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Volume LXXII, Number 32

Final Chance To Vote for Readers’ Choice Awards Adoption Story Is Focus of Screening, Talk . . . . 5 Rider AAUP Petition Opposes Westminster Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Cliffhangers and Character Keep Us Watching . . . . . . . . . . 16 PU Alum Schreiber Relishes Winning Gold Medal for U .S . at World Lax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 CP Bluefish Placed First at PASDA Championship Meet . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

IAS Professor Akshay Venkatesh Wins Fields Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .18, 19 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 21 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Classified Ads . . . . . . 31 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Music/Theater . . . . . . 17 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 29 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 12 Service Directory . . . . 32 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Federal Court Upholds DACA Ruling; DREAMers Remain in Limbo

In a ruling Friday, August 3, a Washington, D.C. federal court reaffirmed its earlier finding that the federal government’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was unlawful. Supporting a lawsuit brought by Princeton University, recent Princeton graduate Maria De La Cruz Perales Sanchez, and Microsoft Corporation, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates gave the government until August 23 to decide if it will appeal the decision, which requires the government to accept new DACA applications and issue renewals. As Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF) Executive Director Adriana Abizadeh pointed out, however, the DACA controversy remains unresolved and the DREAMers remain in limbo. “DACA has been in a tumultuous state for almost a year,” she said. She cited “partial wins” in January with a preliminary injunction mandating the acceptance of DACA renewal applications and in Judge Bates’s ruling last Friday’s ordering a full restart of DACA, but she expressed concern about a preliminary hearing (Texas v. Nielsen) scheduled for today in Texas. “This case is another in a line of many to do away with the DACA program,” Abizadeh noted on Tuesday. “If tomorrow’s case decides that DACA is unlawful, we will engage in mass protest with immigrants and advocates throughout the country. Judge Hanen [Andrew S. Hanen of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas], who is presiding over the case, presided over the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) case in 2015 and his ruling shut down the implementation of that program that would have provided employment authorization to over 3.5 million individuals, two-thirds of whom had been here for over 10 years.” DACA offers protection from deportation to undocumented students, known as DREAMers, who arrived in the United States as children and allows them to continue their studies or work here. Latest statistics from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services indicated a total of about 689,800 DACA recipients in the country, with New Jersey hosting about Continued on Page 12

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Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Hinds Plaza Rally Commemorates Hiroshima

About 90 people gathered downtown in Hinds Park last Sunday evening for a rally to commemorate the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and “to bear witness to the urgent need for global nuclear weapons abolition,” according to the Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA), which sponsored the event. In addition to the keynote speech by nuclear weapons historian Alex Wellerstein on “Reinventing Civil Defense,” poetry readings by 2018 Nobel Peace Prize nominee David Steinberg, and a performance by the Solidarity Singers, the program featured a visit from Black Lives Matter leader Hawk Newsome, who was piloting a small group of marchers on their way from New York City to Washington D.C. to counter-protest the Unite the Right rally planned for this weekend in D.C. on the anniversary of last year’s violent white supremacist demonstration in Charlottesville. Known as the Agape Marchers, Newsome and his colleagues, who spent the night with local CFPA host families, are carrying with them a message of love, Newsome said, and protesting against racism, hatred, and Nazism. The meaning of “agape,” according to CFPA executive director the Rev. Bob Moore, is “universal, unconditional love, love of god.” “We’re marching to D.C. out of love,”

Newsome told the Hinds Plaza crowd. “We plan to rally in front of the Martin Luther King statue to unite people with love. On August 12, we’ll be trying to lead people in love. I’m one of the most respected militant voices in the country, and I choose love. Join us.” Newsome described how he went to participate in the counter-protest in Charlottesville a year ago. “We had to stand up on the side of right and say ‘No’ to hate,” he said. He described the violence as he was “bombarded and attacked by

Neo-Nazis.” He was hit by rocks, and, with blood trickling down his face, he said he went to pick up a rock to throw back when he heard a “little white woman, 70 or 80 years old,” saying to him “‘you can do so much more with your words than with anything you pick up here.’” That was the point, he said, where “he chose love” and committed to nonviolence as his means of standing up for justice. Moore, who hosted the event and spoke Continued on Page 4

Performers at Pettoranello Gardens Have a New, Improved Showcase A new stage is in place at Community Park North Amphitheater in Pettoranello Gardens. After two decades of wear and tear by musicians, dancers, and Shakespearean actors, the platform in the park off of Mountain Avenue was showing its age. “It was time,” said Ben Stentz, executive director of Princeton’s Department of Recreation. “The stage that had been there was constructed by the recreation department’s maintenance staff more than 20 years ago. It was obvious to us that it was getting to the end of it’s life. And a bigger, better stage would open up

the doors to other types of events there.” The new stage is part of a partnership between the Princeton Recreation Department and the Princeton Public Library, which will present Helen O’Shea’s band, The Shanakees, on Sunday, August 12 and a Summer Reading Rock ’n’ Roll Wrap Up on Friday, August 17. “When I heard about the new stage, I knew the time was right to bring Shakespeare and other acts back,” said Janie Hermann, the library’s programming librarian. “My hope and dream is that we can do even more at the amphitheater next summer and make it a regular Continued on Page 12

STAGE TWO: Helen O’Shea and The Shanakees were the first group to perform on the newly-built, enhanced stage at Community Park North Ampitheater in June . The group will return Sunday as part of a new program co-sponsored by Princeton Public Library . From left are Jay Posipanko John Mazzeo, David Ross, O’Shea, and Marvin Perkins .


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“SAY ‘NO’ TO HATE”: Black Lives Matter leader Hawk Newsome spoke at a Hinds Plaza rally to commemorate the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Sunday evening. Newsome is leading a group of marchers from New York City to Washington D.C. to counter-protest a Unite the Right rally planned for this weekend in D.C. on the anniversary of last year’s violent demonstration in Charlottesville. (Photo by John Lien)

earlier in the day from the pulpit of the Christ Congregation Church on Walnut Street on “Faith Imperatives in the Nuclear Weapons Era,” commented on the quality of the program and the excellent turnout. Wellerstein, a media celebrity who has appeared on NPR, the Daily Show, Fox News, and elsewhere, emphasized the need to bring the nuclear threat onto the radar screens of young people. CFPA Assistant Director Niki VanAller noted, “Wellerstein captured the spirit of what we were going for, gave us momentum to inspire folks to keep moving forward. We still have a lot of work to do” She added, “Nuclear weapons are real. They are out there. It’s happened before. It’s important to remember the atrocity that happened in 1945 and to work to make sure that doesn’t happen again.” Steinberg’s poetry, which he read from his book, The Enemy in the Mirror, raised the question of whether we ourselves are a part of the problem of mass violence in the world, whether we are guilty of expressing anger in hurtful ways. The commemoration program, an annual event organized by CFPA since 1980, included a moment of silence at 7:16 p.m., which corresponds to the Japanese time that the bomb dropped on Hiroshima 73 years ago, killing about 140,000 civilians and wounding hundreds of thousands more. —Donald Gilpin

ticipants will be led on walks

At Mountain Lakes Preserve in Mountain Lakes Preserve

The Friends of Princeton Open Space is sponsoring a four-week series, “Capturing the Colors of Nature,” this fall. Led by artists Lucia Stout, Fran McManus, Barbara DiLorenzo, Frank Sauer, and Sarah Smith, the series will be held Sundays October 14, 21, and 28, and November 4, at Mountain Lakes Preserve. The workshops are designed to explore methods of observing, recording, extracting, and applying color from the natural world. Par-

to consider extracting pigments and dyes from nature, using watercolor to record the color palette of place, observing the impact of light on color in photography, and using color as inspiration for design. After each walk, the instructor will lead a simple exercise that puts those color concepts into practice. Admission is $100, plus the ticket fee, for the four workshops. Reservations are recommended. Visit captur ing color.eventbrite.com.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Annual Backpack Drive: The Princeton Human Services Commission is collecting backpacks and school supplies for Princeton schoolchildren entering kindergarten through sixth grade. Drop off by August 10 at the Commission’s office, 1 Monument Drive. Jersey Cares School Supply Campaign: Drop off supplies Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. and Saturday/Sunday 3-8 p.m. at Salt Creek Grille, Forrestal Village, through August 22. For a list of requested supplies, visit www.jerseycares.org/ School_Supply_Drive. McCarter Block Party: Wednesday, August 22 from 5-8 p.m. (rain date August 23), McCarter Theatre Center hosts its annual free event for the public with live music, theater games, kids’ activities, and access to ticket offers. Lots of food and drink from local eateries will be for sale. www.mccarter.org. Feedback Sought: The municipality of Princeton wants ideas and feedback from the community on trail facilities — where they are most needed, which improvements would be best, and what amenities would be most helpful. For more information and to participate, visit www.princetonnj.gov/ news/greater-mercer-trail-network-plan. Daylilies from Morven: The museum/garden at 55 Stockton Street is reimagining its gardens and renovating its beds of daylilies, which the museum would like to offer to good homes. Morven daylily bulbs are bagged and available for pickup in the Museum Shop during regular museum hours. Free for members; $5 non-members. Visit morven.org.

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SEPARATED AT BIRTH: These triplets found each other by accident when they were 19. Their story, at first joyful and ultimately sad and disturbing, is the topic of “Three Identical Strangers,” a film currently showing at the Princeton Garden Theatre, the Montgomery Cinemas, and the Hopewell Theater. A special discussion led by Hopewell psychotherapist Joni Mantell will follow a screening at the Hopewell venue on Sunday, August 12.

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Shocking Story About Adoption Is Focus of Screening and Talk

Through a series of coincidences 28 years ago, two 19-year- old boys discovered that they were identical twins. Incredibly, a third 19-year-old who saw a story about the twins in the New York Post realized immediately that he was their third

brother — they were triplets. Robert Shafran, Edward Galland, and David Kellman knew they had been adopted. But none were aware, nor were their adoptive parents, that they were triplets. Their story is the subject of Three Identical Strangers, a film that chronicles their initial joy upon discovering each other, and eventual tragedy when Galland, a manic depressive, commits suicide.

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T he t h re e te ens were thrilled to find each other. They discovered many things they had in common, from wrestling to the brand of cigarettes they smoked. They made the talk show circuit, partied at New York’s Studio 54, moved into an apar tment together, and opened a restaurant together in Soho. But after a journalist from The New Yorker contacted them about a study he had found by eminent psychiatr ist Peter Neubauer on identical twins separated at birth, the mood changed. It turned out that the boys had been separated not because no one wanted triplets, but because they were being used, like lab rats, for an experiment. “The study was created at the Louise Wise adoption agency in New York, to consider nature vs. nurture,” said Joni Mantell, the director of the Infertility and Adoption Counseling Center in Pennington and New York City. Mantell will lead a discussion following a screening at the Hopewell Theater on Sunday, August 12 at 4:45 p.m. “They picked a blue collar family, a middle class family, and an upper class family to adopt them,” she said. “They sent in a psychologist to observe and film their development over the years, and there was never any mention to anyone that they were triplets. The kids and the parents just thought it was part of a study of adoption. No one said it was a study of nature vs. nurture.” Each of the boys had suffered from emotional issues growing up. The brothers spent a lot of time working t hrough anger t hey

had about the deception surrounding their origins. Galland took his own life in 1995, after being hospitalized for depression. Weighing the role of heredity vs. environment is a fundamental question. “I think one of the things that interests me about this film is that the research reflects a fascination with nature vs. nurture,” said Mantell, who counsels families about adoption. “It is particularly interesting to people in the adoption field, because you do scramble the deck. Adoptive parents are always anxious about this. The study that was done on these boys is radical in terms of the Continued on Next Page

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MORE TO DO AT MORVEN MUSEUM & GARDEN • Summertime Twilight Walking Tours

August 8, 14, 21, and 29 at 6:00 p.m., $5; Free for Friends of Morven Pre-registration required; All ages welcome Travel throughout Morven’s grounds looking at architecture, gardens, outbuildings in a new light. If you are interested in touring on a day not listed above, please email dlampertrudman@morven.org. (Shine only…rain cancels Walking Tour).

• Author Storytime with Barbara DiLorenzo

Thursday, August 23 at 10:00 a.m., $10; Free with Family membership Author/illustrator Barbara DiLorenzo reads two of her books Renato and the Lion and Quincy: The Chameleon Who Couldn’t Blend In and leads a hands-on watercolor painting session. All art materials included. Books available for purchase in Morven’s Museum Shop.

• Archaeology Day for Families at Morven

Sunday, August 26 at 1:00 p.m., $18; Free for Friends of Morven All Ages Welcome Spend the afternoon in and around the site of Commodore Stockton’s 1850’s greenhouse with archaeologists from Hunter Research, Inc. Tour dig site, exhibition, and pot your own take-home plant with our horticulturists.

COMING IN SEPTEMBER:

• SAVE THE DATE:

Morven Museum & Garden’s Gallery Reopening Weekend September 7 through 9. Interested in volunteering with us? Email dlampertrudman@morven.org to learn about new opportunities! Docent training: August 16 & 23 at 4:30 p.m.

• Wendy Hollender Botanical Illustration 2-Day Workshop and Evening Lecture

Workshop: Thursday and Friday, September 27 & 28, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. $225; $175 for Friends of Morven Lecture Only: Thursday, September 27 at 7:00 p.m. $18; Free for Friends of Morven Wendy Hollender, author, illustrator, teacher, and former coordinator of botanical art and illustration at the New York Botanical Garden, presents a two-day workshop drawing plants reminiscent of those grown in Morven’s 1850’s greenhouse. Students will create detailed botanical drawings. Thursday evening’s illustrated lecture will present historic examples of American botanical art, outlining artistic techniques used then, and still today.

Advanced registration required, visit morven.org or call 609.924.8144 ext 113 or email dlampertrudman@morven.org for more details. All events held at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton St., Princeton, NJ IMAGES: (third from top) Sample of Small Finds. Courtesy of Hunter Research, Inc.; (bottom) Mammillaria Elephantidens, from Iconographie descriptive des cactees…, Charles Antoine Lemaire, 1841-47. Courtesy of the Library of Congress


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 6

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week: “What’s your favorite way to enjoy peaches?”

(Asked Saturday at the Just Peachy Farm Festival at Terhune Orchards) (Photos by Erica M. Cardenas)

ENJOYING A DAY ON THE FARM: Terhune Orchards hosted its annual Just Peachy Farm Festival last weekend in Princeton. The event featured live music, pony rides, wagon rides, children’s games, a scavenger hunt, special presentations, farm fresh foods, and plenty of peachy treats. (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

Story of Adoption Continued from Preceding Page

secrecy. But the history of adoption includes a lot of secrecy, especially with adoptive parents from that era.” Adoption records used to be closed, but today the law allows those who were adopted to examine those records. “The pendulum has swung the other way, based on what we’ve learned from their suffering,” said Mantell. “It’s important to be able to have a medical history. Psychologically, too. In the past, kids would be shell-shocked to find out

they were adopted but they had no language to discuss it. Now, parents are educated to tell their children from the day they were born, so there is never a moment of shock. As they grow, they begin to ask questions and parents are advised to share the truth in bits and pieces.” Many families have semiopen adoptions today, in which bir th parents and adoptive parents stay in touch, allowing the children to ask questions of both. “Some have open adoptions where the birth parents are able to visit maybe once a year,” Mantell said. “It tends

to go very well. Kids are thrilled to know that their birth parents didn’t just give them away because they didn’t want them.” The story of the triplets is extreme, but it also illustrates some of the issues common to adoptees who discover their birth families. “As you can see with them in the film, it starts out on a high. They’re really excited. It’s magical to see someone who has the same smile and some of the same characteristics,” said Mantell. “But as it continues, there’s an awkwardness. How do we manage this? I think we’re

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now seeing a generation of adoptees who want to meet their birth families. But navigating those relationships is really tough. Because they missed out on all of those things that make a family.” —Anne Levin

“In sangria or with vanilla ice cream. I eat them outside since they’re juicy.” —Kate Pitches, South Brunswick

Sourland Conservancy Staffer Offers Free Virtual Hikes

T he S ourland Cons ervancy’s newest staff member, Carolyn Klaube, leads free guided virtual hikes on Sourland region trails via the Conservancy’s new blog, SourlandNiche. A niche, in ecology, is all of the interactions of a species with the other members of its community. A variety of factors including soil type and climate also define a species’ niche. Informally, a niche is considered the “job” or “role” that a species performs within nature. Klaube has been hiking the trails — alone or with assistance from her two young boys — through the seasons, photographing items of interest, and sharing interesting information and random facts and links for followers to learn more. Visitors to the blog can see what she found on the trail at Elks, Preserve, The Watershed Institute, Hunterdon County Sourland Mountain Preser ve, Zion Crossing, St. Michael’s, Rockhopper, Eames, Omick Woods, Goat Hill, Rocky Brook, Hopewell Borough Park, Baldpate Mountain, Rosedale, and Nayfield Preserve. To follow the blog and receive email updates on her weekly expeditions, visit www.sourlandniche.blog, enter your email address and click the follow button. Another way to explore the Sourlands is by actually hitting the trail. The Sourland region boasts 24 parks and preserves with hiking trails that range in difficulty from easy to moderate. The preserves are open to the public from dawn to dusk.

