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Volume LXXI, Number 16

All Things Spring Pages 21-26 Anthracite Fields comes to Trenton’s Roebling Wireworks. . . . . . . . . . 5 Princeton Abbey Talk Focuses on Funeral Industry. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Chuck Berry and Jim Jarmusch Put Poetry in Motion . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Lewis Center Presents Into the Woods at McCarter Theatre. . . . 16 Abigail Washburn, Béla Fleck at Richardson Auditorium . . . . . . . . 17 PU Women’s Open Crew Excited by 7-0 Start. . 29 Tuckman Becoming GoTo Player for PDS Boys’ Lax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Julie Fassl Starring for Hun School Softball. . 35 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Classified Ads. . . . . . . . 38 Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Music/Theater . . . . . . . 16 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . 37 Police Blotter. . . . . . . . . 7 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . 38 Service Directory . . . . . 28 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Topics of the Town . . . . . 5 Town Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Angela Siso Stentz Named New PHS Assistant Principal Angela Siso Stentz, Princeton Public Schools (PPS) supervisor of guidance for K-12, has been appointed assistant principal at Princeton High School (PHS). She will replace Lori Lotz, who will be retiring from that position on July 1. In the district since 2000, first as a special education teacher in math and Spanish and for the past ten years in guidance, Ms. Siso Stentz looks forward to using her experience and knowledge and the relationships she’s developed across the district to help in her work with students in the high school. “I’ve had an opportunity to see the district perspective,” she said, “and that knowledge and awareness, knowing where the students are coming from, will help me fill in gaps and work with students, parents, colleagues, and others.” Ms. Siso Stentz, who was supervisor of student activities at PHS, is particularly eager to focus more directly on working with students in her new role, both inside and outside the classroom. “I’m looking forward to enjoying myself in working more closely with students and their families,” she said. “As guidance director I worked district-wide, focusing on programs and staff, sometimes not engaging with students that much. I’m looking forward to helping students with the challenges in their lives and celebrating their accomplishments. I’m especially interested in getting involved in extra-curricular activities and athletics.” Ms. Siso Stentz also noted that, as assistant principal, “I’ll be shifting the way I collaborate with teachers and staff. I’ll be more of a support for their work in the classroom. I’m energized about the fact that I will be collaborating with them in that capacity.” Currently a doctoral candidate in educational leadership and a member of the PHS leadership team, Ms. Siso Stentz has a bachelor’s degree in science and Spanish and a master’s degree in education. “I know Angela will bring to her new position the same passion, care, and common sense that she has demonstrated in such abundance as our supervisor of guidance,” said PPS Superintendent Steve Cochrane. Ms. Siso Stentz enthusiastically embraces the district’s recent emphasis on Continued on Page 10

TRUE COMMUNITY.

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

March for Science to Highlight Education, Community

Along with some 500 cities and towns across America, Princeton will hold a March for Science this Saturday — Earth Day — in solidarity with the March for Science taking place in Washington. D.C. The local event, which begins at Hinds Plaza at 10 a.m., will focus on education and community, with an hour of speakers and science-related activities preceding a march to the Princeton Battle Monument. “We’ll salute the bust of Einstein on the way,” said Princeton resident Nicole Pezold-Hancock, who got the idea for the local march soon after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. “I’m not a scientist, but I’m a science supporter,” she continued. “When it became clear that there was going to be a very different approach to climate science, and just a general lack of interest or dismissiveness

about scientific research, I started to get concerned.” Ms. Pezold-Hancock, who comes from a family of scientists and physicians, began talking with friends about holding a local march. “I live in a place where science is a huge part of our economy, not just with Princeton University but with the major laboratories located here,” she said. “When I heard this rumbling about having a march in Washington in support of robust funding for science and free communication of scientific ideas, I thought, my God, Princeton has to have its own march.” Her idea snowballed. As of this Monday, 800 people were registered to attend the local event. About 1,000 are expected, weather permitting, Ms. Pezold-Hancock said. The rally at Hinds Plaza will include speakers Robert Goldston, a professor of

astrophysical sciences at Princeton University; and Samuel Wang, a professor of molecular biology and neuroscience, also at the University. Kevin Wilkes, local architect and activist, is master of ceremonies. Science activities will be led by the Princeton Family YMCA, enrichment program scienceSeeds, C.H.A.O.S. Lab of the University’s School of Architecture, the University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, and others. “Kids can make ‘gooey garbage,’ which is very hands-on,” Ms. Pezold-Hancock said. “And the C.H.A.O.S. Lab will do a bike-powered blender making smoothies. There will be an Ask-the-Scientist Table where people can find about science careers. So it’s almost like a science festival for the first hour.” Continued on Page 8

Arbor Day Celebrations Teach Children to Care For “Community Forest”

SPRING ON THE GREEN: There are many places to enjoy Princeton in the spring, including Cannon Green behind Nassau Hall at Princeton University. A variety of responses to favorite things about spring in Princeton can be found in this week’s Town Talk. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Third graders from all five of Princeton’s elementary schools are spending some time outdoors this week and next. They are learning what it takes to plant a tree and — more importantly — keep it healthy. It’s all part of the annual commemoration of Arbor Day, which is officially April 28. Saving trees is a particularly relevant issue in Princeton, where emerald ash borer beetles have been destroying ash trees across the area. The Princeton school events began Tuesday morning at Princeton Charter School and will wind up Friday, April 28 at Johnson Park School. Focusing on the young is the key to ensuring the future of Princeton’s “community forest,” said Lorraine Konopka, the town’s arborist. Ms. Konopka, Mayor Liz Lempert, members of Princeton Council and the Shade Tree Commission are among those who will be on hand to help children plant Cercis candensis trees, better known as eastern redbud, on the grounds of each school. “We want to introduce children to the idea of taking care of our earth where we live,” Ms. Konopka said. “Kids have to realize that trees need to be cared for, that you have to water them and replant them.” Each child will be given a small Norway spruce seedling to take home and plant. The tree crew from Princeton’s Continued on Page 4

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Schedule of Events Saturday, April 29, 2017 9:30 a.m. - Arrive at D&R Greenway Land Trust Johnson Education Center One Preservation Place Princeton, NJ 08540

April 29th, 9:30 am Princeton, NJ

10 a.m. - Walk departs

Join us to demonstrate your support for the environment and the urgency of addressing climate change. Wear Green • BYOWB (Water Bottle)• Positive Signs Encouraged

Parking at Johnson Park Elementary School

Walk starts at D&R Greenway Land Trust

Rally at Hinds Plaza Alternative start at One Monument Drive

10:30 a.m. - Walk passes One Monument Drive, additional walkers to join procession 11 a.m. - Rally at Hines Plaza Speakers to include: ·Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert ·Bernadette Woods-Placky, Chief Meteorologist, Climate Central 12 p.m. - Climate Change Primer by C-Change Conversations @ Princeton Public Library

This is a one-way walk and parking is limited, so we encourage carpooling, biking, and use of the FreeB shuttle to help your return or arrival

12:45 p.m. - Climate Concerned, but What Can I Do? by Sustainable Princeton @ Princeton Public Library Register at sustainableprinceton.org or drgreenway.org Questions? Reach us at 609-924-4646 or info@sustainableprinceton.org This walk is a sister march of the People’s Climate March in Washington D.C. and takes place on the same date.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

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Arbor Day Celebrations continued from page one

UPCOMING EVENTS

WEDNESDAY APRIL 19 4:30 PM ROBERTSON HALL

Why Government Can’t (and Shouldn’t) Run Just Like a Business Beth F. Cobert ’80 Former Director (Acting) United States Office of Personnel Management Cobert is visiting the School as part of its Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation Leadership Through Mentorship Program.

THURSDAY APRIL 20 4:30 PM BOWL 016 ROBERTSON HALL

The Civil Rights Movement Through the Lens of Julius Lester Panel Discussion and Reception Artist: Julius Lester, professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has long focused on nurturing how people see themselves and others. A civil rights activist and author of numerous award-winning books for adults and children, his photographs are at the Smithsonian and at Howard University.

Public Works department will be on hand to demonstrate the bucket truck (“always a big hit,” Ms. Konopka said), and what they do to care for trees. With existing eastern redbuds just blooming now, the children will be able to get a look at what the trees they plant will look like if given proper care. The American celebration of Arbor Day dates from 1872, when J. Sterling Morton introduced the concept to the United States and planted an estimated one million trees in Nebraska, according to the National Arbor Day Foundation. By 1920, more than 45 states and territorial possessions were celebrating Arbor Day. It is marked today in all 50 states. The schedule of plantings is as follows: Thursday, April 20, 11:15 a.m. at Littlebrook School with Councilman Tim Quinn as guest; Monday, April 24, 10 a.m. at Riverside School with Mayor Lempert, Mr. Quinn, and Councilwoman Heather Howard as guests; Thursday, April 27 at 10:15 a.m. at Community Park School with Ms. Lempert as guest; and Friday, April 28, 9:30 a.m. at Johnson Park School with Mr. Quinn and Councilwoman Jo Butler as guests. Ms. Konopka is hoping to impress upon the youngsters at each school that the plantings need year-round care. She will encourage them to come and water the trees they have planted during the summer vacation. “It’s about what we have to do to take care of our community forest, which is what we live in — we don’t live in the woods,” she said. “The message is that it doesn’t take a whole lot. But you have to be aware.” —Anne Levin

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Exhibit: April 14 – May 18 in the Bernstein Gallery Panel Discussion: April 20 at 4:30 PM in Bowl 016; reception to follow Julius Lester photographed the black South and portions of the civil rights movement from 1964-68, when he was a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. This exhibition draws from his poignant urban and rural images and features portraits of young civil rights workers of that era, both known and unknown.

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Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Parking Study Open House: On Wednesday, April 19 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Monument Hall, the public is invited to provide input at a workshop on Princeton’s newly launched parking study. The aim is to create new solutions to downtown parking and circulation with the goal of maintaining the economic diversity, vibrancy, quality of life, and character of the town. An online survey is available at surveymonkey. com/r/PrincetonParking. One Table Cafe: On Friday, April 21 at 6:30 p.m., Leontyne Anglin, executive producer of Princeton Community Television, is the presenter at this pay-what-you-can dinner at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. The meal is provided by Albarino’s Tapas and Wine Bar of Shrewsbury. Proceeds go to area hunger partners. RSVP at (609) 216-7770. Record Store Day: On Saturday, April 22, Princeton Record Exchange opens at 10 a.m. to celebrate its tenth anniversary with special events at the store at 20 South Tulane Street and at other locations in town. At 6 p.m. Chris Harford and His Band of Changes do an in-store show. For details, visit www.prex.com. PCDO Meeting: The Princeton Community Democratic Organization holds its monthly membership meeting Sunday, April 23, from 7:30-9 p.m. at the Suzanne Patterson Center behind Monument Hall. Princeton University Professor Brandice Canes-Wrone will speak on the impact of campaign donors on congressional and presidential behavior. Free and open to the public. Sierra Club Pipeline Lecture: Monday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m. following pizza at 6 p.m., in the Student Center of Mercer County Community College, Rider University Professor Michael J. Brogan speaks on “Evaluating Risk and Natural Gas Pipeline Safety: Presenting Political Science and Environmental Science Views.” Also, Senator Kip Bateman, member of Senate Environmental Committee, will make remarks and answer questions on environmental policy issues. RSVP to: Kipatthesierraclub@gmail.com. Red Cross Giving Day: Wednesday, April 26 is the day to donate to the American Red Cross to support food, blankets, and other essentials during disasters. Visit redcross.org/givingday/ NewJersey. Annual Rummage Sale: April 27-29, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad Street, offers gently used housewares, furniture, china, linens, clothes, books, toys, and more. Donations are accepted April 23-26. www.hopewellpresbyterian.org. Dancing Your Way Into College: American Repertory Ballet hosts this panel discussion Friday, April 28 at 5:15 p.m. at its studios on North Harrison Street above McCaffrey’s Market. For students and their parents interested in pursuing a degree in dance or continuing to dance in college as an extra-curricular activity. Free. www.arballet.org. Donate Bikes: D&R Greenway Land Trust is partnering with the Trenton Bike Exchange to collect, recondition, and sell used, quality bikes and raise money for the Boys and Girls Club of Trenton. Drop off bikes Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 1 Preservation Place. www.drgreenway.org.

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5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., aPRIl 19, 2017

MUSIC AND HISTORY: Joe Miller, Choral Director at Westminster Choir College, is the conductor of this weekend’s performances of “Anthracite Fields” at Trenton’s Roebling Wireworks. Mr. Miller spent two years working to bring the Pulitzer-winning oratorio by Julia Wolfe to the Wireworks, where he is pictured.

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Westminster Choir Performs Oratorio At Historic Roebling Wireworks Site

When Westminster Choir College embarked on Transforming Space, a project exploring how the arts can alter a site not originally intended for that purpose, Trenton’s historic Roebling Wireworks immediately fit the bill. T he renovated factor y

where workers made wire rope for the Brooklyn Bridge is a fitting showcase for Anthracite Fields, a multifaceted collaboration for chorus and chamber group that marks the project’s first initiative. Composer Julia Wolfe won a Pulitzer Prize for the oratorio, which addresses issues of labor and industry in the coal mines of northeastern Pennsylvania around the turn of the 20th century. It is being performed Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22, at the Wireworks, a location familiar to the hordes who attend Trenton’s Art All Night festival there each June.

TOPICS Of the Town

great effect on the audience. I came to know Julia’s music through that.” Westminster’s Transforming Space project is designed not only to bring music into non-traditional venues, but also to attract viewers of different backgrounds. “We want to intersect with new audiences, people who might not otherwise come to this kind of performance,” said Mr. Miller. “We want to reach people from downtown Trenton, the Trenton Public Schools, and the hipster art community that hangs around the city.” The project has dominated Mr. Miller’s life for the past two years. “It’s my baby,” Continued on Next Page

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The site makes sense for Anthracite Fields not only because of the Wireworks’ soaring dimensions, but because of the building’s history. “I’ve learned that there is a great connection between the Wireworks and Trenton and anthracite coal,” said Joe Miller, director of choral activities at Westminster out new produCts by and theCheCk conductor of Westminster Choir. “That coal had the kind of power necessary to turn the machines that made the wire, as well as the machines that made pottery, which was a big industry in Trenton.” Anthracite Fields was originally commissioned by The Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia. It uses video projections as well as music to weave together personal inter views the composer conducted with miners and their families, as well as oral histories, speeches, and more. The six-member musical group Bang on a Can All-Stars joins the choir for the production, which was staged by choreographer and opera director Doug Varone. Ms. Wolfe won a Pulitzer for the oratorio in www.princetonmagazinestore.com 2015, and was a recipient OUT-OF-SEASON BONUS SHOP HOURS of a prestigious MacArthur Genius Grant a year later. Monday-Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mr. Miller first became OPEN SUNDAYS: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. aware of the work through composer David Lang, part of a group of composers, with Ms. Wolfe, called Red Poppy Music. “The choir was doing a piece by him a few years ago in Princeton and at the Spoleto Festival, and it was a terrific experience,” 102 NASSAU STREET (across from the university) • PRINCETON, NJ • (609) 924-3494 Mr. Miller said. “It was the www.landauprinceton.com kind of music that had a

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 6

Westminster Choir Continued from Preceding Page

he said. “I am the music director for the project, and I put all of the moving parts together. You’re creating a concert hall venue in places it normally would not be, and that takes a lot of work and resources. There has been an educational component to this, and I have been writing grant after grant. We

have gotten some very nice, generous support, and there is no way we could be doing this without that.” Working with Bang on a Can All-Stars has been a welcome challenge for Mr. Miller and members of the choir. “They are an unusual group of players. They use their instr uments in the most interesting and modern way,” he said. “They are al-

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ways trying to find different ways to create sound and color. They are a quite seasoned, terrific group.” The 40 members of Westminster Choir are “excited and a little terrified,” Mr. Miller said. “They’re being asked to memorize a minimalistic score and to do it with staging and movement, with a conductor behind them, not in front of them. This is a very stretching thing for the school and the choir.” Performances of Anthracite Fields are Friday and S at urday, Apr il 21 and 22, at 8 p.m. “Transformations,” an art exhibit exploring post-industrial locations such as Trenton and northeastern Pennsylvania, will be on view from 6-8 p.m. At 7:15 p.m. both nights, Mr. Miller, Ms. Wolfe, and

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historian Clifford Zink will deliver a presentation. Tickets are $20 for adults; $15 for students and seniors. The Roebling Wireworks is at 675 South Clinton Avenue in Trenton. Visit www.rider. edu/arts or call (609) 9212663 for tickets. —Anne Levin

ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Opens Princeton Office

ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Inc., a San Diego-based biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative medicines that address unmet medical needs in central nervous system (CNS ) disorders, recently announced the opening of a new research and development office in Princeton. The Princeton location will house various clinical research, development, and operations roles. “ACADIA is focused on delivering innovative treatments for CNS disorders with large unmet needs,” said Serge Stankovic, MD, MSPH, ACA DIA’s executive vice president, head of research and development, and director of the Princeton office. “Our new location in Princeton puts us in the middle of a major hub for the pharmaceutical industry, where we will have access to the experienced talent we need to create the next generation of CNS drugs.” There are open positions currently available at the Princeton office, which is located at 902 Carnegie Center, along the U.S. 1 corridor. For m or e i n for m at ion about ACADIA Pharmaceuticals, visit w w w.acadiapharm.com.

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© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What do you love most about Princeton in the spring?” (Photographs by Charles R. Plohn)

Emma: “I really love Communiversity Day. It’s great seeing so many people getting together and enjoying everything Princeton out along Nassau Street and on Witherspoon Street. It’s always so much fun.” Lisa: “Walking and seeing all of the flowers start to bloom and come out on all of the trees, especially the magnolia trees on the Princeton University campus. Also, I am the nurse at Princeton High School, and each year I really look forward to all the graduation events that take place. It’s a really special time of year in Princeton.” —Emma Newman, left, and Lisa Goldsmith, Princeton

Pia: “The ice cream at The Bent Spoon.” Kyra: “Well, probably the flowers and the doggies. My favorite flowers are begonias, and my favorite dogs are the Bichon Frise.” —Pia Sharan, left, and Kyra Mehta, Plainsboro

Daniel: “I like that I can go outside without worrying about the wet and snowy environment. After months of studying and working inside, it feels great to be able to get out again and just enjoy the beautiful springtime here in Princeton. I love heading off campus and into town on the weekends. As always, I am excited for Communiversity Day.” Quinn: “I love the trees; the cherry blossoms and the magnolia trees are just gorgeous. Having the chance to relax and study outside is wonderful, too. It’s so refreshing and different.” —Daniel Hahn, left, Princeton ’18, Piedmont, Calif., Quinn Gruber, Princeton ’18, New Canaan, Conn.

Visala: “Definitely hanging out and relaxing on Poe Field is awesome. Just being with friends, playing Frisbee, and getting some sun is great. I’m very excited for graduation and reunions.” Gaby: “Banana Whips at The Bent Spoon!” —Visala Alagappan, left, Princeton ’17 , Gaby Novogratz, Princeton ’17, New York, N.Y.

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The public has used the Internet to empower bargain shopping in many different areas, but one realm particularly resistant to transparency and equity is the funeral industry, according to Josh Slocum, nationally-known consumer advocate and expert on funeral issues. In a talk on “Bringing the Funeral Industry into the 21st Century” at Princeton Abbey on Sunday, April 23 at 2 p.m., Mr. Slocum will advise audience members on how to protect themselves from paying too much for a funeral. He will also describe his plans to bring transparency and fairness to the funeral business. Executive director of the Funeral Consumers Alliance (FCA) and co-author of Final Rights: Reclaiming the American Way of Death (“the book that the funeral industry doesn’t want you to read”), Mr. Slocum has been working with the FCA to persuade funeral homes to post their prices and services online and has petitioned the Federal Trade Commission to require funeral service providers to include prices on their websites. “That alone would do more for funeral shopping for the consumer than anything else we could do,” he said.

“Consumers’ fear of death and of ‘seeming cheap’ by shopping around allows the funeral business to completely avoid the normal consumer feedback t hat moderates prices in other service sectors,” he added. Mr. Slocum went on to emphasize the disparities in funeral industry pricing and the importance of creating opportunities for price compar isons. “T he ver y same simple cremation, for example, can cost you less than $1,000 at one funeral home, and $3,000 or more at another, often within the same geographical service area,” he said. Comparing funeral shopping to more everyday transactions, Mr. Slocum noted, “It would be like shopping for an iPhone and finding one dealer charging $300 for the model, while another charged $1,200 for the same model. Or a car, say a Honda Civic, had a sticker price of $24,000 at Dealership A, but $72,000 at Dealership B. That’s how extraordinary price differences are in funeral homes. We would never accept this in any other marketplace that was truly competitive.” Over the past two years, the FCA has conducted three nationwide funeral home

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price surveys, each revealing a wide range in prices, often for identical services, offered by funeral homes. A recent survey organized by the FCA of Princeton (FCAP) compared prices and services of 482 New Jersey funeral homes and reviewed their transparency and compliance with federal law. More than 30 percent of the 701 N.J. funeral homes refused to divulge their prices on the phone or by email. Noting a “tendency toward secrecy,” a FCAP press release stated, “Traditionally, funeral homes are known to be reluctant to divulge prices until the customer is sitting in the funeral parlor’s inner office, captive to the hard-sell pitch of a seasoned funeral director.” The survey also revealed a wide range of costs for the same services. A package called “direct cremation,” for example, varies in cost in New Jersey from $550 to $5,065 depending on the funeral home, even though the services are identical. Prices at Princeton’s two funeral homes, according to FCAP, are both in the mid-range, $2,670 ($1,300 member dis cou nt pr ice ) at Kimble Funeral Home on Hamilton Avenue and $3,190 at Mather-Hodge on Vandeventer Avenue. The prices were available by phone, not online, from the funeral homes or through FCA at fcaprinceton.org. The cost of a range of other services — alternative containers, graveside services, refrigeration, transportation, caskets — also varied dramatically at different funeral homes across the state, according to the survey conducted during the fall of 2016. To obtain prices volunteers first checked the websites, then sent emails and made phone calls to obtain information. Even after seven attempts to contact each funeral home, more than 30 percent never responded with the requested information. Warning of “family and friends vulnerable to choosi ng a nd over pay i ng for

ser vices they don’t want or need,” the FCAP urges con s u m er s to pla n a n d shop, but not prepay for a funeral until necessary. The not-for-profit, all-volunteer educational organization encourages consumers to make informed, thoughtful decisions about funerals and memorial arrangements before the need arises. Mr. Slocum’s talk will be part of the Annual Conference of the FCAP and will be preceded at 1 p.m. by a free tour of the Princeton Abbey, part of the old St. Joseph’s Seminary, at 75 Mapleton Road. —Donald Gilpin

Police Blotter On April 8, at 1:17 a.m. t he vehicle dr iven by a 24-year-old male from Hamilton was stopped on Nassau and Bayard Streets for making an improper turn. He, as well as his 23-year-old female passenger from Croydon, Pa., were charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. On April 9, at 2:02 a.m. a 22-year-old male from Somerset was charged with DWI subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Route 206 and Hutchinson Drive for making an improper right turn and failure to maintain a lane. On April 9, at 1:07 a.m. a 19-year-old male from Egg Harbor Township was charged with possession of a CDS and drug paraphernalia subsequent to a motor vehicle stop for speeding on Route 206 and Hutchinson Drive.

