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PEDDIE SCHOOL The Annenberg Effect: 25 Years Later

Summer 2018


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Urban Agenda Magazine. All rights reserved. Nothing herein may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. To purchase PDF files or reprints, please call 609.924.5400 or e-mail melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com. ©2018 Witherspoon Media Group

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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Laurie Pellichero Bill Alden Wendy Greenberg Stuart Mitchner Donald H. Sanborn III Taylor Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Broomer

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A Monument to Golf: The USGA Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History BY BILL ALDEN

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Take Your Game to the Next Level at New Jersey National Golf Club BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

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Summer Staycations: Activities to Enjoy Close to Home BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

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Bike, Hike, and Raft The Lehigh Gorge This Summer! BY TAYLOR SMITH

SUMMER 2018

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Into the Blue: The U.S. Air Force Reserve Turns 70 BY DONALD H. SANBORN III

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Urban Books: New Books By and About The Boys of Summer BY STUART MITCHNER

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A Home Away From Home: Vacation Homes are a Boon to New Jersey’s Economy and Beyond BY WENDY GREENBERG

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The Annenberg Effect: 25 Years Later 50

Fashion & Design: Elephant in the Room Design

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BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

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Surf’s Up!

On the Cover: The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Science Center at Peddie School. Photo courtesy of Peddie School.

URBAN AGENDA MAGAZINE

52 SUMMER 2018

COFFIN LID OF HENET-MER, NEWARK MUSEUM ; THE USGA MUSEUM (© USGA/JOHN MUMMERT); BUTLER’S OF FAR HILLS, INC. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA MOSS; THE P-38 LIGHTNING PUDGY STATIC DISPLAY, JOINT BASE MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST, N.J. (U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO BY AIRMAN 1ST CLASS TARA A. WILLIAMSON/RELEASED); WHITEWATER CHALLENGERS

CONTENTS


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The USGA Museum as seen at the USGA Headquarters, Golf House in Far Hills, New Jersey (© USGA).

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A Monument to Golf

THE USGA MUSEUM AND ARNOLD PALMER CENTER FOR GOLF HISTORY BY

BILL ALDEN | PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE USGA MUSEUM

SUMMER 2018

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The Hall of Champions in the Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History at the USGA Museum (© USGA/John Mummert). The recent acquisitions case of the USGA Museum (bottom) featuring Annika Sorrenstam’s hat from the 2008 U.S. Women’s Open, and a pair of shoe worn by Paula Creamer (© USGA/John Mummert).

The famed architect John Russell Pope designed some of the iconic structures in Washington, D.C., including the Jefferson Memorial, the National Archives, and the West Building of the National Gallery of Art.

B

ut it is one of Pope’s lesser-known creations, a stately brick mansion nestled in the rolling countryside of Far Hills, built in 1919, that has been transformed into a monument to the history of golf. The United State Golf Association (USGA) purchased the Pope-designed home in 1972 to serve as its headquarters and moved its collection of golf artifacts there from New York City as it formally created its museum. It doesn’t take long to get immersed in golf history upon entering the museum, as turning left at the front door transports one into the oak-paneled Bob Jones room, which is filled with artifacts from his legendary 1930 Grand Slam. Winding through the museum, there are rooms dedicated to such icons of the game as Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan, Arnold Palmer, and Mickey Wright. “We want to preserve golf history as a whole. Not just golf history in the U.S., but golf history throughout the world,” says Maggie Lagle, one of the museum historians.

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To help accomplish that mission, the museum underwent a major renovation from 2005-2008, which added a 16,000-square-foot wing named the Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History. It essentially doubled the size of the facility. “We just wanted to expand, we value being the golf history epicenter of the U.S. and being the center point for people coming to learn golf history,” says Lagle, noting that the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday and draws around 8,000 visitors a year. “The future of the game is obviously important, but we are very proud of our collections.” The new section features the Hall of Champions with all of the original trophies from USGA events and plaques with names of the event winners. There is also a chronological timeline of golf featuring galleries starting with the “Dawn of American Golf” and going to the “Golden Age,” the “Depression and World War II,” the “Comeback Age,” the “Age of Superpowers,” and ending with the “Global Game.” Those exhibits include display cases and multimedia presentations

SUMMER 2018


The Superpowers Gallery in the Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History at the USGA Museum. (© USGA/John Mummert).

The Jack Nicklaus Room in the USGA Museum in Far Hills (© USGA/Jonathan Kolbe).

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The Mickey Wright Room as seen in the USGA Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History at the USGA headquarters in Far Hills (© USGA/Jonathan Kolbe).

mixed with some of the treasured artifacts of the game. “We have some very famous clubs, we have Francis Ouimet’s club when he won the 1913 U.S. Open,” says Lagle, noting that visitors can try out replicas of late 19th and early 20th century clubs and balls by testing their skills on the 9-hole Pynes Putting Course adjacent to the museum. “We have the ‘moon’ club, the club that they used on the Apollo mission,” continues Lagle. “We have the Calamity Jane putter used by Bobby Jones. We have Arnold Palmer’s visor that he wore during his 1960 U.S. Open win.” In addition to the permanent collection, which includes more than 70,000 artifacts, the museum features special displays. “We do rotating exhibits, we do one quarterly and one monthly; we try to tie that into topical events,” says Lagle, pointing out that there was a display on Amelia Earhart’s golf connection in May in conjunction with a focus on women in golf history stemming from the addition of the U.S. Senior Women’s Open as the USGA’s 14th championship event. Materials from Shinnecock Hills Golf Club were on display in June as it hosted the U.S. Open. For those interested in digging deeper into golf lore, the new wing also includes a library and research center containing 40,000 cataloged items, including books, journals, scorecards, and championship records. The collection also includes more than 500,000 photographic images, and more than 9,000 hours of historic film and video footage. “The library and research center is amazing,” asserts Lagle, noting that the center recently added the Colonel P. Otto Probst Library from the PGA, which includes 800 rare books and 1,400 periodicals with some documents dating back to the 1500s. “It gets used pretty often. We do have a lot of independent researchers come in, and some college students. Some people come in just for their general research and some people are writing books.” Mirroring the changes in the game which have seen upgrades in clubs, balls, technology, and training, the museum is constantly broadening its portfolio. “We are hoping to do more offsite exhibits at other golf courses and expand other exhibits,” says Lagle. “We try to pair our exhibits and artifacts to what we have going on as a whole at the USGA.” And spending a few hours taking in the sights augmenting Pope’s grand structure will certainly expand one’s understanding and appreciation of golf. Tiger Woods Learning Center scholars tour the USGA Museum (© USGA/John Mummert).

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The Ben Hogan room in the Golf House Museum (© USGA/John Mummert).

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Take Your Game to the Next Level at New Jersey National Golf Club

N

By Laurie Pellichero

estled in the lush meadows of the Watchung Mountains, New Jersey National Golf Club in Basking Ridge is a premier private golf club featuring 18 holes of championship golf and the highly-rated Red Oak Grille restaurant. It is a special place to play, entertain, and relax in a family-friendly atmosphere. It also serves as the perfect venue to host corporate and charity golf events on Mondays only. Designed by noted British architect Roy Case, the course is set on more than 260 acres of rolling terrain and mature woodlands. New Jersey National Golf Club is one of only 20 golf clubs in New Jersey that has received certification in Environmental Planning from the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary System. It has also received numerous accolades and a reputation as one of the finest courses in the region. With its unique layout defined by distinctly different holes, New Jersey National is a championship-level course that provides a true test of golf. Each hole offers five sets of tees, so members can play at any level, from beginner to intermediate. A hole-by-hole aerial view of the course can be found at www.newjerseynational.com, along with scorecards and handicaps. Practice facilities include a full-size, 300-yard practice range; both grass and mat surfaces; an

oversized putting green; and a short game area with practice bunker. New Jersey National offers full memberships, weekday memberships, and junior executive memberships. Full and junior executive memberships include Club Max benefits, with membership privileges at championship-caliber private golf clubs including Pine Barrens Golf Club in Jackson, N.J.; Hollow Brook Golf Club in Cortlandt Manor, N.Y.; and Twisted Dune Golf Club in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. Pacific Links reciprocity also provides members with access and discounts on green fees at more than 140 additional courses around the country and around the world. “Our members like to play the championship courses in Las Vegas, Florida, and California,” said Pierre Bohemond, general manager of New Jersey National Golf Club. Bohemond said that New Jersey National features skilled PGA professionals who can provide expert instruction for men, women, and children. Junior programs include a series of camps and clinics as well as participation in the Club’s Junior Club Championship and the PGA Junior League. The camps and clinics are designed for the beginnerto-intermediate junior golfer ages 7 – 17. Weatherpermitting, all the clinics and camps include an oncourse play day.

SUMMER 2018

Members can also enjoy all the comforts and conveniences of the New Jersey National Clubhouse, which features finely-appointed locker rooms, a fully-stocked Pro Shop, and a private members’ patio. New Jersey National Golf Club is now welcoming new members, with a mid-season discount of 50 percent off for members joining after July 1, who can then enjoy all the privileges of membership through the end of the year. At the Red Oak Grille, which is open to the public for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday, Chef Julio Castellanos offers diverse menus featuring American cuisine with international influences. There is also an extensive wine list and beers from around the world. The spacious restaurant and seasonal decked terrace provide lovely settings to enjoy a delicious meal, with beautiful views of the course and Somerset Hills. “We don’t compromise with quality,” said Bohemond of the array of offerings at the Grille. “We use all fresh, farm-to-table ingredients.” The Red Oak Grille also features a Happy Hour Tuesday through Sunday from 5 to 7 p.m., live music from local bands on Saturday evenings, and Sunday Brunch, along with special dining events such as a Seafood Extravaganza in July. The restaurant is also available for banquets and private parties. Check the website at www.redoakgrille.com for the calendar and menus. New Jersey National Golf Club 579 Allen Road, Basking Ridge 908.781.9400 www.newjerseynational.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF NEWARK MUSEUM

Coffin lid of Henet-Mer (opposite), 21st Dynasty, 1075-945 B.C.E. (detail). Thebes, Egypt; Egyptian. Photography by Richard Goodbody. Newark Museum.

