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Volume LXXIII, Number 14

PU Senior Chen Shares Musical Knowledge with Trenton Students . . . . . . .5 New Era, New Location for Chabad Center . . . . . . . .12 Nuclear Weapons Experts Speak at CFPA Gathering . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Celebrating Brando’s One-Eyed Jacks . . . . . . .21 Capuano Excited to Take Helm of PHS Baseball . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Goalie Craven Stars as Hun Boys’ Lax Produces 2-0 Start . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Legendary Lax Coach Tierney Makes PU Homecoming . . . . . . . 37 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .16, 17 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 35 Classified Ads . . . . . . 47 Dining & Entertainment . . . 33 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Music/Theater . . . . . . 22 New To Us . . . . . . . 28, 29 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 45 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 6 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 47 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Wilson’s Mixed Legacy To Be Embodied In Upcoming Sculpture

Commissioned by Princeton University to create a work of art capturing both the positive and negative sides of Woodrow Wilson’s legacy, acclaimed African American artist Walter Hood recalled when he was a young man leaving for college, “My father said to me, ‘Junior, you’re going to have to be both black and white when you go out there, a double consciousness, navigating the world through the eyes of others.’’’ Double Consciousness, drawn from W.E.B. Du Bois’ Souls of Black Folk, will be the title of Hood’s sculpture that will be installed this summer adjacent to the fountain on the Washington Road side of the plaza of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (WWS). Hood will present a free, public lecture about the value of public art in helping us reflect on our past at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 4, at the Friend Center, Room 101, co-sponsored by the WWS and the Campus Iconography Committee. Reflecting on the concept of “two-ness” in a TED Talk last year about public spaces reclaiming the past and embracing the future, Hood continued, “W.E.B. Du Bois said it’s this peculiar sensation that the Negro has to walk around being viewed through the lens of other people — this two-ness, this double consciousness.” In commenting on the Wilson installation in a Princeton University press release, Hood explained, “This peculiar and burdensome condition that affects African Americans is re-appropriated here as a method and framework for critique, lining up positive and negative aspects of Wilson’s legacy side by side. A progressive to some and a bigot to others, Wilson left a complex legacy this installation aims to capture.” Double Consciousness will be a 39-foot-high vertical sculpture of two columns, one leaning on the other, with black-and-white stone surfaces bearing quotations that represent both sides of Wilson’s mixed legacy. Two vertical planes face each other at the sculpture’s center, one reflective stainless steel and the other glass with images of Wilson’s critics. In April 2016 the University’s board of trustees adopted a report and recommendations made by the Wilson Legacy Review Committee on how the University Continued on Page 10

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Discord Continues Over Choir College Sale The struggles continue between the administration of Rider University, which wants to sell Westminster Choir College (WCC) to a Chinese company, and those who oppose the plan because they fear it will mean the end of the renowned music school. Rider and WCC merged in 1991, and the University announced plans to sell the music school two years ago. Since naming Kaiwen Education, originally a bridge and steel company, as the buyer, Rider has been sued by two entities intent on stopping the sale. A meeting of the Choir College faculty was called for late Tuesday afternoon, April 2, by Marshall Onofrio, dean of the Westminster College of the Arts (at Rider University), but was cancelled at the last minute because a representative of Rider’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) said he was going to attend. Onofrio wanted the meeting limited to Westminster faculty members. “Marshall Onofrio sent an email to all of the Westminster faculty about this meeting, and the union asked me to attend as

a representative,” said Jeffrey Halpern, an associate professor in Rider’s Department of Sociology. “I sent him an email rather than just showing up, and he responded ‘You’re not invited.’ And I’m not paraphrasing.” While the subject of the meeting was not revealed, “In light of recent developments it is important that we all gather,” said Halpern. “Onofrio said, ‘This is not a bargaining session. It’s an opportunity for the community directly affected by

the situation to gather and talk, and you are not invited.’ I’ll go anyway, and talk to people going in and going out.” Onofrio’s letter cancelling the meeting said per University policy, he has the right to call a closed meeting “and there is clear guidance under the National Labor Relations Act about the conditions under which union leadership has the right to attend. This meeting does not fall under Continued on Page 8

Two Organizations Merge to Form Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber

The MIDJersey Chamber of Commerce (MJCC) and the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce (PRCC) have merged to become the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber (PMRC), the two groups announced last Thursday at a meeting at Mercer Oaks in West Windsor. The consolidation of the two chambers will create an organization that serves more than 10,000 individual contacts,

more than 1,600 member companies, and a network of more than 350,000 employees. The new chamber will be the largest regional chamber in the state. The combined organization is expected to save companies and individuals money that has been spent on duplication of membership costs and programming, and, as Peter Crowley, president and CEO of the newly established PMRC Continued on Page 11

ARTJAM ON PALMER SQUARE: HomeFront’s 10th Annual ArtJam, featuring works by more than 125 artists, runs through April 16 in a pop-up gallery at 19 Hulfish Street . The event brings together professional artists, undiscovered artists who have experienced homelessness, and the community in a celebration of creativity . Proceeds benefit ArtSpace, HomeFront’s therapeutic art program . (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 2

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UPCOMING HEALTH PROGRAMS Unless otherwise noted, call 609.394.4153 or visit capitalhealth.org/events to sign up for the following programs.

TIME FOR CHANGE: Understanding Menopause Wednesday, April 10, 2019 | 6 p.m. Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center To learn more about this shared experience in women’s health, join DR. VICTORIA PETTY, a board certified gynecologist from Capital Health Gynecology, for a discussion of menopause causes, symptoms and treatment options. AARP SMART DRIVER COURSE Thursday, April 11, 2019 | 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Capital Health – Hamilton The AARP Smart Driver course teaches valuable defensive driving strategies and provides a refresher of the rules of the road. You must be 18 years of age or older and have a valid driver’s license to attend this course. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. FLUSH COLON CANCER: Know Your Risk Factors, Screening Guidelines and Treatment Options Thursday, April 11, 2019 | 6 p.m. Capital Health – Hamilton You’re invited to our discussion about colon cancer — risk factors, screening guidelines, and treatment options — led by fellowship trained gastroenterologist DR. JYOTI BHATIA from Mercer Gastroenterology. Melissa Phelps, a registered dietitian and certified specialist in oncology nutrition at the Capital Health Cancer Center, will also discuss nutrition. TOTAL SHOULDER REPLACEMENTS Thursday, April 25, 2019 | 6 p.m. Capital Health – Hamilton Many people experience shoulder pain, but it can be caused by a range of conditions. DR. EVAN CONTE, a board certified orthopaedic surgeon at Rothman Orthopaedic Institute, will lead a discussion on common shoulder problems and injuries, their causes, and treatment options including shoulder replacements.

GUT REACTION: Current Medical Management Options for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Monday, April 29, 2019 | 6 p.m. Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center If you are living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) — including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis — then you know about the belly pain, weight loss, and diarrhea that comes with it. Join DR. ANIL BALANI, a fellowship trained gastroenterologist and IBD specialist at Capital Health Center for Digestive Health, for a discussion of current, new, and upcoming medical therapies. DOCS ON THE TRAIL: Enjoying the Outdoors While Managing Your Joint Pain Tuesday, April 30, 2019 | 6 p.m. Hunt House Barn, Mercer Meadows If you’re living with arthritis or considering joint replacement surgery, join DR. ARJUN SAXENA from Trenton Orthopaedic Group at Rothman Orthopaedic Institute to learn how walking or biking can help you manage your pain and even help you recover from surgery. This will be followed by a two-mile hike into Rosedale Park led by DR. JILL YOUNG, a board certified family medicine physician at Capital Health Primary Care – Quakerbridge and trustee of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail. This event is free. PANCREATIC CANCER: Managing Risk, Making and Understanding a Diagnosis Wednesday, May 1, 2019 | 6 p.m. Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center Join DR. JASON ROGART, director of Interventional Gastroenterology & Therapeutic Endoscopy at the Capital Health Center for Digestive Health, and understand how pancreatic cancer is diagnosed and how doctors determine how advanced the disease is. A genetic counselor from our Cancer Center will discuss the important relationship between cancer and genetics and take you through what genetic counseling and testing is like.

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3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

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example, to check for card skimmers when they’re making routine gas station inspections,” Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes said. “I thank the Prosecutor’s Office for supporting this effort. We will continue to do everything we can to keep consumers from becoming innocent victims in our communities.” If a card skimmer is detected, the matter will be referred to the Prosecutor’s Office for further investigation. “A single compromised gas pump can capture data from 30 to 100 credit cards per day,” Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri said. “We are happy to do our part in taking a proactive approach to thwarting this type of criminal activity.” The county purchased the BlueSleuth devices from Berkeley Varitronics Systems of Metuchen at a cost of $995 apiece.

Reservations are open for the 20th Spring Wildflower Gala, held annually at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in Bucks County, Pa. The party is Saturday, April 27 and will feature woodland walks, a cocktail reception, live and silent auctions, a gourmet dinner, and dancing, all to benefit the organization. Auction highlights include a dinner for 10 prepared by Max Hansen at a local historic farm, a vacation timeshare at a villa in Orlando, original oil paintings by Gail Bessette and James Feehan, native spring flowers from the Preserve’s Native Plant Nursery, a week’s stay in Cancun or Los Cabos, jewelry from Diana Vincent, and more. To make reservations, visit www.bhwp.org.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin

HELPING HANDS: Seniors from Hightstown High School’s Peer Group Connection (PGC) recently spent a day working together towards goals at the Princeton-Blairstown Center (PBC). PBC staff worked to strengthen leadership, team building, and problem-solving skills with the students as they approach graduation, and prepare for challenges ahead.

Summer Jobs: Princeton is hiring youth 14-18 for summer employment in a variety of positions, at $15-$18 per hour. Visit princetonnj.gov for more information. Pool and Camp Registration is Open: To sign up for programs at Community Pool, youth and adult sports, day camps, travel, and more, visit princetonrecreation.com. Citizenship Classes: The Latin American Task Force offers classes to prepare immigrants for the Naturalization Interview required to become a U.S. citizen, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, Wednesdays from 7-8:30 p.m. for eight weeks starting April 30. Free. Call (609) 924-9529 ext. 1220. Special Working Session on Parking: Princeton Council will hold a meeting devoted entirely to the parking changes on Monday, April 15 at 7 p.m. in Witherspoon Hall. Free Income Tax Assistance: AARP Tax-Aide offers free tax preparation assistance at Princeton Senior Resource Center (609) 924-7108 and Nassau Presbyterian Church (bilingual assistance). Call for appointments at PSRC; walk-ins are welcome at the church. Stream Cleanup: Help the Princeton Environmental Commission and the Watershed Institute get Grover Park, 301 North Harrison Street, ready for spring on Saturday, April 6 from 9-11 a.m.

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PU Senior Shares Musical Knowledge With Trenton High School Students Lou Chen’s love affair with music has always been as much about empowering others as it has about the music itself. For the Princeton University senior, conducting an orchestra is a tool for community service. Chen was awarded the Pace Center for Civic En-

gagement’s prestigious A. James Fisher, Jr. Memorial Award last November for his work with the Trenton Yout h Orchestra ( T YO ), which he founded during his sophomore year. In the two years since, the ensemble has grown from six to 20 players, most of whom are students at Trenton Central High School. Joined by some fellow Princeton students, Chen meets with the Trenton musicians at the University’s Woolworth music building on Saturday mornings, giving them private lessons and rehearsing them for concerts.

TOPICS

laughing. “I always loved to conduct.” Chen studied piano and violin. “I was one of a very few students whose parents could afford private lessons,” he said. “I was in the school orchestra, and through my interactions with other students I was made aware of how privileged I was.” He insists that as a player, “I was genuinely not that good. I really wasn’t. It was conducting that I loved. When I was applying to Princeton, I actually wrote my essay about how conducting was my secret hobby.” Once accepted, Chen’s plan was to major at Princ-

It was during his freshman spring semester that Chen began exploring the idea of starting a youth orchestra. At Trenton High, he saw that Joseph Pucciatti and Norberto Diaz “were doing great work,” he said. “But they said the challenge was that the students just don’t get individual instruction. So I proposed the idea to the Pace Center (at Princeton), and they approved it. With some friends, I started the group and we began meeting with the students once a week.” The program continued while Chen took a year to study at the University of Oxford, during which he volu nteered at a home less shelter and played in a homeless orchestra. “We act ually w rote our ow n songs,” he said. “We had a final concert for the homeless community. These were not trained musicians, but somehow, we were making music together. It was wonderful.” Chen has found time to serve as a political intern via the Woodrow Wilson school. “I witnessed the Kavanaugh nomination to the Supreme Court. I was actually in the hearing,” he said. The 2018 -19 year has been especially frenetic, due to the University residency of famed conductor Gustavo Dudamel, himself a product and proponent of bringing music to underserved communities. The opportunity to watch Dudamel in action and work closely with him has been invaluable. “This happened to coincide with a big expansion of Continued on Next Page

Of the Town Testimonials on the TYO website attest to the impact of the program. “To say that I had an experience in the Trenton Youth Orchestra would be an understatement,” said student Grace Mitchell. “From the day I joined, I felt at home. Every practice brought something new to the table. TYO has changed my life in no way other than for the better, and has shaped me into a new person I wouldn’t be without it.” “My time in the Trenton Youth Orchestra and the day of the concert are my favorite memories,” said Melki Garcia-Perez. “The concert gave me the confidence to play in front of crowds even if I mess up. Basically, it gave me what I needed to keep moving forward with music.” Up on the podium, Chen gets as much out of the experience as his charges. “It’s easy to become jaded with music at Princeton, because there is just so much opportunity,” he said recently. “But these are beginning musicians. They are seeking artistic guidance, so they are more receptive than more experienced ones might be.They are always listening. There’s a reciprocity that is so invigorating. They energize me.” Music has been a par t of Chen’s life since he can remember. Growing up in San Bernardino, Calif., he was exposed to the classics early on. “My mother says I used to grab a chopstick and conduct whatever music they were playing,” he said,

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

CHARISMATIC CONDUCTOR: Princeton University senior Lou Chen spends Saturday mornings leading the Trenton Youth Orchestra in rehearsals at the University’s Woolworth music building. The ensemble, which he founded, has changed the students’ lives as well as his own. (Photo by Nick Donnoli)

e ton’s Wo o d row Wi ls on School of Public and International Affairs and minor in music. But one semester in, he changed his mind. “I thought what the heck, I’ll be a music major,” he said. “Cut to the chase.” Ch e n i m m e d iately s e t about finding what opportunities existed in conducting. During his freshman year, he became music director of the Princeton University Players. And he began to observe Ruth Ochs, who leads the Princeton Universit y Symphonia and is assistant conductor of the Princeton University Orchestra. Ochs soon invited Chen to become assistant conductor of the Symphonia. A few weeks ago, he conducted Brahms’ Academic Festival Overture as part of two programs by the University Orchestra. Of Ochs, Chen said, “She’s a wonderful, inspiring mentor, and I owe a lot to her.” Ochs is equally effusive about Chen. Recommending him for the Fisher award, which is given annually “to a graduating senior who demonstrates an entrepreneurial spirit, zest for life, love of people, and loyalty to Princeton through their work in the realm of civic engagement,” she wrote, “Lou Chen has been the single most remarkable undergraduate entrepreneur and service initiator in the realm of musical engagement whom I have encountered during my 16 -year career at Princeton University. In fact, as someone who grew up with a strong belief in and somewhat of a track record in service, Lou’s achievements blow my mind.”


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 6

Musical Knowledge Continued from Preceding Page

TYO,” Chen said. “So Marna (Seltzer, director of Princeton University Concerts) folded us into the residency. We have performed for him, and in January I served on a panel with him. He’s remarkable — energetic and open minded about classical music. He has real warmth, especially with kids. It can be really hard to establish that with kids, but he did it in a matter of minutes. He’s so authentic.” After graduation, Chen hopes to find a job in music outreach in New York or Philadelphia. “I have to be somewhere where I can continue overseeing TYO,” he said. “I will commute back every Saturday. I have to be able to keep doing this, because it is so important. I have no intention of abandoning them.” —Anne Levin

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Police Blotter On March 29, at 10:18 a.m., a victim reported that an unauthorized person attempted to conduct a $120,000 wire transfer with their business back account information and a forged signature. The transfer was halted and there was no monetary loss. On March 25, at 10:28 a.m., a 46-year-old male from Horsham, Pa., was arrested at police headquarters, subsequent to an investigation for passing a bad check on February 13. On March 25, at 12:36 p.m., a victim reported that, on March 23, at 6:51 p.m., a male entered a business on Nassau Street and purchased $74 worth of merchandise that he paid for with a counterfeit $100 bill. The business tried to deposit the money at the bank and was advised it was counterfeit. The suspect is described as a 6’ tall black male, 30-35 years old, with a thin build and wearing a blue stocking cap, a necklace, black-and-white Jordan XII sneakers, and a black T-shirt. On March 25, at 8:05 a.m., a caller reported that, sometime between March 23 at 8 p.m. and March 25 at 8 a.m., someone illegally dumped garbage into the dumpster of the business, filling it. This was the second weekend in a row that this occurred at this business on the 800 block of State Road, causing it to pay an extra waste removal fee. On March 23, at 10:33 a.m., a caller reported that, sometime between 11:50 p.m. on March 22 and 10:20 a.m. on March 23, someone forced entry through the rear door of a business on Nassau Street and stole several items. A safe, a shopping cart, and $3,192 in cash were stolen. On March 23, at 1:47 p.m., a resident of Gordon Way reported that on March 22, at 11 a.m. someone impersonating their grandson called them and stated he was arrested and needed $7,000 for bail. The victim sent the $7,000 in cash via FedEx to the individual they believed was a bondsman in Miami, Fla. The victim realized they were scammed when they spoke to their actual grandson the next day. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What are you looking forward to this spring?” (Photographs by Erica M. Cardenas)

Gaby: “Being outside and enjoying the sun.” Esther: “Playing tennis!” —Gaby Pollner, Boca Raton, Fla., with Esther Julis, Los Angeles

“Spending more time outdoors and going for walks.” —Lauren and Katie Baloni, Princeton

“This is Izzy — I got her about two months ago from an Arkansas rescue, and this is one of our first days out with good weather. I look forward to having more time to go out and play with her and take her to dog parks.” —Pooja Kapadia, Plainsboro

MENS & WOMENS

Delaney: “Enjoying the nice weather.” Ellen: “Spending time at the beach in Point Pleasant.” —Delaney St. Pierre, Colorado Springs, Colo., with Ellen Paddock, Buffalo, N.Y.

Isha: “Hanging outside and enjoying the weather.” Krish: “Playing soccer with friends, and it’s the beginning of tennis season.” —Isha and Krish Seth, Princeton


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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

WISHING YOU AND YOUR FAMILY A WONDERFUL EASTER!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 8

Westminster continued from page one

those conditions. Finally, there are elected AAUP representatives on the WCC faculty who have been invited. Most importantly, to change who is in the room will change the dialogue. I know this because you – the faculty – have said so over the years. This will not be the meeting I intended, at which I hoped that we truly would talk freely with one another.” The scheduling and cancelat ion of t he meet ing comes a week after a letter from the office of the New Jersey Attorney General to the New Jersey Chancery Court criticized Rider for its lack of compliance in record requests related to the University’s plan. Last June, just after the University signed an agreement with Kaiwen Education, the state sent 49 questions to Rider and asked for meeting minutes of the trustees over the past three years. D ate d M a r c h 27, t h e 35 -page analysis of the response reads, “Due to Rider’s six month delay in producing documents and eventual production of documents so heavily redacted

as to hamper review, the Attorney General’s review of the sale is incomplete of this date and the state is not yet able to make a recommendation.” Rider had declined to release the contents of the sale agreement with Kaiwen over the past several months, but had assured the Westminster community that Kaiwen would be required to keep the school running for up to 10 years. After an Open Public Records Act (OPRA) request was filed by the Westminster Foundation, language was revealed stating that Kaiwen would be permitted to close Westminster any time after it is sold, if it decides that operating the college is “impracticable” or “economicallly unfeasible.” Responding to the reaction to the document, Rider President Gregory Dell’Omo and Board of Trustees President Robert S. Schimek sent a letter to the Rider and Westminster communities saying that the legal issues that are part of the pending lawsuits are rooted in the 1991 transactions, “the contracts and deeds that effectuated the transactions, and the fact that Westminster is not selfsupporting and Rider can no longer afford to dedicate the financial resources needed to maintain it.” The letter continues, “Rider’s goal to sustain Westminster remains, however, and the proposed transaction is

intended to keep Westminster operating in Princeton with a different owner possessing the resources to make the financial investments that Westminster requires.” A court conference on the issue is scheduled for April 15. —Anne Levin

Bierman To Run for Council as Independent

Adam Bierman has announced that he will run as an Independent for Princeton Council in the November 5 election. Bierman said he believes the voters need a choice for this office that brings a fresh view to municipal issues. Last month Bierman boycotted the Princeton Community Democratic Organization’s endorsement process because of “pay-to-play and neighborhood diversity issues.” He said he will continue to question past practices of municipal government that do not advance the welfare of Princeton’s citizens. “Priorities of Princeton should be schools. safety, taxes, and housing,” said Bierman. “Too often there is inaction by Council members. We need to send them a message.” Beir man said t hat t he goals of his campaign are “competence for municipal projects, transparency for all public undertakings, and fiscal determination to make Princeton livable for all.”

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Wishing You A Joyful Passover Season & Happiness All Through The Year!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 10

Woodrow Wilson

m o M e +M

continued from page one

&

I N P G P O H S PREE S

should recognize Wilson’s legacy, including placement of a permanent “marker” on the WWS plaza. T he tr ustee commit tee acknowledged widespread concer ns about Wilson’s views on race and noted in its report “particular concern” about “the position he took as Princeton University president to prevent the enrollment of black students and the policies he instituted as U.S. president that resulted in the re-segregation of the federal civil service.” The committee declined to rename the WWS or the Wilson residential college, but called for “transparency in recognizing Wilson’s failings and shortcomings” and noted “larger concerns

about the University’s commitment to diversity and inclusivity.” Hood, who was selected by a Universit y com mittee after a competition in which eight different firms presented proposals, has convened focus groups of students, faculty, staff, and alumni as well as members from the Campus iconography Committee over the past two years to inform his thinking about the content and imagery on the Double Consciousness sculpture. Cr e at i v e d i r e c tor a n d founder of Hood Design Studio in Oakland, Calif., Hood is a professor at the Universit y of Califor nia, Berkeley and was a recipient of the 2017 Academy of Arts and Letters Architecture Award. Speaking in his TED Talk about the dangers of trying

to narrow things down to one set of identities, Hood stated, “We can allow two things to be unresolved. I want to live in a world where there’s an ambiguity between two things, because that ambiguity allows us to have a conversation. When things are clear and defined, we forget.” —Donald Gilpin

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continued from page one

pointed out, these funds can be reallocated to additional economic growth, nonprofit organizations in the region, or reinvested in new employees. Crowley further emphasized the importance of the unification. “We will now have one voice speaking for the area’s businesses, and it will provide a larger perspective for people to listen to,” he said. In a letter to members of the two merging chambers, Crowley wrote, “Working together for over a year, our chambers have now joined and created a dynamic, forwardthinking organization that is rich in history, yet evolving to meet the changing needs of a diverse, innovative, and vibrant business community. MIDJersey’s 150-year legacy of regional support, coupled with Princeton’s international

reputation and the Princeton Regional Chamber’s business and educational programs, creates a powerful voice for our business community.” The announcement was made jointly by John Goedecke, chairman of the PRCC, and Jeannine Cimino, chairperson of the MJCC. Goedecke will continue as chairman of the new PMRC through the end of 2019 when his term expires, and Brenda Ross-Dulan will assume the chairperson’s responsibilities in January 2020. Cimino and Bill Rue are vice-chairpersons of the new organization. “The consolidation brings unparalleled business support, increased visibility, and robust networking opportunities to our members and partners, as well as significant time and cost savings to the many companies in the region who were members of both chambers,” Goedecke said.

The PMRC will continue to coordinate more than 115 targeted workshop-style programs a year, including networking and educational events, highlighting industry segments and issues such as independent businesses, women in business, real estate, nonprofits, young professionals, international business, travel and tourism, economic development, technology, diversity and inclusion, and the New Jersey Entrepreneurial Network. The Chamber’s headquarters are in Princeton, and will be moving later this month from Nassau Street offices to 600 Alexander Road. “We need more space as we continue to grow dramatically,” Crowley noted, “and parking will be easier with a large parking lot.” The PMRC will serve clients from Mercer and surrounding counties, including Monmouth, Burlington, Somerset, Middle-

sex, Hunterdon, and Bucks in Pa., with outreach to regional chamber partners throughout Central New Jersey. “This is an exciting day for the business community in the greater Mercer County region, which only stands to benefit from this new collective voice and vision,” said New Jersey Business & Industry Association President Michele Siekerka. “We look forward to working with this dynamic group to mutally promote an environment for business growth in the region and across the state.” —Donald Gilpin

F O R

O V E R

1 0 0

“This award is really for the community that has made the LHT possible — the current and past members of our board, the elected and career officials in both towns and at the county, and the many people who support the LHT as volunteers or donors. The best part is that the idea behind the LHT can be replicated anywhere. We hope that this award will generate interest in creating such trails throughout New Jersey.

New Jersey Future Honors 22-Mile Trail

New Jersey Future has named the Lawrence Hopewell Trail (LHT) a winner of its 2019 Smart Growth Awards competition, recognizing the 22-mile LHT for its success at providing a new, safe, and environmentally-sound means of transportation between communities, businesses, and public spaces in the region. The Smart Growth Awards highlight and honor projects that represent the best examples of sustainable growth and development in New Jersey. The LHT won the award for its grass-roots-driven effort to provide a means of connecting to communities, businesses, and public spaces throughout the region without an automobile. It makes bicycling and walking safe, convenient, fun, and immensely practical transportation choices, and creates multiple recreation opportunities and commuting alternatives for area residents. The LHT, which attracts about 400,000 users per year, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MERGER: Chamber leaders John Goedecke and Jeannine Cimino un- does not own any section veil the logo for the newly formed Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber at a meeting last Thurs- of the trail itself. Instead, it day at Mercer Oaks in West Windsor. (Photo courtesy of Matt Pilsner Photography) formed partnerships with and

T R U S T E D

between numerous public and private entities that own land on which the trail was envisioned. Businesses, educational institutions, state and local government agencies, and private landowners all collaborated to make the trail available to the public as part of their commitment to our community. “We’re honored to be the recipient of one of the most coveted awards in New Jersey,” said Becky Taylor, founder and co-president of the LHT.

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Chamber Merger

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 12

Spring Holiday Menu Starters

Cream of Asparagus Soup • $9.25/24 oz. Fresh Pea & Mint Soup • $8.25/24 oz. Chicken Consommé • $9.25/24 oz. Matzo Balls • $1.75 each / Deviled Eggs • $11.95/dz. Roasted Shrimp Cocktail • $28.95/lb Chopped Chicken Liver • $9.95/lb

Sides

Steamed Asparagus w/ Lemon Zest & Olive Oil • $12.25/lb. Sautéed Snap Peas & Spring Pea Shoots • $12.25/lb. Green Beans w/ Shallots & Mushrooms • $10.25/lb. Oven Roasted Fingerling Potatoes w/ Fresh Rosemary • $10.25/lb. Wild Rice w/ Scallions, Oranges & Pecans • $10.95/lb. Spring Vegetable Risotto • $10.25/lb. Honey Glazed Roasted Carrots • $10.25/lb. Beet & Carrot Salad w/ Walnuts • $12.25/lb. Tzimmes (carrots, sweet potatoes & dried fruit) • $10.25/lb. Vegetable Potato Kugel • $3.95/ea. or $50.00/tray

Entrées

Brisket of Beef w/ Caramelized Onions & Carrots • $29.25/lb. Boneless Chicken Breast w/ Dates, Green Olives & Capers • $16.25/lb. Caramelized Onion Smothered Chicken • $16.25/lb. Pancetta Wrapped Pork Loin w/ Apple Chutney • $15.25/lb. Pan Seared Salmon w/ Spring Onion Sauce • $30.95/lb. Spinach & Spring Onion Frittata (serves 12) • $45.00 Lamb Shanks • $16.95 ea. / Fried Chicken • $14.95/lb.

