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Volume LXXII, Number 28

Unique History of The Bordentown School . . . 5 Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets Summer Program . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Journey to the Center of Planet Einstein. . . . . . 13 PU Lax Alum Schreiber Heading to World Championships . . . . . 23 PFC Boca 16U Soccer Team Wins Mid-Atlantic Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Science Teacher Anne Soos Retires After 50 Years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors. . 18, 19 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Classified Ads . . . . . . . 30 Mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Music/Theater . . . . . . . 17 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . 29 Police Blotter. . . . . . . . . 6 Service Directory . . . . . 33 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Topics of the Town . . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Parking, Recycling Costs Among Topics Discussed At Meeting of Council Following a work session on parking and the financial modeling workbook being prepared by the consulting firm Dixon Resources Unlimited, Princeton Council voted Monday to introduce a parking contract agreement with the IPS Group for single space smart meters. Last month, the Council approved a contract with PassportParking, Inc., for a new app that allows payment for parking through mobile phones. Monday’s vote was the next step in the revamping of the town’s parking system, and consultant Julie Dixon said she is hoping to schedule a kickoff meeting soon. She is hopeful that a rollout of the multi-layered plan can take place in mid-September. The public hearing on the agreement with IPS Group will be at the Council meeting on August 1. Bob Hough, the town’s director of infrastructure and operations, told Council that costs for recycling by Mercer County are about to rise as much as 40 percent over the next five years. A letter last Friday from the Mercer County Improvement Authority informed Hough of the expected cost hike. The current agreement with the county expires at the end of the year. In 2014, Princeton paid the county $190,689 for recycling; the prediction is that by 2023 it will be $318,909. Hough said the county intends to discuss the situation with the other municipalities that use their services. “My understanding is that the main contributor to this is glass,” he said. “It’s a major, major jump. Should we go out on our own to bid? There are a lot of things we need answered.” Upon request of Council President Jenny Crumiller, Hough said he will look into the practices of municipalities that do not use the county’s services for recycling. Kristin Appelget, director of Princeton University’s office of community and regional affairs, reported that a new traffic signal is being installed at the intersection of College Road and Alexander Street. The University is paying for the signal, ADA ramps, striping, and signal request buttons. The new signal, which is projected to be completed by September, is the result of numerous safety concerns expressed to the University, Appelget said. One parking space will be eliminated to increase sightlines. Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton told Council that construction of the new Continued on Page 12

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Referendum May Be Split Into Two Questions

In response to public concerns about the $130M price tag and its effect on local property taxes, the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education is considering dividing its facilities referendum proposal into two parts, with the two questions to be voted on separately. “I think the entire proposed referendum is a sound plan,” said Board President Patrick Sullivan. “but we’ve gotten feedback from the community that it’s a big bite. We wanted to give people another option to postpone part of the plan for two — three years.” At a working session last night, which took place after press time, the Board discussed the referendum and the facilities committee proposal to split the question and invited input from the public. A decision will be made at next week’s July 17 Board meeting on whether to split the question, revise the referendum proposal, and possibly postpone the referendum vote from October 2 to the November 6 date of the general election. Superintendent Steve Cochrane wrote last week, in a letter to families, staff, and community members, “There is no question that as a district we have a need to expand capacity K-12, to address security in all our buildings, to improve HVAC and

electrical efficiencies district-wide, and to make some athletic improvements. The question we are weighing is whether the tax impact of addressing all of those needs at the same time is one the community is ready to shoulder — particularly in light of the recent decision at the federal level which will limit the ability of residents to deduct state and local taxes.” The proposal of the facilities committee of the Board would not eliminate any of the original elements of the referendum proposal, but would include in question

No. 1 improvements at the elementary schools; the construction of a new 5-6 school at Valley Road; the purchase of property at Thanet Road for central administration, transportation, and maintenance; security improvements; HVAC and other infrastructure improvements; a few additional high school classrooms; a second floor over the high school fitness center; and an athletic field at Valley Road, with a total price tag of $80.8 M. Question No. 2, according to the Continued on Page 8

Mayor of Hopewell Township Seeks Gusciora’s Assembly Seat Now that Reed Gusciora has been elected mayor of Trenton, his 15th District New Jersey Assembly seat is up for grabs. Kevin Kuchinski, mayor of Hopewell Township, has issued a statement saying he is pursuing the post. “Our district has a long history of strong representation and innovative leadership, most recently with Reed Gusciora,” he said. “Reed led the charge to bring fairness back to New Jersey, including a major victory on gay marriage several years ago. My goal is to build on Reed’s accomplishments in the Fighting 15th.”

Kuchinski has been on the Hopewell Township Committee since 2015 and was elected mayor a year later. He is a former vice president of marketing for Church & Dwight, and was formerly employed by Procter & Gamble. Kuchinski is currently a partner at Sourland Mountain Spirits, and he has a consulting practice focused on branding strategies. Kuchinski intends to share his platform in coming weeks, focusing on accelerating economic growth in central New Jersey. “As a mayor, I understand first-hand Continued on Page 12

PAYBACK TIME: At a recent Princeton Council meeting, Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) Board President Wendy Mager, left, presented Mayor Liz Lempert with a check for $200,000 as reimbursement of funds for the acquisition of 20-plus acres for the Mt. Lucas Preserve and 35 acres for the Tusculum property, originally the farm of John Witherspoon. FOPOS is a nonprofit devoted to preservation and stewardship of land in Princeton.


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NJM Group Contributes To Community Foundation

JUST PEACHY FESTIVAL: Enjoy everything peach on August 4 and 5 at Terhune Orchards from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The weekend will include cooking demonstrations, a traveling zoo, a ride through the orchards on tractor-drawn wagons, pony rides, duck races, face painting, and Pam’s Everything Peachy Food Tent offering summer fare like peach pie, barbecue chicken, homemade gazpacho, and apple cider donuts.

The Princeton Area Community Foundation has been awarded a $150,000 grant from NJM Insurance Group. The five-year grant will be paid in annual installments of $30,000, and will help fund the Community Foundation’s new All Kids Thrive initiative. “We are grateful for this tremendous support from NJM, which has been a longtime partner to nonprofits throughout New Jersey, including the Mercer County region,” said Jeffrey M. Vega, president and CEO of the Community Foundation. “Our All Kids Thrive program is a bold, new initiative designed to improve the lives of young people living in poverty in our region, but we know we

cannot tackle this problem alone. That’s why supporters like NJM are so important. We hope this inspires other funders to collaborate with us, as we work to ensure that All Kids Thrive.” The Community Foundation is working to alleviate child poverty in the Mercer County region. Education can help lift children out of poverty, but to obtain an education, children must be in class. That is why the All Kids Thrive program will fund partnerships between schools and nonprofits that are working to reduce chronic absenteeism. Studies show children who miss 10 percent or more of the school year – 18 days – often lag behind their peers at every level: from early childhood, when chronic absenteeism erodes the benefits of Pre-K, to high school, where chronically absent students are more likely to drop out. The Community Foundation will announce the 2018 All Kids Thrive grant recipients within the next several months. “One of our core values as a company is to support the communities we’re privileged to serve,” said Mike Van Wagner, NJM’s vice president of public affairs. “For nearly thirty years, the Princeton Area Community Foundation has helped promote philanthropy and advance the well-being of communities throughout central New Jersey. We’re thrilled to be part of the All Kids Thrive initiative, and look forward to seeing the positive impact it will have in our region.”

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Waiters’ Race: This annual event in which waiters from Princeton restaurants compete for prizes is Thursday, July 12 at 4 p.m. in Palmer Square. www. princetonmerchants.org. Tiffany Window Tours: At Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau Street at Vandeventer, Sundays from noon-2 p.m. and by appointment at (609) 9242613 or www.PrincetonUMC.org. Walk and Picnic at D&R Greenway Land Trust: On Tuesday, July 17, 5:30 p.m. (rain date July 18), Jeff Hoagland of The Watershed Institute leads a tour of the Stony Brook. Bring your own picnic, $5 donation. Register at rsvp@drgreenway.org. Annual Backpack Drive: The Princeton Human Services Commission is collecting backpacks and school supplies for Princeton schoolchildren entering kindergarten through sixth grade. Drop off by August 10 at the Commission’s office, 1 Monument Drive. Cooling Centers: Princeton Public Library at 65 Witherspoon Street, and Witherspoon Hall at 400 Witherspoon Street are designated places to cool off during hot weather. Black Bear Safety Tips: It’s bear season, and a few have been sighted in Princeton. Princeton Animal Control reminds residents to secure trash in containers with tight-fitting lids, clean food scraps from grills or decks, feed pets indoors, hang bird feeders at least 10 feet high, put out garbage on the day of instead of the night before, and secure beehives, livestock, or fruit crops with an electric fence. Report any bear damage or nuisance to the NJ DEP hotline at (877) 927-6337 or local police.

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“TUSKEGEE OF THE NORTH”: On a 400-acre campus in Bordentown, African American high school students received quality academic and practical educations between 1886 and 1955. This illustration shows the Georgian buildings and acres of open land that made the school a haven for generations of students. (Courtesy of John Medley, Class of 1954)

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Joh n Med ley had jus t graduated from junior high school in rural Blackwood when his stepmother heard about a boarding academy located not far away. The

Bordentown School, also known as the Manual Training and Industrial School of Colored Youth, sounded almost too good to be true — especially in the early 1950s, when the education of African Americans was hardly a national priority. Medley’s enrollment at the school changed his life. “It was like a new world,” the 84-year-old resident of Columbus recalled last week. “It gave me a foundation in life.”

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For some 70 years, Bordentown was a haven of high academic standards that also required students to learn a trade. Medley, who graduated the year before the school closed, was among those to attend what was often called “the Tuskegee of the North,” after Booker T. Washington’s famous institute in Alabama. The school had to shut down in 1955 after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision that made separate public schools for black and white students unconstitutional (the school was operated by the state of New Jersey). In ensuing years, the Georgian-style, 400-acre campus served intermittently as an institution for disabled children and a youth correctional facility. Its future is uncertain. Most area residents are unaware of the unique history of The Bordentown School. But in recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest. A Place Out of Time, a 2010 documentar y by Dave Davidson, interviewed alumni and historians and showed rare archival footage. Mildred Rice Jordan, a retired Rider University professor and granddaughter of the school’s founder Walter Allen Simpson Rice, wrote the 2017 book Reclaiming African American Students: Legacies, Lessons, and Pre scr iptions : The Bordentown School Model. This year, students from Cherr y Hill High School East made Compromised by Conflict: The Bordentown School and the Struggle for

Black Education, a film that won an award from the New Jersey Historical Commission. Writer and education historian Connie Goddard, who was interviewed for the film along with Medley, has written scholarly articles about the school. “The school was unique because it provided both a solid academic education as well as trade classes,” she said. “Particularly from 1930 on, students graduated with a regular secondary education degree equivalent to what they’d get at any other high school in New

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Jersey. The teaching staff was fully certified academically, and the trade instructors came from pretty good institutions as well.” Part of the appeal of the school was that the faculty lived on campus. “This was very much a self-contained community in many ways, definitely in loco parentis,” Goddard added. “A lot of the children were from what used to be called broken homes. This provided a family structure. But a lot of solid middle class families sent their children there, too, because it was good and it was free.” E x- s lave Wa lte r A l l e n Simpson Rice founded the school in New Brunswick after serving in the Civil War, moving north, and becoming a minister. Starting with eight students in an old frame house, the school grew and moved to a farm in Bordentown in 1896, and was taken under the auspices of the New Jersey Board

of Education in 1903. The school thrived, operating self-sufficiently on a year-round basis with its own farm, cattle, and orchards. Lecturers included Albert Einstein and Paul Robeson. Harvard University graduate William R. Valentine was principal from 1915 until the late 1940s, stressing the approach of offering serious job training as well as rigorous academics. Students had to contribute to the upkeep of the school. All of the laundering, printing, cooking, and raising of produce was done on campus. “I looked at a list of graduates from the 1950s, and so many wound up doing entrepreneurial things,” Goddard said. “There were architects, furniture designers, social workers — a lot of entrepreneurial spirit.” For Medley, who has become a kind of unofficial historian of the school, “It was the best experience you could have as a teenager,” he said. “The students came from all over — not just the

U.S. We had people from British Guiana, Trinidad, and South America, too. You had to have a trade as well as an academic education. I studied the nomenclature and maintenance of auto mechanics.” Medley went on to be a driving instructor and maintenance mechanic in the U.S. Marine Corps, and then worked at the New Jersey Department of Motor Vehicles, retiring as a supervisor. “We still had trouble getting jobs,” he said. “But the determination and inspiration we got from the teachers enabled us to continue. One door closed, another one opened up. But you had to have the initiative.” Medley began researching the school and collecting memorabilia a few decades ago. He has displayed his collection at reunions and is hoping to find it a permanent home. ‘I’m trying to work out a place where some educational institution can put it on display,” he said. “It’s considered

School Matters Local Teachers Collaborate With University Researchers

Teachers from Princeton Public Schools, The Hun School, YingHua International School, Montgomery, West Windsor-Plainsboro, and other districts throughout New Jersey are collaborating with science researchers to enhance their knowledge of science, math, and technology through the QUEST professional development program at Princeton University this summer. More than 20 teachers from 12 school districts are engaging in laboratory experiments and learning about field-based research, focusing on the Disciplinary Core Ideas and Science and Engineering Practices of the Next Generation Science Standards, with funding from the National Science Foundation, Princeton University’s Cooperative Institute for Climate Science Research and the Program in Teacher Preparation, as well as support from participating schools. During the week of June 25-29 teachers in grades four-12 explored Searching for Life on Other Worlds under the guidance of geosciences Professor T.C. Onstott. They learned about the Tree of Life by examining what bacteria, viruses, and other organisms have done to adapt and survive. This week teachers in grades K-eight are working with earth science Professor Steven Carson to investigate various interactions between the ocean and climate systems.

Annenberg’s $100M Gift to Peddie 25 Years Later

Twenty-five years ago, late Philadelphia Inquirer and TV Guide publisher Walter Annenberg made a record-setting $100 million gift to Peddie School in Hightstown, and Peddie reports that the donation positioned the school to compete with the nation’s most elite prep schools and provide access for thousands of students. “The school’s entire endowment today is directly attributed to Annenberg’s gift and every single student who has received financial aid over the past 25 years has directly benefited from his donation,” said Peddie Headmaster Peter Quinn. Annenberg’s gift increased the school’s endowment from $17 to $117 million overnight, and today Peddie’s endowment has grown to $325 million and continues to boost financial aid to students. Before Annenberg’s gift 23 percent of Peddie’s students received financial aid, and that number has been raised to 40 percent. Peddie reports that the gift is even more essential now, as the number of students requiring financial aid has increased since the 1993 tuition rate of $19,000 per year has grown to $62,000 per year.

Hopewell Valley Education Foundation Awards Scholarships, Grants

Hopewell Valley High School seniors Kathryn Genovesi, Brandon Li, Ali Schragger, and Mark Van Selous have received $1,000 scholarships from the Hopewell Valley Education Foundation (HVEF) in recognition of their outstanding academic achievement and school and community contributions. With financial support from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, the HVEF has also announced a $9,200 grant to create an outdoor learning center pond landscape at Bear Tavern Elementary School’s new Outdoor Learning Center and a grant of $8,426 to purchase and install outdoor weather stations that will inform teaching and learning at all four Hopewell Valley elementary schools.

Recent PRISM Grad Will Represent U.S. at Chemistry Olympiad

Yutong Dai, recent graduate of the Princeton International School of Math (PRISM), has been chosen as one of four of the nation’s top high school chemistry students to represent the United States at the 50th International Chemistry Olympiad in Bratislava, Slovakia, and Prague, Czech Republic, on July 19-29. Dai, who will attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the fall, participated in a series of exams that involved nearly 17,000 students across the U.S. followed by the Chemistry Olympiad Study Camp at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Spings, Colorado, June 10-25. During the camp she received college-level training, with an emphasis on organic chemistry, through a series of lectures, problem-solving exercises, lab work, and testing. At the conclusion of the camp, she was selected for one of the four spots on the U.S. team.

Huang Wins Coldwell Banker Scholarship

Lianna Huang, a Princeton resident and 2018 graduate of West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South, has been chosen as the 2018 recipient of the Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Scholarship. Selected on the basis of her academic history and potential, an essay, and recommendations, Huang will receive a total of $4,000 toward her higher education at Pomona College in California, starting this fall.

a hobby for me, so I can’t qualify for grants.” As for the future of the property, it remains uncertain, said Goddard, who has toured the campus. “Of the 20 or so buildings, there are still a half dozen left, like the auditorium and eating facilities,” she said. “The barns have been taken down, but the chicken coop is still there. Basically it’s a couple hundred acres of prime land sitting there that’s not really well used. It would be terrific if it could be used again, but it’s not clear how this could happen.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week: “What do you think of the businesses at the Princeton Shopping Center, and what would you like to see?” (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Police Blotter On July 4, at 1:21 p.m., a victim reported that his vehicle was stolen on July 4 between midnight and 1:20 p.m. on Brook Bend. On July 4, at 3:28 p.m., a 35-year-old male from Lawrenceville was charged with DWI subsequent to a report of a vehicle parked in a travel lane on Park Place. On July 3, at 8 p.m., a victim reported that his vehicle was stolen from the municipal lot on Witherspoon Street between 6 and 8 p.m. on July 2. On July 2, at 2:54 p.m., a victim reported that his bicycle was stolen on Witherspoon Street between 10 p.m. on June 30 and 9 a.m. on July 1. On June 30, at 1:20 a.m., a 26-year-old male from Ewing was charged with DWI subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for turning on red where prohibited on Nassau Street. On June 30, at 10:47 p.m., a 19-year-old male from East Windsor was charged with possession of under 50 grams of marijuana subsequent to a check on a suspicious vehicle parked after hours in Marquand Park on Lovers Lane. On June 29, at 8 p.m., it was reported that someone forced entry into a home on Herrontown Road and stole items from the property. On June 27, at 7:48 a.m., it was reported that unknown actors sprayed graffiti on the interior walls of the men’s restroom at Grover Park. On June 27, at 11:32 p.m., an 18-year-old male from Princeton was charged with possession of under 50 grams of marijuana subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Hodge Road for multiple violations. On June 27, at 12:16 p.m., a suspect was observed removing $200 worth of items from McCaffrey’s Food Market without paying for the merchandise. On June 27, at 6:28 p.m., someone reported witnessing two people conceal property and leave the CVS on Nassau Street without purchasing the items. On June 25, at 5:37 p.m., someone reported observing an individual entering a parked vehicle on Leigh Avenue through the back window. The owner of the vehicle reported $100 was stolen from inside. On June 24, at 2:07 a.m., a 44-year-old male from Ewing was charged with DWI subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on South Harrison Street for failure to keep right.

