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URBAN AGENDA MAGAZINE

H O L I DAY 2 0 1 8

Holiday 2018

Accents By Design


LIVE A P L AT I N U M

© P LAT IN UM BO R N

www.platinumborn.com

LIFE

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H OL IDAY 2 01 8 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lynn Adams Smith ART DIRECTOR Jeffrey Edward Tryon GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Matthew DiFalco Erica M. Cardenas CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Laurie Pellichero Ilene Dube Anne Levin Stuart Mitchner Donald H. Sanborn III Taylor Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer

AND STAY

SAFE &

WARM ALL WINTER LONG.

ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jennifer Covill Joann Cella Charles R. Plohn Monica Sankey Erin Toto OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Melissa Bilyeu URBAN AGENDA MAGAZINE Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27 North Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 P: 609.924.5400 F: 609.924.8818 urbanagendamagazine.com ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES: 609.924.5400 Media Kit available on urbanagendamagazine.com SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION:

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Urban Agenda Magazine. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com. ©2018 Witherspoon Media Group

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George Washington Really Did Sleep Here BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

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Q&A with Sagri Frieber, Owner of Accents By Design of Bedminster

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INTERVIEW BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

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Fashion & Design: A Well-Designed Life 10, 12

Urban Books: Books of Art for the Holiday Season BY STUART MITCHNER

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Exploring Ways to Sleep Better Naturally BY TAYLOR SMITH

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HOLIDAY 2018

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The Art of Making Simple Things Complex: Celebrating the Comic Art of Rube Goldberg BY ILENE DUBE

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Finding Silence in a Not So Silent World BY TAYLOR SMITH

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Helping New Jersey Stay Healthy: Local Hospitals Offer State-of-the-Art Care BY ANNE LEVIN

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Build Mental and Physical Toughness with Boxing, Kickboxing, and Strength Training BY TAYLOR SMITH

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New Shingles Vaccine Offers Lifetime Protection BY TAYLOR SMITH

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We Remember Alan Jay Lerner Well: The My Fair Lady Lyricist’s Centennial BY DONALD H. SANBORN III

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Destination: Cooperstown BY TAYLOR SMITH

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On the Cover: Accents By Design of Bedminster. Photo by Wing Wong.

URBAN AGENDA MAGAZINE

HOLIDAY 2018

LINCOLN CENTER THEATER’S “MY FAIR LADY,” PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS; RUBE GOLDBERG, RUBE GOLDBERG INVENTIONS UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE STAMP (INCLUDED ON SHEET OF “COMIC CLASSICS” STAMPS), DATE UNKNOWN. SHEET OF USPS STAMPS. ALL ARTWORK COPYRIGHT © RUBE GOLDBERG INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. RUBE GOLDBERG ® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF RUBE GOLDBERG INC. ALL MATERIALS USED WITH PERMISSION. WWW.RUBEGOLDBERG.COM; IMAGE COURTESY OF ATLANTIC HEALTH SYSTEM; COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION TELEVISION; VAN GOGH AND THE SEASONS (PRINCETON UNIV. PRESS); FORD MANSION, WINTER (COURTESY OF MNHP), DESTINATION MARKETING CORPORATION OF OTSEGO COUNTY; SAGRI FRIEBER, OWNER OF ACCENTS BY DESIGN OF BEDMINSTER.

CONTENTS


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Ford Mansion, winter (Courtesy of MNHP)

George Washington Really Did Sleep Here

Historical and Cultural Sites in Morristown and Morris County BY LAURIE PELLICHERO | PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MCTB

Located about 25 miles west of New York City, Morris County and its county seat, Morristown, are home to many venues that helped shape American history and culture. Here are just a few to visit... 6

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HOLIDAY 2018


Jockey Hollow

M

orristown has been called the “Military Capital of the American The result of nearly a decade of work, the DHC features immersive, interactive Revolution” because of its strategic role in the war for independence exhibits that explore the stories of Morristown, the Continental Army, General from Great Britain. It hosted General George Washington and the Washington, and Continental Congress during the years that “tried men’s souls.” Continental Army during two New Jersey winter encampments, in The galleries feature many artifacts, interactive activities geared towards 1777 and 1779-80, when Washington plotted the colonies’ rebellion children and adults, and five new videos to experience. Visitors can step into against England. According to Morristourism.org, during these two winters the the footsteps of a Continental soldier for inspection, lift a musket to feel army rested, repaired its artillery, and restocked its munitions. Local iron mines, its weight, and walk past snow drifts and into a recreated log hut. On the furnaces, and forges fabricated guns and musket balls for the Army. The soldiers museum’s main level, the Military Gallery now features an interactive timeline were drilled and the generals planned their spring campaigns. Historians feel of the Revolutionary era. For more information, call 973.539.2016 ext. 210 or that the Continental Army benefited greatly visit www.npsgov.morr. from its two winter stays in Morristown, where While at the Morristown National Historical the safety of the surrounding mountains Park, be sure to visit Jockey Hollow, also provided a haven from the British for the Army known as Wick House. Henry Wick built this to strengthen itself. And it was rich in natural Cape Cod-style house around 1750. His 1,400resources like water and forests, and came acre farm, most of which was covered by forest, with a patriotic population that helped feed made him the largest landowner in Morristown. and provide clothing for the Army. Wick’s trees attracted Washington’s army to During the second winter, General the area as a winter encampment site because Washington stayed at the Ford Mansion, they needed logs to build cabins for shelter which later became one of the earliest house and wood to burn for heating and cooking. museums in the United States. It is located in Major General Arthur St. Clair, commander of Morristown National Historical Park, named 2,000 Pennsylvania soldiers, made his quarters the country’s first National Historic Park in in Wick’s home for the winter. The house was 1933. Many prominent American Revolutionary restored to its original condition in 1934, and figures visited Morristown during the two is furnished to portray its use as a general’s winters, including most of Washington’s headquarters. generals. Alexander Hamilton and Martha Also in the park, Fort Nonsense occupies Washington accompanied Washington to a high hilltop overlooking Morristown. Cannon at Fort Nonsense Morristown. The Marquis de Lafayette came to It was originally built at the order of Morristown with the news that the French would be supporting the Continental General Washington in 1777, and strategically provides a clear view of the lands Army with money, ships, and soldiers. Benedict Arnold was court-martialed in to the north, east, and south with a range of mountains rising directly to the west a Morristown tavern, and shortly after this humiliation he began formulating his of the point. Originally referred to as “the Hill” or “Kinney’s Hill,” it functioned traitorous plot to aid the British by handing over West Point. as an observation and alarm post, and a place of retreat for guards stationed Ford Mansion, which is furnished to reflect how it might have appeared in the town. Its name is said to have grown from a legend that Washington had during Washington’s stay, offers guided tours at 10am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, and set his troops to build the hill simply as a way of keeping them busy. In their 4pm. Tours start at Washington’s HQ Museum, located at 30 Washington Place, pension claims after the war, soldiers referred to the work as “Fort Nonsense.” which is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9:30am to 5pm. The museum now It is open to visitors daily from 8am to sunset. features a new Discovery History Center (DHC) and renovated Military Gallery. After the Revolution, the Morristown area began to evolve from a rural

HOLIDAY 2018

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Historic Speedwell

Acorn Hall, dining room (Courtesy of Acorn Hall)

Stickley Museum, lamproom

society to a light manufacturing center with the iron furnaces and forges Built in 1853, Acorn Hall, at 68 Lafayette Avenue in Morristown, is a Victorian contributing in the pre-Industrial Revolution time period. Locally, the Vail Italianate mansion on the National Register of Historic Places that serves as a family of Morristown supported Samuel F.B. Morse in developing the first house museum and the headquarters of the Morris County Historical Society. electromagnetic telegraph, a device that forever changed the way people Acorn Hall, which was named for the two-centuries-old oak tree formerly communicated from days to mere minutes. standing on its property, is noted for its collection of preserved original midKnown as the birthplace of modern telecommunications, the family’s Victorian era furnishings, fabrics, and artworks. Acorn Hall’s annual Christmas Speedwell Avenue property is part of the Morris County Park System and called celebration features its famous upside down Christmas tree, along with docents Historic Speedwell. The story of telecommunications told there gives little in beautifully decorated rooms and seasonal and classical music played on a known Alfred Vail — the inventor son of an industrialist and judge — his due. c.1869 Chickering piano. Morse conceived the idea for the machine in Parsippany resident and Mission furniture 1832 before meeting Vail three years later and innovator Gustav Stickley was also a Morris receiving financial backing from Vail’s father. County resident. The Stickley Museum at Alfred Vail is credited with the mechanical Craftsman Farms, located in and owned by workings of the telegraph that spelled out the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills, is the the messages being sent over the wire. Now former home of the noted turn-of-the-century a historic landmark site, the Speedwell Iron designer, a major proponent of the Arts and Works also produced the engine parts for Crafts home building and furnishing style. the S.S. Savannah, which in 1819 became the The log house, built in 1911, is one of the most first ship to make an Atlantic Ocean crossing significant landmarks of the American Arts utilizing steam. and Crafts movement, and the site, which Another Morristown resident, George consists of 26 acres of the original 650-acre Perrot Macculloch, spearheaded the effort to tract, has been designated a National Historic build the Morris Canal. Opened in 1831 and Landmark. Located at 2352 Route 10 West utilized for 100 years, the canal contributed in Morris Plains, it is open Thursday through to the success of New Jersey as an important Sunday. Guided tours at 12:15pm, 1:15pm, 2:15pm, manufacturing center during the Industrial and 3:15pm leave from the museum shop, which Revolution. His home, Macculloch Hall is open from 1-4pm. For more information, visit Historical Museum & Gardens, located at 45 www.stickleymuseum.org. Frelinghuysen Arboretum Macculloch Avenue, is both a historic house Set on 127 acres, the Frelinghuysen and museum of fine and decorative arts. Built by Macculloch beginning in Arboretum, located at 353 East Hanover Avenue, Morris Township, is open daily 1810, the Federal-style mansion features ten preserved rooms that showcase without charge. It is a regional center for horticultural activities of all kinds, and six generations of the family’s beautiful 18th and 19th century furnishings. The its grounds feature woodlands, meadows, and beautiful gardens surrounding gardens behind the house are said to be the first in Morris County, dating back the Arboretum’s Colonial Revival mansion, which is also the headquarters of the to the early 1800s. Morris County Parks Commission. Events at the Arboretum include educational programs, tours, cooking classes, lectures, garden demonstrations, and more. The Macculloch Hall Historical Museum is also home to a unique collection of Visit www.arboretumfriends.com. original prints and drawings by famous 19th century political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Nast, who created the image of Santa Claus as we know it today, once lived across the avenue in a home that is now a National Historic Landmark.

