Page 1

Volume LXXI, Number 11

A Facsimile of a Youthful Journal Kept By Scott Fitzgerald Is Among the Rarities at The Upcoming Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale. . . . . . . . . 10 Princeton University Orchestra Presents Concerto Competition Winners. . . . . . . . . . . 14 PU Men’s Hoops to Play Notre Dame in NCAA Opener. . . . . . . . . . . 21 Tiger Men’s Hockey Falls in Quarterfinals. . . . . 22

A Lifelong Student and Lover of the Music of Franz Schubert, Lindsey Christiansen, Leader of the Westminster Art Song Festival, Dies . . . . . . 29 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 17 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Classified Ads. . . . . . . 30 Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Music/Theater . . . . . . 14 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 20 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 28 Police Blotter. . . . . . . . 4 Real Estate. . . . . . . . . 30 Religion. . . . . . . . . . . 28 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Topics of the Town. . . . . 5 Town Talk. . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

After Expansion Approval PCS, PPS Await Appeal, Law Suit Decisions The way forward for Princeton Charter School and the Princeton Public Schools remains cloudy two weeks after Acting State Commissioner of Education Kimberley Harrington approved the PCS request to expand by 76 students over the next two years. PPS has filed an appeal of the decision and will request a stay, while PPS and PCS have also sued each other for violation of the Sunshine Law [Open Meeting Act]. The District has claimed that the Charter School expansion approval will drain $1.2 million in taxes from the school budget every year, necessitating program and staff cuts or large tax increases. PCS has begun recruiting applicants for next year, under a new weighted lottery system which was included in the recent proposal as a means to increase diversity in PCS admissions. As PPS budget discussions proceed, the question has been raised as to whether a longer phase-in of more than two years on the Charter School expansion would mitigate the financial effect on the District schools. PPS Board President Patrick Sullivan, however, has rejected that possibility, suggesting instead that PCS consider a merger with the school district. Mr. Sullivan mentioned that the District had proposed a merger under which the Charter School would retain much of its autonomy. The alternative, he suggested, would be both undemocratic and expensive, necessitating a significant tax increase for the town. Criticizing the expansion as “exactly counter to what our community wanted,” Mr. Sullivan claimed that it “was done with zero input or representation from the affected parties.” Leaders from PPS and the PCS had been holding private meetings prior to the commissioner’s decision, but apparently little progress was made in reaching a resolution to the conflict. Both sides, however, have expressed frustration with the way the state’s funding laws pit public schools and charter schools against each other in the battle for limited funds, and both have emphasized the desire to work together for the good of the schools and the community. Continued on Page 12

St. Paul Parish event 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

see our ad on page 14

75¢ at newsstands

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Princeton Took No Chances With Stella

With some weather websites predicting a foot or more of snow and strong winds for Monday night into Wednesday thanks to the nor’easter named Stella, Princeton’s public works and police departments were taking no chances and preparing for the worst. “We’re ready to go,” said Dan Van Mater, superintendent in the Department of Public Works, on Monday afternoon. “We’re just getting the trucks ready, and the salt dome is full. We’re replenishing what we used last Friday and we have more salt coming in today.” Some 26 people were scheduled to come in to work at midnight. “We take care of it when it starts,” Mr. Van Mater said. “We have everybody come in, as we do with every significant storm.” The same procedure was in process at the Princeton Police Department, where time off was restricted because of the storm. “We’re making sure the vehicles are gassed up and we have an extra dispatcher at the communications center, because call volume always goes up,” said Lieutenant Jon Bucchere, the department’s spokesman. Mr. Bucchere urged the public to visit the police department’s Facebook page as well as the town website to keep abreast of the situation.

“Usually we’ll start putting out messages telling people to stay off the road. You can get trees down, power lines down, traffic accidents — it can be very dangerous,” he said. “We’re going to stay really pro-active with messaging by the minute.” Teased by a run of spring weather last week that coaxed daffodils and crocuses into early bloom, New Jersey residents were taken aback at the predictions of

strong winter weather. But it has been known to snow in the state as late as April. The Great Blizzard of 1888, on record as one of the deadliest snowstorms in U.S. history, left its mark on parts of New Jersey. Other spring snow storms have been recorded since then, the most significant of which was a Category 5 (extreme) storm in 1993 that blanketed some parts of New Jersey with 20 to 30 inches. Continued on Page 7

Heather Howard Foresees Ongoing Debate Over Complexities of Healthcare Overhaul As President Trump and Republicans in Congress re-affirm their determination to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), growing voices of dissent and mounting complications threaten to prolong the debate. “It’s a tumultuous time in health care as we approach the seventh anniversary of the ACA,” said Heather Howard, director of the state health reform assistance network, Woodrow Wilson School lecturer, and Princeton Council member. Both sides prepared to continue the fight as legislators awaited the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report early

this week analyzing the cost and impact of the Republican bill to repeal and replace major parts of ACA (Obamacare). The CBO assessment is expected to warn that millions of Americans currently insured under the ACA could lose their coverage. Pointing out that this issue resonates far beyond the beltway and that it is the states that implement the ACA, Ms. Howard noted, “The states have a lot at stake. The governors have a lot at stake.” She added, “Here in New Jersey we receive more than $3 billion annually, Continued on Page 12

CASTING CALL: Here sit some contestants in the Einstein look-a-like contest, a ritual part of Princeton’s Pi Day celebration of the town’s most renowned citizen, born March 14, 1879. In this week’s Town Talk, people ponder what he might think of Princeton in March 2017. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

Bryn Mawr-Wellesley

BOOK SALE March 17-21 bmandwbooks.com

Don’t Forget Your Perfect Cake From

Chez Alice Gourmet Cafe & Bakery 5 Palmer Square West, Princeton ·609-921-6760 (p) www.chezalicecafe.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 2

True luxury is not measured in acres. 37 Exclusive Custom Townhomes in New Hope, PA • Spacious, gracious 3,600 – 5,500 SF,

three-level townhomes with private elevator • Refined design, architecture and finishes

• Fully customizable floor plans • Discrete rear garages • Private gated community

Sales Office (by appointment only) 400 S. Main Street, New Hope, PA 18938 Call 215.862.5800, or visit us online at RabbitRunCreek.com


3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

SUPERCHARGE YOUR SUMMER Day, Sports, and Specialty Camps for Boys and Girls, Ages 3–15 JUNE 19 – AUGUST 18, 2017

THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ

esfcamps.com/Lawrenceville

THE WIDEST VARIETY OF EXCITING CAMPS & PROGRAMS FOR EVERY INTEREST MINI CAMP

AGE 3

SPECIALTY MAJOR CAMPS

GRADES K-9

DAY CAMP

AGES 4–8

JUNIOR BUSINESS ACADEMY

SPORTS CAMP

GRADES 5–8

AGES 6–14

SENIOR CAMP

AGES 9–15

EXTEND YOUR DAY

AGES 3–15

ALSO CHECK OUT: UNION SOCCER SCHOOLS AGES 6–14 unionsoccerschools.com

PHILLIES BASEBALL ACADEMY AGES 6–14 philliesacademy.com EAGLES FOOTBALL AND CHEER & DANCE ACADEMIES AGES 6–14 eaglesacademies.com

4 WAYS TO SAVE 1. MULTI-WEEK DISCOUNT Sign up for 6 or more weeks and save an additional 8%. 2. FAMILY REFERRAL PROGRAM For every NEW family you refer to us that enrolls, you will receive $75 back as a credit towards the 2018 season’s camp tuition. 3. FAMILY DISCOUNT Save 5% off of every child after your first one. 4. TAX BENEFITS Take advantage of Employer Sponsored Tax Benefit Plans and Federal Child and Dependent Care Credits when you attend ESF. 

VISIT esfcamps.com/Lawrenceville FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS OR CALL 609.869.0606 ALL ADULT STAFF • PREMIER FACILITIES • AWARD-WINNING PROGRAMS • DAILY SWIMMING • CHARACTER-BUILDING CURRICULUM


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 4

TOWN TOPICS Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946

DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001

LYNN ADAMS SMITH, Editor-in-Chief BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor ANNE LEVIN, Staff Writer DONALD gILpIN, Staff Writer

LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher ROBIN BROOMER Advertising Director MELISSA BILYEU Office Manager JENNIFER COVILL Account Manager KENDRA BROOMER Account Manager CHARLES R. pLOHN Account Manager

FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, EMILY REEVES, CHARLES R. pLOHN photographers STUART MITCHNER, TAYLOR SMITH, SARAH EMILY gILBERT, DOUg WALLACK, JEAN STRATTON, NANCY pLUM, KAM WILLIAMS Contributing Editors

MONICA SANKEY Account Manager ERIN TOTO Account Manager gINA HOOKEY Classified Ad Manager

USpS #635-500, published Weekly Subscription Rates: $49/yr (princeton area); $53/yr (NJ, NY & pA); $56/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818

(ISSN 0191-7056) periodicals postage paid in princeton, NJ USpS #635-500 postmaster, please send address changes to: p.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528

Center for Eating Disorders passed a counterfeit $100 Princeton was charged with Expands Partial Hospital Program bill at the Domino’s Pizza criminal trespass after pa-

Peter E. Black Named to President’s Club at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

Lawrenceville, NJ – Morgan Stanley he Martin-Rizzo Group announced today that Mr. Peter E. Black, a Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor, CRPC® in its Wealth hed Service and Management office in Lawrenceville been named to the Firm’s Community has prestigious President’s Club, an elite group composed of the firm’s leading Financial Advisors. The appointment recognizes Black’s consistent creativity and excellence in providing a wide range of investment products and wealth management services to his clients.

. Integrity. It is these qualities that make us proud zo Group representing us in your community.

at Morgan Black, Stanley who has been with Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

ector

®

since is CFP a native of Belle Mead, NJ. He holds a bachelor’s ® Martin Arthur Rizzo, John2011, degree livesPresident in Princeton Senior Vice PresidentUniversity. Black currently ViceBucknell Seniorfrom with his family. Senior Portfolio Manager Management Director Portfolio

Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, a global leader, provides ® Gaspari Maria CFP Scharf, Brett access to a wide range of products and services to individuals, Associate Portfolio Associate Service Client Registered businesses and institutions, including brokerage and investment advisory services, financial and wealth planning, cash management and lending and 300, services, annuities and 08648 NJ insurance, Lawrenceville, Drive, Suite Lenoxproducts 1200 retirement and trust•services. 877-522-2387 609-620-7143

fa.morganstanley.com/themartinrizzogroup/index.htm

www.morganstanley.com

s and Private Wealth Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice and are not “fiduciaries” (under the Internal als are encouraged to consult their tax and legal advisors regarding any potential tax and related consequences

x or legal advice. Clients should consult their tax advisor for matters involving taxation and tax planning and

d CFP (with flame design) in the U.S.,which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s

The Center for Eating Disorders Care (CEDC) at University Medical Center of Princeton has enhanced its Adult Partial Hospital Program with additional therapeutic activities and separation from its inpatient program. The Partial Hospital Program now has a separate treatment space with dining room, group room and lounge. This program will operate independently from the inpatient program. CEDC Partial Hospital patients also have additional experiential activities and the option of full day (8 a.m. to 6 p.m., including three meals) or shorter day (8 a.m. to 3 p.m., including two meals). Both schedules are available three to five days per week, depending on each patient’s needs. The CEDC is nationally known for its acute care services for those with severe eating disorders, aged eight and older, who benefit from intensive treatment and medical care available for co-existing conditions. The Partial Hospital Program is an option for patients following an inpatient or residential stay, or who are struggling in the community and need intensive daytime treatment. The program enables patients to maintain the same treatment team throughout the recovery process for continuity of care if they have been inpatients at the Center for Eating Disorders Care. Experiential treatment opportunities include cooking groups, meals served family–style, take-out ordering, restaurant outings with staff, and grocery shopping excursions. The relapse prevention curriculum has also been expanded. For more information, call (609) 853-7575 or visit princetonhcs.org/eatingdisorders.

Police Blotter On March 3, at 8:10 p.m. a 20-year-old female from Charlotte, NC was charged with tampering with public records after police received a call from the Princeton Public Library regarding a found wallet. The wallet belonging to the female contained a fictitious driver’s license. On March 6, at 11:19 a.m., an unknown person

on State Road. The employee recognized that the bill was counterfeit and advised the individual that he was contacting the police. The suspect immediately left the store and the investigation is ongoing. On March 6, at 11:35 p.m., a 28-year-old male from Princeton was charged with possession of under 50 grams of marijuana and drug paraphernalia subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Leigh Avenue for failure to observe a traffic signal. On March 7, at 6:19 a.m., a 25-year-old male from

trols were called to a residence on Heather Lane to investigate a report of an unknown individual sleeping on the homeowner’s couch. The suspect may have gained entry through an unsecured door. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Emerald Ash Borer: Treatment Options for Homeowners: At Lawrence Headquarters Branch of Mercer County Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, on Thursday, March 16 at 7 p.m., experts present options for dealing with this threat. Registration suggested at (609) 9896920 or lawprogrs@mcl.org. One Table Cafe: Friday, March 17 at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, 6:30 p.m., Arts Council director Taneshia Nash Laird is the speaker at this pay-what-you-can dinner catered by Main Street Catering. Proceeds benefit Mercer Street Friends, Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, and other organizations. Reserve at (609) 216-7770 by March 15. Health Forum: On Saturday, March 18 at 2 p.m. at Sampson G. Smith School, 1649 Amwell Road in Somerset, Dr. Curtis Nordgaard speaks on “Human Health Risks of Natural Gas” in relation to the proposed gas compressor stations at Trap Rock Quarry and beyond. PCDO Candidate Forum and Endorsement Meeting: Sunday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m., the Princeton Community Democratic Organization meets at Suzanne Patterson Center to endorse candidates for Princeton Council, Senate, Assembly, Sheriff, and Freeholder. Free. www.princetondems.org. Princeton Wedding Showcase: Sunday, March 19 from noon-4 p.m. at the Nassau Inn, an open house featuring music, photography, floral designs, fashions, and more will be held, with door prizes, giveaways, and discounts. Register at www.princetonweddingshow. com. NJDOT Information Session: On Tuesday, March 21 from 4:30-7:30 p.m., there will be a public information session on the Route 206 Stony Brook bridge project at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. The project will involve extended closures of Route 206. Library Closed: On Thursday, March 23, Princeton Public Library will be closed for staff development. March Muster at Princeton Battlefield: Saturday, March 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., there will be Continental infantrymen practicing period drilling techniques, firing of reproduction colonial era muskets, living history cooking and encampment demonstrations, and more. Free but donations are accepted. Register for Princeton Recreation Department activities: Online registration is available for 2017 spring and summer programs including board camp, youth track camp, CP pool membership, and more. There is an early bird discount on select memberships. www.princetonrecreation.com. Host a Child from the Fresh Air Fund: Anyone interested in hosting a child from New York City’s low income communities this summer can contact Laurie Bershad at (609) 865-5916 or visit www.freshair.org.


5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., maRCh 15, 2017

RECONSIDERING CONSOLIDATION: Former Princeton Township Mayor Chad Goerner, whose book on Princeton’s historic consolidation has been recently released, is shown here delivering the keynote speech at the New York State Local Government Innovation Conference last November.

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

urbanagendamagazine.com

A Former Mayor Looks Back In Book About Consolidation

By the time consolidation of Princeton Township and Princeton Borough was officially put into effect four years ago, Chad Goerner was no longer in public office. But Mr. Goerner, who served as mayor of the former Township from 2006 until opting not to run for re-election in 2012, remained actively in-

volved in making the historic merger a reality. The author of the original proposal for the towns to develop a consolidation and shared services study commission, Mr. Goerner helped guide the process by serving on the Transition Task Force. Now, he has written a book about the experience. A Tale of Two Tigers: Princeton’s Historic Consolidation, was published in January and is available from amazon.com.

TOPICS Of the Town “I did it to memorialize the history of consolidation. From my perspective, what we did was pretty unique and special,” said Mr. Goerner, who is First Vice President — Wealth Management at UBS FInancial Services Inc. “I wanted to go back and look at the history of consolidation, in detail, and figure out what went right this time and what went wrong in previous attempts. It really kind of became a story in and of itself.” Previous efforts to merge the two Princetons date back to the 1950s and beyond. “There was an attempt by the town to incorporate as a Borough back in the early 1800s, mainly due to the fact that they were concerned about the African American population, and suppressing that,” Mr. Goerner said. “It was basically racism.” Doing his research, Mr.

Goerner was surprised to learn of an 1894 school law that allowed the towns to incorporate in order to control their own school district. “But what was most surprising were the themes that were in favor of or against consolidation were consistent throughout,” he said. “A lot of elected officials started out hesitant to look at consolidating because they were concerned about control over their own community. But after they served for a period of time, they realized how inefficient things really were, and changed their minds.” The book looks at various issues including the controversy over moving the Dinky train station, the “cultural” dif ferences bet ween t he Township and the Borough, the perceived effect of consolidation on police departments, and the response to Hurricane Sandy (after consolidation) in comparison to Hurricane Irene (pre-consolidation). “The response to Irene and Sandy was like night and day,” Mr. Goerner said. “I think a lot of people still don’t understand that even though we consolidated and have great savings, the facts are that Princeton has had one of the lowest municipal tax growth rates of any town in Mercer County. that is due specifically to consolidation.” The second part of the book is designed as a kind of template for other towns considering consolidation. Continued on Next Page

CheCk out new produCts by

Michael Graves architecture & DesiGn

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


We replace “FOGGY” Insulated Glass

45 Spring St • Downtown Princeton • 924-2880

We bring our farm to your neighborhood! Weekly deliveries of 100% certified organic farm shares, all grown on our New Jersey farms. Or pick-up on the farm in Chesterfield or Pennington! Four share sizes available!

Continued from Preceding Page

“It’s a little bit of a handbook for other elected officials,” Mr. Goerner said. “It’s about why they should consider looking at shared services and consolidation at the same time.” Graphics in the book include flyers that were created during the years leading up to the vote on whether to merge. One from 1996, advocating staying separate, pictures Napoleon and Hitler (“History Shows That Once You Start Consolidating, It’s Hard To Stop … The More Power You Have, The More Power You Want”). Another, in favor, is undated (“Don’t be Myth-Led! Consolidation is a win for the Borough and our entire Community”). So how would Mr. Goerner rate consolidation in its fourth year? “I think it’s gone very well so far,” he said. “One of the

things, from my perspective, is that as time goes on, the question of whether it was right or not will be really moot,” he said. “Most people will not understand why we were two separate municipalities. But because it was such a long attempt, there will always be lingering animosity for those who were against it and have been for decades. The reality is that it certainly was successful.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What would surprise Einstein most about Princeton today?” (Photographs by Emily Reeves)

THE OFFICE STORE

28 Spring St, Princeton (next to Chuck’s)

609-924-0112

www.hinksons.com

“How cool it is to be a nerd”

—Malena Attar, Princeton

©DIONISVERA/FOTOLIA.COM

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 6

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Mayor Looks Back

Zarah: “He’d be surprised to see all these cars today because he didn’t like to drive. Ava: “That the Dinky station is now a pub.” —Zarah Cardona (left) and Ava Cedeno, Ewing

honeybrookorganicfarm.com 609.737.8899

Heidi: “That they’re celebrating his miraculous discovery to this day and that they’re having all these amazing contests today just for him.” Brett: “That the houses in Princeton are kind of different.” —Heidi and Brett Torgerson, Princeton

Authentic. Vintage. Luxury.

Krystal: “Hoagie Haven” Jona: “The amount of transportation available around campus now, because he was always lost back then. Today he could get back to his house with no problem.” Bobbi: “The number of people that go by to see Einstein’s lecture room where he taught on campus.” —(from left) Krystal Veras, Jona Mojados, Bobbi Brashear, students Princeton University Class of 2020

Three-STONe eNGAGeMeNT rING

Retail: $3,750

h1912: $2,995

MEET H1912 We are committed to the beauty, value and restoration of vintage watches and jewelry. every pre-owned item is inspected by our expert jewelers and includes a Certificate of Quality and authenticity.

104 Nassau Street 609-924-1363 • www.h1912.com H1912 pRoudly donates a peRCentage of eveRy sale to loCal CHaRities in need.

vintage and pRe-oWned WatCHes & JeWelRy tHat makes luxuRy affoRdable.

Devin: “Einstein would be really surprised how useful smart phones are.” Alexandra: “I think he’d be surprised by how many people want to see his house.” —Alexandra Milojevic and Devin Mullen, Princeton


continued from page one

By Monday af ternoon, PSE&G had issued a press release saying preparations were being made should trees and power lines be downed by strong winds. Extra personnel was being scheduled with more on standby, according to John Latka, senior vice president of electric and gas operations for the utility. Princeton Public Library was closed on Tuesday. Winter storm warnings were issued by the National Weather Service for Central New Jersey beginning at 10 p.m. Monday, March 13 and ending at 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 14. Wind gusts of 40 to 50 miles per hour were predicted near the coast. To report downed wires or power outages, visit www. pseg.com or call (800) 436PSEG. —Anne Levin

Robin L. Smith Speaks On Restorative Justice

National TV personality and best-selling author the Rev. Dr. Robin L. Smith, will speak on Tuesday, March 28 at 7 p.m. in the Daniel J. Theron Assembly Room in the Princeton Theological Seminary Library. Smith will give a talk titled, “Moving Forward with Restorative Justice: Strategies in Engaging Racial Fatigue.” It is free and open to the public. The talk is part of the Seminary’s Navigating the Waters Courageous Conversations series. Navigating the Waters is an educational and empowerment initiative that explores and provides diversity and intercultural proficiency tools for establishing

SPACE

and sustaining the Princeton Seminary community with mutual respect and accountability. Courageous Conversations is a seminary-wide initiative creating safe, confidential, and sacred spaces for hearing one another’s stories. Smith will discuss strategies and qualities of restorative justice as a process of mutual accountability, reconciliation, and community trust-building. She will shed light on why simple everyday activities like walking off campus to explore the surrounding community can sometimes be challenging for black and brown students. She is an ordained minister and licensed psychologist. Her book, Lies at the Altar, has been a #1 national bestseller on the lists of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Publisher’s Weekly, Entertainment Weekly, and many more. Her first book, Inspirational Vitamins, was received with great enthusiasm and acclaim. Smith has appeared on numerous television programs, and is a well-known speaker. She earned her PhD in counseling psychology from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and a master’s degree from Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary (now Palmer Theological Seminary) in Wayne, Pennsylvania. For more infor mation, call (609) 688-1941 or visit ptsem.edu/events. ———

First Annual Tech Summit To Be Held By Chamber

The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce will hold “Disrupt or be Disrupt-

L ED! CAL T I M I L IS

ed,” a technology summit, at The Conference Center of Mercer on Thursday, March 30 from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Keynote speakers will be Simon Nynes of Wayside Technology Group, who will speak on Cloud Computing; and Roy Mehta of CoolR Group, whose talk is titled “The Internet of Things.” Breakout panels will focus on Cyber Risk and Big Data. Panelists on the first are Scott N. Schober of Berkly Veritronics, John Verry of Pinpoint Security, and Rashaad Bajwa of Domain Computer Services. At the second event, panelists are Jeff Evernham of Sinequa; Jeff Marcus of Sparkway; and Megan Watson of WithumSmith+Brown. Tickets are $40 for members; $50 for future members. Visit www.princetonchamber.org.

