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Volume LXXI, Number 37

Back-to-School On Pages 24-25 Five New Officers Join PPD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 First Aid & Rescue Squad to Get New Home. . . . . 8 John Ashbery in the Living Years. . . . . . . . 14 Maya Lin Commissioned for Lewis Center Installation. . . . . . . . . 20 O’Brien Produces Breakout Weekend for PU Women’s Soccer. . . . . 32 Pompliano Stars as PHS Boys’ Soccer Tops Steinert in Opener. . . 34

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Annual Welcoming Week Includes Several Events, Naturalization Ceremony With President Trump’s recent announcement ordering the end of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Princeton’s second annual Welcoming Week could hardly be celebrated at a more appropriate time. Starting this Friday, the town’s Human Services Department is collaborating with Princeton Public Library, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund, The Historical Society of Princeton, and other community partners on this series of events designed to promote contributions made by those who come from other places. A highlight of the week is a naturalization ceremony that will be held Sunday, September 17 at the library. Mayor Liz Lempert will swear in immigrants taking the Oath of Allegiance. “We have people here from all over the world,” she said Continued on Page 16

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With DACA Axed, Countermovements Accelerate Widespread criticism, along with a barrage of political, legal, and proposed legislative action, has arisen in response to last week’s Trump administration announcement of the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program, that protected some 800,000 young undocumented immigrants, also known as DREAMers, from deportation. The announcement, delivered last Tuesday by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, charged legislators with replacing the policy before its expiration in March 2018 and set up the crucial battleground in Congress, where there are multiple bills pending to address the plight of the DREAMers. Members of congress are being swamped with calls and emails from constituents, said Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF) Executive Director Adriana Abizadeh. Urging everyone to keep the pressure on, she continued, “People should be calling

Congress every day. They’re counting and tallying the response. It’s an important issue for the entire nation.” Ms. Abizadeh noted that “there was an incredible response to the attorney general’s announcement last Tuesday. Already by noon we were at the Statehouse for a rally. We want to make sure that the DREAMers feel that they are protected.” Commenting on the increased concern and activity at LALDEF offices on Chambers Street in Trenton, Ms. Abizadeh said, “For the last five years these youth have been able to participate fully in our society and have contributed billions of dollars to our federal gross domestic product.” Her statement at last Tuesday’s DACA rally included a plea to contact representatives and senators, urging them to support legislation that will protect the DREAMers. “With today’s announcement, promising young adults have been thrown into a state of fear and uncertainty,” she said. “It is up to us to fight and rally with the DREAMers

to get legislation passed that would provide them permanent status with our immigration civil code. These young people have kept their side of the bargain, against all odds. We will not let them down.” Ms. Abizadeh urged passage of a “clean” Dream Act bill, not tied to immigration enforcement and not including Continued on Page 18

SP Awarded $100,000 to Develop Climate Action Plan With Florida still reeling from Hurricane Irma, and the effects of climate change dramatically apparent across the globe, Sustainable Princeton (SP) could not have chosen a more appropriate time to announce its $100,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to develop a Climate Action Plan (CAP) for Princeton. Continued on Page 12

Kurt Holuba and PU Football Ready to Kick Off 2017 Season. . . . 31 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Classified Ads. . . . . . . . 40 Mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Music/Theater . . . . . . . 26 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . 38 Police Blotter. . . . . . . . ?? Real Estate . . . . . . . . . 39 Religion. . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Topics of the Town . . . . . 5 Town Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . 6

MONTGOMERY FUNFEST: Classic cars and planes, helicopter rides, children’s activities, live music, a vendor fair, local food, and more were enjoyed by festival-goers at this Sunday’s Montgomery FunFest. The annual community event was held at Princeton Airport. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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D&R Greenway Honors Glenmede Land Trust’s commitment to is an investment and wealth As Partner in Preservation land preservation and envi- management firm. The com-

D&R Greenway Land Trust is honoring Glenmede Trust, which has been a D&R Greenway Business Partner in Preservation since 2000. “We salute Glenmede’s commitment to a green community,” said D&R Greenway President and CEO Linda Mead. “This kind of commitment from the business community fuels our work to create publicly accessible trails with natural preserves that everyone can enjoy. Glenmede has actively supported our educational programs at D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center in Princeton.” “As an asset management firm active in the impact investing space, Glenmede is proud to partner with D&R Greenway and supports the

ronmental stewardship,” said Glenmede Managing Director Mark Nurse. “As a member of the board of D&R Greenway’s sister organization, Stony Brook Millstone Watershed, I am personally committed to the missions and critical works accomplished by both organizations.” “How lucky I am to be part of a community that values land preservation! We are all fortunate for that priority, and grateful to Glenmede and our other business partners who have joined D&R Greenway in this worthy endeavor,” said Phyllis Marchand, D&R Greenway’s chair. Founded in 1956 by the Pew family to manage their charitable assets, the Glenmede Trust Company, N.A. (“Glenmede”)

A Community Bulletin Vigil for Princeton University Student Detained by Iran: Friday, September 15 at 7 p.m. at East Pyne Courtyard, Princeton University campus. Speakers will be on hand at this vigil to show solidarity with Xiyue Wang and to call on the international community to work together to bring him home. Fall Native Plant Sale: On Friday, September 15, 3-6 p.m., and Saturday, September 16, 9 a.m. to noon, D&R Greenway at 1 Preservation Place has nursery staff and volunteers who can answer questions about the best choice of plants for gardening projects. Free. www.drgreenway.org. S.H.R.R.E.D.temberfest; On Saturday, September 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. bring personal documents to be shredded to Witherspoon Hall parking lot, 400 Witherspoon Street. Household goods and clean clothing will also be collected, and home medical equipment, electronics and computers can also be brought for disposal. Donate bikes and dumpster discards at the corner of Valley Road and Witherspoon Street. Visit www. princetonnj.gov or call (609) 688-2566 for details. Volunteer at Morven: Morven Museum and Garden needs volunteers for leading tours, gardening work, administrative tasks, educational programs, and special events. Visit www.morven.org. Princeton Shade Tree Commission Brochure: This publication, available at the Township Clerk’s office at Witherspoon Hall; the Zoning office, Princeton Public Library, and Monument Hall, outlines provisions about tree removal, prohibitions, penalties, and the Emerald Ash Borer. It is also available online at www.princeton shadetree.org. Volunteer for Blood Drives: NJ Blood Services, which supplies blood to 60 hospitals throughout the state, needs volunteers to assist with registering donors, making appointments, canteen duties, and more. To volunteer, call Jan Zepka at (732) 616-8741. Be on “American Pickers”: The documentary TV series about antique “picking” will be filming in New Jersey in September and is looking for large, unique collections to feature on the show. For more information, visit americanpickers@cineflix.com or call (855) 653-7878. Board of Education Forum: On Monday, October 2 at 7 p.m., the League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area and Princeton Community TV will sponsor a forum of candidates, at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street.

pany oversees more than $37 billion of assets under management for high-net-worth individuals, families, family offices, endowment, foundation and institutional clients. Headquartered in Philadelphia, the firm has offices in Ohio, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Washington, D.C. Sessions will be held from ——— 1-3:30 p.m. at the Healthy Free Surviving Cancer Workshop Living Center at the Hamilton Offered to Patients, Caregivers Area YMCA, 1315 WhiteRutgers Cooperative Exten- horse-Mercerville Road, Hamsion Service of Mercer County, ilton. Department of Family and Adults of all ages, who Community Health Sciences are living with or surviving (FCHS), in collaboration with cancer, will learn interactive the Hunterdon and Mercer Re- techniques such as braingional Chronic Disease Coali- storming, problem solving, tion is offering a six-week free and action planning, to better workshop. “Cancer: Thriving manage their symptoms, emoand Surviving,” from October tions, and relationships, make 25-November 29.

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treatment decisions and plan for the future. Participants will learn how healthy eating, fitness, deep breathing, relaxation, communication, and positive thinking can improve their quality of life. All will receive a free book Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions. Light refreshments will be served. The workshop will be facilitated by trained peer leaders Michelle Brill, MPH, family

and community health sciences educator, Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County and Amanda MedinaForrester, MPH, coordinator, Hunterdon and Mercer Regional Chronic Disease Coalition. To register, call Hunterdon Regional Cancer Center Outreach at (908) 237-2328 or the Cooperative Extension Service at (609) 989-6831.


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“SUPER-HIGH EXPECTATIONS:” Five new officers, chosen from an original pool of 800 candidates, joined the Princeton Police Department last month. They are (from left) Michael Miceli, James Eufemia, Ashley Gaylord, Ryan McDermott, and Adam Santos.

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Five new officers, selected from an original pool of 800 candidates, were sworn in to the Princeton Police Department (PPD) last month by Mayor Liz Lempert and PPD Chief Nick Sutter. From a wide range of educational, professional, and life-experience backgrounds, James Eufemia, Ashley Gaylord, Ryan McDermott, Michael Miceli, and Adam Santos will be probationary for

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one year before becoming full-fledged members of the department next fall. Ms. Gaylord is already certified by the Police Training Commission and will be assigned to a field training officer in the patrol division. The other four will attend Mercer County Police Academy.

TOPICS Of the Town “All come from extremely diverse backgrounds, a theme that we really cherish in the Police Department,” Mr. Sutter said. “All bring very different strengths. All will be able to relate to the community in a tremendous way and will be very effective. All are interested in our community policing philoso-

phy and community service. That stood out.” Mr. Eufemia, 25, from Hightstown and Mr. Miceli, 26, from New Milford both come to the PPD from the New York City Police Depar tment. A Hightstow n High School graduate, Mr. Eufemia attended Rowan University, and Mr. Miceli is a Ramapo College graduate. Ms. Gaylord, 24, a graduate of Rutgers University and the Camden County Police Academy, comes to Princeton from the Delaware River Port Authority Police Department. Mr. McDermott, 24, of Hamilton, a Not tingham High School graduate, currently attends Thomas Edison State University. Continued on Next Page

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Mr. Santos, 25, from Hillsborough, is a graduate of Hillsborough High School and Rutgers University who joins the PPD from a position as a corrections officer. Noting the department’s “super-high expectations” for these five new recruits, Mr. Sutter described them as strong educationally and strong in career accomplishments. “The hiring process is designed to identify the highest-caliber officers,” he said. “They’re going to be faced with more complex issues today than we faced in the past. They are required to be much more capable and the job is much more complex than it was, even five years ago. We’re confident that they are up to the job.” —Donald Gilpin

All Saints’ Church and The Sacred Arts

A l l S a i nt s’ Chu rch i n Princeton will celebrate the Sacred Arts on Saturday, September 23 beginning at noon with reflections of the recently created artwork in the Sanctuary with the artist Makoto Fujimura, script readings of two plays from local writers, a book launch of Philosophy, Art, and Religion by Gordon Graham, and a service of music and movement. The price of registration also includes lunch. A ll are welcome. Guests can register online at http://sacredartsday.wee bly.com. All Saints’ Church is located at 16 All Saints’ Road in Princeton. For more information, call (609) 9212420.

Starting Friday Viceroy’s House (NR) Menashe (PG) Ingrid Goes West (R) Ends Thursday Good Time (R) Marjorie Prime (NR) The Trip to Spain (NR) Filmmaker Q&A Swim Team (NR) – Sun, Sep 17 4:00 pm Welcome Week 8 Borders, 8 Days (NR) – Mon, Sep 18 7:30 Art on Screen Melancholia – Tue, Sep 19 7:30pm Cinema Today Passing Strange – Wed, Sep 20 7:30pm Showtimes change daily Visit or call for showtimes. Hotline: 609-279-1999 PrincetonGardenTheatre.org Fri. 09/15/17 to Thurs. 09/21/17

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Question of the Week:

“What type of business would you like to see in Montgomery?” (Asked Sunday at the Montgomery FunFest) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Trisha: “I think I’d like to see either a Chipotle or a Qdoba or something like that.” Kristi: “I think everyone would agree that they’d like a Starbucks.” —Trisha Pimenta, left, and Kristi Liu, Montgomery

Sherril: “I’d like to see a Verizon store in Montgomery.” Nathan: “The same as my mommy said, a Verizon store.” —Sherril Jenore with Nathan Frazioe, Colonia

Rohan: “I’d like to see a Mexican restaurant.” Vineet: “More sports stores. My favorite sports are basketball and baseball, so that would be perfect.” —Rohan Shah, left, and Vineet Bogan, Montgomery

Matthew: “I think Montgomery needs more restaurants, especially in this general area near the airport and the ShopRite. I’d love to have some more variety. A burger place would be really good.” Katie: “I’d like to see a Dairy Queen in Montgomery. I think it would be a really good business and would do very well.” —Matthew and Katie Sonner, Skillman

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Shannon: “I’d love to see some more restaurants with some outdoor seating.” Adam: “I’m from the U.K., so I am not that familiar, but I guess I’d love to see a good, old-fashioned, British pub with some fine cask ale on tap. There’s nothing like good old warm British beer!” —Shannon Kenney, Princeton and Adam Tattersall, Manchester, England


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Dozens of concerts, dance performances, plays, readings, exhibitions, classes, tours, lectures, screenings and more to celebrate the Opening of the Lewis Arts complex

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Council Hears Update on Rescue Squad Project For New Headquarters at Old Public Works Site If all goes according to plan, Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (PFARS) could be installed in roomy, new headquarters by September, 2019. Mark Freda, president of the 77-year-old nonprofit, gave an update on

the long-awaited project at a meeting of Princeton Council on Monday evening. Enough of the $7.8 million needed to finance the building, which will be located on the site of the former Princeton Township Public Works

facility bordered by Valley Road, Witherspoon Street, Route 206, and Cherry Hill Road, has been pledged to start construction, Mr. Freda said. But the plan still needs to go before the town’s zoning and planning boards be-

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fore full approval is given. It was over a decade ago that PFARS began planning for a new headquarters to replace the overcrowded building on Harrison Street it has occupied since 1963. The squad long ago became too small for the vehicles and equipment it uses to respond to some 3,000 calls a year for emergency medical and rescue services. “It is very outdated and totally insufficient to meet the needs of the squad, and therefore the needs of the community,” Mr. Freda said. PFARS is not a municipal agency, though it works hand-in-hand with Princeton Police and Fire Departments. Its annual budget of $1.5 million is raised through volunteer EMT services, insurance reimbursement, and individual contributions. In 2014, Council approved a proposal to form a partnership with PFARS in which the town would get the existing building plus two Cape Cod-style houses the squad owns just behind it, in return for a long-term land lease for the new facility. Princeton owns the properties. At a press conference earlier in the day, Mayor Liz Lempert said there is no plan yet for what the town will do with the properties. Using them for affordable housing is an option, as is selling them, she said. A roadway improvement plan is part of the project. This involves removal of Terhune Road’s access to Route 206; creating three lanes of traffic on Witherspoon Street and Mount Lucas Road; and two traffic signals providing access to Route 206. One would be a full sig-

nal, at Cherry Hill Road; the other an emergency signal at Valley Road. Two of these would be funded by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, and the third is to be funded by PFARS. The new building will have ample bays for PFARS’s 10 emergency vehicles, room for training, storage, decontam inat ion, sleeping quarters, and educational needs. Showing a slide of how the new headquarters might look, Mr. Freda said, “We intend to have a very tasteful building, but one that is cost effective.” PFARS is putting in an application with the town’s zoning board this week, Mr. Freda said. The project is targeted to break ground next April, and the goal for completing construction is August, 2019. —Anne Levin

Healthcare Symposium At Rider University Sep. 26

The Princeton Regional Chamber’s Seventh Annual Healthcare Symposium, titled “Healthcare: Changing at the Speed of Life” will focus on the Innovations in the Healthcare Industry. The symposium will be held on Tuesday, September 26 from 7:30 -11:30 a.m. at the Bart Luedeke Center at Rider University in Lawrenceville. Attendees will hear from key note speaker Ly nelle Hoch, v ice president of immuno-oncology marketing at Bristol-Myers Squibb who will discuss advances in immuno-oncology. Following the keynote presenter will be two panel discussions. Panel one, “Innovations in Healthcare Deliv-

ery” will be moderated by Linda Schwimmer from New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute, and will include p a n el is t s Mas on Re i n er from R-Health, and Dr. C. William Hanson III from University of Pennsylvania. The panel will conclude with Dr. Jim Boozan from Capital Health discussing the hospital’s mobile stroke unit, which was launched in January of 2017 to bring time - cr itical stroke care to patients at their homes. The unit is the first unit of its kind in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, or the Delaware Valley to go live and only the second on the East Coast. The symposium will conclude with a CEO roundtable discussion from the region’s leading hospitals fo c u s i n g o n h e a l t h c a r e trends and strategies, and the future of healthcare in the region. Executives will include: Richard Freeman, president and CEO of Robert Wood Johnson Hospital Hamilton ; Darlene Han ley, president of St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center in Lawrenceville; Vince Costantino, MBA, chief administrative officer of St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton, and Gina Petrone Mumolie, senior vice president of Capital Health in Hopewell. New Jersey Hospital Association’s (NJHA) President and CEO Elizabeth “Betsy” A. Ryan will moderate the roundtable. Tickets are $50 for Chamber members and $60 for future members and can be reserved online at www. princetonchamber.org or by calling (609) 924-1776.


9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 10

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RALLY AGAINST PENNEAST PIPELINE: The Sourland Conservancy is organizing a Rally and Social Gathering Against PennEast Pipeline that will take place at Bulls Island Recreation Area, 2185 Daniel Bray Highway in Stockton, N.J. on Sunday, September 17 at 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will link hands across the pedestrian bridge to show unity in the fight against PennEast. There will also be speakers and guests are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch. This event is sponsored by the New Jersey Sierra Club, Delaware Riverkeeper Network and Sourland Conservancy.

Astrophysicist Will Discuss Black Holes

In the centenary of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, on September 14th, 2015, a team of scientists announced the discovery of the century: the detection of waves in the shape of spacetime – gravitational waves. Over 1.3 billion years ago, two black holes collided, ringing spacetime like a drum, an event more powerful than any since the origin

of the universe. One hour before the gravitational wave hit the Earth, two observatories on different coasts — which together comprise the Laser Interferometer GravitationalWave Observatory (LIGO), were finally locked in observing mode. On September 26, 2017 in Princeton University’s McCosh Hall Room 50 at 6 p.m., astrophysicist Janna Levin will recount the obsessions, aspirations, and trials of

the scientists who embarked on the arduous, 50 year endeavor — a campaign many believed was impossible — to record the first sounds from space. This event, sponsored by the Vanuxem Lecture Series, is free and open to the public with no ticket or reservation required. For further information on this and other events in the series, please see lectures. princeton.edu

Friday, October 13, 9 PM The Hunchback of Notre Dame Silent movie starring Lon Chaney with organ accompaniment Michael Britt, organist General admission $10, all students free Thursday, November 9, 8:00 PM Organ Concert Sophie-Veronique Cauchefer-Choplin Co-Titular of the Grand Organ at St. Sulpice Paris Admission free Friday, November 17, 8 PM From Darkness to Light University Organist Eric Plutz will perform works from somber to joyful. Admission free Wednesday, November 29, 8 PM Harp Extravaganza Harp students of Elaine Christy in recital Admission free Sunday, December 3, 2:30 PM Advent Concert Featuring the Christmas Cantata by Daniel Pinkham and additional music of the season Princeton Chapel Choir Penna Rose, conductor Admission free

Rosh Hashanah Menu Starters

Chicken Soup w/Julienne Carrots and Fresh Dill (24 oz.) – $8.95 Deviled Eggs (1 dz) – $12.95 Chopped Chicken Liver – $9.95/lb

Sides

Apple Noodle Kugel (order by the piece or tray) - $45/tray or $4/ea. Sautêed Green Beans w/ Wild Mushroom - $10.25/lb Tzimmes (sweet potatoes, apricots, prunes, orange juice) – $10.25/lb Fresh Beets, Carrots and Walnuts – $12.25/lb Cauliflower with Lentils & Dates - $10.95/lb Honey Roasted Carrots – $10.25/lb

Entrées

Almond Citrus Crusted Salmon - $30.95/lb Smothered Chicken w/Onions & Chicken Stock - $16.25/lb Roasted Frenched Chicken w/Dates, Olives & Capers - $16.25/lb Brisket w/Caramelized Onions & Carrots – $28.95/lb

Specialty Items

Round Challah with or without Raisins - $9.95 each Chocolate or Plain Macaroons – $3.00 each Honey Cake - $14.95 each Rugelach - $12.95/dz These items will be avilable Wednesday, 9/20 thru Sunday, 9/24. Visit us online @ www.lucystogo.com

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Monday, December 11, 7:30 PM Messiah Sing Community sing with organ, strings, and trumpet Bring a score or borrow one at the door. General admission $5, all students free Wednesday, December 13, 7:30 PM Candlelight Service of Lessons and Carols A service of readings and music featuring the Chapel Choir, Glee Club, and a cappella groups Admission free Friday, February 23, 8 PM B A C H: From Beginning to End A survey of organ masterpieces from four periods of Bach’s life. Eric Plutz, organist Admission free Wednesday, March 28, 8 PM The Stations of the Cross by Marcel Dupré with poetry of Paul Claudel Ken Cowan, organist Rev. Alison Boden, narrator Admission free Saturday, April 14, 8 PM Milbank Concert Missa in Angustiis in d - Lord Nelson Mass {Mass for Troubled Times} by Franz Joseph Haydn Princeton Chapel Choir and orchestra Penna Rose, conductor Admission free Friday, June 1, 3:30 PM Reunions Organ Concert Eric Plutz, organist Admission free

