Page 1

Volume LXXIII, Number 11

Princeton Spotlight Pages 26 - 31 Tenth Annual HomeFront ArtJam . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Former Charleston Mayor Shares Story of Revitalization . . . . . . . . .7 Council Introduces 2019 Budget . . . . . . . . .9 Exploring Corngold’s Epic Walter Kaufmann . . . .13 PU Orchestra Presents Concerto Competition Winners . . . . . . . . . . . .14 PU Men’s Hoops Stephens Has Emotional Jadwin Finale . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Wildberg Makes Historic Leap for PHS Boys’ Track . . . . . . . . 36

www.towntopics.com

Princeton Protestors, Experts at State House Press Peace Agenda

Calling for the option of U.S. military intervention to be taken off the table completely in Venezuela, about 30 demonstrators gathered on Nassau Street in Palmer Square on Monday, carrying signs reading “No U.S. War in Venezuela!” The event, sponsored by the Princetonbased Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) in collaboration with Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), started at 5 p.m. and lasted about an hour. Demonstrators urged passers-by to write to members of Congress asking them to sponsor the Prohibiting Unauthorized Military Action in Venezuela Act. They also distributed fliers, which stated: “The U.S. is trying to overthrow the Maduro government with military threats, economic warfare, and diplomatic isolation. But the solutions for the problems in Venezuela are for the Venezuelans to decide. The peace movement must oppose U.S. intervention and support a resolution through peaceful dialogue!” CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore applauded the collaboration with the DSA, which he called “an important force for progressive causes.” He added, “It’s important to seek synergy and do activities collaboratively. We all need each other.”

75¢ at newsstands

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Bill Introduced Opposing Choir College Sale Six members of the New Jersey Assembly have introduced a resolution that opposes Rider University’s sale of Westminster Choir College to a for-profit company partially owned by the Chinese government, saying it could jeopardize national security. Assemblyman Harold “Hal” Wirths, a Republican who represents Morris, Sussex, and Warren counties, introduced the bill on March 5. It is co-sponsored by fellow Republican Assemblymen Parker Space, Robert Auth, John Di Maio, Erik Peterson, and Kevin J. Rooney. The bill is also expected to be submitted to the New Jersey Senate. “Given that Kaiwen Education, formerly a steel company, does not have a history in higher education, particularly professional music training, and with the multitude of world-class scientists, researchers, and institutions located in Princeton, it appears that the Chinese government may be using the guise of academia to infiltrate the choir college for nefarious purposes, including the collection of United States intelligence and intellectual property theft,” their statement reads. The resolution is the latest effort to

block the sale of the Choir College, which merged with Rider in 1992. Rider president Gregory Dell’Omo announced in 2016 that Rider was seeking a buyer for Westminster. In October 2017, it was announced that the new owner would be a Chinese company, Kaiwen Education, which was offering $40 million for the Princeton campus, plus another $16 million to be invested in programs and infrastructure. While Rider has entered into a purchase

and sale agreement with Kaiwen, there are two lawsuits pending, as well as an arbitration case by the Rider chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). A decision by the New Jersey Attorney General’s office on whether the sale is legal is expected in the next week, according to Constance Fee, president of the Westminster Foundation and an alumna of the renowned music school. Continued on Page 8

Ten-Year Renovation Transforms Princeton U’s Firestone Library After 10 years, Princeton University has completed the renovation of its main campus library, the Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library, and the result is “a building to support modern library services and contemporary approaches to scholarship,” the University reports, with lots more light, open spaces, and flexible study and work areas. “In short,” a University press release states, “the goal was to transform Firestone Library into an innovative 21st-

century library,” and the transformations are dramatically visible on each of the six main floors. The classic Gothic exterior of the 70-year-old library, one of the largest open-stack libraries in existence, has been maintained, but the decade of renovations has changed virtually every space in the 430,000-square-foot interior. The renovation also incorporated a number of sustainable features to improve Continued on Page 10

Resolution 230 Karlie Lund and PU Women’s Hockey Headed to NCAAs . . . . . . . . . 33 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .24, 25 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classified Ads . . . . . . 42 Dining & Entertainment . . . 21 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Music/Theater . . . . . . 15 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 19 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 40 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 8 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 42 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 41 School Matters . . . . . . . 7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

Earlier in the day Moore, along with Princeton University physicists and nuclear weapons experts Zia Mian and Frank von Hippel, testified in support of anti-nuclear Resolution 230 at a hearing before the New Jersey State Assembly Science, Innovation, and Technology Committee. Resolution 230, which urges the federal government to ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and pursue other measures to reduce the danger of nuclear war, passed the committee, which Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker chairs. He will be requesting that it go before the full Assembly later this month. “As a scientist who has colleagues who work on nuclear nonproliferation issues, this is a topic that deeply, deeply concerns me,“ Zwicker said. “I’m aware of the horrible destruction, devastation, loss of life, and change of environment that would occur if anyone were to use nuclear weapons.”

READY FOR SOME PIE: Area youths took their places for Saturday’s Pie Throwing competition, which began at 3:14 p .m . in Palmer Square . It was part of the 10th annual Pi Day Princeton celebration, which continues on March 14, Albert Einstein’s birthday . Participants share their favorite Pi Day activities in this week’s Town Talk on page 6 . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Experience

Continued on Page 10

OVATION-WORTHY

Call for information: 609-331-9117

1 Riverwalk | Plainsboro | ovationatriverwalk.com

Active Adult Living


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 2

Experience

Afternoon Tea Daily 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Reservations Are Required · Refined Teas · Tea sandwiches · Freshly baked scones · House-made sweets $65 per person Enhance your experience with a champagne flight & caviar for $95

609-924-1707 • 20 Bayard Lane • Princeton, NJ 08540 • www.PeacockInn.com

*APY = “Annual Percentage Yield”. Offer valid on NEW MONEY ONLY. Transfer from existing accounts at The Bank of Princeton/MoreBank permitted ONLY with the additional deposit of $50,000 NEW MONEY. Offer valid on a 24 month CD with a minimum opening deposit of $500 and a maximum deposit of $1,000,000 per tax ID. Non-Interest bearing checking account must be opened with a minimum balance of $500 (or Direct Deposit of Payroll or Social Security check into the new checking account) to receive 2.65% APY. The checking account must remain open for the duration of the CD. The $500 minimum balance is required in the non-interest checking for the 24 month CD term unless the Direct Deposit option is used. Rate of 2.60% APY will apply if the customer does not open a checking account. Once the initial 24 month CD time has elapsed, the CD will roll over for an additional 24 month CD at the prevailing interest rate. This will continue until customer notifies the bank within ten (10) days of the maturity date. Promotion begins at 9:00 AM EST on October 2, 2018; subject to change or cancellation without notice. Early withdrawal penalty may apply; fees may reduce earnings. Other terms and conditions may apply.

2.65

%

APY*

24 MONTH CD

Making a Difference with Fourteen Convenient Locations in New Jersey & Pennsylvania

www.thebankofprinceton.com 609.921.1700


ELECTRICAL INC. Luxury Living

CIFELLI T

ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. own ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial

A Tradition of Quality since 1963

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial www.cifellielectrical.com www.cifellielectrical.com ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. ELECTRICAL INC. CIFELLI

Renovations Service Panel Upgrades www.cifellielectrical.com Renovations Service PanelFans Upgrades Paddle Service Panel Upgrades

Renovations Residential & Commercial Paddle Paddle Fans Fans Service Panel Upgrades ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Residential & Commercial Residential & Commercial Cifelli Electrical INC. Inc. ELECTRICAL

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Paddle Fans ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Cifelli Inc. CifelliElectrical Electrical Inc. Residential & Commercial Authorized Authorizeddealer dealerfor forsales, sales, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR installation and startup installation and startup Cifelli Electrical Inc.

R

REGENT

Flooring • Kitchen • Bath

Authorized sales, Authorized dealer Authorized dealer forsales, sales, Authorizeddealer dealerfor for sales, installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup installation and startup 609-921-3238 Renovations Authorized Authorizeddealer dealerfor forsales, sales, Lic #11509A 609-921-3238 609-921-3238

and installation andstartup startup Serviceinstallation Panel Bonded and Insured Renovations Renovations Upgrades Lic #11509A Lic #11509A Service Panel Bondedand and Insured ServingPanel Princeton areas Service Paddle Fans Bonded andsurrounding Insured Upgrades Renovations Upgrades Lic #11509A Interior and ServingPanel Princeton and surrounding areas Paddle Fans Service Bondedand and surrounding Insured Exterior ServingLighting Princeton areas Paddle Fans Upgrades Interior and Interior and ServingLighting Princeton and surrounding areas Exterior Paddle Fans

609-921-3238

Exterior Lighting Certified Tesla Interior and Exterior Lighting Car Charging www.cifellielectrical.com Station Installers

#7 Route 31 North | Pennington, NJ 08534

609-921-3238 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A 609-921-3238 www.cifellielectrical.com Bonded and Insured www.cifellielectrical.com 609-921-3238 Lic #11509A Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

Serving the Princeton Area since 1963

Bondedand and Insured Serving Princeton surrounding areas

Carpet • Hardwood • Vinyl • Laminate Window Treatments • Kitchen/Bath Remodeling Natural Stone/QUARTZ tops • Cabinets/Vanities Sinks/Faucets • Shower Doors/Glass enclosures

(609)737-2466

Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Bonded and Insured www.cifellielectrical.com Lic #11509A Bonded and Serving Princeton and Insured surrounding areas Lic #11509A

Serving Princeton and surrounding areas

Topics

Celebrating 50 Years

CUSTOM MADE50 FURNITURE Celebrating Years Celebrating 50 Years ENJOY SHOPPING FULL CelebratingOUR OverSHOWROOM 52 Years

ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOM FULL Celebrating 50 Years OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF ENJOY SHOPPING OUR SHOWROOMAND FULL OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS OF EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL EARLY AMERICAN EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL AND OF HANDCRAFTED REPRODUCTIONS EARLY AMERICAN, COLONIAL ANDOF SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL PRINTS, COLONIAL SHAKER WELL PRINTS, EARLYFURNITURE AMERICAN, AS COLONIAL AND SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.RPRINTS, DIMES SHAKER SHAKER FURNITURE AS WELL PRINTS, JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R DIMES JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R DIMES FURNITURE,WINDSOR WINDSORCHAIRS CHAIRS, UNIQUE JONATHAN CHARLES AND D.R DIMES FURNITURE, WINDSOR UNIQUE FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS, UNIQUE JONATHAN CHARLES FURNITURE GIFTS, AND CHAIRS, MORE FURNITURE, WINDSOR CHAIRS, UNIQUE GIFTS, AND MORE D.R. DIMES GIFTS, ANDFURNITURE MORE Do GIFTS, AND MORE PRINTS, UNIQUE GIFTSyou ANDhave MORE!that

Do you perfect piecethat of Do you have have that Do you have that perfect piece of furniture in mind perfect piece of perfect piece of furniture mind but can’t in find it? furniture mind furniture ininmind but can’t find it? but can’tfind findit? it? but can’t

Talk to us! Talk us! We specialize Talkintoto tous! us! Talk

custom made furniture We in We specialize in We specialize specialize in Call Now to Order Your and will make it for you. custom made furniture custom made made furniture custom furniture Custom Made Furniture. Hours: Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sun. it 1-5 and by appointment and will make it for for you. and will make you. and will make for you. Visit our showroom today!

Hours: Sun. 1-5 and by appointment Hours:Fri. Fri.& Sat.10-5; 10-5;is 1-5 Where Rosemont? Hours: Fri. &&Sat. Sat. 10-5; Sun. 1-5 and andby byappointment appointment

Only 20 miles from Princeton!

Where is Rosemont? Rosemont? Where is 6 miles from New Hope 10 miles from Flemington Where is Rosemont? Only 20 miles from Rte.Only 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5Princeton! miles N. of Stockton) 20 miles from Princeton! Only 20 from Princeton! 6 miles fromNew New•miles Hope 10 www.canefarmfurniture.com 6609-397-0606 miles from Hope 10 miles milesfrom fromFlemington Flemington 6 miles from New Hope NJ (1.5 10 miles from Flemington Rte.519, 519,Rosemont, Rosemont, Rte. NJ (1.5 miles milesN. N.ofofStockton) Rte. 519, Rosemont, NJ (1.5 miles N. of Stockton) Stockton) 609-397-0606 • www.canefarmfurniture.com

609-397-0606 609-397-0606 •• www.canefarmfurniture.com www.canefarmfurniture.com

Ready to get started on your kitchen or bath renovation project? Cranbury Design Center listens to your ideas and then uses color drawings of your space to help make your vision a reality. We assist with design decisions, cabinet, countertop and hardware selections, and finishing touches like backsplash tile and paint colors. Call or come in to see us in our showroom to get started on your remodel. We look forward to meeting you!

145 West Ward Street, Hightstown NJ cranburydesigncenter.com | (609) 448-5600 CDC-Town Topics 031319 REV.indd 1

3/12/19 4:42 PM

3 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

CIFELLI CIFELLI CIFELLI ELECTRICAL INC.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

Manufacturing Demos at Old Barracks Museum

®

Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946

DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director MONICA SANKEY Advertising Director JENNIFER COVILL Account Manager/Social Media Marketing CHARLES R. PLOHN Senior Account Manager JOANN CELLA Account Manager ERIN TOTO Account Manager

LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor DONALD GILPIN, ANNE LEVIN, STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, TAYLOR SMITH, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL, KAM WILLIAMS Contributing Editors FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, CHARLES R. PLOHN, ERICA M. CARDENAS Photographers USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $52.50/yr (Princeton area); $56.50/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $59.50/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

DAVE BRIGGS Senior National Account Manager

Witherspoon Media Group 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818

GINA HOOKEY Classified Ad Manager

Periodicals Postage Paid in Princeton, NJ USPS #635-500 Postmaster, please send address changes to: P.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528

(ISSN 0191-7056)

On Saturday, March 23 and Sunday, March 24, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Old Barracks Museum will relive the winter of 1777-1778, when Washington’s troops were experiencing the harsh Winter at Valley Forge. Demonstrations by 18th century carpenters, tailors, cordwainers and shoemakers, hatters, gunsmiths, laundresses, clerks, and members of the local militia will be held all day, both days. Musket demonstrations will take place at 12 and 3 p.m. Shaun A. Pekar will discuss shoe manufacturing during the American Revolution and show why the fledgling American Army faced constant footwear shortages and how they dealt with them. At 1 p.m., Jim Casco will present “Gunsmithing: Then and Now” and detail how the craft of gunsmithing changed over time. On Sunday at 1 p.m., Robert Smith will discuss his book, Manufacturing Independence : Industrial Innovation in the American Revolution. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, and free for children under 6 and active U.S. military members. The Old Barracks Museum is located at 101 Barrack Street in Trenton.

Correction

FUNDS FOR RESEARCH: Between Blue Point Grill’s 2019 Pink Pearl Night and Witherspoon Grill’s Pink Drink Night, JM Group raised $19,600 for the YWCA Princeton’s Breast Cancer Resource Center, which provides women with personalized programs enabling them to live with, and beyond, breast cancer. The staff thanks all who supported Pink Pearl Night, which featured an eight-course seafood experience.

In the story “Tenth Annual Pi Day Event is More Varied Than Ever” [March 6], it was stated that Albert Einstein emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1933 for political reasons. It was because of anti-Semitism.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Open Houses on Princeton Theological Seminary Redevelopment: Wednesday and Thursday, March 13 and 14, 7 p.m., at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Citizenship Classes: The Latin American Task Force offers classes to prepare immigrants for the Naturalization Interview required to become a U.S. citizen, at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, Wednesdays from 7-8:30 p.m. for eight weeks starting April 30. Free. Call (609) 924-9529 ext. 1220. Bridge Replacement: Mercer County is replacing two structures on Route 518 over a branch of Bedens Brook in Hopewell Township, located between Elm and Aunt Molly roads. The project is expected to take approximately until mid-August, weather permitting. Alexander Road Closure: From March 16-24, weather permitting, the road will be closed from Canal Pointe to Faculty Road, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays; and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekends; as part of the bridge replacement project. Nominations Needed: The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce is seeking nominations for its annual Women of Achievement Awards. The deadline is March 29. The ceremony will take place at Jasna Polana on June 20. Visit www.princetonchamber,org for information. Ask-a-Lawyer: On Wednesday, March 27 from 7 to 8:30 p.m., free legal advice on immigration and other issues will be offered free at Princeton Public Library’s 2nd floor conference room. Call (609) 9249529 ext. 1220 for information. The library is at 65 Witherspoon Street. Volunteer to Help Wildlife: The Mercer County Wildlife Center needs volunteers to help treat birds, mammals, and reptiles. Orientation sessions are March 16 and 24. Contact Jane Rakos-Yates at jrakosyates@ mercercounty.org for more information. Free Income Tax Assistance: AARP Tax-Aide offers free tax preparation assistance at Princeton Senior Resource Center (609) 924-7108 and Nassau Presbyterian Church (bilingual assistance). Call for appointments at PSRC; walk-ins are welcome at the church. Spring Rabies Clinic: Princeton Health Department offers this service for cats and dogs of any New Jersey resident at the Princeton Fire Department, 363 Witherspoon Street, on Saturday, March 30 from 10 a.m. to noon. Also offered are microchip services for $25. For information, visit princetonnj.gov/health.

Nicole Schrader, MD FACS

Double Board-Certified Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Fellow of the American College of Surgeons

Introducing our new PA Shannon Monaghan

A Balanced Approach formonths, a Natural Look In coming Shannon will be assisting

and offering treatments including Botox, fillers, photofacials, PRP facials, and hair restoration. We look forward to our journey together!

• Face and neck lift • Liposuction • Lip and chin augmentation

• Rhinoplasty • Laser and peels • Botox • Fillers and fat grafting

• Novalash • Eyelid lift • Microdermabrasions • Nano fat grafting

Now seeing patients in Princeton, 609-279-0009 schraderplasticsurgery.com Robbinsville and Voorhees

609-279-0009 schraderplasticsurgery.com


HomeFront’s ArtJam Features Works By More Than 125 Artists

One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Featuring the works of m ore t ha n 125 ar t is t s, HomeFront’s ArtJam will transform a vacant Palmer Square storefront into a colorful, art-filled pop-up gallery from March 29 to April 16. The ArtJam gallery at 19

urbanagendamagazine.com

WHAT’S HAPPENING Ken Ludwig’s

The Gods of Comedy

Directed by Amanda Dehnert A HILARIOUSLY DIVINE COMEDY FILLED WITH MADCAP MAYHEM, A TOUCH OF ROMANCE, AND LOTS OF LAUGHS!

FRIDAY, MARCH 15

Ranky Tanky

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 Wu Man, pipa

with Yang Yi, zheng SUNDAY, MARCH 17

Omar Sosa & Seckou Keita

Transparent Water MONDAY, MARCH 18

Jan Lisiecki, piano

AND MORE TICKETS START AT $25 mccarter.org

609.258.2787 Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment of the Arts

The Edward T. Cone Foundation Kai Yue Foundation

NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

Hulfish Street will include a rotating display of art for sale, including paintings, potter y, glassworks, and hand-sewn items, created by professional international, national, and local artists, including previously undiscovered artists who have experienced homelessness.

TOPICS

Of the Town

NOW - MARCH 31

Sponsored by

One returning artist is Emily “estrange” Lewis, who was homeless when she first participated in ArtJam, but now has a degree from Parsons School of Design and is a successful artist. Another Artspace artist, Aileen O., described her journey: “I left working as a registered nurse in a level 1 trauma burn surgical intensive care unit and was broken; I took care of others with intensity and passion, but neglected myself. Through HomeFront’s WorkFirst program I came to ArtSpace; “ArtJam invites art lov- it’s been the mental, physiers to experience a double cal, emotional, and spiritual win, buying artworks they boost I needed so intensely.” love and supporting a good Continued on Next Page cause,” stated HomeFront in the announcement of its 10 t h annual A r t Jam event HomeFront describes its ArtSpace program, through which many of the works were generated, as “a therapeutic art program, a special place where the creative process becomes a tool for s e lf- e x pr e s s ion, c r it i c a l thinking, and problem-solving that can change the lives of the artists.” ArtSpace/SewingSpace Director Ruthann Traylor pointed out the extraordinary level of community support for ArtJam. “There’s a lot of good energy, and because there’s so much good energy, things just fall into place,” she said, noting that in addition to 125 plus artists, there are more than 60 volunteers helping to staff the gallery, and more than 40 local businesses providing food, gift cards, and other support services. “It takes a lot of effort from volunteers and sponsors to put together this fundraising activity,” said Traylor. “But it is so wonderful to receive the community support and build awareness of HomeFront’s mission. When you’re doing something good, people want to get on board. We’re delighted that Palmer Square is giving us the space and all these businesses are helping us with the food.” Traylor described some of the HomeFront artists whose work will be on display at ArtJam. “We include the self-taught,” she said. “We have artists who are living in HomeFront’s Family Preservation Center who have never exhibited ar t work before.”

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton

Photo: Wu Man

www.princetonmagazinestore.com

15 16 19

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

HOMEFRONT ARTISTS: From left, Terri F., Aileen O’Neill, and Creassya Y. display their artistic creations. HomeFront’s ArtJam, featuring the work of more than 125 artists, will take place from March 29 to April 16 in a vacant Palmer Square storefront. (Photo courtesy of HomeFront)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 6

HomeFront’s ArtJam Continued from Preceding Page

Spring 2019 Lapidus Lecture in American Jewish Studies

heYiddish

Columbus 

Critical Counter-History and the Remapping of American Jewish Literature ednesday arch



13

ďœ´:ďœłďœ° p.m.

McCormick Hall, Room 101

achel ubinstein

Professor of American Literature & Jewish Studies Hampshire College

Organized by the Program in American Studies Cosponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Program in Judaic Studies

ams.princeton.edu/events/yiddish-columbus

She continued, “Since preschool age, I have always loved creating ar t. ArtSpace can be seen as a luxury, yet what it offers is essential for the soul. To be given permission to stop the daily bustle and rush, to be allowed, encouraged, supported in the pursuit of creativity—priceless.� Another HomeFront artist, Nashea, sees ArtSpace as a chance “to have some peace of mind.� ArtSpace for her is a vital part of HomeFront. “It’s great for the people who live here,� she said. “It really helps to block out everything else going on. It stands as a sanctuary for those who live here.� In reflecting on the value of ArtJam, Traylor stated, “Spring is a time of transformation. Through transforming this small corner of Palmer Square, we are bringing art and the story of HomeFront to the Princeton community.� HomeFront founder and CEO Connie Mercer added, “We do more than provide shelter. We help people gain skills for self-empowerment and develop a vision of a better future for themselves and their children.� The ArtJam opening reception w ill be held on Friday, March 29, and it is open to the public from 5 to 9 p.m. In addition to art for sale, during its 19-day run ArtJam will also feature live music performances, private parties, and artist demos. —Donald Gilpin

Chamber To Combine With Entrepreneurial Network

END-of-SEASON

EXTRA SAVINGS

POSSUM-MERINO SWEATERS HANDWOVEN AUTHENTIC LODEN COATS TAKE an EXTRA $100 OFF THE CURRENT SALE PRICE

of every

JACKET

TAKE an EXTRA $200 OFF THE CURRENT SALE PRICE

of every AUTHENTIC LODEN COAT & JACKET

TAKE an EXTRA $50 OFF THE CURRENT SALE PRICE

of every Possum-Merino SWEATER

HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! IN STORE ONLY! NO PHONE, NO MAIL, NO INTERNET ORDERS! END-of-SEASON SALE SHOP HOURS Monday-Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. OPEN SUNDAYS: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

102 NASSAU STREET (across from the university) • PRINCETON, NJ • (609) 924-3494

www.landauprinceton.com

John Goedecke, chairman of the Princeton Regional Chamber of Com merce, and Lou Wagman, executive director of the New Jersey Entrepreneurial Net work ( NJEN ), have announced that their two organizations have agreed to consolidate. As a nonprofit organization, NJEN connects investors, business executives, and the overall community to useful information. NJEN will combine with the Princeton Regional Chamber’s Technology Business Association, bringing its 25 years of experience and contacts to the Chamber. “Innovation and entrepreneurship are the backbones of creativ it y. Combining these two business organizations reflects the importance that the Chamber places on supporting innovation that leads to increased new business development,� said Goedecke, who was involved in the consolidation along with Wagman and Peter Crowley, president and CEO of the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce. “We are pleased to be part of an organization that suppor ts innovation and entrepreneurial initiatives throughout New Jersey,� said Wagman. By building a stronger net work, the organizations are hoping to increase innovation and creativity, helping businesses and entrepreneurs gain more success. Crowley added, “The combination of these two organizations will result in the Chamber better recognizing and discovering new business opportunities. We are thrilled to welcome NJEN as part of our Chamber.�

Š TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What is your favorite Pi Day Princeton activity?� (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Ellan: “Shoving my face in pie at the Pie Eating Contest!� Logan: “Of course, it would be the Pi Recitation. I memorized 123 digits of pi!� —Ellan, Joo, and Logan Yoon, Cliffside Park

Allyson: “The memorization contest. I did not participate but I really would like to next year.� —Allyson, right, and Sandy Dominguez, Somerset

Jayden: “My favorite thing today was throwing a pie at my big brother. I tricked him into it and he wasn’t thrilled! I also was a judge for the Look-Alike Contest. I’m a lifetime judge since I won in the contest’s second year.� Tom: “Getting hit with Jayden’s pie was easily my favorite part of the day.� —Jayden Hunt, right, Cream Ridge with Tom Mirabella, Brick

Jackson: “My favorite part was the Pie Throwing competition, of course. I got to throw pies, but also got hit right in the face and am super sticky. It tasted good too!� Max: “Everything! I loved it all. A couple of year ago I put chocolate sauce on some guy’s hair. That was great, and hilarious.� Kingston: “The Pie Throwing competition. Getting hit in the face by my mom was hilarious. I love her even more.� —Jackson Lipsey, Max Stachowicz, and Kingston Lipsey, all of Princeton


Joseph P. Riley, Jr., whose four decades as mayor of Charleston, North Carolina, transformed the city from an urban wasteland to a highly desirable place to live, visit, and do business, came to Princeton last week to share his success story. Riley was invited by The Princeton Festival, which is celebrating its 15th anniversary and looking to the popular, annual Spoleto Festival USA, which Riley is credited with establishing

in Charleston, for inspiration. On Thursday evening at Monument Hall, he spoke to some 30 local merchants, business, and municipal leaders about the key role the summer arts festival, and historic preservation, played in Charleston’s revival. “Our vision is to become a destination festival,” said Benedikt Von Schroeder, a board member of The Princeton Festival, upon introducing Riley. “We want to enhance Princeton’s role as a

cultural destination over the next 15 years.” Efforts to establish the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston as a sister to the Festival of the 2 Worlds in Spoleto, Italy, were stymied at first. “Plenty of people wondered why we were getting involved with this Italian arts festival,” Riley said. “There was this challenge of fundraising and communicating why it was important. And we sold it. Because the arts are a multiplier of en-

School Matters 101: Fund Benefit to Support PHS Graduates The Ides O’ March Madness, the annual 101: Fund benefit and silent auction in support of scholarships for Princeton High School (PHS) graduates with financial need, will be held at Princeton University’s Cloister Inn eating club on Saturday March 16 at 7 p.m. Guests are encouraged to come dressed casually in Irish green, togas, or their favorite March Madness team jersey. “Our annual benefit event, Ides O’ March Madness, follows our tradition of hosting a fun, informal theme party that connects the Princeton and Cranbury communities,” said 101: Fund Benefit Co-Chair Roxanne List. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with friends and neighbors, while supporting a local cause that’s meaningful to the PHS community.” Tickets start at $125 per person, and can be purchased at the door or online at www. fund101.org. Founded in 1970 and operating as the Princeton Regional Scholarship Foundation until 2008, the 101: Fund has provided more than $1 million in aid to PHS seniors over the past 12 years.

PDS Announces Summer Research Internships Seven Princeton Day School juniors in this year’s Research Experience (REx) program, directed by science teacher Carrie Norin, have secured research-based summer internships at an array of prestigious universities and other institutions around the country. Krista Caasi will study the epidemiology of depression at Harvard University/Massachusetts General Hospital; Andrew Ciccarone will investigate fatigue performance on steel highway bridges in Lehigh University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Alex DiNovi will focus on modeling Arctic Sea ice melt at Princeton University/ NOAA; and Fechi Inyama will measure bioaccumulation of contaminants in wetlands in Rutgers University’s Department of Environmental Sciences. Madison Izzard will analyze movement ecology of sharks at the University of Rhode Island Department of Biological Sciences; Sachin Patel will investigate understanding language recovery after a stroke at Johns Hopkins University Center of Excellence in Stroke Detection and Diagnosis; and Luigi Soriano will investigate the genomics of neuroblastoma at Harvard University/Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

ergy, vision, enthusiasm, and culture. For Charleston, you can date it before Spoleto, and after Spoleto.” The city was “down at the heels” in the mid-1970s, Riley said. “It still had not really recovered from the Civil War. The heart of the city was a vacant lot. It was pretty beat up. And we knew the festival would give it renewed energy.” Riley’s administration was careful to involve the local community from the beginning, he said. The festival began small but now includes 17 days of performances ranging from free concerts on the waterfront and steps of the city’s Customs House, to ticketed events in theaters. “We wanted to make it accessible to everyone,” Riley said. “We wanted the community to feel that the festival was theirs, at all incomes. It gave citizens the membership in the big deal, even if they weren’t at the expensive performances.” During a question and answer period, resident Joel Schwartz asked Riley how the city had turned abandoned buildings into affordable housing. It has been a priority from the beginning of the city’s revival, Riley responded. “We didn’t want to lose any structures. And we believed strongly in affordable housing,” he said. “We created a world-class shelter for the homeless and we formed some housing nonprofits, one at a time. That kept these houses from coming down, in neighborhoods that had been falling apart. Restoring them became developmental. It saved our city and kept neighborhoods intact.”

James Steward, director of the Princeton University Ar t Museum, asked how much existing infrastructure was used in establishing the Spoleto festival in the city. “It wasn’t huge. We had one great space for chamber music, but not much else,” Riley said. Jill Barry, director of Morven Museum and Garden, asked how long it took to see the growth the city was seeking. Riley said that the festival’s founder, composer Gian Carlo Menotti, was “amazing but challenging, and that created some hiccups with the board. So it took about seven years. But we had a strategic plan, and we stuck to it.” R ich G it tleman of t he Princeton Merchants Association asked Riley how restrictive Charleston’s historic preservation laws were on the business community. Riley joked that the town’s historical society was often called the hysterical society. “But we’re very flexible in terms of adaptive reuse,” he said. “Every building saved is a vibrant achievement.” Asked about parking issues, Riley said Charleston did a study that recommended new parking facilities. “We made them, and

we made them beautiful,” he said. “We also put in trolleys to take people from the parking garage to the downtown.” To deal with gentrification, “ keep creating affordable housing,” he said. “That’s the pressing challenge in the American city. It’s a national issue.” Riley left municipal government in 2016, but is still active in Charleston and is currently a professor at his alma mater, The Citadel, in a professorship that has been named for him. His legacy project, Charleston’s International African American Museum located on the site of the wharf where enslaved Africans took their first steps in this country, is about to break ground. “He is a remarkable fellow,” said regional planner Ralph Widner, who was instrumental in bringing Riley, his friend for years, to Princeton. “When he took over, Charleston was very stagnant and the downtown was dead. It had a serious racial problem. He became a valiant civil rights leader and urban designer for the town. And you can see the results.” —Anne Levin

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Former Charleston Mayor Visits To Share Story of Revitalization

Serving the Princeton area for over 20 years

Residential & Office Cleaning Fully Insured Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager

609-683-5889

cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com www.cleanhousehappyhouse.com

For immediate attention, call the Princeton Renata for all your housecleaning and organizing needs.

PDS Honors John and Louise Wellemeyer Princeton Day School honored the vision, leadership, and generosity of longtime PDS community member John C. Wellemeyer and his wife Louise at a March 7 ceremony, officially naming the School’s STEAM facility the Wellemeyer STEAM Center. A 1952 graduate of Princeton Country Day School (predecessor to PDS) and past PDS parent, Wellemeyer has been a member of the PDS Board of Trustees since 2012, serving as chair of the Investment Committee. He has also served as class secretary, class agent, annual fund parent captain, and a member of the annual fund leadership gift committee. “His service leadership is also reflected in generous financial gifts, which have directly benefited programming across the School, none more so than STEAM curricula,” PDS noted.

NASA’s Weiss Visits YingHua International School Michael Weiss, retired NASA deputy program director on the Hubble Space Telescope program at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, visited the YingHua International School in Kingston recently, speaking with students in classrooms from third to eighth grade throughout the day. Weiss, who has appeared on NOVA, the Discovery Channel, NPR, and the BBC discussing the Hubble Telescope and serving missions, recounted first-hand experiences and presented videos on topics the students have been studying, including the training of astronauts, diving experiences, and the Big Bang theory. Weiss accumulated over 200 hours in NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in training Shuttle flight crews on servicing techniques and procedures, and he was involved in all five Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions.

