and this community, we thank you, Dr. Oliver, with all our hearts.

Savannah (912) 355-2335 322 COMMERCIAL DRIVE, SUITE 2 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31406

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1575 WOODROW WILLIAMS RD | COBBTOWN, GA (912) 282-2259 | @THEBARNCOBBTOWN


9 a lady

on the go

A senior living community that offers its residents all the comforts of home

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94-year-old Martha Brooks is a lady on the go. Just about every day of the week, you can usually spot the active nonagenarian walking the grounds of Savannah Square, a senior living community on the Southside of Savannah, where she’s been a resident for the past four years. “I’m probably one of the only residents who regularly walks,” she laughs. “I just love to keep as active as I can be and move around. It’s good for the body.” When she’s not out exercising, Martha loves to listen to her classical music. “I’m a big fan of waltzes,” she adds with a smile. Martha has resided at Savannah Square since moving in with her late husband Charles, and she says she wouldn’t have it any other way. “Everyone on the staff here is so nice and have been eager to help.” As for her fellow residents, she says. “Everyone I’ve met is very pleasant to me. It’s been a great place to live these past few years.” Before moving into the senior living community, Martha and her husband lived in Atlanta for a number of years. When the couple was looking to relocate to Savannah


Some of the community’s many amenities include a full-service beauty salon, a fitness studio, a library as well as a clubhouse. Residents can also enjoy five-star restaurant-style dining with a menu prepared by an on-site chef.

to be nearer to their 6 children who lived here, their granddaughter told them that she had just the place in mind. “My granddaughter is a physical therapist, and she has clients here, so she highly recommended Savannah Square to us, and I am so grateful to her for that,” she says. Martha and her husband were married for 73 years before he passed last year, but she says living at Savannah Square has been like a home away from home for both of them. “They took good care of him when he was alive, and now that I’m alone, they see to it that all my needs are met,” she explains. Savannah Square offers Martha and her fellow residents an abundance of intellectually stimulating, physical and spiritual wellness activities. Some of the community’s many amenities include a full-service beauty salon, a fitness studio, a library as well as a clubhouse. Residents can also enjoy five-star restaurant-style dining with a menu prepared by an on-site chef. “I love eating the great food here,” says Martha with a smile, “and it’s great because I don’t have to go to the grocery store and I don’t have to cook.” And in addition to housekeeping services, a car service is provided every day of the week. Savannah Square also provides its senior residents convenient access to all the best dining, shopping and cultural attractions that historic Savannah has to offer. The staff always makes sure there are events and activities planned, such as weekly musical performances from local artists. “We always have some sort of entertainment available to us,” says Martha. As Savannah’s only active senior living community, Savannah Square offers comfortable and elegant residences for seniors who have an array of diverse lifestyles and requirements. With their spacious one- and two-bedroom cottages and apartments, Savannah Square’s independent living accommodations are perfect for active seniors, while the senior community also features Palmetto Inn, a personal care residence complete with an on-site rehabilitation center. “The staff is always helpful with anything that you might need, and they do it in such a pleasant way,” Martha says. Savannah Square is located at 1 Savannah Square Dr. in Savannah, Georgia. To schedule a tour of this beautiful gated community, please call (912) 927-7550 and ask to speak to a member of the Sales Team.

Savannah

Square

Come take a tour with our sales team Kelli Hartley, Sales Director, and Arianna Maldonado, Move In Coordinator. Hometown Living At Its Best

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In the Land of Giants 42

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Story and Photos By Eric Love

Experimenting with different genres, Lulu and the Giants play everything from full metal rock to Americana and folk along the East Coast, but they always come home to Savannah.

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There was something about walking into a music room. Like a library or an art studio, it’s the smell which first tells the stories. The band rooms of my childhood, with their scents of brass and leather, always held the power to evoke a nostalgia for something pure and comforting. Art, regardless of the form it takes, is born from a place within humanity that desires to tell stories and risks doing so almost recklessly in its honesty. I believe that is why artists

and musicians often exist just outside what society considers normal. They live instead on the fringe, or beyond. They live in a place where stories, whether told with color or notes or dance, are the evidence of life and its fullness. Growing up telling stories and making music, I learned to see the world in different hues. Even now the smell of books in a library or the site of fingers dancing on strings moves me. It isn’t hard, then, to understand why meeting Rachael Shaner felt Hometown Living At Its Best

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Musicians live in a place where stories, whether told with color or notes or dance, are the evidence of life and its fullness.

more like seeing a member of my tribe than meeting a stranger. Growing up, Rachael’s family called her Lulu. She loved music and played the upright bass. When she began studying music in school, she wasn’t tall enough for the bass. That did not stop her. She was classically trained in the art program in the public school system in Savannah, but when she attended Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, she studied Writing Composition. She wanted to learn to write lyrics. Musically, Rachael switched from classical to jazz to learn improvisation. With her primary focus on writing, however, she found she had less time with her bass. Playing music had always been her passion though she hadn’t recognized it. It was foundational to her life and in a way taken for granted. In time, she realized writing wasn’t what she wanted. “The bass is so subtle and sublime,” she said, “I didn’t realize until it was gone that I wanted to do that.” Half a semester from graduating, she left college with no regrets. She’s been playing music ever since. “I do this full time. Music, and the bass specifically, is my rock.” Rachael returned home to Savannah and played in a dozen or more bands, experimenting with different genres. She played everything from full metal rock to Americana and folk. She played rock, blues and funk, sometimes fusing them together. Playing the

Growing up, Rachael’s family called her Lulu. She loved music and played the upright bass. When she began studying music in school, she wasn’t tall enough for the bass. That did not stop her. She was classically trained in the art program in the public school system in Savannah, but when she attended Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, she studied Writing Composition.

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upright bass made Rachael an anomaly. Much like her personal energy, this made her deviate from what was expected or considered normal. It set her apart. In 2017, she formed a band. Appropriately called Lulu the Giant, Rachael and her band mates released a blues-rock album titled “Kingdoms Fall.” They toured the east coast and made friends in cities like Charleston

and Raleigh. Since, she and the band have performed throughout the country, but they always come home to Savannah. In February of this year, two years to the day since the release of their first album, Lulu the Giant released “Solid Gold.” This time, Rachael and her band mate Daniel Malone, a jazz drummer, have created a rock-soul album that resonates with a passion

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Musically, Rachael switched from classical to jazz to learn improvisation. With her primary focus on writing, however, she found she had less time with her bass. Playing music had always been her passion though she hadn’t recognized it.

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demonstrative not only of musical mastery and invention but also a raw love for the craft of making music. “Sometimes you follow demand,” Rachael explains. “But most times I’m just like, ‘I’m good.’ I know I’m getting better as a musician, and that’s fulfilling.” Rachael and Daniel, along with jazz-guitarist Jacob Evans, are promoting the album which unsurprisingly does not cater to the demands of popular culture. Rather, it bears the vitality and unique voice of those who created it. As full-time musicians, Rachael and her band mates are aware of a dilution in the music scene in the digital age. “We have to do it for the love of it,” Rachael says. “Before


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“I do this full time. Music, and the bass specifically, is my rock.” Rachael returned home to Savannah and played in a dozen or more bands, experimenting with different genres. She played everything from full metal rock to Americana and folk. She played rock, blues and funk, sometimes fusing them together. Playing the upright bass made Rachael an anomaly.

it was, ‘Are you gonna buy this $35 vinyl because you love this band? Absolutely.’ But now it’s like .01% of one cent per stream, and you have to have six million streams to make $12. There’s no way to do it for the money anymore. So for us it’s about making a live show experience that people don’t forget.” They succeed. When you watch them perform, and watching plays as big a role in a Lulu the Giant show as listening, you witness artists doing what they love, and it’s obvious. They are having fun and it shows. Like any artist, it has been a journey getting to this point. Since her childhood, Rachael

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was directed by a passion for music which transcended mere curiosity or fad. Even then she spent hours each day practicing. It is little wonder she is equally passionate about art and music being taught in public schools. She traces her musical roots and the opportunities which sprung from them to studying classical music in her public school system growing up. Rachael believes in the power of the arts to help children grow and learn. “Art should not be accessible only to those with an affluent standing,” she says. “It’s the same with education, and I think music and education go hand in hand.” As someone who is living her dream and doing what she loves, she relishes opportunities to visit the arts programs in local schools and inspire the students to stay in the arts. “For me, not coming from an affluent background, I wouldn’t have had those opportunities [without] arts programing where someone can get ahead. Having those opportunities and seeing where it took me, giving me a step up and giving me an outlet, I’m a huge advocate for arts programs in schools.” As political and economic factors play tug-of-war with local, state and federal budgets, cutting funding for art and after-school programs is often among the lowest hanging fruit for saving money. The impact of this is dangerous. “Savannah cut their arts budget [in 2017] by 100%,” Rachael says, “so now the private sector has to step up and fund these after-school programs that are super important. [Students]


In 2017, she formed a band. Appropriately called Lulu the Giant, Rachael and her band mates released a blues-rock album titled “Kingdoms Fall.” They toured the east coast and made friends in cities like Charleston and Raleigh. Since, she and the band have performed through-out the country, but they always come home to Savannah.

need instruments. Teachers need salaries. What can we do for that? What I can do is go play a free concert for them and fight for them at City Hall, cause I have a voice now. I can say, ‘I came from this system, and this is where I am now. Listen to my voice if you won’t listen to theirs.’” In education there is a focus on the common core subjects of reading and math. From a pragmatic perspective, these skills are vital to a child’s development and will play an important role when they take their eventual place in society. It might be easy to dismiss art and music as being secondary, but this logic ignores

obvious connections between the arts and the health and growth of children. Studying art improves motor skills and assists in language development, decision making and cultural awareness. For some students, visual learning is the key difference between success and failure. Music has been linked to improved social skills and regulation of emotion. Is that surprising? It shouldn’t be. Children seem to learn to dance before they learn to walk. Music serves as a common ground which unites us across differing opinions and views. It is powerful and emotive: a unifier and equalizer. Hometown Living At Its Best

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“Sometimes you follow demand,” Rachael explains. “But most times I’m just like, ‘I’m good.’ I know I’m getting better as a musician, and that’s fulfilling.” Rachael and Daniel, along with jazz-guitarist Jacob Evans, are promoting the album which unsurprisingly does not cater to the demands of popular culture. Rather, it bears the vitality and unique voice of those who created it.