Clubs One Table Café presents a conversation with special guest Taneshia Nash Laird, Executive Director of the Arts Council of Princeton at Trinity Church in Princeton on Friday, March 17 at 6:30 p.m. Main Street Fine Catering of Rocky Hill will be providing a delicious meal. Reservations are required by March 15, 2017. To RSVP call (609) 216-7770. The Women’s College Club of Princeton will meet on Monday, March 20 at 1 p.m. at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Princeton. Michael Kownacky and Ted Otten will discuss the development of American Musical Theater. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, visit wccpnj.org.

TODAY!

AUTHOR AND NATIONAL SENIOR LIVING EXPERT

BRAD BREEDING SPEAKING AT STONEBRIDGE AT MONTGOMERY Do you have questions about retirement living? Have you ever asked what IS a CCRC? Then DON'T MISS THIS UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY to learn all there is to know about retirement living from A to Z with Brad Breeding, CFP®.

Thursday, March 30

RSVP by March 24 to 877-791-3389 Can’t make it? Call for a personal tour!

A Continuing Care Retirement Community 100 Hollinshead Spring Rd., Skillman, NJ 08558 | stonebridgeatmontgomery.org This event will include an informational presentation about our community that will last at least 10 minutes. The guest speaker is not an employee or agent of or affiliated in any way with Springpoint. The guest speaker’s presentation, opinions, advice and comments are those of the speaker only.

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Stella


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 8

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. By Sarah Emily Gilbert (Originally published in Princeton Magazine) Dr. Barbara A. Brown (left) and Dr. Lynne B. Kossow of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine.

F

or the past two years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,” explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problem-based economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet…This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.” “For the past two years, we have been offering our Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program as an optional program for our patients,” they continue. “Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice

was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care… We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively [do that].” Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,” the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.” Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. This is helping revive medical students’ interest in internal medicine, which is predicted to increase the number of primary care doctors and revitalize our healthcare system. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

The Princeton Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program is $1,200 per year. The fee can be paid monthly, quarterly, biannually, or annually, and credit cards are accepted as payment. All medical services are billed through the patient’s insurance company as usual. Princeton Lifestyle Medicine is located at 731 Alexander Road, Suite 200 in Princeton, New Jersey. For more information call 609.655.3800 or visit www.princetonlifestylemedicine.com. — Paid Advertisement —


John Witherspoon Middle School Parent Praises Principal, Faculty, Environment

To the Editor: As a parent of two John Witherspoon Middle Schoolers, I am writing to share why I love this wonderful school! JW is run by a dedicated principal, Jason Burr, who works closely with the faculty and staff in order to offer an impressive array of academic and extracurricular opportunities and a warm, nurturing environment to all who attend the school. This is no small task with about 760 preteens and teenagers. Mr. Burr clearly loves this age group, greeting them with a big smile every day and at the many school events that he attends. JW offers academics rivaled by none. But more importantly, the teachers and staff members strive to build well-rounded, happy kids. Middle school is a time of enormous growth — socially, physically, and academically. JW offers kids a way to spread their wings academically, but also to try different sports (15 to choose from), music, drama, musical theater, science bowl (going to the middle school national finals), poetry, journalism, art, engineering, and more. The teachers are there early, available to meet with our children and to help them reach their goals, whatever those goals may be. As a parent of three students who have graduated from or are currently at JW, I can say unequivocally that we raise really good humans at JW! I am proud to be a JW parent and I thank Mr. Burr and the rest of the JW team for creating a wonderful learning and growing environment for our children. DInA ShAW Clover Lane

Neither Sibling Preference Nor a Lottery Would Be Needed if PCS Could Expand

To the Editor: I read Cara Carpenito’s letter last week asking other parents to examine their conscience [“PCS Parents Should Examine Their Conscience: Can They Continue to ‘Choose’ a Segregated School,” March 8 Mailbox]. Princeton is a town of unmistakable wealth, with average incomes triple that of our neighbor Trenton. Adding to our schools’ economic and racial segregation, we additionally bus in mostly Caucasian students from wealthy, suburban Cranbury, which is almost as far away as Trenton. Princeton and Cranbury students attend schools that afford privileges out of reach for most Trenton children. To address this issue, I implore the Board of Education to implement a voluntary program where Princeton parents who want to demonstrate their commitment to

this end, and is planning more. With the weighted lottery and sibling preference (lottery and sibling preference, incidentally, are also used by PPS’s dual-language immersion program) working in concert, I expect PCS to succeed in short order — if only special interest groups stop using scare tactics and trust parents to decide based on schools’ offerings, not scurrilous moral allegations. Last, Professor Rubin’s letter. Space is limited, so I’ll focus on these facts: 1) She cited Bruce Baker as a supporting voice, but one should note that Bruce Baker supplied the vanished slide from her 12/13/16 presentation to the BoE — invited by above-mentioned Andrea Spalla — that stated PCS ranked 622nd in the state (hard to believe even if anti-PCS), and 2) that while 22 percent of kids at JWMS did opt out of PARCC, of those who did take it, 37 percent did indeed fail, and that’s not nothing. I know that I am far from the only parent at PCS who moved to Princeton for PPS, but there my kids are at PCS. Perhaps if PPS took some steps to understand the reasons each family left PPS after having tried it (survey?), PPS might improve for all kids. If PPS did this instead of engaging in lawfare, nobody would want to go to PCS, and it would die. As it is, absent that level of interest, engagement, and self-reflection by PPS, I am glad that more district families will have the same choice ours did. LIZ WInSLOW Dodds Lane

Parent With Two Children at PCS, One at PPS Residents Give High Marks to Town’s Takes Issue With Letters in March 8 Mailbox Curbside Organic Waste Program

To the Editor: In the March 8 issue of Town Topics, three anti-PCS letters were published. I’d like to respond to each letter. Cara Carpenito asked PCS parents to “examine their conscience [sic].” When the author’s fundamental assumption is that the parents of 348 children (plus waitlist) are bad people, how does a community even begin to discuss collaboration? Would the author say that to our faces at a sports competition, piano recital, etc.? As I have two children at PCS and one at PPS, does that make me merely two-thirds evil? Further to Ms. Carpenito’s letter, PCS’s “segregation,” particularly of African American students, was not a statistical issue until 2009-2010, when two notable things happened: 1) the financial crisis, which may have led to many private school children returning to public and entering the PCS lottery, and 2) the formation of the de facto anticharter advocacy group Save Our Schools-n.J., (“SOS-nJ, co-founded by Julia Sass Rubin, who has done work on PPS’s behalf against PCS, outgoing BoE President Andrea Spalla, and Mayor Liz Lempert). As for Ms. Weir’s assertion that charters are required to mirror the sending district’s population; they actually must attempt to do so. PCS does a large amount of outreach to

To the Editor: My wife and I are unabashed fans of Princeton’s Curbside Organic Program, and so proud that our city was first in new Jersey to have one! We knew about the obvious benefit — 25 percent of an average house’s waste can be composted. But we were surprised by other things: how easy it was to find compostable bags at Ace or McCaffrey’s (we use small ones under our sink which we put into larger ones in the garage every few days — no smell, no mess); that wheeling the bin to the curb once a week is effortless (and we’re not youngsters); and that determining what goes in is brainless — “if it was once ‘alive,’ it’s compostable.” We even put in pizza boxes and coffee filters. And our trash bin is lighter, with all that organic water weight now in small bags. But the best of it is the rich compost that the program returns to us each spring. We cover our garden with black gold. People need to renew by April 1, so we did it on the municipal website www.princetonnj.gov/organic/CurbsideOrganics.html. If you haven’t joined already, do it soon so you can get your black gold this spring. ChRIS COUCILL AnD LIZ FILLO Constitution hill West

Exciting March Events Barbara Wells StudioTrunk Show M arc h 1 7 - 1 8 . Sp r i n g s e a s o n k n i t we a r co l l e c t i o n !

PortoTrunk Show M arc h 2 3 - 2 5 .

Spr i ng sea son collec ti on!

Grownbeans R a i n wea r Collec ti on M arc h 2 3 - 2 5 .

Spr i ng sea son collec ti on! Now o p en S undays fo r yo ur co nve n i e n ce s t a r t i ng M a rc h 19t h 12-4p m

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Mailbox Letters Do Not Necessarily Reflect the Views of Town Topics

equality can offer to swap their children’s spots in Princeton schools with children from Trenton. Then, instead of having parents chastise others about segregation, and generating ill will, they can instead lead by example and serve as an inspiration to everyone. I also read Lori Weir’s letter about eliminating sibling preference at PCS [“n.J. Commissioner of Education Decision a Case of Taxation Without Representation,” March 8 Mailbox], which even PPS uses in their lottery-based duallanguage immersion program. To get some facts about who would be most impacted if siblings were split across schools, I examined the Pew Research Center report on Parenting in America. Across the United States, 33 percent of Caucasian mothers had 3 or more children, and the numbers for other racial groups were Asian (27 percent), African-American (40 percent), and hispanic (50 percent). If Princeton has similar demographic patterns, eliminating sibling preference would impact African-Americans and hispanics more than other racial groups. In comparison, the weighted lottery approved for PCS will increase the chances for economically disadvantaged groups. numerically, the calls to dismantle sibling preference seem counterproductive. In the longer term, neither sibling preference nor a lottery would be needed if PCS were allowed to expand to meet all of the demand for it. VIVEk PAI Bertrand Drive


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 10

BOOK REVIEW

Bryn Mawr Book Sale Musings on the Ides of March With Shakespeare and Scott Fitzgerald

I

t’s so quiet a moment you can hear the earth turning. “Here’s the book I sought,” Brutus says. “I put it in the pocket of my gown.” He’s talking to his servant Lucius in a scene near the end of Act IV of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. “Let me see, let me see, is not the leaf turn’d down where I left reading? Here it is, I think.” We’re in Brutus’s tent, it’s “the deep of night,” and we have no idea what he’s reading. All we know is it’s a book, with the place marked by turning down the edge of a page, a familiar everyday human gesture that makes the moment intimate and real, whether it’s 44 B.C. or 1599 when the play was performed or now, on the page today, March 15, 2017, The Ides of March, the day Caesar was assassinated. Brutus hasn’t long to live and he knows it. He’s about to be visited by Caesar’s ghost, and Shakespeare has him misplacing a book, asking his servant to help him find it (“I was sure your lordship did not give it to me”) and then, after humbly admitting “Bear with me, good boy, I am much forgetful,” asking Lucius to play “a strain or two” of music. Here’s the mighty Brutus who delivered the “unkindest cut of all” to Caesar and he’s gently deferring to a servant boy, “I trouble thee too much, but thou art willing,” and again “I should not urge thy duty past thy might,” and yet again (in case you doubted his impending fate) “I will not hold thee long. If I do live, I will be good to thee.” And when Lucius falls asleep, ever gentle Brutus, the quiet reader, goes out of his way not to wake him (“Good boy, good night”). Then, at the very moment he finds where he “left off reading,” the “monstrous apparition” descends upon him. It’s All About Reading The scene with Brutus and his book suggests a hushed Shakespearean state of mind conducive to an appreciation of the timeless pleasure of reading celebrated every year by the Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale. With this great community event only two days away, what better occasion to think about reading? I mean deep, blissed-out reading, the total absorption in a text bound between two covers like the 80,000 or so that are, to put it crudely, up for grabs this Friday when the dealers and first-comers will make their customary dent in the massive stock after paying $25 for the privilege of a day-long preview. Thinking Fitzgerald Of the rarities in this year’s Collectors Corner, one with special Princeton associations is The Thoughtbook of F. Scott Fitzgerald, first published in facsimile by the Princeton University Library in 1965. However, a book that means much more to me in the afterglow of that moment with Brutus is one of the great “thoughtbooks” in American literature. Edited by Fitzgerald’s old friend and Princeton classmate Edmund Wilson, The Crack Up is titled after the essay of the same name. What makes my own copy of the 1956 New Directions paperback a potent example of the tenuous notion of “value” in a world of secondhand books is that I’ve kept this battered volume, a Christmas gift from my mother when I was 17 (the spine barely holding together its 347 pages ) for all of my adult life.

The DNA of a Poet Fitzgerald’s Thoughtbook shows Scott recording his moves in teenage society, measuring one girl against another, with regular entries about where he stood in this or that one’s affectations in relation to this or that male rival. Kept between August 1910 and February 1911, the journal was completed two months before he entered the Newman School in Hackensack. Some typical entries: “Last year in dancing school I got 11 val-

in all four corners. The sea was coming up in little, intimidating rushes. A soft bell hummed midnight. The nineteen wild green eyes of the bus were coming up to them through the dark. Several impressions closer to home: New Jersey villages where even Sunday is only a restless lull between the crash of trains. Parts of New Jersey … are under water,

Works (Boston: Hilliard, Gray and Company, 1836), the Holy Grail I used to dream of finding at Bryn Mawr in the days when I was a book sale regular. The quest began 30 years ago when I read in Jay Leyda’s invaluable Melville Log how Melville, whose eyes were “as tender as a young sparrows” had been unable to comfortably read Shakespeare until he found this very edition with its “glorious great type, every letter whereof is a soldier & the top of every “t” like a musket barrel.” Thanks to the Net, I was finally able to get my hands on the edition that gave Shakespeare to Melville as he was about to embark on his most Shakespearean work, Moby Dick. A book dealer in Ohio had it listed for $150. Each of the seven volumes still carries the bookplate of the Mount Union College Library, the pocket in back still holding a borrower’s card with the title typed at the top and the handwritten names of four students (Williams, Brummer, Moffet, and Montgomery) who checked it out between 1958 and 1968. For book dealers, the ex-library aspect, even though the books are in excellent condition, would take hundreds of dollars off the value. On the collector’s site addall.com I found one edition, “professionally rebound,” listed for $498.89. For me, the library binding and the check-out card with the students’ names add to the edition’s character, though more than anything else, what gives these books a value beyond price is knowing that almost 200 years later I’m following the same tactile/ visual route taken by Melville, experiencing the texture, atmosphere and substance of the page and shape of the words. It’s almost as good as holding his copy. Light to Read By Finally, in addition to that hushed scene between Brutus, his book, and his young servant, there’s a line in Act II of Julius Caesar that illuminates my sense of the reading experience at its best. Once again it’s night and Brutus is about to open a letter Lucius has handed him: “The exhalations whizzing in the air give so much light,” he says, “that I may read by them.” he white glow I read those words by the other night was provided by a humble little booklight. I was leaning on one elbow, all darkness around me, and there it was, the improbable idea of reading by the light of “exhalations whizzing in the air.” I read the line again and then again. The whole play seemed to be poised on those words at that moment, and so it was, since the letter is urging Brutus to follow through on what he’d already been contemplating (‘Speak, strike, redress!’). I looked for a note at the bottom of the page on the Elizabethan usage of “exhalations,” but none was there. It didn’t matter; it would have been out of place, presumptuous, like annotating magic. ——— The cover image of Fitzgerald’s Thoughtbook shown here is from the recent University of Minnesota reprint, subtitled A Secret Boyhood Diary, which is available in Kindle and paperback; the copy in Collector’s Corner is the much rarer 1965 Princeton University Library edition of the facsimile of Fitzgerald’s handwritten journal. For more information on the book sale, visit bmandwbooks.com. —Stuart Mitchner

T

entines and this year 15.” “I am just crazy about Margaret Armstrong and I have the most awful crush on her that ever was.” After fearing that a rival had Margaret’s heart, he records how she tells another girl “she liked me best. All the way home I was in the seventh heaven of delight.” However rudimentary, here are intimations of Zelda and Scott in real life and the triangle of Daisy, Gatsby, and Tom in The Great Gatsby. The notebooks in The Crack Up, on the other hand, abound with glimpses of the poetry indispensable to Fitzgerald’s novelistic identity: Suddenly the room rang like a diamond

and other parts are under continual surveillance by the authorties. Then there’s this one: Bryn Mawr coverlet. So far I’ve been unable to find a Bryn Mawr alumna who knows what this could relate to; the most obvious source might be Fitzgerald’s daughter Scottie, who went to Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore but not, it seems, the college in suburban Philadelphia that co-sponsors this week’s community book event. Bringing Shakespeare to Melville As soon as I realized that Town Topics would be coming out on the Ides of March, I wanted to read Julius Caesar, grateful for the excuse to take out volume VI of The Dramatic

Santé Integrative Pharmacy Take good care of yourself. Opening Spring of 2017

Santé Integrative Pharmacy Take good care of yourself. Opening Spring of 2017

200 Nassau Street • Princeton NJ 08542

200 Nassau Street • Princeton NJ 08542

Naturopaths, Nutritionists, Herbalists, Acupuncturists, Homeopaths, Skincare specialist

We are an Integrative Pharmacy, combining a traditional full service - compounding pharmacy with complimentary and holistic options. Our professional practitioners, working in harmony with our pharmacists, will educate and engage our customers. Flexible schedules. Applicants must have the appropriate licenses or certifications.

Now hiring for immediate start Experienced Retail Manager sought to help redefine the current retail pharmacy experience. As Manager you will promote an integrative approach to health and wellness with a unique selection of natural products and work with a professional staff of licensed/trained/educated holistic health practitioners, along with a professional pharmacy team. You will be in a unique position to set the overall culture and tone for the store and deliver a completely unique and exciting health and wellness experience for our current customers as well as to help educate and grow a whole new customer base. Requirements and Responsibilities Foster a culture of EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICE as the #1 priority. Total leadership and strategic operation of the retail environment including sales and inventory management. Employee staffing, training, and development, supervision and policy implementation. Accountability for achieving/exceeding sales and profitability goals.

As well as

Certified Health Care practitioners · Customer Service Staff

Experienced Retail General Manager Proven ability in team member selection, coaching and development. Demonstrable knowledge of P&L management, setting planograms and managing schedules. Strong Customer Service experience with demonstrable results. Flexible availability; including weekends, holidays, and evenings.


11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 12

Healthcare Overhaul continued from page one

and about 800,000 people have received healthcare insurance who didn’t have it before. We’ve cut in half the number of uninsured. Those funds have helped to shore up the state budget and helped health care providers and hospitals.” Governors dealing with reality at the local level, she pointed out, have been a moderating influence on the healthcare debate. “Chris Christie, for example, has not been a fan of the ACA, but he has been a fan of the money saved for the state, “ she said. Ms. Howard noted that blue state governors have stood up and said ‘don’t take it away,’ but she added that half the states that have chosen to expand Medicaid are red states, like Indiana and Ohio. Of course there have also been governors who have chosen not to expand Medicaid in their states and are eager to speed the demise of the ACA. One possibility proposed as a replacement for Medicaid are per capita caps, according to Ms. Howard, who described them as a form of block grants to the states. She warned, however, “when program funding gets capped

the federal government cuts back, fund amounts shrink and people would lose health care coverage, further eroding the safety net.” Ms. Howard went on to note that despite the advantages of increased predictability for the federal government and some flexibility for governors, a block grant proposal would set off further controversy and disadvantages. “I would anticipate an incredible food fight in Congress over the details. I think that proposal would get bogged down in a lot of debates over a shrinking pie. Block grants of any kind would probably result in reduced benefits for many.” As he took a closer look at his campaign promise to quickly repeal and replace Obamacare, President Trump last month observed, “Nobody knew health care could be so complicated.” That comment sounds more and more like an understatement. Looking forward to studying the CBO report, Ms. Howard hopes to see Congress and the president avoid any hasty decisions on the many complex issues involved. “I hope there will be time for people to analyze the fiscal impact of alternatives and also the human impact,” she said. “I hope the debate will continue.” —Donald Gilpin

The Cranbury Inn RESTAURANT Established 1780

Celebrate St. Patty’s Days at the Inn!

On Friday, March 17th and Saturday, March 18th

we will be offering our Irish Lunch & Dinner Special from 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m., featuring our traditional corned beef and cabbage entree accompanied by the Inn’s famous potato leek soup and Irish bread!

On Sunday, March 19th our Champagne Brunch

will feature our corned beef and cabbage Seating 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. followed by our Irish Dinner from 2 p.m. - 9 p.m.

PCS, PPS Await continued from page one

“While we, as a District, are committed to addressing this decision in the courts,” Mr. Cochrane said, “we are equally committed to ensuring that our schools, our classrooms, and our community remain welcoming environments for every student and their families.” Continuing to contend that the expansion plan would have limited impact on the District, PCS Board Chair Paul Josephson highlighted the importance of choice in public education and expressed his confidence that the two schools “will be able to find common ground going forward and that we can work together, collaboratively and in good faith, to provide the best possible public education opportunities for all Princeton students.” Collaboration bet ween the two warring groups will be the challenging order of business after the courts have rendered their decisions on the law suits and the District’s appeal of the expansion approval. —Donald Gilpin

IS ON

ST. PATRICK’S DAY FUNDRAISER AT D&R GREENWAY: Wear green and bring your dancing shoes on March 17! At 7 p.m., D&R Greenway Land Trust, in partnership with VOICES will “celebrate green” with a St. Patrick’s Day Party and Fundraiser at Music Together, located at 225 Hopewell-Pennington Road in Hopewell. Enjoy performances by VOICES, Rince O’Chroi School of Irish Dance, Amy Zakar and Teamwork Dance, green silent auction, beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres. Money raised will benefit D&R Greenway and VOICES. Tickets cost $65. To purchase, visit www.drgreenway.org or call (609) 924-4646.

The Plainsboro Library Celebrates Makers’ Day

The Plainsboro Public Library will observe NJ Makers’ Day on March 25 from noon to 3 p.m. A statewide event, the observance will promote individual creative pursuits (or “maker” activity) in the science and the arts. Participants in “Makers’ Day” will focus on projects at the library, which they might not be able to pursue in their own homes. Mentors will be on hand to help

STILL COLD? WARM UP... HATS · SCARVES · SOCKS GLOVES · SWEATERS · JACKETS

www.thecranburyinn.com

Science Center into a makerspace. According to Dar ren Miguez, head of the library’s Youth Services Department, “It is our goal that children and teens can explore, create and engage their curiosity with a variety of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) focused tools and activities. Currently we are looking for community input as we start allocating resources and seeking funding . . .” Library staff members want to know what kinds of activities community members would like to explore in the new space and are inviting them to fill out a questionnaire about their interests. Questionnaires are available both in the library and on the library website, at www. plainsborolibrary.org The Plainsboro Library is located at 9 Van Doren Street in Plainsboro.

END-OF-SEASON CLOSEOUT PRICES! End-Of-Winter Sale Hours Monday-Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Open Sundays: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Serving the Princeton area for over 20 years

Residential & Office Cleaning Fully Insured Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager

For Reservations call 609-655-5595 21 South Main Street • Cranbury, NJ

with activities like weaving; hands-on quilting for adults, in the first-floor Community Room; scientific projects; and simple inventions using small LED bulbs, magnets, and batteries. Parents and kids will be invited to disassemble machines and electronic devices, to make planters out of plastic bottles, or to create their own constellation diagrams with LED stars. The nationwide “maker” movement, which started about 2006, emphasizes learning-through-doing in a social environment. In recent years, libraries throughout the country have begun offering programs and setting aside spaces to promote “maker” activity. S u c h s p ac e s – c a l l e d “makerspaces” -- provide tools, technology, and social connections otherwise unavailable to patrons. The library is in the process of transforming its third floor

102 Nassau St • Across from the University • Princeton • 609-924-3494 www.landauprinceton.com

609-683-5889

cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com www.cleanhousehappyhouse.com

For immediate attention, call the Princeton Renata for all your housecleaning and organizing needs.

