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Volume LXXIII, Number 2

Senior Living Pages 22-23 Gustavo Dudamel at Trenton Music Makers Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SheTek Launches New Jersey Operations . .8 HomeFront “Week of Hope” . . . . . . . . . . . 14 A Visit to Mary Hartman’s Fernwood in This Week’s DVD Review . . . . . . . 17 PU Men’s Hoops Edges Penn in OT in Ivy League Opener . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Evaldi Growing into Force in Junior Season with Hun Boys’ Hockey . . . 35

Stephanie Sucharda Starring for No . 5 PU Women’s Hockey . . . . 31 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .24, 25 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 28 Classified Ads . . . . . . 39 Clubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Dining & Entertainment. . 26 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Music/Theater . . . . . . 18 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 29 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 37 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 39 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 38 School Matters . . . . . . 14 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Installations and Appointments at Council Reorganization Meeting

At the January 3 reorganization meeting of Princeton Council, Mayor Liz Lempert swore in new members Eve Niedergang and Dwaine Williamson. Jenny Crumiller, who is in her final year on Council, was named the governing body’s president for the third year in a row. The annual meeting at Witherspoon Hall is a celebratory event of sorts. The room was filled with friends and family of Williamson and Niedergang, as well as interested community members. Two representatives from the office of Governor Phil Murphy were in attendance, along with New Jersey Assemblymen Andrew Zwicker and Roy Freiman; Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes; and Mercer County Freeholders Andrew Koontz and Ann Cannon. Former Council members Heather Howard and Lance Liverman, who were in the audience, were given standing ovations and praised by several members of the governing body. Council approved a list of appointments to boards and commissions as well as numerous professional appointments. Among them are Trishka Cecil as municipal attorney, Kimberly Lacken as municipal prosecutor (replacing Reed Gusciora, now the mayor of Trenton); Storm Water Management Consulting, LLC; and Michael Barrett as public defender for the Princeton Municipal Court. In her speech summing up the governing body’s accomplishments over the past year, Lempert said that in the next few weeks Council will take input from the boards and commissions as to developing goals for the year. Lempert’s speech made brief mention of the town’s ongoing difficulties with its new parking meters. “We’ve received significant feedback, and Council will devote a bulk of our first regular meeting to reviewing the data and citizen comments to consider adjustments,” she said. That meeting is Monday, January 14. Aside from parking, the biggest challenges of 2018 included affordability and some budget cuts, Lempert said. She cited making the Princeton Police Department “a leaner and more nimble force,” the national accreditation of the town’s health department, the opening of the renovated and rebuilt Mary Moss Playground, and the groundbreaking for Continued on Page 10

75¢ at newsstands

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New School Board Looks to Focus on Students The Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education (BOE) is off and running in the new year with major plans, priorities, and challenges for Princeton ’s schools — but is in no rush to advance another facilities referendum in 2019. Calling for a primary emphasis on the students, newly-elected BOE President Beth Behrend noted, “There has been lots of robust discussion about the schools in the past year, but not enough time to focus on students and their needs.” Despite the scaling back of referendum plans last year from $137 million to $26.9 million with the PPS seeking additional funds to combat overcrowding and renovate aging buildings, Behrend suggested that the BOE would not be rushing to seek another bond issue. “Referendum? — it’s premature for me to speculate on that,” she said in a phone interview on Monday. “We’re not interested in rushing anything. There is overcrowding and there are needs, but as a Board we need to have plenty of information in front of us. We need to update our demographic studies. We need to take our time and think through the challenges. And people in the community want to be involved.”

Noting the “wisdom, expertise, and resources” available in Princeton, Behrend emphasized the importance of collaboration and community involvement. “It’s exciting,” she said. “These plans will impact our community for the next 50 years. We’re taking time to do it in a way that’s collaborative and careful.” At the January 3 BOE meeting Betsy Baglio, returning for a second term, and newly-elected members Daniel Dart and Brian McDonald, were sworn in for three-

year terms. Behrend, starting her second year on the Board, and Greg Stanckiewicz, in his third year, were elected president and vice president respectively. Behrend noted the strength and the range of backgrounds and perspectives on the 10-member BOE. Even though there have been some indications, through the referendum process and the November election, of a rift in the group, she dismissed the idea that strong differences of Continued on Page 8

Neighborhood Buddy Program Would Back Up First Responders As the climate has become increasingly volatile, Princeton residents have grown familiar with power outages, flooding, downed trees, and other potential disasters. The town has tried to keep an eye on those who are especially vulnerable, due to medical conditions or age, by establishing a database, and offering Community Emergency Response Training (CERT) to anyone who is interested. Princeton Councilman David Cohen wants to take that preparedness a step further with a program called the

Neighborhood Buddy Initiative. Residents who participate would be a backup system, in their individual neighborhoods, to first responders who might be overwhelmed with calls for assistance during an emergency. At more than one public meeting including Council’s January 3 Reorganization Meeting, Cohen has asked that residents invite him to neighborhood gatherings so that he can make them aware of the program. “A lot of neighborhoods in town are already sort of Continued on Page 11

FUN FIESTA: A lively flamenco performance by Lisa Botalico’s Fiesta Flamenca dance group was a highlight at Sunday’s Fiesta del Día de Los Reyes Magos, or Three Kings Day, event at the Arts Council of Princeton. The last day of the Christmas season, Three Kings Day is celebrated throughout the world by many different cultures. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 4

TOWN TOPICS

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DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 LYNN ADAMS SMITH Publisher MELISSA BILYEU Operations Director MONICA SANKEY Advertising Director CHARLES R. PLOHN Senior Account Manager JENNIFER COVILL Account Manager/Social Media Marketing JOANN CELLA Account Manager

LAURIE PELLICHERO, Editor BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor ANNE LEVIN, Staff Writer DONALD GILPIN, Staff Writer

FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, CHARLES R. PLOHN, ERICA M. CARDENAS Photographers

STUART MITCHNER, NANCY PLUM, DONALD H. SANBORN III, JEAN STRATTON, WILLIAM UHL, KAM WILLIAMS Contributing Editors USPS #635-500, Published Weekly Subscription Rates: $52.50/yr (Princeton area); $56.50/yr (NJ, NY & PA); $59.50/yr (all other areas) Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands For additional information, please write or call:

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Christmas Tree and Brush Collection: Runs through January; have trees on the curb by 7 a.m. and remove all decorations. Do not put the tree in a bag. 2019 Brush and Leaf Schedule: Schedules have been mailed and the information is on the town’s website: www.princetonnj.gov. Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting: Wednesday, January 16, 7 p.m. in the Conference Room, 65 Witherspoon Street. Meet the Mayor: Friday, January 18 from 8:30 to 10 a.m., Mayor Liz Lempert holds open office hours in the lobby of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. MLK Day of Service Work Session in Mapleton Preserve: On Monday, January 21 from 12 to 2 p.m., join Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands clearing small trees, brush, vines, and trash in Mapleton Preserve/D&R Canal State Park Headquarters, 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston. https://fpnl.org. Choir Auditions: Voices Chorale NJ is holding auditions Monday, January 14 at 6:45 p.m. at Music Together, 225 Pennington-Hopewell Road (Route 654), Hopewell. Visit jengoings@embarqmail.com to set up a time; alternative times can be arranged. Cherry Valley Road Closure: In Montgomery Township, Cherry Valley Road will be closed to Jefferson’s Curve, west of George Drive, until August. The road will not be passable. Detours will change periodically to allow or restrict traffic through the Cherry Hill intersection. Visit www.princetonnj.gov/resources/cherryvalley-road-cherry-hill-road-jeffersons-curve-improvement-project for information. Bowman’s Hill Preserve Seeks Award Nominations: Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in New Hope, Pa. seeks nominations for the annual Land Ethics Award. Submit by January 18; visit www.bhwp.org for details and instructions. Womanspace Needs Volunteers: Womanspace Inc., which helps victims of domestic and sexual violence, is looking for volunteers for its response teams. Spring training begins in March. Applications are accepted through January 18. For more information, call Heidi Mueller at (609) 392-0316 or email dvvrt@womanspace.org; or Alison Daks at sass@womanspace.org. Donate Blood: The American Red Cross needs donations of blood. 707 Alexander Road, Suite 701; Gold’s Gym in East Windsor; PEAC Health and Fitness in Ewing; or Mercer County Community College in West Windsor. Visit redcrossblood.org for details.

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Dudamel Tells Trenton Students: “I Played in an Orchestra Like You” In a first floor classroom at Princeton University’s Woolworth Music Building on Monday, a string orchestra made up of fourth to ninth-graders played for someone they might never have imagined they would meet. But there was Gustavo Dudamel, the internationally renowned con-

ductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, listening intently and nodding as violinists, violists, and cellists of the Trenton Music Makers program made their way through Rossini’s William Tell Overture. As artist-in-residence this academic year in celebration of Princeton University Concerts’ 125th anniversary, Dudamel has made sure to schedule significant chunks of time with youngsters from music programs in Trenton and elsewhere. A big part of his agenda, he said in a press conference earlier in the afternoon, is dedicated to social change through music. Dudamel is a leading proponent of the El Sistema program, on which Trenton Music Makers is based and in which he participated as a child in Venezuela.

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“Music has the unique power to unite and create opportunities for dialogue a n d u n d er s t a n d i ng,” h e said. “W hen people feel they own the culture of their communities, you create an identity that is unique.” The residency program, divided into three par ts, began last month. Events include concer ts, cross disciplinar y and crosscult ural panels and dis cussions, visual ar t, and classroom visits. The residency culminates April 26 when Dudamel conducts the Princeton Universit y Orchestra and the Princeton University Glee Club in an already sold-out concert at Richardson Auditorium. The program of works by S chub er t, Mendels s oh n, and Tchaikovsky w ill be repeated April 27 at Trenton’s Patriots Theater at the War Memorial (tickets are free and will be released April 1). And on April 28, as part of Communiversity, Dudamel will take part in the El Sistema Festival, a public concer t feat ur ing hundreds of students from Trenton Music Makers, the El Sistema New Jersey Alliance, and guests. Monday’s schedule also included an evening performance by musicians from the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with a pre-concert by members of the Youth

Orchestra of Los Angeles. O n We d ne s day at 4 : 30 p.m., a panel discussion on El Sistema, moderated by Princeton University Professor Stanley Katz, will be held in McCosh 10, followed by a gallery reception of works by artist Marsha Levin-Rojer in the Bernstein Gallery of the Woodrow Wilson School. Both events are free. At the press conference, Dudamel said he is often asked how he treats youngsters who are players as compared to how he treats professional musicians. “I always say that I work with them in the same way,” he said. “I treat them the same.”

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Friends of Princeton Open Space wishes a

Happy 90th Birthday to Helmut Schwab exemplary Princeton citizen and devoted Trustee and Trustee Emeritus of Friends of Princeton Open Space. Thank you for your tireless commitment to preserving open space and to creating the Stony Brook Trail and pedestrian bridge. We are all in your debt.

Friends of Princeton Open Space Celebrating 50 Years of Open Space Preservation

FOR MORE ABOUT HELMUT’S WORK TO PRESERVE OPEN SPACE IN PRINCETON, PLEASE VISIT FOPOS.ORG

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

LEARNING FROM THE MAESTRO: Gustavo Dudamel, shown here with members of the Trenton Youth Orchestra last month, returned to Princeton University this week for the second phase of his three-part residency on campus. This time, he visited with younger students from the Trenton Music Makers program. (Photo by Nick Donnoli/Princeton University Concerts)


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2018 • 6

Gustavo Dudamel Continued from Preceding Page

Entering the classroom Monday, he took the time to shake hands with several of the young musicians. When they finished playing the three works on the program, he told them, “I played in an orchestra like you. I was watching you and remembering that it was a lot of fun, even though I made a lot of mistakes.” Questioned by one of the students about when he conducted his first concert, Dudamel said he was 11 or 12. When she asked him if it was difficult, he recalled getting a lot of practice by lining up his puppets as an audience, and conducting to a recording of Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, destroying the disk in the process. “Actually, playing an instrument, like you are doing, is hard,” he said. “Conducting is easy.” Being artist-in-residence at the University is “a huge honor,” Dudamel said. “Sharing music, but also understanding, is the goal. Princeton has an amazing background and history. I hope it gets even more open in the next 125 years. We need opportunities for children to be creative and have access to beauty. Classical music has been in a box, and that is changing. I am looking forward to keeping a relationship [with the University] and building bridges.” —Anne Levin

Masters of Illusion: The Legacy of John F. Peto EXHIBITION-RELATED PROGRAMMING SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 AT 2:00 P.M. Gallery walk with trompe l’oeil artist Gary Erbe $15; $10 for members Tour the Masters of Illusion exhibition with renowned trompe l’oeil artist Gary Erbe. THURSDAY, JANUARY 24 AT 6:30 P.M. Inside Peto’s World: An evening with Curator Harry Bower $15; $10 for members Explore life inside 19th century American trompe l’oeil master John F. Peto’s Studio Museum with the museum’s Curator Harry Bower. THURSDAY, JANUARY 31 AT 11:00 A.M. Still Life Stew Storytime & Painting Session $10 per family; Free with Family Membership Ages 4 to 8 Helena Clare Pittman and Victoria Raymond’s picture book and Morven’s Masters of Illusion exhibition will inspire young artists as they hear the story, view some pieces in the exhibition, and then create their own still life watercolor painting. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 AT 10:00 A.M. Trompe l’oeil One-Day Workshop with Lisa Walsh $65; $55 for members Open to artists of all skill levels, this one-day workshop explores the art of trompe l’oeil. Students will create their own single session piece of artwork.

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Sam Daley-Harris Speaks At 55-Plus Club Meeting

“Are Shouting and Silence Our Only Two Options? Bringing Bipartisanship and Transformation to Citizen Activism” will be the topic of a presentation by Sam DaleyHarris, founder and principal of Civic Courage, at the meeting of 55-Plus at 10 a.m., Thursday, January 17, at the Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street. All are welcome and the event is free, with a $3 donation suggested. Daley-Harris founded the anti-poverty lobby RESULTS in 1980, co-founded the Microcredit Summit Campaign in 1995 with Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus and FINCA Founder John Hatch, and founded Civic Courage in 2012. Civic Courage helps non-profits train their members to create champions in Congress and the media for their cause. Daley-Harris is author of Reclaiming Our Democracy: Healing the Break between People and Government, about which President Jimmy Carter said, “[Daley-Harris] provides a road map for global involvement in planning a better future.” Ashoka founder Bill Drayton called DaleyHarris “one of the certified great social entrepreneurs of the last decades.” 55 -Plus was organized in 1986 as a non-sectarian group to promote social contacts and friendships among men and women who are either retired or who have flexible working hours. Members meet at 10 a.m., usually on the first and third Thursday mornings of each month (except late June, July and August) to listen to and discuss a wide range of topics presented by prominent speakers. 55-Plus meetings are open to the general public.

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week:

“What do you think about the new parking meters in downtown Princeton?” (Photographs by Charles R. Plohn)

Millie: “It seems impractical that you cannot feed the meters. Maybe somebody wants to stay in town for five hours, but not pay for a full day. To move your car from a two-hour spot doesn’t make a lot of sense to me.” Melissa: “Well, I think it doesn’t make sense either that you have to move your car rather than be able to refill the meter. I do think that the app makes it convenient, but you can’t refill it if you are in a restaurant or a movie, so it still does not help. The ability to use a credit card is helpful, though.” — Millie Deak, right, Somerset with Melissa Demba, Hillsborough

Sharuti: “I used to enjoy the smart card, especially being able to refund my unused time. Now if I use a credit card, I am paying for more than I am using; I don’t want to get an expensive ticket. I do think the credit card is convenient, but the rates have gone up and not being able to refund unused time is less efficient for someone who is using them.” — Ayona and Sharuti Kahlon, Princeton

Tiffany: “The parking experience was fine. We parked in the garage. There were plenty of spaces and the price was fine.” Javier: “I don’t think it’s bad. I am not a local person, so I don’t know if there has been a hike on the meter rate, but we almost always park in the garage on Spring Street and are always able to find available parking spaces close enough to Witherspoon, where we are shopping and eating today. The rate is reasonable compared to places like Red Bank, and is nothing like New York City.” — Tiffany Taylor, Toms River and Javier Montes, Eatontown

Michael: “About a year ago, the town gave businesses owners a survey, and we went online and completed it to be sure that our opinion was expressed. But unfortunately the new system has become more expensive for everybody, and that’s the bottom line.” Mahir: “To have removed spots and raised the rate from a $1.25 per hour to $2.25 per hour does not make sense. It’s especially hard on employees in downtown, and if you want to use one of the garages, that becomes very expensive.” Aziz: “I think it is going to eventually have an effect on the local economy, because people are going to go somewhere else to shop and dine. And business owners pay so many taxes to be in downtown, it seems excessive to charge clients and employees such high rates for parking.” —Michael Monarca, Mahir Elkasir, and Aziz El Badaoui, owner, all of Casa Aziz Salon


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New Organization for Women in Technology Will Launch Today at Merrill Lynch on Roszel Looking to cultivate a national pipeline of women in technology, SheTek will officially launch its New Jersey operations today with a clinic on the cybersecurity industry followed by an opening event at Merrill Lynch’s 7 Roszel Road offices. “ Wom e n do not ge t enough exposure to technology,” said SheTek CEO Chaya Pamula. “Only 25 percent of tech positions are held by women. I have a passion to help women succeed, to empower women.” An initiative of Pamten Inc., a certified minorityand woman-owned business based in Princeton, SheTek focuses on increasing the representation of women in technology “from education in the classroom to decisions

made in the boardroom,” according to the SheTek mission statement. Speakers at the launch event will include Michele Siekerka, president and CEO of The New Jersey Business & Industry Association, as well as Joanna Black, chief strategy officer of SheTek, and Pamula, who is also CEO of PamTen and founder of SOFKIN, a nonprofit organization supporting underprivileged children in India. The afternoon clinic for women interested in a career in cybersecurity or learning more about how to protect their personal or business online identity will include information about cybersecurity, career options in the industry, job training, and

obtaining certification. The cybersecurity industry is currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals, with an estimated 1.5 million cybersecurity jobs opening up in 2019, according to Pamula. “The need is growing,” she said. “Most women like to work in meaningful, impactful positions, and the cybersecurity field could resonate well with them. This area could also help to fill the gender gap in the tech industry.” Pamula also noted that much of the work in cybersecurity can be handled remotely to accommodate women who have multiple priorities. SheTek will follow up today’s session with a program in New York City

EMPOWERING WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY: SheTek, focused on increasing the representation of women in the technology industry, will officially launch its New Jersey operations today at Merrill Lynch on Roszel Road. Pictured above are SheTek CEO Chaya Pamula (front row center), CSO Joanna Black (second from right), and their SheTek and Pamten team and advisory board members. (Photo courtesy of SheTek)

next month, and a training program in March, which will provide a pathway to certification in the cybersecurity field. Black mentioned that SheTek also consults with companies to develop strategies to empower women and will help companies create programs to develop talent. Pamula added that SheTek also provides staffing services, as well as training and job experience, helping women to find jobs in the corporate and government spheres. Focus areas for SheTek include sparking early interest in technology for girls and mentoring them through the transition into college and into the work force ; consulting with companies on hiring women to fill more roles in technology; training and coaching women within companies to help advance their careers in tech; pairing women with companies who need technology services and staff; supporting women-owned start-ups; educating women business owners on how to use technology in their day-to-day business operations; connecting and supporting women through the online SheTek community networking platform; mentoring and counseling women and girls to help them build skills that will advance their careers; and partnering with a variety of organizations to advance women in technology. SheTek will be teaming up with with Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart this spring to assist them with their “Lead Like a Girl” conference, and the organization looks forward to future opportunities to work with girls at the middle school level in schools and possibly summer camps. Pa m u la, w it h a background of more than 25 years in technology, recalls that, after growing up in India, she graduated from college without a background in technology. “I was curious to learn about computers,” she said. “I didn’t get much advice. The industry is male-dominated, and as I was starting my company I realized I was getting many more resumes from men than women. We created SheTek to give back to children and women.” For more information on SheTek and today’s workshop and launch event, visit www.shetek.net. —Donald Gilpin

New School Board continued from page one

opinion would cause problems for this Board. “Our decisions will be enhanced by different perspectives,” she said, suggesting that unanimity is overrated. “We share a focus on the students. None of us can work individually. Unanimity is not what it’s cracked up to be. If you’re always voting unanimously, you may be missing something. We’re going to be stronger for our differences. I welcome the fact that people want to be involved, that people feel passionately.” Behrend went on to applaud the town’s energetic engagement in the BOE election. “There was a lot of interest across the candidates,” she said. “This was an opportunity for people to be involved. People were very engaged in ways they hadn’t been in the past. Maybe because of frustrations with national politics, people felt strongly and wanted to be more involved locally.” Both Behrend and Stanciewicz expressed gratitude to the town for passing the December 11 bond referendum. “All on the Board are grateful that the community trusted us and supported the referendum,” said Stanciewicz. “They entrusted us to work together with the community and move that plan forward.” Behrend added that after the primary focus on students, the BOE’s next priority would be to implement the $26.9 million referendum renovations and upgrades “with care, time, and transparency. We plan to work with the community on each step and take advantage of local expertise,” she said. Behrend cited a number of different areas on the agenda for addressing student-related issues, including student wellness, equity, restorative justice, possible expa nsions of problem based learning and dual-language immersion (DLI) programs, and others. “There are so many things that the schools have been working on successfully,” she added. “We need to make sure that all children have access to these programs.” Stanciew icz expres s ed gratitude for the accomplishments of the previous Board and optimism for the coming year. “I’m excited

about the challenges ahead. It’s an exciting moment in our schools. Over the past years there have been a lot of things that have helped improve the student experience and move us towards our goals. It’s a privilege to follow Boards that have worked hard to accomplishment so much.” He went on to prais e PPS Superintendent Steve Cochrane and the whole school community. “We’re optimistic,” he said. “Steve Cochrane is an outstanding superintendent. He has vision and strong leadership. There are a lot of strong, passionate people involved, and it will be exciting to see how we do our work together.” T he B OE followe d up its Thursday night session with a retreat on Saturday to work on matters of governance, communications, and other topics with the guidance of a representative from the New Jersey School Board Association. —Donald Gilpin

Lawrence Library Plans Book Sale January 19-27

The Friends of the Lawrence Library January Book Sale will begin on Saturday, January 19, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and end on Sunday, January 27 at 4:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, New Jersey. A preview night will be held on Friday, January 18, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The library will be closed for normal operations that night. Admission to the preview is free for current members of the Friends of the Lawrence Library. New memberships can be purchased during the preview. Admission is $5 for the general public. Booksellers will be charged $20 and will only be allowed to use scanning devices during the preview night. Beginning Saturday, January 19, entry to the sale is free and open during the library’s regular hours. No scanning devices will be allowed. Book donations for the Friends of the Library book sale are always accepted at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch. Proceeds from the book sale fund programs and other library services that benefit library patrons of all ages. For more information about the librar y and its programs please call (609) 883-8294 or visit www.mcl.org.

CELEBRATING HISTORY: The annual Lambertville Winterfest, including a Revolutionary Pub Crawl like this one from 2018, is January 19-27 in several locations of the town by the Delaware. Events include family-friendly activities, an inn-to-inn house tour, walking tours, performances, and lots of food. Visit www.winterfest.net for details.


9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 10

Reorganization

role full-time on March 19. our board and we cannot wait He replaces Susan Hoskins, for him to get started.” continued from page one who has retired. The announcement comes Princeton First Aid and Resafter the completion of a comcue Squad’s new headquarprehensive four-month search ters as significant. process chaired by trustee Liz Each member of Council Charbonneau and including was given an opportunity trustees Kate Hall, Joe Maito speak. Crumiller stressed da, and Josh Lichtblau. The the importance of citizen committee reviewed over 60 engagement. “Keep those applicants during a competisuggestions coming,” she tive recruitment process. In said. “Princeton would not their recommendation to the be Princeton without active board, the committee echoed Kenny’s support, “We sought and opinionated residents.” a candidate that would propel —Anne Levin PSRC into an exciting, new, robust chapter of service to Princeton Senior Center Dr. Drew A. Dyson our senior community. Drew Announces New Director “Drew’s considerable lead- is that leader.” The Board of Trustees of Dyson has spent the last 18 the Princeton Senior Re- ership experience, which source Center (PSRC) Search is visionary, strategic, and years developing his leaderCommittee has announced compassionate, distinguish- ship in a variety of ecclesial Dr. Drew A. Dyson’s appoint- es him as the individual who positions within the Methment as PSRC’s next execu- will lead PSRC forward,” said odist Church, most recently tive director. Dyson, a Princ- Board Chair Mike Kenny. “He as district superintendent, eton native, will assume the has the unanimous support of Raritan Valley District of the Greater NJ Annual Conference, overseeing administrative leadership and program development for 63 churches across central New Jersey. His father was pastor of Princeton United Methodist Church in the 1970s. no surprise... Dyson returned to study at Princeton Theological Seminary where he earned a Master of Divinity (2000) at landau you'll find a storeful of cozy. and PhD in Education and Hats, scarves, Mittens, Formation (2011). He begloves, sweaters, jackets, coats, lieves his leadership experience can be leveraged to socks, slippers and coucH blankets positively impact PSRC’s work. “I am excited about Winter Sale Shop Hours the possibilities ahead and FOR MEN and WOMEN... Monday-Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. look forward to continuing OPEN SUNDAYS: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. landau "wool" keep you warm the story of PSRC’s work cold weather shop hours within the greater Princeton Monday-Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. community,” Dyson said. He Open SundayS: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. credits his parents, both of whom worked with aging communities, as instilling 102 Nassau St • Across from the University • Princeton • 609-924-3494 in him an early respect for 102 Nassau street (across from the university) • Princeton, nJ • (609) 924-3494 www.landauprinceton.com seniors. www.landauprinceton.com

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FIRST DAY WALK: More than 100 people, two dogs, and one small Spider-Woman celebrated the new year with a walk along the canal in Kingston. Led by Karen Linder of the Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands, the group occasionally stopped to learn about life along the canal. The Kingston event was one of 22 First Day Walks held in state parks across the country.

Princeton Community Works registration. Scholarships youngest classes have had also are available. The con- the highest participation Holds Annual Conference

Nearly 500 people from the nonprofit community in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York will come together to make connections, learn best practices, and advance their causes at the Annual Princeton Community Works Conference on Monday, January 28, at Princeton University’s Frist Campus Center. The event will be held from 5 to 9:15 p.m. “Everyone is welcome. We are passionate about inclusion, diversity, and bringing people together who are dedicated to making a difference in the world,” said Marge Smith, who started Princeton Community Works with that mission more than 20 years ago. The event attracts a range of attendees including volunteers, staff, board members, novices, seasoned professionals, and nonprofit leaders. Admission is $40 through January 21, the last day for

ference includes networking activities, a keynote address, boxed dinner, and choice of two workshops from more than 20 topics. According to Smith, the organization is able to keep the price affordable because of the support of Princeton University and the help of 100 volunteers. “M ov i n g For w a r d To gether” is the theme of the conference. Kevin M. Cotter, two-time Olympian in rowing, will deliver the keynote address. As senior associate director of development at Princeton University, from which he graduated in 1996, Cotter understands the philanthropic world and will provide strategic insights that could be implemented by nonprofits of all sizes to better achieve their goals. In addition, Cotter will share lessons learned from his experience leading the Young Alumni Annual Giving effort since 1997. During the past 15 years, Princeton’s

rate of any university in the country. Workshop sessions include volunteer recruitment and retention, board-building cycle, board governance, effective leadership, fundraising success, understanding the grantor’s perspective, understanding donor expectations, metrics and measuring success, budgeting, strategic planning, branding, implementing new tax laws, legal considerations, social media for savvy users, team building, youth volunteers, and more. According to Smith, “Every aspect of the evening is designed to inform and inspire. People leave with new skills, valuable connections, and beaming with exhilaration. It’s a phenomenal evening with amazing people.” Full workshop descrip tions, speaker biographies and the online registration page can be found at www. princetoncommunityworks. org/2018/11/13/2019-pr.