Like sports and other group activities, learning music teaches children how to interact with others and work as a team. It has been known for some time there is a correlation between the arts and improved academic performance. Art and music have been with us since the beginning. Throughout history, they have often walked hand-in-hand with cultural growth, serving as both our anthems and the imagery of our revolutions. Anyone who feels stirring in their chest during the opening refrain of our national anthem or can still remember the song on the radio when they had their first kiss understands the potency of music in our lives. Musicians are among society’s poets, and a world without poetry is a world without color. Rachael, like so many who have art and music in their DNA, stands for the right of all students to study art and music. More than a right, it is a necessity. Once upon a time, Rachael was the girl called Lulu who wanted to study the upright bass but was too short. Now she is the Giant. That’s why Rachael is an advocate. It turns out, artists are not outliers. They aren’t fringe dwellers. Rather, they stand as the vanguard of our future. They are the recorders of our history. The tellers of our tales. They bear witness to our humanity and give it voice. More than that, often they give us wings and propel us forward. Their songs are the soundtrack to our childhoods. Their motion pictures and illustrations are our imagination keepers. Their books are our constant companions. No matter their medium, artists are the heartbeat of society. Now, consider our children. One way or another, they will become our leaders and influencers. They will carry on our stories. Giving them the gift of music and art is giving them tools to grow and improve the world around them. It is giving them a voice. Rachael, like others who value the arts in our children’s lives, does not stand alone. She sees a world with a bright, shining future. She stands in a land full of giants. For booking or contact information, visit www.luluthegiant.com. Check upcoming shows and stream their latest album, “Solid Gold.”  CCL

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DISCOVER MORE. CONNECT MORE. BE MORE. At GEORGIA SOUTHERN, there are more opportunities to succeed, discover new worlds, find a career and make a difference. With more than 140 degree programs and three vibrant campuses, we are passionate about individual success and dedicated to preparing students for lifelong service as scholars and leaders.

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Prioritize Your Peace Of Mind From insurance to retirement planning, I’ll help you bring it all together. Give me a call today to make sure you’re on track to a stronger financial future, or complete the “Contact Me” form on my website at:

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everlasting beauty a VIP experience

a

Our purpose is to enhance your natural beauty and to give you the confidence that you need and deserve by tailoring your experience to suite your individual needs.

As the search for everlasting beauty continues, advancements in medical technology now offer more paths to the fountain of youth than ever before. Vitali Medspa is defining beauty and defying time by offering the latest and most advanced innovations of cosmetic technologies. That paired with highly skilled professionals and Senior Laser Providers set Vitali Medspa apart from all other facilities in the area. With new technologies constantly hitting the market, the demand for non-surgical cosmetic treatments is growing rapidly. “People want their treatments to be less invasive with quicker recovery times” said Kelly Kessinger, MSN, Senior Laser Provider at Vitali Medspa. “We end up getting really good results consistently because we have reliable and highly responsive technology as well as providers with advanced specialty training”. Here’s a sampling of that groundbreaking technology: PROFOUND Profound is the first and only non-surgical radiofrequency microneedling device with FDA clearance for the face and body. It is clinically proven to stimulate up to five times more elastin, two times more collagen, and increased hyaluronic acid with a single treatment. Profound has shown a 100% response rate for facial wrinkles to create significant smoothing and lifting effects ideal for areas such as jowls and neck lines. It also has an impressive 94% response rate for reducing the appearance of cellulite. “Profound is a powerful tool that combines two effective technologies for greater performance and noticeable anti-aging results for patients who are not candidates or are not ready for a surgical facelift” stated Kessinger. Remarkably, only one Profound treatment is needed. Most patients resume normal activities within 24 to 48 hours.

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VELA SHAPE III The VelaShape III is the first FDA cleared, non-invasive device proven to be safe and effective in waist and thigh circumference reduction as well as treatment of cellulite. What makes this body contouring device unique is its combination of Bi-Polar Radiofrequency, Infrared Light Energy, plus Vacuum and Mechanical Massage, all in one treatment. Through a virtually painless process, VelaShape III safely contours, shapes and slims the body, allowing patients to achieve a more toned, contoured figure in as few as three treatments. LASER HAIR REMOVAL WITH GENTE MAX PRO Most hair removal treatments and at-home methods like shaving and waxing can be painful and only provide temporary results. Laser hair removal with the GentleMax Pro is safe and effective at eliminating unwanted and stubborn hair. GentleMax Pro uses a unique dual-mode system safe for all skin types and a dynamic cooling device that lets out cold bursts of air on the treated area to help protect the skin and provide a more comfortable experience.


VAGINAL REJUVENATION WITH CO2 REINTIMA With the CO2RE Intima laser, vaginal rejuvenation without surgery is possible. The CO2RE Intima is a fractionated CO2 laser that delivers pulses of laser energy to the vaginal wall and the vulvar tissue, via a simple handheld device. The heat CO2 REFRACTIONAL RESURFACING delivered by the pulses stimulates new collagen growth, with The CO2RE Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser Resurfacing removes layers of skin tissue in a fractional method (columns minimal discomfort. The healing response also enhances moisture levels in the vaginal canal. During treatment, there of skin are removed, leaving the skin surrounding each column intact to aid in healing). This helps reduce “age-spots” is no need for anesthesia to the vaginal canal; however a (also called sun freckles, liver spots and lentigines), fine lines, topical numbing cream is applied to the external area. You will feel the sensation of heat in the treatment area, but at a wrinkles, scarring, uneven coloration, skin laxity, textural level that’s comfortable. irregularities, dull tone, and a thinned collagen layer of the face, neck and chest. Having this treatment is like having Vitali Medspa is located at 130 Canal Street, Suite 403 in multiple other non-invasive treatments at once. It is the best single treatment for more severe skin damage and wrinkling. Pooler. Call 1.833.VITALI1 to schedule a free consultation. The GentleMax Pro can also be used to remove benign keratoses and/or sun spots, ingrown hairs, facial and spider veins, leg veins, nail fungus and pigmented lesions.

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a family affair

By David Pena | Photos by Dream Weaver Photos and provided by Beth E. Logan

Dr. Kathleen Benton “juggles” family and work life as the new CEO at Hospice Savannah.

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Kathleen Benton has been CEO at Hospice Savannah for just over six months, and for her and her family, her chosen vocation of compassionate service to others has always had a special meaning. Kathleen’s youngest brother, Daniel Deloach, suffered from the “Elephant Man” disease (Proteus Syndrome) for most of his life. “He had 110 surgeries before he died,” recalls Kathleen’s mother Julia Deloach. “He had a palliative care physician, Laura Farless, to help him stay at home while receiving vital treatments, thus improving his final days. We all took an active role in his care.” Kathleen’s role as one of his caregivers during her youth helped her to develop a passion for improving patient care through healthcare advocacy.


Parents Mike and Julia Deloach, husband Rex, sons Andrew and Jack, and service dog Mia.

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“I lived in and out of hospitals because of Daniel, so it was not hard for me to be in tough situations with the families involved. Caring for others comes very naturally to me.”

A CAREGIVER PAST Kathleen’s youngest brother, Daniel Deloach, suffered from the “Elephant Man” disease (Proteus Syndrome) for most of his life. “He had 110 surgeries before he died,” recalls Kathleen’s mother Julia Deloach. “He had a palliative care physician, Laura Farless, to help him stay at home while receiving vital treatments, thus improving his final days. We all took an active role in his care.”

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Kathleen’s life as a Mom, daughter, and CEO is a true juggling act!

Prior to her new role Kathleen was employed at St. Joseph’s/Candler as a Director of Ethics and Palliative Care and served on Hospice Savannah’s board for about ten years making sure that patients were treated ethically. It was during this time that Daniel was nearing the end of his short life. She says, “I lived in and out of hospitals because of Daniel, so it was not hard for me to be in tough situations with the families involved. Caring for others comes very naturally to me. I wanted to make sure I could do something where I was able to contribute to the ‘peace’ of the health care continuum. Although I was always sure to advocate for what was right, it wasn’t always easy to do that.” Mom Julia stresses that Kathleen and the entire family were very involved with Daniel’s care. “She encouraged my husband and me to get some counseling from Full Circle, another Hospice Savannah program, since being in and out of hospitals all the time eventually took its toll.” Julia says she always knew her daughter would be in a caring profession, “She got involved with Relay For Life while at St. Vincent’s Academy. When she went to college, she started Relay For

HELPING OTHERS Julia says she always knew her daughter would be in a caring profession, “She got involved with Relay For Life while at St. Vincent’s Academy. When she went to college, she started Relay For Life there, and it’s still going strong. She’s always felt a need to help others.” With her roots firmly planted in Savannah dating back to her great-grandparents, Kathleen attended Furman University and holds a Masters in Bioethics from Case Western Reserve University and a Doctorate in Public Health Leadership from Georgia Southern.

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DECIDING HER FUTURE Two years after the death of her brother, Kathleen knew that she had to make a change in careers. “Daniel was 30 when he died, and had a lot of hospitalizations throughout his life. I watched him need a patient advocate throughout his entire journey,” she says. “Our family’s caregiving journey helped me develop a passion for helping patients in ALL stages of their illness, whether chronically or terminally ill.”

Life there, and it’s still going strong. She’s always felt a need to help others.” With her roots firmly planted in Savannah dating back to her great-grandparents, Kathleen attended Furman University and holds a Masters in Bioethics from Case Western Reserve University and a Doctorate in Public Health Leadership from Georgia Southern. With three young children of her own, Kathleen and her husband, Rex, now call Savannah’s Isle of Hope home. Two years after the death of her brother, Kathleen knew that she had to make a change in careers. “Daniel was 30 when he died, and had a lot of hospitalizations throughout his life. I watched him need a patient advocate throughout his entire journey,” she says. “Our family’s caregiving journey helped me develop a passion for helping patients in ALL stages of their illness, whether chronically or terminally ill. I know that when you have a chronic or terminal illness it’s very emotional and inhibits every aspect of your life. I want to be able to take some of that burden off of the patients and their families and give them the right resources to help cope and gain support for what they’re going through.” Coming to Hospice Savannah where she could help both the terminally ill AND those, like Daniel, who faced years of palliative care for a serious illness, was a natural fit. “When Kathleen told me that she was a candidate for this position (at Hospice), I told her that she made Daniel’s life about as good as 60

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it could be. I said, ‘If anyone is qualified for this position, you are.’ I think it’s a perfect fit,” says her mother. Under Kathleen’s guidance, Hospice Savannah is growing their community programs that help people have an overall better quality of life. In addition to the Steward Center for Palliative Care and Full Circle Grief & Loss, it also has the Edel Caregiver Institute offering free resources, hands-on skills classes, and deep relaxation yoga and support groups for unpaid family caregivers. “It’s a massive organization, not just a building on Eisenhower,” claims Kathleen. “Our employees, our Hospice House, and our programs are what sets us apart from other healthcare organizations and hospices. It’s safe to say that Hospice Savannah is truly multi-faceted in its approach to patient care.” Hometown Living At Its Best

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“I want to be able to take some of that burden off of the patients and their families and give them the right resources to help cope and gain support for what they’re going through.”