On April 11, at 4:58 p.m. a victim reported that her white iPhone 5 and maroon Otterbox case were stolen bet ween 4 :10 and 4 :30 while she was shopping at Landau. The total estimated value of the theft is $250. On April 12, at 6:51 p.m. a victim reported that at 7 p.m. a man inappropriately touched her in the vicinity of Moore and Spruce Streets. The suspect groped the victim from behind and fled the scene on Spruce Street. The suspect is described as a Hispanic male, approximately 5’8” tall, brown hair and eyes, and a stocky build. Anyone with information on this incident or similar incidents is asked to contact the Princeton Police Department at (609) 921-2100. On April 12, at 7:01 p.m. police responded to the 500

block of Mount Lucas Road on a complaint of criminal mischief at Hilltop Park. They discovered a girl’s purple Pacific Cycle Destiny bike located in the center field with a rear tire that had been set on fire and a burned circular shape in the grass beneath. The owner of the bike was not located. On April 13, at 1:41 p.m. a resident of Cherry Valley Road reported that there was an unauthorized charge on his credit card in the amount of $23.91. On April 13, at 12 a.m. a 46-year-old female from Kendall Park was charged w ith DW I subsequent to a motor vehicle crash on South Harrison Street. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released. ———

View Princeton Council and Planning Board Meetings Online! Town Topics Newspaper now posts videos of all Princeton Municipal Meetings

Watch local government in action at www.towntopics.com

LAUDATO Si’ On Pope Francis’ Encyclical: Care For Our Common Home

Msgr. Vincent Gartland Diocese of Trenton

Calling all Collecting Enthusiasts To join us for

COLLECTING PERFUME BOTTLES 101 A free Educational Program

Sponsored by: The International Perfume Bottle Association

4/20/2017 - 7 p.m. Saturday May 6, 2017 – 12-1 PM Hyatt Regency – Princeton, NJ Door prizes, Refreshments, Starter Packet For more information or to register call: Teri Wirth (407) 973-0783 or vicepresident@perfumebottles.org

St. Paul Spiritual Center light refreshments

St. Paul Parish, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

The Spiritual Center is below the church, entrance from the parking lot behind the church. www.stpaulsofprinceton.org

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Consumer Advocate for Funeral Industry To Speak on Transparency and Fairness


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 8

March for Science continued from page one

Concurrently, a march in Trenton will begin outside the city’s War Memorial at 10 a.m. Among the speakers are Matthew Buckley, Rutgers University assistant physics professor and founder of the New Jersey March for Science; Kimberly CookChennault, Rutgers associate professor of mechanical

and aerospace engineering; former New Jersey Governor James Florio; Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Chapter of the Sierra Club; Assemblyman and physicist Andrew Zwicker; and several others. The Princeton event is headed by the Science and Environment Committee of Princeton Marching Forward, a local activist group

that was formed following the women’s marches that took place all over the globe this past January. “Our focus in Princeton is a little bit different than in Trenton. We didn’t want to steal their thunder,” said Ms. Pezold-Hancock. “Theirs is more of a political rally. Ours is more communityoriented, with an education focus.”

Participants in the Princeton march are encouraged to bring signs that highlight the importance of science in protecting health, safety, and the environment, as well as funding for research. Children can submit their signs in a contest for prizes. “It is an inherently political act for us to gather and march together, but we are striving to keep it non-par-

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Thanks to Library’s Conlon and Dorman For Organizing Environmental Film Festival

To the Editor: As Earth Day approaches on April 22, it seems fitting to express our appreciation to the Princeton Public Library and to Susan Conlon and Kim Dorman for their exceptional efforts and heartfelt dedication to organizing the Princeton Environmental Film Festival earlier this month. The event spanned one week of films, speakers, panel discussions, and Skype interviews on topics ranging from whales and solar power to “inconvenient truths” about plastic-filled oceans and dying coral reefs. At a time when environmental progress in this country may be more threatened than ever, we greatly appreciate this 11th annual festival that brings us together as a community of citizens who are concerned about the environment. To the Editor: ALiCE HAy-ToLo our mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends are at risk. Lawrenceville Heart disease and stroke cause one in three deaths among women each year — more than all cancers combined. Fortunately, we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. The American Heart Association Go Red For Women To the Editor: movement, nationally sponsored by Macy’s and CVS This Wednesday evening at PHS we will hear the results Health, inspires women to make lifestyle changes, mobilize of the Challenge Success Survey conducted earlier this communities, and shape policies to save lives. United, we year. PHS parents already know all too well what they are working to improve the health of all women. are likely to show: our kids have too much homework. Through the outreach and efforts of Go Red For Women, Academic pressure is endangering their mental health and about 293 fewer women in the U.S. die from heart disease putting them at risk for behavioral health problems. As we address this problem, it is important to keep in mind and stroke each day. We Go Red to help create a culture of that our “race to nowhere” culture is more than a wellness health for women and their families. Why? Life is why. As chairwoman of the 15th Annual Garden State Go Red issue — it is also a civil rights issue. By making course grades so dependent on work done outside of school, we For Women Luncheon, i want women across the state to are creating a tremendous bias against low-income and lan- be more aware of their heart health. The luncheon, set guage-minority students. Many of these students have jobs; for Friday, May 19 at the Westin Princeton at Forrestal others do not have the necessary technology to complete Village, will help raise critical funds for the nation’s top assignments at home. Some may just be normal teenagers, killers. Let’s unite for a day of awareness, education, and who have taken on family responsibilities appropriate to inspiration. their age and development unlike the typical upper middle Together, we can prevent heart disease and stroke. it’s class child, whose parents, or paid help, act as a pit crew time to put our hearts into it and Go Red For Women. For providing all services necessary so that they can spend more information on the Garden State Go Red For Women countless hours on homework. The talent and potential Luncheon, visit GardenStateGoRedLuncheon.Heart.org. excluded by this homework regime is disproportionately STEPHERn ALLiSon, DHSC, PA, MBA that of poor and minority students. Chair, Garden State Go Red For Women Luncheon it is no secret that public school is a powerful instruVice President of Cardiovascular Services ment of social reproduction, but shouldn’t we be working and Care Management to mitigate this effect rather than contributing to it? Less at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

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Calling Attention to American Heart Association Go Red For Women Movement, May 19 Event

Challenge Success Survey Expected to Show Parents That Kids Have Too Much Homework

SUNDAY, APRIL 23 at 3:00 PM ERNEST BLOCH

Meditation and Processional for viola and piano

JOHANNES BRAHMS

Piano Quartet in C minor

BEDRICH SMETANA

Piano Trio in G minor, Opus 15 John Novacek – piano, Carmit Zori – violin, Dimitri Murrath – viola, Michelle Djokic – cello TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 6587 Upper York Rd • Solebury, PA For tickets visit concordiaplayers.org or call 215-816-0227 Tickets are also available at the door. Children 18 years and under admitted free of charge.

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Week 1: July 24 - July 28 Week 2: July 31 - August 4 Week 3: August 7 - August 11 To learn more about these events or to register, visit www.prismsevents.com Questions? Call (609) 454-5580 Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science | 19 Lambert Drive | Princeton, NJ

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Mailbox Letters Do Not Necessarily Reflect the Views of Town Topics

homework is a step toward more equitable educational opportunity, in addition to being a much-needed mental health initiative. Parents may be concerned that the current system is needed to propel their students toward acceptance at elite colleges, but academically-motivated students now have myriad resources available to prepare themselves for high-stakes tests. An oppressive homework load is neither an appropriate nor an effective way to do it. Bold leadership is needed to put the brakes on our academic arms race. We need school administrators to act quickly to make long overdue changes to the school schedule and the school culture. in Princeton, we don’t need to keep up with the Joneses — we are the Joneses — and we have a responsibility to make it possible for all of our kids to reach their full potential. CARoL TATE Spruce Street


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 10

Books

space of the Jewish Museum in Berlin—also define the fate of the family of Victor Ripp’s family. While his mother’s family chose the Axis of Exile, his father’s family was devoured by the Axis of the Holocaust. The story of their lives, interwoven with the author’s journey from one monument to another, is more powerful than so many of those made of stone.” M r. R i p p i s t h e a u thor of Moscow to Main Street, Pizza in Pushkin Square, and Turgenev’s Russia. His fiction has appeared in Ontario Review and Antioch Review. He has taught at Cornell University and the University of Virginia. ———

Amy Goodman Talking About “Democracy Now”

Holocaust Journey Discussed dre. Two months later, the At Labyrinth Next Week boy was killed in Auschwitz.

Princeton resident Victor Ripp will be at Labyrinth Books Tuesday, April 25 at 6 p.m. to read from his book Hell’s Traces: One Murder, Two Families, Thirty-Five Holocaust Memorials. (Farrar Straus and Giroux $25), which has been described by André Aciman as “vast and deep in its fiercely unsentimental consideration of how we remember the Holocaust.” In July 1942, the French police in Paris, acting for the German military government, arrested Victor Ripp’s 3-year-old cousin, Alexan-

Mr. Ripp examines this act through the prism of family history. In addition to Alexandre, ten members of his family on his father’s side died in the Holocaust. His mother’s side of the family, numbering 30 people, was in Berlin when Hitler came to power. Without exception they escaped the Final Solution. According to Anna Bikont, author of The Crime and the Silence, winner of the National Jewish Book Award, “The Axis of Exile and the Axis of the Holocaust—the two axes that define the

Amy Goodman, the author of Democracy Now! Covering the Movements Changing America (Simon & Schuster $16) will give a talk on Sunday, April 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. on the threats to journalism and a free press, and the role of independent media in reporting on movements for social change. Presented by The Wilson College Signature Lecture Series, Labyrinth Books, The Princeton Public Library, and Princeton University’s Council of the Humanities and Ferris Seminars in Journalism, the talk will take place at Labyrinth Books and is free and open to the public, although tickets (two per person) are required and can be picked up at Labyrinth Books during store hours. The talk will be followed by a signing of the just-released paperback version of the book. Ms. Goodman will be joined at the signing by one of her coauthors, Denis Moynihan of Democracy Now! In 1996 Amy Goodman began hosting a show on Pacifica Radio called Democracy Now!, which broadcasts on over 1,400 public television and radio stations around the world, with millions accessing it online at DemocracyNow.org. In their new book, Ms. Goodman, along with her journalist brother, David and co-author Denis Moynihan, share stories of the heroes — the whistleblowers, the organizers, the protesters — who have brought about change. The host and executive producer of Democracy Now!, Ms. Goodman has won the Right Livelihood Award, widely known as the Alternative Nobel Prize; a lifetime achievement award f rom Har vard ’s Niema n Foundation for Journalism; the George Polk Award ; Robert F. Kennedy Prize for International Reporting; and the Alfred I. duPontColumbia Award. She is the New York Times bestselling author, with Denis Moynihan, of The Silenced Majority and Breaking the Sound Barrier; and with David Goodman, of Democracy Now!, Exception to the

Mercedes-Benz of Princeton 609.771.8040

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Rulers; Static; and Standing Up to the Madness. She is a syndicated columnist for King Features. Mr. Moynihan has worked with Democracy Now! since 2000. He is a bestselling author and a syndicated columnist with King Features. ———

Gooch and Muldoon Converse on Rumi

Brad G ooch, t he New York Times bestselling author of Smash Cut, Flannery, and City Poet, will talk about his biography Rumi’s Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love (Harper $28.99) with Pulitzer Prize winning poet Paul Muldoon at Labyrinth Books on Wednesday, April 26, at 6 p.m. According to The New York Times Book Review, “Gooch’s biography brings the political and intellectual tumult of the early medieval era to life, producing vivid characters out of the reigning Seljuk sultans and memorable portraits of urban experience.” A Persian poet and Sufi mystic born over eight centuries ago, Rumi has been compared to Shakespeare for his outpouring of creativity and to Saint Francis of Assisi for his spiritual wisdom. Yet his life has long remained the stuff of legend rather than intimate knowledge. Brad Gooch is the author of t he biographies City Poet and Flannery: A Life of Flannery O’Connor, as well as other nonfiction and three novels. The recipient of the National Endowment for t he Hu manit ies and Guggenheim fellowships, he is professor of English at William Paterson University. Paul Muldoon is the author of 13 books of poetry, most recently Selected Poems: 1968-2014. He is the poetry editor for The New Yorker and teaches Creative Writing at Princeton University. ———

Archaeology of Design Subject of Conversation

B e at r i z C olom i na a nd Mark Wigley will be at Labyrinth Books on Thursday, April 20 at 6 p.m. to discuss their book Are We Human? Notes on an Archaeology of Design (Lars Muller, $20). T h e c o - a u t h or s’ f i e l d notes “offer an archaeology of the way design has gone viral and is now bigger than the world. They range across the last few hundred thousand years and the last few seconds to scrutinize the uniquely plastic relation between brain and artifact. A vivid portrait emerges. Design is what makes the human. It becomes the way humans ask questions and thereby continuously redesign themselves.” Ms. Colomina is an architecture theorist, curator, and professor at the Princeton University School for Architecture. Some of her research focuses on sexual fantasies in association with architecture. Mr. Wigley is professor of architecture and Dean Emeritus of Columbia University’s GSAPP.

IS ON

Angela Siso Stentz continued from page one

wellness and balance for its students amidst increasing college admissions and career pressures. “That’s an area I’m ver y passionate about,” she said. “I’m looking forward to working on encouraging our students to focus on balance and wellness, to help them be sustaining citizens of the world.” She added, “We are looking at ways to capitalize on optimal wellness for all. It’s the crux of who we are as individuals.” Ms. Siso Stentz went on to describe changes and challenges that she has observed during her years at PHS. “There are more challenges in a young person’s life than there were 17 years ago,” she said. “Students set very high goals for themselves and with that comes a lot of stress. Most of our students do well with those challenges, but some struggle. The depth and breadth of support from the school has increased.” She also mentioned her concerns w ith the rapid growth of technology. She descr ibed handling t hat technology is “a difficult process. Sometimes it takes parents and the school to help educate students about how to do that wisely and safely.” Ms. Siso Stentz lives in Hamilton with her husband Ben Stentz, who is executive director of the Princeton Recreation Department. —Donald Gilpin

CRMCC Diversity Summit Set for May 3

The Capital Region Minority Chamber of Commerce will present its Third Annual Diversity Summit, “Reaching Out — Connecting with the LGBTQ Business Communit y,” on Wednesday, May 3 from 8-11:30 a.m. at Educational Testing Service (ETS), 660 Rosedale Road, in Princeton. The keynote speaker is Gwen Marcus, executive vice president and general cou nsel, Show t ime Networks. Panel discussions will include “Out At Work: Building Inclusive Workplaces” and “Business and the Bottom Line: The Power of Inclusive Business Strategies.” Registration: $50 memb er s ; $ 60 f ut u re m em bers. For more informat ion, v isit capitalreg ion m i n o r i t y c h a m b e r. o r g / events/register-for-diversitysummit.

“From Private Worries To Common Stories”

Freelance writer Sarah Vander Schaaf will speak about the private toll of anxiety in her talk, From Private Worries to Common Stories on Thursday, April 20 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) Fitness and Wellness Center, 3100 Quakerbridge Road in Hamilton. The talk, which is open to the public, is sponsored through a partnership between NAMI Mercer and RWJ Hospital. After her personal essay about living with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety was published in The Washington Post, Ms. Vander Schaaf devoted much of her time looking

at the mental health issues shared by high-achieving women and families. From international students in exclusive schools to successful businesswomen, people all over the world wrote to Ms. Vander Schaaf to share their private pain and struggles with anxiety, panic, OCD, addiction, and depression. “There is so much that can be done when it comes to coping with anxiety,” Ms. Vander Schaaf said, “but, as friends, and especially as parents keeping up a good front, we don’t really share this part of our private lives.” To facilitate learning from one another, Ms. Vander Schaaf writes a blog for the Mental Health Association ( MHA) of New York City and hosts regular Facebook Live interviews with MHA’s Director of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, John Draper. NAMI Mercer, based in Lawrenceville, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness through education, mutual support, and advocacy. It is an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. For more information on Sarah’s talk, contact Janet Haag, executive director at (609) 799-8994 ext. 11 or email jhaag@namimercer.org.

Convention & Visitors Bureau Names New Officers

The Princeton Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), Mercer County’s and Central New Jersey’s leading Destination Marketing Organization has named Basil Giletto as its new chairman and Tom Gilmour as its new vice chairman. Mr. Giletto is vice president of A-1 Limousine and has been a member of the CVB’s steering committee for several years. In his role as chairman, Mr. Giletto w ill help spearhead the CVB’s continued expansion throughout the 18 Central New Jersey municipalities served by the CVB, as well as several aligned regions. Mr. Gilmour is the new executive director of The Trenton Downtown Association and most recently served as Asbury Park’s director of commerce, where he was responsible for implementing a new and successful tourism program and breathing life back into Asbury Park. Mr. Gilmour will work with the municipalities enhancing their focus on tourism and hospitality targeting the over 2.5 million visitors who visit the region. R ick Coy ne, chair man of the Princeton Regional Chamber of Com merce, said, “Basil and Tom are outstanding professionals who are well versed in the travel and tourism industry. Basil will help us strategically build and expand the Convention and Visitors Bureau membership initiatives and Tom will enhance our municipal focus on the importance of tourism to our local economy.” The Princeton Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau is a business program under the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber’s membership recently passed 1,300 members, including independent businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and corporations in Central New Jersey.


Putting Poetry in Motion With Chuck Berry and Jim Jarmusch

S

phia Inquirer interview about Mystery Train, Jarmusch says, “I think of my films as being somehow more related to poetry as a form than to prose …. I like the spaces that happen between things, even between dialogue. Sometimes that’s a lot more meaningful than the dialogue itself. There’s even a word in Japanese that comes from the Chinese idiogram ma, that we can’t translate into English …. It basically means the space between things which defines those things by not being a part of them.” Jarmusch’s cinematic poetry is about more than things and spaces, it’s in the rhyming of gestures, of moods, and places, like the poem of continuity that happens when Mitsu ko ( Yû k i Kudô) offers a Japanese plum in lieu of a tip to a Memphis bellhop while 28 years later Laura, the bus-driver poet named Paterson’s Iranian partner and wannabe countr y singer ( G olsh if teh Farahani) bakes perfect little Persian miniat ure cupcakes for market day in Paterson, a film about both poetry in the world and poetry on the page. You get a nice sense of Jarmusch finding poetr y in the world w h e n h e tel l s T I M E : “I j u s t loved riding for a week, shooting on the bus — just the point of view of looking slightly down on t he sidewalks, and all those little shops and things. It’s almost theatrical, i n a b e aut if u l way.” The poetry of continuity illuminates the film’s denouement when a Japanese poet (Masatoshi Nagazse) visiting his hero William Carlos Williams’s hometown runs into Paterson (Adam Driver) at a time when his poetry notebook has been savaged beyond saving by Laura’s bulldog, a loss that threatens his faith in his art, so that when he’s asked what he does, he says he’s a bus driver

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when he wants to say he’s a poet. The man from Japan knows better and presents him with a book of blank pages. Paterson’s benefactor, the saver of his poet’s soul, is played by the actor who was sullen Jun in Mystery Train. So, in a rhyme that spans decades, the 20-something rock and roll fan paying his solemn respects to Elvis and Carl Perkins shows up as a middleaged poet tourist paying homage to the space-between-things poetry of William Carlos Williams. And they’re all passengers on the director’s mystery train by virtue of a Japanese word for which there is no translation. St. Louis Hero Right now Jim Jarmusch is probably the only person on the planet capable of devising a film that would d o j u s t i c e to Chuck Berr y’s hometown, St. Louis, where the Walk of Fame on Delmar Boulevard includes T.S. Eliot, William Burroughs, Miles Davis, Yo g i B e r r a , Dizzy Dean, Josephine Baker, and Tennessee Williams. Imagine that group frequenting an imaginary Hotel Maybellene, with, say, T.S. Eliot as the desk clerk and Chuck Berry as bartender of the Club Nadine. Hav ing outlived Elv is by almost 40 years (and T.S. E l iot by 52 ) , Chuck Berry is buried in Bellevue Heritage Gardens, Creve Coeur, St. Louis County, Mo., after the funeral for “a St. Louis hero” reported a week ago in the New York Times. The story featured a photo of Mr. Rock ‘n’ Roll in his coffin with his sailor hat on and his red Gibson laid against the white plush of the coffin lid. Poetry in Motion Anyone who doubts Chuck Berry’s poetical instincts should compare his “Downbound Train” to the one Elvis sings about

NE COM XT IN WE G EK !

I love poetry. I love rhyming. —Chuck Berry (1926-2017) If he had not become such an extraordinary director, Jim would now be a rock star. —Wim Wenders on Jim Jarmusch everal times a week I drive up the hill into Kingston, always with music on the stereo. One morning it’s Ella Fitzgerald singing “Lush Life,” and I take the hill nice and easy, true to the late-night flow of the lyric about “those come-what-may places/where one relaxes on the axis of the wheel of life/to get the feel of life.” But when Chuck Berry’s singing, the axis is tilting, the wheel of life is spinning, the come-what-may places have gone south, the car’s “rocking like a hurricane,” Beethoven’s rolling under the wheels, Tchaikovsky’s running for his life, and my CRV is a Coupe de Ville with mad Maybellene in the passenger seat urging me on (“go, go, go!”) as Chuck comes up from behind in his Ford V8. Now we’re side by side, Kingston’s turned into Cape Girardeau, and we’re motorvatin’ down I-55 on our way from Chuck’s St. Louis to Elvis’s Memphis, the setting of Jim Jarmusch’s Mystery Train. The method behind my vehicular madness is simple: one of the wisest, most interesting, most humane filmmakers in the world is in town today, Wednesday, April 19, and will be appearing on campus at 4:30 in McCosh 50. The Fascinated Foreigner “Everything was car culture and rockand-roll,” Jim Jarmusch told the New York Times in 1992, three years after Mystery Train had come and gone. That midwestern-American high school truth about music and cars was uttered by someone who became “an immigrant in the teenage world” after his hair turned white at the age of 15. That’s according to Tom Waits, the voice of the late-night DJ in Mystery Train. The key to Jarmusch, Waits says, is that he’s been “a benign fascinated foreigner” ever since: “And all his films are about that.” No wonder, then, that viewers of Mystery Train first see Memphis in the company of a lovably conflicted young couple from Yokohama (perky Mitzuko, deadpan Jun), and later through the wide wide eyes of a woman from Rome (Nicoletta Braschi) gazing at the vision of Elvis in midnight-blue lamé that just appeared in her room at the Arcade Hotel. The “fascinated foreigner” has made the rounds in the urban Americana of New York, Cleveland, New Orleans, L.A., Detroit, and Jersey City, from the Memphis of Elvis and Sun and Stax to Paterson, the little city Allen Ginsberg and William Carlos Williams put on the map, not to mention worldwide surfacings in the wilds of Canada, Tangiers, Rome, Helsinki, Paris, and you might also add the city Mitzuko and Jun see in Memphis: “If you took away sixty percent of the buildings in Yokohama, it would look like this.” Poetry in the World “Say it, no ideas but in things,” says William Carlos Williams in Book One of Paterson. In a December 1989 Philadel-

at the beginning and end of Mystery Train, “coming down the line and around the bend.” Berry’s train is a drunken stranger’s dream, the engine “sweaty and damp” with blood, and “brilliantly lit with a brimstone lamp” with “imps shoveling bones for fuel while the furnace rang with a thousand groans.” This song train steams and howls and burns along like an infernal “Ghost Riders in the Sky” with the devil yelling and passengers shrieking with pain: “Wider and wider the country grew/ faster and faster the engine flew/louder and louder the thunder crashed/Brighter and brighter the lightning flashed.” In an early Rolling Stone interview, asked by Greil Marcus where he gets his ideas for songs, Berry says it all begins when he hears a riff “going over and over” and someone says “It’s too dark in here,” which becomes “the story of a girl who hardly could go anywhere, ‘cause at the movie it was too dark, at the party they went to it was one dim light burning,’” and “when they went back home there was no one there and the lights were out and the fuse was blown and it was dark in there. And that’s the way it ends.” Blue Moon In spite of songs like “Downbound Train” and “It’s Too Dark in Here,” Chuck Berry’s music doesn’t evoke the sense of darkness and big city nights Jarmusch expresses so effectively. Somehow it’s always daylight on Maybellene’s highway, the street where Nadine is “walkin toward a coffee colored Cadillac,” and the basepath where the “brown-eyed handsome man” is “rounding third and headed for home.” How to explain why Jarmusch is so good at doing night? Maybe it’s his inner vampire, the one that conceived Only Lovers Left Alive. Or maybe he identifies with Walt Whitman in “The Sleepers”: “I dream in my dream the dream of all the other dreamers.” Whatever it is, there’s poetry in the way the ghost of Elvis haunts Mystery Train and the Arcade Hotel, where every room has a portrait of the King in his charismatic prime, except in the ruins of Room 22 with its unhung, knockedabout image of the grinning overweight Elvis in his Las Vegas decline. Finally, one reason I revisited Jarmusch’s Memphis was to see if could find a hint of Chuck Berry somewhere on the premises, like a casual reference at the bar or over the pool table, or maybe it’s asking too much of a film that has room for Joe Strummer of The Clash and Screaming Jay Hawkins. ut look what happens as soon as I get in the car and “Too Much Monkey Business” comes on, and Chuck’s singing “I been to Yokohama, been fightin’ in the war.” Hold on, weren’t Mitsuko and Jun from Yokohama? Is that just a coincidence? Or is it the poetry of continuity? A sonnet to serendipity? A verse on versimilitude? Or is it just that this man’s music is everywhere. Like John Lennon said, “If you tried to give rock and roll another name, you might call it ‘Chuck Berry.’” —Stuart Mitchner

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 14

Art

“NASSAU INN”: This charming oil painting of the Nassau Inn is among the 27 works by James McPhillips currently on view on the second floor Reading Room of the Princeton Public Library. The exhibit titled, “Nassau Hall to Hoagie Haven,” includes familiar scenes of Princeton along with McPhillips’ pop rebus images. The paintings are on display and available for purchase until July 31.

