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Volume LXXI, Number 34

Back-to-School On Pages 20-25 ABS Alumni Mourn Closing. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 PU Study on LegallyPrescribed Opiods . . . . 7 Senior Living Proposed for Princeton. . . . . . . . 8 Solar Eclipse Viewing Party. . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 PU Women’s Soccer Primed to Kick Off 2017 Season . . . . . . . . . . . 30 PHS Alum Goldsmith Starting Career With Vassar College Men’s Soccer. . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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Council Postpones Waxwood Decision To Sept. 25 Meeting The fate of the Waxwood development on Quarry Street will not be determined for at least another month, as Princeton Council has deferred action to its September 25 meeting in order to seek more input and information before making any decision. If a 2002 agreement with architect and developer J. Robert Hillier, a Town Topics shareholder, is allowed to take effect, with subsequent amendments allowed to lapse, Mr. Hillier would sell the units. If Mr. Hillier’s preferred alternate proposal, presented August 10, 2017, is accepted, then the Waxwood would continue as a rental property. Under a third alternative, Mr. Hillier would set up a fund that would help residents with down payments or foreclosures. Currently three affordable units are being rented to qualified neighborhood Continued on Page 8

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Cautious Optimism About Westminster Buyer The announcement last week that Rider University is negotiating with an “international partner” to purchase Westminster Choir College and keep it in Princeton has students, faculty, alumni, and supporters of the music school hopeful that its future is secure. But they are not taking the news for granted. “We are cautiously optimistic. We just have to be careful to not count on anything until we know what the facts are,” said Constance Fee, who heads the Coalition to Save Westminster Choir College in Princeton. “The most important thing I read in the letter was that whoever these people are, this international organization would maintain the campus in Princeton. That has been our whole focus. We have no indication of what that would mean in terms of whether we are an independent institution, do we have our own board, own faculty, and programs? There is no way to know. I have to keep a rein on my hope that this might be what we know, but we don’t.”

In an effort to stem a growing financial loss, Rider’s board voted in March to sell the Princeton campus of Westminster, which it has owned since 1991. At the time, Rider president Gregory Dell’Omo said the priority was to find a buyer that would keep Westminster in Princeton, though that wasn’t the only option. Since then, the Coalition was formed. They hired attorney Bruce Afran, who filed a lawsuit in June claiming that, based on the 1991 merger agreement, Rider has no legal right to sell the music school. An amendment to the suit stated that Rider’s claimed $10 million annual deficit was not caused by Westminster. On August 17, Mr. Dell’Omo sent an email to the college community announcing that a potential buyer had been found. He declined to identify the buyer, but wrote, “After reviewing proposals over the last several weeks, the Board will now begin negotiations and due diligence with the selected potential partner.” According to Rider spokesperson Kris-

tine Brown, “This selection is the continuation of the process begun in March with formal outreach to approximately 280 entities …. As we have said throughout this process, our goal was to identify a partner that is best positioned to make the necessary investments in and build upon Westminster’s world-class curriculum and rich legacy in Princeton. Continued on Page 10

Iran Denies Graduate Student’s Appeal of 10-Year Sentence

Iranian authorities have denied the appeal of Princeton University graduate student Xiyue Wang, who had been convicted of espionage and sentenced to 10 years in prison, the University announced last Thursday. Mr. Wang was in Iran in 2016 conducting research for his doctoral dissertation in history when he was arrested and Continued on Page 4

First Results of the Readers’ Choice Awards . . . . . . . 9 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Classified Ads. . . . . . . . 37 Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Music/Theater . . . . . . . 26 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . 36 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . 37 Service Directory . . . . . 38 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Topics of the Town . . . . . 5 Town Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . 6

CELESTIAL CONVENTION: More than 2,000 spectators came together in Palmer Square on Monday afternoon for a Solar Eclipse Viewing Party sponsored by the Princeton Public Library and Princeton University’s Department of Astrophysical Sciences. In Princeton, about three-quarters of the sun was blocked by the eclipse. See page 18 for more photos. (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

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3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert (Originally published in Princeton Magazine) Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

or the past two years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” “For the past two years, we have been offering our Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program as an optional program for our patients,” they continue. “Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice

was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care… We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively [do that].” Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. This is helping revive medical students’ interest in internal medicine, which is predicted to increase the number of primary care doctors and revitalize our healthcare system. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,200 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 4

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Iran Denies Appeal continued from page one

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accused by Iran authorities of ”spying under the cover of research.” Princeton University issued a statement last Thursday expressing support for Mr. Wang and reaffirming that he is innocent of all charges. “We are distressed that his appeal was denied, and that he remains unjustly imprisoned,” the statement read. “Mr. Wang was not involved in any political activities or connected to any government agencies; he was simply a scholar conducting historical research.” The University statement continued, “Mr. Wang has already been kept apart from his wife and 4-year-old son for more than a year. The University continues to hope that the Iranian authorities will allow this genuine scholar, devoted husband, and caring father return to his doctoral studies and his family. We will continue to do everything we can to be supportive of Mr. Wang and his family, and of efforts to seek his safe return home.” Mr. Wang has been at Evin Prison in Tehran since August 7, 2016, and he spent his first 18 days in solitary confinement, according to Princeton University. He has been in multiple wards during his time in prison, and both the University and Mr. Wang’s wife Hua Qu have expressed concern for Mr. Wang’s health under difficult prison conditions. During his confinement Mr. Wang has had four consular visits by the Swiss embassy, which represents U.S. interests in Iran. He has also been permitted to make phone calls to his wife on an almost weekly basis and has had several visits from his attorney. The American Council on Education and 31 other higher education and research associations have issued a statement urging Mr. Wang’s return home, and more than 1,400 researchers from 37 countries have signed a petition also calling for his safe return. A State Department official has called “for the immediate release of all U.S. citizens unjustly detained in Iran so they can return to their families,”

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In last week’s newspaper on page five, one of the Princeton Community Village scholarship winners was misidentified in the third paragraph and in the photo caption. The student is not Jonas Daniecki but Noah Daniecki (Jonas’s brother).

LYNN ADAMS SMITH, Editor-in-Chief BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor ANNE LEVIN, Staff Writer DONALD gILpIN, Staff Writer

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STUART MITCHNER, LAURIE pELLICHERO, TAYLOR SMITH, DOUg WALLACK, WILLIAM UHL, JEAN STRATTON, NANCY pLUM, KAM WILLIAMS Contributing Editors USpS #635-500, published Weekly Subscription Rates: $49/yr (princeton area); $53/yr (NJ, NY & pA); $56/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

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and last month the White House said that President Trump “is prepared to impose new and serious consequences on Iran unless all unjustly imprisoned American citizens are released and returned,” but it did not specify what those conditions might be. Mr. Trump and his administration have taken a hard line against Iran and Iran’s destabilizing policies in the Middle East. The State Department has also accused Iran of fabricating security-related charges to detain Americans and others, and has advised, “All U. S. citizens, especially dual nationals, considering travel to Iran should carefully read our latest travel warning.” Asserting that Mr. Wang’s “research was solely for the purpose of completing his academic work,” the statement by higher education

organizations stated, “Scholars around the world engage every day in archival research in pursuit of historical knowledge. Mr. Wang’s imprisonment can only have a chilling effect on historical research and scholarly exchange in Iran and throughout the world, and this, in turn can only lead to diminished understanding and greater mistrust, to the detriment of all. We urge the safe release of Xiyue Wang and call for him to be allowed to return home to reunite with his wife and young son and complete his degree.” —Donald Gilpin

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Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Meet the Mayor: Friday, August 25 from 8:30 to 10 a.m., Mayor Liz Lempert holds open office hours in the lobby of the Princeton Public Library. Walk and Talk: Saturday, August 26 at 8 a.m., Mayor Liz Lempert joins Olivia’s Wellness Connection for a walk and discussion. Meet at Community Park South. West Windsor Bridge Closing: Replacement of the bridge on Cranbury Road (615) over Bear Brook has begun and is expected to take 270 calendar days. Located between Stobbe Lane and Sunnydale Way, the bridge will be closed to traffic until the job is finished. The detour route for eastbound traffic from Route 571 will be left turn on Clarksville Road, left on Cranbury Road. For westbound traffic, left on Clarksville Road, right on Route 571 to right on Cranbury Road. Volunteer for Blood Drives: N.J. Blood Services, which supplies blood to 60 hospitals throughout the state, needs volunteers to assist with registering donors, making appointments, canteen duties, and more. To volunteer, call Jan Zepka at (732) 616-8741. Be on “American Pickers”: The documentary TV series about antique “picking” will be filming in New Jersey in September and is looking for large, unique collections to feature on the show. For more information, visit americanpickers@cineflix.com or call (855) 653-7878. Donated Equestrian Items Needed: Riding with Heart, the therapeutic riding program, seeks new and gently used horse tack, equestrian clothing, and barn equipment for its Fall Tack Sale, September 23 and 24 at its Pittstown farm. Donations are accepted through September 2. Visit ridingwithheart.org . Howell Farm Fall Hatchery Enrollment: Parents interested in Howell Farm’s pre-school program beginning in September can attend an organizational meeting August 23 or 29 at 1 p.m. at the farm, 70 Woodens Lane, Hopewell Township. The program is designed to introduce children aged 3-5 to life on the farm and runs from 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. one morning a week for 12 weeks. Visit www.howellfarm.org or www. mercercounty parks.org .


5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

END OF AN ERA: The American Boychoir, a Princeton institution with a national reputation, will close after 80 years. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

Alumni of American Boychoir School Mourn Closing and Share Memories

Michael Graves architecture & DesiGn

members of the national mu- 1953 to 1957. “More than a sical community. soundbite or tolerable series “There is a collective loss of keypunches,” he wrote in Subscription Information: that I and all of my fellow an email when asked about 609.924.5400 ext. 30 CheCk outNaproduCts by had on his the impact ABS alumni feel,” said Bert or varette, the founder of Ti- life. “The chief musical exsubscriptions@ gerlabs, the Princeton en- perience of my long career witherspoonmediagroup.com trepreneurship center. Mr. in music, that started with Navarette was a student a social security card in at the school from 1987 ’53, and a TV series role urbanagendamagazine.com to 1990, was president of with Ezio Pinza (along with its alumni association, and classmates Oliver Andes and served on the school’s board Travis Bryant).” for 12 years. The closing of the school is “a national disgrace,” he wrote, “emblematic of an evaporation of arts organization funding. A reporter coined the term ‘Americana’ in the ‘50s to describe the very nature of the Boychoir. “For many of us,” he said, We traveled by bus through “we had an opportunity that the contiguous 48 states. was so uniquely beautiful. The archives of the school, www.princetonmagazinestore.com We were able to sing as one, Continued on Next Page with the same quality and passion, in front of a school as s embly i n Wich it a or alongside the New York Philharmonic with Zubin Mehta. We had a shared perspective. We realized this could have been the only time people would hear us sing. So we took a lot of pride and had a lot of professionalism. We honored the tradition of www.princetonmagazinestore.com the school.” ABS alumnus John Harger Stewart sang with the MetroPARAMUS: 846 NJ-17 politan Opera, the New York 201-445-9070 • Mon - Thurs: 10-8,City Fri &Opera, Sat: 10-6 and in Europe before becoming Director of Vocal Activities at Washington University in St. Louis, from which he is now retired. Mr. Stewart, who still teaches voice, remembers arriving in Princeton on the bus from Columbus, Ohio, in September, 1950. “We all have tremendous sadness and regret,” he said, speaking by phone from his home in Amenia, N.Y. “Going to the school was a lifechanging experience for me. The musical training, the LAWRENCEVILLE: 2990 US-1 daily music theory, piano 609-530-1666 • Mon - Thurs: 10-8, Fri & Sat: 10-6, Sun: 11-5 lessons, singing, touring all over America and being on TV — it was a wonderful experience. The paradox is NOW is the best time, so hurry in for the best selection! that they had, this past year, a really good artistic year. Add a fire pit and extend your outside living well into fall. They did two performances with The Philadelphia Our Weber grills are the lowest priced in the area! Orchestra, and they went to China. When they left Free local delivery on a 5-piece set or more! Rosedale Road and moved to [the former St. Joseph’s Seminary in Plainsboro], I was opposed to that. And then they were confronted skibarn.com with financial things they didn’t know about, like getting the place up to code.” Composer, arranger, perand music producer www.princetonmagazinestore.com former, Van Dyke Parks was a classPARAMUS • 201-445-9070 WAYNE • 973-256-8585 LAWRENCEVILLE • 609-530-1666 SHREWSBURY • 732-945-3900 mate of Mr. Stewart from One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

The announcement last week that the American Boychoir School (ABS) was closing after 80 years — 67 of them in Princeton — came as no surprise to those familiar with its recent financial difficulties and struggles to stay alive. But the decision has prompted sadness and nostalgia among alumni, former board members, and

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American Boychoir Continued from Preceding Page

in films ignominiously stored in dusty vaults, correspondence, and the historic significance of this institution, deserve immediate transfer to the Smithsonian, for digitalization and preservation.” Mr. Parks recalls singing Christmas carols for Albert Einstein in the scientist’s kitchen, as Einstein played along on his violin. Another Einstein memory: “When schoolmate Tyler Gatchell (a Princeton native ) and I watched the 3D movie House of Wax ( ’53 ), we heard a guffaw behind us. We turned around to see Dr. Einstein (a familiar Princeton figure on his bicycle) in 3D glasses.” Originally known as The Columbus Boychoir, the choir and school were founded in 1937 in Columbus, Ohio. The organization moved to Princeton in 1950 and changed its name in 1980. From 1952 to 2012, the school, which is for boys from sixth to eighth grades, was based at Albemarle, the former estate of pharmaceutical magnate Gerald Lambert. Sexual abuse lawsuits brought by former students in 2002 cast a shadow on the school. A decade later, ABS sold Albemarle and moved to Plainsboro. By 2015, facing financial troubles and a dwindling enrollment, the school had relocated to Rambling Pines Day Camp in Hopewell. “I am writing with difficult news about the American Boychoir School,” Rob D’Avanzo, chairman of the board of trustees, wrote to supporters last week. “Over the course of the summer, our anticipated enrollment for the 2017-18 school year declined unexpectedly. Students whom we had expected to return decided not to

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do so, and our recruiting effor ts for new students failed to materialize at the levels we had seen in recent years. At present, we believe we would have only 19 to 21 boys with which to open the school in three weeks. this is at best the bare minimum for us to be able to present a professional choir that is up to our standards.” ABS filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April 2015, stating it needed $350,000 to finish the school year and $3 million to emerge from bankruptcy and open for the next academic year. “Even with the continued generous support of the ABS community, the anticipated revenues would not support our operations, which include the satisfaction of our obligations under our Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization. We worked very hard with our committed staff to try to fashion a reduced-cost “break even” budget within these revenue constraints; it just could not be done,” the letter continued. The choir numbered 80 boys when Chester “Chet” Douglass was a student at the school in the 1950s. Mr. Douglass, who chaired Harvard University’s Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology from 1978 to 2008, has fond memories of singing with the NBC Orchestra (now the New York Philharmonic) and going on concert tours to 33 states. “It just chugged along,” he said. “It really did appear that it set the standards for boychoir singing.” Mr. Douglass blames the demise on several factors: the economy, parents who aren’t willing to send their 10-year-old boys away to school, and the fact that puberty comes earlier to today’s boys than it did in the past, causing their voices to change earlier. “They might have put us on a train in In-

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dianapolis and tell us how to change trains in Philadelphia and go to Princeton, where there will be someone to meet you,” he said. “Try telling that to parents today.” The closing of the school is lamented by Catherine Dehoney, executive director of the organization Chorus America. “For many years, the school set the standard for boychoirs and excellence in choral performance for young voices in the U.S., and it helped to inspire the founding of other boychoir programs of different models (non-boarding, year-round),” she wrote in an email. “Chorus America and others have conducted research showing the myriad benefits for children and youth who sing in a chorus …. The choral field owes a huge debt of gratitude to the work of the school over the years.” Some alumni think the choir could come back to life. “Many of us hope for resurrection in the future,” said Mr. Navarette. “I would be remiss if I didn’t say how much admiration I have for the tireless work the entire board put in during the past 10 years, trying to continue this important mission. That has to be acknowledged. No one was doing this for any reason other than trying to continue this mission for these kids. I wanted to send my son there in two years. At some point in the future, I hope a benefactor will help us resurrect the school.” —Anne Levin

Full Moon Bike Ride Is Open for Registration

The Lawrence Hopewell Trail Full Moon Bike Ride will be held Saturday, September 9 starting at 9:30 p.m. Registration is open for the annual event, which starts and ends at the parking lot at Rosedale Lake in Mercer Meadows, Hopewell. “This ride takes cyclists

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through Mercer Meadows via the Lawrence Hopewell Trail, which serves as the backbone of an extensive trail system in the park,” said Jay Watson, curator for the ride. “From the starting gate at Rosedale Lake, riders will head to the Maidenhead Trail, on to the Twin Pines Trail, then back to Rosedale Park, in a ride that takes most riders about 45 minutes to complete.” Helmets are required and cyclists are encouraged to use bicycle headlights and creatively decorate their bikes with glow sticks for the late-night ride. Ice cream vendors will be on hand at the ride start and end of the trail loop. The cost is $10. Riders must be 12-years-old and up. Online pre-registration is strongly encouraged at www.lhtrail.org\fullmoon ride. Riders are also encouraged to show up early to allow time to sign up. Registration will open at 9 p.m.

Clubs K ingston G reenways Association will present a free movie night on Wednesday, August 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Yinghua International School, 25 Laurel Avenue in Kingston. Microcosmos is a one-of-a-kind film that offers a bug’s eye view of the world using specialty cameras. Guests should bring their own lawn chairs as seating will be in limited supply. For more information, visit www. kingstongreenways.org. ——— Mid-Day Toastmasters Club will meet on Tuesday, S eptember 12 at 11: 30 a.m. at the Mercer County Library Branch located at 42 Allentown-Robbinsville Road in Robbinsville. RSVP by calling Joyce at (609) 585-0822. ——— Join Send Hunger Packing for “Salsa and Salsa” at Hinds Plaza on Sunday, September 24 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The 5th annual fundraiser furthers the group’s mission of providing children in the Princeton communit y w ith supple mental meals. Admission is $50 for adults and $25 for children ages 12 and under. Learn more at www. salsaandsalsa.org. ——— The Women’s College Club of Pr inceton will meet on Monday, September 18 at 1 p.m. at All Saints’ Episcopal Church on Terhune Road in Princeton. Jon Lambert, owner of the Princeton Record Exchange, will speak about the history of the store and how it survives in the digital age. This meeting is free and open to the public. ——— Young Jewish Professionals of Mercer County will meet on Thursday, September 14 from 6 to 8 p.m. for a Happy Hour at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room in Princeton.