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HOLIDAY 2018


PHOTOS COURTESY OF ACCENTS BY DESIGN

PROFILES IN DESIGN

Q&A with Sagri Frieber, ASID Associate, Owner of Accents By Design of Bedminster Interview by Laurie Pellichero How long have you been in business, and what is your design background? Thirty years ago, while a diplomat at the United Nations, I attended the Fashion Institute of Technology at night. I supplemented my income by decorating the residences of UN dignitaries. I moved to Bedminster to raise my family and pursue my passion for interior decorating. I started the business in 1991 and 10 years later opened our store in the heart of Bedminster. Accents By Design offers full service interior design, accessories, and high-end window treatments. Accents By Design specializes in expert design services, but you also offer many accent pieces in your showroom. What types of items are available? We offer a wide array of specialty gifts as well as bedding, fabrics, furniture, handmade pillows, lamps, paintings, trims, and wallpaper. We provide our own wallpaper installer and furniture upholsterer.

Tell me about your custom window treatments, as well as your unique fabrics, wallpapers, and carpeting. We are well known for our custom-made window treatments, which are fabricated in our own state-of-theart workroom. By having our own workroom, we are able to deliver the finished product quickly and with attention to every detail. What design trends are you seeing now? As you know, the trend has been to decorate with monochromatic tones such as greys and taupes. I am introducing flashes of color in the form of accessories, chairs, pillows, throws, or window treatments in order to liven the dÊcor. How do you guide your clients in making the right choices for their home or business? I incorporate my clients’ personal styles and preferences into the overall design. I believe that our success is a product of attention to detail, excellent service, unique designs, and unmatched turnaround time. Accents By Design; 325 Main Street, Bedminster NJ Open Tuesday-Friday 10am-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm 908.234.9425; www.accentsbydesign.com

HOLIDAY 2018

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PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE

10

Porta Roma Miro console table; price upon request; southhillhome.com

Michael Aram Palm cheese board with knife; price upon request; hamiltonjewelers.com

Aquazzura Forever Marilyn suede pumps; $750; luisaviaroma.com

Michael Aram olive branch gold nut dish: $100; hamiltonjewelers.com

NasonMoretti Cote D’Or red wine glass; $165; barneys.com

Mr. Brown Almeria modern white gesso table lamp; $996; kathykuohome.com

Roger Vivier Chan buckle evening bag; $2,095; luisaviaroma.com

Morgan Clayhall white graffiti art door cabinet; $8,500; deringhall.com

Zenitque Lorain lounge chair; $1,368; interiorhomescapes.com

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HOLIDAY 2018


UMA STEWART INTERIORS & LIFESTYLE

INTERIOR DESIGN

DESIGN + BUILD

ART BUYING

MILLWORK

umastewart.com

973.954.3870


A WELL-DESIGNED LIFE Fuse lighting Narwhal chandelier; price upon request; thebrightgroup.com Dries Van Noten abstract floral silk bow tie; $145; barneys.com Paula Grace Designs Guitar Maestro cabinet; $9,660; deringhall.com London Undercover black & white Prince of Wales classic umbrella; price upon request; londonundercover.co.uk

Barneys New York Aria hair on hide bench; $1,995; barneys.com Tom Ford Austin cap-toe oxford shoes; $1,990; bergdorfgoodman.com Industry West Channel chair; $800; industrywest.com Ferrari lambskin leather driving gloves; $240; ferrari.com Certified pre-owned Patek Philippe watch; price upon request; hamiltonjewelers.com

PRODUCT SELECTION BY LYNN ADAMS SMITH

Aspinal of London shadow leather nubuck briefcase; $645; selfridges.com

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JOE GINSBERG INTERIOR DESIGN www.joeginsberg.com

phone 212-465-1077


URBAN BOOKS

Books of Art for the Holiday Season BY STUART MITCHNER

A

msterdam was the first stop on my first trip to Europe and the first time in my life that I’d walked into a museum on a whim, on my own, casually, without thinking of it as a prescribed learning experience. Every painting was by the same artist. At 19, I knew about Van Gogh of course. I’d seen Kirk Douglas in Lust for Life. But here was the reality, vividly, wildly, uncontainedly there in the gobs, clusters, and swirls of paint everywhere I looked, and no one else was around, no crowds to contend with; somehow some way I’d lucked out and had the place to myself, just me and Van Gogh. I could almost hear him breathing, smell the smoke from his pipe, as if he were working as I watched, no brush, I imagined him squeezing the paint between his fingers and then slapping it on. Suddenly, seemingly out of nowhere, I’d landed all by myself on the shore of a new world of art.

DEEP IN THE MOMENT Until some digital genius devises a way to make it possible to open a book and come as close to the painter as I felt that day in Amsterdam, Van Gogh and the Seasons (Princeton Univ. Press $60), edited by Sjraar van Heugten, former head of collections at the Van Gogh Museum, is the next best thing. Van Gogh articulates his vision of the seasons in a letter quoted in the introduction (with his italics): “It is something to be deep in the snow in winter, to be deep in the yellow leaves in the autumn, to be deep in the ripe wheat in the summer, to be deep in the grass in the spring. It is something to always be with the mowers and the peasant girls, in summer with the big sky above, in the winter by the black fireplace. And to feel — this has always been so and always will be.” “Deep” is the word for what I felt that day in the museum. Deep in the moment, so close to the substance of the paint I seemed to be touching and touched by it, with the ripe wheat and grass all around, the big sky overhead. Other new books on the artist include Van Gogh & Japan (Yale Univ. Press $45), Martin Bailey’s Starry Night: Van Gogh at the Asylum (White Lion $45), and Vincent, a graphic biography by Barbara Stok (Art Masters Series $19.95).

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DRINKING DELACROIX “Passion impassions him,” Baudelaire once observed of Delacroix. “On his inspired canvases he pours blood, light, and darkness in turn.” Cézanne’s response was still more visceral: “All this luminous colour .... It seems to me that it enters the eye like a glass of wine running into your gullet and it makes you drunk straight away.” Terms like these are somewhat belied by the warmth and intimacy of Women of Algiers in Their Apartment (1834), the painting on the cover of Delacroix (Metropolitan Museum of Art $65), which accompanies what has become the show of the season, on view at the Met through January 6. The monograph is edited by chief curators Sébastien Allard and Côme Fabre, both in the Department of Paintings at the Louvre.

A SPIRAL TEMPLE Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future (Guggenheim Museum Publications $65) accompanies another of the season’s must-see shows, which will be at the museum through April 23. According to the curator’s commentary, “Hilma af Klint (1862–1944) is now regarded as a pioneer of abstract art. Though her paintings were not seen publicly until 1987, her work from the early 20th century predates the first purely abstract paintings by Kandinsky, Mondrian, and Malevich. Generated in part through her spiritualist practice as a medium, her paintings reflect an effort to articulate mystical views of reality.” Having imagined installing her work in a spiral temple, the title for her first group of largely non-objective works was Paintings for the Temple. Considering the shape of the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building that houses the exhibit, af Klint’s art has found the right home.

HOLIDAY 2018


NINTH STREET WOMEN According to Ann Landi in The Wall Street Journal, Mary Gabriel’s Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art (Little Brown $35) “is like a great, sprawling Russian novel, filled with memorable characters and sharply etched scenes. It’s no mean feat to breathe life into five very different and very brave women .... Ms. Gabriel fleshes out her portraits with intimate details, astute analyses of the art and good oldfashioned storytelling.” Jennifer Szalai’s piece in The New York Times sums it up: “The story of New York’s postwar art world has been told many times over, but by wresting the perspective from the boozy, macho brawlers who tended to fixate on themselves and one another, Gabriel has found a way to newly illuminate the milieu and upend its clichés.”

“SOMETHING” A natural for the Christmas season is The Art of Winnie-the-Pooh (Harper Design $29.99) by James Campbell, with a foreword by Minette Shephard, granddaughter of the original illustrator E.H. Shepard. The Portland Mercury calls the book “An effective overview of Shepard’s life and career, including sketches from periods throughout his life … Campbell’s book, in its understated way, makes a case for Shepard as one of the greatest children’s illustrators of all time.” Shepard’s drawings of Pooh, Piglet, and Eeyore came early in my journey from childhood Christmases to Amsterdam and Van Gogh. The “something” Van Gogh gives special emphasis in his vision of the seasons, his sense that “this has always been and always will be” is evoked in the words on the back cover of The Art of Winnie the Pooh: “Together, Milne and Shepard created a timeless world with stories and images as resonant today as they ever were, and loved by children of all ages from generation to generation.”

MORRIS COUNTY

LIVE NJ

Mendham Madison Bedminster

Basking

Ridge HUNTERDON COUNTY S OMERSE T COUNT Y

UNION COUNTY

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klsir.com | | | |

973.543.3500 908.696.8600 908.719.2500 973.377.7785

© MMXVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

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URBAN PANTRY 1.

3.

2.

Perched on a hill in the historic Lambertville/New Hope area, our renovated 1740’s barn looks out on farm fields, animal pastures and the surrounding preserved park. The Barn is available for private and corporate rentals to support the community and educational mission of the farm. To inquire about rentals: reservations@thebarnatgravityhill.com.

NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 4.

XIAN ZHANG Music Director

5.

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE IN CONCERT Nov 23–25

Red Bank | Newark | New Brunswick

16

1. 15 Landsdowne Catering: Whether you are looking for a classic Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Hanukkah meal, 15 Landsdowne is here to help ensure that your meal is as magical as the season. To make this holiday season even simpler, just place your order at www.15landsdowne.com and, like magic, it will be delivered to your home on the designated date! 609.212.0777; info@15Landsdowne.com. 2, 4. Le Bon Magot: A multi-award-winning, woman-owned specialty food business offering distinctive flavors of chutneys, pickles, and preserves created from unique spice blends, unusual ingredients, and innovative treatments of traditional recipes. Le Bon Magot® condiments include (but are not limited to) White Pumpkin Murabba with Cardamom & Vanilla, Spiced Raisin Marmalata with Ras al-Hanout & Smoked Cinnamon, and Lemon-Sultana Marmalata with Caraway & Saffron and are made in small batches using only the freshest produce and highest quality of spices,

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Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts in association with 20th Century Fox, Lucasfilm Ltd., and Warner/Chappell Music. © 2018 & TM LUCASFILM LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. © DISNEY

containing no additives, preservatives, or gluten. 609.477.2847; www.lebonmagot.com. 3. Hopewell Valley Vineyards: V…a victorious, voracious, voluminous, vivifying vino by Violetta Neri. A Cabernet Sauvignon 50%, Sangiovese 25%, and Barbera 25% blend. 46 Yard Road, Pennington. 609.737.4465; www. hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. 5. Sciascia Confections: Sciascia’s awardwinning artisanal chocolate truffles are made in small batches with locally sourced ingredients where possible, fresh cream infusions, and a blend of premium chocolate made from the finest cacao. From silky soft salted caramel to creamy rich raspberry infused chocolate, this is THE BOX you’ll want to share with everyone on your list (corporate gifting available). Exquisite boxes with 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 truffles can be purchased online or by visiting Sciascia’s new boutique shop at Ferry Market, New Hope, PA, or at The Stockton Market on the Jersey side! 215.996.0606. SciasciaConfections.com.