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JAZZ VESPERS A service of poetry, music, and meditation with saxophonist Audrey Welber and pianist Logan Roth and members of the Chapel Choir. WEDNESDAYS, 8 PM October 18 • November 15 • February 7 • March 7 • April 18 SPECIAL MUSICAL GUESTS SUNDAYS, 11 AM October 15 Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin Music of the gospel, Christian, and jazz traditions January 28 The Central Bucks High School-West Chamber Choir Dr. Joseph Ohrt, conductor February 25 Saxophonist Audrey Welber and guest pianist will play music of the gospel and jazz tradition. April 8 Sara Caswell Trio {Sara Caswell, violin; Jesse Lewis, guitar; Ike Sturm, bass} Music of the jazz tradition AFTER NOON CONCERTS - THURSDAYS, 12:30 PM Admission free 2017 September 14, 21, 28 October 5, 12, 19, 26 November 2 & 9 NO CONCERT November 16 November 23 NO CONCERT November 30 December 7 2018 February 8, 15, 22 March 1, 8, 15 March 22 & 29 NO CONCERT April 5, 12, 19, 26 May 3

For further information, please call (609) 258-3654 or e-mail prose@princeton.edu or www.princetonchapelchoir.com


Thanking Sports Photographer Frank Wojciechowski For Contributions to Community Sportsmen, Women

To the Editor: Allow me to deviate from the angst of politics, school budgets, mini-mansions, and traffic woes to mention something that brings me pleasure in each week’s Town Topics. I’m referring to the sports photography of Frank Wojciechowski. Speaking as an amateur photographer aspiring to photograph objects in motion (in my case, birds in flight), I can attest to the difficulty of stopping the action at just the perfect moment. If I get one good one every few months, I’m pleased. I don’t know Frank or how he does it, but week after week, sport after sport, game after game, he manages to capture a clear shot of the pass leaving the quarterback’s hand, the goalie making the save, the brilliant soccer move. So thanks, Frank, for your contributions to this paper and to the sportsmen and women of this community. With another school year beginning, I’m looking forward to your images of yet another sports season. BILL DIX Snowden Lane

mailbox 9-13 Deutsch stu

Board Candidate Stresses Fiscal Prudence, Vouching for Jess Deutsch’s Courage in Long-Term Planning, Unifying Community Seeking Out, Addressing Problems Head On To the Editor: I am writing to introduce myself and to ask for the support of your readers as a Princeton School Board candidate in the November 7 election. As a 16-year Princeton taxpayer, community volunteer, public school parent and corporate attorney with financial and governance expertise, I will leverage my experience and passion to build on the excellence of our public schools. I will do so, however, in a financially prudent manner that helps preserve the quality of life and economic diversity of our beloved town. We as a community face ongoing challenges in ensuring that our tax dollars (48 percent of our property taxes) are spent wisely to secure the best possible education for each and every one of our 3800-plus public school children. Rising enrollment, limited land for expansion, and the politics of state/federal funding and charter schools can either divide and frustrate us, or they can be viewed as an opportunity for us to think “outside of the box” and seek creative, equitable, and fiscally-responsible solutions. I believe the latter approach benefits us all. Our School Board, working with the Princeton Council, must develop a long-term fiscal plan, calling upon finan-

Jess Deutsch, who is running for Board of Education this fall, has the rare blend of passion, enthusiasm, and expertise to try get at the root of some of these problems. Jess has spent much of her adult life seeking out the most vulnerable among us and extending to them a helping hand. Whether through her work as a mental health professional and a non-profit consultant with Princeton Balance, helping quite literally change the path of entire families with the 101 Fund, or her involvement in trying to bring fresh ideas and conversations to the community through Princeton Common Ground, Jess has consistently shown that she is willing to use her voice for those who have been left behind. The truth is that all of the candidates running are very qualified. They all want to make the district better for Princeton’s children and, in many cases, their own children. Running for office is not a decision to be taken lightly and all the candidates in the race and their families deserve a tremendous amount of credit and respect for that. What I can vouch for, though, is Jess’s courage to seek out problems and address them head on. What I can say with absolute certainty is that she deeply and unconditionally loves this community and its children. As someone who has been the direct beneficiary of Jess and the Deutsch family’s tenacious love, I feel that there is no one I would rather have as an advocate for the students and families of the Princeton school system. ZACk DIGREGORIO William Livingston Court

To the Editor: Students in Princeton are often taught the importance of diversity, but not always given the opportunity to practice it and reap its benefits. With each year, the number of students at Princeton High School who report high anxiety levels and staggering sleep deficiencies remain alarming and disheartening. Princeton is recognized nationally for how its best students fare as far as college admissions, but we seldom hear about, and are just starting to talk about, the mental health cost students are paying to achieve the admission results about which we are so proud. These issues concern me not because I do not love Princeton or the experiences I have had there. It is precisely because I love Princeton that I insist that these issues be addressed, so that more students can share in and benefit from the experience I had in Princeton, or forge their own path in the community. These issues are complicated and systemic; if they weren’t, they would’ve been addressed long ago. This is a community that has more resources, both human and otherwise, than almost any other in the country and possibly the world. The solution lies not in new resources but in new ideas.

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cial and other experts in our community, and use it to make sound strategic decisions that will positively impact budgets into the future. The Board must embrace innovation and transparency, adopt best practices from other districts, capture savings through energy audits and sustainable technologies, and review administrative positions to ensure that the jobs people are doing reflect current needs. As a community, we should model for our children how respectful listening and dialogue can help bridge our differences, leading us toward our common goal of seeing our children thrive. Those who know me professionally or from my years of public and board service — for our schools and school gardens, on the boards of the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed or the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton — know that I bring critical thinking, objective decision-making, and passion to all that I do. With your support on November 7, I’d like to become part of a school board that is transparent, forward-looking and sees opportunity in challenges. Together let’s focus on fiscal prudence, long-term planning and unifying our community to enhance the educational experience of all of our children. I welcome your thoughts and ideas at behrendforboe@gmail.com. BETH BEHREND Riverside Drive


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 14

BOOK REVIEW

The Poet at the Door — John Ashbery in the Living Years

F

ormer U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins explained the difference between novelists and poets this way: “I think of the novelist as a houseguest. The poet is more someone who just appears. You know, a door opens and there’s the poet! He says something about life and death, closes the door and is gone. Who was that masked man?” It’s a nice analogy as long as you don’t take it too far. From what I’ve read and tried to read of contemporary poetry, most door to door poets would get, at best, a blank stare. John Ashbery, who was remembered in the New York Times as “a major figure in American literature” when he died ten days ago at 90, once spoke to The Paris Review about “how weird and baffling my poetry seems to so many people and sometimes to me too … on the one hand, I am an important poet, read by younger writers, and on the other hand, nobody understands me. I am often asked to account for this state of affairs, but I can’t.” I know whereof he speaks. Almost every poem I tried to read in Notes from the Air: Selected Later Poems (Ecco 2007), was like opening the castle door to a long fall to nowhere. I should say at the outset that I’m a total novice in the domain of Ashbery, my impressions based on a fiveday whirlwind tour of his work that leaves me somewhere between “Is he kidding?” and “Why do poets have all the fun?” The last thought came after reading poems like “Daffy Duck in Hollywood” that remind me of what happened after I discovered e.e. cummings at 16 — how good it felt to sit down at my parents’ Royal typewriter running naked through the alphabet, scattering punctuation marks like confetti while throwing grammar out the window, riffing wild and free in the days when writing “poetry” was like driving through the night to the shuffle-shuffle beat of “Bo Diddley,” singing along as Bo catches a nanny goat to make his pretty baby a Sunday coat and a big bear cat to make her a Sunday hat. Knock, Knock So if John Ashbery had knocked at my door two weeks ago, he’d have been a stranger in the night. But had he admitted straight off “Nobody understands me,” I’d have invited him in for some tea and cookies. The way I picture him now is in the photograph accompanying a recent New Republic article (“How Should We Grieve John Ashbery?”), where he’s shown standing in a doorway (of all things), one hand gripping a picturesquely weathered red door, the other clutching the door frame as he gazes straight ahead, looking right at you; he’s wearing a pale gray green jacket, crisp blue shirt open at the neck, large stylish eyeglasses. He’s not smiling; it’s a no-nonsense expression but you can see “the wraith of a smile” behind the stare. The Hand In Dan Chiasson’s New Yorker Post-

script, where he speaks of Ashbery’s later work becoming “rather frantic and trippy,” he recalls studying old movies on TCM prior to a visit with the poet, known as an “ardent cinephile.” The film Chiasson chose to talk about was The Beast with Five Fingers, a horror movie involving a disembodied hand. Although he has Ashbery telling him about “dozens of other films with disembodied hands,” it seems odd that he fails to mention the hand in the painting by Parmigianino that inspired “Self Portrait in a Convex Mirror,” the title poem of the 1975 collection that won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. It’s “the right hand/Bigger than the head” that brought t he poet into that fortuitous 16th-century moment. “Francesco,” the poet tells the painter, “your hand is big enough/ To w reck t he sphere, and too big,/One would think, to weave delicate meshes.” The hand’s magnitude also suggests a nod to Melville, “a d oz i n g w h a l e on the sea bottom / In relation to the tiny, self-important ship/On the surface.” The next t i m e A s hb er y addresses the painter by n a m e, i t’s i n reference to “Whose curved hand controls, /Francesco, the turning seasons and the thoughts/That peel off and fly away at breathless speeds.” In effect, it’s the hand that sets “the carousel starting slowly/And going faster and faster: desk, papers, books,/Photographs of friends, the window and the trees/Merging in one neutral band that surrounds/Me on all sides, everywhere I look.” In the last long concluding stanza, the poet calls the painter by name, once more with the hand in the foreground: “Therefore I beseech you, withdraw that hand,/Offer it no longer as shield or greeting,/The shield of a greeting, Francesco.” Suddenly he’s out of the room, out of the painting, falling back “at a speed/Faster than that of light to flatten ultimately/Among the features of the room,” wherein Ashbery plays with the old “it was all a dream” Hollywood copout. It’s as if the hand has taken us into the painting through the other side into the

“disguising radiance” of the poet’s room. At the end, the hand “holds no chalk/ And each part of the whole falls off/And cannot know it knew, except/Here and there, in cold pockets/Of remembrance, whispers out of time.” “This Living Hand” What happens in “Self Portrait in a Convex Mirror” seems a protracted variation on the poet at the door saying “something about life and death,” only now it’s the painter reaching out to bring the poet into his room, with its “few leaded panes, old beams,/Fur, pleated muslin.” Finally, all this talk about a hand conjures up a young man who is never a stranger, always welcome no matter how late the hour, because no one else has John Keats’s knack for delivering one-liners like “A t h i n g o f beauty is a joy forever” before vanishing into the night. Here he is, reaching out to us, “This living hand, now warm and capable/Of earnest grasping … — see here it is — I hold it towards you.” “It’s a Secret” As one who shares Ashb e r y ’s p a s sion for v in tage film, I found some solid g rou nd in Notes from the Air w it h “Her Cardboard Lover” which shares the title of an old M-G-M Norma Shearer movie. The first line is “The way you look tonight,” the title of the song Fred Astaire sings to Ginger Rogers in Swing Time. The next line’s threesome (“perishable, unphotographable, laughable”) channels “My Funny Valentine,” another standard from the Great American Songbook. But look out, a reference to the way “dyslexia strikes in late middle age” tells you to tread warily among the pop song cliches (“At last my love has come along/And you are mine at last”) and as the poem spins to a stop, just when you thought it was safe to open the door, the poet dons his mask: “So it’s all right,/he thinks. He thinks it’s a secret.” So who is he and what is it? These are the questions prompted time and again by the “weird and baffling” state of affairs Ashbery is “often asked to account for.”

“The Songs We Know Best” This column began with some songs on the car stereo during a drive to Doylestown with my son. While I was thinking of ways to approach Ashbery, whose poetry seemed so elusive, we were listening to “The Living Years,” a worldwide hit by Mike and the Mechanics released a few years after Ashbery’s Selected Poems (Viking 1985). Here was a form of popular poetry about life and death and fathers and sons delivered with music of inspirational intensity that turned around a difficult morning. The song about how “every generation blames the one before” was composed by a son whose father died before he could tell him “all the things he had to say in the living years.” It’s a song my son and I have listened to on drives to Montreal and Philadelphia, and all over the state of New Jersey, shyly alert to the way it resonates with our personal history, not to mention that of Mike Rutherford, who wrote the music, and B.A. Robertson, who wrote the lyrics, and the singer Paul Carrack who was eleven when his father died in an industrial accident. My son knows the lyric by heart, with its reference to “crumpled bits of paper filled with imperfect thought/Stilted conversations, I’m afraid that’s all we’ve got.” After lines like “You say you just don’t see it, he says it’s perfect sense/You just can’t get agreement in this present tense/We all talk a different language, talking in defense” comes the soaring chorus: “Say it loud, say it clear, you can listen as well as you hear; it’s too late when we die to admit we don’t see eye to eye.” Afraid to Knock Karin Roffman’s biography, The Songs We Know Best: John Ashbery’s Early Life (Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2017), takes its title from a poem in the 1984 collection A Wave, in which Ashbery plays with the pop song vernacular in a metre not unlike that of “The Living Years.” The lines that bookend the poem are “Or didja ever really think I was somebody else?” and “Or do ya still think that I’m somebody else?” As usual in Ashbery, it’s not clear who is being asked the question. At least, perhaps, not until the line, “Yet you pause before your father’s door afraid to knock.” Reviewing The Songs We Know Best in The Guardian, Mark Ford quotes Ashbery on his father: “He used to wallop me a great deal, so I felt always as though I were living on the edge of a live volcano.” Ford wonders “if the evasiveness of Ashbery’s poetry, its habit of tiptoeing or sliding around a crisis in states ranging from mild apprehension to ominous foreboding, reflects the simmering domestic tensions of these early years.” wonder about the stranger at the door who says “Nobody understands me,” and in the same Paris Review interview: “I am a believer in fortuitous accidents …. The pathos and liveliness of ordinary human communication is poetry to me.” —Stuart Mitchner

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Topics

Young Adult Authors Coming to B&N Sept. 18

Authors E. Lockhart and Julie Buxbaum will be visiting B&N Princeton Marketfair together at 7 p.m. on September 18 for a moderated discussion about their books, literature, writing, female characters, and more. It will be an evening for teens, adults, parents, and educators. The authors will be signing copies of their books. E. Lockhart, the New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars, has just published Genuine Fraud ( Delacorte Press), which has received five starred reviews. Another New York Times bestselling author, Julie Buxbaum is the author of What To Say Next ( Delacorte Press), which was published in July for readers ages 12 and up and should appeal to fans of Sophie Kinsella, Jennifer Niven, and Rainbow Rowell. Line passes are required. For details visit barnesandnoble.com. ———

HSP Hosts Book Talks At Updike Farm

The Historical Fiction Book Group, where scholars participate in discussions of the fictional elements and the nonfictional local and regional context of selected books, will be meeting in the historic barn at the Historical Society of Princeton’s Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road. The first meeting will be at 7 p.m. September 20

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

Books

when the subject will be Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad, with Mekala Audain, professor of 19th century U.S. history and African-American history at The College of New Jersey. On November 15, there will be a discussion of Gore Vidal’s Burr with Paul Clemens, professor of history at Rutgers University. The meetings are co sponsored with the Princeton Public Library, and presented w ith suppor t from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 16

Welcoming Week

continued from page one

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certified plastic surgeon Arthur Perry, MD, FACS Board certified plastic surgeon Arthur Perry, MD, FACS Board certified plastic surgeon Arthur Perry, MD, FACS Board

If you're like most 50-year-old women, you're seeing wrinkles, jowls, and loose neck skin. . eck skin loose n nkles, jowls, and eing wri ou're se Your “aging spurt” can come omen, y suddenly, and can be upsetting, but as a facial aging ar-old w st 50-ye like mo If you're like most 50-year-old women, you're seeing wrinkles, jowls, and loose neck skin. If you're like most 50-year-old women, you're seeing wrinkles, jowls, and loose neck skin. If you're aging facial a as but g, upsettin y, and specialist, I can help tackle your signs of aging. Here’s how. Your “aging “aging spurt” spurt” can can come come suddenl suddenly, and can can be be upsetting, upsetting, but but as as a a facial facial aging aging Your “aging spurt” can suddenly, and can be Your come specialist, I can help tackle your signs of aging. Here’s how. t, I can help tackle your signs of aging. Here’s how. specialist, I can help tackle your signs of aging. Here’s how. specialis A facelift has been the mainstay, but many nonsurgical treatments can help you look look help I you can nts can treatme ical nonsurg many but y, great again. Botox can smooth out forehead, crow’s feet, and scowl lines. fill mainsta been has A facelift facelift has been the the mainstay, mainstay, but many nonsurgical nonsurgical treatments can help you you lines look A but many treatments help look lines fill I lines. scowl and feet, crow’s d, crow’s forehea out out around your mouth with wrinkle fillers, giving you a natural appearance. My smooth great again. again. Botox Botox can can smooth smooth out forehead, forehead, crow’s feet, feet, and and scowl scowl lines. lines. I patented I fill fill lines lines great patented skin care or a peel can improve your complexion. Ulthera focused ultrasound tightens uth with wrinkle fillers, giving you a natural appearance. My patented your mo around your mouth with wrinkle fillers, giving you a natural appearance. My patented around your mouth with wrinkle fillers, giving you a natural appearance. My around s tighten rasound used ult hera foc on. Ult omplexi check and neck skin and upper chest wrinkles. Cheeks and jowls can be lifted with e your c improv peel can e or a peel can improve your complexion. Ulthera focused ultrasound tightens skin care or a peel can improve your complexion. Ulthera focused ultrasound tightens skin care or a skin car with lifted be can jowls and Cheeks . Cheeks wrinkles Instalifts in a short office procedure. And those long forgotten but noticeable moles are chest upper and check and and neck neck skin skin and and upper upper chest chest wrinkles. wrinkles. Cheeks and and jowls jowls can can be be lifted lifted with with check check oles are easily removed. (Check out the Dr. Oz show where I removed Jimmy Fallon’s mole). s in a short office procedure. And those long forgotten but noticeable m Instalifts in a short office procedure. And those long forgotten but noticeable moles are Instalifts in a short office procedure. And those long forgotten but noticeable moles are Instalift ). easily re moved. (Check out the Dr. Oz show where I removed Jimmy Fallon’s mole easily removed. (Check out the Dr. Oz show where I removed Jimmy Fallon’s mole). easily removed. (Check out the Dr. Oz show where I removed Jimmy Fallon’s mole). This noninvasive approach isn’t for everyone and you might be ready for a face or eyelid or eyelid lift. I've been performing my short scar, ponytail friendly, facelift since the 1980s. invasive approach isn’t for everyone and you might be ready for a face This noninvasive approach isn’t for everyone and you might be ready for a face or eyelid This noninvasive approach isn’t for everyone and you might be ready for a face or eyelid This non 1980s. ince the facelift s lift. I've been performing my short scar, ponytail friendly, lift. I've been performing my short scar, ponytail friendly, facelift since the 1980s. lift. I've been performing my short scar, ponytail friendly, facelift since the 1980s. My offices are in Franklin Park and on 5th Avenue in Manhattan. Let's sit down and sit down and tan. Let's Manhat in in Avenue 5th on and make a plan to improve your appearance, digitally altering your 3D photos to show the Park Park Franklin in are My offices offices are are in in Franklin Franklin Park and and on on 5th 5th Avenue Avenue in Manhattan. Manhattan. Let's Let's sit sit down down and and offices My My how the tos to s "new" you. And let's tackle those aging spurts once and for all. 3D pho plan to improve your appearance, digitally altering your make a plan to improve your appearance, digitally altering your 3D photos to show the make a plan to improve your appearance, digitally altering your 3D photos to show the make a ou. And let's tackle those aging spurts once and for all. "new" you. And let's tackle those aging spurts once and for all. "new" you. And let's tackle those aging spurts once and for all. "new" y

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Who am I? I trained in surgery at Harvard Medical School and Cornell - New York - New York Cornell and School School Medical Medical Harvard at Presbyterian and in plastic surgery at the University of Chicago. a surgery in trained Who am Who am am I? I? I? I Hospital, I I trained trained in in surgery surgery at Harvard Harvard Medical School and and Cornell - Following - New New York York at Cornell Who

. Following a Chicago of ity of Univers the at surgery cosmetic surgery fellowship, I’ve practiced cosmetic surgery in NJ and NY for 30 years. plastic in and l, and Hospita erian Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital, and in in plastic plastic surgery surgery at at the the University University of Chicago. Chicago. Following Following a a Presbyterian Presbyt ears. for 30 y J and NY ery in N etic surg cosmeti c surgery fellowship, I’ve practiced cosm cosmetic surgery fellowship, I’ve practiced cosmetic surgery in NJ and NY for 30 years. cosmetic surgery fellowship, I’ve practiced cosmetic surgery in NJ and NY for 30 years. I'm an Adjunct Associate Professor of Plastic Surgery at Columbia University and have have ity and Univers bia University and have at Colum urgery Plastic S or of Plastic Surgery written 4 djunct A plastic surgery including Straight Talk about Cosmetic Surgery, which Profess books, ssociateProfessor of I'm an Adjunct Associate Professor of Plastic Surgery at Columbia University and have I'm an Adjunct Associate at Columbia I'm an A which , Surgery c Cosmeti about Talk Straight g Straight includin won the the best health book and You Being Beautiful, with Drs. Mehmet Oz books, surgery plastic surgery 4 plastic award for written 4 surgery including Straight Talk Talk about about Cosmetic Cosmetic Surgery, which written books, including Surgery, which written Drs. Mehmet Oz with Being Beautiful,with and You ook and You Being Beautiful, and Michael Roizen. I'm the plastic surgery expert and a regular on the Dr. Oz TV show. health b t health book the bes or the best award f won the award for award for the best health book and You Being Beautiful, with Drs. Drs. Mehmet Oz Mehmet Oz won the won the Dr. Oz TV show. I host WABC's "What's Your Wrinkle" and I've created skin care that you can purchase on and Michael Roizen. I'm the plastic surgery expert and a regular on the Dr. Oz TV show. and Michael Roizen. I'm the plastic surgery expert and a regular on the Dr. Oz TV show. and Michael Roizen. I'm the plastic surgery expert and a regular on the n purchase on t you ca care tha drperrys.com and on HSN. I host WABC's "What's Your Wrinkle" and I've created skin care that you can purchase on I host WABC's "What's Your Wrinkle" and I've created skin care that you can purchase on I host WABC's "W hat's Your Wrinkle" and I've created skin drperrys.com and on HSN. drperrys.com and on HSN. drperrys.com and on HSN. women regain their natural beauty, in and out of the But most importantly, I love helping women regain their natural beauty, in and out of the operating room. ing ove help antly, I l But most importantly, I love helping women regain their natural beauty, in and out of the But most importantly, I love helping women regain their natural beauty, in and out of the But most import operating room. operating room. operating room.