IS ON

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“In light of the solar eclipse,

do you have a favorite star or planet?” (Asked at the Princeton University Department of Astrophysical Sciences) (Photos by Erica M. Cardenas)

“The Earth is my favorite planet because it is our home, and it is the only home we have.” —Professor Michael Strauss, Princeton

“I love looking at Saturn through a telescope. Jupiter’s fun too, but Saturn’s the best!” —Professor Jenny Green and Baby Ada, Princeton

“It’s the Helix Nebula, which is essentially a dead star. It looks uncannily like the Eye of Sauron from The Lord of the Rings.” —David Vartanyan, graduate student, Princeton

“My favorite star is Eta Carinae. It is a massive star binary that has thrown out material periodically over the last many centuries. In 1843, there was a big outburst that ejected 10 solar masses and looked almost supernova-like. Eta Carinae was one of the first images taken by the repaired Hubble, in part because it is so dramatic and has an exotic story to tell.” —Professor Adam Burrows, Princeton

“I study clusters of galaxies, and my favorite galaxy cluster at the moment is Able 362. It is one of the richest clusters that’s observed in the HSC Survey, a survey of the sky that Princeton is involved in.” —Elinor Medezinski, post-doctoral student, Princeton


Every day more than 140 portant issues, but we need and director of the Center people in the United States to take steps to educate doc- for Health and Wellbeing at die from an opioid-related tors in order to prevent peo- Princeton. overdose, and deaths from ple from becoming addicted Ms. Currie, who had been opioids continue to increase, in the first place.” working on physician decialmost quadrupling since Ms. Currie’s study, con- sion-making and the factors 1999. du c te d i n col lab orat ion that affect it, noted that it Responding to the report with Princeton economics was logical to consider the ______________ of a special commission graduate student Molly Sch- role of medical schools and ______________ Date & Time: ______________________ chaired by New Jersey Gov- nell, revealed that doctors to team up with Ms. Schnell, our ad,ernor scheduled to run ___________________. Chris Christie, Presi- trained at the lowest-ranked who is writing her PhD disU.S. medical schools write sertation on the market for dent Trump recently declared oughly and pay special attentionmore to theopioid following: prescriptions opioids, to investigate the rethe opioid epidemic a state than doctors trained at the lationship between doctors’ ll tell of usemergency. it’s okay) But two Princeton Univer- highest-ranked schools, sug- training and their propensity better training � sity Faxeconomists number are � � Expiration Date to prescribe opioids. onAddress the gesting that Using a variety of datacase, focusing their attention for physicians, and for genin a recently-published paper eral practitioners in par- bases, they matched all two on the problem of legally- ticular, could help curb the billion opioid prescriptions epidemic. written in the U.S. from prescribed opioids. From 2006 to 2014, “if 2006 to 2014 to U.S News “Many people have become addicted to opioids that were all general practitioners had & World Report’s rankings legally prescribed to them by prescribed like those from of medical schools where physicians,” said Economics the top-ranked school [Har- doctors received their initial and Policy Affairs Professor vard], we would have had training. They found that graduJanet Currie. “Public discus- 56.5 percent fewer opioid sion has focused on illegal prescriptions and 8.5 per- ates of the lowest-ranked opioids and treatment for cent fewer overdose deaths,” schools were much more people with addiction prob- said Ms. Currie, who is chair likely to write opioid prelems. Both of these are im- of the economics department scriptions compared to doctors trained at the highestFast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In ranked schools. And these differences were most proHunan ~ Szechuan nounced among general Malaysian ~ Vietnamese practitioners. Daily Specials • Catering Available “G eneral pract it ioners

(GP) trained at Harvard write an average of 180.2 opioids prescriptions per year, those from the second- to fifthranked schools write 233 per year, and GPs from the seven lowest-ranked medical schools write nearly 550,” Ms. Currie said. Ms. Currie spoke about the need for further education about opioids and their most positive uses. “We need to educate the public that opioids are not appropriate for many types of chronic pain, like back pain, because people build up dependence, leading the opioids to become less effective over time,” she said. “Many people who start off with one problem, chronic pain, end up with two problems, chronic pain plus addiction to opioids. Moreover, the amounts of opioids that

are prescribed after, for example, surgery, are far in excess of what is necessary and often end up being abused.” Ms. Currie noted that she and Ms. Schnell are currently working to refine their study and investigate exactly why and how training makes a difference. “Our study gives a 10,000-foot view. It would be great to zero-in on what aspects of physician training are most important.” Ms. Schnell is also studying the secondary market for opioids, with 30 percent of people who are abusing legal prescription opioids getting them from third parties. Princeton Police Chief Nick Sutter, on the front lines in battling the opioid epidemic, emphasized the severity of the problem and the importance of collaboration in

combatting it. ”Certainly the opioid epidemic is something that we in the police department are dealing with nearly every day in one respect or another,” he said. “We realized some time ago that it is not a law enforcement issue that we can ‘arrest our way out of,’ but rather a public health crisis that requires a multidisciplinary approach to defeat. “Collaboration with medical and psychological health experts and facilities as well as preventative education I believe are essential to this battle. Though out of my purview, I do believe that the medical community must be more responsible in issuing prescription opioids, and we must continue to aggressively address the illegally issued prescriptions of opioids.” —Donald Gilpin

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Physicians From Lowest-Ranked Schools Prescribe More Opioids, PU Study Says


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 8

Senior Living Community Proposed For a Site Near the Shopping Center A 76-unit senior community is proposed for a parcel near the Princeton Shopping Center on North Harrison Street. Sunrise Senior Living, which has 316 senior communities throughout the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, wants to build a 76-unit complex on a 4.5 acre site at the corner of Harrison Street and Terhune Road. The proposal has been submitted to the municipality, and the company is awaiting comments from the staff. The town approved subdivision of the shopping center property two years ago, to create the lot that is zoned for senior housing. “We’ve been looking at Princeton for years now,” said Jerry Liang, Sunrise’s senior vice president of development and investments. “Sunrise has had a presence in New Jersey for 15 or 20 years, and this is one of those areas we’ve been interested in the entire time.” The application is for two buildings of approximately 63,000 square feet. “We put together, I think, a very

sensible and thoughtful project,” Mr. Liang said. “We’ve spent quite a bit of time with planners as well as neighbors in discussion, taking their feedback into consideration. We did a good bit of outreach. We held meetings and met with some people in their homes.” Those who live close to the proposed community were concerned that the design be tasteful and not too imposing. They also were curious about what kinds of services Sunrise would provide. “So we designed it taking into account the proximity of neighbors, making, in effect, two buildings,” Mr. Liang said. “The [main] building is two stories instead of three, and we moved the memory care floor to the side. The piece of land is relatively thin and long. We did a slightly larger footprint but in effect, there are two buildings. That went over quite well.” Princeton’s needs match what Sunrise has to offer, Mr. Liang said. “It fits into a lot of what we look for, as far as the right location,

right area, and the core services we provide. It is a historic location with a great deal of mix in age groups, but certainly one in which many members of the community have lived a long time. There are elderly residents who have been there their whole lives and need a place to spend their final years or months, being cared for near where they are most comfortable. That’s the vision of Sunrise.” According to its website, the company was founded in 1981 and serves 32,400 people. —Anne Levin

A Princeton tradition!

Waxwood Decision continued from page one

residents at rents at or below those dictated by the Council on Affordable Housing (COAH). Five “foundation units” are available for rent to qualified neighborhood residents at 10 percent below market rent, in accordance with an amended developer’s agreement, but two of the units are empty because Mr. Hillier cannot find tenants who are qualified neighborhood residents. Those units that are rented are now rented for between 35 and 40 percent below market rent. At a working session last Wednesday morning attended by Princeton Council, Mr. Hillier and about 20 others, including residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson community and the Waxwood building, Mayor Liz Lempert described a positive, productive exchange. “Council left with a better understanding of necessary information and issues. Residents had an opportunity to express themselves and their views and to be a part of the conversation.” She noted some support for the position that “a deal’s a deal” and that Mr. Hillier and the town should stick to the original agreement, especially if there are residents who are intending to purchase. But she also noted the potentially negative repercussions of enforcing the agreement. “The original intention was to increase the opportunity for home ownership in the community, but if the price is unaffordable or most residents would like to rent and can’t purchase, that changes the situation.” Councilman Lance Liverman also seemed to be seeking a compromise resolution to the dilemma. “I want what is best for the community. I also want the individuals who were promised they could buy a unit to come to some agreement with Mr. Hillier. I am concerned if these units go on sale that we will displace several folks of lower means. Many folks simply cannot afford a large mortgage. So I would rather them stay rentals with additional affordable housing units added.”

Ms. Lempert stated that she is keeping her mind open in awaiting additional information. “It is important to have a result that is fair and is going to serve the community as best we can in providing additional housing opportunities for residents in the neighborhood and for people who’ve moved away and would like to move back.” She described the Waxwood development project as a “great example of adaptive reuse,” but noted frustration that two of the units are currently empty, suggesting that better communication in getting the word out to the right audience or greater flexibility in rent might help the situation. “It’s not a clear-cut decision,” she said. “Affordability is the big issue. I appreciate that Mr. Hillier has been trying to work with the Council and the community, but a signed agreement is a powerful thing.” In the 2003 agreement between the town and Mr. Hillier, when he redeveloped Waxwood to create housing out of what had been first the segregated Witherspoon School for Colored Children, then a nursing home, then the Waxwood building, named after school principal Harry Waxwood Jr., there were to be three affordable units, restricted for neighborhood residents, and five “foundation” units to be converted ultimately to condominiums. Mr. Hillier arranged for a separate fund to be set up to help with the 20 percent down payment for those who wanted to purchase. In making his case for a change in the original agreement that would allow him to continue to rent the properties, Mr. Hillier noted that the rental market is very strong and that there are few takers

for purchasing condos. He cited letters from long-term tenants seeking to save money by continuing to rent. In his August 10 letter to the mayor and Council, Mr. Hillier noted that the Waxwood, as a rental, has provided “long-term members of the community with highquality, affordable rentals that are not available anywhere else in the neighborhood.” He went on to recommend the option of making seven affordable rental units, either as COAH-qualified or “with a Witherspoon-Jackson preference.” His second-choice option would make six units available on the same terms, but add a $400,000 equity fund to increase affordability or to assist in the avoidance of foreclosures. In his letter, Mr. Hillier also noted that though he maintained the responsibility for the management, maintenance, tax payments, and operations of the Waxwood, he had sold the building in a sale-15 -year-leaseback agreement. “This is a standard financing device, “a mortgage,” he said. “I still have all of the responsibility and incentives to make the Waxwood the best that it can be.” Council has requested a letter from the new owner, Robinhood Plaza Inc., to make sure that it will be bound by the terms of agreements made between Mr. Hillier and the town. Before its September 25 meeting, Council is also seeking an opinion on the legality of the neighborhood preference of setting aside units for people who lived in the community for at least 10 years or are descendants of longtime residents. —Donald Gilpin

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READERS’

CHOICE

AWARDS!

Thank you for voting for your favorite local businesses and services! Town Topics is happy to announce this year’s Readers’ Choice Awards winners and runners-up. Half are listed below, and the other half will be featured in next week’s issue. Each winner and runner-up will receive a window sticker showing that YOU chose them as the best! Best Appliance Store:

Best Hair Salon:

Best Orthodontic Group:

Mrs. G TV & Appliances

b + b Hair Color Studio

Princeton Orthodontics

runners-up... Smith’s Ace Hardware H&H Appliance Center Best Buy

runners-up... Koi Spa Salon Metropolis Spa Salon Salon Pure

runners-up... Brace Place Orthodontics Hamilton Dental Associates Mountain View Orthodontics

Best Art Gallery:

Best Happy Hour:

Best Pharmacy:

Princeton University Art Museum

Mediterra

Santé Integrative Pharmacy

runners-up... Mistral Winberie’s Salt Creek Grille

runners-up... CVS Rite Aid Pennington Apothecary

Best HVAC:

Best Pizza:

Best Artisanal Cheese:

Stellitano Heating & AC

Tie: Conte’s and Nomad Pizza

Cherry Grove Farm

runners-up... Princeton Air Lauricella Air Conditioning & Heating Redding’s Plumbing, Heating & AC

runners-up... Osteria Procaccini Nino’s Pizza Star

runners-up... Cranbury Station Gallery Morpeth Contemporary CG Gallery

runners-up... Bon Appetit Brick Farm Market Olsson’s Fine Foods

Roberta Parker

Best Bike Shop:

runners-up... Christine LaSala-Bahmer Robin Wallack Britt West

Kopp’s Cycle runners-up... Jay’s Cycles Hart’s Cyclery Sourland Cycles

Best Restaurant:

Blue Point Grill

Best Caterer:

runners-up... Agricola Eno Terra Mistral

Tie: Emily’s Cafe and Catering and Blawenburg Cafe and Catering Company runners-up... Olives Porta Via Main Street

Best Coffee House:

Small World runners-up... Boro Bean Rojo’s Roastery Starbucks

Best Deli:

Olives runners-up... Red Onion D’Angelo Italian Market Bon Appetit

Best Grocery Store:

McCaffrey’s runners-up... Wegmans Whole Earth Trader Joe’s

Best Gym:

Princeton Fitness and Wellness Center runners-up... Pure Barre Forrestal Village Fitness Orangetheory Fitness

Best Real Estate Broker:

Best Sports Bar:

Tie: Tiger’s Tale and Ivy Inn runners-up...

Best Hoagie:

Hoagie Haven runners-up... Jersey Mike’s George’s Roasters & Ribs Tastee Sub Shop

Best Liquor Store:

Joe Canal’s runners-up... CoolVines Princeton Corkscrew Wineshop Claridge Wine & Liquor

Best Men’s Shop:

Nick Hilton runners-up... Brooks Brothers Landau Barbour

Best Nursery:

Kale’s Nursery & Landscape Service runners-up... Peterson’s Nursery Baumley Nursery & Landscaping of Princeton Madden’s Greenhouse & Nursery

Alchemist & Barrister Triumph

Best Furniture Store:

Elephant in the Room runners-up...

Farmhouse Store Luxe Home Company Gasior’s Furniture & Interior Design

Best Roofing:

Flesch’s Roofing runners-up...

Mill Roofing Trenton Roofing & Siding Accurate Roofing & Siding

Best Gift Store:

Farmhouse Store runners-up...

jaZams Monday Morning Flower & Balloon Co. The Front Porch

Best Florist:

Monday Morning Flower and Balloon Co. runners-up...

Viburnum Wildflowers Dahlia

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Congratulations to the winners of the


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 10

Enjoy a home-cooked meal Enjoy without a the home-cooked cooking. Westminster Buyer continued from page one

“The University remains encouraged by our strong progress to date, accomplished in accordance with our guiding principles, including the commitment to maintain our existing programs, faculty, and administration. Please know that much work still remains, and as this process moves

forward, it’s critical that negotiations remain confidential between Rider and the selected potential partner. We appreciate your continued patience and promise to keep the University community informed as we move into the next phase of this important process.” The Westminster faculty was informed of the potential sale at a meeting on the cam-

TOWN TOPICS READERS THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING US! WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR YOUon VOTING Stop by Olives your US: way home

pus last week. No precise time table was announced for the transaction, and no further details were given as to the identity of the purchaser. “Is it an educational institution? A business? They haven’t told us much of anything,” said Ms. Fee, who is a Westminster alumnus and voice teacher at Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, N.Y. “Friends who were at the announcement said it was positive but vague. But the administrative people were very enthusiastic. If it is something that could benefit both schools, I think it would be more than we could hope for.” The news “wasn’t what we expected,” she continued. “We thought there was going to be a merger with some other university in America. It is an odd mix of encouraging and unsettling at the same time. But a couple of months ago, we thought both schools were going under.” The priority is for the agreement to be a lasting one. “We’re very concerned that the school not just be maintained for a little while,” Ms. Fee said. “We’re concerned that it be maintained for the duration. We don’t want to go through this again.” —Anne Levin

meal without the and cooking. pick up a gourmet meal for under $10! BEST DELI BESTon SANDWICH Stop by Olives your way home and View our delicious daily dinner BEST TAKEOUT pick up a gourmet meal for under $10! specials at olivesprinceton.com Runner Up -BEST CATERER View our delicious daily dinner View our at delicious daily lunch and dinner specials olivesprinceton.com specials at olivesprinceton.com

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

A Fresh Take on Consignment


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 12

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

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Lawrence Library Hosts Book Sale Next Month

The Friends of the Lawrence Library September Book Sale, featuring thousands of used, gently-read books for readers of all ages, will run from Saturday, September 23 (9:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m.) to Sunday, October 1 at 4:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer Cou nt y L ibrar y System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, The book sale preview night is on Friday, September 22, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The library will be closed for normal operations during the Friday preview night. Admission is free for current members of the Fr iends of the Lawrence Library, $5 for the general public; new memberships can be purchased during preview night. Admission charge to the preview night for booksellers is $20. They will only be allowed to use scanning devices during the preview night. Beginning Saturday, September 23, entry to the sale is free and open during the library’s regular hours. No scanning devices will be allowed. Book donations for the Friends of the Library book sale are always accepted at the Lawrence Headquarters

Branch. Proceeds from the book sale fund programs and other library services that benefit library patrons of all ages. For more information about the library and its programs please call (609) 9896920 or visit www.mcl.org. ———

African-American Art Subject of Exhibit Catalog

Constructing Identity : Petrucci Family Foundation Collection of AfricanAmerican Art (Portland Art Museum 2017), a catalog accompanying an exhibit of the same name that ran at the Portland Oregon Art Museum from January 28 to June 18, 2017, brings together paintings, sculpture, prints, and drawings by prominent contempo rary African-American artists along with a selection of historical works from the 1930s, 1940s, and Civil Rights era. Drawing from the Petrucci Family Foundation collection, Constructing Identity features works by more than 80 artists, including H e n r y O s s aw a Ta n n e r, Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, Faith Ringgold, Radcliffe Bailey, Kara Walker, and Mickalene Thomas as well as John Biggers, Barbara Bullock, Dav id Dr iskell, Joyce Scot t, and Sonya Clark, among others.

Mailbox

A Red Orchid Theatre’s

SIMPATICO Featuring Michael Shannon and members of A Red Orchid Theatre

To the Editor: All of us, especially immigrants and new Americans, long for connection and community, for having our gifts recognized and for the opportunity to reach our full potential. While our concepts might vary widely, home and community do have concrete meaning for us all. Real love for home and family can extend to neighbors — and through involvement in civic, non-profit, or religious organizations, benefit the entire community. Perhaps in its broadest sense, community is the experience of being at home. Michael Jacoby Brown goes as far to say, “Community is one of those things that’s hard to define. But you know it when you are in it. It’s a feeling that you are not alone, that you are part of something greater than yourself, yet even when you are in it, you are still yourself.”