RHAPSODY IN BLUE & THE FIREBIRD FEATURING PIANIST AARON DIEHL

Nov 29–Dec 2 AARON DIEHL

PRODUCT SELECTION BY JOANN CELLA

Presented in collaboration with Count Basie Center for the Arts and State Theatre New Jersey.

Newark | New Brunswick

Tickets start at $20! njsymphony.org | 1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476)

HOLIDAY 2018

Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

CONCERT SPONSOR

XIAN ZHANG MUSIC DIRECTOR


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Exploring Ways to Sleep Better

Naturally BY

F

TAYLOR SMITH

or many people, sleep is elusive. You run around all day completing your to-do lists and when it’s time to shut down, you can’t. This is an all too common complaint at places like Santé Integrative Pharmacy in downtown Princeton. Have you ever heard the term wired and tired? That’s is the state that Michael Pellegrino, a clinical nutritionist and wellness practitioner at Sante, finds most customers in when they walk into the store looking for suggestions. “The goal is to nourish and calm the nervous system,” explains Pellegrino. “This includes both a daytime and evening regimen and often an adjustment to their current lifestyle.” “Nutritionally, we immediately look at adjusting or reducing the time or amount of caffeine, sugar, and refined carbohydrates that a person is consuming,” he says. Technology is a common culprit, as well. “I advise patients to place cellphones outside of the bedroom. No screens near the bed. Even turning the Wi-Fi off before going to bed can help. You would be surprised at how sensitive some people are to Wi-Fi,” Pellegrino says. When treating sleep issues, some people think of taking a melatonin supplement. But Pellegrino says that most people take too much melatonin, which can cause further problems in the body. For example, essentially “overdosing” on melatonin can cause the body to stop producing melatonin on its own all together. “The original recommended dosage was 0.3 mg, but the pharmaceutical industry turned that into 3 mg,” says Pellegrino. “Now, you see common single dosages of 5 or 10 mg at any pharmacy or grocery store.” Instead, Pellegrino likes to take a herbal approach that involves consuming herbs that are classified as adaptogens. Adaptogens are strictly plants that can be taken in a herbal beverage, liquid extract, or encapsulated

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form. These particular groups of plants are proven to enhance the resiliency of the body and to support the process known as allostasis, which is the ability to maintain stability through change. “Adaptogens are appropriate for most ages,” says Pellegrino. “Gaia Herbs, HerbFarm, and various practitioner lines are what I most turn to most when prescribing adaptogens.” Curious about CBD or hemp oil extracts? Pellegrino says that when taking these forms of nervous system relaxants, it’s important to consider quality and purity above all else. Sante maintains the highest standards when it comes to the lines of CBD oil that they carry, so that customers can be assured that they are only getting the cleanest and most effective product. “I may also suggest GABA as a supplement, which is helpful for those whose nervous systems are running hot,” says Pellegrino. 5-HTP is another supplement frequently suggested by Sante wellness practitioners as it is a precursor to serotonin, which can become depleted over time due to a person’s lifestyle, age, hormone levels, or even prescription medications. “Sleep issues are chronic for most people, which means that change doesn’t happen overnight, especially when you choose to take a nutritional approach to the problem,” affirms Pellegrino. That being said, a non-prescription approach to improving sleep habits may be the kindest and gentlest approach to your brain and body. Learn more about Santé Integrative Pharmacy at www.santeintegrativepharmacy.com or call 609.921.8820.

HOLIDAY 2018


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A Holiday Tradition in the Somerset Hills

Somerset Hills Holiday House Tour Sunday, December 9, 2018 • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The Somerset Hills most celebrated house tour returns this holiday season with five wonderful properties located in Basking Ridge and Bernardsville. For over a quarter of a century, the Somerset Hills Holiday House Tour, sponsored by The Historical Society of the Somerset Hills (THSSH), has been a tradition enjoyed by thousands. This year’s event will take place on Sunday, December 9, 2018, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This one of a kind, signature event will include five distinct properties displaying historic preservation, custom interior design, and creative holiday décor. Among those featured is one of the earliest and most important historic homes in Bernards Township, commonly known as the Van Dorn homestead, named for Ferdinand Van Dorn. Van Dorn also constructed the adjacent historic stone mill. Situated on four lush acres, the property boasts a large pond and a “mill race.” The front yard contains one of the oldest cucumber magnolia trees in New Jersey. A lovely home reminiscent of the original Childs’ mansion is also on the tour. Beautifully decorated with tasteful décor and holiday trimmings, this home rests on close to five acres of the original Childs property and includes a delightful pond. William Childs was a famous restauranteur who purchased the Van Dorn Mill barn in 1928 and moved it to its current location – The Grain House Restaurant on Route 202 in Basking Ridge, which was at first called the Old Mill Inn. The Brick Academy, an 1809 historic landmark, will serve as the hospitality center. Ticket cost for this event is $40 per person ($35 for members). The deadline to purchase tickets is December 2, 2018. Tickets are not sold the day of the event. Purchase tickets by check payable to THSSH and mailed to: THSSH, P.O. Box 136, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920. NOTE: You must include a self-addressed, LEGAL SIZE, stamped envelope with your check. Make certain your check includes your name, address, and a phone number where you can be reached. Tickets will be mailed after November 9, 2018. This event will be held regardless of weather conditions. Tickets are non-refundable. This event may not be appropriate for children under 12 years of age. For further information, call (908) 221-1770. The Historical Society of the Somerset Hills (THSSH), a 501c3 nonprofit organization, includes the communities of Bedminster Township; Bernards Township; Bernardsville; Far Hills; and Peapack-Gladstone. The funds raised by this event will help THSSH continue to provide a community resource, and deliver engaging interactive programs and exhibits. For more information about THSSH and volunteer opportunities, please call 908-221-1770.


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The

ART

of M aki ng

Simple Things

Complex

Celebrating the Comic Art of Rube Goldberg BY ILENE DUBE

Among the earliest of John George’s memories is going to the Automat with his grandfather. “There was a whole wall of windows and all these little doors, and you would open one and take out your pie, and then a hand would come place a new piece of pie in the slot where you’d taken yours from,” recounts George, 73, a Skillman-based psychologist. “The whole thing was a big Rube Goldberg, a kind of inspiration for the world he put down on paper.” 22

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Rube Goldberg, Rube Goldberg Inventions United States Postal Service Stamp (included on sheet of “Comic Classics” stamps), date unknown. Sheet of USPS stamps. All Artwork Copyright © Rube Goldberg Inc. All Rights Reserved. RUBE GOLDBERG ® is a registered trademark of Rube Goldberg Inc. All materials used with permission. www.rubegoldberg.com


Rube Goldberg, Wearable Inventions (Raising a Mustache), both below, date unknown. Ink on paper.

In

fact, John George’s grandfather, with whom he shared the Automat experience, was Rube Goldberg. “The Art of Rube Goldberg,” the artist’s first retrospective in 40 years, is on view at the National Museum of American Jewish History (NMAJH) in Philadelphia through January 21. The exhibit showcases his earliest published drawings and iconic inventions, political cartoons, and some material not previously exhibited, from original works of art and preparatory drawings to video. Highlights include one of Goldberg’s earliest existing drawings, The Old Violinist, from 1895 (he won a prize for it when he was only 12); an original concept drawing of Boob McNutt and Bertha from the 1920s; and original artwork for such daily and weekly comic strip series as Foolish Questions, Mike and Ike (They Look Alike), and Boob McNutt, all from the 1910s and 1920s. The influence of vaudeville and early film on Goldberg’s imagination is examined, along with his satirical takes on fashion, sports, politics, and gender roles. Also included is footage from the Goldbergscripted film, Soup to Nuts (1930), starring the Three Stooges; the classic self-operating napkin sequence from Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times (1936); and an interview with Edward R. Murrow. “The internet and YouTube has given a whole new life to Rube Goldberg,” says his granddaughter Jennifer George, a jewelry and clothing designer who wrote a book about her grandfather, The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts, 2013). “Any Rube Goldberg machine worth its salt goes viral on the web today.” “iPhones are sort of black boxes by comparison with the machines that Rube Goldberg’s generation knew,” said The New Yorker’s Adam Gopnik, who wrote the introduction to The Art of Rube Goldberg. “So I also think that we look at Goldberg’s drawings with a certain amount of nostalgia for a lost era, when our machinery was at

least lucid.” John George is the son of renowned artist Thomas George (19182014), who spent much of his life in Princeton. Growing up, John George spent a great deal of time with his grandparents — at their Long Island Beach House, at their Upper West Side apartment and in his grandfather’s 57th Street studio — and describes his grandparents as a second set of parents. Goldberg would drive his grandson to activities, such as riding lessons. On the way home George would say “let’s get lost” to his grandfather, and Goldberg would oblige, taking a lesser known route. “He had a unique view of the world, with all its oddities and ironies, and provided a view of the world in which people made simple things complex,” says George. Later, George would walk down the street with his grandfather and be reminded of the celebrity he was, counting among his friends the likes of Charlie Chaplin, Groucho Marx, George Gershwin, and Harry Houdini. The greatest bit of wisdom passed from grandfather to grandson, George recounts, was “to laugh. Just to laugh. It’s a big part of being a healthy person.” By the time he was 48, Rube Goldberg had become an adjective in Merriam-Webster’s dictionary: “accomplishing by over complex and humorous means what seemingly could be done simply; having a fantastically complicated improvised appearance.” “It’s an illogical sequence of things put in a logical sequence,” Goldberg told Murrow in the interview screened in the exhibit. While Goldberg never built the machines featured in his iconic invention drawings, visitors to the exhibition will experience an interactive area of the exhibition, where they can play with existing simple machines and even build their own Rube Goldberg. Goldberg (1883–1970) was the most famous cartoonist of his time,

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Rube Goldberg, Rube and Father Lighting Cigars, date unknown. Photograph.