NEWARK MUSEUM

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Summer Staycati ns Activities to Enjoy Close to Home

BY LAURIE PELLICHERO

NEWARK MUSEUM Founded in 1909, the Newark Museum is New Jersey’s largest museum. It holds fine collections of American art, decorative arts, contemporary art, and works from Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the ancient world. Its varied collections of American art include works by Hiram Powers, Thomas Cole, John Singer Sargent, Albert Bierstadt, Frederick Church, Childe Hassam, Mary Cassatt, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Joseph Stella, Tony Smith, and Frank Stella. You can spend many afternoons exploring its current exhibits including “Arts of Global Africa,” “The Rockies and the Alps: Bierstadt, Calame, and the Romance of the Mountains,” “Vantage Points: History and Politics in the American Landscape,” “Art of the Ancient Mediterranean: Egypt, Greece, and Rome,” and “Dramatic Threads: Textiles of Asia.” The Newark Museum also offers a wide variety of gallery tours and activities, courses and workshops, lectures, special events, and programs for youth and families including New Jersey’s first planetarium and Camp Newark Museum, where children ages 3 to 14 can expand their knowledge through exploration of the Museum’s world class art and science collections. This summer’s six individual one-week sessions run from July 9 through August 17. The Newark Museum is located at 49 Washington Street in Newark. It is open Wednesday through Sunday from noon to 5PM. For more information, call 973.596.6550 or visit www.newarkmuseum.org. MORRIS MUSEUM Located in Morristown, the mission of the Morris Museum is to celebrate art, science, history, and the performing arts by providing engaging exhibitions and programs, all of which are designed to excite the mind and promote cultural interests. The Museum strives to educate, entertain, and inspire diverse audiences of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds. The Morris Museum is the only museum in New Jersey with a professional theater that produces and presents professional productions of musicals, dramas, comedies, and mysteries; year-round children’s theater; a jazz series; a blues series; and special concerts and performances. Current exhibits include “Fashion Forwards: A Survey of Post WWII Fashion Accessories” through July 22, “Spheres of Influence: W. Carl Burger” through August 19, and “From Stone to Gem” through September 16. “The Boomer List: Photographs by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders” opens July 10 and runs through September 9. Galleries featured are Mechanical Music and Automata, American Indian, Natural Science, Rocks and Minerals, Digging Dinosaurs, and Model Railroad. You can also take educator-led or self-guided gallery tours and participate in special programs for adults, children, and families including the Tea and Treasures lecture series and Science Wednesdays on select Wednesdays in July and August. The Morris Museum also hosts a Summer JazzFest on the grounds of the museum with an array of food trucks on site from 5:30 to 7:30PM before each concert.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ESSEX COUNTY

While some people may have vacations planned for the mountains, shore, big cities, islands, and more this summer, there are plenty of fun, entertaining, and family-friendly places to visit right around the area. Here are a few to check out:

TURTLE BACK ZOO

The Morris Museum is located at 6 Normandy Heights Road in Morristown. It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11AM to 5PM and Sunday from noon to 5PM. The Museum is pay what you wish on the second and third Thursday of each month from 4 to 8PM. For more information, call 973.971.3700 or visit www. morrismuseum.org. TURTLE BACK ZOO Discover the “world in your backyard” at Essex County Turtle Back Zoo, which features more than 120 different species of native and exotic animals from five continents. Located in West Orange, the zoo is committed to providing an enriching educational experience that fosters excellence in wildlife education and wildlife conservation, so that present and future generations are inspired to understand, appreciate, and protect the fragile independence of all living things. Turtle Back Zoo features a wide variety of themed areas including African Adventure, Sea Turtle Recovery, Sea Lion Sound, Touch Tank, Amazing Asia, Penguin Coast, Big Cat Country, Wolf Woods, Reptile House, and Wild New Jersey. Other attractions include a Treetop Adventure Course, Miniature Train, Prehistoric Playground, Pony Rides, an Endangered Species Carousel, and Butterfly Tent. Turtle Back Zoo also offers an array of educational programs, including week-long summer camps for children entering kindergarten and first through

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFFREY E. TRYON

eighth grades. Campers will be introduced to the world of animals, nature, and science, and enjoy age-appropriate themed camps that include games, teacherled lessons, behind-the-scenes visits, up-close animal encounters, hands-on science, and fun crafts. Essex County Turtle Back Zoo is located at 560 Northfield Avenue in West Orange. It is open daily from 10am to 4:30pm. For more information, call 973.731.5800 or visit www.turtlebackzoo.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEWARK MUSEUM

MORRIS MUSEUM

PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANKLIN MINERAL MUSEUM

NEWARK MUSEUM

FRANKLIN MINERAL MUSEUM Nature, history, and science are celebrated at the Franklin Mineral Museum in Sussex County. The mission of the museum is to preserve and disseminate knowledge related to the mineral wealth, geology, and history of the “greatest mineral locality on Earth,” and to foster scientific inquiry into those subjects. To that end the Museum acquires, preserves, and displays mineralogical and geological specimens, artifacts, and documents related to the history and mineralogy of the Franklin-Sterling Hill mining district. The Museum also acquires and displays archaeological and paleontological specimens and other items of interest. Franklin and its close neighbor, Ogdensburg, are the homes of some of the world’s most famous zinc mines. Over the years, the two mines produced 33 million tons of ore. The Franklin orebody in particular is famous for its fluorescent minerals and abundance of rare mineral species. In 1954 the last of the ore was raised to the surface at the Franklin Mine. Many in the community at that time wished to preserve the heritage of the mines, and in 1959, a group of collectors banded together to form the Franklin-Ogdensburg Mineralogical Society (FOMS), still in existence today. One of the stated goals of FOMS was to assist in the founding and support of a museum in Franklin dedicated to the local minerals, and the Franklin Mineral Museum opened its doors to the public in 1965. Fun activities for all ages include a guided tour of the Museum, which features an abundant collection of minerals, fluorescent minerals, fossils, Native American artifacts, and a mine replica; mineral collecting in any of the Museum’s three collecting areas; gem panning; and a fossil dig. There are also picnic areas for the enjoyment of visitors. The Franklin Mineral Museum, a nonprofit educational institution, is located at 32 Evans Street in Franklin. Hours are Monday through Friday 10am to 4pm, Saturday 10am to 5pm, and Sunday 11am to 5pm. For more information, call 973.827.3481 or visit www.franklinmineralmuseum.com. STERLING HILL MINING MUSEUM Just over in Ogdensburg, the mission of the Sterling Hill Mining Museum is to tell the story of the Sterling Hill Mine and to inspire lifelong learning about earth sciences, engineering, and the responsible use of the Earth’s nonrenewable resources. The Museum’s Zobel Exhibit Hall has more than 12,000 items on display, and highlights include the Oreck Mineral Gallery with hundreds of fine mineral specimens; a 10-foot-long Periodic Table of the Elements display; a fluorescent mineral display with more than 700 specimens; gold, silver, and copper displays; ore specimens; numerous items invented by Thomas Edison; hundreds of items used in mining and milling operations; fossils; meteorites; and artworks. The Underground Mine Tour features a 1,300-foot underground walk through the Sterling Hill zinc mine. Within the mine passages are numerous pieces of equipment used while the mine was in operation, plus exhibits on the underground mining process. The entire route is well-lit, and no climbing is involved. For many visitors, the most popular part of the mine tour is the Rainbow Tunnel, where brightly fluorescent zinc ore is exposed in the mine walls, exactly as it was in other parts of the mine where ore was produced. Illuminated under ultraviolet light, the walls glow bright green and red, the green signaling the presence of willemite, one of the main zinc ore minerals at Sterling Hill. The Museum also features a Geotech Center, Fossil Discovery Center, Rock Discovery Center, and the Ellis Astronomical Observatory, among other educational offerings. Sterling Hill Mining Museum is at 30 Plant Street in Ogdensburg. Two-hour tours are offered daily at 10am and 1pm in July and August. For more information, call 973.209.7212 or visit sterlinghillminingmuseum.org IMAGINE THAT!!! If you’re looking for something geared specifically to young children, Imagine That!!! in Florham Park specializes in exhibits and activities for pre-school and young elementary school-age kids. For 20 years, it has provided educational fun for children at several locations throughout New Jersey. Now centralized in one large, bright, newly-renovated facility, it offers a wide variety of exhibits and activities for the whole family to enjoy. At Imagine That!!!, children are encouraged to touch, discover, learn, and explore in the 16,000-square-foot space which features more than 35 unique exhibits. Embracing a learning-through-play model, Imagine That!!! is a place where young children can stretch their legs and their imaginations. The exhibits are specifically designed to stimulate the child’s imagination and intellect while

FRANKLIN MINERAL MUSEUM

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PAX AMICUS CASTLE THEATRE If you want to see a show, you might want to visit the Pax Amicus Castle Theatre in Budd Lake. Housed in a castle made of white stone, the nonprofit community theater specializes in contemporary comedies, dramas, and musicals. It also features the Castle Shakespeare Repertory, a non-Equity professional acting company specializing in the works of William Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, and other European and American playwrights. The Magical Caravan Players specialize in educational theatre for children, and Pax Amicus Generation Next offers youngadult performers, ages 13 to 19, the opportunity to perform on the Pax Amicus stage, under the direction of a professional director and choreographer. Pax Amicus Castle Theatre also welcomes professional musicians, singers, comics, magicians, and other guest artists for one-night-only specials at The Castle. Productions this summer include The Wizard of Oz, Legally Blonde The Musical, and Extremities. Pax Amicus Castle Theatre is located at 23 Lake Shore Road in Budd Lake. Check out the full calendar of events at www.castletheatre.com or call 973.691.2100.