A New Era for Chabad Center In a Spacious New Location It has taken more than a decade, but the David & Rose Celler Princeton Chabad Center is finally open on Route 206. The organization, formerly located in a house on Route 27, has moved in to its new digs, in time for Passover. “We will have full Seders on April 19 and 20,” said Rabbi David Dubov, the director of Chabad of Greater Mercer County. “They are open to the community and we hope to welcome many people.” T h e t wo bu i ld i ngs on 18.46 acre s are acros s Route 206 ( State Road ) from Griggs Farm. There is plenty of room for Friday night and Saturday morning services, Sunday morning Hebrew school classes, and adult education sessions. There is a large multi-purpose room. A bride’s room and guest rooms are on the upper floor, for people who want to spend the night. Dubov is especially proud of the new mikvah, or ritual bath. “Most mikvahs have

tiles, but this is all marble,” he said. “It was donated to us by an Italian company i n Trenton, Stone Tech Fabrication. It’s the beautiful marble that makes it unique.” Chabad of Pr inceton purchased the land for the new location in 2004. The official opening is set for September 22, when a big celebration in honor of Dr. Leonard Baum will be held. In the meantime, Dubov is looking forward to a large turnout at the upcoming Seders, for which guests can sign up at princetonchabad. org. “My goal is that this edifice should reach and enrich as many Jews as possible,” said Dubov. “That’s our greatest joy, to reach people physically and spiritually.” Chabad is an alternative to traditional Jewish affiliation, described on chabad. org as “a major movement w it hin mainstream Jewish tradition with its roots in the Chassidic movement of the 18th century.” There

are nine local branches of Chabad, including South Brunswick, Monroe Township, the Windsors, Hami l to n / R o b b i n s v i l l e , T h e College of New Jers ey, Princeton University, the Friendship Circle of Greater Mercer County, Princeton, and Lawrenceville. “The policy of Chabad is to tell people they don’t need to be members of pay dues, though people do give charity,” said Dubov. “We love all Jews equally. We don’t believe in Reform, Conservative, or Orthodox classifications. These are names that sometimes divide our people.” Chabad is an acronym in Hebrew for wisdom, understanding, and knowledge, Dubov said. The organization is currently involved in helping the elderly victims of the massacre at Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh last October. “We want to serve the elderly here and in communities all over,” Dubov said. “That is a big part of our mission.” —Anne Levin

Desserts

6” Coconut or Lemon Cake • $35.00 Coconut or Lemon Cupcakes • $3.00/ea. Easter Sugar Cookies $15.00/dz 6” Chocolate or Traditional Cheesecake • $16.95 Plain & Chocolate Covered Macaroons • $3.00 ea. Chocolate Dipped Matzo “Bark” w/ Dried Fruit • $8.95 box Flourless Chocolate Torte • $28.00 each (serves 8) Dried Apricot Almond Torte • $32.00 each (serves 12) Assorted Brownie Platter (24 pc.) • $50.00

Specialty Items

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Place your orders early! Orders can be picked up on:

Friday, April 19th after 2 PM Saturday, April 20th from 11 AM - 4 PM For latecomers, items will be available in our prepared foods case after 2:00 PM.

Closed Easter Sunday

A NEW HOME: The Princeton Chabad Center has moved to expansive headquarters set on 18 acres on Route 206. An all-marble mikvah, or ritual bath, is among its unique features. Future plans include facilities for summer camp.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 14

Nuclear Weapons Experts Speak At CFPA Membership Gathering Reduce the danger of nuclear weapons was the message at the Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) membership renewal gathering Sunday, March 31 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton. A crowd of about 75 CFPA members heard three nuclear weapons experts — Zia Mian, co-director of Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security; Rob Goldston, Princeton University physicist; and Lydia Wood, campaign coordinator at NuclearBan.US — present the case for nuclear disarmament and the means to achieve it. CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore introduced the speakers and moderated the proceedings. Mian, a physicist originally

from Pakistan, focused his remarks on a resolution, AR 230, currently in the New Jersey Assembly, urging the federal government to ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and to pursue other measures to reduce the danger of nuclear war. The resolution passed a committee hearing on March 11 and will be going to a full vote of the Assembly. Mian pointed out that N.J. could be the second state after California to pass such a resolution. “People need to talk to their elected officials,” he added, noting that Massachusetts is currently working on a similar proposal and a number of municipalities have passed resolutions urging the U.S. government to adopt antinuclear weapons policies.

Mian is currently working on an op-ed article advocating a policy of no first-use of nuclear weapons. “The catastrophic scale of death and destruction could destroy modern civilization and condemn millions to destruction and death,” he said. Seventy countries have signed the 2017 agreement to prohibit nuclear weapons, but the U.S. has remained opposed. Goldston zeroed in on his new idea, which he recently presented in an article in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. A nuclear declaratory policy, he claimed, can significantly reduce the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons. “Any use of nuclear weapons could quickly lead to planetary catastrophe,” he said. To mitigate the risk of nuclear

war, Goldston stated, the nine countries with nuclear weapons should state what they will and won’t do in the face of threats to their security or the security of an ally. In promoting the idea of a nuclear declaratory policy, Goldston said, “The goal should be elimination of all nuclear weapons. That’s the direction we want to move in.” Currently the U.S. is committed to the option of using nuclear weapons to protect vital interests of the U.S. or its allies, but Goldston called for the policy to move towards allowing nuclear weapons only as a defensive last resort, then adding a commitment to no first use. Wood, whose organization was formed in the wake of the United Nations 2017 Nuclear Ban Treaty, is working to educate and mobilize people in support of that treaty. She outlined a number of initiatives designed to progress towards abolition of nuclear arms. “We need to include the younger group and we need to mobilize and bring back a grassroots movement in support of this treaty,” she said. Emphasizing the number of nuclear weapons “on hair-trigger alert,” ready to be launched in minutes, and the high potential for errors in judgement or technology, Wood criticized “the imperialistic and patriarchal undertones undermining diplomacy and international laws.” She went on to advocate diplomacy and reliance on international law and treaties, as she dismissed the idea of deterrence as a positive value of nuclear weapons. “The notion of deterrence is something we have to get past,” she said. “It’s too dan-

gerous. There are many other ways to look at gaining security and peace without threatening violence.” She decried the “self-perpetuating system” of the nuclear weapons industry with corporations spending millions of dollars on lobbying efforts to win government support. The goal of NuclearBan.US, she said, is to get as many countries as possible, particularly the countries with nuclear weapons, to sign the Nuclear Ban Treaty. Endorsing Assembly Resolution 230, as promoted by Mian, Wood added, “We need to educate people and build grassroots momentum. We need to make

sure that people are aware of the humanitarian consequences so that there is more of a public outcry.” She went on to call for communities, states, and universities to stop investing in companies that do business with the nuclear weapons industry. Moore noted the extensive questioning by the audience and the high level of engagement. “Any time nuclear weapons get used, there’s the risk of catastrophic destruction beyond what any of us can imagine,” he concluded. “We need to use every possible means to save ourselves from destroying ourselves.” —Donald Gilpin

The Cranbury Inn gg-s Restaurant E t Established 1780

The “Inn” is ready to take your reservation for

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NUCLEAR BAN: Lydia Wood, campaign coordinator for NuclearBan.US, spoke to Coalition for Peace Action members at their membership renewal gathering at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation last Sunday afternoon. She urged the group to help form a grassroots movement in support of the United Nations 2017 Nuclear Ban Treaty. (Photo by Anna Savoia)

N E W

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MARY POPPINS IN CONCERT WITH THE NJSO Apr 12–14 Red Bank | Newark | New Brunswick Apr 14 performance presented in collaboration with State Theatre New Jersey.

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PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 4/7 1-4pm 155 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton Marketed by: Helen H. Sherman $1,280,000

107 Jamieson Drive, Pennington Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $659,000

PRESENTING

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 4/7 1-4pm

Open House Sunday 4/7 1-4pm

78 Labaw Drive, Cranbury Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $440,000

39 Malsbury Street, Robbinsville Twp Marketed by: Heidi Joseph $430,000

PRESENTING

PRESENTING

Open House Sunday 4/7 1-4pm 18 Manley Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Carole Tosches $514,000

238 Mount Lucas Road, Princeton Marketed by: Ann “Camille” Lee $649,000

PRESENTING

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From Princeton, We Reach the World.

71 Providence Boulevard, South Brunswick Twp Marketed by: Richard “Rick” Burke | $600,000

6 Winthrop Road, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Deborah “Debbie” Lang | $575,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, the World. From Princeton,We We Reach Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton OfficePrinceton 253 Nassau 609-924-1600 foxroach.com OfficeStreet | 253 Nassau Street

| | foxroach.com Princeton Office || 253| Nassau Street ||| 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

symbol are registeredsubsidiary service marks HomeServices ofof America, Inc. ®Inc., EqualaHousing Opportunity. Information notand verified or guaranteed. If yourAffiliates, home is currently listed with Hathaway a Broker, thisHomeServices is not intended asand a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC.HomeServices An independently operated ofofHomeServices America, Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, a franchisee of BHH LLC. Berkshire the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


37 Ridgeview Road, Hopewell - Offered at $1,250,000

Don’t miss this exceptional home in the wonderful Princeton Ridge section of town. This beautiful, treed, 2-acre lot backs to more than 40 acres of preserved land. Designed by Rolf W. Bauhan, one of Princeton’s most prolific architects, this home is timeless in architectural detail. Light, bright, and fully updated, enter this home through the signature foyer with arched doorway. This 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home has two Master suites. The first floor expanded Master, exclusively designed by Peter Morgan, has been beautifully renovated with high ceilings and a gorgeous large bath, walk-in closet and two side closets, and a gas fireplace. As a special treat, enter the bluestone and brick patio and spacious yard from your bedroom. The large, open, bright Living Room with a wood-burning fireplace opens to an inspiring Den/ Office. The Living Room is also open to the Dining Room, custom designed by Max Hayden. The gourmet Kitchen, with beautiful Brazilian granite counters, cherry cabinets, double sink, and high-end stainless steel appliances, plus a Breakfast Room, provides the opportunity for great entertaining as well as intimate gatherings. The first floor Laundry and two-car Garage finish the first floor of this not-to-be-missed home. The second Master, upstairs, also has an ensuite full bath. This room is adjacent to three additional Bedrooms and two full Baths. There is also an expansive Family Room with a second staircase leading to the first floor. The whole house has large beautiful windows, lots of light, and hardwood floors. The front of this home is stone and wood. Please come and see for yourself. Top-rated Princeton schools, near downtown, shopping, restaurants, and everything important.

Roberta Parker Sales Associate

609-915-0206 Mobile

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Roberta Sells Princeton


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 18

to close the gap in access to Chamber To Spotlight Rider Scholarships For First Generation Students higher education. “I gradu- Real Estate Trends

COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER: On March 24 at Princeton University, La Convivencia held its Second Annual Social/Racial Justice and Interfaith Conference, themed “Social justice, Faith, Diversity, & Hope…Together WE RISE.” More than 150 people of different faiths and ethnicities were in attendance to workshops, conversations, and tributes such as this Unity Candle-lighting.

SATURDAY

On March 12, Rider University announced a $1 million gift to the University to establish a need-based scholarship for African American, black, and Latino students who are the first generation in their families to attend college. Recognizing that national college completion rates var y w idely along racial and ethnic lines, the Joan C. Mazzotti and Michael C. Kelly Endowed Scholarship will support the college aspirations of African American, black, and Latino students attending the University. Joan Mazzotti ’72 and Michael Kelly, residents of Haverford, Pa., say they hope their scholarship helps to relieve some of the financial pressures of college for its recipients, thereby helping

Jazz at Princeton University Presents:

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Charenée Wade Quartet Pedrito Martinez Group Donny McCaslin Quartet

ated from Rider in 1972 with a degree in political science,” Mazzotti said. “I attended Rider at a time when there was significant unrest on college campuses and throughout the country. The four years I spent at Rider shaped the values that have guided me throughout my life.” Mazzot t i became even more committed to themes of economic inequality and access to higher education when, in 2000, she became the executive director of Philadelphia Futures, a nonprofit organization that helps low-income, first generation to college students to achieve postsecondary success. “For more than 17 years we have celebrated the college graduations of hundreds of Philadelphia Futures students and watched with pride as they entered graduate school, began careers and took their rightful place in the world,” said Kelly, Mazzotti’s husband and a retired attorney. “Access to a college education can make a profound difference in a young person’s life and in their family’s life. It truly has the potential to change the fabric of a community.” The establishment of the scholarship was announced during a professional development event for Rider students that focused on transitioning from college to graduate school and careers. In attendance were 50 juniors and seniors participating in Rider’s state-funded Educational Oppor tunit y Program and two federally funded campus TRIO programs: the Student Support Service Program and the Ronald E. McNair PostBaccalaureate Achievement Program. These programs help students overcome social, academic and cultural barriers to complete their undergraduate studies. In addition, Rider alumni — many of whom participated in these same programs — attended to share their experiences and help students plan for the future. Mazzotti is currently a member of Rider University’s Board of Trustees and was on the Board previously from 1996 to 2005, serving as its first female chair from 1998 to 2002. She and Kelly established The Mazzotti Awards in Women’s Leadership, an annual award to promote leadership development among female faculty and staff, in 2006. To date, the couple has contributed $300,000 to fund the Awards.

On Friday, April 26, the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber w ill present a breakfast program at Springdale Golf Club on “Real Estate Trends: Human-Focused Spaces for Work-Live-Play.” The speakers are Melissa Marsh and Mitchell Weitz. Marsh, the founder and CEO of Plastarc, is a consultant for Google, Microsoft, and Nike. She will discuss how her work has created transformations in workplace environments through the use of people analytics and data mining. Weisz, head of Real Estate and Workplace Services for Bristol MyersSquibb, will talk about how the company is incorporating the new trends into their local workspace environments. Participants will learn about the latest developments and trends in real estate; the changing expectations of tenants; occupant-centric buildings for how we live, work and play; how we will live, work, and play tomorrow; identifying the impact of change agents in real estate; and driving innovation in real estate. For registration and further information, visit princetonchamber.org.

Panel on Climate Resilience At Princeton Public Library

“What is Princeton doing to be climate resilient?” is the title of a panel discussion to be held Wednesday, April 17, from 7-8:30 p.m. at Princeton Public Library’s Com mu n it y Room. T h is event was rescheduled from an earlier date. Extreme heat, flooding, and climate-related health problems — this is what climate science says is in store for the Princeton region. Planning and preparation can help mitigate the worst of these effects and reduce the economic burden for dealing with them after the fact. Sustainable Princeton will host a panel discussion about building a climate-resilient community. Princeton Councilman David Cohen will moderate. Panelists include Robert Gregory, director of Princeton’s Emergency & Safety Services; Adje Mensah, CEO of A.F. Mensah (a solar and storage technology company); and Kory Kreiseder, stormwater specialist for The Watershed Institute. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served, and all events are low waste. The library is at 65 Witherspoon Street. Further information is available at www. sustainableprinceton.org.

TICKETED HEADLINER CONCERT:

BASSIST DAVE HOLLAND WITH SMALL GROUP I Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall @ 8PM | $15 General | $5 Students

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 609-258-9220 OR VISIT

MUSIC.PRINCETON.EDU

NEW AT THE YWCA: Sandra Toussaint, left, has joined the board of directors of the Princeton YWCA. President and CEO of United Way of Greater Mercer County, Toussaint is shown here with YWCA Princeton NEXT GEN Board Vice President Lauren Peck, during the Princeton YWCA’s Tribute to Women Event. Toussaint has over 15 years of experience in fundraising, strategic partnerships, and marketing.


Lambros Will Bring New Skills, Competence to Princeton Council

To the Editor: Michelle Pirone Lambros brings a new perspective to Princeton Council. One of her many strengths is her focus on Princeton’s economic development. She has been a business owner/operator herself, and has just finished up on a promotional program for Restaurant Week (March 10-17). She also has been representing the Merchants Association on Princeton’s Economic Development Committee. She is very aware of the challenges our merchants face as they carve out niches where a physical presence in Princeton makes sense. She has innovative ideas for growing downtown retail sales, while enhancing the valuation of commercial property as a percentage of Princeton’s tax base. She is interested in working with Princeton University to understand better how its development plans will benefit Princeton’s downtown and tax base, and where joint development opportunities might exist. She is also well aware of the challenges of our new parking system and has been exploring possible ways to make it serve the community better. She also understands land use and issues of neighborhood character, and is on the Zoning Board. She sees new opportunities to craft zoning variance agreements that better enhance both the project and the surrounding neighborhood. She also favors defining form-based neighborhood zoning that supports the individual character and specific features of each of the 12 or so neighborhood zones. In addition, she is very aware of the pervasive concerns about teardowns and feels that we need to develop incentives that encourage renovation over teardowns, with the additional requirement that neighbors must be notified prior to proceeding with a teardown. And she understands the challenges that cultural and economic diversity face in our community, having grown up in Princeton’s Italian community, which has felt the impact of climbing tax burdens. Her grandfather was a founder of the Italian Sportsmen’s Club on Terhune Road, whose membership now largely lives outside of Princeton, while maintaining its cultural and social center in town. Michelle spent her early childhood in Princeton, so she has deep roots. And now with two children at Princeton High School and her oldest at Boston University, she is also aware of the challenges facing Princeton Public Schools. She looks forward to having a role in shaping the town as it moves forward. She’s canny about the development issues that matter and she’s got the financial training to guide the solutions. We need someone who brings new skills and competence to the Council. We need Michelle Lambros! KIP CHERRY Dempsey Avenue

Civil Rights Commission Responds To New Zealand Terrorist Attacks

To the Editor: As members of the Princeton Civil Rights Commission, our hearts are heavy with the news of the terrorist attacks on the Al Noor Mosque and Linwood Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand. We come from various backgrounds and faiths, and some of us do not follow a religious tradition. Today and every day we stand with you against this craven act of violence and cruelty, united in our belief that human rights and freedom of religion is fundamental. Dr. King reminded us that “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” Following in the tradition of the Civil Rights struggle in the United States, we will never abide white supremacy, Islamophobia, or any other form of white nationalism. All human beings deserve freedom, respect, dignity, and safety as their birthright. Protecting that birthright is both our highest calling and our gravest responsibility. Standing shoulder to shoulder, our love will conquer hatred and racism. Speaking on behalf of the Commission, THOMAS PARKER (CHAIR) Leigh Avenue

Maintaining the character of neighborhoods. Ensuring that redevelopment is compatible with existing development. I am not against affordable housing in my neighborhood. If the density proposed was reasonable, like that of Griggs Farm, Princeton Community Village, or the former Stanworth Property, it would still have an impact upon our neighborhood, but it would be acceptable. The Fair Share Housing Plan calls for the development of affordable housing on Sycamore Road east of South Harrison Street and off Terhune Road. These plans call for densities of 10–12 units per acre but I’m sure 22 units per acre would fit just fine, and then they would match what Mayor and Council are proposing in my neighborhood. But maybe not. After all, “All neighborhoods in Princeton are equal, it’s just that some neighborhoods are more equal than others.” JOSEPH A. MCLAUGHLIN President Old Orchard Village Homeowners Association

Thanking Civil Rights Commission For Recommending Workplace Policies

To the Editor: The letter is also addressed to members of the Princeton Civil Rights Commission, members of the Princeton Council, and Mayor Lempert. The Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice wants to thank and applaud Princeton’s Civil Rights Commission for recommending inclusive workplace policies to the City Council, including gender neutral restrooms. Such principles are not only in keeping with our state’s strong civil liberties values as demonstrated by New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination, specifically in public accommodations (NJSA 10:5-12), but implementation of such literally saves lives as well. In 2018, a study from The American Pediatric Association determined that suicide rates among transgender and nonbinary youth were alarmingly high. This is a sad but logical truth as we currently have a nation that is both structured and strictured in such a way that our youth, struggling to determine their identity, are marginalized at every corner. Our kids face these difficulties daily — whether it be in the classroom, in their homes, or out in their communities, and also when facing use of a public restroom. Unrecognized, unidentified… unnamed. Not the name they know to be true; not the identity with which they were born. Rightful name identification results in lower depression, reduction of suicidal ideation, and a decrease of suicidal behavior. When trans youth hear their names, have their identities confirmed and recognized, their chances of committing suicide go down 56 percent. When we make our world more inclusive, we save lives. Thank you, Princeton, for recognizing, respecting, and indeed loving all our beautifully diverse people and the communities to which they belong. ROBERT SEDA-SCHREIBER Chief Activist Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice Wiggins Street

HLC was founded in 2012 and we are located right here in Pennington. There is currently no known cause or cure for ALS, which affects appropriately 30,000 Americans each year. I know a lot about the disease because I personally lost my husband, Kevin O'Donnell, to ALS in 2001. He was 36 years old. Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed in the U.S. and in that same amount of time, we lose another person to ALS. There are currently many families whose lives have been affected by ALS locally and it is our job to help spread awareness, to bring these families together, and to support them the best we can. It's wonderful for our local restaurants and businesses to come together to support this annual event for ALS. Pennington Bagel, Vito's, PJ's Pancake House, Osteria Procaccini, Revere Restaurant, Cugino's Italian Market, Pru Thai, Tea for All, and Freddie's Tavern all donated food and as Hope Loves Company's Founder, I say, "Thank You!" Many local businesses also donated gifts for our silent auction. You can see the lists of local contributors on our website at www.hopelovescompany.org. There will be a day when everyone knows about ALS and understands the toll it takes on our families and our community. Until then, we'll continue to educate, explain, support and unite to make a difference in the lives of those we serve. Hope Loves Company is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and donations are tax deductible. Proceeds from our fourth annual Night of Hope fundraiser will benefit our free programs and resources for families affected by ALS including Camp HLC, a three-day weekend retreat, Hugs of Hope care packages, Family Fun Days, educational materials and resources, and more. If you would like to learn more about Hope Loves Company, please visit our website at www.hopelovescompany.org, or call the HLC office at (609) 730-1144. JODI O’DONNELL-AMES Hope Loves Company

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Mailbox

Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

changes to the character of neighborhoods caused by new development while the neighborhood adversely impacted by the latter was never mentioned. Ordinance #2019-10 to create an “AH-3 Affordable Housing 3 Residential Zone” would authorize the construction of 65 housing units on a three- acre lot, adjacent to houses built to a ¾ unit per acre density. It would also allow four-story, 45’ high multi-family apartment buildings to be erected next to two-story attached single-family homes. On March 21, the Princeton Planning Board met and held a Master Plan consistency review hearing about Ordinance 2019-10, which would create a new zone on the corner of Mt. Lucas Road and Herrontown Road – the AH-3 (Affordable Housing) Zone. The stated primary goals of the Princeton Master Plan, which was re-examined in 2017, include: Ensuring a proper balance between new residential developments, non-residential development and affordable housing and preservation of open space.

League of Women Voters Provide Info for June Primary

To the Editor: On Wednesday, May 1 at 7 p.m. in Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street, the Democratic candidates for Princeton Council will meet in a forum co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters and Princeton Community TV, which will videotape the forum. Video will be rebroadcast and posted on its website and on www.lwvprinceton.org. Be sure you are registered with the party of your choice. If you are currently unaffiliated, you may declare your party at the polls on June 4. If you mistakenly registered as an Independent, you cannot vote in the primary since only Republicans and Democrats hold a primary election. The deadline for changing Party Affiliation for the June primary is April 10. Political Party Declaration forms are available at www. njelections.org and must be received at your county clerk's office by April 10. The deadline to register to vote in the June primary is May 14; your voter registration form must be postmarked by that date. Applications for Vote-by-Mail ballots can be downloaded and must be received by your county clerk at least seven days before the election, May 28. All forms are available at www. njelections.org, where you will be directed to your county clerk. Please attend or watch the forum and VOTE. CHRYSTAL SCHIVELL League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area Monroe Lane

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS

Hope Loves Company Grateful Some Princeton Neighborhoods For Community Support March 16 To the Editor: Are More Equal Than Others I am writing to thank the Mercer County community, for To the Editor: I attended Planning Board meetings on March 21 and the Council Meeting on March 25. The experience brought me back to high school English and a variation on the words of George Orwell, in Animal Farm — “All Princeton neighborhoods are equal — it’s just that some Princeton neighborhoods are more equal than others.” The discussions centered around changes to two land use ordinances. In one, Ordinance #2019-2 — Eliminating Proportional Increase in Floor Area Ratio on Undersized Lots, the density would be consistent with adjacent parcels. The other, Ordinance #2019-10 — An Ordinance to Create an AH-3 Affordable Housing 3 Residential Zone, would permit density more than 25 times that of its neighbors. One proposed to reduce the permitted floor area ratio, the second would allow the maximum floor area to be double that permitted on neighboring properties. One would reduce the area covered by impervious materials, the other would permit the area of impervious surfaces to double. One would reduce the allowable building mass, the second would allow building height to increase by 50 percent. The discussion of one ordinance focused upon concern about

supporting Hope Loves Company's fourth Night of Hope on Saturday, March 16 at Union Fire Co. and Rescue Squad in Titusville. Hope Loves Company, Inc. (HLC) is the only nonprofit in the United States with the unique mission to provide emotional and educational support to children, teenagers, and young adults who have had or have a loved one battling ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Avi Avital, Mandolin Omer Avital, Bass Yonathan Avishai, Piano Itamar Doari, Percussion 1181 Hughes Drive, Hamilton NJ 08690 609-584-6930 w w w. g r e e n h a v e n g a r d e n c e n t e r . c o m cthomas@greenhavengardencenter.com

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 20

Books “Ruth Bader Ginsburg” Author at Labyrinth

Jane Sharron de Hart, the author of Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life will appear at Labyrinth Books on Wednesday, April 10 at 6 p.m. The book was written with the cooperation of Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself and is based on many interviews with the justice, her husband, her children, her friends, and her associates. According to a starred review in Booklist, “De Hart dynamically devotes more than 500 pages to the amazing life of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ... Telling anecdotes skillfully illuminate Ginsburg’s devotion to her family and her wonderfully supportive late husband, her long-standing friendships with an array of public figures, her love of opera, and her humorous wit. This extensively documented account, incorporating more than 100 pages of chapter notes and a bibliography that cites hundreds of resources, is also quite engaging and very easy to read. Expect high demand.” Jane Sherron de Hart is professor emerita of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Among her previous books is Sex, Gender, and the Politics of Sex: A State and a Nation.

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Author of Naples Memoir of a previous book of po- Labyrinth Hosts Talk ems, Stranger’s Notebook. On Writing for Children At Dorothea’s House Princeton University graduate Katherine Wilson will be reading from her memoir, Only in Naples: Lessons in Food and Famiglia from My Italian Mother-in-law, on Sunday, April 7, at 5 p.m. at Dorothea’s House. Wi l s on w as b or n a n d raised in Washington, D.C., and has lived in Italy for the past 19 years. In addition to writing her memoir, she has worked in television, film, and theater. Dorothea’s House is located at 120 John Street in Princeton. The event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. Par ticipants are encouraged to bring refreshments to share at the reception following the program.