The Program in American Studies presents:

on Monday. “The school district reports that there are over 50 different languages spoken in the homes of students. We pride ourselves on our diversity, and Welcoming Week is a chance to affirm the values of our community.” Pr inceton’s Welcoming Week is one of more than 80 similar events being held throughout the countr y, sponsored by the national organi zat ion Welcom ing America. Volunteers and municipal staff will kick off events on Thursday, September 15 from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a welcoming table at the Princeton Farmers Market. The following evening, One Table Cafe at Trinity Church will hold a dinner at 6 p.m. with food provided by Olives, an immigrant-owned business. On Monday, September 18, there is a live Twitter chat at 11 a.m. hosted by Access Princeton. The organization plans to share information on how they assist newcomers through their services and programming. The main event is a Cultural Exchange Night at Hinds Plaza on Tuesday, September 19 at 5:30 p.m. Displays by individuals and families from different cultures will be on view, and Ms. Lempert will read the official Welcoming Week proclamation. The Princeton Folk Dance troupe will lead dancing to live music by Ajde, an international folk dance band playing modern and traditional instruments. Also that evening, there will be a table with information on how people can assist local DREAMers affected by the DACA ruling. The following morning at 10 a.m. longtime Princeton resident and historian Shirley Satterfield will lead a bilingual tour, with an interpreter, honoring African American history in Princeton. A hit at last year’s Welcoming Week, the Albert Hinds African American Tour will highlight how African Americans pioneered movements to make Princeton inclusive. Ms. Satterfield was in the first integrated class at Nassau School. The YMCA is offering a free, week-long membership, and the Princeton Senior Resource Center is providing free class vouchers. Anyone aged 55 and up can try a class for free from September 15-30 at the senior center. “Welcoming Week last year was a tremendous success,” Elisa Neira, executive director of Princeton Human Services, said in a press release. “It not only made us reflect on our community and our sense of welcoming, but also made us think of how we can improve. As a town, we are fortunate to work and collaborate with many like-minded people and organizations that share those same values of welcoming and have put together really exciting programing for Welcoming Week. I strongly believe that the more people we invite to our table, the more successful our initiatives are and planning for Welcoming Week is a great example of that.” For more information and details, visit www.princetonnj.gov/HS/HS-WelcomingCommunity.html. —Anne Levin

To: ___________________________ From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________ Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. READING TO CHILDREN: You don’t have to be a grandparent to Please check it thoroughly and payparticipate special attention to the following: in GrandPals, the rewarding program that matches adult volunteers aged 50 and up with children in Princeton Public Schools to promote a love of learning. Shown here at (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay)

The Princeton University Constitution Day Lecture

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An Anthropologist’s Take

on Campus Speech Debates Wednesday, September 13 4:30 p.m. Arthur Lewis Auditorium Robertson Hall Cosponsored by the Program in Law and Public Affairs; the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions; and the Department of Anthropology Supported by the Office of the Provost

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Town Topics 5.125 x 8_Constitution day ad.indd 1

MONARCHS WELCOME: Princeton is helping to preserve Monarch butterflies. The town is registered as a Monarch Waystation as part of a project sponsored by Monarch Watch, a non-profit founded by the University of Kansas Department of Entomology. Friends of Princeton Open Space has pledged to maintain areas in Tusculum Meadow and Mountain Lakes Preserve with milkweed and nectar sources to meet the Monarchs’ needs. Trailside signs alert hikers to be on the lookout for these creatures. Information on how to report sightings and contribute to the program’s expansion can be found at Monarchwatch.org.

8/8/17 3:02 PM

Community Park School (from left), Somtu Onuetta, GrandPal Denise Houghton, and Natalie Connell get ready to spend a half hour reading together. To recruit volunteers for the coming school year, an event will be held at Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Suzanne Patterson Building, 45 Stockton Street, Wednesday, September 13 at 10:30 a.m. Most volunteers read once a week with kindergarten to second grade children during the day. Call Olivian Boon at (609) 924-7108 to register.

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

YOU’RE INVITED


continued from page one

additional funding for detention, deportation, or a wall. Decrying the Trump administration’s “betrayal of men and women who make up the fabric of this nation” and its focus “on rallying the xenophobic base that fuels the flames of their discrimination,” Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-12) stated, “I am ready to work with my Republican colleagues on creating permanent protections for DREAMers. Republican house leadership must bring the DREAM Act to the floor for a vote. Hundreds of thousands of lives depend on it.” Congressman Leonard

Lance (R-7), meanwhile, has cosponsored the Recognizing America’s Children Act, a bill that would grant high school graduates without a serious criminal record, and who don’t rely on public assistance, conditional immigrant status and the possibility of future citizenship. Supporting President Trump’s decision, Mr. Lance stated that his bill would “provide a workable path for DREAMers with DACA status” and “provide a workable, permanent legislative solution for those individuals who entered our country unlawfully as children with their undocumented parents.” Many academic and business leaders and foreign governments have condemned

Mr. Trump’s decision, with numerous protests taking place in Washington and across the country. Sixteen state attorneys g e n e r a l h av e f i l e d s u i t against the president’s decision to cancel the DACA program. Last Friday Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California, with ten campuses and 283,000 students, filed a lawsuit in federal court accusing the W hite House officials of violating administrative procedures and constitutional due process requirements in abruptly ending the DACA program. As secretary of homeland security in 2012, Ms. Napolitano was one of the original creators of the DACA program.

Locally, Mayor Liz Lempert announced that Princeton continues to stand as a welcoming community, and said, “We urge Congress to act quickly to create an immigration system that is fair, just, and moral. In our community we will work with our local residents to understand the impact of this decision and continue to support them.” Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber sent a letter to Congressional leaders last week urging them to take action on behalf of the DREAMers, to “give these young people the protections and peace of mind that DACA provided, and going beyond that, a path to permanent residence and citizenship.”

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 18

DACA

A s tatement f rom L A LDEF last week announced, “Whether clients come for legal support, ESL, mentoring and enrichment, income tax preparation, computer classes, or counseling, LALDEF is committed to helping our immigrant neighbors achieve their dreams. In the weeks and months ahead, LALDEF will be helping newly vulnerable DREAMers challenge this travesty of justice.” On September 22 and 29, from 1-7 p.m., LALDEF will be helping those who are eligible for two-year work permit renewals. The deadline for renewal is October 5. —Donald Gilpin

LGBT Healthcare Conference At Raritan Valley Country Club

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset, a Facility of RWJBarnabas Health, and Garden State Equality will host New Jersey’s first Healthcare Conference for the LGBT Community on Friday, October 6 at Raritan Valley Country Club, 747 State Route 28, Bridgewater. The free conference is supported through a grant from Sanofi. “We recognize that LGBT individuals often face challenges when accessing the health care services they need, which impacts their overall health,” said Tony Cava, president, Rober t Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset, which was the first hospital in the state to offer primary care services to the LGBT community. “Through this conference, we hope to make them more aware of laws regarding health care access, insurance coverage, and resources to help them take care of their health.” Christina Ho, professor of law at Rutgers University, Newark Campus, will be the keynote speaker for the event and will discuss health care coverage for LGBT individuals under the Affordable Care Act. Ms. Ho was formerly the country director for the Clinton Foundation’s China program. She also worked on the White H o u s e D om e s t i c Pol i c y Council during the Clinton Administration as well as Senator Hillar y Rodham Clinton’s legislative staff. She joined Rutgers L aw from the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center where she founded the China Health Law Initiative. Other topics at the conference will include LGBT legal rights, intersectionality (the overlapping of different forms of discrimination), federal suppor t ser v ices available to the LGBT community, and the unique concerns of LGBT seniors. Free blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose screenings will also be available. In addition, representatives from LGBT-friendly health care providers will offer information and resources for attendees. The conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration is required by calling (888) MD-RWJUH. ———

World Languages and More At Princeton Adult School

Princeton Adult School’s language programs, both English as a Second Lang u a g e a n d Te n Wo r l d Languages, will open its

classes on Thursday, October 5 and continue throughout a ten-week semester. An additional 200 courses in a variety of subjects will also be offered. A lecture series will focus on Russia: 1917-2017. Eight experts will cover the significance of the Russian revolution and work toward the questions of our relationship today in a complicated world. The gubernatorial election coming up in November will be covered in a three-part series with coverage of the issues, candidates and a post-election analysis on November 8. Classes in art history, publishing, opera, and Broadway are scheduled. Visual and creative arts include cartooning, stone sculpture, upholstery, and embroidery. Courses in landscaping, flower-arranging, orchids, and cultivating indoor herbs will also be given. Dance options include country line dance, tango, ballet, belly dance, and more. Fly-fishing, bike repair, paranormal investigations, magic, sculpting, landscaping with native plants, learning about wildflowers or orchids and cultivating indoor herbs are among other choices. Courses focused on cheese, organic bak ing, Korean BBQ, French dinners, and Greek cooking are available. Financial courses include estate planning and health insurance. There are numerous additional op tions. Brochures are available at Princeton Public Library. To register, visit www.princetonadultschool.org or call (609) 683-1101. In-person registration for English as a Second L anguage w ill be held at Princeton High School on Tuesday, September 19, 7-8 p.m.

Police Blotter O n S e p t e m b e r 5, a t 10:09 a.m., a 29-year-old male from Loch Arbour was charged with possession of a hypodermic needle and drug paraphernalia subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on South Harrison Street. On September 5, at 10:16 a.m., it was reported that someone entered the secure shed on the property of Springdale Golf Club and unlawfully operated several golf carts. One of the carts sustained about $200 worth of damage. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 20

“Rise Above: Art Of the Counterculture”

Art

from the entire region who we feel truly represent art that may not be considered socially acceptable by the arts elite … artists who truly rise above the mainstream. These are the artists of the underground.” The opening reception will be held at Artworks Trenton, 19 Everett Alley in Trenton, on September 16, from 6 to 9 p.m., and the exhibit will be open to the public through October 14 during normal gallery hours. Visit www.artworkstrenton.org for more information. The next Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market will take place at the Historic Roebling Machine Shop, 675 S. Clinton Avenue in Trenton, on October 21 and 22 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with over 200 different vendors and a dozen different food trucks. $ 5 ad m is sion. Website : www.trentonprfm.com. ———

The Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market (TPRFM) continues its quest to reinvent Trenton as an arts destination with its second annual curated gallery show, titled “Rise Above : Ar t of the Counterculture.” Curated Artist Maya Lin has been lic and private buildings, by TPRFM founder Joseph commissioned by Princeton landscapes, architectural Ku zem ka, Ar t works’ exUniversity to create an in- work, and intimate studio hibits coordinator Addison stallation for a section of ar t works. Env ironmental Vincent, and key members the landscape at the new concerns are a major part of the TPRFM team, this Lewis Center for the Arts. of her work. group show features dozens Details have yet to emerge Ms. Lin owns and oper- of groundbreaking artists about the substance, size, ates Maya Lin Studio in from around the tri-state and scale of the work, which New York. She was awarded area and encompasses a will “provide a landmark bachelor of arts and mas- variety of styles from assemfor visitors to campus and ter of architecture degrees blage, photography, sculpan invigorated outdoor set- from Yale. She currently ture, and painting to street ting for students to stage ad serves on the boards of the art, taxidermy, and more. hoc performances and enjoy Bloomberg Foundation, the Celebrating the underplein air classes,” according What is Missing? Foundato a release from the Uni- tion, and the Museum of g r o u n d a r t s s c e n e a n d building upon the network versity. Chinese in America. Ms. Lin of artists that the TPRFM Known for her Vietnam is a former member of the has built over the past four Veterans Memorial in Wash- Yale Corporation, Natural years, “Rise Above” highington, which she designed Resources Defense Council, lights the best in the current while still an undergradu- and the Energy Foundation. art community including artate at Yale, Ms. Lin was She lives in New York City ists from the entire region. the 2016 recipient of the and is represented by the With nearly 500 submisPresidential Medal of Free- Pace Gallery. sions and dozens of selected dom. Her work is described The University will celas sculpture and “land art,” ebrate the opening of the contributors, 100-plus piecand has been part of other Lewis Center complex with es of gallery-quality art will memorials as well as pub- an arts festival October 5-8. adorn the walls of Artworks at the official opening on Open to the public, it will Saturday September 16. include dozens of concerts, “We couldn’t be any more plays, readings, dance performances, art exhibitions, excited to cont inue our screenings, and more, at long-standing relationship Louise Feder venues not only at the Lewis with Artworks Trenton and to host our second annual IS ON Center but across the camLouise Feder at Morven pus. Most will be free. Visit gallery show with them,” September 14 said Mr. Kuzemka. “Once arts.princeton.edu. Morven Museum and Garagain we’ve assembled an —Anne Levin amazing selection of artists den presents Louise Feder, assistant curator of t he James A. Michener Art Museum (and a 2006 graduate of Princeton High School), in a discussion about the 1913 Armory Show and its impact on select New Jersey and Pennsylvania artists, on Thursday, September 14 at 7 p.m. The talk will focus on artists including Stuart Davis, John Grabach, Bernard Gussow, and John Marin, among others who are featured in Morven’s current exhibition “Newark and the Culture of Art: 1900-1960.” The exhibition galleries will open at 6:30 p.m. prior to this special event. “Newark and the Culture of Art: 1900-1960” explores the unique combination of art and industry that made “200M”: This photograph is among others capturing unoccupied athletic fields and courts fea- Newark, New Jersey a magtured in “It’s Not About the Game,” an exhibit by photographer Aubrey J. Kauffman now at the net for modern artists in the James Kerney Campus Gallery at Mercer County Community College in Trenton.

University Commissions Maya Lin For Installation at Lewis Center

Comparing Bath Remodelers is like Comparing Bath Soaps

While remodelers may appear similar on the surface in terms of being functional, there are deeper differences. Baxter Construction is different than other contractors. With almost four decades of remodeling experience, your project will run smoothly from start to finish. Baxter will give you the confidence you need to remodel your home.

ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM DESIGN: There will be an official ribbon-cutting ceremony at Elephant in the Room Design at the Princeton North Shopping Center with Montgomery Township Mayor Ed Trzaska on Tuesday, September 26 at 5 p.m. Elephant in the Room Design is a fine consignment and retail store carrying furniture, home décor, and more. Just look for the green door! early 20th century. The ex- Quilt on permanent dishibition celebrates the cul- play. www.artscouncilof ture of creativity that flour- princeton.org. ished alongside John Cotton Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Dana’s Newark Museum. A Museum in Cadwalader museum director with pow- Park, Parkside Avenue, erfully democratic ideas, Mr. Trenton, has an exhibit on Dana sought to educate by the park and its designer, presenting examples of su- Frederick Law Olmsted, perior design to the greatest through September 17. possible number of people, www.ellarslie.com. particularly the city’s imFriend Center Atrimigrant and working-class um, Princeton University populations; making art a campus, shows the 2017 vital part of Newark’s cul- “Art of Science Exhibiture and society. tion” weekdays through Morven Museum and Gar- April 2018. arts.prince den is located at 55 Stockton ton.edu. Street in Princeton. Tickets Grounds for Sculpfor the Louise Feder talk are ture, 80 Sculptors Way, $10 for the general public Hamilton, has “T hat’s and $8 for Friends of Mor- Worth Celebrating: The ven, and can be purchased Life and Works of the at morven.org or by calling Johnson Family” through (609) 924-8144, ext. 113. December 31, “Daniel Clayman: Radiant Landscape” through February 25, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculpture. org. H i s to r i c a l S o c i e t y of Pr inceton, Updike Artworks, 19 Everett Farmstead, 354 Quaker A lley, Trenton, shows Road, has “Frank Lloyd “R ise Above : T he A r t Wright at 150: The Arof the Counterculture — ch ite c t i n P r i n ce ton,” Trenton Punk Rock Flea “The Einstein Salon and Market” through October Innovators Gallery,” and 14. w w w.ar t workst ren a show on John von Neuton.org. mann, as well as a perA r t s C o u n c i l o f manent exhibit of historic Pr inceton, 102 With- photographs. $4 admiserspoon Street, has The sion Wednesday-Sunday, Neighborhood Por trait noon- 4 p.m. Thursday ex te n de d hou r s t i l l 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princeton history.org. The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “George Sotter: Light and Shadow” through December 31, and “Highlights from the New Hope-Solebury School District Art Collection” through October 8. www.michener artmuseum.org. Morven Museum and G a rd e n , 55 Stockton Street, has “Newark and the Culture of Art: 19001960” through January 28. morven.org. The Princeton Universit y A r t Museum has “Great British Drawings from the Ashmolean Museum” through September 17. “Transient Effects: The Solar Eclipses and Celestial Landscapes of Howard Russell Butler” runs through October 8. baxterconstruction.com (609) 258-3788. 609.466.3655

Area Exhibits


21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

Donate furniture, appliances and building Donate furniture, appliances supplies. We’ll pick it up!

and building supplies.

Support the store that builds homes and hope.

Support the store that builds homes and hope.

Donating to the ReStore is a great way to move discounted or excess stock, deal with gently used returns, and show your customers that you care about the environment and your community. Plus, we'll pick up your donated goods, which saves you time and money. Proceeds help build Habitat for Humanity homes in your community and around the world. Remodeling or Downsizing? Consider donating your excess household

Donate furniture, appliances and building supplies. picktoittheup! and We’ll building materials Habitat ReStore. You'll get the Visit us atgoods this location. 530 East Route 38 | Maple Shade, NJ 08052 your donations helped support local families satisfaction of knowing Support the store that builds homes and hope. (856) 439.6717 ext.1

and didn't end up in the landfill. Free Pick-Ups for all of your tax Visit ourtowebsite for is more information. Donating the ReStore a great way toProceeds move discounted or excess stock, deal with gently used returns, deductible donations. help build Habitat for Humanity www.HabitatBCNJ.org and show your customers that you care about the environment and your community. Plus, we'll pick up your homes intime your community andbuild around world.homes in donated goods, which saves you and money. Proceeds help Habitatthe for Humanity your community and around the world.

Visit us at this location. 530 East Route 38 | Maple Shade, NJ 08052 (856) 439.6717 ext.1

Visit our website for more information.

530 East Route 38 | Maple Shade, NJ 08052 and for being our 2014 and 2015 donors of the year! (856) 439.6717 ext.1 | www.HabitatBCNJ.org

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Thank you to

©2015 Habitat ReStore Support Group LLC. All rights reserved.

We’ll pick it up! ©2015 Habitat ReStore Support Group LLC. All rights reserved.

Thank you to

and

for being our 2014 and 2015 donors of the year! ©2015 Habitat ReStore Support Group LLC. All rights reserved.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 22

The 39th Annual Carolyn L. Drucker Memorial Lecture

MEDALS AND SHELLS

MORPHOLOGY AND HISTORY, ONCE AGAIN CARLO GINZBURG Professor Emeritus, UCLA/Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa

“FOCAL LENGTH”: This hand embroidery on linen piece by Daniel Kornrumpf is featured in “Intimate Lines: Drawing with Thread,” which runs from September 17 to January 7 at the Hunterdon Art Museum. An opening reception is on Sunday, September 24, from 2 to 4 p.m.

Carlo Ginzburg has taught at the University of Bologna, UCLA and the Scuola Normale of Pisa. His books, translated into more than twenty languages, include The Night Battles; The Cheese and the Worms; Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method; The Enigma of Piero: Piero della Francesca; History, Rhetoric, and Proof; The Judge and the Historian; Wooden Eyes; No Island Is an Island; Threads and Traces; Fear Reverence Terror: Five Essays in Political Iconography. He has received the Aby Warburg Prize (1992), the Humboldt-Forschungs Prize (2007), the Balzan Prize for the History of Europe, 1400-1700 (2010) and sixteen honorary degrees from different universities.

Tuesday

SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 4:30 p.m. Princeton University McCormick Hall, Room 101

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Sponsored by the Department and Program in Near Eastern Studies and the Program in Judaic Studies, Ronald O. Perelman Institute of Judaic Studies

L O U I S C L A R K VA N U X E M L E C T U R E

Janna Levin Astrophysicist

September 26, 2017 6 p.m., McCosh 10 http://lectures.princeton.edu

ARTSBRIDGE CLOTHESLINE ART SALE: The annual Artsbridge Annual Clothesline Art Sale will take place this Sunday, September 17, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Prallsville Mill in Stockton. Originally conceived as an opportunity for area artists to clean their closets of art that has been gathering dust, this event has evolved into a showcase of fine art at reasonable prices. The works for sale include paintings, jewelry, sculpture, photography, and crafts. All art will be priced at $300 or less, with most at a much lower cost. (Photo by Rodney Miller)

“Intimate Lines” at Hunterdon Art Museum

In “Intimate Lines: Drawing with Thread,” 16 artists wield a needle like a pen to compose intensely personal stories and record intimate histories. In t his Hunterdon A r t Museum exhibition, which opens September 17, artists deal with relationships, gender, and identity; their works show exquisite textured drawings that expand upon textile traditions to make compelling contemporary statements. “Stitching is an intimate physical act, closely connected to the body,” said Carol Eckert, curator of the exhibition. “An often solitary process, it is at once time-intensive, relentless, and contemplative. The artists in this exhibition create works that are inextricable from the process itself — intensely personal figurative images drawn with tangible stitched lines.” Using thread as both a tactile and symbolic medium, these artists approach the traditionally painstaking process of embroidery with a modern sensibility. Building upon historic textile processes and working within the tradition of figurative imagery, they create dialogues between old and new — dialogues intensified by the use of found embroideries, vintage postcards, old photographs, and paper maps. Viewers will also discover everything from the history of textiles and traditional toile patterns to modern pop culture references to comic book heroes and selfies. The opening reception for

“Intimate Lines: Drawing with Threads” is on Sunday, September 24 from 2 to 4 p.m. The exhibit runs until Jan. 7, 2018. The museum is at 7 Lower

Center Street in Clinton. For more information, visit the website at www.hunterdon artmuseum.org or call (908) 735-8415.