Kathleen’s brother Daniel with her three young children

AN END TO ALL THINGS Working in an environment where death is ever-present, one may assume that the death of a patient is something that Kathleen would find difficult, but you’d be wrong in that assumption. “The end of a person’s life can be a very peaceful phase, to be honest. Ironically, the challenges lie in the advancements we’ve made in medicine. In our culture, we are used to a ‘quick fix,’ particularly in the West. Everyone needs to embrace that there’s an end for all of us at some point, whether we want it or not.” 62

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Working in an environment where death is ever-present, one may assume that the death of a patient is something that Kathleen would find difficult, but you’d be wrong in that assumption. “The end of a person’s life can be a very peaceful phase, to be honest. Ironically, the challenges lie in the advancements we’ve made in medicine. In our culture, we are used to a ‘quick fix,’ particularly in the West. Everyone needs to embrace that there’s an end for all of us at some point, whether we want it or not. That’s hard for some people, even though they know the end is coming. Patients often feel that they’re disappointing their family and worry about what the family faces when they’re gone. And as the patient’s caregiver, people tend to feel useless to ‘fix’ the situation.” “People tend to view our Hospice House building on Eisenhower Drive as a place where people just go to die,” says Kathleen, “but we’re so much more than that. With four board certified hospice and palliative care physicians

on staff, we also handle the pain and discomfort that comes with any type of serious illness LONG before patients need to think about hospice care.” The Steward Center for Palliative Care – a team made up of doctors, nurses, and other professional holistic caregivers - oversee most of the ongoing comfort-care patients receive. While hospice care is almost always administered in the home, palliative care patients usually receive care in an outpatient clinic early in the progression of a serious disease such as congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, cancer or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). For example, while a patient is going through chemotherapy, Dr. Farless, the Steward Center’s medical director can focus on the patient’s pain, nausea and fatigue. Kathleen’s mom Julia agrees that palliative care is a misunderstood and under-utilized medical specialty, “People need to know that palliative care is available. It truly helped Daniel and our family, and it can help anyone in that position.”

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“I really wish that people could see the overall organization; we devote the vast amount of our services to the LIVING, not the dying,” says Kathleen, “If you want to get involved or learn more, please come visit me! My door is always open.” Hospice Savannah, Inc. 912.355.2289 www.HospiceSavannah.org Steward Center for Palliative Care 912.354.8014 www.StewardCenter.org Full Circle Grief Support 912.303.9442 www.HospiceSavannah.org/fullcircle

Dr. Laura Farless, Medical Director for the Steward Center for Palliative Care.”

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Edel Caregiver Institute 912.629.1331 www.EdelCaregiverInstitute.org  CCL


Live Oak Park 316 Stephenson Avenue Savannah, GA 31405 912.355.7790 800.851.8491 •

Lakeside 309 Pete Phillips Drive Vidalia, GA 30474 912.538.0724 •

Godley Station 145 Traders Way, Suite B Pooler, GA 31322

Dale A. Miles, DMD Rebecca M. Aspinwall, DMD Derek V. Miles, DMD

912.998.0020

“Specializing in root canal therapy since 1986” Hometown Living At Its Best

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DUFFY & FEEMSTER, LLC (912) 236-6311

Call today to schedule a consultation. 66

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EST. 1951


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e are lawyers you can trust at your most difficult moments. Whether you have been seriously injured in a car or truck accident, or you have recently been charged with a DUI, or you hope to gain custody of your children, or you need advice about a business contract, our team of lawyers and professionals has the experience and patience to pursue the result you seek. No one ever wants to be in a situation that requires a lawyer’s assistance, and we know that this may be the first time you have ever had to work with an attorney. It is our hope you will see us as a legal team that you and your family can trust now and in the future.

OUR MISSION

We seek to provide quality legal service to clients with competency, integrity, zealous representation, within the bounds of law and responsiveness to our clients’ needs.

PRACTICE AREAS

Our firm practices law in a variety of areas, including: · Personal Injury · Business Litigation · Counter Dispute · Wills and Probate · DUI

· Producers Liability · Domestic Relations · Criminal Law · Fraud

Duffy & Feemster, LLC is located at 236 East Oglethorpe Avenue and is part of what is known as “Marshall Row.” This row of townhouses was developed in the 1850s by Mary Marshall, a female architect who also built the Marshall House Hotel and whose portrait hangs in the Marshall House. Legend has it that in the 1960s the entire row of four townhouses was owned by a brick broker who was going to demolish the buildings for their Savannah Grey brick. Robert Duffy and others were able to raise the money to buy the dilapidated townhouses from the brick broker and renovate them. The one at 236 was turned into Robert Duffy’s law office in the mid 1960s and has been the home of Duffy & Feemster, LLC since 1982.

Duffy & Feemster, LLC has been taking care of Savannah and Coastal Empire area residents and businesses, providing them with professional legal representation since 1951.

236 EAST OGLETHORPE AVENUE | SAVANNAH, GA | WWW.DUFFYFEEMSTER.COM


By David Pena | Photos provided by Tunnel to Towers Savannah file, Iron Hook Photography & Daryl Lynn Roberts

Tunnel to Towers Yearly Savannah race seeks to honor all the heroes of 9/11

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When 34-year-old New York firefighter Stephen Siller left his shift at Squad 1 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, on September 11, 2001, he could not have imagined the tragic events that forever changed his city’s landscape as well as the lives of countless Americans. Ironically, Siller was on his way to play a round of golf with his brothers on that sunny day when news of the first plane hitting one of the Twin Towers at the World Trade Center boomed from his radio scanner. However, when he approached the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, he found that it was closed to traffic. Unfazed, he then strapped sixty pounds of gear to his back and sprinted straight through the tunnel and into the World Trade Center, where he bravely gave his life in the line of duty. Soon after the attacks, Siller’s family sought to honor the memory of their fallen hero by starting the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation. Ranked as a “4-Star Charity,” the highest distinction given by Charity Navigator, the Foundation also seeks to honor the memory of the other 342 New York City firefighters who selflessly gave their lives in the line of duty on that day. The Foundation’s programs seek to help families of first responders who perished on 9/11 as well as the most catastrophically-injured service members who sustained injuries in combat or training for deployment. For example, its Smart Home program constructs custom-built homes for these injured heroes that are

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designed to address the unique needs of each individual. They include a myriad of features such as automated doors and lighting, wider halls and doorways, as well as special showers to accommodate wheelchairs. Also, there are automatic door openers and stove tops that can be raised and lowered. Each home is also equipped with back-up generators and central heating and air conditioning systems that can be controlled by tablets. These homes enable the most severely injured heroes to live better, more independent lives. The Foundation is committed to building a minimum of 200 of these homes for service members. Additionally, the Foundation holds an annual fundraiser called the Tunnel to Towers Race, the first of which was held in New York in 2002. However, Race Director Jane Grismer, along with WTOC’s Tim Guidera, had the idea to bring the race to the Hostess City in early 2012. And as she explains, it was no small feat. “Tim and I came up with the idea separately to bring it here, and when I initially approached Robert Espinosa from Fleet Feet with the concept, he led me to Tim, whom I already knew. We immediately set out to make it a reality for Savannah, and now here we are.” The 8th annual Savannah Tunnel to Towers 5K Run/ Walk was held Saturday, Sept. 7 in Orleans Square. At the 2018 Savannah Tunnel to Towers Run/Walk, honorary chairman Dick Eckburg was awarded the


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Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation Follow the Footsteps Award for his dedication to the non-profit. Stephen Siller’s brother Frank Siller was in Savannah for the 2018 event, where he announced that the Foundation would give a mortgage-free home to Katie Celiz and her young daughter. Katie Celiz is the widow of Army Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Celiz, the Hunter Army Airfield Ranger who was killed in action in Afghanistan in July. Celiz’s company honored him by leading the Tunnel to Towers Savannah race. Celiz and his family had been registered to participate in the 2018 70

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Tunnel to Towers event in downtown Savannah, as well as the 2017 event. His daughter wore his race bib as she was accompanied by her father’s company throughout the race. The 7th annual Savannah Tunnel to Towers 5K Run/Walk took place on Saturday, September 8, 2018 at 8:00 a.m. in Orleans Square. Each year since its inception, the race has had more than a thousand registrants who have participated. Hundreds of children and parents serve as volunteers representing Team 343 (named for the 343 firefighters lost on 9/11). They line


“The Savannah Tunnel to Towers (run) is a great patriotic event bringing our community together to honor those who have given their lives in the service of others, and to thank those who continue to serve and protect our lives.�

Frank Siller, and honorary chairman Dick Eckburg Photo By Iron Hook Photography

Photo By Iron Hook Photography

The start of the 2018 race. Frank Siller along with the family and the company of Army Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Celiz, the Hunter Army Airfield Ranger who was killed in action in Afghanistan in July.

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“It’s important to remember that eighteen years ago our nation was attacked, and many lives were lost.”

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“The Tunnel to Towers event has become a “must do” for many of our Savannah-area based military men and woman and their families,” Eckburg said. “Each year the number of active duty military folks and families increases in participation, some pushing babies and toddlers in strollers, and older children running and walking with their parents.”

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Soon after the attacks, Siller’s family sought to honor the memory of their fallen hero by starting the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation. Ranked as a “4-Star Charity,” the highest distinction given by Charity Navigator, the Foundation also seeks to honor the memory of the other 342 New York City firefighters who selflessly gave their lives in the line of duty on that day.

Forsyth Park during the run, holding photos of the firefighters who died on 9/11. All proceeds from the Savannah 5K race benefit the foundation’s programs such as the Smart Home program. Additionally, a portion of the proceeds raised in Savannah’s race will go to help the 200 Club of the Coastal Empire. Race coordinator Anne Guidera has been extremely pleased with Savannah’s response to the event thus far, saying, “Our running community has really embraced this (race). We get so many participants and so much support because it has become Savannah’s way to acknowledge September 11th.” Each year several firefighters even run in firefighting gear to simulate Stephen’s run from the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel to 74

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the Twin Towers. Organizers encourage all public service industry workers, corporate teams and the public to register for the patriotic run. Tunnel to Towers Run Savannah will also feature The Siller Cup Firefighter Challenge, which involves teams of four firefighters or more from across the nation who compete in Savannah to take home a traveling trophy and have the opportunity to defend their title. Stephen Siller had everything to live for: a great wife, five wonderful children, a devoted extended family and tons of friends. Jane Grismer actually attended high school with Stephen in New York. “He was two years ahead of me in school. What a fine human being he was. Not only was he the most popular boy in school and the life of the party, he was always willing to help others,” she says. “My two brothers are also New York City firefighters, and my father retired before 2001 as the general manager for building operations for the World Trade Center. Needless to say, this project has been part of the healing process for me personally. Being able to honor these heroes has changed my life, and I’m honored to help bring it to Savannah.” During his boyhood years, Stephen Siller’s family (who were lay Franciscans) had always instilled in him the guiding philosophies of St. Francis of Assisi, who preached the inspirational maxim “while we have time, let us do good.” Those were the words that Stephen lived by and ultimately died by. His selfless life and heroic death serve as a reminder to us all that we should live our lives to the fullest and to spend our time doing what we can for others; this is Stephen’s legacy. While the Tunnel to Towers Foundation is pleased to host the yearly fun-filled event, Eckburg says that the initial reasons for the race need never be overshadowed or forgotten. “It’s important to remember that eighteen years ago our nation was attacked, and many lives were lost,” he explains.


“The Savannah Tunnel to Towers (run) is a great patriotic event bringing our community together to honor those who have given their lives in the service of others, and to thank those who continue to serve and protect our lives.” “The Tunnel to Towers event has become a “must do” for many of our Savannah-area based military men and woman and their families,” Eckburg said. “Each year the number of active duty military folks and families increases in participation, some pushing babies and toddlers in strollers, and older children running and walking with their parents. “It is very heartwarming to see and feel the mutual love and respect for our country and our values being passed on to the younger generation.” On May 9, 2019 the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation gave a mortgage-free home to the family

The Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation gave a mortgage-free home to the family of SFC Christopher Celiz, an Army Ranger stationed at Hunter Army Air Force Base killed in action in Afghanistan on July 12, 2018. This is part of the Gold Star Family Program from Tunnel to Towers and the Celiz family was among the first recipients of these homes. Pictured are the Celiz family along with representatives from the Tunnel to Towers Foundation, the military and the community.