Rube Goldberg, I Never Thought of That (Portrait of Irma on Wedding Day), 1916. Ink on paper with photograph.

Rube Goldberg, Foolish Questions Postcards, c. 1910. Color postcards.

Rube Goldberg, Concept Sketch of Boob McNutt, c. 1920s. Ink and pencil on paper.

syndicated in daily newspapers throughout the world. In his 72-year career (longevity runs in the Goldberg/George family), the cartoonist, humorist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor wrote and illustrated nearly 50,000 cartoons. But it is the Rube Goldberg devices for which he is most celebrated. Goldberg is considered a grandfather of STEM education, having blended science, technology, engineering, and math before the acronym existed. Rube also pioneered STEAM, with art playing a key role. Born in San Francisco — his father was police and fire commissioner — the quiet, creative child began taking art lessons from a sign painter and in later years was proud that this was his only art training. Though he longed to pursue illustration as a career, his father insisted he study mining and engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Engineers were the rock stars of the industrial revolution and Rube’s father wanted him to be a part of it, but Rube kept drawing. His work appeared in Berkeley’s humor newspaper and in his college yearbook. Upon graduation Goldberg got a job with the San Francisco sewer system, but he left after six months, taking a huge pay cut to become a cartoonist for the sports section of the San Francisco Chronicle. A year later he became staff cartoonist for the San Francisco Bulletin. His The Look-Alike-Boys — a precursor to Mike and Ike (They Look Alike) — appeared in the color supplement to the Sunday paper. The times they were a changin’ — the telephone heralded a new form of communication, and motion pictures were the new entertainment, to which people drove in automobiles. Airplanes inspired people to look up. “The Machine Age had arrived, clicking, churning, cranking, winching, and whizzing into our lives,” according to exhibition materials. “And there was no better, more discerning and satirical eye to comment on these trends than Goldberg.” Believing New York to be “the front row,” Goldberg took a train east and moved to New York. With his wife, Irma, and two sons, Goldberg lived at 98 Central Park West. By 1922, a newspaper syndicate paid him $200,000, the equivalent of $2.3 million today, for his comic strips. His first invention cartoon, The Simple Mosquito Exterminator — No Home Should be Without It, was published in the New York Evening Mail in 1912 (we could use one of those today!). The way Goldberg saw it, technology, intended to simplify life, only made things more complex. In 1914, his Automatic Weight Reducing Machine used a donut, bomb,

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balloon, and a hot stove to trap an obese person in a room without food, who had to lose weight to get free. His contraptions, though parodies of the increasingly automated world, were written and drawn in the dry diagrammatic style of U.S. Patent applications. They contained pulleys, levers, birds, and rockets to fix simple problems like fishing an olive out of a tall jar, or remembering to mail a letter. Goldberg created the character/inventor Professor Butts as his alter ego. He continued drawing the inventions for 30 years, and while he also engaged in other forms of artistic expression, from songwriting to playwriting, acting to sculpting. He never thought that his invention cartoons would come to define his life’s work. In the late 1960s and early 70s, educational shows like Sesame Street, Vision On, and The Electric Company routinely showed bits that involved Rube Goldberg devices, including the Rube Goldberg Alphabet Contraption, and the What Happens Next Machine. Wallace and Gromit; Pee-wee’s Big Adventure; Edward Scissorhands; Back to the Future; Honey, I Shrunk the Kids; and Home Alone, among others, owe a debt of gratitude to Goldberg. “Most of us only hit the jackpot once,” cartoonist Al Jaffee told a 92nd Street Y audience, broadcast on Livestream. “But Rube kept creating new features every week that became wildly popular — he was extremely inventive.” “If my grandfather were alive today, he’d still be a cartoonist,” says John George. “He would still find the ways in which people make simple things complicated. Back in the day, when we wanted to turn on the TV, we’d push a button. Now we have five remotes. He’d turn that into a cartoon. There’s nothing new under the sun. He saw it and took it to heart and shared it with the world.” NMAJH is hosting a Rube Goldberg Machine Contest for high schoolaged students. The contest requires students to build overly complicated and comically contrived inventions that complete a simple task. Student groups of five or more can register for NMAJH’s contest at rubegoldberg. com. Registration closes in November.

HOLIDAY 2018


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COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION TELEVISION

Silence FINDING

IN A

Not So

Silent World

By Taylor Smith

How Meditation is Changing the Lives of Adolescents Everywhere

Bob Roth, CEO, David Lynch Foundation 28

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COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION TELEVISION

H

ealing traumatic stress and raising performance among atrisk populations doesn’t just apply to adults, it also applies to the daily lives and circumstances of many of today’s modern middle and high school students. The science and research behind the impact of meditation on highly stressed or suffering adult populations is well-documented through brain research, and has been incorporated into standard health treatment at hospitals like The Graf Center for Integrative Medicine at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in Englewood, N.J. Designed to be both relaxing and environmentally conscious, the Graf Center for Integrative Medicine provides its patients with a team of licensed and/or certified practitioners offering evidence-based meditation, breath work, and yoga services to “promote prevention, reduce pain, lower blood pressure, and relieve stress and anxiety.” More unusual are places like POE Yoga in Short Hills, N.J., which is offering programs such as its recent Yoga for Young Athletes workshop geared toward teens and adolescents. Standing for “Peace on Earth,” POE maintains studio locations in Fair Haven, Short Hills, and Far Hills, N.J., along with Brooklyn, N.Y. The workshop was the brainchild of Alison Grzyb, a yoga instructor at the POE Yoga Short Hills location. Grzyb says that the intention behind the program is to bring mind-body-breath connection and awareness to student athletes. Grzyb is a former school teacher and counselor with a background in child psychology. She is also certified in kid and teen yoga, and received joga (yoga for athletes certification) training in Toronto. A mother of two young boys who play competitive ice hockey, Grzyb began noticing that her boys were complaining of tight hamstrings, back muscles, and the mental strain of intense athletic competition. Grzyb surmised that it couldn’t just be her children feeling the physical and mental strains of competitive sports — it must be other young athletes as well. So the idea for the workshop was born. Muscular balance, breathwork, stretching, strengthening of the core, improved concentration, and emotional coping techniques were the focus of the four-week session.

“Children have innate mind-body awareness, but they need a teacher or guide telling them when to exhale, where to place their foot, and which arm to raise and at what time,” observes Grzyb. “That’s my role — I’m their guide.” “I also want to remind these young kids that it’s not always about social media, being judged by your peers, or the constant presence of competitive sports — your breath is a reminder of that.” “In the case of my sons, learning to exhale when they shoot the puck, when they exert their power, that’s effective breathwork and mindfulness technique in action.” Grzyb also wants teen athletes to realize that their breath is free and is always available to them. “When you’re able to control your breath, you’re able to control everything that is going on in your mind and physical body.” These forms of meditation promote improved concentration, which can translate to better study habits, academic performance, and improved coping mechanisms. POE Yoga is located at 531 Millburn Avenue in Short Hills. For more information, visit poeyoga.com.

“Every experience changes the brain.” — Bob Roth, CEO, David Lynch Foundation

MINDFULNESS IN SCHOOLS

Rebecca Baelen, a PhD student in education policy at University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, is currently working on a dissertation that takes a multi-pronged approach to mindfulness policy and its applications in today’s schools, specifically as it applies to adolescents. Baelen’s entrance into meditation began during her participation in Princeton in Asia while she was a student at Princeton University. While in India, Baelen studied various forms of yoga with a special focus on pranayama breathing, which is “breathing exercises with the intent and purpose of manipulating and changing breath to alter and cultivate certain states of mind.” While completing the Teacher Prep program offered through Princeton University, Baelen became a certified yoga teacher and quickly added the breathing techniques, yoga, and meditation work into her

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COURTESY OF AFI FEST

teaching practices with high school athletes at The Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville. What started out as a seemingly curious extracurricular activity offered by a student teacher quickly gained status and popularity among both the students and teachers at the school. Then, while teaching in inner-city schools in Baltimore, Baelen realized that mindfulness education practices for both students and teachers had the potential to develop improved “resiliency, perseverance, grit, compassion, and empathy.” “When school administrators, faculty, and staff began doing the mindfulness practices themselves, the overall success rate and effectiveness of the program increased among the students,” Baelen says. “This was the difference — I found that students received the highest benefit and change from meditation and mindfulness practices when the teachers themselves were practicing the work.” Now at University of Pennsylvania, Baelen’s dissertation is focused on teacher well-being. “In order [for mindfulness] to be implemented well, the teachers are especially important,” she emphasizes.

At a recent Prevention R3 Summit, Roth asked the audience, “Is there an inner? If so, how do we get there.” This suggestion of tapping into an “inner” is at the core of the reason why the David Lynch Foundation believes that TM can help children, teens, and adolescents. A New Yorker himself, Roth describes the waking mind as the “gotta, gotta, gotta” mind, as in “I’ve got to pay my Verizon bill, workout, eat healthy, answer emails, wake up, calm down, go to sleep, etc.” This state of being is not unique to adults. What the David Lynch Foundation has found through its work in urban school districts is that this same constant state of overthinking, overworked, highly-charged cortisol levels is affecting our youth in numerous ways. “I talk to these children and they are experiencing the same symptoms as many veterans,” says Roth. “They can’t sleep, they struggle socially, they can’t eat, and aren’t sleeping. This race to the top is killing our children. What we are trying to do through TM is to make time for rest and silence as a priority.”

As CEO of the David Lynch Foundation, Bob Roth is one of the most sought-after meditation leaders in America. He has taught Transcendental Meditation (TM) for 45 years to people including renowned director and creative and visual artist David Lynch. He is also the author of the 2018 New York Times bestseller Strength in Stillness: The Power of Transcendental Meditation. Through the Foundation, Roth has helped to bring TM to more than a million David students in underserved schools in 35 countries; to military veterans and their families; those living with mental illness, post-traumatic stress disorder, and/or anxiety disorders; prisoners; survivors of domestic violence; and more. Roth is currently the host of the SiriusXM radio show, “Success Without Stress,” and has spoken about TM to leaders in almost all fields of industry.