“I am really impressed by all of the healthy options that are here now. Between Chopt and the new Sweetberry Bowls, it’s really great. And a lot of people might not think of Nomad Pizza this way, but they have a really great vegetarian menu. Their arugula salad and shiitake mushroom pizza are to die for. What would I like to see? I would have to say something really community-based, like a gallery or some classes.” —Melissa Kuscin, Princeton

Rachel: “We love the shopping center. They have everything we need in one place and we can walk here easily from our home. I think I’d like to see an ice cream shop here. It would be especially great to have one to go to after having dinner or after an event like the Summer Concert Series.” —David and Rachel Mostafavi with baby Violet, Princeton

“I think we have a great mix right now. We definitely have a diverse group of storefronts. I guess it would be good to have another clothing store or even a shoe store. It would be really great to have another restaurant, too. I was really sad about Main Street closing; the clock tower cabana that they built is such a wonderful space and hope it gets used again.” —Auggie Preziosi, Princeton

Susan: “I love the stores here, and we have a beautiful grocery store in McCaffrey’s and a great hardware store with Smith’s Ace Hardware. But I really miss some of the longtime specialty store like American Sew & Vac and Jordan’s. I’d love to see more specialty stores like that return.” Carolyn: “I really miss Main Street and would love to see some more restaurants, especially a healthy choice, maybe even something farm-to-table.” —From left, Susan Smiley, Princeton with Carolyn Smiley, Orange


“Witherspoon-Jackson Community: Stories Lived, But S eldom Heard � w ill be the theme of the 2018 Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets Summer Program (JEPWJ) from August 2-12, with this year’s celebration dedicated “to all of our ancestors who passed this year, especially Jim Floyd,� said lead organizer John Bailey. Started more than a decade ago by B ailey and Witherspoon-Jackson (WJ) resident and historian Shirley Satterfield, the JEPWJ program this year will retain its focus on community, history, personalities, and families in Princeton’s 20th historic district, but a number of new events will take place during the 10day celebration, including the first Jim Floyd Memorial Lecture delivered on Saturday morning, August 11 by black futurist Chet Sisk, who will discuss the recent world paradigm shift and its impact on Princeton. Other JEPWJ highlights will most likely include a o n e - m a n s h ow o n s l av e r y, coi n c i d i n g w it h a n

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ar t ex hibit feat ur ing lo cal artists; a dinner party and cabaret at Princeton Countr y Club on Fr iday, August 10; a Gospel Fest w it h are a gosp el choir s gathering at First Baptist Church of Princeton at 5 p.m. on Sunday, August 5; “I Remember W hen,� an historical discussion and conversation on service to the community on Tuesday, August 7, with a look at the lives of Paul Robeson, Jim Floyd, Albert Hinds, Doris Burell, Jossie Broadway, Pete Young, Ruth Parker, and others ; a kick-off reception at Studio Hillier on Friday, August 3 at 5 p.m., and various other community gatherings. Sponsored by many Princeton businesses, community leaders, community organ i z at ions, and indi vidual citizens, the 2018 JEPWJ will also feature a walking tour, yard sales, wor ko u t a n d c o n d i t i o n ing sessions, a basketball clinic, and games, music, awards, entertainment, and more. In addition to Bailey and Satterfield, lead organizers of the JEPWJ celebrations include Bob Hillier, Lance Liverman, Leighton Newlin, and Mildred Trotman. “They have all committed time and money and effort to make sure our history is not forgotten,� said Bailey. “It’s a labor of love.� Bailey, who now lives and works as a political consultant in Denver, returns frequently to the Princeton

community where he grew up. “I owe it to myself and t he tow n to engage t he c o m m u n i t y a s of te n a s I can, whenever I can be helpful to the town or the schools,� Bailey said. “I genuinely care about the place. It nurtured me. “ Bailey talked about this year’s JEPWJ focus on stories from the community. “The Witherspoon-Jackson community has stories of faith, leadership, history, and community service, as well as a treasure trove of events and personalities hav ing lived in this r ich and vibrant historic black community. “Many of these stor ies everyone knows, but they haven’t b een told. L et’s tell them. Let’s figure out how we can make this thing work. This will provide an opportunity to talk about racism in Princeton.� Bailey went on to em p h as i z e t h e i mp or t a n c e of such conversations and events in the current political climate. “Especially now with the destructive tactics being used to keep us apart, we have to keep focused on what brings us together. I’m holding all of us accountable. Democracy is elusive. We still have work to do.� —Donald Gilpin

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Joint Effort 2018 Plans 10-Day Witherspoon-Jackson Celebration


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 8

Referendum May Be Split continued from page one

LOCAL PRINCETON RESIDENT TURNS 101: Acorn Glen Assisted Living resident Mr. Shih Tsun Lin turned 101 on Saturday, July 7, 2018. Mr. Lin along with his family and friends celebrated his birthday on Friday at his residence at Acorn Glen in Princeton. As part of the celebration, Mr. Lin’s talented family performed for the community. Shih Tsun was born in China, the third among a total of 8 children. He studied to become a chemical engineer and first came to the United States on a year-long scholarship to pursue his Master’s Degree and eventually moved to the U.S. permanently in 1971. Throughout his life he worked as a professor and enjoyed leisure activities such as bridge, reading, and tennis (which he played into his 80s). He has three children, four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Mr. Lin says the secret to his long and happy life are two things: family and faith. Congratulations to Mr. Lin on this wonderful milestone!

facilities committee proposal, would include the balance of the high school expansion and additional athletic field and high school upgrades, at a projected cost of $48.8 M. Emphasizing the merits of the total plan and urging supporters to make their voices heard alongside the voices of those calling for cost cuts, Sullivan said, “I still think the entire plan is a really good one for kids and the community, at an affordable pr ice. People who support what we think is a reasonable plan have to come out and speak up. We want to be sensitive to public concerns, but the whole plan is sound and well thought-out.” Sullivan added that delays in moving for ward could cause additional problems. “Everybody expects interest rates, inflation, and construction costs to rise,” he noted. Cochrane pointed out the conflicting concerns and the positive nature of the referendum process. “We have identified critical and important needs,” he said. “We have been as sensitive as possible to the costs, and we have engaged the com-

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This fall will be different for science teacher Anne Soos, who just retired after five years at The Hun School of Princeton and 45 years before that at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. “This will probably be the first September since I was 4 that I won’t be thinking about school,” she said. Soos served as science department chair at Stuart for 16 years, then head of the Upper School for 12 years before she arrived at Hun, where she taught a variety of different science courses. A teacher of teachers as well as students, she has worked as a reader of Advanced Placement ( A P ) Biolog y and Environmental Science tests for many years, edited an AP study guide, taught week-long College Board Institutes for teachers, and served as a consultant to the College Board. Even when she was running the Upper School at Stuart, however, Soos insisted that she continue to teach at least one or two classes. “Many people spend their lives trying to find out what they want to do,” she said. “I couldn’t believe I was so lucky 50 years ago to find the right job for me.” Hun Science Chair Jacqueline O’Gorman praised Soos’s patience, curiosity, kindness, “and her never wavering selflessness.” She described Soos as “a seasoned master teacher.” “She has incredible professional expertise in science education and school leadership and has often shared her knowledge and experiences with her colleagues to influence them to delve deeper, think bigger, and take risks in the classroom,” O’Gorman added. “She guides us all in becoming better teachers and better citizens.” Roots Soos grew up in Ithaca, N.Y., where her father was a professor at Cornell University. There were other educators in the family, an aunt who was a professor at Goucher College and a grandfather who was a high school teacher, but teaching was not on Soos’s agenda from the start. “I had no intention of becoming a teacher,” she said. “I had no idea what I wanted to do.” She attended Radcliffe College as an undergraduate (before its merger with Harvard), then Stanford University for a year of graduate school, where she met her husband. W hen he was hired as a chemistr y professor at Princeton University, they moved to Princeton, and she became a graduate student there. “That was before they ad m it te d u nderg raduate women — a very interesting experience,” she recalled. “There weren’t many women around and not many ladies rooms.” After a semester at Princeton, she was enjoying her duties as teaching assistant but decided she was not interested in a PhD in chemistry, so she enrolled in Rutgers’ Graduate School of Education, at which point “I got a call from a nun at a school I’d never heard of,

Stuart Country Day. She said she’d seen my name on the professional job roster and had two biology classes that needed to be taught — would you be interested?” Soos started teaching two classes at Stuart in the fall of 1968 (Stuart Road had just been paved), while she was working on her master’s degree at Rutgers. “What I realized,” she said, “was that I loved teaching high school students. I realized that this was the job that was made for me.” She soon expanded her schedule to full-time and went on to eventually teach every science class in the school. And science at Stuart, gender stereotypes of the past 50 years notwithstanding, has always been serious business. “At Stuart girls do a lot of science,” Soos explained. “We were very proud of the fact that most of our students graduated with four or five years of science and a lot of kids were involved in AP or advanced level courses. So the girls almost regarded as a badge of honor that they knew science was something that they could do and they were going to show the world that they could do it.” Reluctant Administrator For the past 50 years, until last month, Soos has been a classroom teacher, but in 1999 she could not turn down a plea from her headmistress to be head of the Upper School at Stuart. “I didn’t think I could do it,” she said. “I didn’t think I’d be good at it. It was one of the most terrifying job changes I’ve ever made — being somehow in charge. I remember sitting there one of the first days in the fall, listening to people moving back and forth, and realizing: I’m in some way responsible for all of them.” Continuing to teach one or two classes every year during her 12 years as Upper School head helped Soos to stay grounded and in touch with students and teachers at Stuart. “My reputation as a teacher was something that I was very proud of and students seemed to like me as a teacher,” she said. “As administrator you don’t have contact with students in the classroom and you can lose an essential part of what a school is all about. I also think that being in the trenches makes both your colleagues and your students see you in a different light than the administrator in the office. My teaching made it easier for me to continue to relate to my colleagues as a teacher, and I’m also sure that my teaching made me able to relate to the girls at Stuart in a much different way.” As Upper School head at Stuart, Soos was surprised to realize “how much more I learned about people as an administrator that I really hadn’t known or been aware of when I was a classroom teacher. After some difficult parent conferences, I learned to try and understand where the person I was meeting with was coming from and what their issues were before I

major plans. With AP exam grading, leading College Board teacher institutes, “maybe a little tutoring at Hun,” and a big vegetable garden specializing in bumper crops of fiery hot pepstarted giving my own opin- pers, her retirement might ion about things.” be almost as busy as her S h e cont i nu e d, “A s a 50-year career in education. teacher I maybe didn’t un—Donald Gilpin derstand the depth of human behavior until I became Greenacres Relaunched as an administrator and saw a Cobblestone Creek Club Greenacres Country Club, lot of different aspects beyond the classroom. But it’s a Lawrenceville fixture since an incredible tension being 1938, announces its reinvena division head, a 24-hour tion as Cobblestone Creek Country Club. The relaunched job.” After stepping down as country club features a new Upper School head at Stuart golf course designed by arin 2013, Soos was eager to chitect Bobby Weed, a fully focus her energies on teach- renovated health and wellness-focused resort setting, a ing, so when the call came revamped aquatic facility, and from Hun to teach environthe addition of executive chef mental science and forensic Christopher Krail. science, she eagerly acceptThe transition from Greened the new position, which acres to Cobblestone Creek expanded to include a range of different science courses Country Club represents a over the following five years. conceptual shift from a traditional country club to a Noting that “if they were health- and wellness-centric willing to work they learned destination. The club offers a lot,” Soos reflected on a complete lifestyle experiher goals in teaching. She ence and family-friendly atis especially proud of the mosphere with resort amefact that “a lot of my stu- nities including golf, tennis, dents have gone on to major swimming, and fitness. The in science in college,” and t ra nsfor mat ion fe at u re s she expressed her hope that new programs that focus on she helped her students to health, fitness, and nutrition become well educated citi- and a “town center” providing zens, “able to understand culinary, cultural, educational, issues and to vote intelli- and recreational programs gently. I want them to be which will be introduced to able to think and to figure members throughout the seaout what’s real and what’s son. fake.” “Cobblestone Creek is a toSoos, who lives on Hun tally new country club,” said Road w it h her husband Howard Deutsch, president. who is now a professor “We completely reimagined emeritus at Princeton, is and rebuilt it in response to waiting to “get past Sep- our members’ casual, healthtember” before making any oriented lifestyles to provide

“THE JOB THAT WAS MADE FOR ME:” After 50 years as an educator, Anne Soos retired last month from The Hun School of Princeton, where she taught science for five years. For the first 45 years of her career she taught at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart, also chairing the science department for 16 years and serving as Upper School head for 12 years. (Photo courtesy of The Hun School) an experience that goes far beyond the traditional country club.” The new Cobblestone Creek 18-hole championship golf course was designed by Bobby Weed, one of America’s premier golf course architects. Weed, a longtime collaborator with famed architect Pete Dye, has created a course filled with intricate features, clusters of smaller bunkers, and rolling bent grass greens and surrounds. The course also features state-of-the-art practice areas covering over seven acres of rolling terrain. With a combined 30-plus years of experience, PGA golf professionals Michael LaBrutto and Chrissy Caramma are dedicated to improving each member’s golf game with private and group lessons, specialized golf schools, oncourse playing lessons, short game clinics, video swing analysis, and expert club fitting. Cobblestone Creek tennis facilities are surrounded by sprawling woods and

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

P rofiles i n e ducation Science Teacher Anne Soos Retires After 50 Years in the Classroom

Cobblestone’s championship golf course. The club offers comprehensive tennis programs for all levels of players, from beginner to advanced. The club also unveiled a newly renovated resort-style aquatic facility consisting of an oversized, heated pool, shaded kiddie pool, and adjacent children’s activities center. The pool venue includes a gazebo with a Tiki Bar and outdoor grill, steps from the snack bar. Full-menu food service is available from the clubhouse dining facilities. This fall, Cobblestone Creek Country Club will begin comprehensive renovations to the lower level of its clubhouse which will include new locker rooms, an enhanced fitness center, and the addition of new indoor and outdoor casual dining spaces, including a new pub-style bar. This final phase will be completed in time for the opening of the spring 2019 golf season. For more information, visit http://cobblestonecreek. club/ or call (609) 896-0259.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 10

Mailbox

Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08525

Mother of Two Encourages Board of Ed To Proceed With Referendum as Planned

To the Editor: A referendum has been planned for this fall where voters can decide whether they support an expansion and update of the facilities of the Princeton Public Schools. As a mother of two children, 11 and 14, I am well aware of the overcrowding at the middle and high schools. In many of my eighth grader’s classes this year, there were 25 or even 30 children. There was hardly room to move, let alone get a good view of the board and teacher. Immediate action is necessary given the steadily increasing numbers of students. It seems that a small, very vocal group of people who oppose this project have been mobilizing to prevent this referendum from taking place. This seems wrong to me, and is not how a democracy should work. It should not be the loudest who decide, it should be the majority, and the majority is being asked at the vote this fall. There are many people in town who are in favor of the investment; many people who think there is only one choice: We are all worried about the tax impact, but we need to invest in our schools and our children. But these people have not been speaking up because they are waiting for the vote this fall. I encourage the Board to proceed with the referendum as planned. I hope that the investment can be made in a way that the tax impact will be as low as possible; I hope that the major tax impact will only be limited to three years. But there is never a good time to raise taxes. The benefits (for some) of the tax reform are due to expire in a few years, so raising taxes then will be even worse than it is now. The time to act is now, while we can head off the worst overcrowding. We must act before we have kids in trailers, before we can no longer offer the curriculum the people in this district expect, and before our property values start going down because the schools are no longer a draw. WIEBKE MARTENS Marion Road West

Former Participant in “Million Mom March” Ready to Go On “Million Grandma March”

To the Editor: In response to the letter by Trish Verbeyst regarding gun violence [“Time to Stop Blaming Guns,” Mailbox, July 4], I would somewhat disagree. While it is indeed apparent that the number of guns in the hands of people who are dangerous because of psychological disability is part of the problem, I believe that there are simply too many guns available to too many people in the United States. Gun laws vary greatly from one state to another, but these weapons can easily be transported across state lines. In addition, the fact remains that almost any one can purchase any type and as many as one wishes of nearly any firearm. Indeed, many Western countries, with cultures very similar to our own, have much lower percentages of deaths by guns. It is highly unlikely that, per capita, they have fewer dangerously disturbed individuals than we do here in America. I think we can do much better for our wonderful country. Many years ago I participated in the “Million Mom March.” The problems remain, and I’m ready to go again, possibly on a “Million Grandma March.” MARY ANN SOLOMON Grover Avenue

“Better Angels” Offers An Alternative At a Time of “Deep Political Division”

To the Editor: I’m sure that most people would agree that our recent civil and political discourse in America has degraded to the point where some folks are actually advocating for violence. The too-often unasked question is: What to do about it? Not long after the 2016 presidential election, ten Trump supporters and ten Clinton supporters came together, red and blue, to form a unique bipartisan citizen’s movement dedicated to no lesser goal than the depolarization of America. They chose to name the group “Better Angels” after the hope that Abraham Lincoln expressed in the last line of his first inaugural address, regarding the “better angels of our nature.”

Today, Better Angels has more than 3,100 members in all 50 states. Marcia Willsie and I were member delegates to our first national convention in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in early June. At that convention, 147 red and blue delegates participated in the drafting of two founding documents – “An American Declaration” and the “Better Angels Principles and Program,” which lay out our approach. These can be seen on our website, www.better-angels.org/ features/articles. At a time of deep political division, extreme rancor, and lack of civility in our interactions, Better Angels advocates doing things very differently. In our support of depolarization, we engage communities by holding moderated “red/ blue workshops” where people from very different orientations may come together to listen to each other, better understand diverse points of view and also discover common thinking and values, not to mention our shared humanity. The point of the workshops is not to ask people to change their minds or temper their passions, but rather to support principles that bring us together, rather than divide us, and to conduct discourse in a civil and respectful manner. On Saturday, June 30, the first such workshop was held in Princeton, involving about 14 remarkable participants and several observers. With the guidance of trained moderators, we succeeded in civilly sharing viewpoints and practicing respectful discourse. Several of us were left with the strong sense that the people who should be interacting the most are those with the most divergent views. This may seem counterintuitive to those who tend to pursue political tribalism instead, but we believe that it is wholly appropriate to the world in which we live today. Please take a moment to consider joining this movement at www.better-angels.org. JEFF CLARKE, MARCIA WILLSIE Balcourt Drive

Dwaine Williamson Thanks Princetonians Who Supported His Candidacy for Council

Dear Fellow Princetonians: I am honored and humbled to have received your votes and support of my candidacy for Princeton Council. Thank you. Princeton is at a critical juncture on many fronts. While our neighborhoods remain strong and our municipal services first-rate, we are faced with rising property taxes, rampant teardowns, and housing prices that make Princeton unattainable for many. I pledge to be a responsible steward of our public funds. I will work to ensure that our collective resources are Featuring fromremains a welcomshared equitably, ingredients and that Princeton Local Farms prepared ing community. I promise to exercise bold leadership in exploring solutions to keep our downtown by well-known Chefs from core vibrant and growing. I will support the creation of a network of walkable, bike-friendly streets to keep us all safely connected. I believe that together we can work to realize the vision of a Princeton that is sustainable, affordable, and inclusive, while remaining an exceptional place to live, work, raise our children, worship, play, and age in place. Eno Terra • Mediterra I look forward to hearing from each and every one of you in the comingTeresa weeks asCaffe we begin the process of shaping our shared future. Terra Momo Bread Co. DWAINE WILLIAMSON Jonathan Dayton Court

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PrincetonHillary Civil Rights Commission Declines Uricks To Advocate for Black, Latino, Disabled Students Joseph Voller

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This year’s Farm to Table will benefit the Green Teams and Sustainability Organizations of Mercer County in the Mercer County Sustainability Coalition: East Windsor, Ewing, Hightstown, Hopewell Valley, Sustainable Lawrence, Sustainable Princeton, and West Windsor. A partnership of Mercer County communities working together to build a more sustainable future and supporting efforts towards certification through the Sustainable Jersey Program.