Princeton Public Schools Win Sustainability Grants Five Princeton Public Schools have been awarded Sustainable Jersey for Schools (SJS) capacity-building grants. Johnson Park Elementary School, Littlebrook Elementary School, Riverside Elementary School, John Witherspoon Middle School, and Princeton High School will each receive the $2,000 grant, which is intended to assist the school green team as they lead and coordinate sustainability activities. The Princeton schools were among 47 in New Jersey selected to receive the grants, sponsored by SJS and the New Jersey Education Association.

Pennington School Literary Magazine Wins Award The Pennington School literary magazine, Pennyroyal, was one of only five in New Jersey to receive a “superior” rating in winning the National Council of Teachers of English’s (NCTE) Recognizing Excellence in Art and Literary Magazines Award. English teacher Jon Lemay was the advisor for the magazine, and the student editors included Caleigh Calhoun and Shae Calhoun of Stockton; Corrine Coakley, Megan Eckerson, and Julia Peters of Pennington; Ayanna Johnson of Ewing; and Emily Moini of Princeton.

Pennington School’s Odyssey Team Goes to State Finals The Pennington School’s Odyssey of the Mind teams placed first and third in the Coastal Plains Regional Tournament on March 2 in Columbus, New Jersey. For the eighth year in a row, the school’s first place team will advance to the state finals on April 6. Odyssey of the Mind is an international educational program that provides creative problem-solving opportunities ranging from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretations of literary classics.

SPRING LECTURE (starting Tuesday, March 26) FallSERIES lecture series

CHINA: MAO TOTomorrow NOW Computers inFROM Our Lives Today … and

On October 1, 1949, Mao Zedong declared the existence of the People’slecture Republic of China. The While you are spending a minute reading about our exciting series, what country had been fragmented, ravaged and impoverished by invasion, occupation and unendare other people doing on their computers? Meddling in elections? Conducting ing civil wars since 1911 when Imperial China fell. Mao and the Communist Party emerged the cyberwarfare? Plotting nuclear war?China Stealing from your victors from the constant battling and modern was forged. Hear bank leadingaccount? experts discuss what has happened since then. Replacing you with a robot? Or maybe something benign, like making art with computers, or music? Our speakers know this, and will share what they know These lectures are co-sponsored by the Princeton Adult School and the Community Auditing with you. You may leave scared, exhilarated, orRegional determined to learn more. Program of Princeton University’s Officeor of Community and Affairs. NOTE: Lectures will be held in the Friend Center Auditorium, William and Olden Streets. Register Oct. 16: Made in Automation: History of Computing at www.princetonadultschool.org or call 609-683-1101. $125 for the series or pay at the door. STEPHANIE DICK, Assistant Professor, Department of History and Please check the website for any changes in schedule. These lectures are co-sponsored by Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania Princeton Adult School and the Community Auditing Program of Princeton University’s Office of Community and Regional Affairs.the Risk of Accidental and Oct. 30: How Computers Increase Unauthorized Nuclear War BRUCE BLAIR, Research Scholar, Program on Science and Global Security, March 26 / Left Behind Children and Schooling in China Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University EMILY HANNUM, Professor of Sociology and Education and Associate Director, Population Nov. 6: PLOrk, theDepartment Princeton Laptop Orchestra: New Interfaces Studies Center, of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania for Musical Expression JEFFREY SNYDER, Director of Electronic Music and the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, April 2 / U.ofS. TradePrinceton with China: War or Peace? Department Music, University GENE GROSSMAN, Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics. Professor of Economics Nov. 13: Computers and the Visual Arts and International Affairs and Director, International Economics ANNE SPALTER, Digital Mixed-Media Artist, Anne Spalter Studios Section, Department of Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University Nov. 20: Computers and Voting Security ANDREW APPEL, Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science, Department of April 9 / Science, China under Xi Jinping Computer Princeton University RORY TRUEX, Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Department of Politics and the Nov. 27: Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University EDWARD FELTON, Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, and Director, Center for Information Technology Policy, Department of Computer Science and April 16Wilson / HowSchool Communist Was China”Princeton under Chairman Woodrow of Public and“Communist International Affairs, University Mao KARL GERTH, Member, Institute for Advanced Study and Professor, Department of History, UCSD Dec. 4: Tips on Online Privacy DAVID SHERRY, Chief Information Security Officer, Princeton University April 23 / Chinese Companies in the United States JI LI, Member, Institute for Advanced Study and Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School, Rutgers University Lectures will be held in the Princeton University Friend Center Auditorium, William and Olden Streets. www.princetonadultschool.org or call 609-683-1101 to register for the series or pay at the April 30 / Marriage andwebsite Family for in Contemporary door. Please check the any changes inChina the schedule. These lectures are co-sponsored YUPrinceton XIE, Bert G. Kerstetter Professor of Sociology and by Adult School’66 andUniversity the Community Auditing Program ofPIIRS, Princeton University’s Office of Community Regional Affairs. Department of Sociology and Director, Wythesand Center on Contemporary China, Princeton University


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 8

Westminster Sale continued from page one

If the sale is ruled to be illegal, the lawsuits will remain in place, Fee said. “At this point, the Foundation’s number one goal would be for Rider to come to their senses, and go back to the way things were. The second goal is to merge with a n ot h e r v iabl e p a r t n e r. There is a lot of research going on behind the scenes to make sure there is a Plan B in place.” Assemblyman Wirths said he became aware of the situation when alumni of Westminster reached out to him and other members of state government. “When I first heard about it, it was tough to imagine,” he said on Monday. “The Chinese gover nment has been in the news a lot lately. The more I looked into it, the more it didn’t make sense to me why they’d be buying a nearly 100-year-old choir college in Princeton.” T he resolut ion oppos ing the sale includes the statement, “Although often thought of as primarily a college town because of its association with Princeton University, Princeton is home to many worldrenowned research centers in high technology, defense, and cyber space, and is a center of studies for the United States Intelligence community.” “I think a lot of people don’t realize what is going on,” said Wirths. “The Chinese have been kicked out of 10 American colleges, as well as schools in Canada and the U.K. With Princeton home to world class scientists, this is about security.” Asked for comment about the resolution, Rider spokesperson Kristine Brown wrote in an email: “A f ter a comprehens ive process that concluded in

February 2018, Rider University determined that Kaiwen Education would be the best partner to achieve the stated goals of preserving and enhancing the Westminster brand, mission, and history. We are diligently taking the required steps to close this transaction and to ensure that the transition will be as smooth as possible for everyone. To that end, Rider and Kaiwen are working closely with all the required regulatory and legal authorities, at both the state and federal levels, as well as with the appropriate higher education accreditation organizations.” —Anne Levin

Landscaping Series From Lambertville Goes Wild

Lambertville Goes Wild (LGW) will sponsor a twopart learning series “Learn to Landscape: Dream, Design, and Detail” at the Lambertville Public Library, 6 Lilly Street. Lauren Kovacs, a landscape architect with over 10 years of experience in sustainable landscape design, will guide participants through their design practice: from dreaming up a garden style, through designing useful spaces, to understanding installation details. Session 1, “Dream,” will be held Saturday, March 23 from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Session 2: “Design,” is scheduled for Saturday, May 4 from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. This program is free and open to all, but space is limited, so participants are advised to come early to ensure a place in the class. Lambertville Goes Wild is a volunteer group working to promote wider use of native plants as a key part of its aim to certify Lambertville as a Community Wildlife Habitat recognized by the National Wildlife Federation. To reach its goal,

several public spaces, such as parks and schools, and about 100 private properties need to support native species such as butterflies, birds, and bees by providing food, water, cover, and places to raise young. More information is available at LambertvilleGoesWild.weebly.com and on the Lambertville Goes Wild Facebook page.

Mary Poppins Purim At The Jewish Center

T he Jew ish C enter of Princeton will celebrate the holiday of Purim with a Mary Poppins theme March 17-23. The programs are open to the public. The synagogue is at 435 Nassau Street. Purim commemorates the saving of the Jewish people from Haman, who was planning to kill all the Jews. This took place in the ancient Achaemenid Persian Empire. The story is recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther. It is also known as the Feast of Lots. The Pur im Car nival is Sunday, March 17. From 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., a Young Family Hour will be held. The entire community is invited to attend the carnival from noon to 2 p.m. The reading of the Megillah is Wednesday, March 20. At 5 p.m., young families are invited to attend. A community dinner is held at 5:45 p.m., followed by the reading. Then on Saturday, March 23, the synagogoue will hold a Shpiel and Party, starting at 7 p.m. with a program for young families with pre-school-aged children. At 7:45 p.m., a Havdalah service, family Megillah reading, and Purim Shpiel will follow. Tickets range from $5 to $30. To reserve tickets, email Dar yl Rothman at drothman@thejewishcenter.org.

HELPING HANDS: For four weeks culminating on Valentine’s Day, Princeton Youth Hockey Association’s 12U A 2006 team collected household cleaning and bedding products to benefit HomeFront, a nonprofit organization that aims to break the cycle of poverty and end homelessness in Central New Jersey. The team also helped HomeFront’s children learn to skate.

Princeton Awarded $10K pilot program which will the company remotely shut Sustainable Jersey Grant allow construction of 75 down the computer’s operat-

S u s t a i n ab l e P r i n c e to n a n d S u s t a i n ab l e J e r s e y have announced that Princeton has been awarded a $10,000 Sustainable Jersey grant funded by the Gardinier Env ironmental Fund. This grant will support Sustainable Princeton to educate and promote the community about Community Solar, a state-regulated program that will provide both renters and homeowners with a financially viable way to support the development of renewable energy sources. Community Solar farms, also referred to as a solar garden, allow community m e mb e r s to p a r t i c ip ate in the generation of solar power, even if they cannot or prefer not to install solar panels on their property. Solar farms are typically structured to provide subscribers with a cost savings on their utility bill. “This is a step in the right direction to addressing climate change,” said Molly Jones, executive director of Sustainable Princeton. “Par ticipation in Community Solar allows us to suppor t the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions produced through New Jersey’s electricity generation and passes utility bill savings to subscribing residents.” Sophie Glovier, chair of Princeton’s Environmental Commission and a member of Princeton’s Climate Action Plan Steering Committee said, “This is a win-win scenario for the environment and our community. Community Solar allows all Princeton community members to support clean energy, no matter their housing situation.” Unt i l n ow C om m u n it y Solar hasn’t been legally allowable in New Jersey, but within the month, the NJ Board of Public Utilities is expected to provide final regulations for a three-year

megawatts in Community Solar projects each year ( suf f icient power for an estimated 35,000-40,000 h ou s e h old s ) . D e velop e d to help meet New Jersey’s Clean Energ y goals, the Community Solar program is particularly focused on projects that benefit low to moderate income earning residents. Within the next few months, Sustainable Princeton will be meeting with municipal leadership and affordable housing providers to further discuss this oppor tunit y. Once Com munity Solar subscription details are defined, a community-wide education campaign will be launched to encourage all residents to take advantage of this program. Pursuit of this C om m u n it y S olar g r a nt aligns with the strategies defined by Princeton’s Climate Action Plan, a strategic planning effort that Sustainable Princeton has lead over the last year, with the support of more than 50 community volunteers.

Police Blotter On March 9, at 12: 55 a.m., a 30-year-old female from Hamilton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Lovers Lane for speeding. She was also charged with possession of under 50 grams of marijuana. On March 9, at 7:37 p.m., a victim reported that, on March 5, a company claiming to be OZM remotely took over control of their computer as they were using it. The victim paid the company $227.22 and the usage of the computer was restored. The company then asked for the victim’s banking information to prevent additional cyberattacks and when the victim refused,

Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm

ing system again. On March 8, at 8:09 a.m., a 43-year-old female from Manalapan was arrested for providing a false name to law enforcement, subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Russell Road for a failure to inspect. She was also found to have a warrant for $165 out of Princeton in addition to being an unlicensed driver. On March 8, at 11:17 a.m., a caller reported that someone drove a vehicle onto the soccer fields of Smoyer Park, leaving deep tire tracks and ruts, damaging the field. This likely occurred overnight. This same damage was reported on February 13 and three other times in the past. On March 8, at 9:57 p.m., police stopped a pedes trian for suspected underage possession of alcohol. A 20-year-old male from Bethesda, Md., was arrested and also charged with possession of a fictitious driver’s license. On March 7, at 9:31 a.m., a caller reported that individuals entered an unlocked vehicle parked on Redding Circle on Februar y 1, at 10:30 p.m., and stole several sets of keys. The keys were later recovered. O n March 7, at 6 :18 p.m., a victim reported that sometime bet ween 9 :30 and 11:15 a.m. someone removed the Lexus emblem from their vehicle parked on Nassau Street. The front grille of the vehicle was damaged. On March 7, at 9:42 p.m., a victim reported that their iPhone 7 had just been stolen from a bench on Palmer Square East. According to their Find My iPhone app, the phone was moving north on Witherspoon Street. Patrols were unable to locate the phone. The value of the loss is $700. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

A Princeton tradition!


Princeton Council voted on Monday, March 11 to introduce a 2019 budget of $64 million, which translates into an average rise of $83 for taxpayers, or a two percent increase. Other actions at the meeting included introduction of an ordinance to allow an affordable housing development at the former site of the SAVE animal shelter bordered by Herrontown Road, Mt. Lucas Road, and Old Orchard Lane. Budget The budget introduction is just the initial part of the annual process, and changes will likely be made before it is adopted. A public hearing on the budget will be held at the Council meeting on April 8. Municipal Administrator Marc Dashield thanked the staff and members of the Citizens Finance Advisory Committee (CFAC) for their work on the budget. He explained that though there is a decrease of $1.1 million from last year, the budget is actually higher. Last year, the town had a one-time expense of $2,126,000. As a result, the 2019 net increase in the expenditures is approximately $972,000. The biggest component of the increase is related to Princeton’s Fire Department, which is looking to transition from all-volunteer to a combination of volunteer and paid firefighters because of dwindling volunteerism. The approximate figure of $810,000 for fire department expenditures

is a worst-case scenario, Dashield said. Other top budget drivers for 2019 are police staffing, the contract for recycling, and a higher sewer authority payment. David Goldfarb, a member of the Stony Brook Regional Sewerage Authority, gave a report explaining why fees for that service are rising by two percent in individual par ticipant charges, and seven percent for the town. The culprit is an increase in rainfall last year, the amount of which was factored into a five-year average of the projected flow. “Princeton’s sewage system is older and leakier than others in the Authority,” Goldfarb said. “We are trying very hard to identify and fix the leaky areas.” Affordable Housing Site The three-acre prop erty proposed for affordable housing is owned by Charles Yedlin, who previously planned to build an office complex on the site. Yedlin was approached by the town about changing from his original plan for an office building and he agreed to make the switch to a building that would be 100 percent dedicated to affordable one-, two-, and three-bedroom units. “This had been approved for an office building in 2017, but the office market is very soft,” said the town’s Municipal Planner Michael LaPlace. “The owner was approached, and was open to other ideas. It fits in with a lot of the goals of the mas-

ter plan for Princeton to pursue affordable housing opportunities.” The town held a meeting with neighbors of Old Orchard Lane and Mt. Lucas Road last month, and heard concerns about the height of the building, which would be four stories in one area and three stories in another. The plan has shifted somewhat since then, LaPlace said. The site is accessible to public transpor tation on Route 206. Efforts would be made by the developer, RPM Development Company, to be sustainable and LEED cer tified. “The drainage area at Mt. Lucas and Herrontown roads was carefully engineered with the previous site plan, so we have kept it and will work around it,” LaPlace said. —Anne Levin

Gerrymandering is Topic Of Library Presentation

H e l e n K i o u k i s of t h e League of Women Voters of New Jersey gives a presentation on the redistricting and gerrymandering of legislative boundaries in New Jersey on Monday, March 25, at Princeton Public Library. The program will be at 7 p.m. in the Community Room. Kioukis, who serves as lead organizer for the League’s Fair Districts New Jersey Campaign, will discuss how the boundaries are drawn, who draws them, and whether the process needs to be reformed. Ingrid Reed, former director of the New

for many years,” said Mak perfect place to see evidence Kieffer, one of the group’s of these aquatic architects. founders. “We took a brief Without beavers, the history break the last two years of the Abbott Marshlands to take stock of people’s could be very different. Beachanging interests and now vers are responsible for creatwe’re back with a revamped ing and expanding wetlands line-up that includes some that attract a plethora of life long-running favorites, like to the new habitat, creatour treasure trove of used ing deeper and more stable finds, as well as new addi- sources of water for ducks, tions like artisan crafts, pop- frogs, fish, and more. These ular cat-centric goods, and biologically diverse and teemother unique vendors. The ing ponds supported Native beauty of the event is that American and Colonial setall proceeds go to benefit tlers for fishing and hunting, the control of Bordentown’s and later, farmers utilized stray cat population through the rich, fertile silt from the humane efforts of an en- the bottoms of the beaver lightened community.” ponds. While these human Residents, crafters, and inhabitants of the Abbott business owners can get in- Marshlands have long since volved with the event by rent- passed, the beavers and wilding space to sell new or used life remain, attracting nature goods or donating old items. observers from all over. The cost to rent a space is Participants on the walk $25. Email the group at will listen for tail slaps, and btowncitycats@gmail.com look for chewed branches, Bordentown Flea Market or visit www.bordentown- tree trunks, beaver lodges citycats.blogspot.com for and dams, as well as the Back From Hiatus beavers themselves, while Bordentow n Cit y Cats’ more information. also being on the lookout long-running flea market Twilight Beaver Walk for other creatures that go fundraiser is returning after a two-year hiatus with a new In Abbott Marshlands bump in the night. Meet E xperience the Abbot t at Roebling Park at Spring and expanded line-up featuring new and used goods, Marshlands the way our noc- Lake at 6:30 p.m. Bring a artisan crafts, antiques, cat- turnal wildlife neighbors do flashlight and water, and centric items, and unique during the Tulpehaking Na- wear sturdy shoes. ture Center’s Twilight BeaThis program is $5 per vendors. ver Walk on Friday, March person or $20 per family; The event is Saturday, 15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. pre-registration is required April 6, from 8 a.m. to 2 Mercer County Park Com- at ht t p s : //re g i s te r.com p.m., at the Carslake Commission Nat uralist Kelly munitypass.net/reg/. The munity Center, 207 CrossRypkema will lead a walk Tulpehaking Nature Center wicks Street, Bordentown to detect beavers and other is located at 157 Westcott City. All proceeds from the night critters. Avenue, Hamilton. It is open event will benefit the group’s A favorite spot for beavers, Fridays and Saturdays from continuing efforts to rescue, foster, adopt, and provide the Abbott Marshlands is the 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. medical treatment to Bordentown’s stray and feral cat population. Take a stroll down to our previous office at 4 Mercer Street “We launched this event or at our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, where back in 2003 to raise funds you can purchase a copy for 75¢ (3 quarters required) from our to support our rescue efforts coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/7 days a week. and it grew in popularity Jersey Project at Rutgers University’s Eagleton Institute of Politics, will serve as moderator. The Fair Districts New Jersey Campaign is the League of Women Voters of New Jersey’s initiative to reform the state’s redistricting process to one that is more fair, transparent, and inclusive. Prior to joining the League, Kioukis worked as a labor union organizer, representing health care workers in hospitals across New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, as well as more than 1,000 employees within the New Jersey Department of Health. She is a native of South Jersey and an alumna of Boston University. The library is at 65 Witherspoon Street. Visit princetonlibrary.org for information.

ELEGANT

|

S U S T A Can’t I NFindAYourBTown L ETopics!

ELEGANT

|

SUSTAINABLE

JEFFERSON & KITCHEN JEFFERSONBATH KITCHEN & BATH AADivision Divisionofof N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating & A/C

N.C. Jefferson Plumbing, Heating & A/C 29 Airpark Rd,Bldg. Princeton, 08550 5 Crescent Avenue, E, RockyNJ, Hill, NJ 08553 609-924-0762 || www.ncjefferson.com 609.924.3624 www.ncjefferson.com NJSL # 7084 | HIICL#13VH03224100 NJSL# 7084 | HICL# 13VH03224100 FULL FULLSERVICE SERVICEWORRY WORRYFREE FREECONTRACTING CONTRACTING || FROM FROMCONCEPT CONCEPT TO TOCOMPLETION COMPLETION

9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Council Introduces Budget Of $ 64 Million for 2019


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 10

Peace Agenda

Firestone Library

continued from page one

continued from page one

He continued, “Also I’ve been f r us t rated by t he partisan gridlock in Congress. As a state legislator I felt an obligation to try to do something. I’m working with world-renowned colleagues, Mian and von Hippel. Highlighting the importance of our country entering into a treaty that calls for the abolition of nuclear weapons is critical.” Moore noted that “arms control has taken a turn south, undermined by the Tr u m p a d m i n i s t r at i o n . There are definitely alarm bells going off in the expert community, and they should be going off in the general community.” Moore pointed out that Resolution 230, even if it passes the full Assembly later this month, is not binding. “But it’s valuable in generating grass roots democracy,” he said, “using the tools of democracy as an engine to advocate for disarmament and peace.” —Donald Gilpin

the energy-efficiency of the building. T he or iginal Firestone building and the renovated interior “are dedicated to creating an atmosphere of a ‘humanistic laboratory’ that provides spaces of comfort and delight and supports opportunities for inspiration and contemplation,” said Princeton University Architect Ron McCoy. Firestone is one of nine locations within Princeton University Library (PUL). Re n ov at i o n w or k w a s done in multiple phases so that the building, which is central to teaching and research at Princeton, could remain open. “One of the greatest challenges during this renovation was undergoing construction while patrons continued to use the library,” said Director of Library Finance and Administration Jeffrey Rowlands. “As Princeton University’s main library, keeping Firestone open during the renovation was impor tant. It required extensive detailed planning and the ability to be flexible.” Rowlands went on to cite increased usage of the library as one measure of the success of the renovation project. During the past five years, Firestone has experienced a nearly 63 percent growth in the number of people coming to the library, he reported. University Librarian Anne Jarvis commented on the transformed Firestone Library in light of the challenges confronting 21stcentury university libraries. “The speed and scale of change facing academ ic librar ies in recent years has been unprecedented,” she said. “We are moving beyond the concept of a library as a finite place with traditional collections to that of a library as a partner in research, teaching, and learning. Having stateof-the-art facilities is essential to providing expert guidance, discoverability, and access to the world’s

Chamber of Commerce Presents Industry Update

The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce’s annual Mercer County Industry Update on March 28 will report on health care, insurance, education, and the pharmaceutical industry. The event is at Mercer Oaks, 725 Village Road, West Windsor, from 8 to 10:30 a.m. The update will provide attendees with an overview of industry trends in the region, and will include perspectives from four industry leaders. Sean Hopkins of the New Jersey Hospital Association, Mike Van Wagner of NJM Insurance Group, Roberto Vieira of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and John Thurber of Thomas Edison State University are the speakers. T icke t s are $ 35 a n d include breakfast. Visit princetonchamber.org to register.

rapidly evolving knowledge resources.” Some of the new facilities include high-level security and environmentallycontrolled storage facilities in rare books and special collections, which provide secure access to materials that range from an Egyptian Book of the Dead (circa 1250 BCE) to the papers of Nobel Laureate and Princeton Professor Emeritus Toni Morrison; a digital imaging studio, enabling expanded digitization of books and other library materials, providing free access to people around the world; a conservation lab to enhance preservation of materials; graduate study rooms near core subject collections; and the new Ellen and Leonard Milberg Gallery. The Milberg Gallery and the Cotsen Children’s Library are both open to the public. In noting that “one of the guiding principles of the renovation was to open up the building to the light,” Rowlands emphasized the central role of students’ involvement in the planning process. “Students have different needs for study,” he said. “We tried to accommodate different styles for what students wanted in terms of study space.” Rowlands went on to discuss his goal “to make sure that the design elements did not overshadow the function of the space.” He noted, “I was there to push back when I thought, ‘the students are not going to like that,’ or ‘that is not going to function for them.’” PUL holdings include 10 million printed volumes, two million located in Firestone, as well as five million manuscripts, 400,000 rare or significant printed works, thousands of journals, and two million non-print items in over 200 languages. PUL also provides onsite and remote access to extensive collections of databases, digital text, data, and images. Princeton Universit y would not disclose the cost of the renovation project. —Donald Gilpin

“NO U.S. WAR ON VENEZUELA!”: About 30 demonstrators gathered on Nassau Street in Palmer Square Monday afternoon, calling for a prohibition on unauthorized military action in Venezuela. Earlier in the day Princeton physicists Zia Mian and Frank von Hippel and Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore testified in Trenton in support of an anti-nuclear Assembly resolution sponsored by Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker. (Photo by Anna Savoia)

TRANSFORMED SPACES: More light, more windows, and open flexible work spaces are key facets of a recently completed 10-year renovation project at Princeton University’s Firestone Library. The third floor William Elfers ’41 Reading Room is just one of many transformed spaces in the 70-year-old building. (Photo by Shelley Szwast, Princeton University)

Princeton Eye Group Helps Patients in Need

Princeton Eye Group recently held “PEG Cares Day,” t he bra i nch i ld of Rutgers University student Katerina Liu, daughter of PEG surgeon and partner, Dr. Samuel Liu. The day, staffed by volunteer employees of Princeton Eye Group, provided those in need with eye exams at no cost. According to Katerina Liu, “The patients were referred by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Clinic at the Medical Center of Princeton. Our goal is to treat those who do not have health insurance or the ability to pay.” Several of the doctors from PEG have embarked on medical missions around the globe. “W hen I dis cussed the possibility of Katerina joining me on an international surgical mission, she instead suggested that there are many patients who live locally who are in need of charity care,” said Dr. Liu. “So, Katerina came up with the idea of providing compassionate care for local patients in need. She organized and set up PEG Cares Day for the first time last year, and we are continuing this today.” Following a workup by volunteer technicians, all patients received a consultation with Dr. Liu. Those requiring glasses were referred to the Optical Shoppe and offered glasses for as little as $25 a pair, with payment plans spread out

without interest so as not to burden the patient. “This was our second of what is sure to be many PEG Cares Days,” remarked Dr. Liu. “Service is part of our DNA – whether it is traveling with Doctors Without Borders, or volunteering time at local clinics and schools, all of our partners and staff believe in the importance of giving back to our community. It is rewarding to make an impact for some of those closest to us who would not otherwise have access to expert eye care.” “I am so proud of my dad and the team at PEG,” said Katerina Liu. “The gratitude expressed by the patients and the looks on their faces and those of their family members makes it all worthwhile, to say the least.”

Job Opportunities For Princeton Youth

Princeton Human Services is opening up the application process for their annual Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP). This program has been a gateway into the adult world of work and has provided numerous working opportunities to youth in Princeton. Participants must live in Princeton or attend Princeton High School, must be between the ages of 14-18 as of July 5, 2019, and their family income must not exceed 400 percent of the 2018 US federal poverty level. Par t icipants work 25 hours a week and earn

minimum wage ($8.85/hr) for eight weeks during the summer. In the summer of 2018, S Y E P prov i d e d j ob s to nearly 40 students in municipal departments and local nonprofit organizations which included job readiness training, financial coaching and career development. Melissa Urias, the acting director of Princeton Human Services said, “As this program continues to expand, we will offer SYEP participants new career building opportunities by supplying a variety of employment sites, resume-writing skills, and interpersonal interviewing techniques in order to facilitate teens as they transition into the adult workforce.” “Princeton Summer Youth Employment Program is a terrific initiative, and I’m glad to see it grow over the years. It helps our teens start to build their resumes by offering them real-world job experience, and career development training, as well as the thrill of earning a paycheck.” said Mayor Liz Lempert. Applications are available at the Princeton Human Services office in Monument Hall. Forms can also be downloaded online at https:// www.princetonnj.gov/departments/human-services. The application deadline is Friday, May 3, 2019. For questions, call (609) 688-2055 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., or send an email to murias@princetonnj.gov.

HOOT!: Some of New Jersey’s most important raptors are the subject of a presentation at Howell Living History Farm on Thursday, March 14 at 7 p.m. Mercer County Wildlife Center Director Diane Nickerson presents the talk, “An Evening of Owls,” as part of the “Naturally Friends” series in the farm’s 19th century barn. Admission is free. The farm is at 70 Woodens Lane in Hopewell Township. Visit howellfarm.org for information.


Mailbox

Questioning SAVE’s Policy on Cats, With SAVE Director’s Response

Mayor Responds to Hughes Letter On the Finance Advisory Committee

Candidate Bierman Declines Participation In PCDO Endorsement Process

organic SUSTAINABLY FARMED • PERFECTLY FRESH

OUR PRODUCE SECTION IS

100%

,

Tim Quinn Will Maintain Town’s “Close Neighborhood” Vibe

To the Editor: We live in a great town! I was born and raised here as a little lad; and I remember how well the majority of community members got along and were good neighbors. We had neighborhood block parties and socialized often by just sitting on porches and talking. Many of the children, regardless of race, economic status, or the part of town they lived in would come together to play. We grew up respecting everyone. This same sense of community that I enjoyed during my childhood is the same kind of community that Councilman Tim Quinn would welcome back with open arms. I have served in the role of Township Committeeman and Princeton Councilman for 15 years. I know what it takes to get the job done. This is why I am supporting Councilman Tim Quinn for re-election. I have been impressed with how Tim approaches issues. Tim’s listening skills and professional demeanor have worked well with getting the town’s business done. From working on neighborhood zoning initiatives to finding safe pathways for pedestrians and bicyclists, Tim has been an advocate for maintaining the “close neighborhood” vibe of Princeton. We want to keep Princeton a welcoming and safe community. Tim’s support of the recent hiring of new police personnel just confirms his insight to keep Princeton in the forefront when it comes to maintaining quality law enforcement. Tim’s knowledge and constant research of cost saving approaches for the town is remarkable. Tim has communicated how to share services with entities like the Princeton School System or Princeton University to help reduce spending. I support Tim because he is always thinking outside the box to make Princeton a better town. A vote for Councilman Tim Quinn is a vote for a safe, welcoming, cost efficient, and caring Princeton. LANCE LIVERMAN Witherspoon Street

Letter to Mayor Lempert on Route 1 Traffic Issue, With Response

Dear Mayor Lempert: Last Sunday, (March 3) at about 1 p.m. I drove out to Route 1 on Harrison Street. Alexander Road was closed. The traffic backup extended back from Route 1 all the way to the bridge. And my wife had driven back into Princeton on Washington Road about an hour earlier and had noticed a similar backup there for traffic heading to Route 1 from Princeton. If this was the situation in the middle of a Sunday afternoon in March, I can only imagine (or maybe I can’t) the nightmare we are going to be faced with when Alexander is closed for eight months because of the bridge replacement. We have been told that this is a NJDOT project and that it must be done, and I accept that albeit reluctantly. (I am aware that the Dinky service to the Junction will be resuming and while this will eliminate the problem for NJ Transit riders going to the Junction, it will have little to no impact on vehicular traffic in general.) The impact of what is coming will be profound. And the health and safety of Princeton residents will be significantly compromised because ambulances will not be able to navigate out Harrison Street to the hospital without being caught up in traffic with no way to get around it due to the constrictions of Harrison Street. The only thing I can think of, not being a traffic engineer, is that Princeton must encourage the DOT to figure out how the traffic lights at the intersection of Route 1 and Harrison and Washington must be adjusted in order to allow more time for traffic leaving Princeton to access Route 1. This is imperative, at a minimum. And this study should begin immediately. I truly do not believe that the scope of what is to come for Princeton residents has been anticipated. ALAN Y. MEDVIN Longview Drive Response from Mayor Lempert: “Thanks for this suggestion. We are in discussions with NJDOT.” Continued on Next Page

Downsizing? Call me!