“Peach cobbler — my mom makes a pretty good one. I’ll try to get her to make one today.” —Jim Mathew, Garwood

Reggie: “Homemade peach cobbler is an all-time favorite.” Satthel: “Peaches and cream. I had it for breakfast!” —Reggie and Satthel Ross, Lambertville

“Peach ras el hanout, because when it’s peach season at Terhune and you’re doing a workshop on North African spices, you have to choose something local and available.” —Dor Mullen, The Suppers Program, Princeton

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A kshay Venkatesh, re cent ly appointed to t he permanent faculty of the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), has been awarded the Fields Medal, widely considered as comparable to the Nobel Prize for mathematicians. T h e 36 - ye a r - ol d Ve n katesh, who earned his PhD in mathematics at Princeton Universit y in 2002, has worked as a math professor at Stanford University since 2008 and served as a distinguished visiting professor at IAS’s School of Mathematics during the past year. In presenting the award to Venkatesh, along with three other recipients, at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio De Janeiro on August 1, t h e I nter nat iona l Mat h ematical Union (IMU) cited Venkatesh’s “profound contributions to an exceptionally broad range of subjects in mathematics, including number theor y, homogenous dynamics, representation theory, and arithmetic geometry.” The IMU citation noted, “He solved many longstanding problems by combining methods from seemingly unrelated areas, presented novel viewpoints on classical problems, and produced strikingly far-reaching conjectures.” IAS Director Robbert Dijkgraaf stated, “The Fields Medal is an incredible honor for a young mathematician, and the Institute is

exceptionally pleased that Akshay Venkatesh has received this most deserved recognition.” On the occasion of Venkatesh’s appointment to a permanent post at IAS in May, Dijkgraaf commented on the importance of his work: “A kshay is among the most influential contemporary mathematicians, and his appointment ensures the furtherance of the Institute’s pioneering research in the interconnected fields of number theory and representation theory. With his enthusiastic drive to explore unknow n territories and his ability to develop new insights and relations bet ween fields, Akshay’s contributions are bound to be revolutionary and will help to define the future shape of mathematics as a whole.” Forty-two of the 60 mathematicians who have received the Fields Medal, as well as 33 Nobel Laureates, have been affiliated with the IAS. The Fields Medal is awarded every four years to scholars less than 40 years old to recognize outstanding mathematical achievement for existing work and for the promise of future achievement. “The breadth and richness of Venkatesh’s work, as well as the ease with which he works with mathematicians in different fields, has resulted in a large worldwide following, especially among young mathematicians,” according to an IAS press release.

“The signature of his work is great originality and intuition coupled with the development of powerful and general techniques in novel and unexpected settings,” the release continues. “As a result, his developments on long-standing problems in number theory have a broad impact in related areas.” Memories Venkatesh was born in New Delhi, India, but raised in Perth, Australia, where his family moved when he was only 2. Mathematics has always been an important part of his life. “I think just manipulating numbers makes me feel happy,” he said in a biographical video made by Simons Foundation in cooperation with the IMU. “I was involved in these problem-solving competitions.” W h e n Ve n k a te s h w a s 12 and already a senior in high school, he went to the Math Olympiad international competition and won a bronze medal. When he graduated from University of Western Australia four years later, in 1997, he realized, “I was interested in number theory and there weren’t so many people in Australia who were interested in number theory, so that was an impetus to go on to graduate school.” Ven k ate s h enrol le d i n P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y ’s graduate school in mathematics at the age of 16, and received his PhD four years later in 2002. In the

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following years he taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served as associate professor at New York University’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences before joining the faculty of Stanford University in 2008. Venkatesh has won numerous rewards for his research. He served as a distinguished professor in the IAS School of Mathematics in 2017-18, leading a special program on analytical and topological aspects of locally symmetric spaces. Currently in residence at IAS with his wife Sarah, a music teacher finishing her doctoral disser tation in musicology at Princeton University, and their young daughters Tara and Tuli, Venkatesh does find time for life outside the world of mathematics. “In math we tend to be obsessive, and it’s good, I think, to be forcibly stopped from thinking about something,” he said in the Simons-IMU video. “Children are very good at really shutting off your at tempt to think about anything else.” Venkatesh is also an enthusiastic runner. “So running definitely clears my mind,” he said. “It’s very meditative. If I’m thinking about a problem and I’m running and I’m still thinking about the problem, I just have to run a little bit faster, and then I can’t think about it any more.” He described the frustrations and joys of his profession. “A lot of the time when you do math, you’re stuck,” he said. “But at the same time there are all these mo-

7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

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IAS Professor Venkatesh Wins Fields Medal For “Profound Contributions” in Mathematics

“FAR-REACHING CONJECTURES”: Akshay Venkatesh, recent appointee to the Institute for Advanced Study faculty and Princeton University alumnus, has been awarded the 2018 Fields Medal, widely considered as the Nobel Prize for mathematicians. (Photo by Dan Komoda, Institute for Advanced Study) ments when you feel privileged that you get to work with it. And you have the feeling of transcendence. you feel like you’ve been par t of something really meaningful.” P r a i s i n g Ve n k a t e s h ’s virtuosity and his role as a trailblazer of new directions in research, the IMU commented on Venkatesh’s work in mathematics. “Most mathematicians are either problem-solvers or theorybuilders. Akshay Venkatesh is both. What is more, he is a number theorist who has developed an unusually deep understanding of several areas that are very different from number theory.

His breadth of knowledge allows him to situate number theory problems in new contexts that provide just the right setting to highlight the true nature of the problems. Only 36 years of age, Venkatesh will continue to be an outstanding leader in mathematics in years to come.” Commenting on the excitement of the past week, Venkatesh said, “The award came as a surprise for me, and my brief moment of fame was quite an experience! But I am much looking forward to some peace and quiet, or at least as much as my kids will let me have.” —Donald Gilpin

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 8

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Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08525

Problems Given as Evidence for Referendum Demonstrate Reasons for Delay and Study

To the Editor: A letter in the July 25 Mailbox [“Great Towns Build Great Schools: PHS Will Not Continue To Be Great Without Improved Facilities”] mentions several points in favor of the upcoming school referendum. However, some of those are the exact reasons for delay and study. • “Brown liquid oozing from the ceiling …” Why wasn’t shoddy work corrected immediately by the contractors? Why hasn’t the maintenance department rectified the situation? Why should we trust the same people who didn’t manage an $80 million renovation? • “old gym … mold.” Same questions. Homeowners usually resolve mold problems as soon as they’re discovered. Why didn’t the facilities management team? It’s hard to trust the BOE and administration after the last high school renovation debacle. Has anything changed? If both proposed referendums pass we will have spent almost 1/4 BILLION dollars on schools. Are we getting our money’s worth? Can we put our faith in those in charge? I, for one, have not yet been convinced. I’d prefer to see a delay and a thoughtful process rather than rushing into yet more catastrophes. SHEILA SIDERMAN Bouvant Drive

Mr. Sullivan contends that the SRA issue “was already extensively discussed and voted on in public. The discussion on the matter of Cranbury is over, period.” Many residents, including us, have observed neither a “discussion” of this issue, nor a dialogue. Instead, there has been an ongoing, one-sided marketing and promotional effort. While continuing to assert that “the SRA is a great deal for Princeton,” and that the cost to educate the Cranbury students is only 25 percent of the tuition paid by Cranbury, the BOE has consistently declined to provide written proof. We agree with Mr. Cochrane that “there is a place for lawsuits and there is … a place for conversation.” However, compliance by public bodies with the OPMA is not contingent on the willingness of any private citizen to monitor and privately convey violations of such a foundational law. The rule of law is not upheld through the mechanism of private conversations. Rather, the OPMA specifically empowers members of the public to have this conversation in Court, so that violations can be properly and transparently addressed. Last year, members of the BOE, believing that the Board of the Princeton Charter School (PCS) had violated the OPMA at a PCS Board meeting, followed the law in filing a complaint in Court. They did not engage in private conversation prior to their action, nor should they expect this of others. Whether or not the June 12 vote complied with the OPMA is now a matter to be decided by the Court — as should be the case in upholding a statute so fundamental to the transparent and accountable exercise of democratic good governance. CORRINE O’HARA, JOEL SCHWARTZ Armour Road

Urging a Yes Vote On Questions 1 and 2 An Open Letter to Superintendent Cochrane For the Public Schools’ Bond Referendum Editor: And PPS Board of Ed President Sullivan ToI the urge Princeton residents to vote yes on both ques-

Mr. Cochrane and Mr. Sullivan: Last week we filed a complaint in Mercer County Superior Court which alleges that the Princeton Board of Education (BOE) violated the Open Public Meetings Act (OPMA) during a June 12 vote to renew the sending-receiving agreement (SRA) with Cranbury. In response, Superintendent Steve Cochrane characterized the lawsuit as “… less about democracy and more about disruption ….” and BOE President Patrick Sullivan called it a “frivolous lawsuit.” If district officials are confident in their assertion that the June 12 BOE vote was conducted in compliance with the OPMA, then our complaint is at worst a minor inconvenience. However, if the June 12 or other recent BOE votes violated the OPMA by failing to clearly and publicly identify how each member of the BOE voted, one would hope this lapse in good governance would be of greater concern to Mr. Cochrane and Mr. Sullivan. The first sentence of the OPMA declares that “… secrecy in public affairs undermines the faith of the public in government ….” The BOE decision to renew for 10 years the agreement by which approximately 280 Cranbury students attend Princeton High School (PHS) — 17 percent of the total enrollment — perpetuates the largest cause of overcrowding at PHS and hence the primary reason for expanding the school facility. The proposed work at PHS would cost taxpayers approximately $60,000,000; this includes longoverdue remedial work, but the primary cost is to expand capacity.

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tions 1 and 2 for the public schools’ bond referendum. This referendum includes extremely important facilities improvements for all our schools. I understand how hard this additional tax increase can be, but the reality is that improvements to our schools cannot be put off and I believe would only become more expensive the longer we delay. As a parent of both middle and elementary school children I have experienced the issues of overcrowding and facilities impact on education; having visited the high school I have seen that these issues only get worse there. All of the schools are overcrowded. All of the schools need serious fixes to the underlying HVAC systems. Children don’t get to go to all their classes in the winter due to the freezing temperatures in some rooms. And they get sick from other rooms being so warm teachers leave the windows open. Addressing space and facilities infrastructure are not small ticket items. Furthermore, the school board is taking a forward-thinking step in acquiring a property that is close to town and offers possible additional needed playing fields and future additional growth. Any proposal this complex is challenging. I believe the BOE is addressing the totality of the situation in a comprehensive and unified way that will invest what we must in the infrastructure we need to continue to have the great schools we expect. With regards to the tax increase specifically, the estimates presented show voting for both questions 1 and 2 would mean a $34.56 increase for every $100,000 in assessed value in 2020; up to $89.53 in 2022; then back down to $28.64 in 2023. Given how much we need to do for the infrastructure of our schools it is important to act now before the situation gets worse and the cost to resolve gets even higher. I hope you will join me in investing in our future and the heart of our community now. DANA MOLINA Laurel Road

In terms of the return on investment, student progress is measured by tests and does vary from person to person. But that depends more on the input of the parent and teacher in time more than place of learning. There is data missing from the discussion that makes it difficult to justify such a large expenditure. Perhaps because it is based on the archaic method of funding schools with real estate taxes that always keep going up. We need to find out who really gets the lion’s share of the money and who benefits the most. LOUIS SLEE Spruce Street

A School District in Decline Affects Not Only Children But Property Values, Community Morale

To the editor: I’m a parent of three children, two of whom are in the Princeton public schools and one who will be, and I’m writing in support of both the upcoming school bond referendum and the superintendent and School Board members who put our district’s ambitious plans together. Other letter writers have written persuasively about the conditions that create the need for this referendum: overcrowded buildings, a growing school-aged population, critical security improvements. What I’d like to focus on is not the need for these changes, but the process by which the Board developed its plan; the opportunity that we, as a community, have had to give input; and the choice that we, the voters, will face in the referendum. Some recent letters have criticized the process by which the facilities plan was developed, arguing that residents had too few opportunities to weigh in before the final plan was announced, and that the proposal costs too much for too little in return. Others have argued that no improvements are needed: that the Princeton schools are doing just fine, or even if they’re not, our elected officials should be doing more with less. I agree that involving voters in the development of such a plan is crucially important, and that our board members must continually strive for frugal solutions to district challenges. From what I’ve seen, the Board and Superintendent Cochrane have done just that. During the proposal’s development, they held countless information sessions seeking community input, and since the plan’s completion, they’ve conducted ample outreach to inform voters about its components. The recent decision to split the referendum in two is evidence of the Board’s commitment to keeping costs down while still achieving necessary improvements. When I voted for our town’s Board members, I voted for individuals whom I believed would preserve and build on our schools’ excellence in a fiscally responsible manner. To me, this means more than husbanding our schools’ resources. It also means anticipating future needs, so that our schools will be positioned to improve upon their already distinguished record. Undoubtedly, each of us, on our own, would have prepared a slightly different proposal. But that’s not how collective decision making works. We, as a town, have pooled our resources to develop a plan; now we get to vote on it. If, on balance, we think the plan sets our schools on the right path, we vote yes. A no vote would scuttle the plan and send the district back to the drawing board, with all the time and expense that would entail: a profoundly dismaying outcome. No one likes paying taxes. But no one likes living in a town with unsatisfactory schools, either. A school district in decline doesn’t only affect the children who fill its classrooms; it drags down property values and community morale along with it. A thriving school district, in contrast, boosts not only our community’s young people, but the vibrancy of Princeton as a whole. This fall, I will enthusiastically vote yes on the facilities referendum. JANE MANNERS Wheatsheaf Lane

Before Voting on Bond, We Need to Know Who Really Three Questions Posed in Open Letter Gets Lion’s Share of Money and Who Benefits Most To School Board Referendum Committee

To the Editor: The arguments about the proposed $130 million construction bond for Princeton public schools are about two things, the cost to Princeton residents and the value of the investment return to students. Princeton University President Christopher Eisgruber in his 2018 commencement address said: “the upfront cost of education is real, large, and very easy to measure. The returns are equally real and even larger, but accrue over a lifetime, are hard to measure, and vary from person to person. It is tempting to wish you could get more certainty at lower cost.” On the other hand the failure of public education was cited by Derek Bok, former Harvard president, in reply to a question about his book on the trouble in America. From the cost point of view, New Jersey allocated more than $6 billion for school construction in the year 2000, primarily in poor school districts. Has all this been used up? Is there a measurable return on this investment? Maybe we need to compare district construction costs. Hamilton, with 24 schools and three times the number of students, last year approved a $56 million bond for construction, $22 million in credit coming from the state. Would it not be possible to reduce construction costs if the two districts worked together?

To the Committee: I am encouraged by your efforts to keep Princeton schools in good order. $129.6M is a big program. 1. What is the contingency amount in this cost figure at the present time? I will happily support such a program with proper contingency. 2. Who will administer this program to assure timely, costeffective, and proper work? 3. What is the amount of administrative costs in the present estimate? I will happily support such a program with proper administration. Without proper contingency and administrative considerations, I will not be a happy person in the polling booth! CHARLES BUSHNELL South Harrison Street

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A petition to alert people beyond the Westminster Choir College of Rider University community about the proposed sale of the music school to a Chinese company — a sale that many believe will result in the eventual ruin of the music school — is currently being circulated by Rider’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Art Taylor, a Rider professor of information systems and a member of the AAUP chapter, said Monday that the petition has received about 950 responses. “I thought it would take a month to get to that point, but it has only been a week,” he said. “That’s indicative of how disappointed the greater community is.” Taylor said the petition has been posted on the AAUP blog, and is about to be sent to members of the greater classical music community. A par t of R ider since 1991, Wes t m ins ter is a leading music school whose students perform internationally with major orchestras and conductors. Rider announced last year that it was selling the school and its 22-acre campus in Princeton, for $40 million, to Kaiwen Educational, a Chinese for-profit building company “with no experience in higher education or musical education,” reads the petition. Rider’s agreement with Kaiwen guarantees that Kaiwen maintain We s t m ins ter’s prog rams only for five years, and operate the campus for 10 years. “It is clear from the terms of this attempted sale that Rider’s administration is pursuing a path for ward which will lead to the destruction of Westminster Choir College,” it continues. “Therefore, we the undersigned believe that the sale of Westminster Choir College to a for-profit foreign entity beyond the reach of domestic laws, with a very different educational model, and with no experience in higher education or music education, will lead to the destruction and loss of this irreplaceable cultural gem. We remind Rider’s Board of Trustees that their role is to act as stewards to the educational institution which includes Westminster Choir College. We therefore demand that the Board of

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Trustees of Rider University rescind its decision to sell Westminster Choir College and begin the process of healing the Rider community.” Rider president Gregory D ell ’Omo an nou nced in June that the school had signed a purchase and sale agreement for the transfer of Westminster to Kaiwen. But two lawsuits against the school are underway, and the transaction can not be completed while the suits are still pending, according to Bruce Afran, attorney for one of the suits. Taylor said members of the AAUP chapter are considering informing Rider’s Board of Trustees that the sale can be stopped. “I get that they don’t particularly seem to care about Westminster, but this is also hurting Rider and the community and the arts,” he said. “Don’t they care about that?” Taylor said he would also like to make Kaiwen aware of the negativity surrounding the sale. “Whether we can do that, I don’t know. But we can certainly try. We’re not giving up,” he said. “I think Rider’s administration will probably keep trying to do this up to the point where some numbers are thrown out, and then we’ll see what happens. Despite what they have said, there is no impending sale. They have already spent a lot of money on this, and it is hurting the institution. The Board will have to make a decision.” —Anne Levin

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9 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Rider AAUP Chapter Circulates Petition Opposing Westminster Sale

New 2018 Visitors Guide Of Princeton/Mercer Region

The Princeton-Mercer Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau [CVB] and the Princeton Regional Chamb e r of C o m m e r c e h ave compiled a newly designed visitors guide for 2018. The guide is a comprehensive catalog of venues, businesses, and attractions in the Princeton-Mercer Region, in a more visitor-friendly format. New features to the guide include “Day Trip Itineraries,” “Top 10 Attractions and Activ ities,” “Mercer County Communities,” “Historical Happenings,” a “Savor and Sip” spread highlighting top local wineries and breweries, and “Foodie Hot Spots” - featuring top local eateries. “We are very excited to release the new format of the 2018 Visitors Guide. Its new visitor friendly format will make planning trips to the region easier and better highlight Chamber and CVB members in a photo friendly layout,” said Kate Stevens, managing director of the CVB. Find the new guide at www. visitprinceton.org/the-allnew-2018-visitors-guide or request a free guide to be sent to you at w w w.visit pr inceton.org /t r ip -plan ning/request-visitors-guide.