IMAGINE THAT!!!

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

FORD MANSION — WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS MUSEUM For a historical day trip, you can see where General George Washington was headquartered during the harsh winter of 1779-1780 as he plotted the colonies’ rebellion against England. Located in Morristown National Historical Park, the Ford Mansion and Washington’s Headquarters Museum are open for tours in the summer. The Ford Mansion is one of the earliest house museums in the United States. Today it is furnished to reflect how it might have appeared during Washington’s stay. The Colonial Revival museum building was designed by noted architect John Russell Pope, who also designed the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, was the inspiration for the building. The museum features a number of exhibits showing furniture, weapons, documents, and other objects from the 18th century, and also houses a research library. Tours of Ford Mansion begin in the Washington’s Headquarters Museum, located at 30 Washington Place in Morristown. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9:30AM to 5PM. Tours are at 10AM, 11AM, 1PM, 2PM, 3PM, and 4PM. For more information, call 973.539.2016 ext. 210 or visit www.nps.gov/morr.

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMAGINE THAT!!!

providing them with a fun day. Trained staff members are on hand to explain activities and exhibits and to guide visitors through different areas of interest. Features include a puppet theater, dance room, castle jungle gym play area, music room, train exhibit, arts and crafts room, pirate ship with fishing area, and an interactive 3D sand table area. Imagine That!!! is located at 4 Vreeland Road in Florham Park. It is open Tuesday through Friday from 10AM to 4:30PM and Saturday and Sunday from 10AM to 5:30PM. For more information, call 973.966.8000 or visit www. imaginethatmuseum.com.

SKYLANDS STADIUM If you’re looking to spend some time outdoors, you can head over to Skylands Stadium, home to the Sussex County Miners professional baseball team. One of North Jersey’s premier sports and entertainment venues, Skyland Stadium is a year-round, full-service facility where fans can enjoy baseball games as well as meet-and-greets with Miners players, coaches, and their popular mascot, Herbie the Miner. Visit www.sussexcountyminers.com for the summer schedule. Postgame fireworks are scheduled for July 4, 7, 21, and 28; August 25; and September 1. Skylands Stadium will also host the New Meadowlands Flea Market on July 21 and August 18, opening both days at 8AM. Skylands Stadium is located at 94 Championship Place in Augusta. For more information, call 973.383.7644 or visit www.skylandsstadium.com.

Events subject to change. See websites for full details.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SKYLANDS STADIUM

SUSSEX COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS There’s “always something happening” at the Sussex County Fairgrounds, home of the New Jersey State Fair/Sussex County Farm & Horse Show. Running from August 3-12, this ten-day show highlights the hallmarks of an old-fashioned country fair, as well as lots of entertainment, food, and shopping. The six barns will be full of animals, the three rings will be showcasing horses, and there will be plenty of activities for every member of the family. The Outdoor Entertainment Area features two demo derbies, a mud bog, tractor pulls, motocross, and an opening night concert. The Performing Arts Tent has entertainment every day. The Sussex County Fairgrounds is located at 37 Plains Road in Augusta. For more information, call 973.948.5500 or visit www. alwayssomethinghappening.com.

FORD MANSION — WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS MUSEUM

SKYLANDS STADIUM

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BASKING RIDGE COUNTRY CLUB By providing the most value in private membership opportunities, offering a unique, affordable and all-inclusive experience, Basking Ridge Country Club is the ideal place to explore private membership. With flexible membership packages and a superb restaurant that overlooks the club’s pristine 18th green and the rolling Somerset Hills, Basking Ridge Country Club is truly a dynamic environment for all to enjoy without monthly dues or food and beverage minimums. BRCC offers a variety of annual membership packages to best fit your budget and lifestyle. They take great pride in being voted as one of New Jersey’s top family-friendly clubs. BRCC is proud of how warm and welcoming the club is to all who visit; they strive to make it feel like a second home to their members and their guests. Whether your interest in membership is intended to afford you leisure time with friends, encourage your child to develop their golf skills at an early age, or to provide an impressive setting for entertaining business associates and clients, you will find the environment at Basking Ridge Country Club to be both friendly and flexible enough to satisfy all your needs. Basking Ridge Country Club in Basking Ridge, N.J. has had a long and storied existence, and has been a major player in the New Jersey golf scene for over 90 years. In 1986, the Mahans, the current owners, purchased the establishment and transformed it into a fully private golf and swim club. The Mahans made the club a first-class private facility, spending millions to upgrade the amenities and golf course with additional bunkers, trees, and drainage improvements, and began offering annual memberships. About 300 yards has been added to the course’s overall distance, bringing it to around 6,906 yards from the back markers and 6,423 from the members’ tees. From the very first hole, you’ll immediately commune with nature on the 257-acre property — there’s something special about playing on holes that are framed by majestic trees. The club is very family-oriented, whether you’re on the course, warming up at the practice facilities, or soaking up the sun around our 25-meter swimming pool. Membership does not require a bond, initiation fee, assessments or monthly food minimums. Members enjoy not only a great course, but also extensive practice facilities, a golf academy, and a family-friendly swim club. Both the swim club and golf academy are open to the public and do not require a golf membership to take part of. The Golf Academy at Basking Ridge offers junior and adult clinics, junior summer camp programs, and private

lessons from a PGA professional staff. The summer camps accept children between the ages of six through 18. For the 2018 season, there will be new events, both social and golf related, that will spark interest in all members, young to old and everyone in between. The restaurant, “Delicious Heights,” is also open to the public, serving lunch and dinner seven days a week. It has spectacular views of the pristine 18th green and patio dining featuring a full service bar. As always, the club has many membership categories to choose from based upon age and how often one will play, with something for everyone, from beginner to avid golfer. With progressive memberships, a superb restaurant and newly renovated clubhouse that overlooks the club’s pristine fairways and the rolling Somerset Hills, Basking Ridge Country Club is truly a dynamic environment for all to enjoy. For more information on the various memberships available, or to arrange a tour of our property, contact us today at 908.766.8200 ext. 2 or email ltreich@baskingridgecc.com.

ake Valhalla Club...

Basking Ridge Edit.indd 3

4/16/18 12:29 PM

surrounded by a canopy of serene trees and majestic mountaintops, our exclusive club offers rustic elegance in a lakeside setting for all your special occasion needs. Serving members and the public since the 1930s, Lake Valhalla Club’s English Tudor clubhouse provides the backdrop for your guests to enjoy a memorable menu with the personal touch of dedicated hospitality specialists.

Call today to book your private tour of the 108-acre gem hidden in the mountains of northern New Jersey. PHOTO CREDITS: (TOP, FROM LEFT) LAKE VALHALLA CLUB; IDALIA PHOTOGRAPHY; (BOTTOM, FROM LEFT) CASSIE CLAIRE PHOTOGRAPHY, CASSIE CLAIRE PHOTOGRAPHY, IDALIA PHOTOGRAPHY.

13 Vista Road, Montville, NJ 973.334.3190 • www.lakevalhallaclub.com 22

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Bike, Hike, and Raft the Lehigh Gorge This Summer! BY TAYLOR SMITH

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F

PHOTO COURTESY OF POCONOWHITEWATER.COM

ive times larger than New York’s Central Park, Lehigh Gorge State Park in northeastern Pennsylvania is a 4,548-acre wilderness just 90 minutes from Philadelphia and two hours from New York City. The region is home to the Northeast’s most accessible and convenient whitewater rafting, family style rafting, hiking, and rail trail biking. This summer, encourage your kids to put down their screens and instead experience an action-packed Whitewater Dam Release weekend, biking, or hiking in the great outdoors. Surrounded by state park-protected woodlands and mountains, visitors will enjoy 12 miles and four to five hours of active class III whitewater and breathtaking scenery. This type of trip is suitable for ages 8 and up. While paddling over rapids, you’ll have an active, unforgettable day outdoors. Although no experience is necessary, feeling comfortable

in the water is a must. Highlights include over 17 sets of rapids and beautiful scenery in the Lehigh Gorge State Park. Natural whitewater flow occurs from April 2 through mid-June, with Dam Release weekends scheduled from May through October. This year’s Dam Release dates offer an extra “boost” on those class III whitewater rapids that will really get your heart pounding. Dam Release Dates: July: 7, 8, 21, 22, 28, 29 August: 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26 September: 1, 2 October: Daily, plus a mega Dam Release on October 6 and 7.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF POCONOWHITEWATER.COM

biking the Upper or Lower Gorge at 10 or 15 miles, the Lehigh Gap Trail at 23 miles, the Full Lehigh Gorge at 25 miles, or the Full Monty at 36 miles.