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

Mercedes-Benz of Princeton 609.771.8040

www.mbprinceton.com


ONE COUPLE WITH TWO VIEWS: Pictured here is a photograph by David Wurtzel (L) alongside a photograph taken by his wife, Martha Weintraub (R). The two will be presenting their images from a photographic tour they took of western Ireland in an upcoming exhibit at Gallery 14 in Hopewell titled, “Ireland: Two Views.”

“Ireland: Two Views” Coming to Gallery 14

In 2016, husband and wife photographers David Wurtzel and Martha Weintraub joined a photographic tour of western Ireland led by world famous photographer Ron Rosenstock. Ron, a retired professor of photography, has been leading tours of Ireland for over 30 years. He owned a Bed and Breakfast in Westport, County Mayo. It was the base for the tour. Each day, Ron led the group of six photographers to locations he had discovered over the years. The photographers were then turned loose to explore and photograph — even time to set up tripods. Gradually, history came alive. Destroyed religious structures — abbeys and churches — are still revered. The impact of the potato famine is written in abandoned farms. There was a trip to a museum dedicated to the Irish Rebellion, 100 years earlier. But the spirit of the Irish people is unquenchable. No more vivid evidence was the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Westport. Wurtzel and Weintraub pres ent t heir ind iv idual perspectives of the country in “Ireland: Two Views,” an integrated exhibit at Gallery 14. Their photographs will be on display from March 17 – April 16. There will be an opening reception Friday, March 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. and an opportunity to meet the photographers on Sunday, March 18 from 1 to 3 p.m. Gallery 14, located at 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell, is open weekends from noon–5 p.m. and by appointment. For more i n for m at i o n v i s i t w w w. photogallery14.com or call (609) 333-8511. ———

Arts Council of Princeton Awarded “Favorite Art Gallery”

The Arts Council of Princeton has been named “Favorite Art Gallery” in the 2017 JerseyA r ts.com People’s Choice Awards. Presented by Discover Jersey Arts, a program of the ArtPride New Jersey Foundation and New Jersey State Council on

the Arts, the annual Awards highlight the work of New Jersey’s vital and diverse arts community. “We are honored to be recognized for our beloved Taplin Gallery and to be among the top arts organizations in the state,” said Taneshia Nash Laird, Arts Council of Princeton executive director. “The Princeton community, and surrounding area, is fortunate to have a vibrant local arts scene that we are grateful to be a part of. We appreciate the wonderful support from peer organizations and our constituents.” This year, nearly 18,000 arts lovers cast their ballots for their favorite local groups and downtowns. The Arts Council of Princeton was amongst those honored this morning at the 2017 N.J. Conference on Tourism in Atlantic City. “For the ninth year in a row, the people of New Jersey have told us loud and clear that the arts matter,” said Nick Paleologos, executive director of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. “In every corner of the state, from the smallest town to the biggest city, we rely on the work of these exceptional artists and arts organizations to make our communities vibrant, unique places to live, work, and visit.” The Arts Council of Princeton was one of 98 arts organizations and 11 downtown districts nominated in 16 categories, including favor ite per for ming ar ts center, dance company, art gallery, choral group, and more. Nominees were determined by their peers in the Jersey Arts Marketers network, made up of hundreds of arts groups from around the state. “The arts organizations highlighted in the JerseyArts.com People’s Choice Awards will not come as a surprise to many. The winners and nominees alike inspire hundreds every day,” said Adam Perle, president and CEO of ArtPride New Jersey. “These groups help our neighborhoods reach new heights and give us permission to fly to Neverland, dance on rooftops, or

LUNCH & WEEKEND BRUNCH

simply take a longer, deeper look at the beauty that surrounds us. All of the nominees should be very proud of the important and impactful work they are doing.” For detailed results and more information, visit JerseyArts.com/PeoplesChoice.

Area Exhibits Art Times Two, Princeton Brain and Spine, 731 Alexander Road, has “Animal Nature” with works by Hetty Baiz, Beatrice Bork, Heather Kern, Nancy Kern, Shirley Kern, Pamela Kogen and Susan MacQueen through March. (609) 2034622. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has the Neighborhood Portrait Quilt on permanent exhibit. Sculptures by Patrick Strzelec are on the Graves Terrace through June 30. “Philip Pearlstein: A Legacy of Influence” is on view through March 26. Until April 30, Friends of Princeton Open Space sponsors a show of photos taken by Frank Sauer at Billy Johnson Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. www.artscouncilofprince ton.org.

Nassau Presby te rian Church, 61 Nassau Street, has “Lenten Sculpture Show” with works by Charles McCollough through April 17. (609) 924-0103. The Princeton University Art Museum has “Revealing Pictures: Photographs from the Christopher E. Olofson Collection” through July 2 and “The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian VasePainting in the Early Fifth Century B.C.” through June 11. (609) 258-3788. We st W i n d sor A r t Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road, has “The Natural Muse,” 32 works by local artists, March 19May 6. Opening reception March 19, 4-6 p.m. www. westwindsorarts.org.

Middle of the Night Can’t Find Your Town Topics!

Take a stroll down to our previous office at 4 Mercer Street or come to our new location at 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, where you can purchase a copy for 75 cents (3 quarters required) from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.

Celebrating 50 Years

ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL AND SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL PRINTS, JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R DIMES FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS, UNIQUE GIFTS, AND MORE

Do you have that perfect piece of furniture in mind but can’t find it?

Talk to us!

We specialize in custom made furniture and will make it for you.

Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and by appointment

Where is Rosemont? Only 20 miles from Princeton!

6 miles from New Hope

10 miles from Flemington

Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com

Inspiration for your home Gifts for everyone in your life Celebrating 25 years of interior design 342 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08540 Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 5PM (609) 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com @eastridgedesign

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Art

Artworks, Everett Alley (Stockton Street), Trenton, shows “PrindivilleMoher Group Exhibition” and “Explorations in Geometry: Bill Brookover” through March 25. www. artworkstrenton.com. Consid ine G a l ler y, Stuar t Countr y Day S c h o o l , 12 0 0 S t u a r t Road, has “Cell Phone Images Only,” works of the Princeton Photography Club, through April 13. D & R G r e e n w a y, 1 Preservation Place, has “Nature’s Healing Gifts,” photo g raphy a nd ar tworks, through April 7. (609) 924-4646. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Furniture as Art,” four exhibits in one, through March 12. (609) 989-3632. Grounds for Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “Ned Smyth: Moments of Matter” through April 2, and other works. www.groundsforsculpture.org. H i s tor i c a l S o c i e t y of Pr inceton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “The Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” and a show on John von Neumann, as well as a permanent exhibit of historic photographs. $4 admission WednesdayS u n d ay, n o on - 4 p.m . Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.prince tonhistory.org. Lewis Center for the Arts, 185 Nassau Street, has “&thunk,” collages by Princeton University senior Aubree Andres, through March 17. Morven Museum and G a rde n, 55 Stockton Street, has docent-led tours of the historic house and its gardens, furnishings, and artifacts. “Bruce Springsteen : A Photo graphic Journey” runs through May. www.morven.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 14

MUSIC REVIEW

Princeton University Orchestra Presents This Year’s Concerto Competition Winners

The Suffering Servant, U

niversity orchestras frequently — Franz Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in sponsor student concerto competi- E-flat Major and Sergei Rachmaninoff’s tions, with resulting performances Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor. of single movements of a winning concerLiszt revolutionized piano performance to or a standard work from the Baroque or and technique, and Mr. Chien dove right Classical periods. Not the Princeton Uni- into the work that occupied 25 years of versity Orchestra — the 2017 Concerto the composer’s life. Mr. Chien’s opening Competition winners presented this past octaves on the piano (often moving at weekend played some of the most difficult lightning speed) were clean, and he took music in the concerto repertory. Hornist plenty of time conveying the drama of Nivanthi Karunaratne and pianists Kevin the music. Within all the virtuosity there Chien and Seho Young chose complete was grace to be found, including solos by and substantial works from the 19th and clarinetist Brian Kang and oboist Ame20th centuries for their performance with lia Hankla. Mr. Chien found a great deal the University orchestra. Led by conduc- of power from the piano, with amazing tor Michael Pratt in a performance last gracefulness on phrase endings in the Friday night at Richardson Auditorium piano’s uppermost register. Liszt’s orches(the performance was repeated Saturday tration included playful use of the triangle night), these remarkable soloists demonagainst the piano, as Mr. Chien’s keyboard strated performance abilities and compoflourishes were perfectly timed with the sure way beyond their years. orchestra. The solid ending to the onePrinceton University junior Nivanthi movement multi-section concerto showed Karunaratne undertook a challenging the influence of Beethoven on Liszt as piece for her chosen instrument in Rich- orchestra and soloist brought the work ard Strauss’s Horn Concerto No. 2 in E- to a decisive close. flat Major. Composed in 1942, toward the Rachmaninoff’s piano concertos are end of Strauss’s life, this three-movement work was full of lush and rich musical some of the most popular piano/orcheseffects beginning with the opening horn tral works heard. These pieces are known solo. Despite its 20th-century composi- for drama and virtuosity, and Piano Contion, his concerto contained a great deal certo No. 3 in D minor was no exception. of fluid and quick-moving passages for Soloist Seho Young also found grace in solo horn, which Ms. Karunaratne easily the quick running lines, as the orchestra handled with grace and accuracy. This showed a smooth flow in the opening paswas a soloist clearly unafraid of whatever sages. Mr. Young’s piano flourishes were the music presented, and her solo runs in clean, against an army of lower strings in the first movement Allegro. The sound particular were effortless. Ms. Karunaratne consistently showed from the full orchestra was regal, with solid strength and breath in the long me- the solo piano part nonstop. Mr. Young lodic lines. Mr. Pratt and the orchestra showed that he knew this concerto very found lyricism in Strauss’s orchestral well, and always had a plan for where the Care & Rehabilitation Center writing, with dynamic contrasts in the music was going. r. Young’s elegant solo piano part lighter passages. Ensemble hornist Alliwas often answered by equally son Halter played an elegant echo to Ms. elegant winds, including flutist Karunaratne’s horn solo, and lyrical wind St. Paul Parish, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 solos complemented the solo horn line Nicole Ozdowski, clarinetist David Kim, well. All horns joined Ms. Karunaratne in and hornist Allison Halter. In the first The Spiritual Center is below the church, entrance from the parking lot the final movement to close the concerto movement, bassoonist Timothy Ruszala behind the church. www.stpaulsofprinceton.org provided a graceful counter melody to the with full force. The two other concertos presented in solo piano. The second movement was the concert were for piano — featuring marked by a poignant oboe theme from two University student pianists with sur- Tiffany Huang, accompanied by lush and prisingly extensive international experi- broad orchestration and a piano solo that Care & Rehabilitation Center ence. Senior Kevin Chien has won piano was always right with the orchestra. Racompetitions in the United States and chmaninoff used brass sparingly in this The Luxor Pavilion at MERWICK Canada, and has performed in Europe. piece, as three trombones and one tuba Sophomore Seho Young has performed in added a hymnlike character to the final Japan, Russia, Poland, and Italy, and has movement. The Rachmaninoff concerto won several competitions in the United was a huge piece for a student pianist States. The concertos these young men to handle, but like the other two soloists selected for performance with the Uni- heard in this concert, Mr. Young played versity orchestra were among the most as if he does this every day. intricate and demanding in the repertory —Nancy Plum provides a full range The Princeton University Orchestra’s next concerts will be on Friday and of complex medical and rehabilitative Saturday, April 28 and 29 in Richardson Auditorium. The Stuart B. Mindlin sub-acute services. Our physician-directed Memorial Concerts will feature music of Hindemith and Mahler. For information call (609) 258-9220 or visit www.tickets.princeton.edu. interdisciplinary clinical team develops

Christ and the Jewish People

Gregory Y. Glazov (D. Phil., Oxon.) Professor Biblical Studies, Chair, ICSST, Seton Hall University

New date: Tuesday 3/21/2017 - 7 p.m. St. Paul Spiritual Center

enter

The Luxor Pavilion at MERWICK light refreshments

The Right Team for Your Recovery

M

MERWICK

The Luxor Pavilion at Merwick provides a full range of complex medical and rehabilitative sub-acute services. Our physician-directed The Right Team for team Your Recovery interdisciplinary clinical develops and designs an individualizedThe planLuxor of care to meet Pavilion each patient’s specific needs. Patients and family at Merwick are integral parts of the road to recovery. Our range of services includes: and designs an individualized plan of • Medical and surgical recovery

care to meet each patient’s specific needs. Patients and family are integral parts of the road to recovery.

• Wound care management

• Tracheostomy care • Physical and Our range of services occupational therapy includes • Amputee recovery

• Medical and Surgical Recovery

• Speech therapy

• Physical and Occupational Therapy

• Orthopedic care • Cardiac care

• Speech Therapy

• Orthopedic Care

• IV therapy

• Cardiac Care • IV Therapy

• Wound Care Management

• Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN)

• Tracheostomy Care • Amputee Recovery

• Hospice/ end-of-life care

• Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN)

• Hospice/ End-of-Life Care

Rehabilitation therapy provided by Kessler.Core. 100 Plainsboro Road • Plainsboro, NJ 08536 • 609-759-6000 • FAX 609-759-6006

insboro, NJ 08536 • 609-759-6000 windsorhealthcare.org• FAX 609-759-6006 windsorhealthcare.org

Where enhanced supportive services are part of the every day routine... Discover the Acorn Glen difference! Call 609-430-4000 775 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton

D A I LY H O U R S • T W O L AT E N I G H TS

When it’s time to shop… Mon – Wed Thurs – Fri Saturday Sunday

10 am – 6 pm 10 am – 8:30 pm 10 am – 6 pm Noon – 5 pm

Some locations keep extended hours. Check palmersquare.com for details.


AT BERLIND, SUNDAY: At age 32, Iranian-American harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani will perform on McCarter’s Berlind stage on Sunday, March 19 at 3 p.m. His McCarter program will include a mixture of old and new, including works by Cowell, Kalabis, Bach and Scarlatti. Single tickets are $50 and can be purchased online. For further information, visit www. mccarter.org. (Photo Credit: Bernhard Musil/Deutsche Grammophon)

versity. Philippe Graffin has established an indisputable reputation for his interpretations of the French repertoire. He has rediscovered original settings of Chausson’s Počme and Ravel’s Tzigane and championed the forgotten violin concertos of Fauré and the English composer Coleridge-Taylor. As concerto soloist, he has performed with orchestras such as The Philharmonia, BBC Symphony, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Deutsche Radio Philharmonie Saarbrücken the Residentie Orkest, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, and Georges Enescu Philharmonic, among others. Mr. Graffin performs works of many living composers and has had works written for

On Saturday, March 18, 2-5 p.m. the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) BRAVO! Masterclass features violin virtuoso Philippe Graffin. The masterclass is open to the general public, and will be held at Hamilton House on the campus of Westminster Choir College. Attendees will observe four violin students as they are coached on artistry and performance technique. Kathleen Tagg will accompany participants on the piano. The students are Kristy Chen (West Windsor-Plainsboro High School North), Dallas Noble (homeschooled), Joseph Jojo Prentice (Princeton High School), and Demi Fang (Princeton University). The masterclass is presented in partnership with Westminster Conservatory, the community music

Matthews, Philippe Hersant, and Yves Prin. He has recently acquired a Jean Baptiste Vuillaume violin made in 1863, a copy of Stradivarius’ famous “Messiah.” In demand as a teacher, Philippe Graffin is a professor at the Par is Conser vatoire National Supérieur de Musique (CNSM) and at the Brussels Conservatoire Royal. Student applicants were evaluated by a panel of Princeton Symphony Orchestra musicians. Those selected to participate in the masterclass are: Kristy Chen of West

(homeschooled); Joseph Jojo Prentice of Princeton High School; and Demi Fang of Princeton University. The PSO BRAVO! violin masterclass with Philippe Graffin is free and open to the public. Reservations are required via princetonsym phony.org or by phone at (609) 497-0020.

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Topics

JAZZ AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY presents

P R I N C E TO N S YM P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A R O S S E N M I L A N O V , M U S I C D I R EC TO R

PHILIPPE GRAFFIN “Whole-hearted passion with crisp, articulate playing” �THE STRAD�

“Legitimately new and surprisingly approachable…a revelation” — Pitchfork

Restless Romantics Sunday March 19 4pm

Christopher Lyndon�Gee conductor

ELGAR / Violin Concerto NIELSON / Symphony No. 4

Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares A once-in-a-lifetime chance to hear the mysterious voices of the Bulgarian State Women’s Chorus

STEVE LEHMAN’S

Sélébéyone

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! More Princeton Symphony Orchestra!

A RARE APPEARANCE BY AWARD-WINING GLOBAL HIP-HOP PROJECT

Friday / Saturday April 21-22 8pm Pride and Prejudice American Repertory Ballet World Premiere McCarter Theatre

Tuesday, March 28, 2017 7:30 p.m.

Monday, April 17 7:30pm Princeton University Chapel

Sunday May 7 4pm M E T A M O R P H O S I S Debussy’s La Mer Rossen Milanov, conductor Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University

TAPLIN AUDITORIUM IN FINE HALL

FREE-no tickets required

Tickets: $15 general / $5 student www.princetongleeclub.com

princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020 Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. This program is funded in part by the NJ State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

music.princeton.edu

ADD

“ARTISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT.” – The Wall Street Journal

XIAN ZHANG MUSIC DIRECTOR

AGATHA CHRISTIE’S XIAN LUKÁŠZHANG VONDRÁČEK

MURDER ORIENT EXPRESS

ZHANG CONDUCTS BEETHOVEN’S SEVENTH Fri, Mar 24 at 8 pm Richardson Auditorium in Princeton

LIMITED TICKETS

XIAN ZHANG conductor LUKÁŠ VONDRÁČEK piano GARTH GREENUP trumpet NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

KEN LUDWIG EMILY MANN

RAVEL’S BOLÉRO

DIRECTED BY

Sat, Apr 8 at 8 pm State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick + * XIAN ZHANG conductor DEREK FENSTERMACHER tuba YING LI and ZITONG WANG piano NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

XIAN ZHANG

on the

ADAPTED FOR THE STAGE BY

PROKOFIEV Classical Symphony SHOSTAKOVICH Piano Concerto No. 1 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7

A WORLD PREMIERE

TAN DUN Internet Symphony No. 1, “Eroica” VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Tuba Concerto SAINT-SAËNS Carnival of the Animals RAVEL Boléro

NOW - APRIL 2, 2017 EIGHT SUSPECTS, ONE THRILLING RIDE

+ Classical Conversation begins one hour before the concert. * Food Drive—bring a non-perishable item to donate to local food banks.

TICKETS START AT $20!

www.njsymphony.org | 1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476) This program is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

ED B PERFO Y PO RMA PUL NCES AR D EMA ND

www.mccarter.org | 609.258.2787 | Princeton, NJ Production sponsored by

The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation

Opening Night sponsored by CONCERT SPONSOR

CONCERT SPONSOR

This program is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts and by funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.

!

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Music and Theater

PSO Announces BRAVO! school of Westminster Col- him by Rodion Shchedrin, Windsor-Plainsboro High lege of the Arts of Rider Uni- Vytautas Barkaukas, David School North; Dallas Noble Violin Masterclass


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 16

Fri. 03/17/17 to Thurs. 03/23/17

The Sense Of An Ending

Friday - Saturday: 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55 (PG-13) Sunday - Thursday: 2:25, 4:55, 7:25

Land of Mine (Subtitled) Friday - Saturday: 4:40, 9:20 (R) Sunday - Thursday: 4:40

Kedi

Friday - Thursday: 2:30, 7:10 (UR)

The Last Word

Friday - Saturday: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 (R) Sunday - Thursday: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15

The Salesman

Friday - Saturday: 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55 (PG-13) Sunday - Thursday: 1:25, 4:15, 7:05

A United Kingdom

Friday-Saturday: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 (PG-13) Sunday-Thursday: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05

Starting Friday The Sense of an Ending (PG-13) Continuing I Am Not Your Negro (PG-13) 20th Century Women (R) Ends Thursday Julieta (R) The Salesman (PG-13) Cinema Today I Cannot Tell You How I Feel Thu, March 16 7:30pm Saturday Family Matinees Annie (PG) Sat, March 11 10:30am Exhibition on Screen Revolution: New Art for a New World Sun, March 19 12:30pm National Theatre Live Hedda Gabler (NR) Tue, March 21 12:30pm Special Program Deconstructing the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper (NR) Wed, March 22 6:00pm Showtimes change daily Visit or call for showtimes. Hotline: 609-279-1999 PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Lion

Friday - Saturday: 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50 (PG-13) Sunday - Thursday: 1:50, 4:30, 7:10

a Princeton tradition!

CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Kong: Skull Island

CINEMA REVIEW

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE

Expedition Explores Uncharted Island in Remake of Horror Series

T

he original King Kong (1933), starring Fay Wray, was about an expedition to an uncharted island in the Indian Ocean that was inhabited by prehistoric creatures. The explorers captured and caged a gigantic ape and put it on exhibition in New York as the 8th Wonder of the World. Kong escapes and wreaks havoc in the city before scaling the face of the Empire State Building during one of the most iconic climaxes in the annals of cinema. A spin-off, Son of Kong, was released later that year, and launched a series of sequels and remakes. Kong: Skull Island is a refreshing remake of the original and co-stars Samuel L. Jackson, John Goodman, Brie Larson, John C. Reilly, and Tom Hiddleston. The film was directed by Jordan VogtRoberts who made his debut in 2013 with the comedy The Kings of Summer. The special effects adventure unfolds in the 1970s, near the end of the Vietnam conflict. As the

film opens, we find Bill Randa (Goodman) pressuring a U.S. senator (Richard Jenkins) to underwrite an expedition to a Pacific island that is constantly surrounded by treacherous storms that have caused the mysterious disappearance of countless boats and airplanes. Once the expedition is approved, Randa assembles a crew composed of a photographer (Larson), a geologist (Corey Hawkins), a biologist (Jing Tian), and a bureaucrat (John Ortiz). The team is escorted to the island by a squadron of Vietnam veterans led by Lieutenant Colonel Preston Packard (Jackson). It’s man versus monsters in a struggle to survive in a hellhole that time forgot. Stay until the end of the credits and you’ll see an extended postscript previewing Godzilla vs. Kong, a sequel slated for release in the spring of 2020. Excellent (HHHH). Rated PG-13 for action, intense violence, and brief profanity. Running time: 118 minutes. Distributor: Warner Brothers Pictures. —Kam Williams

To: ___________________________ From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) � Phone number

� Fax number

� Address

� Expiration Date

it’s MODERN tECHNOLOGY VERsUs A PREHistORiC BEAst: the giant ape Kong (terry Notary) fends off a helicopter in a vain attempt to avoid being captured. (Photo by Warner Bros. Pictures © 2016 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc, All Rights Reserved)

Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

Hunan ~ Szechuan Malaysian ~ Vietnamese

908.359.8388

Daily Specials • Catering Available

Route 206 • Belle Mead

157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

Bunny Chase Treasure Hunt Saturday & Sunday April 15 & 16, 10am to 4pm

•Treasure Hunt with a Spring Surprise • Wagon & Pony Rides • FREE Admission

Collect Everything You Need For The Holiday! Colored Fresh Country Eggs • Fruits & Vegetables • Cider & Cider Doughnuts • Crisp, Juicy Apples • Fresh Herbs • Flowering Plants • Cut Flowers

Wonderful Homemade Baked Goods

• Pies • Apple Crisp • Cookies • Fruit Breads Come Fly with Us KITE DAYS Saturday & Sunday, May 6 & 7, 10am to 5 pm Make a kite, buy or bring one • country music Admission to festival is $8

OPEN EVERY DAY 9-6 609-924-2310 • www.terhuneorchards.com WINE TASTING ROOM OPEN FRI.12-6 AND SAT. & SUN. 12-5


Wednesday, March 15 1 p.m.: Wednesday Tea & Tour at Morven Museum and Garden in Princeton (repeats weekly). 4:30 p.m.: The Althea Ward Clark W’21 Reading Series welcomes Douglas Kearney and Kirstin Valdez Quade at McCarter Theatre Center. 5 to 7 p.m.: Happy Hour and French conversation with the Alliance Francaise of Princeton at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room. 6 p.m.: Screening of An American Conscience: The Reinhold Niebuhr Story at the Mackay Campus Center auditorium at Princeton Theological Seminary. 7 p.m.: The Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) Soundtracks Series presents a screening of the documentary Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony. Free and open to the public; Princeton Public Library. 7:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street (repeats weekly). 7:30 p.m.: Screening of The Elephant Man (1980) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8 p.m.: The Takacs String Quartet performs Beethoven string quartets at Richardson Auditorium (also on March 16). Thursday, March 16 9:30 a.m.: Meeting, Newcomers and Friends at YWCA Princeton’s Bramwell House. 10 a.m.: 55-Plus Club welcomes Ryan James Brandau, Artistic Director of Princeton Pro Musica, for a presentation entitled “Ein Deutsches Requiem: Johannes Brahms’ Human Masterpiece.” Admission is free with a $3 donation suggested; The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. 1:30 p.m.: McCaffrey’s Food Markets presents “Put Your Best Fork Forward” at the Princeton Shopping Center. RSVP by calling (215) 750-7713. 6 p.m.: Library Live at Labyrinth - Authors Maria DiBattista and Deborah Nord discuss their book “At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present.” The

Shabbat experience is led by parents and will include stories, songs, prayers, and a brief Torah reading. Stay for Shabbat Katan lunch and get to meet other families with little ones; The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 2017 Mercer Green Fest (formerly known as the Living Local Expo) at the Rider University Student Recreation Center in Lawrenceville. More than 70 ecofriendly businesses will be offering information and incentives to help individuals go green and save money. 1 p.m.: Illustrated lecture entitled “Life on the Street in 19th Century New Jersey” with Dr. Kristin O’BrassilKulfan at The 1719 William Trent House Museum, located at 15 Market Street in Trenton. Sunday, March 19 1 to 4 p.m.: Join Terhune Orchards every Sunday throughout March for their Spring Music Series. Also, be sure to sample their award-winning wines. 2 p.m.: Rare- and valuable-books expert Ray Rickman presents a hands-on workshop that explains what determines a book’s value and how and why that value changes over time. Attendees are invited to bring up to three books to be assessed; Princeton Public Library. 4 p.m.: The Princeton Symphony Orchestra showcases violinist Philippe Graffin at its Restless Romantics concert conducted by Christopher Lyndon-Gee. The 3 p.m. pre-concert talk is free to ticketholders; Richardson Auditorium. Monday, March 20 Recycling 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Half Price Day at the Bryn MawrWellesley Book Sale at Princeton Day School. 1 to 3 p.m.: Meeting, The Women’s College Club of Princeton on “An American Legacy: Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, and Oscar Hammerstein” at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Princeton. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Robert G. Parkinson, Assistant Professor of History at Binghamton University presents “Making ‘the Cause’ Common” at The David Library of the American Revolution, located at 1201 River Road in Washington Crossing, Pa. Admission is free.

John Witherspoon Middle School is a place of innovation, partnership and caring! Standardized test scores taken out of context and “alternative facts” don’t measure a school’s success!

Why John Witherspoon Middle School is the right choice for ALL families: •#  2 rated Middle School in the entire state of New Jersey (niche.com). • Just completed a successful run of the musical, Beauty and the Beast, with over 100 student participants. • Reigning Governor’s Cup Champions for outstanding student service in the Students Changing Hunger challenge. •1st place winners in the Regional National Science Bowl (good luck in Washington, D.C.). •Former John Witherspoon Middle School student, Damien Chazelle, just won Academy Award for Best Director for La La Land. • Newly developed IDEAS Wing offers courses in STEM Robotics, STEM Coding and Digital Arts, Entrepreneurship, and Food Sciences. • Advanced middle school students have the opportunity to attend classes at Princeton High School. • An Ideas Center that offers free after school homework help for all children. • One of the only public middle schools in NJ that offers students the opportunity to take two world languages at the same time, including Mandarin. • Excellence in the Arts: 6th Place in STANJ Competition out of 34 High Schools (not middle schools). Regional/State TEENS ARTS FESTIVAL Winners in Theatre/Dance & Music.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE April 21–22, 2017

McCarter Theatre, Princeton, N.J.

April 21: School-Time Performance available

Live accompaniment by:

Performance Sponsor:

Official Print Sponsor:

You’ve won the lottery at John Witherspoon Middle School because we educate the whole child and ensure equal access and opportunity for all.

Official Radio Sponsor:

TICKETS: ARBALLET.ORG | MCCARTER.ORG

Paid for by Princeton Regional Education Association (PREA), proudly supporting Princeton publics schools.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Calendar

event will be held at Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau Street. Friday, March 17 11 a.m.: Free, Tiger Tales for children ages 3-5 at Cotsen Children’s Library (repeats weekly). 6:30 p.m.: One Table Café presents a conversation with special guest Taneshia Nash Laird, Executive Director of the Arts Council of Princeton at Trinity Church in Princeton. Main Street Fine Catering of Rocky Hill will be providing a delicious meal. Reservations are required by March 15, 2017. To RSVP call (609) 216-7770. 7 to 9 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton presents singer-songwriter Leila Adu at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. 8:15 p.m.: The Princeton Folk Music Society presents Joe Jencks, singer/songwriter and musical storyteller at Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane in Princeton (doors open at 7:30 p.m.). Admission is $20 ($15 members, $10 students, and $5 children). Saturday, March 18 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Princeton Pong will be hosting the 2017 March OPEN Table Tennis Tournament. This is a 2-Star USATTS a n c t i o n e d To u r n a m e n t open to groups of all ages and skill levels. Register by March 17 online at prince tonpong.com or call (609) 987-8500. 10 a.m.: Free, guided walk along the D&R Canal feeder between Fireman’s Eddy and Prallsville Mills (5.3 mile distance) with return by carpool. Attendees should meet at Prallsville Mills, one-half mile north of Stockton on Route 29. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.: The Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale opens to the general public at Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road in Princeton (through March 21). 10:30 a.m.: Screening of Annie (2014) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Art for Families at Princeton University Art Museum on “My Side of the Mountain.” Children will consider Cézanne’s use of basic shapes and forms in his paintings and use these elements to create their own colorful compositions. 11 a.m.: Shabbat Katan is a monthly service designed for preschool/kindergarten-aged children and their families. This interactive


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 2017 • 18


CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. INC. ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL INC. INC. ELECTRICAL

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL INC.

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI

Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC.

www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Renovations www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Renovations Renovations Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Upgrades Renovations Renovations Service Panel Renovations Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Renovations Service Panel Upgrades Renovations Paddle Fans Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Panel Upgrades Service Upgrades Residential & Commercial Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Paddle Residential & Commercial Service Panel Upgrades Paddle Fans Paddle Fans Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Fans Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Paddle Fans Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Paddle Fans Inc. Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Commercial Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical Inc. Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Inc.

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. INC. ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL INC.

CifelliElectrical Electrical Inc. Cifelli Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Electrical Inc. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Electrical Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. Cifelli CifelliElectrical Electrical Inc. Inc. Cifelli Electrical Inc. Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Authorized dealerfor for sales, Authorized dealer Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer for sales, installation startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup installation andfor startup installation and startup Authorized dealer sales, Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, dealer for sales, Authorized dealer for sales, dealer for installation and startup Authorized dealer forsales, sales, installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup Authorized dealer for installation and startup installation andstartup startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup installation and Authorized for sales, installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, installation and startup installation and startup Authorized dealer for sales, and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installationand and startup installation startup installation and startup installation and startup installation startup installationand andstartup startup installation

installation and startup 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 Renovations

609-921-3238 Renovations 609-921-3238 Renovations 609-921-3238 Renovations 609-921-3238 Renovations Renovations Lic #11509A #11509A 609-921-3238 Renovations Lic Renovations Lic Renovations Renovations Lic #11509A #11509A Renovations Renovations Service Panel Lic #11509A Lic #11509A Bonded and Insured Renovations

Service Panel Lic Renovations Lic#11509A #11509A Bonded and Insured Service Panel Renovations Service Panel Lic #11509A #11509A Lic Bonded and Insured Service Panel Bonded and Insured Service Panel #11509A Lic #11509A Bonded and Bonded and Insured Service Panel Service Panel Lic#11509A #11509A Upgrades Lic Service Bonded and Insured Bonded andInsured Insured Service Panel Upgrades Lic #11509A and Insured Bonded and Insured Service Panel Upgrades Service Panel Bonded and Insured Upgrades Upgrades Service Panel Bonded and Insured Service Panel Bondedand and Insured Insured Service Panel Upgrades Bonded Insured Upgrades Bonded and Upgrades

Upgrades Upgrades Serving Princeton andsurrounding surroundingareas areas Upgrades Paddle Fans Upgrades Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and and surrounding areas Upgrades Upgrades Paddle Fans Serving Princeton Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Paddle Fans Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Interior and Paddle Fans Paddle Fans Interior and Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Interior and Paddle Fans Interior and Interior and Interior and Interior Interior and Interior and Interior and Interior and Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Interior and Interior and Interior and Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Interior and Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting Exterior Lighting

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com Lic Lic #11509A #11509A www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A Lic #11509A

www.cifellielectrical.com #11509A Lic #11509A Lic#11509A #11509A Lic www.cifellielectrical.com Lic Lic www.cifellielectrical.com Bonded and Insured Lic #11509A #11509A

Bonded and Insured Lic#11509A #11509A Bonded and Insured Bonded Insured and Insured Bonded and Insured Lic Bonded andInsured Insured Bonded and Bonded and Insured Bonded and Insured Lic Bonded andsurrounding Insured Lic #11509A #11509A Bonded and Insured Serving Princeton and areas Lic #11509A Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Bonded and and Insured Serving Princeton and surrounding areas and surrounding areas Serving Princeton surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Serving Princeton and surrounding areas Bonded and Insured Bonded and Insured ServingPrinceton Princeton and surrounding surrounding areas areas Serving surrounding areas Bonded and and Insured Serving Princeton and

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

ServingPrinceton Princeton and and surrounding surrounding areas areas Serving surrounding areas Serving Princeton and

SPACE

FOR

LEASE

19’-9½”

MANORS CORNER SHOPPING CENTER

EQUIPMENT ROOM

160 Lawrenceville-Pennington Road Lawrenceville, NJ • Mercer County

RETAIL, OFFICE & MEDICAL

DRY CLEANING SERVICE AREA

92’-9”

SUITES AVAILABLE: 959, 1044 & 1910 SF (+/-) CUSTOMER SERVICE AREA

AMENITIES INCLUDE • Individual roof mounted central A/C units with gas fired hot air heating & separately metered utilities

CHANGING ROOMS

• Tenants include: Investors Bank, MASA 8 Sushi, Udo’s Bagels, Chuckle’s Pizza & Pasta, Penlar Pharmacy, US Nails & more • 139 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility • Minutes from downtown Princeton & readily accessible from Routes 1, 206 & Interstate 295 • Close proximity to hotels, restaurants, banking, shopping & entertainment

RECEPTION

SPACE AVAILABLE FOR DRY CLEANER Suite 6: 1910 sf (+/-)

Contact us for more info

(908) 874-8686 • LarkenAssociates.com No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information contained herein & same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice & to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals & clients.

(609) 448-5600

custom kitchens, baths and renovations CDC-TownTopics-LuxuryLiving.indd 1

145 W. Ward Street, Hightstown www.cranburydesigncenter.com 3/13/17 2:34 PM

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 2017

Residential Commercial Residential Commercial Residential & &CONTRACTOR Commercial Residential Commercial Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential&CONTRACTOR & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, fEbRuARY 15, 2017 • 20

Joe Hage, Chase Private Client Mortgage Banker, Helps Individuals With Their Real Estate Options “Land is the only thing in the world that amounts to anything, Scarlet, for it’s the only thing in the world that lasts.” erald O’Hara’s statement to his daughter Scarlet about their plantation Tara in Gone With the Wind still resonates today. “It’s always better to buy than to rent if you are able to do so,” points out Joe Hage, Chase private Client Mortgage Banker. “The one investment you can count on to grow is real estate. Historically, an investment in real estate will increase.”

G

IT’S NEW To Us

Headquartered at the JP Morgan Chase Bank at 16 Nassau Street, Mr. Hage has been in banking for 15 years, always working in retail mortgage banking with the largest banks in the country. Assisting people to navigate and negotiate the complicated and challenging process of buying a house is his area of expertise, as well as his greatest pleasure. Residential mortgages are his specialty.

“I help guide customers through the process,” he explains, noting information they should know ahead of time. “Before the clients go looking for a home, they should come to see me. They need to know what they can afford before requesting to see a house, and putting in any offers. There is always a risk factor, and I will evaluate that risk. They can get a pre-qualification letter at no cost from me to take to the realtors and look for a home, but they first need to know how much they can afford. This is very important because they will have other monthly bills to pay. They need to be clear about this. “Also,” he continues, “you want to make sure you have 30 to 60 days for the process. The bank has to determine your credit rating, income, assets, and reserves — all to make sure you can afford the house.” When buying a new house, Mr. Hage notes that a 30year mortgage is typical, and it is customary to put 20 percent down. Mr. Hage is a licensed mor tgage banker, NML S ID 448878. He can handle loans in every state, and he helps people all over the country. “The majority of my clients are married couples,

people with families, also singles, graduate students, and business owners. They vary in age from first-time home-owners to retirees, who may want to downsize. Some clients in Princeton are moving within town from a four- or five-bedroom house to a three- or two-bedroom so they can still have the quality of living in town but without having to pay the extra costs to live here.” In addit ion, Mr. Hage points out that he often helps people with refinancing. “They may want to renovate the house, consolidate debt and use the equity for other needs. More times, a refinance is used to help get them a lower interest rate. For example, if they are paying a five percent mortgage, we may be able to reduce it to four percent. This is a good time to refinance. Also, it can be a good time to consolidate debt, including credit cards. Also, he points out, “With the current volatility in the stock market, people take money out in order to buy a house as an investment or a second home.” During the past 15 years, Mr. Hage has noticed changes in the banking business, especially with the advances in technology. “When I began, we were hand-writing

the applications. By 2006, that had all changed, and everything was changing over to a paperless process.” However, he adds, there is still nothing like a face-toface meeting. “I still use the ‘old school’ approach. Faceto-face and not just having an 800 number. Getting a mortgage is one of the largest debts people will incur, and I want to help them all I can and have it be as comfortable as it can be. “Of course, you have to adapt to change, and staying up-to-date with all the regulations is crucial. We always educate the clients so they can understand the process. There are so many options today, and I want to emphasize that it is very important for people to work with an experienced, educated professional. “JP Morgan Chase has been around for many decades, and we make sure we are always doing the right thing for the consumer. Personally, I am often on the phone after hours and later at night with clients. I work at the same time the real estate brokers work. My priority is always helping the consumer, and I have a very rewarding relationship with the real estate people.” Mr. Hage looks forward to many more years as a residential mortgage specialist. “I enjoy looking out for people and their families and being part of this community. I

To: ___________________________ MORTGAGE SPECIALIST: “I help people buy homes and refiFrom: _________________________ Date & Time: __________ nance their existing homes. Based on the last few decades, this is still historically a very good time to buy a home, while Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. the interest rates are still low for mortgages.” Joe Hage, Chase Private Client Mortgage Banker, looks forward to helpPlease check it thoroughly and payingspecial to financial the following: more peopleattention with their biggest decision — purchasing a home. (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) ❑ Phone number

❑ Fax number

organic SUSTAINABLY FARMED • PERFECTLY FRESH

OUR PRODUCE SECTION IS

100%

,

love this business and being able to help clients realize their dream of owning their own home. I always look forward to closings and giving the new home-owner the gift of an American flag. “Home ownership is the American dream, and being a first generation citizen of this great country, I want to show my patriotism. And what a blessing it is to help all types of people become a contributing part of our society. “I also want people to know I am open to speaking with anyone about mortgage needs or refinancing. This is my greatest pleasure. “Also, if you are not 100

percent satisfied with my service or your experience with Chase at any time, please let me know right away. Your satisfaction is very important to us. We always care about your security and privacy, so please don’t include identifying information like account numbers and social security numbers in e-mails to us. Call us instead or send the information by fax or U.S. Mail.” Mr. Hage can be reached at (908) 208-9514 to discuss mortgage inquiries. Email: joe.hage@chase.com. Fax: (844) 280-0752. Website: http://homeloan.chase. com/joe.hage. —Jean Stratton

❑ Address

❑ Expiration

LESSONS • RENTALS • INSTRUMENTS & MORE

360 NASSAU ST. • PRINCETON WHOLEEARTHCENTER.COM M–F 8–9 • SAT 8–8 • SUN 9–7

NATURAL FOODS GROCERY • SINCE 1970

Montgomery Center • Rte 206 • 609-924-8282 • www.farringtonsmusic.com Next to ShopRite • 5 miles from Downtown • Free Parking Give Your Child the Music Advantage

MUSIC LESSONS RENT ALS RENTALS •• piano •• guitar piano guitar •• drums drums SCHOOL BAND

•• violin voice •• flute TES W R•• A L O violin voice flute • cello

clarinet sax •• trumpet ••• flute • trombone clarinet •••sax sax trumpet PRINCETON: 609-924-8282 • clarinet • trumpet • violin

AFTERNOON ★ NEW LOCATION ★ 206, O Suite N 2042017 L E947 SRT.S S CONCERTS

609-897-0032 (next to Audi dealer) 609-387-9631 609-448-7170 PRINCETON JCT 609-924-8282 5 Minutes from Downtown BURLINGTON HIGHTSTOWN PRINCETON Lessons Only Princeton University Chapel FREE PARKING

www.farringtonsmusic.com

Thursdays, 12:30 – 1:00 Admission free

March 16 Martin Kondziella Berlin, Germany

March 23 NO CONCERT

Call or fax us with your comments. We will be happy to make corrections if we hear from you by__________ If we don’t hear from you, the ad will run as is. Thanks! U.S. 1 Newspaper: 609-452-7000 • FAX: 609-452-0033


Tiger Men’s Hoops Wins Ivy Tournament, Will Face Notre Dame in NCAA Opener

It was a nightmare scenario coming to life for the Princeton University men’s basketball team. After producing a dream season that saw the Tigers go 14-0 in Ivy League regular season play, Princeton found itself trailing host Penn last Saturday afternoon in the semifinals of the league’s inaugural postseason tournament. With the Palestra in an uproar and urging the fourthplace Quakers to the upset, Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson knew his squad was on the ropes as it looked to keep alive in its quest for the NCAA tournament berth that went to the winner of tourney. “I didn’t know how we were going to get on top of the game,” said Henderson, whose team trailed 44-34 early in the second half. “We were behind in so many different ways, not just in the score but physically and mentally. They were putting a beating on us.” Showing the resolve that got them through an undefeated Ivy campaign, the Tigers rallied as sophomore Myles Stephens flew in for a tip-in to knot the game at 59-59 with six seconds left and force overtime. Princeton went on a 9-0 run to start the extra session and never looked back on the way to a 72-64 win. “I think we got it tied and then they went up four

and they missed a three and Devin (Cannady) got a chance to make a couple of free throws,” said Henderson, who got 21 points and 10 rebounds from Stephens in the triumph with junior Amir Bell chipping in 16 points off the bench and sophomore Cannady scoring 12 points, including 10-of-10 from the free throw line. “I thought that was a huge turning point, it gave us a chance. We have always been able to capitalize on small chances.This group wins close games; it is a very tough bunch.” A day later against Yale in the championship game, Princeton broke open a close contest, pulling away to a 71-59 victory and earning the league’s automatic berth to the NCAA tournament. “There was some tension that had come out and I thought we did a good job today of adjusting,” said Henderson, whose team improved to 23-6 as it posted its 19th straight victory. “There is a plan going into the game. We take a few haymakers and they go now we are ready to fight and they go forward from there. I think that is what makes this group what it is.” Princeton senior star and co-captain Spencer Weisz saw a fighting spirit on the defensive end as a critical factor in they win over the Bulldogs.

UP FOR THE IRISH: Members of the Princeton University men’s basketball team, from left, Hans Brase, Pete Miller, Steve Cook, and Spencer Weisz, let out a yelp at a gathering at Triumph Brewing Company last Sunday evening after learning that they will be facing Notre Dame in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. The Tigers defeated Yale 71-59 earlier in the day in the finals of the inaugural Ivy League tournament in improving to 23-6 and posting their 19th straight victory. Princeton earned a No. 12 seed in the West Regional of the NCAA tourney and will head to Buffalo, N.Y. to face the fifth-seeded Fighting Irish (25-8) on March 16 at Buffalo’s KeyBank Center. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

“We got punched in the mouth a few times early; we didn’t come out as strong as we would have liked to,” said Weisz, who had seven points and eight assists against Yale with Stephens leading the way as he contributed 23 points and eight rebounds. “Yale is a great team. We settled down in the second half and got some good shots offensively. Our defense is what carried us all year and we really stuck to that today.” Going undefeated in regular season conference play and then winning the first Ivy tourney is a great achievement for the program. “It is certainly tough; this tournament was new for everyone,” added Weisz, the Ivy League Player of the Year this season. “I still think it is a great thing for the league. There is so much exposure; the atmosphere was tremendous. Fortunately we were able to come out with two titles. We are looking to do a lot more in the dance.” On Sunday evening, the Tigers got their assignment for the Big Dance as they earned a No. 12 seed in the West Regional of the NCAA Tournament and will head to Buffalo, N.Y. to face fifthseeded Notre Dame (25-8) on March 16 at Buffalo’s KeyBank Center. With Princeton having narrowly missed going to the NCAA tourney last year after finishing in second place one game behind champion Yale, Weisz is savoring the chance to end his college career in March Madness. “It is a dream come true, you always dream about this as a kid,” said Weisz, a 6’4, 210-pound native of Florham Park, N.J. who now has 1,219 points in his time at Princeton “To have it cut short last year by a game and a few possessions, tears your heart out. It is so much sweeter this year, doing it in the fashion that we did.” Weisz knows the Tigers will have to show a lot of heart to come away with a win against Notre Dame, a program that plays in the powerful Atlantic Coast Conference and has made two straight trips to the NCAA quarterfinals. “They are an incredible team,” said Weisz. “We will watch a lot of video on them over the next few days. We are just looking to stick to our principles, stick to what has got us here. We are excited for the game.” Henderson, for his part, was excited to see his players leap to their feet and

Skillman H HFurniture

Specialists

Quality

Used Furniture Inexpensive

2nd & 3rd Generations

609-452-2630

MFG., CO.