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Additionally, the Foundation holds an annual fundraiser called the Tunnel to Towers Race, the first of which was held in New York in 2002. However, Race Director Jane Grismer, along with WTOC’s Tim Guidera, had the idea to bring the race to the Hostess City in early 2012. And as she explains, it was no small feat. “Tim and I came up with the idea separately to bring it here, and when I initially approached Robert Espinosa from Fleet Feet with the concept, he led me to Tim, whom I already knew. We immediately set out to make it a reality for Savannah, and now here we are.”

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of SFC Christopher Celiz, an Army Ranger stationed at Hunter Army Air Force Base in Savannah, GA, who was killed in action in Afghanistan on July 12, 2018. This is part of the Gold Star Family Program from Tunnel to Towers and the Celiz family was among the first recipients of these homes. Also the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation is donating $100,000 to pay the mortgage of the Ansari family,with plans to fundraise the remainder of the mortgage. Sgt. Kelvin Ansari was shot and killed as he attempted to apprehend a robbery suspect on May 11, 2019 in Savannah, GA. He was a veteran police sergeant with the Savannah Police Department. For more information or to register for the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Run, please visit www.t2trun.org.  CCL


W TECHNOLOGY

When most people think about construction a majority of them think things are still done the old- fashioned way but that’s not the case nowadays. The construction industry has had advances in all aspects of the construction from better quality materials, autonomous heavy equipment, mobile apps and 3-D/4-D design. With all these advances, we are now able to build larger, taller, and by far more complex buildings then we have in the past. Large corporations such as Microsoft, Google, Procore, and Caterpillar are jumping on board to the growing future of construction technology. Here is a list of some of the areas that have been impacted by technology in the construction industry:

VIRTUAL REALITY / AUGMENTED REALITY:

RESHAPING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY: SCCG has more than 40 years of combined general contracting and facility maintenance experience. They strive to providing quality services to the Lowcountry.

While VR / AR technology has existed in many other industries such as the medical, military, and aviation industry, it is very new in the construction industry. VR/AR technology is being used in several areas such as 3D modeling, heavy equipment training and, safety. One of the biggest benefits is it’s use to help identify hazards in the field. AR allows for construction workers to view first hand hazards or dangers in the workplace without involving any potential risk to a construction worker.

AUTONOMOUS EQUIPMENT: A recent technological improvement in heavy equipment has been the adaption of autonomous software that allows heavy equipment to operate similar to self-driving cars. The benefits of autonomous

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heavy equipment are that it allows for precise accuracy and also allows the equipment to perform the same amount work with less workers. As VR/AR technology helps provide workers with efficiency and safety, the autonomous equipment is ensuring greater efficiency and safety in the construction industry.

MOBILE TECHNOLOGY:

The use of smartphones and mobile applications have made collaboration on projects a lot more efficient and easier. Our company has first hand experience in the benefits of using mobile technology since we first started using Procore. The use of Procore has allowed the integration of our field with our office at the tip of your fingers. All our employees can pull up drawings, RFI’s, submittals, photos, and perform takeoffs from anywhere in the world in just seconds. Procore allows for real time data and communication between the jobsite and project managers back in our office. South Coast Contracting Group has vowed to stay ahead of the technological advances in the construction industry by integrating these advances where possible. SCCG has made it mandatory that all field and office employees use Procore for all our reporting, timesheets, billing, and for daily reports on all our projects. This implementation alone has not only helped the productivity with our company but has also connected our office to the field. Technology has helped to improve construction in ways we never could have imagined and with things changing every day, there’s no telling what the construction industry will look like in 20 years.

(912) 335-9377 | 130 Canal Street Suite 404 |Pooler Ga 31322 Hometown Living At Its Best

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More than just a resident at

Habersham House The decision to join a senior living community shouldn’t mean relinquishing your freedom. Change is scary as is, which is why the employees at Habersham House listen and accommodate first. Nestled among the mossy oaks of historic midtown Savannah, our community is an oasis, a home just like the one you know and love. From spacious, personal care apartments, restaurant-style dining, and recreational activities to a Five Star award-winning Bridge to Rediscovery memory care program and respite/short-term stays, Habersham House residents enjoy a simpler side of the life they’ve lived for decades. “Our residents aren’t just senior citizens; they’re chefs, boat captains, teachers, policemen,” said Katie Williford, Director of Sales and Marketing for Habersham House. “With each new resident comes a new story, one we’re eager to learn. Just like 81-year-old Joseph Cafiero’s.” *

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“I was born here in Savannah,” said Cafiero. “I went to Benedictine Military School before my time at Armstrong College.” After leaving school, Cafiero worked in the shipping business off the ports of Georgia, Texas, Florida, and South Carolina. He worked for the people operating the ships you see coming up and down the various waterways. As Vice President of Sales, Cafiero was given the opportunity to travel a good bit for work. “Whether it was in Italy, France,

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OUR RESIDENTS aren’t senior citizens; they’re chefs, boat captains, teachers, policemen. With each new resident comes a new story, one we’re eager to learn.


Northern Europe, or South Africa, I traveled to make sure the owners were happy with their market share and to let them know we had their best interests at heart.”

A well-seasoned traveler, Cafiero naturally sought a senior living community that could keep up with his active lifestyle while offering security and serenity for his twilight years. Habersham House was the community for him; he decided to join the family in spring of 2018.

Towards the end of his illustrious career, in 1976, Cafiero was appointed as the third generation Italian Consul. “My father’s family is originally from Italy, and the consulate business has been in our blood for about 130 years and three generations. I’m proud of that,” said Cafiero. As Consul, he protected the Italian interests in imports to the USA, meeting ships for inspection as they arrived to the ports.

News article announcing Joseph’s appointment as the Italian Consulate agent in Georgia.

These days, Joseph enjoys strolling through the landscaped grounds, dining in the Five Star restaurant, or performing opera for his new neighbors and friends. He says he always wanted a career in singing, and is grateful for the opportunity to practice his passions.

Joseph Cafiero and Katie Williford, Director of Sales and Marketing for Habersham House.

Cafiero’s father, Joseph Mose Cafiero Sr., on the piers at the Atlantic Coast Line docks after having cleared an Italian vessel for sea in 1950

Joseph Cafiero showing memorabilia of his being knighted by the Italian Government.

“They must’ve liked it, because they asked me to come back and sing for them again,” he laughed. And while Joseph enjoys the exceptional care, community activities, dining and housekeeping services Habersham provides, his family can enjoy peace of mind. *

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Call (912) 352-0070 to hear more stories like Joseph Cafiero’s or to schedule a tour of this beautiful community today. 5200 Habersham Street, Savannah, GA Fivestarseniorliving.com | 912.352.0072


Warriors in the

Fight Against Cancer The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. BY DAVID PENA | PHOTOS BY DREAM WEAVER PHOTOS

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J

John David Fulcher and Michelle Camposano truly exemplify typical American children. Aged thirteen and five respectively, they both enjoy many of the activities that all kids love to do. Whether they’re playing outside, hanging out with friends and family, or enjoying the latest video game, they both bask in the greatness that is their childhood. John David, also known as ‘JD’, has lived in Effingham all his life, along with his mother Melodie, his father Shane, and his two siblings, Anna and Wesley. For many years, he was an active baseball player, and, like many kids his age, his favorite place to be has always been the great outdoors. For her entire young life, Michelle has lived on Hilton Head Island along with her mother Bertha, father Alex and two younger siblings, Lucia and Samuel. She treasures her extensive doll collection and loves to play “dress up,” putting on makeup with her mother. However, things changed dramatically

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John David Fulcher and Michelle Camposano truly exemplify typical American children. Aged thirteen and five respectively, they both enjoy many of the activities that all kids love to do. Whether they’re playing outside, hanging out with friends and family, or enjoying the latest video game, they both bask in the greatness that is their childhood.


Prior to his diagnosis, JD began to experience viral symptoms in his stomach along with an occasional fever. In addition, he began to have leg cramps that became increasingly painful over time. After seeing their son struggle to move around during some of his baseball games, JD’s parents became more concerned and chose to seek medical support. Hometown Living At Its Best

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Every day, around 43 children are diagnosed with cancer. 12% of these children do not survive. In fact, leukemia is the number one cancer killer of our children under the age of 20. Children’s cancer affects all ethnic, gender and socio-economic groups, with more than 40,000 children undergoing treatment for cancer each year.

for JD and Michelle’s families when the two youngsters were diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Prior to his diagnosis, JD began to experience viral symptoms in his stomach along with an occasional fever. In addition, he began to have leg cramps that became increasingly painful over time. After seeing their son struggle to move around during some of his baseball games, JD’s parents became more concerned and chose to seek medical support. “Because of his symptoms, we had him hospitalized for three days while specialists tried to identify the root cause of all his symptoms,” recalls his mother Melodie. After some additional testing, cells called “blast cells” were located in his blood, which are the abnormal white blood cells found in the bone marrow of those with leukemia. JD’s doctors immediately recommended inserting a port into his chest and then beginning chemotherapy treatments. “We were hesitant at first, since no parent wants to see their child on chemo, but seeing how sick he had gotten, we really had no choice. We were willing to hold on to anything we could at that point,” says Melodie.

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As for Michelle, her mother Bertha Montero says the family was not too concerned when she started to complain of random pains in her body. “We never thought her symptoms were (linked to) leukemia,” explains Bertha. “For example, she had a bad nosebleed one day as well as a rash, but it was during summer, so we thought the heat was the cause. Little did we know it was because her platelets were low.” Michelle also began to experience pain in both of her ankles as well as her hands, but she told her parents that she had hurt herself playing recently, so they thought nothing of it. However, when these symptoms refused to go away, Michelle’s parents decided to seek medical help. “After two months of these symptoms, the doctor checked her blood and found that her cells were all over the place. We were then shocked and devastated to learn that it was leukemia,” says Bertha. Michelle began

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her treatment that same week and has continued it ever since. Unfortunately, their stories are far from being unique. Every day, around 43 children are diagnosed with cancer. 12% of these children do not survive. In fact, leukemia is the number one cancer killer of our children under the age of 20. Children’s cancer affects all ethnic, gender and socio-economic groups, with more than 40,000 children undergoing treatment for cancer each year. Apart from their diagnosis, JD and Michelle share another unique bond. Jennie Brewster, Area Director of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, says, “We’re pleased to announce that JD and Michelle are the LLS Boy & Girl of the Year. These children serve as inspiration for our Man, Woman and Students of the Year fundraising campaigns, which take place each spring.” JD and Michelle were chosen from the many local children who are currently being treated for a blood cancer, typically leukemia or lymphoma. Funds raised through the campaign benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s mission to find a cure for blood cancers and improve the lives of patients and their families.” When JD and Michelle are older, perhaps they will consider taking part in the Students of the Year campaign. This campaign is an exciting leadership development and philanthropic program in which high school students participate in a fundraising competition to benefit LLS and the mission to cure blood cancers. Every dollar raised counts as one vote. The candidates/teams who raise the most money at the end of the seven-week competition earn the title “Student(s) of the Year.” For motivated high school students, this program ensures they stand out among their peers when engaging with colleges and/or future employers. Through guidance and mentoring from experienced professionals at LLS, these youth hope to make a real impact in the fight against blood cancers. In addition, those students who excel in the areas of mission awareness, volunteerism, or community involvement are also eligible for recognition via the Citizenship Awards presented at the Grand Finale celebration. The Students of

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Apart from their diagnosis, JD and Michelle share another unique bond. Jennie Brewster, Area Director of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, says, “We’re pleased to announce that JD and Michelle are the LLS Boy & Girl of the Year. These children serve as inspiration for our Man, Woman and Students of the Year fundraising campaigns, which take place each spring.”