HIKING TRAILS IN AND AROUND THE LEHIGH GORGE

Dam Release trips have limited availability, so reservations are strongly recommended. Visitors can book as soon as possible at poconowhitewater.com or whitewaterchallengers.com.

TRAIL BIKING IN LEHIGH GORGE STATE PARK The Lehigh Gorge Bike Trail is one of the most scenic trail rides in the United States. Nestled in the Pocono Mountains, it winds through old growth forests overlooking the dramatic rapids of the Lehigh River in Lehigh Gorge State Park. Bikers will enjoy spectacular views of whitewater crests, slanting cliff faces, unmarked woodlands, and waterfalls. Whitewater Challengers (whitewaterchallengers.com) offers bikes for rent and shuttle services. Half Trail (1-1.5 hours on the trail) and Full Trail (2-2.5 hours on the trail) are available. Another great biking source is Pocono Biking (poconobiking.com). They offer trail maps and the chance to test your endurance skills by

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Lehigh Gorge State Park is nestled between the historic town of Jim Thorpe, Pa., and the Francis E. Walter Dam in the Pocono Mountains. Rich in natural history and views, the park will keep you busy with hiking activities if you are looking for a day or weekend spent outside. A system of extravagant locks and canals were built in the 1830s to support the logging and coal industries, which were once widespread across the region. The river was used as primary transportation for this material. A severe storm swept through in 1862 destroying the canal system, and it was never rebuilt to its original capacity. Visitors can see remnants of the olds locks and dams as they hike and bike along the Lehigh Gorge Trail. Eventually, new railroad technology replaced the canal system, and hikers will observe frequent passing trains. Many of these trains are now used for commercial transportation, as well as a scenic train ride for tourists visiting Jim Thorpe.

RUN & RAFT ON JULY 7 Have you heard the news? This year Whitewater Challengers is offering a Raft & Run event on July 7, which includes a 7.5-mile jog along the scenic Lehigh Gorge Trail before transitioning into a three-hour whitewater adventure along the Lehigh River. On the morning of the event, participants are scheduled to meet at the Whitewater Challengers Rafting Center, located at 288 North Stagecoach Road in Weatherly, Pa. Racers will receive a commemorative Run & Raft T-shirt along with lunch on the river. Runners will enjoy the stretch of mostly gravel trail surrounded by lush foliage, shade, and pristine landscapes. Whitewater Challengers will have shuttle buses on hand at the finish line to provide runners and rafters with a short ride back to the rafting center. To register, visit whitewaterchallengers.com/run.

SUMMER 2018


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PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITEWATER CHALLENGERS

PHOTO COURTESY OF POCONOWHITEWATER.COM


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Chef Manuel Perez creates Albariño’s signature Paella, starting with Spanish “Bomba” rice (Spain’s version of Arborio or Carnaroli) cooked in a shellfish, organic chicken, or vegetable stock for its corresponding condiments. Expect to find a “socarrat” in our Paella, which indicates that the perfect “crust” was created to maximize flavors. The Grove West 508 Broad Street Shrewsbury, NJ 07702 (732) 852-2640 www.albarinorestaurant.com

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At the core of Terra Momo’s culinary philosophy is a deep appreciation for a “taste of place.” We believe that food should speak eloquently of its provenance — its soil, its climate, and the people who nurture it. Albariño Restaurant features Spanish-inspired dishes, using the best ingredients that New Jersey, and the mid-Atlantic region, have to offer. The Grove West 508 Broad Street, Shrewsbury, NJ 07702 (732) 852-2640 | www.albarinorestaurant.com

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INTO THE BLUE THE U.S. AIR FORCE RESERVE TURNS

7O BY DONALD H. SANBORN III


“McGuire is a fantastic example of what the “McGuire is a fantastic example of Air Force Reserve can, and should, be,” asserts what the AirDunham, Force aReserve and Col. Robert graduatecan, of Princeton University. “McGuire is Col. an associate should, be,” asserts Robertunit, meaning that reservists share the same Dunham, graduate of Princeton hardware a with their active-duty counterparts. University. “McGuire an associate That is a model that hasis worked very well.” unit, meaning that reservists share the Now retired, Dunham is a former ops group same hardware with their active-duty commander at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (MDL), anThat Air Force in Burlington counterparts. is a base model that has County, N.J. In 2009 the McGuire Air Force worked very well.” Base was renamed after being consolidated with adjacent Army and Navy facilities, but it remains under the jurisdiction of the Air Now retired, Dunham is a former ops Mobility Command. In addition to the Air Force group commander at Joint Base and the Air Force Reserve, the base is host to the Air National Guard. It also a Marine McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, anhosts Air Force Forces Reserve contingent, as well as the Naval base in Burlington County, N.J. In Air Reserve’s Fleet Logistics Squadron VR-64.

COL. ROBERT DUNHAM, RIGHT, TAKES THE GUIDON FROM COL. UNDERKOFLER, ASSUMING COMMAND THE OPERATIONS GROUP. DUNHAM WAS PREVIOUSLY THECOMMAND DIRECTOR COL. ROBERT OF DUNHAM TAKES THE GUIDON FROM COL. UNDERKOFLER, ASSUMING OFOF THE THE AIR FORCE CENTER AT THE PENTAGON, ARLINGTON, VA. (PHOTO BYAT OPERATIONS GROUP.OPERATIONS DUNHAM WAS PREVIOUSLY THE DIRECTOR OF THE AIR FORCE OPERATIONS CENTER TH CHRISTIAN DELUCA, 514TH AIR MOBILITY WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS) THE PENTAGON, ARLINGTON, VA. (PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN DELUCA, 514 AIR MOBILITY WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS)

2009 the McGuire Air Force Base was “The Air Force created as a with renamed afterReserve being was consolidated separate component on April 14, 1948, when adjacent and Navywas facilities, but the ArmyArmy Air Corps Reserve transferred it remains under notes the jurisdiction of the to the Air Force,” Lt. Col. Kimberly Lalley, the chief of public affairs for the 514th Air Mobility Command. In addition to Air Mobility Wing. “The Air Force Reserve the Air Force andover the 100 Air years Force lineage dates back to when Reserve Airpower was established in Air the Reserve, the base is host to the National Defense Act of 1916. Today nearly National Guard. It also hosts a Marine 70,000 Reserve citizen airmen are stationed Forces contingent, asthe well as locally Reserve in communities throughout United States and overseas and serving globally for the Naval Air Reserve’s Fleet Logistics every Combatant Command in air, space, and Squadron VR-64. cyberspace.”