New Furniture

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881

holler in unison at a Selection Show party at Triumph Brewing Company last Sunday upon finding out that they would be playing Notre Dame. “Just watching them react, that is all matters,” said a smiling Henderson, with his voice raspy from the tense weekend at the Palestra. “They won it, they want to play good teams, and they want be relevant. They believe in themselves, that is all you can ask out of a group.” Princeton is clearly facing a talented group in the Fighting Irish.“Steve Vasturia is a senior; he is a local kid that we recruited,” said Henderson.

“He is a terrific player. They have Matt Farrell. In some ways, it is a similar looking team (to us). They are smart, they play together, they take care of the ball well. It will be a real challenge but we will get to work tonight and be ready to go.” In Henderson’s view, the Tigers feature a versatility that could pose a real challenge for Notre Dame. “What we have is what I think is useful in tournament, we make adjustments,” said Henderson, reflecting on a contest which will see the victor advance to a second round matchup against the winner of the game between fourth-seeded West Virginia

and 13th-seeded Bucknell. “We don’t play one specific way that they can figure out. I think that is useful in tournament games when circumstances take you one way and you have got to figure it out.” Weisz, for his part, believes that adaptability along with a special chemistry will make Princeton tough to beat in the tournament. “Everyone is willing to do whatever it takes to win,” said Weisz. “If guys get hurt or roles change, everyone is always in it to win at all costs. Everyone is encouraging everyone all the time. We really want what’s best for one another.” —Bill Alden

Wherever the Olive GrOWs DestinatiOn: Chile & arGentina the modern Chilean wine industry dates from the 1980s, but wine has been made since the spanish first brought the grapevine there in the 1500s. a minor variety from

Bordeaux,

Carmenere has become the country’s signature grape. like its neighbor, argentina has become known internationally for another Bordeaux grape, Malbec. Join us & discover these wines paired with a Four Course south american inspired Dinner

tuesday, March 21, 2017 | 6:30 - 9:30 pm $59 per person (Excludes Tax & Gratuity)

restaurant & enoteca

la vuelta Wine tastinG enO terra Join us for a grand tasting of Ole

imports’ las Joyas. You’ll be able to taste over 40 selected wines from spain & Portugal by acclaimed wine makers such as rodrigo Mendez & Jose luis Mateo García. Come taste & mingle with growers & producers. We taste every bottle before we buy, shouldn’t you?

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 | 5:30 - 8:30pm $35 per person (Excludes Tax & Gratuity) available to reserve online at

terramomo.com click on our calendar of events

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

S ports


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 22

PU Men’s Hockey Falls to Union in ECACH Quarters, But Turnaround Season Bodes Well for Future Success It ended up being a microcosm of a turnaround season for the Princeton University men’s hockey team as it played at Union last weekend in the ECAC Hockey quarterfinals. With seventh-seeded Princeton having lost 4-1 in the first game of the best-of-three series against second-seeded and No. 6 Union on Friday, the Tigers found themselves trailing 2-0 to the powerful Dutchmen entering the second period a night later. Displaying its never-say-die mentality, the Tigers cut the lead in half with a second period power play goal by David Hallisey. In the third period, the Tigers forged ahead 3-2 on goals by Ryan Kuffner and Alex Riche, the latter tally coming with 1:10 left in regulation. Union, however, scored a goal with 21 seconds left in an extra attacker situation to force overtime and then won the game 4-3 when they converted a penalty shot early in the extra session to advance to the ECACH semis. While Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty rued the fact that his team came 30 seconds from forcing a third game, he is proud of his team’s breakthrough campaign that saw it end with a final record of 1516-3 after going a combined 15-72-6 in the past three seasons, including 5-23-3 in 2015-16. “We started off 0-6-1 and then battle back to have a 1510-2 season in that stretch, the guys were resilient all year,” said Fogarty. “They bought in and trusted

each other. It was a fun ride, there is no question about it.” In Fogarty’s view, the team’s biggest area of progress came in executing systems all over the ice. “We became more of a fiveman unit in how we moved up the rink,” explained Fogarty. “In the past couple of years we didn’t do that; our attack was only two guys. We didn’t have the defensemen rolling. We became a better five-man unit throughout the rink and that got better was the year went on. I am looking forward to seeing next year how can we evolve that and make it stronger in the neutral zone and just increase our scoring.” That multi-faceted attack paid dividends this winter. “We scored 103 goals this year compared to 60 last year,” noted Fogarty. “Our goal scoring is good, I like where it is at. It is a 180 from where we were at the first two years.” Fogarty tipped his hat to the character displayed by team’s seniors Hayden Anderson Tommy Davis, Ben Foster, Colton Phinney, Quin Pompi, Marlon Sabo, Ryan Siiro, and Garrett Skrbich in battling through the hard times. “They stayed with it; they won 15 games their first three years at Princeton and matched that in one year,” said Fogarty. “I know they were excited and happy to come to the rink. It is frustrating when we were 18 games under .500

and 19 games under .500 our first two years. To turn that around and be only one game under 500, that is a lot of wins so they enjoyed it.” With the team’s eight top scorers slated to return next year, Fogarty believes that there should be a lot more wins in the future for the Tigers. “We have a lot of players that were put in impact situations that will return,” said Fogarty, whose team was led in scoring by sophomores Kuffner (19 goals and 17 assists) and Max Veronneau (11 goals, 24 assists) with two other players, freshman Jackson Cressey (7 goals, 26 assists) and junior Hallisey (13 goals, 17 assists), also hitting the 30-point mark. “Losing Colton (star goalie Colton Phinney) will be the biggest void but we are confident that junior Ben Halford can step up and Austin Shaw, our freshman, can as well.” Having risen to seventh place from 12th place in the ECACH standings this season, Fogarty is hoping to see his team jump into the top four next season. “We definitely know that we can play with any team in the ECAC or the NCAA and our focus has to be to pinpoint our first game,” said Fogarty, whose team posted five wins over teams ranked in the Top 10 this season. “We can’t wait for the playoffs to ramp it up and we can’t wait for a 0-6-1 start to try to turn it around. It has to be from the get-go in terms of playing our style of game.” —Bill Alden

To: ___________________________ From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) � Phone number

� Fax number

� Address

� Expiration Date

CRUNCH TIME: Princeton University men’s hockey player David Hallisey, right, takes a hit in recent action. Last Saturday, junior forward Hallisey had a goal and an assist in a losing cause as seventh-seeded Princeton lost 4-3 in overtime to second-seeded and No. 6 Union 4-3 to fall 2-0 in a best-of-three ECAC Hockey quarterfinal series. The Tigers ended the season at 15-16-3, a marked turnaround for a program that went a combined 15-72-6 in the past three seasons, including 5-23-3 in 2015-16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

Hunan ~ Szechuan Malaysian ~ Vietnamese Daily Specials • Catering Available 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

APRIL 1st 2017

This clinic will provide boys and girls, ages 5 to 8, with the basic skills and knowledge to play the game of basketball. This clinic is intended for beginners only. Check-in will begin 30 minutes prior to each session.

Plus

A surprise autograph signing by a member of the New York Knicks.

— WE BUY — BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS Also Buying: Antiques, Collectibles, Jewelry, Postcards, Ephemera, Pottery, Prints, Paintings, Old Glass, etc. ESTATE CONTENTS

Ages 5 to 6 | 12pm to 1pm | Space Limited to first 75 children Ages 7 to 8 | 1pm to 2pm | Space Limited to first 75 children Jr. Knicks Basketball 101 - Ages 5 to 6 juniorknicks.leagueapps.com/events/277803-basketball-101-at-sportika-sports---april-1st--ages-7-to-8

Jr. Knicks Basketball 101 - Ages 7 to 8 juniorknicks.leagueapps.com/events/245460-jr.-knicks-basketball-101-at-sportika-ages-7-to-8

REGISTER ON LINE TODAY!

Downsizing/Moving? Call Us.

609-658-5213

JUDITH BUDWIG 2015 NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence®

Sales Associate

Cell: 609-933-7886 jbudwig@glorianilson.com

The clinics are held at:

Major Sportika | 150 Woodward Road | Manalapan, NJ 07726

R E A L E S T AT E 609-921-2600


Before the Princeton University women’s basketball team faced Harvard in the Iv y L e ag ue Tour nament semifinals last Saturday,

Courtney Banghart wrote three words on the blackboard in the locker room heart, grit, and share. The Tigers went out and

ANSWERING THE BELL: Princeton University women’s basketball player Bella Alarie drives to the hoop in a game earlier this season. Last weekend, freshman forward Alarie starred for Princeton as it competed in the inaugural Ivy League Tournament. On Saturday, Alarie piled up 17 points and 16 rebounds as Princeton defeated Harvard 68-47 in a semifinal contest. A day later, Alarie had 11 points and 11 rebounds in a losing cause as Princeton fell 57-48 to host Penn in the title game. Alarie and Tiger junior Leslie Robinson were named to the AllTournament team. The Tigers, now 16-13, will take part in the Women’s National Invitational (WNIT) Tournament. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

displayed all three of those traits, jumping out to a 2516 halftime lead over the Crimson on the way to a 6847 triumph at the Palestra in Philadelphia. “We shared the ball really well,” said Princeton head coach Banghart in a video of her postgame press conference posted on the Princeton athletics website. “To go into a tournament game and know that your defense is locked down, you get to walk with ease. You don’t have to make shots. I have had some really good offensive teams and I wouldn’t put this group in that category yet but I knew what I was going to get. I knew it was going to be a real battle for Harvard to have to try to score against us.” Princeton junior forward Leslie Robinson and her teammates were certainly ready to battle the Crimson. “I think we just got a little bit of a gut check; we looked at each other and we said we are not losing to Harvard,” said Robinson, who had 15 points and 11 rebounds in the win. “We are going to t he championship. We worked together. We got stops on defense and that converted to our offense.” A day later in the championship game, the Tigers showed guts but couldn’t ove r c om e Pe n n, fa l l i n g 57- 4 8 to t h e Q u a ke r s, the league’s regular season champion. Robinson had nine points and three

rebounds in the loss and made the All-Tournament team along with freshman star Bella Alarie, who had 17 points and 16 rebounds in the win over Harvard and then contributed 11 points and 11 rebounds in the defeat to the Quakers. With Princeton, now 1613, finishing as the second place team in the Ivy League during the regular season, it

will receive the conference’s bid to the Women’s National Invitational (WNIT) Tournament. The WNIT bracket was slated to be released on Monday evening after the NCAA Selection Show announcements. Banghart, for her part, believes that her squad will keep fighting as it looks to extend its season for as long as possible.

“I have said all along, from the beginning of the year, that we were going to find out how far heart can take you,” said Banghart. “This team is gritty, they have a lot of heart. Those things are non-negotiable for this group. I am just really proud of them.” —Bill Alden

• SINCE 1929 •

Nicole J. Huckerby, Esquire Nicole has been with Pellettieri Rabstein and Altman since 1993. She concentrates her practice on complex divorce litigation, domestic violence litigation, preparation of prenuptial agreements, and custody and parenting time disputes. Nicole also handles all divorce related post-judgment matters such as college contributions, spousal and child support issues, cohabitation, and retirement. She is accomplished as both a skilled negotiator and a trial attorney. Nicole has authored numerous articles on issues of children and divorce that can be found on the firm’s website. Prior to joining PR&A Nicole served as a judicial law clerk in Burlington County to the Honorable John A. Sweeney, J.S.C. She is licensed to practice law in New Jersey and Pennsylvania and is a member of the New Jersey State Bar Association and the Mercer County Bar Association. Nicole received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Gettysburg College and her Juris Doctor from Widener University School of Law. Nicole resides with her family in Pennington, New Jersey.

We can help you make informed decisions.

Willing negotiators. Skilled litigators.

John A. Hartmann, III, Chm. Lydia Fabbro Keephart Kristen J. Vidas

Nicole J. Huckerby Jennifer R. Haythorn Jillian A. Frost Nicole M. Crismale

100 Nassau Park Boulevard, Suite 111, Princeton, NJ 08540

609-520-0900 | www.pralaw.com

CAPITAL HEALTH SURGICAL GROUP IS PLEASED TO WELCOME

MICHAEL KALINA, DO, FACOS, FACS ACUTE CARE SURGERY

Whether it is an initial visit to help diagnose a condition, obtaining some of the most advanced treatments, or getting a second opinion, our team of specialists and surgeons can help when you need them most. Dr. Michael Kalina recently joined the multi-specialty surgical team at Capital Health Surgical Group as medical director of our Acute Care Surgery program at Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell. Board certified in general surgery, Dr. Kalina completed his fellowship training in surgical critical care, trauma and acute care surgery at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware. He has extensive training and experience in abdominal wall reconstruction, gallbladder disease, hernia repair, and diseases of the colon and small intestine. Dr. Kalina joins the group’s acute care surgeons who are specially trained in surgical critical care, trauma surgery and emergency general surgery to urgently assess and treat those with general surgical emergencies at Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell.

Capital Health Surgical Group Two Capital Way, Suite 356 Pennington, NJ 08534 609.537.6000 | capitalsurgical.org

One extensive network of care. MEDICAL GROUP

Your neighborhood. capitalmedicalgroup.org

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., maRCh 15, 2017

After Showing Grit in Making Ivy Tourney Final, Princeton Women’s Hoops Primed for WNIT Run


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 24

After Helping U.S. Team Win U-19 World Crown, Sims Emerging as Shooting Star for PU Men’s Lax Austin Sims took his game to a higher level last summer, helping the U.S. team win the championship at the FIL (Federation of International Lacrosse) 2016 U-19 Men’s World Championships in British Columbia last July. For Princeton University midfielder Sims, who served as a co-captain of the U.S. squad, the experience made him more self-assured on the field. “I think it gave me conf i d e n c e k n ow i n g t h at I can play with some of the best players our age in the world,” said Sims, who had a goal and four assists in the competition. Sims is now proving to be one of the best players in college lacrosse, having been named the Epoch/US Lacrosse Player of the Week after scoring a career-high

six goals in an 18-7 win over then-No. 3 Johns Hopkins on March 3. “It is obviously an honor to be the player of the week and get all those accolades,” said Sims. “But I could not have done it without my teammates like Gavin McBride, Mike Sowers, Zach Currier and the guys like Mike Morean running between the lines and making defensive stops. It was nice getting my personal accolades but there are a lot of guys that didn’t get any accolades who also played very well.” It was nice for Princeton collectively to get the breakthrough victor y over the powerful Blue Jays. “A win against a storied program and a rival like Hopkins gives us a lot of confidence,” said Sims. “It showed us what our

Princeton’s Best Summer Programs Sign up today and save!

summer.hunschool.org Open House Sunday, April 2nd

potential could be going forward. It was definitely a confidence builder but we don’t want to rest on our laurels.” L ast week, t he Tigers weren’t quite as sharp as they struggled a bit before pulling out a 17-13 win over Quinnipiac. “It was definitely a slow start; it was a Tuesday game and that can definitely happen to you,” said Sims, reflecting on the March 7 contest. “I think it is a good thing that even though we didn’t play at our best today, we got the win. I think that is the mark of a good team; it is good that we were able to pay well enough to get the win.” After leading just 11-9 late in the third quarter, Princeton went on an 8-1 run to take control of the contest. “I think we got a couple of key defensive stops,” said Sims. “I know we let in a couple but being able to stop the runs and then come back on offense and get a quick goal and kill their runs, which was definitely huge. It was the leadership of our captains and the leadership of our seniors, keeping everyone calm and making sure that no one was freaking out.” Sims, for his part, produced another huge performance as he scored six goals for the second straight game. “It is teammates putting me in promising positions to score and I am just capitalizing on it,” said Sims, the 6’1, 185-pound native of Fairfield, Conn. who now has a team-high 14 goals this season. “Coach (Pat) March harps

on my shooting form and makes me practice it a lot so give him some credit too.” The experience of having played with Tiger freshman star Michael Sowers on the U.S. team has helped Sims getting in the right positions. “I think one of the big things that came out of the summer was my relationship with Mike Sowers,” said Sims. “A dynamic guy like that with vision is able to break down almost any defender. I was able to get a head start on a relationship with him over the summer, knowing that we are going be wearing the same jersey for the next two years.” Princeton head coach Matt Madalon likes the dynamic play he is get ting f rom Sims. “Austin has done a heck of a job,” said Madalon. “What he has done well is that he has put himself in positions to finish plays for us and when he has had opportunities, he has done so.” Madalon acknowledged that Princeton squandered some opportunities in the win over Quinnipiac. “It was not a good 60 minutes of lacrosse from us; we are happy to come out on top,” said Madalon. “That is not to take anything away from Quinnipiac, they did a great job. They have a very good offense, they are well prepared, and good at the face-off X. We just made a lot of mistakes and we are frustrated by that.” The Tigers were able to overcome their sloppy play down the stretch. “I think stick work and execution clicked for a couple of a minutes at a time and we were able to go on a couple of little runs,” said Madalon. While the Princeton defense had some lapses in ex-

SIMPLY AWESOME: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Austin Sims heads to goal in a game earlier this season. Last week, junior midfielder Sims scored six goals to help Princeton defeat Quinnipiac 17-13. It was the second straight sixgoal effort for Sims, who had hit that mark in an 18-7 win over Johns Hopkins on March 3. The 16th-ranked Tigers, now 4-1, are next in action when they play at No. 5 Rutgers (6-0) on March 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) ecution against the Bobcats, Madalon likes the way that unit is coming together. “They have done a really good job, we had some different guys playing some different match ups,” said Madalon. “Quinnipiac does a heck of a job offensively and they made us pay a couple of times, I think Danny Winschuh did well; Nick Bauer is doing a nice job.” With the 16th-ranked Tigers slated to play at No. 5 Rutgers (6-0) on March 15, Madalon knows that his squad will need to do a really good job to come away with a victory over the Scarlet Knights. “We have a good week of practice ahead of us but I

like where we are at,” said Madalon “We are going to start as a staff preparing for them tonight. They have done an outstanding job, they are a heck of a program. We have played a one-goal game with them in the past handful of years. It is a rivalry and our guys will be ready.” In Sims’ view, Princeton is ready to keep building on its promising start. “I think the team is in a good place; we want to keep moving forward with every game,” said Sims “We have a tough game against Rutgers; they are a great team, great program, and a historic rival. It is going to be a good one.” —Bill Alden

Announcing the Grand Opening of East Windsor / Lawrenceville Announcing the Announcing the Foot and Ankle Announcing the Grand Grand Opening Opening of of Grand Opening of Dr. Donna M. //Barrese, D.P.M. East Windsor Lawrenceville East Windsor Lawrenceville East Windsor / Lawrenceville Foot and Ankle Foot and Ankle Foot and Ankle Dr. M. Barrese, D.P.M. Dr.Dr.Donna Donna M. Barrese, D.P.M. Donna M. Barrese, D.P.M.

Fun-Education-Community Sustainable Businesses

March 18th, 11am-4pm

Speakers on Energy Audits, Rebates, and other Incentives

Free to the public

Plus talks on Climate Change & Benefits of Solar Panels

Rider University

Miss Amy Band | Eyes of the Wild Zoo Recycling Show Grand Falloon

Student Recreation Center

Arts and Crafts Corner

2083 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrence

Farmer’s Market Locally prepared food for lunch Health and Wellness Electric Car Display Mercer County Sustainability Coalition

MERCER GREEN FEST Mercergreenfest.org

Presented by the Mercer County Sustainability Coalition Ewing Green Team | Lawrence Green Team | Sustainable Lawrence | Sustainable Princeton | Hopewell Valley Green Team East Windsor Green Team | West Windsor Environmental Commission | Mercer County Office of Sustainability

Offering comprehensive treatment of Foot and Ankle Care for The treatment Offering comprehensive Offering comprehensive Offering Comprehensive Care ofofof Entire treatment Offering comprehensive treatment of Foot and Ankle Care for Foot and Care for the FootFoot & Ankle for theCare Entire andFamily Ankle forFamily. The The The Two locations to serve you: Entire Entire Entire Family 614 Rt. 33E, SuiteFamily 4, East Windsor, NJ 08520 Family 609-448-7500 Two locations to serve you:

Two locations to serve you: Two locations toLawrenceville, serve you: 2633614 Main (Rt. 206), NJ 08648 Rt. St. 33E, Suite 4, East Windsor, NJ 08520 614 Rt. 33E, Suite 4, East Windsor, NJ 08520 609-512-1126 609-448-7500 614 Rt. 33E, Suite 4, East Windsor, NJ 08520 609-448-7500 2633 Main St. (Rt. 206), Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-448-7500 www.drdonnabarrese.com www.drdonnabarrese.com 2633 Main St. (Rt.609-512-1126 206), Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 2633 Main St. (Rt.609-512-1126 206), Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 www.drdonnabarrese.com 609-512-1126

www.drdonnabarrese.com


PU Men’s Volleyball Defeats Coker 3-0

The freshman duo of Greg Luck and Parker Dixon came up big as the Princeton University men’s volleyball team defeated Coker 3-0 last Saturday. Luck and Dixon each had 11 kills to help the Tigers prevail 25-15, 25-20, 25-21. Princeton, now 9-8 overall, plays at BYU on March 21. ———

Princeton Baseball Splits at UNC-Greensboro

Picking up its first wins of the season, the Princeton University baseball team went 2-2 in a four-game set at UNC-Greensboro last weekend. Princeton posted a 5-3 win on Friday as Freshman Ramzi Haddad’s ninth inning homer broke a 3-3 tie. A day later, the Tigers split a doubleheader on Saturday, falling 6-1 in the opener before prevailing 10-5 in the nightcap. Senior star Nick Hernandez led the way in the win, slamming out a career-high four hits along with three RBIs. On Sunday,

Tiger Track Stars Excel at NCAAs

Princeton University track athletes Allison Harris and Adam Kelly excelled as they competed in the NCAA Championships last weekend at College Station, Texas. Senior Harris took ninth in the women’s pole vault with a leap of 13’ 9.25. Sophomore Kelly had a best throw of 69’ 4 to take 10th in the men’s hammer throw. By virtue of their top-10 performances, both Harris and Kelly earned secondteam All-America honors. ———

PU Hockey’s Koelzer Signs with Riveters

Princeton Universit y women’s hockey star Kelsey Koelzer has signed with the New York Riveters of the National Women’s Hockey League (NWHL), inking a contract for the remainder of the season as the Riveters make a push for the Isobel Cup. The top pick in the 2016

NWHL draft, Koelzer is the first player to be signed to a contract this late in the NWHL season. “Being part of the NWHL was a priority for me because I want to take my development from four years at Princeton and utilize it playing with and against some of the best women’s hockey players in the world,” said Koelzer. “I am sad that my collegiate career has come to an end, but I was lucky to play alongside amazing players and coaches. I’m hoping to use that experience to contribute to the remainder of the Riveters’ season in any way I can.” A two-time Patty Kazmaier finalist, Koelzer, a 5’9 native of Horsham, Pa., is also a first-team All-American and has been named all-ECAC three consecutive season. The 2016 ECAC Best Defenseman of the Year, she was a finalist for the award again this season. T h e 2016 Iv y L e ag u e Player of the Year, Koelzer finished her collegiate career at Princeton earlier this month as the Tigers reached the ECAC Hockey semifinals for the first time since 2005-06. Play ing in 128 career games, Koelzer became just the third defender in Princeton history to reach 100 points, as she concludes her collegiate career with 39 goals and 61 assists. She had 203 career blocks

and finished with a +46 onice rating. This season she ranks second nationally in points per game for a defender, and did so last year as well, with 31 points in 33 games. The Riveters wrapped up regular season play last Sunday with a 3-2 win over Boston in Newark. The Riveters face the Buffalo Beauts in a league semifinal contest on March 17. The 2016-17 NWHL season concludes on March 19, when the Isobel Cup Final is played at the Tsongas Center at UMass Lowell ———

American Furniture Exchange

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. ☛GUTTER CLEANING ☛GUTTER REPAIRS ☛GUTTER PROTECTION! 3 Gutter Protection Devices that Effectively Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Serving the Princeton area for 25 years

609-921-2299

Trinity Counseling Service presents

Mindfulness Trainings Mindfulness for Everyday Living: A Three Part Course

March 27th, April 3rd, & April 10th 6:15pm – 7:45pm DOUBLE CENTURY: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Olivia Hompe heads upfield last Saturday against visiting Notre Dame. Senior star Hompe tallied four goals and assist to help Princeton defeat the eighth-ranked Fighting Irish 14-8. In the process, Hompe notched her 200th career point and now ranks seventh all-time in program history in points as she ended the day at 202. The seventh-ranked Tigers, now 5-0, are next in action when they host No. 8 Penn State (7-1) on March 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Interested in learning more about this thing called mindfulness? Or just looking for a refresher? In this course you will learn how to enhance your ability to be more engaged and resilient. Three evening classes, facilitated by Robin Boudette, Ph.D. Held at Trinity Counseling Service, 22 Stockton St., Princeton. $150 /person.

ceton Pediatric Dentistry Princeton Pediatric Dentistry Dentistry Princeton Pediatric

diatric Dentistry Dr.Andy AndyH. Dr. H. Chung Dr. Andy Chung Specializing in Infants, Children,

Specialty#5140

Specialty#5140 Specialty#5140

Mindfulness in Nature A One Day Workshop Saturday, May 13th 1-4pm In this one day workshop we will venture outdoors for mindful walking and meditation on Hopewell Park’s nature trails. Enjoy the meditative qualities of peace and spaciousness, while deepening your connection with nature. Facilitated by Robin Boudette, Ph.D. Workshop will be begin at the Hopewell Creative Arts Studio, 17 Seminary Ave, Hopewell. $50/person.