Princeton Paintings by James Princeton and the surround- rather quickly, sometimes McPhillips on Display at PPL ing areas, along with the pop staying up until 3 or 4 a.m.

If you don’t already have James ( Jay ) McPh illips’ Princeton rebus on your car, you’ve likely seen the bright orange bu mper s t ickers around town. Mr. McPhillips’ pop rebus graphics have certainly made their mark on Princeton, and most recently, the Princeton Public Library (PPL). In conjunction with the redesign of the library’s second floor, Mr. McPhillips debuted his biggest art show to date, “Nassau Hall to Hoagie Haven.” On display in the Reading Room until July 31, the body of work features paintings of

rebus graphics synonymous with Mr. McPhillips’ name. Commissioned by the Arts Council of Princeton, the exhibit includes 27 paintings of familiar scenes around town ranging from local businesses to campus buildings. Some works even offer insightful quotes like his rebus painting that suggests, “Let’s all get a master’s degree in compassion.” While half of the paintings were already complete when he was asked to exhibit his work at the grand opening of the second floor, Mr. McPhillips had to complete the rest

painting. “You name it, I’ve painted it,” says Mr. McPhillips. “When I’m walking through town, I usually notice the lighting around a particular scene that really makes it stand out. I’ll take a picture of it, and work from the photos to recreate the image using oil paints. I’ve found that the paintings work better if I know the place well.” Indeed, Mr. McPhillips knows the town. After working as a Comedy Central TV staffer and ad agency art director in New York, he worked for many years

“BREAKING WAVES”: This painting by Dale Smith is a part of the Watercolorists Unlimited Art Show and Sale on Saturday, May 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Blackwells Mills Canal House, 598 Canal Road in Somerset. The Watercolorist Unlimited artists’ work includes local scenes, florals, barns, landscapes, and seascapes. The group consists of 10 experienced watercolorists who meet monthly to critique and inspire each other.

as a graphic designer for McCarter Theatre, where he grew to know and love Princeton. Featuring everything from the Palmer Square Christmas tree to the Robertson Hall Freedom Fountain, McPhillips’ paintings can’t help but pull at Princetonians’ heartstrings, but he’s found that people are particularly drawn to his scenes of social places. Mr. McPhillips’ most popular paintings are of Hoagie Haven and Small World Coffee, and he’s been commissioned to paint the Ivy Inn not once, but twice. This might evidence locals’ proclivity for eating and drinking, but Mr. McPhillips credits their popularity to the increased tourism in town. “It seems that there’s more tourism in Princeton than ever,” notes Mr. McPhillips. “The town’s architecture and social and cultural centers are starting to draw people from around the world. It brings good vibes to the town and makes everything more attractive to paint.” It also makes quintessential Princeton places like Hoagie Haven and the Nassau Inn more than local hotspots, but also tourist attractions. Whether you’re a native or an out- of-towner, Mr. McPhillips’ paintings allow you to bring home a piece of Princeton. All the works from “Nassau Hall to Hoagie Haven” are available for purchase with proceeds going towards the Arts Council of Princeton, The Princeton Public Library, and the artist. Mr. McPhillips currently resides in Doylestown, Pa. where he works independently selling his paintings, t-shirts, stickers, and posters through his website JayMcPhillips.com. They can also be found at jane Consignment located on 7 Spring Street in Princeton, or online at PrincetonMagazineStore.com. The Princeton Public Library is located at 65 Witherspoon Street and is open Monday–Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sundays 1 to 6 p.m. For more information call the library at (609) 9249529 or email Mr. McPhillips at MrJamesMcPhillips@ gmail.com. ———

HomeFront’s ArtJam Opens May 19

HomeFront’s ArtJam, a fun and funky pop-up art gallery, will open Friday, May 19 at 19 Hulfish Street, Princeton and run for three weeks. The 7th annual event brings together professional artists and HomeFront client-artists in a celebration of creativity. It will feature a rotating collection of art for sale and meet-and-greets with the artists. “The event is inspiring, challenging, provocative, a n d e nter t a i n i ng,” s ays Ruthann Traylor, Home Front’s ArtSpace director. “It’s about using the creative process as a tool to heal and using its power to break down barriers to celebrate the human spirit. The mix of artists in this visually stimulating show is as eclectic as the art — and each piece has a story.” Last year the event attracted several thousand people. “It’s gratifying that so many people come together to support ArtSpace and our clients,” says Ms. Traylor. “The proceeds help pay for the tools to create the art. The tools are, in fact, a luxury. Simply being able to buy supplies is a challenge both for clients and for program.” ArtSpace encourages creativity and self-expression in a safe and nurturing environment. Many HomeFront clients have found a sense of purpose, renewal, and confidence through our ArtSpace prog rams, wh ich allows them to discover their talents. “This exhibit is where their creativity is on display and they take pride in what they have accomplished,” Ms. Traylor continues. HomeFront clients speak highly of the program. One client, Sharon A., came to HomeFront to rebuild her life after suffering four aneurysms which left her anxious and unsure about her future. She had always been creative, and loved to paint, but she was reluctant to apply her talents until she went to ArtSpace. “I am excited that I can paint again — I didn’t think I’d be able to,” she says. “Now my confidence is back. I don’t feel like I have limits any more.” Sharon’s work will be part of this year’s event along with a number of HomeFront’s talented clients.

Curated by Ms. Traylor and her volunteers, the art runs the gamut of media. It includes paintings, photography, glass, sculpture, and jewelry. Also, included in ArtJam this year are products created at Sew ing Space, a branch of HomeFront’s ArtSpace program teaching HomeFront clients how to sew and focuses on fostering entrepreneurial skills. Says one HomeFront volunteer, Susan Ashmore, “The art is just incredible because it’s filtered through imagination and life experience. There’s a lot of exuberance and energy.” Much-needed sponsorships for ArtJam are welcome. For information on sponsorship opportunities or other ways to be a part of the ArtJam experience, contact Ruthann Traylor at (609) 883-7500 or via email at: ruthannt@ homefrontnj.org. or visit www.homefrontnj.org. An opening public reception is set for Friday, May 19 from 6-9 p.m. All artwork will be for sale, and proceeds from this exhibit will benefit HomeFront’s ArtSpace and SewingSpace programs. The reception and show are free and open to the public. ———

THAT Kicks Off Art Tour May 5 at Hunterdon Art Museum

The first countywide selfguided driving and walking art tour of Hunterdon County will be held on the weekend of May 6 and 7, 2017. The Hunterdon Art Tour (THAT) is the realization of a small, dedicated volunteer group of artists, art lovers, and longtime Hunterdon County residents. A free kickoff celebration will take place on Friday, May 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton. THAT’s artists will be featured in a special exhibition, and artwork will be offered for sale at the event. Come and meet the artists, taste local wine from Beneduce Vineyards (Pittstown) and cuisine from BEX eatery + catering co. (Califon), and enjoy a musical performance with Richard McIntyre of the Opera Project (Lambertville). Artists’ studios and group exhibitions at multiple locations will be open to the public on Saturday, May 6 and Sunday, May 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Princeton Seminary presents

“Singing Christ’s Death and Resurrection” a choral service of lessons, anthems, and hymns Saturday, April 22, 7:00 p.m., Miller Chapel featuring the Chapel Choir directed by Martin Tel accompanied by Michael Gittens with brass quartet Free and open to the public. 609.497.7890 64 Mercer Street, Princeton

ptsem.edu/events

ARTJAM 2017: ArtSpace, the art therapy program at HomeFront, is welcoming sponsors for this year’s ArtJam. Opening in May, the art show and sale brings together established artists and HomeFront client-artists to celebrate community, creativity, and the love of art. Pictured here is a piece by one of the HomeFront artists titled, “Mountains.”


Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has the Neighborhood Portrait Quilt on permanent exhibit. Sculptures by Patrick Strzelec are on the Graves Terrace through June 30. Through April 30, Friends of Princeton Open Space sponsors a show of photos taken by Frank Sauer at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. www.artscouncil ofprinceton.org. Artworks, Everett Alley ( Sto ck ton St reet ) , Trenton, shows “The New Native,” by Wil Swink; and the 4th Annual Jur ie d P r i nt E x h ibit ion, through April 29. www. artworkstrenton.com. B e r n ste i n G a l l e r y, Robertson Hall, Princeton University, has “The Black South in the Sixties,” photos by Julius Lester, through May 18. A panel discussion and reception is April 20, 4:30 p.m. princeton.edu. D & R G r e e n w a y, 1 Preservation Place, has “D&R Preserves Through t he S e as ons” t hrough J u n e 16. ( 6 0 9 ) 924 4646. E l l a r s l i e , Tre nton’s Cit y Mu s e u m i n C ad walader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “The Essential Paul Robeson” through April 30, and “On the Edge” through April 30. (609) 989-3632. Frist Campus Center, Princeton University, has an exhibit by Princeton University senior Crystal Qian examining technology, cognition, and the digital aesthetic through pop art and optical illusion through April 21. Grounds for Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Elyn Zimmerman : Wind, Water, Stone” through August 27, and other works. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “The Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” and a show on John von Neumann, as well as a permanent exhibit of historic photographs. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, noon- 4 p.m. Thursday ex te n de d hou r s t i l l 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princeton history.org. The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Polaris: Northern Explorations in Contemporar y Ar t” through April 23 and “Light and Matter: The Photographic Ob ject” through June 25. Visit w w w.michenerar t museum.org. The Jane Voorhees Z i m m erl i A r t Muse um, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Fletcher and the Knobby Boys: Illustrations by

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

Road in Princeton. Susan Victor, Director of Counseling and Support Services at Womanspace, Inc. will present on “Breaking the Bonds of Silence – Understanding the Impact of Domestic Violence.” This meeting is free. The Princeton Community Democratic Organization (PCDO) will meet on Sunday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.) at the Suzanne Patterson Center. Brandice CanesWrone, Professor of Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School will speak on the impact of campaign donors on congressional and presidential SELF-GUIDED ART TOUR: This copper inlaid pot by Karin Abromaitis of Quakertown will be inbehavior. cluded in The Hunterdon Art Tour show and sale on the weekend of May 6 and 7.

Clubs The 55-Plus Club will meet on Thursday, April 20 at 10 a.m. at The Jewish Center of Princeton. Louis A. Sass, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University will deliver a lecture on “Anxiety and Insight in Schizophrenia: Philosophical Reflections.” The Princeton PC Users Group will meet on Tuesday, April 25 at 7 p.m. at the Community Room of the Princeton Public Library. The program will be on the differences between a website and a blog site. The Women’s College Club of Pr inceton will meet on Monday, April 24 at 1 p.m. at All Saints’ Episcopal Church on Terhune

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Area Exhibits

Harr y Devlin” through J u n e 2 5. b i t . l y / Z A M MatM. Mor ven Museum and Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has docentled tours of the historic house and its gardens, furnishings, and artifacts. “Bruce Springsteen : A Photographic Journey” r uns t hrough May 21. www.morven.org. New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “Toy World,” toys made by New Jersey companies, through April 30. www. statemuseum.nj.gov. The Princeton Universit y A r t Museum has “Revealing Pictures: Photographs f rom t he Christopher E. Olofson Collection” through July 2 and “The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C.” through June 11. (609) 258-3788. We s t W i n d s or A r t Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road, has “The Natural Muse,” 32 works by local artists, through May 6. www.westwindsor arts.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 16

Into the Woods

THEATER REVIEW

Fairy Tale Characters Meet When They Venture “Into the Woods”: Lewis Center Presents Sondheim and Lapine Musical at McCarter

T

he Lewis Center for the Arts is presenting Into the Woods in the Berlind Theatre at McCarter. In this musical, fairy tale characters undertake individual quests, encountering temptations — and each other — along the way. The music and lyrics are by Stephen Sondheim, and the book is by James Lapine. An imaginative directorial concept and strong performances reward audiences for joining these characters on their journey. This production, which celebrates the launch of Princeton University’s Program in Music Theater, is part of a spring semester course that provides students with rigorous experience in creating theater under nearprofessional circumstances. The students have worked with a professional director (Ethan Heard), design team, and stage manager either performing an onstage role or serving on the production team. Mr. Heard’s concept fits the academic venue; the new setting is a library with forest-themed wallpaper, where the stories are brought to life from pop-up books. In this version, the narrator is a young woman instead of an old man. She pulls books from the shelves and mixes them up, just as the story mixes traditional fairy tales. A baker and his wife wish to have a child, but a family curse prevents them from doing so. The witch who cursed the baker’s family demands that they procure four objects: “a cape as red as blood, a slipper as pure as gold, a cow as white as milk, and hair as yellow as corn.” Little Red Riding Hood is sent to take a basket to her grandmother, and Jack is sent to sell his beloved cow. Cinderella flees her stepmother and stepsisters to attend her ball, or “festival.” To get what they wish, the characters must interact with their counterparts from other stories. In this respect, the 1987 musical anticipates the TV series Once Upon a Time.

derella’s Prince — a dual role both in the original production and this one — to wear the same leather pants, underlining the predatory seductiveness shared by the two characters. Meagan Raker (Class of ’18), a soprano, is outstanding as Cinderella. She has an exquisite voice, and her acting deftly highlights Cinderella’s character arc. Like Giselle in the musical film Enchanted, Cinderella outgrows her fairy tale environment. “My father’s house was a nightmare; your house was a dream. Now I want something in between,” she tells her Prince. As the Princes, Jared Brendon Hopper (’18) and Nico Krell (’18) are a joint tour de force in “Agony,” in which they commiserate about their romantic frustrations. Emma Watkins (’18) is strong in her dual performance as Cinderella’s Mother and Rapunzel. Milky White, Jack’s cow, is a prop in some productions; here it has become an entertaining mime, performed by Marshall Schaffer (’20). Professor Stacy Wolf’s Princeton University courses have included “The Musical Theatre of Stephen Sondheim: Process to Production” and “Isn’t It Romantic? The Broadway Musical from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Sondheim.” She does much to foster discussion about musical theatre, by hosting conversations with Broadway professionals, and making segments of her classes open to the public. Here, Professor Wolf is fearsome as the voice of the giant. ew audiences, as well as those who have seen previous productions (as has this writer), will enjoy venturing Into the Woods with this talented cast and INTO THE WOODS: Performances are underway for Princeton University’s production of the production crew. Of course, those students Broadway musical. A young narrator (Kateryn McReynolds, center) receives hard-earned who pursue musical theatre as a career will wisdom from an ensemble of fairytale characters. (Photo by Larry Levanti for the Lewis Center for the Arts) face their own formidable quest. However, if this promising performance is any indi“Into the Woods” will play in the Berlind Theatre at McCarter Theatre Center cation, they may well “find there’s hope of through April 22. For tickets call (609) 258-9220, (609) 258-2787 (McCarter). getting through the journey.” —Donald H. Sanborn III or visit arts.princeton.edu/events/into-the-woods/2017-04-14.

Each character must deal with temptations along the way; the wolf tries to lure Little Red Riding Hood away from her task. Even the baker and his wife encourage Jack to sell his cow for beans instead of coins, without knowing whether or not the beans are magical. Mr. Lapine wanted to write “something that was fun, but packed a punch,” the librettist told Craig Zadan, a Sondheim biographer. Mr. Sondheim, whose generation was the target audience for The Wizard of Oz, wanted to write a fairy tale “quest musical.” The Wizard of Oz influences the opening number, in which the recurring title chorus links individual songs about each character’s wishes. A variety of musical styles — operetta, blues, even rap — gives a distinct voice to each of the characters throughout the show. After the beans grow, Jack climbs his be-

anstalk to explore a world of “Giants in the Sky.” During the second act, the characters must put aside their own needs to survive as a community, as they face dire consequences for actions Jack takes during this visit — as well as mistakes they made while on their own journeys. The library setting will be important during this crisis. Music Department alumna Emily Whitaker’s musical direction is crisp and precise. Mr. Sondheim is known for being skillfully verbose — a parody of a song from one of his other shows begins, “another hundred lyrics just flew out of my brain” — but this cast delivers with clarity lines such as “Not forgetting the tasks unachievable, mountains unscalable — if it’s conceivable but unavailable.” The sets by Reid Thompson offer an artfully disorienting effect, as the library walls often move. Costume designer Mio Guberinic has allowed the wolf and Cin-

N

TRANSFORMING S P A C E

Westminster Choir Bang on a Can All-Stars Joe Miller, conductor Doug Varone, director

Anthracite Fields by Julia Wolfe

Image courtesy of Postcommodity

“…unforgettably haunting….” — Los Angeles Times

A multi-media production presented in the monumental space of the Roebling Wire Works, site of the annual Art All Night Arts Festival.

Friday, April 21 • Saturday, April 22 Roebling Wire Works • 675 South Clinton Avenue • Trenton, NJ Free secure parking nearby

Schedule 6–8 p.m.

7:15 p.m.

8 p.m.

Transformations

Transforming Space

Exhibit of art exploring the beauty and dignity found in post-industrial locations, such as Trenton and Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal regions.

Pre-performance presentation by Joe Miller,conductor; Julia Wolfe, composer; and Clifford Zink, historian and preservationist.

Anthracite Fields Performance

Curated by

.

Learn more: www.rider.edu/anthracite_fields Tickets: $20 adults, $15 students/seniors

Postcommodity Artist Talk

Performance

Tuesday, April 25, 6 pm

Wednesday, April 26, 5:30 pm

Join us for two events with Postcommodity (Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martinez, and Kade L. Twist), the 2017 Sarah Lee Elson, Class of 1984, International Artists-in-Residence. As representatives of the Cherokee and Navajo nations as well as New Mexican mestizo culture, the artists engage issues of identity and geography rooted in ancient cultures and contemporary politics. A reception will follow the Tuesday evening talk. Both programs will take place in 101 McCormick Hall.

Box Office: www.rider.edu/arts • 609-921-2663

Funding provided by

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu Photo: Anthracite Fields performance by the Choir of Trinity Wall Street at Lincoln Center. (Chris Lee)

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4/4/17 12:47 PM


17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

MUSIC REVIEW

Abigail Washburn and Béla Fleck Captivate Listeners at Princeton University Concert

F

inishing their second or third piece of the evening, Abigail Washburn and Béla Fleck rose from their seats to acknowledge an appreciative full house in Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium on Thursday. “Clapping sounds really good in here!” Ms. Washburn exclaimed, eliciting laughter and a further wave of applause. But if, superficially, her remark sounded like preening, it was also true. Every sound reverberated warmly in the intimate, wood-lined hall. Clapping did indeed sound good there. But more to the point, the space wonderfully supported each note of the banjo duo’s engrossing performance that evening. Prompted by the birth of their son Juno, Ms. Washburn and Mr. Fleck began their official musical collaboration in 2013 in part as a way to keep the family together on tour. Their act is a coming together of two of the banjo’s foremost ambassadors. In a career spanning nearly four decades, Mr. Fleck has pushed the instrument well beyond its traditional role in bluegrass string bands (though he does that too). Perhaps best known for his pioneering work with the jazz-bluegrass fusion group the Flecktones, Mr. Fleck has also played extensively with jazz pianist Chick Corea, collaborated with bassist Edgar Meyer and tabla player Zakir Hussain, and composed and performed two concertos for banjo and orchestra. Considered by many to be his instrument’s finest technician, Mr. Fleck has been nominated for 30 Grammys — in more categories than any other instrumentalist in the award’s history — and has won 15 of those awards. If the range of genres Mr. Fleck commands is sprawling, Ms. Washburn demonstrates by contrast that it is not comprehensive. From her 2005 debut solo album Song of the Traveling Daughter, she has staked out a corner of the bluegrass world uniquely her own, largely drawing on oldtime Appalachian folk music traditions, but occasionally integrating elements of Chinese folk music. Ms. Washburn is fluent in Mandarin and her inclusion of the language in her singing is as impressive as it is unusual. She plays with a number of groups that range from old-time music (Uncle Earl) to bilingual, multi-genre experimentalism (The Wu Force). In Princeton, Ms. Washburn and Mr. Fleck sat onstage ensconced in a little nest of microphones, cables, and six or seven banjos of varying size and pitch. The texture of the duo’s sound varied

with each piece, but at no point did they sound thin or deficient. This was due in part to the many different instruments the two utilized. On “Little Birdie,” Mr. Fleck picked up a large cello banjo — strung an octave lower than his normal instrument — and instantly became their rhythm section, his rubbery bass lines grounding Ms. Washburn’s limpid vocals and fingerpicking, occasionally thumping the head of his instrument in emulation of a kick drum. In the next piece he reversed course, teasing out intricate trebly lead lines on a diminutive mandolin-sized instrument. But even when they were both playing standard five-string banjos, each complemented the other in timbre and style. Mr. Fleck played with a rolling three-finger style developed by Earl Scruggs, full of ringing open strings droning along with his melodic playing. He wore metal picks on the fingers of his right hand, giving his notes a keen brightness. Ms. Washburn eschewed picks for the more muted, clucking sound of old-time clawhammer technique, striking the strings of her instrument directly with her fingers. Playing together, the two simmered, with Ms. Washburn’s penetrating, full-throated vocals soaring above their picking. One of the evening’s highlights was “Shotgun Blues,” a searing “old time murder ballad” Ms. Washburn wrote, in which a lady — and, as she explained, it’s inevitably the ladies who are the victims in this narrow genre — plots her revenge on a no-good man. The song stretched between a spare, rattling introduction, with both musicians beating ominously on their instruments, and a howling coda with both playing at full tilt — a musical tension that mirrored the speaker’s vacillation between restraint and murderous fury. ost of the material Ms. Washburn and Mr. Fleck played was from their self-titled 2014 album, though the duo also opted to test-run a few new songs. But whether the songs were familiar or not, the audience hung on their every note. After their performance, when the duo came back onstage for an encore, Ms. Washburn proposed they play one of three songs. Audience members clamored indistinctly for their favored number for a few moments until Ms. Washburn, grinning, asked, “Well, do you have enough time for all of them?” We did. —Doug Wallack

M

THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 5 PM I 101 McCORMICK HALL Responding to photographer Edmund Clark’s documentation of the American naval base at Guantánamo Bay and Tim Hetherington’s photographs of civil wars in West Africa, this panel examines the moral responsibilities and contemporary challenges of representing suffering in conflict.

Nicholas Schmidle Staff writer at the New Yorker, Visiting Lecturer in the Humanities Council, and 2016 Ferris Professor of Journalism

Daniel Heyman

Katherine Bussard

Artist, Lecturer in Visual Arts

Peter C. Bunnell Curator of Photography

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Revealing Pictures: Photographs from the Christopher E. Olofson Collection.

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu Tim Hetherington, Untitled, from the series Inner Light, 1999–2003. © Tim Hetherington, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York; Edmund Clark, Camps I — Isolation Unit in Camp 1, 2009, from the series Guantanamo: If the Light Goes Out, 2008–10. © Edmund Clark, Courtesy Flowers Gallery, London and New York. Collection of Christopher E. Olofson, Class of 1992 Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

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4/3/17 9:34 AM

ntimate Lynn Nottage

by directed by Jade King Carroll

May 5 - June 4, 2017 THE FIRST COUPLE OF THE BANJO: Abigail Washburn and Béla Fleck played material from their Grammy-winning 2014 album at Princeton’s Richardson Auditorium. (Photo by Jim McGuire)

THE OFFICE STORE

A deeply moving tale of one woman’s discovery of her own empowerment and the true meaning of intimacy.

www.mccarter.org | 609.258.2787 28 Spring St, Princeton (next to Chuck’s)

609-924-0112

www.hinksons.com

Opening Night sponsor

McCarter programming is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts and by funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.