By

SAM SHEPARD

Directed by

Urging Support for American Heart Association’s Central New Jersey Heart Walk On October 7

Princeton Human Services Is About to Kick Off “Welcoming Week” for Community Newcomers

To the Editor: At our major intersections of Nassau and Vandeventer, and Nassau and Witherspoon we often have a conflict between pedestrians trying to cross with the light (and sometimes not with the light) and cars trying to turn left or right at these busy points. The result endangers the pedestrians even if they are walking with the lights, and slows or stops traffic as the cars have to wait for the crosswalks to clear to make their turns. I’ve seen a solution to this in New Haven. There all traffic is stopped in both directions by red lights and the walk lights give preference to pedestrians. They can cross safely and even diagonally as there is no traffic movement to contend with. Then the walk lights say stop, and traffic resumes its flow. If we adopted this system in Princeton we would make it considerably safer for pedestrians crossing at popular and very busy corners, and improve the flow of traffic in the center of town. It may take some work and many levels of approval to get this system adopted since this involves a state road, I believe, but it would be a significant improvement for both drivers and pedestrians and would probably reduce the backup of traffic in downtown Princeton. DAVID MILLER Hawthorne Avenue

ON STAGE THIS FALL AT

Letters Do Not Necessarily Reflect the Views of Town Topics

To the Editor: Did you know that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number-one killer of all Americans? In fact, someone dies from CVD every 39 seconds! Heart disease also kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. And congenital cardiovascular defects are the most common cause of infant death from birth defects. But we have the power to change that. Research suggests up to 80 percent of heart disease and stroke may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Each of us can do that through more exercise and a better diet, and by supporting the work of the American Heart Association. I’m asking families, organizations, and businesses in Mercer, Middlesex, Somerset, and Hunterdon counties to support the American Heart Association’s Central New Jersey Heart Walk set for Saturday, October 7 at 8:30 a.m. at Arm and Hammer Park, home of the Trenton Thunder. Heart Walk, the signature community event for the association’s Healthy for Good movement, is held throughout the country to educate the public about the small steps they can take to improve their heart health while also raising vital funds for research to prevent and treat heart disease and stroke, the nation’s top killers. The American Heart Association is committed to helping individuals and businesses foster a culture of health, and to providing science-based treatment guidelines to healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public. For more information on the Central New Jersey Heart Walk, visit www.CentralNJHeartWalk.org. GINA PETRONE MuMOLIE DNP, MBA, RN, NEA-BC Senior Vice President Hospital Administration, Capital Health

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Books

I remember feeling an intense longing for community when I worked in Montreal for a year. Apart from a few acquaintances at work and the local church I attended, I didn’t know anyone. I couldn’t figure out where I belonged. Should I return home to the u.S. or stick it out in Canada? The decision became easy when Canadian immigration officials denied a visa extension and I received a job offer in Portland, Maine! For those immigrants and new Americans who have chosen Princeton as their home, it’s all about getting to the place where life seems right again. For as long as I can remember I’ve been drawn to other cultures. If you feel the same way, you should know that Princeton Human Services is about to kick off “Welcoming Week” to celebrate people of all backgrounds who are eager to come together to find their place in our community. So let’s get ready to express our unique expression of American hospitality to the newcomers among us. It’s a critical time for all of us to show the world that our community wants to be welcoming to everyone. Consider these timely words of author Jacob Needleman, “America is not a tribal, ethnic or racial identity. It is a philosophical identity composed of ideas of freedom, liberty, independent thought, independent conscience, self-reliance, hard work, justice.” STEVE DRAKE Tenacre: A Ministry of Christian Scientists


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 16

ways leave impressed,” she added. “And many return or become members.” For m or e i n for m at ion about the Doylestown Arts Festival, visit dtownartsfestival.com. ———

Art

Isles, Inc. Unveils Public Art Projects in Trenton

CELEBRATING THE ARTS: Now in its 26th year, the Doylestown Arts Festival will feature 160 juried artists, live music on five stages, local food vendors, art-making, interactive demonstrations, and bike races. The festival will be held on Doylestown’s downtown streets from 10 a.m to 5 p.m. on Saturday, September 9 and Sunday, September 10.

Doylestown Arts Festival Bucks County Classic will ganizers plan very carefully roll into town with six bike to ensure there is plenty September 9 and 10

Recognized for its picturesque setting and rich year-round arts and culture offerings, the small town of Doylestown, Pa., will once again host the Doylestown Arts Festival, a two-day celebration that is expected to draw tens of thousands of visitors from the MidAtlantic region. The festival will be held on Doylestown’s downtown streets — converted to pedestrian-only avenues during the event from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, September 9 and Sunday, September 10. Fou nded in 1991, t he Doylestown Arts Festival is now in its 26th year. Designed to illuminate the town’s ongoing commitment to arts, crafts, culture, and tourism, the 2017 festival will feature 160 juried artists, live music on five stages, local food vendors, art-making, and interactive demonstrations. On Sunday, the Thompson

races involving professionals, amateurs, children, and historical high wheel bicycles. Home to 8,000 residents as well as the James A. Michener Ar t Museum, the Mercer Museum, Fonthill Castle, the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works Museum, the County Theater, and the Bucks County Civil War Library and Museum as well as an array of galleries, restaurants, and locallyowned shops and boutiques, Doylestown is nationally recognized as a “destination” town. In June, Philadelphia magazine named Doylestown “best fun suburban town”; and in 2013, Travel + Leisure magazine called Doylestown one of “America’s [Top 20] Favorite Towns.” While Doylestown Ar ts Festival director Paul Boger is expecting large crowds, he emphasized that the or-

of parking, access, space, and amenities so that attendees feel welcomed and comfortable. “Our mission is to communicate to festival visitors the ever-present hospitality and warmth of Doylestown, while at the same time celebrating the region’s artists and artistic heritage,” he said. “We encourage everyone from near and far who has any interest in the arts, music, community, or sightseeing to attend this remarkable festival, and to experience the energizing ambiance of Doylestown.” Lisa Tremper Hanover, director and CEO of the Michener Art Museum, the cultural partner of the Doylestown Arts Festival, said the annual event amplifies the regional commitment to arts and culture, and brings new audiences to the Michener, a leading American art museum housed in a transformed prison in Doylestown. “We are always delighted to welcome new visitors, even if their original impetus on a hot day is simply to escape into our air-conditioned galleries,” she said. “But, after seeing our spectacular exhibitions, they al-

Two public art projects, a mural and a site-specific installation at a vacant, yet historically significant, building, are part of efforts to reactivate vacant spaces and spark change in how people — residents and visitors alike — perceive Trenton neighborhoods. Though the projects are located in two different neighborhoods, their unifying concept is the newly designated Creek to Canal Creative District, which serves to catalyze redevelopment that supports and is supported by creative activity and that focuses on community engagement. At 147 Perry Street (at Montgomery Street), utilizing Neighborhood Revitalization Tax Credit (NRTC) funding, an 8’x20’ mural has been painted on a freestanding wall constructed specifically for the project. The mural reflects the industrial and natural history of the city and the harmony between the two. Rather than a static mural which remains on an existing wall for a long period of time, this structure will be repainted with new content in the spring of 2018. Jonathan “Lank” Conner, who is painting the first mural, is an artist, designer, and educator from Hamilton. He is a member of the S.A.G.E. Coalition and has worked on public art and mural projects along the East Coast, including many in Trenton. On Friday, August 25, from 5-7 p.m., another project will be unveiled at 20 Bellevue Avenue at North Willow. The Higbee Street School, built in 1857 and later known as the Nixon School, was the first school built in Trenton for the free education of African-American children and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Also utilizing NRTC funding, this project is located in the Trenton Historic Development Collaborative neighborhood. The site-specific installation in the yard of the

BIG BOOKS: Project manager Andrew Wilkinson stands in the middle of a site-specific installation in the yard of the former Higbee Street School in Trenton. It consists of a series of oversized books viewed from different perspectives and offers an opportunity for the public to contribute their own words, ideas, and stories to the project. A formal unveiling will be held on Friday, August 25 from 5-7 p.m. school consists of a series of oversized books viewed from different perspectives and offers an opportunity for the public to contribute their own words, ideas, and stories to the project. The project was conceived by artist and educator Andrew Wilkinson and constructed by Mr. Wilkinson and Jennifer Dalle Pazze, a student at Rider who holds an associate’s degree in photography from Mercer County Community College. Mr. Wilkinson served as the project manager for both the mural wall and the site-specific installation. For more information, visit www.isles.org.

Area Exhibits Artworks, 19 Everett A lley, Trenton, shows “Urban Legend: The Art of Will Kasso” through August 31. www.artworks trenton.org. Arts Council of Pr inceton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has The Neighborhood Por trait Quilt on permanent display. www.artscouncilof princeton.org. E l l a r s l i e , Tr e nton’s Cit y Mu s e u m i n C ad walader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has an exhibit on the park and

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its designer, Frederick L aw Olmsted, through S e p te m b e r 17. w w w. ellarslie.com. Friend Center Atrium, Princeton University campus, shows the 2017 “Art of Science Exhibition” weekdays through April 2018. arts.prince ton.edu. Grounds for Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Elyn Zimmerman : Wind, Water, Stone” through August 27, “That’s Worth Celebrating: The Life and Works of the Johnson Family” through December 31, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculp ture.org. H i s to r i c a l S o c i e t y of Pr inceton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: The Arch ite c t i n P r i n ce ton,” “The Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” and a show on John von Neumann, as well as a permanent exhibit of historic photographs. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, noon- 4 p.m. Thursday ex te n de d hou r s t i l l 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princeton history.org. The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Myths and Nature: Early Prints by Sam Maitin” through August 27. Visit www.michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum and G a rd e n , 55 Stockton Street, has “Newark and the Culture of Art: 19001960” through January 28. morven.org. N e w H o p e A r t s, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has the Artsbr idge and New Hope Arts Members’ Summer Art Salon through August 27. www.NewHopeArts. org. Pr inceton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, has paintings by Rita Styne Strow through August. w w w. princetonsenior.org. The Princeton Universit y A r t Museum has “Great British Drawings from the Ashmolean Museum” through September 17. “Transient Effects: The Solar Eclipses and Celestial Landscapes of Howard Russell Butler” runs through October 8. (609) 258-3788.


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SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Crowds came together in Palmer Square on Monday for the Solar Eclipse Viewing Party Photography by Erica M. Cardenas


The influential Ghanaian The influential artist El Anatsui Ghanaian artist El Anatsui makes use of Africa’s makes rich history use ofand Africa’s vibrant rich history and vibrant culture to create spectacular culture towall create hangings. spectacular wall hangings. Join us for a conversation Join usbetween for a conversation Anatsui between Anatsui Thank you for choosing andPrinceton Chika Okeke-Agulu, andassociate Chika Okeke-Agulu, professor in associate professor in University the Department of Art the and Department Archaeology. of Art Thisand Archaeology. This Art Museum public program takespublic place program during Anatsui’s takes place during Anatsui’s tenure asVoted the 2015 Sarah tenure LeeasElson, the 2015 Class Sarah of Lee Elson, Class of Best 1984, Artist-in-Residence. 1984, International Artist-in-Residence. Art International Gallery/Institution

ElAnatsui,AnotherPlace(detail),2014.Foundaluminumandcop erwire.©ElAnatsui/ImagecourtesyoftheartistandJackShainmanGal ery,NewYork always free and open toalways the public free and open to the public

artmuseum.princeton.eduartmuseum.princeton.edu Claude Monet, Water Lilies and Japanese Bridge, 1899. Princeton Univesity Art Museum. From the Collection of William Church Osborn, Class of 1883, trustee of Princeton University (1914-1951), president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1941-1947); given by his family

El Anatsui, Another Place (detail), 2014. Found El Anatsui, aluminum Another and copper Place wire. (detail), © El2014. Anatsui Found / Image aluminum courtesy and of copper the artist wire.and © ElJack Anatsui Shainman / ImageGallery, courtesy New ofYork the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York TOWN TOPICS AD

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stablished by Dr. Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, RSM Psychology Center LLC opened in Princeton in 2014, after 19 years in Lawrenceville. The center offers neuropsychological evaluations and treatments that can help students as well as older adults. As Dr. Moser explains, RSM “specializes in comprehensive psychological and neuropsychological services for school-age children through older adults. We believe in a treatment approach which is direct, problem-oriented, and solution-focused, and which can be individually or family-oriented.” Dr. Moser, who received a PhD in professional psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, is a boardcertified neuropsychologist and rehabilitation psychologist, and a state-certified school psychologist. She is also an adjunct professor of clinical psychology at Widener University, and is internationally recognized for her work in the area of sports concussions. A fellow of the American Psychological Association and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, she is the recipient of

many awards and honors in the field. An important feature of RSM’s work is its focus on neuropsychological evaluations. As Dr. Moser explains, neuropsychologists have an understanding and knowledge regarding brain/ behavior connections that is more specialized than that of a general clinical psychologist. Brain/Behavior Connections “We are neuropsychologists who are experts in brain/behavior connections. For example, if a child sustains a concussion, a neuropsychologist understands what cognitive functions are affected and which aren’t and how the child will recover and be able to handle school. Neuropsychologists are trained to administer specialized tests (assessing different brain and neurocognitive functions) that the typical psychologist does not, and they know what the pattern of results means in terms of the person’s academic, work, and social/ emotional performance. “For example, when it comes to learning, neuropsychologists know the

differences between attention, short-term memory, episodic memory, procedural memory, recognition and recall memory, long-term, retrieval, storage, etc. This affects learning on a daily basis as well as more formally in school. It affects how parents and children, teachers and students communicate when they share information, discuss, interpret, and question what they say. “Neuropsychologists can identify the structures and functions that need remediation and help develop plans to improve and/or compensate or get around the difficulties. They also help family members, school personnel, and loved ones understand what the person is experiencing and may not really have full control over.” Such evaluations can be especially helpful for students who may not be performing to their potential in school. As Dr. Moser observes, “When academic grades are less than expected, it is not uncommon for parents immediately to seek tutoring and popular learning center services. But, before ‘treatment’ occurs, isn’t it best to have an expert evaluation to

be sure that the treatment is targeting the real issue? For example, many students are diagnosed with attention deficit disorder after a couple of paper-pencil surveys. But, paper-pencil surveys or an interview are not enough to rule out other possible ‘real’ causes of attention difficulties, such as auditory processing difficulties, a reading disorder, or just being really bright, creative, and bored in the classroom.” Dr. Moser points out that neuropsychological evaluations can help identify their clients’ strengths and weaknesses and develop treatments to help them learn and perform their best at school or on the job. These evaluations provide the evidence and documentation required if they need special consideration and accommodation, such as extended time on tests and assignments, access to notes, a separate room for testing, writing skills support, etc. In-Depth Testing “When a student seems not to be performing up to his or her potential, a neuropsychologist can provide the in-depth testing to answer questions about why

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this is happening. Is the student gifted and bored in the classroom? Does the student have an attentional disorder that results in inconsistent academic performance? is there an auditory processing issue that prevents the student from doing well in lecture classes? Is the student a superior logical thinker and problem-solver, but needs extra time due to more average range processing speed?” In addition, “Does the student benefit from visual presentation instead of verbal presentation in order to process new information? Does the student struggle

with math due to lower non-verbal skills or due to test-taking anxiety? Is the student an athlete who has experienced concussions that are now affecting mental processing? Are there other non-cognitive factors that are impacting the student’s academic performance such as low self-esteem, victimization due to bullying, social isolation, or recent family stressors?” “There are many factors that influence a student’s academic performance,” observes Dr. Moser. “We currently live in an age in which expectations to excel and perform place an inordinate amount of pressure on students. More is expected of students, and so the

assignments, the homework, and even the school hours are burdensome. “In fact, we know that youth are sleep-deprived in the U.S., and the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention all say our school days should start later. As a result, studies show that students who are sleep-deprived and experience academic pressure also suffer from increased emotional and physical disorders. We know that emotional health impacts academic performance.” Several Components Dr. Kathryn Murray, also

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017

School Performance


School Performance

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017 • 22

of their ability. and researchers who are committed to important pubAs Dr. Moser says, “Our Continued from Preceding Page dedicated staff specializes in lic health issues and to the a neuropsychologist at RSM, comprehensive psychologi- well-being of our clients.” and who is additionally cal and neuropsychological —Jean Stratton board-certified in biofeed- services. We are educators back, explains that students are referred to RSM by a variety of sources, including MAKE THIS SCHOOL YEAR schools, universities, hospitals, pediatricians, neurologists, psychiatrists, psycholLAST YEAR! ogists, and word of mouth. W hen st udents reach As your child gears up to head back to school, out to RSM for evaluation, Mathnasium is here to help set the stage for success! the process includes sevOur unique teaching method is designed to eral components, notes Dr. strengthen math foundations, boost confidence, Murray. Initial review and and ultimately, make math make sense. history-taking, review of reWhether your child is ahead of the curve, cords, consultation with reperforming at grade level, or falling behind, together, we can make this ferral sources, observation, school year greater than last year! in-depth testing, detailed reports, and a feedback/ report review session. This usually occurs over a twoday period. Cognitive functions which are tested include memory, language skills, sensory/ perceptual/motor skills, visual/spatial abilities, mental speed/efficiency/flexibility, NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL physical/mental coordination, listening skills, attention Math Help and Enrichment Test Prep Homework Help and concentration, problemsolving skills, reasoning, and general intellectual skills, Mathnasium of [Location] Mathnasium of [Location] Behavioral and emotional 000-000-0000(0000) 000-000-0000(0000) assessment is included to unmathnasium.com/location mathnasium.com/location derstand how those factors Address Line One Address Line One Address Line Two Address Line Two affect cognitive functioning. RSM provides evaluations for other brain disorders and diseases as well, such Mathnasium of Princeton as memory disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, 609-256-MATH (6284) brain tumor, brain injuries, mathnasium.com/princeton and concussions. 301 North Harrison Street The RSM staff includes Princeton, NJ 08540 professionals in several areas. Neuropsychologists, Mathnasium of Pennington brain injur y specialists, 609-483-MATH (6284) school psychologists, and mathnasium.com/pennington others are all available to 1 Tree Farm Road help students and adults find Pennington, NJ 08534 ways to perform to the best

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well as emotional issues including anxiety, depression, mood and eating disorders are some of the difficulties students are coping with today. Schools, with the help of qualified teachers and counselors, are working to help students not only reach their academic potential, but also acquire social skills and develop self-esteem. The Rock Brook School in Skillman enrolls students from 3 years old to 21. A private, nonprofit school for communication-impaired and multiply-disabled individuals, Rock Brook was established in 1974, and is approved by the New Jersey State Department of Education, and received accreditation from the Middle States Commission on Elementary Schools (MSCES). Currently, 50 students from 25 different school districts in central New Jersey are enrolled, and in most cases, the student’s home school district pays tuition. Individualized Program The school day is from 8:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, September through June. An extended year program is available for six weeks beginning in July. “Our program is for students who require an individualized program, along with intensive speech, occupational, and physical therapy,” explains Mar y Caterson, director of the school. “Counseling, social skills, and physical therapy

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Sample classes for all ages Sample for allages ages Sample classes classes for all Ballet and and Hop inin Ballet andHip Hip Hop in Ballet Hip Hop Princeton Dance &Theater Theater Studio Princeton Dance & Studio Princeton Dance & Theater Studio 116 Row 116Rockingham Rockingham Row 116 Rockingham Row Forrestal Princeton ForrestalVillage, Village, Princeton Forrestal Village, Princeton Trial Classes Trial in Modern, Tap and Jazz will be offered classes in Modern, Tap and Jazz Trial classes in Modern, Tap and Jazz will be offered during the first week of – 9/14 during the first week of classes, 9/8 will be offered during classes, 9/8 -the 9/14first week of classes, 9/8 - 9/14 online Schedule and Registration

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23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017

Opportunities for Special Needs Students Are Available at Many Schools in the Area

FREE DANCE CLASSES


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017 • 24

Special Needs Students Continued from Preceding Page

are also provided.” Rock Brook students have a variety of special needs and medical diagnoses, including communication and learning impairment, autism spectrum disorder, and developmental difficulties, continues Ms. Caterson. “Each classroom is staffed

by a special education teacher, speech pathologist, and at least one teacher assistant. The school is committed to helping students communicate and learn so they can reach their individual potential. This is achieved through highly individualized teaching and therapy sessions, the use of technology supports, and other specialized approaches, as well as strong

interpersonal and supportive connections by the professionals with the students.” Long History The Lewis School of Princeton has a long history of helping students with language-based learning disorders. Founded by Marsha Gaynor Lewis in 1973, it is an independent, coeducational, private day school, accredited by the New Jersey

For high achievement in violin, viola and cello performance “You are to be complimented for fostering a warm, supportive community, where your students are well taught in every respect.” Jonathan Beiler First Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra

Call NOW to join our award winning string program: • Private lessons for violin, viola, cello and string bass • Group lessons/ performance • String quartet coaching/ performance • Competition coaching • Music Theory For more information call 609.751.7664 or visit our website www.stringacademy.net

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Association of Independent Schools. Students from PreK through 12th grade are enrolled. The school day runs from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and offers a dynamic variety of afternoon programs after 2:30, which are open to all students in the greater Princeton area. They include speech-language therapy, public speaking and communications fluency, music and visual arts, STEM, STEAM, and STREAM, computer coding and applied 3-D printing, technology literacy, SAT/ACT and college application preparation, and oneon-one or small group tutorials in advanced multi-sensory learning strategies; also competitive athletics, aquatics, archery, and track. In addition, a four-week summer camp study program, also open to all students in the greater Mercer County area and beyond, is offered. Although the school focuses primarily on students with dyslexia, it helps students struggling with ADD, ADHD, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, executive functioning, auditory processing, and organizational skills. The school also provides educational remediation and support for high school post graduates, GAP year students, and college students looking to build stronger reading, writing, and study skills. The Lewis School’s mission is articulated by Ms. Lewis, director and head of school. It is “to educate and to empower bright, creative young people whose scholastic achievement and human potential are hindered by unresolved language-based learning issues related to dyslexia, auditory processing, and attention. It is to provide these promising students who learn differently with the most exceptional multi-sensory education opportunity possible, within a school community specifically attuned and responsive to each student’s learning strengths and weaknesses, and to the nurture and enrichment of the whole person.”