Restaurant & Enoteca

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Due to popular demand,“Il Professore” Anthony Verdoni will return with a 6 class introductory series on the Wines of France. Classes will be held every Tuesday starting January 22 to February 26, 2019. Taste and learn about the different French wines and wine regions to discover what makes France the world’s most coveted producer of wine. Each class is scheduled for 90 minutes. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served, and all attendees are invited to join us for dinner and enjoy 20% off the food portion of your meal. The class syllabus will be posted at EnoTerra.com. All classes will begin at 6:30 pm and are intended as an educational experience and therefore will be limited and must be reserved in advanced.

$40 per Class (Excludes Tax)

$200 all 6 Classes (Excludes Tax)

Thursday, February 21, 2019 4 - 8:30 pm

Light hors d’oeuvres will be served

We have asked some of our winemaker and industry friends to make an exclusive group visit to Eno Terra to showcase some of the most sought-out regions of France. Taste, mingle & meet the growers and producers. All wines will be available for retail sale.

$30 via PayPal | $35 via Door (excludes tax)

For reservations: www.enoterra.com | 609-497-1777 | 4484 Route 27, Kingston, New Jersey


continued from page one

organized, mostly around the issues of opposing development and just having a social network,” he said. “So I thought that the fact that they already exist offers a great opportunity to do outreach. If they are willing to give me ten minutes to talk about this at one of their gatherings, it would be a good way to get the word out.” The idea is to encourage residents to look out for a neighbor who might be physically infirm, elderly, or otherwise vulnerable, ensuring they are safe during an emergency. The Princeton S enior Resource Center and Sustainable Princeton are also involved in the effor t. “Sustainable Princeton, as part of its Climate Action Plan, hopes to organize neighborhoods around changing behavior and increasing sustainability, partly by improving resiliency in the face of extreme climate events,” reads a brochure promoting the plan. Cohen first became interested in the idea shortly before taking office on Council last year. An architect, he had attended a green building conference in Boston, and learned of a climate action plan in another community. “I was trying to put together my por tfolio of different responsibilities for Council. I had been working on local emergency planning, aging issues, and sustainability issues, and this seemed like a great way to combine all three. I liked the idea that it doesn’t really cost the town anything, and could take a little bit of

the burden off of responders,” he said. It is especially important that “buddies” live in the s ame neighborhood. “If roads are closed, or trees are down, that’s when this is most needed. It has to be neighborhood-based so that there can be quick response,” Cohen said. A meeting on the subject was held at Princeton Public Library last October, and Cohen met with residents of the Grover Avenue neighborhood last month. He hopes to get feedback from additional neighborhoods before coming up with a concrete plan. “We are still in the development stages,” he said. “There doesn’t have to be anything formal about this. But on the other hand, it would be a benefit to have at least a spreadsheet sort of thing. Especially if there are people who want a buddy but don’t have one, or people who want to help out, we want to keep track of both so that we can do some matchmaking.” To reach Cohen and set up a neighborhood visit, email him at dcohen@princetonnj.gov. —Anne Levin

White Supremacist Group Plans March on Palmer Square Fliers posted around Princeton announcing a march by a group espousing the message “It’s Okay to be White” on Saturday, January 12 at noon in Palmer Square have local law enforcement on alert and a possible counter-protest being formed. Princeton Police Chief Nick Sutter said this is the same organization that came to Princeton on November 17. On that day, six men wearing sunglasses and duct tape on their mouths stood in front of Princeton University’s FitzRandolph Gate holding signs that said “It’s Okay to be White.” The parent organization, which calls itself The Jersey Goyz, is notably anti-Semitic in its social media postings. Sutter said the police department is trying to find out how many people might be involved in the march. At press time, no permits had been filed. “We’re doing due diligence on this group,” he said. “Whether or

American

not they would need a permit depends on their plan.” Rumors that a counter-protest was being organized were not confirmed. But Sutter said that if there is a counter-protest, the department’s main concerns are keeping the peace and protecting civil liberties on all sides, including the first amendment right to free speech. “It’s more difficult for us when people don’t apply for a permit,” he said. The possibility of groups clashing is a major concern. “We want people to be able to speak their minds, but we want them to do it safely without disruption and tumult,” Sutter said. “We plan to assist people to safely express their opinions in a manner that is consistent with the law. We are cognizant that some messages are very concerning. We have to be there to protect people and allow all people to speak their minds.” —Don Gilpin and BRIDGING THE GAP: The Investors Foundation and Roma FounAnne Levin dation recently awarded a combined $100,000 grant, payable over four years, to The Bridge Academy, a school for children Furniture Exchange with language-based learning disabilities, in Lawrenceville. The funds will help with expansion of the school, allowing more students to attend. The school was formed in 2003 and has since helped hundreds learn to read, increase their math skills, and develop strong self esteem and self advovacy skills.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 14

HomeFront Is Looking for Volunteers During Action-Packed “Week of Hope”

Brea k ing t he cycle of poverty in our community is the goal of HomeFront (HF), and its January 19-25 Week of Hope will provide a wide range of opportunities for everybody to get involved and make difference in the lives of struggling local families. Working at the diaper center or food pantry, reading to children, taking a bus tour of Trenton, participating in the painting of a giant mural, joining tours of the HF Family Campus and headquarters, coffee with HomeFront’s CEO and COO to learn about the organization and its future, and the Night of Hope open house featuring tours, refreshments, and entertainment are some of the events scheduled. “The purpose of the Week of Hope is to introduce HomeFront to those who have a desire to learn more about our mission to end homelessness and to break the cycle of poverty in our community,” said HF Family Campus Volunteer Coordinator Heather Tuller. “During this week, individuals, families, and groups are given numerous opportunities to ‘taste and see’ the types of volunteer roles that exist within HomeFront, all designed to help our neighbors in need.”

This will be the third annual Week of Hope for the nonprofit organization headquartered on Princeton Avenue in Lawrenceville, with its Family Campus in Ewing near the Trenton-Mercer Airport. Since 1991, HF has provided food, shelter, education, job-training, emergency aid, and an array of children’s services and supports for Central New Jersey families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The Family Campus, opened in 2015, accommodates 38 homeless families. “From its very beginning almost 30 years ago, HomeFront has basically been a local volunteer effor t, a classic example of neighbor helping neighbor,” said HF Founder and Executive Director Connie Mercer. “The feedback from families and people of all ages about our last two Weeks of Hope and the joys it brought into their own lives was so positive that we are really excited about WOH 2019,” she added. Highlights of the Night of Hope, 4-7 p.m. on January 24 at the Family Campus, will include HF clients’ art, poetry, and short plays they wrote during a McCarter Theatre playwright workshop. The plays will be performed by actors from McCarter.

Volunteer opportunities at the Diaper Resource Center include bringing diapers and helping to sort, wrap, and shelve them to be ready for local families who need them. Food pantry volunteers will be asked to bring nonperishable food items and to help sort the donations. HF distributes over 1,000 free bags of food to local families each month. A bus tour with the HF CEO will tour Mercer County to learn about homelessness and poverty in the community, and visit several HF properties to see how HF programs can change lives. There will also be tours of the HF Family Campus and the main office, where programs like Fran’s Food Pantry, Furnish the Future, and SewingSpace are located. A community art opportunity for families with children under age 13 will take place at 2 p.m. and again at 3 p.m. on Monday, January 21 at the Family Campus. Participants are asked to bring acrylic paints and brushes for the art therapy program and a community art project that will beautify the Family Campus. L ear n more about t he Week of Hope, volunteer and educational opportunities at HF, and sign up for events at www.homefront. org. On Saturday, January 19, HF staff will also be at Whole Foods on Route 1 and McCaffrey’s in West Windsor to talk with passers-by and sign up volunteers for Week of Hope events. —Donald Gilpin

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MUSIC LESSONS School Matters RENT ALS RENTALS •• piano • guitar • drums piano • guitar • drums SCHOOL BAND

•• violin voice •• flute to “Art Screen Time” Author THost ES W Chapin R•• A L O violin voice flute •ofcello

clarinet sax •• and trumpet Anya Kamenetz, NPR commentator of the acclaimed The Art of Screen ••• flute •••sax • author trombone clarinet sax trumpet Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media PRINCETON: 609-924-8282• violinand Real Life, will be speaking at • clarinet • trumpet Chapin School Princeton on Tuesday, January 15 at 7 p.m. ★ NEW LOCATION ★ An expert on education and technology and mother of two young children, Kamenetz 947 RT. 206, Suite 204 2018 book, which, according to the Chapin website, “hones a simple 97-0032will talk about her (next to Audi message: Enjoy Screens. Notdealer) too much. Mostly with others.” 609-387-9631 609-448-7170 ETON JCT 609-924-8282 5 Minutes from Downtown ThePRINCETON product of hundreds of surveys of fellow parents The Art of Screen Time presents HIGHTSTOWN BURLINGTON ns Only FREE “a philosophy that will PARKING help parents moderate technology in their children’s lives, curb theirwww.farringtonsmusic.com own anxiety, and create room for a happy, healthy family life with and without screens,” the Chapin press release reports. Kamenetz’s website describes her book as “the essential, don’t-panic, evidence-based guide and exploration of how to have a happy family life and raise healthy, successful kids in the age of babies with iPads and moms on their phones at the playground.” Visit www.chapinschool.org for more information and to pre-register for the event.

LESSONS

YingHua School to Partner with Princeton University The YingHua International School in Kingston has announced that it will be partnering with the Princeton University Athletics Department on a new program in character development. Awards for persistent self-reflection and growth mindsets in their academic learning and social interactions will be presented to YingHua students, pre-K to eighth grade, multiple times throughout the year. The YingHua students themselves nominate classmates who demonstrate the attributes of accountability, team orientation, integrity, growth-mindedness, engagement, and respect. Teachers select the award winners from the group of nominees. Emanuel Kowalski, Hendrik Ohrt-Fritz, Jordana Schaffel, Sophia Amato, Nylah Cunningham, Sterling Monaghan, Emilia Retuerto, Oscar Chang, Vito Marcogliese, Oriana Marcano, Ethan Ho, and Skylar Schlitz-Rouse were first round award winners, and have received tickets to an upcoming game at Princeton University.

PRISMS Robotics Team Will Defend Tournament Title

WEEK OF HOPE: During its Week of Hope, January 19-25, HomeFront will offer many volunteer and educational opportunities related to breaking the cycle of poverty in the community. (Photo courtesy of HomeFront)

Michelle Pirone Lambros A veteran entrepreneur, her Announces Council Run newest venture, Princeton

Michelle Pirone Lambros has officially announced her intent to run for Princeton Council in the 2019 election. A second generation Italian American, she is a Princeton native with roots in the communit y going back 100 years. Lambros says her candidacy is motivated by a desire to preserve Princeton’s unique small town qualities through conscientious progress, and her understanding of how its diverse residents and business community are essential to this process. T he call to t he “Blue Wave” of women running for office was another driving force toward public service. In 2018, Emerge America, the national organization that recruits, trains, and provides a network to Democratic women seeking to run for office, selected Lambros and 18 other women in New Jersey for its training program. “Princeton is facing numerous challenges in the near term,” she said. “Balancing municipal project funding and property tax increases, meeting the affordable housing obligation, supporting the business community, resolving the parking meter situation, and stewardship of the residential landscape. These challenges call for collaboration, communication, and creativity. I stand ready to serve our community and help guide it through these important decisions.” Lambros has been serving the Princeton community in a variety of capacities, including the Zoning Board of Adjustment, the Princeton Merchants Association, the Greater Princeton Chamber of Commerce, the Italian American Sportsmen’s Club, and the Arts Council. She has been an active member of the Princeton Community Democratic Organization, where she helped several of the Congressional candidates during the midterm elections, and she was most recently nominating committee chair of the PCDO.

nts. Princeton International School of Math and Science (PRISMS) robotics team has adto the finals of the International Space Station (ISS) Zero Robotics High School ctionsvanced if we hear from you by_________________________. Tournament 2018 again this year. Barring possible delays or cancellation caused by the government shutdown, the PRISMS team will be traveling to the Massachusetts Institute d will ofrun as is. Technology (MIT) later this month to defend its title. The PRISMS team, advised by engineering instructor Gregory Herman, has advanced 9-452-7000 • FAX: from the preliminary round609-452-0033 through to the alliance round, where it will be paired with the Proxima Centauri team from Livorno, Italy and the Rangers team from Sugar Land, Texas. The finalists will see code they have written run in the SPHERES satellites aboard the ISS with live transmission from space. The finals, to be webcast live, will take place simultaneously at MIT, a European Space Agency site, and at the University of Sydney in Australia. Opening the ISS research facilities to high school students, Zero Robotics tournaments are designed to build critical engineering skills for students, including problem solving, design thought process, operations training, and teamwork. This year’s finals competition involves linking up with and towing a dead or malfunctioning satellite.

remains virtually untouched, and Port St. George will serve as a non-invasive oasis from which to explore its natural wonders. In collaboration with Studio Hillier, we’re creating an environment that not only serves those who choose to visit Long Island, but also those who already call it home. The Studio Hillier plan successfully integrates the local community into the project by creating opportunities for sports, education, and entrepreneurs.” The topography gently rises from the harbor to a bluff overlooking the Atlantic. A beach club and condominium units will be built on terraced terrain with ocean and beach views. A golf course, tennis courts, and sporting fields will be built on the land between the harbor and the Atlantic ridge. Several distinct areas allow for a diverse use of architectural styles, with the harbor area featuring traditional Bahamian design influences with modern twists and the Atlantic side boasting a cuttingedge modern look. A total of 515 residences are planned, comprising 500 condominiums and 15 spacious, luxury villas. The project is dedicated to eco-engineering and sustainability. Studio Hillier is incorporating the best available technology into both the infrastructure and the residential and commercial buildings to meet that commitment. Included will be extensive use of photovoltaics and hightech battery storage systems, rainwater retention systems, composting of refuse, and geothermal air conditioning. The development will have a minimal carbon footprint. “Our plan is to make Port St. George the most comfortable, desirable, aesthetically appealing, and sustainable destination in the Bahamas,” said Bob Hillier. “That is a tall order, but possible with the rapid advances in technology and a team dedicated to creating a seamless experience for guests. That is what a vacation should be.”

Promot ions, w ill lau nch Princeton Restaurant Week in early 2019, and is sponsored by the Princeton Merchants Association. “I’ve lived and traveled all over the world, and I can say that hands down, Princeton is one of the best places to live. I look forward to the opportunity to serve as an elected official, and help assure that our town continues to be a safe, beautiful, thriving community,” she said. Lambros has a master’s degree in international affairs from George Washington University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Seton Hill University. She is married to George Lambros, and has three sons, one at Boston University and the other two at Princeton High School. McCarter Producer Speaks

Studio Hillier to Design Eco Bahamas Resort

Studio Hillier, the Princeton architectural firm of J. Robert and Barbara Hillier, who are also Town Topics shareholders, has been selected by StarPort Resorts, Inc. to design Port St. George, the Bahamas’ newest eco-engineered luxury resort on Long Island. The Hilliers have been honored with over 350 design awards. The scenic and tranquil Out Island will be the setting for an 882-acre luxury resort that spans two-and-a-quarter miles from Exuma Sound to the Atlantic Ocean. The project will feature a five-star hotel on a peninsula on Exuma Sound. The centerpiece, however, will be a 100-acre protected harbor where 640 pleasure crafts can be moored, making it the largest in the Bahamas. A harbor village will be home to retail shops, lodging, restaurants, condominiums, and a range of services for the island community. “Our goal with Port St. George is to offer visitors and homeowners alike an environmentally- and sociallyconscious escape from hectic, modern-day life,” said Duane Gerenser, president of StarPort Resorts Inc. “Long Island

At Gotham Princeton Lunch

Debbie Bisno, the resident producer at McCarter Theatre, is the featured speaker Friday, January 11, at the next Gotham Princeton networking lunch event, to be held at Agricola Eatery, 11 Witherspoon Street. Her topic will be what it takes to get a show on the stage. Prior to coming to Princeton, Bisno spent more than 15 years in the Broadway, off-Broadway, London, and regional nonprofit spheres. Her Broadway credits include Mothers and Sons, Grace, Annie, War Horse, and Merchant of Venice. Bisno was co-founder and producing director of Roadworks Productions, a Chicago-based ensemble, launching more than 20 Midwest premieres and championing the work of Kenneth Longergan, Charles Mee, Howard Korder, Patrick Marber, Eric Bogosian, Lanford Wilson, and others. She serves on the board of the Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics and on the Inkwell Council of The Playwrights Realm. The lunch will be held from 12:30 to 2 p.m., and the cost is $38. Visit www. gothamnetworking.com/m/ events/view/Princeton-Meeting-2018-12-09 to reserve.


Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08525

McCarter Thanks Volunteers, Sponsors, Others For Support During “A Christmas Carol”

To the Editor: On behalf of everyone at McCarter Theatre Center, we would like to thank the community for the incredible outpouring of support and generosity that we experienced during the run of our annual production of A Christmas Carol. We were delighted to welcome over 28,000 people to see this show. Many in our audience experienced live theater for the first time, and others have made A Christmas Carol an annual holiday tradition. In addition to our regular performances, we offered five student matinees and shared Scrooge’s story with 4,800 children from area schools. In addition to our generous corporate sponsors — Bank of America and McCarter and English — many local businesses joined in the holiday spirit with special menus, drinks, offers, and promotions to our patrons. These partnerships helped create wonderful holiday memories for families who often come to see A Christmas Carol and spend the entire day in Princeton, sharing a meal and our beautiful town with family and friends. We are grateful to Bloomberg, The Dinky Bar & Kitchen, Jammin’ Crepes, The Nassau Inn, Morven Museum & Garden, Palmer Square Management, the Princeton Public Library, Princeton University Grounds, Small World Coffee, Tico’s Eatery & Juice Bar, and Triumph Brewing Company for their partnership. This season’s production also marked the first time McCarter has produced a sensory-friendly performance of A Christmas Carol. On December 28, we welcomed 900 attendees to a specially-modified performance for children on the autism spectrum and their families where they experienced the magic of live performance in a judgmentfree zone, complete with specially-trained ushers, fidgets, calming areas, and other special features. Thanks to the Karma Foundation, JaZams, and an army of volunteers for helping us bring this idea to fruition. Finally, we would like to that the entire cast, crew, and Community Ensemble members for being such willing partners in this endeavor. EMILY MANN, Artistic Director MIKE ROSENBERG, Managing Director McCarter Theatre Center

Problems With New Parking System Could Lead to More Empty Storefronts

To the Editor: I have to assume that our elected officials were either completely bamboozled by consultants or do not have an ounce of sense. Why else would they change from a perfectly good parking payment system to the new one? As a longtime Princeton resident, I have frequently supported restaurants and businesses in town. No longer. We are relegated to fumbling with change purses or struggling to read dark meters. Or, we are forced into a $1 minimum should we opt for a credit card. And rates have ballooned to pay for these undesired changes. On principle, I refuse to use an app with a 35 cent surcharge per (often small) transaction. I will continue to visit the library, but I presume the library lot will be ‘full’ with greater frequency, as visitors avoid on-street parking. So, while there are already quite a number of empty Princeton storefronts, I would expect that number will grow as other Princetonians, like me, opt to take their business elsewhere due to this unnecessary change. KRISTINE OLSON Lawrenceville Road

Former Mayor Cites NJT Governance For Delaying Dinky Service Initiatives

To the Editor: Yes, the Dinky service isn’t perfect and needs improvement, and yes the new station could use some do-able improvements such as holders for paper schedules, improved handicapped accessibility, more flexible seating arrangements, and the relocation of the historic exhibit into the new Station complex so that kids can see it without going into a bar. But let’s step back and reflect on the institutional environment that has gotten us this far. Significantly, despite the negativity surrounding the Dinky there has been and continues to be private sector interest, the best possible vote of confidence in its future. To be clear, yes, there are people willing to put their money where their mouth is: for example, I am aware of an investor group with extensive railroad experience interested in operating the Dinky service with purpose-built equipment, along with additional stops and increased frequency. But they are not interested in investing in a political quagmire, and such initiatives

Closing of Alexander Road Bridge Clarifies Need for Fully Operational Dinky Service

To the Editor: The front page story about this summer’s closing of the Alexander Road bridge and nearby culvert [“Bridge Projects Will Close Alexander Road,” Jan. 2] makes clear the absolute necessity of having the Dinky fully operational between Princeton and the Junction, with service times as well adjusted as possible, well before Alexander Road is closed and Washington Road becomes even more difficult at rush hours than presently. A “bus” Dinky in that situation simply will not work. JEFF ORLEANS Meadowbrook Drive

Could Timing of Lights Be Adjusted To Ease Traffic From Bridge Closing?

To the Editor: May I offer a suggestion concerning the Alexander Road bridge replacement? When the replacement happens might it be possible to adjust the timing of the traffic lights on Washington Road and Harrison Street (intersecting at Route 1) to accommodate the dramatic increase in traffic? Otherwise the typically crummy rush hour back up will become truly horrific. While you are making that timing adjustment, perhaps consider also changing up the lights at the intersection of Alexander Road and Carnegie Center Drive? The lights currently are timed to stop traffic on Alexander upon demand from Carnegie Center Drive traffic, but this makes little sense. A small number of cars on Carnegie Center Drive will oblige a full light’s worth of Alexander Road traffic to stop, sometimes just as those cars are accelerating from the stop light on the Route 1 bridge. This causes a back up of large numbers of cars that can sometimes extend back to Canal Pointe Blvd intersection. And there is no apparent minimal time delay between stoppage, so when another car comes along Carnegie Center Drive, almost immediately after the light changes at Carnegie Center Drive/Alexander Road, the Alexander Road traffic is obliged to stop again. Why not make the far smaller number of car traffic on Carnegie Center Drive wait a few minutes before the light can again stop the far larger volume of cars on Alexander Road, at least during rush hour? And why not make this change now? ALAN B. FREY Dempsey Avenue A copy of this letter was sent to NJ DOT.

Tuesday, January 15 10am–3pm Morven Museum & Garden 55 Stockton St, Princeton, NJ 10am–1pm: by appointment 1–3pm: No appointment needed

for questions, contact Robin Daum. 609.397.9374, ext. 119 or robin@ragoarts.com Rago will donate a % to Morven

2nd & 3rd Generations

609-452-2630

MFG., CO.

To the Editor: In 1989, my mother, Katharine O’Neil Bidwell and her cousin, Elsie Hillman, sat in a Westminster Choir College board meeting wringing their hands. The realities facing the tiny choir conservatory with its small classes, one-on-one instruction and challenging fundraising demographic made it clear that Westminster needed a partner or it would close. My mother and aunt had a vested interest in keeping the college alive. Their grandmother (my great-grandmother), Katharine Houk Talbott, was Westminster’s first benefactor in Dayton, Ohio. An opera singer, she helped create the school; Westminster’s Talbott Library is named after her. The Talbott family has endowed scholarships and family members have served on the boards of Westminster and Rider University. Aunt Elsie and Uncle Henry’s legacy lives on in Hillman Hall in Westminster’s Cullen Center. Their foundation endowed a fund that supports recruiting and performance activities. The Bidwell endowment, named for my mother, supports training for opera singers. In the early 90s, Rider University stepped up. ThenPresident Bart Luedeke envisioned Rider having a worldclass performing arts program, and Westminster merged with Rider in 1992. My mother and Aunt Elsie were thrilled, and relieved. In 2011, I joined the Rider Board of Trustees. Rider’s investments in Westminster’s physical plant and programs, enrollment, fundraising, and faculty salaries have been significant, but it was never an easy merger between two campuses with distinctive cultures. Meanwhile, recent changes in New Jersey’s TAP grants, a shrinking demographic of high school graduates, competition from public universities, and increasing infrastructure costs mean Rider can’t afford to operate Westminster. Hired by Rider in 2017, PricewaterhouseCoopers contacted over 275 organizations — universities, colleges, conservatories, orchestras — and no domestic institution offered to run WCC in Princeton. Kaiwen Education made an offer to maintain Westminster as a not-for-profit college run by an independent board that would scrupulously follow U.S. laws and practices. This kind of partnership could well be a model for things to come — a new, big idea, the outside-the-box thinking that my mother and Elsie Hillman were engaged in back in 1989. But opponents of the transfer have filed lawsuits. Their hyperbolic attacks scare people about alleged threats to academic freedom and even national security. They stoke fears that Kaiwen will close the campus or turn Westminster into something other than a choir college, even though signed agreements, rules of licensure, and accreditation and US law bar this. These lawsuits seem designed to tie up the transfer process past the June 2019 closing deadline. Opponents offer no serious alternative that provides sufficient financial resources to operate Westminster independently. Their negative, headline-grabbing narrative brings Westminster no closer to security. It’s time for everyone who cares about preserving Westminster Choir College to get behind the one solution on the table. Let’s not jeopardize the future of an institution that deserves better. Let Westminster once again get attention for music, not discord that threatens the school’s very existence. MOLLY O’NEIL FRANK New York City The writer serves as a trustee of several arts and educational institutions.