Beauty and the Beast (PG for action, peril, violence, and frightening images). Emma Watson and Dan Stevens co-star as the title characters in this musical adaptation of the French fairy tale about a young woman taken prisoner by a monstrous, young prince. Supporting cast includes Luke Evans, Kevin Kline, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Stanley Tucci, Aundra McDonald, Ian McKellen, Josh Gad, and Emma Thompson. Born in China (G). Documentary, narrated by Jon Krasinski, depicting an epic expedition deep into the wilds of China to monitor the daily lives of three elusive species: pandas, golden monkeys, and snow leopards. In English and Mandarin with subtitles. The Boss Baby (PG for some mildly rude humor). Animated comedy about a precocious infant (Alec Baldwin) who teams up with his 7-year-old brother (Miles Christopher Bakshi) to foil the plan of a diabolical CEO (Steve Buscemi) who is determined to destabilize feelings of love around the world. Voice cast includes Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow, Tobey Maguire, ViviAnn Yee, and Eric Bell, Jr. The Case for Christ (PG for mature themes, incidental smoking, and medical descriptions of crucifixion). Documentary drama based on investigative journalist Lee Strobel’s (Mike Vogel) bestseller of the same name describing his conversion from a skeptical atheist to a devout believer after two years of trying to convince his born again wife (Erika Christensen) that God doesn’t exist. With Faye Dunaway, Robert Forster, and Frankie Faison. Cezanne et Moi (R for profanity, nudity, and sexual references). Biopic about the lifelong friendship of novelist/philosopher Emile Zola (Guillaume Canet) and Paul Cezanne (Guillaume Gallienne). With Alice Pol, Deborah Francois, and Pierre Yvon. In French with subtitles. The Eagle Huntress (G). Biopic about the epic quest of 13-year-old Aisholpan, who belongs to a tribe of Mongolian nomads, to become the first female in her family in a dozen generations to earn the esteemed status of Eagle Hunter. In Kazakh with subtitles. The Fate of the Furious (PG-13 for profanity, suggestive content, and violence and destruction). Eighth movie in the Fast and Furious series finds Dom (Vin Diesel) and Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) settling down after their honeymoon when a mysterious woman (Charlize Theron) seduces him into a criminal betrayal of those closest to him. Ensemble cast includes Helen Mirren, Tyrese, Ludacris, Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Kurt Russell, and Scott Eastwood. Frantz (PG-13 for mature themes and brief violence). Bittersweet drama, set in the wake of World War I, about the grief-stricken fiancée (Paula Beer) of a late German soldier (Anton von Lucke) who forges a friendship with the mysterious Frenchman (Pierre Niney) whom she finds placing flowers on his grave. Cast includes Marie Gruber, Johann von Bulow, and Ernst Stotzner. In French and German with subtitles. Free Fire (R for sexual references, drug use, graphic violence, and pervasive profanity). Comedy, set in 1978, about a bloody shootout between Boston mobsters and members of the Irish Republican Army after an arms deal had gone bad. Ensemble cast includes Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, Sharlto Copley, and Noah Taylor. Get Out (R for violence, profanity, bloody images, and sexual references). Thriller about a black college student (Daniel Kaluuya) who goes home with his white girlfriend (Allison Williams) to meet her parents (Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford) and uncovers the suburban town’s sordid history of a series of disappearances of African-American males. Supporting cast includes Lakeith Stanfield, Caleb Landry Jones, and Erika Alexander. Ghost in the Shell (PG-13) Science fiction movie based on the Japanese comic book series of the same name about a cyborg counter-terrorist commander (Scarlett Johansson) who is deployed to prevent computer hackers from purloining powerful, mind control technology. With Pilou Asbaek, Juliette Binoche, and Takeshi Kitano. Gifted (PG-13 for profanity, mature themes, and suggestive material). Adventure set in a Central Florida coastal town when a 7-year-old orphan (Mckenna Grace), raised by her uncle (Chris Evans) after her mother’s suicide, becomes the subject of a custody battle when her grandmother (Lindsay Duncan) learns she’s a promising math prodigy. With Octavia Spencer, Jona Xiao, and Jenny Slate. God Knows Where I Am (Unrated). Poignant movie showing the events leading to the death by a starvation of Linda Bishop, a homeless woman who tried to survive a harsh New Hampshire winter in an abandoned farmhouse with only apples and rain water for food. Going in Style (PG-13 for profanity, drug use, and suggestive material). Remake of the classic crime comedy about three retirees (Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, and Alan Arkin) who conspire to rob the bank that bankrupted their pension fund. Supporting cast includes Joey King, Ann-Margaret, Matt Dillon, Kenan Thompson, and Christopher Lloyd. Kong: Skull Island (PG-13 for action, intense violence, and brief profanity). Remake of the King Kong series, set in 1971, about an ill-fated expedition to an uncharted Polynesian island inhabited by a horde of monsters led by a giant ape. Ensemble cast includes Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John C. Reilly, John Goodman, Corey Hawkins, and Tom Hiddleston. Logan (R for graphic violence, profanity, and brief nudity). Hugh Jackman is the Marvel Comics superhero who is a weary Wolverine withdrawn from the world and caring for an ailing Professor X (Patrick Stewart) until he is recruited by a mysterious stranger (Elizabeth Rodriguez) to come to the assistance of a young mutant (Dafne Keen) on the run from dark forces. With Richard E. Grant, Boyd Holbrook, Eriq La Salle, and Stephen Merchant. Power Rangers (PG-13 for violence, action, destruction, profanity, and crude humor). Remake of the series finds five teens imbued with unique superpowers — Naomi Scott, R.J. Cyler, Ludi Lin, Dacre Montgomery, and Becky G — joining forces to save the planet from an evil witch (Elizabeth Banks) who has an army of militant minions. With Bill Hader, Bryan Cranston, and Sarah Grey. Phoenix Forgotten (PG-13 for terror, peril, and profanity). Horror film, set in Arizona on March 13, 1997, about three teens (Chelsea Lopez, Justin Matthews, and Luke Spencer Roberts) who mysteriously disappeared while investigating the sighting of a UFO hovering over the desert. With Florence Hartigan, Clint Jordan, and Ana Dela Cruz. The Promise (PG-13 for mature themes, sexuality, violence, disturbing images, and war atrocities). Drama, set during the last days of the Ottoman Empire, about an Armenian woman (Charlotte Le Bon), who was raised in Europe, who becomes part of a love triangle with a medical student (Oscar Isaac) and an American photojournalist (Christian Bale) when she returns to Constantinople from Paris. Cast includes James Cromwell, Jean Reno, and Shohreh Aghdashloo. In English, German, and French with subtitles.

Calendar Wednesday, April 19 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Princeton University Farmers’ Market at Firestone Library/ Chapel Plaza (repeats weekly through May 10). 4:30 p.m.: Lecture entitled, “Theater of History: Encountering the Past in American Jewish Museums” delivered by Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett at Princeton University Art Museum. 6 p.m.: Human Rights Activist Nadia Murad delivers a lecture on “Yazidi Genocide and ISIS Crimes Against Ethno-Religious Minorities in Iraq and Syria” at Princeton University’s McCosh 50. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street (repeats weekly). Thursday, April 20 10 a.m.: Meeting, 55-Plus Club at The Jewish Center of Princeton. Louis A. Sass will deliver a lecture entitled, “Anxiety and Insight in Schizophrenia: Philosophical Reflections.” Admission is free with a $3 donation suggested. 6 to 8 p.m.: Seasonal Eating Workshop with Andrew Appello at Gravity Hill Farm, 67 Pleasant Valley Road in Titusville. The workshop includes discussion, a hands-on demo, and a group meal. 6:30 p.m.: In celebration of the exhibition “The Berlin Painter and His World,” Greek jazz musician Petros Klampanis performs accompanied by a string quartet. A reception will follow; Princeton University Art Museum. 7 p.m.: Hindu Studies Lecture Series presents “The Seeds of Padavali Kirtan: Expanding Musical Time in Bengali Song” with Eben Graves of Columbia University; Princeton University, Aaron Burr Hall 219. 7 p.m.: Msgr. Vincent Gartland of the Diocese of Trenton delivers a presentation, “On Pope Francis’ Encyclical: Care For Our Common Home” at St. Paul Spiritual Center, 214 Nassau Street in Princeton. 7 p.m.: Meeting, Native Plant Society of New Jersey – West Central Chapter at the Plainsboro Audubon Preserve, 80 Scott’s Corner Road in Plainsboro. Native perennial plants and seeds for sale. For more information, call Judith at (609) 356-0558.

essential tool in land management. $40 NOFA-NJ members and $50 non-members. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.: 2-Year Anniversary Sale at South Moon Under at MarketFair Mall in Princeton. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Art for Families: Art Tales at Princeton University Art Museum. Hear stories from around the world and craft a puppet for your own theater. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Annual Earth Day Celebration and Sale at Whole Earth Center of Princeton, 360 Nassau Street. 1 p.m.: Princeton University Men’s Lacrosse vs. Harvard at Princeton’s 1952 Stadium. 6 to 8 p.m.: Interactive Earth Day Meditation Concert with Syhamji Bhatnagar at Princeton Integral Yoga Community Center at the Princeton Shopping Center. To register, call (609) 4543140 or email IYCCprinceton@gmail.com.

Starting Friday The Lost City of Z (PG-13) Continuing Paterson (R) Get Out (R) Ends Thursday The Eagle Huntress (G) God Knows Where I Am (NR) New Restoration Elevator to the Gallows (1958) Thu, April 20 7:30pm National Theatre Live Twelfth Night (NR) Sun, April 23 12:30pm Art on Screen Cave of Forgotten Dreams Mon, April 24 7:30pm Sonic Cinema Resistance Valerie Tevere & Angel Nevarez Q&A Tue, April 25 7:30pm Showtimes change daily Visit or call for showtimes. Hotline: 609-279-1999 PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Fri. 04/21/17 to Thurs. 04/27/17

Going in Style

Friday - Saturday: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 (R) Sunday - Thursday: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20

The Lost City of Z

Friday - Saturday: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 (R) Sunday - Thursday: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00

Their Finest

Friday - Saturday: 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 (R) Sunday - Thursday: 1:45, 4:25, 7:05

Gifted

Friday-Saturday: 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 (PG-13) Sunday-Thursday: 2:20, 4:45, 7:10

The Zookeeper’s Wife

Friday - Saturday: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10,10:00 (PG-13) Sunday-Thursday: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10

Frantz

Friday - Thursday: 1:55, 7:15 (PG-13)

Tommys Honour

Friday - Saturday: 4:30, 9:50 (PG) Sunday - Thursday: 4:30

Smurfs: The Lost Village (PG for mild action and rude humor). Reboot of the animated series finds Smurfette (Demi Lovato), Brainy (Danny Pudi), Hefty (Joe Manganiello), and Clumsy (Jack McBrayer) racing through a forbidden forest filled with magical creatures to find a lost village before the evil wizard Gargamel (Rainn Wilson) finds it. Voice cast includes Mandy Patinkin, Julia Roberts, Michelle Rodriguez, Meghan Trainor, and Gordon Ramsay. Spark: A Space Tail (PG for action and rude humor). Animated adventure about a teenage monkey (Jace Norman) that embarks with his fellow monkeys (Jessica Biel and Rob deLeeuw) on a dangerous mission to reconstruct a planet ripped to pieces by an evil overlord (A.C. Peterson). Voice cast includes Susan Sarandon, Hilary Swank, and Patrick Stewart). T2: Trainspotting (R for violence, drug use, graphic sexuality, nudity, and profanity). Oscar winning director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) reassembled his principal cast for this sequel, set in Edinburgh 20 years later, that finds the gang resuming their shocking, anti-social antics. Co-starring Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner, Johnny Lee Miller, Robert Carlyle, and Kelly Macdonald. Tommy’s Honour (PG for mature themes, suggestive material, smoking, and mild epithets). A retrospective film describing the contributions of Tommy (Peter Mullan) and young Tom Morris (Jack Lowden), the father-son team who are credited with modernizing the game of golf. Cast includes Sam Neill, Max Deacon, and Ophelia Lovibond. Unforgettable (R for sexuality, violence, profanity, and brief nudity). Thriller about a jealous, jilted divorcée (Katherine Heigl) who becomes unhinged when her ex-husband (Geoff Stults) lets his new fiancee (Rosario Dawson) move into the house they once shared. With Cheryl Ladd, Whitney Cummings, and Isabella Rice. The Zookeeper’s Wife (PG-13 for violence, disturbing images, mature themes, smoking, sexuality, and brief nudity). Jessica Chastain has the title character in this true tale, set in Poland during World War II, about how a fearless woman hid hundreds of Jews during the Holocaust on the grounds of the Warsaw Zoo. Cast includes Daniel Bruhl, Johan Heldenbergh, and Timothy Radford.

—Kam Williams

We are ON A MISSION to welcome families from all over the world. Come meet our dedicated educators and caregivers. Infants and children 8 weeks to 6 years benefit from the following:      

NJ State licensed program Register now for Red Cross First Aid, CPR/AED certified staff Summer session & International student population the new school year. Flexible scheduling Weekly music program Access to other YWCA offerings like dance and yoga

59 Paul Robeson Place, Princeton, NJ ywcaprinceton.org/childcare (609) 497-2100 ext. 325

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

AT THE CINEMA

8 p.m.: Robert P. Kirshner delivers a lecture entitled, “Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Cosmos” at Princeton University’s McDonnell Hall A-02. Free. 8 p.m.: Violinists Pamela Frank and Christian Tetzlaff perform at Richardson Auditorium with a special musical preview by the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble. To purchase tickets, call (609) 2589220. Friday, April 21 11 a.m.: Free, Tiger Tales for children ages 3-5 at Cotsen Children’s Library (repeats weekly). 7 p.m.: Free, recital by Joan Lippincott, Scott Dettra, and Eric Plutz at Princeton University Chapel. 7 to 9 p.m.: Princeton Pro Musica presents a symposium on its upcoming performance of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana (scheduled to appear at Richardson Auditorium on May 21). Artistic Directors Ryan Brandau (Princeton Pro Musica) and Mark Roxey (Roxey Ballet) will discuss their collaboration. This event will be held at Princeton Public Library. 8 p.m.: Westminster Choir performs Anthracite Fields at Roebling Wire Works, 675 South Clinton Avenue in Trenton (also on Saturday, April 22). 8 p.m.: Premiere of American Repertory Ballet’s Pride and Prejudice at McCarter Theatre (also on Saturday, April 22). Saturday, April 22 Earth Day 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Princeton Academy’s Spring Rummage Sale. Shop clothing, toys, furniture, sporting goods, and more. Cash only. Princeton Academy is located at 1128 Great Road in Princeton. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Princeton University Men’s Heavyweight Crew vs. Yale and Cornell at Shea Rowing Center at Carnegie Lake. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Princeton University Outdoor Track Larry Ellis Invite at Weaver Track Stadium. 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Princeton Pong hosts the 2017 April OPEN Table Tennis Tournament. This is a 2-Star USATT-Sanctioned Tournament open to groups of all ages and skill levels. Entry deadline is April 21. RSVP at www.princetonpong.com or call (609) 987-8500. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Chainsaw Safety Training at Cherry Valley Cooperative Farm, 619 Cherry Valley Road in Princeton. Learn proper usage, safety, and maintenance for this


Music and Theater

Jazz at PU Welcomes Composer Billy Childs

PDS PRODUCTION OF “MACBETH” NOMINATED FOR NINE NJ THEATRE AWARDS: Princeton Day School received nine nominations from the Montclair State University Theatre Awards Committee for the fall production of Macbeth. Two of the student performers, Hope Ammidon ’18 (Princeton), as Lady Macbeth, top, and Emily Trend ’18 (Pennington), as Macbeth, were both nominated for awards. The awards will be held on Monday, May 15 at Montclair State University.

Steinway Spirio High Resolution Player Piano

This year’s Princeton Festival Gala will go beyond its usual helping of fun, good food, dancing, and auctions to include a demonstration of the new Steinway Spirio piano, a breakthrough in technology that accurately recreates live performances in the listener’s own living room. The gala will take place on Saturday, April 22 at 6 p.m. at Greenacres Country Club in Lawrenceville. Cocktails only and full-dinner reservations can be made at prince tonfestival.org/event/2017gala until April 20. Jacobs Music, the area’s exclusive Steinway dealer and a long-time supporter of the Festival and its piano competition w ill demonstrate the Steinway Spirio during the cocktail hour. This will be the first local public demonstration of the new instrument. “Listening to the Spirio is an uncanny experience,” said R ichard Tang Yu k, general and artistic director of The Princeton Festival. “There’s nothing mechanical about it – you could swear

it was a live person playing the music.” Spirio owners can access music from Bach to Billy Joel, currently totaling more than 1,700 selections, captured from the playing of Steinway artists. The instrument can also be played like a normal piano. The Princeton Festival’s 13th season of performances across the genres of opera, Broadway musicals, jazz, dance, choral music, and more will run from June 3-25, 2017. For information, visit www.princetonfestival.org. ———

Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” Becomes an ARB Ballet

American Repertory Ballet (ARB) presents the world premiere of Douglas Martin’s full-length ballet, Pride and Prejudice, at McCarter Theatre Center on Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22, at 8 p.m. Jane Austen’s tale of love, manners, and marriage comes to life in this brand-new story ballet with live accompaniment by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO). John Devlin will conduct. The ballet will feature sets and costumes by Christina

Jazz at Princeton University presents the world premiere of pianist/composer Billy Childs’s Rejoice, a new work commissioned by Princeton and performed by Princeton’s 18-member Creative Large Ensemble with special guest Childs. In addition, the group will perform his piece Do you Know My Name ( commissioned by Michigan State University and premiered in January 2016), as well as arrangements of Childs’s music by Grammy Award-nominee Darcy James Argue. Childs and Rudresh Mahanthappa, director of the program in jazz studies, will also perform as a duo. The performance is on Saturday, May 13 at 8 p.m. in Alexander Hall’s Richardson Auditorium. Admission is $15, $5 students. For tickets call (609) 258-9220 or visit tickets.princeton.edu. “Billy Childs is one of the most interesting composers working on the scene as he is able to engage multiple genres simultaneously,” says Mahanthappa. “His ability to traverse a broad scope of music is truly unique, far reaching, and ultimately vital to the future of jazz as an art form and music in general.” The Creative Large Ensemble includes alto saxophonists Alex Laurenzi and Nick Ng; tenor saxophonists Diego Aldarondo and Soon Il Higashino; baritone saxophonist Anna Meadors; trumpeters Matt Hetrick, William Grear, Conor Fitz-

UNDER THE STARS IN BUENOS AIRES: On Saturday, April 8, Jasna Polana was transformed into a sizzling milonga (tango club) for the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) gala “Under the Stars in Buenos Aires.” Tango music performed by violin virtuoso Daniel Rowland and PSO musicians, professional tango dancers, and exotic décor evoked a sultry summer night in the city. The evening raised funds for the orchestra and its PSO BRAVO! education programs, particularly for a new initiative to bring the PSO’s music into the Trenton Public Schools. Pictured from left: Dave Tierno, Stephanie Wedeking, and Daniel Rowland. (Photo Credit: Princeton Symphony Orchestra)

Within the Quota

patrick, and Lucas Makinen ; trombonists Rajeev Erramilli, Kyle Groves, and Michael Stambler, plus bass trombonist Kyle Goldman; vo c a l is t A l l is on S pa n n ; guitarist Michael Delgado; pianist Phillip Yoon; bassist Sean Decker; and drummer Russell Burton. A native of Los Angeles, Childs grew up immersed in jazz, classical, and popular music influences. He studied under Robert Linn and Marton Lauridsen at USC before being discovered by trumpet legend Freddie Hubbard, with whom he embarked on a successful performing and recording tour. As a pianist he has perfor me d w it h Yo -Yo Ma, Sting, Renee Fleming, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, The Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Chick Corea, Wynton Marsalis, the Kronos Quartet, Jack DeJohnette, Dave Holland, Ron Carter, The Ying Quartet, The A mer ican Brass Quintet and Chris Botti. His latest release is 2017’s Rebirth.

Dance and Music as Resistance Music by COLE PORTER As arranged and performed by PENGUIN CAFÉ

Choreographed by JULIA JANSEN for PRINCETON UNIVERSITY BALLET Project Director: SIMON MORRISON

Thursday, May 4, 2017 7:30pm at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall Buy your tickets today 609.258.9220 tickets.princeton.edu $25 General / $5 Students

IS ON

“Often mysterious but usually playful: Penguin Café” —The Telegraph

Jazz Vocal Collective Ensembles i and ii Presents

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 20

Giannini, whose costumes are tailored to showcase the fashions of the English Regency Period from 17901820 to match the period sets. The ballet takes full advantage of McCar ter’s stage. Tickets, rang ing f rom $20-$50, can be purchased in person at the McCarter Theatre box office (91 University Place, Princeton), by phone (609) 258-2787, or online at www.mccarter.org. ———

P

ium

Violin duos by BARTÓK, LECLAIR, DE BÉROIT and PROKOFIEV

ditor pm 7:30 rdson Au a Rich

DIRECTED BY DR. TRINEICE ROBINSON-MARTIN

with special guest

TICKETS: 609.258.9220

princetonuniversityconcerts.org

Darmon Meader of New York Voices

AUDIENCE ON STAGE! PUC125: Performances Up Close

Celebrating 100 years of Ella Fitzgerald, this concert features Darmon Meader and student arrangements of classic jazz standards Ella performed, original compositions, and vocal jazz arrangements.

Thursday, April 27, 2017 7:30 p.m. Taplin Auditorium, fine hall Free admission

music.princeton.edu

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 2017, 8PM

Musical Preview by the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble at 7PM, free to ticketholders

RICHARDSON AUDITORIUM IN ALEXANDER HALL BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY 609.258.9220 PRINCETONUNIVERSITYCONCERTS.ORG $50, $40, $25 GENERAL $10 STUDENTS


21• TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

All Things S pring Spring Into Action to Prepare for the New Season: Planting, Landscaping, Outdoor Activities Abound

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Entertainment and activities of all kinds will be available, starting May 18 with the popular Girls’ Night Out, featuring sales, discounts, and free gifts/services from the Palmer Square shops. Dance Troupes The Summer Block Party presented by Jazams children’s store and Palmer Square on June 16, will feature crafts, music, and food on Palmer Square West, followed by music on the Green. You will not want to miss the Dancers on the Square presented by YWCA Princeton on June 23, when several dance troupes will entertain with special performances on the Green. And music lovers will enjoy the Summer Music Series every Saturday in July and August from 2 to 4 p.m., when an eclectic mix of musicians perform. The Summer Movie Series features family-friendly movies on the Green June 16th, July 14, and August 18 at 8:30 p.m., and if yoga is your thing, you will surely want to experience Summer Yoga with Lululemon on the

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he days are longer, the temperatures warmer, and the breezes balmier. Finally spring is in full swing, and it’s time to welcome this season of renewal with a full array of activities. Wit h a new season, a new look is often in order. Whether it’s a new coat of paint on the house, a new landscaping design, a fullfledged deck or patio cleanup — or a new you, with a new hair style, make-up, or tone-up — the time is now! In addition, spring offers an opportunity to be outside enjoying the numerous activities and events the Princeton area has to offer. Hiking, biking, canoeing, and kayaking on the canal, enjoying bird-watching at the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed, taking in a Trenton Thunder baseball game, or listening to the beautiful voices of the Princeton Singers are among the many choices available in our area. Getting out and about this spring and summer should definitely include taking in the var iet y of events planned at Palmer Square.

ecolog ical management, native plants, and stewardship of natural resources to a special “Frog Slog Night Hike” to learn about those Green on Sundays through- fascinating creatures to the out the summer from 9:30 11th Annual Stream Cleanto 10:30 a.m. ups. Other events include Business will be in the fore- the “Big Day Birding on the front July 18th from 4:30 to Reserve” when participants 7 p.m. when the Business will count as many species to Consumer Showcase is as possible in one day. The presented on the Green. second Annual Watershed Phone, Tablet & Computer Repair This will be followed by the Trail Run and Festival, with Operated by separate 5k and 10k routes popular Summer Sidewalk Expert techs. Sale Friday through Sunday, designed to tour the different types of habitat featured August 4 through, featuring Amazing service. excellent savings from the on the Watershed Reserve, Phone, Tablet & Comput will appeal to runners and shops on the Square during 90-day repair Operated by nature lovers. The day will regular store hours. Expert techs. warranty. also include live music, food To enjoy something more Amazing service. rustic and an appreciation of and beverages, and superthe natural world, you can vised activity for children. 90-day repair Outdoor sign up for one of the outPrinceton Tiger Tech Phone, Tablet & Comp warranty. Environment door programs offered by the 252 Nassau Street Operated by Stony Brook-Millstone WaIn252 addition, you can “Learn Expert techs. 2nd Floor Nassau tershed Association. Since the Language of27 Nature” . Amazing service.Princeton Tiger Tech 1949, the Watershed has in Street the Watershed’s popuU ST Hours: M-F 10-6 SSA helped protect and restore lar adultNAeducation course 252 Nassau Street 90-day repair (609) 608-0902 central New Jersey’s water about Plants and WildflowMENTION THIS AD 252 2nd FOR Floor 10% OFF warranty. Nassau and natural environment ers of PRINCETON Woods, Fields and 27 Facebook.com/PrincetonTigerTech Street ANY REPAIR OR ACCESSORY ST. through conservation, ad- Roadside” held from May Hours: M-F 10-6 SAU NAS Support@PrincetonTigerTech.com vocacy, science, and educa- 10 through June 14, which (609) 608-0902 Princeton Tiger Tech tion. Visit the 930-acre Wa- also includes three Saturday Facebook.com/PrincetonTigerTech 252 Nassau Street PRINCETON tershed Reserve to discover morning field trips. 252 2nd Floor Support@PrincetonTigerTech.com more than 10 miles of hikNassau After enjoying the Wa27 Street ing trails and the Watershed tershed’s numerous events, ST. Hours: M-F 10-6 SAU NAS Center, which is open daily. m a n y h o m e o w n e r s w i l l (609) 608-0902 To register for a program, fe e l i n s p i r e d to s p e n d Facebook.com/PrincetonTigerTech PRINCETON call (609) 737-7592. time outdoors in their own Support@PrincetonTigerTech.com Upcoming programs covPrinc Continued on Next Page 22 er the gamut from talks on