Dickman and Stone Reading April 9

Poets Michael Dickman and Nomi Stone will be reading at Labyrinth Books on Tuesday, April 9 at 6 p.m. Dickman’s poems in Days and Days touch on parenthood, childhood, local natural habitats, graffiti culture, roses, and romantic love. In Kill Class, Stone explores the world of war games in mock Middle Eastern villages in which the U.S. military trains. Michael Dickman is the author of three books of poems: The End of the West; Flies, winner of the James Laughlin Award; and Green Migraine. He is coauthor, with his twin brother, of 50 American Plays (Poems) and Brother. He teaches creative writing at Princeton University. Nomi Stone is a poet, anthropologist, and author

Winner of a 2018 Pushcart Prize, Stone’s poems appeared recently in Poetry Magazine, American Poetry Review, The Best American Poetry, The New Republic, Tin House, New England Review, and elsewhere. She is a postdoctoral fellow in anthropology at Princeton University.

Danez Smith, Seniors To Read at Labyrinth

Award-winning poet Danez Smith and four seniors in the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University will read from their work at 6 p.m. on Friday, April 5 at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street. The reading is part of the C. K. Williams Reading Series, named in honor of the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Awardwinning poet who served on Princeton’s creative writing faculty for 20 years. The series showcases senior thesis students of the Program in Creative Writing alongside established writers as special guests. Featuring student writers Cody Cortes, Madeleine Le Cesne, Annabelle Tseng, and Jonah Herzog Arbeitman, the event is free and open to the public. Danez Smith is the author of Don’t Call Us Dead (Graywolf Press, 2017), a finalist for National Book Award, and boy ( YesYes Books, 2014), winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. Smith’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Buzzfeed, and Best American Poetry.

James A. Moffett ’29 Lectures in Ethics CÉCILE LABORDE, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Who Needs Secularism? India, Liberalism, & Comparative Secularism

There will be a “Picture Book Writing and Illustrating” panel discussion at Labyrinth Books on Thursday, April 4 at 6 p.m. The four participants are Airlie Anderson, the author and illustrator of Cat’s Colors, Momo and Snap Are Not Friends, as well as many other children’s books; Barbara DiLorenzo, the author-illustrator of Renato the Lion, which was chosen as a Junior Library Guild Selection; Laurie Wallmark, whose debut picture book, Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine, received numerous national awards; and the 2012 Caldecott Honor winner for Me… Jane, Patrick McDonnell, who created the comic strip MUTTS, which now appears in over 700 newspapers in 20 countries.

manipulation of poetic diction, and his dialogues with other artists, from Woody Guthrie to Arthur Rimbaud. Locating Dylan in the long history of artistic modernism, the book studies the relationship between form, genre, and the political and social themes that crisscross Dylan’s work.” Timothy Hampton is professor of comparative literature and French at U.C. Berkeley. His books include Fictions of Embassy: Litera-

ture and Diplomacy in Early Modern Europe and Literature and Nation in the Sixteenth Century: Inventing Renaissance France. Nigel Smith is professor of English at Princeton University. His most recent books are Andrew Marvell: The Chameleon and Is Milton Better than Shakespeare? He was also a longtime member of the bands Rackett, which he founded with poet Paul Muldoon, and the Wayside Shrines.

“Bob Dylan’s Poetics” Subject of April 8 Talk

Timothy Hampton and Nigel Smith will be discussing Hampton’s new book, Bob Dylan’s Poetics: How the Songs Work at Labyrinth on Monday, April 8 at 6 p.m. Bob Dylan’s Poetics is the first comprehensive book on both the poetics and politics of Dylan’s compositions. L abyrinth and Princeton Public Librar y invite the community to a presentation and discussion with the author and scholar-musician Nigel Smith. “Hampton studies Dylan not as a pop hero but as an artist, as a maker of songs. Focusing on the interplay of music and lyric, he traces Dylan’s innovative use of musical form, his complex

Think Global ~ Buy Local

Free to Be: The Religious

Roots of Today’s Debates over Gender, Race, and Sexual Truth “I KNOW THE TRUTH, AND I DON’T HAVE TO BE WHAT YOU WANT ME TO BE. I’M FREE TO BE WHAT I WANT.”

Thursday, April 4, 2019 4:30–6:00 pm | COMPUTER SCIENCE BUILDING, LECTURE HALL 104

An Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecture

This lecture is free and open to the public.

Rebecca Davis University of Delaware

il 10

r w day) ! A. p e 4:30 pm t a 0 d ewduled from Feb 2 sno N e Wednesday, February 20, 2019 (resch Lewis Library 138 Princeton University campus corner Washington Road & Ivy Lane

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Celebrating Marlon Brando’s “One-Eyed Jacks” and the Novel Behind It

W

ith Town Topics set to print on Marlon Brando’s 95th birthday, I’ve been riding the wild west of cyberspace to Odessa, the birthplace of Charles Neider, who wrote the novel that inspired One-Eyed Jacks, possibly the most quotable western ever made and the only film Brando ever directed. You might think the writer of such a book would hail from the Odessa in Texas where there’s an eight-foot-tall statue of a jackrabbit downtown. In fact, Charles Neider was born in January 1915 in the Russian city where Pushkin wrote part of Eugene Onegin and Eisenstein shot the cinematic landmark of the slaughter on the Odessa Steps for his 1925 film Battleship Potemkin. When Neider died in Princeton in July 2001, the New York Times remembered him as a prolific essayist, novelist, nature writer and a devoted Twain scholar who edited, arranged, and introduced The Autobiography of Mark Twain (1959). The first time Neider read The Innocents Abroad, which is included in his edition of The Complete Travel Books, he must have smiled to find that Twain had “not felt so much at home for a long time” as he had when he visited Odessa, which “looked just like an American city .... Look up the street or down the street, this way or that way, we saw only America!” Mentioned in passing in the Times obit was Neider’s book The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones (1956), which novelist Wirt Williams suggests “may be the greatest ‘western’ ever written” in his introduction to the 1972 paperback edition. Almost 40 years later, a July 2010 article in The Independent claims that Hendry Jones is “better than any other book on the subject of men, horses, and death, except Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry.” On Bone-Bred Affinities That Williams’s introduction to Hendry Jones fails to cite its connection to Brando’s 1961 film may be a deliberate oversight because by 1972 One-Eyed Jacks was not yet recognized as a cinematic phenomenon, Brando’s Citizen Kane, or it may be because Williams was presenting Neider as “a literary artist and not a professional fabricator of ‘westerns.’” No doubt this is why he makes note of Neider’s Black Sea birthplace on the way to suggesting that a “bone-bred affinity with Central Europe and the Middle East” helped produce “this masterpiece of the American West” by freeing Neider from “the usual, fatal preconditioning” of the genre. Reading Hendry Jones, I had a feeling that the author shared my “bonebred affinity” with western movies in all their dusty glory. My love-at-first-sight response to One-Eyed Jacks, which I’ve seen at least a dozen times, dates back to the Saturday matinee days in Bloomington, Indiana when after a long afternoon of Lash LaRue, Roy Rogers, and Red Ryder, I’d ride home at a two-legged gallop, my ears echoing with the thunder

of posses, careening stage coaches, and the whine of bullets. While my reading at the time included Clarence Mulford’s Hopalong Cassidy books, where the characters used real swear words like g---d--n, the book I loved was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Being one of the few kids in the audience who didn’t shout “Mush!” every time a cowboy kissed or sang to a pretty girl, I was especially taken with the romance of Tom and Becky in the cave. Maybe Neider’s fondness for Mark Twain began when he was a boy growing up in a new land and maybe he too visited Tom Sawyer’s cave and spent a night at the Mark Twain Hotel in Hannibal, Missouri. My boyhood tolerance for

der creates a completely unredeemable specimen of dissolute humanity whose comeuppance in the film still warms the hearts of those of us who have lived and still live in it. As Mizruchi points out, the book’s clearest contribution to the plotline of the movie is in “the protracted scene of the Kid’s jailing and subsequent escape,” a sequence in which Lon has a significant role. Played with gleeful hatefulness by Slim Pickens, Lon is a lesser evil next to the profoundly corrupt Dad Longworth (Karl Malden’s performance of a lifetime), the object of the Kid’s long-festering vengeance after five years rotting in a Sonora prison. Pickens makes Lon so

romance could also explain why I’m fine with the way love saves the day in OneEyed Jacks. Not so film critic Howard Hampton, who refers to “true love or some such drivel” in his essay on the film, one of the special features in the Criterion Collection’s recent digital restoration. The Flavor of the Film In her 2014 biography, Brando’s Smile, Susan L. Mizruchi refers to Neider’s novel as the “credited source” of One-Eyed Jacks, noting that the author “shared Twain’s passion for the West.” While she’s right that the book was “more palimpsest than foundation” in that it helped Brando and his writers “imagine a story and a collection of voices,” Neider’s most significant contribution to the flavor of the film (along with the Monterey setting that provides all those dramatic shots of waves crashing on the shore as Brando’s Byronic hero heals his wounds) is in the vernacular ambiance conveyed in the very names of the characters, Dad Longworth, Bob Emory, Lon Dedrick, Modesto, and of course the Kid, known in Brando’s version as Rio to everyone but his mortal enemy Dad. For the character of Longworth’s deputy, the abominable Lon, Nei-

obnoxious that Brando finds him finally unworthy of death, preferring to have Rio outfox him with an unloaded pistol and bring him moaning and snivelling to his knees, begging for his life. Neider is less merciful. His Lon is grossly carnal, literally stinks (“I reckon it was some trouble he had with his kidneys or bladder”), and his killing, like other killings in Hendry Jones, is described from more than one angle, and with a ferocity more graphic any act of violence in the film: “And then the Kid pulled the trigger and the hammer came flipping down on the charge and the charge blew the nine buckshot down the long barrel and at the muzzle’s end they scattered and all nine hit Lon on the left side of his stomach, shredding it, and it was like nine white-hot pokers going inside him and he screamed a long highpitched scream and screamed again as he was falling and grabbed at his stomach and tried to scream but couldn’t and fell to his knees and pitched onto his face and lay in a pool of blood, thinking he was out on the sea in a skiff in a high wind under the overhanging rocks smelling the stink of the seawolves.” From there it goes amazingly on, from pulpy echoes of vintage Mickey Spillane into territory closer

to Hemingway or Faulkner as the dying man dreams “mixed up dreams” he was too tired to straighten out. As if to make up for giving him such a “written” death scene, Neider has the Kid blow part of Lon’s head off with the other nine buckshot, break the gun against the ground and throw the pieces onto the body, saying, “Here Lon here’s your shotgun.” Brando’s Direction After a recent viewing of the Criterion DVD of One-Eyed Jacks, I was reminded of how much Hugo Friedhofer’s score made me long for Ennio Morricone, whose music is the radiant essence of Sergio Leone’s visionary westerns. In spite of Friedhofer’s often overblown scoring of action scenes and incidental narrative, however, his love theme makes an inspired complement to Brando’s sensitive handling of Pina Pellicier’s Luisa, Longworth’s adopted Mexican daughter and Rio’s salvation. There’s a hint of Brando’s directorial style in the taped recordings he made during the development of the script, one of the special features of the Criterion set. His voice is soft, intimate, suggestive, casually profane, as it might have been when he was directing Pellicier, and then close to being in character, as when he uses Rio’s line (“Just passin’ through, Dad”) during a proposed encounter with Longworth that didn’t make it into the finished film. In the Criterion featurette, The Making of One-Eyed Jacks, it’s suggested that Rio’s style of moving and speaking owes a lot to Ben Johnson, who plays the classic bad guy Bob Emory with earthy finesse. A Sizeable Effort The notion that One-Eyed Jacks could be called Brando’s Citizen Kane is implicit in Brando’s Smile when Mizruchi suggests that he “must have felt at times that he was taking a stab at immortality.” She quotes from a letter written during the filming, in which he calls the film “one of the sizeable efforts of my life,” one to which he’s given “two and a half years of worry, anxiety, striving, discouragement, hopes, and work, work, work.” n a July 8, 2009 column on the occasion of Karl Malden’s death, I wrote about One-Eyed Jacks in similar terms and quoted Malden’s response when he was asked who really wrote the story that became the film: “Marlon Brando, a genius in our time.” Both Brando’s Smile and the Criterion DVD are in the collection of the Princeton Public Library. Although The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones is not available there, the library has Charles Neider’s edition of The Autobiography of Mark Twain (1959), his edition of A Tramp Abroad (1977), and his collection, The Outrageous Mark Twain (1987). Back in 2002, when I was in charge of the Friends book sale, we received a donation from Neider’s library, which I picked up in person from his daughter Susan, who, as far as I know, still lives here, and is an author herself. —Stuart Mitchner

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21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

DVD REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 22

Music and Theater

INVENTIVE UNIVERSE: Momix is an outgrowth of the groundbreaking dance company Pilobolus, and it comes to McCarter Theatre Saturday, April 6 at 8 p.m. The creations of founder Moses Pendleton and colleagues conjure up a world of surrealistic images using props, lights, shadow, humor, and the human body in sometimes startling ways. On the program are excerpts from “Botanica,” “Alchemia,” “Remix,” “Opus,” and “Lunar Sea.” Tickets start at $25. Visit mccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787.

A World Premiere By Rider Theatre

Rider Theatre will present the world premiere of Ivan Fuller’s In Every Note in the Yvonne Theater on the campus of Rider University in Lawrenceville, April 1014. A preview performance is Wednesday, April 10 at 7:30 p.m. In Every Note is the third play in Fuller’s Siege Cycle, focusing on how the arts helped people survive during the Second World War’s siege of Leningrad. The play centers on composer Dmitri Shostakovich and his Symphony No. 7 “Leningrad,”

which he composed while he was trapped in the dying city. “The siege of Leningrad lasted approximately 900 days, during which time over half of the city’s three million citizens died from hunger, the cold, or the bombs that dropped on the city almost every day,” Fuller writes. “Temperatures during the first winter of the siege dropped to record lows of -40 degrees F! And yet, the people refused to surrender. Their resistance, fueled in part by the strength given t hem t hrough t he arts, allowed them to outlast the blockade of their

city and eventually restore it to its former glory. While it may seem hard to believe, Shostakovich’s seventh symphony played a key role in their survival, for it helped remind them that resistance was the only way forward.” Fuller serves as professor theatre, chair of the Theatre & Dance Department, interim chair of the Fine Arts Department and associate dean of the School of Fine and Performing Arts at Rider University. He was the founder and artistic director of the Bare Bodkins Theatre Company, producing Shakespeare in

Ein Deutsches Requiem by Johannes Br ahms

Princeton University Chapel Choir and Orchestr a Sarah Vander Ploeg ’08, Soprano Samuel Duffey ’19, Baritone Penna Rose, Conductor

Sioux Falls, S.D., for 15 years. His play, Eating into the Fabric, was chosen for the Mainstage Reading Series at the Great Plains Theatre Conference in May 2009, where it was awarded a Holland New Voices Award for outstanding play. It was also a semi-finalist for the Eugene O’Neill National Playwriting Conference. In July 2009 Fuller served as playwright-in-residence for Summer Literary Seminars in Vilnius, Lithuania, where he completed the first draft of Awake in Me. In 2010 and 2012, he returned to St. Petersburg, where he finished the latest chapter of his siege cycle, In Every Note. In 2016 and 2017, he traveled to Rwanda, where he wrote and presented his latest play, Deceived by Silence. Fuller serves as professor theatre, chair of the Theatre & Dance Department, interim chair of the Fine Arts Department and associate dean of the School of Fine and Performing Arts at Rider University. Performances are Thursday, April 11 at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 12 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 13 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, April 14 at 2 p.m. The production, also directed by Ivan Fuller, will be performed by Rider Universit y students. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. For more information visit www.rider.edu/arts.

Princeton Youth Ballet In “The Sleeping Beauty”

Princeton Youth Ballet (PYB) presents The Sleeping Beauty on May 4 and 5 at 4 p.m. at Princeton High S chool Per for m ing A r ts Center, 16 Walnut Lane. The production combines

old and new in a reimagined adaptation of the classic fairy tale ballet, set to Tchaikovsky’s score. Disney’s animated film Sleeping Beauty has familiarized three generations of audiences with the classic tale about a princess, a royal snub, a nasty curse, and the dueling magic of feuding fairies. Many will recognize the movie’s iconic music, but may be less familiar with source. Tchaikovsky’s full-length masterwork for ballet (which inspired the score for the Disney movie ) was commissioned in 1889 for the Russian Imperial Ballet’s production of The Sleeping Beauty. In both the Disney film and the ballet, Tchaikovsky’s original musical motifs accompany each of the story’s major characters. In the ballet, these recognizable melodies belong to Princess Aurora, the Lilac Fairy, and the malevolent sorceress, Carabosse. In PYB’s new production, Aurora, Carabosse, and a trio of lead fairies are joined by a full cast of characters. PYB Artistic Director Risa Kaplowitz has created the family-friendly, two-act restaging of the ballet, preserving many of the familiar and best-loved features of The Sleeping Beauty’s traditional choreography. “My goal was to create a version of The Sleeping Beauty that has audience members wondering what will happen next, although much of the ballet’s most memorable choreography has been retained,” she said. Tickets are $18 – $25 when purchased in advance. Scout and group discounts are available. Visit www. princetonyouthballet.org.

Take a stroll down to our previous office at 4 Mercer Street or come to our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, where you can purchase a copy for 75 cents (3 quarters required) from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

Dryden Ensemble Concerts Feature Baroque Music

T he D r yden E ns emble presents “Musica Stravagante,” a program of Baroque music by German and Italian masters on Saturday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 6587 Upper York Road, Solebury, Pennsylvania, and on Sunday, April 7 at 3 p.m. at Miller Chapel, on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street in Princeton.

Lisa Terry

(Photo by William Wegman)

CHARLES S. ROBINSON MEMORIAL CONCERT

Apr

11 Thu

8:00PM

RICHARD TOGNETTI, Artistic Director with PAUL LEWIS, Piano WORKS BY SAMUEL ADAMS, MOZART & BRAHMS Announcement of 2019-20 season at 7:00PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall

2019 Elizabeth Milbank Anderson and Albert Goodsell Milbank Memorial Concert

The Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System is hosting PlayFest, its eleventh annual one-act play festival on Saturday, April 27. There will be two performances, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Tickets are free, but seating is limited. Registration is required online at www.mcl. org starting at 9:30 a.m. on Monday, April 8. This free festival provides a venue for local playwrights and actors to showcase their talent. Local actors w ill perform the staged scriptin -hand readings of si x one-act plays selected for performance at the library. PlayFest directors are Julie Ellen Pr usinowski, Mar y Ann Wylie, and Tim Moran. For more information, call (609) 883-8291 or email Br a n ch Ma nager Ja m e s Damron at jdamron@mcl. org. The Lawrence Headquarters Branch is at 2751 Brunswick Pike (Route 1), Lawrenceville.

Middle of the Night Can’t Find Your Town Topics!

YEARS OF MUSIC MAKING | 2018-2019 SEASON

Saturday, April 6, 2019, 8 PM Princeton University Chapel Admission free

Registration Opens For One-Act Playfest

TICKETS:princetonuniversityconcerts.org 609-258-9220 | $25-55$ General | $10 Students

The concert features Baroque music for oboe and strings. Opening the program is Vivaldi’s Concerto for Strings in G Minor, followed by Albinoni’s Concerto in D Minor for oboe and strings. Two 17th-century works by Biago Marini and Andrea Falconieri follow, both for two violins with continuo. Johann Rosenmüller functions as a bridge between the Italian and German halves of the program. A German organist and composer, he served as an organist in Leipzig, but after being involved in a sexual scandal, was forced to flee to Venice to avoid prison. His Sonata Decima in F for fivepart strings was published in Nuremberg in 1682. The Dryden Ensemble includes Jane McKinley, oboe and oboe d ’amore ; Vita Wallace and Rebecca Harris, violins; Andrea Andros, viola; Lisa Terry, viola da gamba & cello; Anne Trout, double bass; Daniel Swenberg, theorbo and Baroque guitar; and Webb Wiggins, harpsichord, all performing on period instruments. General admission tickets are $25 per concert and student tickets are free with a valid ID. Tickets may be purchased online at drydenensemble.org or at the door.


Dudamel Residency Ends damel that celebrates the However, as part of PrinceWith Concerts and More intersection of music and ton University Concerts’ and Gustavo Dudamel, Princeton Universit y Concer ts’ first artist-in-residence and current music and artistic Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, will return to the Princeton University campus for the final leg of his residency, from Monday, April 22 through Sunday, April 28. Events include a performance by and community jam session with members of the Berlin Philharmonic, a showcase by students from the El Sistema-inspired Harmony Program of New York City, conversations with Nobel Prize-winning physicist Kip Thorne and Irish public intellectual Fintan O’Toole, a day of shared music-making by almost 300 students from El Sistema-inspired programs across the East Coast, a film screening at the Princeton Garden Theatre, and two concerts in which Dudamel conducts the Princeton University Orchestra and Glee Club — one of which is a free (but ticketed) community concert at the Trenton War Memorial. On Tuesday, April 23 at 7 p.m., members of the Ensemble Berlin will present works by Schubert, Wagner, and a world premiere by Princeton University faculty composer Steven Mackey in a program curated by Du-

nature. Ensemble Berlin is made up of five players from the Berlin Philharmonic. They are joined by another four players from KonstKnekt, the orchestra’s training program located in Norway. A post-concert discussion extending this topic to the intersection between art (broadly defined) and nature will follow with Dudamel and Nobel Prizewinning theoretical physicist Kip Thorne (California Institute of Technology). All ticketholders are also invited to hear a showcase performance by students from the El Sistema-inspired Harmony Program of New York City at 6 p.m. Full view tickets are sold out for this evening; obstructed view tickets may be purchased by calling (609) 258-9220, Monday-Friday, 12-5 p.m. Dudamel will conduct the Princeton University Orchestra and Princeton University Glee Club in a program of works by Tchaikovsky, Mendelssohn, and Schubert. The program includes a narrated performance of Mendelssohn’s Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream, featuring actors from the Princeton University Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater. The concert on Friday, April 26 in Richardson Auditorium is sold out.

Dudamel’s shared mission encouraging access to music for all, this program will be repeated in a free but ticketed community concert at the Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial on Saturday, April 27, 4 p.m. This concert will also include atmospheric video projections by Venezuelan film director Alberto Arvelo. Tickets are at princetonuniversityconcerts.org or (609) 258-9220. In the event of a sellout, any turnback tickets will be released on Monday, April 22 at 12 p.m. On Monday, April 22, at 7:30 p.m., Dudamel has selected The Liberator, a film by director Alberto Arvelo, to be screened at the Princeton Garden Theatre. The film, featuring original music composed and conducted by Dudamel, recounts Simón Bolívar’s struggle to liberate South America. A Q&A will follow. Tickets are on sale at the Princeton Garden Theatre. On Wednesday, April 24, at 8 p.m., the community is invited to participate in Princeton University Concerts’ annual Chamber Jam at Richardson Auditorium. T h is opp or t u n it y of fer s amateur players of orchestral instruments to jam with members of the Berlin Philharmonic, one of the world’s

David Holland Headlines New Jazz Festival

Jazz at Princeton University, headed by saxophonist/ composer Rudresh Mahanthappa, presents the first Princeton University Jazz Festival on Saturday, April 13, featuring the bands of today’s top jazz stars as well as jazz greats playing with Princeton’s student groups. Free daytime performances, to be held outdoors at Alexander Beach in front of Princeton’s Richardson Auditorium, begin at noon. At 8 p.m., bassist Dave Holland will perform with Small Group I in a ticketed event at Richardson Auditorium. “We are very excited to lau nch t h is new fes t ival bringing together a wide array of today’s most creat i ve a n d ac c om p l i s h e d j a z z a r t i s t s p e r fo r m i n g with our remarkably talented students,” said Mahanthappa. “A full afternoon of diverse, free concer ts capped by an evening with the legendar y Dave Holland — it promises to be a fantastic day of music, as well as an opportunity for the community at large to come together and enjoy what we hope will become an annual tradition.” Tickets are $15, ($5 for SCHUBERT SONATAS: Pianist Mitsuko Uchida returns to McCarter Theatre on Monday, April students). For information 22 with an all-Schubert, all-sonata program, the second and last leg of her two-year journey and a full schedule call (609) exploring these works by the composer. McCarter is part of the extensive, world tour with the 258-9220 or visit https:// program. Tickets start at 25; visit mccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787. music.princeton.edu.

Jazz at Princeton University Presents Bassist

Dave Holland with Small Group 1 Directed by Rudresh Mahanthappa

Saturday, April 13, 2019 • 8 PM Admission:

Headline Concert

$15 General $5 Students Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

For tickets and full festival schedule visit: music.princeton.edu or call 609-258-9220

WHAT’S HAPPENING FRIDAY, APRIL 5

Bollywood Boulevard

A Live Journey Through Hindi Cinema

SATURDAY, APRIL 6

Momix

Viva Momix

MONDAY, APRIL 8 An Evening with

David Sedaris WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10

Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano, Esperanza Spalding & Leo Genovese: The Spring Quartet FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Angelique Kidjo

Re-Imagining Talking Heads: Remain in Light

AND MORE TICKETS START AT $25 mccarter.org

609.258.2787 Sponsored by

Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment of the Arts

Photo: David Sedaris

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

READY FOR THEIR CLOSE-UP: The musical “Sunset Boulevard,” based on the Oscar-winning 1950 film, is coming to Mercer County Community College’s Kelsey Theatre April 5-14. From left are stars William Kamps as Joe Gillis, Holly Gash as Norma Desmond, Cat Tierney as Betty Schaefer, and Evan Bilinski (background) as Max. Visit www.KelseyTheatre.net or call (609) 570-3333 for tickets. (Photo by Kyrus Keenan Photography)

greatest orchestras, reading Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68 Pastoral. This is currently at capacity for participants, with a waiting list available online at princetonuniversityconcerts.org or by calling (609) 258-2800. Non-participants are welcome to attend as audience members. The Princeton University Center for Human Values will host a conversation on Thursday, April 25, at 8 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium, between Dudamel and Ireland intellectual Fintan O’Toole on the subject of “The Artist in Society.” O’Toole is a columnist for The Irish Times and is the Leonard L. Milberg ’53 visiting lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton University. The conversation will be chaired by Melissa Lane, Class of 1943 Professor of Politics and director of the University Center for Human Values. A reception will follow. This event is free and unticketed. The final event of Dudamel’s residency is Sunday, April 28. In the spirit of an El Sistema “Seminar io,” young people from Trenton Music Makers, and their guests from the El Sistema NJ Alliance, plus Play on, Philly! and OrchKids of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, will gather on the Princeton campus for a day of shared music making. The long-standing tradition in the El Sistema movement of bringing students together for a large-scale, communal experience will include Dudamel meeting the children and working with the programs’ instructors, and sharing his philosophy and experience. The seminario will culminate in a public concert with an orchestra of some 300 players and singers, performing at 3 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium. A com pl e te r e s i d e n c y schedule of public events is available and continually updated at princetonuniversityconcerts.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 24

Art

“BOOK CLUB”: This painting by Natalie Kinnemon of Pennington is among approximately 60 works on display at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College’s 2019 “Visual Arts Student Exhibition.” The show runs through April 25.