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

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will continue to go nowhere as long as the basic question of NJT’s governance stands in the way. So, let’s take the governor at his word, that change at NJT is coming, and let’s make that change work to our benefit. While not presuming to speak for the entire Princeton community, as the former mayor of Princeton Borough (who also happened to have directed the planning of NJT’s successful Newark Airport Station and whose grandfather launched a 100-year old livery business from the 19thcentury Dinky station at the base of Blair Arch), I remain a loyal Dinky rider and feel compelled to ask: NJT, if you are not prepared to operate the Dinky as it should be, could you please step aside and let someone else try? YINA MOORE Former Mayor Princeton Borough


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 16

To Do 2019

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Women of the Year: From Ocasio-Cortez to Joan Baez, with a Visit to Mary Hartman’s Fernwood

T

hanks to an anonymous troll among the twittering wallflowers of the farright who posted a video meant to shame the youngest member of the House, the first surge of joy and hope I felt in 2019 came from a four-minute video made by some frisky Boston University students doing Breakfast Club dance moves on a city rooftop. It’s hard to imagine a more gloriously apt expression for what happened in Washington on January 3 than the sight of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez edging into view around the corner of that transformative moment with a big soundless shout of a smile, arms raised, black hair flying, as she uncoils, twirling, whirling, spiraling, the irrepressible embodiment of force and freedom. She and her fellow students were dancing to the music of the French band Phoenix, a number from 2009 called “Lisztomania,” with lyrics that have a ring ten years later, “This is show time, this is show time, this show time/Time, time is your love, time is your love, yes time is your love.” Back to the Future As the old year ended and the new one began, my wife and I were binge-watching a show that was too outrageous and irreverent for the networks in the mid 1970s. While revellers partied the night away in rainy Times Square, we were time-traveling to a daymare of small-town midwestern America, the home of Mary Hartman, mass murder, and the Fernwood Flasher. The brainchild of All in the Family creator Norman Lear, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman ran every weekday night between January 1976 and May 1977. Being first-time parents with an infant son at the time, we slipped comfortably into the chaos swirling around Mary (Louise Lasser) and her dysfunctional household. I doubt that we saw every episode, but we were definitely there when the Fernwood High basketball coach drowned, face down in a bowl of Mary’s chicken soup, an event that holds 97th place on TV Guide’s list of the 100 Greatest TV Moments. Now instead of peering into an 11-inch black and white Sony doll house TV, we’re seeing full size color versions of Mary, her family, friends, and neighbors. Up close, Louise Lasser looks as appealingly new to the world as ever, with her who-me eyes, girlish Pippi Longstocking braids, blue gingham dresses with Peter Pan collars, and proactive innocence, a Fernwood Candide. In the eight episodes it took to get us to midnight, we went from the waxy yellow build-up on Mary’s kitchen floor and

her failing marriage to the massacre of the Lombardi family down the street, their eight chickens and two goats. Wondering at first what we’d once seen in a show where murder, madness, indecent exposure, and infidelity were played for laughs, we found ourselves coming back for extra helpings of these highly seasoned servings of the comfort food of daily life (thankfully minus laugh tracks and commercials), which created such a stir nationwide that Mary became a cover girl. The Fernwood version of a hostage standoff in an abandoned Chinese laundry, with a cowardly, philandering priest swearing safe passage for the teen-age killer on an actual stack of Bibles, gave a hint of things to come when ABC took the plunge 15 years later and brought D a v i d Ly n c h ’s Twin Peaks into American living rooms, where freaked-out Fernwood lived on in characters like dippy Lucy and tearful Andy of the Twin Peaks police department; Laura Palmer’s psychotic father Leland doing the soft shoe; Nadine Hurley and her lunatic quest for absolutely silent drape runners; and FBI agent Dale Cooper with his Tibetan Book of the Dead sleuthing methods and lust for “damn fine” cups of coffee and cherry pie. Women of the Year Although the Mary Hartman DVD I plucked from the teeming bins of the Princeton Record Exchange contains only the first 25 of 325 episodes, what stands out is Louise Lasser’s astonishing performance, the music of her gestures and intonations, the way she manages to find a balance between passion and compassion, human warmth and a spaced-out detachment from the moment. Consider the quirky heroics of Mary with a gun at her head stealing the heart of the tormented

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

DVD REVIEW

killer while her best friend, the unstop- Claire Foy and Vanessa Kirby brought pable Loretta (Mary Kay Place) composes Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret and performs a country western song vividly to life in The Crown. about the scene for local TV news. The only glimmers of a Fernwood lifeThe chemistry between Mary and Loretta style I saw last year came in Noah Hawreminds me that the past year of series ley’s Fargo, the Duffer Brothers’ Stranger television was dominated by female char- Things (though the supernatural charisma acters such as Lila and Elena in My Bril- of Eleven was less compelling in the secliant Friend, who, when alone together, ond season), and of course David Lynch’s take the beauty of friendship to the high- revival of Twin Peaks for Showtime, where est power. Though their bond is not as Naomi Watt’s Janey-E Jones combined Loemotionally grounded, Lola and Chelsea retta’s energy with Mary’s survival skills, (Rebecca Gidney and Geraldine Hakewell) thereby saving Dale Cooper from a fate make an endearing team in Wanted, an worse than death in life. Finally, I should mention, among other odd couple on t h e r u n D o w n remarkable women, Liv Lisa Fries as cabU n d e r . T h e n aret hooker and apprentice detective in there’s Golden Babylon Berlin; the forever driven homiGlobe Best Ac- cide detective Caroline Proust and deeply tress winner and devious lawyer Audrey Fleurot of Spiral; co-host Sandra the magical Eva Green of Penny DreadO h , t h e M I 5 ful and her demonic adversary Helen Mcagent on the trail Crory, magnificent as the maternal mainof Jodie Comer’s stay of Peaky Blinders. And there’s no Villanelle in Kill- way to leave out the epic stints of Claire ing Eve; Carrie Danes of Homeland and Caitriona Balfe of Coons the soul Outlander, even though we eventually lost of The Leftovers touch with both shows, which almost hapand season 3 of pened during Keri Russell’s final season in F a r g o ; K e e l y The Americans, which just won a longHawes ranging in-coming Golden Globe for Best Drama. brilliantly beJoan Baez tween conflicted This celebration of women that began D S I L i n d s a y with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez ends with Denton in series Joan Baez, who turns 78 today, January 2 of In The Line 9, 2019, and will bring her farewell tour of Duty (“I like to McCarter Theatre on April 30. her more than If you were in Bay Area in the 1960s, anybody I ever you saw Baez’s first Vanguard album evTo: ___________________________ p l a y e d ” ) , t h e erywhere you went, and at every party it e m b a t t l e d b u t seemed aDate girl would be __________________ singing “Donna From: _________________________ & Time: cheerful mother Donna” and “All My Trials” well enough Here is a proof of your to run in ad, Thescheduled Durrells that you___________________. could close your eyes and imagine of Corfu, and Baez in the room. Please check it thoroughly and pay specialwas attention to the following: the doomed Home Secretary in Bodyt might seem a stretch but the line from (Your for check mark will tellRichard us it’s Madokay) guard, which her co-star Mary Hartman to Twin Peaks also den (Robb Stark of Game of Thrones) has leads to The Sopranos, which began just won a Best Actor Golden Globe. � Phone number � Fax numberits historic � Address Expiration run 20 years ago�this month. InDate In the dark world of Ozark, Laura Lin- addition to the black comedy of episodes ney gamely adjusts to a life of crime as like Paulie and Christopher as Laurel and Wendy Bryde while Julia Garner holds Hardy freezing in the Pine Barrens, any her own as the morally amoral teen Ruth discussion of powerful women in series Langmore. And 2018 was the year Tatiana television has to include Carmela Soprano. Maslany ended her virtuoso multiple-role Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, the run in Orphan Black while Helen George’s Complete Series is available in a boxed Trixie and her cohorts in London’s East set on amazon for a considerable sum. End completed another season of PBS’s If you want an inexpensive sample, the consistently wise, warm-hearted and hu- DVD of the first 25 episodes like the one mane Call the Midwife. Across the city in we found at the Record Exchange is also Buckingham Palace, Jenna Coleman was for sale. a charming young queen in Victoria while —Stuart Mitchner

I

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 18

Music and Theater

was as a woman and that fight that continued to the day she died.” Ta k i ng place b e t we en 1968 and 1976, with flashbacks to Simone’s formative years as a child and young adult, Little Girl Blue - The Nina Simone Musical explores Simone’s experiences and involvement throughout the American Civil Rights Movement while also examining the personal trials, tribulations, and relationships that further inspired her repertoire of hit songs. “I feel like introducing this show at George Street Playhouse is the perfect marriage for me,” Michelle added. “I’m so glad to be able to debut Little Girl Blue here.” Tickets beg in at $ 25. Visit w w w.G eorgeStreetPlayhouse.org or call (732) 246-7717 to reserve.

students the opportunity to experience the approach to classical ballet technique that Princeton Ballet School is known for teaching. In addition to these technique classes, the Summer Intensive will include studies in partnering, contemporary, theater dance, and an optional choreographic workshop. Students must be 13 and older; classes are held at the Princeton Studio location with optional housing at Princeton University. There is an audition fee of $30 (the pre-registration audition fee is $25). For those unable to make the in-person audition, a video audition is possible. To pre-register and for m ore i n for m at ion, v i s it www.arballet.org/class-division/summer-intensive

Orchestra from Romania To Visit State Theatre NJ

Hopewell Theater Expands State Theatre New Jersey TAPPING INTO SPRING: New Jersey Tap Dance Ensemble is part of the spring 2019 Milk & Cook- Roster of Live Performances presents the National Sym-

More live stage perfories series of music and storytelling programs for children, at the State Theatre New Jersey in mances are on schedule New Brunswick starting in February. for Hopewell Theater. Profolktales to jazz, tap dance performance, along with ductions begin in February Milk & Cookies Series to rock and roll. The shows milk and a cookie for each and conclude in May. The Is Interactive for Kids theater is at 5 South GreenState Theatre New Jersey are interactive, engaging, and child. Space is limited, so wood Avenue in Hopewell. families are encouraged to fun. But most importantly, has announced the return of Bright Star Children’s Thethe lively, interactive story- live performances are a so- purchase their tickets as early as possible. Performances atre will bring Cinderella cial, communal experience telling series Milk & Cookies, starting February 9 with — something kids can’t get take place on the second and Jack and the Beanstalk the musician and storyteller from digital media or video floor of State Theatre New to the venue Saturday, FebJersey. There is no elevator ruary 2 at 12 p.m. The highgames.” Tahira. energy production is told by Tahira performs Satur- access to this space. The series holds three proMabel and Lenny, who take day, February 9, at 10 a.m. grams for children ages 3-8, “Nina Simone Musical” on several roles. On Feband 12 p.m. and their families. Following At George Street Playhouse ruary 2 at 8 p.m., Love is Returning by popular deTahira, performances will be The world premiere of Strange, a conglomeration by New Jersey Tap Dance mand, she sings and tells Little Girl Blue - The Nina of six original one-act play Ensemble on March 2, and stories drawn from the Af- Simone Musical, exploring readings, will be performed. Sweetbeatz on April 6. Se- rican and African American the life of the singer as told Joey Perillo directs. lect performances are autism- folklore tradition as well as through her own words and Dangerous When Wet: friendly, allowing families her own imagination. New music, opens January 29 at Booze, Sex, and My MothJersey Tap Dance Ensemble with children on the autism George Street Playhouse in er with Jamie Brickhouse is spectrum or with other senso- appears Saturday, March 2, New Brunswick. March 22. Italian Bred: One ry sensitivities to experience at 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., in Wr it ten by L aiona Mi- Woman Show with Candice live entertainment in a safe, a high energy, interactive chelle, who also stars as Guardio + Supper Club is welcoming, sensory-friendly show demonstrating the fundamentals of tap dance. The Simone, the musical reveals April 26, and the Bread and environment. the singer’s journey from Puppet Theater’s Diagonal “We hope Milk & Cookies noon show is autism-friendly. classical piano child prodigy Man: Theory and Practice Sweetbeatz, performing to “high priestess of soul.” will be the spark that kindles is May 9. a lifelong love affair with live Saturday, April 6 at 10 a.m. Visit www.HopewellTheperforming arts,” said Lian and 12 p.m., does original ater.com for tickets and insongs that celebrate the spirFarrer, State Theatre New formation. Jersey’s vice president of edu- it and sassiness of kids. The cation & community engage- noon show is autism-friendly. Princeton Ballet School ment. “The series introduces For tickets or more inforLaunches Audition Tour a variety of genres and styles; mation call (732) 246-7469 Princeton Ballet School, this season’s programs fea- or visit STNJ.org. Tickets the official school of Ameriture everything from African are $3, which includes the can Reper tor y Ballet, launched its 2019 Summer Intensive International Audition Tour on January 12 in Princeton, and concludes on March 9 in Naples, Italy. First held in 1982, the Laiona Michelle Pr inceton Ballet S chool “Arriving on the advent of Summer Intensive is one of Nina Simone’s 2018 induc- the longest running in the tion into the Rock & Roll United States. Hall of Fame, this extraorThe intensive from June dinary musical could not be 24 through July 26 is a coming at a more appropri- program of serious study in ate time,” George Street a warm and companionable Playhouse’s Artistic Director atmosphere. The facult y David Saint said. provides caring and careful Michelle previously ap- instruction conductive to peared at George Street in technical and artistic progthe theatre’s 2017 produc- ress. In seeking to maintain tion of American Hero. “In a feeling of communit y, this piece, Laiona is unbe- Princeton Ballet School purlievable. She truly becomes posely limits the number of Nina Simone,” Saint contin- students in class. Students ued. “This past summer, she receive individualized atsang a single song at a pre- tention and training led by view here on our theater’s school director and former pavilion, and the crowd went National Ballet of Cuba wild.” dancer Aydmara Cabrera. In November 2018, Mi- The faculty includes Americh el le a ls o s a ng s ele c t can Repertory Ballet Artistic pieces from the show at the Director Douglas Martin and Kennedy Center in Washing- guest teachers. At the end of ton D.C. in a special preview the program, students perform at McCarter Theatre in performance. “Nina Simone has always Princeton. Preaching sUnday Auditions are conducted been a kindred spirit to me,” said Michelle. “This is a gut- by Princeton Ballet School wrenching, hypnotic concert faculty members throughout dean of religioUs life and the chaPel in two acts. We go on a roll- the United States and Euercoaster ride together with rope to select approximately her, just wanting to be loved 100 students for the proreligiouslife.princeton.edu and accepted for who she gram. The audition will give

Princeton University chaPel

worship service

phony Orchestra of Romania with cello soloist Andrei Ioni on Wednesday, January 16, at 8 p.m. Conductor Cristian Macelaru leads the orchestra in their American tour debut. Tickets range from $17.50-$70. The program includes Enescu’s Romanian Rhapsody No. 1 in A Major, Op. 11; Dvorák’s Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191 with cello soloist Andrei Ionita; Strauss’s Suite from Der Rosenkavalier, Op. 59; and Ravel’s Boléro. Acclaimed as one of the world’s top youth ensembles, the National Symphony Orchestra of Romania tours regularly at venues throughout Europe. The orchestra’s mission is to attract the best Romanian musicians between the ages of 18-35 to create a unique creative experience in the common pursuit of musical excellence. The orchestra was founded in 2008 following an initiative by cellist Marin Cazacu with the support of the Fr iends of Music from the Serafim Antropov Foundation. The orchestra’s academic program strives to offer young musicians the opportunity to explore demanding repertoire through master classes and concerts, and more importantly, to perform under conductors such as Lawrence Foster, Kristjan Järvi, and Cristian Macelaru, and with soloists including Pinchas Zukerman, Sarah Chang, David Garrett, Elizabeth Leonskaja, and Andrei Ionita. The orchestra’s concerts at the Romanian Athenaeum and the George Enescu International Festival are regularly sold out and international tours have brought them to the Gustav Mahler

International Festival, Ravello International Festival, Vienna Konzerthaus, Berlin Konzerthaus, and Grande Theatre de Provence in Aixen-Provence. Forthcoming tours will see them perform in France including their debut at the Philharmonie de Paris and in Germany, Spain, Brussels, and Austria. The State Theatre is at 15 Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. Visit STNJ.org for information and reservations.

Pianists to Perform At Steinway Society

T he Greater Pr inceton Steinway Society will present a concer t by pianist Chiu-Ling Lin with guest pianists Sophie Zhang, Molly Wong, and Chiu-Tze Lin on Sunday, January 13, at 3 p.m. in the recital hall at Jacobs Music, 2540 Brunswick Pike (U.S. Route 1), Lawrenceville. A reception with refreshments and conversation with the performers will follow the performance.

Chiu-Ling Lin Lin is a pianist and educator who has performed in Peru, Argentina, and Brazil as a United States Information Agency’s Artistic Ambassador. She has also been a soloist with 14 orchestras, including the Des Moines Symphony, where she is principal keyboard player. Lin’s performance, Fantasy, Images & Impressions, will include pieces by Mendelssohn and Debussy, as well as a duet for one piano/ four hands by Paul Schoenfield, played by Lin and her sister Chiu-Tze Lin. Admission is $20 for individual non-members and $10 for full-time student non-members. The box office opens 30 minutes before the concert. Seating is limited, so arrive early to ensure a seat. Founded in 1989, The Greater Princeton Steinway Society is dedicated to developing the talent of young piano students. Performances support the annual scholarship program. Visit steinwaysocietyprinceton.org for information.

janUary 13, 2019 • 11 aM

rev. dr. alison l. boden

FIRST AMERICAN TOUR: Cellist Andrei Ionita is the soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra of Romania, coming to the State Theatre in New Brunswick Wednesday, January 16 as part of its first visit to the United States.


Singers Welcome to Choral Reading

The Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs will hold a choral reading of Gilbert & Sullivan’s Yeomen of the Guard on Sunday, January 13, at the Unitarian Universalist Church, Route 206 at Cherry Hill Road. The event begins with a choir rehearsal at 3 p.m., followed by the reading at 4 p.m. Lee Millhous conducts. Choral singers are welcome. No auditions are held. Vocal scores are provided, and refreshments will be served at intermission. Admission is $10 for singers (or annual membership), and free for students and nonsinging guests. The organization gathers members of the communit y toget her for t he common and joyful enterprise of making music, to sing through for their own pleasure the great works in choral literature, with chorus, orchestra, and soloists as the works require. The meetings are informal readings in which any musically interested person may join the chorus. There are no separate rehearsals and no auditions. Conductors usually do some preparation with the chorus before the singthrough. This varies from minimal snatches for wellknown pieces to a complete review for unfamiliar works. For further information email musical.amateurs@ gmail.com.

Beppe Gambetta Returns For Concert Series

The Delaware River Mill Society has announced its 2019 folk music concer t schedule. The 33-year-old series will include Beppe Gambetta, J.P. Cormier, and Tim Grimm, and raises funds for the Prallsville Mill complex in Stockton. “I started booking performances in 1985 with a goal of bringing world-class musical artists to our region,” said producer John Weingart who hosts Music You Can’t Hear On The Radio on 103.3 WPRB radio, based in Princeton. “The opportunity to see such talent in The Mill’s intimate and historic setting creates a unique and special experience.” Gambetta returns to the Mill January 12 at 8 p.m. and January 13 at 3 p.m. for his seventh consecutive year. He was recently named one of the 25 Best Bluegrass Flatpickers in the World by The Guitar Journal. He will be joined this

time by Canadian guitarist, J.P. Cormier for a concert of Italian traditional music, American folk music, bluegrass, and original songs. Vocal arrangements will be mostly in English and Italian, but also in German and Genovese. Grimm will make his debut appearance at The Mill on Saturday, March 2 at 8 p.m. The actor and musician writes songs about rural mid-western life. Advance tickets for all concerts are available for $ 3 5 a t h t t p s : // w w w. prallsvillemills.org.

“Vivaldi: Revealed” Is Focus of Concert

The Central Jersey Choral Society will explore the choral work of Antonio Vivaldi in concert on Saturday, January 19, 7 p.m. at the Princeton Meadow Event Center in West Windsor. Guided by the Central Jersey Choral Society and Artistic Director Christopher Loeffler, the audience will learn about the life and music of Vivaldi and hear some of his compositions, including Gloria and some of his less-performed choral works such as Magnificat and Credo. “Vivaldi spent his most productive years as the music director of an orphanage in Venice,” said Loeffler. “From there, he would compose music for strings and chorus that would inspire a generation of composers, most notably Johann Sebastien Bach.” The audience is invited to a dessert reception following the event. Tickets for the evening are $20 in advance online and $25 at the door. Visit www.cjchoralsociety. org to purchase tickets.

cially sought at this time, but s i nger s i n a l l voice parts are invited to audition. The auditions are informal and conducted in a friendly atmosphere. The Chorale’s music selections range from Renaissance to contemporary, from spirituals and show music to the sacred and the classic, including choral masterworks and premieres by American composers. Under McCon nell ’s di rection, Voices Chorale NJ will be performing Shakespeare in Love, a concert of Shakespeare’s works set to music by various composers. Concerts will be on May 10 at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Trenton and May 11 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton. Both concerts begin at 8 pm. Week ly rehe ar s a ls are on Monday evenings from 7:30-9:30 pm at Music Together. For more information, visit www.VoicesChoraleNJ.org.

Dryden Ensemble Performs Work About Queen Christina

The Dryden Ensemble will present Queen Christina Goes to Rome, a dramatic retelling of the story of the u nconvent iona l Swe d ish queen, in Pr inceton and Solebury, Pa. S h o w s a r e S a t u r d a y, January 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 6587 Upper York Road, S olebur y, Pa. ; and Sun day, Januar y 20 at 3: 00 p.m. at Miller Chapel, on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street.

Voices Chorale NJ To Hold Auditions

Voices Chorale NJ, the 45 -member communit y chorus, will hold auditions beginning at 6:45 pm Monday, January 14, at Music To ge t her, 225 Pen n i ng ton-Hopewell Road (Route 654), Hopewel, prior to the 7:30 pm rehearsal. Interested singers should contact Voices Chorale NJ auditions coordinator Jenny Goings at jengoings @ embarqmail.com to set up an audition time. Alternative audition times may also be arranged. David McConnell, artistic director of Voices Chorale NJ, is seeking additional singers w it h good read ing skills and who enjoy performing a varied rep ertoire. Tenors are espe-

Trenton Music Makers Perform Free Concert

Roberta Maxwell Queen Christina, one of the most learned women of the 17th century and a great patron of the ar ts, abdicated at the age of 28, giving up her throne for a life of music, art, and religion in Rome. The concert features Roberta Maxwell as Queen Chr ist ina and Paul Hecht as narrator in d r a m at i c re ad i n g s f rom

Trenton children who have been pursuing intensive string instrument study as part of the Trenton Music Makers Orchestra will give a free community concert in celebration of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21 at 5:30 p.m. The concert will take place at the Mildred and Ernest E. Mayo Concert Hall on the campus of The College of New Jersey in Ewing. The concert, co-sponsored by Trenton Music Makers and The College of New Jersey, will celebrate the grow-

ing partnership between the two organizations and will feature performances by the 100 young people who have been meeting after school for up to three years, and their teaching artists. It will also mark the public debut of the second graders from Wilson Elementary School who have joined the program this year as its PreOrchestra students. Trenton Music Makers is in the fifth year of its intensive after-school orchestra program, in partnership with the Trenton Public Schools. Modeled on the El Sistema youth orchestras founded in Venezuela, the program is made available to Trenton children at no charge, but with a high level of engagement and time commitment from the children and their families. E l S is tema orche s t ras throughout the world are documenting better school performance and retention, the development of meaningful social bonds, and even improved cognitive development and executive function, among the children who join. As founder Jose Antonio Abreu said, “The orchestra is the only

The By

group that comes together with the sole purpose of agreeing with itself.” There are currently over 100 El Sistema-inspired youth music programs in the United States, and a growing nationw ide tradition of celebrating the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through concerts that highlight access, racial diversity, and objects lessons in positive culture that are the hallmarks of El Sistema. This concert will be one of dozens across the country, playing a wide variety of music but with a common purpose. “This concert is a priceless opportunity for our kids to share their music with a wide community audience,” says Lydia Veilleux, Trenton Music Makers’ artistic director. “For our second-grade beginners, up through the ‘big kids’ who have been developing as musicians for three years, playing together in celebration of peace and justice will be a perfect beginning to 2019.” Tickets are free of charge, but space is limited, and reservations are strongly recommended at www.trentonmusicmakers.org.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

FEELING HARMONIOUS: Monday, January 14 is Guest Night for The Jersey Harmony Chorus, which invites women who love to sing to join the fun at a rehearsal, followed by refreshments. The group meets at Griggstown Reformed Church, 1065 Canal Road, every Monday at 7:15 p.m and sings popular songs from past decades in the barbershop style. Contact Carole at JHC.Membership@gmail.com for more information.

the letters and diaries of Christina and other historical figures, including the French philosopher Des cartes. The music mirrors Chr istina’s jour ney from Stockholm via Innsbruck to Rome, with excursions to Paris and Hamburg, and ending in Rome. An ensemble of oboe, violins, viola da gamba, lute, and harpsichord will perform chamber music by Buxtehude, Louis Couperin, Schmelzer, Corelli, Scarlatti, and Pasquini. Known to Princeton audiences for the role of Edna in Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance at McCarter Theatre in 2013, Maxwell has performed with Ethan Hawke in Chekhov’s Ivanhov at Clas sic Stage in New York, on Broadway in Equus, Othello, Henry V, and The Merchant of Venice, and off-Broadway i n Ste v ie , A s he s ( O b i e Award ), Mar y Stuart, A Whistle in the Dark (Obie Aw a r d ) , a n d m a ny ot h ers. Her credits include national tours of Lettuce and Lovage, and regional theater productions at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival, Ty rone Guthr ie Centre, the Old Globe Theatre, and others. She h a s a l s o p e r for m e d for television and in movies, including Popeye, Psycho III. Philadelphia , D ead Man Walking, and Brokeback Mountain. She will be appearing in Percy, a movie starring Christopher Walken, recently filmed in Winnipeg. Hecht has performed extensively on stage, in movies, and for television. He made his debut on Broadway as the Player in Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead (Tony nomination). Other Broadway appearances include : Night & Day with Maggie Smith, Invention of Love ( Tom S topp a r d ) , 1776 ( or i g i nal company), The Rothschilds, Shaw’s Caesar & Cleopatra, and Pirandello’s Henry IV (both with Rex Har r ison ) . T V Aud ience members may recog nize him from his appearances over the years as Charles in Kate & Allie and as several unsavory characters on Law and Order. Named in honor of John Dryden, the English poet laureate whose words inspired Baroque compos ers including Purcell and Handel, the Dryden Ensemble specializes in performing music of the 17th and 18th centuries on period instruments. General admission tickets are $25 per concer t a n d s t u d e nt t icke t s are free with a valid ID. Visit dr ydenensemble.org or p u r ch as e t i cke t s at t h e door.

Niceties

ELEANOR BURGESS

Directed by

KIMBERLY SENIOR

JANUARY 11 – FEBRUARY 10

“ONE OF THE

BEST PLAYS

ABOUT WHO GETS TO TELL

THE STORY OF AMERICA.” —Washington Post

TICKETS START AT $25

mccarter.org 609.258.2787 In association with Huntington Theatre Company and Manhattan Theatre Club Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment of the Arts Cast of The Niceties: Lisa Banes and Jordan Boatman, photo by Nile Hawver – Nile Scott Shots.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 20

Art

“FULL MOON RISING”: This photograph is one of many featured in “Kay Kenny: A Poetic Tribute to the Rural Night” at the Hunterdon Art Museum. The exhibit opens Sunday, January 13 with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. featuring a gallery talk by the artist. It runs until April 28.

“PAX”: Cross Pollination Gallery, an artist-owned gallery at 69 Bridge Street in Lambertville, invites the public to a painting demonstration on Saturday, January 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. SiriOm Singh, a landscapes and abstract painter, will demonstrate his unique layering technique — applying acrylic paint with pallet knives — and collages of various materials. He will also answer questions, and give advice to experienced and beginning artists. For more about Cross Pollination Gallery, visit them on Facebook.

MCCC Design Students Present Chair Art Projects

As part of the art assignments in their Three-Dimensional Design class with Professor Michael Welliver, Mercer County Community College (MCCC ) students presented the chairs they created from found objects and got feedback from their classmates recently during the last class of the semester. According to Welliver, the project required students to create a chair using objects that originally functioned as something else. “They need to find the parts and create the chair with as little manufacturing as possible,” he said. The assignment is intended to incorporate design elements the students have been focusing on throughout the semester. “They must decide on a coherent theme and consider concepts like color, balance, positive and negative space, unity, scale, line, and plane. These are the building blocks of composition,” Welliver said. On the day of the final project, one by one, 12 students moved their chairs to the center of the circle, first demonstrating that they could indeed sit on them, and then listening to com-

ments from their classmates. “The critique is part of the lesson,” Welliver explained. “Artists need to learn a vocabular y to speak about art. At this stage, students should be developing selfconfidence and finding ‘their tribe.’ The support of a small cohesive group is an important foundation and that doesn’t usually happen in a university setting.” A n t h o n y M a n a n s a l a’s “Feels Like Home” chair combined elements one might find in a bedroom – storage containers filled with books, a guitar and amp, and a pillow seat. He supplemented his presentation by singing a song on his guitar. “The added element of sound makes it even more real,” one of his classmates said. Students also complimented his consistent use of muted colors, varied textures, and the chair’s overall shape. Manansala said the assignment pushed him to create something on a larger scale. “It really brought out our creative sides.” Mike Davila, whose Water Transport chair featured a cluster of empty water cooler jugs that somehow managed to stand upside down, said, “This project brought new meaning to everyday items.”

Welliver notes that using found objects in art is an idea that goes back more than a century. “While our students have been doing this project for many years, with social media branding it as ‘upcycling,’ this type of art is having a resurgence.”

Photographer Captures Poetry in the Rural Night

Kay Kenny has enjoyed a busy career as a photographer, teacher, painter, and critical writer of visual arts. She has curated several exhibitions and her work can be found in an array of corporate, museum and private collections. And it all began with a class at the Hunterdon Art Museum (HAM). Kenny was 8 years old when she won a scholarship to HAM. She’d climb aboard a bus in Flemington for the trip to the stone mill on Lower Center Street in Clinton where she’d learn from Anne Marsh, a highly-regarded painter and a founder of the Museum. “I was ecstatic: traveling on my own, learning from a master, absorbing each moment until I thought I would burst. I decided from then on ‘I will be an artist!’” Kenny said.