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Spring Music Series Sunday 1-4 pm April and May Live Music and Wine Tasting 4/23 Jerry Steele

4/30 Michaela McClain 5/7 Kite Day Festival Music 5/14 Scot Silver at the Mother’s Day Wine Trail Event

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If you are Interior and not an experienced gardenExterior Lighting Car Charging er, get advice from profeswww.cifellielectrical.com Station Installers sionals or hire a professional Lic #11509A to teach you to do it, or do www.cifellielectrical.com Bonded and Insured it for you! www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A “Spring is an important Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Bonded and Insured time to fertilize your turf, www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A trees, shrubs, and groundBonded and Serving Princeton and Insured surrounding areas Lic #11509A covers,” continues Ms. DaBonded and Insured viau. “Selecting the correct Serving Princeton and surrounding areas fertilizer is important for Serving Princeton and surrounding areas the best results. If you have had poor success in certain now accepting accepting now areas of your garden, you summer Camp Camp may want to consider havHorseback Riding summer ing some soil samples taken applications! 121Laure Laure applications! Summer Camp and analyzed with recom121 NowKingston Accepting A Kingston n mendations to correct the n 121LaureL LaureLave, ave, 121 poor conditions.” NowKingston Accepting Applications! Kingston nJ08528 08528 nJ Determining what items We offer offer one one week week sessions sessions at can be planted now and We We offer offer one week sessions at 601 Lawrence Road, Weweek offersessions one week sessions at at We at where is a challenge for We offerone one week sessions at $425 per week. Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 some beginning gardeners, $425 per week. $450 PER WEEK.from 9:00am-3:00pm Campruns runs from 9:00am-3:00pm and as Ms. Daviau points Camp runs 609.882.7900, ext. 139 or 183 Camp from 9:00am-3:00pm Camp runs from 9:00am-3:00pm Camp runs from 9:00am-3:00pm goto to www.hastyacres.com Pleasego www.hastyacres.com out, visiting a garden cen- Please Camp runs from 9:00am-3:00pm Please go to www.hastyacres.com Please go to www.hastyacres.com ter is a good beginning. 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Kingston nJ 08528 June 26 ing veggies, some are best nJ 08528 • July 18 July 22 •• July July 17 18 -- July July21 22 • July July3 grown from starter plants, 55-Serving the Princeton community for Family 25 yearsOwned and Operated July25 25---July July29 29 •• July •••July July 25 July 29 and others from seed. Check We offer one week sessions at We offer • July July10 11 We offerone oneweek week sessions sessions at at •••August July 31 -11August 4 • August August 11 the number of days to pro--August 5•5 July $425 per week. $425 per week. INSTITUTIONAL • RESIDENTIAL • HISTORICAL WORK Family Owned and Operated duction/harvest. 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23• TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

CALL

SPRING MUSIC SERIES: Jerry Steele will be amongst the performers at the Spring Music Series at Terhune Orchards each week in April and May. The music event will coincide with wine tastings at Terhune’s Wine Barn. The tasting room will be open Fridays-Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. Wine tastings cost $5 per person (there is no cover charge for the live music). The Farm Store is open 7 days a week. For more information, visit www.terhuneorchards.com.

Spring Into Action Continued from Preceding Page

pruning of plants in spring is recommended for some plants, but which plants and how is what you need to know. As an example, roses are typically pruned in early spring — how to do it properly is an art!” Careful Preparation Nick Pirone, owner of Cutting Edge Lawn and Landscaping in Pennington also points out the importance of careful preparation and the need for a thorough cleanup of the grounds before the grass is cut. “You want to remove all the debris left over from the winter. Pick up sticks, and rake or blow out old leaves from planting beds and shrubbery. While leaves are good compost for your lawn when cut up, they do inhibit your lawn from proper growth when left in heavy piles. “Cutting Edge provides design and installation of new landscapes, weekly property management, shrub and

tree pruning, mulching, and more. Once your beds are cleaned out, it is important to add a two-inch layer of triple ground root mulch to all your planting areas. This helps with weed control, retains moisture for the plantings, and looks great. “Spring is a great time to plant shrubs, flowering perennials, and trees,” continues Mr. Pirone. “Bulbs are planted in the fall along with the re-seeding of your lawn. While you can seed now, it is difficult to keep new grass established during the heat of the summer. “When we design and install new landscapes, we take many factors into consideration. Especially working in and around Princeton, deer resistance is at the top of the list. Sunlight conditions and proximity to foundations or overhead wires are also important when creating layouts. Perennials, such as Double Knockout roses, Nepeta, St. Johns Wor t, and Quickfire Hydrangea Continued on Next Page 26

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DATE: Thursday - May 4, 2017 TIME: 6:30 pm Registration, Presentation/Q&A 7-8:00 pm SPEAKER: Thomas A. Leach, M.D. TOPIC: Facial Rejuvenation - Learn more about invasive and non-invasive procedures and treatments. RSVP: Call 609-921-7161 by May 3, 2017 Seating is limited.

DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF DISTINCTIVE SELECTIONS OF WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES WOODS, FINISHES AND STYLES

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Great discounts on Botox®, Juvéderm®, and Juvéderm® Voluma for all attendees. Giveaways and Raffles! Complimentary cosmetic and skin care consultations. Light refreshments will be served.

Come visit our table at the 2017 Mercer County Health and Wellness Expo at Quaker Bridge Mall April 21, 22 and 23rd. Enter our raffle for your chance to win a free CoolSculpting treatment! Hope to see you there!

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 24

Wherever the Olive GrOWs — DestinatiOn: CalifOrnia “Where the surf Meets the turf” California accounts for nearly 90% of american wine production. Join us as we take a trip from the north Coast to the south, and discover how the weather transitions from moody to mild, making for excellent diversity in both wine and surf. tuesday, May 2, 2017 | 6:30 - 9:30 pm $69 per person (Excludes Tax & Gratuity)

available to reserve online at

terramomo.com click on our calendar of events

JUNE 13 – AUGUST 24

l

AGES 2–17

PERFORMING ARTS

ROBOTICS

FILMMAKING

FASHION DESIGN

STEM WORKSHOP

GRAPHIC DESIGN

COMPUTER CODING

SPORTS CAMPS FOR GIRLS

VIDEO GAME DESIGN

CULINARY ARTS

AND MORE!

40 CAMPS for Boys & Girls

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+


25• TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 26

Spring Into Action Continued from Page 23

add great splashes of color while offering no temptation to deer.” Mr. Pirone is proud that his family has a long history of service in the Princeton area. “My grandfather Felix Pirone and my father Bert Pirone had one of the largest paving contracting businesses in Princeton for the past four decades. Now I continue to serve the area with my landscaping and lawn business. Whether the homeowner is looking for an update to the existing landscape or a total overhaul, we are happy to handle it all. We have extensive plant knowledge, which helps us to help you. We know what to plant and where!” Keeping the kids occupied and happy in the summer is important and at times, challenging. Whether away at camp or home with daily activities, they need to be motivated and engaged. Internet Security Digital Doc, the tech repair company in Princeton North Shopping Center, with a new Princeton Tiger Tech division on Nassau Street, has some great opportunities for the younger set, notes marketing manager Mercedes Samuels. “ We w i l l b e r u n n i n g workshops throughout the neighborhood to teach the public (specifically kids and parents) about phone maintenance. We also host workshops about internet security at the local libraries and recreation centers. “In addition, we offer a number of repair services

for iPhones, Galaxy’s, iPads, and more. Along with repairing items, we sell refurbished products. You can upgrade your broken device by buying our renovated tech items, including laptops, ipads, and iphones. We also offer pre-paid plans and wireless services provided by H20. We are Princeton Tigers by nature, and try to stay as involved in the community as possible. Be sure to subscribe to our email for future updates and event listings. pr inceton @ digitaldoc.com.” Now that spring is really here, you may also want to focus on a new you! Toning up the “contours” for the beach or the legs for the tennis court is certainly good advice and available at the many fitness centers in town. Of course, for face, hair, and body pampering, hair salons and spas are in abundance. Salon Azzurro in Rocky Hill specializes in providing the perfect style, cut, and color for its clients. As owners David and Joe Maccarone point out, “Spring always brings change. We are busy doing balayage and adding highlights. Clients are also prepping for conquering humidity’s effect on hair, and that’s where keratin treatments are both necessary and extremely popular. “Keratin treatments smooth the cuticle layer of hair and battle against frizz and ‘fly aways’ in straight, wavy or curly hair. A great keratin treatment does not imply stick straight hair; it does, however, imply much shinier, smoother hair in whatever finished look a client prefers — straight,

wavy, or curly. A capable, educated stylist can create whatever results the client wants, and we have different types for various kinds of hair and for a variety of finished looks.” New Styles In addition, report David and Joe Maccarone, new styles are always popular in spring. “This year, hair with movement is the trend, with beach and body waves gaining weekly in popularity. This look is created with a type of perm using larger size rods.” Easy maintenance is another favorite option, they add. “Clients are looking for ‘wash and wear’ hair, and this, too, contributes to the popularity of beach and body waves.” Beata Giermasinska, owner of Amber Spa in Pennington, notes that spring and summer are the busiest times in the the beauty industry. “Not only do people emerge from the winter months with dry and dull skin and desperate for help, but also wedding, prom, sandal, and bathing suit season brings in new clients. “Our brides and promgoers love lash and hair extensions, spray tanning, professional make-up, and our favorite red carpet treatment: Intraceutical Oxygen Infusion. “With lower UV levels, spring is a great time for facial rejuvenation,” adds Ms. Giermasinska. “A series of microdermabrasion or facial peels will significantly improve your skin before summer. “Also very popular in the spring is Lipomassage, also

CASINO NIGHT FOR CORNER HOUSE: Corner House Foundation Board and community members recently gathered at CoolVines in Princeton to celebrate Elaine Calcote Britt, a recipient of the Marie Mathews Award, who will be honored at the Corner House Foundation’s third Casino Night, “It’s Vegas,” on Friday, April 21 at the Mercer Boathouse. The night will feature dinner, cocktails, table games, live entertainment, and a live and silent auction. Shown here are benefit co-chairs and board members Elizabeth Wasch and Mandy Triolo, with board president Geniva Martin in the center. This event is looking for sponsors for its program and tables. The money raised will go to support substance abuse and leadership programs for Corner House. known as Endermologie. It is the first treatment scientifically tested and clinically proven to reduce cellulite, rid your body of diet- and exercise-resistant fat, and tighten and tone loose, sagging skin. Clients use this treatment to prepare for the upcoming swimsuit season.” Client’s Needs Ms. Giermasinska adds that a variety of massages and body treatments are available, as are many types of facials customized to the client’s needs. “We offer specialty facial treatments

for aging skin, including Environ peels, Circadia Switch, Microder mabrasion, and Intraceutical Oxygen treatment. “For acne prone skin we have deep pore facials and facial peels; also peels and whitening treatments for hyper pigmented skin, and oxygen treatments for rosacea clients, among many other options. We are also the only authorized facility in the extended Princeton area to offer the Dr. Hauschka Holistic Facial, aimed at restoring balance and harmony to the skin.” Hair and nail ser v ices

are also available at Amber Spa, with highlights and hair mask treatments especially favored for spring. “Our nail services are very popular in spring, and we all love nice fresh color and professional treatment on our toes and fingers!” says Ms. Giermasinska. “Favorite colors for the season are soft and feminine pinks, peach, pastels, moss green, and blue.” And so spring is here and the time is now! A new garden, a new you, a new outlook. It’s up to you to spring into action! —Jean Stratton

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29• TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

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No. 6 PU Open Crew Excited by 7-0 Start But Has Plenty of Room for Improvement

I

t didn’t take long for the Princeton University women’s open crew varsity 8 to make a statement this spring. Opening the season by hosting nemesis Brown and Michigan State in late March, the Tigers posted an impressive victory covering the 2,000-meter course on Lake Carnegie in 6:28.5 with the Bears taking second in 6:30.9 and the Spartans coming in third at 6:31.5. Princeton head coach Lori Dauphiny was heartened by the opening day triumph. “Brown is always very competitive; they come prepared,” said Dauphiny. “It was a great way to start the season and we were excited by the result.” Building on that start, Princeton’s top boat defeated Columbia and Clemson on April 1 and then cruised past Harvard and Cornell a week later to win the Class of 1975 Cup. Last Saturday, the sixth-ranked Tigers held off a late surge by No. 8 and previously undefeated Yale to win the Eisenberg Cup

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and improve to 7-0. “I think we are making progress step by step, which is good,” said Dauphiny. “We are really developing through the year.” Dauphiny credits senior co-captains Catherine Babiec and Georgie Howe with helping to spark that development. “They have been really leading by example from the early fall and I think that their message is a positive one for the team,” said Dauphiny. “They want to carry some of the momentum that we built last year—the momentum being good vibes and go fast. We are a positive team. We will have our setbacks but they are always striving forward.” The positive approach exuded by Babiec and Howe has rubbed off on the program’s younger rowers. “I think the sophomore class has showed nice progress from last year,” said Dauphiny. “Sophomore year is a tough year at Princeton; you take more classes and it is not all new like it was your freshman year. I feel that the sophomore class has really been tested and has come out on top.” In beating Yale last Saturday on the Housatonic River in New Haven, Conn., Princeton passed a serious

test. The varsity 8 led at the 1,500-meter mark and withstood a strong move by the Bulldogs down the stretch to win the race by 1.2 seconds. “Yale did a really nice job in that last 500, it was their home course which is nice because you know where you are; when you are in foreign water, you don’t really know the landmarks,” said Dauphiny. “We had the lead and the upper hand at that point and they ate up half a boat length there, one seat, two seats, three seats and four seats. The Princeton varsity 8 could have imploded. Instead, they kept their heads on their shoulders and that was good. They just kept at it and they didn’t let the other crew rattle them. I think that definitely shows the maturity; it also shows that we need to make some improvements.” Dauphiny is looking for her top boat to be sharper from start to finish. “We need to work on certain aspects of our racing; we are not great at shifting cadence and being effective at the new cadence,” explained Dauphiny. “That is something we are continuing to work on. We are just coming to it now in the season. Prior to that, we were figuring out other issues, like starts. We are moving on to examining our

OPEN THROTTLE: Members of the Princeton University women’s open crew varsity 8 power through the water in a race earlier this season. Last Saturday, Princeton’s top boat edged Yale to win the Eisenberg Cup. The sixth-ranked Tigers, now 7-0, row at Dartmouth on April 22. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

race plan more carefully and fine-tuning some of those points that we haven’t really been able to work on.” While there are things to clean up technically, Dauphiny has no qualms with her squad’s overall competitive approach. “I am very proud of the whole team,” said Dauphiny. “Last weekend was challenging for us and I feel like the team handled it with maturity and a positive attitude. Overall it is a good team spirit and enthusiasm. It is a great way to start the season and now we are in the middle of the season.” With Princeton heading north this weekend to row at Dartmouth on April 22,

Dauphiny knows her rowers can’t rest on their laurels. “ U n d e f e a t e d d o e s n ’t mean anything at this point because the season is at a time when all teams are developing, not just us,” said Dauphiny. “I am well aware from our

upset last year [winning the Ivy League regatta grand final after losing to Brown in the season opener] and getting the upper hand. That can happen at any championship.” —Bill Alden

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 30

In Danger of Suffering a 2nd Straight Defeat, PU Men’s Lax Explodes to Beat Dartmouth 16-6 After falling 15-10 to Lehigh to start the week, the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team had cause for concern as it trailed Dartmouth 5-3 at halftime last Saturday. But Princeton head coach Matt Madalon wasn’t fazed, believing that the tide would eventually turn for the Tigers. “We weren’t worried as a coaching staff, the message at halftime was stay the course,” recalled Madalon. “You are playing well, keep pushing, let’s cash in on some opportunities. Shots weren’t going in, their goalies made a couple of good

saves. It wasn’t that we were playing slow.” The Tigers got off to a fast start in the second half as senior star Zach Currier caused a turnover after the opening face-off and got the ball to freshman star Michael Sowers, who scored 11 seconds into the half. “It was a really exciting play; it was a nice spark to get going right out of the gate in the second half,” said Madalon. “I think any time you get a start like that, it makes it a little easier. That cut the lead and we put in three goals in a short amount of time.”

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Princeton didn’t look back, outscoring the Big Green 8-1 in the third quarter on the way to a 16-6 win, improving to 8-4 overall and 3-1 Ivy League. “From there, our guys just took a deep breath and realized that things were going to be fine if we kept playing,” said Madalon. “ S y s te m - w i s e n o t h i n g changed; it was a matter of some shot selection and some shots falling.” The Tigers got contributions from a lot of players in the win over the Big Green. “There were a handful of guys that stepped up and made some plays,” said Madalon, who got three goals and three assists from Sowers with Gavin McBride and Austin Sims each getting two goals and an assist and the trio of Charlier Durbin, Sean Connors, and Connor McCarthy tallying two goals apiece. “Sam Gravitte did an excellent job at the face-off X. Zach Currier did an excellent job at the face-off X as well. Defensively, Bear Goldstein and Arman Medghalchi played outstanding. Offensively everyone just chipped in. It was good to get Austin Sims back and see him get his legs underneath him a

little bit.” It was good for 17t h ranked Princeton to get back on the winning track in wake of the disappointing loss to Lehigh. “You hope you win them all but there are obviously games that you lose,” said Madalon. “When we lose, it is not necessarily hit the reset button. It is, ‘hey let’s figure out what we didn’t do well as coaches, what we didn’t do well as players and make the adjustment.’ When it comes down to it, our goal remains to win the Ivy League so we needed to be able to flip the switch and get going. It is always nice to get back in the win column.” With Harvard (5-6 overall, 1-3 Ivy) coming to Class of 1952 Stadium this Saturday, Madalon is looking for his team to get going faster than in recent play. “It is going to be a great game, they are a very athletic team,” said Madalon. “ T h e y h ave g ot t h e i r strengths in the right spots so we are looking for a heck of a matchup. We just need to put a good week of practice together one day at a time and make sure we are sharp and firing on all cylinders and that we are healthy. It is really just come out and execute and hopefully start a little faster than we have in the past.” —Bill Alden

GREEN WAVE: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Charlie Durbin unloads the ball in a game earlier this season. last Saturday, sophomore midfielder Durbin scored two goals to help Princeton rally to a 16-6 win at Dartmouth. The Tigers trailed the Big Green 5-3 at halftime before going on an 8-1 run in the third quarter to take control of the game. The 17th-ranked Tigers, now 8-4 overall and 3-1 Ivy League, host Harvard (5-6 overall, 1-3 Ivy League) on April 22 in their final regular season home game. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Princeton Baseball Goes 0-4 at Penn

Running into a buzz-saw, the Princeton Universit y baseball team went 0-4 at Penn last weekend. In action on Saturday, Princeton lost 5-4 and 3-1. A day later, the Tigers were overpowered by the Quakers, falling 17-5 and 10-2. Princeton, now 9-22 overall and 5-7 Ivy League, hosts Rider on April 19 and then hosts Columbia for twinbills on April 22 and 23. ———

PU Women’s Water Polo Tops George Washington

Lindsey Kelleher led the way as the ninth-ranked Princeton University women’s water polo team defeated George Washington 16-6 last Friday in its regular season finale. Sophomore star Kelleher tallied a career-high five goals to help the Tigers improve to 22-3. Princeton is next in action when it takes part in the Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA) tournament from April 28-30 at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. ———

PU Women’s Lax Defeats Yale

Olivia Hompe triggered the offense to help the seventh-ranked Princeton University women’s lacrosse team defeat Yale 17-9 last Saturday. Senior star Hompe tallied five goals and an assist as the Tigers improved to 10-2 overall and 4-0 Ivy League. Princeton plays at Penn on April 19 and at Cornell on April 22. ———

Tiger Track Athletes Shine at Texas Event

Producing some stellar performances, the Princeton University track teams excelled at the Texas Invitational last weekend in Austin, Texas. The Princeton women took 10th in the team standings with Kansas State placing first of the 16 schools in the

The Tigers posted a winning time of 6:32.2 over the 2,000-meter course with the Hoyas coming in at 6:38.2. Princeton heads to New England next weekend to face Harvard on April 22 in the race for the Class of 1999 Cup. ———

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Princeton Men’s Tennis Defeats Brown 4-2

Rallying from a doublespoint loss to win four of the first five singles matches, the Princeton Universit y men’s tennis team defeated Brown 4-2 last Sunday in Providence, R.I. The Tigers got wins from Tom Colautti at first singles, Alex Day at second singles, Luke Gamble at third singles, and Jonathan Carcione at sixth singles. P r i n ce ton, now 12-11 PU Men’s Heavyweights overall and 2-2 Ivy League, Fall to Harvard hosts Harvard on April 22 Suffer ing its first loss and Dar tmouth on April of the season, the fourth- 23. ranked Princeton University ——— men’s heavyweight varsity 8 fell to No. 5 Harvard last Tiger Women’s Tennis Saturday in the race for the Edges Brown 4-3 Compton Cup. Displaying its depth, the T h e Cr i m s o n c ove r e d Princeton University womthe 2,000-meter course on en’s tennis team edged visLake Carnegie in 5:30.1 iting Brown 4-3 last Sunday with Princeton finishing at at the Lenz Tennis Center. 5:34.1. The Tigers won the douThe Tigers host Brown on bles point and got victories April 29. from Tiffany Chen at third ——— singles, Nicole Kalhorn at Tiger Men’s Lightweights fifth singles, and Clare McKee at sixth singles. Fall to No. 1 Cornell Princeton, now 13-7 overOvertaken by a late sprint, the Princeton Universit y all and 4-1 Ivy League, plays men’s lightweight varsity 8 at Harvard on April 22 and fell to top-ranked Cornell Dartmouth on April 23. last Saturday in the race for ——— the Platt Cup. Cornell clocked a time of PU Men’s Volleyball 5:40.1 over the 2,000-meter Falls to Sacred Heart course on the Cayuga Inlet Parker Dixon played well in Ithaca, N.Y. as it passed in a losing cause as the Princeton in the final 500 Princeton University men’s meters of the race. The Ti- volleyball team fell 3-0 to gers ended up at 5:42.0. Sacred Heart last Saturday Princeton hosts Penn and at Dillon Gym. Georgetown on April 22 Freshman Dixon had a with the Wood-Hammond team-high 10 kills but it trophy on the line. wasn’t enough as the Pioneers prevailed 25-13, 25——— 19, 25-20. PU Women’s Lightweights P r i n ce ton, now 12-13 Defeat Georgetown overall and 8-6 Eastern InContinuing its promising tercollegiate Volleyball Asstart to the 2017 campaign, sociation (EIVA) is next in the Princeton Universit y action when it takes part in women’s lightweight varsity the EIVA semifinals on April 8 topped Georgetown last 20 where it is seeded fourth Saturday on Lake Carnegie and will face top-seeded to win the Class of 2006 Penn State. Cup. ———

SAFE AND SOUND: Princeton University softball player Megan Donahey, left, beats a throw home in recent action. Last weekend, freshman Donahey starred as Princeton swept a pair of doubleheaders at Penn. On Saturday, she went 3-of-8 overall as the Tigers prevailed 4-3 and 3-2. A day later, Donahey totaled five hits as Princeton won 4-2 and 12-8. The Tigers, now 18-13 overall and 10-2 Ivy League, host a doubleheader against Lehigh on April 19 and return to Ivy action by hosting twinbills against Columbia (16-20 overall, 7-5 Ivy) on April 22 and 23. Princeton is currently in first place in the Ivy South division by three games over Columbia. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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31• TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