———

JOIN US FOR THE FUN OF IT!

in Princeton to benefit

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 4:00 p.m. Performing Arts Center at Princeton High School

Tickets start at $38 Go to princetonsenior.org to purchase!


Christian Compassion in Action

Flemington on September 15th! 6-10PM • the Court house on Main street

Albert J. Raboteau, Ph.D.

Henry W. Putnam Professor of Religion

Princeton University

See jazz greats like: Jeff “Tain” Watts, Lezlie Harrison and Willie Martinez

Central jersey

2017

jazz

festival in FleMington sePt 16 - new BrunswiCk sePt 17 - soMerville

9/27/2017 - 7 p.m. St. Paul Spiritual Center

light refreshments

St. Paul Parish, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

The Spiritual Center is below the church, entrance from the parking lot behind the church. www.stpaulsofprinceton.org

Cool jazz will waft along Flemington’s historic streets during opening-night of the popular, annual Central Jersey Jazz Fest. The evening kicks off outside the Court House on Main Street, with performances by musicians from across the jazz spectrum. And the event isn’t for jazz alone. Strolling through the borough, you’ll discover artsy enclaves, trendy shops, and award-winning eateries. Come – experience for yourself Flemington’s undeniably cool vibe. We welcome you, and trust you’ll enjoy a magical evening … and all that jazz!

explore

Flemingt n Shop.Dine.Tour.Enjoy!

ExploreFlemington.com

Celebrating the Sacred Arts All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Princeton, NJ Saturday, September 23rd, 2017 From 12 noon

Join us for a celebration of the sacred arts:

•Reflections on the recently completed art work in the Sanctuary with the artist Makoto Fujimura •Script readings of 2 plays from local writers •Book Launch - Philosophy, Art and Religion by Gordon Graham •A Service of Music and Movement

Further information and registration at http://sacredartsday.weebly.com

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2017

Sharing the Divine Pathos:

A great weekend of Jazz starts in


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 • 24

Back to School

Town Topics PRINCETON DAY SCHOOL

MAKE THIS SCHOOL YEAR

opportunities

GREATER THAN LAST YEAR!

As your child gears up to head back to school, Mathnasium is here to help set the stage for success! Our unique teaching method is designed to strengthen math foundations, boost confidence, and ultimately, make math make sense. Whether your child is ahead of the curve, performing at grade level, or falling behind, together, we can make this school year greater than last year!

of a lifetime. every day. An independent, coeducational school for students in grades PreK–12, located in the heart of Princeton.

NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL Math Help and Enrichment

Join us for an Open House Lower School • Grades PreK – 4 October 11, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. November 15, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Middle School • Grades 5 – 8 November 7, 8:30 – 10:30 a.m. Upper School • Grades 9 – 12 November 12, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. For more information, please call our Admission Office at 609-924-6700 x1200.

www.pds.org

Test Prep

Homework Help

Mathnasium of [Location]

Currently Accepting Applications for 2017-2018

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The Bridge Academy is a NJ potential for students ages 8 - 18 learn and is the only Orton-Gillingham approved independent school for Find out more a accredited program in New and is the only Orton-Gillingham dysle students with language-based Jersey. Our students on Nove accredited programare in best New Thedisabilities Bridgedescribed Academy is aas NJ as “bright students ADH learning Jersey. such Our students are best “Helping Children Bridge the Gap Between Potential and P who learn differently.” approved independent school for auditory processing, as “bright students 1958described B Lawrenceville Road • � Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 �dyslexia, THE BRIDGE ACADEMY � � speci THE BRIDGE ACADEMY studentsdysgraphia. with wholanguage-based learn differently.” ADHD and/or Our helps Find outdisabilities more at oursuch OPEN learning as HOUSE special education program poten onThe November 14th! is a NJ Bridge Academy helpsdyslexia, maximize academic processing, The Bridge Academy is a NJ Find out auditory more at our OPEN HOUSE approved independent school for and approved school for i forBetween students ages 8 independent -Our 18 “Helping potential Children Bridge the Gap Potential and Performance” ADHD and/or dysgraphia. on November 14th! students with language-based 1958 B Lawrenceville Road • Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 •students 609.844.0770 • www.banj.org with language-based accre and is the onlyeducation Orton-Gillingham special program learning learning disabilities such as such as disabilities “Helping Children Bridge the Gap Between Potential and Performance” accredited program in New dyslexia,dyslexia, auditory processing, Jerse maximize auditory processing, 1958 B Lawrenceville Road •helps Lawrenceville, NJ 08648academic • 609.844.0770 • www.banj.org ADHD and/or dysgraphia. Our Jersey.potential Our students are best ADHD and/or dysgraphia. Our for students ages 8 - 18 descr special education programprogram special education described as “bright students and is the only helpsOrton-Gillingham maximize academic helps maximize academic who who learn differently.” potential for students ages 8 - 18

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017 1:00PM–4:00PM

described as “bright students Jersey. Our students are best Jersey. Our students are best Find out more and is the only Orton-Gillingham

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A coeducational college preparatory boarding and day school. Day: grades seven through twelve. Boarding: grades nine through twelve.

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Town Topics

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George School Admission Office 1690 Newtown Langhorne Road Newtown PA 18940 215.579.6547 admission@georgeschool.org

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2017

Back to School


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 26

(Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) � Phone number

Music and Theater

� Fax number

� Address

NAMI Mercer Benefit Concert in Pennington

NA MI Mercer presents a benefit concert at The Pennington School featuring Tanya Gabrielian performing works by Bach, Rachmaninoff, Chopin, and Gershwin on Sunday, October 8 at 3 p.m. Goodwill offerings will be solicited, with all proceeds going to

� Expiration Date

support NAMI Mercer programs and services. The Pro Musicis Foundation and The Pennington School are partnering with NAMI Mercer to make all this possible. For more information, visit www.namimercer.org. Tanya Gabrielian believes art is a symbol of hope and artists are uniquely positioned to effect positive Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

Hunan ~ Szechuan Malaysian ~ Vietnamese

change — both in individuals and communities. Her conviction grew out of a particularly challenging personal experience. While studying abroad at London’s Royal Academy of Music, Ms. Gabrielian slipped during martial arts training and twisted her spine. A month-long ordeal followed, during which she, who was a teenager, had to navigate a foreign medical system alone, undergoing two serious operations and landing in nine different hospitals. She found comfort in listening to recordings of Bach’s unaccompanied works. The music not only helped her transcend physical pain and psychological isolation, it moved her beyond immersion in the practice of music, focusing her instead on the pure experience of music. On September 12, Ms. Gabrielian released a debut album on MSR, Remix, featuring piano arrangements of Bach solo cello and violin works, the music that

Tanya Gabrielian

profoundly influenced her recovery and her developDaily Specials • Catering Available ment as an artist. A tour will accompany the album’s 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950 release, to include Ms. Gabrielian’s participation in a Weekend of Wellness activities with NAMI Mercer N.J. T he we ekend ’s ac t iv i ties, part of Mental Illness Awareness Week, will comINTERFAITH CAREGIVERS BENEFIT: Dublin-born tenor Ciarán mence with a master class at Sheehan will perform Broadway favorites and Irish classics at Serving the Princeton area for over 20 years The Pennington School on Interfaith Caregivers of Greater Mercer County’s Gala at the Residential & Office Cleaning Thursday morning, OctoStone Terrace in Hamilton on October 12, 2017. This annual Fully Insured ber 5. On Friday afternoon, event supports services for homebound seniors and adults Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager For immediate attention, call October 6, Ms. Gabrielian with disabilities. Tickets, which include dinner and entertainthe Princeton Renata for 609-683-5889 will perform a community ment, are $65 per person. To purchase, call (609) 393-9922 or all your housecleaning and cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com outreach concert for the pawww.cleanhousehappyhouse.com organizing needs. visit www.icgmc.org. tients and staff at Trenton Psychiatric Hospital. As part of Harvest of Hope, NAMI  Mercer’s Annual Wellness Conference, on Saturday,   October 7, Ms. Gabrielian   w ill team up w it h John Haag, executive director of     Pro Musicis, to lead a music   and wellness workshop. Fi nally, on Sunday afternoon, October 8 at 3 p.m., Ms. Ga brielian will perform a bene  fit concert for NAMI Mercer.  The event will be held at The Pennington School Campus  Center in Pennington, N.J.  The public is invited to attend.  ——— 



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Westminster Faculty Recital Series at Bristol

The Westminster Choir College 2017 Faculty Recital Series opens with a performance of part-songs and solo lieder on Sunday, September 24 at 3 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the campus of Westminster Choir College of Rider University in Princeton. Admission is free. A considerable amount of repertoire that is frequently performed by choirs was actually written for small ensembles of soloists and know n as par t-songs. T his program features some of those songs, such as Brahms’s Neues Liebeslieder, and solo lieder by Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms. Pe r for m e r s a r e E l i z a beth Sutton, soprano; Amy Zorn, contralto; Eric Rieger, tenor; Sean McCarther, baritone; Elem Eley, baritone; Phyllis Alpert Lehrer, piano; and J. J. Penna; piano. Learn more about this performance at www.rider. edu/arts or by calling (609) 921-2663.

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This October, American Repertory Ballet (ARB) will present a new triple-bill program in New York City and in New Brunswick. The performances feature work by American Repertory Ballet’s resident choreographers Kirk Peterson and Mar y Barton: Peterson’s Carmen and The Eyes that Gently Touch and Barton’s Straight Up with a Twist. On T hursday, October 12, ARB will perform at State Theatre New Jersey in Downtown New Brunswick at 8 p.m. This performance will feature live accompaniment by the Rutgers Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Kynan Johns. Tickets: $27-57, $15 Rutgers University students with promo code RU15 (must present valid I.D.) are available online at www.arballet.org/ event/carmennj or by calling the State Theatre ticket office at (732) 246-7469. The program opens with Kirk Peterson’s The Eyes that Gently Touch, set to the driving rhythms of Philip Glass’s Mad Rush, culminating in a dance replete with romance and thrilling movement. Next is Mary Barton’s Straight Up With a Twist (an ARB signature performance since its inception), a work set to the eclectic sounds of Kaila Flexer and Third Ear, which showcases the versatility of ARB’s dancers and Ms. Barton’s unique choreographic voice. The performance concludes with a company premiere: Mr. Peterson’s Carmen. Based on Georges Bizet’s opera, Mr. Peterson tells the tale of Carmen, a passionate, freespirited woman, the fickle Don José, and her love triangle between Don José and popular bullfighter Escamillo. Straight Up with a Twist, which premiered in 2011, was the first piece she created for ARB, blending Ms. Barton’s rich senses of narrative and neo-classicism. It has become a hallmark work in the company’s repertory. “I aimed to create a fresh, enthusiastic, playful mood, w it h a l it t l e s e n s u a l it y thrown in,” Ms. Barton explains. ARB originally premiered The Eyes that Gently Touch in 1999 and most recently revived it in 2012. Reviewing this revival, dance critic Robert Johnson characterized the work as a “contemporary classic.” The work has been referred to as both spectacular and poetic — a balance of lyricism and stirring physicality. Mr. Peterson originally created Carmen for Cincinnati Ballet, and these October 2017 performances mark ARB’s premiere of the work. “The original creation of the Carmen Suite by Rodion Shchedrin, instigated by the great ballerina Maya Plisetskaya, was meant to be interpreted as dance,” Mr. Peterson explains. “I wished to explore different aspects of the novella not previously highlighted. This Carmen is my response to this exciting score.” “I had been inspired to choreog raph it in 1970 upon first hearing the exciting Shchedrin/Bizet Suite. It took 28 years for me to bring my ideas to the stage in 1998 for Cincinnati Bal-

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

ARB Presents “Carmen” let. I was so thrilled when Douglas Martin asked me to At State Theatre NJ revive my Carmen for ARB this season. For more information, visit arballet.org or call (609) 921-7758. ———

Hopewell Theater Re-opens And Announces Lineup

The landmark Hopewell Theater has re-opened after undergoing an extensive eight-month renovation, that includes a new lobby, box office, and concession stand, as well as a state-of-the-art cinema system with surround sound, prep kitchen, and expanded theater seating area and balcony. Now fully refitted as a deluxe showcase for music, cinema and the performing arts, the Hopewell Theater will serve as an intimate arts venue and gathering place for the greater Hopewell Valley area. The theater lobby features a full concession stand where patrons can purchase gourmet small plates and desserts along with traditional theater snacks such as popcorn and candy. The theater has hand-picked its menu from a variety of local restaurants that will present special dishes at the concession stand, including Brick Farm Market, The Bent Spoon, and The Peasant Grill. Patrons can enjoy a meal or snack during the show in comfortable cabaret-style banquette seats, leather chairs with tables, or traditional plush fixed theater seats. The theater’s new vision includes a carefully-curated programming schedule that will showcase independent films, some followed by director Q&As or paired with a reading or concert, and live music on a weekly basis performed by local and regional singer-songwriters. There will also be TED-style talks and a variety of discussions from books to visual ar ts to self-improvement and wellness. Artists will have access to the theater, which will be rented during the day to encourage adult artists, musicians, filmmakers, and artist networks who need a venue to either practice, show work, or come together to create. The theater’s fall program schedule features a unique blend of musical genres, mov ies, and multimedia experiences including the 2017 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour, the Alloy Orchestra playing musical accompaniment to the classic film The Lost World, performances by literar y songsmith Dan Bern, Cajun/ Creole musicians The Bunkhouse Boys, and more. Hopewell’s historic theater is being re-launched by the production team of Sara Scully and business partner Mitchel Skolnick. Ms. Scully oversaw the renovation and will serve as executive director. “Our aim is that this theater will serve a wide range of artists and community members and be a resource and intimate, inviting sanctuary to enjoy the arts,” says Ms. Scully. For more infor mation, visit www.HopewellTheater. com. The box office can be reached at (609) 4661964.

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Ethics of Reading VII, Fall 2017

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT Wednesday, 4:30 – 7:20 p.m. (Open to the Public, 4:30-6 p.m.) Marx Hall Room 301

Pierre-Paul Prud’hon, “Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime.”

FALL 2017 - CHV 577, COM 577, ENG 535 Professor Peter Brooks, Comparative Literature and the University Center for Human Values and guest speakers The seminar will study important legal cases in the field of criminal justice and penology, alongside some works of literature that address analogous issues. Focus on reading legal opinions, especially concerning: guilt, search and seizure, interrogation and confession, trial, appeal, and punishment. Attention also to the analysis of narrative and rhetoric in both law and literature. September 13 GUILT AND DETECTION

October 25 TRIAL AND CONVICTION

September 20 GUILT AND DETECTION, PART TWO David Luban, Georgetown Law Center

November 8 TRIAL AND CONVICTION, PART TWO Susanna Blumenthal, University of Minnesota Law School

September 27 SEARCH AND SEIZURE Tracey Meares, Yale Law School

November 15 APPEAL & PETITION

October 4 SEARCH AND SEIZURE, PART TWO

November 29 PUNISHMENT: EXECUTION Bernard Harcourt, Law & Political Science, Columbia University

October 11 INTERROGATION AND CONFESSION Robert Weisberg, Stanford Law School

December 6 PUNISHMENT: PRISON Caleb Smith, Department of English, Yale University

October 18 INTERROGATION AND CONFESSION, PART TWO

December 13 CONCLUSIONS

All reading materials available on our website: www.princeton.edu/~ereading Cosponsors: Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA), Department of Comparative Literature, Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation and the University Center for Human Values along with Princeton University


Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE

© Evan Monroe Chapman

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 28

CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

“…igniting an explosive new enthusiasm for percussion music old and new.” —The New York Times

EDWARD T. CONE PERFORMERS-IN-RESIDENCE

FRIDAY SEPT 15, 2017 7:30pm Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

FREE admission. Tickets required. Available at tickets.princeton.edu or at the door

Works by John Cage, Viet Cuong, Paul Lansky, and a new work with choreographer Susan Marshall

Home Again

CINEMA REVIEW

Middle-Aged Mom Dates Younger Man in Midlife-Crisis Comedy

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away, the decision to return to the house she grew up fter separating from her husband Austen (Michael in was easy, because the girls would live in the lap of Sheen), Alice Kinney (Reese Witherspoon) decides luxury while being pampered by their grandmother Lilto move from Manhattan to Los Angeles with her lian (Candice Bergen). two young daughters Rosie (Eden Grace Redfield) and Alice’s late father was a famous film director, however, Isabel (Lola Flanery). Although Alice’s father has passed Lillian still complains about his philandering and smugly delights in his demise, saying, “He’s gone now, so I won!” The sprawling mansion left to her by the legendary director has a storeroom stuffed with Oscars, movie posters, and other memorabilia from his Hollywood career. Soon after arriving, Rosie and Isabel become terribly homesick. However, that’s not the case with their single mother, who heads to a bar to celebrate her 40th birthday with two long-lost friends. Next thing you know, they are sharing drinks with three young filmmakers in their 20s, one of whom, Harry (Pico Alexander), is instantly attracted to Alice. Alice takes all three of the men home with her, and also has a one-night stand with Harry. However, when Rosie discovers her mother in bed with a stranger the next morning, she asks Alice some tough questions — “How did you meet? Did you have a sleepover?” The plot tests credulity when grandmother Lillian, instead of objecting to the young men’s presence, invites them to move into the guest house after she learns that they’re almost broke and struggling to make it in showbiz. Next, the plot thickens when Austen arrives unannounced from New York, hoping to reconcile with his estranged wife. Thus unfolds Home Again, a zany romantic comedy written and directed by Hallie MeyersShyer. Her debut is impressive, with a tasteful love triangle storyline that is reminiscent of Something’s Gotta Give (2003) and It’s Complicated (2009). This is not too surprising, since both of those hit pictures were written and directed by her Oscar nominated mother Nancy Meyers (Private Benjamin). Excellent (HHHH). Rated PG-13 for sexuality and mature themes. Running time: 97 minutes. DO YOU BELIEVE IN LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT?: Harry (Pico Alexander, Production Studio: Black Bicycle Entertainment. right) and Alice (Reese Witherspoon) are immediately attracted to Distributor: Open Road Films. each other when they meet at a bar in Los Angeles. —Kam Williams

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AT THE CINEMA

PASSING STRANGE: THE MOVIE

American Assassin (R for torture, profanity, brief nudity, and pervasive graphic violence). Thriller about a 23-year-old (Dylan O’Brien), grieving for his fiancée killed in a terrorist attack, who is recruited by the CIA’s deputy director (Sanaa Lathan) and teamed with a veteran agent (Michael Keaton) to apprehend a mysterious madman (Taylor Kitsch) trying to start World War III. With Charlotte Vega, Chris Webster, and Buster Reeves.

Stew, the star and co-writer of the hit Broadway musical Passing Strange, screens Spike Lee’s film version of the stage production and discusses his collaboration with Lee as part of the series Film Blackness, organized by visiting associate professor Michael Gillespie (City College of New York) and made possible by the John Sacret Young Fund for visiting filmmakers.

Annabelle: Creation (R for horror violence). Tale of demonic possession about a dollmaker (Anthony LaPaglia) and his wife (Miranda Otto) who open their home to a nun (Stephanie Sigman) and several orphans only to have them terrorized by one of his creations (Samara Lee). With Talitha Bateman, Lulu Wilson, and Kerry O’Malley. Brad’s Status (R for profanity). Ben Stiller plays the title character in this comedy as a man who finds himself reevaluating his career choices when he accompanies his college-bound son (Austin Abrams) on a tour of schools in the Boston area. Supporting cast includes Michael Sheen, Jenna Fischer, Luke Wilson, and Jemaine Clement.

7:30 PM/ PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE, 160 NASSAU STREET

Dunkirk (PG-13 for intense battle scenes and some profanity). World War II movie recreating the evacuation of over 300,000 Allied soldiers from the shores of France after they were surrounded by the Nazi army. Ensemble cast includes Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance, Fionn Whitehead, Aneurin Barnard, Barry Keoghan, and Harry Styles. In English, French, and German with subtitles.

Tickets on sale at Garden Theatre www.thegardentheatre.com

arts.princeton.edu

The Emoji Movie (PG for rude humor) Animated movie about an over-enunciating text message emoji (T.J. Miller) who embarks on a quest for a filter that will limit him to one facial expression, just like his parents (Steven Wright and Jennifer Coolidge). Voice cast includes James Corden, Anna Faris, and Maya Rudolph.

The Program in Creative Writing presents

Althea Ward Clark ’21 2017-2018

READING SERIES

Good Time (R for violence, drug use, sexuality, and pervasive profanity). Crime drama about a mobster’s (Robert Pattinson) efforts to spring his brother (Ben Safdie) from jail after a botched bank robbery. With Buddy Duress, Barkhad (“I’m the Captain now!”) Abdi and Jennifer Jason Leigh.

september 20 • 4:30 pm

The Hitman’s Bodyguard (R for graphic violence and pervasive profanity). Comedy about a bodyguard (Ryan Reynolds) who helps an assassin (Samuel L. Jackson) negotiate a gauntlet on his way to the Hague where he will testify at the International Court of Justice. Co-starring Gary Oldman, Salma Hayek, and Élodie Yung.