The Lewis School uses a number of programs and curriculum designed by Ms. Lewis. “A Lewis School education integrates well-known remedial approaches such as Orton-Gillingham, Wilson Reading, Lindamood-Bell, and related methods with its proprietary LIMMOL system of teaching and learning,” explains Ms. Lewis. Leading Edge “At Lewis, dyslexia is not defined as a reading problem in isolation but a condition that affects language processing in a wide range of modalities expressed in the brain’s learning. Current research corroborates the theory and approaches that Lewis has implemented for decades, keeping the school at the leading edge of educational change and innovation.” “One of the most significant advantages of The Lewis School is its Diagnostic Clinic for educational testing,” she continues. “Assessment in the clinic identifies the distinguishing characteristics of each student’s learning style, and these results are integrated with the diagnostic opinions of other specialists involved with the child. The student’s profile of academic strengths and weaknesses, gifts and aptitudes are the hallmarks that determine his or her placement and academic path.” Multi-sensory education that engages many senses of the brain simultaneously is very important at The Lewis School. As Ms. Lewis reports, “The Lewis integrated Multi-Sensory Mechanics of Language and Learning (LIMMOL) is implemented in all subjects of the curriculum and in related areas of study. Each student’s strengths are optimized, as the underlying ‘mechanics’ and processes of language and learning are repaired and developed. Ms. Lewis adds that unlike many educational programs that tend to focus on the negative aspects of a child’s learning, “At Lewis, we focus on the unique forms of intelligence among students who learn differently. We celebrate the gifts and talents of our many students. The Lewis School has focused on the ‘multiple intelligences’ of students who struggle to cope or are otherwise failing to achieve their potential in traditional classrooms elsewhere. Learning problems are understood, not as disabilities, but as differences: the expression of remarkable and diverse capacities of human thinking and perception” Teachers and instructors at the Lewis School have a depth off knowledge and training in the field of dyslexic education, points out Ms. Lewis. “Their expertise is enhanced through a rigorous continuing program of professional development in neuroscience and evidence-based research and innovation. The Lewis School and Clinic for Educational Therapy has been a member of the International Dyslexia Association and Orton Society since the early 1970s, and our teachers participate in the annual Harvard and Brain Learning Conferences.” After graduation, Lewis students have attended colleges and universities across the country, and go on to successful careers. As Ms. Lewis says, “We have educated thousands of students

through the years, offering not only the opportunity for academic growth and enrichment but also the opportunity to grow socially, athletically, and artistically. Students who experience a Lewis education are encouraged to grow in their new-found self-regard, independence, and accountability, and leave Lewis ready to take on challenges and opportunities in the future. “Whether a child is enrolled in the full-time, summer, or after school education program at Lewis, the students will learn to discover and celebrate their gifts and great talents, which will help them to ‘open the door to a bright future.’ “At Lewis, we celebrate ‘Great Students Doing Great Things!’” Educational Community “Success, Achievement, Growth, and Empowerment” equals SAGE. This acronym conveys the values of Sage Day School. As the Sage mission statement explains, the school’s goal is “to provide a safe, small therapeutic and challenging educational community that integrates social, emotional, and academic growth through the collaboration of students, families, and staff to empower and prepare students with the skills needed to realize their potential and achieve success.” Sage Day Princeton is the latest addition to the Sage Day group of four small private therapeutic schools serving students with special needs. Founded 20 years ago with the first school in Rochelle Park, the Sage focus helps students dealing with emotional issues including anxiety, depression, ADHD, and school refusal, among other conditions. Sage Day Princeton, which opened in 2014 for grades six through 12, is located on Quakerbridge Road in Hamilton. “We offer individual and group, and family therapy, built into our school curriculum,” explains Christopher J. Leonard, MSW, LCSW, M.Ed., the school’s director of operations. “Each student is paired with a Sage Certified Clinician (™) who guides the student through his or her time at Sage. We accept students in all surrounding counties.” Adds Gary Mattia, M.Ed., principal of Sage Princeton: “As administrators, we are strongly committed to the intellectual and emotional growth of each student. Our focus is on the ‘whole’ student as we provide a comprehensive curriculum in classes that are small, supportive, and challenging, along with therapeutic education that is fully integrated into the school day. State-of-the-Art “All Sage students receive individual therapy twice a week, group therapy twice a week, and family therapy once each week at a minimum. At Sage Day Princeton, we strive to insure a personalized, positive learning environment for each of our students that empowers them to recognize their strengths, and realize their potential in order to be prepared to return to their regular school districts and/or go out into the world. “Our state-of-the-art school Continued on Next Page


Continued from Preceding Page

provides districts in central New Jersey with a unique out-of-district option for classified students with unique needs due to anxiety, depression, mood disorders, school refusal, suicidal ideation, self-injurious behaviors, and eating disorders. Sage fills a specific niche for those students who require consistent,

sustained clinical therapy for themselves, as well as their families, while offering grade six through 12 instructional program that is aligned with the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.” Constant supervision of the students is a very important part of the Sage philosophy, points out executive director John Reilly, MSW, LCSW, PSYA: “Our organizational

Still Accepting Applications for Fall Applications

are currently being accepted

for 2017-2018

Founded over 45 years ago, Nassau Nursery School is a cooperative nursery school situated just steps from downtown Princeton, NJ at Trinity Church. Through creative daily curriculum and extensive special program offerings, Nassau Nursery School provides a uniquely inspiring learning environment for children ages two and a half through junior kindergarten.

We accommodate Children and Adults with special needs.

structure ensures that clinical therapists are supervised and mentored by a clinical director, and all of our clinical directors receive equally intensive supportive supervision. Faculty therapists, and appropriate staff members conference and meet regularly on student needs and issues. We work as a team to implement the highest ethical standards and live by these standards. “Our team approach contributes to the growth and development of our students dealing with emotional struggles. We are strongly committed to the students’ intellectual and emotional growth. In our experience, this is what best empowers them to fulfill their potential as lifelong learners and productive members of society.” Student-Centered Dedicated to helping students with language-based learning differences, The Cambridge School opened its doors in 2001 in Pennington. “Cambridge is excited be starting its 17th year,” explains the school’s head Ellen Gonzales. “We serve students with dyslexia, ADHD, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, central auditory processing, and executive function challenges. Our program is founded on evidence-based research and a student-centered approach to education that provides an individualized and specialized yet comprehensive school experience.” A coeducational, independent day school, Cambridge currently enrolls 135 students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Helping students who learn differently, providing them with a stimulating curriculum that engages and motivates them to learn within an encouraging environment is the priority at Cambridge. “Students are empowered to complete homework independently each day, which is a reflection and reinforcement of the instruction they received in class,” points out admissions director Melody Maskell. “The students are also very proud to live by the Golden Rule : ‘Treat others the way you want to be treated.’ And The Cambridge School’s atmosphere is warm, nurturing, and truly dynamic.” The curriculum and course of study is vigorous and state-of-the-art. “Not only do we address the languagebased learning differences in all areas of our curriculum, we integrate state-of-the-art technology including SmartBoards, green screen, 3-D printing, Chromebooks, and ipads in our instruction,” explains Ms. Gonzales. “Though academics are paramount, we also offer a vibrant arts program, a well-established athletic program, and a variety of extracurricular personal interest clubs to round out the students’ school experience.” She points to three important components to the academic program: Special Courses, Methods of Teaching, and Teacher Training. Integral Part Regarding Special Courses: “Our related services are an integral part of of our educational program to further support student learning. Cambridge offers speech and language treatment and social cognitive strategies (™) with our staff of six

certified speech and language pathologists. Occupational therapy is also offered to address motor planning skills, sensory processing, and occupational behaviors. “Methods of Teaching: At all levels of instruction, there is an intensive focus on executive function development to support each student in his or her organizational skills and work production. Cambridge is hosting Peg Dawson, Ed.D, a well-respected expert in the field of executive function, on October 4. This event is open to the public. “Teacher Training: Teachers are language specialists with Level-1 Wilson Reading certification and training in Orton-Gillingham methods, Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes™, Hochman Writing Program, and Making Math Real, to name a few.

Language instruction provides three periods a day for 45 minutes. Direct, explicit instruction with multisensory learning is used to increase opportunities for learning experiences at all grade levels.” The school offers a 4:1 faculty-to-student ratio, adds Ms. Gonzales. In addition to its regular academic program, the school opened a Diagnostic Center in 2016. “This is a team of nationally-certified professionals who are experts in their field, offer comprehensive psycho-educational speech and language and occupational therapy evaluations, as well as screenings for ADHD and executive function,” explains Ms. Gonzales. “It became clear over the

course of time that there was a need in the greater community to assist in the identification and diagnosis of language-based learning differences.” The performing and visual arts are also very important at Cambridge. A winter play and spring musical are performed every year, says Ms. Gonzales. “We also partner with Westminster Choir College to offer instrumental music lessons, hand bells, drum circle, recorder program, visual arts, and more. “In terms of physical education, K-8 students enjoy a rigorous active curriculum with twice-weekly gym and health classes. In our Upper School, we provide physical education opportunities including golf, yoga, tennis, track and field, and PEC.” —Jean Stratton

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017

Special Needs Students


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 26

Music and Theater

Paul Barnes Presents “Philip Glass at 80”

Pianist Paul Barnes will present a recital titled “Philip Glass at 80: A Retrospective” on Friday, September 9 at 8 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the campus of Westminster Choir College of Rider University in Princeton. Admission is free. Paul Barnes has collaborated with composer Philip Glass for more than 20 years. His Philip Glass Retrospective, in celebration of this collaboration and Glass’s 80th birthday, fe at u r e s B a r n e s’s t r a n scriptions from the Trilogy Sonata and Orphée Suite for Piano, as well as Piano Concerto No. 2 (After Lewis and Clark), which Barnes commissioned and premiered. Barnes will also perform several of Glass’s new Etudes, which are featured on his latest recordi n g, Ne w G e ne ra t i o n s . Barnes will be joined by PHILIP GLASS AT 80: Pianist Paul Barnes (right) will perform music of Philip Glass in a recital Westminster piano faculnatalie Kalibat3-revised.pdf 7/27/17 5:11:51 PM titled “Philip Glass at 80: A Retrospective” Saturday, September 9 at 8 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on ty member Phyllis Alpert the campus of Westminster Choir College of Rider University in Princeton. Admission is free. Lehrer to perform Glass’s

“The Lewis School was very supportive of me both as a student and as an athlete. My teachers believed in me all the way. It was a great experience. The Lewis School provided such a special and personalized way of learning that helped me to understand my learning differences and build confidence. The skills I developed at Lewis allowed me to maintain a B average at the University of Southern California, something that I would never have dreamed prior to attending Lewis.”

Natalie Kalibat,

Class of 2016 University of Southern California The Lewis School of Princeton, 2007 - 2012

BURIED SECRETS: Michael Shannon stars in A Red Orchid Theatre’s “Simpatico” coming to McCarter Theatre, September 8 through October 15, 2017. The tragicomedy explores the slippery netherworld of thoroughbred racing from Pulitzer Prizewinning dramatist Sam Shepard. For tickets, visit www.mc carter.org or call (609) 258-2787. (Photo Credit: Michael Brosilow) Four Movements for Two Pianos. Pau l Bar nes has been fe at u r e d fou r t i m e s on A PM’s Performance To day and his recordings are broadcast worldwide. Deeply inspired by the aesthetic vision of minimalism, Barnes commissioned and gave the world premiere of Philip Glass’s Piano Concerto No.

• 2011 USC Early Acceptance & four year Athletic Scholarship • 2012 Honors College Preparatory Graduate, The Lewis School • 2012 - 2016 Member of USC’s elite Trojan Diving Team • Student Ambassador for USC’s Trojan Athletics Development & Outreach • 2016 USC Graduate of USC: BA in Sociology; Minor in Sports, Business & Media Studies • Voted USC’s 2016 “Outstanding Student for Academic & Overall Achievement” • Two Time NJ State Girls’ Diving Champion, NJSIAA Elite Diver 2011 & 2012; 2011 Eastern Interscholastic Diving Champion • 2012 London Olympic Trials competitor, 10 meter synchronized diving • 2015 Lewis School Distinguished Alumna & Honors Society Inductee • NJ Legislature Tribute for “Meritorious Achievement Competitive Spirit & Sportsmanship as a Champion State Diver” • Sports Anchor Annenberg TV News: highlighted athletes’ off-field volunteer & community service, & stories of personal courage among aspiring young athletes • On-campus reporter & news anchor for ESPN Affiliate WeAreSC & California Telecommunica tions Media • 2015 ESPN Rose Bowl Assistant to the Producer • Sports & Field Reporter for the PAC12 network including UCLA, University of Arizona & Stanford • Won February 2016 PAC12 Diving Conference Championship

“I studied and worked so hard in school and got horrible grades on exams. I also struggled with reading comprehension before I joined Lewis. I now work as a sports anchor and reporter for WBOY, an NBC affiliate, and I am living my dream! ”

53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-8120

2 (After Lewis and Clark). Phyllis Alpert Lehrer is known internationally as a performer, teacher, clinician, author, and adjudicator. She has given master classes, workshops, and enjoyed an active concert career as a soloist and collaborative artist in the United States, Canada, Central America, Asia, and Europe. Learn more about this performance at www.rider. edu/arts or by calling (609) 921-2663. ———

“Memphis” Kicks-Off Kelsey’s New Season

The curtain goes up on a new season at Mercer Count y Com mu nit y College’s ( MCCC’s ) Kelsey Theatre with Memphis. Presented by PinnWorth Productions, this hit Broadway musical offers a dramatized account of the roots of rock and roll, and radio’s role in embracing the new sounds that transformed the country. Dates and show times are: Fridays, September 8 and 15 at 8 p.m.; Saturdays, September 9 and 16 at 8 p.m.; and Sundays, September 10 and 17 at 2 p.m. Kelsey Theatre is located on the college’s West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. A reception with the cast and crew follows the opening night performance on September 8. Winner of the Tony Award for Best Musical in 2010, Memphis is based on a book by Joe DiPietro and the lively musical score of David Bryan, a founding member of Bon Jovi. The plot is loosely based on Memphis disc jockey Dewey Phillips, one of the first white DJs to play black music in the 1950s. Elements of boy-meets-girl simplicity are set against the complex backdrop of American music history and the strict segregation laws of the South at that time. The show stars Matt Coakley of Gillette as Huey; Tamika Reed of Lawrenceville as Felicia; Maureen Hackett of Robbinsville as Gladys; Kyrus Keenan Westcott of Levittown, Pa., as Delray; Robert Harris of Philadelphia, Pa., as Bobby; Jerome Arthur of Somerset as John Gator; and Jeff Dworkin of Langhorne, Pa., as Simmons. Memphis is co-produced by Lou J. Stalsworth and Kate Pinner, and directed by Mr. Stalswor th, w ith co-director Kyrus Keenan Westcott. Music direction is by François Suhr; choreography is by Robert Harris; and costumes are by Kate Pinner. Tickets are $20 and may be purchased online at www. kelseytheatre.net or by calling the Kelsey box office at (609) 570-3333.


Pianist Clipper Erickson will open the Westminster Conservatory 2017-18 Faculty Recital Series with a performance titled “The Russian American Connection” on Sunday, September 17 at 3 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the campus of We s t m ins ter Choir Col lege of Rider University in

The program will include music by Russian and American composers, including Modest Mussorgsky’s monumental Pictures at an Exhibition. Other works include David Finko’s Sonata No. 1, which was inspired by the Yiddish Jewish World and its culture, particularly by the Moscow State Jewish

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Amy Beach’s Ballad, Op. 6. He will also perform Sonata Notturna, composed by Richard Brodhead for Clipper Erickson. The composer wrote about the work, “The sonata is cast as a series of night images, contrasting in character but closely related in their underlying material. Together, these images

elements of both variation and fantasy. ” Erickson studied at The Juilliard School, Yale University, and Indiana University, training with the British pianist John Ogdon and Alexander Fiorillo. Erickson has won top prizes at international competitions such as the Busoni

orchestras throughout the United Sates, as well as a recitalist in venues including the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Carnegie Hall, and Symphony Space in New York. Learn more about this performance at www.rider. edu/arts or by calling (609) 921-2663.