“GUMJI IN TOWN”: Whimsical digital illustrations by Sunghye Cho are featured in “Fly Gumji,” on view April 6 through May 1 at the Plainsboro Library Gallery. An artist reception is Sunday, April 7 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Digital Illustrations At Plainsboro Library

The Plainsboro Library Gallery presents “Fly Gumji” April 6 through May 1. Inspired by her beloved pet, Gumji, artist Sunghye Cho depicts a character that travels the world in detailed, fun, and humorous digital illustrations. From Manhattan to Sapporo, Japan, and Chamonix, the viewer is treated to whimsical urban scenes throughout the world in the form of colorful large format prints. Large sketches will also be displayed, including renderings that show the development of the illustrated character. Cho’s work is created in Photoshop, and those interested in digital and graphic illustration are sure to enjoy this exhibit. An artist reception will be held on Sunday, April 7, from 2 to 4 p.m. Cho has over 18 years of industry experience in designing and in directing multimedia design teams (game, application, web, and mobile) as well as creating awardwinning designs for consumer and enterprise applications. She currently directs a team of CX innovators and UX designers at Samsung SDS in Korea and is in charge of CX design for SDS IT solutions. Previously, she spent two years designing human-com-

puter interaction (HCI) projects at The Princeton Edge Lab. An expert in mobile games and applications and B2C, B2B design, she has successfully launched several online and mobile products. Her experience in the conceptual design and UX industry is broad, having also worked for IT/gaming companies such as Nexon, NHN. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Hongik University in Korea and continued studies in 2D design principles at NYU in New York. The Plainsboro Library is located at 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8:30 pm. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. For more information, call (609) 2752897 or visit the website at www.plainsborolibrary.org.

“First Ladies and Their China” Lecture

The Potteries of Trenton Society invites the community to their annual meeting on Saturday, April 6 at 1:30 p.m. This year’s lecture will be “The First Ladies and Their China” by Ellen Denker. It will be held in the Woodrow Wilson Board Room at the Trenton War Memorial on 1 Memorial Drive, Trenton. Since the beginning of the

United States, Congress has appropriated funds to furnish the White House and demonstrate our nation’s wealth and power to foreign heads of state. Denker’s lecture, sprinkled with anecdotes, will examine the topic of White House China from Martha Washington to Melania Trump, explain the history, use, and preservation of the table china they chose, and demonstrate Trenton’s role in this story. Denker is a museum consultant and independent scholar based in western North Carolina. She holds degrees from Grinnell College, Iowa, and from the Un iver s it y of D elaware, where she was a fellow in t he Winter t hur Program in American Material Culture. As a museum consultant, Denker has worked on a variety of exhibition topics from ceramic and furniture history to visiting nursing and blindness. S h e h a s w r it te n e x te n sively on American ceramics, the Ar ts and Craf ts movement, and American home furnishings. Her list of publications as author and co-author is extensive, ranging from Lenox China to rocking chairs. She has lectured extensively for art and historical organizations across the United States,

and is a founding member of the Potteries of Trenton Society. The lecture is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and pre-registration is strongly suggested. To register, email president@potteriesoftrentonsociety.org with your name and the number of people in your party. Free parking is available in the state parking lots on Memorial Drive near the War Memorial. For more information, visit www.potteriesoftrentonsociety.org.

Janssen Awards $5,000 Grant to Art Center

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has awarded $5,000 to The Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster in support of its art classes for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other special needs. Launched in 2009, Art for Children with ASD and Other Special Needs was The Center’s first community outreach program. Today a total of six award-winning community outreach programs provide an outlet for creative expression in a safe, supportive setting and address specific needs in the community, serving youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder, addiction, and trauma (homelessness), and adults affected by cancer, with multiple special needs and disabilities, and issues related to aging. “At The Center, we recognize the diversity of abilities and needs in the community

and are committed to enabling all visitors to experience the benefits of arts education. Janssen Pharmaceuticals has supported our program for children with ASD since its inception and continues to be a valued partner,” said Executive Director Elie Porter Trubert. “We are tremendously grateful for their generosity.” The Center for Contemporary Art is a regional art center with studio art classes, a summer art camp, rotating exhibitions, and community outreach programs. It is located at 2020 Burnt Mills Road in Bedminster. For fur ther information, call (908) 234-2345 or visit http://ccabedminster.org.

MCCC Gallery Hosts Student Art Exhibit

The work of visual arts students at Mercer County Community College (MCCC) is now on display as the Gallery at Mercer presents its annual “Visual Arts Student Exhibition.” The exhibit, featuring the best works of MCCC students, runs through Thursday, April 25.

It is free and is open to the public. MCCC Gallery Director and Curator Alice Thompson notes that the student exhibition is an important element of the continued growth of students studying visual arts. “It’s a departure from the relative safety of the classroom to present one’s creative exploration to the public. The ongoing encouragement and support of the MCCC visual arts faculty continues to guide our students along the path to becoming visual arts professionals,” she said. The exhibition includes works by students from a range of Mercer’s visual arts programs including fine arts, advertising and graphic design, digital arts, photography, and sculpture. The Galler y is located on the second floor of the college’s Communications Building on the West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Hours are Mondays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., with Wednesday hours extended until 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.mccc.edu/gallery.

APRIL AUCTION WEEKEND April 13+14 Saturday, April 13 @ 10am Remix: Classic + Contemporary Sunday, April 14 @ 10am Selections from from the Estate of Hellen and Joe Darion Sunday, April 14 @ noon Remix: Classic + Contemporary American, English & Continental Silver Exhibition begins 4/6 Catalog online now | ragoarts.com

“LITTLE CHIME BOX”: This piece by Donna Payton is part of “Mix Tape Vol. 2,” on view April 12-26 at Visual Stream Gallery Collective, 7 North Main Street, Lambertville. An opening reception is Friday, April 12, 6 to 8 p.m. The gallery’s second “Mix Tape” exhibit, it showcases a diverse compilation of small works by artists including Jim Doherty, Haley Manchon, Phillip McConnell, Leon Rainbow, Katie Truk, and Megan Uhaze.


“PLAZA 1, 2, 3, 4”: This acrylic by Lin Ferrand is one of the works featured in the “Student Art Exhibit,” at the Princeton Senior Resource Center through April. An opening reception is April 3, 4 to 5 p.m.

lange,” a medley of art, will run from April 6 through May 12, with a free public reception with the artist on Friday, April 12 from 7-9 p.m. Moonan says an expressive language felt deep inside her directs her work as an artist. Its song is aroused by family memories, the natural world, her travel experiences, and vivid recollections of performing in St. John Terrell’s Lambertville Music Circus, a cultural attraction in Hunterdon County from 1949 to 1970. Her love of performing merged into painting in adulthood after her father gave her a set of acrylics and told her to paint. “Mélange” will include tactile venetian plaster paintings, charcoal drawings capturing the essence of nature, and a medley of upcycled LP records. Some discs have the appearance of ancient artifacts and others suggest con“Mélange” Exhibit at nections to the song tracks beneath the newly painted East Amwell Museum Contemporary artist Flor- surface. Her paintings evoke ence Moonan will be mixing a range of moods from playful things up for her solo exhibi- to mysterious. The viewer need

BYRON KIM

opened last September. Located at 1053 Old York Road in East Amwell, has been restored and decorated to reflect the building during the period 1880-1920. It fronts Marion F. Clawson Memorial Park. The new home of the East Amwell Historical Society, the museum in the former Clawson House features several furnished rooms and provides two exhibition rooms. The East Amwell Museum is open Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, call (908) 2373303 or email eahsmuseum2018@gmail.com.

Thursday, April 11, 5:30 Pm | 10 McCosh Hall

The Art Museum’s recent commission of an addition to Byron Kim’s signature work, Synecdoche, provides the occasion for this artist talk. At the conclusion of four days of studio sittings, during which he will have made color studies for portraits of twenty-five members of the Princeton University community, Kim’s presentation will offer an overview of his practice and career as a contemporary Color Field painter. A reception in the Museum will follow.

always free and oPen to the Public

Area Exhibits Arts Council of Princet o n , 102 W i t h e r s p o o n Street, has “Riverside Silos/ Shaping Spaces” and “WILD:

artmuseum.princeton.edu Byron Kim, Synecdoche (detail), 1991–present. Oil and wax on wood. Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. Installed at the 1993 Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial, New York. Photographer: Dennis Cowley. © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

TT_Byron Kim_2019.indd 1

SELL YOUR JEWELRY AND FINE ART WISELY Tuesday, April 9 10am–3pm Morven Museum & Garden 55 Stockton St, Princeton, NJ 10am–1pm: by appointment 1–3pm: No appointment needed To make an appointment or for questions, contact Robin Daum. 609.397.9374, ext. 119 or robin@ragoarts.com

“SUMMIT”: This painting by Florence Moonan is featured in “Mélange,” her exhibit at the East Amwell Museum April 6 through May 12. An artist reception is Friday, April 12, 7 to 9 p.m.

Princeton University Art Museum has “Gainsborough’s Family Album” through June 9 and “Miracles on the Border: Retablos of Mexican Migrants” through July 7. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu. West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Fiction: The Art Show” through May 17. www.westwindsorarts.org.

Artist Talk

Princeton Senior Center tion at the newly-dedicated only bring his imagination. East Amwell Museum. “MéThe East Amwell Museum Student Art Exhibit The Princeton Senior Resource Center presents its “Student Art Exhibition” through the month of April. An opening reception is Wednesday, April 3 from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Suzanne Patterson Building at 45 Stockton Street, Princeton. Featuring the PSRC art students, the art exhibit includes works in acrylic, watercolor, and pencil as well as mixed media arts. Students from Christina Rang’s painting class share watercolor and acrylic works that include cloud studies and representations of spring. Alex Koltchev’s drawing students present various levels of drawing technique, and Hannah Fink’s multimedia students display their latest explorations. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. For more information, visit princetonsenior.org.

boro Road, has “Gifts from the Sea,” photographs by Tasha O’Neill with poems by Cool Women, through May 2. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Masters of Illusion” through May 19. www.morven.org. Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has works by pastel artist Donna Gratkowski through April 30.

Rago will donate a % to Morven for all property consigned.

3/11/19 2:12 PM

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Wildlife Painting and Drawings” through May 4. www. artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, has “Healing Trails” through April 5 and “Animal Expo” through April 12. www.drgreenway.org. Millstone River Gallery, at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Facility, 100 Plains-


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 26

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Easter Sunday Buffet STARTERS Rolls and Butter Imported & Domestic Cheese Display Tossed Spring Salad, Assorted Dressings Strawberry & Goat Cheese Salad Caesar Salad CREATE YOUR OWN OMELETTE (Choice of three fillings)

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27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Town Topics


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 28

Greenscapes Lawn & Landscape Services Offers Design, Installation, and Maintenance

G

reenscapes Lawn & Landscape Services is celebrating its 20th anniversary, and Joan M. Daviau, founder and owner, emphasizes that the Fleming ton - bas e d company’s mission statement is as important today as it was at the company’s beginning in 1999. Innovative design, expert installation, and imaginative care are key.

IT’S NEW To Us

“Our mission is to provide our clients with high quality landscape services that focus on the long-term development and preservation of their properties balanced with an enhancement of outdoor living spaces now,” says Daviau, In addition, she points out, “Our values are to conduct business and perform all work with professionalism, respect, and thoughtfulness.” This philosophy guides her company today as it has guided her in her previous career as a teacher and later human resources executive for Johnson & Johnson and other companies. Many Hats Indee d, she has wor n many hats during an enterprising and diverse career. “I feel that I have come full circle,” says Daviau. “I grew up in an extended Italian fam-

ily in New Jersey. I learned about landscaping, helped to build stone walls, grew vegetables, and we also had grapevines. My grandmother made dandelion wine. “My parents had experienced the Depression, and they were very focused on education,” she continues. “They wanted to be sure I had a degree.” In fact, she earned two: a B.A. from Montclair State College and an M.S. from Smith College. After teaching in public and alternative schools, she changed direction and began a very successful career in human resources, serving in many capacities for Johnson & Johnson, Dow Jones, and other companies. She also had her own human resources consulting firm. W hile still working for Dow Jones in human resources and labor relations in New York City, she established Greenscapes in Griggstown. “I’ve always loved growing things and gardening,” she explains, “but I never expected to be working the landscape business. However, when the opportunity presented itself, I founded the business, and looked forward to returning to the work that I learned and loved growing up.” Two Careers The initial challenges of balancing two careers at the same time for two years didn’t prove too daunting, she says, pointing out that

349 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 609 688-9840 Tues-Sat 12:30pm-5pm www.thecloakanddagger.com

“I am a real workaholic. I also commandeered many types of experts to help me get started, and I learned all I could.” The location in Griggstown was beneficial in helping her to understand shade gardens, she notes. “Everything was shady there, and that was a good learning experience. “T hen, in 20 03, I ac quired a 24-acre farm in R ingoes, and I was able to do some experimenting and expand the landscaping. The business has really evolved. In the beginning, it was 80 p ercent law n maintenance.” Last year, Daviau decided to consolidate, and moved to a new location at 165 River Road in Flemington. The business has grown into a flourishing operation in residential work, specializing in landscape design, planning, installation, diagnostics, and maintenance services. “We have always served the Princeton area, and our primary client base is Princeton,” says Daviau. “We do ent ire proper t y maintenance and estate management. We design the landscape; select the plants, trees, and shrubs; and do the installation. We also do hardscapes and water and lighting features.” “Our firm is really a boutique,” she continues. “We are ver y specialized. We know our clients, and we provide ver y customized work according to t heir wishes. For example, some people only want organic products, and we can offer that, and organic land care.” Easy Maintenance Regarding customers’ interests and needs, she reports that easy maintenance is high on the list. “If they don’t want a lot of maintenance, we try to include flowers and shrubs that require less attention. “We are also planting more and more ground cover now. In general, planting ground cover will aid in reducing weeding time and mulch amounts. In addition, right now, native plans, trees, and shrubs are popular. A

lot of people like ornamental grasses, too.” Placement of plantings regarding sun and shade is very significant, she emphasizes. “It’s the right plant in the right place. You always want to create the right conditions for the right results. “ We p i c k p l a n t s w i t h great care. We only buy from USDA nurseries, and the plants that I prefer to use are those grown in conditions similar to the proposed planting site. There are s o m a ny fac tor s to consider. What are the soil conditions? Does the client want color in the winter? Plants that attract pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, and humming birds, are important.” Other factors to be considered when planting include bloom time, foliage color, drought and salt tolerance, winter interest, deer resistance, fragrance, and climbing or compact plants. “Good” Predators Pests are a major problem for many plants, and for clients who dislike the use of pesticides and chemicals, integrated pest management has become a popular method of control. “This is a way to encourage the ‘good’ predators to come to the garden, and use beneficial insects, such as lady bugs, spiders, and others that will eat the bad bugs,” explains Daviau. Landscape emergencies, such as severe drainage problems, can arise, she adds, and Greenscapes is there when needed. “Sometimes, we’ll help clients redo previous landscapes that have not worked out, and drainage problems can be huge. We have had so much rain lately, that this can be an issue.” Greenscapes can also provide water features, such as small ponds and fountains, which are favorite landscape additions today, as well as the construction of pergolas, arbors, and hardscapes. Patios, terraces, and areas around pools are a hardscape focus. “We do stonework for walls, which can be dry-set or wet,” points out Daviiau. “In fact, we recently built a walled garden for vegetables to keep the deer out. We

LASTING LANDSCAPES: “If you are thinking of a new landscape design, it is good to start planning early. Most people like to see plants and flowers in the spring. It’s good to get started now.” Joan M. Daviau, founder and owner of Greenscapes Lawn & Landscape Services, enjoys helping people get their gardens ready. also try to use deer-resistant plants when we can. “We partner with different companies for different areas of the work, including experts in pool building, irrigation specialists, master arborists, architects, engineers, car penters, electr icians, and so on,” she continues. “I believe that partnering is a very beneficial course for small businesses today. Other work that we do, too, is power washing and cleaning gutters.” She emphasizes the importance of working with responsible, licensed, and certified companies for landscaping. “We are licensed, insured, and registered to conduct business and perform the services offered. We are also a member of the New Jersey Nursery & Landscape Association and the New Jersey Farm Bureau.” Getting It Right Greenscapes serves the Princeton area and beyond, and has many long-standing clients. “We have lots of word-of-mouth referrals, and new customers all the time,” says Daviau, “When I’m planning a landscape design, I have definite guidelines to follow. I get to know the clients’ lifestyle — their children, grandchildren, even their dog! You get to know their tastes and what they want to accomplish. I

love getting it right. And when I can fulfill the client’s vision, I am very happy.” She adds that the opportunity to meet the variety of clients and see the different locations is a big pleasure. “I get to visit lots of places, properties, and gardens. It’s totally fun to see everyone’s different location and meet all the people.” Daviau is also involved in the community, and as she points out, “It is important to give back. I am proud to be a trustee and supporter of the Marquand Park Foundation.” Planning and installing a new landscape design can be lengthy process, and some clients prefer to do it in stages, which can also be helpful with budget issues. “If it’s a very large project, it can take two years,” says Daviau. “On the other hand, a smaller job could take two weeks. Our projects can be weeks, months, or years.” Pleasing the customer with quality work is uppermost, she emphasizes. “What we really want to do is to create spaces the are wonderful for the client. This is our priority.” For further information, call (908) 284-4944, or email jgreenscapes@gmail.com. —Jean Stratton

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n times past, it was not unusual for individuals to rarely visit a dentist. A toothache or related problem could prompt a dental appointment, but there were certainly no six-month scheduled visits that are commonplace today, and flossing was rarely on anyone’s agenda.

she then completed a fouryear oral and maxillofacial surgery hospital-based residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, affiliated with Weill Medical College of Cornell University. “Oral surgery requires very demanding, rigorous, and lengthy training, from four to six years, after four years of dental school,” says Dr. Hung. “During my training, I was in a level 1 trauma center, where I worked with jaw and facial fractures, among other serious injuries and conditions.” An oral and maxillofacial residency includes rotation through related medical fields, such as internal medicine, general surgery, anesthesiology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, emergency medicine, and other medical specialty areas. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, “At the conclusion of this demanding program, oral and maxillofacial surgeons are prepared to perform the full scope of the specialty, which encompasses the diagnosis, surgical, and related management of diseases, injuries, and defects that involve both the functional and aesthetic aspects of the oral and maxillofacial regions. This includes prevention, reconstructive, or emergency care of the teeth, mouth, jaws, and associated facial structures.” Currently, only 15 percent of female dental school graduates are in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, notes Dr. Hung. Office Anesthesia An important area of their training is anesthesiology, she points out. “Some procedures will involve anesthesia, and we can provide this in the office. Not every patient is a candidate for office anesthesia, however, due to an existing medical condition. It is very important that I have the patient’s medical history and current health

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Such poor dental hygiene could result in the loss of many, most, or even all of one’s teeth at relatively young ages. Even today, there are still individuals who, for various reasons, do not see a dentist regularly, and therefore are often subject to a variety of problems. According to reports from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 69 percent of adults ages 35 to 44 have lost at least one permanent tooth, and 26 percent of adults ages 74 and older have lost all of their permanent teeth. Nowadays, treatment is available to address many serious dental conditions. Oral (mouth) surgery and maxillofacial (face and jaw) surgery, in particular, can help correct a number of very serious problems. Medicine and Dentistry “Oral surgery is a combination of medicine and dentistry — a bridge between medicine and dentistry,” explains Dr. Yuan ( Cathy ) Hung, DDS, FAAOMS. Her practice, Prospect Oral Surgery Center at 312 Applegarth Road in Monroe Township, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this April. Originally from Taiwan, Dr. Hung came to the U.S. in 1991 as a student. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and from Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery. After four years at Columbia,

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conditions. I always have a full consultation with the individual about this in case the patient could be medically compromised.” If there are no contraindications for office anesthesia, Dr. Hung offers in-office intravenous nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”) and/or oral sedation. “Our advanced anesthesia provides maximum comfort and safety during your treatment,” she says. When patients see Dr. Hung, it is usually for conditions, such as impacted wisdom teeth, treatment for infections, restoration of damaged teeth, replacement of missing teeth, TMJ pain, serious malocclusion (bite problems), and diagnosis and treatment of oral lesions, among other concerns. Most often, patients are referred to her by their primary dentists or physicians. Dental implants are an integral part of her practice, notes Dr. Hung. A dental implant is integrated into the jawbone, and can last for a very long time. It can replace a single tooth or several teeth, and is considered by many to be a more effective solution than fixed bridges or removable dentures. The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial and Surgeons reports that “implants will not affect neighboring healthy teeth or lead to bone loss in the jaw. If properly cared for, dental implants can last a lifetime.” Bone and Tissue Wisdom teeth are best removed at an early age, explains Dr. Hung. Usually appearing in an individual between the ages of 17 and 25, they frequently develop cavities, cause periodontal disease, or other serious problems. If they become impacted, they can be more difficult to remove. “Removing a tooth is trauma to the bone and tissue,” points out Dr. Hung. “I try to minimize the trauma so there is less pain and swelling. Initial healing for wisdom

tooth extraction can be two to three weeks. This includes bone healing.” Dr. Hung always performs a cancer check on every patient, and it is very important that possible problems be found early. “I can help to identify the problem initially, and then a multi-disciplinary team approach, with medical doctors and head and neck surgeons, is beneficial.” TMJ (temporomandibular joint) is another condition that Dr. Hung diagnoses and treats. TMJ disorders are not uncommon, and have a variety of symptoms, including jaw pain, headache, or earache. Sometimes, they are a result of grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep. “I will do an evaluation for TMJ,” says Dr. Hung, “and this can often be treated with the use of a night guard or physical therapy. Surgery is a last resort.” Dr. Hung’s patients range in age from 13 to 100, she reports, and are from Princeton and the surrounding area. Insurance coverage varies depending on individual policies. New Technologies Her practice includes the latest advances in technology, she notes. “New technologies are developed all the time. For example, the cone beam is a low dose radiation CT scan, and is a step up from panoramic X-ray. It can be very helpful in identifying conditions in the jaw. “Piezosurgery is a technique used for extractions, bone cuts, and sinus lifts in preparation for implants. I also offer the newest FDAapproved technology, including PRF (plasma rich factors). This helps regenerate jaw bone growth, and this device and technology is now available in our office.” In addition to her work as a highly skilled oral surgeon, Dr. Hung is an accomplished classical pianist and composer, and she has released original CDs. In an effort to provide patients with a relaxing, unintimidating experience (especially for those with dentist fear and

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Treatment of Mouth and Jaw Conditions Is Available at Prospect Oral Surgery Center

CARE AND CONCERN: “The scope of my oral surgery practice is extensive. It includes dental implants, surgical placement, restoration, tooth replacement, and surgical extraction. I always do my best for my patients’ well-being,” says Dr. Yuan (Cathy) Hung DDS, FAAOMS. Her practice, Prospect Oral Surgery Center, is located in Monroe Township. anxiety), she often will have her music playing softly in the background. She says she looks forward to many more years of assisting her patients. “I enjoy helping people get relief from pain. And I enjoy the challenges I see in the work, and putting the puzzle together to help my patients.” In recognition of the 10th anniversary of her practice, she is also “looking forward to diversity. I am starting a women’s dentist network, called Morning Glory Women Dentists Network of New Jersey, including meetings with women practitioners to provide them with continuing education and social network-

ing events uniquely designed for working women dentists. In addition, I am in the process of planning speaking engagements in the area.” What always comes first, however, is her patient care, and this includes continuing education. As she says, “I always stay current on all the latest developments. We customize each patient’s treatment to fit their needs, medical conditions, and past experiences. Optimum oral health for my patients is always the goal.” For more information, call (609) 860-6369, or visit the website: www.prospectoralsurgery.com. —Jean Stratton

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 30

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert (Originally published in Princeton Magazine) Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

or the past few years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problembased economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care. We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively do that.

Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. They are among the first physicians to become board certified in Lifestyle Medicine, as well as maintaining their board certifications in internal medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,200 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 32

Israeli Technology Is Topic of Talk

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The MOSAIC Center for Ar ts, Cult ure and Ideas will present an Israeli and Midd le - E aster n Cook ing demonstration by Chef Jill Schoenfeld on Sunday, May 5 at Adath Israel Congregation of Lawrenceville. Schoenfeld is a former food stylist at QVC where she provided presentation expertise to on-air talent, vendors, and guests. She also served as a corporate chef at Glenmede Tr ust Company in Philadelphia. Schoenfeld is part of The Chef’s Warehouse, a purveyor of artisan and highquality products with a large selection of specialty foods from around the world. She shares her product knowledge with local chefs and restaurant owners. She is also the founder and owner of Finkie’s Cookies, a gourmet cookie company. S c h o e n fe l d a l s o d o e s private catering and is active in her community. She is a member of the Junior L e ag u e of P h i la d e lp h i a where she volunteers to help with food shortages in the Philadelphia community. She has organized such events as “Take Your Kids to Work Day” cooking experience and Grandma Geri’s run for Fox Chase Cancer center raising money particularly for AML leukemia research. She combines her Jewish upbringing with her classical French training, cooking fresh, local, healthy, food for her clients, friends, and family. This event is open to the com mu nit y. T he cost is $15 if payment is received by April 30 or $20 at the door. Call (609) 896-4977 or mail to Adath Israel MOSAIC Program at 1958 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648.

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Greenfest, Sustainable Princeton’s celebration of sustainable living, will come to Princeton Shopping Center on Saturday, May 11 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The center is at 301 North Harrison Street. The event is planned as afternoon of engaging entertainment and education on living a more sustainable lifestyle. More than 30 sustainably-minded businesses and organizations have been invited to share information and tips on how we can all do our part. Attendance is free. Participants will be able to test drive a variety of electric vehicles, see live animal wildlife, engage in sustainable art-making, hear live music, learn about Princeton Climate Action Plan, get to know food from low-waste restaurants, and more. The festival will take place in the shopping center’s green courtyard. Pre-register at Eventbrite: http://bit.ly/SPGreenFest2019.

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At The Jewish Center of P r inceton on T hurs day, April 4 at 8 p.m., “Great Minds Salon: Using Israeli Technology To Take On The World” is the title of a presentation by Allon Bloch. Bloch will describe his experiences in building companies such as the small business website and infrastructure platform Wix, which has a multi-billiondollar value on Nasdaq; the online car retailer Vroom; and K, an emerging A Idriven primary care digital health company. He will detail how he leverages Israeli technical expertise and creativity to build global companies, and why he enjoys being “the David that takes on Goliath” in every industry he enters. Block was previously coCEO of Wix and is currently a board member, and CEO and co-founder of Vroom. He is the co-founder and CEO of K Health. He previously worked at as a partner at venture capital firm JVP, where he was an early backer of Cyberark and worked at McKinsey & Co. He holds degrees from Columbia University and Tel Aviv University. The Jewish Center is at 435 Nassau Street. The talk is open to the community. Admission for non-members is $5. Dessert will be served.

Discussions to be Held On “White Fragility”

Not In Our Town Princeton (NIOTPrinceton) will hold a series of discussions on the best-selling book White Fragility by sociologist Robin DiAngelo. They will be held on April 10, 17, and 24, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Based on her years of experience holding workshops and teaching cultural diversity and social justice, DiAngelo clearly describes the difficulty white people have engaging in conversations about race and racism. She suggests ways to gain “racial stamina” to participate without getting defensive, feeling angry, or withdrawing altogether. Everyone is welcome to participate in any or all of the programs, to be led by social justice activists Patricia Deeney and Jim Weber. NIOT Princeton is a multiracial, multi-faith group of individuals who stand together for racial justice and inclusive communities. Labyrinth Books is offering a 15 percent discount on the book. For information: www.NIOTPrinceton.org or Email: info@niotprinceton.org.