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According to Roth, there are three types of meditation. The first, focused attention, is a concentration form of mediation that uses focused thought (or focusing on a word, phrase, place, etc.) to calm the body. The benefits are improved and sustained concentration abilities, which produces gamma brain waves. The second form of meditation is open monitoring or mindfulness. Lynch This practice involves dispassionately disengaging from your thoughts and surroundings. An example would be the act of observing your changing thoughts and moods as waves that simply rise and fall with the tides. This form of meditation (which is also cognitive in nature) produces theta brain waves. As a tool, mindfulness can be a highly effective coping mechanism, and is taught in many yoga and

HOLIDAY 2018

SELF-PORTRAIT COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH

BRAIN RESEARCH HAS BEEN A GAME-CHANGER

DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION


COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION TELEVISION COURTESY OF DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION TELEVISION

recovery centers. The third form of meditation, which Roth teaches and on which the David Lynch Foundation is based, is self-transcending or Transcendental Meditation (TM). In TM, the individual is not attempting to tame or stop their thoughts, rather, they are seeking to settle their mind into a state of innate inner calm that exists below the ocean tides within all of us. Roth and TM practitioners believe that at “the bottom of our inner ocean,” lies complete stillness and bliss. TM produces alpha 1 brain waves, which indicate a calm and alert state of mind. Research has proven that the rest experienced after a 20-minute TM session has the ability to reduce cortisol levels in the body by 30-40 percent, and is deeper than the deepest sleep. Cortisol is a harmful hormone secreted by the adrenals that fuels stress, anxiety, racing thoughts, agitation, weight gain, and memory loss. When asked about the application of TM for teens and adults, Roth says, “I’m a big advocate of equipping children and adults with the tools to find the kind of inner calm that doesn’t exist anywhere else in the world.” He adds, “TM is not a philosophy or a belief system. A 10-year-old child with ADD can master it.”

QUIET TIME PROGRAM The David Lynch Foundation’s Quiet Time program seeks to improve academic performance while reducing stress and violence among school children and young teens. According to the Foundation, “Quiet Time provides students with two 15-minute periods of TM each day to help balance their lives and improve their readiness to learn. This school-wide program complements existing educational strategies by improving the

physiological underpinnings of learning and behavior.” James S. Dierke, executive vice president of the American Federation of School Administrators, says, “The Quiet Time program is the most powerful, effective program I’ve come across in my 40 years as a public school educator. It is nourishing these children and providing them an immensely valuable tool for life. It is saving lives.” According to davidlynchfoundation. org, the Quiet Time program has resulted in a 10 percent improvement in test scores and a narrowing of the achievement gap; reduced ADHD symptoms and symptoms of other learning disorders; an 86 percent reduction of suspensions over two years; a 65 percent decrease in violent conflict over two years; a 40 percent reduction in psychological distress, including anger management, anxiety, and depression; improved creativity and creative thinking; and improved teacher retention and reduced teacher burnout. In the Quiet Time program, TM is taught in schools over a period of four days for one hour each day. TM teachers are brought into the schools and for the first day, spend one hour with each child individually. Over the next three days, TM is taught to the collective classroom. During the school-wide Quiet Time sessions, the day starts with 15 minutes of silence and ends with 15 minutes of silence. The faculty and staff don’t hesitate to get in on the action as well. Roth says, “it isn’t unusual to find the faculty lounge turning into a meditation space after school is over.” In fact, TM has been found to significantly reduce teacher burnout and stress, which is a big issue in most schools, both urban and suburban.

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WhereYouLive

unday, November 12th • 1-3PM DAVID LYNCH

David Lynch started his Foundation in 2005 after having practiced TM twice a day, every day, since 1973 and experiencing “unlimited access to reserves of energy, creativity, and happiness deep within.” TM has, in short, fueled, informed, and shaped Lynch’s artistic and creative work and practices. “TM is, in a word, life-changing for the good,” says Lynch. The Foundation is actively working to teach TM to everyone from young children to disabled veterans, and women and girls who are victims of all forms of violence. Lynch says, “If you don’t already mediate, take my advice: start. It will be the best decision you ever make.”

“Abstinence is not a sustainable solution,” says Roth. That’s where the David Lynch Foundation believes TM comes in, because it “overrides the addiction by doing what pharmaceuticals can’t. It’s an important tool in the toolbox for today’s youth.” “Are we going to sedate every child?” asks Roth, referring to those who are quick to solve their child’s problem with additional drugs. “Meditation is no longer a luxury — it is at the core of what young people need.”

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llection.com or call 908-787-5990

GET INVOLVED Thanks to the David Lynch Foundation’s work and research, children, teens, and adolescents are finding the peace and stillness they need to survive, thrive, and recover. The Foundation’s goal is to bring TM to millions more students across the globe, and “allow meditation to replace mayhem with the help of TM.”

#LoveWhereYouLive #LoveWhereYouLive visit theisoldicollection.com or call 908-787-5990

TM APPLICATIONS FOR ADDICTION AND AT-RISK KIDS

#LoveWhereYouLive OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 12th • 1-3PM about the David Lynch Foundation visitvisit theisoldicollection.com orFor call 908-787-5990 theisoldicollection.com ormore call 908-787-5990 or to donate, visit

Roth emphatically states that “all kids are at-risk kids when it comes to stress and depression levels.” He goes on to say, “the brain doesn’t distinguish between bullets and cyberbullying.” In this sense, a child can experience the same levels of extreme stress in an urban setting as they can at an elite private school in an affluent area. In other words, when a child’s brain is threatened, it looks and feels the same to both children. Addiction is a wide-spread problem among many middle and high school students, and it doesn’t always involve drugs or alcohol. Addictive behaviors are essentially self-medication made manifest, and can take the form of eating disorders, cutting, or extreme sexual promiscuity.

www.davidlynchfoundation.org.

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 12th • 1-3PM OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 12th • 1-3PM visit theisoldicollection.com or call 908-787-5990

#LoveWhereYouLive

To learn about other ways to make a difference in the lives of today’s youth, contact Ina Clark at 212.644.9880 or email ina@davidlynchfoundation.org.

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 12th • 1-3PM visit theisoldicollection.com or call 908-787-5990

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 12th • 1-3PM Bob Roth

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Helping New Jersey Stay Healthy Local hospitals offer state-of-the-art care BY ANNE LEVIN

Despite its small size, New Jersey boasts more than 75 hospitals and medical centers. An impressive group of them are located in the Central and Northern counties, offering stateof-the-art care in increasingly comfortable, even architecturally distinctive, surroundings. Following is a sampling: Summit Medical Group MD Anderson Cancer Center 150 Park Avenue, Florham Park 973.404.9944; www.smgcancer.com Opened this past October, this 130,000-square-foot outpatient cancer facility that is clinically integrated with MD Anderson Cancer Center, the nation’s leading cancer center, boasts the latest technology and advanced treatments including interventional radiology, general X-ray, high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and much more. New radiation oncology techniques and experienced surgeons specializing in many areas of oncology, an infusion floor with 28 suites, and plenty of natural light are among the advances meant to ease the experience of chemotherapy and other treatments. The Summit Medical Group Foundation provides daily lunch, weekly pet therapy, and music programs in the atrium. New Jersey’s oldest and largest independent multi-specialty physician group, Summit Medical Group also offers four Urgent Care Centers in Berkeley Heights, Florham Park, Livingston, and Westfield. Also part of the group’s offerings are walkin mammography, orthopedics, and sports injury clinics, after-hours pediatrics, and Saturday walk-in primary care.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 136 Mountainview Boulevard, Basking Ridge 908.542.3000; www.mskcc.org This famed hospital’s locations outside Manhattan include centers in Basking Ridge and Bergen County. All are outpatient facilities offering cancer treatment such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and other patient care services such as radiology, social work, consults with surgeons, and more. Hackensack Meridian Health Mountainside Medical Center 1 Bay Avenue, Montclair 973.429.6000; www.hackensackmeridianhealth.org This center, which recently merged with Carrier Clinic, began as a threestory cottage in 1891 with a mission of “caring for, curing, and nurturing the sick and injured.” Today, the 820,000-square-foot hospital with 365 beds keeps abreast of state-of-the-art technology while also offering approaches such as its holistic mind-body women’s program.

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Atlantic Health System 855.862.2278; www.atlantichealth.org Atlantic Health System includes six hospitals under its aegis: Overlook Medical Center, Morristown Medical Center, Goryeb Children’s Hospital, Chilton Medical Center, Hackettstown Medical Center, and Newton Medical Center. Overlook Medical Center in Summit is home to some of the state’s top doctors, offering cutting-edge research, advanced technology, and treatments in a compassionate environment. The Atlantic Neuroscience Institute is the region’s leader in neuroscience care, with a broad range of advanced neurological, neurosurgical, and neurodiagnostic services. More brain tumor surgeries are performed there than anywhere else in New Jersey. Morristown Medical Center in Morristown has been designated a Magnet Hospital for Excellence in Nursing Service, and last year was the only hospital in New Jersey and one of 12 in the U.S. to receive three additional top honors. The medical center is home to the largest cardiac surgery program in New Jersey, and the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center was honored in 2016 with an Outstanding Achievement Award from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. Goryeb Children’s Hospital, part of the Morristown Medical Center, has more than 250 pediatricians on staff and more than 100 board-certified pediatric specialists. The hospital specializes in pediatric cancer and is currently adding inpatient beds to its pediatric intensive care unit. There are rooms for parents so they can stay with their children during treatment, and a dedicated pharmacy is on site.