HONORED BY THE TOWN: Mayor Liz Lempert, left, recently presented a proclamation in honor of the Princeton-Blairstown Center’s 110th Anniversary to the organization’s president and CEO, Pam Gregory. What began in 1908 as a summer camp run by Princeton University students and faculty has evolved into a wide variety of year-round programs serving over 8,000 young people from the Mid-Atlantic states.

Colonial Festivities, Fundraising At Old Barracks in Trenton

Trenton’s Old Barracks Museum will be transformed into a Colonial tavern at the Tavern Night Fundraiser on September 14. Live music, food, and drink w ill set the scene for an evening in 18th-century Trenton, when King George II still ruled and the tavern was the center of town. Music, drinks, and games are on the program, all by candlelight. Dance mas ter Sue Dupre will provide instruction, and John Burkhalter of The Practitioners of Musick, accompanied by Russell Hoffman, will perform music of the 18th century on period instruments. Period dress is neither required nor discouraged. Hors d’oeuvres presented by Chambers Walk Cafe and an open bar of wine and River Horse Brewing Company beer will be provided throughout the evening. A silent auction will offer a variety of items, including an original painting by James Doherty, an overnight stay and dinner at Bally’s Atlantic City, golf and cart rental at Trenton Country Club, and more. The event will be held from 7-10 p.m. Tickets at

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DACA Ruling continued from page one

17,400. New Jersey Policy Perspective last year reported that 87 percent of DACA recipients in the state are working, contributing $66 million in state and local taxes each year. It noted that the repeal of DACA would cause New Jersey to lose an estimated $1.6 billion each year in state gross domestic product. Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber applauded Judge Bates’ decision last Friday. “We are very pleased that the court today reaffirmed its ruling that the government’s termination of the DACA program ‘was unlawful and must be set aside.’ As the court noted, it ‘sees no reason to change its earlier determination that DACA’s rescission was arbitrary and capricious.’” He continued, “Princeton University’s continued success as a world-class institution of learning and research depends on our ability to attract talent from all backgrounds, including DREAMers. Our DACA students have earned numerous academic honors, awards, and fellowships. Their con-

tributions strengthen our com mu nit y, and we are proud to stand with them.” Permanent Solution? Both Eisgruber and Microsoft President Brad Smith emphasized the need for permanent protection for DR E A Mers through congressional action. “A lasting solution for DREAMers has become an economic imperative and a humanitarian necessity,” said Smith. “We hope today’s decision will encourage the nation’s leaders to work together before the end of the year to address the uncertainty DREAMers have been living with for almost a year. DREAMers grew up in this country, attended our schools, pay taxes, and contribute to our communities. They deserve bipartisan action by Congress.” Eisgruber concurred with Smith’s plea for legislative action. “Though we are delighted with today’s ruling,” he said, “we will continue to urge Congress to enact a permanent solution that recognizes the contributions DREAMers make and grants them the permanent protection and certainty that they deserve.” —Donald Gilpin

Pettoranello Gardens continued from page one

destination. To me, the setting at Communit y Park Nor t h, w it h t h e nat u re preserve and hiking trails, makes it seem like you are miles away when, in fact, you are still within walking distance to downtown and almost anyone in Princeton can easily bike to get there.” S ha ke sp e are has long been a focus of the amphitheater. The Princeton Rep Shakespeare Festival performed there in years past. More recently, the Hudson Shakespeare Company presented The Tempest and All’s Well That Ends Well in partnership with the library. Blue Curtain has been staging musical events at the venue for over a decade. “There is a long history of events,” said Stentz. “We looked into our options before we built the new stage. It has been perfect so far. It is more functional for the types of things happening in the amphitheater now, more appropriate for a big band or larger group of people performing.” The base of the stage is stainless steel, which is meant to last. “I promised when we got it that it would

SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS: Princeton Community Village (PCV), an affiliate of Princeton Community Housing (PCH), recently celebrated eight PCV residents who won scholarships from the New Jersey Affordable Housing Management Association (JAHMA) and the National Affordable Housing Management Association (NAHMA). Pictured from left are Juliet Malkowski, Daniel Hanna, JAHMA and NAHMA Scholarship Foundation Administrator Bruce Johnson, PCH Executive Director Edward Truscelli, Mary Ebong, Alana Chmiel, and Heidy Guzman. Scholarship winners Noah Daniecki and Molly Rodas are not pictured. (Photo Courtesy of Edith Juarez, PCV)

last longer than I would,” Stent z said. “We had a great Blue Curtain concert this summer, and the library has these enhanced offerings with the concerts and Shakespeare in the park. I wanted to get the place busier.” Singer Helen O’Shea’s band The Shanakees was the first to perform on the new stage this summer. While she had never appeared on the old stage, she recognizes the merits of the new one. ‘We were blown away, as were our guests, not just by the quality of the stage but the ease of getting on and off. It can accommodate much bigger bands,” she said. “And the sound was amazing, too. I think where the stage is positioned in relation to the audience and the trees makes it a unique venue.” The Irish-born O’Shea, who lives in Princeton, will return with her band in a program called The Shanakee Sessions on August 12. The program is “in the round,” she said, with songs and stories from local songwriters Mike Montrey, Fil Wisneski, Marvin Perkins, and hers elf. “T he word shanakee means storyteller in Ireland,” she said. “This is a very innovative show of three or four moving parts, and we’re expecting it to be very successful.” Stentz is hoping for add it iona l u n ique mus ic a l events to take place on the new stage. “I’m working on some other things. I’ve been desperately begging the Princeton High School Studio Band to figure out a way to come over and play, because they’re so good. It’s a time issue, but we’re going to make that happen,” he said. He is hopeful that the new stage and new programming will bring more people to the venue — but not too many. “We want it to be full, but not too full,” he said. “Because when you run out of seats, it can be tough.” All performances at the a m p h i t h e a te r a r e f r e e . “We’re thankful for this

partnership with the library. We want different things,” Stentz said. “Because not everyone likes Shakespeare and not everyone likes the same kind of music.” —Anne Levin

YingHua International School Hosts Federal Language Programs

Yi ng Hua I nter nat iona l School recently hosted the 2018 YingHua STARTALK Teacher and Student Programs. YingHua STARTALK is created under the National Security Language Initiative, a federal program which was launched in 2016 and seeks to expand the teaching of strategically important languages in the United States. Languages taught under the program include Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Hindi, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, and Urdu. YingHua, a Chinese-English Dual Language Immersion program, was selected to share their strength in Chinese academics and methodology with domestically and internationally based teachers and students through the STARTALK program. STARTALK’s mission is to increase the number of U.S. citizens learning critical languages, such as Chinese, Russian, Arabic, etc, and also to provide teacher training program to exemplify best practices in language education and in language teacher development. Every year, there are many U.S. K-12 educational institutes nationwide that apply for the grant. YingHua was one of the few schools awarded to offer the Chinese program two years in a row. T he pro g ra m was de signed to address various experiences and levels of teachers and students. The teacher program included 14 participants, from June 20-July 3. The student program June 25-July 13 was designed for students in grades three-nine. All the participants visited the Museum of Chinese American History in New York. They also had the opportunity to shop in traditional Chinese markets,

order food and negotiate in Chinese, and learn how different parts of China cook different foods depending on the region. The students were also given an opportunity for a more hands on practice. For m or e i n for m at ion about YingHua International School of Princeton, including its Summer Camp, Parent and Me classes, afterschool enrichment classes, or full-time enrollment for early learning, pre-school, elem ent ar y s cho ol, a nd middle school, call (609) 375-8015 or email info @ yhis.org.

Police Blotter On July 31, at 1:20 p.m., a 34-year-old male from Somerset who was employed at Money Bag Multiservices was charged with theft of $20,160 of cash that he was supposed to wire to Guatemala. On July 31, at 8:21 a.m., a 23-year-old male from West Deptford was charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Hutchinson Drive for an overweight vehicle. On July 31, at 9:50 p.m., a 39-year-old male from Mullica Hill was charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia subsequent to a motor vehicle stop on Hutchinson Drive for an overweight vehicle. On July 31, at 9:50 p.m., a 20 -year-old male from Trenton was charged with possession of u nder 50 grams of marijuana after observation of an occupied vehicle in Hilltop Park after dark. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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“Cirkus Diurnus” at West Windsor Arts Center

“HOMEFRONT ON THE WINGS”: This painting by Stacy D. is featured in “Healing in Nature,” on view through August 31 at the D&R Greenway Johnson Education Center in Princeton. The exhibit showcases artwork created by people who have benefited from HomeFront’s ArtSpace program.

“Healing in Nature” At D&R Greenway

D & R Greenway Land Trust has partnered with HomeFront’s ArtSpace program for the first time to present “Healing in Nature,” on view through August 31 in D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton. This partnership showcases artwork created by homeless people who have benefited from the HomeFront Family Campus in Ewing, where calming influences and a healing garden enable a much-needed break. “D &R Greenway’s work to preserve open space is diverse,” says D & R Greenway President and CEO Linda Mead. “We preserve land that benefits everyone in the community, from our Capital City Farm that grows healthy, local food in Trenton, to the well-loved community parks we have created in Hopewell, Lawrence, and Princeton. Again and again, we hear about the healing power of nature from people who enjoy our trails, our parks, and our open spaces in suburban and urban communities. With this exhibit, we want to illustrate the importance that nature plays in healing everyone, everywhere.” “At our HomeFront Family Campus in Ewing, we house as many as 38 families in crisis on any given night,” says HomeFront Executive Director Connie Mercer. “And due to their tumultuous lives and the added stress of their arrival — children frightened, parents in de spair — Hom eFront’s ability to provide calming influences throughout their

stay can play a huge role in emotional healing. A small, contemplative garden at the family campus is the perfect place for parents and their children to take a muchneeded break and seek the fresh air, the beauty, and the solace that only nature provides. And no one knows how true this is more than our wonderful friends at D & R Greenway, promoting this very kind of healing through nature and land preservation for so many years.” Just like D&R Greenway’s Meredith’s Garden of Inspiration, HomeFront’s healing garden has a theme: butterflies. Butterflies are symbols of hope and transformation into a new life. “The garden is in the planning stages. We’re working with Master Gardeners of Mercer Count y,” says ArtSpace Founding Director Ruthann Traylor. Local landscape architect Bay Weber has volunteered her services to develop a detailed plan with winding pathways and calming elements including thoughtfully placed benches, fragrant plantings, gentle wind spinners, sculptural art, and mosaic tiles. “In order to attract butterflies, we expect to be planting native plants. ArtSpace will be creating tile walking stones for the garden, and a portion of the sale of the artwork on view at D &R Greenway will go toward this endeavor.” “A mutual benefactor, Wade Martin, brought local nonprofits together a few years ago to encourage partnerships,” Mead says. “Much has grown from that, including D&R Greenway’s

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc 609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

The West Windsor Arts Center presents “Cirkus Diurnus : Sketchbooks of a Traveling Artist,” a playful and profound exhibit of journals and sketchbooks running August 20 through September 7. An opening reception is on Saturday, August 25 from 4 to 8 p.m. The Center invites the public to explore the creative process of cultural anthropologist and trendspotter Mikel Cirkus. From cities around the world, in 63 journals spanning nearly 40 years, Mikel set out to capture moments between the thought, the pen, and the paper — magic that is slipping away from our increasingly digital worlds. “The beauty of keeping a journal is that you may literally see thought coming to page,” says Cirkus. “The pages develop from brain to heart to hand, to pen to paper.” A p r e m i e r a r t s h o w, “Cirkus Diurnus” features professional notes, personal reflections, quotes, and drawings. The exhibit features five d is t inc t ac t s : Fecu nd it y ( Our Shared Human E xper ience ) ; Flying Cirkus (Musings While Cocooned on Airplanes); Rock Dove (A “Coming of Age” Diary); Oenotes (Wine Journals); and Signature ( Celebrity Encounters). Cirkus believes we all walk around with pages in our heads, yet we are rarely inclined to take time and bear witness to our thoughts by writing them down. He lives by Leonardo DaVinci’s mantra: “God forbid I forget my ideas.” “You can’t predict the outcome of the sketch or thought you put down on the page,” says Mikel. Mikel Cirkus has spent his 32-year career in creative thinking. As a designer, photographer, illustrator, and writer, he has a unique perspective on the rapidly changing world of trends, content creation, and execution. A modern social anthropologist, Mikel wades through the noise of society to find signals that may dictate the next lifestyle trend. Insights gleaned from traveling the globe have enabled Mikel to see patterns that add cultural depth to brand authenticity. Beyond merely “connecting the dots,” Mikel actively pursues and records emergent consumer trends as they appear at the fringe of societies, merge into mainstream media and ul-

Taking care of Princeton’s trees Local family owned business for over 40 years

IS ON

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Art

partnership with the Princeton Y WCA and the Healing Trails tour that will be available this fall. This latest partnership with HomeFront celebrates our mutual goal to create places where people from all walks of life can enjoy the beauty and healing power of being outdoors in nature.” Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission. For more information, visit www.drgreenway.org.

timately influence the food and beverage industry. He is currently global director of strategic foresight for the Flavors Division of Firmenich, the largest privately-owned company in the fragrance and flavor industry – where creativity is both an essence and a guiding principle. He works with many of the most innovative people in marketing, R&D, technical applications and brand management, on hundreds of products in nearly every category of consumerpackaged goods, worldwide. Mikel is a graduate of the ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, California and makes his home in West Windsor.

Area Exhibits Art Times Two, Princeton Brain and Spine, 731 Alexander Road Suite 200, has “The Impact of Art: artists find refuge and regeneration through their art” through August. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Photography by Larry Pars ons” a nd “Place s by John Carney,” both at Princeton Public Library through September 15. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Bernstein Gallery, Rober tson Hall, Princeton University, has “Beirut: Theater of Dreams,” photography by Manal AbuShaneen, through August 15. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Airing Out the Attic” through September 9 and “40-for-40” through January 2019. www.ellarslie.com. Grounds For Sculpture, 8 0 S c u l p t o r s W a y, Ham ilton, has “Mas a yuki Koorida: Sculpture” through March 17, 2019,

“CIRKUS DIURNUS”: An exhibit of journals and sketchbooks by cultural anthropologist and trend-spotter Mikel Cirkus will be at the West Windsor Arts Center August 20 through September 7. An opening reception is Saturday, August 25 from 4 to 8 p.m. (Image courtesy of WWAC) and other exhibits. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Einstein Salon and I n n o v a t o r s G a l l e r y,” “Pr inceton’s Por trait,” and other exhibits. $4 admission WednesdaySunday, 12-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www.princetonhistory.org. James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street, Doylestown, Pa., has “View Finders: Four P h oto g r ap h i c Vo i c e s” through August 26 and “American Moderns: The Legacy of Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest” through O c tob er 21. w w w.m i chenerartmuseum.org. Mor ven Museum & G a r d e n , 55 S to c k to n Street, has “A Gentleman’s Pursuit: The Commodore’s Greenhouse”

t h r o u g h O c to b e r 21. www.morven.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has “Frank Stella Unbound: Literature and Printmaking” t h r o u g h O c to b e r 2 3. (609 ) 258-3788. w w w. artmuseum.princeton. edu. We s t W i n d s o r A r t s Center, 952 Alexander Road, has “Generation Next: The Family Show” through August 17. (609) 716 -1931. w w w.w e s twindsorarts.org. You can now purchase a copy of

Town Topics

for 75 cents in front of our previous office, 4 Mercer Street, or our new location, 4438 Routh 27 North in Kingston, from our coin-operated newspaper boxes, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 14

Town Topics

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In our fast-paced world, lis ten i ng, le ar n i ng, a nd speaking skills are essential. Parents turn to Princeton Speech-Language & Learning Center (PSLLC) because research has shown that effective speech, language, social communication therapy, and academic support at the right time can greatly improve a child’s chances of success in school and in life. Founded in 1989, PSLLC is Central New Jersey’s leading provider of services that help our clients improve their ability to learn, communicate, and interact with their peers. We are widely known for our thorough evaluations and comprehensive reports, which help parents and other professionals understand a child’s strengths and weaknesses. Our therapists are nationally certified speech-language pathologists, who are trained in the latest, most innovative, and research-based therapies. Realizing that “one therapy approach doesn’t fit all,” we tailor our therapies to help each individual overcome his or her challenges. We have access to the latest software, devices, and online resources to help our clients improve their communication skills. Computer-based interventions can motivate clients to help them reach their goals faster. We provide our services where they are most convenient — at school or our comfortable, state-of-the-art learning center two miles north of the heart of Princeton. At our center, we offer evening hours and a kid-friendly atmosphere.