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Dining & Entertainment CINEMA REVIEW

Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase

2

Sophia Lillis Shines as Teen Sleuth in Adaptation of To: Keene Classic ___________________________ After the untimely death of his wife, Carson Drew decided he and his daughter Nancy (Sophia Lillis) might benefit from a change of scenery. So, they moved from Chicago to an idyllic oasis in suburbia called River Heights. The relocation proved to be far more of a challenge for Nancy than her civil rights attorney father, a pillar of the legal community, since the 16-year-old found herself having to adjust to a new school. Plus, the picture-perfect town seemed pretty dull, at first blush, to a thrill-seeker born with a sense of adventure. When we’re introduced to our heroine during the opening credits, she’s careening around corners on a skateboard, the driving soundtrack repeating the refrain, “I’m more than just a girl!” And after star Sophia Lillis takes off her helmet and shakes her fiery red mane in the wind, one can’t help but notice her uncanny resemblance to a young Amy Adams. But I digress. Fortunately, it doesn’t take long for Nancy to find a couple of kindred souls in George (Zoe Renee) and Bess (Mackenzie Graham), classmates also saddled with a low social status.

Continuing Please Bess is being teased by “boy most Derek (Evan Us (R) From:likely” _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ Castelloe). Feisty Nancy puts an end to the bullying by setTransit (NR) is a proof oftoyour ting up a stunt that turns his skinHere blue. Sure, she has do ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Ends Thursday phone some community service for the prank, it solidifies her Pleasebut check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: Apollo 11 (G) relationship with Bess and George. International Cinema Series (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) All of the above is prologue for the ensuing case of The Capernaum (R) the theatre Hidden Staircase, a multi-layered mystery which holds up at 5:30PM Phone number when � Fax number � Address Thu, Apr � 4Expiration Date well for story published in 1930.�The plot thickens Limited Engagement Flora (Linda Lavin) asks Nancy and company to investigate (924-7444) the paranormal activity inside her scary old mansion, the Ruben Brandt, Collector (R) Twin Elms. Fri, Apr 5 at 4:30PM Is the house haunted, or might this merely be a hoax Sat, Apr 6 at 4:30PM for listings and the handiwork of a revenge-minded Derek? A delightful National Theater Live whodunit tale of female empowerment. Allelujah! Very Good (H H H). Rated PG for peril, mild epithets, Sat, Apr 5 at 1:00PM and times. mature themes, and suggestive material. Running time: 89 Art on Screen minutes. Production Companies: Red 56/A Very Good ProYoung Picasso (NR) duction, Inc. Distributor: Warner Brothers Pictures. Thank you. Wed, Apr 10 at 7:30PM —Kam Williams Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

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MYSTERY AT TWIN ELMS: Nancy Drew (Sophia Lillis, left) investigates paranormal activity inside an old mansion owned by Flora (Linda Lavin) in “Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase.” (Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers Pictures)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 34

Upcoming Event “Reflecting on Our Past: The Value of Public Art”

Walter Hood Creative director and founder, Hood Design Studio Thursday, April 4 4:30 p.m. Friend Center Room 101 Reception to follow.

Acclaimed artist Walter Hood has designed a new installation about President Woodrow Wilson, representing both positive and negative aspects of his legacy. It will be installed on Scudder Plaza beside Robertson Hall in Summer 2019.

Due to construction, no events are occurring in Robertson Hall. Check event locations carefully.

S TA F F O R D L I T T L E L E C T U R E

Anita Hill

Attorney and Brandeis University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Co-sponsored by

April 18, 2019 8 p.m., Richardson Auditorium FREE TICKET REQUIRED Tickets for Princeton University members will be distributed at the University Ticketing Office in Frist Campus Center between 12 and 5 pm. Distribution to Students begins Tuesday, April 2, with a limit of one ticket per TigerCard (individuals can present a maximum of two TigerCards). Distribution to Staff/Faculty will begin Thursday, April 4 (again, an individual can present up to two TigerCards). General Public Tickets will be available starting at 12 pm on Monday April 8 online at tickets.princeton.edu or through the University Ticketing Office, with a limit of two tickets per person.

http://lectures.princeton.edu

AT THE CINEMA The Aftermath (R for sexuality, nudity, violence, and some disturbing images). Adaptation of Rhidian Brook’s best-seller of the same name, set in the ruins of Hamburg in 1946, chronicling the tensions which arise when a German widower (Alexander Skarsgard) with a troubled daughter (Flora Thiemann) is forced to surrender his mansion to the British colonel (Jason Clarke) in charge of rebuilding the city. With Keira Knightley, Fionn O’Shea, and Kate Phillips. (In English and Russian with subtitles.) Apollo 11 (Unrated). IMAX documentary revisiting NASA’s historic 1969 mission, the first spaceflight to land on the moon. Featuring archival footage of astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. The Beach Bum (R for pervasive profanity, graphic sexuality, and drug and alcohol abuse). Matthew McConaughey plays the title character in this screwball comedy revolving around the misadventures of a hedonistic rebel who lives by his own rules. With Snoop Dogg, Isla Fisher, Martin Lawrence, Jonah Hill, and Zac Efron. (In English and Spanish with subtitles.) The Best of Enemies (PG-13 for violence, mature themes, racial epithets, and a sexual reference). Drama, set in Durham, North Carolina, in the sixties, based on Osha Gray Davidson’s best-seller of the same name recounting the unlikely, real-life friendship forged between a Ku Klux Klansman (Sam Rockwell) and a civil rights activist (Taraji P. Henson) on opposing sides of a protracted school desegregation fight. With Anne Heche, Wes Bentley, and Bruce McGill. Captain Marvel (PG-13 for action, violence, and brief suggestive language). Twenty-first installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe stars Brie Larson in the title role as a former fighter pilot turned superhero who finds herself at the center of the maelstrom when a galactic conflict erupts on Earth between two alien races. Cast includes Samuel L. Jackson, Gemma Chan, Annette Bening, and Djimon Hounson. Dumbo (PG for peril, action, mature themes, and mild epithets). Family-oriented fantasy about a baby elephant with big ears who’s the laughingstock of the circus until it is discovered that he can fly. Co-starring Colin Farrell, Danny DeVito, Alan Arkin, Eva Green, and Michael Keaton. Everybody Knows (R for profanity). Introspective drama about a married woman (Penelope Cruz) who rendezvous with an ex-boyfriend (Javier Bardem) to reminisce about what might have been when she returns to her tiny hometown without her husband (Ricardo Darin) for her younger sister’s (Inma Cuesta) wedding. With Eduard Fernandez, Barbara Lennie, and Elvira Minguez. (In Spanish, English, and Catalan with subtitles.) Five Feet Apart (PG-13 for profanity, mature themes, and suggestive material). Romance drama about a couple of teenagers with cystic fibrosis (Haley Lu Richardson and Cole Sprouse) who fall in love while been treated in a hospital. With Moises Arias, Parminder Nagra, and Claire Forlani. Gloria Bell (R for sexuality, nudity, profanity, and drug use). Julianne Moore star as the title character in this romance drama as a free-spirited divorcee who unexpectedly finds a new love (John Turturro) at an L.A. nightclub. Ensemble cast includes Michael Cera, Rita Wilson, Sean Astin, Brad Garrett, and Jeanne Tripplehorn. Hotel Mumbai (R for profanity, bloody images, and pervasive violence). Factbased drama recounting the 2008 terrorist attack at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel by radical Islamists which claimed 174 innocent lives. Co-starring Dev Patel, Armie Hammer, Amandeep Singh, and Jason Isaacs. (In English, Hindi, Punjabi, Marathi, Greek, Russian, Arabic, Urdu, and Persian with subtitles.) How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (PG for action and mild rude humor). Final installment in the animated fantasy trilogy finds Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) and Toothless embarking on an epic journey to protect their peaceful village from the darkest threat it has ever faced. Voice cast includes America Ferrara, Cate Blanchett, Jonah Hill, Kristen Wiig, Gerard Butler, and Craig Ferguson. A Madea Family Funeral (PG-13 for profanity, crude sexuality, and pervasive drug use). Tyler Perry’s back in drag as a sassy granny for this raucous comedy set in rural Georgia where a joyous family reunion is unexpectedly marred by tragedy. Co-starring Cassi Davis, Patrice Lovely, and Mike Tyson. The Mustang (R for profanity, violence, and drug use). Rehabilitation drama about a convicted felon (Matthias Schoenaerts) who is given a shot at redemption when he is placed in a horse training program run by a no-nonsense vet (Bruce Dern). With Jason Mitchell, Connie Britton, and Josh Stewart. Pet Sematary (R for profanity, violence, and bloody images). Remake of the 1989 horror film based on the Stephen King best-seller about a doctor (Jason Clarke) who discovers a mysterious burial ground in the woods near his new home, after relocating his family from Boston to Maine. Principal cast includes Amy Seimetz, John Lithgow, Jete Laurence, Lucas Lavoie, and Hugo Lavoie. Shazam! (PG-13 for profanity, intense action, and suggestive material). Adaptation of the DC Comics series about a street-smart, 14-year-old orphan (Asher Angel) who morphs into a superhero just by shouting “Shazam!” Origins tale finds him learning to harness his powers with the help of his foster brother (Jack Dylan Grazer) prior to a showdown with a proverbial evil wizard (Mark Strong) bent on world domination. Ensemble cast includes Zachary Levi, Djimon Hounsou, Meagan Good, Adam Brody, and Michelle Borth. Transit (Unrated). Adaptation of Anna Segher’s novel of the same name, set in Marseilles, about a German refugee (Franz Rogowski) who falls in love with the widow (Paula Beer) of the recently-deceased writer whose identity he’s assumed. Cast includes Godehard Giese, Lilien Batman, and Maryam Zaree. (In German, French, and sign language.) Unplanned (R for disturbing images). Adaptation of Abby Johnson’s (Ashley Bratcher) memoir of the same name chronicling her transition from Planned Parenthood spokesperson to anti-abortion activist. With Brooks Ryan, Robia Scott, and Jared Lotz. Us (R for violence, terror, and profanity). Jordan Peele wrote and directed this suspense thriller, set in Santa Cruz, about a vacationing family that finds itself haunted by identical strangers. Co-starring Lupita Nyong’o, Winston Duke, Elisabeth Moss, and Anna Diop. Wonder Park (PG for action and mature themes). Animated fantasy about a motherless 10-year-old (Brianna Denski) who discovers that the magical amusement park she’s been imagining really exists in the forest outside of her math camp. Voice cast includes Jennifer Garner, Matthew Broderick, Kenan Thompson, John Oliver, and Dr. Ken Jeong. —Kam Williams


Wednesday, April 3 7-9 p.m.: Montgomer y Health Equity Forum at the Montgomery Municipal Building, 2261 Route 206, Belle Mead. RSVP is requested but not required. Panel discussion with health leaders. Call (908) 359-8211 x227 or email health@twp.montgomery.nj.us. Thursday, April 4 10 a.m.: The 55-Plus Club meets at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. “Suddenly, it’s 1976 All Over Again: Reflections on an election two generations ago that may foretell 2020” is the topic of a presentation by Rutgers professor Ross Baker. Free. 8 p.m.: The Takacs String Quartet performs at Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University. $10-$55. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Friday, April 5 9:45 a.m.: The Piano Teachers Forum meets at Jacobs Music, 2540 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Jazz pianist Jeremy Siskin gives a presentation. Coffee at 9:15 a.m. 1 p.m.: At Princeton Senior Resource Center, the film Crazy Rich Asians will be screened. Free, but registration is required. princetonsenior.org or (609) 924-7108. Saturday, April 6 9-11 a.m.: Help the Princeton Environmental Commission and Watershed Institute clean up Grover Park, 301 North Harrison Street. 9-11 a.m.: Nature walk at Herrontown Woods, co-led by science teacher Mark Manning and Friends of Herrontown Woods President Steve Hiltner. Meet at the main Herrontown Woods parking lot, off Snowden Lane, across from the Smoyer Park entrance. Water-resistant shoes recommended. Walk will conclude with refreshments next to Veblen House. FOHW.org. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market at Windsor Athletic Club, 99 Clarksville Road. Music by George & Eddie; Fresh Food Drive to benefit Arm in Arm Food Pantries. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org. 10 a.m.: Family & Friends

Winery Sunday Music Series presents Maggs and Bud. www.terhuneorchards.org. 2 p.m.: Trinity Church Rocky Hill, 1 Park Avenue, screens Quakers, The Quiet Revolutionaries, followed by Q&A with filmmaker Janet Gardner of Rocky Hill. 2 p.m.: Guided tours of Lambertville by the Lambertville Historical Society. Meet in front of Marshall House, 60 Bridge Street. Free. Visit lambertvillehistoricalsociety. org for full schedule of tours. 2:30 p.m.: “Music That Tells a Story,” faculty concert of The New School for Music Study, at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. Stories narrated by students; music of Granados, Ravel, Prokofiev, Brahms, others. Free. 5 p.m.: At Dorothea’s House, 120 John Street, Princeton University graduate Katherine Wilson talks about her memoir, Only in Naples: Lessons in Food and Famiglia from My Italian Mother-inlaw. Free. Monday, April 8 1 p.m.: At Monroe Township Library, 4 Municipal Plaza, Monroe, Chamber Music for Winds. Free. 2 p.m.: At Princeton Senior Resource Center, free CPR workshop on adults and children. Family members, friends, and members of the community will learn CPR. Free, registration required. princetonsenior.org or (609) 924-7108. Tuesday, April 9 7:30 p.m.: Israeli dancing at The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street. $10 for members, $12 others. With instructor Vera Galleid. thejewishcenter.org. Wednesday, April 10 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: Princeton Innovation Center Biolabs and Fox Rothschild LLP host a free Lunch & Learn at 303A College Road East. The topic is the state of Korean clinical trials in both the U.S. and Korea. RSVP by April 8 to princetonbiolabs.com. 7 p.m.: White Fragility: Discussion on the difficulty of discussing race by Not in Our Town, at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Free. 8 p.m.: Torah on Tap, at KIXX Sports Bar, 4591 Route 27, Kingston. Sponsored by The Jewish Center of Princeton. thejewishcenter.org.

The Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater presents

PHÈDRE directed by SUZANNE AGINS featuring J SANSONE ’19

a translation by MARC DECITRE after JEAN RACINE

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Calendar

CPR-Adult/Child/Infant at SNAP Fitness, 2025 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. A Penn Medicine expert will provide information on how to perform CPR and help someone who is choking. Free. Register at (609) 371-7627. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market at Roebling Wireworks, 675 South Clinton Avenue, Trenton. Vendors, food trucks, beer garden, live music. 10:30 a.m.: Wine & Yoga at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. www.terhuneorchards. com. 1 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards on Cold Soil Road, Pam Mount leads a behind-the-scenes tour of how Terhune protects the air, soil, and water on its 200acre preserved farm using sustainable practices. www. terhuneorchards.com. 4-6 p.m.: At the American College of Orgonomy, 4419 Route 27, “All People Great and Small: Readings by Dr. Peter Crist.” $45. (732) 8211144 or email aco@orgonomy. org. 6 p.m.: The film Billboard will be screened at Acme Screening Room, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville. Followed by discussion with filmmaker Zeke Zelker and a Supper Club at Liberty Hall Plaza. www.acmescreeningroom.org. 7:30 p.m.: “The Broadway Musical Heroine,” with cabaret singer Katie Welsh, at the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. $15. Tickets at eventbrite.com or at the door. Sunday, April 7 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market at Roebling Wireworks, 675 South Clinton Avenue, Trenton. Vendors, food trucks, beer garden, live music. 11 a.m.: Sunday Poetry Brunch with Dara-Lyn Shrager, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. princetonlibrary.org. 12:30-2 p.m.: J-Serve, at Beth El Synagogue, 50 Maple Stream Road, East Windsor. International Day of Jewish Youth Service, for teens in grades 6-12 helping in a variety of social action projects. Registration is required at jserve. org/ 2019projectregistration/ princeton. 1-4 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road,

The Nassau Inn presents

A PRINCETON WEDDING SHOWCASE!

PC: Jaye Kogut Photography

Sunday, April 7, 2019 at 12pm Runway Fashion Show • Vendor Exhibits • Menu Tastings • Swag Bags Door Prizes • Giveaways • Exclusive Offers & Much More!

GRAND DOOR PRIZE: $1,000 AMERICAN AIRLINE VOUCHER

Come prepared to book your dream wedding and receive our exclusive pricing of 15% off – one day only!

www.PrincetonWeddingShow.com

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Upcoming Events

Wednesday, April 3 4:30 p.m. Friend Center Room 101 Book sale and signing to follow.

Thursday, April 4 4:30 p.m. Friend Center Room 101 Reception to follow.

Monday, April 8 4:30 p.m. Friend Center Room 101

“Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead”

Cecile Richards Former president, Planned Parenthood

“Reflecting on Our Past: The Value of Public Art”

Walter Hood Creative director and founder, Hood Design Studio

“Is Polarizing Partisanship the New Normal?

Jeff Flake Former U.S. Senator (R-Arizona)

APRIL 2019

5, 6, 11, 12 & 13 at 8 pm BERLIND THEATRE at McCarter Theatre Center

TICKETS/INFORMATION: arts.princeton.edu

Due to construction, no events are occurring in Robertson Hall. Check event locations carefully.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 36

S ports

Princeton Softball in Thick of Ivy Pennant Race, Helped by Power Surge from Sophomore Meyer

M

ackenzie Meyer came into last weekend mired in a batting slump as the Princeton University softball team hosted Columbia for a three-game set. The Princeton sophomore outfielder had gone 2-for-17 in her previous six games as her batting average dipped to .175. But with Princeton trailing Columbia 2-0 in the second inning last Friday afternoon, Meyer found her stoke blasting a homer over the right field fence. “The first pitch was high and outside and my swing was a little late,” said Meyer, a 5’8 native of Lakewood Ranch, Fla. reflecting on her at-bat. “She pitched me the same pitch the next one and I said ‘I don’t want to sit back and let it be a strike,’ so I just swung. When I hit it, it was, shoot, this could go out.” Meyer’s blast got the Tigers rolling as they pulled away to an 11-5 triumph over the Lions. “Any time somebody comes up and does something for the team in that way, it continues with the others,” said Meyer, who ended up going with 3-for-4 with a homer, double, three runs scored, and three RBIs. “We had a couple of huge hits. Megan [Donahey] has been on fire. It was a good

win. Everybody did their job and I think that is why we won. Everybody took care of what needed to be taken care of.” Coming off a superb freshman campaign which saw her hit .326 and earn All-Ivy honors, Meyer wasn’t fazed by her slow start this spring. “It was just coming into the box; today is a new day and you don’t want to ride the highs or ride the lows and just to have fun with it,” said Meyer, who didn’t have as much fun on Saturday as Columbia rebounded to sweep a doubleheader, edging Princeton 2-1 and 5-4. “I think a lot of us do better when we are relaxed. I have great teammates behind me who are nothing but encouraging.” The Tigers are looking to do better collectively after a tough 2018 season which saw Princeton go 10-29 overall and 8-13 Ivy after winning the league title the previous two seasons. “I think this year we want to win for each other so badly that we are not going to let other teams decide that for us,” said Meyer. “We are going to do the things to make us successful and if we come up short then we work harder at practice the next week. I think this year it is just getting back to that mindset.” Princeton head coach Lisa

Van Ackeren credited Meyer with helping to spark the win for the Tigers. “MacKenzie changed the tone of our offense with that homer and everyone followed her,” said Van Ackeren. “That was really cool and she wasn’t done yet. She had two huge hits. The kid is so committed to the process. I think she had some sophomore expectations after a really strong freshman year and she is finding her mindset again. That is super important and this is the time of the year to find it.” Van Ackeren was thrilled to see the Princeton offense pound out hits all afternoon long. “The most proud I was of them was for scoring against different pitchers, that is a really good indication that we are focused on us and the right things,” said Van Ackeren, whose team piled up 11 hits in the win. “We don’t sit back on the pitching change and take it easy the rest of the game. We scored against every pitcher and I think that is an important note. Junior outfielder Megan Donahey has played an important role in getting things going at the top of the order. “She does such a good job, she has been that way her whole career, you just know what you are going

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to get,” said Van Ackeren. Donahey went 2-for-3 with a run and an RBI in the win, and ended the weekend hitting at .362 for the season. “She is a leadoff hitter to her core. She does a really good job and even if she doesn’t get on base, she gives good information. She sets the table and puts pressure on the defense.” With Princeton, now 6-15 overall and 3-3 Ivy League and trailing first place Columbia by two games with 15 more league contests to play, Van Ackeren credits the team’s improvement in the circle this spring to keeping it in the league race. “Pitching is everything and we have two legit starters,” said Van Ackeren, referring to sophomore Allie Reynolds, the winning pitcher against Columbia, and freshman Ali Blanchard, who already has a college no-hitter to her credit. “We have got Riley [Wilkinson] back at closer. We just have a nice rounded out staff this year and that really helps us. If you don’t have pitching, it is really tough to win ball games.” After having gone through a tough 2018 campaign, Princeton is hungry to make another title run. “They are fired up, they are a little bit angry about last year,” said Van Ackeren, whose team hosts a doubleheader against Rider on April 3 before heading to Brown this weekend for a three-game set with a doubleheader slated for

MAC ATTACK: Princeton University softball player Mackenzie Meyer takes a swing in recent action. Last Friday, sophomore outfielder Meyer with 3-for-4 with a homer, double, three runs scored, and three RBIs to help Princeton defeat Columbia 11-5 in the opener of a three-game set between the foes. The Lions rebounded to sweep a doubleheader a day later, edging Princeton 2-1 and 5-4. The Tigers, now 6-15 overall and 3-3 Ivy League, host a doubleheader against Rider on April 3 before heading to Brown this weekend for a three-game set with a doubleheader slated for April 6 and a single game on April 7. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) April 6 and a single game on April 7. “They came into this year saying we need to prove who we are again. I think that is the tone that our senior class has set and our captains are giving great leadership and the team is willing to follow in a positive direction.” Meyer, for her part, believes things are headed in

the right direction for the Tigers. “We came back after two Ivy championships and learned something new last year,” said Meyer. “It helped us this year to transition into a team that comes out and fights for every out of the game.” —Bill Alden


Bill Tierney didn’t get the chance to hone in on his Denver Universit y men’s lacrosse team as it went through its pregame paces before its contest at Princeton last week. With legendar y former Princeton head coach Tierney returning on March 26 for his first game at Class of 1952 Stadium since he left the program in 2009 after guiding the Tigers to six NCAA titles in 22 seasons, the warmup turned into an extended meet and greet session. Wearing a crimson and white Denver ball cap and Oakley sunglasses, the silver haired Tierney, 66, grinned broadly as he chatted with former colleagues on the field, shook hands with old friends, and responded to well wishes shouted from supporters in the stands. Before the opening faceoff, there was a special introduction involving Princeton Director of Athletics Mollie Marcoux Samaan and former player Ed Calkins ’92, a member of Tierney’s first national championships squad, which detailed some of the Hall of Fame coach’s achievements while leading the Tigers, including 10 Final 4 appearances and 14 Ivy titles in addition to the six national crowns. Tierney was touched by all the attention and the kind words. “It was very nice,” said Tierney, whose sons Brendan and Trevor played for him at Princeton on national championship teams. “It was wonderful of Princeton how I have been treated by everybody. The way Matt [Princeton head coach Matt Madalon] handled this whole situation was first class.” The glow, though, didn’t last long after the opening face-off. “It was good to be back, once the game started, it was no different than any other game,” said Tierney, who guided Denver to the national title in 2015, becoming the only coach to lead two different lax programs to NCA A crowns. “They score a goal in 45 seconds, you could tell it was going to be a long night then.” It turned out to be an exciting night for Princeton as it pulled out a 14-13 thriller over the ninth-ranked Pioneers. Princeton junior attackman Philip Robertson acknowledged that the Tigers were fired up to test themselves against Tierney. “It was definitely a special

game; Coach T is a legendar y coach and he builds fantastic programs,” said Robertson. “Any time you can go up against a ranked opponent like Denver, it is a big game. It was Tuesday night under the lights and we were real excited, especially coming off of a tough loss to Yale (14-10 on March 23). We were ready. The Princeton attack was relentless on the evening, firing 41 shots with 25 on goal. “Everyone felt a little light on their feet,” added Robertson. “We were hungry; we knew that we had to get more shots on cage, do a little bit better shooting and attack a little more aggressively. I felt like we played faster tonight, we played great as a team.” While Robertson misfired on some first half opportunities, he came through down the stretch, scoring late in the third quarter and early in the fourth as Princeton broke a 10-10 tie to go up 12-10 and never gave up the lead after that, “It is frustrating sometimes, but you have got to forget and just move forward,” said Robertson. “We did a great job moving as a unit and it really helped get everybody open. Any time that we can get everyone involved, it gets everyone excited with that electric feeling.” Princeton head coach Matt Madalon felt good about how his team kept its focus in the face of the hoopla surrounding Tierney’s return. “Our guys really try to

make it about us even with as much as hype as there was about this game,” said Madalon. “Coach T is an incredible man and an incredible coach, but they knew that they needed to keep practicing and training and doing whatever they could to get the win. I am proud of these guys. It was a gutty win.” Coming into the evening mired in a three-game losing streak, Princeton badly needed the victory over the Pioneers. “We talk about the process over and over,” said Madalon. “It is very nice for them to be rewarded with a win because over the last couple weeks, we as a coaching staff have known they are getting better but it is tough for young guys to understand that until they get back in the win column.” Knowing the pedigree of the Princeton players and the program he played such a key role in building, Tierney sensed that the Tigers would rise to the occasion. “We missed a lot of shots; they are tough to cover,” said Tierney, who earned the 400th victor y of his storied career when Denver defeated Georgetown 16-9 last Saturday. “Sowers is tough and they have three or four offense players who are really quick and took advantage of what we were trying to do and scored one more goal than we did. I think they were a really good 2-5 team that didn’t deserve to be 2-5. When you have all of these games where you lose at the end, eventually it is going to flip your way. We won one the other day (7-6 over Towson on March 23) and today it flips the other way.” —Bill Alden

RETURN ENGAGEMENT: Bill Tierney stalks the sidelines last week as he guided his Denver University men’s lacrosse team against Princeton. It marked the return of the legendary former Tiger head coach for his first game at Class of 1952 Stadium since he left the Tiger program in 2009 after 22 seasons and six NCAA titles. Princeton, though, made it a tough homecoming for Tierney, pulling out a 14-13 win over the ninth-ranked Pioneers. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

PU Men’s Lax Falters Late in Loss to Brown, Digging Hole in Push to Make Ivy Tournament After pulling out a dramatic 14-13 win over No. 9 Denver University to start t he week, t he Pr inceton University men’s lacrosse team picked up where it left off as it hosted Brown last Saturday afternoon. Princeton jumped out to a 4 - 0 lead as A lexander Vardaro, Emmet Cordrey, Philip Robertson, and Michael Sowers all found the back of the net in the first 10 minutes of the contest. But things went downhill from there for the Tigers in the critical Ivy League clash. The Bears outscored Princeton 6-1 over the rest of the half to forge ahead 6-5 at intermission. Brown extended its lead to 8 - 6 early in the third quar ter before senior attacker Cordrey scored two straight goals to make it 8-8. The Bears responded with a 6-1 run to pull away to a 14-10 win. A glum Princeton head coach Matt Madalon tipped his hat to Brow n. “They just did a good job, they ran a little harder for a little longer out there,” said Madalon, ref lecting on a contest which saw Brown end up with a 33-22 edge in ground balls and 16-11 in face-offs. “They did a good job hitting shots and their goalie made some saves down the stretch.” In dropping to 3-6 overall and 0-3 Ivy, Princeton misfired at the offensive end and committed defensive lapses at critical times.