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Chilton Medical Center in Pompton Plains was named the top mid-sized hospital in New Jersey for 2018, according to Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd. Stroke and cancer care, maternity services, weight loss and bariatric surgery, and heart care are among the areas in which the medical center is highly rated. Primarily serving Warren, Sussex and Morris Counties, Hackettstown Medical Center offers a wide range of services including everything from preventive services and outpatient testing to care for minor injuries and life-threatening illnesses. Hackettstown maintains several designations, including Primary Stroke Center from both the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services and The Joint Commission’s Advanced Certification Program. Since 1932, Newton Medical Center has been providing care to the people of Sussex and Warren counties in New Jersey. It is home to the Center for Breast Health, the only one of its kind in Sussex County, addressing all of a woman’s breast health needs with state-of-the-art technology, resources, education, support, and follow-up care. Last year, the nonprofit health care watchdog Leapfrog Group evaluated 68 hospitals across the nation. In the category of protecting patients from harm, the Garden State jumped from 22nd to 15th on the list. But patient safety is only one of the categories in which New Jersey hospitals and medical centers stay ahead of the curve.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF RUMBLE BOXING

Build Mental and Physical Toughness with Boxing, Kickboxing, and Strength Training BY TAYLOR SMITH

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GYM

PHOTO COURTESY OF CKO KICKBOXING PHOTO COURTESY OF VENOM FITNESS BOXING AND FITNESS CENTER

C

ardio is out and HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) is in. Many workout enthusiasts are noticing that their spin classes and running routines aren’t cutting it anymore when it comes to building overall health. Boxing and kickboxing are growing in popularity throughout New Jersey and New York because people are seeing results. The fighter’s physique, long desired for its lean look combined with powerful muscular strength, is what people are after and requesting in many gyms. Here is the rundown of some of the gyms throughout the area that are not only offering opportunities to build muscular strength but are specializing in it, with well-trained fighters as instructors challenging both the body and the mind.

offered all day, throughout the day, starting at 5:30 a.m. CKO Kickboxing boasts several other locations in New Jersey and New York, including 621 Route 130 in Hamilton Township; 609.838.2872.

NEW JERSEY: CKO Kickboxing 900 Madison Street, Suite 2, Hoboken 201.205.2891 www.ckohobokenmadison.com

THE GYM 2 Chestnut Ridge Road, Montvale 201.802.9399 20 Nordhoff Place, Englewood 201.567.9399 www.gettothegym.com THE GYM maintains locations in Montvale and Englewood. With an emphasis on top-tier instructors and the latest equipment, the overall atmosphere is reminiscent of a five-star hotel. Boxing-oriented group fitness classes include the popular Kick-Box and Boxing Bootcamp. LIFETIME 7 Forrestal Road South, Plainsboro 609.608.7100 www.lifetime.life

This Hudson County gym boasts 20,000 square feet between two floors. Your first trial class is free (Hoboken With exceptional spaces designed to inspire and energize, residents receive an upgrade to one free week with purchase the LIFETIME brand of fitness clubs offers a huge selection of starter gloves). Unlike some kickboxing gyms, at CKO you’ll of weekly group fitness classes including Strike, a martial PHOTO COURTESY OF CKO KICKBOXING be able to burn tons of calories and excess energy by hitting arts-inspired class utilizing kickboxing skills, weighted heavy bags, rather than air. Classes run between 45 minutes and 1 hour and will gloves, punches, strikes, blocks, and heavy bars. While not boxing-oriented allow you to go at your own pace. Any level, male or female, is welcome at this in nature, Spartan Strong is a fast-paced circuit workout that will elevate your all-inclusive gym, regardless of experience. Flexible membership programs are heart rate while using bodyweight moves and all the major muscle groups. tailored to your individual needs, goals, and work schedule with classes being

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PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLSPACE

PHOTO COURTESY OF OVERTHROW BOXING CLUB

POE Yoga 531 Millburn Avenue, Short Hills 973.379.1113 (Additional locations in Fair Haven and Far Hills) www.poeyoga.com This attractive hot yoga studio also offers weekly boxing classes known as Poe Punch. Targeting the whole body, these classes will improve strength, aerobic capacity, speed, flexibility, coordination, and balance. Paired with heavy bag work, kickboxing, high energy music, and body weight exercises, Poe Punch will have you nailing complex boxing combinations in no time. Gloves are required, and all levels are welcome.

An affiliate of Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center with a second location in Plainsboro, Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center specializes in fullbody care and training for all ages and fitness levels. BodyPump, BodyCombat, Kettlebell AMPD Demo, Piloxing, Tabata and HardCORE are just some of the high-intensity, strength-focused classes that are included in every gym membership. Venom Fitness Boxing and Fitness Center 681 Lawlins Road, Unit 210, Wycoff 201.904.2122 www.venomfitness-wyckoff.com Exceed your expectations and push your limits at this no-frills gym experience at Venom Fitness Boxing and Fitness Center in Wycoff. Both boxing/kickboxing and boxing/MMA competition-style classes are offered, along with equally physically challenging options like Cobra Sculpt and Viper Bootcamp. Venom promises that in their boxing classes you’ll learn real boxing technique taught by real boxers, build core strength, learn self-defense, and burn between 800-1,000 calories per hour.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PRINCETON FITNESS & WELLNESS CENTER

Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center 1225 State Road (Route 206), Princeton 609.683.7888 7 Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro 609.799.7777 www.princetonfitnessandwellness.com

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NEW YORK CITY:

Rumble Boxing 146 West 23rd Street, Chelsea (Additional locations in NoHo and the Upper East Side) www.rumble-boxing.com

Gotham Gym 600 Washington Street, West Village 646.490.8500 www.gothamgymnyc.com At Gotham Gym, train like a fighter with real fighters. Attendees are asked to bring boxing gloves and hand wraps, but you can also rent or purchase your own at the gym. Gotham Gym creator and owner Rob Piela has worked with everyone from celebrities to construction workers. Fellow fighter Randy Humola started personal training after a stint in the Marine Corps. Lastly, Mike Castillo began boxing at the age of 15 and has competed in the NY Golden Gloves seven times, taking home two silver and two bronze medals. After a stint in the Marine Corps, he joined the Gotham Gym family and has provided members with an intense and focused workout experience.

Rumble is certainly on-trend. This boutique fitness experience combines the best principles of boxing and strength training to help you to develop that lean, confident fighter’s physique. Rumble is HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training), strength training, metabolic conditioning, and uppercut throwing cardio in every class. Heavily-weighted aqua training bags and a nightclub quality sound system keep the energy levels high. Private training is also available. Throwdown NYC 3 East 17th Street, Flatiron District 347.306.3357 www.throwdownnyc.com Throwdown NYC is a full-service boutique fitness studio in the heart of the Flatiron District. They utilize over 20 years of experience in martial arts, fitness, rehabilitation, strength training, and mobility for maximum results. Throwdown aims to bring mixed martial arts (MMA) to a broader population. Kickboxing, HIIT Strength, and Boxing Level I and II classes are offered weekly.

Overthrow Boxing Club 9 Bleecker Street, NoHo 646.705.0332 www.overthrownyc.com As raw, real, and authentic as New York City boxing gets. Underground Boxing, Ring Work, and private training are all offered at both the NoHo and Brooklyn locations. Underground Boxing is taught by pro fighters and top level amateurs. This 45-minute Boxing Burnout class incorporates shadowboxing, heavy bag work, and basic boxing technique to high energy music. Overthrow’s Boxing Burnout takes places in the infamous underground level of No. 9 Bleecker. During the 45-minute Ring Work classes, participants learn footwork, boxing technique, and what it feels like to move and box like a fighter. All of this action takes place on the main level of Overthrow. Gloves are included and hand wraps are available for purchase. Classes number between 10-24 fighters and are no contact.

Willspace 254 West 10th Street, West Village 212.929.1800 www.willspace.com “Every body needs Will.” That’s the motto behind Willspace in New York City. Here, mobility and strength are intertwined. RE:TRAIN is a deliberate and systematic method of training by world-class athletes that breaks down the fundamentals of performance. Students are promised improved mobility, core strength, body control, weight lifting, and endurance.

Vi s i t o n e o f M o r r i s t o w n ’s h i s t o r i c g e m s … Macculloch hall historical MuseuM Morristown, New Jersey Macculloch Hall, a federal-style brick mansion, was built in 1810 by George and Louisa Macculloch. During the holidays, this historic house and decorative arts museum features the works of Thomas Nast (18401902), the American artist who popularized the image of Santa we have come to know and love. Come see Nast’s original drawings of Santa in a house festively decorated for Christmas.

Macculloch Hall Historical Museum • 45 Macculloch Ave. Morristown, NJ 07960 • 973.538.2404 • Maccullochhall.org Wednesday, Thursday & Sunday: 1-4 pm; Private tours by appointment.

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New ShinglesVaccine Offers Lifetime Protection Shingles is a viral infection that lays dormant in those who have had the chicken pox and is most common in those ages 50 and older, both men and women. Shingles can occur anywhere on the body, but is most common as a single stripe of extremely painful blisters around the torso, lower waist, chest and/or face. While it isn’t a life-threatening condition, the virus can be very painful, causing many people to suffer for anywhere from three to six months with severe discomfort. The number one risk factor for shingles is having had chickenpox. The likelihood of contracting shingles increases as you get older and, again, is most common is those ages 50 and older. However, younger people with impaired immune systems can get shingles. For example, those having certain diseases like HIV/ AIDS or those undergoing cancer treatment are susceptible. Also, certain drugs designed to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs can increase the risk of shingles. SHINGRIX is the first shingles vaccine in 10 years to be FDA-approved with limited to no side effects. As Dr. John Sensakovic, an infectious disease specialist at JFK Medical Center in Edison, says, “SHINGRIX is the only shingles vaccine proven to be up to 90 percent effective in clinical

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trials.” Unlike the old shingles vaccine, there is no chance of a patient contracting a mild case of shingles after receiving SHINGRIX. “The new shingles vaccine is preventative medicine at its best,” states Dr. Sensakovic. “The vaccine is given as a two-dose series, with the second shot administered anywhere from two to six months after the first shot. To ensure that you get full protection from the shingles, it’s important to get both shots.” Whereas the old vaccine was effective for only four to five years after the inoculation date, SHINGRIX is effective for a lifetime. “It’s important to note that the vaccine is not used to prevent chickenpox,” says Dr. Sensakovic. SHINGRIX can be administered at your doctor’s office or at some pharmacies. JFK Medical Center in Edison is an affiliate of Hackensack Meridian Health, New Jersey’s most comprehensive and fully integrated health care network. JFK Health in Edison is a leading hospital system that is nationally recognized for its pediatric and adult neuroscience and rehabilitation institutes. With more than 160 patient care locations, Hackensack Meridian Health is the largest health network in the state. For more about SHINGRIX, visit www.shingrix.com.

HOLIDAY 2018

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John Cudia and Melissa Errico in Irish Rep’s “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever.” Photo by Carol Rosegg.

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We Remember Alan Jay Lerner Well THE MY FAIR LADY LYRICIST’S CENTENNIAL THE MY FAIR LADY LYRICIST’S CENTENNIAL

BY DONALD H. SANBORN III Norbert Leo Butz and the company in Lincoln Center Theater’s “My Fair Lady.” Photo by Joan Marcus.