PU Sports Roundup

competition. Devon Block-Funkhouser was fourth in the 400 hurdles, Elisa Steele took seventh in the 400, and Allison Harris was seventh in the high jump to provide individual highlights for the Tigers. On the men’s side, Princeton placed sixth of 17 schools with Texas coming in first in the team standings. The Tigers got wins from William Paulson in the 1,500 and Josh Ingalls in the 800. In addition, Gab Montefalcone took fifth in the 400 hurdles, Austin Kiles finished fifth in the pole vault, Xavier Bledsoe placed fifth in the high jump, and Jared Bell came in fifth in the discus. Princeton hosts its annual Larry Ellis Invitational from April 21-22. ———


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 32

PHS Baseball Gets Into Win Column With Senior Gross Swinging a Hot Bat

With the Princeton High baseball team getting four games postponed in the first week of the season, Dan Gross had trouble finding his hitting stroke. “I started out pretty cold in the beginning of the season, we only played two games in the first week,” said PHS senior outfielder Gross. Last Saturday at Pennington, Gross warmed up, slamming a two-run double in the sixth inning as PHS tried to rally from a 9-1 deficit. “I was just looking for something to hit, he was going outside on me for a few pitches,” said Gross, who added a single earlier as PHS ultimately fell 13-3. “I was really looking for a fastball out there and when it came I just took it to the other field.” For Gross, who was sidelined much of his sophomore season due to injury, coming through in his final

campaign means a lot to him. “I think it is the second year in a row that I have been in the cleanup spot so I have grown into it,” said Gross, who kept up his hot hitting last Monday, going 3-for-4 with a triple, four runs, and an RBI to help PHS defeat Trenton 18-7. “It feels good to get back into the swing of things.” In reflecting on the loss to Pennington, Gross acknowledged that the Little Tigers need to swing the bat better when they have runners on base. “I think that is something we need to work on for this season,” said Gross. “That is really going to make or break us.” PHS head coach Dave Roberts likes the work he is getting from Gross in the cleanup spot. “Dan is doing well for us in the No. 4 hole; he always

GROSS PROFIT: Princeton High baseball player Dan Gross follows through on a swing in a game earlier this spring. Last Monday, senior outfielder Gross went 3-for-4 with a triple, four runs, and an RBI to help PHS defeat Trenton 18-7 and improve to 2-4. The Little Tigers host Nottingham on April 19, South River on April 20, play at Allentown on April 21, host Princeton Day School on April 22, and then play at Hightstown on April 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

works good at bats,” said Roberts. “He has a really good approach. He stands on top of the plate and he is tough to throw strikes to. They are not going to get the ball inside on him. He really puts together good approaches and has been all year.” Roberts is looking for his pitchers to sharpen up their approach on the mound. “It got away from us a little bit, we are really harping on the pitching staff about not putting people away and leaving breaking balls over the plate,” said Roberts. “Guys are getting on base all over the place. They are leaving pitches over the plate. They are not getting ahead or staying ahead.” With PHS coming off a 6-1 win over Trenton last Thursday to get its first victory of the season after three losses, Roberts is seeing some bright spots. “Ben Amon looked good aga i ns t Trenton on t he mound; I am happy with that performance, his first varsity start,” said Roberts. “Jaedyn Paria has been pretty good as well at leadoff.” “It looks like we are going to cruise through the early half of this week with the weather,” said Roberts, whose team improved to 2-4 with the second win over Trenton and will look to keep on the winning track as it hosts Nottingham on April 19, hosts South River on April 20, plays at Allentown on April 21, hosts Princeton Day School on April 22, and then plays at Hightstown on April 24. “I am hoping we can get into a rhythm. I thought the Thursday win against Trenton might help us out.” Gross, for his part, is confident that PHS will heat up. “I really do feel like we are making progress; it is just the minor things that we really need to work on,” said Gross. “If we really fix those things, we will come up on top in a lot of the games.” —Bill Alden

After Singles Stars Opt to Not Compete for Team, PHS Boys’ Tennis Making the Most of Situation Before the 2017 season even started, the Princeton High boys’ tennis team suffered some big losses. The squad’s two top ret ur ning singles players, junior Noah Lilienthal and sophomore Jerry Gu, opted not to compete for PHS this spring due to other commitments. As a result, Little Tiger head coach Sarah Hibbert has been forced to go with some new faces. “Kevin Yang is the only full-time starter returning from last year’s lineup,” said Hibbert of the junior who is playing at first singles. “We have a complete upheaval this year. This is a complete rebuilding year for us but we also have eight freshmen on the team.” Despite being in a rebuilding mode, PHS has produced a promising 4-0 start. “What I have said to this group of guys is that we want a team that is dedicated and that is here,” said Hibbert. “I would rather have a group of guys that work hard. These guys are dedicated, working hard, and they are getting good experience. We will see what happens.” Yang is giving the Little Tigers some good work at the top of the lineup, having moved up from third singles. “He was in the singles mix last year and he has worked hard,” said Hibbert. “You can see that his power and consistency has improved. He will get a lot of experience this year playing first singles. He will have to work a lot harder at first than he did at third. He will definitely learn a lot.” As second singles, sophomore Simon Hwang is on a learning curve. “Simon came on as an alternate for us last year; he was our fourth singles player when Noah wasn’t

involved in matches,” said Hibbert. “He got some good experience, he got to play a couple of big matches for us.” Hibber t is hoping that freshman Brandon Peng can make big progress at third singles. “He brings a lot of potential as a freshman; he had a really good match with Notre Dame,” said Hibbert, whose team topped Notre Dame 5-0 on April 5. “It was very, very close and he was able to hold his nerve and win a 7-6, 7-5 match against somebody he knows from training. It was a good experience for him. As he settles into the role, he will get more more experienced and hopefully will do really well.” A pair of seniors, Ares Alivisatos and Matt Danielson, bring experience to first doubles. “They are good friends and they have played together; their styles do complement each other,” said Hibbert. “Ares is very consistent. He is a cross country runner and he hustles a lot. Matt is good at the net. He is tall and is a good volleyer. Ares can run stuff down and Matt can put them away. They are captains this year for us and they want what is best for the team. They are willing to work hard together.” PHS boasts two more seniors, Mihir Somaiya and Nikhil Vasireddi, at second doubles. “They played together a

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lot last year and they do complement each ot her with the style of play,” said Hibbert. “We are hoping for good things out of them. They had a very good win for us against Lawrence (3-2 on April 10). They were the clinching point and that was important.” The main focus for Hibbert right now is to help her players adjust to their new spots in the lineup. “It is getting everyone settled into their roles, getting the doubles teams to work well together and getting some chances to work on some strategy,” said Hibbert. “It is getting the singles players out there and comfortable in their roles as well.” With the Mercer County Tour nament star ting on April 24, Hibbert is hoping that her players develop a comfort level quickly. “We want to get as many matches there as we can and do as well there as we can,” added Hibbert, whose team has home matches against WW/P-North on April 19 and WW/P-South on April 20 before playing at Hightstown on April 21. “A lot will come down to the draw and how we fall in. The luck of the draw is really huge. We may get seeds, we may not.” —Bill Alden

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MAN UP: Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse player Elon Tuckman sends the ball upfield in a game earlier this season. Last Thursday, junior star Tuckman tallied a goal and three assists to help PDS edge Princeton High 5-4. The Panthers, who defeated Hopewell Valley 14-2 last Monday to improve to 5-1, host the Hill School (Pa.) on April 19 and play at Peddie on April 25. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Elon Tuckman is growing out of his role as the precocious young gun for the Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse team. Tuck man burst on t he scene in 2015, setting a PDS program record for most points by a freshman in his debut season. Last spring, he was a key cog as a group of senior stars, including his older brother, Jonah, along with Connor Fletcher and Joey Levine, helped the Panthers enjoy a season for the ages as they went 15-1, wining the state Prep B title and the program’s first Mercer C ou nt y Tou r na m ent crown. Now, as a battle-tested junior, Tuckman knows it is his time to be a go-to player for the Panthers. “I am not the little brother on the team any more,” said Tuckman. “It was known that graduating Connor, Jonah, and Joey, all t hos e s en iors, that it is definitely a different offense. Coach ( Rich D’Andrea) said some guys need to step up. I am looking to that role, trying to be a leader on this team, filling the spots that we need.” Last Thursday, as PDS played at Princeton High, Tuckman stepped up, tallying a goal and three assists to help the Panthers pull out a 5-4 win. While Tuckman was happy to see PDS pull out the win, he was disappointed with its offensive execu-

tion. “ We h av e h a d b e t te r games; I think we can play a lot cleaner,” said Tuckman. It looked like PDS was going to clean up in the early going, jumping out to a 3-0 lead with 3:30 left in the first quarter as Tuckman had a goal and two assists with senior star Will Brossman tallying the two other goals. “T hat was g reat, Nick ( Day ) was w inning face offs, Will ( Brossman) was bur ying his shot high to low,” said Tuckman. “Ideally that is how we wanted to come out.” Over the years, Tuckman has developed a deep connection on the field with Brossman. “Will and I have been playing for three years,” said Tuckman. “He is one of my best friends, he is an amazing player. I consider him one of my brothers. On the back of our shirt, it says ‘together.’ It is really a brotherly love.” T h e PD S brot h erho o d was exemplif ied against PHS by how the Panthers held together at the defensive end. “Our defense really stepped up, Connor Green played well in goal,” said Tuckman. Late in the third quarter, Tuckman played a key role on the game-winning goal, whipping the ball to Jack Konopka, who fired it into the back of the net.

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“Jack made a great cut, he c aught, he f i n is he d, and it was text book,” said Tuckman. “He is a really st rong shooter, he set the tone in the offseason, taking a bucket of balls and coming on goal and shooting. He is a really good player.” PDS head coach D’Andrea likes the way Tuckman is setting the tone this season. “Elon is a piece that we have built a lot around,” said D’Andrea of Tuckman, who tallied four goals and assists in a 14-2 win over Hopewell Valley last Monday as the Panthers improved to 5-1. “He is a presence on the field and he has a way of com mand ing. His te am mates certainly are lucky to have him.” PDS knows that it was lucky to escape with a win over PHS. “Princeton always does a great job; I think in all my time at PDS, it has always been a relatively close game; it is a crosstown rivalry,” said D’Andrea. “We came out firing and they made some defensive adjustments. Their goalies made some nice saves today.” Sophomore goalie Green along with senior face-off specialist Day made a big difference for the Panthers against the Little Tigers. “Defensively, Green made a great save at the end of the game and Day had an-

ot her phenomenal game at the X,” said D’Andrea. “T hose guys have really anchored our team.” T h e t e a m’s d e f e n s i v e unit came up big throughout the game. “The guys stepped up big time,” added D’Andrea. “They played physical, played together, and we balanced out. This was a defensive win.” In D’Andrea’s view, coming through with the tight win bodes well for the rest of the spring. “We knew coming in that we were going to be playing a lot more of those one or two-goal games with this schedule,” said D’Andrea, whose team hosts the Hill School ( Pa.) on April 19 and plays at Peddie on April 25. “That is a way for us to stretch the program and be ready for tournament time. We know how to win in big spots. A game like this definitely builds character.” Tuckman, for his par t, believes the Panthers can produce another big tournament run if they keep their minds on playing together. “We can’t focus on the personal things, it has got to be the team mentality,” said Tuckman. “It can’t be who has the most points. We are stressing pass, pass, dodge. It has got to be just moving it and getting the team goals.” —Bill Alden

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Junior Tuckman Growing Into Go-To Player, Helping PDS Boys’ Lax to Superb 5-1 Start


Bouncing Back From Loss to Hun, PDS Baseball Cruises Past Peddie

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 34

I n D udeck ’s v iew, h is players let the lapses get to them, struggling to turn the page. Heading across town to away to a 10-5 win over the “Instead of getting over play at the Hun School last Panthers. those mistakes, we dwelled Wednesday, the Princeton PDS head coach Brian on our mistakes a little bit,” Day School baseball team Dudeck acknowledged that said Dudeck. came out swinging. sloppy play negated his “You do that and the ball Senior star catcher Paul team’s good work with the is coming your way.” Franzoni blasted a three- bat. In his post-game message, run homer over the fence “We got off to a good Dudeck focused on getting in center field in the top of start but we made some misthe squad to move on. the first inning to give PDS takes,” said Dudeck. “I told the guys to just a 3-0 lead. “We got five runs and The Panthers added an- that should put us in a good think about it for another other run in the second and position. We didn’t execute hour or two and think about pushed across one more run things that we work on in what you can do different that you can do to help the in the sixth. practice every day. These team tomorrow,” said DuBut in between, PDS fal- little things change the modeck. tered in the field, making a mentum of the game and “The good news is that we number of errors which Hun turn the game.” play Peddie tomorrow and turned into runs as it pulled we have an opportunity to come right back and show that we are a lot better than we played today.” PDS took advantage of that opportunity, rolling to a 12-0 win over Peddie as Franzoni slugged another three-run homer and senior lefty Ryan Sparks struck out six and walked three in a sixhit shutout as the Panthers improved to 4-2. Franzoni’s battling spirit has been a big plus for the Panthers this spring. “Even when Paul has not got hits, ______________ he has had really good at _______________ Date & Time: ______________________ bats,” said Dudeck. “He is continuing to fight, our ad, scheduled to run ___________________. he is continuing to keep his oughly and pay special attention to the following: chin up. He is not getting down.” ill tell us it’s okay) Dudeck is confident that � Fax number � Address � Expiration Datehis players will continue to give their all as the season unfolds. “I like the fact that I have a great group of kids and they are going to keep battling, ” said Dudeck, whose teams hosts the Hill School IN THE ZONE: Princeton Day School baseball player Paul ( Pa.) on April 19, hosts Franzoni makes contact in recent action. Last Thursday, se- Hamilton on April 20, plays nior star catcher Franzoni hit a three-run homer to help PDS at Princeton High on April defeat Peddie 12-0 and improve to 4-2. The Panthers host the 22, and then faces Gill St. Hill School (Pa.) on April 19, host Hamilton on April 20, play at Bernard’s on April 24 at TD Princeton High on April 22, and then face Gill St. Bernard’s on Bank Ballpark. April 24 at TD Bank Ballpark. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) “Whoever we play, they are going to battle. We have Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In quality kids. If they come out and make plays that they are Hunan ~ Szechuan capable of making, we are Malaysian ~ Vietnamese going to be in every game.” Daily Specials • Catering Available —Bill Alden 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

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Showing Character in Victory Over Pingry, PDS Boys’ Tennis Looking Forward to MCT Things weren’t going well initially for the Princeton Day School boys’ tennis team as it hosted Pingry last Thursday. W hile PDS junior star Lex Decker was cruising to a straight set victory at first singles, the other four matches were very much in doubt. “The only person who was really handling his opponent was Lex, everybody else was down big in the first set,” said PDS head coach Will Asch. “All four courts came back. I was really, really pleased with the mental effort that the kids made and the positive sort of attitude. We have a lot of upperclassmen and that is helpful.” The Panthers ended up pulling out a 3-2 win and showed their focus as they stuck around afterwards to break down the match. “They also talked about it a lot after the match; they all wanted to talk about how they played and what strategies they used,” said Asch, whose team improved to 2-1 with the victory. “It is not often you get kids talking about it, they are very interested in improving and talking about the strategy of the game. They are students of the game.” F ir s t s i ngle s s t a ndout Decker has raised the level of his game. “Lex has really improved a lot this year,” said Asch. “He moves a lot better and he hits the ball a lot harder. He is older and smarter.” One of the team’s young players, freshman Christopher Delaney, figures to make a big impact at second singles. “Christopher is at No. 2; he is a very good player,” said Asch. “He is a big hitter but young. Freshmen are not always as well rounded. He is very, very good.” Battle-tested junior Vivek Sharma, who has played a lot of doubles for PDS, has stepped up into the third singles spot for the Panthers. “He is a big, strong guy; he volleys well, he has a pretty big forehand,” said Asch. “He is very seasoned. He has a very good attitude as far as improving his game. He has got a lot of potential.” The first doubles pair of junior Riley Gudgel and se-

nior Jacob Chang has the potential to do some big things this spring. “They are very enthusiastic, they have had some good success,” said Asch. “They are a very solid team.” Seniors Noah Liao and Leo Nye bring experience and chemistr y at second doubles. “They are very close,” said Asch. “They really believe in each other. They lost the first set 6-2 against Pingry and they said we are going to win this match and they came back and they did.”

With the Mercer County Tour nament star t ing on April 24, Asch is looking for his players to show that selfbelief in the county competition. “We are very good, we will be one of the better teams,” s a id A s ch, whos e te a m plays at Hopewell Valley on April 19 and at Pennington on April 20 before hosting Upper Canada College on April 22 as it tunes up for the MCT. “I think we have two very strong singles players. We will see; it is hard for us to win that tournament.” —Bill Alden

STROKE OF BRILLIANCE: Princeton Day School boys’ tennis player Lex Decker hits a forehand in a match last season. Junior star Decker is leading the way at first singles for PDS this spring. The Panthers, now 2-1 in dual match action, play at Hopewell Valley on April 19, at Pennington on April 20, and host Upper Canada College on April 22 before starting play in the Mercer County Tournament on April 24 at Mercer County Park. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Even though Ryan Strype is the captain of the Hun School baseball team, he is not a rah-rah guy. “I am not the loudest; I am not the type of captain to just scream out,” said senior catcher Strype. “I try and do everything I can to lead by example and do everything I can to keep my head up and keep the guys up in the dugout.” Last Wednesday as Hun hosted Princeton Day School, Strype displayed his leadership by example. With PDS jumping out to a 3-0 lead in the top of the first inning, Strype got Hun on track by belting a tworun homer on the bottom of the first to narrow the gap to 3-2. “I have been looking for the fast ball and I have just been missing them, hitting foul balls and he just left it over the plate and I got the barrel on it,” said Strype. Strype’s blast changed the tone of the contest for the Raiders. “I think it helped, especially Jack ( Erbeck) with his pitching,” said Strype. “It got us right back in

the game and it is like a 1-0 game. It allowed him to throw more strikes and keep us in the game.” With Styrpe taking charge behind the plate from his catcher spot, he helped Erbeck settle down on the mound as he ended up going five and two-thirds innings. “It is just make sure he doesn’t dig himself into a hole and get down on himself,” said Strype. “It is all about mentality. If you start getting into your own head, you are not going to pitch well so you just have to throw strikes and keep your head up.” Hun kept hitting, scoring a run in the second inning, three in the third and then getting two in both the fifth and sixth on the way to a 10-5 triumph. “We just had to keep putting the ball into play and we just had to take advantage after that,” said Strype, who contributed a line drive single in the third inning rally. Strype is enjoying taking a leadership role for the Raiders. “It is a great group of guys, it is a great bond,” said Strype. “We always have fun

EARNING HIS STRIPES: Hun School baseball player Ryan Strype takes a big cut in recent action. Last Wednesday, senior catcher and team captain Strype hit a two-run homer to help Hun rally for a 10-5 win over Princeton Day School. The Raiders, who edged Pennington 3-2 last Thursday to move to 4-3, play at Lawrenceville on April 20, head to Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) for a doubleheader on April 22, and then host Trenton Catholic on April 25. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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in the dugout, in practice, and in games.” With legendary head coach Bill McQuade retiring last spring after 46 seasons at the helm of the program, the players are continuing to have fun under new head coach Tom Monfiletto. “McQuade brought a lot of energy but Mono also brings a lot of energy,” said Strype. “They preach the same things, they are both great coaches.” In the view of Monfiletto, Strype’s homer against PDS gave Hun a burst of energy. “Ryan is our captain and for him to come up in that situation and get the home run, that was huge,” said Monfiletto. “That got us back a 3-0, three-run home run kind of takes the air out of you, especially after a couple of tough losses in a row. We are sitting here thinking, ‘oh,’ and then Strype comes up and says, ‘no we are here, we got it.’” Hun didn’t sit back after that, pushing the action and taking advantage of several errors by the Panthers. “Our aggressiveness at the plate led to our ability to get some runs across with some help,” said Monfiletto. “I like how we put the ball in play and sometimes when you put the ball in play good things happen. Nothing can happen if you strike out or pop up.” Sophomore pitcher Erbeck made good things happen on the mound as he found his command after a rocky start. “Those middle few innings he really got comfortable and he did really well,” said Monfiletto. “He settled down, maybe he needed to get it out of his system. He started throwing really well. He was throwing hard, he was locating. That curve ball is a very good pitch and he can throw it at any count. Having the confidence in Strype behind the plate also helped him have the confidence to throw that.” Hun built on the victory over PDS by edging Pennington 3-2 a day later to improve to 4-3. “It is always a good win since we have so much respect for PDS,” said Monfiletto, whose team plays at Lawrenceville on April 20, heads to Mercersburg Academy (Pa.) for a doubleheader on April 22, and then hosts Trenton Catholic on April 25. “We don’t have have any easy games on our schedule. Going against Steinert, St. Augustine, PDS, and Pennington, that is a tough stretch there. If we can come out of this week with two wins, I would be really happy.” Strype, for his part, believes Hun can be tough to beat if it keeps up its aggressiveness with the bat. “We have got to keep putting the ball into play,” said Strype. “We don’t have the most hits in our past two games but if we keep hitting the ball hard, eventually hits are going to start dropping and we are going to put up more runs for our pitching so our pitchers can settle in.” —Bill Alden

With Fassl Aiming to Enjoy Final Campaign, Hun Softball Looking Like a Powerhouse The temperature soared into the 80s as the Hun School softball team hosted Lawrenceville last week. N o t h av i n g p l a y e d i n eight days before the April 11 contest, the Hun players came out on fire with their bats, scoring three runs in the bottom of the first inning. Senior star catcher Julie Fassl got things started for the Raiders from the leadoff spot, lining a single, stealing a base, and then coming home on a fielder’s choice. “I was trying to get myself out of the slump; hitting a single to right center felt great just to get it out of the way,” said Fassl. “It started off the game well too. We all followed up on it too; it got momentum going.” Hun built on that momentum, adding two runs in the second and four more in the sixth on the way to a 9-1 triumph. Fassl helped spark the second inning rally w ith an RBI triple. “That at-bat was the longest I have had,” said a smiling Fassl. “It really felt nice to hit the triple, I just got in front of it and I got it right in the power zone. It was a perfect pitch, a perfect hit, it felt great.” Hun’s offensive outburst on the win over L awrenceville had Fassl feeling very good about Hun’s prospects this spring. “We are very young but a lot of our girls are playing travel which is great,” said Fassl. “We are all pract icing outside of school ball. We have a lot of powerful bats too. We are all just working together now. When someone gets on, the other girl hits her in. It is working really well the year.” Batting first in the lineup gives Fassl the chance to spark the Raiders. “I love batting leadoff for Hun, it gives me more confidence because the team has confidence in you as a leadoff batter,” said Fassl. “It feels great, I like getting the extra at-bats.” Having starred at field hockey and basketball at Hun in addition to softball, Fassl is savoring her final season at the school. “I am upset about it but at the same time you have to enjoy it,” said Fassl, who is headed to Virginia Wesleyan to play field hockey and softball and named as a Trenton Softball Hall of Fame scholarship winner. “It is t he last s eason, there is no pressure on you. You have done all you do. This year I am just really trying to enjoy it.” Hun head coach Kathy Quirk was happy to see Fa s s l h av e a b i g g a m e against Lawrenceville. “Julie is just such a competitor; if she doesn’t do well, she gets frustrated,” said Quirk. “She has come around and she plays well. She

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is a competitor and she just wants everyone to do well.” Quirk was pleased with the contributions she got throughout the lineup in the win over Big Red. “I thought their pitcher did a nice job but we were jus t able to c apita li ze,” said Qu irk, whose team defeated Rutgers Prep 20-0 last Thursday in improving to 3-1 and plays at Lawrenceville on April 20, hosts Academy of New Church ( Pa.) on April 22, and plays at Princeton Day School on April 25. “We practice hitting every day. We practice with heav y balls, we practice w ith w iff le balls. I have been telling them. We just can’t go through the motions. You are at bat to hit a ball.” S enior Kate O’Connell lashed two hits in the Lawrenceville game, showing how s h e has b e n ef it te d from that practice. “We just tell her to just go up there and slap it and have fun,” said Quirk. “That it is a key to her, she has just got to have fun. She has come such a long way. The first hit she had today was a beauty. She is enjoying it, she is a captain. She has really taken

over with the role. I am just really happy for her.” Junior transfer A lanna Pearson had fun in the circle, striking out seven and giving up two hits in going the distance. “It has been tough be cause Julia Revock hasn’t been on the mound,” said Quirk. “My defense is the best when Alanna is on the mound.” T h e H u n d e fe n s e h a s been bolstered with freshman Gigi Venizelos playing shortstop and sophomore Meghan Donohue finding a spot at third base. “I have been happy with Gigi at shor tstop, she is usually a third baseman,” said Quirk. “We have moved her and moved Meghan to third, both of them did it for the good of the team. Meghan is a first baseman and she said, ‘I will do what you want.’” Fassl, for her part, is happy with how Hun is coming together and sees big things on the horizon. “Our team is really close chemistry-wise; we are all friends,” said Fassl. “We have bonded really well so far. I am looking for states this year and MAPLs (Mid-Atlantic Prep League) too.” —Bill Alden