“They capitalized on opportunities and we didn’t,” said Madalon. “We hit the pipes, we hit the goalie, and made careless tur novers. Defensively, we need to do a better job in our one-on- one matchups.” With Princeton playing at Stony Brook on April 6 and hosting Siena in April 9, the Tigers will use the pair of non-league games to sharpen up. “I am looking to shore up some systems and shore up some personnel and start playing a hell of a lot better

lacrosse,” said Madalon. After that, Princeton will he ad i nto a t h re e - ga m e league stretch drive where its back is to the wall as it can’t afford another loss in order to place in the top four and make the Ivy postseason tournament. “It has always been our M.O., the team is never not going to fight,” asser ted Madalon. “These guys will be ready to get back to work. We dug ourselves a hole and the only way to go from here is to dig yourself out of it.” —Bill Alden

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Legendary Coach Tierney Enjoys Homecoming But PU Men’s Lax Spoils Return by Edging Denver

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PU Sports Roundup PU Swim Coach Orr Announces Retirement

Legendary Princeton University men’s swimming and diving head coach C. Rob Orr, a man whose name is synonymous with both championship-level coaching and Tiger Swimming, has announced his retirement as the head coach of the program, effective at the end of the academic year. Orr just completed his 40th season as the Princeton head coach by leading the team to a second-place finish in the Ivy League and guiding freshman Raunak Khosla to an All-America finish at the 2019 NCA A Championships. He retires with 330 dual meet victories — the third-most ever for a Division I men’s swimming coach — and 23 Ivy

L e ag u e Cha mpion s h ip s, including seven of the last 11 titles. Under Orr’s leadership, Princeton produced 24 AllAmerican relays, as well as 38 individual All-Americans. He also coached several Olympians and NCAA champions, including 1988 Olympic 200 backstroke finalist Dan Veatch ‘87, 1992 Olympic double gold medalist Nelson Diebel, 2000 and 2004 Olympian Juan Pablo Valdivieso ‘04, and 2008 Olympians Bryan Tay ‘12 and current assistant coach Doug Lennox ‘09. The third-winningest active coach in the Princeton athletic department, Orr won the inaugural Ivy League Coach of the Year honor in 2015 after a career filled with EISL Coach of the Year awards. In 2015, Orr received the prestigious Richard E. Steadman Award, which is conferred annually to a swimming or diving coach in high school, club, or university ranks who,

in the opinion of the CSCAA, has done the most to spread happiness the sport of swimming and diving. Orr’s two NCAA championships came between 1989 and 1990, and both were in the 200 medley relay. The latter was the 1990 foursome of Mike Ross ‘90, Ty Nelson ‘91, Leroy Kim ‘93 and Erik Osborn ‘90, who set an American record in capturing the 200-yard medley relay. Ross, Nelson, Rich Korhammer ‘89 and Rob Musslewhite ‘92 won the event in 1989. Before that victory, Princeton hadn’t won an NCAA title Charlie Campbell won the 200 back in 1972.

PU Women’s Lax Falls at Maryland

Elizabeth George starred in a losing cause as the No. 16 Princeton University women’s lacrosse team fell 15-7 at No. 2 Maryland last Wednesday. Senior star George tallied three goals and an assist as the Tigers dropped to 5-3 overall.

CHINA SYNDROME: Princeton University men’s hockey player Alex Riche controls the puck in a game this winter during his senior season. Last week, star forward Riche signed a two-year contract with the Kunlun Red Star of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL). Based out of Beijing and Shanghai, Kunlun has competed in the KHL since the 2016-17 season. The KHL is widely considered to be the premier professional hockey league in Russia,  Europe,  and  Asia, and second in the world behind the National Hockey League. Although born and raised in Canada, Riche (whose mother is Chinese) will also  get the opportunity to represent China’s Olympic Hockey Team for the 2022 Olympics in Beijing and would become the first Princeton men’s hockey player to compete in the Olympics since 1948. Riche had 75 points in his Princeton career, scoring 26 goals and adding 49 assists. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Princeton plays at Dart- Princeton Women’s Golf mouth on April 6. Wins Harvard Invitational Annabelle Chang led the Princeton Baseball way as the Princeton UniGoes 1-2 at Harvard Max West, Joe Flynn and versity women’s golf team Nadir Lewis powered the placed first at the Harvard Princeton University baseball Invitational last weekend at team to a 16-9 win at Har- the Orange County National vard last saturday as it sal- Golf Center’s Crooked Cat vaged a win in a three-game course in Winter Garden, Fla. set versus the Crimson. Sophomore Chang won West went 2-for-4 with a homer and two RBIs for her first individual title as t h e T i g e r s w h i l e F ly n n a Tiger, turning in a belowwent 3-for-5 with a homer, par card in all three rounds three runs and three RBIs with a pair of 71s Saturday and Lewis also went 3-for- and a 70 Sunday to finish at 5 with a homer, three runs a 4-under 212, one stroke and three RBIs. Earlier in in front of junior teammate the weekend set, Princeton Maya Walton and Penn’s fell 12-0 on Friday and 5-3 Christina Park at -3. In the team standings, in the first game of the douPrinceton carded a score bleheader on Saturday. T he Tigers, now 5 -15 of a +16 880 to end up 11 overall and 2-4 Ivy League, shots in front of co-runnersplay at Monmouth on April up Penn and Harvard in a 3 before hosting Columbia field that included six of the for a three-game set with seven Ivy League teams. Princeton’s three-round a doubleheader slated for April 6 and a singles game score of 880 on the par-72, 6,163 -yard Crooked Cat on April 7. track was its best ever for PU Swimmer Khosla a three-round event, surExcels at NCAAs passing the 884 Princeton C u l m i n at i n g a s te l l a r turned in at Old Dominion’s freshman campaign on a Princess Anne Invitational high, Princeton University on a par-70, 5,824-yard m en’s s w i m m er R au na k course last fall. Khosla placed placing 11th The Tigers are next in acin the 400 individual medley at the 2019 NCAA Champi- tion when they compete in the Match Madness at Fox onships. Hollow in Branchburg from Khosla, who set the Princ- April 6-7./ eton 400 IM record during his runner-up finish in the Princeton Open Rowing event at the Iv y League Tops Brown, Ohio State Starting its season on a Championships, broke that mark one more time during high note, the Princeton Unithe Friday prelims, and he versity women’s open varsity earned All-America honor- 8 crew defeated Brown and able mention in the process. Ohio State last Saturday on Khosla cut .12 of a second lake Carnegie to retain the off his record time by going Class of 1987 Trophy. 3:42.22 to place 13th in the Princeton’s top boat covprelims, and he moved up to ered the 2,000-meter course 11th in the finals in a time in a time of 6:15.8 with of 3:42.57. Brown coming in second at Khosla is Princeton’s first 6:19.3 and individual men’s All-AmeriOhio State taking third in can since 2012, when Jon 6:19.5. Christensen earned firstThe Tigers host the Ivy team All-America honors in League Invitational on April the 200 breast. 7 at Lake Carnegie. Sophomore Colten Young PU Men’s Heavyweights continued his NCAA weekend by placing 42nd in the Defeat Georgetown Showing early promise, 1-meter final with a total Princeton University men’s score of 275.30 points. heavyweight varsity 8 crew topped Georgetown in its season opening regatta last Saturday on Lake Carnegie. Princeton posted a winning time of 5:47.9 over the 2,000 -meter course, with Georgetown coming in at 6:02.5. The Tigers host Navy on April 6 for the Navy-Princeton Rowing Cup.

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Tiger Men’s Lightweights Defeat Columbia

Coming through in an early season showdown, the Princeton University men’s lightweight varsity 8 crew defeated defending national champion and top-ranked Columbia last Saturday on Lake Carnegie to win the Campbell Cup. P r i n c e to n’s to p b o a t , which lost three times to the Lions last spring, clocked a winning time of 5:39.8 with Columbia coming in at 5:42.5. The Tigers to action when they host Dartmouth, Delaware, and Temple on April 6 in the race for the Diamond Challenge Cup.

Princeton Men’s Tennis Defeats Penn

Bill Duo and Payton Holden came up big as the Princeton University men’s tennis team defeated Penn 5-2 last Saturday in the Ivy League opener for both team. Duo posted a win at No. 5 singles and helped Princeton win the doubles while Holden was victorious at No. 6 singles and also came through in doubles. Princeton, now 17-6 overall and 1-0 Ivy, hosts Dartmouth on April 6 and Harvard on April 7.

Tiger Women’s Tennis Rallies to Edge Penn

Rallying from dropping the doubles point, the Princeton University women’s tennis team edged Penn 4-3 last Saturday in the Ivy League opener for both team. The Tigers got singles wins from Nathalie Rodilosso (No. 6), Grace Joyce (No. 3), Clare McKee(No. 4), and Brianna Shvets (No. 2) to pull out the match and improve to 12-4 overall and 1-0 Ivy. Princeton plays at Dartmouth on April 6 and at Harvard on April 7.

PU Women’s Water Polo Nips Wagner 11-10

Sparked by Amy Castellano, the No. 18 Princeton University women’s water polo team defeated No. 16 Wagner 11-10 last Saturday. Junior star Castellano chipped in four goals and an assist to help the Tigers improve to 16-7. P r i n c e ton plays S a i nt Francis on Apr il 6 and Michigan on April 7 with both games taking place in Cambridge, Mass.

PU Women’s Lightweights Fall to Stanford Tiger Men’s Volleyball Putting up a valiant fight, the Princeton Universit y Defeats George Mason

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women’s lightweight varsity 8 crew lost to perennial national champion and topranked Stanford in its season opener last Saturday on Lake Carnegie. Stanford took t he w in with a time of 6:27.1 on t he 2,0 0 0 -meter cours e with Princeton just behind in 6:30.1. The Tigers are next in ac-

Kendall Ratter came up big as the Princeton University men’s volleyball team defeated George Mason 3-1 last Friday Senior Ratter chipped in 13 kills and six blocks to help Princeton prevail 2522, 21-25, 25-18, 25-23. The Tigers, now 11-12 overall and 9-12 EIVA, host Harvard on April 5 and Sacred Heart on April 6.

Amended - Princeton Charter School will hold a Board of Trustees meeting on Wednesday, April 17, 2018 at 7P.M. located at 100 Bunn Drive in Princeton, NJ. This is place of the original advertised date of April 10, 2019. This is a public meeting and action may be taken.


For Dominic Capuano, coaching is a family business. “My dad coached in baseball for 30 years in the American Legion league and my uncle still coaches,” said Capuano. “I started coaching when was still in school, playing summer ball.” A f ter g raduat ing f rom The College of New Jersey in 2012, Capuano took a job as a physical education teacher at Johnson Park Elementary and then moved to Princeton High. Once at PHS, Capuano plunged into coaching, serving as an assistant for field hockey, girls’ hockey, and baseball. C ap u a n o’s e x p e r i e n c e pitching for the TCNJ baseball team inf luenced his coaching approach. “Everything I have done as a coach has always been based off of my college experience,” said Capuano. “How we did things in college is how I pretty much do things here. It changed me in every single way.You learn so much more when you are

playing a college sport because it is all year round. It has shaped me in every way.” This spring, Capuano is taking the helm of the PHS baseball program after Dave Roberts stepped down to spend more time with his young family. “Dave really helped me out, showing me different things and setting the program up for success in his last couple of years,” said Capuano, who enjoyed a successful head coaching debut as PHS routed Trenton 17-2 in its season opener last Monday. “He has been really helpful to me. I was a little shocked when he told me he was stepping down but then I was excited to follow him.” In adjusting to the head coaching role, Capuano is learning that it is an all-encompassing enterprise. “The biggest thing for me is that my mind doesn’t really shut off,” said Capuano, who is taking over a program that went 13-9 last year and advanced to the Mercer County Tournament semifinals.

“On my drive to work, I am thinking about things we have to do at practice. After practice, I am thinking about what we are going to do tomorrow. It is more of a full-time mental gig for me than anything else.” Looking ahead to his debut campaign, Capuano believes the PHS pitching staff can do some good things this spring, anchored by seniors Ben Amon and Teddy Durbin. “The pitching stands out as a strength, we are returning guys who did very well last year that are our leaders now,” said Capuano, noting that Amon and Durbin are serving as team captains along with classmate Tommy Reid. “They are going to be key to our success. Ben is coming along really well, finetuning things here or there and I know what I am going to get out of Teddy.” Capuano is hoping to get some good mound work out of some of his other veterans, “We have a bunch of junior and senior pitchers who

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are really going to be relied upon,” added Capuano, noting that junior Jay Ramirez, junior Aiden Regan, senior Holden Liv i, and senior Owen Seals should all get innings. “ T h e y m a y n o t h av e pitched too much but their progress has been great and they are really going to be trusted to close games for us.” PHS will be relying on senior leader Reid to jumpstart its hitting attack. “Tommy Reid is going to play a big role for us,” said Capuano of Reid, who went 2-for-4 with four runs scored and two RBIs in the win over Trenton. “He has gotten us some really good at bats in the scrimmages. He is going to be at the top of the order all year.” W hile Capuano is still fine-tuning his batting order, he believes that PHS can pile up runs. “We have got a lot of guys who have potential and some good things have happened,” said Capuano, who is expecting senior Eli Okoye, junior Guatam Chawla, sophomore Flynn Kinney, junior Justin Pormilli, along with Seals, Delany, and Durbin to provide punch. “We are still in the process of figuring out the order.” Capuano has figured out his defensive alignment, which will feature Chawla and freshman Carl Birge at catcher, freshman Kenny Schiavone at third, Kinney and Delaney up the middle at short and second, with Livi, Durbin and Seals sharing duties at first. In the out-

  

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field, Capuano has a crew consisting of Reid, Judd Petrone, Okoye, Livi, and Pormilli. In Capuano’s view, the key to PHS having another winning season could come down to developing team unity as much as the pitching, hitting, and fielding. “The big goal that we are talking about is having a culture of sticking together and

trusting each other,” said Capuano. “Teddy, Ben, and Tommy are doing good job of leading our team. They are the three guys that are going do it mentally and do it on the field. I do think there is starting to be a different attitude with the success we have had the last couple of years.” —Bill Alden

OPENING SALVO: Princeton High baseball player Tommy Reid follows thorough on a swing in a game last spring. Senior outfielder Reid helped PHS give new head coach Dominic Capuano a memorable debut as the Tigers routed Trenton 17-2 in its season opener last Monday. Reid went 2-for-4 with four runs scored and two RBIs in the win. In upcoming action, PHS hosts Piscataway on April 3, plays at Steinert on April 5 and Hightstown on April 6, and then hosts Notre Dame on April 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Continuing a Family Tradition of Coaching, Capuano Excited to Be Guiding PHS Baseball


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 40

With Senior Leaders Setting Positive Tone PHS Boys’ Lax Creating Family Feeling With the Princeton High boys’ lacrosse team coming off disappointing 5-12 campaign in 2018, Alex Park and his fellow veterans on the squad were determined to bring about an attitude adjustment around the program this spring. “There is a lot of hunger and we just focused on being positive,” said senior attackman and tri-captain Park. “We are creating a new culture here and it has really taken root. We are all being positive, we are all getting up for each other. We can see it already that it is working.” T h e u p b e at appr o a c h manifested itself last Wednesday in the season opener at WW/P-South as PHS jumped to a 3-0 lead

over the Pirates six minutes into the contest. “We are sharing the ball. It was all ball movement and just looking for the another guy and looking for the one more pass,” said Park. “It all started with our defense though. Our goalies ( Sam Brandt and Joe O’Donnell) had some stellar saves; the defense was totally solid.” Park proved to be the beneficiary that passing, ending up with four points on two goals and two assists as PHS went on to edge WW/P-S 7-5. “I can attribute that to the sharing the ball and the positivity,” said Park. “It was a team effort.” PHS showed a positive attitude down the stretch,

holding off a Pirate rally after building a 6-1 lead midway through the third quarter. “They came back on us and we were able to stick it out and just grind through it,” said Park. “We kept our heads about us, that was the most important thing.” Along with co-captains Carson Giles and D ylan Westerman, Park is stressing the importance of creating bonds that will last beyond this spring. “I am really just trying to build a positive base under me; I think all of our captains are doing the same thing,” said the Williams College-bound Park. “We have a very seniorheavy team. We are focusing on all the work we have put into four years and bringing up the younger guys and making it a family more than a team.” PHS head coach Chip Casto senses a family feeling developing around this year’s squad. “Carson, Alex, and Dylan have set an entirely different tone, it is very positive, very upbeat,” said Casto. “It is a different culture. When a team can run itself in certain phases, it is very beneficiary and they are doing that now. They love each

other and it is a great team.” Casto liked the way the PHS set the tone against WW/P-S with its early 3-0 run. “It was very nice way to start, I think you could see that our conditioning faded a little in the second half,” said Casto. “It is opening day, it is a scrappy day.” Holding of f a scrappy WW/P-S team was another good sign for the Tigers. “We talked about just being calm and running all of the things that we run and not going off the agenda at all,” said Casto. “We tried to keep tight on that and possess the ball.” T he emphasis on ball possession led to a number of players getting on the scoresheet. “There was a lot of balance, we are hoping for Alex to do the scoring and feeding,” said Casto, who got two goals apiece from sophomores Charles Hamit and Patrick McDonald against the Pirates. “Patrick is really intelligent out there. Will Doran is a freshman but plays like a much older guy. Dylan can shoot the ball.” Junior midfielder Ben Quinones sparked the defense, s cooping up 12 g rou nd balls. “Ben just owned the middle of the field, he is a legit D-I player; he is terrific,” said Casto. “We are plugging some

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holes from Ian [Jacobs] and Patrick [Jacobs ] going to Cornell and guys are stepping up.” While PHS suffered losses to Notre Dame (14-3 on March 30 ) and Princeton Day School (17-3 on April 1) after the opening day triumph, Casto expects his players to keep plugging away. “Without question, I have seen progress from last year in just the culture alone,” said Casto, whose team will look to get back on the winning track as it hosts North Hunterdon on April 4 and

Scotch Plains-Fanwood on April 6 before playing at Hopewell Valley on April 9. “We deal with mistakes and problems a lot better.” Park, for his part, believes that PHS will stick together this spring, no matter what. “We definitely have some stuff to work on but it was good seeing our offseason work being put to the test,” said Park. “We are being positive for our teammates, it is really about the team more than any one individual.” —Bill Alden

PARK AVENUE: Princeton High boys’ lacrosse player Alex Park heads to goal in recent action. Last Thursday, senior attacker and Williams College-bound Park tallied four points on two goals and to assists at PHS edged WW/P-South 7-5 in its season opener. The Tigers, who moved to 1-2 with a 17-3 loss to Princeton Day School last Monday, will look to get back on the winning track as they host North Hunterdon on April 4 and Scotch Plains-Fanwood on April 6 before playing at Hopewell Valley on April 9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Gabe Craven was looking to fit in last year as he joined the Hun School boys’ lacrosse team and took over the starting goalie role. “As a younger player last year, I was learning it all, being new to the program,” said Craven. Craven learned those lessons well, helping Hun win the state Prep A title, making 15 saves as Hun defeated Lawrenceville 9-6 in the championship game. This spring, Craven has assumed a take charge attitude. “I think I have done a better job of being a leader on the field,” said Craven, who has committed to attend the Naval Academy and play for its men’s lax program. “If we are not loud and playing hard, I have got to help pick them up.” Hosting PDS in its season opener, Hun played hard from the opening whistle, jumping out to a 3-0 lead on the way to a 13-5 triumph. “Whoever comes out and at tacks first, that really sets the tone for the game and makes a big difference down the stretch,” said Craven. “They are always a real good team. It is always a fight and you have to come out here and play your best.” The Hun defensive unit fought hard as it repeatedly stymied the Panther attack. “I really can’t do anything without my defense, they are out there and balling out,” said Craven, who ended up with 11 saves in the victory. “If they are not making stops with me, I am not going to play well. They help me feel comfortable out there because I know if [Jack] Ruddy or [Blake] Hansen is on a guy, they are probably going to make a stop. I thought I was seeing the ball really well; they are giving me the shots that I want. It is a unit.” Hun head coach MV Whitlow liked what he saw at the defensive end. “I was most pleased with the defensive effort because PDS does have some good weapons and I thought we defended them pretty well,” said Whitlow. “We gave Gabe the looks that we want to give him. He made the saves we needed and the defense played as a unit, which is good. They communicated well.” The Raider attack also looked very sharp, outscor-

ing PDS 5-1 in the third quarter to put the game out of reach. “We are happy to get out out of the blocks early to a fast start; I thought the decision-making on the field was veteran,” said Whitlow, who got five goals from senior star Devon Cowan. Junior Trevor Deubner, junior Grant Hansen, and senior Jake Wright chipped in two apiece. “We spread things around which was good, we were dynamic which is what we wanted to be.” W hitlow is happy with how his players have bonded. “The team chemistry is good, they believe in each other,” said Whitlow, whose

team topped Mercersberg Academy ( Pa.) 16 -2 last S at urday to improve to 2-0 and will host archival Lawrenceville on April 6 and then play at Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on April 8. “They respect each other; it is a consistency with these guys that they treat each other with a lot of respect.” Craven, for his part, sees that chemistry as fueling success this spring. “As a team we are a unit, hanging out everyday after school, getting excited for practice,” said Craven. “I think we can do some really special things this year.” —Bill Alden

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41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

With Goalie Craven Assuming Take Charge Role, Hun Boys’ Lacrosse Produces Promising 2-0 Start


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 42

Featuring Solid Defense, Potent Hitting, Hun Softball Sweeps Mercersburg In Opener Many coaches believe that defense wins championships and the Hun School softball team is testing that theory this spring. “Our defense has been very solid,” said Hun head coach Kathy Quirk, whose team went on its annual spring training trip to Florida in mid-March “The hitting has been starting to come around. We have some new, young kids so it is a little bit of a challenge but that is what is all about.” One of those young kids, freshman Lexi Murdock, will be handling the pitching duties for the Raiders along with senior Erin Harrigan.

“For a f re s h m a n, s h e throws very hard. She has a little bit of a control problem but is working hard everyday on it,” said Quirk. “She did some nice things for us in Florida and threw three innings for us in our scrimmage and did well. Erin has some good pitches and she just needs to have confidence out there. We are hoping she really steps it up. I tell both of them I can’t defend a walk, you have got a defense behind you.” Hun will be depending on junior star Gigi Venizelos to be an offensive catalyst. “Gigi is leading off; we are looking for her to get on base every single time,

STARTING WITH A BANG: Hun School softball player Abby Zucatti takes a cut in a game last spring. Junior outfielder Zucatti starred as Hun got its 2019 season started with a bang by sweeping Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) 16-0 and 19-4 in a doubleheader last Saturday. The Raiders will look to keep on the winning track as they host Lawrenceville on April 4 and Penn Charter (Pa.) on April 6 before playing at Doane Academy on April 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

whether she walks or hits,” said Quirk of Venizelos, who starred last year as Hun went 10-7 and advanced to the state Prep A title game. “She has done well for us at shortstop; we are looking for some big things from her.” Quirk believes that junior Abby Zucatti, senior Meghan Donohue - O’Keefe, and freshman Nora Shea can also do some good things with the bat. “Abby is batting No. 3 for us and doing a nice job,” said Quirk, whose team displayed a lot of fire power as swept Mercersburg Academy ( Pa.) 16-0 and 19-4 in a doubleheader last Saturday to start the season. “Meghan will bat No. 4 for us and if she stays in the correct batting position, she can hit the ball well. It is not trying to kill it, just making contact. Nora has been doing some hitting for us, she has a nice swing and does a nice job.” O n defens e, Hu n w i l l feature sophomore Hanna Babuschak at catcher, Donohue-O’Keefe at first, freshman Katie Angelini at second, Venizelos at shortstop, and senior MC Shea at third. The outfield will include Zucatti, junior Jackie Drozd, sophomore Kayla Hampton, and sophomore Aimee Millington. In Quirk’s view, her squad has the pieces in place and can have a good season if it plays a sharp brand of ball. “The big thing is that we need to play solid defense and pitchers need need to be strong and t hrow ing strikes,” said Quirk, whose team hosts Lawrenceville on April 4 and Penn Charter (Pa.) on April 6 before playing at Doane Academy on April 8. “I like the way we have been playing and talking, generating plays. Of course we have to score runs, we have to make it happen.” —Bill Alden

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Emphasizing Full Effort, Positive Attitude, Hickey Taking Helm of Hun Girls’ Lacrosse Rachel Hickey is emphasizing a pair of cardinal principles as she takes the helm of the Hun School girls’ lacrosse program. “I ask for two things every single day - I ask them to g ive 10 0 p ercent i n their effort and their attitude because those are two things that each of us can control,”said Hickey, who is succeeding Liz Cook as the head coach of the Raiders. Those lessons were reinforced for Hickey as she competed for the Rutgers University women’s lacrosse team from 2010-13. “Playing at the Division I level, you are pushing every single day; you are going against athletes just as competitive and skilled as you are,” said Hickey. “Having to show up every single day and compete and knowing that if you don’t give your best every day, you are not only giving less to yourself but giving less to you team. At the Division I level, it is all year.” Drawing on that experience, Hickey went into college coaching after graduation, serving as an assistant coach at Kings College from 2013-15, helping the Division III squad bolster its program. “I have been really lucky m y w h o l e l i fe to h av e coaches who gave me great knowledge of the game between high school, club and college,” said Hickey, who starred at Shawnee Hugh before going to Rutgers. “I thought it was a really neat opportunity to go somewhere I can give back to kids who have never played before and that is exactly why I did. Half of my team in college had never touched a stick before. It was really cool.” Hickey enjoyed another co ol exp er ie nce as s h e served as an an assistant for the Wesleyan University women’s lax team from 2015-18. “Under Kim Williams, I was a part of a team that needed a big change in culture,” said Hickey.