It (R for violence, profanity, and bloody images). Adaptation of the Stephen King bestseller set in Maine in the summer of 1989 where seven ostracized ’tweens join forces to exact revenge on the shape-shifting monster (Bill Skarsgard) that is terrorizing their hometown. Ensemble cast includes Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Finn Wolfhard, and Wyatt Oleff. Leap! (PG for action and impolite humor). Animated adventure about an 11-year-old orphan (Elle Fanning) living in Brittany who runs away to Paris with a friend (Nat Wolff) to pursue her lifelong dream of becoming a prima ballerina. Voice cast featuring Mel Brooks, Carly Rae Jepsen, and Maddie Ziegler.

Reading by: Erika Sánchez Photo by Robyn Lindeman

is the daughter of Mexican immigrants. A poet, essayist, and fiction writer, she is the author of a young adult novel, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter (Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2017) and the poetry collection, Lessons on Expulsion (Graywolf, 2017). Her poetry has appeared in Boston Review, Guernica, Paris Review, Poetry, and other publications, and her nonfiction has been published in Al Jazeera, Cosmopolitan, ESPN.com, The Guardian, on NBC News, Rolling Stone, Salon, and elsewhere. She has received a CantoMundo Fellowship, a Discovery/Boston Review Poetry Prize, a Fulbright Scholarship to Madrid, Spain, and a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation.

Yiyun Li Li joined Princeton’s faculty this fall. Her most recent book is a memoir, Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life, published in February 2017. She is the recipient of The Sunday Times/EFG Short Story Award, Benjamin H. Danks Award from The American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, among many other literary awards. She was named by The New Yorker as one of the “20 under 40” fiction writers to watch. Her work also has appeared in The New Yorker, A Public Space, Granta, The Best American Short Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories, among others.

Photo by Roger Turesson

Home Again (PG-13 for sexuality and mature themes). Dramatic comedy about a recently-separated mother of two (Reese Witherspoon) who relocates to Los Angeles where she rents her carriage house to three aspiring filmmakers (Nat Wolff, Pico Alexander, and Jon Rudnitsky), only to have her husband (Michael Sheen) show up unannounced. With Lake Bell, Candice Bergen, and P.J. Byrne.

Berlind Theatre, McCarter theatre center

arts.princeton.edu

Logan Lucky (PG-13 for profanity and crude comments). Oscar winner Steven Soderbergh (Traffic) comes out of retirement to direct, shoot, and edit this comic crime movie about two brothers (Channing Tatum and Adam Driver) who hatch a plan to pull a heist at the Charlotte Motor Speedway during NASCAR’s Coca-Cola 600 car race. Ensemble cast includes Daniel Craig, Hilary Swank, Seth MacFarlane, Katie Holmes, Dwight Yoakam, and Riley Keough. Marjorie Prime (Unrated). Lois Smith plays the title character in this science fiction movie as an 86-year-old woman who hires a computer service to live out her days with a holographic projection of a younger version of her late husband (Jon Hamm). Featuring Geena Davis, Tim Robbins, and Stephanie Andujar. Maudie (PG-13 for mature themes and brief sexuality). Sally Hawkins portrays Maud Lewis in this biopic, set in Nova Scotia in the ’30s, chronicling overcoming the rheumatoid arthritis that had crippled her since childhood to become one of Canada’s most celebrated folk artists. Supporting cast includes Ethan Hawke, Kari Matchett, and Zachary Bennett. Menashe (PG for mature themes). Menashe Lustig plays the title character in this drama, set in the heart of New York City’s Hasidic community, about a grieving widower’s struggle to raise his son (Ruben Niborski) in the wake of his wife’s untimely death. With Yoel Weisshaus and Meyer Schwartz. In Yiddish with subtitles. Mother! (R for sexuality, nudity, profanity, and disturbing violence). Oscar nominee Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan) wrote and directed this thriller about a couple (Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem) whose domestic tranquillity is disrupted after they allow some uninvited guests (Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer) into their country home. With Brian Gleeson, Domhnall Gleeson, and Amanda Chiu. Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13 for action, violence, profanity and suggestive comments). Tom Holland has the title role in this remake of the Marvel Comics series in which Peter Parker is living with his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) and attending high school in Queens while being mentored by Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) until it’s time to morph into his superhero alter ego to engage a new nemesis (Michael Keaton). With Gwyneth Paltrow, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Donald Glover, and Tyne Daly. The Trip to Spain (Unrated). Third film in the culinary series has comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon cracking jokes while traveling around Spain sampling the local cuisine.

that’s so annoying!

Thomas Rowlandson and

The Miseries of Human Life Sunday, September 17, 2 pm | 101 McCormick Hall

Tulip Fever (R for nudity and sexuality). Drama, set in 17th century Amsterdam, about an artist’s (Dane DeHaan) passionate affair with a married woman (Alicia Vikander) whose portrait he’s been commissioned to paint. With Christoph Waltz, Zach Galifiniakis, and Dame Judi Dench.

Graphic Arts curator Julie Mellby discusses the Princeton University Library’s outstanding collection of satirical drawings by Thomas Rowlandson, a selection of which are on view in the galleries of European art, and their relationship to the 1806 comic best seller The Miseries of Human Life.

Viceroy’s House (Unrated). Hugh Bonneville plays Lord Louis Mountbatten in this historical drama, set in New Delhi in 1947, recounting how the Viceroy of India oversees the country’s transition to independence. Co-starring Gillian Anderson, Michael Gambon, and Simon Callow.

A reception in the Museum will follow

Wind River (R for profanity, rape, graphic violence, and disturbing images). Thriller about a rookie FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) who teams with a veteran game tracker (Jeremy Renner) to solve a murder after a body is discovered in the woods on an Indian reservation. With Graham Greene, Judith Jones, and Jon Bernthal.

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu

Thomas Rowlandson (British, 1756/57–1827), Gentleman Drinking from a Jug (detail). Graphite, pen, black ink, and watercolor on laid paper. Graphic Arts Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections, Firestone Library. Gift of Dickson Q. Brown, Class of 1895

—Kam Williams TT_Rowlandson.indd 1

9/8/17 12:18 PM

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

Presented by Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Visual Arts


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 30

8:30 p.m.: Screening of David Gilmour: Live at Pompeii (2017) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Bring your ticket stub to Princeton Record Exchange and receive 15 percent Wednesday, September 13 off their entire catalog of Pink 4 p.m.: Roald Dahl Birthday Floyd related items. Celebration at Barnes & Noble Thursday, September 14 at MarketFair Mall in Prince10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Shop loton. Dress up as your favorite cal produce and baked goods character and enjoy a cookie at the Princeton Farmers Maror cupcake in the café. ket at Hinds Plaza (repeats 4 to 7 p.m.: Empowerment weekly). Fair for Mental Health/Addic5 p.m.: Nassau Street Samtions Consumer Appreciation pler at Princeton University at Phoenix Behavioral Health, Art Museum. Visit the galler1014 Whitehead Road in Ewing. ies and taste what local restauYoga, art, live music, food, and rants have to offer while enjoygiveaways. For more informa- ing musical performances by tion, visit www.empowerment Princeton University student fair.com. Admission is free. groups. 6 p.m.: Alzheimer’s Care5 to 7 p.m.: Professionals of giver Support Group meeting Princeton Launch Party and at the University Medical Cen- Networking Event at Metro ter of Princeton at Plainsboro. North, 378 Alexander Street Free. in Princeton. $20 entry per 7 p.m.: Meet Joe Miller, person. Cash bar, compliconductor of the Westminster mentary hors d’oeuvres and Symphonic Choir, at a dis- networking opportunities. cussion hosted by Princeton Register online at www.seSymphony Orchestra Music niorcareservicesnj.org/event Director Rossen Free; registration. natalieMilanov. Kalibat3-revised.pdf 7/27/17 5:11:51 PM Princeton Public Library.

Calendar

6 p.m.: Young Jewish Professionals (20s & 30s) of Mercer County social at Yankee Doodle Tap Room in Princeton. 6 p.m.: Vineyard-Style Dinner under the stars at Rat’s Restaurant at Grounds for Sculpture. For information, pricing, and reservations, call (609) 584-7800. 7 p.m.: Free screening of Nature Play at Princeton Garden Theatre and a preview of the plans for Stony BrookMillstone Watershed’s new Children’s Nature Play Zone. Admission is free (donation suggested). Friday, September 15 10 a.m.: Athleta Shopping Event at MarketFair Mall in Princeton. Mention the Junior League of Greater Princeton at checkout and receive 10 percent back on all purchases. 7 p.m.: Public Vigil for Princeton University Student Detained by Iran at East Pyne Courtyard at Princeton University. Speakers will include family, friends, fellow students and Princeton University professors.

“The Lewis School was very supportive of me both as a student and as an athlete. My teachers believed in me all the way. It was a great experience. The Lewis School provided such a special and personalized way of learning that helped me to understand my learning differences and build confidence. The skills I developed at Lewis allowed me to maintain a B average at the University of Southern California, something that I would never have dreamed prior to attending Lewis.”

Natalie Kalibat,

Class of 2016 University of Southern California The Lewis School of Princeton, 2007 - 2012

7 to 9 p.m.: Code for Princeton Open House and Social at the Princeton Public Library’s Community Room. Free. Refreshments will be served. Saturday, September 16 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Princeton Junction Train Station Parking Lot. Over 16 farms and 11 artisan food and natural product vendors are represented (repeats weekly). 11 a.m.: The Autumn Wild Forage at Cherry Grove Farm in Lawrenceville. Take a tour of the farm and learn about wild edibles. Noon: Princeton University football vs. San Diego at Powers Field at Princeton Stadium. Noon to 3 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton invites the community to a free, family-friendly 50th Birthday Party Celebration at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. Art projects, instructor demos, music and prizes with 94.5 PST, treasure hunt, food trucks, and more! From 2 to 3 p.m., the event will feature

a community birthday cake, dance performances, and cupcake decorating. Noon to 3 p.m.: The Manny L. Friedman Foundation presents the Tricky Tray and Auction at Amalfi’s, located at 146 Lawrenceville Pennington Road in Lawrenceville. $40 includes lunch and 12 raffle tickets for Tricky Tray. Win gift cards, sports memorabilia, and designer pocketbooks. Silent auction vacation items include three different African safaris, custom-designed trip to Italy, beachfront vacation home on LBI, four Disney park passes and more. Purchase tickets at the door or in advance at www. mannyfriedman.org. 3 to 5 p.m.: Opening Reception, 50th Anniversary Invitational Exhibition at the Arts Council of Princeton. Invited artists range in involvement with the Arts Council, from former artists-in-residence, to featured gallery artists, instructors, Terrace Project artists, and more. Free. 6 p.m.: Vineyard Harvest Dinner at Unionville Vineyards in Ringoes. Main Street Fine

• 2011 USC Early Acceptance & four year Athletic Scholarship • 2012 Honors College Preparatory Graduate, The Lewis School • 2012 - 2016 Member of USC’s elite Trojan Diving Team • Student Ambassador for USC’s Trojan Athletics Development & Outreach • 2016 USC Graduate of USC: BA in Sociology; Minor in Sports, Business & Media Studies • Voted USC’s 2016 “Outstanding Student for Academic & Overall Achievement” • Two Time NJ State Girls’ Diving Champion, NJSIAA Elite Diver 2011 & 2012; 2011 Eastern Interscholastic Diving Champion • 2012 London Olympic Trials competitor, 10 meter synchronized diving • 2015 Lewis School Distinguished Alumna & Honors Society Inductee • NJ Legislature Tribute for “Meritorious Achievement Competitive Spirit & Sportsmanship as a Champion State Diver” • Sports Anchor Annenberg TV News: highlighted athletes’ off-field volunteer & community service, & stories of personal courage among aspiring young athletes • On-campus reporter & news anchor for ESPN Affiliate WeAreSC & California Telecommunica tions Media • 2015 ESPN Rose Bowl Assistant to the Producer • Sports & Field Reporter for the PAC12 network including UCLA, University of Arizona & Stanford • Won February 2016 PAC12 Diving Conference Championship

“I studied and worked so hard in school and got horrible grades on exams. I also struggled with reading comprehension before I joined Lewis. I now work as a sports anchor and reporter for WBOY, an NBC affiliate, and I am living my dream! ”

53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-8120

Catering of Princeton will serve a seasonal buffet dinner, along with an open bar featuring Unionville wines. Guests will then be able to observe the crushing, pressing, and fermentation of the 2017 grape harvest. Tickets are $90 per person. 8 p.m.: Princeton Symphony Orchestra performs Beethoven’s Ninth at Richardson Auditorium. Sunday, September 17 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Trenton Farmers Market at 960 Spruce Street in Lawrence Township (also, Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. throughout the summer). Noon to 6 p.m.: 26th Annual JazzFeast in downtown Princeton’s Palmer Square. The open-air jazz festival draws thousands of people with a wide selection of live music and food. Admission is free to all music performances and food vendors will charge accordingly. 2:30 p.m.: The New School for Music Study Beethoven Faculty Recital at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street in Princeton. Monday, September 18 Recycling 10 to 11 a.m.: Shop locally-made cheeses at Cherry Grove Farm in Lawrenceville in honor of National Cheeseburger Day. 1 p.m.: Monthly meeting of The Women’s College Club of Princeton at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Princeton. Jon Lambert, owner of the Princeton Record Exchange, will speak about the history of the store and how it survives and thrives in the digital age. Free. Tuesday, September 19 11 a.m.: Free, Baby Storytime at Princeton Public Library. Wednesday, September 20 1:30 p.m.: “The Conversation: A Revolutionary Plan for End-of-Life Care” presented by Hopewell Valley Senior Services at Mercer County Library’s Hopewell Branch, located at 245 PenningtonTitusville Road in Pennington. Advance registration is required by emailing hopeprogs@mcl.org. Thursday, September 21 6 to 8 p.m.: Oktoberfest Celebration at the Miele Princeton Experience Center, 9 Independence Way in Princeton. Register in advance by calling 1 (800) 843-7231 ext. 1002 or visit www.mieleusa. com. Tickets are $25. Friday, September 22 5 p.m.: Pink Drink Night at The Peacock Inn, A Benefit for BCRC (Breast Cancer Research Center) of YWCA Princeton. The price of each pink drink (Hibiscus Spritz) sold will go directly to support BCRC. Saturday, September 23 7:30 a.m.: The Parkinson Alliance 5K and 1-Mile Fun Run at 101 Carnegie Center in West Windsor. For more information, visit www.parkinson alliance.org. Sunday, September 24 8 a.m.: A + Life Day Retreat at Princeton Marriot Forrestal Hotel on “Celebrating the Healthy Epicurean Lifestyle With World-Wise Gurus, Authors, Experts, and Chefs.” Limited Seats Available and pre-registration is required. Breakfast and gourmet lunch is included in ticket. For more information, visit www.riseofwise.com.


Heading Into Season Opener Against San Diego, Princeton Football Has Some Key Question Marks

A

lthough the Princeton University football team is coming off an 8-2 campaign in 2016 that saw it tie Penn for the Ivy League title and has been picked to finish first along with Harvard for the upcoming season by the media poll, Bob Surace doesn’t view his squad as a powerhouse just yet. “I just reminded them today that you start the year 0-0,” said Princeton head coach Surace, speaking at the program’s recently held Media Day. “Guys have to step up, it is never the same team from one year to another. It is how we mix and figure this team out.” At the outset, Surace has two key issues to figure out as senior star and tri-captain John Lovett, a 2016 AllAmerica honoree and Bushnell Cup Ivy Offensive Player of the Year, is currently sidelined indefinitely with an injury and the defense suffered some heavy graduation losses. “We try to get the ball in the best player’s hands; he was the best player in the league, not just the best player on our team in so many aspects, catching the ball, running with it, and he was a quality thrower,” said Surace of Lovett, who rushed for 411 yards, passed for 582 yards, had 235 yards receiving and accounted for 31 touchdowns (20 rushing, 10 passing, one receiving) last fall. “We are working through camp to figure out who is taking some of those reps as a ball carrier, as a receiver, and as a thrower. We lost six guys on defense who made some form of All Ivy. Our front seven has looked very good. We are going to need to develop more depth.” Surace believes that the experience and skill of se-

nior quarterback and tricaptain Chad Kanoff (168for-272 passing for 1,741 yards and six touchdowns in 2016) will help make up for the absence of Lovett when Princeton kicks off its 2017 campaign by hosting the University of San Diego on September 16. “It makes the practice go so much smoother; Chad knows the tempo, the calls, where all the guys should be, and what the offensive line calls are,” said Surace. “His operational time for things is better than we have ever seen. He is getting the ball out quicker than he ever has, the throws are on the money. Chad has been on fire throwing the ball with his accuracy, getting the ball out on time, arm strength, his ability to make decisions, and make the right ones. It has been fun to watch his development.” New offensive coordinator Sean Gleeson promises to retain the up-tempo approach instilled buy his successor James Perry, now the head coach at Bryant University. “We are going to play fast, we are going to be physical,” asserted Gleeson. “I came from an old school mentality that you can’t play this game without being hungry so from a motivational standpoint I want to see our guys eager and active at all times to make sure that we are putting the best product out there at all times.” Princeton features speed at running back in junior Charlie Volker, who rushed for a team-high 574 yards and four touchdowns last fall and has won Ivy League sprint and relay titles. “Charlie is a track guy too, so he is juggling double duty, it is not like he is just a running back 365 days a year, 24 hours day,” said Gleeson, noting that sophomore Ryan Quigley (156 yards rushing,

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one touchdown) has been making strides. “I think in year three, what I have noticed in him is that his speed was something you could wow at, but this year, his foot quickness and his ability to make cuts is noticeable.” Gleeson is looking at juniors Jesper Horsted (30 receptions for 413 yards and one touchdown) and Stephen Carlson (two receptions for nine yards) to lead the receiving corps. “I think Stephen has done a nice job in the offseason transforming his body,” said Gleeson, who will be looking to get junior tight end Graham Adomitis involved in the passing game. “Jesper without having been with us in the spring, because he is playing baseball, is getting back up to top speed. He is a tremendous athlete.” Surace, an All-Ivy center in his playing days at Princeton during the late 1980s, views the team’s battle-tested offensive line as a strength. “There are nine guys who played a lot of snaps last year for us and we only lost Mason Darrow who played a significant amount,” added Surace, whose top returners along the line include senior tackle Mitchell Sweigart, junior guard George Attea, senior center Richard Bush, senior guard Eric Ramirez, junior tackle Stefan Ivanisevic, sophomore tackle Reily Radosevich, and junior guard Jack Corso. Gleeson tipped his hat to fellow assistant coach Andrew Zurich for his work with the position group last season. “I think the credit goes to coach Aurich and his development of those guys throughout the year last year,” added Gleeson.

“Having played here and having played the position, he has brought those guys along very quick.” In the view of defensive coordinator and senior associate head coach Steve Verbit, quick development will be a key for a Tiger defense featuring a number of new faces in key spots. “We will try to get out guys to be great from a fundamental and technique standpoint and give them a chance to run to the ball,” said Verbit, whose unit led the Ivies in scoring defense (16.4 points a game), total defense (317.6 yards a game), and rushing defense (80.1 yards a game) defense during the 2016 season. “We will add defenses as they demonstrate to us that they are ready to go. You audition a defense each and every day and when they have showed us they are good at it, you can move on.” Verbit likes what he has seen so far as that process has unfolded. “There are a bunch of the guys have pretty good athletic ability and pretty good speed; we are going to have a chance to get to the quarterback,” added Verbit. “Our guys are tough and physical but you don’t know what you have until game day and until you go against a different colored jersey. They are a team that has worked very hard in the offseason.” Verbit is depending on senior star defensive lineman and tri-captain Kurt Holuba to dominate in the trenches. “Kurt is tireless in terms of the energy that he gives on the field,” said Verbit of HolBusiness uba, who earned third-team All-America honors with 8.0 sacks and 10 tackles for a loss. “He helps make everybody better on every single repetition not only because of his great desire to excel

COACHES’ CORNER: Princeton University football head coach Bob Surace talks with his coaches during the program’s recently held Media Day. Princeton is coming off an 8-2 campaign last fall that saw it share the Ivy League title with Penn. The Tigers get their 2017 season underway when they host the University of San Diego on September 16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) on the field but also off the field in the meeting room, really stepping up and being another coach amongst the positional groups and amongst the units.” Joining Holuba on the defensive line is junior Jake Strain and sophomore Mike Hampson. “Jake has been around, he played 300 or 400 snaps for us last year,” said Verbit. “Matt Hampson is a newcomer. He was a highly recruited young man coming out of Pittsburgh. Guys grow in the offseason, they understand the expectations at the college level. He is bigger, stronger, and faster. He is ready to go and to step up.” Verbit believes that senior Mark Fossati and junior Thomas Johnson are ready to step up at inside linebacker. “Mark is very fine football player, he has always been a great special teams player, now it is his time,” said Verbit, noting that sophomore | Family Law | Litigation John Orr, junior Jackson Simcox, and freshman James Johnson should also see time at linebacker. “He is a guy who has made an unbelievably smooth transition from outside linebacker. Tommy Johnson is that guy who is going to

run through a brick wall for you.” In the secondary, senior Chance Melancon, junior Ben Ellis, and sophomore T.J. Floyd figure to lead the way. “Chance started seven games; he was very good on the press coverage, he is ready to go,” said Verbit. “Ben has been around, just not on the field. T.J. Floyd was our nickel last year, he was at the position he is playing right now for approximately 400 snaps. He is the guy that has to make the calls instead of getting the calls. He is a good football player, he is very physical and has great range.” Looking ahead to the opener against San Diego, Surace knows that his team needs to be ready to battle hard. “They are a really good program, they won a playoff game last year,” said Surace, noting that the Tigers fell 3929 to the Toreros out west in 2014 in the third meeting between the teams. | Personal Injury “They are probably as talented as any team on our schedule. They are going have 10 more practices and two games so it is going to be a great test right from the get-go.” —Bill Alden