To the Editor: Santana Prior to Marco suspending its flawed complaint process, the Princeton CivilJeff Rights Commission (CRC) was an effecMarfil tive institution in sustaining racism. Whether, after city Cody Sells into the champion and Council review, it is transformed protector of civil rights it is supposed to be remains to be seen.This Experience not towill count on it. Year’s cautions Farm tousTable In February, the CRC rejected a complaint brought by me benefit the Green Teams and and my daughter on behalf of black, Latino, and disabled sustainability Organizations of students against the Princeton Public Schools District. The Mercer County in the Mercer complaint challenged the district’s persistent discriminatory disciplinary By submitting it to the CRC, Countypractices. Sustainability we sought the intervention of localValley, institutional protection Coalition: Ewing, Hopewell which was supposedly available to this community. Among Lawrence, Sustainable Lawrence, the remedies requested Princeton was an investigation of school disSustainable ciplinary practices, oversight of the development of new disciplinary policy, and the establishment of an ombudsman in collaboration with the district. The CRC responded with a letter vetted only by selfanointed “leadership” of the County commission. Among the A partnership of Mercer Trumpian reasons for declining to advocate for the agcommunities to declared that it grieved population,working the CRCtogether “leadership” a moreasustainable couldbuild not provide safe space forfuture the accused school district and because of press involvement. Additionally, the CRC supporting efforts towards falsely claimed that it could do nothing certification through the more than provide mediation information because it did not have “special Sustainable Program. investigative, legal, Jersey or judicial authority.” The uproar caused by CRCs handling of the complaint was not widely reported. However, it led to the resignation of disenchanted Board members, the cancellation of meetings, town Council review of the ordinance establishing CRC powers, and tales of falsely reported resolution of unresolved complaints. Perhaps it is unreasonable to expect a commission made up of so many former School Board members to challenge racism in Princeton public schools and to protect aggrieved students. If it is unreasonable to expect the local institutions to fight racism, then it is past time to call in the state administrative and judicial apparatus to protect us. RHINOLD LAMAR PONDER Laurel Circle


To the Editor: Taxpayers can both support local schools and question the unprecedented amount, necessity, timing, and lack of cost efficient alternatives to the Board of Education’s proposed $130 million referendum. This largest ever new local tax debt, would be in addition to remaining current bond debt and the $90 million annual local school budgetary payments. Please read Princeton school system’s website referendum materials and question the Board of Education before the Board votes in a few days whether to have an October public vote. My concerns include absence of prioritization or links of biggest high school costs like atriums and amphitheater sitting; educational needs of students and teachers; the reliance on the arcane argument that 75 percent capacity triggers school overcapacity; the meager efforts to secure energy savings offsets; an eclectic mix of repairs and upgrades not yet vetted to construction codes; absence of a plan to hire third parties to control cost overruns and accurately calculate the effect on local taxes. The Princeton Board of Education is the only educational or charitable organization that can and does require you to personally assume thousands of dollars of debt. Let them know your concerns before they vote. CHRISTINE GRANT Brooks Bend Road

Point A to Point B as quickly as possible, causes speeding, passing in no-passing zones, tailgating, and an aesthetically unpleasant road full of convoys of school buses, commuter cars, bikers, gardener vans, construction vehicles, parents dropping kids off and picking them up, and so on. No biker uses the bike path (Did you see the sign saying they have to “dismount” as they go over the bridge?); and I have almost never seen anyone walking on the sidewalk. I had many conversations with the Mercer County Engineer’s Office about: • installing Deer Crossing signs; • making one speed limit on the entire road; • reducing the speed limit; • reducing the number of costly and distracting traffic signs; and • correcting the passing zones to avoid the deer crossing lanes. But the Mercer County Engineer’s Office told me their hands are tied by the state traffic regulations. It would benefit all of us — human residents, willdlife residents, and travelers passing through, if appropriate traffic regulations for modern day Rosedale Road were in place. How do we make this happen? KATHRYN TRENNER Carter Road

Speaking for Members of Community Concerned That Appropriate Traffic Regulations On Planning for Schools Project Has Not Been Transparent Editor: Rosedale Road Would Benefit All of Us ToOntheJune 26 School Superintendent Cochrane addressed To the Editor: I saw the letter from Bet Sanch about Rosedale Road and I just have to add my two cents, as I have driven Rosedale Road daily for over 30 years. Rosedale got my attention initially because of all the dead deer lining the road on a daily basis — meaning that many cars had hit them — damaging the cars and injuring the occupants of the cars as well. Rosedale Road is Mercer County road, Route 604, and it is 2.5 miles long running from Carter Road to Elm Road. It has (no fewer than) 43 traffic signs instructing drivers what to do (or maybe distracting them from driving). It has one traffic light at Province Line Road. And it has five different speed zones (45 mph for 1.5 miles from Carter Road to the light at Province Line Road; and then 45 mph for 0.8 miles to the school zone at Johnson Park.; then 25 mph for 0.2 miles to the end of the school zone; and then 45 mph for 0.4 miles to Constitution Hill West; and then 25 mph for 0.2 miles up to Elm Road). This gaggle of 43 signs and five speed zones, plus a variety of passing zones and the traffic light — coupled to the fact that most drivers seem focused on getting from

the Princeton Civil Rights Commission. It was a rare public opportunity for Princeton residents to speak directly with him. Many people expressed their concerns about the proposed $130M referendum, scheduled to be voted on October 2, rather than on Election Day, November 6. Princeton High School students have, on their own, conducted a survey of 491 of their peers to determine the most important needs at PHS. They say the most pressing need is improvements in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Many are concerned about mice in the building — indicating maintenance problems. Many want improvements in school security. They expressed concern with over-crowding — more so in hallways, stairwells, and the cafeteria, than in classrooms. Kudos to the students for compiling the only published survey of user preferences I’ve encountered since public conversations began regarding the referendum. Experienced members of our community — teachers, educators, architects, planners, people in finance, PHS grads — are concerned that planning for the schools project has not been transparent and has been presented as a done deal from Day 1, rather than as a public process

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME

involving stakeholders — students, parents, teachers, community residents. Many are concerned that it is not clear what this enormous project even consists of: what the project goals are, and how the proposed improvements will achieve those goals. Many people are concerned that the tax effects of the enormous cost of the physical improvements, combined with as-yet unknown and unexplained increased operating costs, will drive middle income and lower income residents from our town, changing our town’s character forever. We all love our schools and our children, and we want to provide for them. Let’s take time to better understand what is being proposed and why. Unless and until we understand what is being proposed, this project should not move forward. DEBORAH DORMAN A PPS Mom, Proud of Her Three Strong Daughters Who Graduated PHS, Shadybrook Lane

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Enumerating Concerns About Board’s Proposed $130 Million Referendum

Shadybrook Lane Resident Says It’s Increasingly Dangerous to Cross Street or Walk One’s Dog

To the Editor: I am a 32-year resident of Shadybrook Lane, a residential road with mostly families with young children. Over the past several years, speeding cars, pickup trucks, landscaper trucks, and construction trucks have been speeding well above the speed limit. Some of the speeders seem to be young drivers. Shadybrook Lane becomes Overbrook Drive, forming a shortcut to go from Route 27 to Snowden Lane. The road was resurfaced, perhaps eight or ten years ago, and it is very nice and smooth, with minimal potholes. It is increasingly dangerous to cross the street or walk one’s dog. It is also hazardous to check my mailbox mainly (I live on a portion of the road that curves), and ride a bike. Several years ago, a group of residents on my block signed a petition to increase speed checks. I made several calls to the then-township police, to no avail, as the police at the time indicated they were not staffed sufficiently. Inasmuch as the government is responsible for posting and determining speed limits for the safety of the public, I like to think it is also responsible for enforcing the speed limits. Once exceeding speed limits becomes routine, the habit becomes ingrained, and I fear that someday someone (or someone’s dog) will become a casualty. I understand policing traffic may not be an everyday option, and perhaps similarly for periodic policing. A deterrent such as a check-speed flashing lamp, or a radar device flashing one’s speed limit would be prudent. CLAYTON E. LEOPOLD, MD Shadybrook Lane

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 12

Parking, Recycling Costs continued from page one

Mary Moss Playground is on schedule for an opening on July 20 at 11 a.m. The playground at the corner of John and Lytle streets will feature new equipment, a pavilion with picnic tables, a stone boulder scramble embankment with new slides, benches, and bike racks. During the public comment period, Haw thorne Ave nu e re s ide nt G a l i na Chernaya spoke about an ongoing dispute with developer RB Homes over damage to trees from a construction project next door to her house. Last week, the developer had the roots of the trees treated, and plans to do a soil treatment program. But Chernaya said the developer has violated the town’s ordinance regarding a drip line. Mark Dashield, the town’s administrator, said the town’s arborist and the Shade Tree Commission had visited the site. “We want to look at the regulations concerning the drip line and then come back to Council,” he said. Chernaya was not satisfied with that response and said she hopes for more action from the Shade Tree Commission. —Anne Levin

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Mayor of Hopewell continued from page one

the issues facing residents in Mercer and Hunterdon counties,” he said. “I have been on the front lines of these battles. I learned from Senator [Shirley] Turner the importance of focusing on residents’ everyday needs and listening to their concerns.” Un d er h i s le ad er s h ip, Hop ewell Tow nsh ip has rejected President Trump’s ant i -im m ig rant policies, strengthened environmental protections, advocated for common-sense gun reforms, called for transparency in campaign financing, and delivered a 2018 budget below 2015 spending levels, Kuchinski pointed out. His work et h ic comes from being the grandson of coal miners, seamstresses, and auto workers. “I come from a family of strong, smart, supportive women and have been described as someone who listens to all voices and perspectives,” he said. “I will work tirelessly on behalf of all of the residents of the 15th District to take on the important issues and make progress, to build coalitions that move New Jersey forward, and to be a staunch advocate at the State House.” Kuchinski and his wife live in Hopewell Valley and have four childen. He co-chairs the advisory board of The Watershed Institute, and is president of the Hopewell Valley Education Foundation. “In this environment, it’s not enough to mean well or to have progressive ideals,” he said. “The Fighting 15th needs an experienced and

resourceful leader who will put the needs of the people ahead of special interests, a leader who will fight to end gun violence and make our streets safe, a leader who believes that defending our water and the environment while growing the economy and creating jobs is not an either/or choice, but rather something we must achieve together.” —Anne Levin

MC Campaign to Combat Stigma of Mental Illness

Mercer County has announced the launch of a stigma-free campaign to help those impacted by mental illness and addiction. The county acknowledges that many people remain unserved in part because of the stigma of seeking help. The goal is to bring mental illness and addiction out of the shadows and encourage treatment and support. Greater public awareness about these conditions can change negative attitudes and behaviors. The county seeks to promote a message of hope and the belief that healing and recovery are attainable. The campaign will last one year. Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is asking people to sign a pledge devoted to increasing awareness and greater understanding of mental illness and addiction. To sign the pledge, visit mercercounty.com.

IS ON

Celebrating Excellence In Education

2018 Princeton High School Senior Award Recipients Congratulations to the following award recipients from the Class of 2018! The students were honored at an awards ceremony on June 5, 2018 at Princeton High School. Ines Aitsahalia The Mathematics Department Award Alexa Almodovar The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship Charles An The Mathematics Department Award The Computer Science Award

Mia Ferguson The Mathematics Department Award The Computer Science Award Michael Frost The Cranbury Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 68 Award Maximilian Garlock The Mathematics Department Award

Nandeeta Bala The Wendy Jolley Award

Emma Glasser The Amy Schulman Award

Andrew Beamer The Princeton High School Spirit Award

Bianca Guidi The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship

Maxwell Bronfeld The Mathematics Department Award

Yoselin Hernandez The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship

Edna Castillo The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship

Simran Kaur The Computer Science Award Peter C. Thompson Technology Award

Tyler Chen PHS Senior Math Challenge Award Rachel Cheng The Mathematics Department Award The Mathematics Association of America Award Ashwin Dandamudi The Freeman Dyson Award for demonstrating high achievement in Physics The Mathematics Department Award The Mathematics Association of America Award The Computer Science Award Eliz Dikener The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship Alexander Famous The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship

Diane Li The Hubert M. Alyea Award for Excellence in the study of Science Leslie Liu The Computer Science Award

Katherina Orellana Cardona The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship Marie Petitjean The Computer Science Award Michael Ramirez The Bob James Award Katherine Rogers The John McPhee Environmental Science Award Amanda Rubin The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship Max Shi The Computer Science Award James VanderKam The Computer Science Award Thalia VonMoltke-Simms The Mathematics Department Award Alexander Wang The Computer Science Award Amy Wang The Mathematics Department Award

Lachlan McCarty The Computer Science Award

Leda Wang The Stephen J. Gould Award for excellent achievement in Biology

Mary Mena The Cranbury Fraternal Order of Police George C. Nobile Award

Matthew Wang The Mathematics Department Award

Mary Rose Mena The Irving W. Mershon Scholarship Pridhvi Myneni The Computer Science Award

Alexander Zhang PHS Senior Math Challenge Award Robert Zhang The Mathematics Department Award


“Curiouser and Curiouser” — A Journey to the Center of Planet Einstein

T

he recent media-driven erosion of the warm and fuzzy even saintly image of Princeton’s most famous resident has me thinking how differently we’d feel about Einstein if his public persona was as remote, as unknowable, as alien to most of us as the anatomy of his brain. What if there had been no beloved humanitarian to serve as a foil for stories like “Einstein the Anti-Racist? Not in His Travel Diaries” in the June 14 New York Times? It was the image of Einstein’s face on the cover of Frederick E. Lepore’s Finding Einstein’s Brain (Rutgers Univ. Press $27.95) that suggested the austere scientist I was imagining as the polar opposite of the lovable mascot Einstein of Pi Day Princeton. Those eyes seem lightyears away from our reality, “on another planet,” as the saying goes. The cool grey blue color contributes to the effect, which is further developed in the image of the brain on the back cover with the folds and fissures scientist-explorers have taken it upon themselves to tag with geographically derived names like “right hemispheric primary motor cortex” and “postcentral sulcus.” Readers looking for an atlas that locates the cerebral latitude and longitude of Einstein’s genius or his humanitarianism are reminded throughout the book that this can’t be done. As Lepore makes clear in the preface, his subject is a “biography” of the brain rather than the literal search for an entity that has been, in effect, scattered to the ends of the earth in “set after set of brain slices … mounted on microscope slides” by Thomas Harvey MD, chief pathologist at Princeton Hospital and the first human to set foot, as it were, on the planet of Einstein’s brain. “What did the ‘best and brightest’ neuroscientists do (or not do), with Einstein’s brain for over 50 years?” Lepore asks. “And why (at the time of this writing) is the brain lost again?” No wonder Lepore alludes in the previous paragraph to “the grin that remained after the Cheshire Cat had ‘vanished quite slowly.’” When it comes to the geography of the brain, we’re wandering on the other side of the Looking Glass, lost in Wonderland. “To Consider Too Curiously” Lepore’s account of Harvey “opening the cranium with a saw” on the morning of April 18, 1955, and lifting the “gelantinous brain up from the cranial vault” brings to mind Hamlet holding Yorick’s skull in his hand, that “fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy.” As he conducts a philosophical tour of the graveyard at Elsinore for his friend Horatio, Hamlet wonders “Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of Alexander, till he find it stopping a bung-hole?” Ever humane and level-headed, Horatio tells him, “’Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.” Being himself a man of most excellent fancy, Hamlet persists, describing his process with mock-scientific logic: “Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander returneth into dust; the dust is earth; of earth we make loam; and why of that

loam, whereto he was converted, might they not stop a beer-barrel?” There’s an element of Horatio’s “to consider too curiously” in Lepore’s cautionary warning that “dry scientific jargon will suck the oxygen out of the fragile atmosphere that surrounds an interested audience.” After noting that “standard issue” human frontal lobes “have three gyri,” and that Einstein, “with his anomalous divided gyrus had four!” [emphasis is the author’s], Lepore tells us “to regard this startling variation of anatomy strictly as a fascinating example of structural biology and not a surrogate for Einstein’s intellect” or “his profound grasp of our universe,” since “not a shred of scientific evidence exists today that will allow us to bridge the explanator y gap between brain and mind.” In case you’re wondering, the gyri Einstein had four of is plural for g y r us, a ridge on the cerebral cortex. If t hat le ave s us no closer to solving the mystery of Einstein’s genius, it’s okay with me. Think of all the detective novels that fall apart when you come to the tal k y denoue ment. As far as that goes, what makes Shake sp eare’s mos t famous play fascinating to this day is the mystery of Hamlet’s state of mind. Where and What is Fancy? In a later chapter, Lepore uses a quote from The Merchant of Venice (III, 2) to underscore the fact that “neuroscience still cannot answer Shakespeare’s basic question: ‘Tell me where is Fancy bred/ Or in the heart, or in the head?’” Taking “Fancy” to mean “love” in the context of that particular scene, Lepore declares that “the localization” of fancy “was a mystery then … and it still is (even now) in the age of oxytocin (aka the ‘love hormone’).” For Samuel Taylor Coleridge in Biographia Literaria, fancy is “always the ape,” a mode of memory “emancipated from the order of time and space” that receives “all its materials ready made from the law of association.” After giving the reader “a cook’s tour” of the “parables of physics” associated with Einstein, Lepore suggests that “even a thoroughgoing study of Einstein’s written accounts … tells us very little about his metacognition. By necessity, preverbal mental operations must be translated into words that distort the

purity of thought.” At this point, Lepore pulls a quote from T.S. Eliot out of his hat: “I gotta use words when I talk to you/But if you understand or if you don’t/that’s nothing to me and nothing to you.” Fancy Free Lepore uses a light touch to keep scientific jargon from “sucking the oxygen” out of the story he has to tell. He puts Coleridge’s law of association amusingly in play by having Princeton alum and former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld provide the epigraph for a chapter on “what the neuropathologist knew and didn’t know” (“But there are unknown unknowns — the ones we don’t know we don’t know”). After referring to how “the functions of average frontral lobes ascend to t he empy rean heights of our ‘gnostic, mnestic, and intellectual processes,’” Lepore surprises you with a reference to Jaws ( “neuro science is ‘gonna need a bigger boat’”). Quoting from an essay on the “inter-relation between brain size and mental capacity” of notable individuals, Lepore reveals that Walt Whitman’s brain was unavailable for s t u d y, h av i n g been “dropped on the floor by a careless as sisstant.” In the context of Einstein’s “falling man” theory of gravity, Lepore inserts a parenthetical aside “(unlike Wile E. Coyote contending with his archnemesis Roadrunner), nobody got hurt from the fall.” However often you may lose your way on this expedition across planet Einstein, it’s good to have a man “of most excellent fancy” as your guide. “A Hopeless Hybrid” What put Einstein in the news in the era of #MeToo was the publication of The Travel Diaries of Albert Einstein, The Far East, Palestine & Spain 1922-1923 (Princeton Univ. Press $29.95). Editor Ze’ev Rosenkrantz highlights the controversial passages in a lengthy introduction. Of course the accounts pointing to Einstein’s racism and xenophobia have no room for gems from the diaries like “Trees wonderful: people banal.” Nor do journalists with a newsy agenda have time to augment the callous comments they quote with entries such as this one from 9 Oct. 1922: “The sun revitalizes me and removes the gulf between ‘ego’ and ‘id.’