ON THE BALL: Hun School softball player Julie Fassl hones in on the ball last week against Lawrenceville. Senior star catcher Fassl went 2-for-4 with a triple, a run, and an RBI to help Hun top Lawrenceville 9-1 in the April 11 contest, The Raiders, who improved to 3-1 with a 20-0 win over Rutgers Prep last Thursday, play at Lawrenceville on April 20, host Academy of New Church (Pa.) on April 22, and play at Princeton Day School on April 25. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Sparked by Strype’s Production, Leadership, Hun Baseball Rallies to Defeat PDS 10-5


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 36

get its offense going, PHS fell 10 -3 to Summit last Saturday. Senior attackman Jack White tallied two goals in the defeat for the Little Tigers, who dropped to 4-3. PHS hosts Robbinsville on April 21 before playing at Lawrenceville on April 22. ——— Girls’ Lacrosse : Serena Bolitho starred in a losing cause as PHS fell 13-10 to Notre Dame last Monday. Sophomore star Bolitho tallied three goals for the Little Tigers, who moved to 6-3. PHS plays at Allentown on April 19, at North Brunswick on April 21, and at Monroe PLAYING ON: Hun School senior student-athletes are all smiles after finalizing their commit- on April 22 before hosting ment to continue their athletic careers at the college level. Pictured in the front row, from Pingry on April 24. left, are Delia Lawver (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, lacrosse), Anna Maguire (St. Peter’s University, basketball), Julie Fassl (Virginia Wesleyan College, field hockey), and Sophia Albanese (Wellesley College, field hockey). In the back row, from left, are Andrew Kaye (Penn State University, lacrosse), Sam Schluter (Syracuse University, lacrosse), Chris Licitra (Swarthmore College, lacrosse), Alex Ill (Gettysburg College, cross country and track), Rex Berger (Northeastern University, crew), Joaquin Hernandez-Burt (Roger Williams University, Baseball: Coming up short baseball), and Kate Davis (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, lacrosse). in a nail-biter, Lawrenceville 22 before hosting WW/P- The Panthers, now 6-1, play fell 2-1 to Blair Academy last South on April 24. at the Hill School (Pa.) on Wednesday. The Big Red, who April 21, at Shipley School moved to 2-4 with the defeat, ( Pa.) on April 24, and at host Hun on April 20. Stuart Country Day on April 25. Boys’ Lacrosse: Bryce Tolmie sparked the offense as Hun defeated Academy of New Church (Pa.) 11-4 last Softball: Unable to get its Thursday. Tolmie tallied bats going, PDS fell 23-0 to Girls’ Lacrosse : Gianna three goals and two assists Peddie last Thursday. The Lucchesi tallied four goals Panthers, now 1-3, play at to help the Raiders improve Softball: Sparked by Bito 3-3. Hun hosts Peddie on Lawrenceville on April 21 anca Guidi, PHS defeated and an assist but it wasn’t e n o u g h a s Pe n n i n g t o n and hosts Hun on April 25. April 20. Trenton 15-0 last Monday. fell 16-8 to Princeton Day ——— ——— Junior standout Guidi went School last Monday. The Girls’ Lacrosse: Display- Girls’ Lacrosse: Morgan 2-for-2 with two doubles and Red Raiders, who moved i n g a b a l a n c e d at t ac k , Mills enjoyed a milestone four RBIs to help the Little to 3-3 with the defeat, host Hun edged Peddie 8-7 last day as PDS defeated Pen- Tigers improve to 2-4. PHS Mo ore s tow n Fr iends on Wednesday. Zoe Cook, Kate nington 16-8 last Monday. hosts Nottingham on April April 19, play at the Peddie Davis, and Shannon Dudeck Senior star and Princeton 19 and Notre Dame on April School on April 22, and host each scored two goals as the University-bound Mills tal- 20 before playing at Allen- New Hope-Solebury (Pa.) on Raiders moved to 4-2. Hun lied nine points on five town on April 21 and at April 24. plays at the Hill School (Pa.) goals and four assists, hit- Hightstown on April 22. on April 19 and at Mercers- ting the 150 goal mark in ——— burg Academy (Pa.) on April her career in the process. Boys’ Lacrosse: Unable to

Lawrenceville

Hun

PDS

PHS

Pennington

Stuart

Lacrosse: Ali Hannah and Grace Sheppard scored a goal apiece in a losing cause as Stuart fell 12-2 to Holmdel High last Thursday. The Tartans, now 3-3, host Trinity Hall on April 19 and Princeton Day School on April 25.

Local Sports PHS Alumna Horowitz Medals in Dragon Boat Event

Princeton High alumna Carol Horowitz earned medals in the Pan American Club Crew Championships of Dragon Boating last month in Ponce, Puerto Rico. Horowitz, who now resides in Seattle, Wash., was part of a 10-person Washington Masters (WAM) crew in the Women’s Senior C division, consisting of women, ages 60 and over. The WAM team competed in a series of three 200-meter races, three 500-meter races, and a single 2000-meter race and earned three silver medals. WA M a l s o b r o u g h t a mixed team of men and women in the Senior B division (50 and older) to the championships. The mixed boat earned bronze in their 200-meter series and a gold in their 2000-meter race. Horowitz, the daughter of long-time Princeton residents Marjorie Horowitz and the late Milton Horowitz, is now aiming to help the WAM team compete at the

National Championships, to be held on Mercer Lake in West Windsor this September. ———

Pitch, Hit, Run Contest Scheduled for April 23

A Major League Baseball (MLB) Pitch, Hit, and Run competition will be held on April 23 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. at Grover Park baseball fields behind the Princeton Shopping Center at 301 Harrison Street. MLB Pitch, Hit, and Run is a skills competition that is open to any boy or girl between the ages of 7 and 14. There is no requirement for the participants to be part of an official baseball league and all age eligible children are welcome to compete. The pitch event involves six pitches at a strike zone target. Boys will use a baseball while girls will throw softballs. The hit segment involves three hits off a tee in a straight line from home plate. Boys will hit a baseball while girls will hit a softball. The distance to the point where the hit first lands from the straight line is subtracted from the distance of the hit to determine the final score. The run event is a timed event around two bases to home plate. There are boys’ and girls’ competitions in the following age groups: 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14. The boys’ and girls’ winners in each division and the overall champions advance to regional competitions with the national finals will be held at a major league game. There is no entry fee to compete. Participants must be accompanied by a parent and bring a copy of their birth certificate. No metal cleats are permitted. ———

benefit The Katherine Gorrie ’98 Memorial Scholarship Fund. Registration is also available by logging onto www. hunschool.org/alumni/newsand-events/index.aspx. ———

Princeton University Hosting 5k Event

Princeton University is holding its second annual Theresa’s Trail 5-kilometer run/walk on April 29. The race, which benefits The A L S Association of Greater Philadelphia, will start at the University’s Frist Campus Center Lawn. There is registration available on the day of the event starting at 7:30 a.m. with the walk beginning at 8:30 a.m. and the run at 9 a.m. For more information on the event and to register online, log onto http://theresastrails.kintera.org.

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The annual Run for Kate 5-kilometer run/walk will be held on April 29 at the Hun School. Those interested in participating can register at Hun’s Chesebro Academic Center at 8:30 a.m. with the event to start at 9 a.m. The course begins and ends at the academic center and winds through the surrounding neighborhood. There are post-race snacks and drinks for all participants with race t-shirts available while supplies last. The event was initiated by the school to celebrate the life of the late Kate Gorrie, a beloved Hun student who was dedicated to making a difference in the lives of those around her. All proceeds from the race will

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Bob Dougherty Rober t Ely Dougher t y, Bob to all who knew him, died peacefully on April 9th, 2017. He was raised in Princeton, New Jersey and Old Lyme, Connecticut. Bob’s parents, Grace Ely Bassett Dougherty and Gregg Dougherty, were longtime residents of Princeton. Gregg was professor of organic chemistry at Princeton University. Grace was raised by Ernest Cushing Richardson, who was the librarian at Princeton University from 1890 to 1925. Bob’s education started w ith Miss Fine’s School and Princeton Country Day School. He then attended Phillips E xeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. There he served as a president of his class and a class cor respondent for many years. Following his cherished years at Exeter, Bob returned to Princeton University and was a highly congenial member of the Class of 1950. He re-settled in Princeton for the duration of his life. After Princeton University, Bob started as a real estate agent in the offices of Edmund Cook and Associates and served in the National Guard. Bob then co-founded his own real estate firm, Stewardson and Dougherty Realtors. Sadly, his partner Bill Stewardson passed away soon after the firm’s start-up. Bob persevered with a loyal team of real estate associates who opened and closed many doors in the greater Princeton area. His firm’s s lo ga n w as S te w ard s on and Dougherty Associates — Your Key to Excellence. One of several premier real estate agencies in Princeton, Stewardson and Dougherty closed its doors in 1995. He then consulted and helped establish the Coldwell Banker Schlott offices on Nassau Street. In addition to his professional life, Bob served as a trustee of the American Boy Choir and Princeton Day School. Bob was also a member of the Pretty Brook Club, Nassau Club, and the Mayflower Society. Beyond the role of a trustee, Bob supported many civic events, often in quiet and unheralded ways. Some of his greater Princeton family may remember that he was particularly steadfast in his support of the Princeton Hospital Fete. And that had its rewards — Bob won its famous car lottery, not once but twice. He drove home two new Ford Thunderbird convertibles in less than ten years. This was a story that he loved to tell. “What good

2005 or the American Cancer Society. Arrangements are under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home. ———

Julia Willis Philip

Julia Willis Philip, a longtime resident of Claverack, N.Y., passed away peacefully in Hudson, N.Y. surrounded by her loving family. She was 92. Mrs. Philip grew up in Princeton. Mrs. Philip was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1924 and moved to Princeton with her family when she was a young child. Her father, Professor Clodius Willis, was on the faculty at Princeton University. Mrs. Philip attended Princeton High School, Vassar College then Westhampton College at the University of Richmond. After college graduation, she worked as a reporter for the Princeton Herald, under the editorship of a Princeton graduate and decorated World War II Marine Corps veteran, John Van Ness Philip, whom she would marry in 1952. Mrs. Philip, was one of the first women fruit growers in Columbia County, and for over 30 years, managed “Philip Orchards,” in Claverack, first with her husband,

John Van Ness Philip, then as sole proprietor for 24 years following his death. The farm, which has been in the family for more than 280 years, is one of the oldest continually operating family farms in New York State, and is part of the Dutch legacy of the Hudson Valley. A pioneer working woman and civil rights stalwart, she raised five children while holding jobs in New York City, for many years at Fund For the City of New York and at the English Speaking Union. During the 1960s she was part of the Harlem Initiative, a group of Manhattan PTA mothers who helped bus children down from Harlem after bus drivers refused to comply with new laws that mandated integration of the public schools. In 1967 she helped her husband found Modern Distribution Management, a newsletter, that became a leading publication on business innovations. In 1975, she and her husband moved their publication from Manhattan to Claverack and devoted themselves to the management of his family’s historic ancestral home and farm. Over the years, Mrs. Philip opened the family’s 1802 colonnaded house “Ta-

lavera” for Columbia County Historical Society house tours and events. In 1992 she was part of the founding group that worked to save the Hudson Opera House from demolition. She went on to serve on the newly formed Opera House Board for many years, working to initiate the restoration efforts, which have led to its eventual flourishing as the Arts Center it is today. She also sat on the boards of two important New State Historic Sites: Wilderstein in Rhinebeck and Clermont in Germantown. She was a longstanding trustee of the Columbia County Historical Society and in 2014 was honored for her contributions by being designated A First Columbian. She is survived by her siblings: Sallie Jesser (Princ-

eton); Lee Willis (Charlottesville, Va.); and Clodius Willis (Pittsburgh, Pa.); her children: John Van Ness Philip III (Andrew Loren Resto); William Churchill Houston Philip (Mana Kobuchi Philip); Thomas Willis Philip (Emily Beth Cohen); Katherine Philip Chansky (James Chansky); Leila Stott Philip Evans (Garth Evans); nephews, nieces, and grandchildren. A service will be held at Christ Church, Hudson, New York at 11:30 a.m., Saturday, April 29, 2017. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations in her name be sent to the Columbia County Historical Society, 5 Albany Ave Kinderhook, NY 12106, or to the Greenport Fire Department Rescue Squad 3 Newman Road Hudson, NY 12534.

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Joan Lippincott Martha L. Karraker Martha L. Karraker, 99, of Princeton died at Acorn Glen on Wednesday, April 12, 2017. Born in Butte, Montana she has been a resident of Princeton since 1960. Martha was the past vice-president of the Mid-Atlantic Region of AAUW and longtime member of the Nassau Presbyterian Church as well as a board member of both the Mercer County Planning Council and the DelawareRaritan Girl Scout Council. D a u g h te r o f t h e l a te Thomas Lloyd and Frances (Carter) Jones and wife of the late I. Oliver Karraker, Jr., she is survived by two daughters Ruth K. Kreider and Joyce M. Edwards; two sons-in-law Harry Kreider a n d A r t E d w a r d s ; fo u r grandchildren Marc Kreider, Wayne Kreider, Suzanne Edwards, and Amy Sherrod; and five beloved greatgrandchildren. There was a private graveside service in the Rocky Hill Cemetery on April 17, 2017. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to AAUW 1310 L Street NW Suite 1000, Washington, DC

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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL For sponsorship opportunities, to advertise in the commemorative program book, purchase tickets, or to make a tax-deductible contribution in honor of Joan Lippincott, visit Agohq.org, e-mail gala@ agohq.org or phone 212-870-2311, ext. 4308. This event is organized by the AGO National Council’s Finance and Development Committee, Barbara Adler, Treasurer; Michael Bedford, AAGO, CHM, President.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Obituaries

luck,” he would say with his perpetually optimistic voice. Bob was also a very dedicated servant to his religious home of the Nassau Presbyterian Church. An elder of the church, he was also a generous supporter of its renowned music program and renovation projects. In his private affairs, Bob’s life settled beautifully when he married Patricia Paine in 1987. Her previous marriage had ended in divorce. For 30 years, he relished his role as a loving husband to Pat, and stepfather to three sons, Thos Paine (wife Lisa) and brothers John ( wife Patty), and Rod (partner Li); and grandfather to five grandchildren, Sarah, Laura (husband David), Jack (wife Jessi ), Em ily and Evan. Also, surviving Bob are his cherished nephews, Gregg Dougher t y ( w ife Robin ), Marsh Dougherty (wife Mary Ann), and grandnephews Michael, Miles, Ryan and grandniece Kat. He was predeceased by his wife Patricia Paine Dougherty in May 2016, his older brother Jim Dougherty in 2005, and by his sister-in-law Jeanne Dougherty in 2013. A memorial service will be held in the Niles Chapel at Nassau Presbyterian Church on May 13 at 2 p.m., followed by a private family interment at the Dougherty family gravesite in the Princeton Cemetery. Contact stepson Thomas Paine (609) 865-1984 or ThomasHPaine@gmail.com for additional information. Memorial donations may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 38

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GARAGE SALE: Saturday April 22nd, 8am-2pm. 22 Titus Avenue, Lawrenceville. Cleaning out garage after 40 yrs of putting stuff in it! Lots of antiques that are in project condition; drop-leaf table, Cannonball bed, chairs, mirrors & so much more. Selling cheap. My loss, your gain. Pictures on Craigslist. 04-19

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Laredo, very good condition. V6; 210,400 K miles. Sunroof, leather interior, clean body, good tires. Familyowned. $2,000 or best offer. (609) 712-2659. 04-19

2013 HONDA ACCORD EXL: Loaded, 4-cylinder, 52,000 miles, metallic gray. Asking $15,500. (609) 466-3621. 04-19 SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Bright, 27.5’x17’ room w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, cable TV, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,100/mo. utilities included. (609) 924-4210. 04-05-3t GUITAR LESSONS available for all levels of students. Individualized courses set by professional musician. (609) 924-8255; www. princetonstudio.net 04-05-3t

“People who live in glass houses shouldn’t." — J. S. Singer

03-22-5t KARINA’S HOUSECLEANING: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Available week days. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 03-29-4t HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873. 04-05-3t LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf GROWING YOUNG FAMILY LOOKING FOR A HOME TO CHERISH and not a tear down turned ‘McMansion’. Min 3 beds/2 baths in Princeton boro/township, understand some work may need to be put into the house. Negotiable up to $600,000. Email NeedPrincetonHome@gmail.com or call Town Topics (609) 924-2200 to leave your contact info. Please no Realtors. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

1 BEDROOM APTS NEAR NASSAU ST. FOR RENT: Available starting 7/1/2017 located in Princeton Borough “tree” streets. Wooden floors. Abundant light. All available apartments are located within one block of Nassau St. Apartments range from $1,700-$1,900 plus utilities. Call (908) 874-5400 Ext. 802 for more details. tf 2 BEDROOM APTS NEAR NASSAU ST. FOR RENT: Available starting 7/1/2017 located in Princeton Borough “tree” streets. Wooden floors. Abundant light. All available apartments are located within one block of Nassau St. Apartments range from $2,300-$2,600 plus utilities. Call (908) 874-5400 Ext. 802 for more details. tf

Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf FOR RENT IN PRINCETON: Wiggins Street, 3-bedroom duplex within 2 blocks of downtown. 1 offstreet parking space. Available midApril to August 31st. $2,200/month plus utilities. Call (609) 915-9951. 04-12-3t NEED SOMETHING DONE? Experienced Contractor/Handyman. Seminary Degree, 19 years experience in Princeton. Bath renovations, decks, tile, window/door installations, masonry, carpentry & painting. Licensed & insured. References available. (609) 477-9261. 04-12 LAWN MOWING, Watering, Weeding, etc. Great Rates! Please call Stephen (732) 710-1589. 04-12-8t 601 EWING STREET: Newly Renovated Office Suite in Prime Princeton Location - Private office with common waiting room, available immediately. Rent negotiable $1,100. Two-year lease available. Call (609) 688-0200. 04-05-4t CHILDCARE: Seeking a part-time childcare position. Over 20 yrs. of dependable, professional & dedicated care. Resume & references available. Parishioner of St. Paul’s. (609) 883-3947, Alice Ann. 04-05-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@live. com 04-05-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-05-4t STORAGE UNIT FOR RENT: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in Skillman, Montgomery 22x15 with electric newly added: $220 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonstorage. homestead.com/ or (609) 333-6932. 04-05-6t CLEANING/HOUSEKEEPING: Provided by Polish woman with excellent English. Experienced with references. Has own transportation. Please call Alexandra to schedule your free estimate (609) 227-1400. 04-05-6t LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810. 04-05 HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 04-12-8t

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $23.25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $59.00 • 4 weeks: $76 • 6 weeks: $113 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Classifieds by the inch: $26.50/inch • Employment: $33


...to new beginnings

...to new beginnings

...to new beginnings

Kathleen Miller

Sales Associate Cell: 908.256.1271 kathleen.miller@cbmoves.com •20+ years associated with Susan Gordon & Coldwell Banker

Catherine O’Connell Sales Associate

Kathleen Miller Cell: 908.380.2034

Sales Associate catherine.oconnell@cbmoves.com

Cell: 908.256.1271 •Specializes in first time home buyers, kathleen.miller@cbmoves.com

international relocation and investment purchases.

Kathleen Miller

Catherine O’Connell

Sales Associate Cell: 908.380.2034 catherine.oconnell@cbmoves.com

•20+ years associated with

•Specializes in first time home buyers, international relocation and investment purchases.

•NJ Licensed Real Estate agent over •NJ Licensed Real Estate Agentfor with B.S. 17 years in Finance and Masters in Teaching serving the Greater Princeton Area

•Over 10 years of direct marketing and advertising experience  

•NJ Licensed Real Estate agent for over 17 years •Over 10 years of direct marketing Susan Gordon & Coldwell Banker serving the Greater Princeton Area and advertising experience   •Experienced in contract management, staging and marketing, sales and customer service

•NJ Licensed Real Estate Agent with B.S. •Experienced in contract management, in Finance and Masters in Teaching staging and marketing, sales and Sales Associate customer service Princeton and all it has to

Catherine O’Connell

Salesyour Associate Minutes from doorstep! Enjoy Cell: 908.256.1271 offer without giving up conveniences, privacy and a beautiful wooded Cell: 908.380.2034 kathleen.miller@cbmoves.com catherine.oconnell@cbmoves.com setting.

Kathleen Miller O’Connell •20+ years associated with in first time home buyers, This stunning contemporary colonial offers spacious Catherine rooms on•Specializes three

Saleslevels. Associate Associate international relocation and investment Susan Gordon & Coldwell A perfect solution for thoseBanker requiring multiple studies, a Sales large purchases. Cell: 908.256.1271 Cell: 908.380.2034 library, office and long term or frequent guest arrangements. een.miller@cbmoves.com •NJ Licensed Real Estate agent for over 17catherine.oconnell@cbmoves.com years

•Over 10 years of direct marketing serving the Greater Princeton Area and advertising experience   years associated with in first time home buyers, For a complete interactive tour, go•Specializes to international relocation and investment •NJ Licensed Real Estate Agent with B.S. n Gordon & ColdwellinBanker •Experienced contract management, 430NASSAU.COM purchases. in Finance and Masters in Teaching staging and marketing, sales and customer service censed Real Estate agent for over 17 years •Over 10 years of direct marketing

ng the Greater Princeton Area

erienced in contract management, ng and marketing, sales and omer service

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

...to new beginnings

and advertising experience  

•NJ Licensed Real Estate Agent with B.S. in Finance and Masters in Teaching

susan-gordon.com

10 Nassau Street • Princeton • 609-921-1411 www.cbmoves.com/Princeton Ask about our revolutionary HomeBaseSM system! ©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.


Listed by Robin Wallack • Direct dial 683-8505 or 924-1600 ext. 8505 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

LI NE ST W IN G!

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 40

www.robinwallack.com

COME ONE; COME ALL! Tucked among mature trees on a quiet cul-de-sac in Princeton’s Riverside section, you will find a lovely colonial set on a superb lot. Bluestone path leads to the welcoming front door, and in you go! Slate entry opens to some of the most delightful rooms we’ve seen, with the living room having glowing wood floor, traditional mouldings, oversized windows, and two custom built ins, consisting of arches, shelves, and storage. A woodburning fireplace serves as the perfect focal point. The formal dining room can accommodate any size group, whether a family gathering, or an elaborate dinner for friends. Both the dining room and living room open to the bluestone terrace, which has plenty of seating around it’s perimeter. Cookouts, drinks, and fun for all! A paneled study has built in bookshelves, storage, and even a wet bar. But wait--there’s more! The current owners designed and built a most incredible addition. In the fantastic kitchen/great room there are built in bookshelves, recessed lights, a gas fireplace, plus glass doors to an Ipe deck, which overlooks peaceful gardens and meandering path. The chef’s kitchen has every bell and whistle, including Miele steam oven and five burner Miele range. Custom cabinets are crafted of maple, and there is plenty of counter space, as well as storage cabinets. What a treat to work in a space like this! Don’t miss the first floor powder room, updated beautifully, and having a really cool “feel”. This addition exemplifies the much desired “open concept”. The second level continues in this vein, with spacious bedrooms and hardwood floors. The master bedroom, part of the exquisite addition, has a charming window seat, walk-in closet, many windows and the third fireplace. Ensuite, of course, there is not only a full bath with a large shower, but an additional half bath in this wing. In the opposite wing, there are three additional bedrooms and two full baths. All this just a stone’s throw from the University, the New York bus, and town. Just what you’ve been asking for! $1,475,000

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC


Listed by Robin Wallack • Direct dial 683-8505 or 924-1600 ext. 8505 • robin.wallack@foxroach.com

W ! NE ING ST LI BE STILL MY HEART! This story-book house, crafted of stone and wood, is clearly one of Princeton’s extraordinary properties. Surrounded by more than four acres, documented provenance handed down from owner to owner, states that this house was once a cottage. Designed by Wilson Eyre Jr., and built in the Arts and Crafts style in 1919, it is hardly a “cottage”, having five bedrooms and three full and one half baths, including an in-law suite. Staggeringly beautiful trees and plantings provide the perfect foil for the house itself. Stone walls and breezeway add to the lyrical charm of the grounds. Much of the land and trees are mature, and require only minimal attention. Looking at the house, your eyes will be drawn to the new cedar shake roof, rebuilt recently in complete harmony with the surroundings and original design. Walk down the herringbone-patterned brick path, and you enter a large, beamed great room, with stone seating, carpet, and a wall of stone. Many windows bring in light, and the views of the garden are delightful. The living room, with gleaming wood floors, has a wall of built-ins, wood-burning fireplace, and recessed lighting. There is a more formal entry, as well, with a welcoming Dutch door, antique beams, and tons of light. Just when you thought things couldn’t get any more charming, you see the dining room, with another wood-burning fireplace, built-in corner cupboard, and exposed wood ceiling beams. What delightful family gatherings and holiday meals can be shared in this special room! Adjacent to the dining room is the eat-in kitchen, with five burner gas stove and butcher-block eating island. Now hold on to your hat--the sunroom can be considered the piece-de-resistance, with brick floor (having radiant heat), built-in bookcases, in-ground planters, floor-to-ceiling windows, and built-in desk. Grab a book and settle in, or enjoy breakfast there every morning surrounded by the three walls of windows and the views beyond! On the main level is also a wine closet, workshop, and slate-floored mud room. The second floor has treasures, too. Four bedrooms, including the large ensuite master bedroom, are light and airy, and there are plenty of closets. But wait--there’s more! Returning to the main level, go up the private stairs to the in-law suite Bedroom, full bath, and large all-purpose room complete the picture. Visiting family and guests will love the privacy and “cool factor” of these rooms, or you could have a private place to write your novel! Detached three car garage completes the picture. We are proud to present this very special listing for $1,200,000

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8505 direct

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

www.robinwallack.com


LI NE ST W IN G!