L

yricist, librettist, and screenwriter Alan Jay Lerner (1918-1986) writes Farr sang “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly” and “I Could Have Danced All Night” in his autobiography The Street Where I Live, “Lyrics, no less than from My Fair Lady; and the title song from On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, music, are written to be heard. A lyric without its musical clothes which Lerner wrote with composer Burton Lane. Holbrook’s performances is a scrawny creature and should never be included “Almost Like Being in Love” and “The Heather allowed to parade naked across the printed on the Hill” from Lerner and Loewe’s Brigadoon, and “On page.” In his centennial year, his lyrics are the Street Where You Live” from My Fair Lady. being heard and read. Lincoln Center Theater’s revival “What I like about Lerner’s lyrics is that they all touch of My Fair Lady, the masterpiece musical he wrote with on certain emotions and feelings that still exist and are composer Frederick Loewe, began previews last March. viable today,” says Farr. “The lyrics for “On a Clear Day” That month also saw the publication by Oxford are optimistic and real. Even in the case of “I Could Have University Press of The Complete Lyrics of Alan Jay Danced All Night,” you can take it out of the musical Lerner. This anthology is edited by Dominic McHugh, and make it your own. Many of Lerner’s lyrics are still author of Loverly: The Life and Times of My Fair Lady powerful, because they help the performer to connect and Alan Jay Lerner: A Lyricist’s Letters; and Amy Asch, with the audience — and that’s what performing is all who previously compiled and annotated The Complete about, sharing that live energy.” Lyrics of Oscar Hammerstein II. Holbrook presented It’s Time For a Love Song: The McHugh suggests that what sets Lerner apart is “his Lyrics of Alan Jay Lerner at Don’t Tell Mama in early range, which we got the full measure of while compiling October. He observes that the lyricist “led two lives, the Complete Lyrics. Lerner was a great romantic personally and professionally. He was a well-educated but also an intellectual. His wordplay reveals his high man who came from a wealthy middle class family and intelligence, wit, and ingenuity.” became one of the finest lyricists in films and the theater. Asch remembers that before she started working on However, his private life was different. He married eight the book, she had “the mistaken impression that Lerner times, he smoked, and he had a nervous habit of biting was a bit lazy. But I learned that Lerner was the one who his nails. Performing these love songs reveals to me that got the various projects rolling. And he persevered. He Lerner was a tortured soul who wished that he could be kept on writing in the second half of his career — even a more secure, confident person — who could fall in love Courtesy of Oxford University Press when his shows flopped, and musical theater stopped with just one person, and it would last forever.” being as central to American culture as it once was.” McHugh observes, “There were multiple versions of dozens of the lyrics On September 12 Asch signed copies of the book, at the Barnes & Noble and almost every song has at least one change that Lerner made along the at 150 East 86th Street in New York City. The event featured performances by way. It was challenging to make sense of all these versions, but also very cabaret singers Richard Holbrook and Shana Farr, accompanied by Daryl Kojak. rewarding because we could see Lerner’s mind at work.” Moser agrees. “He Holbrook also served as moderator for a discussion between Asch and Margot was never satisfied. That’s why Asch and McHugh have so many different Moser, the last performer to portray Eliza in the original Broadway run of My versions of certain songs, because he kept fixing his songs all the time. He was Fair Lady, and the first American to play the part. a perfectionist.”

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PHOTOS BY JOAN MARCUS

Harry Hadden-Paton as Henry Higgins.

Lauren Ambrose as Eliza Doolittle.

LERNER AND LOEWE The first Lerner and Loewe musical was Life of the Party, in 1942. This was followed by What’s Up and The Day Before Spring. In the latter show Lerner explored a concept to which he would return multiple times: letting contemporary characters visit the past. In 1947 Lerner and Loewe had their first major success: Brigadoon opened at the Ziegfeld and ran for 581 performances. The story concerns two Americans who encounter a magical Scottish village that appears once every century. In 2014 Liza Lerner — the lyricist’s daughter, who is a producer and an interior designer —produced a revival at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre. New York City Center presented a concert production in 2017. In addition to these early works with Loewe, Lerner wrote Love Life with Kurt Weill; the show opened in 1948. It contains “I Remember It Well,” in which a man and woman recall the same evening differently. Lerner remembered the idea well, and adapted it for the film Gigi 10 years later. Lerner also wrote a film, Royal Wedding, with Lane; and the screenplay for An American in Paris. In 1951 Lerner and Loewe opened Paint Your Wagon, a Gold Rush-themed musical.

Jordan Donica as Freddy Eynsford-Hill.

“Higgins realizes…that he is drawn to Eliza, that he has feelings for her,” Bishop says. “On his way home he sings ‘I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face. She almost makes the day begin.’ You realize it’s a kind of love song for this repressed guy who doesn’t know much about the world. She’s the one who ultimately molds and teaches Higgins. He may give her a new accent and a better station in life — this is Edwardian England, not 2018 — but she gives him a heart, and she is the stronger of the two.” The original production starred Rex Harrison as Higgins, and Julie Andrews as Eliza, and opened on March 15, 1956. It ran for six years, breaking the five-year record set by Oklahoma! Moser remembers that during the final performance on September 29, 1962, when Higgins boasts that “in six months I could pass her off as a duchess at an embassy ball,” a member of the audience shouted, “tell him it’s the last night, Margot!” “When My Fair Lady came out, I was in high school,” says Steve Ross, who, with Maximilian St. James, presented We Remember Him Well: The Songs of Alan Jay Lerner at the New York Public Library in August. “None of us had ever heard something that smart, chic, or well performed. The cleverness of the words, and beauty of the melodies that accompany the lyrics, made Lerner’s songs something I had to sing.”

“MY FAIR LADY”

ELIZA RETURNS TO BROADWAY

“Lerner and Loewe tussled with musicalizing Pygmalion for years, and at one point gave up,” notes André Bishop, the producing artistic director of Lincoln Center Theater. “Other songwriting teams had been approached; Rodgers and Hammerstein were unable to do it. So Lerner found it a difficult task to compress this complex show into a Broadway vehicle for the mid-fifties without making it a love story.” The idea of adapting George Bernard Shaw’s play into a musical was that of Gabriel Pascal, who had produced the 1938 film starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller. “If you read Pygmalion you’ll notice that many of Lerner’s lyrics, and a great deal of the book, are straight from the play, or Shaw’s screenplay for the movie,” Bishop observes. The story concerns Eliza, a cockney flower girl, who offers to pay a reclusive and cantankerous phonetics professor, Henry Higgins, to teach her to speak English properly. As Higgins boasts they would, the grueling lessons enable Eliza to succeed at an embassy ball, where she is mistaken for a princess. After the ball, however, Eliza becomes upset by Higgins’ indifferent treatment of her, and leaves him.

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Directed by Bartlett Sher, the 2018 revival opened April 19 at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater, starring Lauren Ambrose as Eliza and Harry HaddenPaton as Higgins. Bishop says of the cast, “Lauren is a very good singer, and a superb classical actress.” Hadden-Paton was cast because “we wanted a younger Higgins, so that there wouldn’t be such a difference in their ages.” Ambrose played her final performance October 21, leaving to appear in an M. Night Shyamalan series for Apple. Laura Benanti replaced Ambrose in the role. On September 9 Diana Rigg played her final performance as Higgins’ mother, and has been succeeded by Rosemary Harris. “The Lincoln Center Theater production reminds audiences how brilliant and special this show is,” remarks Liza Lerner. “Revivals are having a harder and harder time gaining traction with audiences, partly due to the aging population from that time, but the audiences at My Fair Lady are of all ages. It is gratifying to see. I think now is the time to be open to new interpretations for these older and beautiful shows, but My Fair Lady has no need for this.”

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Melissa Errico and the cast of Irish Rep’s “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever.” Photo by Carol Rosegg.

LATER SHOWS McHugh observes that the 1960 Lerner and Loewe show Camelot “was a bold move in a new direction. Lerner wanted to do something different from the lighter style of My Fair Lady and Gigi, and Arthurian myth is more deeply romantic and grand. On the other hand, Camelot was a commercial idea because there were numerous versions of the legend in the 20th century.” St. James adds that a spoken monologue delivered by Arthur at the end of the first act is “an aria without music.” After Camelot Lerner and Loewe collaborated on two more projects: a stage adaptation of Gigi; and a film, The Little Prince. Gigi was revived on Broadway in 2015, adapted by Heidi Thomas. Liza Lerner co-produced a 2011 Broadway revival of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever. She tells the Weiner Nusim Foundation that the show “is about reincarnation, psychic discoveries, and ESP.” The show has just concluded a run at the Irish Repertory Theatre, where Charlotte Moore is the artistic director. “At the end of our three-month run, I am finding subtleties at every performance,” says Moore, who directed the production. “I think ESP and reincarnation mysteries will never lose their appeal, although their interest has waned from the mid-sixties to now. People who knew Mr. Lerner have regaled me with stories of his fixation on those subjects!” Maximilian St. James adds, “As a schoolboy in London, Lerner was scheduled to attend a lecture by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who had become a spiritualist), who had announced that he would reveal certain heretofore unknown secrets concerning the Great Beyond, and reincarnation. A few hours before the lecture was to have taken place, Conan Doyle suddenly died. That stuck with Lerner all his life, and he had a preoccupation with ‘what happens next.’ That was always with him.” As part of a celebration of Lerner’s centennial, the York Theatre Company will present Carmelina, which Lerner wrote with Lane and librettist Joseph Stein, starting January 2019. The show was seen briefly on Broadway in 1979;

York has presented the show twice before, in 1996 and 2006. The production will be part of the York’s Musicals in Mufti series, which will also include staged readings of Lolita, My Love, a show Lerner wrote with John Barry, which opened in Boston but never was moved to Broadway; and the world premiere of a stage concert adaptation of The Little Prince, for which Erik Haagensen has adapted Lerner’s screenplay. Lerner’s final Broadway musical was Dance a Little Closer in 1983. The score, for which Charles Strouse composed the music, includes “There’s Always One You Can’t Forget.” Shana Farr notes that “the show was only on Broadway for one night. But everyone who’s experienced a broken heart can relate to the lyrics of that song. Lerner’s lyrics are the type that don’t change over time. That’s one of the reasons Lerner is a part of the Great American Songbook. Most of the songs that sit in that collection can hold true to what’s going on in today’s world.”