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Kenny will return to HAM, this time as an artist with her own solo exhibition showcasing her outdoor photography. “Kay Kenny: A Poetic Tribute to the Rural Night” opens Sunday, January 13 with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. featuring a gallery talk by the artist and refreshments. Everyone is welcome to attend. The exhibition runs until April 28. Kenny’s work is a celebration of the rural night landscape; a poetic tribute to the wild imaginings and the nightmares and dreams inherent in the lonely darkened corners of the world. Kenny’s long exposures – some for up to one hour – capture the intense activity of the night sky through the passage of time; the silhouettes of the darkened landscape serve as backdrops for the selected foreground illumination. Kenny avoids using ambient light, using hand-held flashlights on foregrounds and objects to literally paint with light. “My images are reflections; the dreams and fears inherent in the quiet darkness of a rural landscape,” Kenny said. “Despite my efforts to create these images, however, there is always the risk of the unexpected consequences of weather and creatures. It seems like magic when I do succeed.” Kenny hopes her photographs will encourage others to rediscover the night sky. “One of the saddest things I’ve lear ned in st udy ing the darkness is how many people have not really seen the night sky,” Kenny said. “Light pollution is more destructive than just the

loss of the stars, but seeing them again is a powerful reminder of what we’ve lost in our cities and suburbs.” Kenny has taught photography for more than 20 years at New York University, and the International Center of Photography in New York City. She earned an MA from Rutgers University and an MFA from Syracuse University in visual arts. A former Hunterdon County resident, Kenny has studios in South Orange and Saugerties, N.Y. The Hunterdon Museum is at 7 Lower Center Street in Clinton. For more information, call (908) 735-8415 or visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

“The Creative Commons” At ArtYard in Frenchtown

ArtYard, at 62A Trenton Av e n u e i n Fr e n c h to w n , pr e s e nt s “ T h e Cr e at i ve Commons : Progressive Studio Practice from the Creative Growth Art Center, LAND Gallery, and the Center for Creative Works.” The exhibition, on view January 12 through April 14, features works from three nonprofit studios influenced by the work of Creative Growth founders Florence and Elias Katz, whose radical approach to art making and inclusion for adults with developmental disabilities has launched careers and occasioned a sea change in conceptions of contemporary art. An opening reception is Saturday, January 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. This quiet revolution has allowed artists such as Judith Scott, a hearing-impaired woman with Down sy ndrome who spent 35 years in an institution, to achieve international recognition, exhibit at MoMA, and represent the United States in the Venice Biennale after finding community, meaningful employm e n t , a n d e x p o s u r e to the fiber arts at Creative Growth. She was not alone. These programs provide not only community, studio space, encouragement, and exposure to new materials, but also a source of income for individuals who have often struggled to find meaningful employment. The show features a continuous projection of four short films produced and directed by members of t h e O a k la n d - b as e d s t u dio Creative Growth: Sus a n J a n o w’s e x i s te n t i a l opus Questions ; Rosena Finister’s exuberant Finger Poppin’ Time; Gregory Stoper’s History in a

Minute, in which Stoper por trays Abraham Lincoln from the cradle to the grave ; and Paulino Martin’s colorful, contemplative City. Creative Growth also contributes a collection of ball gow ns, mermaid skirts, knit apparel, and jeans from its annual fas h ion e ve nt, B e y o nd Trend, as well as an array of John Martin’s oversized imaginary wooden tools. Among the contributions from the Brooklyn-based L A N D G aller y are Dean Millien’s diminutive tin-foil gorillas; a cheerful, toe-obsessed painting by Raquel Albarran; and a large selection of works by Garrol Gayden, whose ghostly pencil portraits of Coney I s l a n d ’s S p o o k- a - R a m a , Ferris wheels, roller coasters, and neighborhood block parties evoke a love of place. Wor k s f r o m t h e C e n ter for Creative Works in Philadelphia include Mary T. Bevlock’s part geometric, part figurative coloredpencil drawings ; inviting maps and landscapes by Timothy O’Donovan ; and Ish mael S ut ton’s evo c a tive black-and-white master drawings, including his arguable improvement on the Mona Lisa. ArtYard’s “The Creative Com mons” ex hibition showcases the work of 31 living artists, all working a n d pr ac t ici ng at t h e s e metropolitan centers. For m or e i n for m at i o n , v i s i t www.artyard.org.

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For the first time, 10 of the surviving portraits carried out by British master Thomas Gainsborough of his daughters, augmented by approximately 40 additional family images by the artist, will be on view in a historic gathering. “Gainsborough’s Family Album” will trace the full arc of Gainsborough’s career through his family portraiture from public and private collections around the world, and by doing so will provide insights into the human character and compassion of one of Britain’s greatest artists, as well as into the nature of the family in the 18th century. Gainsborough ’s Family Album is organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London, where it originated and will run through February 3, in cooperation with the Princeton University Art Museum, the exhibition’s only North American venue, where it will be on view February 23 through June 9. “This beautiful and important exhibition will offer a fascinating glimpse into the private life of one of Britain’s most important artists, and in the process, yield new perspectives on family life, domesticity, and, perhaps most importantly, parental love at the birth of the modern age,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher– David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. One of Br itain’s most prominent and successful artists, Gainsborough (172788) was renowned as a portraitist of exceptional liveliness and subtlety, whose fashionable sitters appear to have deftly stepped inside compositions suffused with effects of light, air, and feathery materiality. From modest rural beginnings, Gainsborough rose to become one of the most acclaimed painters of the age, depicting royals, aristocrats, and the changing nature of Britain itself at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. The exhibition is anchored by well-known paintings of Gainsborough’s two daugh-

dren into adulthood, including The Artist’s Daughters with a Cat (ca. 1760-61) and rarely seen works such as a full-length double portrait of the two from about 1774. These images will be seen alongside a portrait of the artist’s father, a drawing of the artist with his wife and pet dogs, and canvasses of his siblings, in-laws, and nieces and nephews, among ot hers. Ta ken toget her, these works tell a story of family intimacy, the passage of time, artistic evolution, and even mortality unique in the history of art. The exhibition at Princeton will be accompanied by additional works from the Museum’s collections that extend the consideration of family and of the nature of childhood into the 20th century, including works by Ammi Phillips, Lewis Hine, Dorothea Lange, Ruth Bernhard, Sally Mann, and more. Princeton Museum Director James Steward will deliver the exhibition’s opening lecture on Saturday, February 23 at 5 p.m. The Princeton University Art Museum is located at the heart of the Princeton campus. Admission is free. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed Mondays and major holidays.

“Catherine Suttle: Spaces and Structures” at HAM

Catherine Suttle’s paintings encourage audiences to appreciate the little things that are all around us, but oftentimes fail to notice. “My paintings reflect my conviction that beyond the obvious, there are nuances and subtleties to be seen and appreciated,” Suttle said. “They give my paintings their character and their personality. I enjoy the unexpected and the awkward, and my paintings are experiments in seeing how I can figure out ways to incorporate those qualities into a satisfying whole.”

“MARY AND MARGARET GAINSBOROUGH, THE ARTIST’S DAUGHTERS”: This oil on canvas painting by Thomas Gainsborough, ca. 1774, will be featured in “Gainsborough’s Family Album,” on exhibit at the Princeton University Art Museum February 23 through June 9.

m a n, A n i m a l a nd Pla nt L i f e” t h r o u g h J a n u a r y 2 5 . w w w. c r a n b u r y a r t s council.org. G ro u n d s For S c u l p ture, 80 Sculptors Way, H a m i l t o n , h a s “J a m e s Carl : woof ” and “Masayuki Koorida: Sculpture” through March 17, and other exhibits. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Woodrow Wilson and t he Great War,” “Pr inceton’s Portrait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, 12-4 p.m. T hursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestow n, Pa., has “Leslie Poontz : Integration” through February 17, and “Frank Hyder: The Janis Project” through February 23. www.michenerart museum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Masters of Illusion” through May 19. www.morven.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has “Picturing Place in Japan” through Febr uar y 24 and “Time Capsule 1970: Rauschenberg’s Currents” January 19 through Februar y 10. (609) 258-3788. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s Council, 952 Alexander Road, has “Faculty Student Art Show” through March 1. An opening reception is January 13, 4 to 6 p.m. www.westwindsorarts.org.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

ters, Mary and Margaret, as “Gainsborough’s Family Album” at PU Art Museum they grew from young chil-

“INTERIOR 1”: This oil and oil pastel painting is featured in “Catherine Suttle: Spaces and Structures,” on exhibit at the Hunterdon Art Museum January 13 through March 3. A reception and gallery talk by the artist are scheduled for Sunday, January 13 from 2 to 4 p.m. T he Frenchtow n -based ar t i s t’s s olo e x h ibit ion, “Catherine Suttle: Spaces and Structures” opens at t h e Hu nterdon A r t Mu seum on Sunday, January 13 from 2 to 4 p.m. with a reception, refreshments, and gallery talk by the artist. The exhibition runs until March 3. The title reflects her most recent abstract work which combines atmospheric areas — spaces — with elements that appear solid and opaque — structures. It also refers to the subject of a series of small landscape paintings that feature shedlike structures, Suttle said. Sut tle says she enjoys working with oils because the color is luscious and rich. She often pours or rubs the paint because “it feels like a more natural way of working with it,” she notes. This approach results in nuanced color and surprising accents that she enhances with line and more intense color. Suttle hopes viewers of her show will develop a new appreciation for abstract compositions and will experience color in a new way, not only as an element that sparks a feeling, but also as structural. “I hope people look beyond what they often first respond to — the peacefulness conveyed by my paintings — and see the tension within them,” Suttle said. Suttle received a master’s degree in ceramic sculpture from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the affiliated Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. During this time, she taught beginning ceramics to adults and college students at the University of Tennessee. A f te r g r a d u at i on, s h e worked as a studio artist in Knoxville for many years and exhibited locally and across the state. She also helped found a cooperative art gallery, 200 East, in downtown Knoxville. She currently serves as the director of cultural resources at the Hunterdon Land Trust in Flemington. The Hunterdon Art Museum is at 7 Lower Center Street in Clinton. Hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the suggested admission is $5. For more information, call (908) 735-8415 or visit www.hunterdonartmuseum. org.

Area Exhibits Ar t for Healing G allery, Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center, has “Reflections of Light: Lucy Graves McVicker,” through March 1. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Winter Warmth” January 10 through February 3. www.lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Prince to n , 102 Wit herspoon Street, has “All That You L e ave B e h i n d ” t h r ou g h March 16. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Princeton Uni-

versity, has “Music Made Visible: Metaphors of the Ephemeral” through January 31. A public reception is January 9 at 6 p.m. D & R Greenway Land Tr u s t , 1 P r e s e r v a t i o n Place, has “L ovely as a Tree” through January 25. www.drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Park s id e Ave nu e, Trenton, has “40-for-40” through January, “Changing Face/Changing Place” through January 13, and the Garden State Watercolor Society’s “49th Annual Juried Show” through January 20. www.ellarslie.com. G ourgaud G a l ler y, 23A Nor th Main Street, Cranbury, has “Alive-Hu-

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tween what certain family members want and what others don’t. Some people have very specific ideas when it comes to how they want their funeral service to be handled after their demise. Things to keep in mind: If the decedent has made mention of exactly how they want their funeral to be, via a will, it’s important that you honor that wish and organize the service in that manner. Some people also preplan and pre-pay for their funeral. In this case, the family needs to ensure that the person’s wishes are taken into account and the funeral service is handled in that way. If the decedent wasn’t very traditional or conventional in their outlook and didn’t want a standard funeral, the family can consider a celebration of life. This is a great way to honor the person’s memory and respect them. Aside from this, you can honor your loved one by doing something beneficial in their name. For example, you can donate something to their favorite charity, plant trees in their favorite garden, or even dedicate a bench at a park they visit often. Sometimes, the details that have been outlined by the person in their will may be entirely different from what you had wanted for the service. Regardless of what you think, it’s important to focus on what the decedent wanted, and make sure the funeral and the service is in line with their wishes. If you want some help and assistance making funeral arrangements or would like to know more about our services, get in touch with us at Franklin H. Rainear Jr., Affordable Funeral Service & Cremation, LLC through our online form at https:// affordablefuneralservicecremationco.com, or call (888) 213-4090. Hopewell Memorial Home Funeral Pre-Planning Our dedicated staff will come to your home and you never have to

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Workers, the in-home consultation reviews overall health and wellness including medical and physical conditions, support networks, health information, and legal documentation. They also assess potential depression, memory issues, isolation, and any other mental health conditions. The assessment includes a home safety evaluation as well. After needs are determined, information is provided on a range of services, including in-home care providers, transportation, nutrition options, elder care attorneys, adult day programs, medication management, and volunteers as well as social and community resources. “We receive so many calls from adult children who are worried about their aging parents as well as calls from the older adults themselves. They are in need of a variety of resources as well as expert opinion on how to stay safe, comfortable, and as independent as possible,” says Beverly Mishkin, LCSW, Director of Senior Services. The In-Home Geriatric Care Management Assessment is one service of many on the continuum of senior care programs that JFCS provides. The consultation complements JFCS’s Secure@ Home program, which provides comprehensive care management services to enable older adults to remain in their own homes. As our population ages, JFCS continues to help older adults obtain their optimal level of well-being — whether aging at home or transitioning to another level of care. Lifetime Home: Safe Home Design Solutions If you love where you live, chances are you don’t wish to move. With Lifetime Home’s help, you can stay regardless of your age or mobility. The home that once empowered you to live independently may suddenly seem restrictive — or worse, dangerous. Features you once loved — full flights of stairs, sunken living rooms, standard size bathrooms, marble floors, high kitchen wall cabinets — might now give you cause for concern. Lifetime Home offers design solutions catering to your specific needs. We identify areas in your home that can be trip hazards, or merely improve your ability to navigate your way through your home to assure safety and

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PRESENTING

8 Ashwood Court, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Beth J. Miller & Judith “ Judy” Brickman $560,000

521 Bergen Street, Lawrenceville Marketed by: Beth J. Miller $599,000

29 Caroline Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $810,000

75 Fountayne Lane, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $452,500

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67 Greenway Terrace, Princeton Marketed by: Kenneth “Ken” Verbeyst $1,080,000

5 Lakeshore Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: John Terebey, Jr. $675,000

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 26

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rin Bell (Nicole Kidman) is a veteran LAPD detective whose partner, Chris (Sebastian Stan), died when his cover was blown during an undercover operation gone bad. Courtesy of flashbacks, we learn that he was murdered by Silas (Toby Kebbell), the leader of the gang of bank robbers the two had infiltrated. At the time, Erin and Chris were also lovers, and she was pregnant with his baby. Fast forward 16 years and we find the single mom doing a miserable job of raising their rebellious daughter, Shelby (Jade Pettyjohn), who is presently under the spell of a surly slacker (Beau Knapp) already in his 20s. The problem is that ghost-like Erin ostensibly never recovered from the loss of Chris. Haggard, pale, and rudderless, she’s still haunted by the fact that Silas and his henchmen vanished with the millions stolen in the heist, and were never apprehended. A crack in the long-dormant case arrives when some incriminating evidence at a crime scene indicates that the gang has resurfaced. The clues revitalize traumatized

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Aquaman (PG-13 for action, violence, and some profanity). Jason Momoa stars as the legendary DC character in this origins tale which finds the reluctant superhero forced to face his destiny as king of Atlantis in order to defend the underwater kingdom and the rest of the planet from his power-hungry half-brother (Patrick Wilson). With Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Dolph Lundgren, Djimon Hounsou, and Nicole Kidman. Ben Is Back (R for drug use and pervasive profanity). Lucas Hedges plays the title character in this coming-of-age drama about a troubled teen who arrives home unexpectedly on Christmas Eve after running away from a drug treatment center. With Julia Roberts, Courtney B. Vance, and Kathryn Newton.

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SATURDAY EVENING

RYAN SILVERMAN

Bumblebee (PG-13 for action and violence). Spinoff of the Transformers franchise revolving around the adventures of a young autobot (Dylan O’Brien) resuscitated by an 18-year-old (Hailee Steinfeld) after being found battle-scarred and broken in a junkyard along the California coast. Cast includes John Cena, Angela Bassett, Len Cariou, and Justin Theroux.

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A Dog’s Way Home (PG for peril, mild epithets, and mature themes). Adaptation of W. Bruce Cameron’s best-seller of the same name about a pet pooch (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) that embarks on a very eventful, 400-mile journey after being separated from her owner (Jonah Hauer-King). With Ashley Judd, Edward James Olmos, and Alexandra Shipp. Escape Room (PG-13 for profanity, peril, terror, violence, and suggestive material). Psychological thriller revolving around six strangers forced to survive by their wits after becoming ensnared in a deadly trap beyond their control. Co-starring Debra Ann Woll, Tyler Labine, Taylor Russell, Logan Miller, Niki Dodani, and Jay Ellis. The Favourite (R for profanity, nudity, and graphic sexuality) Olivia Colman portrays Queen Anne (1665-1714) in this biopic revolving around the bitter battle between the Duchess of Marlborough (Rachel Weisz) and a servant (Emma Stone) for the frail monarch’s friendship and affections. With Emma Delves, Faye Daveney, and Paul Swaine. Green Book (PG-13 for violence, mature themes, profanity, racial slurs, smoking, and suggestive material). Unlikely-buddies dramedy, set in the sixties, about the friendship forged between a black classical pianist (Mahershala Ali) and his white chauffeur (Viggo Mortensen) driving around the Deep South during Jim Crow segregation. With Linda Cardellini, Don Stark, and P.J. Byrne. The Grinch (PG for brief rude humor). Animated adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ children’s classic about a bad-tempered grouch (Benedict Cumberbatch) who masquerades as Santa Claus in order to steal Christmas. Narrated by Pharrell, and featuring the voicework of Rashida Jones, Angela Lansbury, and SNL’s Kenan Thompson. Holmes & Watson (PG-13 for violence, profanity, sexuality, drug references, and crude humor). Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly co-star as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, respectively, in this crime comedy which finds the legendary sleuths trying to stop arch-rival Moriarty (Ralph Fiennes) from assassinating Queen Victoria (Pam Ferris). With Rebecca Hall, Hugh Laurie, Steve Coogan, and Kelly Macdonald. If Beale Street Could Talk (R for profanity and sexuality). Adaptation of James Baldwin’s classic novel, set in Harlem, revolving around a pregnant teenager’s (Kiki Layne) efforts to free her fiancé (Stephan James) falsely accused of rape. With Regina King, Teyonah Parris, and Colman Domingo. Mary Poppins Returns (PG for mature themes and brief action). Emily Blunt assumes the title role in this musical sequel which finds the magical nanny reunited with the nowgrown Michael (Ben Whishaw) and Jane Banks (Emily Mortimer) in the wake of a family tragedy. With Lin-Manuel Miranda, Colin Firth, and Meryl Streep. Mary Queen of Scots (R for violence and sexuality) Saoirse Ronan plays the title role in this costume drama based on John Guy’s best-selling biography chronicling the charismatic monarch’s turbulent reign. With Margot Robbie, Gemma Chan, and David Tennant. The Mule (R for brief nudity and sexuality, and pervasive profanity). Clint Eastwood directed and stars in this crime thriller about a broke World War II vet who unknowingly agrees to transport $3 million in cocaine across Michigan for a Mexican drug cartel. Ensemble cast includes Bradley Cooper, Michael Pena, Laurence Fishburne, Alison Eastwood, Taissa Farmiga, and Dianne Wiest. On the Basis of Sex (PG-13 for profanity and suggestive content). Courtroom drama revisiting a groundbreaking sex discrimination case argued by Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Felicity Jones) early in her legal career. With Kathy Bates, Sam Waterston, Armie Hammer, and Justin Theroux. Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG for action and rude humor). Buddy sequel, set six years after the original animated adventure, finds Ralph (John C. Reilly) and BFF Vanellope (Sarah Silverman) embarking on a desperate quest in search of a replacement steering wheel for a broken video game. Voice cast includes Gal Gadot, Jane Lynch, and Ed O’Neill. Replicas (PG-13 for violence, disturbing images, mature themes, nudity, and sexual references). Sci-fi thriller about a biologist (Keanu Reeves) willing to violate his scientific ethical principles to resurrect his family after a tragic car accident. Cast includes Alice Eve, Thomas Middleditch, and Emjay Anthony. Second Act (PG-13 for profanity and crude sexual references). Fish-out-of-water comedy about a 40-year-old sales clerk (Jennifer Lopez) who lands a dream job she isn’t qualified for with help of a doctored resume. Cast includes Milo Ventimiglia, Vanessa Hudgens, and Charlyne Yi. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (PG for action, violence, mature themes, and mild epithets). Animated reboot of the Marvel Comics franchise revolving around the adventures of a friendly neighborhood Spider-Man (Shameik Moore) from Brooklyn, who is a half-black/half-Puerto Rican teen. Voice cast includes Mahershala Ali, Hailee Steinfeld, Lily Tomlin, Nicolas Cage, Zoe Kravitz, and Chris Pine. The Upside (PG-13 for drug use and suggestive content). English language remake of The Intouchables, the 2011 French dramedy inspired by the real-life relationship of a paralyzed billionaire (Bryan Cranston) and the ex-con (Kevin Hart) he hires as a live-in caregiver. With Nicole Kidman, Julianna Margulies, and Aja Naomi King. Vice (R for profanity and violent images). Christian Bale portrays Dick Cheney in this seriocomic biopic recounting the ambitious politician’s career from Beltway bureaucrat to most powerful vice president in U.S. history. Featuring Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney, Sam Rockwell as President George W. Bush, Tyler Perry as Colin Powell, and Steve Carell as Donald Rumsfeld. Welcome to Marwen (PG-13 for violence, profanity, mature themes, disturbing images, and suggestive content) Fact-based drama about a cross-dresser (Steve Carell) left with amnesia after a violent, hateful attack who tries to recover his memory by building a miniature World War II village in his back yard. Support cast includes Janelle Monae, Leslie Mann, Diane Kruger, and Eiza Gonzalez. (In English, French, and German with subtitles). —Kam Williams

Saturday JANUARY 26

8pm

MICHELLE MERRILL, conductor RYAN SILVERMAN, vocalist P R O G R A M I N C L U D E S : Besame Mucho / So in Love

Luck Be a Lady / Feeling Good / That’s Life princetonsymphony.org or 609 /497-0020 Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University. Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change. Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

AT THE CINEMA


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 28

7: 3 0 p.m . : P r i n c e to n of Gilbert & Sullivan’s YeoUniversit y students per- man of the Guard, at the form Mozart’s early opera Unitarian Church, Route Die Gartnerin aus Liebe 206 at Cherry Hill Road. at Richardson Auditorium. Lee Milhous conducts, $10. Free. Open to all. Wednesday, January 9 Saturday, January 12 Monday, January 14 6:30 p.m.: Assemblyman 10 a.m.: Delaware & Rar7 to 9 p.m.: Princeton Andrew Zwicker delivers itan Canal Watch holds a PFL AG, a support group the Sierra Lecture, “Science walking tour of the canal be- for families and friends of Literacy and Democracy,” at tween Trenton Battle Monu- lesbian, gay, bisexual, transthe Student Welcome Cenment and Port Mercer. Meet gender and queer (LGBTQ+) ter, Mercer County Commuat Port Mercer canal park- individuals, meets at Trinity nity College, West Windsor. ing lot on Quaker Road. Call Church, 33 Mercer Street. Pizza at 6 p.m. RSVP to (609) 635-2783 for details. pflagprinceton.org. Kipatthesierraclub@gmail. 1-3 p.m.: Open House at 7 p.m.: The Tesla Quartet com. Princeton Friends School, performs chamber music by Thursday, January 10 470 Quaker Road. ( 609 ) Part, Adams, Goddard, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: The 683-1194 or w w w.princ- Glass at The Pennington Princeton Farmers Market etonfriendsschool.org. School’s Meckler Library, is at the Princeton Family 2 p.m.: At Morven Mu- 112 West Delaware Avenue, YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. seum, 55 Stockton Street, Pennington. Free. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: “Masters of Illusion” gallery Tuesday, January 15 T he P r inceton Reg ional walk with trompe l’oeil artist 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: ValuC h a m b e r of C o m m e r c e Gary Erbe. $15 ($10 memation Days at Morven Muholds its mont hly mem - bers). morven.org. seum, 45 Stockton Street. bership luncheon at the 7: 3 0 p.m . : P r i n c e to n Katherine Van Dell, Mike Princeton Marriott. Former Universit y students per- Byers, and Sebastian Clarke Pennsylvania Gov. Mark S. form Mozart’s early opera of Rago Arts appraise jewel______________ Schweiker speaks on “Be Die Gartnerin aus Liebe ry, fine and decorative arts. _______________ Date & Time: ______________________ Bold in 2019: Sound Govat Richardson Auditorium. Free. Email robin@ragoarts. ernment Relations will Lead our ad, scheduled to run ___________________. Free. com to schedule. to Future Economic Suc7:30 p.m.: “Anti-Semitic Sunday, January 13 oughlycess.” and pay special attention to the following: princetonchamber. Hate Speech and Bots Epi10 :30 a.m.: Corporate ill tell org. us it’s okay) demic” is the title of a talk principal and philanthropist 7 p.m.: Princeton Friends by Joel Finkelstein, founder School hosts Dr. Sharon Kim Pimley speaks about � Fax number � Address � Expiration Dateand director of the Network “The Blessings of My Heart Rose Powell in a forum, Contagion Institute, at The “Raising Emotionally Intel- Transplant.” Join the group Jewish Center of Princeton, for conversation and coffee. ligent (EQ) Children During 435 Nassau Street. Free. RSVP preferred, call (609) Turbulent Times.” Limited info@thejewishcenter.org. 896 4977. $5 charge at the seating. Call ( 609 ) 683Wednesday, January 16 door. 1194 ext. 38 or visit www. 1 to 4 p.m.: At Terhune 7: 3 0 -9 : 3 0 a . m . : T h e princetonfriendsschool.org. Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Princeton Area Chamber of Friday, January 11 Sunday Winery Music Se- Commerce holds a Business 7:30 p.m.: The Capital ries. Before Business Breakfast at Singers of Trenton perform the Nassau Club of Prince3 p.m.: The Princeton So“Songs of the Season” at St. ton. princetonchamber.org. ciety of Musical Amateurs Paul Church, 216 Nassau holds a choral rehearsal fol9-11 a.m.: Open House at Street. www.capitalsingers. lowed by reading at 4 p.m. Princeton Friends School, org. 470 Quaker Road. ( 609 ) 683-1194 or w w w.princFast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In etonfriendsschool.org. Hunan ~ Szechuan 8 p.m.: Princeton CounMalaysian ~ Vietnamese try Dancers holds a Contra Daily Specials • Catering Available Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

Calendar

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WINE TASTING ROOM ~ OPEN FRI. 12-6; SAT. & SUN. 12-5 (609) 924-2310 • Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat & Sun 9-5 • www.terhuneorchards.com

(instruction at 7:30 p.m.). Peter Stix with Raise the Roof. $10. Friday, January 18 8:30 to 10 a.m.: “Meet the Mayor.” Mayor Liz Lempert holds open office hours in the lobby of Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street. 8 p.m.: McCarter Theatre presents recording artist Damien Sneed and his blend of jazz, classical and gospel with “We Shall Overcome: A Celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” Visitmccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787. 8:15 p.m.: The Princeton Folk Music Society presents singer/song w r iter Dav id Massengill at Christ Congregational Church, 50 Walnut Lane. $10-$20. www.princetonfolk.org. Saturday, January 19 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: The West Windsor Community Fa r m e r s M a r ke t i n d o or market is at Windsor Athletic Club, 99 Clarksville Road. The Rick Fiori Band entertain. Bring single serving shelf-stable foods such as milk, 100 percent juice, cereal, entrees, and nutritious snacks for Send Hunger Packing West Windsor Plainsboro. 10 a.m.: Volunteers are needed for the clean-up of the D &R Canal in South Bound Brook. Meet at Lock 11 parking lot, Canal Road, South Bound Brook, across from the post office. (201) 401-3121. 4 p.m.: “Marijuana: Parents Matter” is a clinical case presentation by Dee Apple at the American College of Orgonomy, 4419 Route 27. Free Call (732) 821-1146 or visit www.adifferentkindofpsychiatry.com. Sunday, January 20 1 to 4 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Sunday Winery Music Series. 2 p.m . : Z u m b a for a Cause, at Windsor Athletic Club, 99 Clarksville Road, West Windsor. $5-$15, benefits children who are food insecure. Sponsored by Mercer Street Friends. mercerstreetfriends.org. 3 to 5 p.m.: Family Barn Dance for all ages at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive, presented by Princeton Country Dancers. $7 ($20 per family). princetoncountrydancers. org/family-dance. Monday, January 21 Recycling 12 to 3 p.m.: Martin Luther King Day of Service Work Session at Maple ton Preserve, 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston. Join Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands in this cleanup session. Visit http://fpnl. org for details. 3 p.m.: Screening of From Liberty to Captivity and panel discussion of human trafficking at Washington Crossing United Methodist Church, 1895 Wrightstown Road, Washington Crossing, Pa. Free. 7 p.m.: Multifaith Service in memory of Martin Luther King Jr., at the Unitarian Church, Route 206 and Cherry Hill Road. Princeton University professor Ruha Benjamin preaches. Free. Wednesday, January 23 7 p.m.: The PHS Studio Band, Princeton Jazz Combo, Studio Vocals, and Jazz Ensemble perform at John