I began reading Kretschmer’s Physique and Character. Wonderful description of temperaments and their physical habitus. I can thus categorize many of my fellow beings but not myself, because I’m a hopeless hybrid.” As I pointed out in my preview of the Travel Diaries in a column on Einstein’s birthday, March 14, 2018, the negative remarks aren’t restricted to the Chinese or the Indians and Levantines. He’s no less dismissive of the citizens of Prague and the followers of Theosophy. Visits from Berliners are compared to “burial alive.” Even children get a knock when he talks of “my corpse being dragged to a children’s Christmas party.” The Times story and others make much of Einstein’s claim that the Indians in Ceylon “live in great filth and considerable stench,” leaving out his observation that the same people “look like nobles transformed into beggars,” and his reaction to being transported in a rickshaw, “I was very much ashamed of myself for being complicit in such despicable treatment of human beings but couldn’t change anything …. Because these beggars in the form of kings descend in droves on any foreigner until he has surrendered to them. They know how to implore and to beg until one’s heart is shaken up …. Halfnaked, they reveal their fine and yet powerful bodies and their fine, patient faces.” Then this: “Once you take a proper look at these people, you can hardly take pleasure in the Europeans any more, because they are more effete and more brutal and look so much cruder and greedier — and therein unfortunately lies their practical superiority, their ability to take on grand things and carry them out. Wouldn’t we too, in this climate, become like the Indians?” In Meckel’s Cave very now and then I like to take out the clinical statement from Princeton Radiology concerning the MRI that I had some years ago and that led me, as it happens, to Frederick Lepore, who is a professor of neurology and opthamology and a practicing neurologist and clinical neural opthamalogist at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick. Both as a writer and reader, I found MRI language amusing. Who’d have thought my brain had a place in it called “Meckel’s cave” ? I looked it up at the time but came away with nothing but the knowledge that I preferred not to know. I had a similar reaction to the passage in Einstein’s Brain describing the “posterior ascending limb of the Sylvian fissure.” That has the sound of a storybook adventure waiting to be written. If only we could locate the human mystery — the spirit, the heart, the soul, the poetry — on a map of the brain somewhere between Meckel’s cave and the Sylvian fissure. That’s where these columns come from. Just take a right at Meckel’s cave. —Stuart Mitchner

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13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 14

Art “Realism in Color and Form” At Pedersen Gallery

“REALISM IN COLOR AND FORM”: The new exhibit at the Pedersen Gallery in Lambertville features paintings by George Stave such as “La Belle Chocolatier,” above, and sculptures by Joe Brown, including “Counter Punch,” below. “Realism in Color and Form” runs July 15 through August 4, with an opening reception on July 14 from 7 to 9 p.m.

The Pedersen Gallery in Lambertville presents ”Realism in Color and Form,” featuring paintings by George Stave and sculpture by Joe Brown. The exhibit runs July 15 through August 4, with an opening reception on July 14 from 7 to 9 p.m. George Stave (1923-2011) is known for his realist landscapes and still lifes. His landscapes were painted en plein air without preparatory drawing in order to capture the unique evanescence of natural light. His still lifes were painted in his studio in a trompe l’oeil realism. Stave’s achievements in landscape painting were celebrated in 1981 with a one-man exhibition at the Newark Museum. His landscape painting is a kind of meditation. He connects the viewer to what is local, but through his art he lets us see it for the first time. Beauty, not fashion, guides his art. He informs our experience of reality by leading us with his artistic perceptions. The unique light of the Jersey Shore or the array of brightly colored bottles and tins that make up his art are delights that remain. Joe Brown (1909-1985) f irst came to Pr inceton Universit y as the newlyappointed boxing coach. Brow n began box ing at Temple University in 1927, where he became captain of the boxing team and soon transitioned to professional

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fighting with his first bout in Atlantic City. In 1937 Princeton University approached him with the offer to become their boxing coach. Not long after this appointment, Dean Christian Gauss saw a small sculpture of an athlete by Brown and encouraged him to become the University resident fellow of sculpture. Brown is best known for his boxing sculptures. He knew firsthand how boxers moved and how they felt when they received a punch. His focus on the specifics of the motion of muscles and the expression of athletic determination in his sculpture gave rise to his recognition as a leading sports sculptor. The Pedersen Gallery is located at 17 North Union S t r e e t i n L a m b e r t v i l l e. Hours are Saturday and Sunday noon to 5 p.m., and by appointment. For more information, call (609) 3971332.

“40-for-40” Exhibit At Trenton City Museum

A treasure hunt awaits visitors to the “40-for-40” exhibit at the Trenton City Museum Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park. Forty of the most significant objects in the museum collection will be on view, however visitors will face the challenge of finding them. Some, like the monumental vase exhibited at the 1904 St. Louis exposition, will be in plain view, but finding the Trent Tiles may be more of a challenge. Trustee Diane Ciccone, curator of the exhibit, and the collections committee have combed the archives to find the most important objects in the museum col-

le c t ion, i n clu d i ng s om e brought out of storage that have not been seen in many years. After visitors complete the “treasure hunt,’” they can nominate No. 41 as an additional “object” for the list. The “40-for-40” exhibit will be on display from July 14 through January 2019. An opening reception is on Saturday, July 14 from 7 to 9 p.m. On Sunday, July 15 at 2 p.m., there will be a free guided tour of the exhibit led by David Bosted, trustee and historian. The 40-for-40 Exhibit is part of Ellarslie’s 40th anniversary that will culminate in a celebration on October 13. For more information, visit www.ellarslie.org.

AFTERGLOW Returns to Grounds For Sculpture

Grounds For Sculp ture’s summer par ty A FTERGLOW will return on Aug us t 11 f rom 9 p.m. to m idn ight. T h is event is hosted by the Grounds For Sculpture Young Professionals, and presents a night of illumination, onenight-only experiences, and revelry, attracting hundreds of young professionals from the tristate area. Secure your ticket at www.afterglow2018.org. AFTERGLOW attendees w ill exper ience the pre miere of Social Sparkles – an interactive installation by multidisciplinary design studio Toer (Netherlands), reminiscent of fireflies on a summer night and filling the air with swarms of light that move overhead as guests walk below. Guests w ill als o b e among t he first to view a new exhibi-

tion by artist James Carl, featuring works Carl has created using a remarkably elaborate and mathematical process of weaving lengths of venetian blinds. Guests will explore the grounds to see newly fabricated 26 foot steel sculpture, Dina Wind: Harp of David #1, as well as indoor and outdoor works by stone sculptor Masayuki Koorida. The AFTERGLOW ticket ($100) includes exclusive after-dark access to the park, music spun by DJ Fatha R a m z e e, p e r for m a n c e s, food, and beverages. Signature cocktails and tastings w ill be prov ided by Tattoo Tequila and Sourland Mountain Spirits, named Farm Distillery of the Year 2018 by American Distilling Institute. Craft beer will be provided by Brooklyn Brewery. Handcrafted local fare will include creations by Tower Dogs, Dump N Roll, and Cupcake Carnivale – named one of 2018’s 101 Best Food Trucks in America. Grounds For Sculpture Young Professionals (GFSYP) is a group of creatives and professionals ages 2140 who rally around unique experiences, programs, and events. Located in Hamilton, Grounds For Sculpture is a 42-acre nonprofit sculpture park, arboretum, and museum founded by Seward Johnson. For more i nfor mat ion, v is it w w w. groundsforsculpture.org.

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pradhanica

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Sat JuLy 14 Leonardo Suarez paz’S

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THE LION KING DIRECTORS: ROGER ALLERS AND ROB MINKOFF 88 minutes, rated G

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Sat JuLy 21 Lakou Mizik always free and open to the public

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More information: info@bluecurtain.org

In co-operation with the Princeton Recreation Dept.


Art Times Two, Princeton Brain and Spine, 731 Alexander Road Suite 200, has “The Impact of Art: artists find refuge and regeneration through Topics their art” through August.

P R I N c E tO N s YM P h O N Y O R c h E s t R A R OssE N MIL ANO V , M U sI c D I REc tOR

PIcK 3+ AND sAVE!

SYMPHONIC SATURDAY NIGHTS! 9.29 A BERNstEIN cELEBRAtION

10.27 BEEthOVEN PIANO cONcERtOs

1.26 sAtURDAY EVENING POPs!

2.2 BEEthOVEN’s fIfth

3.23 DVOŘÁK & LIEBERMANN princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020 8 PM CONCERTS

Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. Accessibility questions? Call Kitanya Murray at 609/497-0020.

These programs are made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

by Manal Abu - Shaneen, through August 15. D& R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, has “Cosmophilia” through July 25. www.drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Airing Out the Attic” through September 9. www. ellarslie.com. Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “10th A n nu a l Ju r ie d E x h ibit” through July 29. www.photo gallery14.com. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Michael Rees: Synthetic Cells” through July 14, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” “A-Team Artists of Trenton,” and other exhibits. $4 admission WednesdaySunday, noon-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “Rae Sloan Bredin: Harmony and Power” on view through July 15, and “View Finders: Four Photographic Voices” through August 26. “American Moderns: The Legacy of Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest” is on view through October 21. www.michenerartmuseum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “A Gentleman’s Pursuit: The Commodore’s Greenhouse” through October 21. www. morven.org. Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau Street

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Area Exhibits

Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “Photography by L a r r y Pa r s on s” a n d “Places by John Carney,” both at Princeton Public Library through September 15. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Princeton University, has “Beirut: Theater of Dreams,” photography

SUMMER ART CAMPS: Summer Art Camps are underway at The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster. Camps are available for children ages 5 through teens. In addition, the center will offer Summer Art Camp for children with autism spectrum disorder and other special needs on Saturdays in July and August. The Center’s Summer Art Camps are designed to stimulate creative expression through projects and activities. New projects are introduced each week, and all sessions are led by professional teaching artists. There will be a supervised lunch for fullday campers. Children interested in only coming for a morning session or afternoon session can register for half-day camps. For more information or to register, visit www.ccabedminster. org or call (908) 234-2345. at Vandeventer, has Tiffany Window Tours (St. George and the Dragon and other stained glass windows), Sundays, noon to 2 p.m. and by appointment, (609) 9242613. www.PrincetonUMC. org. Princeton University Art Museum has “Frank Stella Unbound: Literature and Printmaking” through October 23. (609) 258-3788. www.artmuseum.princeton. edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Generation Next: The Family Show” through August 17. (609) 716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org.

Local fresh lavender is blooming!

Call/text ahead to cut it fresh or take home a plant. The farm stand is now open to purchase plants and lavender products. Visit www.princetonlavender.com to see our newly-built loft studio, listed on AirBnB.

Princeton Lavender

F R E S H , F R AG R A N T, LO C A L LY G R OW N 3741 Lawrenceville Road · Princeton, NJ 08540 Brad: 973-978-8311 · Beth: 973-570-2099 WWW. P R I N C E TO N L AV E N D E R .CO M

Restaurant & Enoteca

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Sunday, August 5 | 3:00 - 5:30 pm Every glass of wine tells a story, one of exploration and expansion. Join us for a tasting across the islands of the Mediterranean to enjoy unique styles and indigenous varietals. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served. $20 via PayPal | $25 at the door (Excludes Tax)

TA S T I N G

For reservations: www.enoterra.com | 609 497-1777 4484 Route 27, Kingston, New Jersey


Chez Alice

Located inside a Victorian mansion in beautiful Ewing Township, Blooming Grove Inn offers an escape to the past. Originally the main farmhouse on Blooming Grove Farm, the building was converted to a restaurant around the turn of the 20th century and called Blooming Grove Inn. Come visit the best restaurant in Ewing for a delicious meal and cocktail served in the warm ambience of American history, or dine al fresco on the terrace. Blooming Grove Inn is open for lunch and dinner, and offers a great bar menu and weekday Happy Hour specials. Their new summer dinner menu begins this Friday, July 13 at 5 p.m. Call (609) 8821150 for reservations.

We love weddings. We’re proud to serve delicious food, coffee, and baked goods every day. But we especially love designing custom cakes for your special day! Team up with our experts to make your cake memorable — whether it’s your wedding, anniversary, birthday, or other milestone. (We love being part of those, too.) Call (609) 921-6760 or visit w w w. chezalicecafe.com.

Lady and the Shallot

Lady and the Shallot, a plant-based eatery located in the Trenton Farmers Market, combines passion for food and a mindful and ethical way to sustain a healthier life using whole foods and plantbased options. Menu options include Fresh Market and G reek S alads, Indian and Italian inspired

Flatbreads, Avocado Toast, Rainbow Tacos, Lentil and Mushroom Tahini Tacos, Chocolate Pizza ( new! ), and weekly market specials with an emphasis on the local produce sold seasonally at the market. Lady and the Shallot has become a popular lunch destination. New hours starting July 25: Wednesday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Trenton Farmers Market is located at 960 Spruce Street in Lawrence Township. For more information, visit www.ladyandtheshallot.com.

Mediterra Restaurant

At Mediterra Restaurant, the concept is simple: Tap into the extraordinary cuisine of the nearly two dozen cultures surrounding the Mediterranean … add extra emphasis to Italian and

~ Eat

Spanish … pair our largely locally sourced ingredients with an ever-changing but always superb collection of fine and affordable wine … and nurture a staff of restaurant professionals who will treat you as the valued guest that you are. 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton. Call (609 ) 252-9680 or visit www.mediterrarestaurant. com.

valued community meeting place. We have locallyproduced items including gluten-free items, organic fruits and veggies, readyto-eat foods, luxury alpaca goods, cheesecakes, fresh pas t a, a nd, of cou r s e, breads and croissants at the MFOS table. So come and discover the Farmers’ Market!

Join us every Saturday from June to October, 9 a.m. to 1p.m. at the Village Shopper on Route 206 in Montgomery. Support local farmers and join in the community spirit. Vendors are waiting to prov ide you w it h t heir f r e s h e s t , m o s t f l av o r f u l i te m s. L o c a l b u s i nesses sponsor this

taurant Bonne Assiet te offers modern and classic French fare. Open for lunch and dinner, we are a BYOB, so come in, bring your favorite bottle of vin, and join us for a unique gastronomic experience. Our enclosed patio dining is open for the summer. We feature grass-fed aged meats, free range organic poultry, sustainable sea-

Restaurant Montgomery Friends Bonne Assiette of Open Space Nestled in the quaint Farmers’ Market town of Pennington, Res-

food and fishes, organic produce, and in-house made gluten-free dressings and sauces. Vegetar ian and vegan meals available upon request. Reservations available at w w w.opentable.com or call the restaurant at (609) 737-7174.

Stockton Market

Stockton Market is a year-round indoor artisanal and community market in Stockton, N.J. offering locally produced and prepared foods, eat-in dining, fresh produce and handcrafted gifts all weekend long. Kick off your weekend with Friday Night Live featuring live music and vendors offering in-market or take-out dining options serving to a large BYOB crowd. Open Friday–Sunday (see website for hours) (609) 608-2824; stocktonmarket.com.

Fresh ~ facebook TWITTER

Refreshing Summer Drinks

Strawberry Mint Lemonade • Iced Coffee/Iced Tea Iced Latte/Iced Chai • Special Summer Salad Everything made fresh and from scratch NEW SUMMER MENU DINE AL FRESCO ON THE TERRACE Blooming Grove Inn 234 West Upper Ferry Road | Ewing, NJ

www.bloominggroveinn.com • 609.882.1150 D TH E An

Friday 3 – 8pm | Saturday & Sunday 10am – 4pm 19 Bridge Street • Stockton, New Jersey • stocktonmarket.com

Join us for FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE... live entertainment & ready to eat meals. BYOB!

Chez Alice Gourmet Cafe & Bakery 5 Palmer Square West, Princeton 609-921-6760 (p) www.chezalicecafe.com

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Lady and the Shallot Plant Based Comfort Foods

Starting July 25 our new hours will be: Wednesday 11-3 • Thursday 11-4 • Friday 11-4 • Saturday 10-4

Fresh Market and Greek Salads, Indian & Italian inspired Flatbreads, Avocado Toast, Rainbow Tacos, Lentil & Mushroom Tahini Tacos, Chocolate Pizza, and WEEKLY MARKET SPECIALS with an emphasis on the local produce sold seasonally at our market. The Trenton Farmer’s Market 960 Spruce Street • Lawrence Township, New Jersey www.ladyandtheshallot.com

16th Season!

Open June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM

MONTGOMERY FRIENDS FARMERS’ MARKET

Open Thru October 27th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM

Sangria, Tapas, & Paella Al Fresco Dining

Open June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AM to 1PM

Jersey fresh vegetables and fruit, locally-raised poultry, eggs, beef and pork, coffee, pastries, fruit Open bread, June 6th-October 24th • Saturdays, 9AMpies, to 1PM gluten-free baked goods, flowers, honey, alpaca products, community info, music and FUN!

Village Shopper, 1340 Route 206 South, Skillman

SPONSORS

SPONSORS

Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Union Line Garage Market Benefactor: Princeton Design Guild

SPONSORS

Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Market Patron: Union Terra MomoLine Garage Band Sponsors: 1st Constitution, Lili B's, Market Benefactor: Princeton Design Guild Radiation Data, Princeton Orthopaedic Group

Blue Ribbon Sponsor: Union Line Garage Market Patron: Terra Momo

Individual Sponsors: Mary & Gary Reece, Amy & Mark Taylor, Jaci & Ed Trzaska, Louise & Cliff Wilson

Band Sponsors: 1st Constitution, Lili B's,

(609) 252 - 9680 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 mediterrarestaurant.com


“SWAN LAKE” AT PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE: On Sunday, July 15 at 12:30 p.m., Princeton Garden Theatre is screening The Royal Ballet’s “Swan Lake.” The Royal Ballet presents a new production of Tchaikovsky’s ballet, with additional choreography by Liam Scarlett and designs by John Macfarlane. Prince Siegfried chances upon a flock of swans. When one of the swans turns into a beautiful woman, he is enraptured. But she is under a spell that holds her captive. Marianela Nuñez is Odette and Vadim Muntagirov is Prince Siegfried. There will be a special introduction at noon: Mary Pat Robertson will provide some background about the ballet, the choreographers, and the Royal Ballet. Tickets cost $18 for general and $16 for members. For more information and tickets, visit princeotngardentheatre.org or call (609) 279-1999.