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After Making All-America for PU Football Last Fall, Holuba Primed to Lead the Way in Final Campaign Kur t Holuba didn’t get the chance to finish his sophomore season with the Princeton University football team in 2015 due to a knee injury. “I went down in the third game with a torn MCL, it was really difficult,” recalled Holuba, speaking at the program’s recently held annual media day. “It was a long road to recovery. It was difficult to watch my teammates go out and play without me. It definitely motivated me and fueled me to keep working hard and get back to being healthy.” That work paid dividends as defensive lineman Holuba returned with a vengeance last fall, earning third-team All-America and first-team All-Ivy League honors with 8 sacks and 10 tackles for a loss as Princeton went 8-2

and shared the Ivy League title with Penn. “Thankfully we had a great season last year so it was all worth it to come back and be stronger,” said Holuba, a 6’4, 265-pound native of Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J., who was a finalist for the 2016 Bushnell Cup Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year award. “I think the difference bet ween years past and last year was that we had a much more heavy emphasis in finishing games because we were always close my first two years. Last year, I feel like every second half we were focused and able to finish games off.” Now, Holuba is focused on finishing his career with another Ivy title campaign. “I just want to get better every day and every game, I don’t try to put any numbers or anything like that,”

CAPTAIN KURT: Princeton University football star Kurt Holuba smiles as he fields questions at the program’s recently held annual media day. Senior defensive lineman Holuba, who earned third-team All-America honors last fall, is serving as a captain of the 2017 Tigers along with classmates Chad Kanoff and John Lovett. Princeton kicks off its season when it hosts the University of San Diego on September 16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

said Holuba, who gets his senior season under way when Princeton hosts the University of San Diego on September 16. “I just want to go 10-0 and win an Ivy League championship, that is what I am most concerned about. It is a team game so anything I can do to help the defense and help our team win, that is what is most important.” Holuba will shoulder additional responsibility to lead t he team t his fall, serving as a tri-captain of the 2017 Tigers along with classmates Chad Kanoff and John Lovett. “We have had some incredible guys who have been Princeton captains, being on the same list is an incredible honor and I am just trying to do my best and uphold the tradition of the school,” said Holuba. Getting to his final year at Princeton has given Holuba a different perspective on things. “It is definitely a little different, being the oldest guy in the room and stuff,” said Holuba. “I think back to being an incoming freshman in my first camp and things like that and just how much different the experience is being a senior and leading these guys rather than following the guys before me. It is kind of surreal but it is really fun.” Looking ahead to the San Diego game, Holuba is excited to lead his guys into action. “Everybody has been working hard and getting better every day,” said Holuba. “You can just see the progression from day one to now. I have been salivating since spring ball basically to get a new season going. I can’t wait to play.” While Holuba is hoping for a special season, he knows that continued progression requires an attention to detail on a daily basis. “We can’t think about expectations or any of the big picture things like repeating,” said Holuba. “We can’t let any of that get into our head. We have to take it one day at a time and one game at a time and just keep getting better.” —Bill Alden

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O’Brien Produces Breakout Performances As Tiger Women’s Soccer Improves to 6-0 Courtney O’Brien picked a very good time to score the first goal in her career with the Princeton Universit y women’s soccer team. With Princeton locked in a scoreless tie against visiting Rider early in the second half last Thursday evening, sophomore forward O’Brien fought off some defenders in the box and knocked a volley into the back of the net to give the Tigers a 1-0 lead 42 seconds into the half. Having battled back from a knee injury which limited her to 12 appearances in a reserve role last fall with no points, O’Br ien was thrilled to finally get on the scoresheet. “It was an accumulation of excitement, like this is going in because it has to,” said O’Brien, a native of Studio City, Calif. who came off the bench midway through the first half against Rider. “Maybe that was just coming a little from frustration but also just excitement for me to get out there to prove myself. I haven’t had that much playing time to get in there and show what I can do.” Minutes later, O’Br ien showed hops and skill, leaping high in the air to head a Vanessa Gregoire corner kick into the goal. “It was one of those balls where you just know you have got it; you just feel it is in your range,” said O’Brien. “When you want that goal, you will do anything, you will dive head first straight for it.” For O’Brien, finding the range meant a lot. “I finally feel like myself again so I definitely see a turning point for me in my confidence playing on the field,” said O’Brien, who added two more goals on Sunday to help Princeton defeat New Hampshire 3-1 and improve to 6-0. “It is exciting.” With Princeton coming off an exciting Labor Day weekend which saw it win 2-0 at No. 20 North Carolina State on September 2 and then beat No. 18 Wake Forest 2-0 two days later, O’Brien and her teammates were looking to show those triumphs weren’t a fluke. “It definitely shows that we have a ton of potential and that we are at a really good starting point,” said O’Brien, reflecting on the trip to North Carolina. “We have a lot more to do because it is only the beginning of the season and once again we want to prove that wasn’t just a lucky weekend and that is what we are capable of. We have a lot more time to get used to playing together and get our flow and get a lot more wins.” P r i nce ton h e ad coach Sean Driscoll saw the wins in North Carolina as evidence that the Tiger have the ability to compete with anyone. “There is no other word to describe it than magical,” said Driscoll. “It was a weekend where we didn’t know what to expect. You just go down there and try to put up the best fight you can. We played really well against N.C. State and got a lot of confidence out of that game and then, lo and behold, we came back and

played even better against Wake Forest. This team is very deep, our strength is in our depth. We showed that by playing 19 kids against Wake Forest and 18 kids against N.C. State. We don’t lose anything when we go to other players.” Driscoll sees O’Brien’s breakthrough as proof of that depth. “I am happy for Courtney; she has had a great attitude,” said Driscoll of O’Brien, who was later named the Ivy League Player of the Week for her heroics last weekend. “She is coming off a major injury two years ago. She was getting back to herself last year and we have seen a real improvement this spring and then again this fall. She has incredible leaping ability as you saw on the second goal. She has been very determined; no one wants to score more than that kid. It just gives us another weapon and the more weapons that we have and the more danger we present with multiple people, the better we are going to be.” With Princeton producing shutouts in its first five games, the team’s back line has been providing some incredible play. “Natalie Larkin, Mikaela Symanovich, Katie PrattThompson, Olivia Sheppard, and Lucy Rickerson are the five that have played back there and have rotated,” said Driscoll. “They have been incred-

ible, to play against the level of competition we have played against and to not conceded a goal. It is wonderful. Natalie Grossi, the goalkeeper, played really, really well in North Carolina. It goes to show you the determination, the effort, and the willingness to just really roll up their sleeves and work as hard as possible. They take tremendous satisfaction and pride in the position and when they get a clean sheet it means a lot.” Noting that Princeton got off to a 9-1-1 start in 2016 before getting hit by some key injuries and ending up 10-4-3, Driscoll’s excitement over his team’s start is tempered by that experience. “It is a ver y close-knit team, I think they are very supportive of one another,” said Driscoll. “Across the midfield and with all of the forwards, we rotate every player a lot. That is the key to keep confidence high and keep legs fresh. It is exciting. The only caution is last year we started off in a very similar fashion and then hit a speed bump. We are cautiously optimistic.” O’Br ien, for her par t, is optimistic that she can emerge as a key piece in the rotation this fall. “It is fun to come off the bench and make a difference and prove that I can add something to the team,” said O’Brien. “I want to help so being that spark feels good. I am excited for more.” —Bill Alden

RISING STAR: Princeton University women’s soccer player Courtney O’Brien, center, rises up to head a ball in recent action. Last Thursday against visiting Rider, sophomore forward O’Brien enjoyed a breakout game, scoring her first two college goals as the Tigers prevailed 2-0. On Sunday, O’Brien added two more goals to help Princeton defeat New Hampshire 3-1. O’Brien was later named the Ivy League Player of the Week for her heroics. The Tigers, now 6-0, host No. 3 West Virginia (5-2) on September 15 and Delaware (2-2-2) on September 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Statistically, the 12thranked Princeton University field hockey team matched No. 3 Penn State when the foes met last Sunday at Bedford Field. Princeton outshot the visiting Nittany Lions 15-12 and generated seven penalty corners versus eight given to Penn State. But on the scoreboard, the Tigers came up short, falling 2-0 to the undefeated Nittany Lions (5-0). Princeton head coach Carla Tagliente acknowledged that her squad squandered its chances in dropping to 1-3. “We had plenty of op portunities; it was just really poor finishing on our

part with a lot of baseline entries and shots that were really uncharacteristic of some of our players,” said Tagliente. “The positive is the game could have been 2-0 us in the first 10. Overall, we could have put in five or six goals. We need to find a way to clean that up.” The Tigers also need to clean things up at the defensive end, as a lapse on a penalty corner led to Penn State scoring an insurance goal at the 51:42 mark to go up 2-0. “We get 10 chances on attack and great ones; they go down the other end, get a cheap corner and it is a goal,” lamented Tagliente.

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“We have got to lock down a little bit and just engage. You are going to have games like that, where you attack and attack. That was a big letdown. If we keep it 1-0 and we get a couple of corners at the end, then the pressure is on them and it could have gone either way.” With Princeton starting the weekend by beating Rutgers 4-1 last Friday as senior star Ryan McCarthy tallied two goals, Tagliente believes the Tigers are heading in the right direction. “It was much better than last week; I think offensively was the biggest improvement,” said Tagliente. “We didn’t generate much attack against UNC (a 2-0 loss in the season opener), today we outshot them and we had plenty of corners. The defensive structure is just so much better in the middle 25 and it is creating a lot of our attacking opportunities. The press is a little better.” The Tigers will need to bring an attacking mentality as they head south to play at No. 1 Duke (4-1) on September 17 and at No. 11 Maryland (3-2) on September 19. “The focus is to grow and get better,” said Tagliente. “Looking at film and at both teams, we are stronger in a lot of areas. We just need to step up and start executing stuff.” —Bill Alden

prevailed with a tally at the at the 103:55 mark of the contest. P r inceton, now 0 -2-1, hosts Southern Illinois University Edwardsville on September 15. ———

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

PU Field Hockey Falls to Undefeated Penn State, Determined to Sharpen Execution at Both Ends

PU Women’s Volleyball Excels at Villanova Event

Natasha Skov starred as t he Pr inceton Universit y women’s volleyball team went 3-0 at the Villanova To u r n a m e n t l a s t w e e kend. S ophomore Skov poste d si x k i lls a nd 10 d igs to lead Pr inceton to a 3 -1 ( 21-25, 25 -22, 25 18, 25-17) comeback win over C on ne c t icut i n t he f inal match of t he event on Sat urday. On Fr iday, Skov had 15 kills and 15 digs in a 3-0 (28-26, 2520, 25 -21) w in over A lbany and a 10-kill, eightdig, four-block effort in a 3-0 (25-22, 27-25, 25-20) w in over host Villanova. She was later named the Iv y League Player of the Week for the first time in her career. Princeton, now 6 -1, is next in action when it competes in the American Volleyball Challenge from September 15-16 in Washington, D.C. ———

PU Sports Roundup Tiger Men’s Soccer Falls to Seton Hall

Squandering a 3-0 lead, the Princeton Universit y men’s soccer team fell 4-3 in overtime to Seton Hall last Thursday. The Tigers built a 3-0 lead 51 minutes into the contest on a pair of goals from James Reiner and another tally by Jeremy Colvin, but were unable to hold off the Pirates from there. Seton Hall scored t hree goals in the next 39 minutes to knot the game at 3-3 and force overtime where they

SIX SHOOTER: Princeton University men’s water polo player Jordan Colina looks to unload the ball last Sunday as the Tigers hosted UCLA in the annual Princeton Invitational at DeNunzio Pool. Senior Colina scored six goals in a losing cause as the 11th-ranked Tigers fell 14-8 to the No. 4 Bruins. Princeton won its three other games at the event, topping Chapman 15-6 and Johns Hopkins 9-5 in action on Friday and then posting a 16-9 victory over Santa Clara on Saturday. The Tigers, now 7-1, return to action when they head west to take part in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) Tournament from September 22-24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Q u ent i n Pompl ia no has been moved up the field to play forward for the 2017 campaign. For senior Pompliano, going to striker has been like a homecoming for him. “Left back was definitely a switch for me last year,” said Pompliano. “It is good to be back to my normal position and helping out the team that way.” Last Thursday, as PHS opened its season by hosting Steinert, Pompliano didn’t waste any time showing his comfort level up top, finding the back of the net 2:02 into the game. “I think it was a great ball from Sebastian [Ratzan],” said Pompliano, reflecting on his tally which got the Little Tigers rolling as they cruised to a 5-1 win over the Spartans. “We have been working with the midfielders and the forwards all preseason, checking in and checking out, just creating space for the forwards to run into. It is one of our strong suits this year, we have a lot of speed up top.” In Pompliano’s view, the team’s strong group of seniors is setting a positive

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been playing together since freshman year,” said Pompliano, “We are all ver y good friends in school, we all get along well. There is no chemistr y issue with the team.” Having been upset in the first round of the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional last year when it was seeded second, Pompliano and his classmates are hungry to get as much as they can out of their final campaign. “We are going to learn from that, we are obviously going to take the next steps to get farther in the state tournament,” said Pompliano. “We are going to take it one game at a time right now.” PHS head coach Wayne Sutcliffe liked the way his team took care of business in the opening game. “We were knocking it pretty good, it is a slow progression, that is all,” said Sutcliffe. “We are very pleased. It is never easy in the first game of the campaign, we were clicking.” Sutcliffe was pleased to see Pompliano make an impact so quickly in his new spot on the field. “It was great for Quentin to get on the board, and Sebastian did a good job of finding him,” said Sutcliffe. “We simply wanted to get him closer to the goal this season; he is a good finisher.” Senior midfielder Drew Beamer had a great game

30 yards out. “Beamer had a good game; he asserted himself,” said Sutcliffe. “He was on the ball a lot and credit to him for that good finish. That volley with the left foot was excellent.” Sutcliffe is looking for the PHS defense to assert itself more. “We are not perfect but as far as effort, it was very good,” said Sutcliffe, not ing t hat seniors Ju n Hasegawa, Ian Jacobs, and Jasper Scott were featured on the back line while senior Patrick Jacobs handled the goalkeeping duties. “Jacobs made a really nice save in the second half, credit to him for that. It takes time for the back three to really jell. In Pompliano’s view, the positives on the day outweighed the negative of allowing the Steinert tally. “It is a great first step, obviously we didn’t want to concede the goal,” said Pompliano of PHS which played tough defense in tying Notre Dame 0-0 last Monday to move to 1-0-1 and will look to stay undefeated as it hosts Robbinsville on September 15 and Lawrence High on September 19. “Our goal for the day was a clean sheet and it is unfortunate that we didn’t get it but we scored five goals. It is not a crazy deal to concede one. We are just looking to get better every day in practice.” —Bill Alden

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HEADS UP: Princeton High boys’ soccer star Quentin Pompliano, left, heads a ball in a 2016 game. Last Thursday, senior Pompliano, who has moved to forward this year after playing on the back line last fall, scored the initial tally as PHS defeated Steinert 5-1 in its season opener. The Little Tigers, who tied Notre Dame 0-0 last Monday to move to 1-0-1, host Robbinsville on September 15 and Lawrence High on September 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Sasha Sindhwani came out firing as the Princeton Day School field hockey team hosted South Hunterdon last Friday. PDS junior forward Sindhwani scored 58 seconds into the contest and added another tally late in the first half, helping the Panthers roll to a 6-0 victory. “We just went out there with all that we have got,” said Sindhwani. “I think we just connected really well to begin with and that was really effective for us to get the ball down the field and score some goals. I think it was a really great game overall.” With PDS coming off a great 2016 season which saw it go 16-4 on the way to winning the state Prep B title and advancing to the Mercer County Tournament title game, Sindhwani knows

that foes will be shooting for the Panthers. “We really have a target on our back this year but I feel this season might be a pretty good one too,” said Sindhwani, who had a goal and an assist as the Panthers defeated Stuart Country Day 6-0 in their season opener on September 7. Sindhwani’s confidence is based, in part, on the team’s camaraderie. “We have all been here for quite a while now,” said Sindhwani. “We all join as a team, it is not separate groups. We just have each other’s backs and I think that is really working for us.” Putting in a lot of work over t h e of fs e as on has helped Sindhwani get off to a blazing start. “This season has been about conditioning, skills were developed outside,”

FAST START: Princeton Day School field hockey player Sasha Sindhwani, left, goes after the ball in a game last season. Last Friday, Sindhwani scored two goals and chipped in an assist to help PDS defeat South Hunterdon 6-0 and improve to 2-0. A day earlier, Sindhwani had a goal and an assist as the Panthers topped Stuart Country Day 6-0 in their season opener. The Panthers are slated to host George School (Pa.) on September 15 before playing at Peddie on September 18 and at Hun on September 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

said Sindhwani. “I play for the Princeton Field Hockey Club.” PDS head coach Heather Farlow likes the skill Sindhwani has been displaying this season. “Sasha has been outstanding,” said Farlow. “She is playing ver y confidently and we are trying to give her positive strokes. We are really super pleased with how she is doing.” In Farlow’s view, the players’ familiarity with each other has helped the PDS attack quickly get into a rhythm this season. “In terms of our team ch e m is t r y a n d ou r ba l l movement on the field, I think people are comfortable because they are playing in pretty much the same spots,” said Farlow. On defense, the Panthers had to make some moves to deal with the loss of Kiely French to graduation and Eva Petschnigg moving back to her native Austria. “We lost two defenders; we had a student, Kyra Hall, who was in the Bahamas last fall but had been a starter on defense the year before and she was returning and then we had talk to Skylar Mundenar about transitioning to defense,” said Farlow. “She played forward and mid last year and is a solid all-around athlete. We asked her to do that because of her speed and her game sense. It has worked out really well.” The Panthers are working toward another championship run, looking to defend their state Prep B title. “We go game by game; it is certainly a goal but not an expectation,” said Farlow, whose team will look to keep on the winning track as it hosts George School (Pa.) on September 15 before playing at Peddie on September 18 and at Hun on September 19. “It is something that they are striving for but we are not taking it for granted. We are just trying to get into a good position in terms of the tournament but taking it game by game.” Sindhwani, for her part, has her sights set on a title double. “I think we have a pretty good shot,” said Sindhwani of the team’s prospects for the Prep B repeat. “We are looking to go for counties; that is the main goal coming back from last year.” —Bill Alden

Star Forward Leggett Providing an Offensive Spark As PDS Boys’ Soccer Produces Promising 2-1 Start Wesley Leggett had his foot encased in an ice pack af ter t he Pr inceton Day School boys’ soccer team played its season opener last Wednesday but he was all smiles. PDS junior star Leggett tallied the initial goal of what turned out to a be a 5-0 win for the Panthers over visiting Wardlaw-Hartridge. While Leggett was happy to get on the board, he was more concerned about the final outcome. “It was good, it is always good to score a goal,” said Leggett, who got kicked in the ankle late in the contest and had to call it a day to get treatment. “In the long run we are always looking for the win first.” In Leggett’s view, the big win in the opener was a continuation of a positive preseason for the Panthers. “We have really worked hard, we have a very good squad this year,” said Leggett. “The preseason went well, we won our scrimmages 5-0 and 5-3. Those wins boosted our confidence and made us feel we could beat anyone. Winning Prep B last year was also another confidence booster, we are gunning for MCTs this year.” Leggett, for his part, is looking to be the team’s top gun at the attack end this year. “I am looking to lead us in goals,” said Leggett, who had four goals and an assist as PDS defeated Red Bank

Regional 6-1 last Monday to improve to 2-1. “I like to shoot with both feet, I have a strong left foot. It is not letting the defense know what I am going to do in order to keep them on their toes.” PDS head coach Ollie Hilliker believes that Leggett could emerge as an offensive force this fall. “Wesley scored the first goal in both of our preseason scrimmages within two and a half minutes,” said Hilliker. “He is on fire, he just has to stay in the game. He has to adapt his game against good players; he is going to play better players in different games and he has to adapt to that. He is talented, he has a lot of ability. He should be up there with our top scorers.” The return of senior Luke Franzoni to the squad has made a difference. “Luke has been brilliant, he didn’t play last year to concent rate on baseball and it is great to have him back,” said Hilliker of Franzoni, who scored two goals in the opener. “H is a great player, not just his ability but his attitude and personality are spot on. He has a great work rate, he is a great kid. He is up and down that line, putting in those two goals today and three goals in the last preseason game. He is another one who is on fire.” Coming off a 2016 campaign which saw PDS win

the state Prep B title has fired up the team’s veterans. “We return a lot of players and a lot of quality players,” said Hilliker. “The confidence is high. It is just keeping them at the right level of confidence but realistic of the level we are actually at right now and making sure as it continues to get better. We have to get better each game and that is what is important.” Hilliker is confident that PDS can produce a lot of quality play this fall. “We have got good lo cal talent, which is what we are about here, giving local kids the opportunity to succeed and bring them together and playing soccer,” said Hilliker, whose team hosts George School (Pa.) on September 13 and Rutgers Prep on September 16 before playing at Springside-Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on September 19. “They are doing it. The togetherness of the team is very good, the ability within the team is good. What they had to do today is to adapt. This a tight field and they were playing high lines. We have got to be able to adapt and not always play pretty soccer.” Leggett, for his part, believes that PDS can grind out plenty of wins this fall. “It is our character, we work hard,” said Leggett, when asked to assess the strengths of the team. “If we don’t think we are better than a team, we are obv iously going to work harder and get the result.” —Bill Alden

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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

PDS Field Hockey Looking Formidable Again, Getting a Lift from Sindhwani’s Improved Skill Set