JUDITH BUDWIG Sales Associate

609-933-7886

jbudwig@glorianilson.com

360 NASSAU ST. • PRINCETON WHOLEEARTHCENTER.COM M–F 8–9 • SAT 8–8 • SUN 9–7

NATURAL FOODS GROCERY • SINCE 1970

American Furniture Exchange

Family Owned and Operated Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs

• Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

• Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & Downspouts • Gutter Cleaning • Roof Maintenance

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

LIC#13VH02047300

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

completely separate for their health and safety. We did show them several cats who were known to previously be indoor/outdoor cats in their former households and they Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics were not interested in any of them. It is our goal and numEmail letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08525 ber one priority to find the best home for every pet in our care and we were not able to come to a mutually agreed option for the Medinas. SAVE was simply upholding our standards and policies. We invited them to come back in hopes of finding a match. We hope everyone will choose to adopt don’t shop and save the lives of two pets. The one To the Editor: I am angry! I am also humiliated and perplexed! Let me you adopt and the one who takes their place. explain.... HEATHER ACHENBACH Executive Director, SAVE My husband and I decided we wanted to adopt a cat — preferably an adult cat, who would have a more difficult road to a permanent home than a kitten. So we automatically turned to SAVE, since we have a long-time relationship with them. We have been generous donors, attending fundraising events and sending annual donation checks. We live on a farm so To the Editor: Princeton, like other towns in this state, struggles to shave when a SAVE board members asked, we agreed to shelter and feed any feral cats that they felt were unsuitable for adoption. every penny in taxes, and the Council has tasked the CitiWe have received over 20 in the past and a number of them zens Finance Advisory Committee in helping with this effort. still reside in and around our barns. Along with the feral Given that 29 percent of our property tax dollars flows to the cats, we also provide homes for unwanted animals from the County — 40 percent more than the town’s share, Council entire area, resulting in pastures containing emus, llamas, requested CFAC conduct a preliminary analysis of County spending in hopes of identifying room for savings. miniature donkeys, and retired horses. In response to last week’s letter in the Town Topics from Last week, I visited SAVE to meet the cats and to submit our application. Since we had already adopted our last cat Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes (“Mercer County Refrom SAVE, I assumed the application was just a formality. sponds to Citizens Finance Advisory Committee Analysis,” Imagine my surprise, then, when my husband and I returned Mailbox, March 6), we want to make clear that our intention to make our final choice, only to be told that our application is to engage the county constructively. Our findings show was rejected. And the reason? We have a doggy door! The that the taxes paid to the county by Mercer County residents director told us that SAVE’s policy was not to allow adoption are out-of-line with taxes in similar New Jersey counties if there was any chance that a cat could get outside. As the — about 25 percent higher, $54 million higher, than the parent of numerous cats in the past, I can attest to the abil- average of our eight peer counties, equating to $1,151 for ity of a cat who wants to go out to do just that. And they the average residential tax bill in Princeton. don’t need a doggy door — a child leaving the door open, All counties in New Jersey offer the same services that workmen coming in and out ... we all know this is true. So Mercer County does. While our County does host the state the cat that we wanted to bring into a loving home — to play capital, the percentage of property in the County that is with, cuddle and enjoy — is still living in a cage, allowed out tax exempt is not materially different from the eight peer a few minutes a day. counties, and all of the peers also operate parks and schools and spend heavily on public safety. While our analysis is What is wrong with this picture? Don’t get me wrong. I think SAVE does an admirable job preliminary, its conclusions and recommendations have not saving the lives of unwanted or abandoned cats and dogs. changed. We encourage the County to dig further — and do the kind But surely their secondary purpose should be finding these animals loving homes. In this respect, I think they are failing. of rigorous self-examination that Princeton and the great MARY MEDINA majority of municipalities do every year in the service of Skillman keeping their residents’ taxes as low as possible. The CFAC presentation and underlying spreadsheets are SAVE’s Response: available online at princetonnj.gov/boards-committees/ To the Editor: citizens-finance-advisory-committee. Shelters and rescues often find themselves under critiMAYOR LIZ LEMPERT cism for their pet adoption policies and procedures. To SCOTT SILLARS, some, we adopt too easily and to others, the process is Chair, Citizens Finance Advisory Committee too arduous. At SAVE, every cat and dog in our care is treated as an individual. It is a luxury we have as a medium sized, limited intake shelter that is not supported by federal, state, or local taxes. We do our best by every single pet. They are not a number, they are a name and they are loved. Our adoption policies are based on industry best To the Editor: I decided not to participate in the Princeton Community practices and in alignment with the outcomes desired by our board, staff, and volunteers. We are proud to share we Democratic Organization endorsement process because adopted 600 cats and dogs in 2018, which is 80 more than of the dues requirement to vote. While there still remain the previous year. And this year, in the month of February Standing Rules that give the PCDO (a private club) a role alone, we adopted 54 cats into their forever homes (SAVE in the Princeton Municipal Committee (who are elected) selection process, reference to paid PCDO vote has no has capacity for approximately 75-85 cats). place in the selection process of the Municipal Committee. We recognize and understand the disappointment of There is a need to get money out of the process. the Medinas. We shared a lengthy discussion on indoor ADAM BIERMAN versus outdoor cats. With feral cats on the property, it Grover Avenue is important to keep the “house” cat(s) fully indoors and


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 12

Mailbox Continued from Preceding Page

Princeton Needs Mia Sacks’s Voice, Energy in Planning Future

To the Editor: It is rare that a candidate for local office elicits the enthusiasm and confidence with which I endorse Mia Sacks for Princeton Council. It is time for Princeton to undertake a comprehensive review of our zoning code and municipal planning processes through the lens of social justice. Princeton’s Master Plan and land use ordinances should be updated to more robustly reflect our community values of diversity and inclusion. Mia’s extensive background in civil liberties advocacy combined with her experience on the Planning Board provide her with the requisite tools to participate in this crucial work. For Princeton to become a community that is truly welcoming, we must do more than put signs proclaiming that value on our lawns. We must fully acknowledge and work to overcome our town’s segregated history. It is time to elect officials willing to go beyond rhetoric about equity to lead the way in making decisions that embrace affordable housing and progressive zoning policies. As a proven leader in the community and founding member of the Princeton Progressive Action Group, Mia has already demonstrated the conscientious hard work, expertise, and passion that will propel us forward. Princeton needs Mia’s voice on our Council and her energy in planning our future. I urge voters to join me in supporting Mia Sacks for Princeton Council and in voting for her on June 4. LINDA OPPENHEIM S. Harrison Street

“Do the Right Thing”: Endorsing Michelle Lambros and Tim Quinn

To the Editor: I am reaching out to the Princeton community and friends to share my support of Tim Quinn and Michelle Pirone Lambros for Princeton Council. I know some of you support other people in the race and I respect a difference of opinion. However, the future of Princeton is at stake. So I support a sense of history and a sense of where we are and the attributes that these two candidates display. They are both qualified, experienced, and committed to Princeton. The town is changing. Issues and community hot topics are multiplying and the town is not the quaint little college town it used to be. With that said, Tim represents continuity and Michelle represents new ideas. Both of these perspectives are needed on Council to support the great efforts of the other Council persons, the mayor, town administrator, and those talented people who work for the municipality and serve our community everyday. Tim Quinn and Michelle Pirone Lambros will be for good for Council. Good for the town. Good for seniors, youth, families, businesses, and the diverse population that live, work, play, go to school and call Princeton home. In the words of Spike Lee at this year’s Academy Awards ceremony, when he thanked everyone and encouraged them to “Do the Right Thing,” I am asking you to do the same and vote for Tim Quinn and Michelle Pirone Lambros for Princeton Council. JOHN BAILEY Birch Avenue

and ideals. Michelle’s formidable proposals, not least for providing community resources to Princeton’s most vulnerable families, reflect her bedrock Democratic values. So do her imaginative but entirely practicable solutions about supporting these proposals with partnerships between the municipality and the private sector. She combines a strong vision for the future with the kind of hard-won realism that makes change possible. In more than 50 years of political involvement, I have had the privilege to work for and with some extraordinary leaders, from Robert Kennedy and John Lewis to Hillary Clinton. In my nearly 40 years of living in Princeton, the community has been blessed with leaders of the caliber of Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Mildred Trotman, and Phyllis Marchand. Michelle Pirone Lambros is running for the Council in the spirit of those great Democrats, and I hope others will join me in voting for her on Sunday and again in the June primary. SEAN WILENTZ Edgehill Street

Friends of Princeton Open Space Thanks Those Attending Lewis Talk

To the Editor: A warm thank you from all of us at the Friends of Princeton Open Space (FOPOS) to those who attended the March 3 talk by Dr. Diane Lewis on the threats to our shared aquifer of using commercial fertilizers and herbicides on America’s largest crop, lawn. A key plank of FOPOS’s organizational mission is to “advocate for sound policy decisions that protect the environment.” Dr. Lewis’s “Great Healthy Yard Project” (http://tghyp.com/) offers solutions for private landowners who wish to care for their yards as carefully as we steward our public conservation lands. We also wish to thank Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for their sponsorship of this 50th-anniversary-year event and our membership for their on-going support of our public education programs. WENDY MAGER President The Board of Friends of Princeton Open Space

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Rider

Furniture

“Fine Quality Home Furnishings at Substantial Savings”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147 www.riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 AmEx, M/C & Visa

Library Live at Labyrinth Hosts Talk on Ageism

Ashton Applewhite will discuss her book, This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto against Ageism, at Labyrinth Books on Monday, March 18 at 6 p.m. The program is part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series. According to New York Times best-selling author Anne Lamott: “This book totally rocks. It arrived on a day when I was in deep confusion and sadness about my age — 62. Everything about it, from my invisibility to my neck. Within four or five wise, passionate pages, I had found insight, illumination and inspiration. I never use the word empower, but this book has empowered me.” Katha Pollitt, poet, essayist and Nation columnist, says: “Vibrant, energetic, fact-filled

Ashton Applewhite and funny, This Chair Rocks is a call to arms not just for older people but for our whole society.” Ashton Applewhite has been recognized by the New York Times, The New Yorker, National Public Radio, and the American Society on Aging as an expert on ageism. She blogs at This Chair Rocks, speaks widely around the world, and has written written for Harper’s and Playboy.

NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA XIAN ZHANG Music Director

Thanking Deanna Stockton, Others For Quick Action on Potholes

To The Editor: I followed my letter [Mailbox, Feb 20] with a personal plea for attention to the potholes on the Harrison/Nassau Street intersection at the Princeton Council meeting on Monday February 25. On the evening of Thursday, February 28, that intersection was repaved and is now safe and secure to cross through. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Principal Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton and NJ Department of Transportation Community and Constituent Relations Regional Manager Kimberly Nance for their professional efforts to fix this intersection and create a safe and secure roadway for all of us to use. Kudos, and encomiums to all who made this happen. Keep up the good work. HOWARD W. SILBERSHER Governors Lane

Lambros Has a Rare Combination: A Tough Mind and an Activist Soul

To the Editor: I urge my fellow Democrats to support Michelle Pirone Lambros for municipal Council at the PCDO Endorsement meeting on March 17. I’m speaking up because I strongly believe the times have met with the right candidate for the Council. Michelle has a rare combination of a tough mind and an activist soul. She has the interests of all Princeton deeply at heart, but knows that saying as much is always subject to proof. We Democrats always do our best when we have the knowhow and competence to back up our admirable phrases

Books

ZHANG CONDUCTS SCHUBERT & DVOŘÁK featuring DVOŘÁK’S CELLO CONCERTO

Mar 22–24 Princeton | Newark | Morristown

SAROD & SCHEHERAZADE featuring sarodists AMJAD ALI KHAN, AMAAN ALI BANGASH and AYAAN ALI BANGASH

Apr 5–7 Newark | New Brunswick Tickets on sale now! njsymphony.org | 1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476) Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm

Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

CONCERT SPONSOR

CONCERT SPONSOR


Exploring Stanley Corngold’s Epic “Walter Kaufmann” Ahead of an Epic Book Sale But if, for instance, I read a good book ... it rouses me, satisfies me, suffices me. –Franz Kafka (1883-1924) eginning Friday morning Princeton Day School will become a vast encampment of the homeless, with some 80,000 supplicants looking to be adopted and appreciated, and perhaps passed on to a comfortable, fulfilled life in distinguished surroundings. The southern border is a trumpian tempest in a teapot compared to the numbers of refugees seeking asylum at the Bryn Mawr Wellesley Book Sale. Of course it’s nonsense, the idea that hard-nosed dealers, bibliophiles, and obsessive collectors will be paying $25 for the heartwarming satisfaction of giving homes to lifeless entities they actually intend to resell at a profit, or may never read, or may keep only to show off as collector’s ornaments. Still and all, “homeless” is the message spelled out when the doors close on the last day of the sale with multitudes ignored, abandoned, unwanted, scattered naked and alone on the tables, unclaimed after five hours at ten bucks a box. Kafka’s Here One author whose books usually find a home with patrons at the BMW sale is Franz Kafka. Most writers want to be read. For them there’s an element of truth in the homeless trope. Kafka, on the other hand, asked Max Brod to burn all his writings after his death, which would have consigned The Castle and The Trial to Borges’s “Library of Babel,” where “it is enough that a book be possible for it to exist.” As it happens, one of the foremost Kafka scholars on the planet resides in Princeton and has written a book about another longtime Princeton resident, the philosopher Walter Kaufmann (19211980 ). Readers who give a home to Stanley Corngold’s Walter Kaufmann: Philosopher, Humanist, Heretic (Princeton Univ Press $39.95) will be keeping company not only with Corngold and Kaufmann, but w ith an all-star cast that includes Nietzsche and Dostoevsky, Sartre and Camus, Goethe and Hegel, Socrates and Sophocles, Buddha and Christ, Kant and Kierkegaard. In view of the upcoming occasion, I’m approaching Corngold’s epic study as if it were a world-class antiquarian book fair where each chapter is a gallery devoted to one or more of Kaufmann’s books, each inhabited by Corngold’s witty, playful, rigorous but always comradely presence ; no rush, no crowd, no one’s looking over your shoulder, and you can count on Kafka ( “one of Kaufmann’s perpetual if second-order educators,” in Corngold’s words) whenever you’re in need of literar y sustenance. Sure enough, here he is on the second page of the first chapter, with its daunting title “Nietzsche Redivivus” (to which James Joyce’s Molly Bloom might say, “Who’s he when he’s at home? ”). Not to worry when Kafka’s standing in

B

the shadows saying, “No one sings so purely as those in deepest hell; what we consider the singing of angels is their singing.” Corngold goes on to point out that Kaufmann’s first book, Nietzsche: Philo s ophe r, Psy cholo g ist , Antichr ist ( Princeton Univ. Press 1950 ), has an impact on readers comparable to Kafka’s, which, as described by Theodor Adorno, “commands interpretation ... collapses aesthetic distance,” and “overwhelms you,” suggesting that “life and death are at stake.” At the same time, Corngold falls unknowingly into line with the book sale theme by putting a dealer’s spin on the “defiant cover” of Kaufmann’s Nietzsche, “the title printed in carmine letters — a burning orangered — anticipating Nietzsche’s sun worship and craving to blaze like a sun.... How much of this blaze flashes out of Walter Kaufmann’s magnum opus? ” Thomas Mann c a l le d it “a work of great superiority over everything previously achieved in Nietzsche criticism and interpretation.” Mindful of the looming local event, I should note that Corng o l d m a ke s s u r e w e ’r e a w a r e o f Kaufmann’s market value: “the cheapest hardback copy o f T h e Fa i t h of a Heretic (1959 ) found on A mazon at the time of writing ranges between $62 and $495, the cheapest paperback between $92 and $195.” It’s also necessary to remind today’s readers of how thoroughly copies of Kaufmann’s landmark work Existentialism from Dostoevesky to Sartre (Meridian 1956) pervaded the campus counterculture of the Vietnam era. As Corngold puts it, Kaufmann’s “anthology of existentialist writings” became “the Lonely Planet of the sixties in its refusal of ethical conformism.” The Faustian Philosopher After referring to Kaufmann’s untimely death at 59 (on “one of his Faustian journeys of exploration to West Africa,” where he “swallowed a parasite that attacked his hear t” and died months later “of a burst aorta in his Princeton home”), Corngold quotes from The Faith of a Heretic: “When I die, I do not want them to say: Think of all he still might have done. There is a cowardice in wanting to have that said. Let them say ... There was nothing left in him: he did not spare himself; he put everything he had into his work, his life.”

Trying to picture a Faustian philosopher who gave ever y thing he had to his work and his life, I come up with a nightmarish composite of Goethe and Ber trand Russell. However, once you put Corngold’s reference to the “permanent youthfulness — zest and pugnacity — in all of Kaufmann’s writing” together with the image of a globetrott ing poet /philosopher/photographer venturing off the beaten path in Africa and India, I begin to see someone who would have caught my attention in the late 1970s when I was practically living at Firestone Library. I’m picturing a bike-riding, boyishly handsome professor with a youthful ambiance, a casual dresser, shirt always open at the neck, hatless even in winter, someone who might easily be confused w ith Princeton’s equally boyish-looking president at t he t ime, William Bowen. Cor ngold ’s f irst impression, as a student at tending a Kaufmann lecture on existentialism, was of “someone who himself looked like an undergraduate.” This image is belied by a n e x t r a or d i n a r y p er s ona l h is tor y : born in Germany, Kaufmann rejects Christianit y at 11 and converts to Judaism, studies the Talmud in Berlin, emigrates from Na z i G er m a ny to t he U.S. i n 1939 at 19, g r a d u ate s w it h honors f rom Williams College, leaves Harvard after a year to join the Army Air Force, serves as an interrogator for the Military Intelligence service, discovers the works of Nietzsche and is captivated, returns to Harvard, where he earns his Ph.D. in 1947, arrives at Princeton that fall and three years later publishes a book that helped rehabilitate Nietzsche’s reputation by removing the stigma of Nazism that had blighted it. Happy Accidents In his second chapter ( “Raw Life” ), about Existentialism from Dostoevesky to Sartre, Corngold quotes a character in The Castle commenting on the difficulty of interpreting a letter where the thoughts prompted “are endless and the point at which one happens to stop is determined only by accident and so the opinion one arrives at is just as accidental.” I n t he world of s econd ha nd b o ok sales, the notion of “accident” is crucial to the quest. Amid a gathering as immense as the Bryn Mawr Wellesley event, treasures can turn up in unex-

pected places, misfiled or underpriced or among miscellaneous volumes that have been picked up, glanced at, and left behind by frantic, impatient patrons caught up in the opening mor ning’s storming of the tables. Unlikely as it may seem, the “good book” quote from Kafka with which I began is a happy accident I arrived at while riff ling mindlessly through the 100 pages of notes at the back of Corngold’s Kaufmann. Since the epigraph is conditional (“But if, for instance”), unresolved, one could say “Kafkaesque,” you should know that it’s from the “Letter to His Father” Kafka never sent and that it says or suggests as much about a philosopher who didn’t spare him self, who put ever y thing he had into his work, his life, as it says about Kafka, thus: “I feel too tightly constricted in everything that signifies Myself: even the eternity that I am is too tight for me. But if, for instance, I read a good book [ say, an account of travels ] , it rouses me, satisfies me, suffices me.... From a certain stage of knowledge on, weariness, insufficiency, constriction, self-contempt must all vanish: namely at the point where I have the strength to recognize as my own nature what previously was something alien to myself that refreshed me, satisfied, liberated, and exalted me.” During a visit to the set-up in progress at the PDS gym, I had a preview of the works under Philosophy, hoping to find some volumes by Kaufmann. What I found instead, along with Heidegger’s Being and Time and Walter Benjamin’s Reflections, was a copy of the 1940 edition of Kierkegaard’s Stages On Life’s Way, published by Princeton University Press, which plans to reprint many of Walter Kaufmann’s most important books, with new introductions. f I have a chance for a visit to the fully stocked sale, I hope to find a copy of Life at the Limits, the first book of the trilogy Man’s Lot (1978), which includes photographs Kaufmann took in India and which is the subject of one of Corngold’s harshest and most absorbing commentaries. In the end, after portraying Kaufmann as “ an ascetic priest in Dionysian sheep’s clothing,” Corngold says “one is simply challenged, as Kaufmann would have it, by a book that stares back at you asking: Are you, reader, equal to this work?” —Stuart Mitchner

I

The Bryn Mawr Wellesley Book Sale begins on Friday, March 15. Admission is free except on Opening Day, whe n ticke t s a re $ 25 p e r p e r s on . The sale runs from March 15 to 19 at Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton. Monday, March 18, is Half Price Day (with some excep tions), and Tuesday, March 19, is $10 a Box Day. For details visit bmandwbooks.com.

Sales and Service since 1927 2454 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 · 908-359-8131

Visit www.bellemeadgarage.com!

We Service:

cars and trucks mowers and snow blowers tractors and machines

We Sell:

cars and vans and trucks tractors and mowers parts and implements

Lines Carried:

Massey Ferguson, BCS 2 wheeled tractors and attachments Scag Mowers and Yard Equipment WE BUY CARS AND TRACTORS

EASTRIDGE DESIGN HOME

342 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08540 (609) 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com Store Hours: M–F 10am – 5pm

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

BOOK REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 14

MUSIC REVIEW

Princeton University Orchestra Presents Winners of 2019 Concerto Competition

O WE FIX: • • • • •

Wet Basements Sagging Floors Bowing Walls Nasty Crawl Spaces Musty Odors

BEFORE

21 Years as the Region's Most Trusted Name in Waterproofing and Foundation Repair AFTER

CONTACT US FOR A

FREE ESTIMATE Lifetime Transferable Warranties

SINKING CONCRETE? Don't Replace it - RAISE It! CONCRETE PATIOS | UNEVEN SLABS | SINKING STEPS AND WALKWAYS

215-764-3078 www.Bqbasementsystems.com

EUREKA! I have discovered that Marvin Cheiten’s

THE HIDDEN ALLY

ne musical bright spot after every winter in Princeton is the spring concert of the Princeton University Orchestra, when the ensemble presents winners of its annual Concerto Competition for undergraduate students. As evidenced by the audience reaction in this past weekend’s concert at Richardson Auditorium, this year’s winners have not been squirreled away practicing to the expense of everything else, but are fully participating in the Princeton University experience, with armies of friends who came to support them in their solo performances. Four of this year’s winners performed with the University Orchestra Friday night (the concert was repeated Saturday night), demonstrating musical poise, technical dexterity, and the culmination of their enormous capacity for hard work. University Orchestra Conductor Michael Pratt warmed up the audience Friday night with the magical world of childhood as conjured by French composer Maurice Ravel in his five-movement Mother Goose Suite. Opening the first movement “Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty” in a languid tempo marked by graceful flute and horn solos, Pratt and the Orchestra set an enchanted scene. Wind solos were clean against violins that were so lean and agile, it was hard to believe there were more than 25 of them. The “Tom Thumb” movement was well complemented by solos from the winds, especially English horn player Ethan Petno. Pratt maintained a supple lilt to the third movement, contrasting with a broad instrumental palette as the Orchestra brought out Ravel’s trademark orchestral sunrise closing the Suite. Haeun Jung and Katie Liu are both juniors at the University, concentrating in molecular biology and operations research, respectively. In conjunction with their demanding academic careers, Jung has won numerous state awards for violin, and Liu has proven proficient on both violin and viola. The two talented instrumentalists joined the Orchestra for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola in Eb Major. Together with the Orchestra, Jung and Liu were successful in bringing to life the contrasting instrumental colors Mozart, also proficient on both violin and viola, intended for both instruments. Both soloists were in synchrony with the Orchestra from the outset, playing with the ensemble when not performing on their own. The solo parts were often a conversation between violin and viola, and Jung and Liu demonstrated both independent performing styles and solid awareness of each other and the accompanying Orchestra around them. Jung was a more decisive and physical player on the violin, while Liu

S P R I N G 2 01 8

PRINCETON MAGAZINE

PRINCETON MAGAZINE

PRINCETON MAGAZINE

F E B R UA RY 2 01 8

S U M M E R 2 01 8

Chasing Light:

S E P T E M B E R 2 01 8

Wendy Kopp

White House photographer Amanda Lucidon documents Michelle Obama, PU Class of ’85

How Princeton played a role in Teach for America and Teach for All

Patrick Kennedy is at home in New Jersey

SEPTEMBER 2018

SUMMER 2018

SPRING 2018

FEBRUARY 2018

Donna Gelagotis-Lee, Poet On the Altar of Greece

Please contact us to make sure you keep receiving Princeton Magazine. PRINCETON MAGAZINE

This piece has just about everything to draw the reader in.”

T

The Princeton University Orchestra will present it next performances Friday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium and Saturday, April 27 at 4 p.m. at the Patriots Theater at the War Memorial in Trenton. Conducted by this year’s artist-in-residence Gustavo Dudamel, these performances will feature music of Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mendelssohn performed by the University Orchestra and Glee Club. Friday night’s performance is sold-out; tickets for the Saturday performance are free but required, and will be available on Monday, April 1.

is now available as a

“GREED, Paperback and an eBook at FORTUNE, BarnesandNoble.com LOVE, & MarvinCheiten.com SEX, MONEY, EXPLOITATION, POLITICS, HISTORY, MORALITY…

found an elegant and graceful tone from the viola. Mozart’s music traveled seamlessly between the two solo instruments, often capturing the same rich conversational style heard between characters in the composer’s operas. The closing cadenza to the second movement andante was dramatic and a bit mournful, foreshadowing Mozart’s Requiem to come. For his solo clarinet performance, University junior Hanson Kang chose a work of a 20th-century French composer, who despite his prolific output, seems to be little known. Clearly not one to shy away from a challenge, Kang was featured with the Orchestra in Jean Françaix’s 1967 Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, a work considered almost unplayable when composed because of its technical difficulty. The four-movement work composed in a difficult key for the clarinet, and Françaix himself described the piece as full of “loops, wing-turns, and nose-dives which are terrifying for the soloist.” Seemingly ignoring his vocally loud cheering section until the Concerto was over, Kang demonstrated solid breath control and lightning-quick runs, while maintaining the humor and fun intended by the composer. This Concerto, especially in the cadenzas, seemed truly improvisatory, with Kang appearing to make it up as he went along, although every note was intended. Kang emphasized a great deal of phrasing in a quirky second movement waltz, and played an expressive solo line against an ethereal orchestral texture in the third movement. A rollicking and jaunty closing movement served as a backdrop to the clarinet fireworks and nonstop playing required of the soloist, with Kang well up to the task. he fourth soloist presented, University senior Lou Chen, was not an instrumentalist — his solo with the Orchestra was conducting the ensemble in Johannes Brahms’ Academic Festival Overture. Chen has been conducting instrumental ensembles both on and off campus through much of his time at Princeton, and he was clearly comfortable on the podium. Most impressive about the Orchestra’s playing of the Brahms Overture under Chen’s leadership were the dynamic contrasts and swells Chen asked of the players — the music was always going somewhere. Chen was a precise conductor, bringing out both the regal nature of the piece and the humorous passages rooted in old-time drinking songs with effective changes in gestures to which the Orchestra responded. A winner of musical awards and clearly an innovative conductor, Chen proved himself well in the University Orchestra’s concerts and undoubtedly has a bright future in the field if he chooses that direction. —Nancy Plum

TERESA AZARIO MOMO: CAPTURING A MOTHER’S LOVE THROUGH FOOD U.S. AIR FORCE RESERVE TURNS 70 SETTING THE TABLE WITH MOTTAHEDEH AND WILDFLOWERS THE ORIGINAL QUAKER SETTLEMENT IN PRINCETON A MONUMENT TO GOLF VACATION HOMES BIKE, HIKE, AND RAFT THE LEHIGH GORGE

PM_CVR Feb2018.indd 1

1/19/18 4:26:28 PM

PM_CVR Spring2018.indd 1

3/23/18 10:03:49 AM

PM_CVR September2018.indd 1

One-Year Subscription: $10 | Two-Year Subscription: $15 609.924.5400 ext. 30 subscriptions@witherspoonmediagroup.com princetonmagazine.com

8/15/18 9:52 AM


SWAN STORY: The dance of the four “little swans” is a highlight of “Swan Lake,” which will be presented Saturday, March 16 at the State Theatre in New Brunswick by the Russian National Ballet, at 2 and 8 p.m. The company of 50 has been visiting North American stages since 1999, including the State Theatre, which is at 15 Livingston Avenue. Tickets are $19-$49. Visit stnj.org.

Benefit for Voices Chorale dancers for years, and will treatment options for dancnow be recognized as an of- ers, from the amateur to Is a “Souper” Cabaret

Voices Chorale NJ will hold a spring benefit event, Souper Cabaret, Sunday, March 31, from 4-8 p.m. at Music Together Worldw i d e, 225 Pe n n i n g to n Hopewell Road (Route 654), Hopewell. The event will include entertainment, food, and a select silent auction. Husband - and -w ife duo Scott and Bridgette Johnson will perform favorites from Broadway and beyond. The singers have have appeared nationally and internationally with their signature Let’s Duet concert series. Joined by pianist Martin Néron, friends, and members of the Chorale, they will present favorite songs and duets reaching across eras, genres, and styles. Tickets are $60 per person, $110 per couple, or $300 for a first rank table of six. To purchase visit www. voiceschoralenj.org. Voices Chorale NJ is an au d it i on e d ch or u s w it h members from throughout Central New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. Now under Artistic Director Dr. David McConnell, Voices was founded by Dr. Lyn Ransom in 1987.

Ballet School Names Studio for Spine Center

Princeton Ballet School, the official school of American Repertory Ballet, has announced the naming of the Princeton Spine and Joint Center Studio at its Princeton headquarters, located at Princeton Shopping Center. “We are grateful to Dr. Ana Bracilovic and her husband, Dr. Grant Cooper, codirectors of the Princeton Spine and Joint Center, for their generosity, passion, and belief in our mission,” said Julie Diana Hench, executive director of American Repertory Ballet. “This partnership furthers our commitment to ensuring that our dancers receive a holistic dance education, including a broader understanding of health, wellness, and injury prevention.” Princeton Spine and Joint Center has been caring for Pr inceton Ballet S chool

ficial health care provider for the School. In addition, Dr. Bracilovic will participate in upcoming “On Pointe” events that are free and open to the public: “Dancing Your Way into College,” a panel discussion on March 15, and “Physical Therapy: Taking Care of the Young Dancer’s Body” on May 3. Dr. Bracilovic will also be presenting lectures once a month for advanced dance students on a variety of topics ranging from anatomy and biomechanics, strengthening and conditioning, to injury prevention. In addition, she will be creating a series of warm-up exercises for students to do prior to classes and rehearsals, in collaboration with School Director Aydmara Cabrera. Dr. Bracilovic began her dance training at an early age at Pr inceton B allet School and continued dancing through college and medical school. Today, Drs. Bracilovic and Cooper’s two daughters are students at the school. In medical school, Dr. Bracilovic took dance classes at Steps on Broadway, where she spotted a brochure with the term unfamiliar to her at the time, “dance medicine.” The brochure featured a man in a white lab coat examining the knee of a dancer in a leotard. The man was Donald Rose, M.D., orthopedic surgeon and director of Harkness Center for Dance Injuries in New York City. Dr. Bracilovic would spend t wo su m mers w it h Rose and his staff learning all about the injuries of professional dancers. After medical school and residency t r a i n i n g, D r. B r ac i l ov i c and her husband opened their practice, Princeton Spine and Joint Center, a few blocks from Princeton Ballet School. Much in the same way sports medicine evolved as a branch of medicine specializing in the injuries of athletes, dance medicine is a further evolution of athletic injuries focusing on the specific care, diagnosis, and

seasoned professionals. In 2008, Dr. Bracilovic wrote a book, Essential Dance Medicine, dedicated to increasing the awareness and knowledge of the subject as well as emphasizing the importance of developing further funding for this field. “I am thrilled to be back in our hometown and to have the chance to work with many of my former teachers as well as the next generation of Princeton Ballet School students,” said Dr. Bracilov ic. “There is no better feeling than watching dancers perform whom I’ve seen in the office as patients. Seeing them shine in the beauty of their expression, musicality, and incredible prowess of their technique is testament to the amazing capacity of the human body and spirit, as both a science and an art. It is to this end that I relish supporting Princeton Ballet School, its students, teachers, and families, and the arts in our community in general.”

The Migration Plays At McCarter Theatre

Continuing McCarter Theatre’s tradition of producing socially relevant work that engages with the central questions of our culture, McCar ter has par t nered with Princeton University’s Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) on The Migration Plays, a new initiative focusing on the nature of migration, how it is represented culturally, and the ways in which it shapes the world around us. TOPICS McCar ter has commis s ion e d f ive play w r ig ht s

— Adam Gwon, Mar tyna M a j o k , H e a t h e r R a f f o, Mfoniso Udofia, and Karen Zacarías — to write a series of short plays inspired by the research and programming of the PIIRS Migration Lab and its Mellon funded Saw yer Seminar, “Global Migration: The Humanities and Social Sciences in Dialogue.” Since the spring of 2018, these five playwrights have engaged with the Migrations Lab by attending sem inars and sy mposia, meeting with scholars, and explor ing t he P r inceton campus to create pieces with unique and personal perspectives on migration. The Migration Plays will be directed by Elena Araoz, a theatre /opera director currently engaged as a lecturer in theater at Princeton University. A public reading of these five short plays will take place on Sunday, April 14 at 2 p.m. at McCar ter’s Matthews Stage, followed by a panel discussion. This event will be free and open to the public, with reservations required. Ab o u t T h e Mi g r a t i o n Plays, McCarter Artistic Director Emily Mann said “McCarter is immensely proud of its work with PIIRS and The Migration Lab. A play is an immediate encounter with the lives of others, something that is difficult to glean from a photo or a news article. The triumphs, the decisions, the difficulties faced in everyday life are things with which we can all relate, and when those aspects are placed directly in front of you by another human being on

stage, that immediacy can spark a whole world of new discussions, compassion, and empathy.” Immigration is a subject with which all five commissioned playwrights are intimately familiar, including Heather Raffo, who says “migration is a very personal subject to me. The idea of somebody starting in one home and ending up in another part of the world is something I’m very familiar with because I had over one hundred relatives living in Iraq at the start of the war in 2003 — I now have just two cousins left in the country. My family have fled as refugees and immigrants to places like New Zealand, Germany, Florida ... so what it means to be a refugee and the many different roads that takes is something I am continually exploring.” Professor of Comparative Literature, Cotsen Professor in the Humanities, and faculty head of the PIIRS Migration Lab Sandra Bermann added: “Migration is an immense issue for our generation, and the generation we are teaching. Migration is in many ways the human face of globalization, and our work attempts to bring our many campus disciplines together with the broader Princeton community to consider it more closely. When searching for collaborative partners, it was an easy decision to reach out to Emily Mann and the McCarter to partner on commissioning these plays. We look forward now to experiencing these works first hand.” Visit mccarter.org to register.