Witherspoon Middle School. $5. 7 p.m.: Iv y Counseling Group hosts a session on essential oils by certified aromatherapist Susan Niedt. Register at (609) 688-8300 or email info@volitionwellness.com. 8 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers holds a Contra Dance at Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive (instruction at 7:30 p.m.). Ridge Kennedy with the Princeton Pickup Band. $10. Thursday, January 24 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: The Princeton Farmers Market is at the Princeton Family YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. 6:30 p.m.: At Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, “Inside Peto’s World: An Evening with John F. Peto Studio,” with curator Harry Bower. $15 ($10 members). morven.org. Saturday, January 26 12 p.m.: At Ivy Counseling Group, 182 Tamarack Circle Skillman, “Don’t Catch a Cold this Winter: With Advanced Eden Energy Practitioner Alla Rosina.” Free. RSVP at (609) 688-8300. 2 p.m.: At Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, “Politics Behind the Painting: Trumbull’s “Declaration of Independence,” talk by local historian John Baxter on Richard Stockton and his portrait in the famous painting. morven.org. 8 p.m.: Klezmer music by the Strauss/Warschauer Duo at The Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nass au St reet. C antor Jef f Warschauer and his wife, Deborah Strauss, perform w it h clar inet ist Michael Winograd and violinist Jake Shulman-Ment. A Yiddish dance session follows; dessert will be served. $25 ($14 members). www.thejewishcenter.org. Sunday, January 27 1 to 4 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Sunday Winery Music Series. Monday, January 28 5 to 9:15 p.m.: Princeton Community Works Conference at Frist Campus Center, Princeton University. All are welcome to this event focused on the nonprofit community. $40. princetoncommunityworks.org. Wednesday, January 30 8 p.m.: Princeton Country Dancers holds a Contra Dance at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive (instruction at 7:30 p.m.). Bob Isaacs with Rhythmic Heart. $10 (free for 35 and under). Thursday, January 31 11 a.m.: At Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, “Still Life Stew” storytime and painting session. Children take home paintings and stew recipes. $11 per family. www.morven.org. Saturday, February 2 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: The West Windsor Community Farmers Market indoor market is at Windsor Athletic Club, 99 Clarksville Road. ALBO entertains; fresh food drive benefits Arm in Arm Food Pantries. 1 to 4 p.m.: At Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road, Wassailing the Apple Trees. 2-4 p.m.: Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, hosts a celebration of Chinese New Year for all ages with traditional music and instruments, martial

arts, calligraphy, painting, da nce, or iga m i, ga m e s, crafts, and more. To register, visit princetonlibrary.org or call (609) 924-9529. 7:30 p.m.: Central Jersey Dance Society presents the Salsa Sensation Dance at the Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. Lesson from 7:30 to 8:30, followed by open dancing till 11:30 to Latin Mix music. No partner needed. $10$15. centraljerseydance.org. Monday, February 4 5 p.m.: Free legal workshop — protecting your family from the cost of aging. At Acorn Glen Assisted Living, 775 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton. Wednesday, February 6 6 and 9 p.m.: Princeton University Concerts presents Messiaen’s “Quartet for the End of Time,” composed in a W WII concentration camp, at Richardson Auditorium. princetonuniversity concerts.org. 7 p.m.: At Ivy Counseling Group, 182 Tamarack Circle, Skillman, “Introduction to Self-Love: Simple Practices to Acknowledge Your Worth and Foster SelfLove with Counseling Intern and Wellness Advocate Erin Brendel.” Free. Thursday February 7 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: The Princeton Farmers Market is at the Princeton Family YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. 5 :30 p.m.: Downsizing demo — Where do I begin? At Acorn Glen Assisted Living, 775 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton. Saturday, February 9 Cupid’s Chase, the annual 5K to help support people with disabilities, starts at Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street. For more information and to register, visit comop.org. Sunday, February 10 4 p.m.: Bravura Chamber Music concert at Monroe Township Senior Center, 12 Halsey Reed Road, Monroe Township. The concert highlights prominent women composers of the late 19th century. $10-$12 (students free). Monday, February 11 7 to 9 p.m.: PFLAG, a support group for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals, meets at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street. pflagprinceton.org. Sunday, February 17 4 p.m.: The Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs does a choral reading of Mozart’s “Coronation Mass” and Haydn’s “Lord Nelson Mass,” at t he Unitar ian Church, Route 206 at Cherry Hill Road. Choral singers welcome, no auditions. $10 (free for students and nonsinging guests). Visit princetonol.com/groups/psma/. Thursday, February 21 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: The Princeton Farmers Market is at the Princeton Family YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. Sunday, February 24 3 p.m.: The Klez Dispensers perform a klezmer music program at Richardson Auditorium. $10 (free for seniors, children, students). t icket s.pr i nceton.e du or (609) 258-9229.

ONLINE www.towntopics.com


T

his was one of the nicest massage experiences I ever had. Everything about it was wonderful, including the relaxing atmosphere and the experienced, friendly massage therapist.” This recent comment came

IT’S NEW To Us

from a Princeton resident after a visit to Tranquility Den, the new massage spa in the Princeton Shopping Center. It is only one of a series of rave reviews that have been bestowed upon the new establishment since its opening in October. “We are pleased and encouraged that so many people love the spa,” says owner Ellen Kogan. “We always try to go above and beyond for our guests. Even though we are new, we already have many regulars, and I think that’s a testament to the quality experience we offer.” Important Benefit Tranquility Den is unlike any other massage establishment in the area, says Kogan. “What makes us special is our unique, whimsical ambiance and our commitment to giving our guests an exceptional experience. Why do people want to get a massage? Because they have a pain, or injury, or they’ve had a bad day and feel stressed. We always try to make our guests feel better physically and emotionally.

“The most important benefit of a massage is that it is helpful in relieving stress. We live in a world that is too stressful. Now, our guests can come to a place where there are no phones ringing; the lighting is dim, it smells good, and they can escape from the daily stress of their lives.” Several types of massage treatments are available, including the traditional full body Swedish and deep tissue massages. One of the ways Tranquility Den is set apart, however, is by its focus on the Den Massage. “This is our house specialty,” explains Kogan. “This massage doesn’t require disrobing; just wear loose, comfortable clothing. Your session starts with a soothing neck, shoulder, and back massage as you enjoy a foot soak in a therapeutic blend of Chinese herbs. Then you lie back in a big, plush recliner; we cover you with a cozy blanket and give you a toasty shoulder wrap, and you enjoy a wonderful lower leg and foot massage. This is an hour of pure relaxation and comfort.” The Tranquility Den massage experience is special in many ways, she adds, including its focus on all the senses. “A massage here is a treat for all the senses. We awaken and engage the senses, and create a nurturing environment that makes people feel wanted, happy, and safe. “From the moment you first come in, when we offer you a cup of hot, calming tea and your favorite essential oil, to the time you leave, we focus

NEW YEAR, NEW LOOK:

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our attention on providing you with tranquility for your mind, body, and soul. A massage can heal emotionally, too.” Close Attention Ellen Kogan’s experience as an interior designer and her extensive travels have given an added dimension in her new role as spa owner. She is focused on providing the best in every way for her clients. This includes the overall environment as well as specific massage treatments. “First, I am a professional spa-goer. I visit spas fairly regularly at home and on vacation, and I take pride in finding the best. As a designer, I pay close attention to detail, and I absorb everything around me like a sponge. I have high standards for what a great experience should be. “During my research, I went to a lot of workshops. I believe it is important to learn something every day, and I immerse myself in whatever I am doing. At Tranquility Den, we have highly experienced licensed massage therapists, and they receive additional Tranquility Den training here. We also have daily staff meetings to discuss customer feedback so that we can continuously improve the experience we offer to our guests. “Our priority is to provide people with a memorable experience from beginning to end. Our ambiance is one-of-a-kind. For example, every piece of furniture is handpicked with love. We have antique pieces in the waiting area and top-of-theline, plush recliners for our

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Den massage. We have a curated playlist of soothing background music, dim lighting, and an overall decor to create a relaxing, serene atmosphere.” Quiet Relaxation Four separate massage spaces are available for clients, from private to semiprivate. In the case of Den massages, Kogan points out that several clients can be together for group get-togethers, such as bachelorette parties, birthday celebrations, corporate events, book club meetings, girls’ night out, and other occasions. “I love to see everyone having a good time together — perhaps a group of women experiencing a Den massage and having fun with friends. It can also be an opportunity for a couple to have a romantic date, or, of course, for an individual to enjoy a time of peaceful, quiet relaxation. “We also offer our space for cocktail parties, and we can accommodate up to 40 people. These are becoming very popular, and it’s wonderful to see people enjoying themselves at a party, which can also include a massage, if they wish.” “I love meeting our guests,” she continues. “I’m a people person. I have lots of interests, and there are so many interesting people here in Princeton and the surrounding towns, and from many backgrounds. We have clients from all over the world.” Right Location Massages are typically one hour or 90 minutes, and begin at $88 ($68 for members). Memberships are available for $80 per month, entitling a member to a complimentary

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HEALING TOUCH: “We care a lot about our guests, and we want to help them relax. We make them feel welcome and comfortable, and give them a great relaxation experience to make their day a little better.” Ellen Kogan, owner of Tranquility Den in the Princeton Shopping Center, looks forward to introducing more people to the healing benefits of massage. 90-minute Den massage or a one-hour Swedish massage as well as special discounts on products, exclusive invitations and promotions, an interior design consultation, free use of the event space, and many other benefits. Kogan is especially pleased with the Princeton Shopping Center setting with its easy, convenient parking and central location. “It had to be the right location for us, and this is just right. The courtyard is beautiful with its attractive landscaping, and it makes me very happy to be here.” In this time of heightened stress in our country and world, and with added pressure on overworked minds and bodies, the value of the healing power of a gentle touch has never been greater.

Ellen Kogan is working hard to provide clients with just such an experience. “My job is to make people comfortable. We listen carefully to everyone’s needs and make sure they are met. I am always thinking about how we can make things even better. The quality and care and the exceptional experience we offer does set us apart. People will feel soothed and comforted in a warm and nurturing environment. We do our very best for them.” Tranquility Den is open Tuesday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 12 to 6 p.m. (609) 285-5147. Website: www. tranquilitydenmassage.com. —Jean Stratton

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

Tranquility Den at Princeton Shopping Center Is a New Spa for Massage and Relaxation

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 30

S ports

Stephens Displays Senior Leadership, Passion, As PU Men’s Hoops Edges Penn in Ivy Opener

M

yles Stephens has been battling an injured knee in recent weeks, but he was determined to block out the pain as the Princeton University men’s basketball team hosted Penn last Saturday in the Ivy League opener. “I haven’t played much this past week, trying to get it better,” said senior guard Stephens, a native of nearby Lawrenceville. “It is Penn, so ‘by any means necessary’ is what we say.” The 6’5, 210-pound Stephens displayed a mean game in the paint against the Quakers, pulling down a career-high 16 rebounds and chipping in 11 points to help Princeton pull out a 68-65 overtime nail-biter in front of a throng of 4,212 packing Jadwin Gym. Stephens was determined to do whatever necessary to help the Tigers prevail. “We definitely wanted this win; I wanted to do anything I can to help this team win,” said Stephens, who wore a brace on his right knee. “ We h a v e n e e d e d r ebounds a lot lately so that was something I was trying to do.” Princeton head coach Mitch Henderson tipped his hat to Stephens and his gritty effort. “Myles played like a dominant senior, 16 rebounds is unbelievable,” asserted Hen-

derson. “He is passionate, he is emotional. I just thought that the guys really approached the game in the right way and we are really happy with that.” Henderson knew his team needed passion to overcome a dogged and talented Penn squad which went on a 11-3 run in the last five minutes of regulation to force overtime. “That was a great win, that is a really good team,” said Henderson, whose squad improved to 8-5 overall. “It felt very much like the Penn games that I remember as a player. That was a tense, heavy game; I just felt it tight here (pointing to his heart). We just happened to make a couple of more plays. We were fortunate, we made some mistakes in situations, like giving the ball back to them at the end of the game and missed some free throws. That usually costs you.” Princeron was fortunate to have junior center Richmond Aririguzoh in top form as he tallied a career-high 20 points and battled Penn star A.J. Brodeur tooth-and-nail in the paint. “Richmond was terrific on both ends,” said Henderson of Aririguzoh who was later named the Ivy Player of the Week for the first time in his career.

“Richmond is putting in his time and it is showing up. That is what you want a team to be about.” Aririguzoh knew that he faced a major challenge in his battle with junior standout Brodeur, who ended up with 18 points and 15 rebounds. “He is an incredibly tough player to guard,” said Aririguzoh of Brodeur. “He is really talented, he knows how to use his body and the angles so you just have to be as solid as you can. He is just a really great player so you have to stay in front him and make him take the toughest shots possible.” Princeton showed mental toughness by coming through in overtime after weathering the late Penn run. “I was absolutely concerned, [Devon] Goodman made the 3 to tie it,” said Henderson “I thought we were getting good looks, but the whole bench was thinking ‘we have got to go inside.’ In overtime, we struggled to get going. We lost four overtime games last year in the league and it is really nice to get one here and feel like that is over.” Stephens saw the triumph as a big step for the Tigers. “We use it as fuel, we talk about it all the time,” said Stephens. “That is the dif-

ference from last year to this year; those four overtime games as a loss and then coming out on top this time and being 1-0, that is all we could ask for.” Henderson is seeing growth in his squad it has posted wins in four of its last five games, including a 67-66 win at No. 17 Arizona State on December 29. “We are not the same team; we are totally different,” said Henderson. “We came back from Arizona State different; we went down to Duke different. The non-conference schedule was great for us. It was a hard schedule, it prepared us. We are a different from a month ago and we need to be different than we are right now in February.” The Tigers face a hard test next week as they have a rematch against Penn (10-5) on January 12 in Philadelphia at The Palestra. “Next week is going to be hell; it is going to be brutal,” said Henderson. “We will have a little fun tonight and then we will get right back at it.” Looking ahead, Henderson knows his team faces a brutal campaign this winter in a league featuring parity across the board. “Everybody has good players, there is good coaching around the league,” added Henderson. “It is going to be a grind.” Stephens, for his part, is looking forward to that grind. “Top to bottom, the

BOUND FOR GLORY: Princeton University men’s basketball player Myles Stephens, left, snags a rebound last Saturday against Penn. Senior star Stephens grabbed a career-high boards and scored 11 points to help Princeton edge the Quakers 68-65 in overtime in the Ivy League opener for both teams. The Tigers, now 8-5 overall, will have a rematch against Penn on January 12 in Philadelphia at The Palestra. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Ivy League is so good; it has gotten better every single year I have been here,” said Stephens. “This first game has shown it is going to be like this every night. It is going to be

a tough battle and then the next night on these back-tobacks, is going to another tough battle. We have got to be ready for that.” —Bill Alden

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When the Princeton Univer sit y wom en’s hockey team hosted Merrimack for a two-game set in its first action after the holiday break, Stephanie Sucharda realized that the clock is ticking on her college career. For senior defenseman and team captain Sucharda, the holidays drove home the fact that she only has weeks left with the Tigers. “It is kind of sad, coming back from Christmas break, you realize that you are halfway done the season,” said Sucharda, a 5’8 native of Mississauga, Ontario. “I am making the most of everything that we have left. I think this one of the favorite teams I have been on in my hockey career. I am happy that this will be the group of girls that I end my hockey career with. It definitely feels good and we have a good team this year, so I am hoping to make it last as long as possible.” S u charda had a go o d weekend as the Tigers returned from holiday break by tying Merrimack 1-1 on December 30 and then beating the Warriors 5-3 a day later. In the second game, Sucharda helped jump start the Tiger offense, assisting on a goal by Carly Bullock as the Tigers knotted the game at 1-1 and then scoring a power play goal in the waning moments of the first period to put Princeton ahead 3-1. “I haven’t been playing

with Claire [Thompson] too much this year and we were put back together,” said Sucharda reflecting on her assist. “We had some good chemistry last year. I just passed it to to her, she moved it up and whipped it across to [Carly] Bullock. With Bullock in the slot, you can’t really go wrong with that.” On her goal, which came with 48 seconds left in the period, Sucharda blasted a one-timer from the point. “It felt good to get that for sure; we were on the power play and there was some good movement up top between Sarah Verbeek, Mariah Keopple and myself and then Keopple passed it to me,” said Sucharda. “[Sharon] Frankel had a great screen in front and Annie MacDonald did as well. The goalie couldn’t see a single thing and that whole side of the net was open. It feels really good for our second power play unit to get a goal like that, it was pretty important in the game.” This past weekend, Sucharda kept up her superb play as Princeton defeated Harvard 4-1 on Friday and Dartmouth 5-2 on Saturday. Sucharda tallied an assist against the Crimson and added a goal a day later to help the fifth-ranked Tigers extend their program-record unbeaten streak to 16 (120-4). “We act ually beat t he record when I was a freshman,” said Sucharda, noting

that the previous mark was 12. “We were the last ones to set the record; it definitely feels good. I think that we have such a solid team from the freshmen to the seniors. Everyone is fully bought in and we have great team chemistr y. If someone is playing really well, they will play more. If someone is injured, we can afford to put out other players. It really comes down to depth and the girls we have in the locker room. They have been just great together.” P r i nce ton h e ad coach Cara Morey credited Sucharda leading the way in the win over Merrimack. “I thought Sucharda played great; it was one of her best games,” said Morey of Sucharda, who now has three goals and six assists on the season, giving her 59 points in her career on nine goals and 50 assists. “She is just steady in the back. She had good gaps, she jumped into the rush, and had a great goal. She played amazing, she was probably our best one tonight.” Tiger freshman standout Sarah Fillier is emerging as one of the best players in the ECACH, having been named the league’s Rookie of the Month for December. Fillier now has 26 points on 10 goals and 16 assists, second on the team to the 28 (13 goals, 15 assists) scored by junior standout Bullock. “She is just getting bet-

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to face them,” said Morey. “In some way, we learn from all these things. We have to learn now how to play with a 5-1 lead and maybe stay a little more disciplined.” With Princeton showing better discipline in the wins over Har vard and Dar tmouth as it improved to 12-2-4 overall and 10-0-2 ECAC Hockey, Morey is focused on the preseason not streak milestones. “We are just trying to get better every single day and working towards playoffs,” said Morey, whose team plays at Cornell on January 11 and at Colgate on January 12 before going on hiatus for exams. “The pressure was getting to 13 to own the record and now at this point, it doesn’t

matter to me. We need to win the big games to get the team ready so when the playoffs come we are firing on all cylinders.” Sucharda, for her part, is fired up to see what the Tigers can do over the rest of the season. “It is keeping up the conditioning that we have; as it gets late in the season, a lot of teams lose their legs in the third period,” said Sucharda. “We have one of the fittest teams in the league so I don’t think that will be a huge problem so continuing that as an emphasis is big. It is also continuing to play the game well. We have played different teams and have done well against all of them.” —Bill Alden

FINAL PUSH: Princeton University women’s hockey player Stephanie Sucharda fires the puck in recent action. Last weekend, senior defenseman and team captain Sucharda starred as Princeton defeated Harvard 4-1 on Friday and Dartmouth 5-2 on Saturday. Sucharda tallied an assist against the Crimson and added a goal a day later to help the fifth-ranked Tigers extend their program-record unbeaten streak to 16. Princeton, now 12-2-4 overall and 10-0-2 ECAC Hockey, plays at Cornell on January 11 and at Colgate on January 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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ter and better because she is feeling more comfortable in our systems and with her teammates,” said Morey. “She can really elevated her game at this point.” Morey didn’t like the way Princeton got sloppy late in the second game against Merrimack. “You are not going to win too many games if you take eight penalties,” said Morey. “We did win the game because we put so much in the bank. But for me it is the consistency; we need to expect better of ourselves there.” In Morey’s view, getting back into action with the weekend against Merrimack was a valuable experience. “I thought this was a great series, Merrimack is a very strong team so it was good

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

Sucharda Making Most of Senior Campaign, Sizzling PU Women’s Hockey on 12-0-4 Run

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 32

Picking Up his Scoring for PU Men’s Hockey, Defenseman Topatigh Emerging as Standout Having emerged as a key defenseman for the Princeton University men’s hockey team in his first two years with the program, Derek Topatigh was ready to shoulder more responsibility in his junior campaign. “We have a lot of young defense, me and [Josh] Teves, we really have to try and step and be leaders this year,” said Topatigh, “It has been a learning process for the young guys.” As Princeton returned from its holiday break to host a twogame set against Maine in the last weekend of December, Topatigh and his teammates were primed to get back on the winning track. “We have been on a bit of a

skid before this weekend; we all came back from Christmas break mentally prepared and ready to go,” said Topatigh, a 5’11, 185-pound native of Mississauga, Ontario. That mindset paid dividends as Princeton edged Maine 1-0 on December 28 and then pulled away to a 7-3 win over the Black Bears a day later. “We have been finding our stride and getting some good bounces and able to convert some points too,” said Topatigh, reflecting on the sweep of Maine. In the 7-3 win, Topatigh helped the Tigers get in stride, scoring the first goal of the evening, finding the back of the net 6:12 into the contest.

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“Jake Paganelli just got in there; he was flying through the middle and tried to go five hole,” said Topatigh. “It was just lying here in the crease, the goalie didn’t know where it was and I just followed up. I was able to bang it in fortunately enough.” Topatigh’s tally triggered a 3-0 first period run and Princeton never looked back on the way to the 7-3 triumph. “It was awesome, it was much needed and it was a lot of fun,” said Topatigh, who didn’t have a lot of fun this past weekend as the Tigers lost 3-2 to Cornell on Friday and 4-3 to Colgate a day later to drop to 5-10-2 overall. Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty credits Topatigh with giving the defensive unit a much-needed boost this winter. “He has been very good this year, he has been one of our most improved players,” said Fogarty of Topatigh, who has five goals and three assists so far this season after totaling four goals with 15 assists in his first two seasons. “He was very good last year but this year he has taken a nice step offensively as well.” In assessing his improved scoring, Topatigh said it comes down to a simple formula. “It is definitely something I worked on but like [assistant coach] Brad Dexter says, the offense will come as long as you get it out of the d-zone as fast as you can,” said Topatigh. “The more time you have to play in the offensive zone, the more points you are going to get.” —Bill Alden

Since getting off to a 3-1-1 start, inconsistency has become the constant for the Princeton University men’s hockey team since mid-November. The Tigers have gone 2-91 in that stretch and a frustrating 3-2 loss to Cornell last Friday evening served as a microcosm of that uneven play. Princeton dug a 2-0 hole in the first period and then fought back to tie the game at 2-2 early in the third period only 3-2 on a goal that was originally waved off but hen reinstate after official review. Sophomore defenseman Matthew Thom acknowledged that the Tigers lacked zip in the first period. “We just got to be a lot harder, they were working us in our zone beating us to battles, that just can’t happen if you want to win games,” said Thom, a 6’3, 200-pound native of Oakville, Ontario. “We had to bear down, start winning the battles, hit them more and be more physical.” In the second period, the Tigers played harder, getting more puck possession and outshooting the Big Red 12-10. “We had a pretty good couple of shifts in the second period,” said Thom. “We definitely hemmed them in a couple of times; we had a couple of chances. It was a good period.” Thom cut the Cornell lead in half as he scored with 3:54 left in the period. “Mark [Paolini] supported me right off the break out of the zone and had a great rush up the side,” recalled Thom. “He hit me cross ice and I just managed to squeak it in.” Midway through the third period, Thom helped Princeton knot the contest at 2-2, assisting on a goal by Corey Andonovski. “I just wanted to get it on net and get it deep, “ said Thom.

  

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PU Men’s Hockey Produces Good Moments But Inconsistency Results in 0-2 Weekend “It hit their goalie’s shoulder and Ando was there for the rebound and buried it hard.” But with 7:05 left, Cornell scored the decisive goal as the officials overruled the original call of goalie interference which had appeared to negate the tally. “We knew they would be coming out hard, we resisted pretty well,” said Thom. “Unfortunately that goal got called there.” While Thom was disappointed with the outcome against the Big Red, he is heartened by the progress he is making in his second year of college hockey. “Coming into this year, I was definitely feeling a lot more comfortable,” said Thom, who has three goals and two assists so far this season after tallying seven assists last winter. “Being a second year defenseman, I am just trying to rush the puck a little more and contribute a little more offensively and just be stronger on the puck.” Getting paired up with senior star defenseman and team captain Josh Teves has helped Thom be a stronger player. “It is awesome; he is a phenomenal defenseman as everyone knows,” said Thom. “He supports me whenever I go and I try whenever he goes and sometimes you kind of watch him. He is a great guy to play with.” Although Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty didn’t like what he saw from his team in the first period against Cornell, he was encouraged by how things went after that. “We weren’t getting loose pucks with our second man, the first man was trying to do too much,” said Fogarty. “Then we got second person help in the second and third period and I thought we played a good 40 minutes.”