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Good Time Friday - Thursday: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 (R)

The Trip to Spain Friday - Thursday: 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55 (UR)

The Only Living Boy in New York Friday - Thursday: 2:30, 4:45, 9:40 (R)

Menashe Friday - Thursday: 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30 (PG)

Wind River Friday - Thursday: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 (R)

The Big Sick Friday - Thursday: 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 (R)

Maudie Friday - Thursday: 7:00 (PG-13)

Starting Friday The Midwife (NR) Continuing Wind River (R) The Big Sick (R) Limited Engagement A Ghost Story (R) Hollywood Summer Nights On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969) Thu, Aug 24 7:30 pm National Theatre Live Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (NR) Sun, Aug 27 12:30pm Hollywood Summer Nights Monkey Business (1931) Wed, Aug 30 7:30pm Showtimes change daily Visit or call for showtimes. Hotline: 609-279-1999 PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

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The Dark Tower

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Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

Gunslinger Defends Planet Earth From Extinction

L

aurie Chambers (Katheryn Winnick) is understandably worried about her 11-year-old son’s recurring nightmares. In them, her son Jake (Tom Taylor) is becoming convinced that the demise of Earth is imminent. So, she takes him to a psychiatrist who diagnoses Jake’s visions as delusional and has him committed to a mental health facility. However, Jake really is psychic, and he is accurately forecasting the impending extinction of life on Earth. The planet’s only hope of averting this apocalypse rests on the shoulders, or more precisely, on the trigger fingers of Roland Deschain (Idris Elba). He’s the last in a long line of gunslingers from another dimension who have been locked in mortal conflict with forces that are led by Randall Flagg (Matthew McConaughey), an evil sorcerer who is on a quest for infinite power. World domination by him is attainable if Randall can reach the Dark Tower, the nexus between time and space that is located in a parallel universe called End-World. Soon the mysterious figures in Jake’s dreams begin to materialize on the streets of Manhattan. After Randall’s minions murder Jake’s mother, the boy is rescued by Roland. The two escape through a portal to Mid-World where the epic battle to preserve life on Earth unfolds. That is the point of departure of The Dark Tower, an

adaptation of Stephen King’s magnum opus of the same name. The science fiction series was inspired by “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came,” a poem written by Robert Browning in 1855. King also cites Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy, Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti westerns, and the legend of King Arthur as major influences. The Dark Tower took a circuitous route to becoming a movie. The story was originally optioned by J.J. Abrams in 2007. Ron Howard subsequently acquired the rights in 2010. However, the picture was ultimately written and directed by Nikolaj Arcel, whose A Royal Affair was nominated in 2013 for an Oscar in the Best Foreign Film category. This movie is Mr. Arcel’s first English language film, which is why he received help with the screenplay from three scriptwriters that includes Oscar winner Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind). The final production is engaging enough to establish the franchise and leave you anticipating a sequel. Very Good (HHH). Rated PG-13 for action, gun violence, and mature themes. Running time: 95 minutes. Production Studio: Sony/ Media Rights Capital/Imagine Entertainment/Weed Road. Distributor: Sony Pictures. —Kam Williams

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All Saints (PG for mature themes). Drama about the real-life struggle of a pastor (John Corbett) to save his cash-strapped church by farming its grounds with the help of some Vietnamese refugee congregants. With Nelson Lee, Gregory Alan Williams, Cara Buono, and Chonda Pierce. Annabelle: Creation (R for horror violence). Tale of demonic possession about a dollmaker (Anthony LaPaglia) and his wife (Miranda Otto) who open their home to a nun (Stephanie Sigman) and several orphans only to have them terrorized by one of his creations (Samara Lee). With Talitha Bateman, Lulu Wilson, and Kerry O’Malley. Atomic Blonde (R for sexuality, nudity, graphic violence, and pervasive profanity). Cold War thriller, set shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall, about an MI6 agent (Charlize Theron) sent to Germany to solve the murder of a fellow spy. Cast includes James McAvoy, John Goodman, Eddie Marsan, and Toby Jones. The Big Sick (R for profanity and sexual references). Romantic comedy recounting the real-life courting of a fan (Zoe Kazan) by a Pakistani stand-up comedian (Kumail Nanjiani as himself). Supporting cast includes Ray Romano, Holly Hunter, and Aidy Bryant. Birth of the Dragon (PG-13 for violence, profanity, and mature themes). Philip Ng plays Bruce Lee in this biopic, set in San Francisco in the 60s, about a showdown between the martial arts legend and a kung fu master (Xia Yu). Cast includes Billy Magnussen, Xing Jing, and Terry Chen. In English and Mandarin with subtitles. The Dark Tower (PG-13 for action, gun violence, and mature themes). Adaptation of the Stephen King science-fiction thriller about an 11-year-old adventurer (Tom Taylor) who slips into another dimension where he witnesses a showdown between an evil sorcerer (Matthew McConaughey) and a gunslinger (Idris Elba) defending the universe from extinction. Supporting cast includes Abbey Lee, Dennis Haysbert, and Jackie Earle Haley. Dunkirk (PG-13 for intense battle scenes and some profanity). World War II movie recreating the evacuation of over 300,000 Allied soldiers from the shores of France after they were surrounded by the Nazi army. Ensemble cast includes Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance, Fionn Whitehead, Aneurin Barnard, Barry Keoghan, and Harry Styles. In English, French, and German with subtitles. The Emoji Movie (PG for rude humor) Animated movie about an over-enunciating text message emoji (T.J. Miller) who embarks on a quest for a filter that will limit him to one facial expression, just like his parents (Steven Wright and Jennifer Coolidge). Voice cast includes James Corden, Anna Faris, and Maya Rudolph. Girls Trip (R for pervasive profanity, crude humor, coarse dialogue, drug use, and brief graphic nudity). Dramatic comedy about four college classmates (Jada Pinkett Smith, Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, and Tiffany Haddish) who reunite for the first time in years to attend the Essence Festival in New Orleans. With Larenz Tate, Kate Walsh, and Mike Colter, and with cameo appearances by Mike Epps, Common, Ne-Yo, and Mariah Carey. The Glass Castle (PG-13 for profanity, smoking, and mature themes). Brie Larson stars in this adaptation of Jeanette Walls’s best-selling memoir of the same name about being raised in a dysfunctional family by an artist (Naomi Watts) and an alcoholic (Woody Harrelson). Cast includes Sarah Snook, Josh Caras, and Max Greenfield. The Hitman’s Bodyguard (R for graphic violence and pervasive profanity). Comedy about a bodyguard (Ryan Reynolds) who helps an assassin (Samuel L. Jackson) negotiate a gauntlet on his way to the Hague where he will testify at the International Court of Justice. Co-starring Gary Oldman, Salma Hayek, and Elodie Yung. An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power (Unrated). Al Gore picks up where he left off in this cautionary documentary warning of the havoc being wreaked around the planet as a consequence of climate change. Featuring commentary by Presidents Obama and Trump. Kidnap (R for violence and scenes of peril). Suspense thriller about a single-mom (Halle Berry) who becomes a vigilante after her young son (Sage Correa) is abducted by kidnappers. With Lew Temple, Dana Gourrier, and Chris McGinn. Leap! (PG for action and impolite humor). Animated adventure about an 11-year-old orphan (Elle Fanning) living in Brittany who runs away to Paris with a friend (Nat Wolff) to pursue her lifelong dream of becoming a prima ballerina. Voice cast features Mel Brooks, Carly Rae Jepsen, and Maddie Ziegler. Logan Lucky (PG-13 for profanity and crude comments). Oscar-winner Steven Soderbergh (Traffic) directs, shoots, and edits this comic crime caper about two brothers (Channing Tatum and Adam Driver) who hatch a plan to stage a robbery at the Charlotte Motor Speedway during NASCAR’s Coca-Cola 600 car race. Ensemble cast includes Daniel Craig, Hilary Swank, Seth MacFarlane, Katie Holmes, Dwight Yoakam, and Riley Keough. Maudie (PG-13 for mature themes and brief sexuality). Sally Hawkins portrays Maud Lewis in this biopic, set in Nova Scotia in the ’30s, about how she overcomes the rheumatoid arthritis that had crippled her since childhood to become one of Canada’s most celebrated folk artists. Supporting cast includes Ethan Hawke, Kari Matchett, and Zachary Bennett. Menashe (PG for mature themes). Menashe Lustig is the title character in this drama, set in New York City’s Hasidic community, about a grieving widower who is struggling to raise his son (Ruben Niborski) alone after his wife’s untimely death. With Yoel Weisshaus and Meyer Schwartz. In Yiddish with subtitles. The Nut Job 3: Nutty by Nature (PG for action and rude humor). The animated sequel has Surly the squirrel (Will Arnett) and Buddy (Tom Kenny) joining forces with other animals to prevent their crooked mayor (Bobby Moynihan) from paving the park to build an amusement park. Voice cast includes Maya Rudolph, Jackie Chan, Katherine Heigl, and Jeff Dunham. The Only Living Boy in New York (R for profanity and drug use). Drama about a love triangle that develops when a college grad (Callum Turner) discovers that his father (Pierce Brosnan) is cheating on his mother (Cynthia Nixon) with a younger woman (Kate Beckinsale). With Jeff Bridges, Kiersey Clemons, and Wallace Shawn. Patti Cake$ (R for crude sexual references, drug use, pervasive profanity, and a brief nude image). A movie set in Lodi, New Jersey, about a rapper’s (Danielle Macdonald) quest for superstardom. With Bridget Everett, Siddharth Dhanajay, Mamoudou Athie, and Cathy Moriarty. Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13 for action, violence, profanity, and suggestive comments). Tom Holland assumes the title role in this film of the Marvel Comics series that finds Peter Parker living with his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) and attending high school in Queens while being mentored by Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) until it’s time to morph into his superhero alter ego to engage a new nemesis (Michael Keaton). With Gwyneth Paltrow, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Donald Glover, and Tyne Daly. Wind River (R for profanity, rape, graphic violence, and disturbing images). Thriller about a rookie FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) who works with a veteran game tracker (Jeremy Renner) to solve a murder after a body is discovered in the woods on an Indian reservation. With Graham Greene, Judith Jones, and Jon Bernthal. —Kam Williams

Calendar Wednesday, August 23 10 a.m. to noon: Athleta Girl Summer Camp Series at MarketFair in Princeton. Shop the new fall collections, along with crafts/activities. 5 p.m.: Annual Block Party at McCarter Theater. Live music by the Philadelphia Orchestra, crafts, beer garden, and backstage tours. Free. 5:30 p.m.: Princeton Public Library hosts a Community Picnic at Community Park South. Free. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.: Pop In Workshop: The Art of Journaling at 10 Hulfish Street and presented by the Arts Council of Princeton. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Kingston Greenways Association presents a screening of Microcosmos at the Yinghua International School, 25 Laurel Avenue in Kingston. Special cameras and microphones depict a bug’s eye view of the world. Guests should bring a lawn chair or cushion. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Stage Fright (1950) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Thursday, August 24 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Shop local produce and baked goods at the Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza (repeats weekly). 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Pop In Workshop: Wonders of Water! (WOW) at 10 Hulfish Street and presented by the Arts Council of Princeton. Free. 6 to 10 p.m.: The Summer Courtyard Concert Series at Princeton Shopping Center welcomes Michael Austin with the Theljon Allen Band, a soul jazz group. This event is Free. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Friday, August 25 9 to 10 a.m.: Free, Baby Boot Camp stroller-based fitness program on Palmer Square Green (weather permitting). For more information and to register, visit www.babybootcamp.com. 3 p.m.: Native Plant Sale at D&R Greenway Land Trust, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place in Princeton. Saturday, August 26 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Princeton Junction Train Station Parking Lot. Over 16 farms and 11 artisan food and natural product vendors are represented (repeats weekly). 10 to 11:30 a.m.: Intro to Kayaking at Washington Crossing Historic Park (Lower Park), 1112 River Road in Washington Crossing, Pa. Kayaks, paddles, and flotation devices will be provided. Ages 10 and up only. Admission is $10. Register in advance http://bit.ly/2vJQTLj. For questions, contact Katie at katscott@pa.gov. Noon to 7 p.m.: Sangria Weekends at Terhune Orchards (every Saturday and Sunday throughout August). 2 to 3 p.m.: Free, Highlights Tour at the Princeton University Art Museum (occurs every Saturday and Sunday).

ter! (WOW) at 10 Hulfish Street and presented by the Arts Council of Princeton. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Fargo (1996) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Friday, September 1 9:30 a.m.: Free, Job Seekers Sessions at Princeton Public Library. Saturday, September 2 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Princeton Junction Train Station Parking Lot. Over 16 farms and 11 artisan food and natural product vendors are represented (repeats weekly). 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Pickyour-own apple season begins at Terhune Orchards’ Van Kirk Road Orchard. The first apple varieties available for picking will be Jonamac and McIntosh. Apple picking will be available at Van Kirk Road Orchard everyday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (weather permitting) through October. Sunday, September 3 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Trenton Farmers Market at 960 Spruce Street in Lawrence Township (also, Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. throughout the summer). Monday, September 4 Labor Day Tuesday, September 5 7 p.m.: Gente y Cuentos discusses Latin American short stories in Spanish at Princeton Public Library. Free. Wednesday, September 6 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Dirty Dancing (1987) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Thursday, September 7 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Shop local produce and baked goods at the Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza (repeats weekly). 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967) at Princeton Garden Theatre (co-sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton with an introduction by executive director Taneshia Nash Laird).

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

AT THE CINEMA

2 to 4 p.m.: Free music concert in Palmer Square featuring rock artist The Alice Project. Sunday, August 27 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Trenton Farmers Market at 960 Spruce Street in Lawrence Township (also, Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. throughout the summer). 2 to 4:30 p.m.: Historic Princeton Walking Tour of downtown Princeton and the University campus. Tickets are $7. Tour begins at the Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street. This event is presented by the Historical Society of Princeton. 7 to 9 p.m.: Café Improv at the Arts Council of Princeton. Attendees can expect an evening of local music, poetry, and comedy. To register, visit cafeimprov.com. Monday, August 28 3 to 5 p.m.: Pop In Workshop: Sew Easy presented by the Arts Council of Princeton at 10 Hulfish Street. Free and open to the public. Tuesday, August 29 9:30 a.m.: Read & Pick: Apples at Terhune Orchards. This innovative program combines storytelling with farm activities and is suitable for children and parents ages preschool to 8 years. The cost to attend is $7. Register in advance at www.terhuneorchards.com (also at 11 a.m.). Wednesday, August 30 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.: Pop In Workshop: The Art of Journaling at 10 Hulfish Street and presented by the Arts Council of Princeton. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Monkey Business (1931) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8 p.m.: Meeting, Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive in Princeton. Thursday, August 31 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Shop local produce and baked goods at the Princeton Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza (repeats weekly). 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Pop In Workshop: Wonders of Wa-


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 30

S ports

Featuring Abundance of Talent All Over the Field, PU Women’s Soccer Looking to Wear Down Foes

S

ean Driscoll is facing a problem this fall in guiding the Princeton University women’s soccer team, but don’t expect any of his foes to be sympathetic. With an abundance of skilled performers at his disposal, it isn’t going to be easy for Princeton head coach Driscoll to figure out the best way to deploy his resources. “We have a lot of good players; I think we are probably two-deep at every position on the field which I haven’t been able to say until now,” said Driscoll, who is entering his third season at the helm of the program and led the Tigers to an overall 10-4-3 record and 2-3-2 in Ivy League play in 2016. “We have a lot of depth and that has to be our focus, utilizing as many of the players as we can to stay fresh and to also put other teams in situations where we are constantly staying a little more fresh perhaps than they are. Our mentality in terms of rotation of players may slightly change from what it was, certainly from two years ago when we basically played 14-16 players. We have a lot more ability to rotate this year.” At forward, junior star and top returning scorer Mimi Asom (9 goals and 1 assist in 2016) boasts a lot of finishing ability. “Mimi is the most focused I have seen her, she

has a very good mentality about her right now,” said Driscoll, noting that sophomore Courtney O’Brien, sophomore Abby Givens (3 goals, 3 assists), junior Sam McDonough (4 assists), and senior Beth Stella should all see time up top. “Mimi’s fitness level is the highest it has been. Her overall focus, which is the most important for her, is very high. She is a very good player.” Princeton features a very good player to trigger the midfield in senior Vanessa Gregoire (3 goals, 4 assists). “Vanessa has big time potential; I expect a huge year from her in terms of overall quality, her movement, and her endurance,” asserted Driscoll. “She looks fantastic.” Driscoll has a lot of quality options in the midfield with such players as sophomore Tomi Kennedy (3 goals, 1 assist), sophomore Sophia Gulati (1 assist), senior Alessia Azermadhi (1 assist), and sophomore Emily Hilliard (1 assist) along with a pair of freshmen, Olivia Kane and Carolyne Davidson. “It is deep, there are going to be a lot of battles,” said Driscoll in assessing his midfield. “A lot of kids who have had the luxury of being the best at their position are now going to have to really fight, which is good competition. If nothing else, it is pushing to make them better and giving

us a better rotation.” Senior standouts Natalie Larkin (1 goal, 2 assists) and Mikaela Symanovich (2 assists) will battle hard on the back line. “They are the epitome of work rate, fitness, and competitive nature,” said Driscoll. “They are both tireless workers. There is no way to duplicate them when they leave next year, there will be no replacing that kind of mentality. They both blow away the fitness test. Every year, they are the top two.” While Larkin and Symanovich form a special one-two combination on defense, Princeton is expecting a number of other players to shore up the unit. “Katie Pratt-Thompson, a senior, will be in there and you have sophomore Olivia Sheppard, a standout Canadian national team player at center back,” added Driscoll. “We also have two freshman, Lucy Rickerson and Tatum Gee, who have done really, really well.” The Tigers boast four goalkeepers in sophomore Natalie Grossi, junior Noelani Kong-Johnson, senior Gudrun Valdis Jonsdottir, and sophomore Kelli Calhoun. Grossi got most of the work last year in her freshman season, starting all 17 games with a 0.93 goals against average and four shutouts. “Natalie looks good, she has done well; Noelani

has also done well,” said Driscoll. “We are expecting Gudrun and Kelli to make a little bit of a push here. Right now, I would say Natalie and Noelani have been the top two but I do expect the other ones to make it a competitive battle. We have a good group of goalkeepers, they are working hard.” With Princeton going 1-32 in its last six games last fall after a 9-1-1 start, Driscoll is looking for his 2017 team to push harder at both ends of the field. “I think we need to make sure that we don’t make any game-changing mistakes,” said Driscoll. “We had some innocuous mistakes where we put ourselves in trouble last year on occasion. We need a greater focus and attention to detail on our defense as a unit. The bottom line is we need to identify where we can manufacture goals as a team. Everyone is going to be involved in helping us score.” Based on what he has seen in the preseason, Driscoll is confident that the squad can manufacture a lot of wins this fall. “I would say that we are very excited about the group of kids that we have, the chemistry, and the enthusiasm,” said Driscoll. “We look forward to seeing how things go. We have a lot of young kids and we also have some good leadership. It is a really enjoyable group to work with.” With Princeton hosting Monmouth (0-1-1) in its sea-

KICK-OFF TIME: Princeton University women’s soccer player Natalie Larkin prepares to kick the ball upfield last season. Senior star and All-Ivy League performer Larkin will be counted on to again shore up the defense this fall for the Tigers, who get their 2017 campaign underway when they host Monmouth on August 25. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) son opener on August 25, Driscoll knows his squad will have to work hard to beat the Hawks. “Monmouth is a very hardworking, blue collar mentality team with tremendous athleticism and a lot of success,” said Driscoll, whose squad will be playing at Villanova on August 27 before heading south for contests against Atlantic Coast Conference foes North Carolina State on September 1 and

at Wake Forest on September 3. “They are coming off a tie and a loss this past weekend. They will be very hungry and fired up. It will be a good game; it is a cross state rivalry. They are going to be excited to play against us and our team needs to be equal to the task. It is opening night so I expect us to work extremely hard and have a good start.” —Bill Alden