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the Year Grand Finale takes place on April 12 at Savannah Station. The Man & Woman of the Year Finale Gala will take place on Friday, May 3 at 6:30 pm at the Hyatt Regency Savannah. Fortunately, both JD and Michelle have been responding well to their treatments. “Michelle has her good and bad days,” explains Bertha. “Sometimes she’s very tired or feels nauseous, but overall she’s doing well. It looks like she’ll be finishing her treatment in December, so she’s definitely looking forward to Christmas this year. She just started school this year and hates to miss it (due to treatment).” Since the start of his chemotherapy treatment, JD has experienced numerous hospital stays, blood transfusions, platelet transfusions, and chemo injections in his legs, but he is looking forward to getting out more as his immune system rebounds from treatments. Whether he’s playing baseball, having fun with his pets outside, or riding his dune buggy and four-wheeler, JD has always been very active, so he looks forward to the day when he regains the energy to resume these activities full-time. “As far as JD’s prognosis and remission status, he’s doing great, and he’ll finish his treatments in September, so we are anxiously counting down the days,” says Melodie. “One fact we (the LLS) are extremely proud of is our recent FDA approvals,” explains Brewster. “In a typical year,


“We never thought her symptoms were (linked to) leukemia,” explains Bertha. “For example, she had a bad nosebleed one day as well as a rash, but it was during summer, so we thought the heat was the cause. Little did we know it was because her platelets were low.”

it was normal to see about 5 new approvals from the FDA for blood cancer treatments. In 2017 and 2018, we’ve seen a tremendous jump with a total of 39 new approvals, and LLS played a role in 34 of those. There is some incredible work being done at LLS!” The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. Since its inception, LLS has invested more than 1.2 billion dollars in research to help children like JD Fulcher and Michelle Camposano. This has led to game-changing advances in immunotherapy, genomics and personalized medicine. The treatments that they’ve pioneered for blood cancers are now saving the lives of people affected by many different types of cancer. Find out more at www.lls.org or Jennie.Brewster@lls.org or call (912) 436-3280 for more information. You can make donations to the LLS by visiting https://pages. mwoy.org/ga/savannah19/byeark.  CCL

Fortunately, both JD and Michelle have been responding well to their treatments. “Michelle has her good and bad days,” explains Bertha. “Sometimes she’s very tired or feels nauseous, but overall she’s doing well. It looks like she’ll be finishing her treatment in December, so she’s definitely looking forward to Christmas this year.

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Crazy

Like a Fox I

For nearly two years, The Fox & Fig Café has been winning over its patrons, one meatless dish at a time.

In case you haven’t noticed lately, plant-based restaurants have been on the rise around the country and for a very good reason; vegetables have quickly become the new culinary stars of the kitchen. More and more folks are discovering that veggies deliver a surprisingly tasty substitution for their animal-based counterparts. To further the point, the terms “vegetable-focused” and “plant-based” have essentially replaced the term “vegetarian” when it comes to eating establishments, as many chefs have found a new sense of freedom in creating dishes that focus on farm-fresh produce instead of meat and seafood. Savannah’s latest contribution to this everexpanding veggie movement is the plant-based cafe Fox & Fig, owned and operated by thirty-year-old culinary visionary Clay Ehmke. When Clay first moved to Savannah in the summer of 2014, he envisioned a unique kind of restaurant where a creative plant-based menu would be the foundation for a great night of dining out. However, he soon learned that he would have to put that dream on hold, at least for a time. That’s because once he settled in the Hostess City, Clay played an integral role in the 2014 opening of The Collins Quarter, an Australian café fashioned after the widely popular coffee café restaurants of Melbourne. Once there, he was immediately given the task of dutifully

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studying the best cafés in New York, gathering instrumental information on the keys to their success. “At that time, I still had the intentions of opening my vegan restaurant, but first I had to get my feet wet,” he says, “so after leaving (Collins Quarters), Jennifer Jenkins helped me gain a firm footing in the Fox Family of cafes, and we’ve worked together ever since.” Jennifer is the owner of the Foxy Loxy and the Coffee Fox cafes. After his stint with Collins Quarter, Clay managed Jenkins’ Coffee Fox, an award-winning craft coffee house in the heart of downtown for about two years before managing the Henny Penny Art Space & Café. During this time, the pair was dutifully scouting locations for Clay’s new restaurant. With the help of his new partner and now co-owner, The Fox & Fig Café began serving up its plant-based delicacies in the fall of 2017. “We became the only all-vegan restaurant in town,” Clay says proudly. “The process (of bringing the restaurant into fruition) has truly been a collaboration all along. While Jen brings the heart and

no labels here While the Fox & Fig is categorized as a plant-based restaurant, Clay is quick to add that he doesn’t make a habit of throwing out the words “vegetarian” or “vegan.” He says, “I want people to know that they can eat plant-based food with no loss to their palate. We don’t have an agenda to push, or at least one that’s obvious; we just want our customers to enjoy their experience here.”

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her brand to the table, she also brought the foundation for our business; I could not have done it without her. I bring the creative direction, leadership and team management, so I think we’re a good fit.” From the outset, this dynamic duo seemed to have a hit on their hands. Crowds poured in to see what the hubbub was all about, and Clay was pleasantly pleased, albeit a bit surprised by it all. “We had the reputation of the Fox name around town, so that definitely helped, but the overall reaction was pretty powerful. I must admit that at first was quite a shock to me.” This was because eighteen months prior to opening the restaurant, Clay was part of a project held by the folks at Creative Coast, and, according to him, the concept

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for a new vegan restaurant in Savannah went over like a lead balloon. “Every year, the folks at Creative Coast would do something called ‘Fast Pitch,’ which was like a Shark Tank for start-up businesses,” Clay explains. “Basically, you would pitch an idea, and five judges would give a thumbs up or down on it. I stood on that stage in the spring of 2016 and gave my best pitch (for what would ultimately become the Fox & Fig).” The judges’ reaction was overwhelmingly negative, by all accounts, which was not lost on the audience, which was made up of possible investors. “They basically told me I would never make it, and it would be a disaster. Well, I love to look back and laugh at that now.”


“There was initially a lot of skepticism about the restaurant. Now we’re putting out food that everyone can enjoy, whether they’re vegans or not.” - Clay Ehmke

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“I want people to know that they can eat plant-based food with no loss to their palate. We don’t have an agenda to push, or at least one that’s obvious; we just want our customers to enjoy their experience here.” - Clay Ehmke

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Proving his critics wrong was admittedly satisfying for Clay, but he is quick to give credit to his partner. “There was initially a lot of skepticism about the restaurant, but Jen really believed in me and my vision,” he says. “She knew my track record and understood what I was going for. Now we’re putting out food that everyone can enjoy, whether they’re vegans or not.” Nestled on Troup Square on Habersham Street, Fox & Fig Cafe has been providing quite the creative plant-based menu crafted from locally sourced and seasonal ingredients for about two years now. The restaurant proudly partners with local businesses to bring their customers a curated selection to choose from. Their diverse menu includes Leopold’s coconut cream milkshakes, house-made cashew hemp lattes, and a vast assortment of wines to choose from. Featuring an all-day brunch menu, pastry case, and full-service espresso bar, Fox & Fig delivers scrumptious and innovative interpretations of traditional meat-based dishes. While the Fox & Fig is categorized as a plant-based restaurant, Clay is quick to add that he doesn’t make a habit of throwing out the words “vegetarian” or “vegan.” He says, “I want people to know that they can eat plant-based food with no loss to their palate. We don’t have an agenda to push, or at least one that’s obvious; we just want our customers to enjoy their experience here.” And for its efforts, The Fox & Fig Café was voted Best Vegetarian Restaurant in 2018 by Connect Savannah’s readers, and it continues to win skeptics over, one meatless dish at a time. “It all comes down to the fact that, whether you’re a meat eater or not, you’re going to have some plants

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on your dinner plate,” explains Clay. “The spices and seasonings are what sells the food, and (our menu) is full of tasty dishes. We can provide a lot of the flavors, sensations, and textures that (meat eaters are) already enjoying.” As for the future of The Fox & Fig, Clay is seriously thinking of expanding the brand. He attributes part of the success of his restaurant to the simple fact that it doesn’t have an obvious agenda, thus making it more palatable for vegans and meat eaters alike. “People are turned off by the word ‘vegan,’ so we keep our agenda a secret,” he says with a laugh. “It’s always great to have meat eaters show up to the restaurant and leave satisfied and full. Ironically, the majority of our clientele are not vegans, so we’ve only just begun. We’re already working with other bars and vendors, and I would love another project in Chatham County, whether it’s in Pooler or Savannah, by 2020. My dream would be to open up an upscale vegan ‘bar food’ place.” He adds that whatever form the expansion takes, like the Fox & Fig, he would not be propagating any agenda – or at least overtly. “We’re not in the business of pushing vegetarianism on anyone; we just push good food and the public can make up their own minds,” he beams with the slyness of…a fox.  CCL

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PulsePoint Connecting Our Community

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BY DAVID PENA |PHOTOS BY DREAM WEAVER PHOTOS

I

Chatham Emergency Services are making available a free application that notifies any CPR-certified responder and/or civilian when someone nearby needs CPR.

If you’ve had the unfortunate experience to be a victim who suddenly collapses say, in a restaurant or at a dinner table, needless to say it can be terrifying and frustrating to those who are not trained to handle the situation. Believe it or not, around sixty percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most say they would be willing to use CPR or a defibrillator to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only a relatively few of them say they’ve used CPR in an actual

emergency. Interestingly, the nationwide survival rate outside a hospital is just six percent, even when a patient is treated by first responders, only 11 percent survive. The folks at Chatham Emergency Services believe that’s a number we can increase together, and they’re doing something about it. “We have an app that we pay for and make available to the public for free,” says CEO Chuck Kearns. This unique concept Hometown Living At Its Best

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To put it simply, PulsePoint is a mobile phone application that allows users to view and receive alerts on calls being responded to by fire departments and emergency medical services. The app’s main feature, and where its name comes from, is that it sends alerts to users at the same time that dispatchers are sending the call to emergency crews. The goal is to increase the possibility that a victim in cardiac arrest will receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation quickly.

involves a smartphone application called PulsePoint, which is actually a free application that notifies any CPR-certified responder and/or civilian when someone nearby needs CPR. To put it simply, PulsePoint is a mobile phone application that allows users to view and receive alerts on calls being responded to by fire departments and emergency medical services. The app’s main feature, and where its name comes from, is that it sends alerts to users at the same time that dispatchers are sending the call to emergency crews. The goal is to increase the possibility that a victim in cardiac arrest will receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation quickly. The app uses the current location of a user and will alert them if someone in their vicinity is in need of CPR. The app, which interfaces with the ambulance services dispatch center, will send notifications to users only if the victim is in a public place and only to users that are in the immediate vicinity of the emergency. It also goes so far as to provide them with a photo and location of the nearest Automated External Defibrillator (AED). “We have a donor who donates every year to keep it active. If you’re within a quarter of a mile of the event, your phone will let you know someone may need CPR while also directing you to the scene.”