IS ON

said the 6’1, 215 -pound Brunson, who rushed for 45 yards and a touchdown on five carries and had an interception. “That is what I did today; I felt like I played good but I could play much better. I am the power back of the team; I like to feel the contact. There is a lot I have to improve, especially running the ball. My cuts need to be better. I love playing both sides of the ball, it is very energizing.” W hile the Raiders feel good about extending their winning streak, that is not their main focus. “The streak is great but we are all about taking care of business each and every week,” said Brunson. Hun head coach Todd Smith liked the way his team took care of business in the opener. “We went in healthy, we went in ready to go, firing on all cylinders,” said Smith. “I think we stubbed our toe a little bit in the beginning but we picked it up as the quarter went on. It was a good test for us today this early in the season. It is the kind of team we don’t mind seeing. The kids got to play hard. We came out healthy and we got to see a lot of different kids play. Overall, I thought it was a pretty successful week one.” In Smith’s view, Brunson’s hard play on both sides of the ball helped make Hun successful. “Malcolm is just one of the kids in our stable that we

SPACE

FOR

Sophomore Bryonna “Breezy” Worthy served notice last year that she can be a go-to finisher and started 2017 with a bang, scoring the game-winning goal against Ewing on Saturday. “It is going to be Breezy carrying the load up top,” said Hallac, noting that senior star Kara Borden is currently sidelined as she recovers from knee surgery. In assessing her team’s prospects, Hallac believes that the talent surrounding Worthy can help her carry the load. “If we are playing with one striker up top, we are going to be really transitioning to offense and getting midfielders involved in the attack, making sure that Breezy has people to play with up top,” said Hallac, whose team plays at Princeton Day School on September 14, hosts Monroe Township High on September 16, and then plays at Oak Knoll on September 19. “That is going to be really important and also taking more shots and finishing. Defensively, we have to be willing to play out of the back and not just create 50/50 situations. We need to create counter attacks. I want to put more pressure on teams. I think we have a back four that is going to be really good playing out of the back and possessing the ball.” —Bill Alden

LEASE LAWRENCEVILLE-PENNINGTON ROAD

It didn’t take long for the Hun School football team to pick up where it left off last year as it hosted Royal Imperial Collegiate of Canada in its 2017 opener on Saturday. Coming off an 8-0 campaign and riding a 22-game winning streak, Hun jumped out to a 7-0 lead less than two minutes into the contest, opening the floodgates for a rout. By the end of the first quarter, the Raiders led 35-0 and never looked back on the way to a 63-6 victory over the Knights. Hun junior linebacker/running back Malcolm Brunson and his teammates were fired up to get their 2017 season underway. “Overall I am pretty happy with the way our team played,” said Brunson. “We came out hard in the first quarter and we didn’t let up the whole game. We played great on both sides of the ball. On defense, we were relentless in our pursuit. On offense, we were making plays happen. All in all, I think we played great.” Brunson, for his part, enjoys getting the chance to help out on both defense and offense. “I feel like I am the tone setter of the defense; I like to play fast and physical,”

have got back there,” said Lacking Depth But Boasting Plenty of Skill, Smith. “Malcolm has really come Hun Girls’ Soccer Looking to Pressure Foes into his own this year. He is Although the Hun School have been fantastic.” really dominating at the linegirls’ soccer doesn’t boast Hallac has two good opbacker position. He is our quantity in terms of num- tions at goalie in junior Leah power back. We love him.” bers this fall, it does possess Sutphen and senior Livi Senior quarterback Pat- quality all over the field. Kooker. rick Holly and junior run“Our numbers are pretty “Leah looks fantastic, she ning back Josh Henderson thin but the core group that has done a lot of work,” ashelped Hun dominate the we have coming back is serted Hallac. “She is not K nights. Har vard - bou nd good and strong,” said Hun the tallest keeper in the area Holly passed for 303 yards head coach Joanna Hallac, and she was a little vulnerand three touchdowns while who guided the Raiders to a able on those high balls last Henderson rushed for 125 7-10-2 record in 2016. “We year. She has worked her yards and two touchdowns have added a couple of new- tail off and has shored that on five carries. comers.” up quite significantly. She “I am really happy with The Hun defense fig- is poised for another strong Patrick, we left some meat ures to be the strength of year. I think Livi is going to on the bone but overall, I the team this fall, featuring get herself back into that think he had a great day,” senior Kendall Dandridge, rotation; I am really happy said Smith. “Josh Henderson junior Olivia McNulty, se- with how she looks too.” had a great day as well.” nior Jenna Jarvis, freshman The Raiders should get With Hun hosting Stellar Amanda Jenkins, and junior some good offensive work Preparatory High School Brenna Wehner. in the midfield with senior from Hay ward, Calif. on “Our back line looks pret- Nicole Apuzzi, sophomore September 16, Smith wants ty solid; I am excited about Nicole Angelini, and senior his team to keep its nose to our defense, I think our back Kennedy Debow leading the the grindstone. four are strong,” asserted way. “We already told them this Hallac, whose team’s back “I was able to push Nicole game is over, we will watch line stepped up in the seaApuzzi back up into the midthe film on Monday and we son opener last Saturday as field; I think she will be back will learn from it and it is Hun edged Ewing 2-1. as an offensive threat,” said done,” said Smith. “We have Kendall back on Hallac. “We move on to the next the outside, she is making “Nicole Angelini is the week and we get ready for some more runs from the center midfield. We are kind them. We just take it one day back and becoming an ofof going to run the offense at a time and one practice fensive threat like she was in through her, not unlike we at a time and we try to get her first two years. Liv looks did last year. Kennedy had better each day.” stronger this year at the her best season last year in Brunson, for his part, is other outside back position. the middle. She is already ready to move ahead. “We Jenna will probably switch looking like she is picking have to keep doing what we in for her from the midfield up where she left off. She are doing and not let up and so they can be pretty inter- is one of these quiet playhave a great week of prac- changeable. I have got two ers, she just does her job so tice,” said Brunson. new players at center back, well and you don’t necessar“We are playing a team which is really huge for us ily notice her.” from California next week so because that gives us more I am pretty sure they will be options to move people into ready to get after us. Over- a forward position. Amanda all, we have to stay focused, is transferring from Wardkeep working hard, and we law Hartridge and Brenna MANOR BOULEVARD is transferring to us from will be alright.” Notre Dame. Both of them —Bill Alden

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ON THE BALL: Hun School girls’ soccer player Kendall Dandridge, right, battles for the ball in a game last season. Senior defender Dandridge figures to be a force on the back line in her final campaign for the Raiders. Last Saturday, Dandridge and the Raiders got things off on the right foot, edging Ewing 2-1 in their season opener. Hun plays at Princeton Day School on September 14, hosts Monroe Township High on September 16, and then plays at Oak Knoll on September 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 36

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18 and Moorestown Friends on September 19. ——— G i r l s’ Te n n i s : P u l l i n g out wins in both doubles m atch e s, PD S d efe ate d Moorestow n Friends 3 -2 last Thursday in its season opener. The Panthers play at George School (Pa.) on September 13, host WW/PSouth on September 14, and then play at Stuart Country B o y s ’ S o c c e r : C h r i s Day on September 18 and Pontrella starred in a los- at Haddonfield in Septeming cause as Hun fell 3-0 ber 19. WW/P-South last Saturday in its season opener. Senior goalie Pontrella made 17 saves for the Raiders in his debut at the position. Hun hosts Academy of New Church (Pa.) on September 14, plays Archbishop Curley Rec Department Holding High (Md.) on September 17 S.A.F.E.T.Y. Coaches Clinic T h e P r i n c e ton Re c r e in the Mainline High School Jamboree at Malvern Prep ation Department and the (Pa.), and then hosts Pen- Princeton Soccer Association will offer the Rutgers nington on September 19 S.A.F.E.T.Y. Clinic (Sports Awareness For Educating Today’s Youth) on September 26. The clinic will run from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and is beFootball: Starting its 2017 ing held in the main meetcampaig n on a posit ive ing room of the Princeton note, Lawrenceville defeat- municipal building on Withed Loomis Chaffee (Conn.) erspoon Street. Attendees 26-16 last Saturday in its must be present for the enseason opener. The Big Red tire three hours to complete will look to keep on the win- the certification. The Rutgers S.A.F.E.T.Y. ning track when they host Deerfield Academy (Mass.) Clinic meets the “minimum s t a ndards for volu nte er on September 16. coaches safety orientation and t rain ing sk ills pro grams (N.J.A.C. 5:52) and provides partial civil immunity protection to volunteer coaches under the Little Field Hockey : Ali Han- League Law.” nah tallied a second half The clinic costs $35/pergoal to help Stuart earn a son and advance registration 1-1 tie with Pennington last is required. The registration Monday. Senior goalie Sam deadline is September 21. Johnson made six saves as Individuals can register onthe Tartans moved to 0-1-1. line at: http://register.comStuart hosts Hamilton on munitypass.net/princeton. September 16, Country Day The Rutgers Safety Clinic is School of the Sacred Heart located under the Tab “2017 (Pa.) on September 18, and Community Programs.” For George School (Pa.) on Sep- more info, visit www.princtember 19. etonrecreation.com or call (609) 921-9480.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

the second half, weaving through three defenders before finding the back of the net. Pennington hosts Lawrenceville on September 15 before playing at the Hun School on September 19.

Hun

Local Sports

KICKING GAME: Princeton High girls’ soccer goalie Shaylah Marciano boots the ball up the field in a game last season. Last Monday, sophomore goalie Marciano made six saves in a losing cause as PHS fell 2-1 to Notre Dame. The Little Tigers, now 1-2, host WW/P-South on September 13 before playing at Robbinsville on September 15 and at Lawrence High on September 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

PHS

Cheng had three aces and 12 assists for the Little Tigers, who improved to 2-0. PHS hos t s Not re Dame on September 14, plays at WW/P-South on September 15 and at Moorestown on September 16 before hosting Collingswood on September 18. ——— G irls’ Ten n is : Spencer Watts came through as PHS edged WW/P-South 3-2 last Monday. Sophomore star Watts posted a 6-4, 7-6 victory at first singles over Haijia Wang to help the Little Tigers pull out the win. PHS, now 4-0, hosts Nottingham on September 13 and Ewing on September 15 before playing at WW/P-North on September 18 and at Hightstown on September 19.

Football: Unable to get its offense going, PHS fell 36-0 at Pemberton last Saturday. Junior running back Evan Angelucci was a bright spot for the Little Tigers, rushing for 61 yards on 11 carries. PHS, now 0-2, hosts Hightstown on September 16. ——— F i e l d H o c k e y : L i s e t te Dubow came up big as PHS defeated Hopewell Valley 4- 0 last Monday. Senior forward Dubow tallied two goals to help the Little Tigers improve to 1-1. PHS plays at W W/P-South on September 15, hosts Hunterdon Central on September 16, and then plays at Notre Dame on September 19. ——— Girls’ Volleyball: Rachel Cheng starred as PHS defeated W W/ P-Nor t h 2- 0 Football: Dante Wilson had (25-19, 25-10) last Monday. a big day in a losing cause as Pennington lost 27-14 to Bristol High (Pa.) last Saturday. Wilson rushed for two touchdowns and 102 yards as the Red Raiders fell to 0-2. Pennington plays at Montclair Kimberley on September 16. ——— Mercedes-Benz Boys’ Soccer: Ibra Diop starred as Pennington edged of Princeton Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) 1-0 last Saturday in its sea609.771.8040 son opener. Diop scored the www.mbprinceton.com lone tally of the contest in

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PDS G irls’ S oc c er : Br ianna Astbury scored a goal but it wasn’t enough as PDS fell 2-1 in overtime to Morristown High last Monday. Sophomore midfielder Astbury notched a second half tally as the Panthers moved to 1-1. PDS hosts Hun on September 14, plays at Shipley School (Pa.) on September 15, and then hosts Wardlaw Hartridge on September

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Obituaries

Daniel served in the Army during World War II, and was finally assigned to the Military Intelligence Japanese Language School in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His working career was as a civil engineer with Humble Oil (now Exxon Mobil) in Houston, Texas. He retired in 1985. He was a prominent member of the S.A.R. and the General Society of the War of 1812 in Austin and Georgetown, Texas. ———

Harry was a science and math reader for Recording for the Blind [now Learning Ally] for over 50 years. He and Judith were the Democratic committee persons for District 5 of Princeton Tow nship from 1998 to 2008. Harry also served as a mid-career intern at the constituent office of Rep. Rush D. Holt, Jr. over that same interval.

In 2001, Judith, he and several friends started the Evergreen Forum, a learning-in-retirement program in Princeton. Harry served on the Forum Steering Committee for many years, taught courses in current events, was a member of the science course panel, and was a student in many Forum classes.

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

Harry Pinch

Daniel Bernard Stauffer

Daniel Bernard Stauffer died on May 7, 2017 at Acorn Glen in Princeton, New Jersey. He is survived by his wife Georgina Fleming Stauffer, formerly of Princeton; his daughters Diane and Sue of Texas; and his son Michael, who currently resides in California. He had three stepchildren, John, Molly, and Stephen Hall, two grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his first wife, Shirley Ouimet. Daniel was born in Shanghai, China in 1924 and raised in Yokohama, Japan along with his brother Donald. His father was a civil engineer. He began his education at the International School in Yokohama, and continued it at The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, where he graduated cum laude in 1942. He went on to study at Princeton University, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in civil engineering.

Harry Pinch, a resident of Princeton, died on September 6th, 2017 at the age of 88. Harry was born in Toronto in 1929. He came to the U.S. in 1935, lived briefly in Bayonne before settling with his family in the Bronx. He was educated in the public schools of New York City and at various yeshivas. In 1951 he received the bachelor of science degree cum laude from the City College of New York. He was awarded a PhD in chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University in 1956. He met his wife Judith Emdin at graduate school and they were married in 1955. In 1957 he was employed as a member of the technical staff at RCA Laboratories and worked there and at the successor companies, retiring in 1998. His interests were in crystal growth, inorganic synthesis, and the deposition and characterization of thin solid films. In addition to his wife, Judith, he is survived by his son Adam, his daughter Adela, and her daughter Clara.

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Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm p.m. Holy Eucharist Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

33 MercerThe St.Prayer Princeton www.trinityprinceton.org Book 609-924-2277 Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm 214 Nassau Street, Princeton

St. Paul’s Paul’s Catholic Catholic Church Church St.

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Msgr. Walter Rosie, Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Saturday, MarchPastor 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 Vigil Mass: 5:30pm p.m. Sunday:Saturday 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Sunday, March 27 Mass in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 witherspoonchurch.org


INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

LIBRARY PLACE • PRINCETON Norman T Callaway, Christina M Callaway $3,150,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7048496

PHEASANT HILL ROAD • PRINCETON Norman T Callaway, Christina M Callaway $2,950,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7047312

OAKRIDGE COURT • PRINCETON Sylmarie Trowbridge $1,595,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7050744

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

LANDFALL LANE • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Amy Stackpole Brigham $1,575,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7049660

COLFAX ROAD • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP Jane Henderson Kenyon $1,200,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7047416

BENEDEK ROAD • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Catherine Stinson $1,150,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7048674

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

OPEN HOUSE, SUN 1-4

Realtor® owned GOVERNORS LANE • PRINCETON Robin McCarthy Froehlich $899,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/6944272

BROOKSIDE DRIVE • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP Brinton H West $849,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7038379

FAIRFIELD ROAD • SOUTH BRUNSWICK TWP Madolyn Greve $637,800 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7048677

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

INTRODUCING

WALKING PURCHASE DR • PENNINGTON BORO Pamela C Gillmett $635,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/6954834

CHERRY BROOK DRIVE • MONTGOMERY TWP Vanessa Gronczewski $540,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/3371313

BAYARD LANE • PRINCETON Jane Henderson Kenyon $525,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/7047398

CRANBURY 609.395.0444 LAMBERTVILLE 609.397.1974 MONTGOMERY 908.874.0000 PENNINGTON 609.737.7765 PRINCETON 609.921.1050

CallawayHenderson.com

Please visit CallawayHenderson.com for personalized driving directions to all of our public open houses being held this weekend. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

INTRODUCING


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 40

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS MasterCard

VISA

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. Fall is just around tHe Corner! Why not have a yard sale & clear out some unwanted items? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

PrinCeton MoVinG sale: All must go. Original art, authentic designer shoes, clothes & jewelry. Chanel, Jimmy Choo, Gucci, YSL, LV, Zegna suits & ties, Burberry, etc. Antique Chinese furniture, Kreiss furniture, drums, Oriental rugs, pair of Murano lamps, household goods & more. Friday, Saturday & Sunday September 15, 16, 17 from 10-4. 124 Quaker Road. View at Discovery Estate Sales. 09-13

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: (609) 924-2200 ext 10

******************** PolisH Your ProPosal Retired consultant will polish your proposal. (609) 951-9697 ******************** 09-06-2t

PrinCeton rental: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf

HandYMan: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

With references, available in the Lawrenceville, Princeton and Pennington areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

relocation, to a temporary single room, or long term one-bedroom/ two-bedroom private space, in a well maintained home & quiet residential setting, within 15 miles or so from Princeton. (609) 731-1120. 09-06-3t

Karina’s HouseCleaninG: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Available week days. I can work hourly. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259.

08-30-4t Irene Lee, Classified Manager Writer/editor:

Experienced

tf writer available to help you with your • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. HoMe HealtH aide or writing project. Correspondence, Flea MarKet: Saturday SeptemCoMPanion: NJ certified with•20 • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. reports, articles, novels, biography, ber 16th, 9 am until 1, at Princeton seeKinG teMPorarY/ years experience. Line-in or out. Valid memoir, etc. Call (609) 649-2359. First Aid Squad, 237 •North Harrison lonG terM rental: 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. drivers license & references. Looking eXCellent aFter sCHool Street, next to Princeton Shopping A man of 50’s, his books, few art 09-13-3t for employment, also available night sitter Center. Over 25 vendors selling bric- Contents• Ads lineshift. spacing: • all bold face type: pieces $10.00/week sale: with Saturday, & plants, need immediate Experienced $20.00/inch with disabled & a-brac, small appliances, art, linen, kitchen, toys, furniture, books, jewelry, clothes, etc., refreshments, too!! Rain or shine!!! 09-13

MoVinG sale: 7 Marvin Court (in Woodmont), Lawrenceville. DWR Saarinen dining table, Bartoli Kartell chairs, kitchen items, Hendredon Asian bedroom furniture, king bed, vintage DR table & 6 chairs, Asian cabinet, paintings, artwork, vintage lamps, tables, accessories, sofas, china, crystal, mink & sable full length coat, garage items, house full. Friday & Saturday September 15 & 16 from 9:30-3. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 09-13

September 16th from 9 am-1 pm. 75 Rollingmead Street, Princeton. Sale in basement-enter between 65 & 75 Rollingmead. Furniture, art, clothing, etc. 09-13

Piano For sale: Baldwin upright piano. Excellent condition. Perfect for music students. $850. (609) 252-0094. 09-13 trees For sale: Spruce & Hemlock. Balled-and-burlapped. Hand dug to order. Wholesale prices. I can deliver & plant. Contact Dave (732) 267-9733. 08-30-3t

elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 2279873. 08-30-3t

For rent: Lovely 3 BR, center hall Colonial. Well maintained. Hardwood floors throughout. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. Close to town & schools. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 08-30-3t HoMe HealtH aide: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

tf lolio’s WindoW WasHinG & PoWer WasHinG: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf CarPentrY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf

3 & 6 rooM oFFiCe suites: Historic Nassau Street Building. 2nd Floor, w/ Parking. (609) 213-5029. 08-23-5t CleaninG, ironinG, laundrY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 08-16-6t

Contreras PaintinG:

Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 09-06-4t rosa’s CleaninG serViCe llC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 09-06-4t

American Furniture Exchange

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

LIC#13VH02047300

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Finally, an affordable house in PRINCETON

In a very private western section location at the end of a cul-de-sac, the best of both worlds - close to schools and not far from town center. Living room, dining room, kitchen, den, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, garage and workshop attached. Gracious living in a terrific location you won’t want to miss it. $599,000 Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1370183

www.stockton-realtor.com CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 70 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5.

Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-584-0500 paul@apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $23.25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $59.00 • 4 weeks: $76 • 6 weeks: $113 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Classifieds by the inch: $26.50/inch • Employment: $33


Historic Restoration

75 Cleveland Lane, Princeton

Beyond the fieldstone walls, a historic restoration of this circa 1920’s, Ernest Flagg designed home is underway. Rich in history, seldom has a property of this caliber undergone such a thorough restoration to provide all of today's state-of-the-art luxury amenities while restoring the home's unique architectural details. Within walking distance to downtown Princeton and its vibrant restaurant and shopping scene, 75 Cleveland Lane features total finished living space of approximately 9000 square feet,

Wendy Merkovitz, Broker/Manager mobile.609.203.1144 wmerkovitz@glorianilson.com

which includes the main home and the carriage house apartment above the five-bay

garage. Follow the progress as this Western Section home is returned to grandeur!

33 Witherspoon Street | Princeton, NJ 08542 609.921.2600 glorianilson.com

Join the conversation! /GNRprinceton

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 42

NEWLY PRICED

304 Ewing Street, Princeton Marketed by: Ann “Camille” Lee $1,195,000

157 Bedens Brook Road, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $1,125,000

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

Open House Sat & Sun 9/16 & 9/17 1-4pm 8B Corsalo Road, West Amwell Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $799,000

43 Washington Drive, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $749,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

Open House Sun 9/17 1-4pm

Open House Sat & Sun 9/16 & 9/17 1-4pm

286 Route 518, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $635,000

17 Benjamin Rush Lane, Princeton Marketed by: Roberta Parker $625,000

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

From Princeton, We Reach the World. Open House Sun 9/17 1-4pm

Open House Sun 9/17 1-4pm

13 Blackfoot Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Helen H. Sherman | $499,000

118 N Star Avenue, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Helen H. Sherman |$449,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, Reachthe the World. From Princeton,We We Reach World.

| 253 Nassau Street | |609-924-1600 | foxroach.com | 253 Princeton Office Princeton Office Nassau Street 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

symbol are registered service marks ofof of America, Inc. ® Equal Opportunity. Information not verified guaranteed. your home is currently listed with aHathaway Broker, this isHomeServices not intended as and a solicitation. © BHH BHH Affiliates, Affiliates, HomeServices LLC. An An independently independently operated subsidiary ofHomeServices HomeServices of America, America, Inc.,Housing Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and aa or franchisee ofIfBHH BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Berkshire Hathaway Hathaway © LLC. operated subsidiary HomeServices of Inc., aa Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and franchisee of Affiliates, LLC. the HomeServices HomeServices symbol symbol are are registered registered service service marks marks of of HomeServices HomeServices of of America, America, Inc. Inc. ®® Equal Equal Housing Housing Opportunity. Opportunity. Information Information not not verified verified or or guaranteed. guaranteed. If If your your home home is is currently currently listed listed with with aa Broker, Broker, this this is is not not intended intended as as aa solicitation. solicitation.


Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

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Sold

Thank You Roberta would like to thank the readers of Town Topics for voting her as the Best Real Estate Agent! What an honor! As a resident of Princeton for many years, Roberta Parker has established herself as one of the premier professionals in the Princeton Real Estate market. Roberta has more than 20 years of real estate experience and has closed over a Half Billion dollars worth of residential sales during her career.

Awarded NJ Five Star Professional Designation By Customers & Clients Circle of Excellence Platinum

Roberta Parker 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609-924-1600

Sales Associate 609-915-0206 Mobile roberta.parker@foxroach.com robertasellsprinceton.com

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 44

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC THE OFFICE STORE

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS:

28 Spring St, Princeton (next to Chuck’s)

609-924-0112

www.hinksons.com

COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

PRINCETON

NEW LISTING ON CARNEGIE LAKE! BROKERS OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11 - 1

Princeton – $1,650/mo. 2nd floor office on Nassau Street with parking. Available now.

PRINCETON CHARTER SCHOOL

Princeton – $1,650/mo. 1 BR, eat-in kitchen, LR, bath. Available now.

A US Department of Education Blue Ribbon School Serving 402 students in grades K-8 Seeks qualified applicants for the following 2017/2018 position:

Princeton Address-franklin Twp – $1,950/mo. 3 BR, 1 bath renovated home with LR, DR, kitchen. Fenced-in backyard. Available now. Princeton – $4,000/mo. 4 BR, 2.5 baths, LR, DR, kitchen, garage. Great neighborhood. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses! STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com

PRINCETON CHARTER SCHOOL

See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

A US Department of Education Blue Ribbon School Serving 402 students in grades K-8 Seeks qualified applicants for the following 2017/2018 position:

32 Chambers Street Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha f. Stockton, Broker-Owner PIANO LESSONS: Learn to play piano- a magnificent journey! Call Bob Ross, teaching all styles for 18 yrs. Jacobs Music Lawrenceville & in-home special arrangements. (908) 874-0274. 08-30-6t CLEANING LADY: My lovely cleaning lady is looking for more jobs. Employed by me 20 yrs. Thorough, trustworthy & reliable. Call for references, (609) 306-3555. 08-23-13t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 09-13-6t

Carina Dowell Sales Associate

Cell 908.304.8118

551 Lake Drive, Princeton $2,795,000

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

10 Nassau Street | Princeton | 609-921-1411 www.ColdwellBankerHomes.com/Princeton The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. ©2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker® and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.

“It’s a great comfort to a rambling people to know that somewhere there is a permanent home - perhaps it is the most final of the comforts they ever really know." —Ben Robertson

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume, copies of NJ certificate(s) and college transcripts to: Head of School, Princeton Charter School, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, or pcsoffice@ princetoncharter.org. Princeton Charter School is an equal opportunity employer. Deadline for application is September 15, 2017. Must be a resident of New Jersey or willing to relocate. For more information visit our web site at www.pcs.k12.nj.us. 09-06-2t

tf

AfTER-SCHOOL TUTOR 3:00–6:15 PM Interested candidates should send a cover letter and resume to: Head of School, Princeton Charter School, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, or pcsoffice@princetoncharter.org. Princeton Charter School is an equal opportunity employer. Deadline for application is September 22, 2017. Must be a resident of New Jersey or willing to relocate. For more information visit our web site at www.pcs. k12.nj.us. 09-13-2t

PART-TIME & SUBSTITUTE STAff NEEDED: University NOW Children’s Center is looking for several M-F, Part-time Support Staff members ranging between the hours of 11:30-6 pm & Substitute Support Staff. We are looking for warm, nurturing, energetic, reliable & responsible individuals to work in a team teaching situation. Under the supervision of our classroom staff, the part-time & substitute cares for children ranging from 3 months to almost 5 years. The Substitute is an “on call” position with variable hours 8:30-6:00 pm. Experience working with young children required. CDA, AA degree or more a plus. Please no phone calls. Email resumes to sbertran@princeton.edu 09-13-3t

Did you forget your at home? Find us on the web from your office!

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

U.S. Postal Service Statement of Ownership Management and Circulation (Req. by 39 USC 3685) Name of Publication: Town Topics Publication Number: 01917056 Date of Filing: 9/13/17 Frequency of Issue: Weekly Number of Issues published Annually: 52 Annual Subscription Price: $49 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of publication: 4438 Rte 27N. Kingston, Middlesex County, New Jersey 08528. Full Name and Complete Mailing Address of Publisher and Editor-in-Chief: Publisher/Editor-in-Chief, Lynn A. Smith, 4438 Rte 27N. Kingston, NJ 08528; Owners, Lynn A. Smith, 2 Glenbrook Court, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648; J. Robert Hillier, 190 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542; Mary Glazer, 2515 Boston Street, Unit 804, Baltimore, MD 21204; Julia Gonzalez-Lavin, 14770 Orchard Parkway, Unit 438, Westminster, CO 80023; Myrna Bearse, 1200 University Street, #216, Seattle, WA 98101; Jean Alison Peebles, 24 Markham Road, Princeton, NJ 08540; Michael J. Napoliello, 27 Richard Court, Princeton, NJ 08540. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees & other Security Holders owning more than one percent or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages or securities: None. Average Number of Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 months: A) Total Number of Copies: 15,300; B) Paid and/or Requested Distribution: 1) Outside County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Direct Written Request from Recipient, Telemarketing, and Internet Requests from Recipient, Paid Subscriptions including Nominal Rate Subscriptions, Employer Requests, Advertiser's Proof Copies, and Exchange Copies.): 255; 2) In County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Direct Written Request from Recipient, Telemarketing, and Internet Requests from Recipient, Paid Subscriptions including Nominal Rate Subscriptions, Employer Requests, Advertiser's Proof Copies, and Exchange Copies.): 3,730; 3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: 11,165; 4) Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS: 0; C) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 15,150; D) Non Requested Distribution by Mail and Outside the Mail: 1) Outside County Non Requested Copies as stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample Copies, Requests Over 3 Years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists and other Sources.): 0; 2) In County Non Requested Copies as stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample Copies, Requests over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 0; 3) Non Requested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies Mailed in Excess of 10% Limit Mailed at Standard Mail or Package Service Rates): 0; 4) Non Requested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): 0; E) Total Non Requested Distribution: 0; F) Total Distribution: 15,150; G) Copies Not Distributed: 150; H) Total: 15,300; I) Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 100; Number of Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: A) Total Number of Copies: 15,300; B) Paid and/or Requested Distribution: 1) Outside County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Direct Written Request from Recipient, Telemarketing, and Internet Requests from Recipient, Paid Subscriptions including Nominal Rate Subscriptions, Employer Requests, Advertiser's Proof Copies, and Exchange Copies.): 255; 2) In County Paid/Requested Mail Subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Direct Written Request from Recipient, Telemarketing, and Internet Requests from Recipient, Paid Subscriptions including Nominal Rate Subscriptions, Employer Requests, Advertiser's Proof Copies, and Exchange Copies.): 3,730; 3) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: 11,165; 4) Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS: 0; C) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 15,150; D) Non Requested Distribution by Mail and Outside the Mail: 1) Outside County Non Requested Copies as stated on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample Copies, Requests Over 3 Years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists and other Sources.): 0; 2) In County Non Requested Copies as stated on PS Form 3541 (include Sample Copies, Requests over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association Requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): 0; 3) Non Requested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies Mailed in Excess of 10% Limit Mailed at Standard Mail or Package Service Rates): 0; 4) Non Requested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): 0; E) Total Non Requested Distribution: 0; F) Total Distribution: 15,150; G) Copies Not Distributed: 150; H) Total: 15,300; I) Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 100. 16. Electronic Copy Distribution: NA.


I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-30/11-15 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted in your home. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-12-18

STORAGE SPACE: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17

Princeton References

WE BUY CARS

•Green Company

Belle Mead Garage

HIC #13VH07549500 05-10-18 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 SMALL OFFICE SUITENASSAU STREET: with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports

(908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

CONTENTS SALE: Saturday, September 16th from 9 am-1 pm. 75 Rollingmead Street, Princeton. Sale in basement-enter between 65 & 75 Rollingmead. Furniture, art, clothing, etc. 09-13 PIANO FOR SALE: Baldwin upright piano. Excellent condition. Perfect for music students. $850. (609) 252-0094. 09-13 TREES FOR SALE: Spruce & Hemlock. Balled-and-burlapped. Hand dug to order. Wholesale prices. I can deliver & plant. Contact Dave (732) 267-9733. 08-30-3t ******************** POLISH YOUR PROPOSAL

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Retired consultant will polish your proposal. (609) 951-9697

A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf FALL IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER! Why not have a yard sale & clear out some unwanted items? Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

******************** 09-06-2t HOME HEALTH AIDE OR COMPANION: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Line-in or out. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 2279873. 08-30-3t

FOR RENT: Lovely 3 BR, center hall Colonial. Well maintained. Hardwood floors throughout. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. Close to town & schools. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 08-30-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PRINCETON RENTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf EXCELLENT AFTER SCHOOL SITTER With references, available in the Lawrenceville, Princeton and Pennington areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf SEEKING TEMPORARY/ LONG TERM RENTAL: A man of 50’s, his books, few art pieces & plants, need immediate relocation, to a temporary single room, or long term one-bedroom/ two-bedroom private space, in a well maintained home & quiet residential setting, within 15 miles or so from Princeton. (609) 731-1120. 09-06-3t 3 & 6 ROOM OFFICE SUITES: Historic Nassau Street Building. 2nd Floor, w/ Parking. (609) 213-5029. 08-23-5t

(609) 924-2200 ext 10 tf FLEA MARKET: Saturday September 16th, 9 am until 1, at Princeton First Aid Squad, 237 North Harrison Street, next to Princeton Shopping Center. Over 25 vendors selling brica-brac, small appliances, art, linen, kitchen, toys, furniture, books, jewelry, clothes, etc., refreshments, too!! Rain or shine!!! 09-13 MOVING SALE: 7 Marvin Court (in Woodmont), Lawrenceville. DWR Saarinen dining table, Bartoli Kartell chairs, kitchen items, Hendredon Asian bedroom furniture, king bed, vintage DR table & 6 chairs, Asian cabinet, paintings, artwork, vintage lamps, tables, accessories, sofas, china, crystal, mink & sable full length coat, garage items, house full. Friday & Saturday September 15 & 16 from 9:30-3. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 09-13 PRINCETON MOVING SALE: All must go. Original art, authentic designer shoes, clothes & jewelry. Chanel, Jimmy Choo, Gucci, YSL, LV, Zegna suits & ties, Burberry, etc. Antique Chinese furniture, Kreiss furniture, drums, Oriental rugs, pair of Murano lamps, household goods & more. Friday, Saturday & Sunday September 15, 16, 17 from 10-4. 124 Quaker Road. View at Discovery Estate Sales. 09-13

REAL ESTATE MARKET UPDATES October 7th, 10:45 am October 12th, 6:45 pm Once again, Weichert will be presenting the Fall Market Update Seminar! In one hour, you will acquire truly essential information on how to analyze the current real estate market trends and the opportunity presented by historically low interest rates. Learn about absorption rates and how it impacts buyers and sellers. I really hope you can attend either session, whether thinking of making a move now or sometime down the road. To reserve your seat, please contact me. Refreshments will be served. RSVP is a MUST.

609-921-1900 ● 609-577-2989 (cell) ● info@BeatriceBloom.com ● BeatriceBloom.com Facebook.com/PrincetonNJRealEstate ● twitter.com/PrincetonHome ● BlogPrincetonHome.com

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

2 lots total 5.93 acres = 1 house on 3ac. PLUS 1 buildable lot on 2.93ac

$599,000 PRICE INCLUDES:

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

A handsome brick ranch on 3 acres of beautiful property in Montgomery Township with 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, 2 powder rooms, Living Room/Dining Room, Den, Eat-In Kitchen, and enclosed stone/brick-Porch. AND 2.93 acres buildable lot (once a technical variance is obtained) Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1370180

www.stockton-realtor.com

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

PRINCETON LUXURY APARTMENTS: 253Nassau.com Weinberg Management, WMC@collegetown.com Text (609) 731-1630. 07-12-tf


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017 • 46

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The PrinceTon collecTion

PRINCETON $7,500/mo Centrally located 5 bedroom rental in Littlebrook.

PRINCETON $749,000 Governor’s Lane townhome with gleaming hardwood floors.

52Arretonroad.info $3,700,000 225cloverlane.info Meticulously renovated historic Arts & crafts home. new construction by Angelone homes.

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PRINCETON Centrally located

$2,100,000 102cherryhillroad.info $1,850,000 Walk to town from this 2+ acre property next to Tusculum.

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PRINCETON $925,000 Wonderful floor plan in a secluded Littlebrook area.

bedroom

renta

For More Photos and FloorPlan, Visit 52arretonroad.inFo PRINCETON Colonial in park-like setting, in-ground pool.

$1,140,000

PRINCETON $1,200,000 Large Riverside home with views of Carnegie Lake.

PRINCETON $1,250,000 Classic renovated Colonial on gorgeous Littlebrook lot.

architect Wilson Eyre. Jr. of Eyre and McIlvaine 4 ½ acres, near downtown Princeton, through gat an Arts and Crafts Styles, Rothers Barrows is on exterior is stone imported from the Cotswolds, En ored & updated by current owners. Renowned D redesign & decorating. In keeping w/ the tenets o PRINCETON used throughout. Colonial in park-like setting, in-gro 46GreenwayTerrace.info $999,000 200GroverAvenue.info $970,000 101BertrandDrive.info $930,000 Traditional colonial in sought after neighborhood. Gorgeous two story great room with brick fireplace. A house for all seasons wih great floorplan and updates.

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PRINCETON $1,388,000 Newer Colonial w/top-of-the line upgrades, finished bsmnt.

PRINCETON $1,425,000 Custom remodeled 5 bedroom home in Littlebrook.

PRINCETON $1,599,000 Large Ettl Farm brick Colonial with in-ground pool.

123Shadybrooklane.info $885,000 125crookedTreelane.info $865,000 140Snowdenlane.info $690,000 Bright split level home in coveted littlebrook. Secluded yet accessible with an excellent floorplan. expanded cape close to town, schools and transportation.

r

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ned by Wilson Eyre, with tall 100-year-old tulip & a tennis court/sport court & a pool. The Arts and C PRINCETON, Presenting Rothers Barrows, designed by Philadelphia architect Wilson Eyre. Jr. of Eyre and McIlvaine and in 1917 as part of a large Princeton equestrian estate. The home is on 4 ½ acres, near downtown Princeton, through gates & patio w/ grmt outdoor kitchen. A 4-car Arts & C sweeping circular drive. One of New Jersey’s fine examples of American Arts and Crafts Styles, Rothers Barrows is on the

Jersey Register of Historic Places as well as the National Register. The exterior is stone imported from the Cotswolds, Englan carved wood cedar shingle roof. The interior has been renovated, restored & updated by current owners. Renowned Deco PRINCETON $1,990,000 PRINCETON $2,100,000 PRINCETON $3,700,000 Marshall Watson Interiors New York was responsible for the historic redesign & Arts decorating. Inhome keeping w/ the tenets of the A stunning Colonial on a beautiful 2-acre lot. Near town. New of construction in Littlebrook by Angelone Homes. Historic 100-year-old & Crafts style on 4+ acres. and Crafts movement, handmade ceramic tiles, stone & fine woods were used throughout.

Offered at $

The landscaping retains much of the original “Chestnut Hill Style” designed by Wilson Eyre, with tall 100-year-old tulip & oak understory azaleas & rhododendrons. The grounds feature 3 koi ponds, a tennis court/sport court & a pool. The Arts and Craft rental $4,000/month rental $3,100/month house haswith fulllovely BA, yard, kitchen & washer/dryer, a multi-level patioinw/ grmt outdoor kitchen. A 4-car Arts & Crafts Furnished 3 by bedroom 2 bath ranch littlebrook. renovated ranch garage and basement. surrounded

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900 garage completes the home. PRINCETON Beatrice Bloom, Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Newer Colonial w/top-of-the 609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Princeton Office Beatrice Bloom

Bloom, Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker Princeton ResidentialBeatrice Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker www.weichert.com 609-921-1900 (office) • 609-577-2829 (cell) • 609-577-2989 (cell) 609-921-1900 (office) info@BeatriceBloom.com info@BeatriceBloom/BeatriceBloom.com

c om

/ BeatriceBloom.com

Offered at $4,00 line u

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47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEmbER 13, 2017

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PRINCETON

$1,269,000

This 100-year-old Colonial in the Riverside area of Princeton has been tastefully updated to suit today`s lifestyle, still holds dear many of its original features and is a delight to behold. Features include four bedrooms, two full baths, living room with fireplace and dining room with built-in storage. The updated kitchen provides custom cabinetry, large island with extra deep sink and Travertine countertop. Additional features include hardwood floors throughout the first and second floor. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY

IN TOWN LOCATION

FRANKLIN TWP. $639,900 Lovely 3,391 sf. Colonial in Princeton Highlands with an extra deep backyard. Seller just fully paid for the solar panels. Large home with finished bsmnt & full BA (2016), kitchen (2017), excellent opportunity. Mary Saba 732-239-4641 (cell)

PENNINGTON $585,000 A 3 BR, 2.5 BA Col. on a tree-lined street. Features an EIK, LR w/ W/B FP & lg windows. The back yard is beautifully landscaped w/ mature trees, plantings & a large stone patio. Linda Twining 609-439-2282 (cell)

COMPLETELY RENOVATED

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

PRINCETON $599,000 Totally renovated 117-year-old Colonial with 3 bedrooms, 1 full- and 1-half bathrooms. Walk out of Living room to a large IPE deck and back yard. Walking distance to parks and downtown Princeton. Joseph Plotnick 732-979-9116 (cell)

PRINCETON $839,000 Cstm home has kitchen with granite cntrtps and HW flrs, DR with HW flrs, FR with gas FP and HW flrs and French doors that open to back yard and deck. Dir: Herrontown Rd to 62 Herrontown Circle. Eric Branton 609-516-9502 (cell)

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WHERE EXCELLENCE LIVES

MONMOUTH BEACH, NEW JERSEY Live the captivating, coastal lifestyle in this remarkable waterfront home with breathtaking river views and the beach across the street. 6000 SF, 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, 2 fireplaces, infinity pool, Ipe dock. $4,099,000

LITTLE SILVER, NEW JERSEY Timeless style throughout this richly detailed waterfront home. Breathtaking Tudor with grand views of the Shrewsbury River and fabulous new updates offers 3 floors with 8 bedrooms, 10 full/2 half baths, 11 fireplaces. $2,950,000

WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY Dramatic architecture, window walls, stunning millwork, paneling & moldings adorn this custom Colonial overlooking Echo Lake CC. Classic design with modern amenities includes chef’s kitchen, spa baths, finished basement & terrace. $2,750,000

Represented by: Eric Bosniak, Sales Associate O. 732.842.3200

Represented by: Sarah Pomphrey, Sales Associate O. 732.842.3200

Represented by: Kimberley Haley, Sales Associate O. 732.449.2777

MANASQUAN, NEW JERSEY This luxurious 6 bedroom, 5 bathroom Condo is a glamorous residence with stunning appointments. A spacious, delightful entertainer! 2 fireplaces. Superlative design. $2,400,000

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY Sweeping 36+ acre equestrian dream estate with stunning stucco & stone home & Amish-built horse barn with 8 large stalls & amenities. Enjoy a designer kitchen, stone fireplaces, 3-season porch, 1st level Master suite, paver patio, full gym and more. $1,875,000

SCOTCH PLAINS, NEW JERSEY Custom built 6 bedroom Colonial offering stunning details! Open floor plan includes formal banquet-sized dining room, living room with full wall of built-ins, gorgeous gourmet kitchen with beautiful wood topped center island. $1,599,900

Represented by: Linda Henderson, Sales Associate O. 732.449.2777

Represented by: Freeman “Jeff” Smith, Sales Associate O. 908.735.8080

Represented by: Frank D. Isoldi, Broker Sales Associate O. 908.233.5555

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY Stately & historic 16-room Colonial, 8.99 acres. Minutes to Princeton. Front-to-back entry, custom millwork, stunning kitchen, 3 fireplaces, 4.5 renovated baths, expansive terraces and barn. $1,269,000

FREEHOLD TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY Create the perfect environment with this exhilarating 6 bedroom, 6 bath residence. Highly-desirable home where the good life flourishes. A spacious home that is a delightful entertainer. 2 fireplaces, pantry. Elegant luxury and so much more! $1,249,000

MORGANVILLE, NEW JERSEY Premier property nestled on private cul-de-sac with just under 6,000 square feet of custom, luxury features and open floor plan. An extraordinary buy! $1,099,999

Represented by: Elizabeth Zuckerman/Stephanie Will, Sales Associates O. 609.921.1411

Represented by: Larry Soto, Sales Associate O. 732.494.7700

Represented by: Joan Bostonian, Sales Associate O. 732.254.3750

ColdwellBankerluxury.Com

Coldwell Banker residential Brokerage

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification.©2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.

Town Topics Newspaper September 13, 2017  

Witherspoon Media Group

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