Olympics New Jersey (SONJ) is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Oly mpic-t y pe spor ts for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy, and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills, and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes, and the community. Over the past 50 years, Special Olympics New Jersey has changed the lives and hopes of thousands of individuals with intellectual disabilities throughout New Jersey. For the athletes and their families, SONJ has opened the door to unimagined possibilities. For those who volunteer, support, and sponsor the Games, it inspires unprecedented pride and hope for a brighter future. And for the schools, counties, and towns who host events, it transforms society, creating a more just and understanding environment for all, and demonstrating to the world the recognition of the value of every human being. You can join this transformative movement, so the next 50 years features a new generation of inclusion and unity that creates a permanent change in perspective and allows the power of sport to transform lives and open minds. Through a series of seasonal sport-related Open Houses, SONJ will look to cultivate new athletes and volunteers while fostering

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 16

DVD REVIEW

Cliffhangers and Character — The Things That Keep Us Watching How fearful /And dizzy ‘tis, to cast one’s eyes so low! —Shakespeare, from King Lear t’s primal stuff, the fear of falling, the horror of being suspended in space, left hanging, the vicarious sensation of feeling the fall the way the Duke of Gloucester does as he falls without falling from the “dread summit … the crown ‘o the cliff” in Act 4, scene 6 of King Lear. Edgar simulates the experience for his blind father, combining force of will with Shakespeare’s language the way a film director manipulates a submissive viewer, taking advantage of that age-old perceptual Open Sesame “the willing suspension of disbelief.” Flash forward four and a half centuries and vast audiences are willingly giving themselves up to the cliffhanger dynamic of series television bequeathed by Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980), who crafted classic manifestations of that primal fear, most famously in Vertigo (1958), which opens with Princeton alum Jimmy Stewart ‘32 hanging from a San Francisco rooftop and ends as the mystery woman played by Kim Novak falls to her death from the San Juan Bautista bell tower. Having moved from the U.K. to Hollywood in 1939, Hitchcock made cliffhanger props of American monuments in Saboteur (1942) and North by Northwest (1959). When fellow director François Truffaut refers the Master of Suspense to the scene on top of the Statue of Liberty in Saboteur showing the hero (Robert Cummings) gripping the hand of the dangling title character (“the villain suspended in mid-air … a life hangs by a mere thread … the public can’t help but be terrified”), Hitchcock wistfully observes, “If we’d had the hero instead of the villain hanging in mid-air, the audience’s anguish would have been much greater.” He gets his wish in North by Northwest, which offers a Mt. Rushmore sequel to the image of a man falling to his death from Liberty’s torch. The falling man in the later film is a Russian spy, seen only after the “anguished” audience has thrilled to the sight of Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint hanging from a cliff by their fingerips surrounded by the gargantuan faces of American presidents. Multiple Cliffhangers Two shows that caught on in the terrorist-tormented aftermath of 9/11 were Fox’s 24 in the States and ITV’s Spooks (aka MI-5) in the U.K. My wife and I became addicted to 24, finally squirming free after six seasons, ears ringing and eyes glazed from the din of the thriller machine, with multiple cliffhangers descending upon the helpless viewer at the end of each hour in a pounding delirium that propelled you headlong into the next “action-packed” episode. We might have broken the cycle sooner if not for the presence of Jack Bauer, Kiefer Sutherland’s charismatic counter-terrorism agent, and CTU analyst Chloe O’Brien (Mary Lynn Rajskub), his most faithful, brilliantly capable, and refreshingly unglamorous ally.

I

Character had little to do with what kept us watching the first season of MI-5 with its outrageous plotlines, conspiracies and moles, plus cliffhangers of “there’sno-way-out-of-this” enormity, and the knowledge that no one is safe (least of all the agents you’re identifying with); we soon learned that the unsafest place to be in this series was a designated safe house. Thankfully, Season 2 introduced a substantial, admirably sympathetic character, MI-5’s resident genius Ruth Evershed (Nicola Walker), who, like Chloe in 24, gave the viewing experience a dimension beyond the whirl of terrorist events and ever-deepening subterfuge. Looking back over the absurdly convoluted plot summaries for both shows, I wonder how my wife and I could spend so many hours and days of our lives in thrall to such stuff. Yet neither of us regrets it. After all, we’d been watching countless films, old and new, in theatres and on television, for decades, and here was something else we cou ld share ; it’s been a couple t h i ng, a n ig ht ly bonding of sorts, ye ar af ter ye ar, curled up together on the couch, left hanging time and again from the same cliff, couch p ot ato p a r o d i e s of Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint. Odd Couples W hat keeps us w atch i ng i n t h e second decade of the 21st centur y derives from the same compelling mixture: vicarious excitement, danger, death, and violence in locales like Berlin, London, and Paris. It’s no surprise that the shows we’re especially responsive to often center on a couple, usually a man and a woman working together to solve mysteries, save lives, save the world, or save each other. Of course not all the embattled couples have to be male/female or even adults. In Stranger Things a group of boys teams up with a telekinetic 11-year-old girl. Then there’s the odd couple on the run in the Aussie series Wanted, a Thelma and Louise throwback in which two wonderfully incompatible women become best friends in a match made by chance. Although not in the same league, Mind Hunter brought together two equally incompatible males. In Grantchester a handsome jazz-loving Anglican priest (James Norton) helps his detective buddy solve crimes, a situation that’s all the more interesting if you’ve seen Norton as the ruthless psycho in Happy Valley. Another place-name U.K.

series featuring a quirky couple is Broadchurch, where there are as many twists and turns in the relationship between the detectives played by Olivia Coleman and David Tennant as in the plots they struggle to unravel. The German period series Babylon Berlin, one of the best shows we saw this year, featured a magnetic couple in inspector Gereon Rath (Volker Bruch) and the beautifully undaunted, morally immoral Charlotte Ritter (Liv Lisa Fries), along with stunning visuals, epic musical sequences in arena-sized cabarets, and cliffhangers to live and die for (car sinks underwater, heroine trapped inside, hero swimming to shore for help, no way to get her out, time passes, situation hopeless, she survives). Spiraling The first season of the French series Spiral was so bleak and so raw that we gave up, having tried it only because two of the main actors, Thierry Godard and Audrey Fleurot, had been in our favorite show at the time, A French Village. So we thought why not try the British police procedural, In the Line of Duty, but couldn’t make it through the first episode. After the gritty depths of Spiral, the adventures of a police anti-corruption unit with no compelling characters left us cold. So back we spiraled to the gritty, grafittidrenched Paris of Spiral and fell under the spell of Caroline Proust’s police captain Laure Bertaud, a lovely, shabby, delightfully profane life force with a killer smile (you haven’t lived until you’ve heard what she does with the simple expletive merde). Though Bertaud had been at the center of the first episode, we didn’t bond with her until she clashed with Audrey Fleurot’s Josephine, a sexy, devious, totally unprincipled defense attorney with a genius for turning the law on its head. Spiral’s secret weapon is Philipe Duclos as the wily, besieged, unrelenting Judge Roban, with his underhanded smile and boyish shock of white hair, a character Balzac himself might have conceived. Spiral picked us up and swept us away. Watching two episodes a night, we were carried right through to the end of the sixth season. At that point, encouraged by the seriesbesotted couple down the street, we went back to In the Line of Duty, which, like Spiral, took off like gangbusters after a flawed first season. While we were slow

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to warm to the anti-corruption team of Steve Arnott (Martin Compson) and Kate Fleming (Vicky McClure), we climbed on board the binge train for good as soon as Keeley Hawes (from MI-5 and The Durrells of Corfu) entered the picture as the tough, tortured, fascinatingly ambiguous and very human Detective Inspector Lindsay Denton. While we still wouldn’t rate In the Line of Duty as highly as Spiral, it has the distinction of ending the first episode of the fourth season with what may be the cliffhanger of the century, or at least the most outrageous ever visited on series television, including even Babylon Berlin. What happens (or almost seems to be happening) in the kitchen of a forensics detective is also evidence that a cliff is not necessary to produce the maximum suspended-between-life-and-death impact. Back to the Source If you start searching for references to the first cliffhanger, you’ll find that the source of the term itself is an early novel of Thomas Hardy’s with a distinctly unpromising title, A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873). Midway through the story, which was published in serial form in 1872-73, a geologist named Henry Knight and the novel’s heroine Elfride Swancourt find themselves hanging from a precipice Hardy calls “the Cliff without a Name.” Unlike the cliff near Dover where Shakespeare envisioned the fall without a fall in King Lear, this one is on the southwest coast. Looking down into “the dizzy depths beneath them,” Knight knows that “unless they performed their feat of getting up the slope with the precision of machines,” they would fall over the edge of “this terrible natural facade” and find themselves “whirling in mid-air.” While the girl is finally able to climb to level ground by standing on his shoulders, Knight is left hanging with nothing to grasp but a plant. He figures he can last for no more than ten minutes; for her to find help would take the better part of an hour. As she disappears from sight, the chapter ends with the curiously unsuspenseful line, “Knight felt himself in the presence of a personalized loneliness.” As Knight hangs there he finds himself staring at an embedded fossil of “a creature with eyes … dead and turned to stone” that were “even now regarding him.” While the geologist holds on, “face to face with the beginning and all the intermediate centuries simultaneously,” Elfride is removing her elaborate undergarments and using them to fashion the rope she uses to save his life. The chapter is titled “A Woman’s Way.” pparently A Pair of Blue Eyes has never been filmed, perhaps because a believable depiction of the first cliffhanger would task even the most resourceful of directors. Someday someone will surely take it on. Meanwhile, here we are, with America hanging from a cliff that looms larger every day. —Stuart Mitchner

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17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Music and Theater

Friendly dogs are allowed in Mill Hill Park according to the Department of Parks and Recreation ; the dog must be leashed. There are dog curbing stations available in several areas of the park. Alcohol is not prohibited in the park.

McCarter Tickets On Sale For 2018-19 Season

THE KING IS BACK: On Thursday, August 9 at 7:30 p.m., the Princeton Garden Theatre celebrates Elvis Week with one of Elvis Presley’s iconic film performances in the 1957 musical “Jailhouse Rock.” Elvis plays Vince Everett, who is locked up after a barroom brawl. His cellmate is a washed up country singer-turned-bank robber who teaches him how to play the guitar. Filled with classic tunes including the eponymous “Jailhouse Rock,” which was a number one hit in 1957.

Sarah Dash at Levitt AMP with the dance music classics “Sinner Man” and “Low Trenton Music Series

On August 9 at 5:30 p.m., songstress Sarah Dash performs at Mill Hill Park as part of the Levitt AMP Trenton Music Series. Dash is a founding member of famed d o o - wop a n d f u n k-ro ck band Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, along with Patti L aBelle, Nona Hendr y x, and Cindy Birdsong. The group, which later became Labelle, made history as the first African American female group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City, and the first black vocal group to be featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. Since t hat time, Dash has performed with some of the greatest names in pop, rock and R&B, including The Rolling Stones, Alice Cooper, The Marshall Tucker Band, Laura Nyro, The O’Jays, Wilson Pickett, and Bo Diddley. The Trenton, New Jersey native has also released solo albums and has had her own hits

Down Dirty Rhythm.” Even a cursory glance at Dash’s career reveals a woman steeped in music who has lived through ever-changing trends and times and remains as vital and vibrant as ever. The concert takes place at Mill Hill Park, 165 East Front Street, Trenton. There are two parking garages available in the vicinity of the park. One is the Liberty Commons Garage, which is located just across the street from the park on East Front Street. The other is the Lafayette Garage, which is connected to the hotel located two blocks away on the corner of Warren and Lafayette Streets. Street parking is located on North Warren, East Front, Montgomer y, and South Broad Streets. East Front Street between North Broad a nd Montgom er y Streets will be designated handicap parking for visitors.

On Saturday, August 11 at 8 p.m., Dharmasoul performs at Hopewell Theater. Drums, guitar, and vocals are the backbone and energy behind the new album “Lightning Kid,” the debut record of New Jersey-based power-duo Dharmasoul. With Jonah Tolchin (right) on guitar, Kevin Clifford on drums, and the two singing both lead and backup vocals, this duo brings their songwriting and production chops to their new band Dharmasoul.

McCarter Theatre Center announced that patrons can immediately access tickets for all events throughout the upcoming 2018-19 season. In addition to its five-show Theater Series and annual production of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, an eclectic mix of musicians, dance companies, and performing artists are on tap, including several returning favorites and McCarter debuts. Numerous new additions to the previously announced season schedule are now on sale as well, including a ’90s flashback with FRIENDS! The Musical Parody (October 30), comedian and satirist Andy Borowitz (February 8), alt-folk super-group I’m With Her (February 16), singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo (April 12), and jazz pianist Ahmad Jamal (May 18). Of note for the Theater Series: for The Age of Innocence, ( September 7 – October 7), McCarter will now be of fer ing 2 p.m. matinee performances on Wednesday, September 26, and Wednesday, October 3. These performances will replace the originally scheduled Sunday evening performances on September 23 and September 30.

Folk Musician Dom Flemons at Hopewell Theater

On Wednesday, August 8 at 7:30 p.m., Hopewell T heater is hosting Dom Flemons, Grammy Awardwinning musician, singersongwriter, and slam poet. Carrying on the songster tradition, Flemons strives to mix traditional music forms with a contemporary approach, to create new sounds that will appeal to wider audiences. In his recent solo album Prospect Hill (2014), Flemons drew from a wide range of styles, including ragtime, Piedmont blues, spirituals, southern traditional music, string band music, fife and drum music, and jug-band music. He began his career as a performer in the Arizona music scene, where he produced 25 albums for singersongwriters and slam poets in Pheonix. In 2005, Flemons cofounded the Carolina Chocolate Drops, an African American string band that won a Grammy for its 2010 album Genuine Negro Jig. Today, he tours throughout the United States and internationally as “The American Songster.” In February 2016, Flemons performed at Carnegie Hall for a Tribute to Lead Belly. In September 2016, Flemons performed at the opening ceremonies for the National Musuem of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

Martin Hayes Quartet’s Irish Music at Hopewell Theater

The Martin Hayes Quartet, a new ensemble from one of Ireland’s foremost musicians, will perform unique interpretations of traditional Irish music at the Hopewell Theater on Friday, October 12 at 8 p.m. Tickets to The

AND THE WINNER IS: Inspired by the Tony Awards, the 2018 Kelsey Awards will be emceed by New Jersey performer Mark Applegate of Trenton. The show takes place Saturday, August 18, starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $18 for all. Tickets are available by calling the Kelsey box office at (609) 570-3333 or online at www.kelseytheatre.net.  Martin Hayes Quartet performance are available online at hopewelltheater.com and start at $50. Irish fiddler Martin Hayes is known worldwide for his soulful interpretations of traditional Irish music. The award-winning artist has collaborated with Paul Simon, Sting, Cassandra Wilson, Bill Frisell, and with Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble on the Grammy-winning album Sing Me Home.

Hayes launched his new quartet in the U.S. in 2016 with a sold-out four-night residency at the Irish Arts Center in New York City. It later toured Ireland and the U.K. Their first album, The Blue Room, was released there to great acclaim by the Irish and English press: “absolutely essential listening when it comes to the very best of contemporary Ir ish music” (A r ts Desk UK), “especially div ine”

(The Sunday Business Post), and “nothing short of revelatory” (Glasgow Life). The Blue Room will be released in the U.S. in October as the quartet makes their first American tour. With a wealth of musical experience and exciting new ideas, The Martin Hayes Quartet is simultaneously ancient and contemporary, innovative and authentic.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 18

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From Princeton, We Reach the World. From Princeton, We Reach the World. Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street

From Princeton, We Reach the World.