GET TICKETS!

PSO March Events Focus on the Flute

The Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) focuses on the flute this month at events throughout Princeton which collectively highlight the sound, history, artistry, and versatility of the instrument. On Thursday, March 14 at 7:30 pm, the PSO and the Princeton Garden Theatre present Ingmar Berman’s 1975 film adaptation of Mozart’s opera The Magic Flute. Tickets at $ 6.75 $11.50 are available at www.princetongardentheatre.org. On Wednesday, March 20 at 7 p.m., in partnership with the Princeton Public Library, “Exploring the Flute” will feature flutist Melanie Williams with her collection of flutes of various shapes and sizes, to discuss the instrument, its history, and role in orchestral music. The event is free. On Saturday, March 23 at 1 p.m., as part of a PSO BRAVO! Masterclass, four students from area schools will prepare repertoire for recital

ChELSEA KNOx, principal flute Metropolitan Opera Orchestra

DVOŘÁK/LIEBERMANN/ MAZZOLI

ROSSEN MILANOV Music Director

ROSSEN MILANOV, conductor ChELSEA KNOx, flute

Saturday March 23 8pm Sunday March 24 4pm Missy MAZZOLI / Sinfonia (for Orbiting Spheres) Lowell LIEBERMANN / Concerto for Flute and Orchestra DVOŘÁK / Symphony No. 8

princetonsymphony.org or 609/497-0020 Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University. Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Music and Theater

under the guidance of Metropolitan Opera Orchestra principal flutist Chelsea Knox. The masterclass is presented in partnership with Westminster Conservatory, in Hillman Hall, Westminster Choir College campus. Observation of the masterclass is free and open to the public, but ticketed reservations are required: www.princetonsymphony.org. F i n a l l y, o n S a t u r d a y, March 23 at 8 p.m. and Sunday March 24 at 4 p.m., the PSO features Knox as soloist in Lowell Liebermann’s Concerto for Flute and Orchestra, Op. 39. Also on the program are Missy Mazzoli’s Sinfonia (for Orbiting Spheres) and Antonín Dvorák’s Symphony No. 8 in G Major, Op. 88. Rossen Milanov conducts. Richardson Auditorium on the campus of Princeton University. A 3 p.m. Pre-Concert Talk is free to Sunday ticket-holders. Tickets, $35 and up, can be purchased at www. princetonsymphony.org or (609) 497-0020.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 16

New Yorker Radio Hour episode features a diverse man Fellow at Harvard, and To Be Taped at McCarter mix of interviews, profiles, worked for six years as an

On Tuesday, May 7, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, will sit down with the author and twotime Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Caro for a live taping of “The New Yorker Radio Hour,” the radio program and podcast from The New Yorker and WNYC Studios. The conversation will take place before a live audience at McCarter Theatre. Caro will discuss his forthcoming book, Working, plus his epic biography of President Lyndon Johnson, the state of the presidency today, and more. “The New Yorker Radio Hour” is a weekly program presented by Remnick and produced by WNYC Studios and The New Yorker. Each

storytelling, and an occasional burst of humor inspired by the magazine, and shaped by its writers, artists, and editors. For his biographies of Robert Moses and Lyndon Johnson, Caro has twice won t he P u lit zer P r i ze, twice won the National Book Award, three times won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and has also won virtually every other major literary honor, including the Gold Medal in Biography from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Francis Parkman Prize. In 2010, President Barack Obama awarded Caro the National Humanities Medal. C a r o g r a d u a te d f r o m Princeton, was later a Nie-

2018-19 SEASON

AGES

6-12

SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 2019, 1:00 PM | A CONCERT FOR KIDS AGES 6-12

“THE GIRL WHO LOVED WILD HORSES” The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Bruce Adolphe, Host with special guests The Princeton Girlchoir Based on the beloved story by Paul Goble, “The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses” is a musical telling of the exciting and haunting tale of a Native American girl who understands horses on a mystical level.

TICKETS JUST $5 KIDS | $10 ADULTS princetonuniversityconcerts.org | 609-258-9220 R i c h a rd s o n A u d i t o r i u m , A lexa n d e r H a l l

YEARS OF MUSIC MAKING | 2018-2019 SEASON Paderewski Memorial Concert

Mar

14

investigative reporter for Newsday. He lives with his wife, the writer Ina Caro, in New York City, where he is at work on the fifth and final volume of The Years of Lyndon Johnson. Remnick, the editor of T h e N e w Yo r ke r s i n c e 1998, began his career at The Washington Post, in 1982. He is the author of several books, including The Bridge, King of the World, Resurrection, and Lenin’s Tomb, for which he received both the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction and a George Polk Award for excellence in journalism. He became a staff writer at The New Yorker in 1992 and has since written more than two hundred pieces for the magazine. For tickets, visit mccarter.org.

Family Concert Program ter Symphony, Juilliard Lab org, by phone at ( 609 ) Fittante is a choreograOrchestra, and Connecticut 258-9220, or in person two pher and specialist in the At Richardson Auditorium Youth Symphony. She has hours prior to the concert at dance of the Baroque era.

On Saturday, March 23 at 1 p.m., Princeton University Concerts holds the annual family concert at Richardson Auditorium, featuring The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in the “Meet the Music” program. The concert is a musical telling of Paul Goble’s story The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses. Guests from Princeton Girlchoir will take part. The story focuses on a Native American girl who runs away from home to be with wild horses, to whom she is mystically drawn. Composer Bruce Adolphe is the host. Tickets are $5 for children and $10 for adults. Visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org or call (609) 258-9220.

Metropolitan Opera Flutist Is Soloist with Orchestra

On Saturday, March 23 at 8 p.m. and Sunday March 24 at 4 p.m., the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) and Edward T. Cone Music Director Rossen Milanov welcome back former principal flute Chelsea Knox, now principal at the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, for a performance of Lowell Liebermann’s Concerto for Flute and Orchestra, Op. 39. The program also features Sinfonia (for Orbiting Spheres) written by Missy Mazzoli, and Antonín Dvorák’s Symphony No. 8 in G Major, Op. 88.

Thu

8:00PM

Piano

Chelsea Knox Piano

Pre-concert talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders FRANZ SCHUBERT WORKS FOR PIANO DUO, INCLUDING THE FANTASIE IN F MINOR, D. 940, OP. 103 Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall princetonuniversityconcerts.org | 609-258-9220 Tickets: $25-$55 General | $10 Students

HE WON’T GROW UP: The Broadway musical “Finding Neverland,” about J.M. Barrie, author of “Peter Pan,” comes to the State Theatre in New Brunswick for three performances March 22 and 23. The show is based on the motion picture of the same name, which starred Johnny Depp. Tickets are $35-$108. Visit stnj.org.

The performances take place in Richardson Auditorium. A pre-concert talk featuring Milanov, Knox, and Mazzoli takes place Sunday at 3 p.m. Knox has held positions as assistant principal flute of the Baltimore Symphony and principal flute of the New Haven Symphony and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra. She has performed concertos with the Baltimore Symphony, Hartford Symphony, Manches-

won competitions including the New York Flute Club Young Artists Competition and the Hartford Symphony Young Artists Competition. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The Juilliard School in New York City as a student of Jeffrey Khaner. Liebermann’s Concer to for Flute and Orchestra was commissioned by and dedicated to the flutist Sir James Galway. Mazzoli’s Sinfonia was commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and plays on the word sinfonia, which refers to a baroque musical form but is also an old Italian term for a stringed, churning hurdygurdy which influenced the composer’s music. Dvorák’s eighth symphony references lively Bohemian dances and rhy thms from his native country. Tickets ($96, $80, $62, $35, and $28-youth) are available at princetonsymphony.org or by calling (609) 497-0020.

Violinist Kopatchinskaja Makes Princeton Debut

On Thursday, March 28 at 8 p.m., violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja makes her Princeton University Concerts debut at Richardson Auditorium, as part of the series’ 125th anniversary season. Gaining international renown in recent years, Kopatchinskaja has a repertoire that runs from baroque and classical to commissions and reimag ined moder n masterpieces. With Polina Leschenko at the piano, she will explore music rooted in her Moldovan-AustrianSwiss heritage, including sonatas by Béla Bar tók, George Enescu, and Francis Poulenc as well as the Hungarian flavors of Maurice Ravel’s “Tzigane” — a piece which was, coincidentally, given its PUC premiere by George Enescu in 1938. At 7 p.m., Princeton University violin students, directed by performance faculty member Anna Lim, will offer a brief musical preview in tribute to Kopatchinskaja. This pre-concert event is free to all ticket-holders. The Live Music Meditation with Kopatchinskaja originally scheduled for 12:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium has been cancelled. T i c ke t s a r e $10 - $ 55, available online at princetonuniversityconcerts.

the Richardson Auditorium A graduate of the School Box Office. of American Ballet, he has worked with Apollo’s Fire, James Galway in St. Juilliard 415, and the BosPatrick’s Day Concert ton Early Music Festival. He State Theatre New Jersey is artistic director of BALAM presents Sir James Galway Dance Theatre, a contempoin a special St. Patrick’s Day rary world dance company concert on Sunday, March inspired by Balinese theater, 17, at 3 p.m. Joining Gal- which has performed at Linway in recital is flutist Lady coln Center Out-of-Doors, Jeanne Galway, and pianist Jacob’s Pillow Dance FesMichael McHale. tival, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Bali International Dance Festival. Fittante has taught mask and gesture at the Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute, and currently teaches dance at Queens College in New York City. La Fiocco is a period instrument ensemble which performs music of the late Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical eras. La Fiocco presents an annual series of three concerts each in Princeton and Solebury, and will make its debut this year in Boston and Providence. James Galway Tickets are $25 general, T he prog ram includes $10 students; free for chilIrish folk songs and classical dren 12 and younger when pieces by Faure, Poulenc, accompanied by an adult. and other composers. They are available at the Belfast born, Galway stud- door (check or cash), or at ied in London and Paris lafiocco.org. before embarking on his orchestral career in such Takacs String Quartet orchestras as the Sadlers Returns to Richardson Wells and Royal Covent As part of Princeton UniGarden Operas, The BBC, versity Concerts’ 125th anRoyal Philharmonic, and niversary season, the Takács London Symphony Orches- String Quartet will make their tra, before becoming solo 20th appearance on the series flautist with the Berlin Phil- Thursday, April 4, at 8 p.m. in harmonic under Herbert von Richardson Auditorium. Karajan. The ensemble — with new The Galway Flute Acad- second v iolinist Har umi emy is the Galways’ educa- Rhodes — will be joined by tional platform, including pianist Marc-André Hamelin daily master classes, week- and bassist John Feeney to end residencies, and 10-day perform Franz Schubert’s flute festivals. “Trout” Quintet for Piano and T i c k e t s r a n g e f r o m Strings in A Major, D. 667. $17.50 - $70, available at This work was selected by STNJ.org. The theater is audience members as one of at 15 Livingston Avenue their favorite pieces of chamber music in PUC’s audience in New Brunswick. survey last season. Also on La Fiocco Performs the program: Franz Joseph With Baroque Dancers Haydn’s String Quartet in Sarabande! is the title of G Major, Op. 76, No. 1 and two concerts by the period Dmitri Shostakovich’s String instr ument ensemble L a Quartet No. 4 in D Major, Fiocco, featuring Baroque Op. 83. dancers Carlos Fittante and A t 7 p.m ., P r i n c e to n Robin Gilbert Campos, with Emeritus Professor Scott music by Vivaldi, Lully, Ra- Burnham will offer a premeau, and Juan Arañes. The concer t talk, free to all concerts will be held on Sat- ticket holders. Tickets are urday, March 30, 7:30 p.m., $10-$55, available online at Christ Congregation, 50 at pr incetonuniversit yWalnut Lane, Princeton; and concerts.org, by phone at Sunday, March 31, 3 p.m., (609) 258-9220, or in perat Trinity Episcopal Church, son two hours prior to the 6587 Upper York Road, concert at the Richardson Solebury (New Hope), Pa. Auditorium Box Office.


“Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces” Exhibit at ACP

“POLAR VORTEX BEAUTY”: This photograph by Bridget Davis was chosen as the winner of the Delaware River Basin Commission’s Winter 2018-2019 Photo Contest. The Spring Photo Contest will begin on March 20, and has a deadline of May 15. For more information, visit www.nj.gov/drbc/basin/photo/photo-contest.

DRBC Winter Photo Contest Winner

The Delaware River Basin Commission ( DR BC ) announced that Bridget Davis’ photograph, titled Polar Vortex Beauty, was chosen as the winner of the commission’s Winter 2018-2019 Photo Contest. Forty photographs were submitted by 14 individuals for the contest. “I always have my camera with me and enjoy photographing the amazing wildlife and beautiful scenery of this area along the West Branch Delaware River,” said Bridget Davis of Deposit, N.Y. “The recent polar vortex made for some fantastic photographs; I felt sorry for the geese, but they didn’t appear to mind the cold.” The winning image will be featured on the commission’s website at www.nj.gov/drbc/ basin/photo/photo-contest and on its social media sites. The photo will also be published in the commission’s 2019 annual report, and the winner will receive a certificate of recognition.

The contest’s purpose is to highlight amateur and professional photography representing the beauty, diversity, function, and significance of the water resources of the Delaware River Basin, a 13,539-square mile watershed. Approximately 15 million people (or about five percent of the nation’s population) rely on the water resources of the Delaware River Basin to support a variety of significant uses including public drinking water, industry, agriculture, power generation, recreation, fisheries, and aquatic life. The Spring Photo Contest will begin on March 20, and has a deadline of May 15. Complete contest details, including instructions on how to submit photographs, are available on DRBC’s website at the above link. The DRBC is a federal/interstate government agency responsible for managing the water resources within the Delaware River Basin without regard to political boundaries. The five commission members are the

The Arts Council of Princeton presents “Riverside Silos/ Shaping Spaces,” a dual exhibition by photographer Ricardo Barros and sculptor Autin Wright. This installation addresses volume — the space a substance occupies — in various ways through light, shadow, and form. “You could say we’re focusing on the same subject, but seeing it through different lenses,” says Princeton resident Barros. “Or,” Wright adds, “We’re both pursuing a sculptural vision. Mine results in a threedimensional sculpture. Ricardo works with similar forms to produce a two-dimensional photograph.” “Riverside Silos/Shaping Spaces” will be on view in the Arts Council’s Taplin Gallery March 23 through May 4. “We look forward to working again with Ricardo, our friend of many years,” says ACP Artistic Director Maria Evans. “And we’re excited about welcoming Autin to our gallery for the first time.” An artist talk will be held on Saturday, March 23 from 2-3 p.m., followed by an opening reception from 3-5 p.m. Also on view in the Lower Level Gallery will be Charles David Viera’s “WILD: Wildlife Paintings and Drawings.” The Taplin Gallery is at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street. Parking is available in the Spring and Hulfish Street Garages and at metered parking spots along Witherspoon Street and Paul Robeson Place. For more information, visit artscouncilofprinceton. org or call (609) 924.8777.

Jerseyarts.Com Announces People’s Choice Winners

The ArtPride New Jersey Foundation, in partnership with the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, has announced the winners of the 2019 JerseyArts.com People’s Choice Awards. Now in its 11th year, the annual contest celebrates the work of New Jersey’s vital and thriving arts community. Nearly 14,000 arts lovers from throughout the region

cast their ballots this year. From 115 nominees, 19 groups were honored. “The arts in New Jersey are vibrant, diverse, and innovative,” said Adam Perle, president and CEO of ArtPride New Jersey, during the awards ceremony at Lyceum Hall Center for the Arts in Burlington. “We are extremely proud to host the annual JerseyArts.com People’s Choice Awards, and to honor the outstanding cultural industry that makes our state such an incredible place to live, work and play.” The 2019 JerseyArts.com People’s Choice Awards honorees are; Favorite Large Performing Arts Center: New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark; Favorite Small Performing Ar ts Center: South Orange Performing Arts Center, South Orange; Favorite Large Theatre to See a Musical: Paper Mill Playhouse, Millburn; Favorite Large Theatre to See a Play: McCarter Theatre Center, Princeton; and Favorite Small Theatre: Luna Stage Company, West Orange. Favor ite A r t Mus eu m : Grou nds For S cu lpt ure, Hamilton; Favorite Art Gallery: Studio Montclair, Mont-

clair; Favorite Symphony/ Orchestra: New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Newark; Favorite Choral Group: Paper Mill Playhouse Broadway Show Choir, Millburn; Favorite Ballet Company: New Jersey Ballet, Livingston; Favorite Modern/Cultural Dance Company: New Jersey Tap Ensemble, Bloomfield; Favorite Opera Company: Opera Theatre of Montclair, Montclair; Favorite Music Festival: Montclair Jazz Festival, Montclair; Favorite Film Festival: Montclair Film Festival, Montclair; and Favorite Visual Arts Festival: Newark Arts Festival, Newark. Favorite Adult Art Class: Montclair Art Museum Yard School of Art, Montclair; Favorite Visual Arts Camp: Montclair A r t Museu m’s SummerART Camp, Montclair; Favorite Performing Ar ts Camp : Jazz House Kids Summer Workshop, Montcla ir; a nd Favor ite

Downtown Ar ts District: Montclair. Honorable Mentions were Favorite Central Jersey Performing Arts Center: State Theatre New Jersey, New Brunswick; Favorite South Jersey Symphony/Orchestra: Bay Atlantic Symphony, Atlantic City; Favorite North Jersey Art Museum: Newark Museum, Newark. “The thousands of fans who come out and vote every year for their favorites are further proof that the arts matter in New Jersey,” said Allison Tratner, executive director of the State Arts Council. “As drivers of tourism and the economy, these distinctive arts destinations anchor communities in every corner of the state, and help connect us with the creativity so vital to our quality of life.” For detailed results and more information, visit JerseyArts.com/PeoplesChoice.

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

Film Series

ART ON SCREEN PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE In conjunction with the exhibitions Gainsborough’s Family Album and Confronting Childhood, this series presents films that explore the themes of family and childhood. Museum members receive Princeton Garden Theatre member admission price.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 7:30PM

BARRY LYNDON

Directed by STANLEY KUBRICK Introduced by Art Museum Director JAMES STEWARD 203 minutes, rated PG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 7:30PM

HOPE AND GLORY

Directed by JOHN BOORMAN Introduced by Associate Director for Education CAROLINE HARRIS 113 minutes, rated PG-13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 7:30PM

BOYHOOD

Directed by RICHARD LINKLATER Introduced by Associate Director for Education CAROLINE HARRIS 160 minutes, rated R

“RIVERSIDE SILOS/SHAPING SPACES”: Photographs by Ricardo Barros and sculpture by Autin Wright will be featured in a dual exhibition on view March 23 through May 4 at the Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery. An artist talk is Saturday, March 23 from 2-3 p.m., followed by an opening reception from 3-5 p.m.

always free and open to the public

artmuseum.princeton.edu

Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

TT_Film Series_March 2019.indd 1

3/7/19 1:55 PM

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Art

governors of the basin states (Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania) and the commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Nor th Atlantic Div ision, who represents the federal government.


laborated to create multifaceted learning experiences for junior kindergarten, first-, and third-grade pupils. Each class approached the project through social studies, STEAM, and technology. Jill Work was technology teacher for “Animal Expo,” and Elene Nickerson was the STE A M teacher. The project also emphasized language and information skills, in addition to the creative multimedia art. Lively interpretations of animals fill the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, including creatures native to New Jersey in general and Central Jersey in particular. The young artists also crafted essays on habitat, food, interactions of their species with Lenapes of long ago, and with 21st-century humans. All addressed habitat requirements and environmental effects upon their chosen species. Each Stuart first-grader chose a specific farm animal to study and depict. Third-graders — with Aileen O’Shea and Denise King, teachers — depicted their animals in vivid oil pastels. Their species studies were tied to Lenape traditions. Stuart’s junior kindergarten students utilized field guides to local birds, with emphasis

NO STRINGS ATTACHED • No Service Charges • No Minimum Balance • Unlimited Check Writing “ANIMAL EXPO”: Animal art and accompanying essays by students of Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart are on display through April 12 at D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery, One Preservation Place, Princeton.

RANTEE A U

Stuart Country Day School “Animal Expo” at Olivia Rainbow Gallery o f t h e S a c r e d H e a r t ,

“MASTER OF THE RUPTURED WOOD”: Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, will present an illustrated lecture by trompe l’oeil artist Gary Erbe, a Q&A, and book signing of Erbe’s “Footprints: The Art and Life Of Gary Erbe” on Saturday, April 13 from 2 to 4 p.m. $15; $10 for members. Ticket includes admission to the Museum galleries April 13. “Footprints” is available for purchase and signing separately. For more information and to register, visit morven.org/masters-of-illusion. upon winter’s species; even learning to distinguish male from female of the species. The class also watched the maturation of eagles through the live Duke Farms Eagle Cam; and multiple species through the bird- cam of Cornell University’s Department of Ornithology. Andres Duque, art teacher, coordinated this interweaving. The Olivia Rainbow Galler y of D & R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center

G

D

.75 WHAT ARE YOU SAVING FOR?

D & R Greenway Land Tr u s t ’s O l i v i a R a i n b o w Gallery presents “Animal Expo,” art by students of

through April 12. In this imaginative, interdisciplinary project, teachers from different subject areas col-

%

APY***

F

R

O RO EA Y NE TAKE YOUR

DREAM TO REALITY

WITH OUR NO PENALTY CD* YOU’LL ENJOY

2.65

%

a d l i u B et Budg

Plan for Retirement

Bank Smart

out t Ge Debt of

IN

*

T ES D

UAAN

T ES

APY 60 months ITH INT Save for EE mergen W R cies H INT T G I THE WBEST OF ALLEWORLDS! R  Access your money any time G for any reason!!* RANTE HH EC CC EKC INK

E

is located at One Preservation Place, Princeton. Admission is free. For more information, call (609) 9244646 or visit the website at www.drgreenway.org.

DV Bead Society Forum and Trunk Show

The Delaware Valley Bead Society (DVBS) will present Mark Fleishman’s “Bead Forum and Trunk Show” on Wednesday, March 20, at 7 p.m. in the Café of the Hunterdon County Senior Center, 4 G aunt t Place, Building 1, Flemington. The program is free and open to the public, but non-members must pre-register. Fleishman will cover topics such as what to look for in terms of natural quality, how best to choose between natural beads and enhanced ones, and how to use color and the structure of the material to judge quality. In addition to a discussion of the scientific background of certain stones, Fleishman will touch on the history of natural and enhanced specimens and how colors came to be. At tendees will learn of other natural materials that are suitable for jewelry, such as common fossils and pearls. He will also discuss availability and hardness (durability) of gemstones, as well as how to determine which beads are natural, which are “enhanced” or synthetic, and which are incompatible with natural history. A question and answer period will follow. After the presentation, there will be a trunk show where beads of all types will be available for analysis, purchase, or trade. To register, email your name, address, and phone number to odyssey5@ptd. net or call (908) 246-1231. For more information, visit www.delawarevalleybeadsociety.org.

Celebrating% % 15 Years... NO NO

 High Yield without stock market volatility

R A U  Consumer, Business, and IRA

TEE

G

.75 .75

 Start saving today with as little as $1,000

D

Accounts Welcome

G

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 18

WITH INTEREST

 No Maintenance or Setup Fees  NO SURPRISES

APY IN OUR CO M M* U N I T Y ! STRINGS Area

Exhibits STRINGS 1 Edinburg Road BranchATTACHED 2265 Offi ces Route #33 M Celebrating ATTACHED 8 M AY Mercerville, Hamilton Square, NJ AY 311, 82 0 1 NJ

APY*

31, 210609-269-1616 7 Years OF COMMUNITY BANKING

• 1 Edinburg Road, Mercerville • 2265 Route #33, Hamilton Square

609-269-1619

Corporate Offices

• 2297 Route #33, Hamilton Square • Freehold Loan Office, 76 West Main Street, Suite #102

A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Awakenings” through March 31. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princet o n , 10 2 W i t h e r s p o o n Street, has “All That You L e ave B e h i n d ” t h r ou g h

grandbk.com

Bank Local • Shop Local • Go Local NO MINIMUM BALANCE REQUIRED See how well we can work together. NO MINIMUM BALANCE REQUIRED TO .75% EARN .75% ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD. TO EARN ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD.

Contact Us

grandbk.com • 1.800.234.3459

*** Interest bearing account. No minimum to open account. No qualifications. No minimum balance required to earn .75%Percentage AnnualYieldPercentage Yield.as ofAccurate of Rate, 05/25/2017. *Annual (APY) is accurate February 8,as2019. terms, and conditions are subject to change without notice. Limited time only. APY assumes interest remains on deposit to maturity. NO Rate Penaltyguaranteed for early withdrawal beginning seven days after funds have been through May 31, 2018, after whichreceived rate formayyour CD. No withdrawals are permitted during the first six days following the receipt of funds. $1,000 minimum balance required to obtain APY. Maximum $75,000 per tax ID. New Money Only, which is defined as money not on deposit with Grand Bank within three months prior to the date of account opening. No account opening change without No interest activities fees.your Unlimited CheckIRA deposits are subject to rules for IRA accounts. or maintenance fees. Daily notice. compounding to maximize earning potential. writing. No minimum usage levels. Personal accounts only.

March 16. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. D & R Greenway Land Tr u s t , 1 P r e s e r v a t i o n Place, has “Healing Trails” through April 5 and “Animal Expo” through April 12. www.drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Park s id e Ave nu e, Trenton, has “From Durer to Digital and 3 -D : The Metamorphosis of the Printed Image” through April 28. www.ellarslie.org. G roun d s For S c ul p ture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has “The Act of Drawing” through March 31, and other exhibits. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Morning at the Updike Farmstead,” “Princeton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, 12-4 p.m. T hursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “The Art of Seating: Two Hundred Years of American Design” through May 5 a n d “Na k as h i m a Looks : Studio Furniture” through July 7. w w w.michenerartmuseum.org. M il lstone R iver G a l ler y, at Mer wick Care & R e h a b i l i t a t i o n Fa c i l i t y, 100 Plainsboro Road, has “Gifts from the Sea,” photographs by Tasha O’Neill with poems by Cool Women, through May 2. A reception and poetry reading is March 14, 5-7 p.m. M o r p e t h C o n te m p o rary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, has “Saunter” through March 31. w w w. morpethcomtemporarycom. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Masters of Illusion” through May 19. www.morven.org. Present Day Club, 72 Stockton Street, has works by pastel artist Donna Gratkowski through April 30. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has “Gainsborough’s Family Album” through June 9 and “Miracles on the Border: Retablos of Mexican Migrants” March 16 through July 7. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu.


T

he changes in pho tography have been almost unimaginable. Film transitioning to digital; Kodak — an icon of the industry — almost gone.

IT’S NEW To Us

W ho could believe 20 years ago that the general public would regularly snap pictures with their phones? W ho heard of a smar tphone? The sheer speed of the changes is both amazing and unsettling. Face-to-Face Nevertheless, even in the age of instant turnaround and non-stop action, some things remain. Knowledgeable, reliable service, high quality products, and helpful face-to-face interaction are still welcome in our world, and in business transactions. New Jersey Camera & O ne Hou r Photo of fer s such an experience for its customers. Located in the Lawrence Shopping Center at 2495 Brunswick Pike for the past year, it has served the area in various other locations for many years. Owners Doug Masin, Leon Treskunov, and Bennie Williams and manager Er ic Kramer offer expertise in all areas of photography, printing, equipment, and the latest technological advances. “We can do so much for

our customers,” points out Doug Masin, who has been in the camera and photo lab business for 30 years. “We buy, sell, trade, and repair cameras, offering all the brands such as Sony, Nikon, Leica, Canon, and others. “We can print in many areas, including from phones and from slides, and we can also restore old photos that are faded or damaged. We can scan old slides onto a disk or fast drive, and do also do VHS transfers to DVDs and to flash drives— and we do everything inhouse. Nothing is sent out.” In something of a turnaround, he adds, in this day of instant everything, there has recently been new interest in film. “This has really surprised me,” says Masin. “In 1999/2000, I had the best years in film. After that, it plummeted, and everything was digital. Now, there has been a resurgence of interest in film, especially among younger people. “They like to use disposable cameras with film. For a lot of people, it’s fun waiting to see what the picture will look like. It’s the anticipation. The way it used to be, waiting for the film to be developed — unlike today, with the instant digital format.” Special Meaning Masin particularly enjoys the restoration of old photos and the printing process. He becomes involved with customers to whom a particular image has special meaning. “It’s ver y personal when

people share their lives with us through their photos. Lots of times, they’ll bring in photos of pets who have died or other special images that are important to them.” Helping clients with photographic advice in all areas is the specialty of manager Eric Kramer, a professional photographer himself. He finds his position at New Jersey Camera to be a perfect match with his work as a photographer. “I was originally a customer at the store, and then ended up working here,” he explains. “I wanted to learn more about the camera sales end and the printing. It’s been great.” With his focus and experience in portraits, wedding photos, and social media, he is in an ideal position to advise customers, who range from professional photographers to beginners. “I can help people with advice about settings, composition of pictures, different cameras, etc. As a visual artist, I try to help you to make your images look even better.” Full Range He adds that customers are interested in the full range of cameras, and he can assist them in finding the model most appropriate for their needs. “If someone is new to photography, they may want to rent one to try it out. Our customers are across the board, including kids just learning and also retirees who may be taking up photography as a new

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

First-Class Products, Service, and Expertise From New Jersey Camera & One Hour Photo

IMAGE EXPERTISE: “We have a niche. No one else in the area is just like us. We’re full service, offering new and used cameras, rentals, trade-in, restoration, repair, film processing, and knowledgeable advice.” The staff at New Jersey Camera & One Hour Photo in the Lawrence Shopping Center is proud of their long history of service and quality products. Shown, from left, are manager Eric Kramer and owners Bennie Williams, Doug Masin, and Leon Treskunov. hobby. Of course, we get lots of people who want to take pictures when they go on vacation. “Our clients are f rom Princeton and the area, both longtime regulars and new customers, and they’re interested in the full range of what we offer, from renting or buying a camera to film processing to restoration. Whatever their goal, I enjoy being able to supply someone with the tools they need to capture an image. Also, in February, we are scheduling a series of classes and seminars for all areas of photography.” Many customers visit the store regularly, and New Jersey Camera also enjoys a thriving online business,

essential to today’s world of buying and selling. In addition, notes Masin, “It is necessar y to keep up-to-date with all the new technology and advances. Eric is very knowledgeable about all this.” Along with cameras, customers will find a full range of accessories at the store. Camera bags, flashes, camera batteries, filters, tripods, of course, film, and also picture frames are all available, as are passport photos. The owners look forward to a long stay in the Lawrence Shopping Center, which is currently undergoing a renovation, with many more stores on the horizon. “We really enjoy helping our customers,” says Doug

Masin. “We try to offer a very comfortable, warm atmosphere, and we like interacting with the customers. We look forward to continuing to offer high quality service, printing, and products. And we do our best to provide what they need within their budget. We are here to stay!” And, while fully immersed in the high-tech world of today, New Jersey Camera & One Hour Photo offers the singular service that has stood the test of time. The store is open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (609) 799-0081. Website : w w w.njcamera1hourphoto.com. —Jean Stratton

Now ! n e p O Rehabilitative Services • Long-Term Care • Memory Care

Village Point Rehabilitation & Healthcare is a new state-of-the-art healthcare center that offers high-quality health services with modern innovative programming and amenities. Village Point serves the individual needs of our residents with an array of services that include rehabilitation, memory care and long-term care.

For more information call 844-718-8879 3 David Brainerd Drive, Monroe Township, NJ 08831 villagepointhealthcare.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 20

THE RESIDENCES AT RABBIT RUN CREEK

ULTRA LUXURY MEETS ULTRA PRIVACY.