In reflecting on the team’s inconsistency, Fogarty said that his players need to be self starters. “We have to stay on them but it has to come from within,” said Fogarty. “They have to be committed to get the win at all costs. It was something we tweaked in the first intermission; we did an effective job after that.” Princeton has been getting increasingly effective play from Thom along the blue line. “He has been playing good, he has taken a nice step offensively, “ said Fogarty of Thom. “He is playing with Teves the last two years. He is the guy who believes he has to stay back and let Josh go. He is taking initiative and jumping into the play this year.” The Tigers played hard a night later against Colgate, jumping out to a 2-1 first period lead but was doomed again by some uneven play, surrendering three unanswered goals on the way to a 4-3 defeat as they moved to 5-10-2 overall and 3-6-1 ECAC Hockey. In the wake of the loss to Cornell, Fogarty was still upbeat about team’s prospects going forward. “You have to take some stuff that we did,” said Fogarty, whose team will look to get in the winning track when it hosts Harvard on January 11 and Dartmouth in January 12. “It has been two slow periods over our last four games. It is our goal to get better and get the younger guys involved. They are doing well.” In Thom’s view, if the Tigers play with the urgency they displayed in the final periods against Cornell, things will work out well. “I think after first period we are playing well; we started playing like we could,” said Thom. “We forechecked hard. We got pucks out fast and efficiently. If we just keep doing that going forward, it will be a good rest of the season.” —Bill Alden

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THOM CRUISE: Princeton University men’s hockey player Matthew Thom glides ip the ice in recent action. Last Friday, sophomore defenseman Thom contributed a goal and an assist as Princeton lost 3-2 to visiting Cornell. A night later Thom and the Tigers fell 4-3 to Colgate. Princeton, now 5-10-2 overall and 3-6-1 ECAC Hockey, will look to get in the winning track when they host Harvard on January 11 and Dartmouth in January 12. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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With the Princeton University women’s basketball team trailing visiting Penn 37-34 midway through the third quarter last Saturday in the Ivy League opener, Bella Alarie took control of the contest. Princeton junior star Alarie scored eight points over the last 3:41 of the quarter to help the Tigers forge ahead 44-39. “We definitely felt like we needed to play off our momentum we took in the third quarter,” said Alarie. “I think this crowd was amazing tonight. The amount of people who showed up and were cheering us on was really special. We played off their energy.” But over the last 12 minutes, Penn showed more energy, outscoring Princeton 27-16 to pull out a 66-60 win before 1,104 in Jadwin Gym

in a riveting contest emblematic of the heated rivalry between league rivals. “It is a whole new season once Ivy League play starts and you always want to start out with a win,” said Alarie. “Every game really matters where with non-conference, it doesn’t matter. We all approach these games really seriously. These are the most important games of our season so it does feel really different in these games.” While Alarie posted a double-double on the day with 21 points and 17 rebounds, those statistics didn’t mean to her as much as the final numbers on the scoreboard. “They are definitely a team that really relies on their posts and it is always going to be my job, Taylor Baur’s job, and Sydney Jordan’s job to shut down the post players,” said Alarie,

PENNED IN: Princeton University women’s basketball player Bella Alarie puts up a shot under duress as the Tigers hosted Penn last Saturday. Junior star Alarie posted a double-double with 21 points and 17 rebounds but it was not enough as Princeton fell 66-60 in the Ivy League opener for both teams. The Tigers, who dropped to 8-8 overall and saw their sevengame winning streak snapped, will now be on hiatus for exam break and return to action when they play at Columbia on February 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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whose eyes were reddened by some post-game tears. “I think we did an OK job of that; we do have a lot to learn from this game. I had a good line but I am so very disappointed in the outcome. I could have made more free throws, you just want to leave it all on the floor.” Having missed the team’s first 11 games this season due to a broke right arm suffered in preseason practice, Alarie is in a good place as she has returned to the court. “It is still an adjustment to have way more games under your belt is always helpful but I felt like every game I have improved,” said Alarie, a 6’4 native of Bethesda, Md., who is averaging 19.6 points and 9.6 rebound a game in seven appearances. “I learned more and more, like how I can really benefit this team and help them. As for my injury, that is in the past.” Pr inceton head coach Courtney Banghart disappointed by her team’s performance as it fell to 8-8 overall and saw its seven-game winning streak snapped. “We didn’t play very well, which is good to know that we still had a chance,” said Banghart. “That was not the Princeton team, we are better than that. We gave up 27 points in the fourth quarter. We gave No. 33 [Phoebe Sterba] seven 3s, that is the game. We didn’t finish possessions. I didn’t like any part of the game. I didn’t think we played well on either side of the ball. I like Bella’s numbers but this was not the team I have been coaching for two months. While losing the Ivy opener stung, Banghart, a former Dartmouth standout who is in her 12th season at the helm of the Tigers, knows there is a lot of basketball to be played. “I have been in the league now for almost 20 years and I won well over half of the Ivy League titles that I have been in the league,” said Banghart. “If you win 12 games, you win the league so we got to win 12 and now we have 13 games to do it.” With the Tigers on hiatus for exam break and back in action when they play at Columbia on February 1, the players will lick their wounds and get primed for the thick of the Ivy campaign. “I like our pieces,” said Banghart, noting that the Tigers suffered a loss to Yale in the second weekend of Ivy play last winter and rolled to the regular season title and won the league’s postseason tournament. “It is good to get you eyes on who I think will be in the top half of the league already. I think us and Penn will be in the top half. They will get better by February 26 when we play them and so will we. The key will be who plays better in that game.” Alarie, for her part, is confident that the lessons gained from the defeat to the Quakers will help Princeton get better and better over the rest of the winter. “We have a whole month of January with nothing but exams and time to prepare,” said Alarie. “I think we are going to build off of this game. We have learned a lot about ourselves and about Penn today and how we need to approach the rest of our games and the rest of the season.” —Bill Alden

Tiger Women’s Track Falls to Navy

PU Sports Roundup Princeton Wrestling Shines at F&M Open

Earning three individual titles, the Princeton University wrestling team excelled at the Franklin & Marshall Open last Saturday in Lancaster, Pa. Freshman Quincy Monday won the title at 157 pounds at while junior Kevin Parker prevailed at 184 and freshman Travis Stefanik triumphed at 174 pounds. The Tigers were assured of the title at 174 as Stefanik out-dueled fellow Princeton freshman Grant Cuomo in a 10-9 nail-biter. Princeton hosts North Carolina on January 11 at Dillon Gym and Oklahoma State on January 12 at Jadwin Gym.

Tiger Men’s Swimming Edges Navy 152-148

Led by senior standouts Cole Buese and Murphy McQuet, the Princeton University men’s swimming team edged Navy 152-148 last Saturday. Buese placed first in the 100 and 200 backstroke races as well as the 100 butterfly while McQuet prevailed in the 100 and 200 freestyle events. Princeton, now 7- 0, is next in action when it competes in the annual HYP meet from February 2-4 at Cambridge, Mass.

PU Men’s Volleyball Falls to Purdue Fort Wayne

G eorge Hu h man n and Parker Dixon starred in a losing cause as the Princeton University men’s volleyball team fell 3-0 to No. 15 Purdue Fort Wayne last Saturday in Fort Wayne, Ind. Ju n ior Hu h man n con tributed 14 kills and three blocks, wh ile clas smate Di xon had 13 k ills, si x digs, and two blocks, but it wasn’t enough as Purdue Fort Wayne prevailed 25-21, 26-24, 25-18. The Tigers, now 0-4, face UC-Irvine on January 11 and Erskine on January 12 with both matches to take place in Fairfax, Va.

ing in the Navy Invitational on January 12 at Annapolis, Md.

Princeton Men’s Track Defeats Navy

Getting some superb performances from its corps of middles distance r unners, the Pr inceton University women’s track team bat t led hard in a 89 - 83 loss to Nav y last Sunday in Jadwin Gym. Senior Mimi Buscher placed first in the mile while senior Jackie Berardo won the 500 meters, sophomore Sophie Cantine prevailed in the 800, and senior Laura Hergenrother was victorious in the 1,000. Princeton will be compet-

Excelling in the field events, the Princeton University men’s track team defeated Navy 95-86 last Sunday in Jadwin Gym. Senior Adam Kelly placed first in the weight throw and Jesse Thibodeau won the long jump to provide highlights in the victory for the Tigers. Princeton is next in action when it takes part in the Navy Invitational on January 12 at Annapolis, Md.

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

PU Women’s Hoops Gets Big Game from Alarie But Fades Late in Loss to Penn in Ivy Opener


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 34

With Podgalsky Making Noise on Defense, PHS Boys’ Hockey Stifles Robbinsville 6-1

“Ryan is a physical player “Nate had a good game As a senior defenseman and assistant captain for the and he has a good head on today, he played hard,” said Princeton High boys’ hock- his shoulders,” said Podgal- Chase. “He pinched when ey team, Nathan Podgalsky sky. “He knows where to he should and he made a couple of nice passes. We knows he has to speak up be.” this winter. When Robbinsville scored need that down the stretch. “I am definitely a voice, a power play goal early in It is nice to score goals but ______________ you have to keep the boys the third period to make it you have to play well in your _______________ Date & Time: ______________________ a 3-1 game, Podgalsky was end and it starts with the demotivated,” said Podgalsky. in the right place “You got to keep them in our ad, scheduled to run ___________________.moments fense.” later, setting up a goal by Fresh man goalie Dan line.’ oughly and pay special attentionPHS to the following:star Colm iel Prokoshin played well sophomore Last Monday, Podgalsky ill tell and us it’s okay) PHS was motivated to Trainor as the Little Tigers against the Ravens, making 20 saves on the evening. stifle Robbinsville as they regained momentum. “I did a couple of pinches out to a 3-0 lead af�jumped Fax number � Address � Expiration Date “Daniel tracks the puck ter two periods and cruised to keep it in on the boards we l l,” s a i d Ch as e. “H e to a 6-1 victory, improving and then Colm [Trainor] m ove s wel l s ide -to - s ide came down and I saw that with the puck. He is not as to 9-4-1. “We have been having right away,” recalled Pod- big of a body so he has got a little bit of trouble with galsky, who also assisted to come out and be a little our defense but tonight we on a goal by Austin Micale more aggressive and cover just really connected,” said later in the period. “It is a his angles.” Chase was looking for his Podgalsky. “We were run- Trainor, I knew it was going squad to be more aggressive ning what we wanted to run, to go in.” PH S h e a d c o ach T i m collectively on defense. which was good.” “We are trying to shore Podgalsky enjoys running Chase liked what he saw with defensive partner ju- from Podgalsky in the win up that part of our game,” over the Ravens. said Chase. “We have been nior Ryan McCormick. struggling with consistency of playing hard in our end. Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In I was more worried about Hunan ~ Szechuan that than how many goals we scored tonight.” Malaysian ~ Vietnamese Answering the RobbinsDaily Specials • Catering Available ville goal, though, was a key 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950 moment for PHS. “That was good, we responded,” said Chase. “We came out a little flat on that Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc and they capitalized on it. 609-430-1195 We came right out and put Wellstree.com one back in so it was nice to see the good response.” Wit h t he L it t le Tigers Taking care of Princeton’s trees hav ing posted t wo w ins since a 7-3 loss to Hun last Local family owned business Wednesday, Chase is hoping for over 40 years that PHS can get in a roll in January.

“We were playing sloppy that day and Hun is a good team, so if you are not going to play well, it is going hurt,” said Chase, whose squad plays St. John Vianney at Baker Rink on January 10 and then faces Hopewell Valley on January 11 and Notre Dame on January 15, with both of those games to take place at the Mercer County Park rink. “In a game or two, that will be a good showing on whet her we can contin ue that good play or revert back to the old ways.” Podgalsky, for his part, be-

lieves that the win over Robbinsville could be a harbinger of good things to come. “This is definitely a good rebound from that,” said Podgalsky, referring to the Hun loss. “Every year, Robbinsville has given us a run for our money. We have St. John Vianney coming up, we definitely have to prepare for that and it should be a good game. We are not ready yet for the postseason but we are definitely a states qualification team.” —Bill Alden

PODCAST: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Nathan Podgalsky heads up the ice in a game earlier this season. Last Monday, senior defenseman and assistant captain Podgalsky led a solid defensive effort and contributed two assists to help PHS defeat Robbinsville 6-1. The Little Tigers, who improved to 9-4-1 with the win, play St. John Vianney at Hobey Baker Rink on January 10 and then face Hopewell Valley on January 11 and Notre Dame on January 15, with both of those games to take place at the Mercer County Park rink. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

All recyclables must be in official buckets and at the curb by 7:00 a.m. • NO ITEMS IN PLASTIC BAGS WILL BE COLLECTED

2019 MERCER COUNTY Curbside Recycling Schedule TUESDAY

Lawrence Jan. 14, 28 Feb. 11, 25 March 11, 25 April 8, 22 May 6, 20 June 3, 17

July 1, 15, 29 Aug. 12, 26 Sept. 9, 23 Oct. 7, 21 Nov. 4,18 Dec. 2, 16, 30

Princeton Jan. 7, 21 Feb. 4, 18 March 4, 18 April 1, 15, 29 May 13 June 1, 10, 24

July 8, 22 Aug. 5, 19 Sept. 7, 16, 30 Oct. 15, 28 Nov. 11, 25 Dec. 9, 23

SPECIAL

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EVENTS

Ewing Jan. 5, 15, 29 Feb. 12, 26 March 12, 26 April 9, 23 May 7, 21 June 4, 18

WEDNESDAY July 2, 16, 30 Aug. 13, 27 Sept. 10, 24 Oct. 8, 22 Nov. 5, 19 Dec. 3, 17, 31

Hopewell Township Hopewell Boro and Pennington Jan. 8, 22 July 9, 23 Feb. 5, 19 Aug. 6, 20 March 5, 19 Sept. 3, 17 April 2, 16, 30 Oct. 1, 15, 290 May 14, 28 Nov. 12, 26 June 11, 25 Dec. 10, 24

Entire City of Trenton Jan 9, 23 July 10, 24 Feb. 6, 20 Aug. 7, 21 March 6, 20 Sept. 4, 18 April 2, 17 Oct. 2, 16, 30 May 1, 15, 29 Nov. 13, 27 June 12, 26 Dec. 11, 28 Hamilton Zones 1 and 4 Jan. 2, 16, 30 July 3, 17, 31 Feb. 13, 27 Aug. 14, 28 March 13, 27 Sept. 11, 25 April 10, 24 Oct. 9, 23 May 8, 22 Nov. 6, 20 June 5, 19 Dec. 4, 18

Household Hazardous Waste Collection and Electronics Recycling Events Dempster Fire School (350 Lawrence Station Road)

March 30, June 29 and September 28

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FRIDAY

Hamilton Zone 2 Jan. 3, 17, 31 Feb. 14, 28 March 14, 28 April 11, 25 May 9, 23 June 6, 20

July 6, 18 Aug. 1, 15, 29 Sept. 12, 26 Oct. 10, 24 Nov. 7, 21 Dec. 5, 19

West Windsor Jan. 10, 24 Feb. 7, 21 March 7, 21 April 4, 18 May 2, 16, 30 June 13, 27

July 11, 25 Aug. 8, 22 Sept. 5, 19 Oct. 3, 17, 31 Nov. 14, 30 Dec. 12, 26

Hamilton Zone 3 Jan. 4, 18 Feb. 1, 15 March 1, 15, 29 April 12, 26 May 10, 24 June 7, 21

July 5, 19 Aug. 2, 16, 30 Sept. 13, 27 Oct. 11, 25 Nov. 8, 22 Dec. 6, 20

HOLIDAY COLLECTIONS If collection day falls on a holiday (Christmas, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day and Thanksgiving) collection will be the following SATURDAY.

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MUNICIPAL RECYCLING AND PUBLIC WORKS: Ewing / 882-3382 Hamilton / 890-3560 Hopewell Boro / 466-0168 Hopewell Twp / 537-0250 Lawrence Twp / 587-1894

Pennington Boro / 737-9440 Princeton / 688-2566 Trenton / 989-3151 West Windsor / 799-8370

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Usually, snow is a good friend to the gardener. It insulates the earth, blanketing the crowns of vulnerable perennials and preventing them from heaving out of the ground. But snow can also be a destructive force, twisting and breaking brittle shrubs such as Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Boxwoods, and Andromeda. Like many other problems, its destructive side is best dealt with by foresight. Here is a short list of precautions. Snow Drop: Damage will occur to foundation shrubs if snow builds up on the roof and then falls on the plants with all its weight. Where possible, foundation plantings should always be located just beyond the snow’s landing zone. Alternatively, snow brakes installed on the roof will help keep large masses of snow from cascading onto plants below. Snow Drag: Snow that piles up around woody plants may solidify into ice, dragging branches down and breaking them off at the base. Vulnerable shrubs should be tied up with organic twine, and a loose cat’s cradle woven between their branches for internal support. Wet and Late Snows: The worst snow, perhaps, is a wet snow, as it sticks to branches, quickly building up into dangerously heavy loads. The only thing more destructive is a wet, late snow, which also sticks to the surfaces of newly emerged leaves. When this occurs, you must take a broom, a bamboo pole, or just your hands, and dislodge as much snow as possible. Gently, of course, and not in a rage, for the idea is to shake away the snow, and not to punish the poor shrub.

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Eddie Evaldi is developing into a force for the Hun School boys’ hockey team this winter. Going from 5’3 as a freshman to 5’10 as a junior, Evaldi is a bigger, improved version of himself. “I have grown a lot; that has really helped my confidence,” said Evaldi. “With that, my speed has also increased. I have been working a lot on my acceleration stuff and have really brought that to my game.” Last Wednesday against Princeton High at Hobey Baker Rink, Evaldi displayed his all-around game, tallying three goals and two assists, helping Hun pull away to a 7-3 victory as it improved to 9-4. “It is always nice to pick up points, it is actually the first hat trick of my high school career,” said Evaldi. In reflecting on his big night, Evaldi was quick to credit his teammates. “I am playing with a Notre Dame commit [Matt Argentina], another kid, Brian Nelson, who has 35 points right now and Aidan McDowell, who should be playing Division I,” said Evaldi. “Hayden Watson is big and is a great player as well. I have really great players around me so it is not really hard to get so many points.” The Raiders were feeling great about themselves coming into the clash with PHS after reeling off five straight wins from December 28-30 on the way to earning the title at the Purple Puck tournament in the Washington,

D.C. area. “We were 3-4 and then we went into Purple Puck and going 5-0 really raised our confidence,” said Evaldi. “It was nice to win a tournament. We had in our minds that we going to win this game.” Hun head coach Ian McNally believes that his team’s run at the Purple Puck could be a turning point this season. “The Purple Puck was awesome,” said McNally. “It was kind of unexpected; we even said it feels like something special is happening here. We are finding different ways to win and different guys stepping up. Everything went right in the tournament, even when it didn’t, we made it right by the end of the game.” Evaldi has been stepping up for the Raiders, starring at both ends of the ice. “Eddie has been playing defense all of last year and so far this year; I decided to change it up a little bit so we have got him playing center now which gives him free rein,” said McNally. “Every second he has the puck, he draws more attention to himself. He takes it up here and moves all around and all of a sudden everyone is panicking and chasing him. He has got eyes in row back of his head and all of a sudden he is passing it to one of his teammates.” The team’s big five of Evaldi, junior defenseman Watson, sophomore forward Argentina, senior forward

Nelson, and senior defenseman McDowell have been getting in sync. “Those guys as a unit have become a pretty lethal combination,” said McNally. “Every time they are on the ice, they possess the puck. They are creating goal scoring chances. It is like watching a power play all the time. If you are against them on the other team, basically you can’t let them get the puck because the second they do, it is gone, they are up the ice and are behind the defense.” With Hun heading into the thick of its Mid-Atlantic Prep league (MAHL) schedule, McNally is confident his team will keep playing well as it looks to place in the top four and make the league playoffs. “We are in a tough spot because we are already 0-3 in our league, we usually only play one league game in December,” said McNally, whose team plays at Wyoming Seminary (Pa.) on January 9 in an MAHL contest and they plays a non-league game against Seton Hall Prep on January 11. “We are in a hole, but in the three years we have been doing this, somebody always finishes 3-3 and makes the playoffs. We can still finish 3-3 so that is the goal.” Evaldi, for his part, believes that the Raiders can achieve that goal. “We are going in the right direction, we are starting to click,” said Evaldi. “I feel there is a good possibility we are going to win those three games and go into the playoffs on a high.” —Bill Alden

Sophomore Goalie Wexler Shows Her Progress As PDS Girls’ Hockey Takes 2nd at Invitational Jillian Wexler enjoys keeping busy when she is on the ice for the Princeton Day School girls’ hockey team. Last Sunday as PDS hosted Chatham-Madison High at McGraw Rink in the championship game of its 29th annual Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational, sophomore star goalie Wexler was under the gun all afternoon. She ended up making 33 saves, starring in a losing cause as the Panthers fell 2-0. “I like to get a couple of shots to start off,” said Wexler. “It is not fun to sit there and get rusty. I thought I played my game.” Although Wexler was disappointed by the outcome, she liked the way the Panthers battled to the final buzzer. “We played Chatison last year two or three times and all of the game were close; I knew they would give us a nice test,” said Wexler. “We gave a good effort, they were definitely a challenge for us. We lack experience but everyone tried really hard.” Getting a lot of experience with her club team in addition to PDS has helped Wexler make a lot of progress from last winter. “My game overall has gotten better because I have been working with my goalie coach,” said Wexler, who plays for the New Jersey Colonials U16 club team and trains with its goaltending director Dan Gould. “My movement has improved, I have gotten a lot quicker; up and down, side to side. I am getting better at playing the puck too. The glove is something that is natu-

ral for me.” As the only goalie on the PDS roster the last two years, Wexler enjoys that responsibility. “Sometimes I wish I had one, but it is nice getting the games,” said Wexler. “I don’t feel any pressure, I just play my game.” PDS head coach Lorna Cook is impressed by how Wexler has stepped up her game. “You see can see the improvement in Jill from last year to this year, it is really apparent,” said Cook. “Her angles are getting much better, she has been working a lot with the goalie coach for her travel team. She played well last year for us; the improvement then was really obvious and it has continued. She hasn’t played goalie for that long actually. She is just a very competitive kid. Mentally, she has been much stronger; she doesn’t let a goal rattle her. She has been supporting her teammates really well and has been a really positive influence for a team that has a lot of new players.” Noting that PDS was welcoming back some players who had been sidelined, Cook liked the effort she got in the loss to Chatham. “We are going to play them at the end of the month and I think it is going to be a good matchup then too,” said Cook. “It will be a good measurement for us to see if we have improved and hopefully we will.” Starting the tournament with a 5-1 win over Summit High on Saturday was a good sign for the Panthers. “Going into the weekend, we

definitely wanted to get it back on track with a win; we had lost a bunch before the break while we were shorthanded,” said Cook, noting that such key performers as senior Sasha Sindhwani, junior Ellie Schofield, sophomore Madeline Chia, senior Flynn Gorman, and junior Caroline Haggerty have all been sidelined at various points this winter. “We wanted to make sure that we had a good effort and we did that yesterday so that took the pressure off a little but we still really wanted to win this game today. We knew that we have some players that have to get their game legs back.” With some big games on the horizon as PDS is slated to host Rye Country Day (N.Y.) on January 10 and Randolph High on January 15 as part of a busy month, Cook believes her team can get back on the winning track. “We have some tests ahead but I think we have some chances to build our confidence,” said Cook. “Hopefully we will have some good practices as well in there. I would like to have a winning record at the end of the month so will will see if we can get there.” Wexler, for her part, is confident that the Panthers can pass those tests. “We want to get a couple of wins against some teams that have given us a tough time in the past,” asserted Wexler. “It would be great to get a win against Mo-Beard or Immaculate Heart; we are coming up soon against them. There are a lot of players who have never played before and they are all getting better everyday. It is really nice to see.” —Bill Alden

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

With Talented Junior Evaldi Growing Into a Force, Hun Boys’ Hockey Building on Purple Puck Title

GLOVE WORK: Princeton Day School girls’ hockey goalie Jillian Wexler gloves a save in action last season. On Sunday, sophomore standout Wexler starred in a losing cause, making 33 saves as PDS fell 2-0 to Chatham-Madison High in the championship game of its Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational. The Panthers, who moved to 3-7 with the loss, are slated to host Rye Country Day (N.Y.) on January 10 and Randolph High on January 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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609-924-0147 FIRING AWAY: Hun School boys’ hockey player Eddie Evaldi sends the puck up the ice in recent action. Last Wednesday, junior star Evaldi tallied three goals and two assists to help Hun defeat Princeton High 7-3 at Hobey Baker Rink. The Raiders, now 9-4, play at Wyoming Seminary (Pa.) on January 9 and at Seton Hall Prep on January 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 36

Stuart Basketball: Nia Melvin led the way as Stuart defeated St. Andrew’s (Fla.) 69-27 last Saturday. Sophomore guard Melvin had 15 points and nine assists to help the Tar tans improve to 9-5. Stuart hosts Pennington on January 9 and Lawrenceville on January 11 before playing at St. Rose on January 12 and at Kent Place on January 12.

PDS Boys’ Basketball: Despite a big game from David “Diggy” Coit, PDS fell 8970 at Lawrenceville School last Saturday. Senior guard Coit poured in 24 points for the Panthers, who dropped to 7-5. PDS plays at Newark Academy on January 12 and at Montclair Kimberley on January 14. Girls’ Basketball: Unable to gets it offense going, PDS fell 54-13 to Robbinsville last Monday. The Panthers, now 1-9, play at South Hunterdon on January 12 and at Montclair Kimberley on January 14. Boys’ Hockey : Gibson Linnehan and Trevor Mackles scored goals to help PDS defeat Vermont Academy 2-1 last Saturday as it wrapped up play in its Harry

Rulon-Miller Invitational. The win improved the Panthers to 7-5-1 as they finished tied with Lawrenceville for second in the points standings at the tournament behind A lbany Academy (N.Y.). In upcoming action, PDS hosts the Hill School (Pa.) on Wednesday before heading to New England to play at the Groton School (Mass.) on January 11 and at Worcester Academy on January 12 and then coming home to host Bishop Eustace on January 14.

PHS Girls’ Basketball: Catherine Dyevich starred to help PHS defeat New Egypt 3213 last Saturday. Senior star Dyevich scored 14 points as the Little Tigers improved to 7-1. PHS plays at Ewing on January 11, hosts Hillsborough on January 12, and plays at W W/P-South on January 15. Boys’ Swimming: Josh K im and O wen Tennant were double-winners as PHS defeated Hamilton 116-53 last Thursday. Kim placed first in the 200 freestyle and 100 breaststroke while Tennant prevailed in the 200 individual medley and 500 free as the Little Tigers improved to 6-1. PHS has a meet at Hopewell Valley on January 10 before hosting Notre Dame on January 15. Girls’ Swimming: Katie DiVenti and Emily Bauser came up big as PHS topped

Hamilton 121-48 last Thursday. DiVenti won the 200 freestyle and 100 butterfly while Bauser placed first in the 200 individual medley and 100 breaststroke for the Little Tigers, who moved to 4-3. PHS has a meet at Hopewell Valley on January 10 before hosting Notre Dame on January 15. Wrestling: Despite producing some superb performances, PHS fell 45-31 to host Spotswood in a quad meet last Saturday. Daniel Monahan won by pin at 126 pounds as did Chris Sockler at 132, Alec Bobchin at 138, and Dominic Riendeau-Krause at 145. In other action at the quad, PHS lost 54-21 to Hightstown and 48-37 to fall to 0-6 on the season in dual match competition. Sophomore Chloe Ayers did earn a title over the weekend as she placed first at 106 pounds in the South Jersey Wrestling Hall of Fame Tournament for girls at Timber Creek. In upcoming action, PHS has a match at Lawrence on January 9 and a tri-match at Notre Dame on January 12. Track: Producing some superb effor ts, the PHS track team started their indoor campaign at the Marine Corps Holiday Classic at the NYC Armory on December 29 and at the CVC Relays on January 2. At the Marine Corps meet, Dar tmouthbound senior Nils Wildberg opened his season with a 23’ 4.5 long jump, the best jump in New Jersey this year and fourth in the U.S. Senior Acasio Pinheiro finished third in the mile with

an a New Jersey top time of 4:24, while juniors Matt Perello (22.81) and Colleen Linko (26.75) recorded an indoor personal bests in the 200 meters. At the CVC Relays, the distance medley relay of Tucker Zullo, Jackson McCarthy, Perello and Pinheiro placed first in an N.J. No. 2 and US No. 5 time of 10 :42.83. Paul Brennan also won the shot put, extending his NJ #1 to 5411.5. On the girls side, the quartet of Linko, Raina Williamson, Kendall Williamson and Gabby Goddard won two events, taking the 4x200 in 1:49.29 (Linko split 26.04 on anchor) and winning the 4x400 in an NJ #5 4:08.30. PHS is next in action when it competes in the Lawrenceville School’s Lavino Relays on January 12.

Pennington Boys’ Basketball: Patrick Higgins starred in a losing cause as Pennington fell 55-46 to Lawrence High in a consolation game at the John Molinelli Tournament on December 28. Higgins scored 17 points for the Red Raiders, who moved to 0-11. Pennington hosts Morristown Beard on January 11 before playing at Doane Academy on January 12 and at South Brunswick on January 14. G irl s’ B aske tba l l : Sparked by a huge game from Taylor Blunt, Pennington defeated Hopewell

Valley 67-40 in the championship game of the John Molinelli Tournament on December 28. Blunt tallied 26 points to help the Red Raiders improve to 8 -1. Pennington plays at Stuart Country Day on January 9, hosts the Peddie School on January 10, plays at Pingry on January 12, and then hosts Lawrenceville on January 15.

Local Sports Dillon Youth Basketball Recent Results

In opening day action last Saturday in the 4th /5th grade boys’ division of the Dillon Yout h Basketball League, Corner House edged Cross Culture 29-28 as Leone Westrick led the way with 13 points for the victors while Raymond McLaughlin added eight points. Princeton Dental Group defeated Mason Griffin & Pierson 2219. Matthew Ghaim scored 12 points to trigger the offense for Princeton Dental while Leonardo Momo tallied eight points in a losing cause. PBA # 130 nipped Princeton Youth Sports 2623 as Michael Bess and Sebastian Bremner combined for 20 points in the win. Gavin Levine starred for PYS, netting 14 points. In the 6th/7th grade boys’ division, McCaffrey’s defeated Princeton Pi 25-22 as Pasquale Carusone led the way with 14 points. Remmick Granozio had 13 points in a losing cause. In other action, Lependorf & Silverstein beat Dick’s Sporting

Goods 43- 25. Jihad-Jisari Wilder and Tarak Jayachandran tallied 12 points apiece for the victors. Christopher Foreman had six points in the loss for Dick’s. Smith’s Ace Hardw are defe ate d Majeski Foundation 33-25 as Jack Davidge and Benjamin Tarter combined for 21 points to lead the way. O w e n B i g g s s c or e d 11 points in the loss for Majeski Foundation. In t he 8t h -10 t h grade boys’ division, Knicks defeated the Lakers 52-33. Jake Zuckerman scored a game-high 15 points for the Knicks while Zander DeLuca chipped in 10 points. Drew Petrone, Theo Steiger, and Henri Maman each scored seven points in the loss for the Lakers. The Spurs defeated the 76ers 52-49 as Jeremy Sallade tallied 19 points in the win and John Reardon added 14. Owen Deming scored 11 points and Cosimo Guerin contributed 10 points for the 76ers. I n t h e g irls’ d iv is ion, Princeton Pettoranello beat Princeton Restorative Dental 16-10. Sneha Kumar led the way with six points for Princeton Pettoranello while Romy Johnson scored four points in a losing cause. Jefferson Plumbing defeated Woodwinds 44-24 as Betaneya Tsegay scored 16 points and Genesis Angeles scored 14 points for the victors. Deidre Ristic scored eight points for Woodwinds. Nuggets defeated the Wizards by a score of 20-10 as Luna Bar-Cohen scored 10 points in the win with Madeleine Nieman chipping in six points. Anna Winters and Clare Barlag each scored four points for the Wizards.