Princeton Office | 253 Nassau Street | 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com | © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If|your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com

Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street || 609-924-1600 || foxroach.com Princeton Office 253 Nassau Street 609-924-1600 foxroach.com

© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


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19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 20

BlacKkKlansman

CINEMA REVIEW

Black Cop Infiltrates Klan in Spike Lee’s Dramatic Comedy

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ack in the ’70s, Ron Stallworth became the first African American to join the Colorado Springs Police Department. The young, ambitious college grad was soon promoted to detective, and his first undercover assignment was to cover a Stokely Carmichael (Corey Hawkins) rally when the Black Power advocate was invited to speak at Colorado College. However, his most unlikely mission was to infiltrate the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan. Using his real name, he answered a KKK classified ad recruiting new members, not knowing what to expect. When the organization contacted him by phone, Ron adopted a white accent and complained that his sister was dating a black man. That was all it took for him to get invited to the next Klan meeting and to secure a membership card signed by Grand Wizard David Duke (Topher Grace). Instead of blowing his cover, Ron asked a colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), to attend the meetings to impersonate him. Despite several close calls, they managed to closely monitor the Klan’s movements over the next nine months. That comical and life-threatening assignment is the

focus of BlacKkKlansman, a thought-provoking dramatic comedy adapted by Spike Lee from Stallworth’s memoir of the same name. The movie won the Jury’s Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year. The movie mocks the small-minded Klan members’ racist attitudes and behaviors. However, it simultaneously serves as a timely cautionary tale by juxtaposing that shameful chapter of American history with a closing credits newsreel of the neo-Nazi march in Charlottesville last summer that culminated with the death of Heather Heyer when a white supremacist drove his car into a parade of peaceful counter-demonstrators. This is a sobering movie that suggests that the Klan might very well rise again. It is easily Spike Lee’s best offering in recent years. Excellent (HHHH). Rated R for pervasive profanity, racial epithets, disturbing violence, sexual references, and mature themes. Running time: 135 minutes. Production Studio: 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks/Monkeypaw Productions/Blumhouse Productions/QC Entertainment/ Legendary Entertainment/Perfect World Pictures. Distributor: Focus Features. —Kam Williams

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Calendar

Starting Friday Eighth Grade (R) Continuing Three Identical Strangers (PG-13) Ends Thursday Sorry to Bother You (R) Hollywood Summer Nights Beetlejuice (1988) Thu, Aug 2 at 7:30 Kids! Bee Movie (PG) Sat, Aug 4 at 10:30AM Special Event Yellow Submarine Sing Along (1968) Tue, Aug 7 at 7:30 Hollywood Summer Nights Sleepless in Seattle (1993) Wed, Aug 8 at 7:30 Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

gerplays for children ages 0-17 months. Wednesday, August 15 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, August 16

10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Musician and educator Mariana Iranzi presents a bilingual, interactive concert for the whole family at the Princeton Public Library in both Spanish and English (for ages 2 and up). 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Princeton Summer Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.: “The Everyday Should be Mother’s Day Event” at Nic + Zoe in Princeton’s Palmer Square. Enjoy 25 percent off select styles (through Sunday, August 19). 6 to 8 p.m.: The Arts Council of Princeton presents a musical performance by the Octavia Blues Band at the Princeton Shopping Center. Free. Guests should

bring their own lawnchair. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Amadeus (1984) at Princeton Garden Theatre.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Noon to 6 p.m.: Sangria Weekends at Terhune Orchards (also on Sunday, August 12). Sunday, August 12 12:30 p.m.: Art on Screen Wednesday, August 8 at Princeton Garden Theatre 6 p.m.: Twilight Walking presents a showing of I, Tour at Morven Museum, Claude Monet (2016). 55 Stockton Street in Princ4 to 5:30 p.m.: Voyage eton. Admission is $5. ESL at Princeton Public 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Library. Speakers of world Sleepless in Seattle (1993) languages who are learnat Princeton Garden Theing English as a second atre. language are invited to at8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra tend these free 90-minute Dance with the Princeton sessions. Country Dancers at the Monday, August 13 Suzanne Patterson Center. 5:30 p.m.: Sharon BanGeneral admission is $10 croft presents “Successfully ($5-$10 for students). Navigate College: Be the Thursday, August 9 Best You Can Be” at the 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Prince- Princeton Public Library. ton Summer Farmers Market Gain a better understanding at Hinds Plaza. of weighted assignments, ef5 to 9 p.m.: Celebrate fective study practices, pursummer with live entertain- chasing textbooks, minimizment every Thursday night ing stress, and test-taking in Palmer Square. techniques. 6 to 8 p.m.: The Arts Tuesday, August 14 Council of Princeton pres11 a.m.: Baby Story ents a musical performance time at the Princeton Pubby Eco Del Sur at the Princ- lic Library. Stories, songs, eton Shopping Center. Free. rhymes, movement, and finGuests should bring their own lawnchairs. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Jailhouse Rock (1957) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Friday, August 10 9 a.m.: Baby Boot Camp in Palmer Square provides fitness, nutrition, and community support for moms. This innovative 60-minute stroller routine uses intervalbased training for a full-body workout that will get you sweating. Free. Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton includes farm-fresh produce, café, eat-in foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood, meats, guest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards. Enjoy Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery’s award-winning wines, wine fare, and relaxing music every Friday night throughout the summer (through September 7). 7 p.m.: Members of Central Jersey Dance present Dancing Under the Stars at Hinds Plaza (weather permitting). Saturday, August 11 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Station in West Windsor. Noon to 2 p.m.: Palmer Square’s Summerstage presents a free live musical performance by Deni Bonet.

Friday, August 17

9 a.m.: Baby Boot Camp in Palmer Square provides fitness, nutrition, and community support for moms. This innovative 60-minute stroller routine uses interval-based training for a full-body workout that will get you sweating. Free. Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton includes farm-fresh produce, café, eat-in foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood, meats, guest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Saturday, August 18

9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Station in West Windsor. Noon to 2 p.m.: Palmer Square’s Summerstage presents a free live musical performance by Mr. Ray.

“I, CLAUDE MONET”: On Sunday, August 12, at 12:30 p.m., the Princeton Garden Theatre is screening “I, Claude Monet,” a fresh new look at impressionist master Claude Monet through his own words. Using letters and other private writings, the film reveals new insights into the man who not only painted the pictures that gave birth to impressionism, but who was also perhaps the most influential and successful painter of his time. Shot on location in Paris, London, Normandy, and Venice, this is a cinematic immersion into some of the most loved and iconic scenes in Western art. Tickets cost $14 for general admission, and $12 for members.

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“We didn’t lose our comt appeared that Tom in a group matchup, trailing Schreiber squandered a 10-9 with just over five min- posure at all; we were losgolden opportunity to be utes remaining in regulation. ing for the majority of the the hero as the U.S. men’s “We knew this going in g a m e , ” s a i d S c h r e i b e r. national team battled Can- that Canada was a really, “There were a couple of ada in the final at the FIL really good team and that it simple but monumental (Federation of International is a going to be a battle,” plays made in that game that weren’t flashy, that weren’t Lacrosse) World Lacrosse said Schreiber. going to wow anybody but Championship last month. “It is not going to be where With the rivals locked in one team beats the other by that were just such great an 8-8 deadlock and five five or six goals, you know plays. It was mostly defenseconds remaining in regu- it is going to come down sive stops and just some lation of the July 21 contest to one or two. It was really smart plays by guys on the in Netanya, Israel, former chippy as was the final. They offensive side.” In a fourth quarter rally, Princeton University star were both exciting finishes which saw it overcome defimidfielder Schreiber mis- and both really physical fired on a good look in the games. It is a just a bunch of cits of 7-6 and 8-7, the team crease, missing a point blank guys who were really hungry applied the pregame messhot. to win against each other.” sage. “Part of Coach K’s wisdom “I was shocked with While the U.S. cruised to how much room I had and lopsided wins over Scotland and part of what we heard shocked with how much time (18-2) and England (19-2) the whole time was ‘focus I had when I caught it,” said to close out pool play, the on the next play and don’t Schreiber. team maintained its hunger think about how this game is going to end up’,” said “I probably rushed it a to improve. Schreiber, who scored the little bit. So from there my “The message all the time team’s seventh goal in the mind was, ooh, I just blew from the coaches down to that one, I better get the ball the players was to make sure win and ended up with three and at least give ourselves a we are growing and we are goals in the contest. “It was just ‘make the next chance.” advancing forward the entire play,’ and I think we had Schreiber got one more time,” said Schreiber. enough guys making those chance just before the final “I think that is one thing simple plays and focusing on horn and this time he buried we can point to helping us it with a second remaining to down the stretch. It was the that enough of them snowgive the U.S. a dramatic 9-8 first time after college where balled together. It ended up working for us.” win and the world title. you were with your team and For Schreiber, winning the “Rob Pannell was taking coaching staff all day, every world title was the product the ball and we locked eyes day. It is not to say that we for a second; I saw a path are not coached in the pro of a lot of hard work. “It means a ton, beyond and Ned Crotty set a pick in league, you play the game the crease,” recalled Sch- and you go home. Whereas playing for the U.S. and here we had a full film break- wearing the colors and all of reiber. “It all happened in slow down, meeting debrief, and that, it was the 23 guys and motion. I was wide open, I a pregame meeting. We are the staff coming together saw the ball and it was hope- able to make a lot more ad- over those two weeks and fully catch it and I was going justments than we normally being able to accomplish to bury it. It was strange be- would. I think that was huge cause we didn’t know if time for us.” In a semifinal contest had expired. It didn’t set in for a long time but it was a against a plucky Australia forever play. I just ended up team, the U.S. broke open a tight game that saw it leadin the right spot.” While the U.S. ended up ing 5-4 in the first half to with the gold, there some post a 14-5 win and earn bumps in the road to the a date with Canada in the title as the team overcame final. “That is a smart team, deficits along the way. In its opening game of they play well together,” said group play, the U.S. found Schreiber of the Australians. “It was good for us, they itself trailing the Iroquois Nationals 3-0 and 7-5 be- played in a similar way that fore pulling away to a 17-9 the Canadians did. I think our defense, in particular, victory. “It was a good experience, did a really nice job of withbeing down a few goals and standing that. It is a lot of having to keep our com- pressure to play against, posure and battle back,” with teams that possess the said the 6’0, 190-pound ball that well and are that Schreiber, a native of East selective about their shots.” Before the highly-anticiMeadow, N.Y. who scored 200 points in his Princeton pated gold medal showdown ONTGOMERY OMMONS career before going on to against Canada, Schreiber ______________ the Ohio Machine of Major and his teammates got some Route 206 and Applegate Road _______________ Time: ______________________ extra inspiration as they reLeague Lacrosse (MLL) Date and & Princeton | Somerset County | NJ Toronto to Rock the ceived a pep talk, via conferour ad,the scheduled run of ___________________. National Lacrosse League ence call, from Duke men’s oughly(NLL). and pay special attentionbasketball to the following: • Prestigious Princeton mailing address head coach Mike Krzyzewski, a West Point ill tell us“They it’s okay) are just really tal• Built to suit tenant spaces ented and skilled; we were grad who has coached USA basketball�toExpiration three Olympic • Private bathroom, kitchenette and tighten some�things � able Fax to number Address Date up. Sure enough, nine days gold medals. separate utilities for each suite “It was incredible, we could later we were dealing with • Premier Series suites now available! the same thing on the same tell that it was genuine and Renovated offices with upgraded meaningful and something I field so it was good.” flooring, counter tops, cabinets In what turned out to be won’t soon forget,” said Schand lighting a preview of the final, the reiber. “He had a couple of U.S. edged Canada 11-10 words of wisdom in there • High-speed internet access available that I know for a fact that we all thought about in that • 219 parking spaces available on-site game and will stick with us with handicap accessibility for a long time.” • Less than one mile away from The U.S. had to stick toPrinceton Airport gether as it trailed Canada 6-4 at halftime.

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CAPTAIN AMERICA: Tom Schreiber handling the ball for Team USA last month at the FIL (Federation of International Lacrosse) World Championships in Netanya, Israel. Star midfielder Schreiber, a 2014 Princeton alum who scored 200 points in his Tiger career, scored a goal with one second to play to give the United States a 9-8 win over Canada in the gold medal game at the competition. Finishing the seven-game tournament with 13 goals and eight assists, Schreiber was named to the All-World Team and as the Outstanding Midfielder of the tourney. (Photo by Adam Scott/US Lacrosse)

Schreiber, now 26, noting that he was hampered a bit physically due to a knee injury he suffered during the indoor season. “I hope I haven’t even reached the halfway point of my career. I am in a good place; I enjoy playing and I hope to play as long as I can.” —Bill Alden

come off in any other way. That gold is what I will remember and what I think about when it comes to the real highlights of my career.” Looking ahead, Schreiber is hoping make a lot more highlights before ending his lacrosse career. “I plan on playing for as long as I can and for as long as my body holds up,” said

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our goal at the end of the day over such a good team,” said Schreiber, whose father, Doug, played for the U.S. team that won gold in the 1974 world tournament. “It was really meaningful and my family got to go over to Israel. For me, it has been a team effort my whole life in terms of my personal development. To enjoy it with the family and with our team was pretty incredible.” In Schreiber’s view, the way the U.S. team came together paved the way to gold. “I think it just comes down to only caring about the team; we knew what we wanted to accomplish,” said Schreiber. “It is the type of tournament where nobody cares who makes the all star team, no one cares who gets the awards, but it is about winning. We knew we would have a pretty good shot at getting to the gold medal game and I don’t think we looked over anybody I think it is easier said than done but every single guy only focused on that.” S c h r e i b e r ’s b r i l l i a n c e , though, led him to receive some of those individual awards as he was named to the All-World Team and as the Outstanding Midfielder of the tourney. “That stuff is big but it pales in comparison to the gold medal,” said Schreiber, who tallied 3 goals and eight assists in the tourney. “I am certainly appreciative and I don’t mean to

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Sharpening Her Skills as U.S. U-21 Team Veteran, Wong Primed for Final Season on PU Field Hockey O ve r t h e las t s e ve r a l years, Elise Wong hasn’t had much time to relax over the summer months. Since emerging as a field hockey star at Lake Forest High (Ill.), Wong, who is headed into her senior season at Princeton University, has been involved with various U.S. teams, training over the summer with the national program as she has moved up the ranks. D e f e n s i v e s t a r Wo n g played for the U-17 junior national team from 2012-15, for the U-19 national team in 2015-16 and is now a member of the U-21 squad. “Getting all of that international experience has been a great learning experience for me and a stepping stone,” said the 5’2 Wong. “I have had great coaches that have helped me along the way.” This summer, Wong was busy as usual, training at the national team headquarters

at Lancaster, Pa. in June and then playing for the U.S. in a test series at Argentina. Although the U.S. went w i n le s s i n t hree ga m e s against Argentina, Wong believes the squad made progress. “We didn’t get the scoreline that we wanted, but we showed tremendous growth as the series went on; one of our mottos is that we wanted to grow as we went on,” said Wong. “We showed that we can play and compete and challenge a team like Argentina on their home turf.” With her experience in the U.S. program, Wong is looking to show more leadership. “It is a really young team and some players I played with growing up are getting their chance in the U.S. pipeline now,” added Wong. “I feel really comfortable as one of the older players. You are a young kid and then all of a sudden you are

ON THE STICK: Princeton University field hockey star Elise Wong guards the back line in a game last season. Rising senior defender Wong spent much of her summer training with the U.S. national program and was recently chosen to play on the U.S. U-21 team for another year. Wong and the Tigers will start preseason practice next week and open 2018 regular season play with a game against North Carolina on August 31 in Philadelphia, Pa. Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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a veteran. You get pushed up to the next team and then you are young again.” I n e a r l y J u l y, Wo n g learned that she had been chosen to play another year for the U.S. U-21 squad. “It is extremely exciting; you are training until that moment and it is nice to have that payoff when the selection comes around,” said Wong. “I hope to take more of a leadership role.” It was doubly exciting for Wong to be joined on the U-21 team by two Princeton teammates, rising junior Maddie Bacskai and rising sophomore Mary Kate Neff. “I have known them and have watched both of them play for years,” said Wong. “It is great to play with them outside of the Princeton team also.” The trio helped shore up the back line for the Tigers last fall as Princeton overcame a 1-4 start to win the Ivy League title and advance to the NCAA quarterfinals on the way to a 12-7 record. “Something we really focused on was our defensive play and it improved,” said Wong, who chipped in two goals and earned secondteam All-Ivy honors in 2017. “We have most of the same unit coming in this year so we can go from there.” Princeton saved its best for last in the NCAA tourney, upending No. 5 Virginia 3-2 in overtime in an opening round contest before getting edged by No. 4 North Carolina 3-2 in the quarters. “All of those schools are powerhouses and we showed that we can play and compete with them,” said Wong. “We challenged them the whole way through. It was tough going back-to-back with a double overtime game and getting up the next morning, knowing that you have to face a great team like UNC. The team rose to the challenge.” With Princeton preseason practices starting next week, Wong and her teammates will be gearing up for a major challenge on opening weekend as they face North Carolina on August 31 and Wake Forest on September 2 in games that will be played in Philadelphia, Pa. “We have been training for such a long time; the spring season was great growth for us,” said Wong. “This summer we have really been focusing on making sure that we are fit and we are connected as a team so we can go into the preseason and hit the ground running.” Wong, for her par t, is bringing a sharp focus into the fall as she wraps up her college career. “I am very excited about making the most of it,” said Wong. “I have great support from my family and great support from my friends and teammates. I am looking forward to this season.” —Bill Alden