“It’s all about helping people in their darkest moment. We show up within minutes and start to make everything ok. How could a person not be fulfilled by that?” 114

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“It’s all about helping people in their darkest moment. We show up within minutes and start to make everything ok. How could a person not be fulfilled by that?” Chuck urges everyone to download the app from their app store. If you download the app, you can pick which agency you’d like to follow, but whatever agency you choose, he says that by doing so, it could possibly save someone close to you.

In February 2017 PulsePoint introduced a professional version called Verified Responder that also alerts in residential settings. Based originally in the San Francisco Bay Area, PulsePoint is run by a public 501c non-profit foundation of the same name. As of December 5, 2018, the foundation reported that connected agencies had requested the assistance of 188,520 nearby responders for 58,900 cardiac arrest events. “One of our board members discovered it, so he brought it to our attention. He’s a former firefighter, so we all took a liking to it,” says Chuck. “He went out into the community to accept donations so that we could pay for the start up.” In fact, Chatham Emergency Services was THE FIRST in the state of Georgia to adopt this program and also provides training in regard to it. Originally from Florida, Chuck Kearns was a paramedic for thirty-five years, so he knows a good thing when he sees it. “We encourage everyone to go to the Red Cross, Heart Association or any hospital

to learn hands-only CPR. Of course, we no longer advocate learning or using the mouth-to-mouth method, which is not usually the best way to go. It can actually be detrimental to a person’s health, not to mention most folks’ reluctance to do it.” At the present time, PulsePoint has about 1656 users following the app locally, so that speaks volumes about the effectiveness of PulsePoint as a life-saving device. “It also says a lot about our overall response team, who are paid professionals and volunteers that go out and save lives.” Sudden Cardiac Arrest is not just a job for emergency responders but rather a community-based issue that requires a community-based response. “In no other medical situation is there such a vital reliance on the community,” adds Chuck. Knowing to start early CPR and using rapid defibrillation can change the whole outcome in a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) event. When that emergency call comes in your team will be ready. But

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At the present time, PulsePoint has about 1656 users following the app locally, so that speaks volumes about the effectiveness of PulsePoint as a life-saving device. “It also says a lot about our overall response team, who are paid professionals and volunteers that go out and save lives.”

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what if someone was already at the scene, applying lifesaving CPR and defibrillation until the EMS team arrived? With PulsePoint, your dispatch system immediately alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby SCA event through the free PulsePoint Respond mobile app and lets them know the location of the closest AED. “It’s all about helping people in their darkest moment. We show up within minutes and start to make everything ok. How could a person not be fulfilled by that?” Chuck urges everyone to download the app from their app store. If you download the app, you can pick which agency you’d like to follow, but whatever agency you choose, he says that by doing so, it could possibly save someone close to you. For more information visit Chathames.org.  CCL


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Captain Judy has been chartering a straight course for more than a half century BY STEPHEN PRUDHOMME PHOTOS BY RYAN LEE PHOTOGRAPHY AND CAPTAIN JUDY 120

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a half century of life on the sea Capt. Judy is the owner of Miss Judy Charters. Her fleet consists of six inshore boats and four offshore, one of which she owns and docks in the “biggest little marina” next to her home on Wilmington Island. The other boats are owned by individuals who work for her. She’s also done a weekly fishing report for 25 plus years that appears in hundreds of publications.

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A

At an age when most girls are playing with dolls and doing dress up, Judy Helmey was handling fish and crabs, the latter resulting in her first charter, when she was 5 years old. More than a half century later, Capt. Judy is most comfortable in fishing attire and boots rather than getting dolled up. She’s happiest being in her outdoor “office” and exudes a joie de vie that virtually ensures she won’t be accused of possessing a crabby personality. Capt. Judy is the owner of Miss Judy Charters. Her fleet consists of six inshore boats and four offshore, one of which she owns and docks in the “biggest little marina” next to her home on Wilmington Island. The other boats are owned by individuals who work for her. She’s also done a weekly fishing report for 25 plus years that appears in hundreds of publications. A native of Savannah, Capt. Judy was only five years old when her mother was killed in a car wreck. That left her under the care of her father, Sherman, who had started a fishing charter service in 1948; prior to that, he worked for Al Capone, making modifications to trucks carrying bootleg liquor at his automotive repair

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shop in Savannah. “I went everywhere with him,” says Capt. Judy, who did her first charter when she was five; a crabbing trip in the river for $5. “I learned everything about the business. When I was 14, I was working as a captain, illegally. You had to be 18 to get a captain’s license.” After skirting the law for four years, she obtained her captain’s license. She and her father worked together until he retired at the age of 80 and she took over the business. Much like the waves Capt. Judy rode, the years rolled by. Hers was the first charter fishing in the area and could very well be the last one floating. “I love my customers and fishing,” she says. “It’s more than fishing when you go with us, more than a A native of Savannah, Capt. Judy was only five years old when her mother was killed in a car wreck. That left her under the care of her father, Sherman, who had started a fishing charter service in 1948; prior to that, he worked for Al Capone, making modifications to trucks carrying bootleg liquor at his automotive repair shop in Savannah.

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ride in a boat I take people fishing and show them a good time.” Capt. Judy refutes any antiquated notion that women can clean and cook fish but not catch them; undoubtedly, she’s adept at all three tasks. “My dad never said you’re a girl and can’t do that,” she says, noting she’s had a few male customers who felt uncomfortable with a female captain. “It’s so easy to turn stuff around when you’re captain of the boat. You make them feel like they’re in charge.” Steve Howell has taken close to 100 offshore fishing trips with Capt. Judy and refers to her as the sister he never had. Likewise, he’s the big brother she never had. As such, he added, they argue all the time, especially about fishing techniques and tackle. Steve

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Capt. Judy refutes any antiquated notion that women can clean and cook fish but not catch them; undoubtedly, she’s adept at all three tasks. “My dad never said you’re a girl and can’t do that,” she says, noting she’s had a few male customers who felt uncomfortable with a female captain. “It’s so easy to turn stuff around when you’re captain of the boat. You make them feel like they’re in charge.”

acknowledges, however, that her fishing knowledge is immense, leading to some great catches and outings. “We (almost) always catch fish,” he said. “We always have a good time. I have always believed Judy puts safety ahead of everything else. This last point is worth noting: When you are going 35 to 50 miles out into the ocean, you put your life into the hands of your captain so you’d better have confidence in her. I do.” Unbeknownst to many people, Steve noted, Capt. Judy is an accomplished cook whose specialties include tomato pie, pork ribs and baked beans. When it comes to fish, however, she won’t eat it unless it’s fried and slathered in cane syrup. “After 50 years of catching fish, can you blame her?” he said. As with every other facet of life, technology has impacted fishing. “I started before they had navigational aids,” says Capt. Judy, noting that she used to navigate

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by the ‘seat of her pants.’ “It’s easier to find fish nowadays. The boat drives itself. I’ve embraced technology big time.” Capt. Judy specializes in offshore fishing. She says she does a lot of family and company trips, birthday parties, and burials - a little bit of everything. She still runs a boat a lot and says she looks at young whippersnappers who complain about being tired as though they have three heads. “I love it,” she says. “People retire so they can go fishing. I have the perfect job. I still change the oil and do other minor engine work. When I can’t change the oil in the bilge, I have no business running a boat.” Deidra Helmey-Jeffcoat is Capt. Judy’s cousin and a 20-year charter boat captain. She works exclusively for Captain Judy. “She’s very knowledgeable,” Deidra says. “She knows fishing better than most people. It is part fishing and part entertainment. You can’t just be a bump on a log. Judy has lots of stories from her youth. She has so much repeat business and a lot of respect from everyone.” Kathy Brown has worked with Capt. Judy as a charter boat captain for 30 years and has served as her first mate for the past 10 years. Like HelmeyJeffcoat, she’s effusive in her praise of Captain Judy. “She’s extremely good at what she does,” Kathy says. “That’s her passion. She’s just great with people and has really intriguing stories. Even if we don’t catch fish, people will have a great time. People just go to her. She’s an A Number 1 dame.” For further information, go to missjudycharters.com or call (912) 897-4921.  CCL


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BY DAVID PENA | PHOTOS BY REBECCA GALLOWAY PHOTOGRAPHY

A community comes together to help others in need.

E

Every week for the past five years, around 100 volunteers gather in a small trailer outside a southside church to help fill bags with food for the underprivileged kids in the community. No, this isn’t some city initiative or government-funded program. It’s actually a group called P.A.CK., or People of Action Caring for Kids. Founded five years ago by Savannah native Malena Stone, the organization has now mushroomed into an impressive deterrent against the problem of childhood hunger. “It’s a great life lesson for the folks who participate, who are mainly comprised of kids. It reminds them what they need to be grateful for while giving them a chance to help others in the process,” she says. Hometown Living At Its Best

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When most Americans think of hungry children, they might envision the swollen bellies and skeletal frames of youth in some third world country, but the story actually hits much closer to home.