The fourth phase is now available. •

3,600–5,500 SF with full basements and elevators

Refined architecture and finishes • Open, contemporary floorplan that promotes entertaining •

Private, gated community

SALES OFFICE HOURS Wednesday-Friday 10 AM-6 PM Saturday & Sunday 12-4 PM RTE 202 (LOWER YORK ROAD) & RABBIT RUN DRIVE, NEW HOPE, PA 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com


Five Feet Apart

CINEMA REVIEW

Romance Drama Revolves Around Love Between Hospitalized Teens Stella Grant (Haley Lu Richardson) is a typical 17-yearold in most regards. However, she is also suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease which makes her very susceptible to a variety of breathing disorders. Consequently, she spends much of her time in the hospital. She’s currently receiving treatment for bronchitis on a ward with several fellow CF patients, including her friend Poe (Moises Arias), although there is a strictlyenforced rule that they stay at least six feet apart at all times because they could easily infect each other. That regulation is put to the test upon the arrival of newcomer Will Newman (Cole Sprouse), a CF victim with a bacterium which would prove fatal should Stella catch it from him. But the two kids fall in love at first sight, and find it hard to resist each other. Luckily, nurse Barb (Kimberly Hebert Gregory) is there to monitor the movements of the young patients. She has been particularly vigilant to prevent any rendezvous on her

watch, ever since an incident that led to a tragic ending. Thus unfolds Five Feet Apart, a bittersweet romance drama marking the noteworthy feature film directorial debut of actor Justin Baldoni (Jane the Virgin). Baldoni deserves considerable credit for coaxing impressive performances out of Richardson and Sprouse, who manage to generate convincing chemistry in challenging roles where they can’t touch each other. The movie’s sole flaw rests in its unnecessarily adding a melodramatic twist more appropriate for a soap opera at the picture’s climactic moment. It is a distracting rabbitout-the-hat development that almost ruins an otherwise poignant love story. Very Good (H H H). Rated PG-13 for profanity, mature themes, and suggestive material. Running time: 116 minutes. Production Companies: CBS Films/Wayfarer Entertainment. Distributors: CBS Films/Lionsgate —Kam Williams

Fri. 03/15/19 to Thurs. 03/21/19

Transit

Fri-Sat: 2:10, 4:35, 7:00, 9:25 (R) Sun-Thurs: 2:10, 4:35, 7:00

The Wedding Guest

Starting Friday Everybody Knows (R)

Apollo 11

Continuing Apollo 11 (R)

Fri-Sat: 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 (PG) Sun-Thurs: 2:30, 4:45, 7:00

Fri-Sat: 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 Sun-Thurs: 2:45, 5:00, 7:15 (G)

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Dining & Entertainment Ends Thursday Shoplifters (R) Free Solo (PG-13)

Everybody Knows Fri-Sat: 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20 Sun-Thurs: 1:35, 4:30, 7:25 (R)

Special Program The Magic Flute (1975) Thu, Mar 14 at 7:30PM

They Shall Not Grow Old Fri-Sat: 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 10:15 (R) Sun-Thurs: 1:30, 4:25, 7:20

Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Green Book

Fri-Sat: 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 Sun-Thurs: 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 (PG-13)

To: ___________________________ From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: Ice okay) Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm (Your check mark will tell us it’s � Phone number

I WISH I COULD BE NEXT TO YOU: Stella (Haley Lu Richardson) and Will (Cole Sprouse), who both have cystic fibrosis, must stay a certain distance away from each other despite their growing attraction in “Five Feet Apart.” (Photo courtesy of CBS Films/Lionsgate)

Vitality Santé has transformed the neighborhood pharmacy into a

center of health and wellness.

Metagenics Clear Change Detoxification Kits (All varieties)

25%off

Now is the perfect time of year to cleanse your body of waste and toxins. Designed to enhance the body’s natural metabolic detoxification process. Choose from a daily to 28-day program.

is the

of Life

200 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (Next to Café Vienna)

� Address � Expiration Date CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

Hunan ~ Szechuan Malaysian ~ Vietnamese Daily Specials • Catering Available 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

CV Sciences Plus CBD Oil (All varieties)

20off %

Collagen Products

25off %

A Santé favorite brand of hemp-derived CBD oil. Choose from a selection of sprays, drops, balms, capsules and gummies. Non-GMO and gluten-free.

Adding collagen to your diet is a no-brainer! Choose from powders, capsules or chews. Multiple sources available.

B-Complex Vitamins

Body Lotions

(All brands)

20%off

B-complex vitamins deliver the benefits of all 8 B vitamins by supporting a healthy metabolism, increased energy and mood stabilization. Brands include Emerald Labs, Thorne, MegaFoods, Ortho Molecular and more.

The Cranbury Inn

(All brands, all varieties)

RESTAURANT

Find more promotions and store events on our website:

Established 1780

Celebrate St. Patty’s Days at the Inn!

santeintegrativepharmacy.com

(All brands)

25%off

*

Explore Santé’s selection of natural, paraben-free organic products packed with botanicals, vitamins and minerals. Indulge in body lotions to moisturize and pamper your skin. *Exclusions: Avène and Dr. Hauschka body care products

Avène Skin Care (All varieties)

Buy One Get One for 50%off *

Enjoy a Beauty Bundle BOGO, plus receive a bonus gift with purchase of 2 deluxe mini products. Valid while quantities last. One per customer. *Of equal or lesser value.

While quantities last. Sale ends end of day of March 31st.

Santé Integrative Pharmacy

� Fax number

STORE 609-921-8820 PHARMACY 609-921-8822 FAX 609-921-8824

Follow Us!

STORE HOURS:

Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sat: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sun: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

We accept all insurance plans, including CVS/Caremark, Express Scripts, Horizon, Optum & CIGNA.

• Same Price • Same Co-Pay • Better Service

On Friday, March 15th and Saturday, March 16th

we will be offering our Irish Lunch & Dinner Special from 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m., featuring our traditional corned beef and cabbage entree accompanied by the Inn’s famous potato leek soup and Irish bread!

On Sunday, March 17th our Champagne Brunch

will feature our corned beef and cabbage Seating 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. followed by our Irish Dinner from 2 p.m. - 9 p.m.

For Reservations call 609-655-5595 21 South Main Street • Cranbury, NJ www.thecranburyinn.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 22

AT THE CINEMA

Don’t forget to pick up your St. Patty’s goodies! Cookies Macarons Irish Potatoes Irish Soda Bread

Open 7 days a week: 7am to 9pm 4581 Route 27 · Kingston, NJ 609-921-2778

COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

www.terhuneorchards.com (609) 924-2310

BRING SPRING HOME

Farm Fresh Greenhouse Lettuce & Flowering Plants

WINERY SUNDAY MUSIC SERIES March 17 – Jim Matlack & Carmen Marranco March 24 – Kingston Ridge | March 31 – Bill O’Neal & Andy Koontz

Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat & Sun 9-5 • www.terhuneorchards.com

Alita: Battle Angel (PG-13 for action, violence, and brief profanity). Rosa Salazar tackles the title role in this post-apocalyptic sci-fi as a cyborg with amnesia recruited by a compassionate scientist (Christoph Waltz) to break the world’s cycle of death and destruction. Cast includes Mahershala Ali, Jennifer Connelly, Jackie Earle Haley, and Michelle Rodriguez. Apollo 11 (Unrated). IMAX documentary revisiting NASA’s historic 1969 mission, the first spaceflight to land on the moon. Featuring archival footage of astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. Captain Marvel (PG-13 for action, violence, and brief suggestive language). Twenty-first installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe stars Brie Larson in the title role as a former fighter pilot turned superhero who finds herself at the center of the maelstrom when a galactic conflict erupts on Earth between two alien races. Cast includes Samuel L. Jackson, Gemma Chan, Annette Bening, and Djimon Hounson. Captive State (PG-13 for action, violence, sexuality, brief profanity, and drug use). Sci-fi thriller unfolding in a Chicago neighborhood about a decade after it was occupied by an extraterrestrial force. Co-starring John Goodman, Vera Farmiga, KiKi Layne, Alan Ruck, and Machine Gun Kelly. Everybody Knows (R for profanity). Introspective drama about a married woman (Penelope Cruz) who rendezvous with an ex-boyfriend (Javier Bardem) to reminisce about what might have been when she returns to her tiny hometown without her husband (Ricardo Darin) for her younger sister’s (Inma Cuesta) wedding. With Eduard Fernandez, Barbara Lennie, and Elvira Minguez. (In Spanish, English, and Catalan with subtitles.) The Favourite (R for profanity, nudity, and graphic sexuality). Olivia Colman portrays Queen Anne (1665-1714) in this biopic revolving around the bitter battle between the Duchess of Marlborough (Rachel Weisz) and a servant (Emma Stone) for the frail monarch’s friendship and affections. With Emma Delves, Faye Daveney, and Paul Swaine. Fighting with My Family (PG-13 for sexuality, violence, crude humor, drug use, and pervasive profanity). Fact-based comedy about a couple of retired pro wrestlers (Nick Frost and Lena Headey) whose children (Florence Pugh and Jack Lowden) dream of following in their parents’ footsteps. With Dwayne Johnson, Vince Vaughn, and Stephen Merchant. Five Feet Apart (PG-13 for profanity, mature themes, and suggestive material). Romance drama about a couple of teenagers with cystic fibrosis (Haley Lu Richardson and Cole Sprouse) who fall in love while been treated in a hospital. With Moises Arias, Parminder Nagra, and Claire Forlani. Free Solo (Unrated). Oscar-winning Best Documentary following Alex Honnold’s attempt to become the first person to scale Yosemite’s 3,000-foot tall El Capitan Wall solo, with no ropes or safety gear. Green Book (PG-13 for violence, mature themes, profanity, racial slurs, smoking, and suggestive material) Oscar-winning Best Picture, set in the sixties, about the friendship forged between a black classical pianist (Mahershala Ali) and his white chauffeur (Viggo Mortensen) driving around the Deep South during Jim Crow segregation. With Linda Cardellini, Don Stark, and P.J. Byrne. Greta (R for violence and disturbing images). Suspense thriller, set in NYC, about a naive young woman (Chloe Grace Moretz) who unwittingly befriends a widow with an evil agenda (Isabelle Huppert) whose pocketbook she found on the subway. With Maika Monroe, Colm Feore, and Stephen Rea. Happy Death Day 2U (PG-13 for violence, profanity, sexuality, and mature themes). Slasher sequel finds heroine Tree Gelbman (Jessica Roth) re-entering the time loop and repeatedly reliving the same day during which she is hunted and killed by a masked assassin. With Ruby Modine, Israel Broussard, and Suraj Sharma. How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (PG for action and mild rude humor). Final installment in the animated fantasy trilogy finds Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) and Toothless embarking on an epic journey to protect their peaceful village from the darkest threat it has ever faced. Voice cast includes America Ferrara, Cate Blanchett, Jonah Hill, Kristen Wiig, Gerard Butler, and Craig Ferguson. If Beale Street Could Talk (R for profanity and sexuality). Adaptation of James Baldwin’s classic novel, set in Harlem, revolving around a pregnant teenager’s (Kiki Layne) efforts to free her fiancé (Stephan James) falsely accused of rape. With Regina King, Teyonah Parris, and Colman Domingo. Isn’t It Romantic (PG-13 for profanity, sexuality, and a drug reference). Satirical fantasy, set in NYC, about an Australian architect (Rebel Wilson) who wakes up trapped in a romantic comedy after being knocked unconscious by a mugger on a subway platform. Supporting cast includes Liam Hemsworth, Adam Devine, and Priyanka Chopra. The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part (PG for crude humor). Animated musical adventure finds the citizens of Bricksburg facing a new threat, namely, invaders from outer space. Voice cast includes Will Arnett, Tiffany Haddish, Alison Brie, Chris Pratt, and Elizabeth Banks. A Madea Family Funeral (PG-13 for profanity, crude sexuality, and pervasive drug use). Tyler Perry’s back in drag as a sassy granny for this raucous comedy set in rural Georgia where a joyous family reunion is unexpectedly marred by tragedy. Co-starring Cassi Davis, Patrice Lovely, and Mike Tyson. Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase (PG for peril, mild epithets, mature themes, and suggestive material). Sophia Lillis stars in the title role in this adaptation of the second novel in Carolyn Keene’s classic mystery series which finds the teen sleuth teaming with her BFFs (Zoe Renee and Mackenzie Graham) to solve a case of paranormal activity in a haunted house. Supporting cast includes Linda Lavin, Laura Wiggins, Andrea Anders, and Sam Trammell. Shoplifters (R for nudity and sexuality). Oscar-nominated Best Foreign Film, set in Tokyo, about a poor family that adopts a homeless child (Miyu Sasaki) they meet while stealing from a grocery store. Co-starring Lily Franky, Sakura Ando, and Kirin Kiki. (In Japanese with subtitles.) They Shall Not Grow Old (R for graphic images). World War I documentary commemorating the centennial of the conflict and featuring previously unseen footage. Directed by Peter Jackson. The Wedding Guest (R for profanity, violence, and brief nudity). Dev Patel plays the title character in this suspense thriller about a shadowy figure who travels from England to Pakistan to kidnap a Muslim bride-to-be (Radhike Apte). With Jim Sarbh, Harish Khanna, and Nish Nathwani. What Men Want (R for drug use and pervasive profanity and sexuality). Romantic comedy about a female sports agent (Taraji P. Henson) who gains a competitive edge over her male colleagues when she develops the ability to hear men’s thoughts. Ensemble cast includes Tracy Morgan, Wendi McClendon-Covey, Shaquille O’Neal, Erykah Badu, Kellan Lutz, Aldis Hodge, and Mark Cuban. Wonder Park (PG for action and mature themes). Animated fantasy about a motherless 10-year-old (Brianna Denski) who discovers that the magical amusement park she’s been imagining really exists in the forest outside of her math camp. Voice cast includes Jennifer Garner, Matthew Broderick, Kenan Thompson, John Oliver, and Dr. Ken Jeong. —Kam Williams


Wednesday, March 13 6:15 p.m.: “Honey Bees: A Powerful Pollinator,” Sierra Club lecture by Angela Juffey at Mercer County Community College Student Center, Hughes Drive, West Windsor. Free. RSVP to kipatthesierraclub@gmail.com. 7:30 p.m.: At Douglass Student Center, 110 George Street, New Brunswick, “Last Yiddish Heroes: Lost and Found Songs of Soviet Jews during World War II.” Free. 8-10:30 p.m.: Wednesday Contra Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Mark Widmer with the Princeton Pickup Band. $10. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, March 14 5:30-7:30 p.m.: Young Professionals Wine & Networking at The Peacock Inn, 20 Bayard Lane, sponsored by Princeton Area Chamber of Commerce. www.princetonchamber.org. 7-10 p.m.: Meeting of the Sierra Club focused on PennEast Pipeline and fossil fuel projects in New Jersey. At Phillip Pittore Justice Center, 25 S. Union Street, Lambertville. Friday, March 15 4- 8 p.m.: High School Horticulture Expo at Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Free. Saturday, March 16 9 a . m .- 5 p. m . : H i g h School Horticulture Expo at Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Free. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Farmers Market, at Windsor Athletic Club, 99 Clarksville Road. 2 and 8 p.m.: The Rus-

5 : 3 0 p.m . : P r i n c e to n A rea Chamber of Com merce presents the Albert Einstein Memorial Lecture at M ac K ay Au d itor i u m , MacKay Campus Center, 64 Mercer Street. Nobel Prize winner Michael W. Young is the speaker. www.princetonchamber.org. 7:30-9:30 p.m.: International Folkdance by Princeton Folk Dance Group, meeting at the YWCA Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Lesson followed by dance, no partner needed, beginners welcome. $5. (609) 921-1702. Wednesday, March 20 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers has a Contra Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. With Bob Isaacs and Raise the Roof. Free. www. princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, March 21 5-6:30 p.m.: Meditation Talk and Walk through Greenway Meadows Park; meet at the Johnson Education Center. Led by Andrea Fereshteh, author of In the Company of Trees. Free but RSVP: (609) 924-4646 or rsvp@drgreenway.org. 7 p.m.: Dirk Evers lectures on “Artificial Intelligence: Friend or Foe of Human Flourishing?” at Center of Theological Inquiry, Luce Hall, 50 Stockton Street.

7:30-9:30 a.m.: “Growing in Trenton: The State Treasurers’ Perspective,” sponsored by the Princeton Area Chamber of Commerce, at Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan Way, West Trenton. State Treasurer Elizabeth Maher Muio is the speaker. www.princetonchamber.org. Saturday, March 23 7 p.m.: Movie Night and Discussion at the American College of Orgonomy, 4419 Route 27, Kingston. The film is Beautiful Boy; discussion is with Dee Apple and Susan Marcel. Free. www.acomovienight.com. Sunday, March 24 12-3 p.m.: The HopewellKeroka Alliance holds its 10 t h a n n u a l l a r g e f l e a market at Hopewell Valley Central High School, Pennington. Contact hopewell. keroka.alliance@gmail.com for more information. 1-4 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Winery Sunday Music Series presents Kingston Ridge. www.terhuneorchards.org 3 p.m.: Violinist Alexandre Djokic and pianist Roburt Gaidos perform at 1867 Sanctuary, 101 Scotch Road, Ewing. $5-$15. 1867sanctuary.org/ticket-info/. Monday, March 25 8:30-10 a.m.: Princeton

Learning Cooperative holds an open house at 16 All Saints’ Road. Free Visit info@Princetonlearning cooperative.org for more information. Wednesday, March 27 5:30 p.m. at Wolfensohn Hall, Institute of Advanced Study, Patricia Clavin lectures on “Brexit: Jolly Old Storm Clouds, Britain and Europe, 1919-2019.” 7-8:30 p.m.: Ask-a-Lawyer prog ram of fers f ree advice on immigration and other issues at Princeton Public Library’s 2nd floor conference room. The library is at 65 Witherspoon St re e t. ( 609 ) 924 -9529 ext. 1220. 8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers holds a Contra Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive. Sue Gola with Dr. Twamley’s Audio Snakes. $10 (free for age 35 and under). www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Thursday, March 28 10 a.m.: Meeting of the 55 - Plus Club w it h t a l k, “How Do We Prepare Our Students from PreschoolCollege with Social-Emotional Civil Discourse and Civil Engagement,” by Rutgers professor Maurice J. Elias. At The Jewish Center

of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. 5:30 p.m.: The Princeton Chamb er Music S ociet y presents “Portraits of England,” in conjunction with the Gainsborough exhibit. Saturday, March 30 7:30 p.m.: La Fiocco period instrument ensemble performs music and dance of the late Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical era at Christ Congregation, 50 Walnut Lane. $10-$25. lafiocco.org. Sunday, March 31 At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Winery Sunday Music Series presents Bill O’Neal and Andy Koontz. terhuneorchards.com. Thursday, April 4 8 p.m.: The Takacs String Quartet performs at Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University. $10-$55. princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Sunday, April 7 At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Winery Sunday Music Series presents Maggs and Bud. www.terhuneorchards.org Sunday, April 14 At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Winery Sunday Music Series presents O’Neil & Martin. www.terhuneorchards.org.

13 th Annual Mercer Green Fest Reduce Reuse Recycle

Rider University – Student Recreation Center 2083 Lawrenceville Rd., Lawrence

Saturday, March  16th,  2019   From  11:00  am  –  4:00  pm   RAIN  OR  SHINE  |  FREE  ADMISSION  |  APPROPRIATE  FOR  ALL  AGES  

Miss Amy’s Band | Eyes of the Wild | Electric Vehicles Display| Sustainable Local Business | Farmer’s Market | Sustainable Art Use the South Entrance to campus You can also use NJ Transit Bus 606, or You can ride your bicycle

Hosted by the Mercer County Sustainability Coalition East Windsor Township |Ewing Township | Hamilton Township | Borough of Hightstown | Hopewell Borough, | Hopewell Township |Lawrence Township | Borough of Pennington |Sustainable Lawrence, Sustainable Princeton | Robbinsville Township | City of Trenton | West Windsor Township | Mercer County Planning Department | The Watershed Institute

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Calendar

sian National Ballet presents “Swan Lake” at the State Theatre, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. $19$49. stnj.org. 4 p.m.: Poetry reading in English and Russian at Princeton University East Pyne building, Room 010. Presented in conjunction with the “Your Language My Ear” symposium. Free. 7:30 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society’s No-Name Dance, at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. $15 (students $10). (609) 945-1883. Sunday, March 17 1-4 p.m. At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Winery Sunday Music Series presents Jim Matlack and Carmen Marranco. www.terhuneorchards.org. 7 p.m.: 12th Annual SacksWilner Holocaust Program at Adath Israel Congregation, 1958 Lawrenceville Road (Route 206). Hetty Komjathy, daughter of a minister, tells the story of how her family in the Netherlands hid families from the Nazis. Free but RSVP to amanda@adathisraelnj.org. Monday, March 18 Recycling 1 p.m.: Chamber Music at Monroe Township Library, 4 Municipal Plaza. The Verona String Quartet. Free. 1 p.m. : T he Wom en’s College Club of Princeton meets at All Saints’ Episcopal Church. Terhune Road. Thomas J. Espenshade, professor Emeritus of sociology at Princeton University, will speak about the New Jersey Families Study. Free. www. wccpnj.org. Tuesday, March 19 3 p.m.: Medical experts discuss the health benefits of nature at D &R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place. Free but RSVP to rsvp@drgreenway.org or call (609) 924-4646.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 24

PRESENTING

NEWLY PRICED

Open House Saturday 3/16 & Sunday 3/17 1-4pm 12 Buckingham Drive, East Brunswick Twp Marketed by: Heidi Joseph $835,000

16 Cheyenne Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant $779,888

NEWLY PRICED

44 Linden Lane, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Annabella “Ann” Santos $544,900

41 Narrows Way, Monroe Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $599,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

17 Scarlet Oak Road, Raritan Twp Marketed by: Lisa Candella-Hulbert $599,900

9 Shinnecock Hills Court, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Nancy Goldfuss $890,000

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

Open House Sunday 3/17 1-4pm

Open House Saturday 3/16 & Sunday 3/17 1-4pm

23 Tanglewood Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Roberta Parker | $1,198,000

28 Todd Ridge Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant | $799,000

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 foxroach.com © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

From Princeton, We Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com

Princeton Office || 253 Nassau Street || 609-924-1600 || foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 foxroach.com 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway omeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


From Starter to Stately Homes

INTEGRITY ~ KNOWLEDGE ~ TRUST

Twp. $2,550/mo. Under Contract in 6 Days!

52 Governors Lane, Princeton Impressive and in a class by itself. Generously proportioned spaces with high ceilings and large windows evoke an elegance in this graceful four bedroom, three and a half bath END UNIT townhome located in Governors Lane. This distinctive community surrounded by 20 acres of open space and tree-lined streets ® is located on a distinguished park setting with meandering walkways, benches, and garden courts. Inside, exceptional quality features at every turn include decorative base and crown moldings, solid wood panel doors, stained oak hardwood floors, Schlage hardware, decorator-quality lighting fixtures, Kohler bathroom fixtures, and much more. Experience the joy of cooking in this fully equipped kitchen with top-rated appliances, endless storage space, donnamurray@comcast.net and Corian counters. An oversized two car detached garage, new HVACs (2018), and new water heater (2018) add value to this 2015 NJ REALTORS® Circle of hallmark home with progressive excellence, interior comforts, and conveniences that complement today’s busy lifestyle.

Listed by Donna M. Murray Sales Associate, REALTOR Cell: 908-391-8396 Excellence Award® Winner -Platinum

Donna M. Murray CRS, e-PRO, ASP, SRS Sales Associate, REALTOR®

2018 NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Award® - Platinum

253 Nassau St, Princeton, NJ 08540

NJ REALTORS® 2017 REALTOR® of the Year Mercer County Association of REALTORS®

PRINCETON OFFICE / 253 Nassau Street / Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-1600 main / 609-683-8585 direct / 908-391-8396 cell

609-924-1600

Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.foxroach.com • www.donnamurrayrealestate.com A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

e


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 26

Princeton Spotlight Chapin School

Chapin welcomes curious, engaged learners whose families value our belief that lifelong habits of mind and heart are formed in the elementary and middle school years. Our efforts and resources are dedicated to early childhood, elementary, and middle school learning experiences that are the foundation of future success. We believe this focused approach creates advantages:

leadership opportunities in developmentally appropriate ways, confidence to take academic risks, and a deep appreciation for community. Visit www.chapinschool.org.

Concord Pet

Concord Pet started in 1978 out of a trailer. Originally, the Mutschler family was looking for a way to feed the family horses. In 1981 Larry Mutschler opened his first retail location on

Concord Pike in Wilmington, Delaware, with only one employee in a 1,000-squarefoot building. This building still exists today as storage for the Concord Pike location. Originally Larry had two partners — his brother and a good friend. The company grew to nine locations by 1998. Today Larry solely owns the company that has grown to 29 locations from Princeton to Salisbury, Md. For

over 36 years the company has been locally owned and operated, and we at Concord Pet know what that means to our customers. At Concord Pet we help our customers as if they are family. We strive to be the best in the area, from carrying bags to hiring a knowledgeable staff. Please feel free to stop in at Concord Pet, where you and your pet will be part of our family!

Conte’s Pizza

Conte’s Pizza is proud of its long tradition serving Princeton’s pizza lovers. Conte’s specializes in thin crust pizza. The menu includes build-your-own toppings, pasta, homemade soup, salad, sandwiches, and a full bar. Conte’s is also proud to now offer glutenfree pizza and pasta. Private parties can be booked at Conte’s as well — inquire for details. A Town Topics Readers’ Choice winner for Best Pizza, Best Wait Staff, and Best Bar, and voted one of the best restaurants and happy hours!

Kelsey Theatre

The Kelsey Theatre at Mercer is now registeri n g f o r To m a t o P a t c h ! Now in its 46th year, Tomato Patch is the longestrunning, most successful

multi-disciplinary visual and performing arts program in Central New Jersey. Featuring classes for all school age students, Tomato Patch is taught by a talented staff of professional artists. Check us out online at www.tomatopatch.org. To m a t o P a t c h W o r k shops is a multidisciplinary full-day Theater, Dance, Music, Visual Art, and Video summer program for grades 4-12 in two sessions: Session 1 (eighth through 12th grades, June 24-July 18) and Session 2 (fourth through seventh grades, July 22-August 8). Tomato Patch Workshops culminate in the Festival of the Arts. The Master Class is fullday theater intensive summer program for grades 8-12 in two sessions: Session 1 (June 24-July 12) and Session 2 (July 22-August 9). The Master Class in Theater culminates in A Night of One Acts. Junior Tomatoes is 10 week-long Saturday morning theater workshops exploring creativity, movement, improvisation, and more from September through June for grades K-five in three sessions. All classes culminate in performances for family and friends. These classes fill up quickly

so register now for Spring Session which starts April 6. Call (609) 570-3566 for more information.

Orvana London

Located in the heart of downtown Princeton, Orvana London is designer studio shop offering beautiful handmade textiles in stylish silhouettes. Visit us at 12 Chambers street for your spring/summer shopping spree and we will style you for free! Call us at (609) 436-7129.

Princeton Academy Of The Sacred Heart

Princeton Academy thirdgrader Sandro Cunningham was honored on the Rachael Ray Show, which aired on Tuesday, March 5, for his inspiring community service. About three years ago, Sandro developed an idea to provide new or gently-used coats to those in need. He conceived of the idea after watching the news with his mother. The coverage highlighted the struggle of those less fortunate and their struggle to stay warm during the winter months. Sandro immediately wanted to help and his idea was simple. He set up a coat rack outside of the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (TASK) with the help of his father and hung donated Continued on Page 27

Restaurant & Enoteca

Breaking Breaking Bread, Bread, Building Building Bridges Bridges A Lenten event with

Breaking Bread, Building Breaking Bridges Bread, A Lenten event with

ASyria Lenten eventClub with Supper Syria Supper Club

JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF HOSPITALITY, FELLOWSHIP, H O S P IAT N A LDI TEYN, CFOEULNL OT EWRS H I P , AND ENCOUNTER 03.18.19 6 P M0 |3 .M1 8O. 1N9 D A Y 6PM | MONDAY

JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF HOSPITALITY, FELLOWSHIP, AND ENCOUNTER

ST. PAUL SPIRITUAL CENTER, . AP SA S U AL US PS ITR, IPT RU IANL C CE ET N T E, RN, J 2 1 S4 T N ON 214 NASSAU ST, PRINCETON, NJ

$75 PER PERSON Online advance purchases $75 PER PERSONONLY via Eventbrite. Online advance purchases ONLY via Eventbrite. Contact: speddicord@faithjustice.org

Contact: speddicord@faithjustice.org

03. 1 8. 1 9 6PM | MONDAY

We must strive and ask for the grace to create a culture of encounter ... that restores to each person his or her own dignity as a child of God, the dignity of the human person. We must strive and ask for the grace to create a culture of encounter ... that restores to each person his (Pope Francis 2016) or her own dignity as a child of God, the dignity of the human person. (Pope Francis 2016) Founded in the wake of the New Jersey travel ban on Syrian refugees, Syria Supper Club provides

ST. PAUL SPIRITUAL CENTER, JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF 214 NASSAU ST, PRINCETON, NJ HOSPITALITY, FELLOWSHIP, AND ENCOUNTER

opportunities for neighbors of diverse backgrounds to gather for a traditional meal and share Founded in the wake of the New Jersey travel ban on Syrian refugees, Syria Supper Club provides conversation. Each meal is prepared by a team of Supper Club cooks, who use food as a means for opportunities for neighbors of diverse backgrounds to gather for a traditional meal and share sharing culture, heritage and family traditions. conversation. Each meal is prepared by a team of Supper Club cooks, who use food as a means for Our program will incorporate elements of fellowship, story-telling, reflection, and, most importantly, sharing culture, heritage and family traditions. EATING! Event proceeds benefit the refugee support programs of the Syria Supper Club. Our program will incorporate elements of fellowship, story-telling, reflection, and, most importantly,

EATING! Event proceeds benefit the refugee support programs of the Syria Supper Club.

$75 PER PERSON Online advance purchases ONLY via 03. 1 b8.ri1t9e. Event

Sponsored by the Center for FaithJustice, with gratitude to our hosts, St. Paul Parish. Sponsored by the Center for FaithJustice, with gratitude to our hosts, St. Paul Parish.

6PM | MONDAY

Princeton Restaurant Week 2019 Now till Sunday, March 17th

Three-Course Lunch Menu $20

Three-Course Dinner Menu $35

ANTIPASTI

ANTIPASTI

LENTIL SOUP

LENTIL SOUP

yogurt, gremolata

yogurt, gremolata

JERSEY GREEN SALAD

JERSEY GREEN SALAD

pomegranate, carrot, candied walnut, goat cheese, lemon

pomegranate, carrot, candied walnut, goat cheese, lemon

KALE SALAD

POACHED PEAR SALAD

parmesan, baguette, pickled red onion, green goddess dressing

arugula, toasted almond gorgonzola dolce, lemon vinaigrette FRIED CALAMARI

SECONDI

rock shrimp, black sesame aioli

BUCATINI

SECONDI

“cacio e pepe,” cracked black pepper, pecorino

BUCATINI

TAGLIATELLE

“cacio e pepe,” cracked black pepper, pecorino

braised veal, maitake mushroom, swiss chard, rosemary, pecorino

TAGLIATELLE

WILD MUSSELS

braised veal, maitake mushroom, swiss chard, rosemary, pecorino

calabrian sausage, green garlic brodo, pepperonata bruschetta SHORT RIB SANDWICH

EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA ricotta, mozzarella di bufala, basil, san marzano tomato, broccoli rabe

arugula, fontina, caramelized onion, garlic aioli

GRIGGSTOWN FARM CHICKEN sweet potato purée, brussels sprout, bacon, apple cider jus

DOLCI Chocolate Mousse chocolate ganache, cayenne port reduction, almond tuile Cannoli kahlua, chocolate chip, ricotta Crumble pear, cranberry, oat crumb, vanilla gelato

ENO TERRA (609) 497.1777

4484 Route 27, Kingston

enoterra.com


Continued from Previous Page

coats for people to take if they needed it. He also left extra hangers for people to leave a coat if they wanted to donate one. Sandro’s Coat Rack has collected over 1,000 donated coats over three years and this act of goodwill has not gone unnoticed. Sandro

and his family have been featured on nj.com, CBS News and most recently on the Rachael Ray Show. An exciting announcement was made on the show; Burlington Coats donated $5,000 to TASK and 1,000 new coats! Thank you, Sandro, for inspiring your community and Princeton Academy by living Goal 3, a social awareness which impels to action!

Princeton Fitness & Wellness Centers

Let exercise be your weapon against aging and illness. Princeton Fitness & Wellness Centers share some perks worth the sweat. Reduce Risks: Regular exercise reduces risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke, osteoporosis, and even some

types of cancer. The Centers provide free on-site nurse evaluations every 12 weeks to monitor the improvements your workout earns. The nurse is conveniently available for emergencies or simply to capture your blood pressure. Exercise comfortably with this peace of mind. Minimize Stress: The Centers’ extensive offerings

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Princeton Spotlight

Continued on Page 28

Congratulations to Jim McLaughlin and the Princeton Wealth Advisors team for being named #1 in Southern NJ, Forbes Best-In-State Wealth Advisors. .

Fashion To Fit Your Style.