Specializing in Infants, Children,

Adolescents Needs Patients Patients Adolescents and and Special . Andy H. Chung Specializing inSpecial Infants, Voted one of Children, zing in Infants, Children, Because we care about you... New Jersey’s Adolescents and Needs Patients Because weSpecial care about you... Princeton Pediatric Dentistry and Special Needs — Patients A Breakthrough in Laser Dentistry — FAVORITE KIDS’ DOCS Specialty#5140

— A Breakthrough in Laser Dentistry — Specialty#5140

Waterlase Waterlase

Dr. Andy H. Chung we care about you... Because wein Infants, care about you... Specializing Children, 2016 by

hrough in LaserAdolescents Dentistryand —Special Needs Patients

Dental Laser — A Breakthrough Dentistry — ·Braces in Laser Dental Laser Because we care about you... ·Nitrous Oxide Available • Decay • Avoid Being ‘Numbed’ ·Digital X-Rays — A Breakthrough in Laser Dentistry — Being •Removal Decay • Avoid

aterlase Waterlase 

Waterlase  ental Laser

• Cavity • ‘Numbed’ Avoid the ·Sealants Removal Shot and ·Preventative Care • Avoid •Preparation Cavity the Pain • General Preparation Shot and ·Minimally Invasive Dentistry Soft Tissue • Pain Laser Cavity ·Offering Afternoon Hours •Procedure GeneralExtended Late Detection

Dental Laser Dental Laser

Tissue • Laser Cavity Decay • Avoid Being Soft EMERGENCY CARE EMERGENCY CARE Procedure Detection Removal ‘Numbed’ • Decay NEW PATIENTS • Avoid Being WELCOME Removal EMERGENCY ‘Numbed’ CARE Cavity • Avoid the FOLLOW US ON 609.924.0404 NEW PATIENTS WELCOME • Cavity • Avoidbythe Decay • Avoid Being Preparation FACEBOOK! Shot •and Office Hours Appointment princetonpediatricdentistry@gmail.com Preparation Shot and Fax 609.924.0430 Pain General princetonpediatricdentistry@gmail.com Removal ‘Numbed’ Pain • General by Appointment Princeton•Shopping Center •Office 301 NHours Harrison St • Princeton Soft Tissue Laser Cavity Soft Tissue • Laser Cavity 863 State Road, Princeton (near CVS) Fax 609.924.0430 • Procedure Cavity Procedure Detection Detection • Avoid the

609.924.0404

www.drandyprincetonpediatricdentistry.com Preparation EMERGENCY CARE Shot EMERGENCY CARE

Princeton Shopping Center • 301 N Harrison St • Princeton and

• General NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

Pain

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

609.924.0404 Soft Tissue • Laser Cavity Office Hours by Appointment

Register online at: www.trinitycounseling.org/mindfulness Questions? 609-924-0060.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., maRCh 15, 2017

PU Sports Roundup

Princeton wrapped up the weekend by falling 12-3. In upcoming action, Princeton, now 2-6, plays a threegame set at the University of Mar yland from March 17-19. ———


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 26

With Senior Star Blue Leading the Way, PHS Boys’ Hoops Made Solid Progress Although the Princeton High boys’ basketball team ended the winter by falling 63-41 to Marlboro in the first round of the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional, the squad produced a couple of memorable wins over the last 10 days of the season. PHS defeated crosstown rival Princeton Day School 53-47 in the opening round of the Mercer County Tournament on February 17 and pulled out a rousing 68-63 win over Hillsborough in its home finale six days later. For first-year head coach Pat Noone, those triumphs meant a lot to the pro gram.

“We won a playoff game in Mercer Count y and I think that is the first time they have won one in a pretty long time here,” said Noone. “When you play PDS in the playoffs, it is such a rivalry game. That game with Hillsborough was Senior Night, that was a great team win.” In Noone’s v iew, PHS made great strides as it | Business ended up with a final record of 12-14. “I thought getting double digit wins and getting up to 12 was pretty positive,” added Noone. “I think they had seven or eight wins last year so that

was a pretty good jump. To get that first playoff win was a good job.” The stellar play of senior superstar Zahrion Blue was the biggest positive of the Little Tigers this winter. “He was definitely legit; it was lucky for me that the best player was the most coachable,” said Noone of Blue who averaged 22.3 points perLaw game| this season Family Litigation and eclipsed the 1,000-point mark in his career along the way. “We formed a good relationship early on and had a good trust; that was the most impor tant t hing. I think there is so much more

untapped for him.” Noone was lucky to have eight other seniors joining Blue on the roster. “It is huge to have nine guys go through the program,” said Noone, whose Clas s of 2017 include d Andrew Goldsmith, Teddy Martilla, Spencer Zullo, Bo List, Cristo Silva, Alex Filion, Justin Marciano, and Sam Serxner. “I think the best thing, talking to them all, I think they leave proud to be playing. They are real proud | Personal of this year Injury and have respect for the basketball program. They are excited about things. You don’t want someone to leave and say whatever.” One of the best things about the season for Noone was the improvement he saw

DIFFICULT TIMES DEMAND...

Business | Family Law | Litigation | Personal Injury

Business | Family Law | Litigation | Personal Injury

across the board. “I think they just enjoyed being together and playing,” said Noone.“We made leaps and bounds; they all became better basketball players. I wish I had more time with this group. I think we would have made even more improvement. Fillion wasn’t playing much in his junior year and he came out here and had a pretty good year. Spencer Zullo was doing a lot of things that didn’t show up in the box score. You got some contributions from everybody.” In Noone’s view, the squad has a good foundation in place that should ensure continued improvement. “I like the group coming back, we have got a good group of guys with Jaylen Johnson, Isaac Webb, Tommy Doran, Mike Frost, and Sam Tarter,” said Noone. “We slowly brought up a sophomore in Brendan Rougas and a freshman, Riley McMahon. I think the first time they got in was against Steinert and since that time

we have been able to get them minutes. The fear is gone, they have seen it. That will be good because when we bring up more guys to the team next year, they will have a feeling of how the program is run and they can lean on them to get into things.” Having come to PHS after serving as the head coach at Lincoln High in Jersey City, Noone enjoyed his first year at the helm with the Little Tigers. “There was a lot of support; it was a really good experience,” said Noone. “Being here felt more like a true high school basketball setting. The town comes out, the families are there. It is the kids they all grow up with; the games are competitive. You get a lot of community. That is really the way high school athletics is supposed to be. That was a blast for me. It was very hard for me to leave my other job but they welcomed me in with open arms.” —Bill Alden

TIMESFOR DEMAND... DON’TDIFFICULT SETTLE LESS. ATTORNEYS AT LAW ATTORNEYS AT LAW Contact Our Family Law Group

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 609.275.0400

Szafe rma n, La k ind, Blumstein & Blader, P.C. Contact Our Family Law Group 101 Grovers Mill Road, Suite 200 Lawrenceville, NJ

Szaferman, Lakind, B lumstein & Bl ader, P.C. 101 Grovers Mill Road, Suite 200 Lawrenceville, NJ

szaferman.com 609.275.0400 szaferman.com

* Szaferman Lakind was selected to Best Lawyers® Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. A description of the selection methodology can be found at BestLawyer.com/About/MethodologyBasic. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey. * Szaferman Lakind was selected to Best Lawyers® Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. A description of the selection methodology can be found at BestLawyer.com/About/MethodologyBasic. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

Contact Our Personal Injury Group Szaferman, L aki nd , Bl umste i n & B l a d e r, P.C . 101 Grovers Mill Road, Suite 200 Lawrenceville, NJ

609.275.0400 szaferman.com

* Szaferman Lakind was selected to Best Lawyers® Best Law Firms list. The Best Law Firms list is issued by U.S. News & World Report. A description of the selection methodology can be found at BestLawyer.com/About/MethodologyBasic. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

FINAL FLIGHT: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Zahrion Blue flies to the hoop in a game last winter. Senior star Blue enjoyed a stellar final season, averaging 22.3 points per game and eclipsing the 1,000-point mark in his career along the way. PHS finished the winter with a record of 12-14 under first-year head Coach Pat Noone. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Spyglass Design, Inc Your Life, Your Vision, Your Home

Kitchen Interior Designers 609.466.7900 • www.spyglassdesigns.net


Coming into the winter, the St uar t Countr y Day S cho ol bas ke tba l l te a m looked to save its best for last, setting its sights on a state Prep B title and a deep run in the Mercer County Tournament. S o los i ng to event ua l champion Pennington in the Prep B finals and getting eliminated in the first round of the MCT on a buzzer beater in overtime wasn’t exactly the ending the team envisioned. Yet in reflecting on a season which saw the Tartans finish with an 18-10 record, Stuart head coach Justin Leith believes the positives far outweigh the negatives. “Two weeks out, it is, look, Stuart has a basketball program now,” said Leith. “We have a couple of eighth graders who are coming up next year that I have coached in the fall in AAU and they are really going to help us. We are returning everyone except for one senior. It is an exciting time. The season didn’t go perfect, meaning that we didn’t win the Prep B or get to the semifinals of the MCT but at the end of the day but we still had a strong season. You always want better and you want to win it all.” Even though Stuart came out on the short end of an exciting game in its MCT opener as it fell to Nottingham 46 - 45 in over time, Leith had no qualms with the effort he got from his players. “They ran a play and they scored and they won,” recalled Leith. “There was a hand in the face, the girl hit a tough shot. We didn’t make any mistakes in that moment. The girl hit a big shot and good for her. There w as n o d i s app oi nt m e nt there, the team fought hard the whole game. We were up and we were down. It was a good game. There was no frustration.” The Tartans boast a tough 1-2 punch in junior guard Jalynn Spaulding and sophomore forward Bey-Shana Clark. “Jalynn is certainly a threat from the outside; she is really athletic and can shoot the ball well,” said Leith.

“Bey Shana has gotten better and she is going to have to. I know she wants to play on the next level and with her size, she is going to have to be able to face the basket and shoot the basketball, dribble the ball up the floor. She can do all of those things. Both of them averaged around 15 points. You can’t say that about a lot of teams. Sometimes teams just have one player that can score and there are a bunch of players near five points. We we have two kids that at any point, you can give you 20 plus points in any game. They are great to have.” Freshman point guard Jasmine Hansford showed great progress this winter for the Tartans. “Jasmine got better and better, she was frustrated at times because she was only a freshman and had those growing pains,” said Leith. “I am really excited to have her back next year. I am sure she will grow in leaps and bounds. She is going to play spring, and summer and in the fall again. She will definitely be a huge contributor next year.” Stuart also got key contributions from junior captain Madeleine Michaels and junior transfer Marissa Lewis. “Maddie was an exemplary captain and has been a defensive leader the last two years,” said Leith. “Marissa was on fire defensively and she helped us in so many ways. I didn’t expect it coming into the season, she was a pleasant surprise. She is a tough kid and great kid.” Going forward, Leith is expecting the program to experience more and more success. “I think the focus in the offseason is to get better,” said Leith. “We will play in the summer league together; we will go to a team camp. We will make sure that everyone is on the same page. Luckily, we are returning so many people so we don’t have to rebuild. Instead, we are going to build on the strong foundation that we already have.” —Bill Alden

includes parts of Rocky Hill, Skillman, and Hopewell, or at tend a school in the PLL Boundary Area. The registration fee is $180. Contact Chrissy Brown at Dillon Youth Basketball cryanbrown14@gmail.com Title Game Results with any questions about the In the title game last Sat- program or scholarship reurday in the 4th/5th grade quests. boys’ division of the Dillon ——— Youth Basketball League, Princeton Little League Cross Culture defeated Princ- Holding 2017 Registration eton Pi 31-29. Cross Culture Registration for the Princgot 11 points from Jonathon eton Little League’s (PLL) Davidge and eight points from spring 2017 baseball and tee Frank McLaughlin. Henry ball season is now open at Doran scored 12 points and www.princetonlittleleague. Owen Biggs added eight in com. the loss for Princeton Pi. Boys and girls between the I n t he 6t h / 7t h g rade ages of 4-13 are eligible to boys’ division championship play. In order to be eligible, game, Jefferson Plumbing players must either live withedged Corner House 35-32 in the PLL Boundary Area, in overtime. Jefferson was led which includes parts of Rocky by Matthew Singer (16 points) Hill, Skillman, and Hopewell, and Ryan Cruser (13 points). or attend a school in the PLL Jaxon Petrone scored 14 Boundary Area. points and Jonah Yuan added The season will run from 10 points a losing cause for April 1 through June 10. PreCorner House. season team practices will In the 8th/9th grade boys’ be held from March 27 ondivision final, the Knicks de- wards. Opening Day will be feated the Sonics 42-36, led April 1 (both ceremonies and by a balanced scoring attack games) and the season will of Luke Wingreen (11 points) conclude with Championand Ben Moyer (10 points). ship Saturday and the End of Judd Petrone poured in 34 Season Celebration on June points for the Sonics in the 10. loss. Please log onto the PLL In the title game in the website to see the schedules girls’ division, Majeski Foun- for the league’s divisions, dation edged Gallagher Risk which include: Tee Ball (ages Management 19-16. Majeski 4-6); Instructional Division Foundation was led by Moji- (ages 6-8); Rookies Division sola Ayodele with 15 points. (ages 7-9); Minors Division Sammy Renda scored eight (ages 9-10); and Intermediate points in a losing cause for (ages 11-13). Gallagher with Molly Brown All players registering for the and Ali Surace adding four Rookies, Minors, and Intermepoints apiece. diate Divisions (ages 7 and up) ——— must attend Mandatory Player

Local Sports

Princeton Girls’ Softball Continuing Registration

The Princeton Little League (PLL) is currently accepting registration for its Princeton Girls’ Softball program at www.princetonlittleleague. com. Girls between the ages of 6-12 are eligible to play softball; the league age is determined by a player’s age as of December 31, 2016. Princeton Girls’ Softball has three age divisions: Rookies ages 6 to 8; Minors - ages 9 and 10; and Majors - ages 11 and 12. Each division will have practice and/or a game once during the week and once on Saturdays. Weekday practice times will depenbad on coaches availability. Saturliberty sport 4wd with a v6 engine and auto trans, abs, front and side air bags, cloth seating, center dayfullgames/practices will be mfm cd with sirius stereo, tilt steering and cruise control, 16’’ alloy wheel, keyless entry and security, power between 9-1 PM depending door locks, and mirrors, skyslider roof-full open with canvass cover, roof rails, auto headlamps, tinted glass, on game schedule and coach ter and wiper. ax history report! schedule. 94712 miles Silver $8995 The season begins with sler 300 Touring 4 dr with a 3.5 V6 engine and auto trans, ABS, front and side air bags, A/C, power windows, Opening mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seating, 17’’ alloy wheels, fog lamps, power adjustable pedals, amfm cassette/6 Ceremonies on Aprilconsole, 1 and concludes with eo with Boston speaker system, tilt/telescope steering and cruise control, overhead lighting, full center , rear window defroster, keyless entry with security, traction control, and leather wrapped steering the wheel. End of Season Celebration r, very low mileage 300 Touring with a Clean Carfax History Report! on June 10. 29201 miles Cool Vanilla $7995 In40/20/40 order to be eligible, playge Dakota Sport 4X4 Reg Cab with a 3.9 V6 engine and auto trans, air bags, A/C, cloth seating with must either live within seat, tinted glass, rear sliding glass, amfm stereo, 5X7 ext mirrors, class IV trailer tow, anti spiners rear differenmps, tilt steering and cruise control, 16’’ alloy wheels, hd rear suspension, full spare tire, and bedliner. Clean the PLL Boundary Area, which

Evaluations on February 25 at the Hun School. The registration fee for PLL Spring Baseball 2017 is $205. Each player will receive a full uniform. The registration fee for Tee Ball is $120 (Tee Ball players will receive a cap and jersey). Scholarships

are available towards registration fees and the purchase of equipment (gloves and shoes). Please contact Meghan Hedin with any questions about registration, scholarships, or volunteering at meghan.hedin @ gmail. com. ———

PHS Baseball Program Holding Annual Clinic

The Princeton High baseball team will be holding its 18th annual Spring Training Youth Baseball Clinic on March 19 from 1: 003:00 p.m. in the New Gym at PHS. The program is open to boys and girls ages 5 - 13 and all levels are welcome. The clinic w ill focus on pitching, catching, throwing, fielding and hitting. All participants must bring their own glove. Weather permitting, some drills may be held outside. P r e - r e g i s te r b y e m a i l to : swati @ lele -sarafin. com, stating your name, child’s name and phone number. The cost is $25 prere g i s t r at ion, $ 30 at the door. Payment on day of clinic is cash or check payable to “PHS Baseball Booster Club.” ———

as well as volunteer athletes from the Princeton High track program. Par t icipa nt s w i ll have the opportunity to try running, hurdling, jumping and throwing events. For more infor mation on program specifics and to download the registration form, visit princetoncranbury.wixsite. com/pctc. ———

Princeton Athletic Club Holding 6k Spring Run

The Princeton Athletic Club is holding its annual 6-kilometer spring trail run on April 8 at the Institute Woods. The run starts at 10:00 a.m. at the Princeton Friends School, 470 Quaker Road. This event is limited to 200 participants. All abilities are invited, including those who wish to walk the course. Entry fee is $33 till March 25, including the optional Tshirt. The fee increases after March 25. Same day registration will be limited to credit card only – no cash – and space available. For more information and to register, log onto www. princetonac.org. ———

Princeton Rec Department Starting Spring, Summer Sign-up

The Princeton Recreation

Princeton Cranbury Track Department has activated Holding Registration online registration for its

Registration is now open for the newly-formed Princeton Cranbury Track Club. The Princeton Cranbury Track Club is a USAT F member organization with the goal of helping the area’s young athletes entering grades 3 through 8 to develop in the sport of track and field. This summer, three session groups will take place consisting of six practices in each session. Athletes can register for any or all of the sessions. Practices will be run by experienced coaches

2017 Spring and Summer programs. The programs include: Day Camp, Teen Travel Camp, Basketball Camps & Leagues, Skate Board Camp, Youth Track Camp, CP Pool Membership, CP Pool Programs, Kid’s ‘Splash ‘n Dash’ Aquathon, among others. There is an Early-Bird Special Discount on select CP Pool Memberships, Day Camp and Teen Travel Camp registration available until April 7. More information can be found online at www. princetonrecreation.com.

Sales and Service since 1927

2454 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 · 908-359-8131

SEE ALL VEHICLE AND TRACTOR/EQUIPMENT AT:

www.bellemeadgarage.com 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4WD with a 4.7HO V8 engine and auto trans, QuadraTrac 4WD system, ABS, front and side air bags, leather seating-fronts heated, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and seats, power sunroof, roof rack, trailer hitch and wiring, chrome clad alloy wheels, fog lamps, full center console, amfm cd stereo with Navigation steering audio controls, and Infinity Sound, front tow hooks, auto headlamps and rear view mirror, keyless entry with security, tilt steering and cruise control, power adjustable pedals, overhead lights, and mini trip computer. This is a real nice Jeep with One Owner and a Clean Carfax History Report. A Belle Mead Originated Jeep! 1J8GW68J14C219561 Black 102870 miles $7995 2008 Nissan Altima S 4 dr sedan with a 2.5 4 cyl engine and auto trans, ABS, air bags, A/C, cloth seating, power windows, door locks, mirrors, full center console, amfm cd stereo, styled wheel covers, overhead lighting, keyless entry, tinted glass, rear window defroster, tilt steering, and cruise control. One Owner and a Clean Carfax History Report! 1N4AL21E88N403309 White 80269 miles $6995 2017 Massey Ferguson GC1715 Compact Tractor with Loader, a 1.1 3 cyl diesel engine with 19 PTO HP, 2-range hydrostatic transmission with side-by-side foot pedals and cruise control, 4WD, DL95 loader, 3 point hitch, ROPS, utility lights, flat operator floor, 60’’ mid mount PTO driven mower deck(driver over), rear PTO, and T4 tires-have choice of these/Ag/Turf. MGC150GJH93647 Massey Red 1.2 hrs $13695

WE BUY CARS AND TRACTORS

ory Report on a One owner Truck! 116496 miles Grey $5995

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs UP AND COMING: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Marissa Lewis dribbles up the court in game this season. Junior guard Lewis helped the Tartans post a 18-10 record this winter. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

LIC#13VH02047300

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., maRCh 15, 2017

Stuart Basketball Fell Short of Lofty Goals But Foundation in Place for Bright Future


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 28

Obituaries

Joanne Richmond

OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Seminary Assistant, Princeton Theological Seminary

11 AM SUNDAY MAR 19, 2017

CE

DIRECTORY

Hector Herrera VI SER

Obituaries Continued on Next Page

Preaching Sunday in the University Chapel

IP

Route 206 • Belle Mead

from their travels with her husband Al during his musical tours with Frank Sinatra, Liza Minnelli, Pablo Casals, Philip Glass, the New York City Ballet, and the Composers Conference. Joanne and her family spent many wonderful vacations together. During the summer, visits to Long Beach Island and Atlantic City took place. Summer vacations were also spent in the Barre/Montpelier area of Vermont with her extended family. Joanne and her family cruised the Caribbean several times and for her 75th birthday, her family surprised her with a week-long trip to Orlando to celebrate at Sea World and Disneyworld. Joanne was a loving, kind and compassionate individual. She will be remembered for her creativity and generosity and her spirit will live on in her children and grandchildren. She would often say she would go to the ends of the earth for her family and she loved them to the moon and back. Funeral Service was held at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 11th 2017, at MJ Murphy Funeral Home, 616 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction. Friends may call from 2 p.m. until the time of the service at the funeral home. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Juilliard Scholarship Fund in memory of Joanne Richmond, The Juilliard School of Music, Office of Development and Public Affairs, 60 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023.