Actors’ NET Performs “Romeo and Juliet”

On July 13-29, Actors’ NET stages a pair of star-crossed lovers in Shakespeare’s passionate and tragic tale of warring families and young love, Romeo and Juliet. It is codirected by George Hartpence and Carol Thompson of New Hope, Pa., and stars Kelly Colleran as Juliet and Nicholas Napoli as Romeo. Performances will take place on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and on Sunday at 2 p.m. at The Heritage Center Theatre, 635 North Delmorr Avenue (Route 32), Morrisville, Pa. — near the Calhoun Street Bridge. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $17 for seniors (62+), and $15 for WHYY cardholders and students. Parental discretion advised. Group rates available for 10 or more. For more information, call the nonprofit Actors’ NET at (215) 295-3694 or email actorsnet@aol.com.

Blue Curtain Kicks Off 2018 Series July 14

Blue Curtain kicks off its 2018 series with Pradhanica and Leonardo Suarez Paz’s Cuartetango on Saturday, July 14 at the Pettoranello Gardens Amphitheater (Route 206 and Mountain Avenue). The concert, free and open to all, starts at 7 p.m. Pradhanica is a dance and world drum ensemble created and composed by Indian rhythm composer Pandit Divyang Vakil and choreographed by Jin Won. The Indian dance form of kathak comes together with high-energy drumming on the cajon, djembe, and tabla, with melodic support on sitar or sarangi. Pradhanica’s performance is divided into two segments — pure dance and abhinaya, or expressive dance. The abhinaya section draws on the storytelling origins of kathak and explores several of the nine emotions (Navrasa) through rhythm, melody, and dance.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Music and Theater

Virtuoso violinist and multiple Latin Grammy nominee Leonardo Suarez Paz leads the Cuartetango string quartet with bandoneon and tango dance to the forefront of 21st century nuevo tango, following in the footsteps of his mentor and friend, Astor Piazzolla. Suarez Paz is the star of iconic TangoX2, Perfumes de Tango, the Mariano Mores show where he danced and played, and Broadway’s Forever Tango and Tango Argentino. Concertgoers are encouraged to come early and enjoy the beautiful outdoor setting of Pettoranello Gardens at Community Park North (Route 206 and Mountain Ave). Blankets and low-backed lawn chairs are recommended for lawn seating. IT TAKES TWO: Pradhanica and Leonardo Suarez Paz’s Cuartetango perform on Saturday, July For more information, con- 14 at the Pettoranello Gardens Amphitheater (Route 206 and Mountain Ave.) The concert, free tact info@bluecurtain.org. and open to all, starts at 7 p.m. Virtuoso violinist and multiple Latin Grammy nominee LeonJoe Zook and Blues Deluxe ardo Suarez Paz leads the Cuartetango string quartet with bandoneon and tango dance to the In Trenton Blues Jam 3 forefront of 21st century nuevo tango, following in the footsteps of his mentor and friend, AsThe Trenton Museum Society tor Piazzolla. For more information, contact info@bluecurtain.org. presents the return of Joe Zook and Blues Deluxe in Trenton Blues Jam 3, an all-blues extravaganza at the Trenton City Museum, Ellarslie Mansion in Cadwalader Park on Saturday, July 28 at 6:45 pm. The special brand of hardrocking blues as performed by Legendary National Blues Hall of Fame guitarist Joe “Zook” Zuccarello and fellow Trenton area blues musicians has been a popular staple in the 40 year history of musical performances at Ellarslie. As part of the Trenton Museum Society’s endeavor to highlight the cultural contributions of the Trenton City Museum to Trenton and the wider community over the past 40 years, they are recreating the wildly-popular 2005 blues concert by bringing back Joe and friends for Trenton Blues Jam 3. The lineup for the evening BAROQUE BREAK: Les Agréments de Musique presents an evening of French baroque music on includes 13 blues acts includ- Sunday, July 15 at the Bristol Chapel in Westminster Choir College. Admission is free and the ing: DD & the Dive Bombers; performance starts at 7:30 p.m. Visit www.rider.edu/events for more information. Blues in Disguise with TJ Nix and “the Bishop of the Blues” Paul Plumeri; Kim Rogers performing with Dick Gratton; Slippery Rock Reunion Band; Dave Orban & the Mojo Gypsies; The Trenton Makes Band; Dan Mosovitch Trio; and Joe Zook’s Blues Deluxe Big Band with bassist and singer and fellow Blues Hall of Famer Billy Holt, monster blues drummer Jeff Snelson, John Sopko on keyboards, harp player Tony Buford, Steve Kaplan playing sax, clarinet, and flute, Frank Russo on bass, and trumpet player Danny Tobias. The venue warns that this is bound to be another sold-out performance. Patrons should buy their tickets on the Ellarslie website ellarslie.org now. $35/ ticket, members price $30/ticket. For more information and a list of individual performers jamming with the band, see http:// ellarslie.org.

Restaurant Bonne Assiette Modern and Classic French Fare

Summer Lunch Special

French Barbecue Platter for Two - $19 Black Truffle Burger, Spare Ribs, Smoked Chicken Breast Twice Fried in Duck Fat French Fries Provencal Salad & Unlimited Ice Tea Grass fed aged meats, free range organic poultry, sustainable seafood and fishes, organic produce and in-house made gluten-free dressings and sauces.

Serving Lunch and Dinner · Patio now open · BYOB 23 W. Delaware Avenue · Pennington, NJ · 609-737-7174

Frenchtown, NJ

e l l i Bast D a yt i o n

celebra

it's not a revolt, it's a Revolution !

SATURDAY JULY 14TH 2018

9AM Quiche Breakfast, Frenchtown United Methodist Church (3rd St.)

Server Race Marie Antoinette Art Vendors Live Music Mime Puppet Show Strolling Musician Henna Caricatures Drew Nugent & The Midnight Society lolly hopwood Festivities Noon to Night - Sunbeam Park, Bridge & Race Streets

LOVEFRENCHTOWN.ORG


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 18

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

204 Creststone Circle, South Bruswick Twp Marketed by: Deborah “Debbie” Lang $455,000

12 Jeffers Road, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: John A. Terebey $749,888

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

9 Kravchenok Street, Sayreville Boro Marketed by: Lisa Candella-Hulbert $614,900

16 Lawrencia Drive, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Barbara Conforti $550,000

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

Open House Sunday 7/15 1-4pm 48 Linden Lane, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Annabella “Ann” Santos $539,900

1 Manchester Court, Manchester Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $799,000

PRESENTING

From Princeton, We Reach the World. Open House Sunday 7/15 1-4pm

Open House Sunday 7/15 1-4pm

4390 Province Line Road, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Danica Keenan | $585,888

204 State Road, Princeton Marketed|by: Priya Khanna $599,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com | © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If|your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street || 609-924-1600 || foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 foxroach.com

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


68 Wiggins — Live well in the heart of Princeton!

Lovely landscaping and a beautiful front porch welcome visitors to this handsomely renovated American Foursquare twin home. Only a block or two away from the University and downtown Princeton, this gem is ready for modern life. Its classic good looks are complemented by the thoughtful top-to-bottom recent renovation. New roof, new windows, new plumbing, electric & HVAC systems will give comfort and peace of mind for years to come. The first floor, with its open plan is anchored by the stunning, sun-drenched new kitchen. White cabinets, stainless appliances and polished Carrara counters shimmer in the streaming sunlight under the high ceilings. Solid wood floors (Brazilian teak) run underfoot from the kitchen into the spacious adjoining living room and into every other room, bringing continuity and an air of luxury and sophistication throughout the home. Adding convenience to the first floor is a new, proper mudroom with a built-in bench & a coatrack. The adjacent powder room completes the first floor. Upstairs, 3 sunny bedrooms share a gorgeous new bathroom clad in white marble. The top floor boasts an elegant and spacious second bathroom and a room easily adaptable to a master suite, quiet home-office or guest retreat. Take your pick. Completing this perfect picture is the walk-out finished basement with plenty of room to sprawl. A second powder room adjoins. Out the back is an ample 3-car plus parking and a grassy backyard. Princeton schools and the Dinky train station are nearby; Princeton Junction train station is few miles down the road. This is a true gem in downtown Princeton. $899,000

Galina Peterson 908.227.9044

galina.peterson@foxroach.com

SELLING | BUYING | RELOCATION

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609-924-1600

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Handsomely Renovated American Foursquare


Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE

er Theater

Princeton Summ

uncommon

wandoomtheerns

Sorry to Bother You

CINEMA REVIEW

Ambitious Telemarketer Joins the 1% in Sophisticated Social Satire

T

o describe Cassius “Cash” Green (Lakeith Stanfield) as struggling would be an understatement. He and his girlfriend, Detroit (Tessa Thompson), are four months behind in their rent on their unfinished garage apartment in inner-city Oakland. The only reason they haven’t been evicted is because their landlord is Cash’s Uncle Sergio (Terry Crews), who is willing to wait to be paid, and has even given his nephew a car. Cash has been unemployed, but it isn’t for a lack of trying. His luck changes when, despite being caught lying on his résumé during a job interview, he’s hired because the interviewer admired his ingenuity. The hope is that he’d bring the same ambition to succeed to his entry level job as a telemarketer. During his training, Cash is warned to “stick to the script,” if he wants to get ahead. He also gets valuable advice from an African American colleague (Danny Glover), who is in the neighboring cubicle, to “use your white voice.” So, after he drops his black accent and follows the company’s guidelines, Cash is promoted to the coveted post of powercaller. With his promotion, he makes enough money to pay Uncle Sergio, buy a new car, and move to

a fancy flat in an upscale neighborhood. Unfortunately, the raise is a mixed blessing for Cash because it creates tension between him and the friends he left behind in the crowded call center. They’re still making minimum wage and are organizing a union over the objections of management. His politically-active girlfriend Detroit, who also works in the company, calls him a “scab” when he crosses the picket line formed by his former co-workers. Sorry to Bother You is a thought provoking social satire that is the scriptwriting and directorial debut of Boots Riley. He’s better known as the founder of the radical hip hop group, The Coup, as well as being one of the most dynamic leaders of the Occupy Oakland Movement that was started in 2011. Excellent (HHHH). Rated R for sexuality, graphic nudity, ethnic slurs, violence, pervasive profanity, and drug use. Running time: 105 minutes. Production Studios: Cinereach/Forest Whitaker’s Significant Productions/ Macro/MNM Creative/The Space Program. Distributor: Annapurna Pictures. —Kam Williams

serstein by Wendy Was

July 12 22 ¯

Hamilton Mu rray Theater on Princeton University’s Campus

(732)997-0205

TAKE MY ADVICE AND “TALK WHITE”: Co-worker Langston (Danny Glover, right) gives his newcomer telemarketer colleague Cash (Lakeith Stanfield) some valuable advice about how to get ahead in his new job.

PrincetonSummerTheater.org

Joyce DiDonato: Nick Heavican

(Photo by Peter Prato/Annapurna Pictures — © 2018 Annapurna Releasing, LLC. All Rights Reserved)

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:

Princeton University Concerts // 2018-2019 Season

SINGLE TICKETS NOW ON SALE ONLINE ONLY

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 20

CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

GUSTAVO DUDAMEL, Artist-in-Residence BOBBY MCFERRIN, Vocalist JOYCE DIDONATO, Mezzo-soprano

YEARS of MUSIC MAKING

PATRICIA KOPATCHINSKAJA, Violin AVI AVITAL, Mandolin & OMER AVITAL, Bass MARTIN FRÖST, Clarinet JERUSALEM STRING QUARTET PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, Viola

AND MUCH MORE...

Starting at just $5 student/$25 general

princetonuniversityconcerts.org


Wednesday, July 11

10 a.m. to noon: Penn Medicine Princeton Health presents a free “CarFit Check-Up Event” at the parking lot at 707 Alexander Road. Call (888) 897-8979 to schedule an appointment. 6 p.m.: Andrew Martin discusses his book, Early Work: A Novel at Labyrinth Books in Princeton. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Do The Right Thing (1989) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, July 12 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Princeton Summer Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 6 p.m.: Join the Paint Party at Cranbury Station Gallery for a relaxed and artistic summer evening. Cranbury Station Gallery provides the canvas, paints, and supplies. Guests are welcome to bring their favorite drinks and snacks to enjoy. The cost to attend is $35. Register by calling (609) 921-0434. Pre-payment is required. 5 to 9 p.m.: Celebrate summer with live entertainment every Thursday night in Palmer Square. 6 to 8 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton presents a musical performance by DC Fusion at the Princ-

brary as teamed up with Labyrinth to offer a night of music and dancing. Admission is free but guests are asked to bring a food item to donate to Arm in Arm. A cash bar will be available. Ages 21 and older. Sunday, July 15

Noon to 2 p.m.: Tiffany Window Tours at Princeton United Methodist Church. The tours will reoccur every Sunday through August and by appointment. Call (609) 924-2613. 12:30 p.m.: Screening of the Royal Ballet’s Swan Lake at Princeton Garden Theatre. Monday, July 16

11:30 to noon: Princeton United Methodist Church hosts a “Prayer for Separated Immigrant Parents and Children.” This event will reoccur every Monday through August. For more information, call (609) 924-2613. Tuesday, July 17

7 to 8 p.m.: Penn Medicine Princeton Health presents a free information session entitled, “Practicing Mindfulness to Reduce Anxiety and Depression” at the Mercer County Library System, West Windsor Branch, 333 North Post Road. Wednesday, July 18

7 to 8 p.m.: Penn Medicine Princeton Health presents a free information session on “Nutrition Management for Prediabetes and Diabetes” at Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center, 1225 State Road. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of The Women (1939)

at Princeton Garden The- and Printmaking.” atre. Friday, July 20

8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, July 19 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Princeton Summer Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 5 to 9 p.m.: Terhune Orchards hosts the 7th Annual Farm to Table Fundraiser Dinner, which includes five courses paired with Terhune Orchards’ own wine. Chefs from the Terra Momo Restaurant Group will prepare the meal. Throughout the evening live music will be provided by the Ocean Country Band. At the end of the evening, each guest will go home with locally grown produce and a recipe booklet. Tickets are on sale now through the Sustainable Lawrence website, sus tainablelawrence.org. 5 to 9 p.m.: Celebrate summer with live entertainment every Thursday night in Palmer Square. 6 to 8 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton presents a musical performance by Trinidelphia at the Princeton Shopping Center. Free to attend. Guests should bring their own lawnchair. 7:30 p.m.: Special singa-long screening of Grease (1978) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8:30 pm.: Princeton University Art Museum presents an outdoor screening of Clueless (1995) inspired by the transformation of literary sources in unexpected ways, as seen in the exhibition “Frank Stella Unbound: Literature

Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton includes farm-fresh produce, café, eatin foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood and meats, guest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards. Enjoy Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery’s award-winning wines, wine fare, and relaxing music every Friday night throughout the summer (through September 7). Saturday, July 21 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Station in West Windsor. 7 p.m.: American College of Orgonomy movie night featuring The Pursuit of Happyness with Will Smith. Free admission and refreshments. The screening will take place at the ACO Campus, 4419 Route 27 in Princeton. For more information, visit www. acomovienight.com. 7 p.m.: Blue Curtain presents a series of free performances at Pettoranello Gardens Amphitheater located at Route 206 and Mountain Avenue in Princeton. This weekend features Lakou Mizik and Iberi. Sunday, July 22

Noon to 2 p.m.: Tiffany Window Tours at Princeton United Methodist Church. The tours will reoccur every Sunday through August and by appointment. Call (609) 924-2613.

Starting Friday Sorry to Bother You (R) Continuing Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (PG-13) Ends Thursday The Catcher Was a Spy (R) Hollywood Summer Nights On the Town (1949) Thu, July 12 at 7:30 Royal Ballet Swan Lake Sun, July 15 at 12:30 Hollywood Summer Nights The Women (1939) Wed, July 18 at 7:30 Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

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Calendar

eton Shopping Center. Free to attend. Guests should bring their own lawnchair. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of On the Town (1949) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Friday, July 13 Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton includes farm-fresh produce, café, eat-in foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood and meats, guest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards. Enjoy Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery’s award-winning wines, wine fare, and relaxing music every Friday night throughout the summer (through September 7). 8:45 p.m.: Outdoor screening of The Goonies at Palmer Square Green. Guests should bring their own blankets and lawn chairs. Saturday, July 14 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Station in West Windsor. Noon to 2 p.m.: Free, live music concert by SunDog on Palmer Square Green. 7 p.m.: Blue Curtain presents a series of free performances at Pettoranello Gardens Amphitheater located at Route 206 and Mountain Avenue in Princeton. This weekend features Pradhanica and Leonardo Suarez Paz’s Cuartetango. 7 to 11 p.m.: It’s Disco Fever at Labyrinth Books! The Princeton Public Li-


HITTING A HIGH NOTE: Professor Laura Brooks Rice (right), pictured with a 2016 CoOPERAtive Program participant, will lead a master class with participants in Westminster’s 2018 CoOPERAtive program on Monday, July 16 at 7:30 p.m. in the Robert L. Annis Playhouse on the Westminster Choir College campus in Princeton. mer the concert will be held artists and grace the Paper New Voices of 2018: From Sea to Shining Sea at Montclair State Univer- Mill stage with an inspiring,

On July 27 and 28, the Papermill Playhouse is hosting the annual “New Voices” concert, the culmination of Paper Mill Playhouse’s Summer Musical Theater Conservatory. Members of the competitive Conservatory who earned coveted spots in the Senior (ages 15-18), Junior Plus (ages 13-14), and Junior companies (ages 1012) are directed and choreographed by Paper Mill Playhouse’s professional artistic staff in this fully produced, original concert. This sum-

sity. The Paper Mill Playhouse Summer Musical Theater Conservatory is a program of rigorous study allowing students to enhance their individual performance potential while developing a broad base of theater experience and knowledge. New Voices is an opportunity to see the stars of tomorrow. This original concert features over 100 incredible performers. It is amazing to see these young performers grow into professional

heartfelt performance. Students from Paper Mill Playhouse’s Conservatory have gone on to appear in numerous Broadway productions, film, television, and regional theater. The Summer Musical Theater Conservatory and New Voices are generously supported by the Investors Foundation. Paper Mill programs are made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

On July 12-15 and 18-22, Princeton Summer Theater is performing Uncommon Women and Others. Wendy Wasserstein’s watershed debut play follows a group of graduates from Mount Holyoke College at the dawn of second-wave feminism as they make new friendships, fall in and out of love, and imagine a brighter future for themselves. This comedy tackles what it means to dare to be an uncommon woman in a world that constantly tells women to accept less. For tickets and more information, visit www.princeton summertheater.org/uncom monwomen.