902 Carnegie Center | Suite 320 | Princeton, NJ 08540 609-750-3000 (Local) | 888-711-4362 (Toll-Free) Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC

©2009 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 09-BR3DD-0013 EG 9/09 The Forbes ranking of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors, developed by SHOOK Research is based on an algorithm of qualitative criteria and quantitative data. Those advisors that are considered have a minimum of 7 years of experience, and the algorithm weighs factors like revenue trends, AUM, compliance records, industry experience and those that encompass best practices in their practices and approach to working with clients. Portfolio performance is not a criteria due to varying client objectives and lack of audited data. Out of 29,334 advisors nominated by their firms, 3,477 received the award. This ranking is not indicative of advisor’s future performance, is not an endorsement, and may not be representative of individual clients’ experience. Neither Raymond James nor any of its Financial Advisors or RIA firms pay a fee in exchange for this award/rating. Raymond James is not affiliated with Forbes or Shook Research, LLC.

Shop At: 12 Chambers Street, Princeton 6 0 9 . 4 3 6 . 7 1 2 9 • w w w. o r v a n a . c o. u k @or vanalondon

Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 28

Princeton Spotlight Continued from Previous Page

combat rough days. Over 150 Group Fitness classes provide something for every mood — from unwinding with

yoga to releasing tension in a boxing class. Craving downtime? Relax in the Center’s spa pool or sauna. The Fitness Floor offers the latest state-of-the-art equipment. Certified trainers, many with

extensive degrees, share exercises and assistance. Every six weeks, complimentary personal training evaluations refresh workouts with new exercises. S t a y We l l : R e s e a r c h shows exercise can slow the progression of aches and physical limitations. Previously, these issues were assumed part of aging. Exercise is an investment in your

future mobility. For those healing from an injury or illness, the Center Wellness Programs bridge the gap between clinical treatment and continued recovery. Live Better: In addition to the immediate benefit of a happier, healthier existence, exercise has lasting positive effects. Done consistently, it strengthens body and mind lifelong.

Motivated? Enjoy a workout today at one of our Centers in Princeton (609) 6837888 or Plainsboro (609) 799-7777.

Princeton Restaurant Week

The inaugural Prince ton Restaurant Week runs through March 17. Each participating restaurant is offering its own unique three-course prix-fixe din-

ner menus of $35 and lunch for $20. Casual dining restaurants offer an array of special promotions, new menu items, and prix-fixe menus. This first year, Princeton Restaurant Week has 40 restaurant participants. Full-service restaurants participants include Agricola, Alchemist & Barrister, Blue Point Grill, Continued on Page 29

Starting at $250 For Single-Level Homes Locally owned and operated, at Concord Pet we help our customers as if they are family. We strive to be the best in the area, from carrying bags to hiring a knowledgable staff.

10 OFF

$

When you spend $75 or more

Follow us across the web

y owned and operated, Weextras strivefortofans! be the best in the More great content and ncord Pet wewww.concordpetfoods.com help our area, from carrying bags to mers as if they are family. hiring a knowledgeable staff. 609-683-1520 | 301 North Harrison Street | Princeton Follow us across the web Mon.-Sat. a.m. content - 9 p.m.;and Sun. 10 for a.m. - 6 p.m. $ More9 great extras fans!

10OFF

www.concordpetfoods.com

when you spend $75 or more

520 | 301 North Harrison Street | Princeton | Mon-Sat 9:00 am - 9:00 pm; Sun 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Princeton Restaurant Week 2019 Now till Sunday, March 17th

Three-Course Lunch Menu $20

Three-Course Dinner Menu $35

FIRST COURSE

FIRST COURSE

choice of

choice of

SOUP OF THE DAY

SOUP OF THE DAY

NJ GREEN SALAD

NJ GREEN SALAD

toasted red quinoa, orange, sweet potato, pomegranate, maple walnut & dijon

toasted red quinoa, orange, sweet potato, pomegranate, maple walnut & dijon

MAIN

MAIN

choice of

choice of

MUSSELS PROVENÇAL

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER STEAK

shallot, tomato, garlic, saffron broth, pernod, rouille & grilled bread

harrisa chickpea, frisee, roast leek & ginger vinaigrette

LUMACHE MUSHROOM “BOLOGNESE”

MONKFISH A LA PLANCHA

shitake & cremini ragú, san marzano, herb & parmigiano

lemon brodetto, roast cherry tomato, spring onion & toasted fregola

MARKET GRAIN BOWL

BRAISED PORK SHOULDER

forbidden rice, haricot vert, za’atar zucchini, pickled beech mushroom, poached egg & green harissa

pureed potato, cippolini onion & morello cherry

339 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ 08540 Monday 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Tuesday - Friday 11:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. Saturday 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Sunday 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.

DESSERT OLIVE OIL BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDING spiced fruit compote

We now serve gluten-free pizza and pasta! MEDITERRA (609) 252.9680

29 Hulfish St, Princeton

mediterrarestaurant.com


Continued from Previous Page

Cargot, Chennai Chimney, Despana, Enoterra, Lan Ramen, Local Greek, Mediterra, Mezzaluna, Mistral, Peacock Inn, Shanghai Park, Springdale Golf Club, Teresa’s Café, Tortuga’s Mexican Village, Trattoria Procaccini, Witherspoon Grill, and the Yankee Doodle Tap Room Casual dining restaurants include: Bon Appetit, Café Vienna, ChopT, Cross Culture, Dinky Bar, Bowls, Jammin’ Crepes, Lillipies, Milk & Cookies, Nassau Seafood, Nomad Pizza, The Pho Spot, Pizza Den, Nino’s Pizza Star, PJ’s Pancakes, Princeton Soup & Sandwich, Say Cheez, Small World Coffee, Surf Taco, and Sweetberry Bowls. Princeton Restaurant Week is presented by the Princeton Merchants Association and the MacLean Agency. The PMA fosters a vibrant, sustainable local economy by attracting, nurturing and maintaining a mix of businesses that serve the economic, social and material needs of the community. Visit www.princetonmerchants.org for more information. For information on Princeton Restaurant Week, go to www.princetonrestaurantweek.com.

Princeton Wealth Advisors Of Raymond James

The principals in our practice have been colleagues for more than 25 years. Several of our clients have been with us the entire time. Why? Because they trust us to help them invest and manage their wealth in a way that fosters their financial wellbeing. Whether working with high-net-worth individuals, families, or select institutions, we always keep that trust in view. Currently managing more than $1.4 billion in assets for our clients, our team represents over 100 years of collective experience in financial services. Our skills and knowledge are complemented by the vast informational and technological resources of Raymond James, an acknowledged leader in the financial services industry. In designing financial strategies for our clients, we draw on concepts and principles formulated by some of the world’s most successful investors — renowned thinkers like Warren Buffett, Charles Ellis, and Burton Malkiel. We combine that wisdom with solid research and investment products we believe to be the best in their categories. Incorporating our in-depth understanding of each client’s unique circumstances and needs, we ultimately create a distinctive plan that provides a road map for the client’s financial journey. Call (609) 750-3000 or visit www.princetonwealthadvisors.com.

Santé Integrative Pharmacy

Santé Integrative Pharmacy has transformed the neighborhood pharmacy into a center of health and wellness. One of the most beautiful and innovative stores in Princeton, Santé offers carefully curated professional supplements, vitamins, natural skincare, healthy snacks, homeopathic formulas, and unique gifts that are perfect for today’s proactive health care consumer. Our

pharmacists, nutritionists, and other wellness practitioners are here to help you make informed decisions about your health. We are a full-service pharmacy that brings together a community of health-minded individuals through education, special events, lectures, and consultations. 200 Nassau Street, Princeton; www.santeintegrativepharmacy.com.

to the artwork, is in keeping with our mother’s sensibility; that every guest feels that “this visit” is the best one yet. Teresa Caffe is the perfect destination to connect with family and friends, sip Italian wines, dine al fresco on a warm summer evening, and experience authentic Italian cuisine in the heart of Princeton at 23 Palmer Square East.

The Terra Momo Restaurant Group

Tindall & Ranson

The Terra Momo Restaurant Group was formed by Raoul and Carlo Momo, who were originally inspired by their parents, Raul and Teresa Momo, who opened an Italian specialty food store in the mid 1970s. In 1982, the Group opened their first restaurant, Teresa II, in New Brunswick, eventually expanding their operations to include five dining concepts across multiple cultures, including Eno Terra, Mediterra, and Teresa Caffe in the Princeton area. While the flavors and themes vary, they all share the Terra Momo vision of quality, creativity, and exceptional service. Each setting has an individual sense of place. You can experience this in the colors of our custom-designed interiors, the smell of our artisan bread, the taste of locally-grown produce, and the selection of carefully chosen wines. The sounds of our music, and the care our staff provides, create a vibrant setting for great memories with family and friends. Eno Terra is founded on the principle of the regionalism and the seasonality of what our local farmers grow, what our three-season harvest from our Eno Terra Canal Farm produces, what our fishermen catch, and the grass-fed beef and antibiotic-free poultry our producers offer. The two-floor restaurant in a completely renovated turn of the century farmhouse is the perfect location to consider us for your party, wedding anniversary, shower, rehearsal, or corporate event. 4484 Route 27, Kingston; contact Lilly Flanagan: events. enoterra@terramomo.com. At Mediterra our concept is simple: to ensure that our guests tap into the extraordinary cuisine of the nearly two dozen cultures surrounding the Mediterranean, with an emphasis on Italian and Spanish, while pairing locally-harvested ingredients with an ever-changing but always superb collection of fine and affordable wine, and then nurture your experience with a staff of restaurant professionals who welcome you as family. Enjoy the Mediterranean hospitality of our restaurant for your next event. We welcome all occasions from festive events, corporate breakfast meetings, and business dinners. We have a variety of customizable areas for your event. 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton; contact Heather Embert: events. mediterra@terramomo.com. The neighborhood trattoria style atmosphere at Teresa Caffé, named after our mother, Teresa Azario Momo, features simple Italian-inspired fare, unsurpassed seasonal pasta dishes, and pizzette, and all of our baked goods are made fresh daily at our bakery. Every detail from the olive oil to the wine, from the basil

Tindall & Ranson – NJ Plumbing, Heating and Cooling is your LOCAL expert in plumbing, heating, air conditioning, geothermal, and home energy audits. Located in Central Jersey, we service the entire Greater Mercer County area. We’re dedicated to providing you with quality service and information, whether you’re a valued returning customer or new to our family! From routine service and maintenance, to emergency repairs, to installation or replacement, and energy efficiency — you can rely on Tindall & Ranson to keep your family’s home comfort needs as our utmost concern. Call (609) 250-0334 or visit www.tindallranson. com.

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

Session ISession II-

Free Fitness Festival At Medical Center

Princeton Fitness & Wellness at Plainsboro and Penn Medicine Princeton Health will host a free fitness festival on Saturday, March 23 to celebrate the sixth anniversary of the state-of-theart fitness center attached to Princeton Medical Center. The festival, scheduled from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., will feature more than 20 fitness classes and demos, health screenings and information, kids’ classes and activities, and other events focused on fitness and health. On-site vendors provide opportunities to shop local for unique products. The fitness center is at 7 Plainsboro Road. For more information, call (609) 7997777.

Good Food….Always.

Olives is a family owned and operated catering and takeout food market located at 22 Witherspoon Street in Princeton. Olives offers delicious homemade foods and bakery items - all made from scratch, along with imported specialties from Greece. But beyond their food, Olives offers friendly smiles, great (and fast) service and a promise that you will be back for more. Located conveniently in downtown Princeton, Olives offers up some of the best eats in town, from sandwiches to salads and homemade baked goods! Enjoy a Gourmet Dinner to Go at Olives - perfect for grabbing a wonderful meal while on the fly - check their website weekly for the Dinners to Go menu!

You can purchase a copy of

Town Topics

for 75 cents in front of our previous office, 4 Mercer Street, Princeton, or at our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.

Princeton Restaurant Week 2019 Now till Sunday, March 17th

Three-Course Lunch Menu – $20, Three-Course Dinner Menu – $27 FIRST COURSE Minestra Classic Italian Vegetable and White Bean Soup Romaine Hearts Salad Romaine, Caesar Dressing, Croutons, Shaved Grana Tuscan Kale Salad Kale, Quinoa, Beets, Cranberries, Ricotta Salata, Sherry Vinaigrette Bruschetta Grilled Bread, Herbed Ricotta, Mushroom Tapenade, Grana

MAIN Margherita Pizza Tomato Sauce, Fresh Mozzarella, Basil, Extra Virgin Olive Oil Perfetta Pizza Fontina, Arugula, Prosciutto, Grana, Padano, Lemon Zest Pepperoni Pizza Tomato, Cheese, Pepperoni Penne Al’ Arrabiata Spicy Tomato Sauce Penne Bolognese Classic Beef Meat Sauce, Herbed Ricotta Linguine Vongole Clams, Chili Flakes, Garlic White Wine Fedelini Gambaretti Shrimp, Spinach, Tomatoes, Garlic White Wine, Pecorino

DESSERT Tiramisu Fruit Tart Flourless Chocolate Cake Focciocolato (for two)

TERESA CAFFE (609) 921-1974

23 Palmer Square East, Princeton

teresacaffe.com

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Princeton Spotlight


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 30

levels welcome! Beginner

Princeton Spotlight AN

UNSTOPPABLE OFFER UNSTOPPABLE

ANtime is NOW to upgrade your home OFFER The with a new highyour efficiency The time is NOW to upgrade home with a heating new high efficiency and cooling system.

Beginner

heating and cooling system.

$1150 0% $1000 0% 36 months

UP TO

OR

UP TO

OR

TRADE IN ALLOWANCE ON NEW QUALIFYING TRANE ON NEW& QUALIFYING TRANE HEATING COOLING SYSTEMS HEATING & COOLING SYSTEMS

FINANCING UNTIL JANUARY 2020 FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

Intermediate

Intermediate

Competitor

No time Competi t or to cook? Running the kids Sebastiani Sebastiani No time Sebastiani Sebastiani om one activity to another? FN EC NIC CN IN N GAA AC CAADDEEMMYY F E N C I N G F E N I G F E G FENCING ACADEMY No time to cook? Sebastiani Stop byto cook? TRUS

859 SE #8 L IC EENN S E # 95 45540 000 B M U 1 P L C - R L ICG # 1 3 V H 0 8 5 9 H VA AC TO R R E S E # 8

T 993

TRUS since 1

since 1

993

T

BING PLUM G G CO N T R IN N 40 T A HE INNGDITIONIN B L IC EE N S E #0 195 455 0 0 0 IC BO H P LU M PLAUIRMCTHGERMAL S G H VARCAC- RTOLR REG #13V IN AUIO ITIN DN OCONT HEGAETO RG NYDIT TH REN E N C E AIRITCOHEERNM&ABLA WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM KOTH S

IT GE Y AUD RENO ENERGEN & BATH KITCH

609-924-3434

Limited Enrollment! Call 609.924.2932 to reserve your slot.

609-924-3434

WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM

FENCING ACADEMY

Sebastiani

All ages & experience experience ages & All All ages & experience All ages & Yexperience experience levels welcome! welcome! welcome! All ages & ages & AAll Clevels Alevels D E experience M levels welcome! Beginner Beginner Beginner levels welcome! levels welcome! Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Beginner All ages & experience Beginner Beginner Competitor Competitor Competitor levels welcome!

FENCING Running the kids FENCING ACADEMY Running the kids from one activity to another? from one activity to another?

for aStop Stop by by

gourmet dinner to go! for a

for a gourmet dinner gourmet dinner to go! heck website for daily dinner specials... Changes weekly to go!

Check website for daily dinner specials... Changes weekly

Check website for daily dinner specials...Changes weekly

22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 22 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 609.921.1569609.921.1569 609.921.1569 www.olivesprinceton.com www.olivesprinceton.com www.olivesprinceton.com Monday-Friday: 7am to 8pm Monday-Friday: 7am to 8pm Monday -toFriday 7am-8:30 pm Monday-Friday: 7am toSaturday: 8:30pm • Saturday: 8am to9am 8:30pm • Sunday: 8am to 7pm 8am 8pm • Sunday: to 6pm Saturday 8am-8:30pm Saturday: 8am to 8pm • Sunday: 9am to 6pm Sunday 8am-6pm

Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate

AllBeginner ages & experience Competitor Competitor Intermediate Competitor levels welcome! INTELLIGENT Competitor FENCING Classes Start Beginner 09/10/18 Intermediate Summer Camps Summer camps Summer camps Summer camps Competitor Weekly classes Classes Start Weekly classes Weekly classes Open bouting 09/10/18 Open bouting Open bouting Summer camps Private camps lessons Summer Private lessons Summer camps Weekly classes Private lessons

Summer camps Weekly Openclasses bouting Weekly classes Weekly classes sebastianifencing.com Private lessons Open bouting sebastianifencing.com Opencamps bouting sebastianifencing.com Princeton, NJ | 609-734-0020 Open bouting Summer Princeton, NJ | 609-734-0020 Private lessons Princeton, NJ | 609-734-0020 Privateclasses lessons Weekly Private lessons sebastianifencing.com Princeton, NJ | 609-734-0020


31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

ONE MONTH ON US AND UP TO 50% OFF OF YOUR MEMBERSHIP FEE* Learn more at princetonfitnessandwellness.com/towntopics *Some restrictions apply. Must be 18 years or older. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Expires 3/31/19.

1225 State Road | Princeton, NJ | 609.683.7888

7 Plainsboro Road | Plainsboro, NJ | 609.799.7777

fitness FESTIVAL Join us for our

CELEBRATING 6 YEARS!

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 | 9AM - 12PM • Sample over 20 classes & demos • Full access to our state-of-the-art fitness floor • Family classes, demos, and activities

• Health screenings and wellness information provided by Penn Medicine Princeton Health • Shop local vendors

ALL ACTIVITIES AND SCREENINGS ARE FREE TRY.PRINCETONFITNESSANDWELLNESS.COM/FITFEST19 7 Plainsboro Road | Plainsboro, NJ | 609.799.7777 20527394_0319


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 32

“To be honest, you don’t know what your son is missing from school until you experience Princeton Academy. It is such a gift to be surrounded by families that share similar values of respect, kindness, integrity and a desire to have nothing but the best for our sons. You cannot appreciate the opportunities they are given until you have a chance to experience them firsthand.” - PASH Parent

“To be honest, you don’t know what your son is missing from school until you experience Princeton Academy.

e

ON ACA ET

MY DE

the

ar

t

of

S a c re d H

Creative. Compassionate. Courageous. We bring out the best in boys. Princeton Academy embraces diversity, equity and inclusion, and our doors are always open to have a conversation that will help to fulfill your dream of providing the best education for your son. Learn more about our Individualized Affordable Tuition model. www.princetonacademy.org/AffordingPrincetonAcademy | (609) 759-3053

ar

t

the

PRIN C

of

ON ACA ET

MY DE

PRIN C

It is such a gift to be surrounded by families that share similar values of respect, kindness, integrity and a desire to have nothing but the best for our sons. You cannot appreciate the opportunities they are given until you have a chance to experience them firsthand.” - PASH Parent

S a c re d H

e

Creative. Compassionate. Courageous. We bring out the best in boys. Princeton Academy embraces diversity, equity and inclusion, and our doors are always open to have a conversation that will help to fulfill your dream of providing the best education for your son. Learn more about our Individualized Affordable Tuition model. www.princetonacademy.org/AffordingPrincetonAcademy | (609) 759-3053


PU Women’s Hockey Falls in ECACH Semis But Gets NCAA Bid, Will Play at Minnesota

L

ast weekend turned out to be nerve-wracking for the Princeton University women’s hockey team. On Saturday, Princeton headed north to play at Cornell in the ECAC Hockey semis, knowing that a loss could doom its chances of getting invited to the NCAA tournament. The Tigers jumped out to a 2-0 lead early in the second period on goals by Claire Thompson and Carly Bullock but couldn’t hold off the Big Red, losing 3-2 in double overtime. “I thought it was a really tight, even game obviously, it was back and forth,” said Princeton head coach Cara Morey. “We probably had five opportunities to end the game and they probably had three or four good scoring chances to end it earlier. It was just waiting; somebody was going to put it in and it happened to be them.” As a result of the defeat, which left the Tigers at 207-5 overall, the squad’s players and coaches were on pins and needles as they waited for the NCAA Selection Show at 9 p.m. on Sunday evening. “I was confident at the beginning, I was thinking that we were going to get in because of our body of work,” said Morey, whose team won

the Ivy League title, finished second in the ECACH standings, reached a national ranking of fourth, the highest ever for the Tigers, and set a program record with a 20-game unbeaten streak. “It shows that we had a great season. It was a double overtime loss. We had the 20-game unbeaten streak. As we got closer to the selection show, it started to really worry me. They don’t just go by the numbers. They look at the numbers as a guideline but when it is that close in percentage points, it could have gone any number of ways.” Things went the Tigers’ way as they learned that they will play at second-seeded Minnesota (30-5-1) in an NCAA quarterfinal contest on March 16. “We were watching the show together at Cannon, just the players and staff,” said Morey. “When they announced it, there were tears in people’s eyes. They were so excited and happy that our season isn’t over yet.” The selection marks the program’s third NCAA appearance overall and first trip to the national tourney since the Tigers fell 6-2 at Minnesota in the 2016 quarterfinals at Ridder Arena in Minneapolis. Morey acknowledged that

Princeton will be in for some nervous moments as they face the Gophers, one of the traditional powerhouses in college women’s hockey. “The biggest challenge is just their history of being great, it is hard to beat teams that have been in this position a lot more often than our team has,” said Morey of Minnesota, which is making its 17th straight appearance in the NCAA tournament and has won four national championships in the last seven years. “We are a pretty young team and we are new to this success.” With the four Tiger seniors having played in the 2016 NCAA contest at Minnesota, Morey believes that experience will be a plus. “Our seniors have been through it; I think that is helpful but they are the only class that has ever been in this position,” said Morey. “It will help because they are our leaders. The familiarity with it is kind of ironic in that it is the exact same trip for them.” Princeton senior forward and co-captain Karlie Lund, a native of Eden Prairie, Minn., is excited about the return trip to her home state. “This time around I think our team is more confident in ourselves and our ability to play at the top level,”

said Lund as quoted on the Princeton sports website. “We also have a very closeknit team where everyone supports one another. Minnesota is a great team, so it should be a good game. Having the chance to play in Minnesota one last time is incredible. I played all my youth and high-school hockey in Minnesota, so to have one of my last games there will be bittersweet. There are a few Minnesotans on the team, so hopefully we can have a good amount of Tiger fans at the game.” Morey is confident that her team will be up to the challenge after navigating the emotional roller-coaster last weekend. “I think we just have to stay calm, not get wrapped up in the hype, not get lost in the crowd noise and the hysteria around the event,” said Morey. “We just have to play our game and just really believe that we can. It is going to be important to take away time and space from a lot of their superstar players. They have a phenomenal roster, they are strong, they are creative, and they are offensive minded.” With the Tigers boasting such stars as freshman forwards Sarah Fillier (20 goals, 35 assists) and Maggie Connors (26 goals, 16 assists) along with junior standouts, forward Bullock (21 goals, 21 assists), defenseman Thompson (9 goals, 19 as-

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

S ports

GOING FOR IT: Princeton University women’s hockey player Karlie Lund goes after a puck in recent action. Last Saturday, senior forward and co-captain Lund contributed an assist as Princeton fell 3-2 in double overtime to Cornell in the ECAC Hockey semifinals. The disappointment over that loss turned to joy a day later as the Tigers were awarded an at-large bid to the upcoming NCAA tournament. Princeton, now 20-7-5 overall, will play at second-seeded Minnesota (30-5-1) in a national quarterfinal contest on March 16. The selection marks the program’s third NCAA appearance overall and first trip to the national tourney since it fell 6-2 to the Gophers in the 2016 quarterfinals at Ridder Arena in Minneapolis. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) sists), and goalie Steph Neatby (a goals against average of 1.88, .930 save percentage), and senior defenseman Stephanie Sucharda (3 goals, 9 assists) and Lund (10 goals, 16 assists), Princeton has the talent to give the Gophers a hard time. “We have a really solid roster from top to bottom,” said Morey, whose team didn’t have the services of Connors last weekend due to injury.

“We have a lot of depth, we have a lot of offensive power, we have great defenders, and we have three amazing goaltenders. We definitely have all of the pieces, we just have to do our thing.” —Bill Alden

Think Global Buy Local


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 34

After Emotional Jadwin Finale for PU Men’s Hoops, Senior Star Stephens Primed for Ivy Tourney Run As Myles Stephens left the floor at Jadwin Gym last Saturday for the last time in his career with the Princeton University men’s basketball team, he hugged his coaches and teammates one by one as he went to the end of the bench. Moments after Princeton’s 81-59 loss to Yale in the home finale, he embraced some of his former teammates gathered courtside as he made his away to the locker room. Stephens acknowledged that he had a lot on his mind as the evening unfolded. “Four years is a long time and as a student athlete, you spend so much time coming down here every day, lifting, conditioning and practicing,” said Stephens. “I was definitely a little emotional.” As a native of nearby Lawrenceville, Stephens has received some extra fan backing over his career with the Tigers. “It means a lot, it is nice,” said the 6’5, 210-pound Stephens with a smile. “I have been able to have a lot of family and friends come to my games throughout the years and that has been special to me. Being a local guy, I have had my friends from middle school come to my games and guys I haven’t seen since high school coming to a game. That is always a cool thing. To have them support me is definitely special.” This winter, senior captain Stephens had to provide extra support to his teammates as fellow senior star Devon Cannady recently left the program due to personal issues.

“It was a tough time; we went through that as seniors and we had to deal with a lot,” said Stephens. “I think we dealt with things the right way. We kept our tram together and told them this is then, we have a season to finish. We have goals that are still unaccomplished and we still have those goals to accomplish. We are not done as seniors. We are going to attack this week with the same mentality that we have been attacking the season.” P r inceton head coach Mitch Henderson credited Stephens and his classmates with steadying the ship for the Tigers. “This group has had to do more than any other group I have ever had here with in terms of dealing with off the court stuff,” said Henderson, whose senior class also included Noah Bramlage and Elias Berbari. “It is a lot to put on anybody, not being here with one of their teammates that they started off the season with. It is a testament to leadership of the team and keeping things together when they were all over the place for us to be qualified for the tournament. I know we are disappointed in a way, but I see this as a sign of seniors keeping us on path and keeping us focused in the right direction. That is something I am proud of them for that.” Henderson is proud of what Stephens has given Princeton on the court over the last four years.

FINAL MILE: Princeton University men’s basketball player Myles Stephens dribbles up the floor in recent action. Senior star and captain Stephens played well in his final weekend at Jadwin Gym but it wasn’t enough as Princeton fell 67-63 to Brown on Friday and 81-59 to Yale a day later. Stephens had 11 points and seven rebounds in the loss to the Bears and then chipped in 13 points and nine rebounds against the Bulldogs. Princeton, now 16-11 overall and 8-6 Ivy League, is next in action when it competes in the Ivy postseason tournament. The third-seeded Tigers will face second-seeded and host Yale in the semis on March 16 in New Haven, Conn. with the victor advancing to the title game the next day. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

“One of the most impressive things I told him was at Cornell, guarding Matt Morgan and winning in OT,” said Henderson of Stephens, who has scored 1,332 points and grabbed 557 rebounds in his Princeton career and was named the 2016-17 Ivy Defensive Player of the Year. “It was taking a task and making it personal. We have relied heavily on his defensive progress, his ability to get easy baskets for us, and then rebounding nightly. He had 13 [points] and 9 [rebounds] tonight, that seemed like a normal evening for him. We are going to miss all of that a lot.” Princeton, now 16-11 overall and 8-6 Ivy League, will be looking to send Stephens and the seniors out on a high note as it competes in the Ivy postseason tournament this weekend. “This is what we have been waiting for; there is a big picture of Myles with an NCAA tournament sticker on,” said Henderson, whose team is seeded third and will face second-seeded and host Yale in the semis on March 16 in New Haven, Conn. with the victor advancing to the title game the next day against the winner of the other semifinal piting top-seeded Harvard versus fourth-seeded Penn. “Let’s put these guys back in the tournament again; all you have got to do is play 80 minutes well.” Noting that Tigers had to fight to pull out the crown in the 2016-17 season when it entered the inaugural league tourney with an undefeated Ivy mark, Henderson likes being in the underdog role this year. “We were in a position two years ago where we were in the first tournament and we were going down on the road,” said Henderson, whose team went on to fall 60-58 to Notre Dame in the first round of the NCAA tournament that season. “All eyes were on us so the shoe is on other foot. We are in it. We are really happy about being in it and we have got a big week ahead.” Henderson believes that his squad can rise to the occasion. “You play Saturday; you have one more day to prepare and we got an opportunity to get a little healthy,” said Henderson, noting that he is hopeful that sophomore star Ryan Schwieger will be back in action after being sidelined last weekend due to a concussion. “We have to play better and we will; we are going to work really hard at it this week.” Stephens, for his part, wants to keep his Princeton career going for as long as possible. “We have to play well, we have to make our shots, and we have to play better defensively,” said Stephens. “I don’t think we have played well this past weekend. We just have to play harder and I know we can do it. Sometimes you need a couple of bounces to go your way. I think we can get over that hump.” —Bill Alden

JUNCTION BARBER SHOP

33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Ellsworth’s Center (Near Train Station)

799-8554 Tues-Fri: 10am-6pm; Sat 8:30am-3:30pm

With Sophomore Star Sears Erupting for 6 Goals, PU Women’s Lax Rallies to Top Stony Book 15-14 After piling up 64 goals in 19 games last spring during her freshman year for the Princeton University women’s lacrosse team, Kyla Sears wasn’t as prolific in the early going this season. Entering Princeton’s game against visiting Stony Brook last Saturday, star attacker Sears had seven goals in the first four games in the 2019 campaign. But finding her finishing touch, Sears erupted for five goals in the first half as the Tigers took a 9-8 lead over the Seawolves. “Our offense really clicked; we were finding each other, we were giving each other good looks,” said Sears a 5’4 native of Skaneateles, N.Y. “Any player is as successful as their teammates around them; we found each other’s strengths today. Sears has developed a strong bond with senior Elizabeth George who assisted on two of her first half goals. “It is a great connection, some days she will have five, six goals and then some days she can have five or six assists,” said Sears. “She is so versatile; she is somebody anyone wants on their offensive line.” T he Pr inceton offense sputtered early in the second half as Stony Brook went on a 6-1 run to take a 14-10 lead with 14:30 left in regulation. “They changed up a little bit; they crowded the middle a little more which is where they were getting all of our offensive looks so that was a really smart change by them,” said Sears. “We just had to find some different offensive sets to put them on their toes a little bit.” Sears was on her toes down the stretch, making two assists and scoring a goal as the Tigers tallied five unanswered goals in the last 10:01 of the contest to pull out a dramatic 15-14 win. “I had the successful first half scoring wise and then you have to step back and if the attention comes behind a little bit then we are going to have more openings up top,” said Sears, who ended up with six goals and two assists, matching her career single-game best in goals and setting a new personal mark for points in a game. “I think that was the plan, working off each other and to pull attention from one person and give it to another.” With eighth-ranked Princeton, now 4-1, having won three in a row since a 14-9 loss to Virginia on February 23, Sears believes that hard work has resulted in the team’s recent surge. “UVa is a great opponent and I think that was a wakeup call,” said Sears. “That is who we are going to see if we want to have a good season. From that game, we made a mindset to make our practices harder than any game that we would have. I think that is what let us have such a successful day today.” Building on her freshman season, Sears is looking to assume more responsibility in the Princeton attack. “We have younger players behind me who are just as talented and it is trying to find that mesh in the of-

fense which is a fun role,” said Sears. “I have leaders above me. I think our offense is so versatile age-wise which is is going to give us success for years to come.” P r i nceton he ad coach Chris Sailer credited Sears with playing a leading role in triggering the victory over Stony Brook. “Kyla is just getting better and better and she is starting to find a groove,” said Sailer of Sears, who was later named the Ivy League Player of the Week. “She is so smart off of the cut. Whether we put her behind the cage or we play her a little more inside, she is able to find some good looks and make a lot of combination plays. We had nine assists on 15 goals, which is what we needed to have against a team like this with their tough zone defense.” Senior standout George made a lot of big plays against the Seawolves, tallying three goals and four assists. “George is amazing, we asked her two days ago to change up,” said Sailer of George, who recently passed the 100-point mark in her Princeton career. “She usually plays up front and we put her behind on the left side. We just thought we wanted to have Tess and Kyla inside against their zone. We thought that was what we needed and Georgie was the person. She ended up having just a monster day; she responded so well to everything we asked of her and

then the nine draw controls. That was just a major difference in the game.” Sailer liked the way her team responded over the last 10 minutes of the contest in overcoming the Stony Brook lead. “You never want to be down 14-10 late in the second half but we really believe in our players,” said Sailer, who got three goals and an assist from junior star Tess D’Orsi, including the gamewinning tally with 2:06 remaining in regulation. “They fought incredibly hard out there, winning draws, Sam [Fish] making some big saves, and kids making plays all over the place. It was awesome to see. We do have a lot of fight and you could really see that today.” In Sailer’s v iew, some of that fighting spirit was prompted by the loss at Virginia. “We just played so poorly in that game and we knew were capable of so much better,” said Sailer, whose team is next in action when it plays at Florida on Match 19. “I think that is probably the best thing that could have happened to us this season.” Sears, for her part, believes that the win over Stony Brook showed that Princeton is capable of doing some special things this spring. “I think it is pure fight and we are a gritty team,” said Sears. “We have been in this position before and we are able to pull out of it and I think that sets momentum for the season. That is a great characteristic to have as opposed to just letting ourselves fold up.” —Bill Alden

SIX SHOOTER: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Kyla Sears handles the ball last Saturday against Stony Brook. Sophomore attacker Sears tallied six goals and two assists to help the Tigers rally to a 15-14 win. Sears was lated named the Ivy League Player of the Week for her performance. Princeton, now 4-1 and ranked eighth nationally, is next in action when it plays at Florida on March 19. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


Putting up a remarkable fight, the Princeton University men’s hockey team got swept by Brown last weekend in a best-of three ECAC Hockey first round series. In the opener on Friday, the Tigers trailed 1-0 late in the game before Brown scored two goals in the last 2:23 on the game to earn a 3-0 victory. A night later, Princeton trailed 5-2 with 4:37 remaining in regulation before

scoring three extra-attacker goals in a span of 2:47 to force overtime. Brown ultimately prevailed 6-5 as it tallied the game-winning goal at 3:30 of the third overtime in a game that lasted 103:30. It marked the longest game in program history for the Tigers as its previous marathon contest was 89:54 from the 2009 ECAC Hockey s em if inal against Cornell. The defeat left Princeton with a final overall record of 10-18-3.