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Bacskai Making Impact for U.S. U-21 Squad After Breakthrough Season on PU Field Hockey Maddie Bacskai made a big jump forward last fall in her sophomore season for the Princeton University field hockey team. After a solid debut in 2016 which saw the star defender earn All-Ivy League honors, Bacskai emerged as one of the top performers in the nation, getting named as the Ivy Defensive Player of the Year and earning first-team All-American recognition. “From my freshman year to my sophomore year, I made a lot of development, not only on the field, but mentally and as a leader on the team,” said Bacskai, a 5’5 native of Berwyn, Pa. “I was much more comfortable in the backfield and defending as a center back. I was communicating more with the players in front of me and with our goalkeeper. I was much more vocal which helped me and helped my other teammates.” In reflecting on her honors, Bacskai is quick to credit her teammates playing a key role in her success. “It is really nice to get to get all of those accolades; it is about my teammates as well and how they are always helping and supporting me to get there,” said Bacskai, who scored four goals in 2017 after tallying two goals and three assists as a freshman. “It is really exciting and cool to see my name up there. It is a confidence builder. It gives me the energy to keep pushing myself; I am always looking to get to that next level.” Playing at a high level nationally, Bacskai was recently selected to compete again for the U.S. U-21 team. “It is an honor just to say that I can represent my country,” said Bacskai, who first made that squad in 2016 and helped it earn a silver medal at the Junior Pan American Games and take fifth place in the Junior World Cup that year. “I am also playing with some of the best girls in the U.S., so every training opportunity is competitive and really valuable.” Training with her U.S. teammates has helped Bacskai home in on individual improvement. “I feel like with school, you have goals to win certain games and get to the tournament,” said Bacskai. “Whereas your mindset in this national team setting is that you want to get better; you want to compete not only with your teammates but with yourself. Something that we do with the U-21 program is that we have training goals at the beginning of every practice. You write down a makable training goal; it is kind of on your mind through the session. You are always keeping track, am I doing this, and how far am I from my goal, and at the end you reevaluate it.” Getting joined on the U-21 team by Tiger teammates, rising senior Elise Wong and rising sophomore Mary Kate Neff, is a bonus for Bacskai. “It is cool; they are some of your best friends from the team at school, and then you have this opportunity to play with them in this really intense training environment,”

said Bacskai. “I think it also helps the Princeton team as well. We try to bring back some of our drills and skills we learn at the national team practices and try to incorporate them and add them to our Princeton stuff.” Displaying that skill, the three helped the Tiger defense hold the fort as it topped No. 5 Virginia 3-2 in overtime in the opening round of the NCAA tournament last fall. “We were just looking to keep it simple and do our job and get the ball out of the back field,” said Bacskai. “We were playing against really talented players, staying disciplined and focused. That was pretty much our goals and focus points going into each of those tournament games.” While Princeton fell 3-2 to No. 4 North Carolina in the NCAA quarters, Bacskai believes that the Tigers can build on that performance going forward. “We were definitely in the game pretty much the whole time,” said Bacskai. “We

took that coming into next season.” With the 2018 regular season starting for Princeton on August 31 when it plays North Carolina in Philadelphia, Pa., the Tigers will need to be on their game to hang in there against the powerful Tar Heels. “We were looking to come out strong because most of our competition is right after the beginning of the schedule,” said Bacskai. “ We don’t have m u ch time to readjust and get a handle on things. I am confident that we will get back to where we ended in the spring and last fall.” As Bacskai and her teammates return to Princeton next week to start preseason practice, they are looking to make the most of their time together. “The girls are really excited to get back on campus and get back in the swing of things,” said Bacskai. “We have a lot of returning players and we also have some good incoming players, so I am looking forward to see how we come together and develop. I think we will be ready right from the start.” —Bill Alden

SKY HIGH: Princeton University field hockey player Maddie Bacskai advances the ball in a game last fall. Rising junior defender Bacskai emerged as one of the top performers in the nation in 2017, getting named as the Ivy Defensive Player of the Year and earning first-team All-American recognition. She was recently named to the U.S. U-21 team for another year, having first joined that squad in 2016. Next week, Bacskai and her Princeton teammates start preseason practices for the upcoming season. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Fou r m e mb e r s of t h e Princeton University wome n’s h o cke y te a m we r e honored recently by the America Hockey Coaches A s s o c i at i o n ( A H C A ) a s 2017-18 Krampade/AHCA All American Scholars. R is i ng s e n ior S tepha nie Sucharda, rising junior Claire Thompson, and rising sophomores Sharon Frankel and Sarah Verbeek each claimed the prestigious honor, now being given in its second year. To be eligible for the honor, student-athletes must have attained a 3.60 GPA in each semester during the 2017-18 season, and participated in 40 percent of their team’s games. All four Tigers were also named ECAC Hockey AllAcademic last month, with Sucharda picking up Commissioner’s List honors for the third straight season with having the highest GPA on the team all three years. A former member of the C a nad ia n U22 Nat iona l Team, Sucharda is an AllIvy League defender. She led Princeton’s defenders in scoring last year as an assistant captain with a teambest 18 assists and three goals in 32 games. Thompson, also a defender, had nine goals and seven assists last season while forward Frankel had 10 points (5 goals, 5 assists) and forward Verbeek collected 10 points (4 goals, 6 assists) as well.

Recently graduated Max Becker and David Hallisey of the Princeton University men’s hockey team have been named All-America Scholars by the America Hockey Coaches Association (AHCA). In its second year of presenting the honors, AHCA has partnered with Krampade to honor those student-athletes who had a 3.60 GPA in each semester during the past season and participated in at least 40 percent of their team’s games, as 2017-18 Krampade/AHCA All American Scholars. Becker, who graduated in June with a degree in economics, scored the most memorable goal of the season last year. He notched the game-winning goal in overtime against Clarkson in the

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Aaron Paul, a 2015 University of Virginia grad and previously a volunteer assistant coach at Virginia and Wake Forest, has been na m e d as t he as s is ta nt coach of the Princeton women’s tennis program. At Virginia, Paul, a native of North Potomac, Md., earned his degree in computer science while minoring in mathematics. He competed with Virginia’s club tennis team, playing in the top singles spot, and was a student manager for the men’s basketball team. Af ter graduation, Paul worked as a basketball operations analyst for the Washington Wizards. He spent the 2016-17 season as a volunteer assistant at Wake Forest before returning to his alma mater in the same role last season. In the summer of 2017, Paul spent four months with a fellowship in professional coaching and per formance analysis as a part of the USTA Player Development Program in Lake Nona, Fla., working with players and shadowing coaches while participating in continuing education and coaching programs.

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25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

PU Sports Roundup

title game to give Princeton the ECAC Hockey Championship. In 35 games, Becker scored four goals and six assists and was named to the ECAC All-Tournament Team and was a member of the ECAC All-Academic team all four years. Hallisey was third on the team in scoring with 38 points (18 goals, 20 assists) in 36 games. Earlier in the season he had a six-game goal scoring streak of nine points in six games, and delivered in the postseason as well scoring the gamewinning goal at Union to advance Princeton to the ECAC Hockey semifinals. He finished his career with two assists in the NCA A tournament against Ohio State and earned a degree in economics in June.

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Emphasis on Fun Stoked Competitive Fire As CP Bluefish Dominated PASDA Meet Although the Community Park Bluefish swim team rolled to another undefeated dual meet season in Division 1 PASDA action this summer, the squad outdid itself at the league’s championship meet. The Bluefish, who have been undefeated in dual meets since 2015, rolled up 3,934.50 points in winning the Division 1 competition, nearly doubling the 2,030 scored by the runner-up Lawrenceville Swim Association. Even Bluefish head coach Mike Uchrin was taken aback by how his swimmers performed at the meet, which was held the John Witherspoon Middle School pool from July 23-24. “We blew away expectations; I was optimistic because it was in Princeton, but one thing that worried me was that we were stuck indoors,” said Uchrin, who is in his fourth season guiding the program. “That is not what summer swimming is about; you want to be outside. We were at Witherspoon and be-

cause of the environment, it tended to be hot and humid on deck which created some challenges for us, getting the kids ready to roll and hyped up and not having them too tired.” But with the program’s emphasis on keeping things fun for its 240 competitors, the Bluefish swimmers rolled through the PASDA competition. “The more fun the kids have, the more fired up they are to compete on behalf of the team and the success is a byproduct of that,” said Uchrin. “It comes w ith hav ing an amazing coaching staff alongside the swimmers at every level and being able to rely on them to work with those kids so they get that individual attention so they can improve. We have kids from all different kinds of backgrounds come together.” Two of the top kids on the girls side came from one family as Mia Bitterman starred in the six-and-under group while older sister, Zoe, won the 25-yard freestyle and the 25 butterfly in the 10-and-

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unders. “The Bitterman sisters are establishing a little bit of a Bluefish dynasty,” said Uchrin. “Mia finished in the top three in the six-and-under events in the freestyle and backstroke, which was great to watch. All year, she has been so steady in those events. Zoe Bitterman was the PASDA MVP for the 10-and-unders.” The rest of 10-and-under girls, which included Julia Godfrey, Annie Flanagan, Ellie Krol, Anna Winters, and Vivian Lee, were steady, placing first and second in the 100 free relay and taking first and third in the 100 medley relay. “It is a very deep group and all season long, the relays that came out of that group was just phenomenal,” added Uchrin. “If you look at the relay results for the 10-and-under girls, it was really impressive what they were able to do. That was definitely one of our deepest groups.” The 12-and-under girls proved to be a force, featur-

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SHARP PERFORMANCE: Community Park Bluefish swimmer Serena Sharpless displays her breaststroke form in a race this summer. Sharpless starred for the 18-and-under girls as the Bluefish took first in Division 1 at the Princeton-Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet at the John Witherspoon Middle School pool on July 23-24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

ing Piper Dubow, the winner of the 50 breaststroke, Sabine Ristad, second in the 100 individual medley and third in the 50 butterfly, along with Kyleigh Tangen and Audrey Wilhelm. “That was likely, collectively, our strongest group of all of our different groups,” asserted Uchrin. “We had so many swimmers t hat really helped establish that to be such a reliable group for us. If you look at the 200 free relay alone, that relay won every single dual meet and won the PASDA championships by 12 seconds. That is an incredible feat for them to do that.” Bluefish stalwarts Abby Walden, Emily Smith, and Alexandra Cherry paced the 14-and-under group. “Those girls came back and they were tremendous all year,” said Uchrin. “There were times in dual meets when they were maybe down in some individual events but whenever they came together for the relays, they just swam so hard for each other.” In the 18-and-under group, Serena Sharpless, Cameron Davis, and Ella Caddeau piled up a lot of points as Sharpless took first in the 50 free and second in the 50 fly while Davis was second in the 50 free and third in the 100 IM and Caddeau took second in the 50 back and third in the 50 fly. “Sharpless, Davis, and Caddeau have been with the team and they are great role models,” said Uchrin. “The younger kids all look to them. They help line them up and they get them to know their events.” As for the Bluefish boys, Krol twins Matthew and Brian gave the 8-and-under group a great lift. Matthew took first in the 25 breast and 25 fly while Brian won the 25 back and took second in the 25 free. “They are the most fun to watch, they have so much fun when they do it,” said Uchrin. “I see them cheering for their teammates and jumping up and down. I think the Krol brothers and that 8-and-un-

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der boys group may have the best spirit on the team, they have so much fun.” The team’s 12-and-under boys had a lot of fun at the PASDA meet as Coll Wight won the 50 back and the 100 IM while Matthew Baglio took second in the 50 fly and fourth in the 50 free and Martin Brophy placed third in the 50 fly and third in the 50 free and Kent Kyle finished second in the 100 IM and third in 50 breast. “We actually had a ton of those 11-12 boys that all came together,” said Uchrin. “We had a number of new faces in that group, which was great with Coll being one of them coming on board. We also had some veterans in Matt Baglio and Marty Brophy. That was a great group, they had strong swims. Coll was definitely on for us at the PASDA championships.” Andrew Lenkowsky led the way for the 14-and-under boys, posting a pair of victories. “Lenkowsky won the 100 IM and 50 free; it was a deep group that all pushed each other,” said Uchrin. “It was another group that we had longtime Bluefish families like [Paul] Lacava and [Julian] Velazquez. It stays with the fact that we like to have fun but push each other and stick together.” The 18-and-under boys showed a lot of depth as Dylan Torrance won the 50 back and took fourth in the 100 IM with Philip Lacava taking second on the 50

free and fourth in the 50 fly, Charles Yandrisevits finishing fourth in the 50 free and fifth in the 100 IM, Karl Lackner taking fourth in the 50 free and sixth in the 100 IM, Calvin Ristad placing second in the 50 breast and third in the 50 free, and Owen Tennant taking third in the 50 breast and fourth in the 100 IM. “We have a number of 15-and-over boys who have stuck with the sport for a long time,” said Uchrin. “There are a lot of teams that can’t field relays in that age group and we had multiple relays. It speaks to the kids who want to come back and compete. We had Dylan Torrance, Karl Lackner, and Charlie Yandrisevits, who all were all seniors for us this year and have been with the team for a long time. They are graduating. It was great to see them go out there and have some really close races.” For Uchrin, it has been great to be involved in a program that has become such an institution on the local summer sports scene. “This was my fourth year and I am seeing what it means to the community,” said Uchrin. “I have had families come through and say that they were Bluefish back when they were children 20 years ago. We have records going back all the way to the early ‘70s. It is really a fixture in the community, and it is something that the kids look forward to every year.” —Bill Alden


After the Cranbury Swim Club closed in 2014, Will Kinney had to find another outlet for his summer swimming. Joining the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings as a swimmer and assistant coach, Princeton High standout K in ney qu ick ly fou nd a home. “The team is a lot of fun, it is positive and it is such a great experience for everyone,” said Kinney, who is heading into his sophomore year at William and Mary. “I don’t think it could have worked out any better. I have met so many people; it has been really nice to grow with this team.” Showing that growth this summer, Kinney served as the head coach of the Lemmings program. “It was definitely more responsibilities with communicating; we had a lot of new families this year, so it was important to get everyone on the same page,” said Kinney. “It was really rewarding; we finished this season 4-1, which has been our best record since I have been here. The progress was incredible since with the newer families, a lot of the kids weren’t certain about how they were feeling about the team. As the practices progressed, they really became some of the best swimmers on our team so it was really fun to have these new families.” The Lemmings had a lot of fun at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet, placing fourth of six teams in Division 2 at the competition held on July 2324 at the John Witherspoon Middle School pool which saw the Ben Franklin Swim Team take first. “Our team is such a good blend of swimmers who only do PASDA and then swimmers who also compete for clubs,” said Kinney. “It is fun to see these swimmers interact, helping each other out. We had some lightning-fast swims from all of our swimmers.” As for the Nassau girls, the team got some some fast swims from Nava BrennerWitten, who starred in the 8-and-under group, while Juliet Wei came up big for the 10-and-unders. BrennerWitten placed first in the 8-and-under 25-yard backstroke and 25 butterfly and second in the 25 freestyle while Wei won both the 25 breast and 25 fly. “They are definitely awesome, they have both been with the team a long time,” said Kinney. “It has been super fun watching them get faster and faster. They are always listening to what we have to say, always having a smile on their face.” The trio of Emma Hopkins, Kimberly Wei, and Sophia Burton paced the 14-and-under group. Hopkins finished first in the 50 free, 50 back and 100 individual medley while Wei took second in the 50 back and fifth in the 50 fly and Burton placed second in the 50 fly and 100 IM. “T hey really had awe some seasons; they are fun to watch because they have

taken on this older kid role on our team,” said Kinney. “They are really helping the younger kids with stuff and then coming in and showing them some really fast swims.” Lemmings veterans Isabelle Monaghan and Rachel Adlai-Gail came up big in the 18-and-under category. Monaghan won the 50 back and took second in both the 50 free and 100 IM while Adlai-Gail finished second in the 50 fly, third in the 100 IM and fourth in the 50 free. “They are really helpful; they are always coaching everyone on the team,” said Kinney. “I am really proud of what they did.” As for the Lemmings boys, Stephen Baytin and Sebastian Rodricks starred in the 8-and-under group. Baytin won the 25 free and 25 back while Rodricks placed first in that division in the 25 breast and 25 fly. “They had some really fast swims,” said Kinney. “They are great; you can put those two in anywhere and you know they are going to have a fast swim.” Two sets of twins, the McDowells, McLaughlin and Piers, and the Singhals, Armann and Aurav, piled up points in the 10-and-unders. “It is really fun to watch them swim against each other,” said Kinney. “We always call it the ‘twin showdown’ when they are going against each other.” Kinney’s younger bother, Sawyer, was another 10U standout, winning the 25 back and taking third in the 25 fly. “It has been really fun having him on the team; I think he looks up to me and what I did through PASDA,” added Kinney. “I am really proud of the swims that he has been doing.” Daniel Baytin produced a dominant performance in the 12-and-unders as did L or ne Wight in t he 14-and-under group. Baytin finished first in the 50 free, 50 breast, and 100 IM while Wight prevailed in the 50 back, 50 breast, and 100 IM.

“Daniel broke 2 PASDA records [in the 50 breast and 100 IM] at championships, one of which had been standing for 25 years,” said Kinney. “He is unreal. Lorne Wight also had a really big meet. Both Lorne and Daniel won MVPs in their respective age groups.” Oliver Gassman was a one-man show for Nassau in the 18-and-under boys, taking first in the 50 free and 50 fly and second in the 100 IM. “This is his first year with Nassau; it was super nice having him come on the team and doing some fast swims,” said Kinney. “He got used to the way the team ran quickly and really became good fiends with a lot of the people.” In Kinney’s view, the positive environment around the pool is what sets the Lem-

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Finding Summer Home With Nassau Lemmings, PHS Alum Kinney Guides Team to Strong Season

IN CONTROL: Daniel Baytin churns through the water in a meet last year for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings. In late July, Baytin helped the Lemmings take fourth in Division 2 at PrincetonArea Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet, starring in the 12-andunder boys’ group. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) mings program apart. “The Nassau team has some of the nicest people that I have met; this year, our pool won the sportsman-

ship award for Division 2,” said Kinney. “It goes to show that everyone is really caring for everyone else on the team

and looking out for people on the other teams as well. It is super to see how friendly and nice all of the swimmers are.” —Bill Alden

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Local Sports Mercer Tennis Facility Receives USTA Award

The Mercer County Park Commission’s tennis facility in West Windsor has been named as one of 24 winners in the 37th annual U.S. Tennis Association (USTA) Facility Awards program, which recognizes excellence in the construction and/or renovation of tennis facilities throughout the country. “This is a great honor for our Park Commission and the outstanding Mercer County Tennis Center,” said Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes. “From lessons to leagues to tournaments, the Tennis Center offers opportunities for people of all ages and skill levels to be involved in a terrific sport, have fun, and stay fit.” The Mercer County Tennis Center, which encompasses 19 acres of Mercer County Park, consists of six indoor courts and 22 lighted outdoor courts.