SH

908.359.8388

Joanne leaves behind five beautiful grandchildren including Christopher Beschner (18), Caroline Beschner (15), Sean Richmond (14), Scott Richmond (12), and Alexis Beschner (12), as well as her furry grandchildren Bailey and Henry. Joanne’s family was the single most important thing in her life and she always put others needs ahead of her own. She treasured her children and grandchildren and was immensely proud of them. As a classically trained pianist, she shared her love of music with them and often frequented their school concerts, shows, and recitals. Joanne could also be found cheering for her grandchildren at the baseball fields, hockey arena, basketball court, softball fields, football games (marching band and cheerleading) and other school related events. She was their biggest supporter. Joanne was an avid tennis fan and followed the pro circuit on television and enjoyed watching her son Fred and her grandchildren on the courts. She was the consummate homemaker and loved to cook and bake, especially during the Christmas holidays. Joanne also wrote the most wonderful notes. Every card she sent did not just contain the obligatory salutation and signature. She personalized each card with an often lengthy, wellthought out, newsy letter. And no Christmas holiday would be complete without Joanne playing traditional Christmas carols while her family sang joyfully around the piano. Joanne and her family have wonderful memories

R WO

Joanne Mae (Amici) Richmond, 83, passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family, on Saturday, March 4 t h 2017, at Brandy wine Living in Princeton. Born in Barre, Vermont in 1934, Joanne grew up in Bayonne, New Jersey. Joanne married the late Albert Richmond at the Little Church of the West in Las Vegas in 1963 and they settled in Teaneck, New Jersey to raise their two children, Allison and Fredrick. They were married for 29 years until Al’s death in 1992. Joanne relocated to the Princeton area in 2002. Joanne received her Bachelor of Science and Masters of Science degrees in piano

from The Juilliard School of Music in 1957 and was an accomplished concert pianist. Shortly after receiving her degree, Joanne performed nationwide with a classical music group and worked summers performing for guests at the Green Mansions Resort in the Adirondacks. Joanne made her piano debut at the Steinway Concert Hall before age 10 and later performed at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. She was the first female pianist hired to perform with the Radio City Music Hall Orchestra, where she met her husband, Al, who was also a member of the orchestra. Shortly after graduation she was employed by Columbia Records for a short period of time prior to starting her family. Joanne and her husband Al also performed with a small, local musicale group in Teaneck. Joanne had the privilege of knowing many famous artists including Van Cliburn, Charles Strouse, and Jerome Robbins. Joanne also had the privilege of working with conductor Eugene Ormandy and many other famous music artists. She was a lifelong union member of the Local 802, Associated Musicians of Greater New York having joined in 1954, and was also a retired piano teacher. Joanne was the daughter of the late Alfred and Iole (Lotti) Amici and twin sister of the late Lucille Amici, who died shortly after childbirth. She is survived by her daughter Allison J. Richmond (of Belle Mead) and her husband William A. Beschner, and her son Fredrick J. Richmond (of Skillman) and his wife Mary A. Richmond. In addition,

Music performed by The Princeton University Chapel Choir Penna Rose, Director of Chapel Music & Eric Plutz, University Organist

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Reverend M. Muriel Burrows, Pastor 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 9:00 a.m. Sunday School for Adults 10:00 a.m. Sunday School for Children 1st-12th Grade Nursery Provided • Ramp Entrance on Quarry Street (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365

Tired of being your own god? Join us at the

St. Paul’s Catholic Church 214 Nassau Street, Princeton St. Paul’s Catholic Church Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH 407 Nassau St. at Cedar Lane, Princeton Martin K. Erhardt, Pastor

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: at 7:00 p.m. Saturday VigilSunday Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m.

Sunday 9:00am

Christian Education

Sunday 10:30am

Worship with Holy Communion

Wednesdays in Lent (March 8 - April 5) 7:00pm Evening Prayer

Call or visit our website for current and special service information. Church Office: 609-924-3642 www. princetonlutheranchurch.org

AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

SundayHoly Week Trinity Church 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I & Easter Schedule 9:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II

10:00 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages Wednesday, MarchRite 23 II 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Holy5:00 Eucharist, RiteEucharist II, 12:00 pm p.m. Holy Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm Tuesday Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Wednesday Thursday March 24

5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Holy Eucharist, Ritewith II, 12:00 pmPrayers

Holy Eucharist withJeanes Foot III, Washing The. Rev. Paul Rector and The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Stripping of the•Altar, 7:00 pm

33 Mercer St. Princeton Keeping Watch,609-924-2277 8:00 pm – Mar.www.trinityprinceton.org 25, 7:00 am

Friday, March 25

The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

An Anglican/Episcopal Parish www.allsaintsprinceton.org 16 All Saints’ Road Princeton 609-921-2420

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Follow us on: SUNDAY Holy Eucharist 8 AM & 10:15 AM* *Sunday School; childcare provided Christian Formation for Children, Youth & Adults 9:00 AM WEDNESDAY Holy Eucharist 9:30 AM The Rev. Dr. Hugh E. Brown, III, Rector Thomas Colao, Music Director and Organist Hillary Pearson, Christian Formation Director located N. of the Princeton Shopping Center, off Terhune/VanDyke Rds.


After a long illness, cardiologist Dr. John Frederick Hagaman, MD died at his home in Princeton on March 6, 2017, at the age of 69. The cause of death was due to complications from a degenerative brain disease. Born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania on December 15, 1947, he was the only child of Frederick Homer Hagaman and Virginia Gerding. He grew up in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania and graduated from the Episcopal Academy in Merion in 1966. From there he went on to earn a BS degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, and an MD degree from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. He met his future wife, Andrea T. Hyde, while an undergraduate and they were married in Newtown, Connecticut, on May 25, 1974. Further training took John to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Michigan. Moving back east, he spent a year working as an emergency room physician at the Danbury Hospital in Danbury, Connecticut, before moving south, where he completed a fellowship in noninvasive cardiology at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In 1980 John came to Princeton, where he joined the medical practice of William F. Haynes, MD. Their partnership marked the beginning of Cardiology Associates of Princeton which in later years grew to include add it ional par t ners. He loved the practice of medicine and over the ensuing 32 years, his practice grew and he gained a reputation for his skills as a diagnostician, attentive listener, and compassionate healer with a deep seated interest in his patients, not just as cases, but as people with a wide range of interests and backgrounds. He also delighted in his professional relationships with medical colleagues and in teaching medical students rotating through the University Hospital of Princeton. The hallmarks of John’s temperament were his boundless enthusiasm, energy, and cheerfulness. He embraced not only medicine but many other interests as well. He loved music; playing the guitar and banjo and singing in a cappella groups in school and college, in student produced musicals in medical school and, later in life, with the barbershop chor us, The Brothers in Harmony. As a sportsman,

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Melanie Lucia Anatole Melanie Lucia Anatole, a longtime resident of Trenton, passed away suddenly on Friday, March 9, 2017. Born in Castries, Saint Lucia on March 13, 1961, she was the daughter of Joseph and Agneta Anatole. Melanie relocated to the United States in 1988 in search of a better way of life for herself and her son, eventually becoming a U.S. citizen. Melanie was a devoted daughter, mother, and grandmother. She traveled every year to visit and care for her mother in St. Lucia. A deeply spiritual person, she was a dedicated and active member of Higher Ground Interdenominational Church under the leadership of Bishop Roosevelt Butler. Melanie was happiest when caring for her two young grandchildren, Dilan M. Anatole Jr. and Madison Denys Anatole, attending church and providing community service. Melanie was the muchloved caregiver to several local families and their children whom she loved dearly. She is known by all for her kind heart, sense of humor, dedication, industriousness, and thoughtfulness. Simply, she was a special person and wonderful human being. Melanie is survived by her

mother, Agneta Anatole ; son, Dilan Mario Anatole; daughter in law, L atrice A natole ; four grandchildren, Dilan Mario Anatole Jr., Madison Denys Anatole, Brandon Pannell and Shyler Smith; and her 10 siblings. She will be greatly missed by her family, her congregation, her many friends and the families she cared for. Melanie will be buried in St. Lucia where her family will hold a private service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in her name may be made to Higher Ground Interdenominational Church at 1009 Whitehead Road, Ewing NJ 08638.

Lindsey Christiansen This is it, chaps. Take me home./I believe, my son, I am going. That’s it./Goodbye — drive on. Cut her loose, Doc. I’m going, I’m going. At a gallop!/Clear the way. Good-bye. God bless you!/ Good-bye, everybody. A general good-night. The words of Annie Dillard’s poem Deathbeds, set to music by James Primosch, were the last words sung at the 2017 Westminster Art Song Festival at Westminster Choir College on February 25, 2017. Four days later, on March 1, 2017, Ash Wednesday, Lindsey Christiansen, a long-time leader of the Festival and one of Art Song’s most ardent performers and teachers, died peacefully at home after a five-month journey with brain cancer at the age of 70. Just weeks before she knew she was sick, Lindsey collaborated with her colleague, pianist J. J. Penna, to plan a program of American song literature for the Festival that wed music to some of her favorite poems with spiritual themes: Jane Kenyon’s Otherwise and Briefly It Enters, and Briefly It Speaks, Denise Levertov’s “… That Passeth All Understanding.” For those at the Westminster Art Song Festival who knew her, the songs spoke of her living and her dying. Lindsey Christiansen was professor of voice at Westminster Choir College of Rider University for 40 years, from 1977 to 2017, and chair of the voice and piano department for 18 years. She specialized in German lieder and was a life-long student and lover of the music of Franz Schubert. She was an exceptional voice teacher and a demanding professor of song literature classes, where she instilled in countless students a love for song. She taught thousands of young singers over her more than 45-year teaching career to find their voice, believe in their potential and flourish as musicians, teachers, performers and human beings. Her example has shaped a generation of voice teachers who

are now inspiring the lives and voices of their students, Professor Christiansen’s musical grandchildren. In the words of Matthew Shaftel, dean of Westminster Choir College, and Margaret Cusack, chair of the piano and voice department: “With an unrelenting commitment to musical excellence, intellectual rigor and the personal and musical growth of her students she enriched our community in countless ways …. She has been a fierce champion of students in ever y aspect of their education, both in nurturing and encouraging those with difficulties, and insisting upon and maintaining the high standards that she and the art of singing demand.” Born Alice Lindsey Peters on October 3, 1946 in Roanoke, Va. to Alice and Howard Peters, she was the eldest of four children. As a young girl, she played piano and sang in churches served by her father, a Methodist minister in Virginia. It was these early experiences of music in the church that led her to devote her life to the study, teaching and making of music. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Richmond, and completed her master’s degree in voice and organ from the University of Illinois. She then taught as a part of the voice faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and studied at the Hochschulle für Musik in Hamburg, Germany for a year as a part of an International Rotary Foundation Fellowship. She was twice an artist-in-residence for voice study at the Franz-Schubert-Institut in Baden bei Wien, Austria. She met her husband, Knud Christiansen, in 1975 during the year she was in Germany. They were married the next year in Williamsburg, Va., and then moved to Princeton, where they raised their two children, Molly and Andreas. A voracious reader of theology, from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Ethics to Richard Rohr’s Falling Upward, she was an elder at Nassau Presbyterian Church and, in her last year, a member of the choir at Trinity Episcopal Church. As her own grandmother had been a guiding light throughout her life, so she became an extraordinary grandmother to her three granddaughters, singing regularly to Maya, Anna, and Hazel. Lindsey Christiansen was a brilliant teacher and extraordinary musician, but she will be most remembered for her infectious energy, grace, strength, intellect, wit, joy for life, and generosity. Her strong, loving, vibrant spirit will continue to resound for years and years to come in the lives of those she taught and the lives of those she touched. In addition to her husband, children and grandchildren, she is also survived by her brother John Peters, her sisters Mary Lee Peters and Liza Peters, her son-inlaw John Gearen, and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. A memorial service in celebration of Lindsey Christiansen’s life will be held at Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton, New Jersey, on Saturday, March 25th at 11 a.m.

To honor her life and legacy, memorial contributions can be made to the Lindsey Christiansen Art Song Festival Endowed Fund, which has been established in her honor to sustain the study and performance of art song at Westminster Choir College of Rider University. Contributions may be made online at https:// alumni.rider.edu/artsongfestival or sent to Westminster Choir College of Rider University, Attn: Art Song Festival, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton NJ 08540. For assistance in making a gift, please contact Kate Wadley ‘02 at 609-9217100 ext. 8213 or kwadley@rider.edu.

(and her husband Bob), five grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren. In lieu of f lowers, do nations may be made to SAVE.

Edward Levine

Florence L. Dawes Florence L. Dawes, 94, of Princeton passed away on March 7, 2017 at Merwick Care and Rehabilitation Center. She was born in Princeton and spent most of her life there until she moved to Florida when she was 85. She was a graduate of Princeton High School and attended Blackstone College in Virginia, majoring in journalism. In the late 1940s, Florence established Woodcroft Nursery School and Summer Day Camp, which she owned and operated for 15 years. In the early 1960s, she began selling real estate, working part time with George Sands soon after he established Hilton Realty. T he 1980s were F lorence’s peak years selling real estate. She joined John T. Henderson Inc. Realtors, and in 1983 she won the Relocation Prize. In 1986, she sold over $10,000,000 of real estate, which broke the 30-year record for sales at Henderson Realtors. She later was associated for many years with N. T. Callaway Real Estate until she turned 80 and retired. For many years, Florence was a volunteer at the Hospital Aide Shop at Princeton Hospital, where her chocolate milkshakes were legendary. She also was a past member of the Present Day Club. Florence’s pride and joy over the years were the standard poodles she cherished. The last one died in 2016 shortly before she returned to Princeton. Florence was predeceased by two sons, John Coffee and Janney Dawes and her sister Marjorie Weiland. She is survived by two children, Joseph Coffee (and his wife Laurie) and Colleen Hall

Edward L. (Ted) Levine of Skillman, died on February 25, at the age of 89. He was predeceased by Rosalie, his wife of 62 years. He is survived by his three brothers and their familie; his children Carol Lovseth (Tim) of Denver, Colo.; his sons, Alex (Joyce) and Jim (Lisa), of Princeton; seven adoring grandchildren, Matt, John, Nathalie, Zeke, Jade, Freddie, and Elijah; five great-grandchildren; and friends and relatives around the country. Ted was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, served in the Army Air Corps, and received his BS and law degrees from the University of Wisconsin. He practiced law with one firm in New York for 41 years, helping to build and lead Cole and Deitz, which became the New York Office of Winston and Strawn. He was one of the city’s ablest and most knowledgeable banking attorneys, and worked frequently with government agencies in addition to representing his clients. A career capstone came in 1980, when he was tapped by the U.N. to create the private banking system of the soon-to-be-independent Federated States of Micronesia. Upon moving to Princeton in 2001, he became a regular at 55 Plus, McCarter Theatre, Richardson Auditorium, and in the classrooms of Princeton University, auditing a variety of classes with great curiosity. In 2012, he and Rosalie moved to Stonebridge at Montgomery, where he became an active member of the community and made many new friends. Ted will be remembered for his sense of humor, his fierce sense of justice and of right and wrong, his generosity, and his love for his family, which misses him greatly and will hold him in our hearts forever. May his memory be a blessing.

TOWN TOPICS is printed entirely on recycled paper.

PERSONAL PAPERWORK SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC.

Are you drowning in paperwork? • Your own? •Your parents? •Your small business? Get help with: •Paying bills and maintaining checking accounts •Complicated medical insurance reimbursements •Quicken or organizing and filing

609-371-1466

Insured • Notary Public • www.ppsmore.com

Specialized Services for Seniors and Their Families, Busy Professionals

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

John Frederick Hagaman

he was a competitive swimmer in high school, loved bike riding, downhill skiing, and especially, golf. He was a long time member of the Springdale Golf Club. He also had a passion for photography, and for American and European history and traced his genealogical roots back to Holland to the 1630s. He served for many years on the board of directors of the YMCA in Princeton and was the Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 88 in the 1990s. And, throughout all his years in Princeton, he and his family were devoted members of Trinity Church. John is survived by his wife of 42 years, Andrea T. Hyde; his sons Charles and William Hagaman and William’s wife, Ursula Bailey. A memorial service celebrating his life will be held at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 on Saturday, March 18 at 1 p.m, to be followed by a reception. Those wishing to make memorial contributions in John’s name are encouraged to donate to either Trinity Church, or to the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University Medical Center, ATTN: Matt Reals, 516 West 168th Street, 3rd floor, New York, NY 10032. The email contact is mr3134@cumc. columbia.edu. Arrangements are under the direction of The MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 30

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS MasterCard

VISA

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. SprinG iS ALMOST Here! GArAGe SALe + TOWn TOpiCS CLASSiFieD

ADirOnDACK CHALeT & GUeST CABin: Weekly summer rental on pristine St. Regis Lake only minutes from the charming resort town of Lake Placid. Sleeps up to 12. Includes canoe, row & sail boats. Beautiful mountain views. Mike at (609) 688-0368 or (518) 521-7088.

HAnDYMAn: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com

SeniOr/eLDer CAre: Experienced, compassionate caregiver/ companion, live-in or out, 24 hours or hourly, English speaking with drivers license, car & excellent references. Will provide personal care, manage medications, errands, light housekeeping, cooking. Call: (215) 9904679 or email Nuc_iko@yahoo.com 03-08-3t

Free estimate. Please call Magda, (609) 372-6927.

take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

ing based on a proven one to one method tailored to fit the talents & learning habits of each student. Mandarin can be both fun & challenging. I have watched my students of all ages benefit tremendously from my instructive mentoring methodology. I always see positive results. With a PhD from Wuhan University in China & over 12 years’ experience, I have a proven, exceptional track record as a Chinese born Mandarin tutor. I will teach you Mandarin using an individual approach tailored to meet your needs. If you want your child to do better or if you want to learn Mandarin call me at (609) 915-3782 or email me at yhstack@gmail.com 02-01-8t

CLASSIFIED = GreAT WeeKenD! RATE INFO:

COnTrerAS pAinTinG: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@live. com

SUperiOr HAnDYMAn SerViCeS: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 03-08/05-24

Irene Lee,03-01-5t Classified Manager

rOSA’S • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check.SMALL OFFiCe SUiTe03-15 CLeAninG SerViCe LLC: nASSAU STreeT: • 924-2200 25 words $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. (609) ext 10or less: tf MAnDArin TUTOr: HOUSe CLeAninG: By expeDoes your For houses, apartments, offices, day- with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call tf child have an interest in learning rienced Polish lady. Good prices. care, banks, schools & much more. available. (609) 921-6060 for details. • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates References available. Own transpor- HOMe HeALTH AiDe: 25 years Mandarin? I maintain a success- Has good English, own transporta06-10-tf experience. Available mornings to ful •practice of individualized tutor- $10.00/week MOVinG SALe: 149 Linden Lane, tation. Honest,• reliable, Ads excellent with job. lineofspacing: $20.00/inch all bold face type: tion. 25 years of experience. CleanPut an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

Princeton, on Saturday 3/18 from 8am–1pm. Furniture, household items, tools galore. Rain or shine. 03-15

GUiTAr LeSSOnS available for all levels of students. Individualized courses set by professional musician. (609) 924-8255; www. princetonstudio.net 03-01-3t FOr SALe: 2000 DODGe rAM 1500 4x4 SLT Laramie club cab, V8 automatic. 80,000 miles. $4,500. (215) 595-4915 03-15 HOMe WAnTeD: Local couple looking to downsize into Princeton (in or adjacent to old Boro). Home with low/no maintenance priced to $700,000. Town homes/first floor condos with off-street parking preferred. Any condition. Buyers will pay brokers fee. Cash sale closing at seller’s convenience. Principals contact Kenneth Verbeyst- Broker Assoc, BHHS Fox Roach Realtors (609) 924-1600 or ken@verbeyst.com

02-22-4t AriS’S CLeAninG SerViCeS: We can make your place sparkle! Providing residential / commercial cleaning services. Great references, bilingual (English/Spanish), reliable with own transportation & reasonable prices. Call Aris for a free estimate: (347) 231-9842. 03-01-3t prinCeTOn renTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245.

03-01-3t TWO prinCeTOn nASSAU ST. OFFiCeS: 2nd floor five office suite approx. 1,800 SF-$7,070/mo. 3rd floor single office approx. 435 SF-$1,500/mo. Tenant pays electric, landlord pays heat. (609) 213-5029. 02-15-5t

tf GrOWinG YOUnG FAMiLY LOOKinG FOr A HOMe TO CHeriSH and not a tear down turned ‘McMansion’. Min 3 beds/2 baths in Princeton boro/township, understand some work may need to be put into the house. Negotiable up to $600,000. Email NeedPrincetonHome@gmail.com or call Town Topics (609) 924-2200 to leave your contact info. Please no Realtors.

tf CArpenTrY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf eXCeLLenT BABYSiTTer/ DOGSiTTer: With references, available in the Princeton area. Please text to (609) 216-5000 tf penninGTOn BOrO2 Br ApT FOr renT: Lovely & spacious apt in heart of historic district. This bright updated gem features eat-in kitchen, living room, hardwood floors, stackable washer/dryer & central air. Separate entrance. Added bonus includes heat, hot & cold water & sewer. Walk to shopping, dining & more. No pets, smoke free. Available now, $1,500/mo. (609) 731-1708. 03-08-3t 92 nASSAU-One room Office for Rent. 4th floor of Hamilton Jewelers. Overlooking FitzRandolph Gate of Princeton University. (609) 9246294 or ejgursky@comcast.net

tf

03-01-4t

STOrAGe UniTS FOr renT: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in Skillman, Montgomery 22x15 and 22x21 $210 and $280 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonstorage. homestead.com/ or (609) 333-6932. 02-15-6t i BUY USeD vintage “modern” furniture, pottery, glass, art, rugs, signs, teak, Mid-Century, Danish, American, Italian, etc. from the 20’s to the 80’s or anything interesting or old. One or many. I also buy/collect teak pepper mills (the older & grimier the better) & vintage Seiko watches. Call (609) 252-1998. 03-15-3t CLeAninG, irOninG, LAUnDrY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 02-22-6t

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

ing license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 03-01-5t eDDY’S LAnDSCApe & HArDSCApe COrp:

Lawn maintenance, spring/fall cleanup, mulching, mowing, fertilizing, pruning, planting, lawn cutting, tree service. Patios, retaining walls, stone construction, drainage, fences, etc. Free Estimates. 10% off. (609) 8474401; edy_davila@msn.com 03-08-13t HOUSe CLeAninG LADieS Vilma & Marelin. We speak English & have good references available. Own transportation. Please call or text to (609) 751-3153 or (609) 375-6245. 03-15-5t TOWn TOpiCS CLASSiFieDS GeTS TOp reSULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

TK pAinTinG: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 01-18/07-12 eSTATe LiQUiDATiOn SerViCe: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 MUSiC LeSSOnS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FArrinGTOn’S MUSiC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-13-17 AWArD WinninG SLipCOVerS

Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

Custom fitted in your home. tf

THe MAiD prOFeSSiOnALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404.

Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-06-17

• 03-01/08-23

The Value of Real Estate Advertising Whether the real estate market is up or down, whether it is a Georgian estate, a country estate, an in-town cottage, or a vacation home at the shore, there’s a reason why Town Topics is the preferred resource for weekly real estate offerings in the Princeton and surrounding area.

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IRISH TO LOVE THIS HOUSE

With the charm of yesterday and the amenities of today, the Historic Wilmot House, circa 1830, will simply delight you. Two bedrooms, two full baths, living room/parlor, sun-filled modern kitchen with breakfast room, inviting back yard, garage. A house with charm and character and a very reasonable price in a lovely Ewing Township neighborhood. $219,000 Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1349823

www.stockton-realtor.com CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

If you are in the business of selling real estate and would like to discuss advertising opportunities, please call Town Topics at (609) 924-2200, ext. 21

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $23.25 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $59.00 • 4 weeks: $76 • 6 weeks: $113 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Classifieds by the inch: $26.50/inch • Employment: $33


BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-04-17 HOME rEPAIr SPECIALISt: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-22-17 StOrAGE SPACE: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf NEED SOMEtHING DONE? General contractor. Seminary Degree, 18 years experience in Princeton. Bath renovations, decks, tile, window/door installations, masonry, carpentry & painting. Licensed & insured. References available. (609) 477-9261. 03-09-17 SPrING CLEAN UP! Seeding, mulching, trimming, weeding, lawn mowing, planting & much more. Please call (609) 637-0550. 03-30-17

WE BUY CArS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf WHAt’S A GrEAt GIft fOr A fOrMEr PrINCEtONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

tWO PrINCEtON NASSAU St. OffICES: 2nd floor five office suite approx. 1,800 SF-$7,070/mo. 3rd floor single office approx. 435 SF-$1,500/mo. Tenant pays electric, landlord pays heat. (609) 213-5029. 02-15-5t ADIrONDACK CHALEt & GUESt CABIN: Weekly summer rental on pristine St. Regis Lake only minutes from the charming resort town of Lake Placid. Sleeps up to 12. Includes canoe, row & sail boats. Beautiful mountain views. Mike at (609) 688-0368 or (518) 521-7088. 03-15 HOUSE CLEANING: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Own transportation. Honest, reliable, excellent job. Free estimate. Please call Magda, (609) 372-6927. 02-22-4t ArIS’S CLEANING SErVICES: We can make your place sparkle! Providing residential / commercial cleaning services. Great references, bilingual (English/Spanish), reliable with own transportation & reasonable prices. Call Aris for a free estimate: (347) 231-9842. 03-01-3t PrINCEtON rENtAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf GrOWING YOUNG fAMILY LOOKING fOr A HOME tO CHErISH

GArAGE SALE + tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIED = GrEAt WEEKEND!

(609) 924-2200 ext 10 tf MOVING SALE: 149 Linden Lane, Princeton, on Saturday 3/18 from 8am–1pm. Furniture, household items, tools galore. Rain or shine. 03-15 GUItAr LESSONS available for all levels of students. Individualized courses set by professional musician. (609) 924-8255; www. princetonstudio.net 03-01-3t fOr SALE: 2000 DODGE rAM 1500 4x4 SLT Laramie club cab, V8 automatic. 80,000 miles. $4,500. (215) 595-4915 03-15 HOME WANtED: Local couple looking to downsize into Princeton (in or adjacent to old Boro). Home with low/no maintenance priced to $700,000. Town homes/first floor condos with off-street parking preferred. Any condition. Buyers will pay brokers fee. Cash sale closing at seller’s convenience. Principals contact Kenneth Verbeyst- Broker Assoc, BHHS Fox Roach Realtors (609) 924-1600 or ken@verbeyst.com 03-01-3t

I BUY USED vintage “modern” furniture, pottery, glass, art, rugs, signs, teak, Mid-Century, Danish, American, Italian, etc. from the 20’s to the 80’s or anything interesting or old. One or many. I also buy/collect teak pepper mills (the older & grimier the better) & vintage Seiko watches. Call (609) 252-1998. 03-15-3t CLEANING, IrONING, LAUNDrY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 02-22-6t CONtrErAS PAINtING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@live. com 03-01-5t rOSA’S CLEANING SErVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 03-01-5t

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

Lawn maintenance, spring/fall cleanup, mulching, mowing, fertilizing, pruning, planting, lawn cutting, tree service. Patios, retaining walls, stone construction, drainage, fences, etc. Free Estimates. 10% off. (609) 8474401; edy_davila@msn.com

HOME HEALtH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

EXCELLENt BABYSIttEr/ DOGSIttEr:

Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

StOrAGE UNItS fOr rENt: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in Skillman, Montgomery 22x15 and 22x21 $210 and $280 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonstorage. homestead.com/ or (609) 333-6932. 02-15-6t

and not a tear down turned ‘McMansion’. Min 3 beds/2 baths in Princeton boro/township, understand some work may need to be put into the house. Negotiable up to $600,000. Email NeedPrincetonHome@gmail.com or call Town Topics (609) 924-2200 to leave your contact info. Please no Realtors. tf

CArPENtrY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf

SPrING IS ALMOSt HErE!

MANDArIN tUtOr: Does your child have an interest in learning Mandarin? I maintain a successful practice of individualized tutoring based on a proven one to one method tailored to fit the talents & learning habits of each student. Mandarin can be both fun & challenging. I have watched my students of all ages benefit tremendously from my instructive mentoring methodology. I always see positive results. With a PhD from Wuhan University in China & over 12 years’ experience, I have a proven, exceptional track record as a Chinese born Mandarin tutor. I will teach you Mandarin using an individual approach tailored to meet your needs. If you want your child to do better or if you want to learn Mandarin call me at (609) 915-3782 or email me at yhstack@gmail.com 02-01-8t

With references, available in the Princeton area. Please text to (609) 216-5000 tf PENNINGtON BOrO2 Br APt fOr rENt: Lovely & spacious apt in heart of historic district. This bright updated gem features eat-in kitchen, living room, hardwood floors, stackable washer/dryer & central air. Separate entrance. Added bonus includes heat, hot & cold water & sewer. Walk to shopping, dining & more. No pets, smoke free. Available now, $1,500/mo. (609) 731-1708. 03-08-3t 92 NASSAU-One room Office for Rent. 4th floor of Hamilton Jewelers. Overlooking FitzRandolph Gate of Princeton University. (609) 9246294 or ejgursky@comcast.net 03-01-4t SENIOr/ELDEr CArE: Experienced, compassionate caregiver/ companion, live-in or out, 24 hours or hourly, English speaking with drivers license, car & excellent references. Will provide personal care, manage medications, errands, light housekeeping, cooking. Call: (215) 9904679 or email Nuc_iko@yahoo.com 03-08-3t

EDDY’S LANDSCAPE & HArDSCAPE COrP:

tOWN tOPICS CLASSIfIEDS GEtS tOP rESULtS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf tHE MAID PrOfESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 03-01/08-23 SUPErIOr HANDYMAN SErVICES:

EStAtE LIQUIDAtION SErVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-27-17

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL tODAY! fArrINGtON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-13-17

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. Of PrINCEtON

AWArD WINNING SLIPCOVErS

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 03-08/05-24

Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

Custom fitted in your home.

Princeton References

Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding.

SMALL OffICE SUItENASSAU StrEEt: with parking. 1839 sq. ft. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf

Fabrics and hardware. fran fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-06-17

tK PAINtING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917. 01-18/07-12

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-17-17

•Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-04-17 HOME rEPAIr SPECIALISt: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-22-17

GET RID OF PET ODORS BEFORE YOU LIST We all love our pets, but their odors? Not so much. And that goes double if you’re a potential home buyer. If you have pets, here’s how to make sure lingering odors don’t interfere with your home sale: • Open the windows and bring in some fresh air. Better circulation can do wonders for getting rid of all kinds of stale and musty smells, as well as pet odors. • Do a thorough cleaning of the walls, floors and trim with cleaners designed to neutralize pet odors. Have carpets, drapes and upholstery cleaned too. • Carpets badly stained or embedded with odors that just won’t be cleaned away? It may be time to invest in some new carpets and padding. Thoroughly wash floors before installation. • Seal and paint walls. Not only will it help get rid of any lingering odors, it also makes the whole house look fresher and better cared for. • Be proactive. Scoop cat litter and vacuum up hair on a daily basis. Keep the area around pet dishes clean, and if you can, take your pets for a drive while your home is being shown, or at least confine them to a room or pet crate during showings. Not sure if your home has pet odors? Ask your agent to do a sniff test. Sometimes all it takes is a "fresh nose" to give you a new perspective.

03-08-13t HOUSE CLEANING LADIES Vilma & Marelin. We speak English & have good references available. Own transportation. Please call or text to (609) 751-3153 or (609) 375-6245. 03-15-5t

609-921-1900 Cell: 609-577-2989 info@BeatriceBloom.com BeatriceBloom.com

facebook.com/PrincetonNJRealEstate twitter.com/PrincetonHome BlogPrincetonHome.com

“What I love most about my home is who I share it with." —Tad Carpenter

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-17-17


SU N. ,M AR ., 19

SU N. ,M AR ., 19 EN OP

EN OP

PM

PM

E US HO

4 1–

E US HO

4 1–

17LiedtkeDr.go2frr.com

559ProvinceLineRd.go2frr.com

17 Liedtke Drive, Cranbury Twp . $1,150,000 Elegant 5BR, 5BA colonial w/grand 2-story foyer, hwd floors, customized gourmet kit w/brkfst rm. Lrg Master Suite, Princess Suite, and bonus room. LS# 6916812 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Annabella “Ann” Santos

559 Province Line Road, Hopewell Twp $995,000 4BR, 3.5BA Contemporary sits on top of approx. 14 acres with amazing views! Truly a luxury retreat! LS# 6928834 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Abigail “Abby” Le

EN OP

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

EN OP

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

PM

PM

E US HO

4 1–

E US HO

4 1–

274SunsetRd.go2frr.com

11SMainSt.go2frr.com

274 Sunset Road, Montgomery Twp. $949,000 4 BD, 4.5BA, finely crafted new construction waiting for the new owner to enjoy! House and Lot Behind are both for sale. LS# 6879334 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Roberta Parker

11 S. Main Street, Cranbury Twp. $939,000 Beautifully updated 4BR, 2 full & 2 half BA historic home features pumpkin pine hwd floors, crown molding, and a chef’s kitchen. LS# 6935649 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Rocco D’Armiento

EN

EN

OP

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

OP

PM

E

US

4

1–

PM

E

US

HO

4

1–

HO

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

LI NE ST W IN G!

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 32

Open house Extravaganza March 18 & 19 foxroach.com

12RedMapleLn.go2frr.com

5FarmingtonCt.go2frr.com

12 Red Maple Lane, Montgomery Twp. $869,900 Lovingly maintained 4BR, 3.5BA Grosso built colonial located on cul-de-sac on approx. 1.16 acres. LS# 6783930 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst

5 Farmington Court, West Windsor Twp. $745,000 Lovely 4BR colonial in Princeton Oaks. This home is located on a cul-de-sac with mature trees and professional landscaping. LS# 6941008 Call (609) 924-1600 Marketed by Eva Petruzziello

EN OP

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

EN OP

SU N. ,M AR ., 19

PM

E US

HO

4

PM

E US

1–

HO

4

1–

49HumbertSt.go2frr.com

44OakmontTer.go2frr.com

49 Humbert Street, Princeton $575,000 Just what everyone wants---a vintage home in the sweet spot of Princeton. Surprisingly large garden is a real treat, as is the updated kitchen, central air and charm galore. LS# 6864724 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Robin L. Wallack

44 Oakmont Terrace, East Windsor Twp. $385,000 Lovely 3BR open floor colonial located on wooded lot on a cul-de-sac in Windsor Farm. Formal LR & DR, full basmt, deck & fenced-in backyard! LS# 6931147 Call (609)924-1600 Marketed by Eva Petruzziello

A Trusted Name in Real Estate for 130 Years

1886

2016

253 Nassau Street • Princeton, NJ 08540 • (609) 924-1600 • www.foxroach.com ©2015 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


374 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton Marketed by Ellen Lefkowitz | Mobile 609.731.0935 | Office 609.921.2600

Offered at $1,150,000

222 Monroe Avenue, Montgomery Twp Marketed by Randy Snyder | Mobile 609.658.3193 | Office 609.921.2600

45

Countries

Offered at $989,999

1,200 Offices

32,000 Real Estate Professionals

$118B 2015 Annual Sales

*Christie’s Affiliate Network statistics as of March 31, 2016

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

T H E B R A N D T H AT D E F I N E S L U X U R Y R E A L E S TAT E . W O R L D W I D E .


current rentals *********************************

residential rentals: Princeton – $125/mo. 1 Parking space 2 blocks from Nassau Street. Available now. Princeton – $1,400/mo. Studio with kitchen & bath. Available 6/16/17. Princeton – $1,500/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR/DR, eat-in kitchen, 1-car garage +1 car parking. Available 6/6/17. Princeton – $1,650/mo. 2nd floor office on Nassau Street with parking. Available now.

storaGe sPace: 194 Nassau St. 1227 sq. ft. Clean, dry, secure space. Please call (609) 921-6060 for details. 06-10-tf

MoVinG sale: 149 Linden Lane, Princeton, on Saturday 3/18 from 8am–1pm. Furniture, household items, tools galore. Rain or shine. 03-15

need soMetHinG done? General contractor. Seminary Degree, 18 years experience in Princeton. Bath renovations, decks, tile, window/door installations, masonry, carpentry & painting. Licensed & insured. References available. (609) 477-9261. 03-09-17

Guitar lessons available for all levels of students. Individualized courses set by professional musician. (609) 924-8255; www. princetonstudio.net 03-01-3t

sPrinG clean uP! Seeding, mulching, trimming, weeding, lawn mowing, planting & much more. Please call (609) 637-0550. 03-30-17

Princeton – $1,675/mo. 1 BR apartment 2 blocks from Nassau Street with 1 parking space. Available now.

We BuY cars Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131

Princeton – $2,600/mo. 2 BR, 1.5 baths, LR/DR, eat-in kitchen, full basement w/laundry, garage. Available now. Princeton – $2,600/mo. FULLY FURNISHED (could be unfurnished) 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, eat-in kitchen, with 2-car garage. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses! STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 chambers street Princeton, nJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. stockton, Broker-owner

Ask for Chris tf WHat’s a Great GiFt For a ForMer Princetonian? a Gift subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

sPrinG is alMost Here! GaraGe sale + toWn toPics classiFied = Great Weekend! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10 tf

For sale: 2000 dodGe raM 1500 4x4 SLT Laramie club cab, V8 automatic. 80,000 miles. $4,500. (215) 595-4915 03-15 HoMe Wanted: Local couple looking to downsize into Princeton (in or adjacent to old Boro). Home with low/no maintenance priced to $700,000. Town homes/first floor condos with off-street parking preferred. Any condition. Buyers will pay brokers fee. Cash sale closing at seller’s convenience. Principals contact Kenneth Verbeyst- Broker Assoc, BHHS Fox Roach Realtors (609) 924-1600 or ken@verbeyst.com 03-01-3t tWo Princeton nassau st. oFFices: 2nd floor five office suite approx. 1,800 SF-$7,070/mo. 3rd floor single office approx. 435 SF-$1,500/mo. Tenant pays electric, landlord pays heat. (609) 213-5029. 02-15-5t adirondack cHalet & Guest caBin: Weekly summer rental on pristine St. Regis Lake only minutes from the charming resort town of Lake Placid. Sleeps up to 12. Includes canoe, row & sail boats. Beautiful mountain views. Mike at (609) 688-0368 or (518) 521-7088. 03-15

House cleaninG: By experienced Polish lady. Good prices. References available. Own transportation. Honest, reliable, excellent job. Free estimate. Please call Magda, (609) 372-6927. 02-22-4t aris’s cleaninG serVices: We can make your place sparkle! Providing residential / commercial cleaning services. Great references, bilingual (English/Spanish), reliable with own transportation & reasonable prices. Call Aris for a free estimate: (347) 231-9842. 03-01-3t Princeton rental: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf GroWinG YounG FaMilY lookinG For a HoMe to cHerisH and not a tear down turned ‘McMansion’. Min 3 beds/2 baths in Princeton boro/township, understand some work may need to be put into the house. Negotiable up to $600,000. Email NeedPrincetonHome@gmail.com or call Town Topics (609) 924-2200 to leave your contact info. Please no Realtors. tf HandYMan: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

SELL YOUR HOME NOW • WE PAY CASH

• NO HOMEOWNER INSPECTION

• WE PAY TOP DOLLAR

• NO REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS

• WE BUY HOMES IN ANY CONDITION

• NO HIDDEN COSTS

• WE BUY VACANT LAND

• NO HASSLE

• QUICK AND EASY CLOSING

• FREE NO OBLIGATION QUOTE

Phone 609-430-3080

www.heritagehomesprinceton.com heritagehomesbuilders@gmail.com Igor L. Barsky, Lawrence Barsky

Let us show you how to protect what you’ve worked so hard to earn.

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area Princeton professional office looking for a part time administrative

assistance, 9am to 1pm.

Please contact Tom Petrone 609-306-8997

IN PRINT. ONLINE. AT HOME.

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 34

stockton real estate, llc

well loved and well read since 1946

Rider

Furniture

“Fine Quality Home Furnishings at Substantial Savings”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15

609-924-0147 www.riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

AmEx, M/C & Visa

princetonmagazine.com

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

Innovative Design • Expert Installation s)NNOVATIVE$ESIGN Professional Care s%XPERT)NSTALLATION Ph 908-284-4944 Fx 908-788-5226 s0ROFESSIONAL#ARE dgreenscapes@embarqmail.com License #13VH06981800 Ph-908-284-4944 Fax-908-788-5226

A. Pennacchi and Sons, Inc dgreenscapes@embarqmail.com

ICONIC MASONRY License #13VH02102300

For Over 70 Years

You’ve earned the good things in life. Let us help you protect them. With Borden Perlman, you get the benefit of over 100 years’ experience, expert service, plus a local team of specialists dedicated to helping you. To learn more give us a call today.

Brick • Stone • Stucco • Installation • Restoration Preservation of all masonry and concrete structures Small repairs promptly addressed

a.pennacchi.com • 609.394.7354

Serving our community for over 100 years. 609-896-3434 ■ BordenPerlman.com

Home

Auto

Boat

Va l u a b l e s

4 Generations of Excellence Proudly serving Princeton since 1947 Deal directly with Paul G. Pennacchi Sr. Call Paul at 609.203.0033


35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017

Weichert

®

Real Estate Mortgages Closing Services Insurance

PRINCETON, Move into this bright, 3-yearold Colonial that is just a short distance from schools, Community Park pool, Princeton Shopping center and town. Features include five bedrooms, four full- and one-half baths and gleaming hardwood floors throughout. Upgrades include stainless-steel appliances and a fully finished basement. Outside offers a paver patio and fenced yard. $1,410,000 Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

CHARMING LITTLEBROOK HOME PRINCETON, Appealing, expanded 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape in pristine condition. Special features include HW, stone floors, 2 wood-burning FPs and a galley-style kitchen w/ granite. $750,000 Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEAR TOWN PRINCETON, An updated Victorian house located on a desirable “tree street” with 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, in the heart of the old Boro. Not to be missed. $1,049,000 Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

LOVELY PRINCETON HOME

AMAZING OPPORTUNITY

PRINCETON, A fabulous Colonial in the Western section of Princeton w/ 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths & a fantastic kitchen. Situated on a lovely lot near town, schools & community pool. $1,175,000 Linda Twining 609-439-2282 (cell)

ROCKY HILL, Located on nearly 3 acres w/ single family home & 2 oversized 2-car garages ready for renovation, reinvention & possible expansion/subdivision. $449,000 Denise Varga 609-439-3605 (cell)

Princeton Office www.weichert.com 609-921-1900

Weichert

,

Realtors

®


COLDWELL BANKER DE CU -S LAC

CO

PO

O

L

NS NEW TR UC TIO N

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE PRINCETON

145 Ridgeview Circle, Princeton Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 5 Beds, 5.5 Baths • $1,895,000 ROC GRE KWEL EN L

181 Crusher Road, Hopewell Twp Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 5 Beds, 4.5 Baths • $999,999 LI NE ST W IN G

L BR ITT OO LE K

19 Benedek Road, Lawrence Twp Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 5 Beds, 5.5 Baths • $1,195,000

44 Scribner Court, Princeton Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $1,249,000

34 Wood Hollow Road, West Windsor Twp Donna Reilly & Ellen Calman, Sales Associates 5 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $699,000

32 Music Mountain Boulevard, West Amwell Twp Howard Young, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $539,000

91 Eleanor Drive, South Brunswick Twp Kathleen Miller, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $629,000 BA FINIS SE HE ME D NT

N PR EW IC LY ED

548 Princeton Kingston Road, Princeton Kathleen Miller, Sales Associate 3 Beds, 2 Baths • $739,000

10 Scudder Court, Pennington Boro Heidi A. Hartmann, Sales Associate 4 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $775,000 LI NE ST W IN G

PO

O

L

6 FA ACR RM E

210 Constitution Drive, Princeton Gail Zervos, Sales Associate 6 Beds, 4.5 Baths • $1,995,000

N PR EW IC LY ED

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, mARCh 15, 2017 • 36

CB Princeton Town Topics 3.15.17.qxp_CB Previews 3/13/17 12:00 PM Page 1

929 Route 518, Montgomery Twp Coldwell Banker Princeton 3 Beds, 2 Baths • $452,500

190 Fountayne Lane, Lawrence Twp William Chulamanis, Sales Associate 2 Beds, 2.5 Baths • $349,900

10 Nassau Street | Princeton | 609-921-1411 www.ColdwellBankerHomes.com/Princeton ©2016 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International, the Coldwell Banker Previews International logo and “Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate” are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper March 15, 2017  

Witherspoon Media Group

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you