PU Throwing Star Kelly 2nd at NCAAs

Princeton University men’s track star thrower Adam Kelly broke the Ivy League record in the weight throw with a heave of 76’8.5 feet to take second at the NCAA I ndo or Track a nd F ield Championships at Birmingham, Ala. last weekend. S en ior s tar Kelly jus t missed winning the title as North Dakota State’s Payton Otterdahl uncorked the top throw of 79’ 1.25. Kelly’s throw betters Cornell’s Rudy Winkler (76.6.25 feet) for the best mark in Ivy history. In addition, Kelly’s second place finish is the program’s best status in the weight throw at the NCAA Championships since Dave Pellagrini took home the title in 1980. It was an outstanding winter campaign for Kelly as he wrapped it up with his performance at the NCAA Championships. He was also named the United States Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches’ Association ( USTFCCCA) Indoor Mid-Atlantic Regional Field Athlete of the Year and Ivy Heps Most Outstanding Male Field Performer as Princeton won its fifth straight indoor Heps crown.

lation but a shot by senior midfielder Charlie Durbin was saved by Rutgers goalie Max Edelmann. The Tigers, now 2-3, play at Penn on March 16 in the Ivy League opener for both teams.

Princeton Baseball Goes 0-4 at Greensboro

Jake Boone played well as the Princeton University baseball team went 0-4 in a four-game set as UNCGreensboro last weekend. Sophomore infielder Boone went 4-of-15 with a run over the weekend as the Tigers fell 3-2 on Friday and 5-3 on Saturday before getting swept in a doubleheader on Sunday, losing 6-2 and 5-3. Boone is now hitting a team-high .370 on the season. Princeton, now 1-6, heads

to t he Washing ton D.C. defeated George Washingarea for a four-game set at ton 14-8 last Saturday. Georgetown from March 15Laura Larkin, Eliza Britt, 17. and Amy Castellano each scored three goals in the Tiger Men’s Volleyball win as the Tigers improved Falls 3-0 to Lewis Parker Dixon starred in a to 11-4. Princeton will head west losing cause as the Princeton University men’s volley- to play in the Loyola Maryball team fell 3-0 to seventh- mount Invitational in Los ranked Lewis last Saturday. Angeles, Calif. from March Junior Dixon had a team- 15-16. high 10 kills but it wasn’t Tiger Men’s Tennis enough as Lewis prevailed Sweeps Buffalo, Bryant 25-22, 27-25, 27-25. Displaying its depth, the Princeton, now 10-9 over- Princeton University men’s all, is next in action when it tennis team posted 6-1 wins competes in the BYU Tour- over both Buffalo and Brynament in Provo, Utah from ant in action last Saturday. March 21-23. The victories extended PU Women’s Water Polo Princeton’s winning streak Tops George Washington to seven as it improved to With a trio of players pro- 15-4. The Tigers will be playing ducing hat tricks, the 18thranked Princeton University in the USD Challenge in San women’s water polo team Diego, Calif. from March 2224.

PU Men’s Lacrosse Edged at Rutgers

RUSHING AHEAD: Princeton University women’s basketball player Gabrielle Rush dribbles past a Penn defender in recent action this January. Last Saturday, senior Rush scored seven points and dished out a career-high 10 assists to help to help Princeton defeat Yale 80-68 and improve to 20-9 overall and 12-2 Ivy League. In upcoming action, Princeton will compete in the Ivy postseason tournament at New Haven, Conn., where it is seeded first and will face fourth-seeded Cornell in a semifinal contest on March 16 with the victor advancing to the title game a day later against the victor of the other semi that pits second-seeded Penn against third-seeded Harvard. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

A furious rally fell just short as the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team lost 9-8 at Rutgers last Saturday in Piscataway as the Scarlet Knights earned the Tots Meistrell Cup. Trailing 9-3 at halftime, the Tigers scored five unanswered goals in the second half as junior star Michael Sowers had two goals and an assist and sophomore star Chris Brown contributed two goals to spearhead the rally. Princeton had a chance to tie the game in the waning seconds of regu-

PATRICK’S DAY: Princeton University wrestler Patrick Brucki, right, takes control of a foe in a bout earlier this season. Last weekend, sophomore standout Brucki placed first at 197 pounds at the EIWA Championship in Binghamton, N.Y. As a result, Brucki qualified to compete in the NCAA Championships in Pittsburgh, Pa. from March 21-23. Tiger freshman Patrick Glory won at 125 while junior Matthew Kolodzik was third at 149 and freshman Quincy Monday was third at 157 as they also booked places in Pittsburgh. In the team standings, there Tigers placed third with 122.5 points as Lehigh defended its 2018 title with 153 points, while Cornell finished second with 139 points. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Tiger Men’s Hockey Falls in ECACH Playoffs


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 36

Battling Through Nagging Knee Problem, Wildberg Makes Historic Leap for PHS Track For Nils Wildberg, winning the inaugural boys’ long jump at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions indoor track and field meet wasn’t the surprise. He’d been dreaming of a state title for two years. It’s how the Princeton High senior came through despite his training being thrown off completely by a knee injury. “You have to be in that right mindset for success,” said Wildberg. “I jumped surprisingly well for training that little. That day I guess I was just mentally strong.” W i l d b e r g j u m p e d 2 3’ 4 to win the MOC title in late February, just a halfinch shy of his new indoor personal record set while winning the Eastern States Championships long jump five days earlier. “We’re thrilled to have Nils as inaugural state champion,” said PHS head coach Ben Samara. “All the history we have, he’s one of only three guys to do it, which is incredible given the other athletes we’ve had walk through the doors.”

Wildberg is the first long jump champion in indoor MOC history and joins previous male state champions Peter Sharpless and Stephen Fletcher in the PHS record books. “It was fantastic,” said Wildberg. “I felt unusually good that day. All my jumps were over 23. I was just elated when I found out I was in the lead and about to win. It was a fantastic experience. It’s just a great honor to be the first long jump indoor champion. I wouldn’t have been able to do it without m y co ach a n d a m a z i ng teammates to support me.” Wildberg’s belief that he could be a state champion started in his sophomore year af ter a si xt h -place finish at the 2017 outdoor MOC, and moved into striking position with a secondplace finish last spring at the 2018 outdoor MOC. “When I medaled my sophomore year, that’s when it really hit me,” said Wildberg. “If I really put in the work, focus, and be smart about everything, I can really do

Specialists

something. As a sophomore, everyone was older than me; I didn’t expect to be at that high level in the first place. When I medaled, I thought I had potential and I wanted to expand on my ability. Then when I got second last year. There’s so much good compet it ion w it h A’Nan Bridgett (of WW/P-South) and my own teammate, Varun (Narayan), and placing second in such a competitive environment was something that showed I could take it to the next level from here.” As Wildberg entered his final winter season for PHS, he was brimming with confidence. At the Marine Corps Holiday Classic at the end of December, he opened the season with a 23-4½ leap before a fluke injury put everything in doubt. “I had just competed in my season opener and had a great result,” recalled Wildberg. “I was just cooling off afterwards and I stood up and I felt a pop in my knee. Embarrassingly enough that’s how I got injured.” What followed was frustration as Wildberg, his coaches, and doctor tried to assess how he soon he could compete again without risking his knee. “There’s always a thought in the back of my mind saying I might not be able to compete at all the rest of the season,” said Wildberg. “I remained optimistic throughout the whole experience. I did not give up, and I wanted to do all I could to make sure I’d be back. Having the right

mindset gave me the confidence to give it a go.” Wildberg’s doctor cleared him to compete as tolerable. His state hopes got a boost at the Mercer County Championships in late January with a third-place finish at 21’ 2¾ that quelled some fears. “Counties was the first time I got back on the track, the first time in a long time,” said Wildberg. “I took two short approach jumps and nothing was really hurting. I saw William (Murray) from Lawrenceville, he jumped into first place, and I went to my coaches and I said, ‘let me take one full approach jump because nothing is hurting.’ I took one and it was a foul but it felt good. I gained confidence from there. I knew I could take a jump without hurting myself. From there, I tried to do as much as I could to get back into it without being too risky.” Wildberg didn’t compete again until February 19 at Easterns. It was a tune-up and a test for the MOC that was that same week. Up until Easterns, he’d had next to no real training. “That’s the amazing part,” said Samara. “He had one practice where shook his legs out. Then with muscle memory he came out and jumped 23’4. We only had him do two jumps. After this long layoff, I told him he was going to be sore. He had one big jump and was able to take it home.” Going into the Eastern meet, Wildberg planned to just jump twice as he just wanted to see how his knee felt. “I wouldn’t say I was super confident,” said Wildberg. “I didn’t know how far I could really go with my knee. As soon as I took my first jump, I was thinking to myself, I could really do something. From there, I told myself that if you play your cards right, you could be the next state champion.” He fouled on his first jump, but it had good distance. Wildberg’s second jump of 23-4½ won the meet, and he was begging to jump a third time, but saved it for the MOC and the chance to be the first champion in the newly added event indoors. “I was super excited when I heard about it,” said Wildberg. “I had worked extra hard the fall and the beginning of winter and knew I’d have a chance to take the title indoors. I guess you could say I was bouncing off the walls.” Wildberg was even more thrilled to come away with the win at the MOC. It sends him into the spring on a high

Artificial Intelligence

Friend or Foe of Human Flourishing? 2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

William Witherspoon Lecture on Theology and Science

Dirk Evers

Professor of Systematic Theology Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

Artificial Intelligence Friend or Foe of Human Flourishing?

Thursday Dirk Evers March 21, 2019 at 7pm

William Witherspoon Lecture on Theology and Science

Professor of Systematic Theology Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

to beThursday followed by a reception March 21, 2019 PUBLIC WELCOME at 7pm Rider to be followed by a reception PUBLIC WELCOME LOCATION:

Furniture

Luce Hall at

LOCATION:

at CenterLuce ofHall Theological Inquiry

Center of Theological Inquiry

“Fine Quality Home Furnishings 50 Stockton Street at Substantial Savings” Princeton, New Jersey4621 Route 27

50 Stockton Street Princeton, New Jersey

Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147 www.riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 AmEx, M/C & Visa

FLYING HIGH: Princeton High boys’ track star Nils Wildberg flies through the air in the long jump at a meet last spring. Last month, senior star Wildberg won the inaugural NJSIAA Indoor Meet of Champions Long Jump Showcase. Fighting through injury, the Dartmouth College-bound Wildberg produced a best mark of 23’4 to win the competition. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) note and the Tigers are hoping to see more big jumps to come from Wildberg. “I think Nils was blessed,” Samara said. “He was lucky it was his drive leg and not his plant leg. Getting into squat position is very tough for him. Running out of blocks is going to be difficult. Running upright was all right for him. He was very comfortable doing that. To not have the training and practice time in, I was very concerned about rust, but he has an incredible determination to get things done. He wanted to be state champion. He was determined to get it done and he did.” Heading to Dar tmouth College next year to continue his career, Wildberg is determined to produce a big spring. He was disappointed with his final winter meet when he jumped 22’3 for 23rd place at the New Balance Indoor Nationals last Saturday. “I was definitely expecting a little more,” he said. “However, I guess my lack of training really caught up to me finally. I can’t really be too disappointed. I just didn’t have training a really long time. I still have spring and now I can really get back into it outdoors and start training again.” The nationals were a sharp reminder of why Wildberg is anxious to get back to work. He has great potential if he can train consistently while healthy. “The way he was training and competing, I think he would have 100 percent won the national title,” said Samara. “He was on track to go 25 feet. You can only control what you can control. There’s no sense thinking about that now.” Although Wildberg didn’t

match his incredible performances under pressure down the stretch in Easterns and the MOC at the Nationals, he can use it as a learning experience. “Definitely patience,” said Wildberg. “That’s a big one. Learning to trust yourself. At the same time, believing everything will work out for you. When you have an injury like this, you really learn a lot about your body and yourself mentally. I had a lot to think about those two months. Especially after winning Meet of Champions, there’s a lot to think about there. It’s hard to put into words.” Wildberg is an important cog for the PHS team this spring. The Tigers cover the events well with sprinter Matt Perello, pole vaulter Simon Schenk (third at MOC in school-record 15’ 6), shot and discus thrower Paul Brennan, and javelin thrower Ben Kioko expected back, and could use Wildberg’s aid in sprints as they hunt for another state team title. “This is the most special group we’ve ever had,” said Samara. “This was supposed to be their encore year. The injuries have so far put a damper on it. We’re determined they’re not going to go out as a one-hit wonder. We hope they can get the state title again. We have a long way to go.” Wit h Wildberg on t he mend, the PHS track squad is waiting to see what its newest state champion can do when well-trained. “I think things are looking up,” Wildberg s aid. “My knee is looking better. I think I’ll be able to train efficiently. Hopefully I’ll be able to build up and be at my peak at Meet of Champions outdoors.” —Justin Feil


Tripling Win Total from Last Winter, PHS Boys’ Hoops Made Big Strides For the Princeton High boys’ basketball team, its valiant battle against powerhouse Freehold in the opening round of the Group 4 Central Jersey sectional proved to be a microcosm of a positive season. The underdog 14th-seeded PHS jumped out to a 20-15 first quarter lead over thirdseeded and eventual sectional champion Freehold, hit a drought in the second quarter to fall behind, and then battled tooth and nail before succumbing 60-50. “We had a pretty good game plan; the guys played their tails off and we did a lot of good things,” said PHS head coach Patrick Noone. “We just got to a point where we couldn’t score in a stretch during the second quarter and at beginning of third. We kept it within striking distance; I think we were down eight with about three minutes left.” Tiger senior captain and star guard Brendan Rougas did some great things in his finale, tallying a game-high 15 points. “Brendan was awesome, unfortunately it was his last game,” said Noone. “We are going to miss him dearly. He hit a three early and just kind of rode off from there. He played great.” Overall, PHS made great strides this winter, going 1213 after suffering through a 4-21 campaign in 2017-18. “We made a lot of really good progress, our seniors were great,” said Noone,

extremely important,” said know about the program. I some big seasons ahead. whose Class of 2019 also in- the season was that we were Noone.“When guys come think we are in a pretty good “We have potential there,” � Phone number � Fax number � Address Expiration Date cluded Jaylen Johnson, Jack in every game,” said Noone. back, that�means they had a spot after the season we had said Noone. “We have to reMcMahon, Tyler De Lalinde, “We played the two teams good experience. They want this year. We had a couple ally tap into that this sumand Evan Filion, who was that were in the sectional fi- to be around and say hello of heartbreaking losses that mer and hope that the guys sidelined by injury nal, Trenton and Freehold, and see how everything is would have had us above play a lot and the progress “Brendan did an outstand- and we were in both games going. They don’t feel dis- .500; I think we are moving continues.” ing job, he had a great ca- with them. Against Trenton, connected; that is a sign that in the right direction.” —Bill Alden reer for us and the same it was a tie game with three we are building something.” for Jaylen, Jack, and Tyler. minutes left and against With three seasons guiding Those guys really led us this Freehold, we were up 10 PHS under his belt, Noone year which was huge for us. early in the game. That was believes things going well. That had a lot to do with it.” a good sign for us that we “We have done a good job The emergence of junior star were in those games.” Also Buying: Antiques, Collectibles, of building, usually the third Jay Jackson had a lot to do Another good sign for the year is when you see how you Jewelry, Postcards, Ephemera, Pottery, Prints, with the team’s improvement. program has been the way Paintings, Old Glass, etc. “Jackson was named secFast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In ond team All-CVC, he had ESTATE CONTENTS an outstanding year,” noted Hunan ~ Szechuan Noone. Malaysian ~ Vietnamese “Even when he didn’t get Daily Specials • Catering Available his points, his rebounding and his defense was there. I 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950 think that speaks volumes, he was unbelievable this year.” Three other juniors, Gefen Bar-Cohen, Jack Suozzi, and Riley McMahon, also provided some outstanding play. “Gefen had phenomenal year; Jack had some big games as did Riley McMahon,” said Noone. “It was a great team effort.” Two sophomore starters, point guard Tim Evidente and for ward Ethan Guy, gave the Tigers a big spark. “What a pleasant surprise that was,” said Noone. “We knew they were good, but the way they came in and handled the pressure of playing varsity right off the bat was unbelievable.” Through the winter, the Tigers showed an ability to deal with the pressure. “I think the best part of

— WE BUY — BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS

Downsizing/Moving? Call Us.

609-658-5213

FROM A VINTAGE TIMEPIECE

TO A TURKS

AND CAICOS TIMESHARE

We insure them. Your insurance needs are as unique as you are. Family owned for four generations, Borden Perlman protects your personal assets. Call Leslie Duffy at 609-512-2919 to discuss the right game plan for you.

home . auto . valuables

609.896.3434 | 800.932.4476 | BORD ENPERLMAN .COM Ewing Office: 250 Phillips Blvd., Suite 280, Ewing, NJ 08618

INSIDE STUFF: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Jaylen Johnson puts up a shot in a game this season. Senior forward Johnson enjoyed a solid final campaign for PHS, providing inside punch for the Tigers as the went 12-13 and made the state tournament. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

New Brunswick Office: 120 Albany St., Tower II, Suite 405, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

To: ___________________________ From: _________________________ Date & Time: ______________________ Boasting a core four of rein which former players have are doing in terms of building Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled to run ___________________. he program,” said Noone. supported the team. turning starters in Jackson, Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: “For the freshmen and Bar-Cohen, Evidente, and “We had a lot of alumni (Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) coming to games, that is sophomores, it is all they Guy, PHS appears poised


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 38

PDS Girls’ Hoops Showed Growth, Character, As Young Players Gained Valuable Experience On paper, it would appear that it was a rough winter for Liz Sharlow as she took the helm of the Princeton Day School girls’ basketball program. Although PDS took its lumps in posting a 2-19 record, former Lehigh University women’ hoops star Sharlow enjoyed her debut campaign. “It was a learning experience; it was great to see how much the girls grew,”

said Sharlow. “I learned a lot from the girls; they were great teammates and worked so hard. They made it so much fun.” The Panthers had a lot of fun coming through with a 35-33 overtime win against Lawrence High in the final week of the season. “It was an exciting win; it was an overtime game,” said Sharlow of the February 13 contest. “Gwen [Allen] and

Fighting Uphill Battle Against Formidable Foes, PDS Boys’ Hockey Enjoyed Solid Campaign Over the course of the 2018 -19 c a mpa ig n, t he Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team fought an uphill battle nearly every night. Dealing with a daunting schedule that included a gauntlet of formidable foes, PHS didn’t possess the reservoir of talent that is has featured in the past. “Our schedule was just brutal this year,” said PDS head coach Scott Bertoli, whose squad took on such tough non-conference opponents as Don Bosco, Delbarton, Albany Academy (N.Y.), the Groton School (Mass.), La Salle (Pa.), and Seton Hall Prep in addition to playing Mid-Atlantic Hockey League (MAHL) rivals like the Hill School (Pa.), Wyoming Seminary (Pa.), and Lawrenceville. “Without question, this was the hardest schedule we have ever faced, and this year’s team wasn’t the best team we have ever had. It was hard with the lack of depth.” Displaying character and pluck, PDS managed to go 14-12-1, advancing to the MAHL semis where it fell 4-1 to eventual champion Hill. “When we were at full strength and had everyone there, I felt confident playing against anyone,” said Bertoli. “I think we proved that with great games against Hill (a 1-0 loss in overtime on January 9) at relatively full strength and a really good effort against Lawrenceville (a 5-4 defeat on January 24) which proved to be an outstanding team this year by New England standards. They had some really impressive wins.” The Panthers boasted an

  

ON THE BALL: Princeton Day School girls’ basketball player Tyler

Top litigation firm NewthisJersey Robinson handles the ball inina game winter. Freshman guard

Robinson made steady progress in her debut campaign as PDS

Topwent litigation firm New Jersey 2-19 under newin head coach Liz Sharlow.

Brooke [Smukler] fouled out so some of the younger players really stepped up. Tyler Robinson had a big game, she really played well. Elle Anhut stepped up. Maggie Amaral had some big rebounds.” With a roster featuring four freshmen and four sophomores, a youthful PDS squad gained some valuable experience this winter. “They really improved and showed some resilience,” said Sharlow, whose corps of young players included freshmen Robinson, Anhut, and Madeline Nowack along with sophomores Anna Ellwood, Anna-Marie Zhang, Caroline Topping, and Abigail Weinstein. “We had some tough games.” Senior captains Brooke Smukler and Gwen Allen showed toughness as they led their younger teammates. “Brooke was a big scorer for us; Gwen was a great rebounder and a defender,” said Sharlow, whose roster also included another senior Laurel Peters. “She showed a lot of leadership and heart; she is just so intense and competitive.” In Sharlow’s view, the Panthers have what it takes to be more competitive next season. “It comes down the the work they put in over the offseason, I definitely think we have a foundation to build from,” said Sharlow. “They showed so much progress from the beginning of the year to the end of the season. They believed in one another; I developed trust in them and they trusted me. They were a great group. We have an exciting future.” –Bill Alden

(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Top litigation firm in New Jersey

impressive trio of senior stars in forward and captain Coby Auslander along with forward and assistant captain Ty Eastman and defenseman and assistant captain Chip Hamlett. “Most years, I don’t name our captains until the fall; it was an easy decision for me and our coaching staff to name Coby the captain and Ty and Chip the assistant captains at the breakout last year,” said Bertoli, whose senior class also included Kevin Flahive and Aidan York. “I have only done that two or three times. They were effective, they impacted the game and the scoreboard and they endeared themselves to their coaching staff.” Auslander and Eastman had a big impact in their home finale against Father Judge as the Panthers prevailed 6-4 with Auslander tallying four goals and two assists and Eastman chipping in two goals and three assists. “It looked like a group that we would get opportunities against and that was good,” said Bertoli. “We scored goals; it was a great way to end their home careers.” Auslander’s outburst was emblematic of a brilliant final campaign which saw him score 45 points on 20 goals and 25 assists. “I can go on and on about Coby, for him to have a night like he did was great,” said Bertoli of Auslander who tallied 123 points in his Panther career and is headed the Christopher Newport to play for its Division III men’s lacrosse program. “His compete level is off the chart. We have had some really great kids and players here and he is right up there with them.”

The Panthers showed their competitive fire in mid-December when played at the Barber Tournament at the St. Mark’s School (Mass.) and went 1-1-1 despite being undermanned. “We were missing three of our best kids and one of our freshmen who is a talented kid because of club conflicted,” said Bertoli, noting that the team was basically playing with six forwards and four defensemen for three games in 20 hours against New England boarding schools. “We lost a heartbreaker in the last second to Vermont Academy 2-1, we beat Worcester Academy, (Mass.) 7-1, and we tied Kents Hill (Maine) 1-1. When we go up there, I hope we can be competitive in the first couple of games and then hopefully just survive physically in the third game. Here we are in every situation with opportunities to win. It showed the character of the kids; they never fail to amaze me.” Looking ahead, Bertoli believes that the program has the pieces in place to maintain its winning tradition. “We are going to be younger. We have some really good, talented kids who play,” said Bertoli, who will be welcoming back such stars as sophomores Luck Antonacci, Drew McConaughy, Birch Gorman and Gibson Linnehan along with juniors Alex Allen, Chris Cecila, Jeremy Siegel, Justin Sherman, Stephan Gorelenkov, and David Sherman. “It is time for those younger kids to mature and take on greater responsibilities and play more meaningful minutes. I expect that to happen. One thing I never worry about is the effort level that we are going to get and the way the kids conduct themselves.” –Bill Alden

Willing negotiators. Willing negotiators. Willing negotiators. Skilledlitigators. litigators. Skilled Skilled litigators.  SINCE 1929 

 SINCE 1929 

 SINCE 1929 

John A. Hartmann, III, Chm. Lydia Fabbro Keephart John A. Hartmann, III,J.Chm. Kristen Vidas

Nicole J. Huckerby Jennifer R. Haythorn Nicole J. Huckerby Alexandra M. Kachala

Lydia Fabbro Keephart Jennifer R. Haythorn John A.A. Hartmann, III,Alexandra Chm.III, M. Nicole John Hartmann, Chm. Kristen J. Vidas www.pralaw.com KachalaJ. Huckerby 609-520-0900

Lydia Fabbro Keephart

Jennifer R. Haythorn

100 Nassau Park Boulevard, Suite 111 | Princeton, NJ 08540

Kristen J. Vidas Alexandra M. Kachala Nicole J. Huckerby Lydia Fabbro Keephart 609-520-0900 www.pralaw.com Frost Kalyan Jennifer Haythorn 100R. Nassau Park Boulevard, Suite 111 Jillian | Princeton, NJ 08540

609-520-0900

www.pralaw.com

100 Nassau Boulevard, Suite 111 | Princeton, NJ 08540 Announcing Our New OfficePark Location

STICKING TOGETHER: Members of the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team celebrate after scoring in goal in a 5-4 loss to Lawrenceville at Hobey Baker Rink in late January. PDS ended the season at 14-12-1, advancing to the Mid-Atlantic Hockey League (MAHL) semis where it fell 4-1 to eventual champion Hill (Pa.). (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Custom Glass Tabletops

Think Global Buy Local

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

Skillman H HFurniture Quality

Used Furniture Inexpensive

Princeton Main Office: 989 Lenox Dr.|1st Floor|Lawrenceville, NJ 08648|T: (609) 520-0900|F: (609) 896-1265 Other Offices: Mt. Laurel / Nutley / Newtown, PA

New Furniture

Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881


In semifinal action last Saturday in the 4th/5th grade boys’ division of the Dillon Youth Basketball League, PBA#130 defeated Princeton Dental Group 47-38. Asher Delue scored 31 points to lead the way for the victors with Michael Bess chipping in 12. Henry Jamieson led Princeton Dental Group with 25 points. Corner House topped Pr inceton Yout h Sports 37-15 as Raymond McLaughlin tallied 14 points in the victory. Phineas Choe led PYS with nine points. In semifinal games in the 6th/7th grade boys’ division, Majeski Foundation edged McCaffrey’s 46-45. Owen Biggs paced Majeski Foundation with 24 points while Jonathon Feldman tallied 19 points in a losing cause. Lependorf & Silverstein topped Princeton Pi 35-30 as Travis Petrone scored 11 points for the victors. Remmick Granozio scored a gamehigh 19 points in defeat for Princeton Pi. In the 8th-10th grade boys’ division semifinals, the Lakers nipped the Knicks 47-43.

Princeton 5k Race Slated for April 7

The ninth annual Princeton 5k Road Race is scheduled for April 7 at 8:30 a.m. The USATF sanctioned course begins and ends at Walnut Lane, between Princeton High and John Witherspoon Middle School. The race benefits the PHS cross country and track programs. The entry fee is $35 for the community at large and $25 for PHS students, athletes, teachers, and staff. For online registration and information, log onto www. princeton5k.com.

Applications for 2019 seasonal and summer employment with the Princeton Recreation Department are now available on the department’s website. Seasonal job opportunities are available for the following positions: Day Camp Counselor, Day Camp Counselor in training, Community Park Pool Lifeguard/Swim Instructor, Community Park Pool Customer Service, and Season Park Maintenance. Instructions on how to apply can be found online at www. princetonrecreation.com under “Seasonal Employment.”

Bailey Hoops Academy Holding Spring Programs

The Bailey Basketball Academy (BBA) has announced the spring schedule for its upcoming hoops programs. The programs will provide players with an opportunity for competitive travel play, individualized instruction, skills development and fundamentals as well as league play. BBA is led by Kamau Bailey, the former Princeton Day School girls’ hoops coach and the Philadelphia 76ers International Camps Clinician. For more information, contact coach Bailey at (917) 626-5785.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Dillon Youth Basketball Playoff Results

Recreation Department Offering Summer Jobs

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Local Sports

Spencer Hamilton poured in 38 points for the Lakers while Zander DeLuca led the way for the Knicks with 13 points. The Spurs topped the 76ers 43-36. John Reardon tallied 28 points for the victors while George Peter Hare led the 76ers with 23 points. In semifinal contests in the girls’ division, Jefferson Plumbing edged the Nuggets 17-15 as Nikitha Das led the way with nine points. Stella Wolsk scored six points in the loss. Princeton Pettoranello defeated Woodwinds, 20-10. Sara Chaing tallied 16 points for Pettoranello in the win while Deidre Ristic led Woodwinds with five points. The championship games are slated for March 16.

SHOWING COMMITMENT: Princeton High senior student athletes are all smiles as they took part in a ceremony last week to celebrate commitments they made to continue their sports careers at the college level. The athletes on hand included: Sydney Vine (Colorado College, tennis); Oliver Tennant (Hamilton College, swimming); Teddy Durbin (Colby College, baseball); Olivia Jaffe (Oberlin College, field hockey); Ella Kotsen (Bryn Mawr College, basketball); Alexander Park (Williams College, lacrosse); Isabella Phillips (Pomona College, water polo); Ben Amon (TCNJ, baseball); Erin Devine (Ursinus, basketball); Camille Franklin (Oberlin College, soccer); and Natalia Drobnjak (Swarthmore College, volleyball). Not pictured is Galil Cohen (Dickinson College, soccer).

Rider

Furniture

“Fine Quality Home Furnishings at Substantial Savings”

4621 Route 27 Kingston, NJ

609-924-0147 www.riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 AmEx, M/C & Visa

YMCA CAMP MASON “Piecing Everything Together”

We are excited to welcome

OVERNIGHT CAMP

98%

of parents report that their child felt a sense of belonging at YMCA Camp Mason.

RANCH CAMP

ADVENTURE TRIPS

98%

of parents report that their children made new friends at YMCA Camp Mason.

OPEN HOUSE 4/7 & 5/5 1pm start

93%

of parents responded that their child’s self image/self confidence improved as a result of YMCA Camp Mason overnight camp

Ansie (Ann) Monaghan to the Redwood Wealth Management team!

Ansie Monaghan Senior Wealth Advisor cell: 609-613-2247 ansie@redwoowdwmg.com 110 Marter Avenue, Suite 410 Moorestown, NJ 08057 Phone: 856-500-2900 • Fax: 856-210-7230 RedwoodWMG.com

Outdoor Pool - Skatepark - Archery - Boating - FREE Day Trip Options - Ropes Courses Arts & Crafts - Mountain Biking - Horseback Riding - Nature/Farm Program - Hiking Staff and Campers from Around the Globe - Affordable Rates - So Much More!