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WINNING CREW: Coleman Chiurco, a Princeton resident and rising senior at the Hun School, accepts the first place trophy from Commodore Phil Lutz for a victory in the traditional 12 meter class at Race Week recently held by the New York Yacht Club at Newport. R.I. Coleman competed on the crew of the Columbia, a former America’s Cup winner, skippered in this event by his father, Tony Chiurco MD, former chief of neurosurgery at University Medical of Princeton, now retired. The six-court indoor facility der the jurisdiction of a park has a second-floor viewing and recreation department, lounge overlooking the courts, an educational institution, a and stadium seating is avail- nonprofit corporation, or be a able on the premier outdoor private or commercially owned court. Last November, the and operated facility that ofPark Commission opened fers both USTA and public four new regulation pickleball programming designed to help courts at the Tennis Center to grow tennis. give racket-sport enthusiasts Facilities were judged on even more options. The facil- the following criteria: overall ity is also home of the Mercer layout and adaptation to site; County Tennis Hall of Fame. excellence of court surface and The Mercer County Tennis lights; ease of maintenance; Center hosted 13 tournaments accommodations for players, in 2017 with 1,535 individuals spectators and press/officials; participating. Mercer County aesthetics; graphics (including hosts multiple unique tourna- the use of signs and landscapments including the 52-year- ing); amenities such as casual old James Cryan Memorial seating for spectators, food tournament and the Stone services and social areas; and Age Open, established in the facilities’ participation in 1997. It also hosts such high USTA programs. school events as the Mercer Nominated facilities were County Tournament and the voted on in the following catNJSIAA Group semis and fi- egories: Public Courts that are nals. either small tennis centers with “Great tennis facilities like two-10 courts or large tenthe Mercer County Park Com- nis centers with 11 or more mission Tennis Facility help us courts; and Private Facilities to grow the game at the grass- that support the USTA and roots level, and we are proud other “growth of the game” to recognize them for their programs open to the public. ongoing impact on the sport This is the fourth time the of tennis,” said Kurt Kamper- Mercer County Tennis Center man, chief executive, USTA has received a USTA Facility National Campus. “The Mer- Award. All 2018 award wincer County Park Commission ners will be honored at the Tennis Facility has embraced USTA Semi-annual Meeting at many of our tennis initiatives the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New and kept the sport at the fore- York City on August 30, and front of its community each each will receive a wall plaque year.” and an all-weather sign, which To be considered for an can be mounted at the facility. award, facilities must be un-


9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages

served in several roles end- Governance — A Public ing as Deputy Director for Servant’s Experience unthe National Security Pro- der Six Presidents, edited grams Division at what is by John C. Long. now the Office of ManageMr. Mor r ill s er ve d on ment and Budget. He rep- many boards, committees, resented OMB on the Ros- and councils including the tow Task Force on National National Academy of Public Telecommunications Policy Administration; Council for and led the effort to open Excellence in Government; the Highway Trust Fund for the Association for Public mass transit. Policy Analysis and ManIn 1972 Mr. Morrill’s ob- agement; Child Developjection to the Vietnam War ment Research and Public led him to serve as Deputy Policy Standing Committee, County Executive of Fair- National Research Council fax County, VA. He then of the National Academy ret ur ned to t he Federal of Sciences; the Aspen Ingovernment as Assistant stitute Roundtable on ComSecretary for Planning and p r e h e n s i v e C o m m u n i t y Evaluation at what is now Initiatives for Children and the Department of Health Families. In Bucks County, and Human Services from PA, Mr. Morrill was active 1973 -1977. In 1977 Mr. with Planned Parenthood, Morrill was recruited to join the Moyer Scholarship Founthe team responsible for cre- dation, Bucks County Food ating the new U.S. Depart- and Wine Festival, Bucks ment of Energy. County Women’s Advocacy At the end of 1977, he be- Coalition, and Pennswood gan a 23 year relationship Village. with the Mathematica ComBill Morrill was a true Repanies in Princeton, NJ, first naissance man: wine enthuas Senior Fellow, Sr. VP, and siast, accomplished cook, then President of Mathemat- self-taught guitar player, ica Policy Research, Inc.; VP author of illustrated travel and General Manager, Con- journals, splendid writer, sulting and Research at Mar- aspiring tennis player, wise tin Marietta Data Systems; gardener, prolific artist in and CEO, Chairman, and Sr. colored pencils, impressive Fellow of Mathtech, Inc. In poet, aficionado of folk and 2000 Mr. Morrill joined ICF bluegrass music, singer of International in Fairfax, VA all Methodist hymns by numas a Senior Fellow, retiring ber, consummate workaholin 2013. ic, and preserver of family Over the years Mr. Morrill treasures and stories. authored and co-authored For the full obituary and several professional reports, information concerning a chapters, and publications; memorial service, please he received many honors contact Joseph A. Fluehr AN EPISCOPAL PARISH and awards throughout his Funeral Home, Richboro, PA career, including Lifetime at Holy (215) 968-8585 Trinity Church Week or www. Sunday National Associate of the fluehr.com. 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule National Academy & of SciencIn lieufor ofAll flowers, 9:00 a.m. Christian Education Ages please es. In 2013 he published his consider making a financial Wednesday, March 23 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II memoir: A Journey through contribution Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm to The Wesley5:00 Evensong withPrayers Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with for Healing, 5:30 pm

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Obituaries

William Ashley Morrill William Ashley Morrill, age 88, died on July 25, 2018 at his home in Pennswood Village, Newtown, PA, from complications of Parkinson’s disease. Born in Bronxville, NY, to now deceased Katharine Anderson Morrill and Ashley Baker Morrill, M.D., (both offspring of Methodist Bishops), Bill attended the Bronxville School ( K-12).

an Fund, 318 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459; The Maxwell School, 44 University Place, Syracuse, NY 13210; National Academy of Public Administration, 1600 K Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20006; Planned Parenthood Keystone, P. O. Box 813, Trexlertown, PA 18087; The Fellowship Fund, Pennswood Village, 1382 New tow nLanghorne Road, Newtown, PA 18940; or a progressive charity of your choice.

sion for nursing and travel. A few years after attending Seton Hall University and receiving her nursing degree from Mountainside Hospital School of Nursing, Carolyn traveled to Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, where she worked as a nurse for the Arabian American Oil Company (ARAMCO). There she met and married George Jones, her husband of 52 years, until his death. Together with their four children, they worked and t raveled t hroughout t he Middle East, before moving to England, then Singapore, finally returning to the States after 20 years overseas. Carolyn is predeceased by her parents, her five siblings and husband, George. She is survived by a daughter, three sons, their spouses, and seven grandchildren. Arrangements are by Mather-Hodge, Princeton. Memorial services are private.

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

He graduated in 1952 from Wesleyan University, majoring in government, and got his Masters in Public Administration in 1953 from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University. He is also pre-deceased by his brother, Richard Baker Morrill, and his former wife, Lois Birrell Morrill. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Porter Morrill, and four daughters: Margaret K. Morrill Gates of Madrid, NY (Cedric); Carolyn R. Cummins of Sabael, N Y (Joseph ) ; Elizabeth Darcie Corbin of Bloomington, MN (Roger); and Janet Robin Forsell of Clifton Park, NY (Jeffrey); seven grandchildren: Daniel Gates, Molly Baker (Justin), Kim Gates, Kate Cummins, Cody Cummins, Mindy Corbin, and Kurt Forsell; t wo g reat- g randch ildren Callie Cummins and Cash Baker; and his sister-in-law JoAnn Morrill of Minneapolis and her son and daughters and their children. In 1953 Mr. Morrill began his over 60 year career in public service in successive posts in the Directorate of Manpower and Organization, United States Air Force. From 1962-1971 he

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Obituaries Continued on Next Page

Carolyn Hansen Jones

Carolyn Hansen Jones of Stonebridge at Montgomery, passed away on July 26, 2018, two weeks shy of her 93rd birthday. Born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, Carolyn had a pas-

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Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am Wherever you Service are onfor your journey faith, The Prayer Book Good Friday, of 12:00 pm –you 1:00are pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm –with 2:00 us pm at: always welcome to worship Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

RELIGIOUS DIRECTORYSERVICES OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRE RELIGIO 5:30

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30pmp.m. The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. AN EPISCOPAL PARISH Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. ANHoly EPISCOPAL Eucharist, Rite I,PARISH 7:30 am Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Trinity Church Holy Sunday Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II,Week 9:00 am

Trinity Church Holy Week Sunday Festive Choral Eucharist, RiteChurch II,Sunday 11:00 8:00 Holy Eucharist, Rite Iam Week &a.m. Easter Schedule Trinity Holy 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I & Easter Schedule & Easter Schedule 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for AllIAges AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

9:00Jeanes a.m. Christian Education for All Ages The. Rev. Paul III, Rector March 23 9:0010:00 a.m.Wednesday, Christian Education for AllIIAges Wednesday, March 23 a.m. Eucharist, Rite The Rev.Holy Nancy J. Hagner, Associate 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy12:00 Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist, Rite II, pm Wednesday, March 23 Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 5:00 Evensong with Communion following 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy33Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 Mercer Holy St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Eucharist, Rite II,Tenebrae 12:00 pm 7:00 Service, pm pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Service, 7:00forpm Tuesday Holy Eucharist,Tenebrae Rite II with Prayers Healing, 5:30 pm Thursday March 24 p.m. Holy Eucharist Tenebrae Service,12:00 7:00 pm Tuesday Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Thursday March 24 Tuesday 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer Thursday March 24 p.m. Holy Eucharist 12:00 p.m.5:30 Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes Holy Eucharist withRite FootII,Washing andIII, Rector Holy Eucharist, 12:00 pm Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Friday, March 25 Wednesday 33 Mercer St.Foot Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Stripping of with the 7:00 pm for Holy Eucharist Washing and TheAltar, Prayer Book Service Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Wednesday Keeping Watch, 8:00 pmAltar, –with Mar. 25, 7:00Friday, amPrayer Stripping of the 7:00 pm 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm – Mar. 25, 7:00 am Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The. Rev. Paul Jeaneswith III, Rector 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing Prayer

St. Paul’s Catholic Church

St. March Paul’s25 Catholic Church Friday, Friday, March 25 Msgr. Walter Rosie, Nolan,Pastor Pastor Msgr.Easter Joseph Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm

TheTom PrayerWhittemore, Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Director of Music 216III, Nassau The. Rev. Paul Jeanes RectorStreet, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Princeton 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 The Prayer Book Service for214 Good Friday, 7:00 am

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

33 Mercer St. Book Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor The Prayer Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm –5:30 1:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:007:00 am Saturday The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, pmp.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm p.m. Sunday, March 27 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Evening 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Stations of Prayer, theSunday: Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. The Prayer Book Prayer, Service2:00 forFestive Good pm Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Evening pmChoral – Friday, 3:00 pm7:00 Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am 216Nassau Nassau Street, Princeton Street, Princeton The 214 Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church Princeton’s First TraditionChurch St. Paul’s Paul’s Catholic Church St. Catholic ECUMENICAL CHRISTIAN WORSHIP St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton 214 Nassau Street, Princeton 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor

Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor 214 Nassau Princeton SUNDAY AT 10AM Easter EggStreet, Hunt, 3:00 pm Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pmp.m. Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor REV. DR. ALISON L. BODEN REV. DR. THERESA S. THAMES Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m.Religious Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pm Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 p.m. Dean of Religious Life Associateand Dean of5:00 Life Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and and the Chapel andp.m. the5:00 Chapel Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and p.m. 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday atam 7:00 p.m. p.m. in Sunday at 7:00 JoinMass us! All areSpanish: welcome! Visit religiouslife.princeton.edu Festive Choral Eucharist, II, 9:00 Holy Eucharist, RiteRite I, 7:30 am am Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Festive FestiveChoral ChoralEucharist, Eucharist,Rite RiteII,II,11:00 9:00 am The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org

Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate

St. Paul’s Catholic Church Church ofPrinceton Christ, St.First Paul’s Catholic Church 216 Nassau Street, 214 Nassau Street,Princeton Scientist, Princeton

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 The Great Vigil of Easter, 7:00 pmp.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and p.m. 609-924-5801 –10:00, www.csprinceton.org Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 11:30 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery p.m. at 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive inTestimony Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Christian Science Reading Room The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector

TheNassau Rev. NancyStreet, J. Hagner, Associate 178 Princeton Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from

Witherspoon S

124 Wither

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

10:00 10:00 a.m an A (A mu

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

NJ

¡Eres10:00 siemprea.m. bienvenido! Worship

Service Christian Science Reading Room 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 178 Nassau Street, Princeton and Youth Bible Study 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 witherspoonchurch.org

10 - 4

Worship & Children’s Program: Sundays at 10 AM Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are Rev.always Jenny Smith Walz, Lead Pastor welcome to worship with us at:

AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week First Church of Christ, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 8:00 a.m. Holy Rite I & EasterEucharist, Schedule Wherever you arePrinceton on your journey of faith, you 124are Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ Scientist, Wherever you are on your journeywith of faith, you are 9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton always welcome to worship us at: 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org March 23 always welcome to worship with us at: 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. and Youth Bible Study Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm First Church of Christ, Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Adult Bible Classes Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 5:00 Evensong with Communion following Holyp.m. Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm First Church of Christ,

Scientist, Princeton Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Witherspoon StreetStreet, Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Princeton, NJ Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

(A multi-ethnic congregation)

Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m.Tuesday Worship Service Thursday March 24School 12:00Children’s p.m.Worship Holy Eucharist a.m. Service 10:0010:00 a.m. Sunday Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youthwith Bible Holy Eucharist FootStudy Washing and and Youth Bible AdultWednesday Bible Stripping of theClasses Altar,Study 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 congregation) pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer Adult Bible Classes (A Holy multi-ethnic 5:30 p.m. Eucharist The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector (A multi-ethnic congregation) Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music 609-924-1666 • •Fax 609-924-0365 Friday, March 25 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am witherspoonchurch.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm witherspoonchurch.org

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 124 witherspoonchurch.org

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. ¡Eres siempre bienvenido!

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room Christian Science Reading Room 178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924 wit

Nassau Street, Princeton 609-924-0919 178 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton


Continued from Preceding Page

Gail Liebmann Gail Liebmann died on August 4. She was born in Manhattan in 1923 to Sarah (Weinstein) and Raphael Liebman, joining four siblings, all of whom were unprepared for but thrilled with her arrival. Her birth name was Abigail, which she shortened to Gail well before entering Seward Park High School, from which she graduated early and with high honors. As a teenager in Brooklyn, she became an active member of the Labor Zionist Youth Movement’s Hashomer Hatzair, cultivating friendships which were to last a lifetime, and would work as a volunteer on a Hashomer Hatzair kibbutz in Israel many years later. When she was 16, she was introduced by a mutual friend to her future husband, Abe Liebmann, because, though spelled differently, they shared a last name. Their marriage would last until his death over 60 years later. Mrs. Liebmann attended Hebrew Union College, from

which she received her Hebrew Teacher’s license after completing classes at night while raising three children in West Orange, New Jersey, her home since 1952. She was a Hebrew teacher to thousands of children at The Jewish Center of West Orange B’nai Shalom, where she taught for over 42 years (a school record). In the mid1980s, The Gail Liebmann Fund was established at B’nai Shalom by her family in her honor to recognize a Hebrew School student of distinction chosen by the school’s principal each year. In 1989, Mrs. Liebmann earned the title “Master Teacher,” qualifying her to mentor colleagues in New Jersey’s Metro-west area. Upon her retirement in 1996, she was formally commended for her decades of service to the Jewish community at B’nai Shalom, with the Mayor of West Orange, Samuel Spina, proclaiming May 1, 1996 “Gail Liebmann Day,” and Rabbi Stanley Asekoff (now Rabbi Emeritus) stating that “what Gail has been able to do is convey to generations of youngsters the knowledge, excitement, and joy of the Jewish experience.” Gail Liebmann was also on the faculty of Hebrew Union College, The Jewish Education Association’s Midrasha Institute of Jewish Studies, and B’nai Shalom’s Adult Education Program. For many years, she served as President of the Hebrew Teachers’ Association of Essex County. Gail Liebmann was a pastpresident of B’nai Brith Women (now Jewish Women International), and was a life member of Hadassah. Her children, Robin Liebmann

Wallack (Alan), Rory Liebmann (Kay), and Dr. Dana Liebmann, recognize their mother’s profound influence on their immediate and extended family, with all her children, her five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren continuing a legacy which values the importance of education, compassion for animals, singing, good literature, and, of course, the Jewish traditions passed on to her from her own parents so long ago. Donations in Gail Liebmann’s memory may be made to The Matthew J. Ryan Hospital for Small Animals at The University of Pennsylvania.

brother and sister-in-law Craig and Cheryl Stevens, and nephews Michael and Matthew Stevens. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Stuart Fund at www.stuartschool. org/giving/the-stuart-fund or Living Beyond Breast Cancer at www.lbbc.org. Arrangements are under the direction of the MatherHodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Memorial Service A Memorial Service in celebration of the life of Rooney (Ann) Poole will be held on Thursday, September 6, 2018 at Noon in the Princeton University Chapel, Marquand Transept, Princeton, NJ 0 85 4 4. Re c e p t i o n to follow. Please RSVP to Katie Poole at Rooney. memorial.service@gmail. com.