Jo Dee Messina “Ladies of Country Concert” On Saturday, July 14

Country music artist Jo Dee Messina will headline the Ladies of Country Concert on Saturday, July 14 at Mercer County Park located at 1638 Old Trenton Road in West Windsor. The concert is part of the five-day 16th Annual Freedom Fest State Fair that will be held July 11-15 at its new location at Mercer County Park. Concert tickets include admission to the Fair. “Jo Dee Messina is a truly talented artist and a national treasure. Her music and her story are an inspiration to all of us,” said Nick DeMauro, executive director and chief executive officer of L.E.A.D. (Law Enforcement Against Drugs) and fair manager for the 16th Annual Freedom Fest State Fair. “We feel blessed to have her as the headliner for our Ladies of Country Concert.” Messina has had nine No. 1 singles on the Billboard country music charts and has sold five million albums worldwide. She has been honored multiple times by country music organizations including the ACM Awards and the CMA Awards, and has been nominated for Grammy Awards. Her bestknown singles include her breakout debut song “Heads Carolina, Tails California,” and others such as “I’m Alright,” and “Bye Bye.” Concertgoers at the Ladies of Countr y Concer t will have the opportunity to enjoy food, games, and picnic grounds and included in admission unlimited carnival rides, a magic show, live animals, fireworks, horse shows, racing pigs, and other fun activities for the whole family as part of the 16th Annual Freedom Fest State Fair. “A ticket to the concert on Saturday night gives you a ticket to the Fair and all activities,” said DeMauro. “It’s two great events for the price of one.” A nonprofit organization, the Freedom Fest State Fair is an annual five-day agricultural event. Proceeds will benefit L.E.A.D. “Our involvement in this event

opportunity to promote their programs and raise much needed funds while sup porting a drug-free lifestyle, agriculture, and healthy living,” said DeMauro. Tickets can be purchased at the gate for lawn seating or in advance for reserved concert seating. Lawn seating is $12.50 online, or $17.50 at the gate. Reserved seating is $30 online, or $37.50 at the gate. Kids under 36 inches tall are free. For tickets to the 16th Annual Freedom Fest State Fair country music concert or for more information, visit www.freedomfeststatefair. com or call (609) 259-2500.

MCCC and Trenton Children’s Chorus Perform Jazz

Mercer County Community College (MCCC) is partnering with the Trenton Children’s Chorus (TCC) to present the 2018 Summer Jazz Institute, a master class for high school and college music students. The weeklong program will be held Monday, July 30 to Friday, August 3, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at MCCC’s James Kerney Campus at 102 North Broad Street. The faculty who will lead the program include Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin of Pr inceton Universit y ; MCCC’s Scott Hornick and Jim Holton, and Dr. Rochelle Ellis, TCC music director and faculty member at Westminster Choir College. Guest artist is Terell Stafford. The instrumental and vocal cur r iculum includes : jazz theory (harmonic and melodic song structure ); improvisation (playing over changes and adapting melodies); ear training (hearing music in real time); and ensembles (small group, big band, and vocal). Students will present a public performance on the final day. Students should bring a bag lunch. Snacks and water will be provided. The cost is $150 for the week. For more information,

3716. Students may register online at www.trentonchildrenschorus.org.

Concert Features New Works By NJSO Composers

The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra presents dynamic new works from the composers of the 2018 NJSO Edward T. Cone Composition Institute — Jonathan Cziner, Natalie Dietterich, Aaron Hendrix, and Brian Shank — on Saturday, July 14, at 8 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton. From July 9–14 at Princeton University, the four emerging composers will have their works rehearsed and performed by the NJSO, participate in master classes with Institute Director Steven Mackey, receive feedback from conductor David Robertson and NJSO musicians, and have career-enriching sessions with musicindustry leaders. The NJSO and Robertson perform Cziner’s Resonant Bells, Dietterich’s Aeolian D ust s, H e n d r i x’s Night Train, and Shank’s Into the Rose Garden. The concert pro g ra m, “S core s : New Orchestral Works,” also includes “Echoes” from Mackey’s Mnemosyne’s Pool. Mackey says: “The Cone Institute takes a holistic approach to the elements that go into a successful career as a composer. Beyond the opportunity to polish their orchestral works with professional musicians, the composers will meet with industry leaders for insight into the practical elements of publishing and promoting their music.” All tickets for the Institute concert, “Scores: New Orchestral Works,” are $15 and are available at njsymphony.org/scores. A free reception for all concertgoers follows the concert, featuring a special Cone-inspired flavor of ice cream from Princeton’s The Bent Spoon.

Get the scoop from

NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA XIAN ZHANG Music Director

scores:

New Orchestral Works Sat, July 14 at 8 pm Richardson Auditorium in Princeton David Robertson conducts the NJSO premieres of dynamic works by the composers of the NJSO Edward T. Cone Composition Institute in an evening that will show the vibrant future of orchestral music.

DAVID ROBERTSON conductor STEVEN MACKEY institute director NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Photo Jason Paddock / iShootRock.com

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 22

“Uncommon Women and gives local L.E.A.D. chap- call TCC at (609) 278-0822 Others” Starting July 15 ters and communities the or MCCC at ( 609 ) 570 -

Program includes: JONATHAN CZINER Resonant Bells BRIAN SHANK Into the Rose Garden AARON HENDRIX Night Train NATALIE DIETTERICH Aeolian Dusts STEVEN MACKEY “Echoes” from Mnemosyne’s Pool Major underwriting support for the NJSO Edward T. Cone Composition Institute is generously provided by the Edward T. Cone Foundation and Princeton University.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

General admission tickets $15 1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476) | njsymphony.org/cone This program is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. XIAN ZHANG MUSIC DIRECTOR


Schreiber Following in Family Tradition As PU Lax Alum Heads to Worlds for U.S.

I

n 1974, University of Maryland men’s lacrosse star Doug Schreiber helped the U.S. national team win the gold medal at the FIL (Federation of International Lacrosse) Men’s Lacrosse World Championship in Melbourne, Australia. Now 44 years later, Schreiber’s son, former Princeton University standout midfielder Tom Schreiber, will be following in his father’s footsteps as he plays for the U.S. squad at the 2018 Worlds in Netanya, Israel from July 12-21. For Schreiber, a 2014 Princeton alum who scored 200 points for the Tigers on 106 goals and 94 assists, getting the chance to maintain the family tradition is special. “We have obviously been at this thing for a while; he has been around my entire career obviously,” said Schreiber, a native of East Meadow, N.Y. “He won a national championship in college; that’s something that I wasn’t able to do. It was a long time ago, but it is cool to do something that he has also done.” It has been a long road for Schreiber in his bid to make the U.S. squad. “It is probably two and a half years or three years,” said Schreiber, who was cut from the U.S. squad that played in the 2014 Worlds. “It has been a series of exhibition games and then more of a formal tryout weekend last summer around this time. They kind of whittled the roster down a little bit more in the fall

and I made the final cut in January, so it has been a bit of a process.” For Schreiber, finding out that he made the cut was worth the wait. “It is an honor; it is obviously a big deal in our sport,” said Schreiber. “It is something that I strived to do forever; it was a pretty great feeling.” Striving to get better each year helped Schreiber earn his spot on the U.S. squad. Upon graduating from Princeton, Schreiber became a star in Major League Lacrosse (MLL), helping the Ohio Machine to the 2017 title and earning league MVP awards in both 2016 and 2017. He has also played indoors for Toronto Rock of the National Lacrosse League (NLL), earning Rookie of the Year honors in the 2016-17 campaign. “My goal year to year is to keep expanding my skill set. It is something I take pride in,” said the 6’0, 190-pound Schreiber. “I think especially with playing indoor the last two years, I have been able to pick up on a few new things from some of the guys with a box lacrosse background. I am just trying to expand the repertoire as much as I can. In addition to that, just being a bit older, a bit more mature, and a bit more experienced certainly helps along the way.” In Schreiber’s view, the U.S. team helped enhance its chemistry by going through a training camp in Foxborough, Mass. earlier this month in its final tuneup for the Worlds.

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“It is interesting because we are all competing against each other in the MLL and then we all come together with the same uniform, under the same roof, so to speak, for a few days, play together, and then go back to our respective teams again the next week,” said Schreiber. “I think the nature of the tryouts with it being over a few years and having a few exhibition games per year, we were able to develop some of that chemistry as time goes on. But this last week, in particular, having only 25 guys in comparison to 35 or 40 or even higher than that in the last few exhibitions gives you a chance to really come together.” While U.S. is clearly stocked with talent, the coaching staff has gone out of its way to assemble a unit of complementary parts. “They were thinking about guys who can play well together with one another,” said Schreiber. “We are a team full of the best guys around and at the end of the day, it is about winning the gold, peaking at the right time, and playing well together.” Schreiber, for his part, is more than willing to sacrifice some individual glory to give the U.S. its best chance at earning gold. “Whatever my role needs to be is fine by me,” said Schreiber. “Whether that is facilitating or shooting or setting a pick. If I have to play defense, I will play defense. It is one of those opportunities that is so unique and special that all of the other stuff kind of goes out the window.” In reflecting on the competition, which begins for the U.S. when they face the Iroquois on July 12, Schreiber

believes the team needs to exercise patience with the ball. “We are used to just playing so fast in the MLL with the shot clock, high pace, two-point arc, and a lot of freelancing on offense,” said Schreiber, who helped coach Uganda at the 2014 Worlds. “I think being a little bit smarter with the ball and rewiring our mind-set there a little bit to adjust to the international rules, which is a slower game with no shot clock is key.” Another key to success will be maintaining an evenkeeled approach to adversity. “We need to be stoic; we are going to have peaks and valleys,” said Schreiber. “It is making sure that we are sticking to what our plan is and doing the right things and doing our jobs. If guys can mesh together and the faster we can do that, the better shape we will be in. We have taken some good steps already in doing that. I think managing that throughout the process will be important.” After falling to Canada in the 2014 gold medal final, the U.S. is determined to mesh at the right time in Israel. “We all know that is the goal, that is not something that we have to articulate,” said Schreiber, whose former Tiger teammate Zach Currier ’17 will be playing for Canada while rising Princeton sophomore Andrew Song is competing for China and 2017 alum Alistair Berven is on England’s squad.

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

S ports

FAMILY TIES: Tom Schreiber heads to goal during his career with the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team. Schreiber, a 2014 Princeton alum who scored 200 points for the Tigers on 106 goals and 94 assists who has gone on to star in Major league Lacrosse, will be playing for the U.S. national team at the FIL (Federation of International Lacrosse) World Championships in Netanya, Israel from July 12-21. Schreiber is following in a family tradition at the competition as his father, Doug, played for the U.S. squad that won the gold medal at the 1974 Worlds in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “We are not looking past anyone else either. The Iroquois have a great team and the other teams maybe aren’t at the same level but they can win at any time. The focus is on Canada, they won

the last one. There are certainly a handful of guys that are out for some redemption there. For the majority of the team, this is their first time. I don’t think we need any added motivation.” —Bill Alden

REGISTER BY AUGUST! Registration open for the 2018 flag football Fall season. Registration will be limited, so sign up now at our website: http://pjflnj.org The goal of our league is to provide a safe and productive environment that enables boys and girls to build leadership characteristics in a fun, team focused environment while developing agility, speed, and football fundamentals. We also strive to provide a service to our community by providing a healthy surrounding for the children, great entertainment for the families and opportunities for the community to work together for the children.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 24

PU Sports Roundup PU Men’s Hoops Alum Bell Headed to Italy Pro League

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Recently graduated Princeton University men’s basketball player Amir Bell ’18, who was named the 2017-18 Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year, is headed to Sicily to begin his professional hoops career. Bell signed last Friday with Fortitudo Agrigento in Serie A2, the seconddivision league in Italy. T.J. Bray ’14 played two seasons in Serie A2, first for Pallacanestro Trapani, also in Sicily, in 2014-15, and then for Junior Casale in northern Italy in 2015-16. During his Princeton career, the 6’4, 190-pound B ell, a nat ive of E as t Brunswick, N.J., finished 31st in program history in scoring, with 1,043 points. His 313 career assists were the sixth-most since the stat began being kept just more than 40 years ago, and his 118 games played were tied for fourth in program history. Bell had his highestscoring season as a Tiger last winter, averaging 10.9 points and a career-best 5.4 rebounds and 3.7 assists per game. Agrigento finished eighth in the Serie A2 West division with a 15-15 record. Jalen Cannon, a St. Francis (N.Y.) alum, led the team

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in scoring last season at 15.2 points per game while Pendar v is Williams, t he only other American on the squad and a Norfolk State alum, was second with 12.8 points per game. Williams has since signed with BG Göttingen in Germany for the upcoming season.

PU Men’s Lightweights Fall in Henley Quarters

Competing at the Temple Challenge Cup at the Henley Royal Regatta in England last weekend, the Princeton University men’s lightweight varsity eight posted two wins to advance to the quarterfinals. P r inceton’s impres sive run ended with a narrow defeat to 2018 IRA heavyweight champion Yale. The lightweights stayed in contact with the Bulldogs — a boat comprised of rowers from Yale’s top three crews, including several from the champion varsity eight — and made a hard charge late to try to pull the upset. Sprinting finishes were a hallmark of the Tigers, the Eastern Sprints and IRA silver medalists, throughout the 2018 season, and the Temple Cup quarterfinal was no different. Ultimately, Yale held on by about a seat, but Princeton proved once again that it always had a special final gear when needed. While the loss of seniors James Goble and James Sincavage will be felt by the program, Princeton returns six rowers — four underclassmen — and a freshman coxswain from this team, which had an extra month to train together because of this Henley trip.

PU Field Hockey Has 3 Make U.S. U-21

Three Princeton University field hockey standouts Maddie Bacskai, MaryKate Neff and Elise Wong were named to the U.S. U-21 national team while another Tiger star, Sophia Tornetta was picked for the development squad, USA Field Hockey said last week. Princeton had the most players on the U-21 team followed by Louisville, Maryland and Old Dominion. Rising junior Bacskai and rising senior Wong were key members of the Tiger defensive unit in 2017. Princeton was 18th nationally in shutouts per game (0.26)

GETTING THE CALL: David Hale ’11 fires a pitch during his career with the Princeton University baseball team. Hale was called up to the New York Yankees last week and made an impact on Friday evening in a 6-2 loss at Toronto, coming out of the bullpen to pitch 5 2/3 innings, giving up five hits, one run, and striking out one. He had posted a 4.20 ERA in 11 starts for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, going 3-2, adding 44 strikeouts in 55 2/3 innings before joining the Yankees. Hale, 30, has a 10-10 lifetime record in the majors, having pitched in parts of five seasons for Atlanta, Colorado, and Minnesota in addition to New York. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) and goals-against-average PU Soccer Alum Marsch (1.50). Rising sophomore To Coach in Germany Neff finished second on Former Princeton UniverPrinceton with eight goals sity men’s soccer star and and was fourth on the team assistant coach Jesse Marsch with 19 points last fall while ’96 was named an assistant rising senior Tornetta tallied coach with RB Leipzig in the 11 points. Bundesliga this week, signing Tiger Women’s Rowers a two-year contract with the German club. Have Big Weekend Princeton University womLast week, Marsch stepped en’s open rowing stars Em- down as the head coach of the ily Kallfelz and Hannah Scott New York Red Bulls of Major came up big in last Sunday on League Soccer (MLS), a posiboth sides of the Atlantic. tion he had held since 2015. Rising senior Kallfelz won the Marsch departs after becomU-23 Women’s 1x Final at the ing the winningest coach in Senior Trials on Lake Mercer, club history with a record of which clinched her place at the 58-35-25. Named MLS Coach upcoming U-23 World Champi- of the Year during his first onships, which will take place campaign, Marsch led the Red Bulls to the 2015 Supporters’ July 25-29 in Poland. Meanwhile across the pond Shield, a U.S. Open Cup final in England, rising sophomore appearance, and two trips to Scott put a finishing touch on the CONCACAF Champions a winning week at the Henley League, including a semifinal Royal Regatta as she joined appearance in 2018. Founded in 2009, R B teammate Heidi Long to win the Hambleden Pairs title by Leipzig was elevated to the Bundesliga prior to the 20163/4 of a length. 17 season. In its first year the Die Roten Bullen finished in second place, and was sixth this past season. Following his playing retirement from the MLS, where he won three league titles and four U.S. Open Cup medals during his 14-year career, Marsch was hired by Bob Bradley ’80 as an assistant coach for the U.S. Men’s National Team. Bradley was Marsch’s coach at Princeton, at the Chicago Fire and Chivas USA. Marsch helped the U.S. win its group at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the first time the team won its pool since 1930, before finishing in 12th place. The U.S. was the runner-up at the 2011 Gold Cup, losing to Mexico in the final. In August 2011, Marsch was named the first head coach of MLS expansion team the Montreal Impact. He parted ways with the Impact in November 2012 after leading the Impact to the most successful inaugural MLS team record since Seattle’s record 12 wins in 2009.

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Surveying his options as he went through the college baseball recruiting process, Paul Franzoni concluded that the New Jersey Institute of Technology offered a range of opportunities that he couldn’t pass up. “I loved that NJIT plays in a really cool conference, the ASUN (the Atlantic Sun Conference); it is the sixth best conference this year out of all 32 Division I conferences so that was a big selling point.,” said Franzoni, a former Princeton Day School standout catcher and three-time All-Prep B performer. “I wanted to play at the highest level possible. I also love that it is close to home. I can come home and hang out with my brothers on a weekend. Another part that factored into my decision was they had a kid who was a three or four-year starter at catcher who graduated last year, so there was an opening in that position. I came in and my focus was to go and win that spot.” Franzoni earned the starting catcher spot and enjoyed a superb freshman campaign, hitting .271 to earn ASUN All-Freshman honors and help NJIT go 22-25 overall and 9-12 in league play as it advanced to the conference postseason tournament for the first time in program history. Although things ended up going well, Franzoni harbored some doubts early on as he went through fall ball. “I struggled in the fall, to be honest, just adjusting from high school where you see a Division I guy every 10 games, if even that, and then going to the fall and scrimmaging those pitchers single day,” said the 5’10, 175-pound Franzoni. “I was getting used to hitting that caliber of pitching and just being away from home too.” With NJIT beginning its season by losing three games at NC Central in late February, Franzoni wasn’t sure if he was a D-I caliber hitter. “That was a tough weekend. We got swept,” said Franzoni, who started the opener and picked up an RBI on a sacrifice fly. “The first weekend at NC Central, I was wondering if I am really ready for this. I struggled a little bit at the plate that weekend.” A week later at Nav y, Franzoni got into a groove, going 5-for-10 with two runs and an RBI as NJIT went 2-2 in the four-game set. “Against Nav y, I had a breakout weekend,” recalled Franzoni. “I had some hits and I played well behind the plate. Then from there, I thought you know this is your spot so let’s just lock it down.”