Register today at campmason.org 23 Birch Ridge Road Hardwick, NJ 07825 www.campmason.org information@campmason.org 908-362-8217

Scan to see Camp Mason in action!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 40

Obituaries

William Paul Jacobs After a long decline, William Paul Jacobs of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully at home in his sleep on Sunday, March 3 at the age of 99. He is survived by his beloved wife of nearly 70 years, Jane Shaw Jacobs; two children, Mark Jacobs of Phoenix, AZ, and Anne Jacobs of West Windsor, NJ; as well as his sister, Mary Jacobs Brown of Worcester, MA; five treasured grandchildren, Jeffrey Jacobs, Robinson Jacobs, Patrick S. Jacobs, Phoebe Brown, and Madeleine J. Jacobs; and six great-grandchildren. Bill was born in Boston, MA, on May 25, 1919 to Elizabeth G. Kennedy Jacobs and Vincent Henr y Jacobs. He grew up in West Roxb u r y, M A , at te n d e d Boys English High School in Boston, and was graduated magna cum laude in 1942 from Harvard University, where he later received a

Ph.D. in biology. He served stateside in the U.S. Army during World War II. W h i l e d oi n g g r a d u ate work at The California Institute of Technology, Bill traveled for a weekend ski trip to Yosemite National Park in February 1946. He found the slopes icy, so he took what he thought was a safe trail through a woods. This strategy led to his losing his way in the mountains, surviving a blizzard and 5 degree temperatures on his first night out, spending eleven days lost in the snow, eating lichen and snowmelt, and finally being rescued only after his parents and the Yosemite ski patrol had conceded his death. Within two years of this misadventure, Bill met and mar r ied Jane Shaw and joined the faculty of biology at Princeton University, where he remained until his retirement in 1989. He studied the hormonal control of plant development and was an early proponent of quantitative techniques in that field. “What Makes Leaves Fall,” one of his early papers published in 1955 in Scientific American, describes how a decrease in the plant hormone auxin coming from the leaf blade creates a specialized layer of self- destr ucting cells, the abscission layer, which weaken a leaf’s attachment to a plant, allowing a breeze to blow the leaf away. Bill also studied a unique alga, Caulerpa, which consists of only a single cell, yet grows to lengths of three feet and differentiates into roots, stems, and leaves. In a paper published again in Scientific American in

1994, he referred to this anomaly as “a gauntlet flung in the face of biological convention” and described the work done in his lab discovering the conditions that allow Caulerpa to develop without interior cell walls. The recipient of a Gugg e n h e i m Fe l l o w s h i p i n 1967, Bill also received the Charles Reid Barnes Life Membership Award from the American Society of Plant Biologists in 1998. He published 165 papers, including seven after his retirement. His book, Plant Hormones and Plant Development, was published in 1979. One of Bill’s regrets when he was lost in Yosemite was that he had not danced enough. This was in spite of having often snuck out of his second story boyhood bedroom in West Roxbury to dance at the RoselandState Ballroom in Boston. Bill compensated during his remaining 73 years, throwing and attending dance par ties, joining Jane on the dance floor at the first trigger of a good song, and playing many Fred Astaire, John Travolta, and Gene Kelly movies for captive grandchildren. In his last years, Bill was cared for with truly amazing grace and loving kindness by his aides and nurses from HomeWatch Care Givers and from Princeton Hospice. In lieu of f lowers, the family suggests a donation to HomeFront in Lawrence Township. A memorial service will be held at The Mountain Lakes House, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton at noon on April 6.

Mary Cullens Murdoch January 3, 1933 – February 27, 2019 Mary Cullens Murdoch, a 50-year resident of Princeton, died peacefully of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on Februar y 27, 2019 in her home at Princeton Windrows. Bor n in Newtown, CT, Mary was the only child of Reverend Paul Archibald Cullens and Agnes Robinson Cullens, and the wife for over 60 years of William F. Murdoch, Jr. who predeceased her in 2018. She is a graduate of the Dana Hall School and Wheaton College in Massachusetts, where she was recognized in 2006 with an Alumni Board award. A standout student-athlete on Wheaton’s varsity basketball team, Mary also sang in the a cappella group Wheaton Whims. She met Bill Murdoch in Boston while teaching third grade at the Tower School in Marblehead, MA. They married in 1958. They lived together in Pittsburgh, PA, Fairfield, CT, and Baltimore, MD, before relocating to Princeton in 1968. A former President of the

Princeton Day School Parents Association and head of the local Wheaton College alumni group, Mary also served on the board of the Princeton University McCosh Health Center and more recently chaired the Windrows Welcome Committee. She volunteered for decades to host parties for Princeton alumni and cochaired several major Princeton reunions. She was recognized as an honorary member of Princeton’s Class of 1952. Mary spent 70 summers at her family’s wilderness retreat on the French River in Northern Ontario. She and Bill welcomed family members and guests to the beauty and tranquility of island life where they were surrounded by fresh water and Canadian wildlife. Mary is survived by four children and their spouses, Mary (Molly) Murdoch F i n n e l l a n d S a m u e l C. Finnell, III (Skillman); Elizabeth Murdoch Maguire and Henry C. Maguire, III (Lewisburg, PA); Timothy R. Murdoch and Pascale Lemaire (Montreal); and Kate Murdoch Kern and John W. Kern IV (Bethesda, MD). She had nine grandchildren: Julia and Eliza Kern (San Francisco); Liliane and Maxime Murdoch (Montreal); Henry Maguire (Calgary) and Alexandra Maguire ( New York City); Maggie Finnell ( Princeton ), Sam Finnell and Morgan Bunting Finnell (Boston), Louise Finnell Trapasso and Jon Trapasso, plus two great-grandsons, Frederick and William Trapasso (Metuchen). The family is planning a private burial service in Wakefield, RI. In lieu of flowers, people are encouraged to

donate to the Poodle Club of America Rescue Foundation, Inc: www.poodleclubofamericarescuefoundationinc.org or to a charity of choice.

Leonard J. La Placa Leonard J. La Placa, 95, of Princeton died Sunday, March 10, 2019 surrounded by his loving family. Born in Jamesburg, NJ, he resided most of his life in Princeton. Leonard was the co-owner, along w ith his late w ife Laurel, of Nassau Interiors, Princeton for over 60 years. Leonard was a devoted Husband, Father, Grandfather, and an energetic member of the Princeton Community. Mr. La Placa’s charming and warm personality touched all that knew him. Son of the late Giuseppe and Mary (LaMar) La Placa, wife of the late Laurel (Smith) La Placa, he is survived three daughters and three sons-inlaw, Laurie and James Holladay, Claudia and Michael George, and Trinna and Rachid BenMoussa; a sister, Josephine La Placa; and four grandchildren, Clayton George, Jawed BenMoussa, Noor BenMoussa, and James Holladay. The Funeral Service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral H o m e, 4 0 Va n d e ve nte r Avenue, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery. Friends may call on Friday, March 15, 2019 from 4–7 p.m. at the Funeral Home. Memorial Contributions may be made in Leonard’s m e m or y to h is favor ite charity: Princeton Nursery School, 78 Leigh Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Continued on Next Page

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


(wife Corrie), William Lappan (wife Kelly), Robert Lappan, Gerald Lappan (wife Lorraine); as well as several nephews and nieces that she loved dearly. Maureen was known for her contagious sense of humor and love of having a wonderful time. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated on Sat urday, April 27, 2019 at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Continued from Preceding Page

Nini, Esterina Toto, and Clarice and Antonino Cifelli; a sister-in-law Maria Palumbo; two grandchildren Christine Trump and her husband Ian and Kathleen Sullivan; one great-granddaughter Ellanore Mae; and several nieces and nephews. Calling hours will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 14, 2019 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral

Maureen Stevens

CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

WORSHIP SERVICE

Frank L. Tamasi

Maureen Stevens (Cahill) passed away at her home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday, February 24, 2019. She was a lifelong Princeton resident and an active St. Paul’s Catholic Church parishioner. Maureen had a varied career as she was a nurse, a real estate agent, and an interior designer. However, most of her working career was spent at Telequest as an office manager — a job she loved. She considered her co-workers at Telequest as family. Maureen was proud to have a large family and numerous loyal friends. She was predeceased by her loving husband, Michael Stevens; beloved friend David Dilts; and older brother, Daniel Cahill. She is survived by her sister, Ann Caton, and seven brothers: Thomas Cahill, Jr., Peter Lappan (wife Glenda), Richard Lappan, Charles Lappan

Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. The Funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, March 15, 2019 at the funeral home. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Friday at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in Princeton Cemetery.

Frank L. Tamasi, 87, of P r i nce ton d ie d S u nday, March 10, 2019 at Princeton Care Center. Born in Pettoranello, Italy, he resided in Princeton for 60 years. He was a member of St. Paul’s Church. He ser ved in the Italian Army. He was a supervisor at Princeton University and also was employed by ETS. Son of the late Sebastiano and Elpidia (Paolino) Tamasi, husband of the late Liliana (Palumbo) Tamasi, he is survived by his daughter and son-in-law Debbra and Mark Sullivan; his sisters and brother-in-law Ersilia

MARCH 17, 2019 • 11 AM

AFTERNOON CONCERTS 2019

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Obituaries

Princeton University Chapel Thursdays, 12:30 – 1:00 Admission free

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY OF RECTORY OF DIRECTORY RELIGIOUS SERVI DIRECTORY OF IOUS SERVICES RELIGIOUS RELIGIOUS SERVICESSER March 14

Gedymin Grubba Gdansk, Poland

PREACHING SUNDAY

ONLINE

REV. DR. THERESA S. THAMES

www.towntopics.com

ASSOCIATE DEAN OF RELIGIOUS LIFE AND THE CHAPEL

Ages I llowing 5:30 pm

er

mPrayer

ic

on.org princeton.org 0 am

or of Music

– 1:00 pm

pm

urch urch ch

0 pm

ch

m. m. 5:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. p.m. p.m.

p.m. p.m.

on.org

NO CONCERT

RELIGIOUSLIFE.PRINCETON.EDU

AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm

RECTORY OF GIOUS SERVICES

kg

March 21

Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

Wherever you are onEducation your journey faith, you are Princeton Quaker Meeting 9:00 a.m. Christian forofAll Ages always welcome toMarch worship23 with us Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II at:

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

Step out of time into Rite theII,shared Holy Eucharist, 12:00 pmsilence of a 5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm First Church of Christ, Quaker meeting in our historic Meeting House. AN EPISCOPAL Tenebrae Service,PARISH 7:00 pm Tuesday Scientist, Princeton

MeetingsChurch for Worship at 9 and 11 Thursday March 24 Trinity Holy Week Sunday 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Child Care available at 11 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 8:00 Eucharist, Rite &a.m. Easter Schedule HolyHoly Eucharist with Foot Washing and I

Wednesday of the Altar, 7:00 pmNursery SundayChristian Church Stripping Service, Sunday School and at 10:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. Education for All Ages 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Keeping Watch, 8:00 pmNJ –with Mar. 25, 7:00 amPrayer 470 Quaker Road, Princeton 08540 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Worship and Children’s Program: Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr.Easter Joseph Rosie, Pastor March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, RectorRite II www.princetonfriendsmeeting.org Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Holy Eucharist, Rite ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr.II, Tom12:00 Whittemore, of Music Sundays atofMass: 10 AM7:00 Saturday 5:30pmp.m. The GreatVigil Vigil Easter, Friday, March 25pmDirector 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Mercer St. Rite Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Holy33 Eucharist, IIBook with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 The Prayer Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am pm Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Christian Science Reading Room Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Tuesday Lenten Meditations The PrayerTenebrae Book178 Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Service, 7:00 pm Nassau Street, Princeton Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00,Spanish: 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm AtinNoon in the Chapel Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am 609-924-0919 – Tuesday Open Monday through from 10 - 4 MassFestive in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00Saturday pm St. Paul’s Catholic Church Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Thursday March The Prayer Book Service for Good24 Friday, 7:00 pm Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are p.m. Catholic Holy Eucharist St.12:00 Paul’s Church

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are Bible Classes always welcome toAdult worship with us at: (A multi-ethnic congregation)

First Church of Christ, Witherspoon S 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 124 Withers Scientist, Princeton witherspoonchurch.org 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

10:00 a

10:00 a.m. 216Nassau Nassau Street, Princeton Street, Princeton Holy214 Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. and 214 Nassau Street, Princeton always welcome to worship with us at: Saturday, March 26 Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Ad Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Wednesday First Church of Nancy Christ, Stripping ofWalter the Altar, 7:00 pm Msgr. Nolan, Pastor The Rev. J. Hagner, Associate ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pm (A mult Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer 124 Witherspoon5:30 Street, p.m. Princeton, NJSaturday Scientist, Princeton Wherever areReading on your Holy Eucharist Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Christian you Science Roomjourney of faith, you are Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00NJp.m. 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 16 Bayard Princeton AN Lane, EPISCOPAL PARISH 10:00 a.m. Worship Service124The. 609-924-1 178 Nassau Street, Princeton Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Sunday, March 27 always welcome to worship with us at: Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Holy a.m. Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 amDirector of Music with 10:00 Worship Service Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Friday, March 25 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 4 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. and Youth Bible Study Trinity Church SundayHoly Week Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Wherever always you are on welcome your journey ofto faith, you are with us at: worship

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Adult Bible Classes 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:007:00 am am 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule Service forYouth Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm and Bible Study 9:00178 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 Nassau Street, Princeton Wednesday Testimony MeetingMarch and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, – Rector Stations of theThe. Cross, 1:00 pm 2:00 pm Wednesday, 23 Bible Classes TheAdult Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II witherspoonchurch.org 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm ¡Eres siempre bienvenido! (A multi-ethnic congregation) 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Princeton University chaPel

(A a.m. multi-ethnic congregation) Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 The Prayer Book Christian Science Reading Room

Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm Christian Science Reading Room Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

Tuesday

609-924-091912:00 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Thursday March 24 p.m. Holy Eucharist Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist

St. Paul’s Princeton’s Catholic Church First Tradition St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton 214 609-924-1666 Nassau Street, • FaxPrinceton 609-924-0365 The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

EcumEnical christian worship 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 witherspoonchurch.org Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm sunday at5:30 11am Msgr.Easter Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 pmp.m.

Mass: Sunday: Dean 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 andDean 5:00 p.m. of Religious Wherever you arelife on your journey of faith,Associate you are of Religious life Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. and the Chapel and the Chapel Mass always in Spanish: 7:00 p.m. The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector welcome to Sunday worship withat us at: Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Friday, March 25 Mass in All Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. JoinFestive us! are welcome! VisitRitereligiouslife.princeton.edu 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Choral Eucharist, II, 9:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

Rev.Saturday DR. Alison l. BoDen Vigil

Rev. DR.p.m. TheResA s. ThAmes 5:30

First Church of Christ, Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School

W


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 42

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS MasterCard

VISA

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

PRINCETON MATH TUTOR:

PRINCETONPSYCHOTHERAPY OFFICES: Part-time & full-time psychotherapy offices in professional office suite at 1000 Herrontown Road, Princeton NJ 08540. Contact: Dr. Arnold Washton, (609) 497-0433 or awashton@ thewashtongroup.com 01-30-8t

ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 03-06-4t

tf

03-06-3t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

PRINCETON APARTMENT: Rental– Spacious, charming, extra large living room, hardwood floors, 1 bedroom + den/sunroom w/cathedral ceiling, central A/C, private entrance, plenty of parking, tenants own patio, garden setting, NYC bus, convenient location, no pets, non-smoker. Available now. $2,295/month incl. utilities. 1 year lease required. Call (609) 924-2345. 03-06-3t

OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 03-13-4t

SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

tf

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years HANDYMAN • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash,SUPERIOR credit card, or check. SERVICES: of experience. Available mornings to HOUSE CLEANING: By an experiFOR SALE: take care of your loved transport • 25 wordsBeautiful or less: $15.00 • one, each add’l word HOME 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater thanhome 60 words in length.07-04-19 Experienced in all residential PRINCETON FOR RENT: Thomasville mahogany 70”x44” to appointments, run errands. I am 2 BR, 1 bath. Small beautiful house, enced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) repairs. Free Estimate/References/ 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Hon3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: • 6Available weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual rates formal dining table, •66”x24” side- well Insured. discount (908) 966-0662 or www. available. known in Princeton. Top care, $50.00 nice location. May 1st. JOES LANDSCAPING INC. board & 80”x36”x14” picture frame excellent references. The best, cell $2,300/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) est & reliable. References available. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com OF PRINCETON • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week 02-27-6t curio cabinet. Brass claw feet & 608-2456. 02-06/04-24 accents on curio & sideboard. Includes two 20” leaves, 6 chairs & custom glass top. $4,500 or best offer. Call or text: (908) 581-1160. 03-13

ANTIQUE TOOLS & HARDWARE SALE: Wood & Metal Planes, Saws, Brace & Auger Bits, Civil War Tool Chest w/ Tools, Boring Machine, Levels, Tap & Dye Set, Rim & Mortice Locks, Plate & Thumb Latches, Glass Brass & Ceramic Knobs, ca1915 Sconces. For appointment: plp4319@gmail.com, (609) 439-7700 call or text. 03-13 PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 96 Hun Road. Thursday 3/14, Saturday 3/16 & Sunday 3/17 from 9:303:30. Full house! Quality furnishings. Mahogany traditional furniture, king 4-poster bed, mirrors, glass-top dining table, rugs, designer clothing, handbags, fine jewelry, Biomat 7000, Power Plate, Bianchi bike, household & much more. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales.com 03-13 HARPSICHORD FOR SALE: Bannister one-manual. Needs servicing. Price negotiable. Call (609) 5778293. 03-13

(609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396.

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf GARDEN: Vegetable garden space available on private property. You till, plant, weed & harvest produce on share basis and/or cash on Cherry Valley Road in Princeton. Call John @ (609) 924-5157.

CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 02-20-4t

03-13-2t PARKING 3 blocks from Nassau Street near the public library. (609) 651-6757, leave message or call back. 03-13-2t

SKILLMAN HOME FOR RENT: 2 BR, 1 bath. Available April 15. $1,600/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) 608-2456. 03-06-3t LANDSCAPE SERVICES: Leaf clean up, weeding, shrub trimming & removal. Garden bed edging, planting. Mulch, stone & top soil installed. Licensed & insured. (732) 423-7566. 03-13-3t OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 02-27-5t PRINCETON OFFICE with parking lot, furnished, available 4 days/ week as sublet. Integrative health practitioners utilize rest of space. $450/month for use on M, F, Sat, Sun. Other arrangement may be possible. Email: pberk500@gmail.com or Text: (732) 740-5573. 03-13-3t

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 01-23-12t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 03-13-8t BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, slipcovers. Table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential

Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Montgomery Knoll Office Complex 1500 & 1900 sq ft Units Each Unit Has 5 Windowed Offices, Kitchenette & Private Bath Close Proximity to Princeton Call: 908-281-5374 Meadow Run Properties, LLC.

A HOUSE THAT WILL PLEASE THE MOST DESCERNING COLLEEN Walk to downtown Princeton and Princeton University from this meticulously crafted half-duplex featuring Great Room with fireplace, State-of-The-Art Kitchen, Four bedrooms, Three and a half baths. Truly special and that’s “NO BLARNEY.” $929,000

www.stockton-realtor.com CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Basement Waterproofing Services

KEEPING BASEMENTS DRY SINCE 1947 All Phases of Waterproofing Foundation Restoration Structural Stabilization & Repairs

609-394-7354 Princeton Owned Business & Resident Family Owned and Operated for 4 Generations Deal directly with Paul Sr. or Paul Jr Pennachi 72 years of stellar excellence!

apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35

tf


ANTIQUE TOOLS & HARDWARE SALE: Wood & Metal Planes, Saws, Brace & Auger Bits, Civil War Tool Chest w/ Tools, Boring Machine, Levels, Tap & Dye Set, Rim & Mortice Locks, Plate & Thumb Latches, Glass Brass & Ceramic Knobs, ca1915 Sconces. For appointment: plp4319@gmail.com, (609) 439-7700 call or text. 03-13 PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 96 Hun Road. Thursday 3/14, Saturday 3/16 & Sunday 3/17 from 9:303:30. Full house! Quality furnishings. Mahogany traditional furniture, king 4-poster bed, mirrors, glass-top dining table, rugs, designer clothing, handbags, fine jewelry, Biomat 7000, Power Plate, Bianchi bike, household & much more. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales.com 03-13 HARPSICHORD FOR SALE: Bannister one-manual. Needs servicing. Price negotiable. Call (609) 5778293. 03-13 CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY: by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 02-20-4t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf GARDEN: Vegetable garden space available on private property. You till, plant, weed & harvest produce on share basis and/or cash on Cherry Valley Road in Princeton. Call John @ (609) 924-5157. 03-13-2t PARKING 3 blocks from Nassau Street near the public library. (609) 651-6757, leave message or call back. 03-13-2t PRINCETONPSYCHOTHERAPY OFFICES: Part-time & full-time psychotherapy offices in professional office suite at 1000 Herrontown Road, Princeton NJ 08540. Contact: Dr. Arnold Washton, (609) 497-0433 or awashton@ thewashtongroup.com 01-30-8t PRINCETON HOME FOR RENT: 2 BR, 1 bath. Small beautiful house, nice location. Available May 1st. $2,300/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) 608-2456. 03-06-3t PRINCETON APARTMENT: Rental– Spacious, charming, extra large living room, hardwood floors, 1 bedroom + den/sunroom w/cathedral ceiling, central A/C, private entrance, plenty of parking, tenants own patio, garden setting, NYC bus, convenient location, no pets, non-smoker. Available now. $2,295/month incl. utilities. 1 year lease required. Call (609) 924-2345. 03-06-3t

Christina “Elvina” Grant Sales Associate, REALTOR®

Fox & Roach, REALTORS® 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 Office 698.924.1600 Direct 609.683.8541 Cell: 609.937.1313 christina.grant@foxroach.com

Lawn & Landscape Services

Celebrating 20 Years!

Innovative Design • Expert Installation Professional Care 908-284-4944 • jgreenscapes@gmail.com License #13VH06981800

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IRISH TO LOVE THIS HOUSE Living Room with fireplace, Dining Area State-Of-The-Art Kitchen 4 bedrooms, 3-1/2 Baths In Princeton’s Riverside neighborhood.

$1,159,000 www.stockton-realtor.com

We are pleased to announce

YUEN LI “IVY” HUANG SALES ASSOCIATE

has joined Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate’s Princeton office.

33 Witherspoon Street Princeton, NJ 08542 MOBILE 609.933.9988 OFFICE 609.921.2600 yuenlihuang@gmail.com www.ivyhuang.com WeChat ID: ivyrealtor

glorianilson.com

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

FOR SALE: Beautiful Thomasville mahogany 70”x44” formal dining table, 66”x24” sideboard & 80”x36”x14” picture frame curio cabinet. Brass claw feet & accents on curio & sideboard. Includes two 20” leaves, 6 chairs & custom glass top. $4,500 or best offer. Call or text: (908) 581-1160. 03-13


As a �er�er �o�n�y �o� Pro���er, � �a�e ��e �nowle��e an� e��er�ise �o �o�nsel �lien�s ��ro��� ��e �o�e ��yin� or sellin� �ro�ess an� �o �re�are ��e� for ��rren� �ar�e� �on�i�ions� � offer �y �lien�s ��e �i��es� le�el of ser�i�e �ossi�le� �� wo�l� �e �y �leas�re �o �el� yo��

TC

TERESA CUNNINGHAM Sales Associate, ABR®, SRES®

2013-2018 NJ REALTORS® CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE SALES AWARD® Licensed in NJ and PA

�� �i��ers�oon ��ree� Prin�e�on, �� ����� ōŷDÝĵr˥˟˨ʳ˧˟ˡʳˢˤ˥ˣ ������ ������������

��sy�����ail��o� www���sy����o�

LANDSCAPE SERVICES: Leaf clean up, weeding, shrub trimming & removal. Garden bed edging, planting. Mulch, stone & top soil installed. Licensed & insured. (732) 423-7566. 03-13-3t OFFICES WITH PARKING Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 02-27-5t PRINCETON OFFICE with parking lot, furnished, available 4 days/ week as sublet. Integrative health practitioners utilize rest of space. $450/month for use on M, F, Sat, Sun. Other arrangement may be possible. Email: pberk500@gmail. com or Text: (732) 740-5573. 03-13-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 03-06-4t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 02-27-6t OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 03-13-4t

in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 01-23-12t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 03-13-8t BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

Skillman H HFurniture Used Furniture

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

Inexpensive

New Furniture

Like us on facebook 212 Alexander St, Princeton Mon-Fri 9:30-5, Sat 9:30-1

609.924.1881

r o f e c a p S

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com

e s a e L

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

02-06/04-24

Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, slipcovers. Table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware.

04-25-19

tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

Specialists

China Chef

Frozen Yogurt

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com

Quality

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

AVAILABLE Chuckle's Pizza Masa 8 Sushi Countryside Food Mart The Dance Network US Nails

Fluid Physio

A Cut Above Salon

Penlar Pharmacy

Udo's Bagels

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 44

“Always Professional, Always Personal”

SKILLMAN HOME FOR RENT: 2 BR, 1 bath. Available April 15. $1,600/mo. plus utilities. Call (609) 608-2456. 03-06-3t

Manors Corner Shopping Center

160 Lawrenceville-Pennington Road | Lawrenceville | New Jersey

1

SUITE LEFT!

1,910 sf

(+/-)

RETAIL MEDICAL OFFICE

SUMMER ART CAMP 7 years old and up!

• Individual roof mounted central A/C units with gas fired hot air heating and separately metered utilities • 139 Parking spaces on-site with handicap accessibility • Adjacent to a residential housing development and Bright Horizons Day Care • Located in a densely populated area • Minutes from downtown Princeton and readily accessible from Routes 1, 206 and Interstate 295 • Close proximity to hotels, restaurants, banking, shopping and entertainment

Contact Us: (908) 874-8686 | LarkenAssociates.com

July 24 - 26 and July 31 - Aug 2 Wednesday - Friday, 9am - 3pm Full 3 Day Tuition: $285 or Daily Drop-In: $99 *Includes supplies. Discount for siblings. Bring your own lunch.

Art Camp and More!

Location: Christine Cardenas Center for Performing Arts and Education 221 Broad Street, Florence, NJ 08518

Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected | Raider Realty is a Licensed Real Estate Broker

Registration and for more information:

No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

770-314-1187 · info.ecardenas@gmail.com


A VERY UNIQUE HANDYMAN/HOME HEALTH AIDE:

IT DATA SCIENTIST (#6394):

We have a good-sized house in Princeton & older, both in need of health & repair. This is a live-in position where you will do routine house repairs, driving, shopping & caring for an older man with his full mental capacities. If you have an excellent background as a handyman & you enjoy helping older people, this may be your future job. Please call (609) 924-4649. 03-06-2t

Master’s deg in tech mgmt, data sci, math, stat, comp sci or rel +3 yrs exp (or Bach +5). Define, plan & manage data analysis initiatives applying data sci principles & tech to dvlp tech solutions that solve operational probs & process challenges. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, Sr Strategic Staffing Analyst, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-03D, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 03-13

ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for an advertising Account Manager to generate sales for our luxury magazines, newspaper, and digital business. The ideal candidate will: • Establish new and grow key accounts and maximize opportunities for each publication, all websites, and all digital products. • Collaborate with the sales and management team to develop growth opportunities. • Prepare strategic sales communications and presentations for both print and digital. • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more. • Prepare detailed sales reports for tracking current customers’ activity and maintain pipeline activity using our custom CRM system. Positions are full- and part-time and based out of our Kingston, N.J. office. Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Compensation is negotiable based on experience. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. Please submit cover letter and resume to: lynn.smith@witherspoonmediagroup.com melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS

Town Topics a Princeton tradition! ®

est. 1946

*********************************

RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE RENTALS: Princeton Office – $2,000/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. Conference room, reception room, 4 private offices + powder room. With parking. Available now. Princeton – $1,700/mo. Includes heat & water. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, Kitchen. No laundry or parking. . Available 3/15/19. Princeton – $2,750/mo. Griggs Farm, 3+ story town house. 1st floor family room w/fireplace, half bath. 2nd floor LR Dining area, Kitchen & half bath. 3rd floor, 3 BR, 2 full baths. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER

FOR SALE: Beautiful Thomasville mahogany 70”x44” formal dining table, 66”x24” sideboard & 80”x36”x14” picture frame curio cabinet. Brass claw feet & accents on curio & sideboard. Includes two 20” leaves, 6 chairs & custom glass top. $4,500 or best offer. Call or text: (908) 581-1160. 03-13 ANTIQUE TOOLS & HARDWARE SALE: Wood & Metal Planes, Saws, Brace & Auger Bits, Civil War Tool Chest w/ Tools, Boring Machine, Levels, Tap & Dye Set, Rim & Mortice Locks, Plate & Thumb Latches, Glass Brass & Ceramic Knobs, ca1915 Sconces. For appointment: plp4319@gmail.com, (609) 439-7700 call or text. 03-13 PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 96 Hun Road. Thursday 3/14, Saturday 3/16 & Sunday 3/17 from 9:303:30. Full house! Quality furnishings. Mahogany traditional furniture, king 4-poster bed, mirrors, glass-top dining table, rugs, designer clothing, handbags, fine jewelry, Biomat 7000, Power Plate, Bianchi bike, household & much more. For photos visit evelyngordonestatesales.com 03-13

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. ☛GUTTER CLEANING ☛GUTTER REPAIRS ☛GUTTER PROTECTION! 3 Gutter Protection Devices that Effectively Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Serving the Princeton area for 25 years

609-921-2299 SIMPLIFYING THE HOME BUYING PROCESS INTO SIX STEPS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Determine your purchasing power by working with a mortgage advisor to determine your purchasing power. Search for your home with a Realtor who has the knowledge of local markets and activity. Pick the right mortgage by using a team to provide competitive and versatile lending products. Insure your home, family and auto with the right coverage bundled into one for a substantial discount. Protect your investment with a home warranty and home protection services. Close on time. Consistent, persistence & quality service, ensures you close when you want to.

All under One Roof… Real Estate, Mortgage, Insurance & Closing Services - Let us take you home.

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27

“A house is your third skin, after the skin of flesh and clothing." “The Town Topics provides excellent service and gives our marketing the exposure throughout the Princeton area.”

- Gerri Grassi, Vice President/Broker Manager, Berkshire Hathaway, Fox & Roach, REALTORS®, Princeton Office

—Jenny Erpenbeck

The Top Spot for Heidi Joseph Real Estate SalesAdvertising Associate, REALTOR ®

Town Topics is the most Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 comprehensive and preferred heidi.joseph@foxroach.com weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540 areas in town, as well as the 609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 • 46

®

Winner’s Circle 2018

CONGRATULATIONS

to this year’s award winners! Our success begins and ends with our top performing associates and their legendary service.

Beatrice Bloom

Ingela Kostenbader

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Platinum - 2018

Mary Saba

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Gold - 2018

Abdulbaset Abdulla NJ REALTORS®

Eric Payne

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Platinum - 2018

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Gold - 2018

Eric P. Branton NJ REALTORS®

Deborah Coles

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Silver - 2018

Jean Budny

NJ REALTORS®

Andrew Lobrace

NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Silver - 2018

Nadia Macauley NJ REALTORS®

Laurent Ouzilou NJ REALTORS®

Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018

Katherine Pease NJ REALTORS®

Lisa Theodore NJ REALTORS®

Denise J. Varga NJ REALTORS®

Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Circle of Excellence Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018 Sales Award, Bronze - 2018

Princeton Office • 609-921-1900

Equal Opportunity Employer


47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

NEW CONSTRUCTION

HOPEWELL TWP. $725,000 The opportunity to live serenely off the beaten path, but still close to coffee and community, restaurants, theatre, shopping, schools and commuting roads and rails. Dir: 11 Dunwald Lane. Denise Varga 609-439-3605 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,895,000 Close to downtown, with convenient access to major highways and train stations. Located in a community setting, with park-like settings, this home sits on 2 acres with a wooded lot. Vanessa Reina 609-352-3912 (cell)

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM

AMAZING PRINCETON HOME

PRINCETON $1,455,000 This renovated 4-5 Bedroom, 4.5 Bath Colonial has fenced 2-acre yard with tennis court, pool & patio. Features hardwood floors, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen with granite & finished basement. Dir: Gallup Rd #218. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

PRINCETON $1,350,000 Beautifully appointed 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath colonial in desirable Ettl Farm backing to open common area. Gourmet kitchen with granite counters open to vaulted family room. Hardwood floors throughout. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $899,000 This natural light-filled home is full of surprises! The large windows at the front of the home w/ bookcases underneath and the wall of windows in the dining room give front to back views of the foliage in the yard. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

Princeton Office • 609-921-1900

PRINCETON

$899,000

In the heart of Littlebrook, this updated home is ready for its new owner! The large living room, with brick surround fireplace greets you as you enter the home. Updated Kitchen w/ SS appliances. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)


Idyllic Views on Princeton Ridge

193 Ridgeview Road: Known as Windwhistle Farm... On Princeton’s coveted ridge, the timeless setting of this stunningly renovated and expanded antique Colonial feels perfectly above the fray. Bountiful landscaping frames a classic clapboard facade, enticing those seeking charm, comfort and space. An airy two story foyer bridges the original house and the newer section, which includes a sunken living room with fireplace and raised terrace. The dining room also has a fireplace and built-ins beneath the quintessential beamed ceiling. The family room with third decorative fireplace flows into the custom kitchen, where granite and travertine counter tops are naturally refined. The walk-out, finished basement made bright by French doors is ideal for billiards, exercise or media. Upstairs, the master suite has a soothing tiled bath with radiant heat, steam shower and sunny walk-in closet. A study nook joins 2 bedrooms, a full suite, the laundry and a tiled bath in what was the original wing. The oversized garage boasts a finished studio with endless possibilities. How rare to find 5 acres as scenic as this bordering 44 acres of preserved land. All just a 5 minute drive to the center of downtown Princeton, Princeton University, and some of the area’s most coveted schools, both public and private. $1,550,000 “Real estate has been the perfect profession for me, a lifelong Princetonian with a love of architecture and people. As a broker associate for over 30 years, I have guided sellers and buyers in Princeton and the surrounding communities through the ups and downs of the real estate market. Educating and supporting my clients - past, present, and future - are my primary goals. Real estate is my passion and every day brings new relationships and opportunities.” — Barbara

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, March 13  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, March 13  

Witherspoon Media Group