When most Americans think of hungry children, they might envision the swollen bellies and skeletal frames of youth in some third world country, but the story actually hits much closer to home. About 1 in 5 children lack proper access to food during the year, and for the more than 12 million kids in the U.S. facing hunger, obtaining the energy they need to grow and perform well in school can be a daily challenge. “From the start, our ultimate goal was to provide a consistent, child-friendly venue to allow groups and families serve our community together,� says Malena, a former speech pathologist

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at Memorial Medical Center and now P.A.C.K.’s head coordinator. “We wanted the children in our community to look outward to those around them and be willing to share with anyone in need. We believe that God intended for us to teach our children to serve and give.� Now a 501c3 non-profit, P.A.C.K has about 50 dedicated volunteers who pack and distribute between 8,000 and 10,000 bags of weekend food to children in the community each month during the school year. Food bags are also distributed during the summer months, with more than 10,000 bags handed out during last summer alone. Brittany Olizarowicz, who, along Hometown Living At Its Best

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“We wanted the children in our community to look outward to those around them and be willing to share with anyone in need. We believe that God intended for us to teach our children to serve and give.” Brittany Olizarowicz, who, along with her kids Mack and Finley, has volunteered at the nonprofit since July, says, “We were looking for a way to involve our kids in the community after moving here and stumbled upon P.A.C.K. Now my kids feel like they have a second family, and it’s changed our lives in such a positive way.”

with her kids Mack and Finley, has volunteered at the nonprofit since July, says, “We were looking for a way to involve our kids in the community after moving here and stumbled upon P.A.C.K. Now my kids feel like they have a second family, and it’s changed our lives in such a positive way. They now have a much different understanding about how the world works in terms (of the less fortunate), and how very lucky they are to have what they have.” P.A.C.K.’s humble beginnings can be traced back to 2014, when Malena was looking for a way for her children to help underprivileged youth in the community. “We actually started in my kitchen with my three kids, my oldest being only seven at the time,” recalls

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Malena. “I was looking for a way that they could help the community, but we weren’t able to find anything, so we figured we would do it at our home instead.” The family decided that childhood hunger was a problem that required immediate action and distributing bags of food to nearby schools was a great way to start. “When we first started packing the bags, we would pack a few each week to distribute at the local school for the kids to have on weekends. Then some of our friends and their kids joined in the effort, and it just grew from there,” she says proudly. Thus, an idea that started with a family and 50 bags of food has now grown to hundreds of volunteers as well as members of churches and businesses who currently


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pack and distribute 8,000 bags of food to local school children each month. P.A.C.K. currently serves 21 local schools and community centers. The nonprofit provides more than 1,500 bags of microwavable meals for Cure for Childhood Cancer and the Ronald McDonald House as well as toiletry bags to children at Performance Initiatives and other community centers. P.A.C.K. also provides “Busy Bags� to pediatric hospital inpatients, children receiving outpatient treatments, and families staying at the Ronald McDonald House. The bags contain toys, crafts, and activities that hopefully serve as a happy distraction to children who are undergoing treatments. The majority of the food bags packed each week go to local elementary school children in need. “Teachers tell us that there is a noticeable change in the children who receive the bags with better concentration and behavior

Thus, an idea that started with a family and 50 bags of food has now grown to hundreds of volunteers as well as members of churches and businesses who currently pack and distribute 8,000 bags of food to local school children each month. P.A.C.K. currently serves 21 local schools and community centers.

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when nutritional needs are being met,” explains Malena. “We also work closely with the counselors at the schools we serve to provide other items as they are needed by students, like school supplies, toiletries, and uniforms.” Packing is done in a simple “assembly line” fashion that is extremely familyfriendly, and all ages are welcome. The process takes place out of a small trailer in the Compassion Christian Church parking lot in Savannah. “We like to call it ‘The Cottage,’” laughs Melena. “We are so thankful that the church allows us to host events at their facility,” she says. P.A.C.K. hosts a food packing party on the first Sunday of each month during the school year. “No experience is required, and all ages are welcome. In fact, we’re one of the few nonprofits that doesn’t have any paid staffers,” Hometown Living At Its Best

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says Malena. “We typically pack around 1,200 bags in 45 minutes.” Each Friday, members hand out the bags in local schools and community centers. Covardis Broadie, Manager of Urban Hope, says, “Our kids definitely look forward to (getting their bags) every week. PACK has truly been a godsend to this community.” Most of the food is purchased through a partnership with America’s Second Harvest Food Bank, which allows P.A.C.K. to purchase large quantities of food for a significantly reduced cost. “At certain times, when quantity and selection are limited at the food bank, we purchase food through retail venues,” explains Malena. “Some of our food also comes from food drives from area churches and civic groups.” Food is packed into 2.5-gallon freezer bags, and each bag contains 6 meals, 2 snacks, 1 juice box, and 1 single serve non-perishable milk. Each bag also contains a sticker bearing the name of the person who packed the bag as well as a handmade card to the child receiving it. “The stickers give children responsibility for the bag they’re packing. It also shows that a person can make a difference in someone else’s life, one kind act at a time,” she says. Although P.A.C.K.’s primary aim is to feed underprivileged children, the organization also

occasionally hosts other events, such as handing out free summer reading books to support the children and teachers in the schools it serves. They also host an annual Christmas Grandparent adoption for local nursing home residents and have just begun packing toiletry bags for the homeless in our community. “Once a quarter, we host a neighborhood event where families can go with us to serve the community in some way. Everyone is welcome, and folks can find details on our Facebook page,” explains Malena. What began five years ago as a mother’s way of teaching her kids the value of giving back has now become a formidable force in the fight against hunger in the community, and Malena Stone could not be more pleased. “By doing what we do, we are able to show God’s love to those who need it most,” she says, “and if a little group of people in a southside trailer can feed up to 10,000 kids a month, then imagine what a city as big as Savannah could accomplish. As God continues to provide volunteers and resources, we will continue to serve our community by making a difference - one bag at a time!” For more information or to volunteer, please email Malena Stone at packsavannahga@gmail.com or check out their website at www.packsavannah.com  CCL Hometown Living At Its Best

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and lions Planes, trains spotted in Pooler 148

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[ BY STEPHEN PRUDHOMME | PHOTOS BY DREAM WEAVER PHOTOS]

Richard Hyde is onboard with model trains, classic autos and a miniature circus.

R

Richard Hyde doesn’t have much unused space in his home and garage. The latter holds classic cars and a miniature circus, while the former includes an attic filled with model trains racing through scenes of towns, a movie theater and an antebellum mansion. Whether it’s a car or a train, a trapeze artist or a miniature Mount Rushmore featuring his likeness, this Pooler resident brings a creative touch and childlike excitement to his work and ensures the circus is in town every day.

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A native of Nashville, Tennessee, Richard ran a tool truck for many years before working on yacht interiors and plane interiors at Gulfstream. Now 73 and retired since 2016, the genial Richard has plenty of time to restore classic cars in his garage and work on his model trains, planes and other displays that take up most of his 1,500-square-foot attic. It all started with a gift from his wife, Beverly, more than 20 years ago. “She bought me a toy train,” says Richard, who grew up with three brothers and was raised by his mother. “I didn’t have one as a child. I grew up under meager circumstances. Getting

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that train opened up something in my brain that I hadn’t used.” With the signal arm going up on his model train avocation, Richard went to town, so to speak, creating various scenes which his growing collection of trains would pass as they chugged along. “I tried to make everything interesting,” he says, citing his Mount Rushmore, which features a likeness of him made by Adam Fox from the Savannah College of Art and Design, next to the four famous presidents. “There’s a Kiss concert and drive-in theater that work. The trains are almost secondary.”


A native of Nashville, Tennessee, Richard ran a tool truck for many years before working on yacht interiors and plane interiors at Gulfstream. Now 73 and retired since 2016, the genial Richard has plenty of time to restore classic cars in his garage and work on his model trains, planes and other displays that take up most of his 1,500-square-foot attic.

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“My wife bought me a toy train,I didn’t have one as a child. I grew up under meager circumstances. Getting that train opened up something in my brain that I hadn’t used.”

With the signal arm going up on his model train avocation, Richard went to town, so to speak, creating various scenes which his growing collection of trains would pass as they chugged along.

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But Richard is not the only artist in his household. Beverly painted the murals in the attic. “She’s my right arm,” Richard says. “She’s everything.” Then there’s the circus. Eight years ago, Richard saw a Little Circus Wagon display at Savannah Mall and decided to create his own using the various pieces he had accumulated during the years with his train layout. He had 1,000 3-inch human figures, most of which were purchased and made of plastic; the others he carved from wood. There are also 150 animals including lions, tigers and


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Joining the Circus

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Eight years ago, Richard saw a Little Circus Wagon display at Savannah Mall and decided to create his own using the various pieces he had accumulated during the years with his train layout. He had 1,000 3-inch human figures, most of which were purchased and made of plastic; the others he carved from wood. There are also 150 animals including lions, tigers and bears – oh my! – viewed by 150 people sitting in the stands. The circus operates under four main tents, and the entire display was showcased at Savannah Mall for the last two years.


Richard also is intrigued by classic cars. He’s had Corvettes dating back to 1953, a 1932 Chrysler Imperial Roadster, a 1932 Rolls Royce and, currently sitting in his garage, two Nash Metropolitans: a 1955 convertible and 1959 hardtop, two of the 14,000 that were made from 1953 to 1962.

bears – oh my! – viewed by 150 people sitting in the stands. The circus operates under four main tents, and the entire display was showcased at Savannah Mall for the last two years. “I went to the circus as a kid,” Richard says. “It just intrigued me.” Richard also is intrigued by classic cars. He’s had Corvettes dating back to 1953, a 1932 Chrysler Imperial Roadster, a 1932 Rolls Royce and, currently sitting in his garage, two Nash Metropolitans: a 1955 convertible and 1959 hardtop, two of the 14,000 that were made from 1953 to 1962. “They were two-seaters that were very economical,” he says. “They were marketed as a second car for baby boomers. They were cute. Women loved them.” Richard also has a black 1976 Corvette that he bought new for $6,900. He put in a stroke 383 motor that gives the car a top speed of about 150 mph. Richard was 14 when he got his first car, a 1939 Ford Coupe, and says it mushroomed from there. He says he’s had 200 to 300 cars, most of which he sells after restoring them for an average price of $12,000 to $15,000. “I like to see them leave a lot better than when they came,” Richard says. “The lines are just so beautiful on these cars. They stand out. They’re things I thought I wanted when I was young that I now have.” One car owner who stood out for Richard was

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One car owner who stood out for Richard was Larry Gatlin. The member of the Gatlin Brothers had Richard restore his 1956 Thunderbird. Richard refers to Larry as a friend, saying he’s a good guy and a very nice person. Larry likewise has nice things to say about the restorative work Richard did on his car. “He was very happy with it,” Richard says, noting that all the Gatlin Brothers were nice guys, Christians.

Larry Gatlin. The member of the Gatlin Brothers had Richard restore his 1956 Thunderbird. Richard refers to Larry as a friend, saying he’s a good guy and a very nice person. Larry likewise has nice things to say about the restorative work Richard did on his car. “He was very happy with it,” Richard says, noting that all the Gatlin Brothers were nice guys, Christians. During his time growing up in Nashville, Richard also met Johnny Cash, whom he describes as a laidback guy. He encountered others who would achieve fame, yet he remained focused on his own life and career. “Everyone was just trying to make a break,” Richard says. Nearby resident and former WTOC newscaster Doug Weathers met Richard in 1997 and checked out his model trains with his 7-year-old son. “We were amazed,” Doug says. “Everything was working.” Weathers returned for another tour of the trains in 2018. “I saw the updated trains and Mount Rushmore with his picture carved with the four presidents,” Doug says. “I thought it was great and the work was very good.”  CCL

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BY DAVID PENA | PHOTOS BY DREAM WEAVER PHOTOS

Tiny Houses, Big Dreams

I

“I look forward to the day when I stand in front of 75 Dundee Street in Savannah and see a community where formerly homeless vets are living, enjoying the quality of life where there once was nothing, not even a foundation,” says Cindy Kelley, Executive Director for the Chatham/ Savannah Authority of the Homeless (CSAH). “About five years ago, we were talking mostly about the problem of homelessness. Today, we are focusing on the solution, building homes and we’re doing something about it in a big way.” Most would agree that, aside from the brutal summers we often experience in Savannah, the climate around our area is generally pleasant year-round. However, one major drawback to the relatively mild weather is that Savannah attracts homeless persons from across Georgia and across the Southeast, making it the second most homeless-populated region in the state. The facts are very telling; of all the homeless served in 2017, 718 were children and youth, 638 were considered chronically homeless, and 231 were veterans. But despite the array of support services developed over the last few decades, local homeless

numbers have remained high for a number of reasons. Most significantly, Chatham County only has 713 emergency and transitional housing beds, which support less than 15% of our homeless population. Additionally, Savannah has a severe lack of affordable housing, which is now the primary cause of homelessness in the region. In order to reduce the barriers to affordable housing, Cindy

On a mission to help formerly homeless vets enjoy a greater quality of life.