LEGACY Asch considers “the immeasurable joy his works have given to theatre audiences — in their original runs, and in movies, and cast albums. Not to mention regional theatres, summer stock, and high schools over the decades — plus the pop recordings of his songs. The words soar because of the music that goes with them. All of it starts with a germ of an idea and a blank piece of paper. After intense effort, the idea finds expression in words and in music — and when someone of Lerner’s ability gets it just right, the song feels inevitable, like it has always existed.” “The musical theater is an inherently American art form. Lerner and Loewe, along with Rodgers and Hammerstein, were at the forefront of creativity in that field,” Liza Lerner says. “I think it’s important that audiences today see these shows, not just from an archival standpoint, but the themes, and stories resonate today in the same ways. I think audiences crave to be transported, by song, language, and spirit.”

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The Farmers’ Museum

Cooperstown Beverage Exchange

Fatbike

Fly Creek Cider Mill & Orchard

Destination:

COOPERSTOWN

by

TAYLOR SMITH

Find Your Way Home to Cooperstown, New York PHOTOS COURTESY OF DESTINATION MARKETING CORPORATION OF OTSEGO COUNTY

Cooperstown is a village that lies in the central region of New York. It was founded by William Cooper alongside Otsego Lake, which serves as the source of the Susquehanna River. The name “Otsego” derives from a Mohawk or Oneida word meaning “place of rock,” referring to the large boulder near the lake’s outlet, known today as Council Rock. Cooperstown is the perfect destination for nature enthusiasts, especially during the fall and winter months. With numerous indoor and outdoor attractions, visitors can spend their days exploring the great outdoors and their evenings cozied up inside a brewery. ENJOY THE SCENIC OUTDOORS IN OTSEGO COUNTY Hiking, biking, fishing, kayaking, golfing, snowmobiling, and more await in Otsego County. Four state parks sit within Otsego County including Glimmerglass State Park, Robert V. Riddell State Park, Gilbert Lake State Park, and Betty and Wilbur Davis State Park. The same trail system that allows for 40 miles of mountain bike tracks turns into a cross-country skier’s paradise during the winter months. The area offers over 300 miles of snowmobiling trails through the rolling foothills of the Catskills. Anglers will find year-round fishing opportunities on the region’s many waterways, including fly fishing and ice fishing. FOR THE LOVE OF BASEBALL Perhaps Cooperstown’s biggest claim to fame is the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Located at 25 Main Street in downtown Cooperstown,

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the Hall of Fame is open seven days a week and aims to foster a deep appreciation for America’s favorite pastime in all of its visitors. Especially noteworthy is the Plaque Gallery, where all 323 Hall of Fame members’ bronze plaques honor their athletic achievements. With over 60,000 square feet of exhibit space, the Hall of Fame explores ballpark memories from the beginning of the game to today, as well as baseball’s greatest records. For a complete list of current and upcoming exhibits, visit www.baseballhall.org. TOP ATTRACTIONS FOR VISITORS OF ALL AGES From baseball to agriculture and American art, some of Cooperstown’s top attractions include the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, the Fenimore Art Museum, the Glimmerglass Festival, the Farmers’ Museum, Brewery Ommegang, and Fly Creek Cider Mill & Orchard. Don’t forget to visit the Joseph L. Popp Butterfly Conservatory in Oneonta and take an entertaining ride aboard the Cooperstown and Charlotte Valley Railroad. Lastly, Cooperstown and neighboring Oneonta’s Main Streets both feature ideal strolling and window shopping. COOPERSTOWN BEVERAGE TRAIL Hit the trail! The Cooperstown Beverage Trail that is, with the aid of a map provided by www.cooperstownbeveragetrail.com. Originally comprised of four establishments — Bear Pond Winery, Cooperstown Brewing Company, Brewery Ommegang, and the Fly Creek Cider Mill — the trail has grown include Butternuts Beer & Ale, Rustic Ridge Winery, Pail Shop Vineyards,

FALL 2018


National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

and Cooperstown Distillery. All of these producers are a testament to Cooperstown’s history of fine drink. For example, did you know that Cooperstown was once the hops-growing capital of North America? FINE DINING Why not pair the great views of central New York with some delicious cuisine? For lakeside dining, try Lake Front Restaurant or Blue Mingo Grill. Farm fresh foods and locally inspired menus can be found at Origins Cafe at Carefree Gardens and Danny’s Market, which boasts “the best chicken sandwich in the world.” After a day of baseball, take the family to New York Pizzeria, Cooperstown Back Alley Grille, or Toscana Italian Fusion & Grill. Enjoy a sweet treat no matter the weather at Golden Guernsey Ice Cream or The Cooperstown Penguin, where you can create your own customized ice cream flavor. Council Rock Brewery, Bocca Osteria, and Nicoletta’s Italian Cafe are great options for a romantic dinner for two. WHERE TO STAY Cooperstown and Otsego County offer an array of accommodations, perfect for traveling families, couples on a romantic getaway, or special occasions. The luxurious and historic Otesaga Resort Hotel was built in 1909 and features an impressive Federal-style edifice and front portico along with massive 30-foot columns. The Otesaga occupies 700 feet of lakefront on the southern shore of Otsego Lake. The hotel was built by Edward Severin Clark and Stephen Carlton Clark, two grandsons of Cooperstown’s well-known benefactor, Edward Clark. The family’s other building projects include the Dakota on Manhattan’s Central Park West. With the idea that their wealthy guests might want to play golf, the Clarks constructed Leatherstocking Golf Course adjacent to the hotel. Leatherstocking was designed by Devereux Emmet, and is still considered to be one of The Otesaga’s top attractions. To book your reservation, visit www.otesaga.com.

Located in the heart of the village and close to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and all of Main Street is The Cooper Inn. Situated on scenic, park-like grounds, The Cooper Inn recalls the elegance and grandeur of 19th century Cooperstown. UPCOMING EVENTS Things don’t slow down in Otsego County during the late fall and winter seasons. In fact, the cozy weather brings weekends full of entertaining activities for outdoor enthusiasts, baseball fans, food lovers, and art critics alike. The Glimmerglass Film Festival 2018: Passages begins on Thursday, November 8 and runs through Monday, November 12. This year’s theme will showcase and explore cinematic passages of all kinds — from physical to geographical, emotional, and spiritual. For ticketing information, visit www.glimmerglassfilmdays. org. Wassailing Weekend at Fly Creek Cider Mill & Orchard takes place Saturday and Sunday, November 17 and 18 (this is a reoccurring event through select weekends in November and December). Demonstrators will showcase the preparation of the traditional holiday drink, including the savory spices and sweet cider involved. Santa Express at the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley Railroad offers children the chance to take a train ride with Santa, Mrs. Claus, and their helpers. All of the Holiday Trains burst with colorful lights, displays, and Christmas spirit, including on-board holiday music, sweet treats, and refreshments. The Santa Express starts November 23 and runs through December 16. Seating is limited and group discounts are available. For more information, call 607.432.2429. Shop Small Saturday in Oneonta on Saturday, November 24, a great way to show support for local artisans, crafters, and shop owners. Also on November 24, The Farmers’ Museum presents Thanksgiving at the Farm.

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Cooperstown Winter Carnival

Fenimore Art Museum

Walk off your holiday meal with a leisurely stroll through the historic village at the museum. Day of Holiday Fun in Oneonta starts on Saturday, December 1 and includes the Home for the Holidays Parade, Gingerbread Jubilee, Festival of the Trees, and more. One of the region’s best-loved holiday traditions is the Candlelight Evening, during which the landscape of The Farmers’ Museum is transformed with seasonal greenery and aglow with hundreds of candles. Join the local community for the Cooperstown Concert Series 49th Season on Saturday, December 15 with a performance by The Empty Pockets, a soulful Americana band that will be performing at the Ballroom at the Village Hall in Cooperstown. The 2019 Cooperstown Winter Carnival is scheduled for February 8, 9, and 10.

foothills of the Northern Catskill Mountains of New York, Cooperstown and Otsego County are situated in the south-central part of the state, approximately 4 hours from New York City and 1.5 hours from Albany. The drive itself is a beautiful one, and features great leaf peeping during the autumn months. From the south, take Routes 1-88 and 28 towards Binghamton/ Oneonta/Cooperstown. Bus service is offered through Adirondack Trailways. For fare and schedule information, call 800.858.8555. Oneonta Public Transit operates Monday through Saturday (closed on Sundays) and maintains an Oneonta to Cooperstown bus line. Call 607.432.7100 for departure times. Find yourself in Cooperstown by rail! Visitors can take the train to AlbanyRensselaer Station and then rent a car for the 76-mile drive to Cooperstown. Better yet, Amtrak has teamed up with Trailways of New York to offer service from New York City to Cooperstown via a train/bus combo ticket. Major airports are located in Albany, Syracuse, and Binghamton. The driving time from Syracuse is slightly less than 2 hours and Binghamton is 1.5 hours. Otsego County is served by two small airports — Cooperstown Westville and Oneonta Airport.

GETTING THERE Find your way to Cooperstown by car, bus, train, or plane. Located in the

To say that food very often sets the mood for an event is not an understatement. At 15 Landsdowne, food is our passion. We believe in using only the freshest, seasonal, and most thoughtfully-sourced ingredients. We constantly strive to keep our menus modern, with a warm, familiar feel. We are happy to sit with you to create a custom menu to suit your event and vision.

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HollyDay Day 2018 Holly 2018

HistoricSites Sites Decorated for for the Holidays VisitVisit SixSix Historic Decorated the Holidays

Saturday, Saturday, December December 1st 1st 10 am to 4 pm 10 am to 4 pm

Acorn Hall Holly Walk 2017 Acorn Hall

Ford Mansion at Washington’s Headquarters Headquarters Macculloch Hall Historical Museum Macculloch Hall Historical Museum Saturday, Dec. 2 Sunday, Dec.Trades 3 Museum of Early & Crafts 11am – 4pm Museum of 11am – 4pm Trades & Crafts Early Ford Mansion Acorn Hall Schuyler-Hamilton House Macculloch Hall Ford Mansion Schuyler-Hamilton House Museum of Early Trades & Crafts Macculloch Hall Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms Schuyler-Hamilton House Museum of Early Trades & Crafts Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms Stickley Museum Schuyler-Hamilton House Six Historic Decorated at for the Holidays FordSites Mansion Washington’s nd

rd

$30 in advance - $35 online day of Tickets: $30 - Buy at morristourism.org Purchase tickets at 973-631-5151 Children under 12 are free

morristourism.org

Info at Morris County Tourism Bureau (973) 631-5151 Sponsored by:     

    

   

       

            Jeanne and Joe Goryeb


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Urban Agenda Magazine, Holiday 2018  

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Urban Agenda Magazine, Holiday 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group