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Franzoni was locked in the rest of the spring, piling up 36 hits, 21 runs, 16 RBIs, seven doubles and tying for the team lead with three home runs. “Really, this whole trend of this first year was getting my confidence up,” said Franzoni, who ended up starting 42 games this spring for the Highlanders. “I faced a ton of guys who got picked up in the MLB draft, which is a really fun experience. It is getting used to seeing those guys and building up confidence, knowing you can hit them and play with those guys.” Behind the plate, Franzoni emerged as a vocal leader for the Highlanders. “I just tried to lead by example and bring energy; my biggest thing this year was to direct everything on the field through bringing the

best energy and having my teammates feed off of that,” said Franzoni. “I know I was only a freshman, but I was trying to be a leader out there, helping everybody get up and ready to play. The biggest thing this year was getting wins. That is all I really cared about, that is all I really wanted to do.” One of the team’s biggest wins came over eventual league champion Stetson when NJIT posted an 8-1 victory over the Hatters on April 22 to stay alive in its drive to make the ASUN postseason tournament. “They beat us the first two games and we knew that it was huge game, so to not get swept and to stay in contention because only the top six of the eight teams qualify for the tournament. We ended up beating them that game 8-1; I had a home run

that game, which was good.” While Franzoni is proud of what he accomplished in his debut campaign, he is not about to rest on his laurels. “I was sup er honored to make t he ASUN A llFreshman team, that really meant a lot; it was one of my goals heading into the season,” said Franzoni, who is spending the summer training with his younger brother Luke, who will be starting his freshman season with the Xavier University baseball team this fall, and cousin B.J. Dudeck, who played college ball at VMI and LaSalle University. “I just wanted to go out there and prove I could be a difference maker in the conference and help NJIT win baseball games. That was my biggest goal all season, just do everything I could to help us get wins and make the conference tournament. I just want to keep building on that in the next three years coming up.” —Bill Alden

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Seizing Opportunity in Debut for NJIT Baseball, PDS Alum Franzoni Earns All-Freshman Honors

CATCHING ON: Paul Franzoni is taking control at catcher this spring in his freshman season for New Jersey Institute of Technology’s Division I baseball program. Franzoni, a former Princeton Day School standout, enjoyed a superb debut campaign for NJIT, hitting .271 and earning ASUN (Atlantic Sun Conference) All-Freshman team honors to help the Highlanders go 22-25 overall and 9-12 ASUN on the way to making the league’s postseason tournament. (Photo by Mike McLaughlin Photography for New Jersey Institute of Technology,Courtesy of NJIT Sports Information)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 26

PFC Boca 16U Soccer Wins Mid-Atlantic Title, Punching Ticket to Colorado for Club Nationals

The Princeton Football Club ( PFC ) Boca 2002B team didn’t have to travel far to compete in the U.S. Club Soccer Mid-Atlantic Regional, as the competition was held in nearby Somerset. But after surviving a gauntlet of tough foes in games played in a heat wave, the PFC 16U squad earned a trip of around 1,750 miles as it won the regional crown in its division to qualify for the U.S. Club Soccer Nationals in Aurora, Colo. Competing against clubs from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New York in group play, Boca showed impressive form. After starting the competition with a 5-0 win over Eastern FC Blast 2002 Premier, the PFC team edged GPS MA Elite Blue 02 2-1 as Aron Szoke and Ian Pompliano both found the back of the net. Ending group play with a 3-0 record, Boca posted a 3-1 win over West-Mont United SA - Premier White. In the semis, PFC blanked GPS MA Elite Blue 02 Boys (2-0) to set up a clash in the finals against PDA South Suarez, which had previously SELECT CLUB: Members of the Princeton Football Club (PFC) Boca 2002B team celebrate after they won the 16U title at the U.S. topped Boca on penalty Club Soccer Mid-Atlantic Regional earlier this month in Somerset. PFC defeated PDA South Suarez 2-0 in the title game to earn a trip to the U.S. Club Soccer Nationals in Aurora, Colo. later this month. The PFC team includes Princeton High students Jared Bell, Brendan Coffee, Rafael Matar Grandi, Dylan Parker, Ethan Parker, Simon Sheppard, Noah LaPoint, and Ian Pompliano, along with Peter Sarsfield of Princeton Day School, Jakob Kunzer of Lawrenceville School, Xavier Guerreiro and Aron Szoke of Council Rock High North (Pa.), Herbert Ramirez and Brendan Sagbo from Hightstown High, Daniel Ingersoll of South Hunterdon, and Connor Staples from WW/P-South.

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kicks in the U.S. Club State Cup Final. In t he rematch, B oca turned the tables on its rival as Xavier Guerreiro tallied two goals and the defense stifled PDA South Suarez in a 2-0 triumph. In reflecting on the title run, Boca head coach Yordan Hristov pointed to the squad’s work ethic and depth of talent. “This has been a dream season for our team and the win in the final was a logical outcome of the hard work and team effort throughout the season,” said Hristov. “The boys performed at a high level despite the hot weather and showed beautiful soccer. Everyone played a key role for the success — players for the way they competed, parents for their outstanding support, and the club for helping these boys live their dream.” The Boca squad will look to keep performing at a high level when it makes its way to the Rocky Mountains for the nationals which are slated for July 20-24. —Bill Alden


After winning two nail-biters to start play in the Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 tournament, the Princeton Little League (PLL) squad was looking to put the hammer down as it faced host Midd letow n i n it s t h ird game. Needing one win to clinch the crown in the double elim inat ion tour nament, Princeton made a statement, pulling away to a 12-6 triumph. “You could see there was a pattern; we would have these huge innings where we would get a pretty big lead, but we wouldn’t bring the hammer down,” said PLL manager Jon Durbin, reflecting on the win in the clincher which gave the PLL program its second sectional crown. “In the Middletown game, by the time we got to the sixth and seventh inning, they did not challenge us. I think the boys’ confidence level had reached the point that they finally had learned, against tougher competition, what you have to do is to keep the pressure on the other team the whole game and also keep them at bay. So that was the learning progression for the team.” Noting that the win marked the second sectional title for the PLL program, Durbin sees work ethic as a key factor in the team’s success. “The last team to do it was the 2015 team, which was the Teddy Durbin, Jackson Rho group; that was a really good team,” said Durbin. “They had set their goal. That group really wanted to win a state championship. They ended up just shy of that, finishing third. This team’s big goal from day one has been to win the state championship too. You could see that they are really working hard to get there.” The title has a special personal meaning for Durbin. “It is exciting, from my perspective, for us to be back again, especially in what is the Durbin family’s last tour of duty as coaches and players for PLL,” said Durbin. “But also just because these boys really want it. They are one of two groups who have shown that this was their goal and they were determined to go out and get it. They still have another big mountain to climb in winning states, but they are there to have a chance.” Durbin noted t hat t he team’s playoff run has been

the product of a group effort across the board. “Quite often when you have these deeper runs, it is two or three players making the hugest impact, but with this team, there have been so many hero mo ments along the way, but t he hero moments have been distributed across a number of players,” said Durbin, noting that Jonathan Tao went 8-for-11 with 3 RBI’s at the plate with 7 2/3 innings pitched with 10 strikeouts at the sectional while Gordon Grandbouche went 4-for-9 with 7 RBIs, A.J. Surace went 5-for-13 with 3 RBIs, Danny Harlan went 5-for-11 with 3 RBIs, and Rohan Sheth had 7 1/3 innings pitched with eight strikeouts. “I feel like when that starts happening, you know you are getting the buy-in from the whole team. Everybody wants to want to win.” PLL executed in all phases of the game in the sectionals, boasting a gaudy .337 batting average and .448 on-base percentage along with some telling pitching and fielding stats. “We challenged the pitchers to be as efficient as they possibly could so, in sectionals, 66 percent of our pitches were strikes compared to 50 percent for opponents,” added Durbin. “We had challenged the hitters to try to make the other team’s pitchers have as many deep pitch counts as possible. Our hit ters generated 27 walks compared to seven for our opponents. Our opponents threw 114 more pitches than us, which is the equivalent of throwing an extra game. We challenged them in the field to keep the errors to an absolute minimum and in sectionals we had only three team errors the entire tournament. It shows that the defense is playing really well.” In order to achieve the goal of a state title, PLL will need to maintain its attention to detail. “The level of competition just gets higher and higher, so it is not only maintaining that focus, but executing the small things; that becomes way more important,” said Durbin, whose team opens the state tourney by facing Franklin Township on July 11 in Lacey Township. “We have been working really hard on improving our bunting. I have a feeling in the state tournament that some of these games are going to come down to one or two runs and it is going to be something small like

dropping down a key bunt to move runners up to to get a run across the plate in a key moment late in a game or just to change the dynamic in a game.” In Durbin’s view, though, it is the desire to win that may be the ultimate game changer in the state competition. “We have been talking to the players, saying ‘you can’t let up now, you have got to keep focused, you have got to stay hungry, and you have got to keep executing a high level and want it,’” said Durbin. “Quite often I feel the difference when you get to this level is which team really wants it more.” —Bill Alden

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Continuing Its Run Through Intermediate Playoffs, PLL Wins Sectional Title, Heading to State Final 4

BANNER DAY: Members of the Princeton Little League (PLL) squad display the banner they earned for winning the Section 3 Intermediate 50/70 tournament last week. PLL defeated host Middletown 12-6 to clinch the title and advance to the N.J. State tournament which starts this Wednesday in Lacey Township. It marked the second sectional crown for the PLL program. Pictured in the front row, from left, are Danny Harlan, Alex Winters, Nico Vitaro, Remmick Granozio, Jonathan Tao, Rohan Sheth, and Jack Durbin. In the back row, from left, are manager Jon Durbin, A.J. Surace, Ethan Roth, Lucas Pelc, Wes Yonish, Gordon Grandbouche, and coaches Damon Grandbouche, and Jeremy Vitaro.

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Sparked by McArthur’s Versatile Play, NJ Spiritwear Rolling in Summer Hoops D u r i ng h is c are er for the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball team, John McArthur’s inside-outside game helped him pass the 1,000-point mark in his career and lead PDS to the state Prep B title in 201516. L as t Monday even ing, McArthur displayed his versatility, tallying 18 points to help NJ Spiritwear top Majeski Foundation 81-70 in overtime in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League.

T h e 6’ 5 , 19 0 - p o u n d McArthur got off to a hot start, scoring 12 points in the first half, driving hard to the hoop and draining jump shots from the perimeter as NJ Spiritwear jumped out to a 42-33 lead. “We were really going to the pick and roll; we had a lot of energy,” said McArthur. “Our guys really know how to play. My shot has been off the past couple of games and I found it today.” In the second half, NJ Spiritwear found itself in trouble as Majeski, com-

SPIRITED EFFORT: John McArthur unloads a pass during his career with the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball team. Last Monday, McArthur, now a rising sophomore at Immaculata University, tallied 18 points to help NJ Spiritwear top Majeski Foundation 81-70 in overtime in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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prised of players from The College of New Jersey men’s hoops team, reeled off a 14-2 run late in the game to pull ahead 64-63. “I think we started losing ourselves and we started trying to play for ourselves,” said McArthur. “Once we started playing together and locking up on defense, we started coming back.” McArthur helped NJ Spiritwear come back, powering to the hoop for a key bucket that gave it a 65-64 lead “I was hyped up; my teammates were getting hyped up,” said a smiling McArthur, reflecting on the play. “It was just a moment.” The teams knotted at 6767 at the end of regulation, but NJ Spiritwear dominated the overtime, outscoring Majeski 14-3 to pull away to the 81-70 win as Zavon Johnson set the tone with several dazzling layups. “Zavon is a true point guard,” said McArthur of Johnson, who had 18 points in the win with Troy Jones chipping in 19. “He is really good at running the floor and bringing us together.” Playing its first season in the summer league, NJ Spiritwear is coming together nicely, having posted five straight wins to improve to 5-1 and move into first place. “I think it was getting the jitters out and learning to play together,” said McArthur, noting that the core of the squad came from the AAU team he competed on in high school. “This is our first time playing with each other and we have got the chemistry going.” For McArthur, who played at Susquehanna last year as a freshman and has transferred to Immaculata University, getting experience this summer should pay dividends this winter. “I focus on the fundamentals a lot and it is good getting out here,” said McArthur. “These guys have a lot of experience. I will definitely be ready in college after playing against these guys.” In McArthur’s view, NJ Spiritwear is ready for a deep run in the league playoffs, which start on July 16. “I am really confident in my teammates and I feel we are starting to click and play together well,” said McArthur. “We have started to click and play together. It is going to be really hard to stop us once we get going.” —Bill Alden

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Local Sports PLL 10 Year-Old All Stars Fall in District 12 Tourney

Showing plenty of offense, the Princeton Little League (PLL) 10 year-old All-Star team posted a pair of wins before getting knocked out of the double elimination District 12 tournament. PLL opened up the tournament with an 11-1 win over Millstone-Roosevelt on July 1 and followed that up with a 15-3 triumph over West End on July 2. On Thursday, Princeton fell 15-5 to East Windsor and then saw its tournament run end when it got edged 6-5 by West Windsor last Saturday.

Post 218 Baseball Tops North Hamilton

Chris Murdock starred as the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team defeated North Hamilton 5-2 last Monday. Former Hun School standout Murdock pitched 4 1/3 innings and got two hits in the win as Post 218 improved to 6-15. Princeton was slated to wrap up the season by playing at Ewing Post 314 on July 10.

Stuart Sports Camps Still Have Openings

There are still openings for upcoming sports camps on the campus of the Stuart Country Day School. The school will be hosting field hockey and tennis camps for the week of July 16-20. It is holding basketball and lacrosse camps during the week of July 23-27. The tennis camp is open to Princeton-area girls who are entering grades K-5 this fall while the other three camps are open to girls entering grades 3-9. For more information, log onto www.stuartschool.org and hit the link for Summer Camps on the home page or forward an e-mail to apierpont@stuartschool.org.

SPECIAL HONOR: Luke Jarrach, left, receives the Princeton Special Sports (PSS) 2018 Jack Rutledge Cup from PSS CoPresident and Head Coach John Pecora. The Cup is awarded once a year to the player who has demonstrated the exceptional determination, enthusiasm, and sportsmanship exemplified by player Jack Rutledge, who lost his valiant fight with leukemia in 2008. Jarrach lives in Princeton and is the son of Joel and Christine Jarrach. and more. The celebration will start on August 2 with a Joint Effort Safe Streets concert with the Arts Council of Princeton in the courtyard of the Princeton Shopping Center at 6 p.m. with an after concert gathering in the the Elks on Birch Avenue at 7:30 p.m. On August 3, there will be a kick-off reception at Studio Hillier on Witherspoon Street at 3 p.m. The events on August 4 include a walking tour at the First Baptist Church at 10 a.m. and a happy hour at the Princeton Country Club at 4 p.m. On August 5, there is a gospel fest scheduled to take place at the First Baptist Church at 5 p.m. An historical discussion, “I Remember When” on service to the community and a look at the lives of Paul Robeson, Jim Floyd, Albert Hinds, Doris

Burell, Jossie Broadway, Pete Young, Ruth Park, and others is slated for August 7 at 6 p.m. at a place to be announced. An art exhibit is slated for August 8 at the Arts Council at 5 p.m. On August 9, there will be a community gathering at the Elks at 7 p.m. On August 10, the events include a youth basketball clinic at Community Park at 10 a.m. and a dinner party/dance at the Princeton Country Club at 8 p.m. There is a community gathering scheduled for August 11 at the Ivy Inn at 8 p.m. On August 12, there will be basketball games at Community Park starting at 10 a.m. and going all day with a closing gathering slated for 7 p.m. at the Elks. For more information on the Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets Program, call John Bailey at (720) 629-0964.

Safe Streets Hoops Events Slated for August 2-12

The 2018 Joint Effort Princeton Safe Streets Safe Streets Community Celebration will be taking place from August 2-12. Held in conjunction with many Princeton businesses, community leaders, community organizations and citizens, the program’s theme this year is “Witherspoon Jackson Community: Stories Lived, But Seldom Heard.” The activities will center around the historic role of the Witherspoon — Jackson community residents in the 20th Historic District of Princeton, New Jersey. The Witherspoon — Jackson Community has stories of faith, leadership, history, and community service, as well as a treasure trove of events and personalities having lived in this rich and vibrant historic black community. The celebration features a series of events and activities held at different locations throughout the Witherspoon — Jackson Communit y, Princeton, and the surrounding area. There will be a walking tour, historic discussion with black seniors, yard sales, community recognition and receptions, a cabaret/dinner party, an art and photography exhibit, a Gospel Fest, workout and conditioning sessions, a basketball clinic and games, music, awards, entertainment,

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Verna Stewart Damon Matthews Ver na Stewar t Damon Matthews died in Newport Hospital in Newport, Rhode Island, in a room with a beautiful view of the waterfront and harbor in the distance, in the early hours of July 6th, 2018, after a brief illness. She was born on September 23, 1929 in Woburn, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Philip Arthur Damon and Anne Ruth Van Buren Damon. She grew up in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where her father was president of the Pittsfield Cooperative Bank, and attended Miss Hall’s School, graduating in 1947. She was an alumna of Wellesley College, Class of ‘51. She married John P.C. Matthews of Princeton, New Jersey on March 31, 1951, in Pittsfield. They lived in Munich, West Germany from March 1954 to March 1959 while John worked for the Free Europe Press, the print division of

Vincenza C. Pirone Vincenza C. Pirone, 97, of West Windsor died Saturday, July 7, 2018 at home surrounded by her loving family. Born in Pettoranello, Italy she was a resident of Princeton from 1946 until 2009 when she moved to Hamilton and later residing with her daughter in West Windsor. She was a member of St. Paul’s Church, the Altar Rosary Society, and the Princeton Italian American Sportsman Club Ladies Auxilliary. Daughter of the late Nicola and Elvina ( Palumbo) Tamasi ; w ife of the late Ginefrico P. Pirone; sister of the late Eliseo Tamasi; and late son-in-law, Malcolm Bell; she is survived by a son and two daughters and son-in-law, Cesina Bell with whom she resided, Mario Pirone, Margaret and Robert Cash, a brother and sister-in-law Domenico and Adele Tamasi, and sister-inlaw Lina Tamasi of Isernia, Italy ; five grandchildren Stephan ie Wyers, Br ian Cash and his wife Stephanie, Rachel Pirone, Chris-

topher Pirone, Alexandra Pirone, a step-granddaughter Karen Smith and her family in Scotland; three great-grandchildren Adriana Wyers, Logan Cash, Savannah Cash; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins in the U.S. and Italy. Our family would like to thank all the aides who took such good care of Mom over the years as well as representatives from Adaptive Care Management and recently Synergy Home Care. The funeral will be 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 12, 2018 f rom t he Mat her- Ho dge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial w ill follow in the

Princeton Cemetery. Friends may call on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to S t. Pau l ’s Ch u r ch, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton or Princeton-Pettoranello Sister City Foundation, 120 John Street, Princeton.