HISTORY OF THE JOINT BASE HISTORY OF THE JOINT BASE

assigned the 431st Fighter was Squadron.” killed whenMcGuire his P-38 for aircraft flying to and from Europe,”toPorcelli wasSquadron.” assigned to McGuire 431st Fighter Lightning crashed on Negros Island in the Philippines; he had been attempting “At the war, it was the killed when his P-38 Lightning on “The roots of the Joint Base go back to World War I,continues. when Camp Dix end wasof theto assist his wingman duringwas a dogfi ght, a close-range form of crashed aerial combat. established,” aviation historian Richard Porcelli, author of Floyd receiving airfield for returning war wounded. But Negros Island inmilitary the Philippines; he had been “The roots of says the Joint Base go back toDr. World “The Air Force became an independent service, separated from the Bennett Field and Naval Air Station Atlantic City. “Starting in 1917, it was Army, on September 18,attempting 1947,” says Air Service to gain in 1946 the base wasthe closed,U.S. as part of the toPorcelli. assist his“The wingman duringtried a War I, when Camp Dix was established,” says major mobilization point for forces headed for the European war. After the independence as early as 1920, but was denied. It did notofhappen until after the post-war [reduction in] forces. Its closure was dogfight, a close-range form aerial combat. aviation historian Dr. Richard Porcelli, author of war, Camp Dix became a training base, and in the 1920s a primitive airfield was Second World War, partially after the War Department (later Department of short-lived, with reactivation in 1948 by the newly “The Air Force became an independent created on the site. Floyd Bennett Field and Naval Air Station Defense) recognized the role of air power in the winning of the war.”military “In theCity. 1930s, using federal funds, airport infrastructure was added including formed U.S. Air Force.’’ service, separated from theForce US Army, on Command Atlantic “Starting in 1917, it was the major The Air Force has two reserve components: the Air Reserve concrete runways. The airport was named Rudd Field in honor of Guy Rudd, for New and Jersey’s the Air National “The mission of the says 514thPorcelli. Air Mobility The base wasK.named Medal of Guard.September 18, 1947,” “The Wing Air is to mobilization point for forces headed for the a fallen aviator from Newark. In 1939 it became Fort Dix Army Air Field. In 1940 recruit and sustain combat-ready Reserve citizen airmen to flas y, fi ght, as and win, Honor recipient and second leading American Service tried to gain independence early European war. After the war, Camp Dix became a it became the home base of the 119th Observation Squadron, antecedents of while enhancing our nation’s air mobility capability,” says Lalley. fighter ace, Ridgewood-born Thomas McGuire, Jr. 1920, but was denied. It did not happen until after today’s 119th Fighter Squadron.” trainingNew base,Jersey and inAir theNational 1920s aGuard’s primitive airfield was used mainly as a base for anti-submarine patrols, (1920-1945). “His first combat assignment was in the Second World War, partially after the War was“During created WWII on the itsite. A “TYPICAL DAY” Department FOR A RESERVIST as well as a stopping point for aircraft flying to and Alaska from Europe,” Porcelli flying P-39s with the 54th Fighter Group,” (later Department of Defense) In the 1930s, using federal funds, airport continues. “At the end of the war, it was the receiving airfield for returning war says Porcelli. “He returned to the U.S. in recognized the role of air power in the winning ofAir infrastructure was added including concrete “No day is typical,” asserts Lt. Col. Tamara Johnson, who has been in the wounded. But in 1946 the base was closed, as part of the post-war [reduction sinceGeisler, 1998, and at Joint MDL since 2009. Formerly a KC-10 pilot, she 1942 marriedForce Marilynn theBase war.” in] forces.The Its closure wasnamed short-lived, with in reactivationDecember in 1948 by theand newly runways. airport was Rudd Field is an duties include drafting awards and decorations formed Air whom he called ‘Pudgy.’ Henow named hisexecutive assigned officer. HerThe Air Force has two reserve components: the honor ofU.S. Guy K.Force.’’ Rudd, a fallen aviator from for the squadron. “I get to interact with our impressive airmen and learn about The base was named for New Jersey’s Medal of Honor recipient and second P-38 Pudgy, in her honor. A reproduction of Pudgy Air Force Reserve Command and the Air National Newark. In 1939 it became Fort Dix Army Air the amazing things they do on a daily basis. While they believe they’re ‘just leading American fighter ace, Ridgewood-born Thomas McGuire, Jr. (1920th can be seen on the base.” doing their jobs,’ I’m in a position Guard. mission of the Air Mobility Field. “His In 1940 became the home base of the to“The recognize them for514 constantly going above 1945). firstit combat assignment was in Alaska flying P-39s with the 54th and beyond.” “In February 1943 he reported to Orange Wing is to recruit and train Air Force Reserve Fighter Group,” says Porcelli. antecedents “He returned 1942 and 119th Observation Squadron, of to the U.S. in December Col. DeSantis, Citizen the operations group for the married Marilynn Geisler, whom he called119th ‘Pudgy.’ He named hisAirport assigned P-38 how to fly County to learn theMichael Lockheed Airmen for activecommander duty and enhance our514th today’s New Jersey Air National Guard’s Air Mobility Wing, attends “a lot of meetings. I’ll come in and prepare for a Pudgy, in her honor. A reproduction of Pudgy can be seen on the base.” P-38 Lightning,” Porcelli continues. “He was nation’swhere air mobility capability,” a fact sheet Fighter Squadron.” maintenance operation meeting, we review the states day prior’s flying. “In February 1943 he reported to Orange County Airport to learn how to fly posted to the South Pacific in March 1943 with the provided by McGuire’s Office of Public Affairs. “During WWII it was used mainly as a base for Thursday I’ll be fl ying all day in a C-17, refueling. A big part of my job is training the Lockheed P-38 Lightning,” Porcelli says. “He was posted to the South Pacific 49th Fighter Squadron, Group. Then other pilots how to flhe y; that’s probably about 10 percent of my job. The rest of it in March 1943 with the 49th Fighter Squadron, 5th Fighter Group. Then he was 5th Fighter anti-submarine patrols, as well as a stopping point McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Joint Base Air Show (OPPOSITE). Many aircraft were accessible for close inspection. Photo by Alan Budman/Shutterstock.com SUMMER 2018

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DEFENSE VISUAL INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION SERVICE (DVIDS) F-22 Raptor performs a single-ship demonstration at the 2018 Power in the Pines Open House and Air Show rehearsal held May 4, 2018 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Matthew Hecht.

is being a commander. With a group of almost 600 people, it’s a big job for me.” A Princeton resident, Major Sasha Heath is a KC-10 pilot with the 76th Air Refueling Squadron. “A typical day for me depends on what I have scheduled for that particular duty day,” Heath says. “When I come in to fly, for example, the day revolves around the mission. From preparing for the flight, completing the flight, and conducting any necessary debriefs or paperwork, it’s quite a process.” “Your primary job in the Reserve is to be ready,” says Dunham. “I was the operations group commander. A wing has three different groups. There’s an operations group, consisting of the people who directly do operations; a maintenance group that works with operations to keep all the airplanes up in the air; and a mission support group.” Col. Adrian Byers, the vice commander for the 514th Air Mobility Wing, agrees with Dunham that “We all have the same requirements of maintaining our readiness. We’re pilots, but we’re officers first. I assist the wing commander in running day-to-day operations. When he’s not here, I run the wing in his stead. One of the pilots in the squadron may come down and be flying a mission the next day. So they’ll plan for that mission.”

A “THREE-LEGGED STOOL” For a reservist, juggling military duty with civilian life can be “very challenging,” says Johnson. “You just have to be organized, and you have to be efficient with your time.” Heath agrees: “Juggling a full-time civilian job with being a reservist is definitely a challenge. I normally work my Reserve days into days off from my civilian job. As a pilot for the Reserves, one must make time for not just flying, but other duties required of all reservists. I make sure to set aside at least several days a month in order to keep up.” “Reserve duty entails one weekend a month, with 14 or 15 days of active duty training per year,” says DeSantis. “But it is challenging for the families, a huge sacrifice. We constantly refer to that at retirement or award ceremonies. We have their families stand up, because we recognize what a sacrifice it is for them to work, raise a family, stay current and qualified in that reserve job, and pursue higher education — probably on weekends or during evening hours. We try to build a lot of family time activity when we can. During the holidays we’ll open up an airplane.” Byers acknowledges the impact that military duty can have on a reservist’s employer. “Sometimes that can be a little challenging, because it always

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depends on how the employee and employer interact. I fly for American Airlines. There’s a requirement that any reservist must let their employer know that they’re going to do military duty. By law they have to allow you go; they understand and accept that. But what we don’t want to do is abuse that trust. Towards the end of the fiscal year, we typically do an employer appreciation flight. We bring the employers out, so they can see what their employees have been doing throughout the whole year.” “For a pilot who works at the airlines it tends to be a little bit easier, as opposed to a small business owner,” adds Dunham. “It is the ‘three-legged stool.’ You’ve got your ‘military’ leg, you’ve got your ‘civilian career’ leg, and you’ve got your ‘family’ leg. If you take too much away from any one of those legs, the stool gets out of balance. As long as everyone’s talking it can work very well. When I say ‘everyone,’ it’s the reservist who’s in the middle; he’s got to talk to everyone. Usually when the reservist is open about expectations, he can make things work.”

KC-46 PEGASUS TANKERS Joint Base MDL has been chosen to receive 24 Boeing KC-46 Pegasus tankers. “This is incredible news for Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, the state of New Jersey, and the future of national security in the United States,” U.S. Rep. Tom McArthur tells David Levinsky of the Burlington County Times. “Over 42,000 New Jersey residents in my district who are employed at the base and…rely on its survival can breathe easy, knowing the joint base will remain our nation’s premier air mobility installation.” “Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst and Travis AFB were chosen as the next two active-duty-led KC-46A bases because they meet all operational mission requirements at the best value for the Air Force and the American taxpayer and support our tanker recapitalization strategy,” former Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James says in a statement. “The need for a new tanker is strong, and it is the reason that the Boeing KC-46 Pegasus is one of the Air Force’s highest priorities,” says Porcelli. “It was contracted as a KC-135 replacement, but it will also eventually replace the KC10 as well. The choice of McGuire for the basing of the KC-46 Pegasus assures the future viability of the air base and all the employment and financial benefits it provides.” “The huge thing is that we maintain a capability of force extension that the Air Force needs,” adds Byers. “As we start to have new fighter aircraft coming along, like the F-35, they need to have more capable tankers [such as] the

SUMMER 2018


PHOTOS COURTESY OF DEFENSE VISUAL INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION SERVICE (DVIDS) Audience members of the 2018 Power in the Pines Air Show observe an air assault demonstration at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. May 5, 2018. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Stanley Moy.

A C-17 Globemaster III flies over a C-5 Super Galaxy during the 2018 Power in the Pines Open House and Air Show May 6, 2018 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Katherine Spessa. SUMMER 2018

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF DEFENSE VISUAL INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION SERVICE (DVIDS) The Trojan Thunder T-28 team performs aerial stunts during the 2018 Power in the Pines Open House and Air Show at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. U.S. Air Force photo by Brad Camara.

KC-46. So as I take the KC-10 out of the picture, and replace it with the KC-46, McGuire gains a whole other capability to support the commanders down the road.” “I’ve heard we’re going to start divesting the KC-10 next year, probably in September,” says DeSantis. “The first KC-46 is slated to arrive in 2021. We’ll start losing the KC-10 in September 2019.” Last March, however, current Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson stated that the Air Force probably will need to keep the KC-10 in service longer than anticipated. According to Joe Gould and Valerie Insinna of Defense News, the KC-46 tanker program has been beset by delays, partially due to deficiencies in the high frequency radio, and the refueling boom. Wilson has expressed concern that Boeing is prioritizing commercial projects over the tankers. In a statement, the manufacturer responded that “There is no greater priority…than the delivery of the KC-46. Boeing has continued to demonstrate its commitment to deliver the tankers as soon as possible and believes in our partnership with the U.S. Air Force.” Wilson has replied that “Boeing has been overly optimistic in all of their schedule reports,” adding, “My focus right now is to get the aircraft from Boeing and get them up there flying so we can modernize the fleet.”