TOPICS AND TRENDS ININEDUCATION TOPICS AND TRENDS INEDUCATION EDUCATION TOPICS AND TRENDS

TOPICS TOPICSAND ANDTRENDS TRENDSININEDUCATION EDUCATION

e Lewis School of Princeton the Center forCenter Educational TestingTesting and Academic Planning present Lewis School ofand Princeton Educational Academic Planning present TheThe Lewis School of Princeton andand thethe Center forfor Educational Testing andand Academic Planning present TheThe Lewis School of Princeton andand theseminars Center for Educational Testing and Academic Planning present monthly neuroscience-based seminars on topics that impact children who learn differently. Lewis School of Princeton the Center for Educational Testing and Academic Planning monthly neuroscience-based on topics that impact children who learn differently. monthly neuroscience-based seminars on topics that impact children who learn differently. present monthly neuroscience-based seminars topics that impact children whowho learn differently. monthly neuroscience-based seminars on topics that impact children learn differently. Please join usjoin injoin aon Please usain adiscussion. panel discussion. Please uspanel in panel discussion. Please joinjoin us in discussion. Please usainpanel a panel discussion. November 14, 2018 November 14, November 14,2018 2018 November 14,14, 2018 November 2018 Auditory Processing and Attention Auditory Processing Auditory Processingand andAttention Attention Auditory Processing and Attention Auditory Processing and December 5, 2018 Wednesday, January 16, 2019 December5,5,2018 2018 Attention December December 5, 2018 Wednesday, December 5, 2018 December 5, the 2018 Dyslexia: Unwrapping the Wednesday, December 5, 2018 Dyslexia: Unwrapping GiftGift Unwrapping the Gift Wednesday, December 5, 5, 2018 1:00pm-2:30pm Dyslexia: Unwrapping thethe GiftGift Wednesday, December 2018 Dyslexia: Dyslexia: Unwrapping January 16, 2019 January 16, 2019 1:00pm-2:30pm January 16, 1:00pm-2:30pm January 16,2019 2019 January 16, 2019 Numerical Cognition 1:00pm-2:30pm Numerical Cognition 1:00pm-2:30pm Numerical Cognition Numerical Cognition Numerical Cognition February 2019 February 20,20, 2019 February 20, 2019 February 20, 2019 February 20, 2019 Memory Attention Memory andand Attention Memory and Attention Memory and Attention March 13, 2019 Memory and13, Attention March 2019 March 13, 2019 March 13, 2019 The Multilingual Child March 13, 2019Child The Multilingual TheThe Multilingual Child Multilingual Child April 24, 2019 April 24, 2019 The Multilingual Child April 24,24, 2019 April 2019 Trends in Education Past Present Trends inApril Education Past andand Present Please (609) 924-8120 register. 24, 2019 Please callcall (609) 924-8120 to to register. Trends in Education Past and Present Trends inMay Education Past and Present May 2019 Please callcall (609) 924-8120 to register. 16,16, 2019 Please (609) 924-8120 to register. Trends in Education and Present May 16,Past 2019 May 16, 2019 Conversation and Language Conversation and Language Call (609) 924-8120 to register. May 16, and 2019 Conversation Language Conversation and Language

Upcoming Session: Upcoming Session: Upcoming Session: Upcoming Session: Upcoming UpcomingSession: Session:

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 1:00pm-2:30pm

Numerical Cogniti on Dyslexia: Dyslexia:

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Since 1973, leading, research-based education Since 1973, the the leading, research-based education Conversation and Language Since 1973, the leading, research-based education at The Lewis School prepared students Since 1973, the leading, research-based education at The Lewis School hashas prepared students at The Lewis School has prepared students impacted by Dyslexia, Language-based Learning at The Lewis School has prepared students impacted by Dyslexia, Language-based Learning impacted by Dyslexia, Language-based Learning Since 1973, the leading, Differences™ and ADHD to achieve academic impacted by Dyslexia, Language-based Learning Differences™ and ADHD to achieve academic Differences™ and ADHD to achieve academic independence and a path to success. The leading, research-based education Differences™ and ADHD to achieve academic independence and a path to success. at at research-based education independence andand a path to success. a path to students success. Theindependence Lewis School prepares

The Lewis School has prepared Please Us Our for Our 46 Annual impacted byJoin Dyslexia, Please Join Us for 46Language-based Annual Please Join Us for Our 46 Annual Please Join Us of for Our 46 students impacted by Dyslexia, Tree Light Learning Differences™ and ADHD to Tree of Light Annual Tree of Light In Recognition of the Gifts and Great Promise of Tree of Light achieve academic independence Language-based Learning In Recognition of the Gifts and Great Promise of and Children Whoand Learn Differently In Recognition of Who theofGifts Great Promise of of Children Learn Differently In Recognition the Gifts and Great Promise a path to Differently success. Children WhoMusic, Learn Differences™ and ADHD toTree Children Who Learn Differently Enjoy Holiday andLighting the Lighting the Enjoy Holiday Fare,Fare, Music, and the of theofTree EnjoyEnjoy Holiday Fare, Music, and the Lighting of the Tree Holiday Fare, Music, and the Lighting of the Tree Friday, December 7, 2018 from 6:00pm-9:00pm achieve academic independence Friday, December 7, 2018 from 6:00pm-9:00pm *This event free and open to6:00pm-9:00pm the public. Friday, December 7,is 2018 from 6:00pm-9:00pm *This event is free and open to the public. Friday, December 7, 2018 from The *This Lewis School Champions the Gifts of and ais free path to success. eventevent to thetopublic. *This is and free open and open the public. th th

Lewis School Champions the Gifts of Learning Differently The The Lewis School Champions the Gifts of Learning Differently The The Lewis School Champions the Gifts of Learning Differently and the Value of Thinking Outside of the Box™ Lewis School Champions the Gifts of Learning and the Value of Thinking Outside of the Box™ Differently and and the Value of Thinking Outside of the the Value of Thinking Outside ofBox™ the Box™

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THE JACK SHOW: Princeton High boys’ basketball player Jack Suozzi heads up the court in recent action. Last Saturday, junior guard Suozzi scored 13 points to help PHS top New Egypt 66-37 last Saturday as it improved to 3-4. In upcoming action, the Tigers host Ewing on January 11, Ferris on January 12 and WW/P-South on January 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Learning Differently and the Value of Thinking Outside of the Box™ Admissions, Pre-K through High School Post-Graduate ForFor Admissions, Pre-K through High School andand Post-Graduate ForFor Admissions, Pre-K through High School and Post-Graduate Admissions, Pre-K through High School and Open Houses 1, Dec 9,March Jan Feb 9, Feb 23) 11) Open Houses (Jan 9, (Dec Jan(Dec 19, Feb 9, 12, Feb 23,Jan 9, April 13, Open Houses 1, Dec 12, JanJan 9, 19,19, Feb 9,Post-Graduate Feb 23)May Open Houses (Dec 1, Dec 12,12, JanJan 9, Jan 19, 19, FebFeb 9, Feb 23)23) Open Houses (Dec 1, Dec 9, Jan 9, Feb Contact (609) 924-8120 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ lewisschool.org Contact (609) 924-8120 53 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ NJ www.lewisschool.org Contact (609) 924-8120 Bayard Lane, Princeton, lewisschool.org Contact (609) 924-8120 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ NJ lewisschool.org Contact (609) 924-8120 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, lewisschool.org

Open Houses (Oct 27, Nov 7, Nov 10, Dec 1, Dec 12) Contact (609) 924-8120 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ lewisschool.org

Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm


Alexander Perry Morgan Jr. Alexander Perry Morgan Jr. ( Perry), architect and longtime member of the Princeton community, died peacefully on January 4th in his home after a Christmas full of family. He was 94 years old. Perry will be remembered as a man of great integrity, with a deep, warm sense of humor who loved his work as an architect and was always helping others. He loved reading to his children, grandchildren, and g r e at- g r a n d c h i l d r e n , a s well as sailing, playing tennis and golf, painting, and appreciating classical music. He was a loving father and devoted husband. He adored the natural world and cherished summers spent with his family on North Haven, Maine. He was born May 8th, 1924, in Paris, France to Janet Croll Morgan and Alexander Perry Morgan. One of his earliest memories included seeing Charles Lindbergh parade through the streets of Paris after his first transatlantic solo flight. The family moved to New York City in 1927, where Perry attended the Buckley School and grew up with his two younger sisters, Margaret and Caroline. Perry went off to boarding school, St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, where he began a love of chemistry and rowing that continued at Princeton University. His college education was interrupted by World War II. He served three years in the Army, most of which was spent in Europe, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant in the 283rd Engineering Combat Battalion. On returning to Princeton, he joined the Ivy Club and studied architecture like his father, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, Woodrow Wilson Scholar, and as valedictorian for the class of 1946. He was on the first Princeton Lightweight rowing team to win at the Royal Henley Regatta. After graduation he continued his studies at Princeton, earning his master’s degree in architecture in 1952, and was honored with a Fulbright Scholarship to study architecture in Italy. Perry’s European travels brought him both education and love. While skiing in Austria, he met two American women who, on their return to New York, introduced him to their roommate, Elisabeth Harrison (Liz). During a hurricane, on August 13th, 1955, Liz and Perry were married — a formidable, happy union

Herman S. Ermolaev Herman S. Ermolaev, Professor Emeritus of the Princeton University Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, died peacefully on January 6, 2019 at the age of 94. Born on November 14, 1924 in Tomsk, Siberia, Herman spent his youth in the Don region of southern Russia. During the turbulent years of World War II, Herman left the USSR. He was part of the forced repatriation of Cossacks form Lienz, Austria in 1945, from which he escaped. Herman then completed Russian secondary school in Salzburg and entered the University of Graz. In 1949, Herman came to the United States to finish his undergraduate degree at Stanford University. He

then pursued doctoral work at the University of California-Berkeley, from which he earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1959. In 1959, Herman started teaching in the Slavic Dep a r t m e nt at P r i n c e to n , where he spent his entire academ ic career. A s an expert on Soviet literature and the Nobel-prize winning author Mikhail Sholokhov, Professor Er molaev was widely published in both the United States and in Russia. He was particularly fond of teaching, and was known for his survey course on Soviet literature, which he brought alive through personal reminiscence, history, and literature. As many as 350 students a semester enrolled in this course. He also offered upper-level undergraduate courses on the Russian short story and advanced Russian courses. Professor Ermolaev retired in 2007. Professor Ermolaev is survived by his loving wife Tatiana (Kusubova); son Michael Stigler (and his wife Mireille) of Lausanne, Switzerland; daughters Natalia (and her husband Theodor Brasoveanu) and Katya Ermolaeva, both of Princeton, NJ; four g randchildren, Natacha, Mat thieu, Grégoire, and Nadezhda; and one greatgrandchild, Alissa. A Russian Orthodox funeral service will be held on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Vladimir’s Russian Orthodox Church in Jackson, NJ. Burial will follow at St. Vladimir’s Cemetery in Jackson. Flowers may be ordered through Narcissus Florals (732) 281-0333. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Timothy E. Ryan Home for Funerals (732) 505-1900. Condolences may be sent to www.ryanfuneralhome.com.

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron, 96, died in Princeton, New Jersey, on December 15th, 2018. Born in Cape May, NJ, in 1922, she grew up in Cape May and Jenkintown, PA. She graduated from Swarthmore College as an English major in 1943 and joined the Navy that same year. She was a Lieutenant Junior Grade stationed at Naval Supply Depot Mechanicsburg, PA, where she worked in Communications as a coder/ decoder on the Enigma machine. There she met her future husband, the wellknown Princeton miler Lt. William Robert Bonthron (d. 1983), a Naval Supply Officer recently returned from a lengthy tour in Oran, Algeria. They were married in 1946, lived briefly in Williamsville, NY, and moved to Princeton, where they raised four children: Jennifer Bonthron Waters, of Easton, MD ; Susan Jane Bonthron of Guilford, VT; William Deas Bonthron of Hopewell, NJ ( d. 2016); and Thomas Spencer Bont hron of Pit tsburgh, PA (d. 2009). She was also a beloved stepmother to William Bonthron’s son William James Bonthron of Ottawa, Ontar io ( d. 20 02 ) , and daughter Katherine Katama Bonthron of Munich, Germany (d. 2014), and aunt of Jill Arace of Waitsfield, VT. Jane enjoyed bridge and golf and was a longtime vol-

unteer with the Princeton Hospital Aid Society and Meals on Wheels. She is survived by her two daughters ; four grandchildren, Beatrice Waters Kalinich, R o b e r t K n i g h t Wa te r s , Caitlin Bonthron Roper, and Anna Jane Ruff; three step-granddaughters, Alexandra and Fiona Bonthron and Catriona Gannon; and great-grandchildren, Emily and Helen Kalinich and Wyatt and June Kroyer. Her life will be celebrated at a private gathering in Cape May, NJ, in the late spring.

Patricia Anne Peacock August 5, 1944 – December 29, 2018 Dr. Patricia Anne Peacock ( Speelman), 74, beloved mother, grandmother, and sister, passed away on December 29, 2018, after a long and bravely fought battle against cancer. Pat was born in Crestline, Ohio, but spent her youth in Piscataway, New Jersey, where she, her three brothers and sister all participated in building their family home. She graduated from St. Peter’s High School in New Brunswick, New Jersey. An avid lifelong learner, she received advanced degrees from Colorado State University and Rutgers University, ultimately earning her doctorate in adult vocational education. She taught adult education classes at George Mason University and Strayer University. Prior to being diagnosed with cancer, Pat had gone back to school at The College of New Jersey to pursue a teaching certificate in early childhood education. A n ardent b eliever i n working to achieve one’s dreams, Pat directed the George Mason University Enterprise Center on the Manassas, Virginia, campus. She also served as the Director of the Rutgers University Regional Small Business Development Center in Camden, New Jersey. At both of these centers, Pat helped small business owners develop business plans and launch their start-up companies. A trailblazer for women, Pat was named Melita’s New Jersey Woman of the Year in 1993. In 1999, the YWCA honored her with the TWIN award, a Tribute to Women and INdustry. Pat is predeceased by her parents, Daniel and Roseanne Speelman, sister Christine Spears, and brot her, Jim Speelman. She is survived by her two daughters and sons-in-law, Carolyn and David Kwieraga and Kristin and Ron Menapace; her six grandchildren, Amanda and Noelle Kwieraga and Paige, Henry, Claire, and Julianne Menapace; as well as her brother Steve Speelman and brother and sister-in-law Tom and Sally Speelman.

Throughout her life, family was Pat’s inspiration and joy. She was always ready to play a game, design a craft, read a story, go on an adventure, or just spend time with her children and grandchildren. In 2011, Pat retired to join her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in Princeton to help raise their four children. Pat cherished her Christian family in the various places she lived. As a member of Tr init y Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey, she spoke fondly and with affection for her fellow parishioners, especially the children that participated in the Children’s Chapel services she helped lead. She also inspired her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in supporting the Princeton community, including the opening of their gift and furniture store, Homestead Princeton. In her free time, Pat enjoyed reading, sewing, knitting, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Saturday, January 12, 2019, at 11 a.m., followed by a reception in the Parish House. Friends of all ages are welcome to share in the celebration of Pat’s life. Afterwards, Pat will be interred in the church’s memorial garden in a private family ceremony. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Trinity Episcopal Church children’s program.

Fredric J. Spar Fredric J. Spar, 70, died at home in Princeton, NJ, on December 22, 2018. Born in Brooklyn, NY, Fred was a student-athlete who ran track at Midwood High School and Cornell University. His career had many chapters: He worked as an elementaryschool science teacher before completing a Ph.D. (1980) at Brown University, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan at the Stanford Center. He lectured at Keene State College before working 36 years as a communications consul-

tant at Kekst & Company in Manhattan. He was a member of the 2010 class at Harvard University’s Advanced Leadership Initiative and applied his experience thereafter advising or serving on the boards of environmental and education organizations: The Watershed Institute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, Generation Schools, and City Year New York. He was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge, for which he worked tirelessly on improvements to wildlife habitat and accessibility for human visitors. Fred moved to Princeton when he married Winifred Hughes, a fellow graduate student at Brown University. Together they spent many hours birding and hiking, rooting for the Boston Red Sox, and engaged in a lifelong intellectual discussion. Fred was dedicated to his garden and continued to read and speak Mandarin throughout his life. He shared his passion for sports and the outdoors with his children through skiing, fishing, tennis, and coaching soccer and Little League baseball. Fred will be remembered as a loving husband and father, a great intellect in both scholarship and business, an environmentalist, a man of understated wit, and a soul of exceptional kindness and generosity of spirit. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Winifred Hughes Spar; his sons Adam and Alex; his sister Laurie, and her husband John Pierce. He also leaves his aunt, Edith Gilitos; cousins; sisters- and brothers-in-law; and nieces and nephews. Burial was in Princeton Cemetery on December 24, 2018. A memorial service will be Sunday, January 27, 1 p.m., at the The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Donations in his memory would be welcomed at the organizations he served. Arrangements by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing Township.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

Obituaries

that was to last 63 years. Perry and Liz settled in Princeton in his family’s longtime home, Constitution Hill, and he continued, for a short time, to work as an architect in New York City. In the ensuing years they had four children: Jamie, Lisa, Peter, and Matthew. Perry and Phil Holt, arch itect ure s chool clas s mates, formed a nationally recognized architecture firm — Holt Morgan Russell — where he worked until his retirement. In the 1980s, he converted Constitution Hill from a Jacobean style estate into an innovative clusteredhousing community, the first of its kind in Princeton, inspired by northern European design that prioritized open space and privacy, while preserving the historic structures and grounds. T hroughout h is ent ire career, Perry volunteered his time in the Princeton communit y and beyond. For many years he served on the Princeton Zoning B oard and worked w it h Dorothea’s House, the local Italian-American organization. He was on the North Haven Golf Club Board of Directors and was on the architect’s advisory board for the design of the new North Haven Public School. He was also a longtime member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, Springdale Golf Club, and the Nassau Club. Perry is survived by his wife Liz, his sister Margaret, his four children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his sister Caroline. In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to one of the many causes for which he cared deeply: The Ocean Conservancy (oceanconservancy.org) or Habitat for Humanity (habitat.org). A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church on Saturday, February 2nd at 1:30 p.m.

Continued on Next Page

Princeton University chaPel

worship service janUary 13, 2019 • 11 aM

Preaching sUnday

rev. dr. alison l. boden dean of religioUs life and the chaPel religiouslife.princeton.edu


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 38

Obituaries Continued from Preceding Page

Elias Menachem Stein Elias Menachem Stein, a towering figure in mathematics for over half a century, died on December 23. He was 87. The cause of death was complications related to mantle cell lymphoma, according to his family. Renowned for deep and highly original contributions to his field of mathematics as well as the mentor of generations of younger mathematicians, including two winners of the Fields Medal, the profession’s highest distinction. Mr. Stein was a professor at Princeton University for 55 years, teaching, by popular demand, until the age of 86. Born on January 13, 1931 in Antwerp to Elkan Stein, a diamond merchant, and Chana Goldman, both Polish citizens, he and his family fled Belgium in 1940, following the German invasion. With diamonds hidden in the soles of his shoes as part of his father’s effort to protect the family’s assets, he entered the United States in April 1941 aboard the SS Nyassa from Lisbon, spending his first three weeks in the country living on Ellis Island. There he first witnessed boys playing “a strange game with sticks,” as he would later tell his ch i l d r e n, s om e t h i n g h e would come to understand to be baseball, a sport he would admire for the rest of his life. It was the beginning of his fierce, if not uncritical, devotion to his adopted homeland, its strange new customs and, above all, the glorious intricacies of its democratic processes, which he monitored w ith what would become his signature intensity. After his family settled on New York’s Upper West Side, he enrolled in Stuyvesant High School, where he was captain of the math team, graduating in 1949. Stein attended college at the University of Chicago and stayed on to earn his PhD in 1955. Follow ing teaching stints there and at MIT, where, among others, he befriended future Nobel Prize winner John Nash, turning, in a rare moment of professional overlap, to his father’s Diamond District connections to help Mr. Nash buy a ring for his future wife, according to Sylvia Nasar’s book, A Beautiful Mind. Later, Mr. Stein spent an academic year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. While there, he was offered a tenured position at Princeton University, joining the faculty in 1963. For decades, he held an endowed chair as the Albert Baldwin Dod Professor; at the time of his death he was Professor Emeritus. He served twice as chair of the

mathematics department. Stein’s research was primarily in harmonic analysis — roughly speaking, the study of vibrations — a basic tool in science and technology. Mr. Stein discovered new phenomena and unsuspected connections between seemingly unrelated problems. His work led to a deeper understanding of topics as varied as sound recording, the stock market, and gravitational waves. As Charles Fefferman, one of Stein’s star doctoral students and later a colleague at Princeton, has noted of his former thesis advisor, “[his] work often combines two remarkable qualities: an understanding of several branches of math, each of which normally is known only by specialists, and an astonishing ability to find connections between them. Before Stein tells you his solution, the problems involved look utterly hopeless.... Then, with exactly the right point of view and exactly the right few words, ... [his] incredible insights ... link everything together.” Stein is the author of several books, now considered classics in their field. In his 70s he devoted his time to creating a series of advanced undergraduate mathematics courses at Princeton and writing, in collaboration with former student Rami Shakarchi, a four-volume textbook to accompany the course. One reviewer of the first volume referred to Stein as “certainly one of the great avatars and developers of Fourier Analysis in modern times.” He was a prolific author and generous collaborator. His many honors include the Schock Prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1993, the Wolf Prize in 1999, and the National Medal of Science awarded by President G eorge W. Bush at a White House ceremony in 2002. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he received honorary degrees from Peking University in 1988 (after his effort to help rebuild the local mathematical community following the devastation of the Cultural Revolution), and from his alma mater, the University of Chicago, in 1992. Stein is survived by Elly, his wife of 59 years; a brother, Daniel; a son, Jeremy, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 2012-2014; a daughter, Karen, an architecture critic and former member of the jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize; a daughter-in-law, Anne; and three grandchildren, Carolyn, Alison, and Jason. A s a collaborator and teacher, he was known for the clarity, elegance, and enthusiasm he brought to his research, writing, and teaching. Stein dated his interest in science to a memory from when he was three years old, as he watched the spinning wheel of his father’s diamond polishing machine, believing he had discovered proof of perpetual motion. He soon came to understand that his so-called theory was a youthful illusion, but one that nonetheless propelled

his lifelong view of mathematics as a brilliant balance of imagination and rational investigation. His interest in solving problems never waned. When he received a l i fe t i m e a c h i e v e m e n t award from the American Mathematical Society, with characteristic modesty his response focused not on himself but on the field he so loved, saying: “We can be confident that we are far from the end of this enterprise and that many exciting and wonderful theorems still await our discovery.”

Lorraine Erskine Garland Lorraine Erskine Garland, 89, of Jamestown, RI, and Bradenton, FL, died peacefully with her family present on December 28, 2018 in Medway, MA. She was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on D ecember 9, 1929, t he daughter of Madeleine Ellis and Frank Erskine. Lorraine spent her childhood in Massachusetts, Maine, and Virginia with her mother, Madeleine, and her stepfather, Alan D. Kinsley. She was an only child. Lorraine raised her children in Princeton, NJ. Later in life, she spent winters in Sarasota, FL, and summers in Jamestown, RI. Lorraine was a graduate of Dana Hall School in Wellesley, MA. She met her husband, Philip (“Pete”) Lincoln Garland, Jr., while studying Landscape Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, RI. She believed in civic engagement, participated in local government, and provided leadership to local associations including the Parent Teacher Association of her daughters’ school and the annual ‘fete,’ a fundraiser for the Princeton hospital. Lorraine was also a productive real estate agent in New Jersey’s Morris and Mercer counties, working for many years at Stockton Real Estate in Princeton, NJ. Lorraine lived her life surrounded by many beloved four-legged companions. She was a founding member of the Irish Wolfhound Association of the Delaware Valley. She was an equestrian and able coachwoman in her younger years, and an early supporter and frequent guest at polo matches in Newport, RI, and Sarasota, FL. Her final companion was Ares, a “rescue” poodle, who never left her side. Lorraine was a loyal and devoted mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She is survived by her former husband Philip Lincoln Garland, Jr., of Englewood, FL, and Chatham, MA, and her children, Thomas Alan Garland, Katherine Garland Presswood, and Elizabeth Garland Deardorff. She also leaves behind three beloved grandchildren, Taylor, Whit-

ney, and Sam. Finally, she will be missed by five greatg randchildren, Winston, Madeleine, Aiden, Fiona, and Ethan. In lieu of flowers, donations will be welcome to the memory of Lorraine Garland to the Irish Wolfhound Foundation, David Milne, Treasurer, 150 Creek Rd., Phillipsburg, NJ 08865 ; Florida Poodle Rescue, P.O. Box 7336, St. Petersburg, FL 33734; Salmon Hospice, 37 Birch St., Milford, MA 01757; or Milford Regional Healthcare Foundation, 14 Prospect St., Milford, MA 01757.

Frances Brown Yokana Fr a n c e s B r o w n Yo k a na, 92, of Princeton and G r e e n s b o r o , Ve r m o n t , passed away on Saturday, December 29, 2018. Frances was born in Princeton, NJ, and was a lifetime resident of Princ-

eton. She graduated from Randolph-Macon College in 1948 and married Andre Yokana in 1954. In Princeton, she ser ved as t he president of the Present Day Club and was a member of Bedens Brook Country Club, the Nassau Club, and the Contemporary Garden Club of Princeton, and volunteered for numerous charitable organizations. She spent summers with her family in Greensboro, Vermont, where she was an active member of the community, and President of the Greensboro Association. She was an avid gardener and her gardens in Vermont were legendary. Her life was filled with family, friends, and flowers. Predeceased by her parents Frederic Ham i l to n B r o w n a n d Fr a n ces Churchill ( Woolaver) Brown; she is survived by her husband of 64 years, A ndre Yokana ; her son, Davis Yokana; her daughter and son-in-law, Lisa Yokana and Blake Auchincloss; and her granddaughters, Alice and Anne Longobardo. A memorial service will be held on January 12, 2019 at 11 a.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church. Arrangements are under the direction of MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Religion Ruha Benjamin To Preach At Commemorative Service

The Princeton Clergy Association is hosting the annual Multifaith Service in honor of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 21, the federal holiday designated in honor of his birthday. The Service will be at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road at Route 206. The preacher will be Ruha Benjamin, an associate professor in Princeton University’s Department of African American Studies and the leader of the Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of Princeton. Attendees are encouraged to bring their children, as the Service will conclude by 8:30 p.m. Diverse faith leaders in the Princeton area will co-lead the liturgy, and area choirs and musicians will also participate. During the service, a freewill offering will be received, which will be split equally between the United Negro College Fund and the Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action. The service is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA). For further information, visit peacecoalition.org or call (609) 9245022.