“She has the goal to win the national championship. Getting to coach alongside of her and watch someone who is so innately competitive and willing to put the time in to get where she wants to be was really inspiring. I learned so much from her.” After a stint in Hawaii as her husband finished up his Naval duty, the couple retuned to their native New Jersey and Hickey found a position at Hun as assistant director of admission and girls’ lacrosse head coach. “I am doing recruiting in admissions; for me it has always been about the people,” said Hickey. “I genuinely care about the kids and the families. I felt at the high school level I could be really impactful and help the kids get to where they want to be. It is all like the perfect fit, it just makes sense.” As the Raiders went t h roug h t h e pre s e as on, Hickey has worked on helping her players develop greater self belief on the field. “I really want to instill confidence in these girls; I want them to know that they are capable and that it is OK to make mistakes,” said Hickey, whose team lost 14-9 to Hopewell Valley last Monday to fall to 1-2 and hosts Lawrenceville on April 3 and Stuart Country Day on April 5. “I think there are a lot of kids who are afraid to fail. It is OK to fail as long as we learn from what we did wrong.” Hickey has confidence in her attacking unit, which includes senior Lauren Johns, junior transfer Ally Cowan, sophomore Renee Nearing, junior Rose Denommee, junior Emily Albanese, freshm a n C h a r l ot te B e d n a r,

sophomore Nicki Renna, and senior Kira Black. “Lauren Johns is going to be a middie; Ally is new to the program and is a really strong player overall,” said Hickey, who got four goals from Cowan in the loss to HoVal with Renna chipping in three. “Nearing is a good player. Rose is another player who we are excited about, she is more like an inside player, she cuts well and she understand the offense very well. Emily will see time in the midfield. Charlotte doesn’t back down to anything. Kiera cuts really well, she sees the offense well.” The Raider defense led by senior Kendall Nehlig, junior Grace Davis, junior Chessie Ross, senior Olivia McNulty, and sophomore Anna Hyson. “Kendall is the kind of kid who does everything right; she is really aware of the field,” said Hickey. “Grace, Chessie, Olivia, and Anna are also on defense.” Junior transfer goalie Ariel Gold does a lot of things right in the cage. “Ariel is really quick, she is super agile,” said Hickey. “She is small in size so I think a lot of people underestimate her but she moves well in the cage.” As the Raiders have started their 2019 campaign, Hickey is more focused on development than the record. “Even when we win games, I am going to sit back and I want the girls to sit back and say ‘did we give 100 percent effort’ and ‘could we have given a little more out there?’” said Hickey. “We still need to learn from the wins too. If we are just evaluating ourselves off the wins and the losses, we are never to get better and we need to learn every single day.” —Bill Alden

ON THE BALL: Hun School girls’ lacrosse player Lauren Johns brings the ball upfield in a game last season. Hun will looking for senior star midfielder Johns to have a big final campaign. The Raiders, who have gotten off to a 1-2 start, hosts Lawrenceville on April 3 and Stuart Country Day on April 5. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


W hile the Princeton Day School baseball team doesn’t feature a dominant mound ace or a powerful slugger, it does boast a versatile group of seniors who can do just about anything on the diamond. “I don’t think we have a guy this year who can change t hings w it h one swing or maybe go out on the mound and shut people down, but we have five seniors and they all have plenty of experience,” said PDS head coach Brian Dudeck, referring to his Class of 2019 which includes Matt Nyce, Brendan Buccer i, Tommy Sarsfield, Kevin Flahive, and Vin Gasparro. “It is just a question of them putting everything together and getting out on the field and executing all of the stuff we have been practicing.” Dudeck is looking for two of those seniors, Nyce and Bucceri, to lead the Panther pitching staff. “Matt Nyce had pitched a lot and Brendan Bucceri did a lot for us last year,” said Dudeck. “He had more of closer’s role in the beginning of the season and took on a little more responsibility as the season went on. All the seniors will throw, but Nyce and Bucceri will be the main two guys.” PDS also features some young arms in freshman

Jackson Bailey together with sophomores Shivam Singh and Bryce Powell and junior John Carroll. “We have some kids that are going to do what they need to do,” added Dudeck. “We are working on the philosophy of having kids throw strikes and letting our guys in the field do their job.” The Panthers will need their seniors to do a good job with the bat. “In the last couple of years, Matt has done real well and Brendan has been good,” said Dudeck, who is also expecting Carroll and fellow junior Tom Bocian to contribute offensively. “All of the seniors have had times where they have done good things. It is a question of getting everyone on the same page and being consistent.” Around the diamond, PDS looks solid defensively.“We actually have our core infielders from last year,” said Dudeck, noting that Powell is at third base, Nyce is at shortstop, Carroll is at short or second, Sarsfield is at first and that freshmen Michael Carroll and Hunter Von Zelowitz are battling for a middle infield spot. “Tom Bocian is at catcher and he is being pushed by freshman Alex Stillwell, who is going to be a good player. We have Bucceri at centerfield, Gasparro in

left, and Flahive right. Singh has worked very hard and Chad Sprague, a junior, has worked very hard.” In Dudeck’s view, a strong work ethic has become a staple of the program over the years. “We have a nice core of kids who work out in the morning and do all of that kind of stuff,” said Dudeck, whose team went 9-11 in 2018. “One of the good things about our team is that we have a lot of mentorship and traditions that we are passed down from one group to the next. They normally have a real good work ethic, they do a lot of stuff on their own. They get together and go out and do things by themselves in the fall. They do what they need to do to get prepared. We don’t have a lot of numbers but we have some good kids.” Dudeck is hoping that hard work will pay dividends this spring. “The key right now is for them to trust their ability and go out, relax, play and have fun and let everything else take care of itself,” said Dudeck, whose team opened its 2019 campaign by losing 10-4 to Pennington last Monday and will play at Monroe on April 3 before hosting Lawrenceville on April 4 and St. Joe’s Metuchen on April 8. “With the numbers that we always have, we have pieces that we can move around. It is like playing a chess game.” —Bill Alden

Learning From Opening Day Defeat at Hun, PDS Boys’ Lax Posts Wins over Peddie, PHS To: ___________________________

“Greenie is our guy; the cool thing about him is that he is consistent. He is always going to make those Joe Moore knew what he experience in the game.Date & From: _________________________ Time: __________________ crazy saves.” was getting into when he “We have some pret t y Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Learning from the opener, made his debut as the head good guys in place at the PDS showed more consisPlease check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: coach of the Princeton Day coaching level and we put tency as it defeated Peddie School team systems in place.” 20-3 on Saturday and then (Your boys’ checklacrosse mark will tell some us it’snew okay) for its season opener at the PDS boasts two very good Hun School last Thursday. guys in senior attackman topped Princeton High 17-3 last Monday. � Phone number � Fax number � Address � Expiration Date “It was pretty much what Coby Auslander and senior “It is playing together and was I was expecting - high goalie Connor Green Austempo, high speed, and a lander tallied two goals and how we respond, that is high level of lacrosse,” said an assist in the loss while thing I talked about after the game,” said Moore, whose Moore. Green recorded 17 saves. team plays at Lawrenceville Hun took control of the “Coby is going to be an on April 3 and Academy of tempo early on, jumping all around guy for us; he is New Church (Pa.) on April off to a 3-0 lead and while going to be somebody that 6 before hosting Pennington PDS pushed back, pulling to we look to to be that fireball on April 8. “We can either within 4-2 midway through for us to get the boys go- hang our heads or else we the second quarter on a goal ing in those situations when can turn this thing around.” by Cal Caputo, it never got you are down and you need —Bill Alden closer than that on the way somebody to step up,” said to a 13-5 loss. Moore. “We knew Hun was going Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In to try to get out to an early start on us and they did,” Hunan ~ Szechuan said Moore. “Unfortunately Malaysian ~ Vietnamese we couldn’t rally back.” Daily Specials • Catering Available Moore acknowledged 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950 that Panthers had to work through some opening day glitches. “We kind of fell apart and got on each other a little more than I would have liked to see rather that sticking together,” said Moore. “It is early in the season, we have a lot of time to figure it out.” With the new coaching staff installing new schemes, Moore is confident that the Panthers will be on the same page going forward. “We have probably a 5-1 player coach ratio, it is no mistake for us that we have a bunch of coaches on the sideline,” said Moore, noting that his assistant coaches, Nate Small and Josh Frechette have extensive

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SPRING 2019 ANSCHUTZ LECTURE IN AMERICAN STUDIES

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NYCE AND SMOOTH: Princeton Day School baseball star Matt Nyce fires a pitch in a 2018 game. Senior standout Nyce figures to provide production with his arm and bat this spring for the Panthers. PDS, which opened its 2019 campaign by losing 10-4 to Pennington last Monday, plays at Monroe on April 3 before hosting Lawrenceville on April 4 and St. Joe’s Metuchen on April 8. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Spearheaded by Quintet of Solid Seniors PDS Baseball Bringing Work Ethic, Versatility


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 44

North 11-10 last Saturday. Lucchesi tallied seven goals for the Red Raiders, who improved to 1-1. Pennington hosts Robbinsville on April 3 and Academy of New Church Boys’ Lacrosse: Snap- (Pa.) on April 5 before playping a t wo - game losing ing Delran on April 8. streak, Lawrenceville defeated the Blair Academy 14-3 last Monday. The Big Red, now 2-2, host Princeton Day School on April 3 before playing at Hun on April 6. G irl s’ L ac rosse : Zoe Softball: Lindsay Kucker Cook came up big as PDS starred as Lawrenceville de- e d g e d Pe d d i e 16 -15 i n feated Peddie 8-0 last Sat- overtime last Monday. Seurday in its season opener. nior star Cook scored five Kucker threw a two-hit shut- goals to help the Panthers out with 16 strikeouts and improve to 1-2. PDS plays at one walk and also chipped the Shipley School (Pa.) on in a hit and scored a run for April 3, at Lawrenceville on the Big Red. Lawrenceville April 5, and at Stuart Counplays at Hun on April 4 be- try Day on April 8. fore hosting South HunterS of tba l l : Dropping a don on April 6. nailbiter, PDS fell 14-13 to Pennington in its season opener last Monday. The Panthers play at Rutgers Prep on April 5 and at Lawrenceville on April 9.

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Pennington

Boys’ Lacrosse : Zach Young and Vince Colalillo starred in a losing cause as Pennington fell 14-13 to WW/P-North last Monday. Both Young and Colalillo had three goals and two assists as the Red Raiders dropped to 0-2. Pennington hosts Hightstown on April 4 before playing at St. John’s Vianney on April 6 and at Princeton Day School on April 8 Girls’ Lacrosse: Sparked by a huge performance from senior star Gianna Lucchesi, Pennington edged WW/P-

PHS Softball: Falling short in a slugfest, PHS lost 10-7 to Trenton Central High last Monday in its season opener. The Tigers play at WW/P-North on April 3 before hosting Notre Dame on April 8. Girls’ Lacrosse: Shaylah Marciano and Mariana Lopez-Ona led the way as PHS defeated Robbinsville

16-1 last Saturday. Junior star Marciano tallied two goals and three assists while senior standout Lopez-Ona notched six goals to help the Tigers improve to 2-0. In upcoming action PHS plays at Pingry on April 4 before hosting Notre Dame on April 8. Boys’ Tennis: Suffering straight-set losses at the top two singles spots, PHS fell 4.5-0.5 Hopewell Valley last Monday in its season opener. The Tigers play at Steinert on April 4 and at Hightstown on April 8.

Hun Baseball: Sparked by Anthony Bencardino and McGwire Tuffy, Hun defeated Allentown 10-0 last Monday. Bencardino and Tuffy both doubled and had three RBIs to help the Raiders improve to 4-0. Hun plays at the Hill School (Pa.) on April 3 before hosting Peddie on April 6 and St. Augustine on April 8.

Local Sports Princeton Rec Department Seeking Summer Hoops Teams

This year will mark the 31st campaign of the Princeton Recreation Depar tment Men’s Summer Basketball League at the outdoor courts at Community Park.

ROBERTS RULES: Members of the 2019 Princeton High baseball team gathered to honor recently retired head coach Dave Roberts. Roberts guided the PHS program from 2009-2018. During his tenure, PHS qualified for the state tournament three times (2014, 2016, and 2018) with the 2018 squad going 13-9 and advancing to the Mercer County Tournament semifinals. Over the last nine years, 13 PHS players have gone on to play college baseball. Coach Roberts (front row-second from the right) is pictured with his family. Also in attendance were new PHS head coach Dom Capuano (first row on the left), new JV head coach Benito Gonzalez (second row on the left), the PHS players, assistant coach Scott Goldsmith (front row, third from the right), and Jon Durbin (president of the PHS Baseball Boosters) along with former players and current and former parents from the PHS baseball family.

EARNING THEIR SPURS: Players on the Spurs squad enjoy the moment after they topped the Lakers 49-38 in the 8th-10th grade boys’ division championship game in the Dillon Youth Basketball League last month. The team included Kevin Normandin, Jaxon Petrone, Phillip Christy, Pranav Guhathakurta, John Reardon, Andy Xia, Daniel Cibbarelli, Ryan Friedman, Shamus Madan, Isaiah Nazario, Jeremy Sallade, and Jordan Tejeda. The league starts in June and runs through the end of July. Anyone interested in entering a team in the league should contact Evan Moorhead at (609) 921-9480 or emoorhead@princetonnj.gov for more information.

PLL Holding Tee-Ball, Instructional Sign-Up

The Princeton Lit tle League (PLL) is still accepting registration for its Tee Ball and Instructional Divisions (Ages 4-8). The focus of the programs is on player development and providing the opportunity for kids to play games in a balanced, competitive league format. The primary goals are for players to have fun and be safe, learn the fundamentals of the game, and grow as athletes and as young people. Tee Ball (Ages 4-6) program holds a combined practice and games on Saturdays only with variable start times approximately between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. The Instructional (Ages 6-8) division holds combined practices and games on Monday nights (6-7:30 p.m.) and Saturdays from approximately (9:30-11 a.m.) The PLL strongly supports children playing multiple sports so there is flexibility on attendance each week. The league asks that players try to make as many of their weekly PLL commitments as possible during the season to communicate in advance with the team manager when there is a conflict. Players can live within the PLL Boundary Area, which includes parts of Rocky Hill,

Skillman, and Hopewell or they can attend a school in the PLL Boundary Area. The registration fee for Tee Ball is $125 while the registration fee for Instructional Baseball is $205. Each player will receive a cap and jersey. The league offers a $20 sibling discount. This applies to families who have kids playing both softball and baseball. Scholarships are available. For more information, please contact info@princetonlittleleague.com

Princeton 5k Race Slated for April 7

The ninth annual Princeton 5k Road Race is scheduled for April 7 at 8:30 a.m. The USATF sanctioned course begins and ends at Walnut Lane, between Princeton High and John Witherspoon Middle School. The race benefits the PHS cross country and track programs. The entry fee is $35 for the community at large and $25 for PHS students, athletes, teachers, and staff. For online registration and information, log onto www. princeton5k.com.

Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6k Spring Run

The Princeton Athletic Club is holding its annual 6-kilometer spring trail run on April 13 at the Institute Woods. The run starts at 10 a.m. at the Princeton Friends School, 470 Quaker Road. The entry fee is $38, including the optional T-shirt. Same day registration will be limited to credit card only – no cash – and space available. This event is lim-

ited to 200 participants. All abilities are invited, including those who wish to walk the course. For more information and to register, log onto www. princetonac.org. A portion of the proceeds benefits Robbinsville High School Robotics FTC Team 14020, whose members will assist on the event crew.

Recreation Department Offering Lifeguard Course

The Princeton Recreation Department (PRD) is offering an American Red Cross Lifeguard Re-Certification Course at Community Park Pool in Princeton. This course is available to current lifeguards that need to recertify their lifeguard training. Lifeguards are required to recertify every two years. The course will be taught by PRD staff person with current American Red Cross Instructor Certification. The course fee is $156 and the program is open to both Princeton residents and nonresidents. All training materials are included. Course dates are June 4 & 6 from 4–8:30 p.m. at the Community Park Pool complex. Participants must attend both sessions. Space in the program is limited. Individuals can register online at: http://register. communitypass.net/princeton.The course is located under the Tab “2019 Bluefish Swim/Dive & Youth/ Adult Water Programs.” For more info, visit www.princetonrecreation.com or call (609) 921-9480.

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SILVER STREAK: Members of the Lependorf & Silverstein team celebrate after they defeated Majeski Foundation 41-32 in the championship game of the 6th-7th grade boys’ division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League last month. The squad included John Linko, Jihad-Jasiri Wilder, Gyan Gautam, Tarak Jayachandran, Christian Paul, Will Pittman, Brian Donis, Owen Kelly, Travis Petrone, Jeremy Wachtel, and Karim El.


Katharine Salter Pinneo Katharine Salter Pinneo, longtime Princeton resident, died on March 16, 2019 at Pennswood Village in Newtown, PA, surrounded by family. She was born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, on April 16, 1930 to Marion Williams and Thomas Manning Salter, attended Glen Ridge High School, and earned a BA in history from Skidmore College in 1952. Following a MA

Memorial Service George Cordell Easter September 8, 1934 — December 18, 2018

A memorial service to celebrate George’s life will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road. All are welcome at a reception following the service.

Donations may be made to the Princeton Friends School, www.princetonfriendsschool. org, donations email: friends@ princetonfriendsschool.org; the Princeton-Blairstown Center, www.princetonblairstown. org; or to a charity of choice.

John Little John Edwin Little, the son and only child of the late Charles E. and Geraldine B. Little, was born on April 2, 1934, in Circleville, Ohio. He died peacefully at home in Lawrenceville, NJ, on March 17, 2019, after a long illness. A graduate of Fairview High School in Dayton, Ohio, John contemplated majoring in chemistry in college but pursued history instead. He received his A.B. cum laude from Harvard University in 1957, and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan and Princeton University. In 1966 he was awarded a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University where he completed a dissertation under the direction of Wesley Frank Craven on “John Adams and American Foreign Affairs, 1775–1780.” John married Rosemary von Storch Allen in the Princeton University Chapel on October 8, 1966. Carolyn Allen, the bride’s sister, attended the bride, and John’s colleague at the Papers of Woodrow Wilson, David Hirst, served as best man. During their 35 years of marriage the couple traveled the world, visited friends, and enjoyed the companionship of their adopted rescue cats Rudy and Carrie. John was buried in the Princeton Cemetery next to his beloved wife Rosemary, who predeceased him in 2001. John was an American historian and accomplished editor of historical documents. Work-

ing under the direction of project editor Arthur Link, Little participated in collecting and editing The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, a comprehensive edition of Wilson’s correspondence and writings (Princeton University Press, 1966–1992). While continuing to write his dissertation, he joined the Wilson Papers project in 1961 as a “searcher,” charged with going through “seemingly endless boxes” — as John described them — of Wilson materials at the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Offered a full-time job at the project in 1964, he began as an editorial assistant and ended his career with Wilson as an associate editor. What began as a one-year appointment stretched to 34 years. Then, from 1996 until 2015, he was a research associate with The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, contributing to volumes 28–43 of this edition, also published by Princeton University Press. He was a longtime member of the American Historical Association and belonged to the Association for Documentary Editing. Based on his years at the Wilson Papers, he presented a paper at the 1992 annual meeting of the ADE, “The Work of the Project: An Inside View,” which was published in the June 1993 issue of the association’s journal, Documentary Editing. John had a deep, lifelong interest in classical music, with a particular interest in the works of Gustav Mahler. As a performer, John mastered the French horn, his instrument of choice. He regularly attended performances of the New York Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Boston Symphony (including its summer appearances at Tanglewood), and music festi-

vals in Norfolk, Connecticut, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. He was an enthusiastic follower of concerts at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium. Combining his interest in music and history, he also researched and wrote several entries for the Dictionary of American Biography (Oxford University Press) on nineteenth- and twentieth-century composers, performers, and

conductors. Among these are pieces on Antonin Dvorák, Joseph Casimir Hofmann, Vladimir Horowitz, Arnold Schoenberg, and Frederick August Stock. John was a knowledgeable historian and scrupulous textual scholar. As a number of his friends and colleagues observed, John was always “a gentleman and a scholar.” Continued on Next Page

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

WORSHIP SERVICE APRIL 7, 2019 • 11 AM

PREACHING SUNDAY

DANIEL HEATH

UNIVERSITY CHAPEL INTERN PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY RELIGIOUSLIFE.PRINCETON.EDU

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

Obituaries

in education from NYU, Kay worked for the College Board in New York City during which time she met Everard Pinneo, who was then director of admissions at the University of Pittsburgh. She and Ev were married in Bennington, Vermont, on July 7, 1962. Kay’s professional life centered on healthcare policy. In Princeton, she worked for Planned Parenthood, the Carnegie Foundation, the New Jersey League of Women Voters, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Forums Institute. In addition to her work advancing matters of equality and social justice, Kay was widely recognized as a talented flower arranger. She served for years on the Trinity Church Altar Guild and received formal training at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Where some saw flower arranging as a hobby that counterbalanced her work, Kay regarded justice and beauty as two sides of the same coin and each an expression of the divine. To her children she imparted a sense of curiosity and adventure and a willingness to take a wrong turn and get lost. The journey was always more important than the destination. She is survived by Ev, her husband of 57 years, daughter Nell and grandson Martin of Pau, France and son Tom, grandson Steven, and devoted daughter-in-law Dr. Julie Pantelick of Princeton. Celebrations of her life will be held at Pennswod Village in Newtown, PA, on Friday, May 10 at 10 a.m. (primarily for residents), Trinity Church in Princeton on Saturday May 11 at 11 a.m., and in Pau, France later in the summer.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 46

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Maria Geczy, MD Born January 8, 1934; passed away peacefully, surrounded by love on March 13, 2019. Maria Geczy, MD, was a cardiologist, pharmaceutical executive, women’s rights advocate, lifelong intellectual, and beloved mother/ grandmother/sister/aunt. She died peacefully March 13, 2019, at Stonebridge retirement community, surrounded by family. Maria was born in Budapest, Hungary on January 8, 1934, to Lea Szitar and George Geczy. She lived in Budapest until she was 11, when she, her parents, and brother fled Hungary. The family spent six years as refugees in Austria, primarily in Salzburg. Under the circumstances, Maria received no formal secondary education. The family emigrated to the United States in 1951 and settled in New Brunswick, NJ. Maria was accepted to Douglass College the following year, and then went on to Pennsylvania Women’s Medical College. While in residency at the Cleveland Clinic, she married Tamas Raday in April 1962. The couple settled in the Philadelphia suburbs, where they eventually had two children, Thomas and Sophia Raday. After practicing cardiology at Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, Maria entered a career in the pharmaceutical industry. She worked at both Smith Kline and Wyeth Laboratories before taking a position at Syntex Laboratories in Palo Alto, CA, in 1979. She was at one point the highest-ranking

woman in the pharmaceutical industry, culminating her career as Vice President, Medical Affairs at Syntex. She was a tireless champion for women in the workplace, regularly recruiting other women as leaders as well as advocating for women in the administrative area to be promoted to higher positions and put on career tracks. At the same time, she sought to elevate the skills associated with women’s traditional roles as caregivers and household managers, insisting that — when homemakers sought to move into the workplace — these skills should be respected as important qualifications. In 1987, Maria and Tamas s eparated am ic ably, re maining close friends until Tamas’s death in 1991. Maria became a devoted San Franciscan, active in the San Francisco Symphony, the Metropolitan League, the City Club, and the Asian Art Museum. She was a deep and independent thinker and progressive in her politics. When she retired from Syntex in 1994, she worked on the first health-care reform-efforts under President Clinton, advising a key Member of Congress. She also pursued interests in art, architecture, classical music, fractals, photography, genealogy, and archaeology, traveling to study hieroglyphics at Oxford and to Israel and Egypt to view and translate relics firsthand. Maria is survived by her children Thomas (Jill) and Sophia Raday (Blair Alexander); her brother George Geczy, Jr.; her sister Elizabeth Zuckerman; her beloved grandchildren Tom, Matthew, and Natalie Raday and George and Catalina Alexander; and many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces, and grand-nephews. A pr ivate memor ial is planned for late spring. Donations in memory of Maria may be made to the Nature Conservancy. Arrangements are under the direction of The MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

AFTERNOON CONCERTS 2019 Princeton University Chapel Thursdays, 12:30 – 1:00 Admission free

April 4 Timothy Harrell Trinity Episcopal Church Solebury, PA

April 11 Jackson Borges All Saints Church & St. George's Chapel Rehoboth Beach & Harbeson, DE

Directory of Religious Services Princeton University chaPel 16 All Saints’ Drive, Princeton

All are welcome to join us for

HOLY WEEK SERVICES

Princeton’s First Tradition EcumEnical christian worship sunday at 11am

Rev. DR. Alison l. BoDen Dean of Religious life and the Chapel

Rev. DR. TheResA s. ThAmes Associate Dean of Religious life and the Chapel

DIRECTORY RELIGIOUS SER Sunday, April 14, 8 a.m. & 10:15 a.m.

Join us! All are welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu

Palm Sunday/Passion Sunday

Monday, April 15, 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Tuesday, April 16, 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Wednesday, April 17, 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Thursday, April 18, 7:30 p.m.

Princeton Quaker Meeting

Step out of time into the shared silence of a Quaker meeting in our historic Meeting House. Meetings for Worship at 9 and 11 Child Care available at 11

470 Quaker Road, Princeton NJ 08540 www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org

Maundy Thursday

Friday, April 19, 12:00 p.m.

AN EPISCOPAL PARISH Stations of the Cross

Trinity Church Week Sunday Friday, April 19,Holy 7:30 p.m. 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Easter Schedule Good Friday Service Rite I

DIRECTORY O RELIGIOUS SERV

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages Wednesday, March Saturday, April 20, 7:3023 p.m. 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite of II, Easter 12:00 pm The Great Vigil 5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Sunday, April 21, 10:15 a.m. Tuesday 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Easter worship with March choir and Thursday 24orchestra

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Hugh Brown, rector Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and 609 - 921-2420 • Wednesday www.allsaintsprinceton.org Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm AN EPISCOPAL PARISH Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm Trinity Church Holy Week Sunday

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Sunday & Easter Schedule 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for AllAll AgesAges Walter Nolan, Pastor 9:00Msgr. a.m. Christian Education for Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor 10:00 a.m.Egg Holy Eucharist, Rite II Easter Hunt, 3:00 pm Wednesday, March 23 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Saturday 5:30 p.m. TheHoly GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 pm Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm

5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II10:00, with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 11:30 and 5:00 Tuesday Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish:Tuesday Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Thursday March 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Choral Eucharist, Rite II,249:00 am 5:30 p.m.Holy HolyEucharist, Eucharist with Rite II, Healing 12:00 pmPrayer Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and The Rev. Wednesday Paul Jeanes III, Rector Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm By: Christopher McNabb, Curate The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. 25, 7:00 amPrayer 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr.Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector TomThe. Whittemore, Director of Music

Br. Christopher McNabb, •Curate • Mr. Tom •Whittemore, 33 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Friday, March 25 Director of Music 33Mercer MercerSt. St.Princeton Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Wherever youofare on your Stations the Cross, 1:00journey pm – 2:00 of pmfaith, Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm you are always welcome to worship with us at: The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton Nassau Street, Saturday, March 26 First214 Church ofPrinceton Christ, Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Scientist, Princeton Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pm

Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. 609-924-5801 - 10:00, www.csprinceton.org Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Wednesday Testimony Meeting and 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Nursery at 7:30 p.m. ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 609-924-0919 - Open Monday - Saturday from 10 - 4

Worship and Children’s Program: Sundays at 10 AM Holy Thursday 4/18 at 7:30 PM Good Friday Requiem 7:30 PM Easter Sunday 6:30 and 10 AM

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Street Christ, Witherspoon Scientist, Princeton Presbyterian Church 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton

With

609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

10:00Sunday a.m. Worship Sunday Church Service, School Service and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School Christian Science Reading Room and Youth Bible Study 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Biblethrough Classes 609-924-0919 –Adult Open Monday Saturday from 10 - 4 (A multi-ethnic congregation)

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are witherspoonchurch.org always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

St. Paul’s Catholic Church

Witherspoo

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

124 Wit

10 10:00 a

Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery Princeton at 7:30 p.m. 216 Nassau Street,

¡EresMsgr. siempre bienvenido! Joseph Rosie,

Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

Pastor

Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30, and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m.