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Tyler Lussi was thrilled to be selected 21st overall by the Portland Thorns in National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) Draft this past January but she knew it didn’t guarantee anything on the pro level. Instead, former Princeton University women’s soccer standout Lussi had to fly out to Portland days after her college graduation in June for an extended tryout to earn a spot on the team. “I was out here for about two and a half weeks on trial; I hadn’t signed yet when I got here,” said Lussi, a four-time All-Iv y League performer who graduated as Princeton’s all-time goals leader (53) and points leader (122). “I had to prove to the coaching staff and the team that I am going to bring a whole other level of intensity and work rate. For those two and half weeks, I just had to work really hard and prove to the coach that I can make the team.” Lussi apparently proved her point and made the team. “I was signed on June 30th,” said Lussi. “It was definitely a great feeling and I was now officially on the team.” Not was t i ng a ny t i m e to make an impact, Lussi helped the Thorns pull out a 1-1 draw at Houston in her debut on July 8 and then scored the winning goal in a 2-1 win over Houston as the teams met for a rematch on July 22. In her first appearance, Lussi came off the

bench looking to spark the Thorns. “At halftime, they told me I was going to go on; at that point we were down 1-0,” recalled Lussi. “I had to go on with full confidence. Ever y time I play, I step on with confidence but at this point I had to do everything I could to put their back line under pressure and make sure to bring that work rate, create chances, and try to help the team. We ended up with a tie but in a hard away game, it was definitely a stepping stone for what the team needed.” Two weeks later, Lussi was in the starting lineup for a rematch with Houston and tallied a 39th-minute goal that ended up being the game-winner in Portland’s 2-1 victory over Houston. “It was definitely something I will never forget, scoring my first professional goal like when I scored my first college goal freshman year,” said Lussi. “E ach m emb er of t he Thorns team has the responsibility to do all they can to have the ball go into the back of the net. Helping with that effort is a real privilege and a great responsibility to have. Having 18,000 rock and celebrate that goal is like nothing I have ever experienced.” While Lussi scored a lot of goals at Princeton, she makes it clear that her record output was the product of a group effort. “It is a huge honor but I could not have done it without every one of my team-

PROFESSIONAL APPROACH: Tyler Lussi dribbles the ball up the field this summer in her debut campaign for the Portland Thorns of the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL). Recently graduated Princeton University women’s soccer star Lussi ’17, the program’s all-time leading scorer, didn’t waste any time making an impact for the Thorns, scoring a gamewinning goal in her third appearance for the club. (Photo Courtesy of Portland Thorns)

mates in all my four years,” said the slender 5’7 Lussi, a native of Lutherville, Md. who was named the Iv y League Offensive Player of the Year and a second-team All-American in 2015 when she helped Princeton win the league title and advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament. “It is not something I did myself, it is the team that did it. I never want to look at it as I broke the record, I say the team broke this record.” Reflecting on her Princeton career, Lussi notes that she grew a lot on and off the field. “I think just maturity-wise as a person and a player, I learned to understand and work individually with different people and different teammates,” said Lussi. “It was being able to prepare myself every single day and trying to do the best I can. That didn’t just happen when I came in freshman year. It is a process.” That maturity has come in handy as Lussi has adjusted to the rigors of pro soccer. “High levels of performance and focus are necessary for every single practice and game in order to get better,” said Lussi. “I have always tried to train, recover, play, compete, and prepare myself at a professional level in college so that part of my experience was what I expected coming into this. I think the major difference for me has been the high level of analysis of not just every teammate and game performance and practice during the week but also the analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of each member of the opposing team. There are constant adjustments throughout the week and games in an attempt to gain an advantage. Professional soccer is combining the team’s best physical performance with the strategy of the evolving game.” Looking ahead to the rest of the Thorns’s season, Lussi is determined to perform at a high level. “Coming in I didn’t expect anything but I knew that just working hard and bringing my intensity and my ability to press the back line is going to show something different and help the team attack,” said Lussi. “That has always been in my mindset ever since I started playing soccer. I have always wanted to score, I have always wanted to attack. I want to bring that relentless intensity.” Lussi is hoping that her intensity takes her to the top of the soccer world. “I want to keep improving and learning from the best every day; I am playing on a team that has world class players,” said Lussi, who played for the U.S. U-23 team this March in matches against Japan, England and Norway at La Manga, Spain. “I want to play soccer as long as possible at the highest level and continue to play in the NWSL. I want to make the top U.S. team so that is where I am headed and hopefully will be.” —Bill Alden

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

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Buoyed by Winning Gold at Maccabiah Games Issroff Eyes Bigger Role for PU Men’s Soccer Benji Issroff traveled to Israel six years ago to celebrate his bar mitzvah. This summer, Issroff, now a rising sophomore defender for the Princeton University men’s soccer team, returned to Israel as a member of the U.S. squad competing in the 2017 World Maccabiah Games and ended up enjoying another celebration as the team won the gold medal. For Issroff, making the U.S. team for the competition was special on many levels. “It meant quite a lot; the tournament sets up the intersection of a lot of identities of mine,” said the 6’0, 165-pound Issroff, a native of New York City who attended a tryout for the team in Philadelphia. “My Jewish heritage is very important to me and then soccer, which I devote a lot of time to, forms a big part of my life as well.” As the team trained in Israel before starting the competition on July 5, Issroff quickly sensed that the U.S. was hungry for gold. “We won the competition four years ago and we were trying to be the first team to win back-to-back Maccabiah Games for soccer,” said Issroff, who was joined on the team by Princeton goalie Josh Haberman ’17 and Tiger student assistant coach David Goldstein ’17. “We always had that lofty goal and ambition; obviously you hope you have the talent but you can’t be sure everything is going to fall your way. That first week definitely helped us become more accustomed to each other and get to know each other’s tendencies.” Although the U.S. fell 1-0 to Great Britain in the second game of pool play at the competition, Issroff believes the setback may have benefitted the squad in the long run. “In any competition, not everything is going to go your way; part of winning and eventually becoming a champion is learning to deal with adversity,” said Issroff. “Against Great Britain we had a very close game, they

scored in the last seven minutes off a set piece. It was obviously a bit unfortunate and not how we would have preferred it to go but having that bit of adversit y made us more resilient as we progressed through the tournament.” Rebounding with a 2-0 win over Australia in final game of pool play, Issroff and his teammates never looked back after that. “It got our confidence going, it was quite a comfortable win against Australia,” said Issroff. “We felt pretty dominant that whole match and that gave us conf idence and jump-started our run.” Af ter beating Ur uguay 2-1 in the quar terfinals, the U.S. had to sweat out a tough match as it edged toward host Israel 2-1 in the semis. “That was a big test, they were the toughest competition we faced by a wide margin,” said Issroff, noting that the Israel squad was comprised of players from the country’s Under-20 national team. “We were a goal down to them but fortunately for us, they had gone into extra time the day before and won in penalties so they had some tired legs. As the game progressed, that really helped us as they got more tired.” As a result of the hardfought win over Israel, the U.S. earned a rematch with Great Britain in the gold medal game. “We tried to deal with their height and physicality up top; they had two very big forwards and so we tried to better handle them by giving them less space when they were trying to hit long passes into those guys and then making sure that we were collecting the ball after they did,” said Issroff, recalling the team’s game plan coming into the final. “I think we had a similar mentality as we did in the group stage. We thought we just needed to execute better, be sharper, move the ball quicker. We had quite a lot of motivation to seek revenge.” Avenging the earlier de-

LEAP OF FAITH: Benji Issroff jumps for the ball on the back line last fall during his freshman campaign for the Princeton University men’s soccer team. This summer, Issroff starred for the U.S. squad at the Maccabiah Games in Israel, helping the team to a second straight gold medal at the competition. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

feat in style, the U.S. pulled away to a 3-0 win. “All the work we have been putting in really came to fruition in the end,” recalled Issroff, who played defensive midfielder for most of the tournament but moved to center back in the semis and final to help protect leads. “They got a red card pretty early in the game but we had scored in the second minute so we got off to a really fast start. I think that helped calm everyone’s nerves and really helped us concentrate on playing well.” Things weren’t as calm in the aftermath of the win for the U.S. “There was a fireworks display after our game,” said Issroff. “Standing there with all the fireworks and our achievement and letting it sink in was quite surreal.” Sharing the experience with fellow Princetonians Haberman and Goldstein made the achievement even more meaningful for Issroff. “They are both people that I greatly admire,” said Issroff. “I was rooming with Josh throughout the entire experience so I had a lot of time with him. After their last year at Princeton, it meant a great deal to me to be in their company for one last competition. It was also quite fun.” As he looks ahead to his sophomore season at Princeton, Issroff is looking to utilize some of the main things he gained from the Maccabiah competition. “It really gives me quite a bit of confidence and hopefully I can try to bring that back to the team as a whole,” said Issroff. “I learned about resilience and character that I would also like our team to embody next season. It just helps me bridge the gap to stay sharp and fit and mentally acute.” With Princeton coming off a 2016 season that saw it go 7-7-3 overall and 1-3-3 Ivy League, suffering three onegoal losses in league play, Issroff is confident the Tigers have what it takes to come through in the close ones. “The Ivy League is always a really competitive league and I think the physical nature of the Maccabiah will help me adjust this year,” said Issroff, who played in all 17 games last fall and made four starts, picking up an assist in a 4-1 win over Rutgers. “We had a lot of close games last year that didn’t quite fall our way. We will have a very young team and hopefully we will be able to turn some of those games around and win.” Issroff, for his part, believes he can help guide the squad’s young players. “I would like to try to have more of a leadership role on the team,” said Issroff. “Now that I am past my freshman year, I think I am able to contribute more. We had a lot of great seniors last year who were quite big contributors to the team and hopefully I can step up and help fill some of that void.” —Bill Alden

PU Men’s Hockey Star Teves Had Special Summer, Getting to Skate for Hometown Calgary Flames J o s h Te v e s h a s l o n g d r e a m e d ab o u t p l ay i n g for his hometown Calgary Flames. “I am a big Flames fan,” said Teves, a 6’0, 180-pound native of the western Canada city. “I had a mock Stanley Cup with the Flames logo on it.” After a superb sophomore season last winter for the Princeton University men’s hockey team, star defenseman Teves got to hit the ice for the National Hockey League’s Flames this summer as he took part in the team’s Development Camp. “It was a pretty amazing experience to put on the logo for the first time, even if it is a practice jersey,” said Teves, who tallied four goals and 21 assists in 2016-17 for the Tigers on the way to earning First-Team All-Ivy League honors. “To have my friends and family in the city be able to come and watch some of the ice times and that sort of thing was pretty special as well. They don’t get a lot of opportunity to see me in the flesh on the ice.” Teves and his Princeton teammates enjoyed a special campaign last winter as the Tigers went 15-16-3 and advanced to the ECAC Hockey quarterfinals after going 5-23-3 in the 2015-16 season and getting swept by Clarkson in a best-of-three ECACH opening round series. “It just took a couple of years for the coaching staff to get their message and culture ingrained into us,” said Teves. “Our first year, we lost a ton of games by one goal and we were just on the edge. I think it was positive this year to see some of that success and have a little taste of it and keep us just wanting more.” Teves attributed his individual success in his sophomore campaig n to t he squad’s collective improvement. “I can thank the team for that; we had a lot of confidence as a team,” said Teves. “When the rest of your team is feeling good, you are going to feel good as well so I think that was huge. Coming into my second year, I felt more comfortable with the team, the guys around me, and the rest of the league. I could try to make some more plays and jump in a bit more offensively so that was positive.” It gave Teves a comfortable feeling to be skating with teammate and fellow rising junior Max Veronneau at the Calgary camp. “It was good to have Max there; he had just been coming from the Vegas camp,” said Teves. “He had a little more experience than I did so it was nice to go through that with him.” With a schedule packed with practices, on-ice drills, and meetings, Teves gained some valuable experience at

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the Calgary camp. “The coaches were out there, both from the NHL club and some of the AHL (American Hockey League) c o a c h e s a s w e l l ,” s a i d Teves. “It was a lot of feedback; they could get a closer look at you and give you some personal advice. That was really helpful. We did two practices and a scrimmage at the end. It was pretty neat, there were quite a few fans who came out for the scrimmage and a lot of little kids who play for organizations I had played for.” Being on the ice with the Flames whetted Teves’s appetite to play pro hockey someday. “You are surrounded by first round draft picks or guys that play in the American Hockey League and some that have played games in the NHL,” said Teves. “To feel like you fit in that group and you belong there really helps the confidence. I think that is going to help

me moving forward. There is a lot of information, there is a lot of teaching going on and I just tried to sponge it all up as far as all of the different meetings and the advice on or off the ice.” Looking ahead to the upcoming season at Princeton, Teves has a lot of confidence in the Tigers and their prospects. “We need to have our goals set high; the ECAC championship is not out of the question,” said Teves. “We need to have lofty goals; I think we can accomplish them. A tournament berth would come with that and that would be a huge step for our program.” Teves, for his part, plans to step up even more as a junior. “I think that part of the game will take care of itself as we succeed as a team,” said Teves, reflecting on his individual goals. “I am just going to work hard to play a bigger role. Coming into my third year, I want to play more of a leadership role, helping the younger guys and helping to lead our team.” —Bill Alden

LIGHTING THE FLAME: Josh Teves controls the puck in a game last winter for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. This summer, rising junior defenseman Teves got to live out a dream as he skated with his hometown Calgary Flames of the National Hockey League at the team’s Development Camp. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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PU Sports Roundup

Signs With Greek Pro Team

Former Princeton University women’s basketball standout Blake Dietrick ’15 will continue her professional career with AO Dafni Agioy Dimitrioy of the Greece League for the 2017-18 season. Dietrick played for the Bendigo Spirit of the Australian National Basketball League last season. The Spirit went 13-11, finishing sixth in the league, one game out of a playoff spot. The former 2015 Ivy League Player of the Year averaged 7.3 points, 2.7 rebounds, 2.4 assists per game on 47.7 percent shooting in 24 games for the Spirit. Earlier in the 2016-17 season, Dietrick had become the second Ivy League player ever to make a WNBA roster as she made the Seattle Storm’s opening night roster. A two-time first-team AllIv y selection, Dietrick is ranked fourth on the Princeton charts in three-pointers made (210) and three-point shooting percentage (.395). She is four t h in assists (346) and 12th in scoring (1,233). During her senior campaign, Dietrick helped the team to one of the greatest seasons in Ivy League history. The Tigers had an unblemished 30-0 regular season, won its fifth Iv y League title in six years, and won the program’s first-ever NCAA Tournament game. The guard averaged careerhighs in points (15.1), assists (4.9), and rebounds (4.5) per game en route to Associated Press and WBCA Honorable Mention All-America honors.

US Lacrosse Honoring Sailer

US Lacrosse recently announced that it is going to name the walking path at its headquarters in Sparks, Md., the “Chris Sailer Trail,” in honor of the National Hall of Fame and Princeton University women’s lacrosse coach. The Sailer Trail will be formally dedicated October 21 as part of the Princeton Invitational at US Lacrosse, a four-team fall-ball event that will include the Tigers, Fairfield, Villanova, and a team from the New York Athletic Club. “In addition to leading her teams to great success on the field, Chris Sailer has been a tremendous advocate and representative of the sport during her career,” said Steve Stenersen, CEO of US Lacrosse. “We’re delighted and proud to recognize her at our facility.” I n h er 31 s e as on s at Princeton, Sailer has compiled a record of 386-152, guiding the Tigers to three NCAA championships, 11 national semifinal appearances, 24 NCA A tournament appearances, and 13 Ivy League titles. S a i l e r’s h o n o r c o m e s thanks in part to the support of former players. In conjunction with the dedication of the walking path that surrounds Tierney Field (named for former Princeton and current Denver men’s head coach Bill Tierney) at US Lacrosse Headquarters, the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association has selected 11 former collegiate coaches to cel-

ebrate as trailblazers of the game for their exceptional work advancing women’s lacrosse and the coaching profession during the Title IX era. E ach of t he follow ing IWLCA Trailblazers will be recognized with a plaque a l o n g t h e S a i l e r Tr a i l : Pat Genovese, Tina Sloan Green, Caroline Hausserman, Kathy Heinze, Carole Kleinfelder, Gillian Rattray, Sue Stahl, Sue Tyler, Lanetta Ware, Marge Watson, and Judy Wolstenholme. Each began coaching collegiate women’s lacrosse in the 1960s or 1970s, helping to lay the foundation for the modern game. Their love for the sport, passion for teaching, and dedication to coaching were driving forces in advancing women in collegiate athletics. The IWLCA Board of Directors worked with US Lacrosse to create this honor to preserve their legacy and ensure that future generations will not forget their contributions to women’s lacrosse.

Princeton Lax Grad Hirsch To Coach at Alma Mater

Former Princeton University men’s lacrosse stalwart Jeremy Hirsch ’10 is coming home to join the coaching staff of the program. Hirsch, the sole captain of the 2010 Tigers, has been named the defensive coordinator for the men’s lacrosse team, Princeton head coach Matt Madalon said last week. He comes to Princeton after spending the last four years as the defensive coordinator at Hobart, working under former Tiger assistant coach Greg Raymond. “We’re thrilled to have Jeremy Hirsch join our staff,” said Madalon. “As an alum, he has a great understanding of the history and tradition of Princeton lacrosse, as well as a great respect for and loyalty to the University

and its mission. He has done an outstanding job at Hobart, helping that program to national prominence and the NCAA tournament. We can’t wait to have him get started working with our guys.” Hirsch was the coordinator for a man-down defensive unit that led Division I in 2016, when Hobart won the Northeast Conference tournament and advanced to the NCAA tournament. Hobart defeated Bryant and St. Joe’s, two teams averaging a combined 23 goals per game, in the 2016 NEC tournament and allowed just 13 total goals in the two games. The Statesmen then won t he N EC reg u lar- season championship this past season and reached the conference tournament final. Hirsch was a three-year starter for the Tigers as a defens ema n. He help e d P r inceton to t he NCA A tournament three times, including the quarterfinals his junior year, and played on Ivy League championship teams as a junior and senior. Princeton also won the inaugural Ivy League tournament when Hirsch was a senior. After graduating with a degree in history, Hirsch began his coaching career at Malvern Prep in 2012 before getting his first college coaching position at Hampton - Sydney, where he coached the defense and was the program’s strength and conditioning coach. “I am excited to return to a program I care deeply about in my new role as an assistant coach and defensive coordinator,” said Hirsch.

“I would like thank Matt Madalon for providing me with this unique opportunity to join his staff and to coach with the Princeton lacrosse program. It was ingrained in me while a player for Princeton that playing great defense is synonymous with Princeton Lacrosse. I’m eager to build upon that tradition as a coach. I look for ward to digging in at Princeton and working with the student-athletes and can’t wait to get started.” Other than former longtime volunteer assistant coach Br yce Chase ’63, Hirsch is the first Princeton alum to be a member of the coaching staff since Matt Striebel in 2005.