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AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, slipcovers. Table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19

Irene Lee, Classified Manager

tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, 01-09-20 or check. of experience. Available mornings to deck staining. 16 years experience. BARN SALE: 19 County Route 518, take care of your loved one, transport PROFESSIONAL TOWNgreater TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS 25Rainwords or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads than 60 words in length. MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, Princeton,•NJ. or Shine-CASH Fully insured, free estimates. Call OFFICE SPACE to appointments, run errands. I am GETS TOP RESULTS! guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, and CARRY, all offers considered(609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ in beautiful historic building. Princ• 3 weeks:well$40.00 • 4 weeks: discount rates available. known in Princeton. Top care, $50.00 • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual Whether it’s selling furniture, finding violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, manEVERYTHING must go! Saturday excellent references. The best, cell eton address. Free parking. Confer- live.com dolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ a lost pet, or having a garage sale, ence room, kitchenette and recep• Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week & Sunday: January 12 & 13 and 19 (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. half hour. Ongoing music camps. 01-02-5t & 20; 10am to 3pm. Wide variety of vintage collectibles, furniture, misc household. Farm Equipment: John Deere, Case, International Harvester, Atlas, Letz, Gravely. 01-09 WARREN PLATNER ARM CHAIRS: For Sale. Please call & leave a message (609) 306-4841. 01-09 2013 KIA OPTIMA: 36,000 miles, $9,300. CARFAX available. Runs great, new tires, well-maintained. Text or call (609) 575-9007. 01-09 OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com

tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732.

12-19-4t

tf

tionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 10-31-12t ELDERLY CARE: Certified, experienced with dementia/alzheimer’s & blind. Assist with shower/dress, medication. Driving to appointments, groceries, etc. Laundry, light cooking & light cleaning included. Pets ok, non-smoker, reliable & dependable. Victoria (609) 902-1136. 01-02-3t MOTHER DAUGHTER CLEANING SERVICE: Only green cleaning products used. Only Saturdays available. Call (267) 671-8071. 01-02-3t FOR RENT IN PRINCETON: Bright, quiet, 1st floor, 2 BR apartment, w/walk-out 2 room basement for multiple uses. W/D, private patio overlooking park, walk to town, parking, no pets. $1,875/mo. + utilities. Available immediately. (609) 9244710. 01-09-3t

TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENTPRINCETON: 1000 Herrontown Road. 2,320 SF, (609) 921-6651 or cy@yedlinco.com 01-09-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188.

CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE:

01-02-6t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168.

I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

01-09-8t

01-09-20

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 11-07/01-30 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

MAKE THE RIGHT MOVE

This Riverside area gem has been totally remodeled. Living Room with gas fireplace, Dining Area and state-of-the-art Kitchen, plus a Bedroom with Full Bath on the Main Floor. Upstairs there are three additional bedrooms-The Master Bedroom has a private bath and a walk-in closet, and the other full bathroom is tucked between 2 bedrooms for access from either room. There is a lovely private back yard with a garage for parking. $1,158,000

www.stockton-realtor.com CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.50 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $62.75 • 4 weeks: $80.25 • 6 weeks: $119.25 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 40

Are you thinking of selling? A second opinion is always wise…

Call me for mine! I have 35 years of Listing and Selling Experience and I’m Relocation Certified! Heidi A. Hartmann

Cell-609.658.3771

As reported by The New York Times, December 30, 2018 “Most people spend more time picking a restaurant then they do picking a real estate agent.” If you’re thinking of selling, interview a few agents and look for someone who knows how to competitively price your home by using the most recent sales. Next, look at the agent’s financial ability to market your home and finally, be sure they have strong negotiating skills to better capitalize your gain. Then, choose a nice restaurant and celebrate! 


PRINCETON | Built in the 1930's, this classical brick in-town residence has been masterfully restored to perfection offering all of today's conveniences and expanded with a fabulous post-modern addition with architecturally well-integrated spaces. Approached through wrought iron gates and a circular driveway, this beautifully positioned house is surrounded by majestic specimen trees, perennial gardens, stone walls, expansive blue stone terraces and a secluded tennis court. A gracious entrance foyer with arched doorways and deep-set moldings introduces the well-proportioned rooms throughout the house. Enter into the elegant sunken living room with high ceilings and views of the gardens through multiple French doors with transoms. Nearby, a spacious dining room with numerous custom plaster details is sure to make your holiday dinners memorable. The original library and study adjoining a hearth-warmed sitting area with window seats and built-in bookcases was the site of numerous historic meetings during WW II. The dramatic addition includes a pyramidal skylight over a spacious, sun-drenched breakfast/family room with an exposed brick wall tying the twostory stair tower to the main house. Adjacent, a well-appointed kitchen with a large center island and top-of-the-line appliances is awash in light with a huge skylight crowning the space. Upstairs, the sumptuous master bedroom features a vaulted ceiling with cove lighting, a fireplace (one of four), lavish his-and-hers bathrooms and dressing areas. A skylight above a spiral staircase connects the attic guest bedroom suite to the second floor via a dramatic, enclosed glass-block wall. Uniquely sited on an acre of land on a private cul-de-sac backing up to 10 acres of woodlands, this home is one of Princeton's few luxury properties from which one can walk into pristine countryside from its back door and into town from its front door. It is a tribute to the craftsmanship of yesteryear with all the modern amenities coveted by today's buyer. Price Available Upon Request

Judith Stier Sales Associate Direct Line: 609.240.1232

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.2600 | glorianilson.com Licensed Real Estate Broker

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

THE BRAND THAT DEFINES LUXURY REAL ESTATE. WORLDWIDE.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 42

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19

“Heart thoughts are profound,

hindsight aches and hope is obscure. I’m craving a great adventure -- one that leads me back home."

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

—Donna Lynn Hope

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10 DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

BARN SALE: 19 County Route 518, Princeton, NJ. Rain or Shine-CASH and CARRY, all offers consideredEVERYTHING must go! Saturday & Sunday: January 12 & 13 and 19 & 20; 10am to 3pm. Wide variety of vintage collectibles, furniture, misc household. Farm Equipment: John Deere, Case, International Harvester, Atlas, Letz, Gravely. 01-09 WARREN PLATNER ARM CHAIRS: For Sale. Please call & leave a message (609) 306-4841. 01-09 2013 KIA OPTIMA: 36,000 miles, $9,300. CARFAX available. Runs great, new tires, well-maintained. Text or call (609) 575-9007. 01-09 OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 12-19-4t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Robbinsville throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. $614,900 throughout.

This Toll Brothers’ Dorchester model features 5 BRS and 2.5 BA in the prestigious Washington Hunt development in Robbinsville.

Updated with fresh paint and new609-555-0000 carpet, this classic farm house$870,000 style home is sure to please. $870,000 $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000

609-921-2700

609-555-0000

609-555-0000 MLS#1002306576

PROPERTY SHOWCASE

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Pennington Boro $534,900 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Hopewell Twp $590,000 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. West Windsor $815,000 throughout.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Lawrence Twp $445,000 throughout.

Pennington Boro. Ideal for professional or medical offices $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 with plenty of parking. Also for Rent609-555-0000 $4,800.

Fenced yard. Bluestone patio. Large Great Room. $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 609-555-0000 609-921-2700 MLS# 1002294298

cul de sac, parklike grounds! Minutes to Trains to NY and Phil, $870,000 609-555-0000 $870,000 609-555-0000 major road and shopping. Must see!

Mozart 2 model. Min. to shopping,609-555-0000 Resaurants, Princeton Jct $870,000 $870,000 609-555-0000 Train Station, Rt. 1, I-95/I-295.

Fully renovated building, smart design, in the heart of

609-921-2700

MLS#1002497504

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, Lawrenceville $525,000 4 bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. A home for all seasons! Spacious & beautifully updated! throughout. Nothing left to do but move in & love living here! 609-921-2700 $870,000 $870,000

MLS#NJME100020 609-555-0000 609-555-0000

Move in!4 Beds, 2.5 Baths Double-lot. Solar Smart Home.

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, Brunswick 2.5 $429,900 4South bedrooms, 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. Exquisite Cedarbury model in The Pointe w/many custom throughout. features. Premium lot, 3 BR+ office, 3 full BA, full bsmt, central vac, sec syst, fpl w/custom mantle, custom window

$870,000 treatmts & more! $870,000 609-921-2700

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

MLS#1009954274

Welcome Home! 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath home on a tree-lined

609-921-2700

MLS# 7207436

123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, $1,550 updated per month 4Lambertville bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated throughout. Rare opportunity for street front retail business, 625 sf. retail, throughout. wonderful space for a café/coffee shop, art gallery or office in this excellent central location in the heart of Lambertville

$870,000 609-737-1500 $870,000

609-555-0000 MLS #: 1008362652 609-555-0000

A lovely 4 BR, 2.5 BA home in desirable Liberty Green,

609-921-2700

MLS#1008362354

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1/13 1–4 PM 123 123 MAIN MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, $359,900 4Hamilton bedrooms, 2.5 2.5 baths, baths, colonial, colonial, updated updated throughout. 6 bedroom, 2 and ½ bathroom colonial in Hamilton throughout. Township. These empty-nesters are looking for a new family to enjoy the home they have lovingly-maintained over the

$870,000 past 30 years. $870,000

609-737-1500

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

MLS #:1009939462

CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf HOME IMPROVEMENT: Princeton based general contractor. Small & large construction work, framing, drywall finished to paint, tile, kitchens, baths, decks & handyman items. References, licensed & insured. Immediate response, Steve (609) 613-0197. 01-09 PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 10-31-12t ELDERLY CARE: Certified, experienced with dementia/alzheimer’s & blind. Assist with shower/dress, medication. Driving to appointments, groceries, etc. Laundry, light cooking & light cleaning included. Pets ok, non-smoker, reliable & dependable. Victoria (609) 902-1136. 01-02-3t MOTHER DAUGHTER CLEANING SERVICE: Only green cleaning products used. Only Saturdays available. Call (267) 671-8071. 01-02-3t FOR RENT IN PRINCETON: Bright, quiet, 1st floor, 2 BR apartment, w/walk-out 2 room basement for multiple uses. W/D, private patio overlooking park, walk to town, parking, no pets. $1,875/mo. + utilities. Available immediately. (609) 9244710. 01-09-3t APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 bed, 1 bath, on a lovely, quiet lane in the heart of downtown Princeton. $2,100/ month. Call Amy (617) 957-4323. 01-09-3t

123 MAIN Pennsville $199,900 123 MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 colonial, updated This 4 bedroom, 1 and bathroom, 2 story colonial sits on 4 bedrooms, 2.5½baths, baths, colonial, updated more than an oversized double lot! There are actually 5 lots throughout. throughout. that make up this 120’x192’x100’x185’ parcel giving you a

123 MAIN Princeton $695,000 123 MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, baths, the end of a long2.5 winding privatecolonial, driveway sitsupdated this unique, 4At bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated custom built, 6 bedroom, 5 and TWO ½ bathroom, brick throughout. throughout. cape cod home. Comfortable country location, Princeton

123 MAIN Pennington $432,000 123 MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, updated one of the sweetest in Mercer County, just a few 4In bedrooms, 2.5 towns baths, colonial, updated blocks from the charming downtown, Kunkel Park and the throughout. throughout. highly ranked Toll Gate Grammar School, is a spacious 3

123 MAIN Pennington $495,431 123 MAIN STREET, STREET, PENNINGTON PENNINGTON 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, colonial, at Pennington American Properties updated March 2019 4Heritage bedrooms, 2.5 by baths, colonial, updated quick deliver Hopewell Model! 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bath, 2 throughout. throughout. car garage. Main floor master with walk in closets, and bath.

$870,000 609-737-1500 $870,000

$870,000 609-737-1500 $870,000

609-737-1500 $870,000 $870,000

$870,000 $870,000

variety of options and room to stretch out.

609-555-0000 MLS #: NJSA113536 609-555-0000

address - enjoy nature at its finest.

609-555-0000 MLS #:NJME203098 609-555-0000

bedroom, 1 bathroom ranch on a wide, south-facing lot.

MLS #: NJME202664 609-555-0000 609-555-0000

609-737-1500

MLS #:NJME20347

609-555-0000 609-555-0000

NMLS 113856

TOLL FREE: (800) 288-SOLD WWW.WEIDEL.COM WWW.WEIDEL.COM PROPERTY PROPERTY

MORTGAGE MORTGAGE

INSURANCE INSURANCE

TITLE TITLE

CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 01-02-5t OFFICE SPACE FOR RENTPRINCETON: 1000 Herrontown Road. 2,320 SF, (609) 921-6651 or cy@yedlinco.com 01-09-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-02-6t


504 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/PABU102086 $3,295,000 4BR/4.1BA Duplex Penthouse Terraces Low Taxes Kevin Steiger: 215.519.1746

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/13, 1:00 - 3:00PM

506 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com $2,495,000 3BR/3.1BA River Views Expansive Terrace Low Taxes Donald Pearson: 267.614.0844

The Lifestyle You’re Accustomed to Costs Less in Pennsylvania

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/13, 1:00 - 3:00PM

512 Waterview Pl., New Hope, PA Kurfiss.com/1002077952 $2,750,000 4BR/4.1BA Duplex Penthouse Terraces Low Taxes Donald Pearson: 267.614.0844

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/13, 1:00 - 3:00PM

3749 River Rd., Lumberville, PA Kurfiss.com/1000246263 $795,000 2BR/2BA 2,447SF 0.77AC Low Taxes Donald Pearson: 267.614.0844

KURFISS.COM 215.794.3227 New Hope Philadelphia Bryn Mawr Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated. All Rights Reserved. SIR® is a licensed trademark to SIR Affiliates, Inc.

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/13, 1:00 - 3:00PM


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 44

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

Custom Fitted Storm Doors

741 Alexander Rd, Princeton • 924-2880

Christina “Elvina” Grant Sales Associate, REALTOR®

Fox & Roach, REALTORS® 253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540 Office 698.924.1600 Direct 609.683.8541 Cell: 609.937.1313 christina.grant@foxroach.com

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Montgomery Knoll Office Complex 1500 & 1900 sq ft Units Each Unit Has 5 Windowed Offices, Kitchenette & Private Bath Close Proximity to Princeton Call: 908-281-5374 Meadow Run Properties, LLC.

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-09-8t BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

HOME MAINTENANCE BUDGET January is a great time to create a budget for home improvement and maintenance. It is estimated that average cost to maintain a home is between 1% and 3% of your home’s purchase price. If your home costs $500,000 you should budget between $5,000 and $15,000 a year to maintain and or replace things like the roof or appliances. Setting aside this money every year does not necessarily mean you will need to use it but will certainly create a fund that can be used when the need arises. Some years you will only use a small amount to update landscaping and other years you may need to replace windows. Being diligent about keeping up with the maintenance of your home will both help with the value and keep your home in good repair. Prioritize your projects, figure out which ones you can do yourself and hire a licensed contractor for the others.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE RENTALS: Princeton Office – $2,200/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,300/mo. Nassau Street. 2nd floor. With parking. Available now. Princeton Apt. – $1,900/mo. 2nd floor apt. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, kitchen. Available now. Princeton Address-$2,650/mo. Montgomery Twp. Blue Ribbon Schools. FULLY FURNISHED. 3 BR, 2.5 bath townhouse. Available now. Princeton – $2,750/mo. Griggs Farm, 3+ story Town House. 3 BR, 2 full & 2 half baths. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses!

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE. We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 CHAMBERS STREET PRINCETON, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 MARTHA F. STOCKTON, BROKER-OWNER AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, slipcovers. Table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area PART TIME RETAIL: at Landau on Nassau Street in Princeton. Flexible schedule. Pleasant personality required. Situation works well for recently retired. Call (609) 924-3494 & ask for Robert. 01-09

ADVERTISING SALES Witherspoon Media Group is looking for an advertising Account Manager to generate sales for our luxury magazines, newspaper, and digital business. The ideal candidate will: • Establish new and grow key accounts and maximize opportunities for each publication, all websites, and all digital products. • Collaborate with the sales and management team to develop growth opportunities. • Prepare strategic sales communications and presentations for both print and digital. • Develop industry-based knowledge and understanding, including circulation, audience, readership, and more. • Prepare detailed sales reports for tracking current customers’ activity and maintain pipeline activity using our custom CRM system. Positions are full- and part-time and based out of our Kingston, N.J. office. Track record of developing successful sales strategies and knowledge of print and digital media is a plus. Compensation is negotiable based on experience. Fantastic benefits and a great work environment. Please submit cover letter and resume to: lynn.smith@princetonmagazine.com melissa.bilyeu@witherspoonmediagroup.com

CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 11-07/01-30 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Innovative Design • Expert Installation s)NNOVATIVE$ESIGN Professional Care s%XPERT)NSTALLATION Ph 908-284-4944 Fx 908-788-5226 s0ROFESSIONAL#ARE jgreenscapes@gmail.com License #13VH06981800 Ph-908-284-4944 Fax-908-788-5226 American Furniture Exchange dgreenscapes@embarqmail.com License #13VH02102300

30 Years of Experience!

PENTHOUSE LIVING

Come see this top floor condominium with cathedral ceilings in living and dining rooms, skylights and fireplace. Two bedrooms, two full baths, floored attic. Let someone else take care of the maintenance and just relax and enjoy. $183,000 In a most convenient Lawrenceville location comfort and convenience at a most attractive price.

www.stockton-realtor.com

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area


JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf MOVING? TOO MUCH STUFF IN YOUR BASEMENT? Sell with a TOWN TOPICS classified ad! Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10 DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf BARN SALE: 19 County Route 518, Princeton, NJ. Rain or Shine-CASH and CARRY, all offers consideredEVERYTHING must go! Saturday & Sunday: January 12 & 13 and 19 & 20; 10am to 3pm. Wide variety of vintage collectibles, furniture, misc household. Farm Equipment: John Deere, Case, International Harvester, Atlas, Letz, Gravely. 01-09 WARREN PLATNER ARM CHAIRS: For Sale. Please call & leave a message (609) 306-4841. 01-09 2013 KIA OPTIMA: 36,000 miles, $9,300. CARFAX available. Runs great, new tires, well-maintained. Text or call (609) 575-9007. 01-09 OFFICE SPACE on Witherspoon Street: Approximately 950 square feet of private office suite. Suite has 4 offices. Located across from Princeton municipal building. $1,700/ month rent. Utilities included. Email recruitingwr@gmail.com 12-19-4t PRINCETON MATH TUTOR: SAT/ACT/SSAT/GRE/GMAT HS-College Math. 8 Years Experience. Email Erica at: info.ecardenas@gmail.com tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf HOME IMPROVEMENT: Princeton based general contractor. Small & large construction work, framing, drywall finished to paint, tile, kitchens, baths, decks & handyman items. References, licensed & insured. Immediate response, Steve (609) 613-0197. 01-09

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 10-31-12t ELDERLY CARE: Certified, experienced with dementia/alzheimer’s & blind. Assist with shower/dress, medication. Driving to appointments, groceries, etc. Laundry, light cooking & light cleaning included. Pets ok, non-smoker, reliable & dependable. Victoria (609) 902-1136. 01-02-3t MOTHER DAUGHTER CLEANING SERVICE: Only green cleaning products used. Only Saturdays available. Call (267) 671-8071. 01-02-3t FOR RENT IN PRINCETON: Bright, quiet, 1st floor, 2 BR apartment, w/walk-out 2 room basement for multiple uses. W/D, private patio overlooking park, walk to town, parking, no pets. $1,875/mo. + utilities. Available immediately. (609) 9244710. 01-09-3t

SERVI

AT YO U

R

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENTPRINCETON: 1000 Herrontown Road. 2,320 SF, (609) 921-6651 or cy@yedlinco.com 01-09-4t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 01-02-6t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 01-09-8t BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-29-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-09-20

Professional, Cour Professional, Co and 100% 100% Satisfaction and Satisfactio Professional, Courteous

Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Professional, Courteous Interior Painting, Exterior and 100% Satisfaction GuaranteedPainting and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painti and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Professional Kitchen and Bath Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair

Design Available Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Rep

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 bed, 1 bath, on a lovely, quiet lane in the heart of downtown Princeton. $2,100/ month. Call Amy (617) 957-4323. 01-09-3t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 01-02-5t

CE

A Town Topics Directory

Professional, Courteous and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Professional, Courteous and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair

Interior Painting, Exterior Painting, and Drywall Repair

1 Full Cord

Delivered & Dumped $225

•Quality Craftsmanship •Reasonable Rates •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •FreeCraftsmanship Estimates •Quality •Popcorn•Reasonable Ceiling Installation Rates& Repair •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Power Washing Decks/Home •Reasonable Rates •Free Estimates • Quality Craftsmanship • Cabinet Resurfacing •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper • Reasonable Rates • Power Washing •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Deck Sealing/Staining • Licensed, Bonded & Craftsmanship Decks/Home •Quality •Cabinet Resurfacing •Quality Craftsmanship •Free Estimates Insured • Rates Wall Resurfacing/ •Reasonable (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home • Free Estimates of & Wallpaper •Popcorn Ceiling Installation Repair •Reasonable Rates •Licensed, BondedRemoval & Insured • Popcorn Ceiling • Deck Sealing/Staining •Wall www.fivestarpaintinginc.com Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates Installation & Repair •Licensed, Bonded & Insured •Deck Sealing/Staining

•Quality Craftsman License # 13VH047 •Reasonable Rat •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair •Power Washing Decks/Home •Quality Craftsmanship •Free Estimates •Cabinet Resurfacing (609) 799-9211 •Reasonable Ratesof Wallpaper & •Wall Resurfacing/Removal (609) 799-9211 •Licensed, •Power Washing Decks/Home Bonded •Popcorn Ceiling Installation 30 Years of •Licensed, Bonded & Insured& Repair •Quality www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Staining www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of WallpaperCraftsm Experience! •Free Estimate •Cabinet Resurfacing •Free Estimates •Deck Sealing/Staining License # 13VH047 •Reasonable •Popcorn Ceiling Installation & Repair Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras (609) 799-9211 •Power Washing Decks/Home •Popcorn Ceiling Installat (609) 799-9211 Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture •Cabinet Resurfacing www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Wall Resurfacing/Removal of Wallpaper •Licensed, www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Cabinet Resurfa Unique Items •Power Washing Decks/Home Bonded •Deck Sealing/Staining License # 13VH047 •Wall Resurfacing/RemovalLicense of Wallpaper I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! # 13VH047 •Power Washing Deck •Free Estim •Deck Sealing/Staining Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available! •Wall Resurfacing/Remova (609) 799-9211 ONLINE •Popcorn Ceiling Instal (609) 799-9211 609-306-0613 www.towntopics.com www.fivestarpaintinginc.com •Deck Sealing/Sta www.fivestarpaintinginc.com Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area •Cabinet Resur American Furniture Exchange

License # 13VH047

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

License # 13VH0 License # 13VH047 •Power Washing De (609) 799-921 CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. •Wallwww.fivestarpaintin Resurfacing/Remo Carpentry & General Home Maintenance James E. Geisenhoner •Deck Sealing/S

Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

(609) 799-9 www.fivestarpaint BLACKMAN

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

609-683-4013

AWARD WINNING HOME FURNISHINGS Custom made pillows, cushions. Window treatments, slipcovers. Table linens and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 CLEANING BY POLISH LADY: For houses and small offices. Flexible, reliable, local. Excellent references. Please call Yola (609) 558-9393. 10-31/04-24

45 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019 • 46

Buying

Selling

Mortgage

Title

Insurance

Realt

OPEN WEDNESDAY 11 AM - 2 PM & SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

FOR MORE PHOTOS AND FLOOR PLAN, VISIT 15LINDENLANE.INFO PRINCETON

$1,649,000

In the heart of downtown Princeton, a few blocks from Princeton University, sits a stunning home that combines the charm and appeal of a century old home with a spacious modern open floor plan. Architect Kirsten Thoft remodeled and fully renovated this home in 2007 with spectacular detail to both traditional and modern amenities. The renovations spare no expense to carefully maintain the character of the home, updated for today’s lifestyle. Custom staircase and mouldings, pocket doors, hardwood floors, and extensive built-ins throughout make it both an intimate family space and an entertainer’s dream come true. The spacious entrance hall opens into the family room with original tin ceiling, and pocket doors. The gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, stainless-steel appliances, pantry and enormous island overlooks the light-filled great room with built-in bookcases & beautiful bar. The great room opens to a formal dining room that overlooks a wraparound porch. The custom doors allow for dining and porch area to function as an indoor/ outdoor entertainment space. A separate mudroom with built-in cubbies and tons of storage along with a powder room complete the first floor. Retreat upstairs to the master bedroom with en suite walk-in steam shower. Just down the hallway are two additional bedrooms one with a fireplace and the other with a wall of floor-to-ceiling wood built-in closets. These bedrooms share a hall bath with a BainUltra heated Jacuzzi tub. The crown jewel of this home is the third floor which has two additional spacious bedrooms, featuring built-in bookcases, desks, window seat and closets. The two bedrooms share a full bath and a bonus sitting area. The fenced in backyard with Ipe wood deck offers terrific space for outdoor memories to be created with family and friends. This home truly has it all. With ample off-street parking you can leave the cars at home and stroll around town.

If you want your home featured, contact me:

Beatrice Bloom Sales Representative/Princeton Residential Specialist, MBA, ECO-Broker

609-577-2989 (cell) | info@BeatriceBloom.com | BeatriceBloom.com

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900


47 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2019

Real Estate • Mortgage • Insurance • Closing Services

Realt

PRINCETON $2,395,000 Exquisite home designed by architect Bill Feinman and built by Princeton Design Guild on beautiful wooded Littlebrook lot. The home has every possible upgrade and convenience, including handcrafted cabinetry, built-ins and mouldings throughout. The finished basement has a wet bar, bathroom, craft room, office space, music room and storage. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

NEW CONSTRUCTION

BELLE MEAD COLONIAL

HOPEWELL $749,000 New Construction in Hopewell Boro! This luxury home features 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths located 3 blocks from town. Open floor plan, high-end kitchen and high-quality finishes. Vanessa Reina 609-352-3912 (cell)

MONTGOMERY TWP. $699,000 Excellent opportunity to own a beautifully upgraded & impeccably maintained home in Montgomery Twp. Offers a great open floor plan with many excellent features and upgrades.

CLASSIC COLONIAL

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $985,000 This updated center hall Colonial welcomes you with mature landscaping. Fully updated gourmet eat-in-kitchen with Granite countertops and custom cabinetry. Large backyard with bluestone patio. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

SOUTH BRUNSWICK $619,900 Excellent opportunity to own a beautifully upgraded & maintained Colonial in Princeton Gate! Elegant home w/ open flr plan, finished basement, formal Living & Dining rooms. HW flrs, custom window treatments. Mary Saba 732-239-4641 (cell)

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

Mary Saba 732-239-4641 (cell)

R E A L T O R S

®


WYNFIELD HALL

RIVER MEWS

Wynfield Hall is an exceptional example of old world craftsmanship and details not found in comparably priced homes today. This Zaveta masterpiece was built with the concept of “green” construction and sophistication as a fusion of the best of both worlds. Sited on 3.8 Solebury acres, Wynfield Hall is over 7,000 square feet of luxurious living space that offers 4 bedrooms and 4.2 baths. $2,049,000

The 1st level contains a foyer, entrance to the garage, basement and elevator. The 2nd level is an open floor plan design with walls of windows that allow natural light to rush in and fill the room. There is an eat-in kitchen, living room with fireplace and dining area. The dining area has access to a completely private patio for al fresco dining. The rear wall of the living room has a picture perfect vignette of lush greenery and distant trees. The 3rd and 4th levels contain 3 bedrooms/3 baths. $929,000

PRICE IMPROVEMENT!

ANANDA

CROSS CREEK

The kitchen is bright and open with ample storage and cabinetry. Located off of the foyer is the perfect office location which can serve an extra bedroom for guests since it enjoys a full bath. Upstairs is an add’l 4 bedrooms and 3 baths. The finished basement is an ideal space for a home theater, gym, office or proverbial “teen hang-out” space. The immaculately landscaped grounds are home to a new rear deck and salt water lap pool. A whole house generator erases all worries. $995,000

Cross Creek is one of the most amazing properties in the area of Bucks County. Located in Carversville, this meticulously restored home offers the highest level of amenities. Bluestone patios cascade down to green lawns, gardens, and the babbling sounds of a stream. This property is incomparable. $2,399,000

For more information on a property or to arrange a private tour, please contact us at 215.862.5500 Addison Wolfe Main Office 550 Union Square, New Hope, PA 18938

Addison Wolfe by the Canal 30 West Bridge Street, New Hope, PA 18938

ADDISONWOLFE.COM

Town Topics Newspaper, January 9  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, January 9  

Witherspoon Media Group