FUTURE GOALS “I would love to go back to the Pentagon,” says Byers. “I’ve had two tours there, but I would love to go to headquarters and continue to serve in that capacity when my time at McGuire is done. Especially if that would lead me to a job that would positively affect the lives of airmen.” Heath says, “As challenging as it is at times to keep up with reserve duties, I enjoy that I can continue to serve, and want to complete my 20 years. The

Reserve presents a unique opportunity for citizens to give their experience and commitment to the military while still pursuing a full-time civilian career.” “I enjoy being in the operation side of things, as opposed to a staff job at the headquarters,” says DeSantis. “Any time I’m in an operations command job, I feel like I’m doing the most good I can for my country. That’s tremendously rewarding. My aspiration would be to become a wing commander. A wing consists of two to three thousand people, so every time you move up an echelon, it’s an exponential change in responsibility. But that’s not an unusual advancement for a group commander. Johnson, who has a new baby, plans to retire next year. “Until then I want to do the best I can to make sure the great people I work with are acknowledged for their continued commitment to excellence.” “When I entered Princeton, my father, a Princeton grad of ’53, told me to get to know as many of my classmates as possible, as I’d never again be surrounded by as great a group,” remembers Dunham. “My dad was wrong, the greatest people I’ve ever been involved with are the reservists I’ve trained with, deployed with, and fought with. The honor of my life was serving with these great Americans.” On May 5-6, Joint Base MDL presented the 2018 Power in the Pines air show. The event included the Air Combat Command F-22 Demonstration Team, the Canadian Forces CF-18 Team, and a U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights. “It gets a lot of young folks interested in the military,” enthuses Byers. “You’re sparking an interest in someone at an early age, who later could be one of those guys who we could have here at McGuire, flying C-17s or KC-10s. Every two years we get air shows. We put it on, and we look for community support. Once the community gets involved, then the sky’s the limit — literally!”

Audience members (OPPOSITE) explore the 2018 Power in the Pines Open House and Air Show May 6, 2018 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. U.S. Air Force photo by Brad Camara. SUMMER 2018

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URBAN BOOKS

New Books By and About the Boys of Summer BY STUART MITCHNER

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Unlike most broadcast booth sidekicks, Hernandez is a guy on a firstname basis with the world whose 15-year-old Bengal cat Hadji is the star of a twitter feed that tracks his loving owner’s movements through the day. As he says in his preface, Hernandez finds most books about baseball players boring, comparing them to paint-by-number exercises, and though he doesn’t say it, the by-numbers business is usually being done by a ghost writer. This book is all his, in contrast to Pure Baseball and Shea Goodbye, which were written with the help of professional writers. Echoing Sinatra, he says, “I want to write this my way.” He begins with an anecdote from his San Francisco childhood about how his father would bring home fresh-from-the-bakery sourdough bread, “still warm, soft on the inside with a crust that made your teeth work just the right amount. I want to make this book something like that. Something that you set your teeth into and say, ‘Keith, that’s pretty good. More, please.’” Keith is also the only player I know of who can compare his approach to writing about and playing baseball with appearing on Seinfeld. In fact, his title comes from a to-kiss-or-not-to-kiss episode with Julia Louis-Dreyfus where she’s wondering “Who is this guy?” and he’s thinking “I’m Keith Hernandez!” When they were filming the scene, Keith found that the script was “really just a starting place” and that everything could change “once the ensemble’s creative juices were flowing.” It’s the “inventiveness and spontaneity” that reminds him of baseball, “where you’re forced to improvise almost constantly.”

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@keithpurrnandez

T

he freshest, most appealing baseball books of the summer look to be I’m Keith Hernandez (Little Brown $28) and The Comic Book Story of Baseball (Ten Speed Press $18.99), with words by Alex Irvine, and graphics by Marvel artists Tomm Coker and C.P. Smith. I grew up in post-war southern Indiana loving baseball. The nearest major league team was the Cincinnati Reds. About 250 miles to the north were Chicago and the Cubs and White Sox. St. Louis and the Cardinals were about the same distance to the west. I still remember Cubs broadcaster Bert Wilson exulting, “It’s a beau-tiful day for a ballgame!” But I was never a Cubs fan, nor did the Reds ever mean much to me. The Cardinals have always been my team. Along with the poetry I instinctively responded to in the name St. Louis, there was the visual poetry of the two cardinals sitting on the slanted branch of a golden bat. I didn’t think of it as “poetry” then but what else can you call a name and an image that retain the same primal appeal for me today that they did when I was 6? Add to these essentials the fact that Stan Musial, one of the most charismatic players of all time, played for the Cardinals, and here I am, looking forward to Keith Hernandez’s new book because it promises to tell the story of the all-star first baseman’s days in the Cardinal organization. While I’m Keith Hernandez will have a special appeal in the New York area because he played for the 1986 World Champion Mets and has been a fixture in the Mets broadcast booth with Gary Cohen and Ron Darling, he’s still a hero in St. Louis, where he had a Most Valuable Player season in 1979 and was a key member of the 1982 World Champions.


BASEBALL COMICS The graphics in The Comic Book Story of Baseball, subtitled The Heroes, Hustlers, and History-Making Swings (and Misses) of America’s National Pastime, evokes a kind of baseball innocence I associate with the childhood days of comic books and sports magazines. I don’t remember which newspaper it was, but I used to see cartoons of great baseball moments like Ty Cobb sliding into second base spikes high or Babe Ruth pointing to the spot where he hit a homerun, illustrated in the book as one of the myths of baseball (“Babe’s Called Shot”). Library Journal makes note of Marvel comics veterans Coker and Smith’s “powerful graphics, tinted lightly with color for a marvelous vintage effect.” Former major-leaguer Dirk Hayhurst, author of The Bullpen Gospel and commentator for ESPN and TBS, says “baseball history should always be presented in comic book form” and considers The Comic Book Story of Baseball “probably the most accessible history of the game I’ve ever held in my hands.”

SCRAPBOOK DAYS The cover photos on I’m Keith Hernandez and Red Sox slugger David Ortiz’s memoir Papi: My Story (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt $28) remind me of growing up as a subscriber to SPORT magazine, which I treasured for the full-page color portraits of the players that I would clip out and paste into scrapbooks right above my carefully printed leaky ballpoint career batting or pitching stats. As devoted as I was to the Cardinals (for them I made separate scrapbooks), I valued all the players in both leagues, and reveled in the glory of the numbers. It still amazes me that someone who was a total loss when it came to math could be so smitten with the numerical beauty of RBIs, home runs, and batting averages. And of course the most romantic number of them all was Babe Ruth’s immortal 60. It’s amusing to read in Glenn Stout’s The Selling of the Babe

(St. Martin’s Press $27.99) of the era when “the home run was viewed with suspicion, such an irregularity that it was considered pure folly to hope for one”; it was “the baseball equivalent of a Hail Mary pass in football today; a wonderful surprise when it happens, but hardly worth counting on.” So it was that the Red Sox traded a 20-game-winning pitcher with a gift for the occasional “wonderful surprise” to the Yankees and were doomed to live under the Curse of the Bambino until the 2004 team finally brought a World Championship to Boston, a feat lived and recounted by David Ortiz in Papi, which was written with Michael Holley, and according to the Washington Post offers “the unpolished reflections of one of the few ballplayers to redefine a club.”

CURSES The tale of the team that outdid the Red Sox for WorldSeries deprivation is told in Rich Cohen’s The Chicago Cubs: Story of a Curse (Farrar Straus and Giroux $26), which, speaking of curses, includes Cubs manager Lee Elia’s famous soliloquy on the f-word. Player/manager Lou Piniella, another baseball great with a gift for expletives, has a new book out: Lou: Fifty Years of Kicking Dirt, Playing Hard, and Winning Big in the Sweet Spot of Baseball (Harper $27.99), with Bill Madden, “a Hall of Fame book about a baseball life, nicely framing four great decades of the national pastime” says Boston Globe writer Dan Shaughnessy. Finally, my title gives me an excuse to mention Roger Kahn’s 1972 classic about the Brooklyn Dodgers, The Boys of Summer. It’s too soon to know whether I’m Keith Hernandez will attain the status of a classic, but early reviews seem close to what he was hoping for when he cited the fresh-baked sourdough bread of his boyhood: ‘”Keith, that’s pretty good. More, please.” Gay Talese says “Even when he is writing about his slumps, his book is a hit.” George F. Will calls him “the thinking person’s ballplayer,” and Sports Illustrated finds his book “Poignant and unexpectedly literary.”

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AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO UPDATING YOUR HOME Advice from an ASID Interior Designer Can Make All the Difference Make Use of Every Square Inch Hope Sferra, Allied ASID, NJCID, of Hope Sferra Interiors in Summit, N.J., advises that expanding your space doesn’t always entail an addition; she says to look at the existing footprint and make use of every square inch. She recently expanded a cramped kitchen by removing a wall and carefully designing a high-functioning, clean-lined cabinet layout that goes all the way to the ceiling. Color it Beautiful and Consider Wallpaper “Grey has been the go to color for the last several years; I think this season we are going to start seeing warmer, richer colors,” says Kristina Favale, Allied ASID, of Whimsy Interiors in Wayne, N.J. However, according to Favale, light and airy isn’t going anywhere. She says white shiplap is as popular as ever and wallpaper is something to be considered! Finally, using fresh flowers and fruit are a good way to “bring in lots of color without the commitment.” Light it Right “We all love daylight and yards of glass are being specified in homes today,” notes Linda Kitson, Allied ASID, of MarketPlace Designs in Summit, N.J. “However maximum daylight may result in extreme glare that can cause eye fatigue, not to mention the UV rays that can wreak havoc on precious furnishings.” Consider window treatments that can be flexible in allowing full, filtered, blocked or semiblocked light. Also, try to use both ambient and task lighting in all spaces, especially in reading nooks. Needs will vary, of course, based on the time of day and other considerations such as location and direction. Luckily, adjustable light levels and sunlight filtration work hand in hand in today’s spaces and can be automated as well.