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The Top Spot for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is the most comprehensive and preferred weekly Real Estate resource in the greater Central New Jersey and Bucks County areas. Every Wednesday, Town Topics WITH MODERN AMENITIES OLD FASHIONED CHARM UPDATED

Offered in the Historic Wilmotevery House, Circa 1830, 2in bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room/parlor, kitchen, inviting back yard, garage. reaches home Princeton A house with charm and character at a very reasonable price. In a most desirable Ewing Township neighborhood. $160,000 and all high traffic Virtual Tour: business www.realestateshows.com/1349823

areas in town, as well as the communities www.stockton-realtor.com of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: Gina Hookey, Classified Manager Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. WeorARE Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, check.the • 25area’s words oronly less: $23.95 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $61.00 • 4 weeks: $78 • 6 weeks: $116 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $34 community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946!


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 32

AT YO U

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SERVI

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A Town Topics Directory

For Quality & Care...

Greenleaf Painters,LLC*

CREATIVE WOODCRAFT, INC. Carpentry & General Home Maintenance

James E. Geisenhoner Home Repair Specialist

609-586-2130

Specializing in the Unique & Unusual

• Interior/Exterior • Residential/Commercial • Power Washing • Light Carpentry Call Now for a Free Estimate 609.750.0030

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

CARPENTRY DETAILS ALTERATIONS • ADDITIONS CUSTOM ALTERATIONS HISTORIC RESTORATIONS KITCHENS •BATHS • DECKS

Professional Kitchen and Bath Design Available

609-466-2693

Donald R. Twomey, Diversified Craftsman

BLACKMAN

Fully Insured • Owner Operated Professional Painting with a Personal Touch

greenleafpainters.com

American Furniture Exchange

LANDSCAPING FRESH IDEAS

Innovative Planting, Bird-friendly Designs Stone Walls and Terraces FREE CONSULTATION

PRINCETON, NJ

30 Years of Experience!

Antiques – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras Books - Coins – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture Unique Items

TR

609-683-4013

EE SERVIC

609-306-0613

HD

HOUSE PAINTING & MORE

House Painting Interior/Exterior - Stain & Varnish (Benjamin Moore Green promise products)

Wall Paper Installations and Removal Plaster and Drywall Repairs • Carpentry • Power Wash Attics, Basements, Garage and House Cleaning

Hector Davila

609-227-8928

Email: HDHousePainting@gmail.com LIC# 13VH09028000 www.HDHousePainting.com

References Available Satisfaction Guaranteed! 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Excellent Prices

Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

05-16-19

PAINTING BY PAUL LLC: Interior, exterior. Wallpaper removal, light carpentry, power washing, deck staining, renovation of kitchen cabinets. Free estimates. Fully insured. Local references. Cell (609) 468-2433. Email paulkowalski00@gmail.com 06-20-8t

Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Contact Liz: (609) 5140514; ez@zuckfish.com 05-23-12t

Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500

TK PAINTING:

04-04/09-26 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS

E

Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19

609.987.1492 WWW.ADPLANDDESIGN.COM

LA ND

G N I P S CA

Alvaro Pelaez

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

WE BUY CARS Belle Mead Garage

Ask for Chris tf WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

info@adplanddesign.com

A Gift Subscription!

548 Alexander Rd. Princeton, NJ 08540

We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info!

For Your Complete Tree & Landscaping Needs

tf

Member of NJ Nurseries and Growers Association

SUMMER IS HERE! GARAGE SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10 tf

Highest Quality Seamless Gutters. Serving the Princeton area for 25 years Experience and Quality Seamless Gutters Installed

3 Gutter Protection Devices that Work! Free estimates! All work guaranteed in writing!

Easy repeat gutter cleaning service offered without pushy sales or cleaning minimums!

609-921-2299

PERSONAL ORGANIZER: Certified organizer with lots of experience. Eager to declutter and organize closets and rooms in your home. Call Jenny at (732) 715-4664. 07-25-3t

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

(908) 359-8131

President/CEO

Phone: 609.987.1492

HOPEWELL COMMERCIAL for rent: 1400 SF, $2,500/mo. Includes NNN. Contact Jonathan Lamond (609) 947-0769. 07-18-tf

PRINCETON COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE: 220 Alexander Street. Excellent Location, First Level. ~900 SF, $2,500/mo. Weinberg Management, (609) 731-1630. 08-08

Custom fitted.

12-31-18

I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

NEWTOWN PA ESTATE SALE: Friday & Saturday August 10 & 11, 9-1. 384 Woodhill Road. Unique world items. Boys’ BR furniture, (2) guest rm. reg. sz. mattresses & frames (4 yo, Serta, Majesty), furs, antiques, serving pieces, brass Samovar, pinball, auto wheelchair, paintings, 4 yellow leather dining chairs, many vintage pieces. 08-08

GARAGE SALE: Saturday, August 11, starting 8 am. 25 & 27 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Artwork plus frames, tools, clothes, shoes, bikes, lawn furniture, fans, A/C’s, wet dry vacs, sewing machine, typewriter, household goods, books, etc. 08-08 MOVING/YARD SALE: Saturday August 18 from 9 am- 3 pm. 107 Helen Avenue, Lawrenceville. Antiques, dishes, art and much more! 08-08

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf PRINCETON: Sunny 2-bedroom. Mid-Century Modern with cathedral ceiling, built-in bookcases & extensive use of natural woods. Oak floors, spotlighting, central AC. French doors to private balcony terrace. Modern kitchen & bath. Western Section, walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. (609) 924-4332. tf PRINCETON: Large, private, onebedroom apartment on Princeton estate. Magnificent gardens, bright, elegant, newly redone. 18 windows, expansive views. New luxury kitchen, granite countertops. Washer-dryer, recessed spotlights, large closets, AC, Italian tile floors. Parking. (609) 924-4332. tf ELDER CARE AVAILABLE: Compassionate caregiver with over 30 years experience. Own transportation, references available. (609) 883-0296. 07-25-4t CANDE’S HOUSECLEANING SERVICE: Houses, Apartments, Offices. Party Cleanup, Move-in or out. Honest and responsible person. Years of experience. Free estimates. (609) 3102048. 08-08-3t


Nestled on country estate. Lawrence Township with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,300. (609) 731-6904. 08-08-3t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 08-01-5t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 08-01-9t STORAGE UNITS FOR RENT: 10 minutes north of Princeton, 22x21 and 22x15 for discounted rents of $280 and $220 respectively: http:// princetonstorage.homestead.com/ or (609) 333-6932. 08-08-6t

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-25-19 J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-08-19 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details. tf

12-31-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding.

Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19 TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures

SUMMER IS HERE!

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-04-19 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

WE BUY CARS

Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-25-19 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18

Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

NEWTOWN PA ESTATE SALE: Friday & Saturday August 10 & 11, 9-1. 384 Woodhill Road. Unique world items. Boys’ BR furniture, (2) guest rm. reg. sz. mattresses & frames (4 yo, Serta, Majesty), furs, antiques, serving pieces, brass Samovar, pinball, auto wheelchair, paintings, 4 yellow leather dining chairs, many vintage pieces.

GARAGE SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10

08-08 tf

GARAGE SALE: Saturday, August 11, starting 8 am. 25 & 27 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Artwork plus frames, tools, clothes, shoes, bikes, lawn furniture, fans, A/C’s, wet dry vacs, sewing machine, typewriter, household goods, books, etc.

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

08-08

PAINTING BY PAUL LLC: Interior, exterior. Wallpaper removal, light carpentry, power washing, deck staining, renovation of kitchen cabinets. Free estimates. Fully insured. Local references. Cell (609) 468-2433. Email paulkowalski00@gmail.com 06-20-8t PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE

MOVING/YARD SALE: Saturday August 18 from 9 am- 3 pm. 107 Helen Avenue, Lawrenceville. Antiques, dishes, art and much more!

in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Contact Liz: (609) 5140514; ez@zuckfish.com

08-08

05-23-12t

“It

was good to walk into a library again; it smelled like home." —Elizabeth Kostova

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

· Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

COME OUT AND PLAY

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

HOUSE FOR RENT:

Let’s play tennis, or swim in the pool and just leave the chores to someone else while you enjoy this lovely top floor condominium. In a most convenient Lawrenceville location, it offers 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, cathedral ceilings in living and dining rooms, skylights, fireplace and floored attic. Comfort and convenience at a most attractive price. $195,500

www.stockton-realtor.com


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018 • 34

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC THE OFFICE STORE

CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE RENTALS:

28 Spring St, Princeton (next to Chuck’s)

Ice Cream On Palmer Square • 9 Hulfish St. • To 11pm

609-924-0112

www.hinksons.com

“Always Professional, Always Personal” ǣ  ōsNjOsNj NŸȖŘǼɴ ǻŸƼ ƻNjŸ_ȖOsNjʰ Ý Ìɚs ǼÌs ĨŘŸɠĶs_¶s Ř_sɮƼsNjǼÞǣsǼŸOŸȖŘǣsĶOĶÞsŘǼǣǼÌNjŸȖ¶ÌǼÌsÌŸŎsEȖɴÞض ŸNjǣsĶĶÞضƼNjŸOsǣǣŘ_ǼŸƼNjsƼNjsǼÌsŎ¯ŸNjOȖNjNjsŘǼŎNjĨsǼ OŸŘ_ÞǼÞŸŘǣʳ Ý Ÿ¯¯sNj Ŏɴ OĶÞsŘǼǣ ǼÌs ÌÞ¶ÌsǣǼ ĶsɚsĶ Ÿ¯ ǣsNjɚÞOs ƼŸǣǣÞEĶsʳÝǼɠŸȖĶ_EsŎɴƼĶsǣȖNjsǼŸÌsĶƼɴŸȖʵ

TC

TERESA CUNNINGHAM ǢĶsǣǣǣŸOÞǼsʰDNJ˖ʰǢNJrǢ˖

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EȖǣɴǼO˔¶ŎÞĶʳOŸŎ ɠɠɠʳDȖǣɴǻNʳOŸŎ

Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. 2nd floor with PARKING. Available now. Princeton Office – $2,200/mo. 5-rooms with powder room. Front-toback on 1st floor. Available now. Lawrenceville – $1,200/mo. 2 BR, 2 bath, small K. LR, DR. Available 9/9/18. Princeton Apt. – $1,700/mo. 2nd floor apt. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, eat-in kitchen. Available now. Ewing – $1,800/mo. 3 BR, 2.5 bath house, central air, garage +2-car parking. Move-in condition. Available 9/1/18. Princeton Apt. – $1,900/mo. Plus utilities. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, kitchen. Available now. Hillsboro Twp. – $2,600/mo. Plus utilities. 3 BR, 2 bath converted barn. FULLY FURNISHED. LR w/fireplace, extended DR, kitchen. MB, sitting room & bath on 1st floor. Upstairs 2 BR, 2 bath + family room. Available September 2018. Princeton Address-$2,650/mo. Montgomery Twp. Blue Ribbon Schools. 3 BR, 2.5 bath townhouse. Fully furnished. Available 8/4/18. Princeton – $3,400/mo. Stunning 2 BR, 2 bath apartment. Terrific Nassau Street location. Available now. Princeton – $3,600/mo. Brand new & beautiful 2 BR, 2 bath apartment. Deck, laundry room. Available now.

We have customers waiting for houses! STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 Chambers Street Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. Stockton, Broker-Owner HOPEWELL COMMERCIAL for rent: 1400 SF, $2,500/mo. Includes NNN. Contact Jonathan Lamond (609) 947-0769.

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area ACCOUNTANT: Monmouth Jct, NJ. Prep monthly/ qtrly finan’l reporting package in USGAAP; monthly invoices to gvtmt & comm’l contracts; fill out budget & admin forms for future gvt contract proposals; co. annual budgets & performance tracking; gvt contract & fed/state finan’l compliance filings; set up patent filing tracking sys. & maintain info in i-Edison. Assist in prep. of indirect billing rates (ICR, PBR), BOD packages; 1120, 1065 tax returns; export/import docs, ITAR, DDTC, customs, excise duty & compliance report. Work with govt & ext. auditors, DCAA, DCMA, CO, insur. brokers, banks, etc. REQ: Bachelor’s Acctg or related + min. 1 yr acctg or related exp. Resume to EcoCatalytic Technologies, 9 Deer Park Dr, Ste. J-1, Monmouth Jct, NJ 08852 08-08

PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED: Flexible hours, cleaning, laundry, chores. Good pay, no benefits. CV to P.O. Box 437, Kingston, NJ 08528. 08-08-3t

SUMMER PART-TIME SECRETARY NEEDED: Flexible hours, good pay, no benefits. CV to P.O. Box 437, Kingston, NJ 08528. 08-08

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS NEEDED: University League Nursery School, 457 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Flexible hours between 8:15 AM– 6:15 PM. $13/hour. Contact Cindy Schenthal at director@ulns.org 08-08

ONLINE www.towntopics.com

PRINCETON- POLICE DEPARTMENT

POLICE OFFICER

Open to qualified men and women between 18 and 35 years of age. Must be a resident of New Jersey with a valid New Jersey Driver’s License at time of appointment.

Submit application at: https://www.policeapp.com/ August 31, 2018 deadline An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/V

Princeton Police seeks

Crossing Guard Salary: $15 per 30 minute shift $22.50 per 45 minute shift Mornings 7:45-8:30 a.m. Afternoons 2:45-3:30 p.m.

For more information: http://www.princetonnj.gov/employment.html

07-18-tf PERSONAL ORGANIZER: Certified organizer with lots of experience. Eager to declutter and organize closets and rooms in your home. Call Jenny at (732) 715-4664. 07-25-3t

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton NEW PRODUCTS ADDED WEEKLY!

LOOKING FOR A GREAT PLACE TO CALL HOME? Take a look at this charming house and picture yourself relaxing on the bright and inviting enclosed porch or relaxing in the sunny living room. The dining room with gleaming hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen and half bath complete the first floor. Upstairs 3 bedrooms and full bath. In addition a finished third floor which can be used as an office or playroom. A great place to live on a sunny, tree-lined street in Lawrence Township at a great price. $255,000

www.stockton-realtor.com

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


Mortgage

NEW PRICE

Insurance

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Real Estate

Realt

Closing Services

BEAUTIFUL HOPEWELL HOME

FRANKLIN TWP. $619,900 Excellent Emerald model, 1st floor full bath & den perfect for guests. Gleaming wood floors, upgraded kitchen w/ breakfast room, upgraded MBA, beautiful Trex deck, open back yard, brickfront and much more!

HOPEWELL $735,000 Traditional farmhouse-style home offers 21st-century ease and appeal. Spacious open floor plan, modern fundamentals, handsome finishes, and walls of windows that provides breathtaking views of the landscape!

Mary Saba 732-239-4641 (cell)

Denise Varga 609-439-3605 (cell)

NEW PRICE

RIVERSIDE HOME

PRINCETON $1,928,888 Designed for today’s living in mind. Features 6 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, a light-filled first-floor from the double-height windows in the family room, plus hardwood floors throughout.

PRINCETON $999,000 A showstopper of a home! Reminiscent of New England, this 4 bedroom, 2 bath home is move-in ready. Good size rooms, lots of natural light. Near Riverside Elementary, University and downtown.

Yuen “Ivy” Li Huang 609-933-9988 (cell)

Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES

NEW PRICE

PRINCETON $780,000 Bi-level on gorgeous Littlebrook property ready for owner. Boasts an Open living/dining room combination with gleaming hardwood floors and custom built-in bookcases. Sunny kitchen overlooks back yard.

PRINCETON $625,000 Move right into this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Adorable and efficient “Costwold Cottage” in Riverside on a beautiful property within reach of Carnegie Lake. Features formal living room with hardwood floors.

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

R E A L T O R S

®


CB Princeton Town Topics 8.8.18.qxp_CB Previews 8/7/18 10:50 AM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY

CARNEGIE LAKE

BROOKSTONE

Princeton | 4/3.5 | $2,475,000 551 Lake Drive

Princeton | 5/4+ | $1,678,500 166 Fairway Drive

Montgomery Twp | 6/4.5 | $995,000 697 Georgetown Franklin Turnpike

Carina Dowell Search MLS 1000217266 on CBHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann Search MLS 1001541908 on CBHomes.com

Elizabeth Zuckerman / Stephanie Will Search MLS 1001485308 on CBHomes.com

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

NEW LISTING

Cranbury Twp | 5/3.5 | $849,900 31 Bodine Drive

Hopewell Twp | 4/4 | $799,900 75 Van Dyke Road

Cranbury Twp | 5 / 2.5 | $665,000 19 Griggs Road

Deanna Anderson Search MLS 1000397628 on CBHomes.com

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1000406252 on CBHomes.com

Deanna Anderson Search MLS 1005932791 on CBHomes.com

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

NEW LISTING

Plainsboro Twp | 4/2.5 | $644,900 74 Franklin Drive

Plainsboro Twp | 4/2.5 | $590,000 16 Beechtree Lane

Princeton | 3/1.5 | $399,000 36 Wilton Street

Gail Zervos Search MLS 1002041612 on CBHomes.com

Marion Brown Search MLS 1001804534 on CBHomes.com

Kathleen Miller Search MLS 1002143224 on CBHomes.com

COLDWELLBANKERHOMES.COM/PRINCETON Princeton Office 10 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1411 Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. All associates featured are licensed with NJ Department of State as a Broker or Salesperson. Š2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper - August 8, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper - August 8, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group