Kelley and the CSAH launched the Tiny House Project, which seeks to reduce homelessness by providing stable housing for homeless veterans in the Savannah/Chatham area. “The total projected cost for the Tiny House Project started at around $200,000 but has grown to around $2.1M, which includes all costs associated with land acquisition, building supplies and labor, permits,

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insurance, and operations costs,” says Kelley. All project funds are being raised through partnerships with private foundations, businesses, groups and individuals. CSAH has received an outpouring of support since initiating the project, which has allowed them to raise $1.6M in both in-kind and financial donations to date. Groundbreaking for infrastructure development began in July of last year and was completed in September. Project Manager Tom Taylor, who came

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on board over a year ago, says, “One day my wife attended a function where Cindy Kelley, the executive director for CSAH, was the guest speaker. She brought home a brochure about the project, and I was looking for something to do. Since I was a builder in Michigan for 40 years, I knew it would be the perfect project. About four years ago, the Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless came up with the Tiny Houses concept. Because of zoning they decided on 75 Dundee Street off of Wheaton St. What started with a budget of $200,000 has now mushroomed into 2.4 million dollars, all from private donations.” “Not a dime comes from government funding,” says Tom. “I then started getting the permits and ultimately got the ball rolling.” CSAH purchased a $208,000 piece of land near active homeless camps in the hopes of completing the construction of 72 houses. “We’re actually completing 3 stages, with stage one completed. There are 24 houses already built, one of which is a medical clinic,” explains Tom. The medical clinic is sponsored by JC Lewis Primary Health and Village 2 is sponsored by Nine Line Foundation.” All together the project will finish constructing a total of 71 tiny houses. Veterans selected for the project undergo an assessment and those most in need are prioritized for the housing. This was the third piece of land the CSAH considered but marked the first purchase that did not face objections from the surrounding neighbors. “We hope to have our first occupants in by June,” he adds. Ultimately, The Tiny House project hopes to provide 60 permanent homes and 11 transitional homes for eligible homeless veterans. Most of the 71 homes will measure 128 ft2, with 3 homes being built at 144 ft2 to accommodate veterans with wheelchairs or other mobility support needs. Homes will be separated into six villages across a community, which will also contain walking paths, three clubhouses, and the medical clinic. Each of the six villages will be self-managed with the support of an appointed resident manager. To instill feelings of pride and promote self-


A bright future ahead. “I look forward to the day when I stand in front of 75 Dundee Street in Savannah and see a community where formerly homeless vets are living, enjoying the quality of life where there once was nothing, not even a foundation,� says Cindy Kelley, Executive Director for the Chatham/Savannah Authority of the Homeless (CSAH).

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Most significantly, Chatham County only has 713 emergency and transitional housing beds, which support less than 15% of our homeless population. Additionally, Savannah has a severe lack of affordable housing, which is now the primary cause of homelessness in the region. In order to reduce the barriers to affordable housing, Cindy Kelley and the CSAH launched the Tiny House Project, which seeks to reduce homelessness by providing stable housing for homeless veterans in the Savannah/Chatham area.

sufficiency, residents will meet and contribute to community-wide decision-making, as well as set community rules. They will work together to coordinate activities such as shopping, medical appointments, and home maintenance. Village residents will also elect a Council of Villages representative to plan activities and address concerns in the community. For its part, CSAH uses local data to educate over 40 community groups annually on the causes as well as solutions to the homelessness problem in our community. In the fight to reduce homelessness, CSAH serves as an advisor to local government officials on key

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policy and funding decisions related to care for homeless persons and best practices in homelessness prevention and reduction. The Cove at Dundee is the first permanent tiny home community approved for development in Georgia and one of the few homeless-serving housing communities in the nation that offer a full range of utilities and supportive services. “I think veterans are extremely important because of their service to our country, and I have a special affinity to helping the homeless in our area,” says Tom. “If anyone deserves what we’re accomplishing, the vets do.”  CCL


Finding a purpose “One day my wife attended a function where Cindy Kelley, the executive director for CSAH, was the guest speaker. She brought home a brochure about the project, and I was looking for something to do. Since I was a builder in Michigan for 40 years, I knew it would be the perfect project. About four years ago, the Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless came up with the Tiny Houses concept. Because of zoning they decided on 75 Dundee Street off of Wheaton St. What started with a budget of $200,000 has now mushroomed into 2.4 million dollars, all from private donations.� - Tom Taylor

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Paul and Karen Egan have traveled around the world as Salvation Army officers. They share the rank of major and a desire to impact the lives of those in need through the programs offered by the longtime service organization. Not to be overlooked is a shared life as husband and wife. As a result, their lives and jobs overlap. They met in Atlanta, serving on the same brigade, their paths to the Georgia capital bearing similarities and differences. Paul grew up in Beaufort, South Carolina. Following high school, he worked as a corps helper for the Salvation Army for one year. His next stop was the Army’s training school in Atlanta. “The Salvation Army had worked so much with my mother and her family when she was a child,” Paul says. “We also attended the Salvation Army Church. I felt a spiritual calling; it wasn’t for the money.” For Karen, it was continuing a family tradition. She was fourth generation Salvation Army; her grandparents had served as officers. “I grew up in the Salvation Army Church Hometown Living At Its Best 173


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For Karen, it was continuing a family tradition. She was fourth generation Salvation Army; her grandparents had served as officers. “I grew up in the Salvation Army Church and worked for the Salvation Army in different capacities,” says Karen, a native of St. Petersburg, Florida. “I was already serving in the church in an education role. Becoming an officer was a calling, the Lord leading me to what to do.”

and worked for the Salvation Army in different capacities,” says Karen, a native of St. Petersburg, Florida. “I was already serving in the church in an education role. Becoming an officer was a calling, the Lord leading me to what to do.” The school in Atlanta offers two years of classroom instruction in counseling, Bible study, bookkeeping and administration, along with field training. Upon graduation, individuals are officers and ordained ministers. As part of their field training, Paul and Karen were assigned to the 10-person Clark Howell team. Their job was to work with young people in that Atlanta neighborhood. Paul says they enjoyed each other’s company and he asked Karen out. It took a number of attempts and several months before she said yes. “He was smitten,” Karen says. “It took a little while for me. I was older.” It was worth the wait. Ten months later, the couple married. Their first assignment as officers and husband and wife was in Maryland, Paul working in Salisbury and Karen serving in nearby Cumberland. Paul assisted the officer in charge and worked with the local Boys & Girls Club, umpiring and coaching baseball and basketball. Karen focused on programs and education. During the next 17 years, the Egans served in various cities in West Virginia and Maryland, staying an average of three years in each place. Hometown Living At Its Best

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“I understand the people; they understand me. This is home for us.� - Karen Egan

The school in Atlanta offers two years of classroom instruction in counseling, Bible study, bookkeeping and administration, along with field training. Upon graduation, individuals are officers and ordained ministers. As part of their field training, Paul and Karen were assigned to the 10-person Clark Howell team. Their job was to work with young people in that Atlanta neighborhood.

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Their son was born while they were in Charleston, West Virginia. Paul notes that raising their son was tough, with work getting into much of their waking hours. Just as in the military, Salvation Army officers adapt so they can carry on their mission. Paul says they would bring their son to the warehouse where they were working and he would zip around on his roller skates to get materials and supplies. That worked until his teenage years, when pursuing an acting career became more appealing than roller skating around a warehouse as a glorified stock boy. The Egans next moved to Greensboro, North Carolina. They stayed there for six years before transferring to Dallas for a year, then heading to Oklahoma City. For the next five years, Paul worked as the finance officer and with the local senior population. Meanwhile, Karen worked with various programs in the community. Then, in June 2018, the couple got the call to come to Savannah. For Paul, it was a homecoming. “My mother still lives in Beaufort and our son’s in Orlando,” Paul says. “I understand the people; they understand me.” Karen echoes those sentiments: “This is home for us.” Working in Savannah, Paul says he’s impressed with the shelter and the men’s six-month rehabilitation program. “It’s exceptional here in terms of the number of people we work with, and to see the progress of the men going through the program,” he says. “It’s very rewarding.” Noting he and Karen work as a team, Paul says they have different responsibilities throughout the day and might not see each other until they get home. Once there, they often use each other as sounding boards. 178

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“We understand when the other is struggling, and can talk things out,” Paul says. Larry Haskell, the Salvation Army’s director of development in Savannah, says the Egans complement each other very well and are focused on making an impact in the community. “They’re very engaging. They’re really driven for results and have a calming and confident air that moves the team forward,” Larry says. “They’re respected by staff and the advisory board. They’re always out in public, not sitting at home or at the office.” Jim Williams, a member of the Salvation Army’s Advisory Board in Savannah, describes Paul as very experienced and knowledgeable with finances and human resources, and familiar with the area and families. Noting it’s a couple’s ministry, a mission to which they’ve pledged a life of service, Jim says the Egans continue to carry out that mission in Savannah with a strong commitment and engaging personalities. “They’re sweet people,” he says. “They’re easy to get along with and dedicated. They’re a good addition to the team.” Karen says she knew what to expect when joining the Salvation Army, and there’s been an adventure to it. “I’ve traveled to Israel, Greece and Turkey. I wouldn’t have done that without the Salvation Army,” she says. Just as in the military, Salvation Army officers adapt so they can carry on their mission. Paul says they would bring their son to the warehouse where they were working and he would zip around on his roller skates to get materials and supplies. That worked until his teenage years, when pursuing an acting career became more appealing than roller skating around a warehouse as a glorified stock boy.


Working in Savannah, Paul says he’s impressed with the shelter and the men’s six-month rehabilitation program. “It’s exceptional here in terms of the number of people we work with, and to see the progress of the men going through the program,” he says. “It’s very rewarding.”

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The Egans both conduct services at the Salvation Army Church. Karen says their goal is to make a difference in people’s lives through Christ. She adds it’s rewarding when young people she’s worked with take on leadership roles and become Salvation Army officers. “I like to see them take leadership in the church and follow what God has called them to do,” Karen says. The Salvation Army pays for the Egans’ living expenses. As Paul previously noted, the work he does is not driven by money. Still, he plans on serving for another 10 to 12 years before retiring. “It’s all I’ve ever known,” Paul says. “It’s an opportunity to see officers who you mentored when they were young and lives being changed. The Salvation Army helped to break the real cycle of poverty in my mother’s family. That’s worth more than a $100,000 a year salary.”  CCL

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Chatham County Living Magazine - Summer 2019  

Chatham County Living Magazine - Summer 2019  

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