LI NE ST W IN G!

105ElmRd.go2frr.com

283ProspectAve.go2frr.com

Princeton $2,197,000 5BD, 6BA traditional w/contemporary touch is a perfect mix of old world charm w/all the modern refined amenities you’d expect from the most luxurious estate! LS# 6956679 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Roberta Parker

Princeton $979,000 4BR, 2.5BA contemporary just blocks away from downtown & the University! Unique midcentry modern design w/hwd floors throughout. LS# 6960344 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Roberta Parker

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

274SunsetRd.go2frr.com

12RedMapleLn.go2frr.com

274 Sunset Road, Montgomery Twp. $949,000 4 BD, 4.5BA, finely crafted new construction waiting for the new owner to enjoy! House and Lot Behind are both for sale. LS# 6879334 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Roberta Parker

12 Red Maple Lane, Montgomery Twp. $869,900 Lovingly maintained 4BR, 3.5BA Grosso built colonial located on cul-de-sac on approx. 1.16 acres. LS# 6783930 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

N PR EW IC E!

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 42

Open house Extravaganza April 22 & 23 foxroach.com

21WShoreDr.go2frr.com

1303CanalRd.go2frr.com

21 W. Shore Drive, Hopewell Twp. $779,000 Contemporary colonial w/5BR, 3.5BA, 3 car gar, 1.38 acres. 38’ deck, gazebo & in-ground pool. Top of the line kit, hwd fls, sun room & much more! LS# 6910498 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Deborah “Debbie” Lang

1303 Canal Road, Franklin Twp. $760,000 Let nature surround you! Casual living on 7 acres, custom home, 3BR, 3 baths, lovely kitchen, great room with fireplace and spacious patio. LS# 6950017 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Marianne R. Flagg

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

E US 23 HO RIL EN AP M OP N., –4 P SU 1

49HumbertSt.go2frr.com

9RevereRd.go2frr.com

49 Humbert Street, Princeton $575,000 Just what everyone wants---a vintage home in the sweet spot of Princeton. Surprisingly large garden is a real treat, as is the updated kitchen, central air and charm galore. LS# 6864724 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Robin L. Wallack

9 Revere Road, Montgomery Twp. $490,000 Expanded bi-level home w/hwd flrs on main level, updated EIK w/granite countertops & ss appl. Home office can be used as BR. LS# 6911792 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Marianne R. Flagg

r Princeton Home Marketing Center

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ | 609-924-1600 -1600 www.foxroach.com

Princeton Home Marketing Center 253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ | 609-924-1600 www.foxroach.com Mortgage

| Title | Insurance

©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC.BHH An independently operated Affiliates, subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. anchisee of LL C. Everything you need. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® erica, Inc.® ©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. olicitation. Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

Right here. | Right now. Mortgage Title | Insurance Everything you need. Right here. Right now.


43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 44

stockton real estate, llc current rentals *********************************

residential rentals: Princeton – $125/mo. 1 Parking space 2 blocks from Nassau Street. Available now. Princeton – $1,400/mo. SHORT-TERM RENTAL. FULLY FURNISHED house with 3 BR, 3.5 baths. Walk to everything from this gracious brick house. Available 5/1/17 through 10/31/17. lawrenceville – $1,450/mo. 2 BR, 1 bath condo. Central air, washer/dryer. Available April 20, flexible. Princeton – $1,600/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath. Fully Furnished apartment. Available 5/7/17. Princeton – $1,650/mo. 2nd floor office on Nassau Street with parking. Available now. Princeton – $1,800/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, kitchen. Heat, HW & 1 parking space included. Available 6/5/17. Princeton address-Franklin twp – $1,950/mo. 3 BR, 1 bath renovated home with LR, DR, kitchen. Fenced-in backyard. Available July 2017.

We have customers waiting for houses!

eddY’s landscaPe & HardscaPe corP: Lawn maintenance, spring/fall cleanup, mulching, mowing, fertilizing, pruning, planting, lawn cutting, tree service. Patios, retaining walls, stone construction, drainage, fences, etc. Free Estimates. 10% off. (609) 8474401; edy_davila@msn.com 03-08-13t

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to all of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

Joes landscaPinG inc. oF Princeton Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

•Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-04-17 aWard WinninG sliPcoVers

http://www.stockton-realtor.com

Custom fitted in your home.

32 chambers street Princeton, nJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. stockton, Broker-owner

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 03-08/05-24 sMall oFFice suitenassau street: with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf tk PaintinG:

tf

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

suPerior HandYMan serVices:

toWn toPics classiFieds Gets toP results!

Princeton References

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

tHe Maid ProFessionals: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-01/08-23

Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-12-18

Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 01-18/07-12 estate liQuidation serVice: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 Music lessons: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. call todaY! FarrinGton’s Music, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-13-17 i BuY all kinds of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-17-17

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

We believe that something as deeply personal as Buying, Selling or Property Management Deserves personal treatment. Stockton Real Estate would be pleased to assist you With all your Real Estate Needs

There is no place like home and Stockton Real Estate will help you get there Stockton Real Estate, LLC 32 Chambers Street, Princeton NJ 08542 Phone (800) 763-1416 or (609) 924-1416 info@stockton-realtor.com • www.stockton-realtor.com www.stockton-realtor.com

BuYinG: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 HoMe rePair sPecialist: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-22-17 storaGe sPace: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf

We BuY cars

cello For sale: Size 4/4, Strobel MC80 with stand and bow, $700. (609) 577-5063. 04-12 sPrinG ruMMaGe sale at trinitY cHurcH: 47th Annual Spring Rummage Sale at Trinity Church. Preview Sale April 28, 6pm-9pm; $5 tickets available starting 12pm. Rummage Sale Saturday, April 29, 9am-3pm; free tickets available starting 7am. Participating departments include Antiques, Art, Books, Housewares, Jewelry, Ladies Accessories, Ladies Fashions, Linens, & Men’s Fashions. Proceeds support Trinity Outreach non-profit partners. For more information, call (609) 924-2277 ext 151 or www.facebook.com/ trinityprincetonrummage 04-19 For sale: 2000 dodGe raM 1500 4x4 SLT Laramie club cab, V8 automatic. 80,000 miles. $4,500. (215) 595-4915

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131

tf

Ask for Chris

2001 JeeP Grand cHerokee

a Gift subscription!

Laredo, very good condition. V6; 210,400 K miles. Sunroof, leather interior, clean body, good tires. Familyowned. $2,000 or best offer. (609) 712-2659. 04-19

We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

2013 Honda accord eXl: Loaded, 4-cylinder, 52,000 miles, metallic gray. Asking $15,500. (609) 466-3621. 04-19

tf WHat’s a Great GiFt For a ForMer Princetonian?

MoVinG? too MucH stuFF in Your BaseMent? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! call (609) 924-2200 ext 10 DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon GaraGe sale: Saturday April 22nd, 8am-2pm. 22 Titus Avenue, Lawrenceville. Cleaning out garage after 40 yrs of putting stuff in it! Lots of antiques that are in project condition; drop-leaf table, Cannonball bed, chairs, mirrors & so much more. Selling cheap. My loss, your gain. Pictures on Craigslist. 04-19 MoVinG sale: Saturday April 22 from 8 am-2 pm. 8 Green Shadow Lane, Princeton. Family room, living room, bedroom, furniture, kitchen equipment. 04-19 suMMer rental: Furnished 4-5 BR, 3.5 bath home available June 1-September 30. Located on large private lot in Princeton’s Western section. $3,000/month + utilities, internet & cable TV. Mike (518) 521-7088 or campregis@aol.com 04-19 Hi Hill FarM-Heide FaMilY estate sale: 327 Wertsville Road, Ringoes. Friday & Saturday April 21 & 22 from 9:30-3; Sunday April 23 from 11-2. Country home filled with antiques. Furniture includes antique Country French, oak S roll desk, Baker, marble topped, poster bed, Mid-century, white wicker, beautiful china, Waterford, lamps, art, Jade stone trees, exquisite linens, barware, carpets, mirrors, chandeliers, library, Salterini outdoor furniture, porch rockers. An authentic estate not to be missed! Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 04-19

SELL YOUR HOME NOW • WE PAY CASH

• NO HOMEOWNER INSPECTION

• WE PAY TOP DOLLAR

• NO REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS

• WE BUY HOMES IN ANY CONDITION

• NO HIDDEN COSTS

• WE BUY VACANT LAND

• NO HASSLE

• QUICK AND EASY CLOSING

• FREE NO OBLIGATION QUOTE

Phone 609-430-3080

www.heritagehomesprinceton.com igorbar2000@gmail.com Igor L. Barsky, Lawrence Barsky

sPacious FurnisHed rooM: Bright, 27.5’x17’ room w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, cable TV, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,100/mo. utilities included. (609) 924-4210. 04-05-3t

HoMe HealtH aide: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf carPentrY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf 1 BedrooM aPts near nassau st. For rent: Available starting 7/1/2017 located in Princeton Borough “tree” streets. Wooden floors. Abundant light. All available apartments are located within one block of Nassau St. Apartments range from $1,700-$1,900 plus utilities. Call (908) 874-5400 Ext. 802 for more details. tf 2 BedrooM aPts near nassau st. For rent: Available starting 7/1/2017 located in Princeton Borough “tree” streets. Wooden floors. Abundant light. All available apartments are located within one block of Nassau St. Apartments range from $2,300-$2,600 plus utilities. Call (908) 874-5400 Ext. 802 for more details. tf 3 BedrooM aPts near nassau st. For rent: Available starting 7/1/2017 located in Princeton Borough “tree” streets. Wooden floors. Abundant light. All available apartments are located within one block of Nassau St. Apartments range from $2,300-$2,700 plus utilities. Call (908) 874-5400 Ext. 802 for more details. tf

Guitar lessons available for all levels of students. Individualized courses set by professional musician. (609) 924-8255; www. princetonstudio.net 04-05-3t

Princeton rental: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf

larGe aPt For rent: 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood floors, washer/dryer, dishwasher, A/C. On route 130 close to 195, 295 & turnpike. References required. $1,500/mo. (609) 335-0075. 04-19

For rent in Princeton: Wiggins Street, 3-bedroom duplex within 2 blocks of downtown. 1 offstreet parking space. Available midApril to August 31st. $2,200/month plus utilities. Call (609) 915-9951. 04-12-3t

tWo Princeton nassau st. oFFices: 2nd floor five office suite approx. 1,800 SF-$7,070/mo. 3rd floor single office approx. 435 SF-$1,500/mo. Tenant pays electric, landlord pays heat. (609) 213-5029. 03-22-5t

need soMetHinG done? Experienced Contractor/Handyman. Seminary Degree, 19 years experience in Princeton. Bath renovations, decks, tile, window/door installations, masonry, carpentry & painting. Licensed & insured. References available. (609) 477-9261. 04-12

karina’s HousecleaninG: Full service inside. Honest and reliable lady with references. Available week days. Call for estimate. (609) 858-8259. 03-29-4t HoMe HealtH aide/ coMPanion: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Cindy, (609) 227-9873. 04-05-3t lolio’s WindoW WasHinG & PoWer WasHinG: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HandYMan: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf GroWinG YounG FaMilY lookinG For a HoMe to cHerisH and not a tear down turned ‘McMansion’. Min 3 beds/2 baths in Princeton boro/township, understand some work may need to be put into the house. Negotiable up to $600,000. Email NeedPrincetonHome@gmail.com or call Town Topics (609) 924-2200 to leave your contact info. Please no Realtors. tf

laWn MoWinG, Watering, Weeding, etc. Great Rates! Please call Stephen (732) 710-1589. 04-12-8t 601 eWinG street: Newly Renovated Office Suite in Prime Princeton Location - Private office with common waiting room, available immediately. Rent negotiable $1,100. Two-year lease available. Call (609) 688-0200. 04-05-4t cHildcare: Seeking a part-time childcare position. Over 20 yrs. of dependable, professional & dedicated care. Resume & references available. Parishioner of St. Paul’s. (609) 883-3947, Alice Ann. 04-05-4t contreras PaintinG: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@live. com 04-05-4t rosa’s cleaninG serVice llc: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-05-4t storaGe unit For rent: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in Skillman, Montgomery 22x15 with electric newly added: $220 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonstorage. homestead.com/ or (609) 333-6932. 04-05-6t cleaninG/HousekeePinG: Provided by Polish woman with excellent English. Experienced with references. Has own transportation. Please call Alexandra to schedule your free estimate (609) 227-1400. 04-05-6t


INTRODUCING

NEWLY PRICED

CAMPBELTON CIRCLE • PRINCETON Pamela Parsons $2,595,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/6958122

NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON $2,200,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6961566

PROVINCE LINE ROAD • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Jane Henderson Kenyon $1,995,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6863045

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

Realtor® owned MOUNTAIN VIEW ROAD • MONTGOMERY TWP $1,599,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6961567

MOORE STREET • PRINCETON Owen ‘Jones’ Toland $1,245,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6961146

BERTRAND DRIVE • PRINCETON Phoebe L Lee $1,175,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6960079

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

BURD STREET • PENNINGTON BOROUGH Deborah W Lane $849,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/6961317

EGLANTINE AVENUE • PENNINGTON BOROUGH Catherine ‘Kate’ Stinson $775,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6957896

AUTUMN HIILL ROAD • MONTGOMERY TWP Carolyn Spohn $750,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6959072

INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING

LINDEN LANE • PRINCETON Amy Granato $735,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6961651

BAINBRIDGE STREET • PRINCETON Cheryl Goldman $725,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6961051

CARSON ROAD • LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP Martha Jane Weber $545,000 CallawayHenderson.com/id/6954315

CRANBURY 609.395.0444 LAMBERTVILLE 609.397.1974 MONTGOMERY 908.874.0000 PENNINGTON 609.737.7765 PRINCETON 609.921.1050

CallawayHenderson.com

Please visit CallawayHenderson.com for personalized driving directions to all of our public open houses being held this weekend. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

NEWLY PRICED


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017 • 46

LAWN MAINTENANCE: Prune shrubs, mulch, cut grass, weed, leaf clean up and removal. Call (609) 954-1810. 04-05

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 04-12-8t

SUBSTITUTE SUPPORT STAFF NEEDED: We are looking for warm, nurturing, energetic, reliable & responsible individuals to work in a team teaching situation. Under the supervision of our classroom staff, the substitute cares for children ranging from 3 month-to almost 5 years. This is an “on call” position with variable hours 8:306:00 pm. Experience working with young children. AA degree or more a plus. Please no phone calls-email resume to sbertran@princeton.edu 04-19-3t

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

EDDY’S LANDSCAPE & HARDSCAPE CORP: Lawn maintenance, spring/fall cleanup, mulching, mowing, fertilizing, pruning, planting, lawn cutting, tree service. Patios, retaining walls, stone construction, drainage, fences, etc. Free Estimates. 10% off. (609) 8474401; edy_davila@msn.com 03-08-13t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

1928 Old Town canoe, 17 ft., Charles River Model, Serial 97518, original paddles, fiberglassed. Was great on Carnegie and Delaware River. Cellphone: 609-500-8435

tf JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations

The Value of Real Estate Advertising

Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

Whether the real estate market is up or down, whether it is a Georgian estate, a country estate, an in-town cottage, or a vacation home at the shore, there’s a reason why Town Topics is the preferred resource for weekly real estate offerings in the Princeton and surrounding area.

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-13-17 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-17-17 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17

•Green Company

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-22-17

Custom fitted in your home. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654

TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 01-18/07-12

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS

STORAGE SPACE: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf

windhamstitches.com 04-12-18

WE BUY CARS

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-01/08-23

(908) 359-8131

Belle Mead Garage

You’ve earned the good things in life. Let us help you protect them. With Borden Perlman, you get the benefit of over 100 years’ experience, expert service, plus a local team of specialists dedicated to helping you. To learn more give us a call today.

tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

A Gift Subscription!

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 03-08/05-24

We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

Auto

GARAGE SALE: Saturday April 22nd, 8am-2pm. 22 Titus Avenue, Lawrenceville. Cleaning out garage after 40 yrs of putting stuff in it! Lots of antiques that are in project condition; drop-leaf table, Cannonball bed, chairs, mirrors & so much more. Selling cheap. My loss, your gain. Pictures on Craigslist. 04-19 MOVING SALE: Saturday April 22 from 8 am-2 pm. 8 Green Shadow Lane, Princeton. Family room, living room, bedroom, furniture, kitchen equipment. 04-19 SUMMER RENTAL: Furnished 4-5 BR, 3.5 bath home available June 1-September 30. Located on large private lot in Princeton’s Western section. $3,000/month + utilities, internet & cable TV. Mike (518) 521-7088 or campregis@aol.com 04-19 HI HILL FARM-HEIDE FAMILY ESTATE SALE: 327 Wertsville Road, Ringoes. Friday & Saturday April 21 & 22 from 9:30-3; Sunday April 23 from 11-2. Country home filled with antiques. Furniture includes antique Country French, oak S roll desk, Baker, marble topped, poster bed, Mid-century, white wicker, beautiful china, Waterford, lamps, art, Jade stone trees, exquisite linens, barware, carpets, mirrors, chandeliers, library, Salterini outdoor furniture, porch rockers. An authentic estate not to be missed! Photos can be seen on estatesales. net, MG Estate Services. 04-19

SPRING RUMMAGE SALE AT TRINITY CHURCH: 47th Annual Spring Rummage Sale at Trinity Church. Preview Sale April 28, 6pm-9pm; $5 tickets available starting 12pm. Rummage Sale Saturday, April 29, 9am-3pm; free tickets available starting 7am. Participating departments include Antiques, Art, Books, Housewares, Jewelry, Ladies Accessories, Ladies Fashions, Linens, & Men’s Fashions. Proceeds support Trinity Outreach non-profit partners. For more information, call (609) 924-2277 ext 151 or www.facebook.com/ trinityprincetonrummage 04-19 FOR SALE: 2000 DODGE RAM 1500 4x4 SLT Laramie club cab, V8 automatic. 80,000 miles. $4,500. (215) 595-4915 tf 2001 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

Laredo, very good condition. V6; 210,400 K miles. Sunroof, leather interior, clean body, good tires. Familyowned. $2,000 or best offer. (609) 712-2659. 04-19

2013 HONDA ACCORD EXL: Loaded, 4-cylinder, 52,000 miles, metallic gray. Asking $15,500. (609) 466-3621. 04-19 SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Bright, 27.5’x17’ room w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, cable TV, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,100/mo. utilities included. (609) 924-4210. 04-05-3t

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Serving our community for over 100 years. 609-896-3434 ■ BordenPerlman.com

Home

Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10

CELLO FOR SALE: Size 4/4, Strobel MC80 with stand and bow, $700. (609) 577-5063. 04-12

· Postcards

Ask for Chris

Let us show you how to protect what you’ve worked so hard to earn.

MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT?

DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

Princeton References

HIC #13VH07549500 05-04-17

If you are in the business of selling real estate and would like to discuss advertising opportunities, please call Town Topics at (609) 924-2200, ext. 21

SMALL OFFICE SUITENASSAU STREET: with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf

Boat

Va l u a b l e s

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


Selling

Mortgage

Title

47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIl 19, 2017

Buying

Realto

Insurance

AMAZING OPPORTUNITY

12+ ACRES WITH A BARN HOPEWELL $799,000 Classic Hopewell charm at its finest, with room for horses. This Victorian beauty is set on 12.2 acres, impeccably maintained with top-of-the-line finishes through-out.

MONTGOMERY TWP. $884,900 This Colonial on a cul-de-sac has 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, family rm, dining rm, living rm, library with built-in bookcases, sun room overlooking back of house and a trellised deck with a view of the pool.

Eric Payne 609-955-1310 (cell)

Eric Branton 609-516-9502 (cell) | Laurent Ouzillou 732-789-5966 (cell)

CHARMING LITTLEBROOK HOME

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $750,000 Appealing, expanded 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape in pristine condition. Special features include hardwood floors, stone floors, 2 wood-burning fireplaces and a galley-style kitchen with granite.

PRINCETON $799,000 Location, location, location! This charming home has 4 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. Walk to schools, stores, pool, parks and Downtown. A must see!

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

NEAR TOWN

STUNNING COLONIAL IN ETTL FARM

PRINCETON $999,000 An updated Victorian house located on a desirable “tree street.” Home features 4 bedrooms and 2 baths, in the heart of the old Borough. Not to be missed!

PRINCETON $1,599,000 One of the largest homes in Ettl Farm with an in-ground pool and large deck, 5 bedrooms, 5 full- and 2-half baths, conservatory, 2 offices and a finished basement.

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Maintain width of dot/marks with base of i

Cap Height

X Height

1/32 cap height gap

7/64 cap height even with top arm of t

1/4 Cap Height

R E APrinceton L T OOffice R S 609-921-1900

R E A L T O R S

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CB Princeton Town Topics 4.19.17.qxp_CB Previews 4/18/17 10:14 AM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER E SE RI VE R

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262 Holcombe Way, Lambertville City Rosaria Lawlor, Sales Associate 3 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $574,900

Elizabeth Zuckerman/Stephanie Will, Sales Associates

5 Beds, 4.5 Baths • $1,080,000

N PR EW IC LY ED

M HI BER LL T' S

LA

19 Bodine Drive, Cranbury Twp Deanna Anderson, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 3.5 Baths • $889,000

25 Woodland Drive, Montgomery Twp

32 Music Mountain Blvd, West Amwell Twp Howard Young, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $525,000 BA FIN SE ISH M ED EN T

84 Carson Road, Lawrence Twp Kathleen Miller, Sales Associate Main House / Barn • $1,250,000

CR GR ANB EE UR NE Y

19 Linden Lane, Princeton Susan Gordon, Sales Associate 6 Beds 5+ Baths • $2,995,000

DG

BU OP SIN TI ES ON S

G LU LO XU BA RY L

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE PRINCETON

The 4th Annual Shred Fest

400 Mountain View Road, Montgomery Twp Patricia O'Connell, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2+ Baths • $429,999

206 Armour Avenue, Hamilton Twp Rosaria Lawlor, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $299,000

46 Myrtle Avenue, Lawrence Twp William Chulamanis, Sales Associate 3 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $259,900

• ASSURE SHRED Secure Document Destruction

Thursday, May 4, 2017 10AM to 1PM Rain or Shine Smoyer Park, 613 Snowden Lane, Princeton In lieu of payment please bring canned food to donate. For More Shred Fest Info Call 609-921-1411

10 Nassau Street | Princeton www.ColdwellBankerHomes.com/Princeton ©2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International, the Coldwell Banker Previews International logo and “Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate” are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper April 19, 2017  

Witherspoon Media Group

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