Are you considering working with Give Artwork a Helping Hand aYour professional interior designer Did you know that when hanging a piece of artwork you should place the center of the piece at five feet from the floor for maximum appeal? Linda Wagner, Allied ASID, of Barrett Wagner Interior Design in …but aren’t sure where to start? Wall, New Jersey, says this is a general rule of thumb and she also advises reorganizing groupings by theme color or frame style. Proper lighting is also important. Make Daring Changes at the Hearth of the Home Don’t be afraid to give your fireplace a contemporary transformation. Pat Valentine Ziv, ASID, of PVZ Design in Mountainside, N.J. did it by going Theand American Society ofconcrete Interior Designers, vertical using an off-white custom façade, black and glass fireplace doorsNJ and Chapter a floating hearth. (ASID) will match you up

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PROFILES IN DESIGN

A Fresh Take on Consignment at Elephant in the Room Design F

By Laurie Pellichero | Photography by Charles R. Plohn

photo courtesy of elephant in the room design

rom the moment you walk in the bright green door to Elephant in the Room Design in the Princeton North Shopping Center, you will see that it’s not your average consignment store. The clean, spacious 2,000-square-foot showroom is filled with artfullyarranged vignettes filled with an eclectic mix of new and consigned furniture and home decor items. Owner Cynthia “CJ” Johnson said the name of the store just came to her. “How did that piece of furniture you once loved become the ‘elephant in the room’? Maybe you really do still love it, but it simply doesn’t fit into your new decor or space. It’s time for us to find it a new loving home!” The shop features a carefully-curated collection of consigned pieces including furniture, seating, dining tables, occasional tables, desks, rugs, mirrors, artwork, lighting, objets d’art, china, glassware, and more. “We fill a certain niche, with styles and prices

for everyone,” said Johnson. New merchandise arrives daily, so each visit promises something fresh. “One of the things I hear most often is ‘I can’t believe it’s consigned,’” said Johnson of the condition of the merchandise displayed in the showroom. Along with the consignment items, Johnson offers new furniture from Wesley Hall, CR Laine, and Harden, all available in custom fabrics and finishes. She said she chose those manufacturers because they are all American and for their high level of craftsmanship. Elephant in the Room Design also features a selection of retail lighting, artwork, Zodax candles and diffusers, and other home decor items. Only open since January 2017, the shop is already an area favorite, winning Best Furniture Store recognition in the 2017 Town Topics Readers’ Choice Awards. Johnson said she is thrilled with the warm welcome that Elephant in the Room Design has received. “It is so encouraging,” said Johnson. “Consignment is a great way to attain styles and types of items that you can’t readily find elsewhere in the curent retail landscape. Quality craftsmanship is proving to be even more elusive, but my inventory always offers a variety of high quality pieces.” “I love providing a place for inspiration, confidence, and approachable design for my customers,” continued Johnson. “It’s an engaging and welcoming atmosphere — a happy place!” Johnson has a BFA in studio art and graphic design. She taught art at the high school level in Basking Ridge, and also worked at a consignment shop in Summit before opening Elephant in the Room Design. She said she chose Princeton because of its central location and “great community of cosmopolitan people.”

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She said it is wonderful to have her own store. “It’s a culmination of all my experiences,” said Johnson. “Every day is filled with amazing people and fantastic treasures.” Johnson said that the consignment period for each item is 90 days. Merchandise is reduced by 15 percent off of the original price after 30 days and 30 percent off of the original price after 60 days. Some specialized furniture pieces can stay in the store a bit longer to find the right home. Johnson works with the owners to determine the best price for each item, and also does research online. She is very careful to choose items in good condition, and most look almost new. “There are stories behind everything,” she said. “We have some really interesting pieces. Many are from people’s travels or ancestors.” Johnson also features her own fabric and wall covering designs at the shop, which can be incorporated into new and consigned upholstered pieces, wall art, pillows, and more. The fabric can be ordered in any amount of whole yardage. She offers many colors and patterns with customization also being a possibility. “I’ve always been drawn to pattern and color,” said Johnson. “Print-on-demand changes everything. I create my original artwork and pattern designs. It is all printed right here in the U.S. I offer a wide range of fabric and color options for my customers. It encourages individuality.” Johnson’s colorful designs have been called unexpected, whimsical, and timeless—and many samples are on display in the shop. Johnson said she and her associate Polly Balland also enjoy creating the varied vignettes in the store. “It’s fun to create a fresh look with disparate items,” she said. This fall, Johnson is teaching a Princeton Adult School class at the shop on six different Friday nights — with each workshop focusing on a different interior design topic. She also offers design consultation services after store hours. Elephant in the Room Design is located at 1225 State Road 206, Suite 8, in Princeton. It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 6pm. For more information, call 609.454.3378 or visit the website at www.elephantintheroomdesign.com.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTLER’S OF FAR HILLS, INC.

A Home Away From Home

Vacation homes are a boon to New Jersey’s economy and beyond BY WENDY GREENBERG

Second homes represent a lifestyle change, an investment, and sometimes several years of exploring myriad locations. But often, the second home becomes as beloved as the first home, and many times the homeowners don’t want to go home. They ARE home. 44

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BUTLER’S OF FAR HILLS, INC. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA MOSS

As

Spring Lake realtor Cindy Napp says, “Life is short. Buy the beach house.” Napp, a Jersey Shore expert with Diane Turton Realtors in Spring Lake, credits the convenience of I-195 — stretching from Mercer County to Monmouth County — for the Jersey Shore’s ever-increasing popularity as a second home location. It is also convenient to reach from northern New Jersey. “People coming here want to get here Thursday night, and get to work on Monday morning,”’ says Napp. “They want to be able to set up a situation that for the future will be a ‘grandchildren magnet.’ Beach homes are a permanent lure for the whole extended family, toddlers to teens and beyond,” says Napp, who specializes in Monmouth County shore properties. “A place in the suburbs, no matter how attractive, doesn’t tempt older children like a spot near the beach. Shore places quickly become multigenerational gathering spots.” Why? “Well, there is only one Atlantic Ocean,” she says. “It’s a great quality of life, and the ride is easy.” For the areas from around Long Branch down to Point Pleasant, the area is “completely built out,” according to Napp. There is little new construction, and it is mostly older homes. Many follow the pattern of starting with a small cottage, and remodeling to accommodate a larger family. And renting — for example in July when youngsters are in camps — can generate income. Aside from the ocean as a draw, other factors influence a decision on whether to consider a second home, says Jeffrey Haines, owner of the interior design firm Butler’s of Far Hills, in Far Hills, N.J. “It’s good to have a destination spot for family and friends to come to other than their primary home,” says the nationally-recognized designer. “I find that people tend to

extend invitations to their second home that are maybe different from their primary home — extended family, acquaintances, old friends from earlier phases of life — they like to share their special spot.”

TAKING A LEAP OF FAITH Joan and Tim Reil‘s “first” home is in Princeton Junction and their second is in Spring Lake. When deciding on a location for their second home, they took a trip down the Eastern Seaboard, through the Carolinas and down to Florida. They settled on Spring Lake because their grown sons live in New York City, and it’s easier for the family to get together when they are geographically closer. “We experimented with different towns,” says Joan Reil. “It is important that the off-season be attractive to you, too.” The empty nesters have one less bedroom in their second home than in their four-bedroom Princeton-area home. They built a swimming pool at their new home and remodeled the late 1970s ranch house to achieve an open look. The kitchen, dining room, and living rooms create a large space, and furniture can easily be rearranged there. A downstairs bedroom can transition to a study. “It’s still in progress, it’s taken a good year,” says Joan Reil, a teacher in the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District. For others considering a second home, she suggests first renting in the community they are most interested in. “Take the leap of faith — you never know,” she says. “Key is having a patient and personal realtor, and talking to a financial person. There are lots of ways to finance.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BUTLER’S OF FAR HILLS, INC. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA MOSS


PHOTOS COURTESY OF KEVIN WILKES, PRINCETON DESIGN GUILD

STATE OF THE STATE The second home or vacation home market in New Jersey “has been and continues to be an important part of the very important tourism industry,” says Peter S. Reinhart, an attorney who is director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute at Monmouth University. The Institute is a research center and database on real estate and economic development for the region. There are challenges within the state, says Reinhart, who is Monmouth University’s NJAR/ Greenbaum/Ferguson Professor of Real Estate Policy. “Following Superstorm Sandy in 2012, the vacation home market took some time to recover as the repairs and rebuilding worked through the permitting process and financial recovery,” he says. “Production of new homes was severely hit during and following the economic recession.” Although new home building has gradually increased since 2011, much as been in the state’s urban areas. “The Jersey Shore however will continue to be a major tourism and vacation destination,” says Reinhart. The traditional shore areas, he says, have gradually picked up. And as baby boomers age, “a number of them are buying second homes in more urban areas rather than beach homes.” One of the biggest concerns will be how changes in the federal tax laws adopted in late 2017 will impact the housing market in New Jersey, he points out, explaining that recent tax law changes lowered the amount of a mortgage deduction from $1 million to $750,000 for new mortgages for both primary and second homes. “The biggest concern is the $10,000 limit on state and local property and income taxes (SALT) that can be deducted. This will effectively increase the cost of owning second homes. New Jersey has also been in competition with southern states like Florida and the Carolinas for second homes, where taxes are lower,” he notes.