(A

609-9


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47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

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OFFICE SPACE • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must beROSA’S pre-paid, Cash,(609) credit card, or check. 924-2200 ext. 10; OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon 07-25-19 LAWRENCEVILLE CLEANING SERVICE LLC: in beautiful historic building. PrincStreet: $15.00 Approximately 950 square • 25 words or less: • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. classifieds@towntopics.com MOVING SALE: eton address. Free parking. ConferFor houses, apartments, offices, dayfeet of private office suite. Suite has CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: 9 Bennington Drive, • Friday & Satur- 4 offices. tf available. care, banks, & much more.annual discount rates ence room, •kitchenette and recepLocated• across from Princ- $50.00 3 weeks: $40.00 4 weeks: 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 schools month and For houses and small offices. Flexiday April 5 & 6, 9:30-3. Quality fur- eton municipal building. $1,700/ tionist included. Contact Liz: (609) Has good English, own transportaAntiques, paintings, ble, reliable, local. Excellent referencnishings, Ethan Allen sofa, modern month rent. Utilities tion. 25 years of experience. Clean- BUYING: included. Email 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, glass top tables, DR table & chairs, recruitingwr@gmail.com lamps, china, pine & iron hutch, carpets, kitchen items, formalware, Stuart Weitzman shoes, costume jewelry, 2 wedding gowns, baseball memorabilia. Family room, tools & garage items. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 04-03

GARAGE & YARD MOVING SALE: Tools, lawn mower, barbecue, patio furniture, gardening supplies & much more! Saturday April 6, 8:30 am-1 pm. 94 Ross Stevenson Circle, (off Mt. Lucas Road). 04-03 ANTIQUES FOR SALE: Working 1953 Chambers stove, vintage wood burning stove & sleigh, Victorian tufted arm chairs, bamboo desk, handpainted Hitchcock chairs, dressers, blanket chest, antique prints, etc. (347) 255-3873. 03-27-3t STUDIO/APARTMENT in Princeton, Littlebrook section of town. Private entrance, private bath, cable TV, WiFi, washer/dryer facilities. Offstreet parking. For single tenant. Please respond to vidodds@aol.com or fax at (609) 924-6934. 03-27-2t HOME IMPROVEMENTS by Morton Berk. General carpentry. Specializing in all interior trimwork. Call (215) 801-5256. 03-20-3t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 02-27-6t

03-13-4t MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386. 03-20-3t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

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Taking care of Princeton’s trees

01-23-12t

NASSAU STREET-PRINCETON: Two furnished offices available with shared conference room and parking. $1,600/mo. Please call (609) 921-1331. 03-27-3t HOUSECLEANER/ORGANIZER available Monday-Friday, 9-3. Has own transportation. Speaks English. Pet friendly. (609) 635-2588. 03-27-3t PRINCETON APARTMENT: Rental– Spacious, charming, extra large living room, hardwood floors, 1 bedroom + den/sunroom w/cathedral ceiling, central A/C, private entrance, plenty of parking, tenants own patio, garden setting, NYC bus, convenient location, no pets, non-smoker. Available now. $2,295/month incl. utilities. 1 year lease required. Call (609) 924-2345. 03-27-3t FOR SALE BY OWNER: Townhouse in Griggs Farm, 3 BR, 4 bath, with additional family room, 1-car garage. Princeton schools, excellent location, recreational areas. $518,000. Sue (609) 240-4596 after 4pm. 04-03-3t LANDSCAPE SERVICES: Leaf clean up, weeding, shrub trimming & removal. Garden bed edging, planting. Mulch, stone & top soil installed. Licensed & insured. (732) 423-7566. 04-03-3t

ing license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-03-4t

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 03-13-8t PRINCETONPSYCHOTHERAPY OFFICES: Part-time & full-time psychotherapy offices in professional office suite at 1000 Herrontown Road, Princeton NJ 08540. Contact: Dr. Arnold Washton, (609) 497-0433 or awashton@ thewashtongroup.com 03-27-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t

old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 02-06/04-24 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

es. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393.

10-31/04-24 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 04-03-6t

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware.

Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

01-09-20

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500

04-25-19

05-16-19

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Local family owned business for over 40 years

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Basement Waterproofing Services

KEEPING BASEMENTS DRY SINCE 1947 All Phases of Waterproofing Foundation Restoration Structural Stabilization & Repairs

609-394-7354 Princeton Owned Business & Resident Family Owned and Operated for 4 Generations Deal directly with Paul Sr. or Paul Jr Pennachi 72 years of stellar excellence!

apennacchi.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Leave the car at home –walk or jump on your bike to schools or the center of town from this charming half duplex. It has wonderful features – central air – lovely gas fireplace, 4 bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, stateof-the-art kitchen, finished basement. New and noteworthy - great place to call home in a great Princeton location. $929,000

www.stockton-realtor.com Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 48

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 4/7, 1:00 - 3:00PM

6BR/4.2BA 4,557SF 19AC Time-Honored Craftsmanship with Modern Amenities 3-Stall Stable w/Heated Tack Room Riding Ring Michael Richardson: 609.647.4523 210 Woosamonsa Rd., Pennington, NJ

Kurfiss.com/1000438406

$1,224,900

Long Willow Farm on 36+ Acres

Solebury Splendor on 14+ Acres

6BR/4.1BA 6,811SF 1788 Stone House 2 Guest Houses Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151

5BR/5.1BA Secluded 1.7Acre Pond Pool Linda Danese, Broker: 215.422.2220

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1001939802

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1001901290

$3,190,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 4/7, 1:00 - 3:00PM

$2,875,000

Holmquist Farm on 12+ Acres

4BR/4.1BA Duplex Penthouse Terraces Low Taxes Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

5BR/5BA 3,811SF Completely Renovated & Turnkey Hellen Cannon: 215.779.6151

512 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/1002077952

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/1000463284

Kurfiss.com

|

$2,750,000

$2,750,000

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill - Coming Soon Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.


49 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 4/7, 1:00 - 3:00PM

The Stockton Market

3BR/2.1BA River Views Expansive Terrace Low Taxes Douglas Pearson: 267.907.2590

14,000SF 0.58AC Commercial Building 3 Rental Apt. Chris Preston: 215.262.9609

506 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU307974

Stockton Borough, NJ

$2,495,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 4/7, 1:00 - 3:00PM

Kurfiss.com/NJHT104854

$1,675,000

Circa 1775 Fieldstone House

4BR/3BA 3,926SF 4.08AC Graciously Renovated Dana Lansing: 267.614.0990

3BR/4.2BA 12.15AC Period Details Fieldstone Barn

6723 Paxson Hill Rd., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU442760

Solebury Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU204044

$1,450,000

JUST LISTED: Sweeping Delaware River Views

Lisa James Otto: 215.262.3003

$1,395,000

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 4/7, 1:00 - 3:00PM

3BR/3.1BA 3,672SF 1.98AC Expertly Renovated Dana Lansing: 267.614.0990

2BR/2BA 2,447SF 0.77AC Low Taxes: $9,389 Donald Pearson: 267.614.0844

New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU442756

3749 River Rd., Lumberville, PA Kurfiss.com/1000246263

$1,275,000

Sundance Cottage

$775,000

Perched High Above Picturesque Smithtown Creek

3BR/3BA 2,836SF 14.68AC Arts & Crafts Flair Michael J. Strickland: 610.324.1457

3BR/1.1BA 1,774SF 1.85AC Custom Woodworking Michael J. Strickland: 610.324.1457

Upper Black Eddy, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU444666

Tinicum Township, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU445634

Kurfiss.com

|

$685,000

$599,000

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Homes With Extraordinary Lives

215.794.3227 New Hope Rittenhouse Square Chestnut Hill - Coming Soon Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 50

Town Topics a Princeton tradition!

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

®

est. 1946

ANTIQUES FOR SALE: Working 1953 Chambers stove, vintage wood burning stove & sleigh, Victorian tufted arm chairs, bamboo desk, handpainted Hitchcock chairs, dressers, blanket chest, antique prints, etc. (347) 255-3873.

A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

03-27-3t STUDIO/APARTMENT in Princeton, Littlebrook section of town. Private entrance, private bath, cable TV, WiFi, washer/dryer facilities. Offstreet parking. For single tenant. Please respond to vidodds@aol.com or fax at (609) 924-6934.

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Curious about the direction of the Princeton Real Estate Market?

tf

03-27-2t

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

You’re invited to join us for answers to this and other real estate questions. Saturday, April 6th at 11:00AM Weichert Princeton Office 350 Nassau Street

HOME IMPROVEMENTS by Morton Berk. General carpentry. Specializing in all interior trimwork. Call (215) 801-5256. 03-20-3t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available.

LAWRENCEVILLE MOVING SALE: 9 Bennington Drive, Friday & Saturday April 5 & 6, 9:30-3. Quality furnishings, Ethan Allen sofa, modern glass top tables, DR table & chairs, lamps, china, pine & iron hutch, carpets, kitchen items, formalware, Stuart Weitzman shoes, costume jewelry, 2 wedding gowns, baseball memorabilia. Family room, tools & garage items. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 04-03

RSVP: PrincetonMarketSeminar.com

HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Live-in or out. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873.

Move in!4 Beds, 2.5 Baths Double-lot. Solar Smart Home. Fenced yard. Bluestone patio. Large609-555-0000 Great Room. $870,000

$870,000 609-921-2700

609-555-0000 MLS# 1002294298

Lovely 3 BR home with a sunroom overlooking a beautiful 1 acre property! Full finished basement w/wood burning FP. $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 Clean and well maintained by orig609-555-0000 owner. Koi pond, deck, patio, undergr sprinklers, wood flrs.

609-921-2700

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, NEW LISTING East Windsor $659,000 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Gorgeous 3400 sf, 4 bedroom, 4 bath home in desirable throughout. Crowne Pointe.Home features an office, sunroom, finished basement, heated in-ground pool.”

$870,000 609-921-2700 $870,000

609-555-0000 MLS#NJME266452 609-555-0000

MLS#MJMX120246

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, Brunswick 2.5 $574,900 4East bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Over 4000sf of living space, 5 bd 3.2 bth, Master w fireplace, throughout. his & hers dressing room, 2-1/2 bth, steam shower & tub. Huge deck, corner lot, Home Warranty.

$870,000 609-921-2700 $870,000

609-555-0000 MLS#1908552 609-555-0000

123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 4/7 1–3 PM 123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. NEW LISTING South Brunswick $448,000 throughout. The Point Community, features chef dream kitchen w/ granite, SS stove vent system. Master suite w/luxury bath, $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 609-555-0000 2 additional BR and 2 BA. Loft, 2 car garage & basement.

609-921-2700

MLS#1919605

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 LISTING Lawrence $295,000 4NEW bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Imagine living in one of the largest models backing up to throughout. a wooded area in one of the Premium Locations in 55+ Lawrenceville Point! This contemporary style home boasts 3

$870,000 bedroom and 2 and half baths. $870,000 609-737-1500

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

MLS#:NJME266048

$870,000 $870,000

609-555-0000 MLS#:NJME267086 609-555-0000

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. West Windsor $584,900 throughout. Stunning 3/3 w/Loft! Every beautiful upgrade you could want! Gorgeous decor throughout! Expanded Wellington! $870,000 609-555-0000

$870,000 609-921-2700

609-555-0000 MLS#NJME266490

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, $739,000 4Pennington bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Nestled at the edge of Pennington Borough, flanked on throughout. two sides by protected woodlands woven through with the Pennington Loop Nature Trail, within strolling distance of

$870,000 downtown Pennington, and in the609-555-0000 Toll Gate school district, $870,000 609-555-0000 this four-bed, 2.5-bath home built by Richard Potts is simply perfect.

609-737-1500

MLS#:NJME265134

123 MAIN STREET, NEW LISTING $650,000 123 MAINTitusville STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, updated Current owners selected this amazing 6 acre parcel to build 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, updated their dream home, with 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths, mainly throughout. throughout. because of its proximity to New York City & Philadelphia yet

123 MAIN STREET, NEW MAIN LISTING Titusville $499,900 123 STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, updated on a hill over-looking the valley and neighboring Bald 4Nestled bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, updated Pate Mountain sits this pretty 4+ bedroom storybook cape, throughout. throughout. on 7+ picturesque acres.

123 STREET, NEW MAIN LISTING Ewing $499,00 123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated on the site of the Mansion Hill Farm sits this classic 4Built bedrooms, 2.51835 baths, colonial, updated 4 bedroom, 2 and half bath colonial with contemporary floor throughout. throughout. plan on 2.68 acres. A secluded enclave of 16 estate homes

123 STREET, NEWMAIN LISTING Pennington $529,999 123 MAIN STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, baths, colonial, updated in the 2.5 community Princeton Farms 4Situated bedrooms, 2.5 baths,oriented colonial, updated neighborhood, this updated 4 bedroom, 2 and half bath throughout. throughout. Colonial on a private lot, is now available!

schools. $870,000 $870,000 609-737-1500

$870,000 $870,000

paths and rolling countryside. $870,000 $870,000 609-737-1500

$870,000 $870,000

close to the town of Pennington and Hopewell Township

609-555-0000 609-555-0000 MLS#:NJME275314

609-737-1500

MLS#:NJME268688

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

thoughtfully placed by the builder to enjoy ponds, canal

609-555-0000 609-555-0000 MLS#:NJME274856

609-737-1500

MLS#:NJME266456

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

NMLS 113856

TOLL FREE: (800) 288-SOLD WWW.WEIDEL.COM WWW.WEIDEL.COM PROPERTY PROPERTY

tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

BIO - FERTILIZATION A MUST THIS SPRING with Pepper deTuro WOODWINDS ASSOCIATES

03-13-4t

PROPERTY SHOWCASE

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. NEW LISTING South Brunswick $329,000 throughout.

SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com

and the views are INCREDIBLE! This is not just a home... it is a Life Style!

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. NEW PRICE Hopewell $570,000 throughout.

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR:

03-20-3t

123 123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, updated 4Princeton bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated $1,189,900 throughout. Welcome Home to this Stunning Custom Built 5 Bedroom 4 1/2throughout. Bathroom “Extended” Madison Federal Model. The setting throughout. throughout. 609-555-0000 609-555-0000

03-20-3t

02-27-6t

GARAGE & YARD MOVING SALE: Tools, lawn mower, barbecue, patio furniture, gardening supplies & much more! Saturday April 6, 8:30 am-1 pm. 94 Ross Stevenson Circle, (off Mt. Lucas Road). 04-03

$870,000 609-737-1500 $870,000

MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386.

MORTGAGE MORTGAGE

INSURANCE INSURANCE

TITLE TITLE

If you were among the fortunate to escape serious loss and damage of mature trees and shrubs during this past winter’s storms, you may well want to consider a valuable preventive measure this spring. Ornamental plantings (those in our gardens) need an extra dose of TLC now. Most urban landscape soils are in poor condition, they are highly compacted and too low in organic matter, forcing trees and shrubs to grow under stress. Healthy soil biology allows plants to maximize soil fertility even in the harshest urban environments. Come summertime, our trees will experience much slower growth while they rebuild their defenses. Fertilization now will encourage root growth and give them a head start. A good root system is necessary for overcoming environmental stress. Woodwinds’ specially formulated liquid fertilizer and root-promoter decreases soil compaction while increasing air and water retention, both of which are essential for nutrient uptake by the trees’ roots. The biological products we use provide a “natural systems” approach to soil health, which assists the roots of plants, trees, flowers, and lawns to improved access to water, minerals, and nutrients, allowing your plants to flourish and become more resistant to any environmental stress and subsequent insect and disease attack. A professional evaluation by a trained arborist can help improve current conditions and protect against future problems.

Call WOODWINDS (609) 924-3500 or email us treecare@woodwinds.biz to schedule a spring tour of your garden.


SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

Part-time & full-time psychotherapy offices in professional office suite at 1000 Herrontown Road, Princeton NJ 08540. Contact: Dr. Arnold Washton, (609) 497-0433 or awashton@ thewashtongroup.com

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 02-06/04-24 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

03-27-8t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING:

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate.

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware.

04-03-6t GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS:

classifieds@towntopics.com tf BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822.

01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

08-29-19



STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

OFFICE LISTINGS:

Princeton Office – $2,000/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. Conference room, reception room, 4 private offices + powder room. With parking. Available now. Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. Nassau Street, 2nd floor, reception area & nice-sized offices. One has private powder room. Heat & 2 parking spaces included.

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS: Princeton – $1,700/mo. Includes heat & water. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. No laundry or parking. . Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

10-31/04-24

(609) 924-2200 ext. 10;

07-04-19

51 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

PRINCETONPSYCHOTHERAPY OFFICES:

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

GORGEOUS HOMES ∙ ENGAGED COMMUNITY ∙ AMENITIES GALORE



ELEMENTS AT WEST WINDSOR Luxury 55+ Community 10,000 Square Foot Clubhouse

21 San Marco Street



3

3

4 San Marco Street 

3

2



2

2

Cards & Billiards Room

Aerobics & Dance Studio Meeting Rooms Fitness Center Indoor Swimming Pool

Outdoor Swimming Pool Tennis Court Bocce Ball Shuffleboard

Community Garden Pond with Fishing Dock Walking Trails

22 Tuscany Drive

TERESA CUNNINGHAM Sales Associate

“Always Professional, Always Personal” MOBILE 609.802.3564

TC

OFFICE 609.921.2600 BusyTC@gmail.com BusyTC.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 52

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

LAWRENCEVILLE MOVING SALE: 9 Bennington Drive, Friday & Saturday April 5 & 6, 9:30-3. Quality furnishings, Ethan Allen sofa, modern glass top tables, DR table & chairs, lamps, china, pine & iron hutch, carpets, kitchen items, formalware, Stuart Weitzman shoes, costume jewelry, 2 wedding gowns, baseball memorabilia. Family room, tools & garage items. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 04-03

STUDIO/APARTMENT in Princeton, Littlebrook section of town. Private entrance, private bath, cable TV, WiFi, washer/dryer facilities. Offstreet parking. For single tenant. Please respond to vidodds@aol.com or fax at (609) 924-6934.

GARAGE & YARD MOVING SALE: Tools, lawn mower, barbecue, patio furniture, gardening supplies & much more! Saturday April 6, 8:30 am-1 pm. 94 Ross Stevenson Circle, (off Mt. Lucas Road). 04-03

HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available.

ANTIQUES FOR SALE: Working 1953 Chambers stove, vintage wood burning stove & sleigh, Victorian tufted arm chairs, bamboo desk, handpainted Hitchcock chairs, dressers, blanket chest, antique prints, etc. (347) 255-3873. 03-27-3t

03-27-2t HOME IMPROVEMENTS by Morton Berk. General carpentry. Specializing in all interior trimwork. Call (215) 801-5256. 03-20-3t

02-27-6t HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Live-in or out. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873.

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 03-13-4t MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/ weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 3269386. 03-20-3t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com

03-20-3t

“Making a home is hard

work, and for some reason it is under-appreciated. It’s a way to make sense of things." —Erin Boyle

tf

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area SR. SYSTEMS ANALYST:

JC101 (DVG Tech Solutions, Princeton NJ) Gathers rqmts from bus users. Sets up & configure Oracle Bus Intelligence Applics. Dvlps, Tests, UAT & product’n environmnts. Expands, modifies & creates custom OBIEE/ OBIA end to end rprtg for the bus team. Tool used incl ODI, Ste Systs & OBIEE. Master’s deg in Comp Sci/ Engring/IT or frgn equiv + 12mths of exp. Loctn: Princeton, NJ & assignmts are in various unanticipatd loctns w/in the U.S. long term, reloc maybe rqd. Please email res & refer to job code to Hr@dvgts.com 04-03

You can purchase a copy of

Town Topics

for 75 cents in front of our previous office, 4 Mercer Street, Princeton, or at our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.

ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for an advertising Account Manager to generate sales for our luxury magazines, newspaper, and digital business. The ideal candidate will: • Establish new and grow key accounts and maximize opportunities for each publication, all websites, and all digital products. • Collaborate with the sales and management team to develop growth opportunities. • Prepare strategic sales communications and presentations for both print and digital. • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more.

Witherspoon Media Group • Prepare detailed sales reports for tracking current customers’ activity and maintain pipeline activity using our custom CRM system.

Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution Positions are full- and part-time and based out of our Kingston, N.J. office. Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

· Newsletters

Compensation is negotiable based on experience. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. Please submit cover letter and resume to: lynn.smith@witherspoonmediagroup.com melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com

· Brochures · Postcards · Books

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Specialists · Catalogues · Annual Reports MFG., CO. Witherspoon Media Group For additional info contact: 609-452-2630 Witherspoon Media Group 2nd & 3rd Generations

melissa.bilyeu@ Custom Design, Printing, witherspoonmediagroup.com Publishing and Distribution Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution · Newsletters

Newsletters ·· Brochures Brochures ·· Postcards · Books Postcards · Catalogues Books Catalogues · Annual Reports

In Princeton’s Riverside Neighborhood

· Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ For additional info contact:

Living Room with fireplace, Dining Area, State-Of-The-Art Kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 3 Full Baths, Patio and Garage. $1,159,000

witherspoonmediagroup.com melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

www.stockton-realtor.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


PRINCETON | Thoughtful updates grace a traditional Colonial overlooking .6-acre of landscaped grounds on a quiet cul-de-sac. The sunsplashed open floor plan contains beautifully detailed gathering spaces spanning from an expansive two-story foyer. A step-down living room’s focal point is an elegantly-mantled fireplace, while the banquet-sized dining room presents two sets of French doors to the deck for al fresco meals. The fireside study is a perfect office or library. State-of-the-art amenities in the chef’s kitchen include a center island, granite countertops, upper-end appliances and white cabinetry. A full wall of built-in cabinets lends character to the kitchen’s dining area which opens to the family room and deck. The family room is anchored by the home’s third fireplace, while a picture window and two sets of French doors to the deck are further highlights. Upstairs, the chic master suite features a designer bath offering spa details, dual walk-in closets with extensive organizers and a private balcony. Additional living space is found in the walkout lower level opening to a brick patio. This exceptional residence is ideally located about a half-mile from downtown Princeton. Offered at $1,393,000

Judith Stier Sales Associate Direct Line: 609.240.1232

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.2600 | glorianilson.com Licensed Real Estate Broker

53 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019 • 54

AT YO U

R

SERVI

CE

A Town Topics Directory

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS Since 1955 KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

908-359-3000 609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes Starting at$250 $250For For Single-Level Homes Starting Single-Level Homes Starting atat Single-Level Homes

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes Starting at at $250 $250 For Starting For Single-Level Single-LevelHomes Homes

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes

609-423-2901 609-423-2901 609-423-2901 609-423-2901 Div. of Hawthorne Property Group, L.P.

Erick Perez

Fully insured 15+ Years Experience Call for free estimate Best Prices

Since 1955

908-359-3000 American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

CALL 609-924-2200 TO PLACE YOUR AD HERE

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 01-23-12t NASSAU STREET-PRINCETON: Two furnished offices available with shared conference room and parking. $1,600/mo. Please call (609) 921-1331. 03-27-3t HOUSECLEANER/ORGANIZER available Monday-Friday, 9-3. Has own transportation. Speaks English. Pet friendly. (609) 635-2588. 03-27-3t PRINCETON APARTMENT: Rental– Spacious, charming, extra large living room, hardwood floors, 1 bedroom + den/sunroom w/cathedral ceiling, central A/C, private entrance, plenty of parking, tenants own patio, garden setting, NYC bus, convenient location, no pets, non-smoker. Available now. $2,295/month incl. utilities. 1 year lease required. Call (609) 924-2345. 03-27-3t FOR SALE BY OWNER: Townhouse in Griggs Farm, 3 BR, 4 bath, with additional family room, 1-car garage. Princeton schools, excellent location, recreational areas. $518,000. Sue (609) 240-4596 after 4pm. 04-03-3t LANDSCAPE SERVICES: Leaf clean up, weeding, shrub trimming & removal. Garden bed edging, planting. Mulch, stone & top soil installed. Licensed & insured. (732) 423-7566. 04-03-3t LANDSCAPING: Spring Cleanups, Tree Replacements, Hedgerows, Winter Storm Pruning, Watering, Flower Bed Installments, Foundation Plantings, Spring Weeding.Twenty five years experience. Please call Stephen (732) 710-1589. 04-03-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-03-4t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 03-13-8t PRINCETONPSYCHOTHERAPY OFFICES: Part-time & full-time psychotherapy offices in professional office suite at 1000 Herrontown Road, Princeton NJ 08540. Contact: Dr. Arnold Washton, (609) 497-0433 or awashton@ thewashtongroup.com 03-27-8t

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 9541810; (609) 833-7942. 04-03-13t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 04-03-6t

GREEN–PLANET PAINTING: Commercial, Residential & Custom Paint, Interior & Exterior, Drywall Repairs, Light Carpentry, Deck Staining, Green Paint options, Paper Removal, Power Washing, 15 Years of Experience. FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES. CALL: (609) 356-4378; perez@green-planetpainting.com 04-03-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 02-06/04-24 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf


55 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2019

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $1,699,000 New Construction in new development! Grmt kit. 5 lg BRs. Easy access finished attic & ovrszd 2-car gar. Underground public water, sewer, gas, electric & cable. 5 more lots avail. to custom build. Vanessa Reina 609-352-3912 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,699,000 Move right into this well-appointed home in Princeton’s Riverside section. Features 10ft ceil. on the 1st floor & 9ft ceil. on 2nd flr w/ detailed moulding in many rooms, plus 5 BRs & 3 BAs. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

NEW LISTING

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

PRINCETON $1,649,000 New Construction in new development! Grmt kit. 5 lg BRs. Layout & finishes designed w/luxury in mind. Underground public water, sewer, gas, electric & cable. 5 more lots avail. to custom build. Vanessa Reina 609-352-3912 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,329,000 This renovated 5 Bedroom, 4.5 Bath Colonial has fenced 2-acre yard with tennis court, pool & patio. Features hardwood floors, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen with granite & finished basement. Dir: 218 Gallop Rd. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

You Are Invited To A Complimentary Weichert Market Update Seminar Is now a good time to buy or sell? Join us for answers to this and other real estate questions.

Saturday, April 6th at 11am OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM PRINCETON $1,125,000 Classic 4-5 bedroom Colonial with all the charm of century old home and current amenities. First floor master ensuite with large sitting area. Upstairs 3 bedrooms share a full bath. Finished attic. Dir: 15 Jefferson Rd. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Princeton Office • 609-921-1900

Register at PrincetonMarketSeminar.com

Princeton Office 350 Nassau Street • 609-921-1900


INTRODUCING

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

WOOSAMONSA ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP David M Schure $2,250,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME266414

BROOKSTONE DRIVE • PRINCETON Christina M Callaway $1,675,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/1000440066

FOULET DRIVE • PRINCETON Martha Jane Weber, Joseph Weber $1,495,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/1007158550

OPEN HOUSE, SUN 1-4

NEWLY PRICED

INTRODUCING

CHRISTOPHER DRIVE • PRINCETON Robin McCarthy Froehlich $1,295,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/1008340066

CARTER ROAD • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Merlene K Tucker $1,227,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/1005814465

PLANTERS ROW • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP Sarah Strong Drake $1,200,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJSO111108

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

PROVINCE LINE ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP Owen Jones Toland $1,199,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/NJME270672

AUNT MOLLY ROAD • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP Jane Henderson Kenyon $835,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME274430

TERHUNE ROAD • PRINCETON Sylmarie Trowbridge $769,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME266788

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

NEWLY PRICED

EAST SHORE DRIVE • HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP Nadine Cohen $695,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJME266796

SYCAMORE LANE • MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP Carolyn Spohn $675,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/NJSO111160

YORKSHIRE ROAD• SOLEBURY TOWNSHIP Cynthia Shoemaker-Zerrer $570,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/PABU446388

LAMBERTVILLE 609.397.1974 MONTGOMERY 908.874.0000 PENNINGTON 609.737.7765 PRINCETON 609.921.1050

CallawayHenderson.com

Please visit CallawayHenderson.com for personalized driving directions to all of our public open houses being held this weekend. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

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Town Topics Newspaper, April 3  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, April 3  

Witherspoon Media Group