PU Hoops Standout Hummer Signs With Russian Team

Former Princeton University men’s basketball star Ian Hummer, the 2013 Ivy League Player of the Year and the second-leading scorer in program history, has signed to play with Avtodor Saratov in Russia. H u m m e r ’13 , a 6’ 7, 225-pound forward from Vienna, Va., has played in Finland, Germany, and most recently Turkey since finishing a Princeton career that saw him earn three All-Ivy League honors, including first-team honors as a junior and a senior. His 1,625 career points and 625 career field goals made are each second only to Bill Bradley ’65 (2,503 points, 856 field goals). His 725 rebounds are fifth all-time and his 308 assists were fourth when he graduated and are now sixth. Hummer is the fourth Ti-

ger alum to ink a pro deal over the summer, along with Spencer Weisz ’17 (Israel), T.J. Bray ’14 (Greece) and Steven Cook ’17 (Estonia). Avtodor Saratov is in Russia’s VTB league, the top level of professional basketball in the country. The team plays in the town of Saratov, about 500 miles southeast of Moscow.

PU Hoops Coach Banghart Helps U.S. Win U23 Event

Princeton University women’s basketball head coach Courtney Banghart helped guide the USA Basketball’s Women’s U -23 Nat ional Team to the title at the inaugural U23 Four Nations Tournament last weekend in Tokyo, Japan. Banghart served as an assistant coach for the U.S. squad, which was led by Louisville’s Jeff Walz with Michelle Clark-Heard of Western Kentucky serving as the other assistant. T h e to u r n e y fe at u r e d college-aged students and athletes. Selected for the squad were U.S. citizens who currently are freshmen, sophomores, or juniors in college. The U.S. went 3-0 in the round-robin competition, topping Australia 78-60 and beating Canada 107-61 before wrapping up the event with a 103-71 victory over host Japan on August 15. Banghart recently finished her 10th season as head coach of the Tigers, surpassing the 200-win milestone during the 2016-17 season. She is the program’s all-time leader in victories (208) and sits with a .705 winning percentage.

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TITLE TOM: Tom Schreiber heads upfield during his career with the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Last Saturday, star midfielder Schreiber ’14 helped the Ohio Machine defeat the Denver Outlaws 17-12 in the Major League Lacrosse (MLL) championship game in Frisco, Texas. Schreiber tallied a goal and three assists in the final as the Machine overcame a 12-10 fourth quarter deficit to earn the franchise’s first MLL title. Schreiber was earlier named the 2017 MLL MVP. Recently graduated Princeton star Zach Currier ’17 starred in a losing cause in the title game for the Outlaws, contributing a goal and three assists, as well as four ground balls and three caused turnovers. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

In addition to Dietrick, four ot her recent Tiger grads, Annie Tarakchian ’16, Devon Allgood ’12, Addie Micir ’11, Niveen Rasheed ’13, have signed Tiger Hoops Grad Dietrick pro contracts.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 34

After Growing Into a Star for PHS Boys’ Soccer, Goldsmith Primed to Begin Vassar College Career Over the course of his four seasons with Princeton High boys’ soccer team, Andrew Goldsmith grew into a leader and a top scorer. In his senior campaign last fall, he served as a cocaptain of the squad with Alex Ratzan and contributed 17 goals from his center midfield spot as PHS went 17-1-2 and shared the Mercer County Tournament title with the Pennington School. “I would say the biggest thing is my confidence on the ball,” said Goldsmith, reflecting on the progress he made over his PHS career. “In my f resh man year play ing w it h s en iors, it would be like if someone passes me the ball, that is fine. As I kept getting older and got more confident, I went to go get t he ball because I wanted it and I wanted make an impact on the game. With the confidence, I was able to make plays and do things for the team that I wasn’t able to do my freshman year.” Now, Goldsmith is looking to help a new team as he is currently undergoing preseason training in preparation for his freshman season with the Vassar College men’s soccer program. For Goldsmith, the road to Vassar began at the end of his freshman year when he started playing at college showcases and e-mailing coaches. He ended up narrowing his search to Division 3 programs, including

several New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) schools, before deciding that Vassar was the right place for him. “The soccer piece of it was a big deal because I clicked with the head coach, Andy Jennings, who is a really experienced guy,” said Goldsmith. “He has coached the U20 English national team. The assistant coach Ross Macklin just played at Vassar, he graduated few years ago. He was a really good player, a center mid, and I made a good relationship with them. I really clicked with the guys on the team well; it was a really good fit. Another reason I chose Vassar was the quality of the soccer they play and how much they emphasized keeping the ball on the floor and playing good soccer.” Off the field, Goldsmith s aw special qualit ies in Vassar as well. “Maybe the most important thing is the collaborative environment and the community feel you get the second you arrive on campus,” said Goldsmith. “Everyone at Vassar wants you to strive and wants you to succeed.” Since the end of his PHS c a r e e r, G o l d s m i t h h a s worked hard to enhance his chances of succeeding at the next level. “During the winter, spring and even a little bit in the summer, I had training sessions with Stronghold SC,” said Goldsmith, referring to his club team.

“Mostly it has just been training on my own with a few guys. Alex Ratzan and I have been training very hard this summer. I have b e en play i ng w it h g uys like Chris Harla, Pete Luther, Aidan Passannante, and Maxime Hoppenot. I have also been following the [Vassar] conditioning packet pretty strictly.” Even before hitting the field at Vassar, Goldsmith had developed a bond with the guys with whom he will be playing. “We have a group chat; we talk a lot with each other on fitness stuff and what we should work on,” said Goldsmith. “That is something I have been really happy with. The captains have reached out to us ever since we got into the school. They have been really nice, always offering to help. They have connected us with all of the other guys on the team. I am really excited to get on campus and actually meet everyone in person.” With preseason practices having started on August 19, Goldsmith is thrilled to finally reach his objective of playing college soccer. “I have been looking forward to this since this has been my goal for a while now,” said Goldsmith. “I have been working hard to do this and my family has helped me a lot. I am excited to accomplish it but I really haven’t accomplished much yet as I still need to prove myself once

I get there. That is what I am most excited for, to play at the next level and really push myself and see what I can do for the team and how I can prove myself at the next level.” As he enters his debut c ampaig n, G oldsm it h is looking to push hard for t he Brewers, no mat ter what role he ultimately assumes. “I am just looking to get on the field ; they said I would be at center mid or outside back, primarily center mid,” said Goldsmith, who could see his first college action when Vassar hosts Western Connecticut State on September 1 in its season opener. “That is where I am hoping for, but I would be happy playing anywhere to help out the team in any way possible.” —Bill Alden

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SOLID GOLD: Andrew Goldsmith tracks the ball in a game last fall during his senior season for the Princeton High boys soccer team. After enjoying a stellar career for PHS, Goldsmith has moved on to the Vassar College men’s soccer program where he is currently taking part in preseason practice. Vassar starts its 2017 campaign when it hosts Western Connecticut State on September 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski

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During her career with the Hun School girls’ soccer team, Ashley Maziarz played a big role as the program reached new heights. Starring at midfield and defense, Maziarz’s skill and clutch play helped Hun win the state Prep A title in the

fall of 2014. Maziarz’s brilliant goal on a free kick proved to be t he game winner in the title contest as Hun stunned perennial power Pennington 2-0. Moving on to Lehigh in the fall of 2015 and joining its women’s soccer team, Maz-

BALL HAWK: Ashley Maziarz surveys the action from her center back position in action last season during her sophomore season for the Lehigh University women’s soccer team. Former Hun School standout Maziarz played a key role for a stingy Mountain Hawk defensive unit that started the 2016 season with eight straight shutouts as Lehigh went on to post an 11-52 record. Last Friday, Maziarz started her junior campaign by helping Lehigh play to a 0-0 draw through two overtimes with visiting Monmouth. (Photo Courtesy of Lehigh Athletics)

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iarz has become a key piece in the ascension of another program. After playing a reserve role as a freshman when the Mountain Hawks went 7-8-3, Maziarz broke into the starting lineup at center back last fall, fortifying a defense that started the season with eight straight shutouts as Lehigh went on to an 115-2 campaign. “We finally made it to the Patriot League playoffs for the first time in a few years so that was a big step for us,” said Maziarz, reflecting on the team’s improvement in a season that ended when the Mountain Hawks fell 1-0 to Lafayette in double overtime in the league quarterfinals. “We set goals to achieve every year and the ultimate goal is to be Patriot League champions. There are many steps you have to take to make it there and our first step was making it to the playoffs which we finally did so we feel like we are making progress towards that ultimate goal.” Maziarz had to take steps to get on the field after making nine appearances off the bench in her debut campaign. “Freshman year was kind of hard for me, I didn’t get to play in many games,” said Maziarz, who is joined on the Lehigh squad by former Hun teammate Jess Sacco. “I learned from the experience; I had to learn to fill my role in a different way. It was work harder practicing and learn from the older girls. I worked on getting better at practices and doing everything I could to improve to make it out on the field. After becoming a starter at center back last fall, Maziarz continued to get better and better. “As the season went on, my biggest improvement was my positioning in the field,” said Maziarz. “I am used to the ball work and the passing. I am pretty accurate with that stuff but as far as the positioning, I had a lot to learn. Just because in college, it is a different speed of play and I can’t be constantly going up the field. I was used to that and a lot of times the play was faster and I was behind on things. I think the biggest thing for me was through freshman year until now, I have learned where I need to be in reference to the game.” The defensive unit as a whole got on the same page

over the course of the 2016 campaign. “Our goalie [Sam Miller] communicated ver y well with us,” said Maziarz. “Defensively, she is always telling us where to be on the field directing us as much as she can. She sees the play very well and if she thinks things are too hectic and needs to slow down, she tells us. I think, positioningwise, we are just very connected throughout the back line. I had more of a holding role defensively. The other center back likes to get forward a lot more so we really balance well for each other as far as going and staying and just balancing out the field.” T h e M o u n t a i n H aw k s showed their balance at both ends of the field in a riveting 3-2 victory over eventual Patriot League champion Bucknell in late October. “I think Bucknell was huge for us because we went into the game knowing how well they had been doing,” said Maziarz. “It forced us to bring our A-game and all of our forwards and defensemen were on point. Our goalkeeper made this huge, phenomenal save in the first half on a shot that could have drastically changed the game. Every single player on our team was locked in and focused and that was what contributed to it.” Having focused this summer on recovering from a knee injury, Maziarz was happy to be back with her teammates in early August to start preseason training. “The biggest contributing factor to last year was the closeness of the team,” said Maziarz. “We all got along very well and that correlates directly onto the field. If you trust your teammates, you are playing for your teammates. That is what is going to drive you further and further. Right now we are just focusing on continuing to build those relationships. On the field, we are trying to do the little things as best

as we can because once you get the little things, then everything else will fall into place.” Last Friday, Maziarz and the Lehigh defense took care of the little things as the Mountain Hawks started the season with a 0-0 draw t h r o u g h t w o ov e r t i m e s against visiting Monmouth in its season opener. “We are just taking it day by day, right now we are trying to win as many games as we can and take it to the Patriot League,” said Maziarz. “Once we are in league play, we want to step up our game even further. We have got to make that jump even bigger. Last year, we played well in the beginning but we need to ramp it up one more notch for the playoffs.” —Bill Alden

Local Sports Princeton Little League Opens Fall Ball Sign-up

Registration for the Princeton Little League (PLL) 2017 fall baseball season is now underway. The PLL fall season gets underway on September 9 and runs to October 28. All sessions to be on Saturday afternoons with no weeknights. Player development is the primary focus of the PLL fall program. Players will be organized by age division and by team. They will play games, but no standings will be kept, as the primary goal is to work on skills and have fun. Players will also practice for 30-40 minutes (depend-

ing on age group) before the start of each game. Fall ball will also feature the return of our Pro Coaching Sessions. Pro coaches will lead two special days of training for all registered players and all volunteer coaches. The 2017 fall ball runs from on eight Saturdays from September 9-October 28. The Divisions are as follows: -Tee Ball: 4-6 year olds 1:30-3 p.m. -Division A: 6-8 year olds 1:30–3 p.m. (coach pitch). -Division AA: 7-10 year olds 3– 5 p.m. (kid pitch). -Division AAA : 10-13 year olds 2:30– 4:30 p.m. (kid pitch). Players must reside in the municipality of Princeton or parts of Hopewell, Skillman, and Rocky Hill or attend a private or public school within the PLL Catchment area. Lawrence Township and Princeton Junction residents are not eligible, unless they attend a school in the PLL Catchment Area. League Age is based on the player’s age on 8/31/2018. Players born before 9/1/2004 or after 8/31/2013 are not eligible. (6-7 year olds who played in the Instructional Division this past spring are eligible to play in the AA division. Please consult with spring coach about placement if needed.) The fee for Tee Ball is $125. The fee for all other divisions is $150. Players will receive new jerseys. New/Replacement hats will be for sale at the Snack Shack for $10. Contact Meghan Hedin via email at meghan.hedin@gmail. com with any questions.

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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Becoming a Starter for Lehigh Women’s Soccer, Hun Grad Maziarz Helped Spark Turnaround Season


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 36

Obituaries

children to sports practices and out for burgers, playing tennis, building fly rods, and writing. There will be a service to celebrate Andy’s life in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, September 16, 2017 at The Little Sanctuary, St. Albans School, 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to The River School Center for Innovation, an initiative to rethink how language and literacy is taught to kids with hearing loss. Select “Support River School” at www.riverschool. net and indicate in memory of Andrew Sheldon, or text “Andrew Sheldon” to 41444.

Andrew M. Sheldon Andrew M. Sheldon, a loving husband, proud father, and energetic grandfather, passed away on June 23, 2017 at his home in Old Town Alexandria, Va., surrounded by his family. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Linda; his daughter Casey Seidenberg, her husband, Nick, and their children, Henry, Teddy, and Pippa; and his son, Christopher Sheldon, his wife, Eileen, and their children, Buchanan and Talbot. He is loved and missed by so many. Andy had a peaceful and patient nature, a desire to constantly learn and grow, and a genuine love for family. He was deeply moved and inspired by the golden mean — symmetry, proportion, and harmony — and these principles shaped both his creative work and his life. Born in 1944 in Little Rock, Arkansas, Andy grew up in Buffalo, N.Y. and Princeton, where he ultimately met his wife, Linda, and raised his family with much joy. He began his own architecture business, Andrew M. Sheldon Architect, in 1975, and was passionate about designing beautiful spaces for his clients, including houses from Mexico to Nantucket and many places in between. He also founded Sheldon Designs in 1975, providing economical, easy-to-build blueprints for small houses, farmhouses, and cabins, becoming an early contributor to the “tiny house” trend. Andy received his bachelor of arts and bachelor of architecture degrees from R ice Universit y in 1966 and 1967, respectively, and also studied architecture at Pratt University. Andy served in the Army from 1968 to 1970, including a tour of duty in Vietnam. He worked for both small and large architecture firms in Princeton before starting his own firm. Andy received the Historical Society of Princeton’s Historic Preservation Award in both 2003 and 2004, and his architecture has been featured in many publications including The Washington Post. Andy also served on the Princeton YMCA Board of Directors from 1986 to 1994, and on the Princeton Site Plan Review Advisory Board from 1990 to 1995. Andy enjoyed being near the water, taking his grand-

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Susan E. Thompson Rev. Susan E. Thompson, 76, of Princeton, New Jersey passed away Wednesday, August 16, 2017. Born in Wilmington, Ohio, she spent most of her childhood at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Susan enjoyed two enriching careers, first as a Registered Nurse from 1967 to 1979, she then finished her Master’s of Divinity at Princ-

eton and was first ordained in 1985. Susan served two chaplaincies. The first was at Abingdon Memorial Hospital in Philadelphia and the other was at Samaritan Hospice in New Jersey. She served at the churches of Hobart and South Kortright in rural New York, Larison’s Corner in Ringoes, New Jersey, and lastly at Scotchtown Presbyterian Church in Scotchtown, New York. Daughter of the late Delbert and Zella Nicholas, wife of the late Thomas Whaley, and Rev. Ralph Thompson. She is survived by her daughters Melissa (Glenn) Hawthorne and Stephaney (Robert) Weber; her step-children James ( Melanie) Thompson and Joy Thompson; and her five grandchildren Ashley Reid, Kate Weber, Kelly Weber, Mackenzie Thompson, and Morgan Thompson; her loving brother, James (Sharon) Nicholas and their three boys Shaun, Nathaniel, and Brian (Sarah); and their grandchildren Levi and Wyatt. There will be a memorial service on Saturday, August 26, 2017 at 10 a.m., in the Chapel at Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton with a light reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Assistance Program for the Presbyterian Church C/O The Board of Pensions of the Presbyterian Church (USA), 2000 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, w w w.pensions.org /avail ableresources/form/documents/fdd-100.pdf. Thanks be to God for all good gifts. Amen.

Leonard Baum Leonard ( Lenny, fondly known to many as Opa) Baum died unexpectedly at the age of 86 on August 14, 2017 at his home in Princeton. Lenny was born on Aug 23, 1931 i n B r o o k l y n , N.Y. to parents Sophia Fuderman and Morris Baum (who were themselves first cousins ). He married his high school sweetheart Julia Lieberman in 1953, the year he graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude in mathematics, from Harvard University. He received a PhD in mathematics from Harvard in 1958. He worked for a couple of years at the University of Chicago before moving to Princeton to work at the Institute for Defense Analysis (IDA) — a Defense Department think tank which specialized in cryptography. Lenny’s affiliation with the IDA in Princeton spanned 1959 through 1978. He wrote over 100 internal papers there and is responsible for what has become the motto of the IDA: “No idea is bad. A bad idea is good. A good idea is

terrific.” To his coworkers, he was a “renaissance man” who was exceptional at all aspects of problem solving, was dogged — never giving up until he solved a problem, and was also a patient mentor and teacher whose influence lives on. Despite spending the bulk of his research career in a classified environment, Lenny published 11 refereed articles which have received a combined 9,000 citations and continue to be cited to this day. Lenny’s public scientific legacy includes the BaumWelch algorithm and coau t h or s h i p of t h e f i r s t proof, published in 1967, of its mathematical underpinnings. This algorithm directly enabled the first effective speech recognition systems. Today, 50 years later, this work remains at the center of these systems — while its mathematical and algorithmic descendants and other relatives, have impacted many fields from genomics to weather prediction to finance. After leaving the IDA, Lenny teamed up with Jim Simons to apply his mathematical modeling to the financial markets. He retired early, legally blind, seeing with only his rods, having lost all his cones to a dystrophy, but that didn’t stop him from travelling the world over, visiting many exotic places. He continued to trade for himself very successfully, often taking very contrarian positions. An avid Go player, deep lover of science, and seeker of truth, he continued working on math

literally up until his death, spending the night before he died reading new math papers on prime numbers. Like his father before him, he was a great walker, walking four miles a day up until his last few months. He was a loving husband, father, and devoted grandfather. The grandchildren loved his “Opa Stories.” Lenny was generous of spirit, deeply ethical, and always kind. In addition to his devotion to family, Lenny, and his late wife Julia, made his friends feel like family. He will be deeply missed by the many who were touched by his life, including his companion of the last decade, Maxine Lampert, with whom he shared many adventures. Lenny is survived by his two children — Eric Burton Baum currently living in Princeton (spouse Chaitra Keshav Baum ), and Stefi Alison Baum currently living in Winnipeg, Manitoba (spouse Christopher O’Dea). Lenny is also survived by eight grandchildren: Eric’s children (Nathan, Noah, Julia, and Asha), and Stefi’s children (Connor, Kieran, Brennan, and Annelies). He is predeceased by the love of his life, Julia Lieberman (Feb 22, 1999). The funeral was August 15, 2017 graveside at noon at the Princeton cemetery, followed by Shiva.