“As with all real estate markets, the one constant is change,” says Reinhart. “Sellers, buyers, and renters will adapt their behavior to these changing market conditions. One important constant is the wonderful vacations at the Jersey Shore. There will continue to be generations of families who create memories of their Jersey Shore vacations, no matter the type of dwelling.” But those thinking about second homes are not limiting themselves to New Jersey, says Haines. The firm’s clients interested in second homes are attracted to Nantucket, Mass.; the East and West Coasts of Florida; and the Carolinas, particularly Charleston, N.C., or Palmetto Bluffs, S.C. “Each of these places embodies such a unique character,” he explains. “Most recently I worked with a client on their new secondary home, which is an Upper West Side getaway apartment — so it isn’t always about the beach or warm locations. Sometimes it’s about having a place that gives them access to their cultural interests, city living, and extended circles of friends.” Zillow, the online real estate database, in its May research, reported that Ocean City, N.J. has the largest share of second homes — half of all homes (more than other East Coast areas) are used for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. On the East Coast, the other areas with the most second or seasonal homes are Cape Cod, Mass.; Morehead City, N.C.; Salisbury, Md.; Naples, Fla.; Key West, Fla.; Fort Myers, Fla.; and Myrtle Beach, S.C. All make the top 10 list for most vacation homes.

WHAT TO THINK ABOUT For those lucky enough to find a lot or a house, architect Kevin Wilkes of Princeton Design Guild has some ideas for building or remodeling. Wilkes, AIA, an award-winning Princeton architect, founded Princeton Design Guild in 1985 with the mission of connecting the architect and general contractor for an integrated design and build team approach.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF KEVIN WILKES, PRINCETON DESIGN GUILD


With homeowners choosing between waterside or mountain ski retreats, “we see more oceanfront, for watersport vacations,” he notes. “The shoreline offers multiple price points, from high end to medium affordable.” “In a town with a lot of available real estate, building a new home is feasible,” says Wilkes. “But in built-up towns, there are few available empty lots, so we look for existing structures. We always try to see if we can salvage some element because there are cost and permitting benefits to remodeling rather than building a brand-new building.” Remodeling can make approvals easier. “You can capture the latent value of an existing building. Water and electrical utilities could already be run to an existing basement, so you have $10,000 of improvements in place,” he points out. A vacation home needs storage — for sports equipment, a kayak, camping gear, tennis rackets, bikes, and so on. The storage should be at ground level so one doesn’t have to keep carrying equipment upstairs. Think about your personal storage. “You may not need enormous walkin closets because perhaps you are only taking weekend clothes,” says Wilkes. “You might be able to trim personal storage areas.” Bedrooms may not be as large. “Can the kids double up? They may not need desks for homework during the times you will be at the vacation house.” Kitchens usually are the primary focus. “That doesn’t really change,” says Wilkes. “They can open out to the landscape for engaged outdoor entertaining or they can take advantage of dynamic views. For oceanfront clients, sometimes we invert tradition and move the main family living level, which includes the kitchen, to the top floor. If you raise your eye level from 10 to 30 feet, you can see an additional 2.7 miles out to sea. With options such as elevators and garbage chutes, top-floor living can be made convenient.” “One thing we consider with clients,” he notes, “is the potential for renting out a vacation home to help defray the costs of maintaining them. Many rent out their Jersey Shore homes for part of the summer, so it helps to make provisions to store their personal possessions and to have special storage for towels and linens for renters.” Codes have become stricter for good reason. For example, windows have to be able to survive wind impacts of flying objects; flood zone requirements are pushing homes higher up in elevation. “At the end of the day, the architect is primarily responsible for compliance,” Wilkes says.

“More and more people and agents come to us early during a real estate purchase process,” Wilkes says. “Approvals for land use are more difficult these days, and builders/architects are experts. There are more environmental and energy regulations, since the 1970s, when the building code was a modest paperback. Now, I have two three-foot-long bookshelves packed with code books.” For interior design, dwellers in second homes, notes Haines, “want easy maintenance. They won’t be there all the time and they don’t want to think too much about its care. So this is considered in the material selections, finish selections, and fabric selections. I find the style is often the same or similar to the primary home, however maybe the color palette is different — more calming or maybe more bold — or the accessories and artwork are more specific to the locale. The décor often centers around the time of the year that they plan to use the home — geared towards a certain season. For example, we wouldn’t want to use heavy fabric in hot or humid climates, the same with colors. “For a secondary home, we can design more for a season rather than year-round, however, we have to remember than many clients will use their secondary homes for holiday celebrations so it has to also be comfortable year-round. “ In general, offers Haines, “be ready for spontaneous guests — sleeping, eating, entertaining.”

THE VACATION HOME AS HOME When choosing a realtor, choose one who knows the community, suggests Napp. “You want someone who brings you into the community, someone local. We can all fall in love with a house, but you have to fall in love with a community, too. And renters turn into buyers.” “Don’t forget costs such as homeowner’s association dues, cable TV and internet, and travel costs,” she says. “And some lender fine print prohibits rentals. Local real estate agents know the nuances of local regulations and costs.” What the Reils like, says Joan, is that their town is not a one-season town. “There is something going on all year, an active community with a convenient train station — that was a real draw.” “When we get there, we instantly feel like we are on vacation,” she says. “We feel like that IS our home.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PEDDIE SCHOOL

The Annenberg Effect: 25 Years Later A Look Back at an Epochal Turning Point in One School’s History

T

wenty-five years since Walter H. Annenberg bestowed his historic gift on Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J., the school is an example of how philanthropy can transform a school — and how a school can transform thousands of lives as a result. On Father’s Day, 1993, Annenberg gave $100 million to Peddie — along with $265 million to the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Southern California and Harvard University — as an endowed fund designed to expand financial aid, institute innovative programs, and recruit exceptional faculty. It was the largest cash gift ever given to an independent school, and it brought instant fame to Peddie. Overnight, the school’s endowment catapulted from $17 million to $117 million. Applications soared. Students who previously had never considered Peddie because of financial circumstances were given an opportunity at a world-class education. A quarter-century later, Peddie continues to see the transformative power of Annenberg’s generosity. Now one of the top independent boarding schools in the country, its students represent a wide range of geographic, ethnic, and socio-economic backgrounds, adding a plurality of thought that spurs innovation. When asked by The New York Times in June 1993 about his colossal gift to private education, Annenberg said: “I’m interested in the young people because the character of our country will be shaped by young people in the days ahead.” Annenberg himself first arrived on the Peddie campus in 1921. He was a shy seventh-grade boy, with a bit of a stutter and hard of hearing in one ear. Over six years at Peddie, he would transform into a confident man, make lifelong friends, and enjoy what he called “the happiest days of my life.” Annenberg, known as a student as “Annie,” was voted by his classmates “best businessman” and “done most for Peddie” when he graduated in 1927. That same year, he made his first gift to the school, donating $17,000 for a new cinder track on the athletic field. Annenberg’s father was a successful businessman who went from a newspaper street vendor to the owner of the Philadelphia Inquirer, New York Daily Mirror, the Daily Racing Form and other magazines. Annenberg, the only son in a family with seven sisters, took over the family’s publishing company after graduating

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Peddie and attending the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He expanded the media empire, launching Seventeen magazine and TV Guide, which became the nation’s largest selling weekly magazine. In 1969, he was appointed ambassador to the United Kingdom. During his entire adult life, Annenberg remained deeply involved with Peddie. He made numerous generous gifts and often visited the campus. Headmaster Peter Quinn, who was director of admission at the time of the gift, said Annenberg believed his gift could make a difference to the school he loved. “Ambassador Annenberg had always been generous, but the $100 million gift to our endowment was unlike anything he had ever done before both in size and purpose,” Quinn said. “The gift was precisely what we needed to fulfill our mission, and everyone knew it. This was the best gift he could have given us, and it was very much a forward-looking gift.” Quinn said the gift continues to generate income for financial aid, faculty support, and program development. “Peddie is a school for the future: a student body united by excitement, curiosity, and character; an excellent teaching faculty distinguished by dedication, humor, and patience; an innovative program focused on personal growth and intellectual discovery,” he said. Sangu Delle, co-founder of a venture capital firm that invests in entrepreneurial ventures in Africa, is grateful for the full scholarship he received from Peddie in 2002. “The experience changed my life, and I am grateful to Ambassador Annenberg for playing a role in that,” said Delle, who Forbes magazine named one of Africa’s Top 30 Under 30. Anne Seltzer, the school’s former director of development who is credited with shepherding the gift at the time, said she was assigned the task of researching what other schools had done with large gifts. A colleague at a college who had previously received a historic gift told her “you know, 25 years later it hasn’t made that much difference.” But Seltzer knew that Annenberg’s philanthropy could change Peddie and change lives. “We began to think differently about Walter’s proposal, and we decided to ask the ambassador to restrict the gift for financial aid. It seemed to us that promising broader access to a Peddie education through financial assistance would fit the mission of the school and, in the long run, would be transformative,” Seltzer said. “It was the smartest thing we ever did.”

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Urban Agenda Magazine, Summer 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Urban Agenda Magazine, Summer 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group