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Obituaries

Radio Free Europe. T hey moved back to Princeton in 1959, where she worked for Princeton University as a programming tutor at the Computer Center; then at Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton as their parish administrator until she retired. She was a longtime member of Trinity Church and was on its vestry committee. She was formerly a member of the board of the Princeton Historical Society. She leaves behind her two sons John, Jr. and Christopher; Christopher’s w ife Jill Matthews; four granddaughters, Aurora, Pilar, Esmé, and Rhys Matthews; her daughter-in-law K’lyn Matthews ; two brothersand sisters-in-law, Paul and Lelia Matthews and Alexander and Shirlee Matthews; and numerous nephews and nieces. On the Damon side she leaves her sister-inlaw Geneviève Damon, her two nieces Sumali Damon Piyavidyakarn and Lawan Damon Chumsai, and her nephew Bill Damon. Preceding her in death were her husband John ; her brother-in-law Thomas S. Matthews, Jr. and sisterin-law Ann Matthews; her brother Philip A. Damon, Jr.; and her sons Thomas Matthews and Philip Damon Matthews. There will be a memorial service later this month at St. Columba’s Church in Middletown, Rhode Island. She will be buried at Trinity Church in Princeton in the family plot in early September, following a funeral service there. The dates and times of both services will be announced shortly.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 30

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS VISA

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CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: (609) 924-2200 ext 10

06-27-3t

HANDYMAN: General duties at

HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 06-13-6t

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Contact Liz: (609) 5140514; ez@zuckfish.com 05-23-12t

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

Irene Lee, Classified Manager 05-16/08-01

tf your service! High skill Tuesday levels in in- OFFICES • Deadline: 2pm • Payment: ads must pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. WITH All PARKING TOWN be TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS door/outdoor painting, sheet rock, Ready for move-in. Renovated and MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, GETS TOP RESULTS! J.O. PRINCETON • 25MOVING wordsSALE: or less: $15.00 • each add’l word • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater 60 words inPAINTING length.& deck work, power washing & genguitar, drums, trumpet,than flute, clarinet, refreshed. 1, 315 and cents 6 room suites. HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Friday July 13 from 9:30-2 & Saturday eral on the spot fix up. Carpentry, Whether it’s selling furniture, finding violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, manHistoric Nassau Street Building. 3 Alexander weeks:tile$40.00 • 4 weeks: • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6or having month and a lost pet, a garage sale, annual discount rates available. July 14 from 9:30-3.• 20 installation, moulding, etc. EPA $50.00 (609) 213-5029. dolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ Painting for interior & exterior, framTOWN TOPICS is the way to go! Street. Nice assortment of Mid-cen- certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week 06-20-5t half hour. Ongoing music camps. ing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, tury furniture. Room & Board camel We deliver to ALL of Princeton as www.elegantdesignhandyman.com leather sofa & chair. Bulthaup dining table, 2 benches & 2 arm chairs. 10’4”x18’3” Sarouk carpet, white loveseat, Vuarnesson coffee table, 4 Italian black leather & chrome chairs, pair of Savonarola chairs. Decorative accessories, bike, outdoor furniture, generator, etc. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-11 FANTASTIC ANTIQUE TOOL SALE: Many tools. 173 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. Saturday, July 14 starting at 10 am until...Enter rear of house. 07-11 ART–PLUS GARAGE SALE: Saturday, July 21. Unique selection of artwork of all genres & sizes. Painting & prints. Framed & unframed. Other decorative items like small sculptures. Small number of dessert plates, cocktail glasses & vintage serving pieces. For more information & location see www.princetonartsale. com 07-11 HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 06-13-5t

Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING:

Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

HOUSE FOR RENT:

tf

with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. (609) 731-6904. 06-27-3t

ELDER CARE AVAILABLE: Compassionate caregiver with over 30 years experience. Own transportation, references available. (609) 883-0296. 06-27-4t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. 05-30-9t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-04-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 07-04-4t 4/5 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,090 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 06-27-6t PAINTING BY PAUL LLC: Interior, exterior. Wallpaper removal, light carpentry, power washing, deck staining, renovation of kitchen cabinets. Free estimates. Fully insured. Local references. Cell (609) 468-2433. Email paulkowalski00@gmail.com 06-20-8t

well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

tf PRINCETON RENTALS: 253Nassau.com Downtown Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Luxury Apts. All Amenities.

07-19-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted.

217 Nassau Apt 2. Spacious 2 Bedroom Unit. Laundry, Private Deck.

Pillows, cushions, table linens,

211 Nassau Apt 2. Spacious 1 Bedroom Unit.

window treatments, and bedding.

Weinberg Management, Exclusive Broker. Text (609) 731-1630. WMC@collegetown.com 07-11-tf PRINCETON COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE: 220 Alexander Street. Excellent Location, First Level. ~900 SF, $2,500/mo. Weinberg Management, (609) 731-1630. 07-11-tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

“Your true home is in the here and the now."

—Thich Nhat Hanh

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18

12-31-18

windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 TK PAINTING:

Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info!

07-04-19

Town Topics — Tops for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is THE preferred resource for weekly real estate offerings in the greater Princeton area and beyond. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $23.95 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $61.00 • 4 weeks: $78 • 6 weeks: $116 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $34

tf


Listed by Robin Wallack • Direct dial 683-8505 or 924-1600 ext. 8505 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

MAIN STREET All the charm of a vintage house with all the creature comforts of today combine to create a once in a lifetime house where memories are made! Gorgeous grounds, top-of -the-line upgrades, and thoughtful additions make this a house not to be missed. Twelve rooms include five bedrooms, four and one half baths, formal living room and dining room, and great room/ family room. All of these rooms have wood floors and plenty of wonderful windows. The piece-de-resistance is the kitchen, with a mudroom having built-in benches and cubbies, and a heated floor! The large kitchen itself has an island with marble top and granite counters, Wolf 6 burner stove, Miele dishwasher, Sub-Zero refrigerator and wine cooler, and more. Breakfast room has French doors to the deck, and gas fireplace. Every room offers something special. One of Lawrenceville’s premier properties. $999,999

POTTERS RUN Located in one of Princeton’s popular Toll Brothers communities, this ten-room colonial offers oak floors in virtually every public room. Two-storey entry has curved staircase, emphasizing the elegance of the floor plan. Opening on one side to the living room, and the other to the formal dining room, guests and family have plenty of room to socialize, and the family room encourages exactly this, having a fireplace, wet bar, built-in bookcases, and a door to the back yard. The kitchen has granite counters and stainless appliances, with a stepdown breakfast room featuring volume ceiling and sliding glass doors to the patio. Also on the main level is a private study. A wonderful home, it is on a cul-de-sac in the Johnson Park elementary school district, close to Marquand Park and all that Princeton has to offer. $999,000

AUDUBON LANE This custom colonial is no cookie-cutter house! Eleven rooms offer special features and lots of space. Situated perfectly on over two acres, this Princeton property has glowing oak floors throughout. A spacious family room has a cathedral ceiling and skylights, stone surround fireplace, recessed lights, wonderful built-in shelves and window seats, and walls of windows. On this level is also a large master bedroom addition, having yet another fireplace, vaulted ceiling, skylight, and a sybaritic bathroom, complete with jetted tub, granite counters, tumbled marble and a heated floor! A charming gallery has French doors to the bluestone patio. Four additional bedrooms and a Juliet balcony make this a superior offering. $1,349,000

CAMERON COURT Step right up to easy living in Queenston Common’s sought-after townhouse community right in the heart of Princeton. Beautifully appointed, with updated kitchen (granite counters, wood floor, recessed and under-counter lighting, and secret peninsula storage), this two-bedroom “unit” is spacious, beautifully landscaped, and overlooks a small stream of Harry’s Brook. How pleasant it will be to sit on the deck, read your book, and hear the birds! The open living room /dining room has a new gas fireplace. Lower level offers many options --game room, family room or even space for guests. Master bedroom has walk-in closet and updated bath. Custom storage and more. Community amenities include a pool and tennis court. Right near the bus to Manhattan and close to Littlebrook School. $655,000

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

www.robinwallack.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 32

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 06-13-5t

AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18 MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 06-27-3t

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf

“Always Professional, Always Personal”

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18

TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

Notice of Application to Establish a Branch

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BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18

The Bryn Mawr Trust Company 801 Lancaster Avenue Bryn Mawr, PA 19101 Intends to apply to the Federal Reserve System for permission to establish a branch office at 53 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542, Mercer County. The Federal Reserve System considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application, in writing, to the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Ten Independence Mall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106. The comment period will not end before July 26, 2018, and may be somewhat longer. The Federal Reserve Board’s Policy Statement regarding notice of applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on application, contact Mr. William T. Wisser, Vice President, at 215-574-7267. The Federal Reserve System will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are received by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia on or before the last date of the comment period.

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Notice of Filing an Application Notice is hereby given that on July 11, 2018, The Bryn Mawr Trust Company, with its principal place of business located at 801 Lancaster Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, PA 19101, filed with the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities an application for a Letter of Authority to establish a branch at 53 Hulfish Street, Princeton, Mercer County, NJ 08542. All interested persons may file comments regarding this application, in writing, with the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities, Corporate Applications Division, 17 North Second Street, Suite 1300, Harrisburg, PA 17101-2290. In order to be considered, comments regarding this application must be received by the Department of Banking and Securities no later than ten (10) business days after the date of publication.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

LOVELY IN LAWRENCE Tired of mowing grass and shoveling snow? Just picture yourself in this 2 bedroom, 2 bath top-floor condominium where the livin’ is easy. Cathedral ceilings, skylights, balcony, fireplace, Association pool and tennis court, offer cool and convenience. $195,500 www.stockton-realtor.com

Think Global ~ Buy Local Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

609-452-2630

MFG., CO.


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GIRLS’ VARSITY HEAD LACROSSE COACH: The Hun School of Princeton has an immediate need for a Girls’ Varsity Head Lacrosse Coach. Email resume to: hr@hunschool.org 07-11-3t

POSITIONS AT SANTÉ INTEGRATIVE PHARMACY: We are looking for skincare consultants & health and wellness experts to join the team in our beautiful store. If you’re upbeat, passionate about wellness & looking for the chance to help others make good choices about their health, we’d love to hear from you. No walk-ins please. Interested applicants should send a resume to info@santeintegrativepharmacy.com 07-11

Middle of the Night Can’t Find Your Town Topics!

Take a stroll down to our previous office at 4 Mercer Street or come to our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, where you can purchase a copy for 75 cents (3 quarters required) from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

SERVI

SWIMMING BLACKMAN POOL SERVICE LANDSCAPING Since 1955 FRESH IDEAS

908-359-3000

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

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A Town Topics Directory

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE Since 1955

Witherspoon Media Group

908-359-3000 American Furniture Exchange

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters

melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Family Owned and Operated

FLESCH’S ROOF FLESCH’S ROOFING Family Owned and Op & Metal Sheet Metal & Sheet Co., Inc Family Owned andCo. Operated

FLESCH’S ROO & Sheet Metal

· Postcards

For additional info contact:

James E. Geisenhoner

INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK ).34)454)/.!,s2%3)$%.4)!,s()34

30 Years of Experience!

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

· Annual Reports

Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

FLESCH’S RO

· Brochures

· Catalogues

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC.

Serving the Princeton Serving the Princeton community for 25 yearscommunity for over

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

· Books

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

THANK YOU FOR BEST &VOTING Sheet Metal Co Serving US the Princeton communit Serving the Princeton community for o ROOFING COMPANY ).34)454)/.!,s2%3)$%.4)!,

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Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

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Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

We also do Gutter work and Roof Maintenance

Slate ✧ Copper

&2%%%34)-!4%3s15! Rubber ✧ Shingles

Metal and Cedar Roofing

609-3

FREE ESTIMATES • QUALITY SERVICE • REPAIR WORK

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LIC#13VH02047300

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018 • 34

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

PRINCETON RENTALS:

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

253Nassau.com Downtown Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Luxury Apts. All Amenities.

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19

217 Nassau Apt 2. Spacious 2 Bedroom Unit. Laundry, Private Deck. 211 Nassau Apt 2. Spacious 1 Bedroom Unit. Weinberg Management, Exclusive Broker. Text (609) 731-1630. WMC@collegetown.com 07-11-tf

REDUCING YOUR ENERGY BILL ON A BUDGET There is nothing better than stepping into a cool building after being outside on a hot summer day. But this refreshing feeling also means a high, and growing, energy bill. Though most people believe their homes are already energy efficient, energy-saving efforts may not be paying off as much as you had hoped. Even if your home is newer (less than 30 years old) and built to code, newer homes can still benefit from energysaving improvements. Some expensive improvements like replacing windows are thought to be the best way to reduce energy consumption, but will not reduce your energy bill as significantly as you hope. One D.I.Y. strategy to noticeably reduce your energy bill is to caulk and seal plumbing lines, electric wires, windows, crawlspaces, and attics with a foam sealant. Or, a professional can seal ductwork and revamp your HVAC. Another strategy to reduce your energy bill is to program your thermostat so that the AC/heat is not blasting when your home is empty during the day.

PRINCETON COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE: 220 Alexander Street. Excellent Location, First Level. ~900 SF, $2,500/mo. Weinberg Management, (609) 731-1630. 07-11-tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

These tips will keep your home at a comfortable temperature while cutting down on your energy costs.

Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

609-921-1900 ● 609-577-2989 (cell) ● info@BeatriceBloom.com ● BeatriceBloom.com Facebook.com/PrincetonNJRealEstate ● twitter.com/PrincetonHome ● BlogPrincetonHome.com

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 05-16/08-01

SELL YOUR HOME NOW • WE PAY CASH

• NO HOMEOWNER INSPECTION

• WE PAY TOP DOLLAR

• NO REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS

• WE BUY HOMES IN ANY CONDITION

• NO HIDDEN COSTS

• WE BUY VACANT LAND

• NO HASSLE

• QUICK AND EASY CLOSING

• FREE NO OBLIGATION QUOTE

Phone 609-430-3080

www.heritagehomesprinceton.com igorbar2000@gmail.com Igor L. Barsky, Lawrence Barsky STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf YARD SALE +

= GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10 tf PRINCETON MOVING SALE: Friday July 13 from 9:30-2 & Saturday July 14 from 9:30-3. 20 Alexander Street. Nice assortment of Mid-century furniture. Room & Board camel leather sofa & chair. Bulthaup dining table, 2 benches & 2 arm chairs. 10’4”x18’3” Sarouk carpet, white loveseat, Vuarnesson coffee table, 4 Italian black leather & chrome chairs, pair of Savonarola chairs. Decorative accessories, bike, outdoor furniture, generator, etc. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 07-11 FANTASTIC ANTIQUE TOOL SALE: Many tools. 173 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. Saturday, July 14 starting at 10 am until...Enter rear of house. 07-11

HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 06-13-5t HOUSE FOR RENT:

www.stockton-realtor.com

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf ELDER CARE AVAILABLE: Compassionate caregiver with over 30 years experience. Own transportation, references available. (609) 883-0296. 06-27-4t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 06-13-6t OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 06-20-5t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. 05-30-9t

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED

ART–PLUS GARAGE SALE: Saturday, July 21. Unique selection of artwork of all genres & sizes. Painting & prints. Framed & unframed. Other decorative items like small sculptures. Small number of dessert plates, cocktail glasses & vintage serving pieces. For more information & location see www.princetonartsale. com 07-11

On a tree-lined street in Lawrence Township, this charming house would be a great place to celebrate summer BBQs in the big backyard. The enclosed front porch leads to a sunny living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen and half bath. Upstairs 3 bedrooms and full bath. In addition there is a finished third floor which can be used as an office or playroom. A pleasing house offered at a very pleasing price. $255,000

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. (609) 731-6904. 06-27-3t MACK’S WINDOW CLEANING: Windows & storm windows. Inside & out. $9 each window. Fully insured. All work guaranteed. Call (609) 9241404 or (609) 393-2122. 06-27-3t

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 07-04-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 07-04-4t 4/5 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,090 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 06-27-6t PAINTING BY PAUL LLC: Interior, exterior. Wallpaper removal, light carpentry, power washing, deck staining, renovation of kitchen cabinets. Free estimates. Fully insured. Local references. Cell (609) 468-2433. Email paulkowalski00@gmail.com 06-20-8t PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Contact Liz: (609) 5140514; ez@zuckfish.com 05-23-12t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf


Mortgage

NEW PRICE

Insurance

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2018

Real Estate

Realt

Closing Services

AMAZING PRINCETON HOME

HOPEWELL TWP. $530,000 Fantastic home near downtown Pennington & Princeton. New Roof! 1-year old septic system! Completely renovated and set on 3 beautiful acres. This 4 bedroom, 3-full bath home is waiting for you.

PRINCETON $1,450,000 Beautifully appointed 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath Colonial in desirable Ettl Farm, backing to open common area. Gourmet kitchen with granite counters, open to vaulted family room. Hardwood floors. Rent for $8,000/mo.

Eric Payne 609-955-1310 (cell)

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

RIVERSIDE HOME

FANTASTIC CONTEMPORARY

PRINCETON $1,099,000 Immaculately maintained home. Renovated kitchen and bathrooms. Oversized bluestone patio and amazing back yard. Located in the Riverside neighborhood.

PRINCETON $1,015,000 A bright, sunlit Contemporary with a newly installed kitchen that has an island breakfast bar. Hardwood floors throughout second floor & most of the first floor. Also a 2-car attached garage.

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell) and Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW PRICE

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM

PRINCETON $625,000 Move right into this 3 bedroom and 2 bath home. Adorable & efficient “Cotswold Cottage” in Riverside on a beautiful property within reach of Carnegie Lake. Features formal living room with hardwood floors.

TITUSVILLE $700,000 Custom-built classic, 4BR, 2.5BA Colonial, large kitchen with breakfast area, hardwood on first floor. Stunning family room with soaring ceiling, fireplace and deck access. Dir: 422 Pennington-Titusville Road.

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Katherine Pease 609-577-6598 (cell)

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

R E A L T O R S

®


CB Princeton Town Topics 7.11.18.qxp_CB Previews 7/10/18 1:42 PM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEWLY PRICED

Cranbury Twp | 4 / 4.5 | $1,150,000 7 Shady Brook Lane

Hopewell Twp | 4 / 4 | $825,000 75 Van Dyke Road

Cranbury Twp | 4 / 2.5 | $795,000 3 Monroe Place

Deanna Anderson Search MLS 1001987646 on CBHomes.com

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1000406252 on CBHomes.com

Deanna Anderson Search MLS 1001992968 on CBHomes.com

NEW LISTING

NEWLY PRICED

NEW LISTING

Plainsboro Twp | 4 / 2.5 | $690,000 24 Franklin Drive

Hopewell Twp | 4 / 2.5 | $599,999 3 Van Dyke Road

Hopewell Twp | 3 / 2.5 | $389,000 251 Brinley Drive

Maureen Troiano Search MLS 1002002482 on CBHomes.com

Rosaria Lawlor Search MLS 1001839176 on CBHomes.com

Ziqi "Lynn" Li Search MLS 1001818254 on CBHomes.com

NEW LISTING

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

NEW LISTING

Lawrence Twp | 3/2.5 | $365,000 176 Fountayne Lane

Lawrence Twp | 2/2.5 | $315,000 6 Marilyn Court

Franklin Township | 2 / 2.5 | $265,000 129 Bayberry Drive

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1001994464 on CBHomes.com

Roswitha "Rose" Cianfrani Search MLS 1000469356 on CBHomes.com

Armando Perez Search MLS 1001942940 on CBHomes.com

COLDWELLBANKERHOMES.COM/PRINCETON Princeton Office 10 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1411 Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. All associates featured are licensed with NJ Department of State as a Broker or Salesperson. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper July 11, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper July 11, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group