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ad is sure to be read. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. 08-23 With references, available in the Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 Lawrenceville, Princeton and windhamstitches.com for more details. • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. Pennington areas. Please text to LAST CALL ESTATE SALE: 04-12-18 tf (609) 216-5000 • 3 NJweeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. 4597 Route 27, Kingston, 08528. tf Next to Post Office. 2nd floor of denTHE MAID PROFESSIONALS: PRINCETON • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Resital office, enter from front. Saturday LUXURY APARTMENTS: August 26 from 10-1. Antique French & German clocks, antique French bronze statue, antique lamps. Books, model boats & much more! 08-23 YARD SALE: Saturday, August 26, starting 9 am. 25 & 27 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). 1998 Mercedes-Benz SL500 convertible w/ soft & hard tops. Collection of CDS, rakes, hand saws, & shovels. Artwork, storage containers, furniture, shoes & clothes (including men’s). 08-23 ELDERCARE COMPANION P/T Immediately. Caring in-home compassionate professional. Princeton area. Will engage adult in cognitive activities to help memory. Call (609) 452-7613 or (732) 672-1403, leave message. If I missed your call, phone again. 08-09-3t

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

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SEEKING TEMPORARY/ LONG TERM RENTAL: A man of 50’s, his books, few art pieces & plants, need immediate relocation, to a temporary single room, or long term one-bedroom/ two-bedroom private space, in a well maintained home & quiet residential setting, within 15 miles or so from Princeton. (609) 731-1120. 08-16-3t GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSE SHARE: 4 BR, 1.5 bath house, on pleasant residential street. 1 block to Nassau Street. 1st floor is furnished. Washer & dryer in basement. Tenants responsible for leaf removal & snow removal in compliance with Princeton’s regulations. No pets, no smoking. Available Sept. 1 for 1 year or longer. $3,100/mo. plus all utilities. Credit check & security deposit required. Call (609) 924-0970. Leave message. 08-23-2t

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37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 38

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609-664-6558 Email: boytreea@aol.com JFK: Drop off $145 - Pick-Up w/Parking $160 - NO TIP

Newark: Drop off $45 - Pick-Up w/Parking $60 - NO TIP

Philadelphia: Drop off $95 - Pick-Up w/Parking $105 - NO TIP Laguardia: Drop off $140 - Pick-Up w/Parking $160 - NO TIP

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

Contact us today for a free estimate

(609) 683-7522

“Keep pets in the comfort of their home and routine.”

“Keep pets in the comfort of their home and routine.” Proudly serving Princeton,

Proudly serving Princeton, Pennington Penningtonand and surrounding area for over 6 years surrounding area for over 6 years

Pet Sitting Service 609-947-2769 www.fourpups.com Pet Sitting Service 609-947-2769 www.fourpups.com

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

Email: info@olympicpaintingco.com www.olympicpaintingco.com Serving the greater Princeton area since 1989

HD

Fully registered and insured

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

(609) 924-2200 ext 10 08-23 LAST CALL ESTATE SALE: 4597 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528. Next to Post Office. 2nd floor of dental office, enter from front. Saturday August 26 from 10-1. Antique French & German clocks, antique French bronze statue, antique lamps. Books, model boats & much more! 08-23 YARD SALE: Saturday, August 26, starting 9 am. 25 & 27 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). 1998 Mercedes-Benz SL500 convertible w/ soft & hard tops. Collection of CDS, rakes, hand saws, & shovels. Artwork, storage containers, furniture, shoes & clothes (including men’s). 08-23

FOR RENT: Lovely 3 BR, center hall Colonial. Well maintained. Hardwood floors throughout. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. Close to town & schools. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 08-09-3t EXCELLENT BABYSITTER With references, available in the Lawrenceville, Princeton and Pennington areas. Please text to (609) 216-5000 tf

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 08-02-5t ROSA’S

Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

ELDERCARE COMPANION P/T Immediately. Caring in-home compassionate professional. Princeton area. Will engage adult in cognitive activities to help memory. Call (609) 452-7613 or (732) 672-1403, leave message. If I missed your call, phone again. 08-09-3t

American Furniture Exchange

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE: Landscaping, Pruning, Edging, Mulching. Free estimates. Call Franco (609) 510-8477. 07-12-8t

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PRINCETON RENTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf SEEKING TEMPORARY/ LONG TERM RENTAL: A man of 50’s, his books, few art pieces & plants, need immediate relocation, to a temporary single room, or long term one-bedroom/ two-bedroom private space, in a well maintained home & quiet residential setting, within 15 miles or so from Princeton. (609) 731-1120. 08-16-3t GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSE SHARE: 4 BR, 1.5 bath house, on pleasant residential street. 1 block to Nassau Street. 1st floor is furnished. Washer & dryer in basement. Tenants responsible for leaf removal & snow removal in compliance with Princeton’s regulations. No pets, no smoking. Available Sept. 1 for 1 year or longer. $3,100/mo. plus all utilities. Credit check & security deposit required. Call (609) 924-0970. Leave message. 08-23-2t

CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 08-02-5t PRINCETON NEW HOUSE: FOR RENT. 4 BR, 4 bath. Private home, 1 acre lot. Deck, garage, modern kitchen, central air, walk-out basement. Walking distance to Nassau Street. $3,800/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) 216-0092. 08-23-3t PRINCETON RENTAL: Single family home with newly renovated eat-in kitchen. 2.5 BR, 1.5 baths, H/W floors & central A/C with spacious back yard & walking distance to campus & shops. Located on Linden Lane in Princeton. Basement includes washer/dryer & off-street parking. No pets. $2,500/mo. plus utilities. Sept. 1st. After 5 pm, (609) 273-4416 or mariagdifo@hotmail.com 08-23-3t REMODELED 3/6 OFFICE SUITES: Historic Nassau Street Building. 2nd Floor, with Parking. (609) 213-5029. 08-23-5t CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 08-16-6t CLEANING LADY: My lovely cleaning lady is looking for more jobs. Employed by me 20 yrs. Thorough, trustworthy & reliable. Call for references, (609) 306-3555. 08-23-13t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf PRINCETON LUXURY APARTMENTS: 253Nassau.com Weinberg Management, WMC@collegetown.com Text (609) 731-1630. 07-12-tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-10-18


39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

308 Pennington Titusville Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $1,124,000

181 Plainsboro Road, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $1,050,000

NEWLY PRICED

72 Linden Lane, Princeton Marketed by: Yael Zakut $825,000

4505 Province Line Road, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $788,800

NEWLY PRICED

45 Lake View Drive, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Deborah “Debbie” Lang $770,000

22 W Spring Hollow Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker $745,000

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

44 Rutgers Lane, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Priya Khanna | $539,000

21 Globeflower Lane, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: Ginny Sheehan |$459,900

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 40

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS: Princeton – $1,400/mo. Studio with eat-in kitchen & bath. Rent includes heat & 1 parking spot. Available in August. Princeton – $1,650/mo. 2nd floor office on Nassau Street with parking. Available now. Princeton – $1,850/mo. 2 BR, 2 bath, LR/kitchen combo. Available now. Princeton Address-Franklin Twp – $1,950/mo. 3 BR, 1 bath renovated home with LR, DR, kitchen. Fenced-in backyard. Available now. Princeton – $3,400/mo. SHORT-TERM RENTAL. FULLY FURNISHED house with 3 BR, 3.5 baths. Walk to everything from this gracious brick house. Available now through 10/31/17. Princeton – $3,850/mo. Colonial, 5 BR, 2 full baths, LR, dining room, family room, kitchen w/ breakfast area. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses! STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

Custom fitted in your home.

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware.

12-27-17

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-12-18

WE BUY CARS

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-01/08-23

(908) 359-8131

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 STORAGE SPACE: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf SMALL OFFICE SUITENASSAU STREET: with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18

Belle Mead Garage

Ask for Chris tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10 08-23 LAST CALL ESTATE SALE: 4597 Route 27, Kingston, NJ 08528. Next to Post Office. 2nd floor of dental office, enter from front. Saturday August 26 from 10-1. Antique French & German clocks, antique French bronze statue, antique lamps. Books, model boats & much more! 08-23

YARD SALE: Saturday, August 26, starting 9 am. 25 & 27 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). 1998 Mercedes-Benz SL500 convertible w/ soft & hard tops. Collection of CDS, rakes, hand saws, & shovels. Artwork, storage containers, furniture, shoes & clothes (including men’s). 08-23 ELDERCARE COMPANION P/T Immediately. Caring in-home compassionate professional. Princeton area. Will engage adult in cognitive activities to help memory. Call (609) 452-7613 or (732) 672-1403, leave message. If I missed your call, phone again. 08-09-3t FOR RENT: Lovely 3 BR, center hall Colonial. Well maintained. Hardwood floors throughout. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. Close to town & schools. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 08-09-3t EXCELLENT BABYSITTER With references, available in the Lawrenceville, Princeton and Pennington areas. Please text to (609) 216-5000 tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

32 Chambers Street Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. Stockton, Broker-Owner

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PRINCETON RENTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf SEEKING TEMPORARY/ LONG TERM RENTAL: A man of 50’s, his books, few art pieces & plants, need immediate relocation, to a temporary single room, or long term one-bedroom/ two-bedroom private space, in a well maintained home & quiet residential setting, within 15 miles or so from Princeton. (609) 731-1120. 08-16-3t

GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSE SHARE: 4 BR, 1.5 bath house, on pleasant residential street. 1 block to Nassau Street. 1st floor is furnished. Washer & dryer in basement. Tenants responsible for leaf removal & snow removal in compliance with Princeton’s regulations. No pets, no smoking. Available Sept. 1 for 1 year or longer. $3,100/mo. plus all utilities. Credit check & security deposit required. Call (609) 924-0970. Leave message. 08-23-2t PROPERTY MAINTENANCE: Landscaping, Pruning, Edging, Mulching. Free estimates. Call Franco (609) 510-8477. 07-12-8t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 08-02-5t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 08-02-5t PRINCETON NEW HOUSE: FOR RENT. 4 BR, 4 bath. Private home, 1 acre lot. Deck, garage, modern kitchen, central air, walk-out basement. Walking distance to Nassau Street. $3,800/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) 216-0092. 08-23-3t

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Where enhanced supportive services are part of the every day routine... Discover the Acorn Glen difference! Call 609-430-4000 775 Mt. Lucas Road Princeton, NJ 08540

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 70 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

LIFETIME WARRANTY ON ALL WORK WE DESIGN AND BUILD NEW PATIOS! 609-751-3039 • www.ReNewMason.com

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5.

Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

609-584-0500 paul@apennacchi.com

! N IO T! EW T F N UC TS LE R I ST N N Y8U CO ONL

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

NEW PRINCETON LISTING

255 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON

Located in the heart of walkable Princeton … adjacent to Princeton University’s campus A LIFESTYLE!

At the end of a cul-de-sac, off Mountain Avenue in the western section of Princeton, this charming house has living room, dining room, kitchen, den, a bedroom and bath with laundry on the first floor and 2 bedrooms and bath upstairs. Behind the 1-car attached garage there is a storage/work room. A private and cozy back yard offers patio and mature plantings. Available for occupancy in time for school. A great house in a great location. $599,000 Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1370183

www.stockton-realtor.com

LUXURY 2 & 3 BEDROOMS / 2 BATH APARTMENT HOMES GOURMET KITCHENS QUALITY FINISHES GAS FIREPLACES BALCONIES

ROOFTOP PATIO OUTDOOR CAFE ON-SITE BANK ON-SITE PARKING & STORAGE

NOW LEASING 609.477.6577 WWW.CARNEVALEPLAZA.COM


259 Mount Lucas Road PRINCETON

4 BEDS

3.1 BATHS

7,000/MO

227 Prospect Avenue PRINCETON

3 BATHS

5 BEDS

6,000/MO

226 Jefferson Road PRINCETON

4 BEDS

3 BATHS

5,200/MO

Marketed by ShuHung “Simonne” Lo | m.609.580.0909

Marketed by Anne Nosnitsky | m.609.468.0501

Marketed by Vandana “Vani” Uppal | m.609.575.0075

103 Mercer Street

7 Heritage Hills Court

51 Lafayette Road

PRINCETON

3 BEDS

3.1 BATHS

4,600/MO

MONTGOMERY TWP

4 BEDS

3.1 BATHS

4,600/MO

PRINCETON

1 BEDS

1 BATH

4,500/MO

Marketed by Anne Nosnitsky | m.609.468.0501

Marketed by Vandana “Vani” Uppal | m.609.575.0075

Marketed by Anne Nosnitsky | m.609.468.0501

12 Riverside Drive

119 Saint Clair Court

37 Dorann Avenue

PRINCETON

3 BEDS

2 BATHS

4,200/MO

Marketed by Michelle Needham | m.609.839.6738

PRINCETON

3 BEDS

2.1 BATHS

4,200/MO

Marketed by Marcia Graves | m.609.610.8200

33 Witherspoon Street | Princeton, NJ 08542 609.921.2600 glorianilson.com

PRINCETON

3 BEDS

2 BATHS

3,200/MO

Marketed by Ermelinda “Linda” Carnevale | m.609.462.7719

Join the conversation! /GNRprinceton

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

AFFORD TO DWELL WELL. NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT IN AND AROUND PRINCETON.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017 • 42

PRINCETON RENTAL: Single family home with newly renovated eat-in kitchen. 2.5 BR, 1.5 baths, H/W floors & central A/C with spacious back yard & walking distance to campus & shops. Located on Linden Lane in Princeton. Basement includes washer/dryer & off-street parking. No pets. $2,500/mo. plus utilities. Sept. 1st. After 5 pm, (609) 273-4416 or mariagdifo@hotmail.com 08-23-3t REMODELED 3/6 OFFICE SUITES: Historic Nassau Street Building. 2nd Floor, with Parking. (609) 213-5029. 08-23-5t CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 08-16-6t CLEANING LADY: My lovely cleaning lady is looking for more jobs. Employed by me 20 yrs. Thorough, trustworthy & reliable. Call for references, (609) 306-3555. 08-23-13t

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf PRINCETON LUXURY APARTMENTS: 253Nassau.com Weinberg Management, WMC@collegetown.com Text (609) 731-1630.

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS

07-12-tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

Custom fitted in your home. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654

08-23-18

windhamstitches.com 04-12-18

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-10-18 THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-01/08-23 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17

“My father says you remember the smell of your country no matter where you are but only recognize it when you are far away." —Aglaja Veteranyi

PART-TIME & SUBSTITUTE STAFF NEEDED: University NOW Children’s Center is looking for several M-F, Part-time Support Staff members ranging between the hours of 11:30-6 pm & Substitute Support Staff. We are looking for warm, nurturing, energetic, reliable & responsible individuals to work in a team teaching situation. Under the supervision of our classroom staff, the part-time & substitute cares for children ranging from 3 months to almost 5 years. The Substitute is an “on call” position with variable hours 8:30-6:00 pm. Experience working with young children required. CDA, AA degree or more a plus. Please no phone calls. Email resumes to sbertran@princeton.edu 08-23-3t

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

well loved and well read since 1946

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR®

· Newsletters

Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

· Brochures

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

· Postcards · Books · Catalogues

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

· Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

This beautiful property would lend itself to wonderful barbeque parties and lots of outdoor activities. Situated on over five private acres of beautiful grounds, this charming brick house contains 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath and 2 half baths, Living Room/Dining Room, eat-in kitchen and den. Fire up the grill – set up the outdoor furniture and enjoy. All this and the possibility of a sub-division with a “Technical Variance” makes this a most desirable investment. In nearby Skillman, Montgomery Twp. a property with lots of potential. $599,000 Virtual Tour: wwwrealestateshows.com/1370180

www.stockton-realtor.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


Selling

Mortgage

Title

GREAT UPGRADES

Insurance

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AuguST 23, 2017

Buying

Realto

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

FRANKLIN TWP. $639,900 Upgraded brick front Emerald model w/ fully fin. basement w/ full BA (2016), new kitchen, spacious master BA w/ jetted tub, breakfast area with skylights, solar panels, paver patio and HW floors.

$389,000 LAWRENCEVILLE A 4 BR, 3 1/2 BA Colonial w/ open floor plan, EIK, formal DR, LR & FR, 2-car gar. w/ separate workshop & 1/2 BA, IG pool w/ covered patio & tennis court. Dir: Rt 206 to 851 Lawrence Rd.

Mary Saba 732-239-4641 (cell)

Jean Budny 609-915-7073 (cell)

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

NEAR TOWN AND SCHOOLS

PRINCETON $949,000 In the heart of Riverside neighborhood lies this 4 BR, 2.5 BA ranch on .5 acres on a cul de sac. As you enter this home you are struck by the sense of space & light. Dir: 4 Howe Circle.

PRINCETON $970,000 This expanded split-level/Colonial offers 6-plus BRs, 5 BAs & great room w/ floor-to-ceiling, wood-burning, brick FP. Additional enhancements include HW floors & natural WD doors.

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW PRICE

FABULOUS COLONIAL

PRINCETON $1,325,000 This Colonial is near schools, Community Park pool & Princeton Shopping center. Features 5 BRs, 4.5 BAs, HW flrs, SS applcs. & a fully fin. basement, plus a paver patio & fenced yard.

PRINCETON $1,375,000 Located on a premier lot, this house has an inviting front entry with bluestone front porch. The main living area of the home is open & bright and the designer updated kitchen is a show stopper!

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

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CB Princeton Town Topics 8.23.17.qxp_CB Previews 8/22/17 1:20 PM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

330 Stonecliff Road, Princeton Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 5 Beds, 3 Baths • $1,495,000

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15 Grayson Drive, Montgomery Twp 156 Cranbury Neck Road, Plainsboro Twp Elizabeth Zuckerman / Stephanie Will, Sales Associates Deanna Anderson, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $829,000 4 Beds, 4 Baths • $789,000

10 Scudder Court, Pennington Boro Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $699,000

9 Dana Court , South Brunswick Twp Patricia O'Connell, Sales Associates 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $599,999

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25 Woodland Drive, Montgomery Twp 7 Briardale Court, Plainsboro Twp Elizabeth Zuckerman / Stephanie Will, Sales Associates Donna Reilly & Ellen Calman, Sales Associates 5 Beds, 4.5 Baths • $1,080,000 5 Beds, 5.5 Baths • $929,000 OL

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84 Carson Road, Lawrence Twp Kathleen Miller, Sales Associate Main House / Barn • $1,250,000

697 Georgetown Franklin Turnpike, Montgomery Twp Elizabeth Zuckerman / Stephanie Will, Sales Associates 8 Beds, 4.5 Baths • $1,269,000

117 Mine Road, Hopewell Twp Kathleen Miller, Sales Associates 3 Beds, 3 Baths • $699,000 LO W FE HO ES A

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463 Federal City Road, Hopewell Twp Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 5 Beds, 3.5 Baths • $2,250,000

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PRINCETON

272 Fountayne Lane, Lawrenceville Alan Ko, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $389,000

10 Nassau Street | Princeton | 609-921-1411 www.ColdwellBankerHomes.com/Princeton © 2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker® and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper August 23, 2017  

Witherspoon Media Group