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Volume LXXII, Number 24

PFARS Cadets Heading to College . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Multifaith Service, Vigil for Peace . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Balanced, Free Meals at PSRC . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Concordia Chamber Players Open Princeton Festival . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Rock and Roll, Baseball, and the American Dream . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Wildberg Stars for PHS Boys’ Track at MOC . . 29 Summer Men’s Hoops Tipping Off 30th Season . . . . . . . . . .32

PU Baseball Star Gross Selected in Draft . . . . 27 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .22, 23 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 26 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Classified Ads . . . . . . 36 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Music/Theater . . . . . . 19 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 34 Police Blotter . . . . . . . . 4 Service Directory . . . . 35 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.towntopics.com

Princeton, Cranbury Examine Send-Receive Schools Agreement With a June 30 deadline approaching for renewal of the Princeton-Cranbury send-receive schools agreement, both school boards have been reviewing the current contract and the possibility of extending it through 2030. The Princeton Public Schools Board of Education (BOE) was planning to address the matter at last night’s meeting, but it was not known at press time whether or not a vote was taken on the issue. At a community conversation, “Understanding the Princeton-Cranbury SendReceive Agreement,” sponsored by the BOE Saturday morning in the Princeton Public Library, about 80 people listened to an informative 25-minute presentation and engaged in an hour-long follow up discussion. “When you look from a superficial point of view it seems like there might be an easy solution to the question,” said Board member Beth Behrend, “but the details provide a different picture. It’s complicated, but it’s not helpful to say that without explaining why. The library session was planned to help people understand the choices. Hopefully this meeting helped to get the information out so that the public understands.” The Princeton-Cranbury agreement was signed in 1988, and last year Cranbury, which does not have a high school, paid $4,813,480 to send 289 students to Princeton High School, according to information presented at Saturday’s forum. The presentation highlighted financial and educational benefits of the agreement for both districts, including economies of scale, with Cranbury finding it not cost-efficient to provide a high school for fewer than 300 students and the Cranbury tuition payment providing Princeton schools with their second largest source of revenue (after the tax levy) to support a wide range of programs and expenses. The presentation went on to discuss alternatives to renewal, which could include letting the contract expire in 2020, in which case the send-receive relationship would continue indefinitely on the same terms; or taking steps to terminate, which would involve legal action, a feasibility study, identification of a new district to accept Cranbury students, approval from the New Jersey Commissioner of Education, and the possibility of further appeals and legal action. Continued on Page 14

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Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Princeton Dems Rally to “Flip NJ Blue”

“Catch the Blue Wave: Flip NJ Blue!” was the rallying cry on Sunday night, as a crowd of about 170 enthusiastic Democrats filled the Suzanne Patterson Center and made plans to help Democrats win five New Jersey congressional races that have been targeted by the national Democratic Party in its effort to retake control of the House of Representatives in the upcoming November elections. Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-12) set the tone for the evening with a rousing keynote speech. She was followed by Democratic candidates from three of the five “flippable” districts and two speakers representing congressional candidates who were unable to attend. Local high school students introduced each of the speakers, and 16th District Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker served as emcee for the proceedings. Zwicker noted that in 2015 he had “showed, with the help of many people in this room, how you swing a district from Republican to Democrat.” There had never been a Democrat representing the 16th District in the New Jersey assembly until Zwicker’s 2015 upset victory. “To see this large enthusiastic turnout is heartwarming as we set out to change the course of this country,” Zwicker said.

Princeton Community Democratic Organization (PCDO) Vice President Mary Anne Greenberg commented on the strength of these New Jersey’s Democratic congressional candidates. “These are substantive candidates,” she said. “All these candidates are very focused on and committed to service. It was very powerful.” It was also apparent that all of the speakers were motivated by dissatisfaction with the Trump administration and the effects of President Trump’s actions on

New Jersey. “Currently there is a great deal of unrest,” Greenberg said. “This event helped people to focus on an action that is cathartic at this time as well as impactful. People signed up to work for these candidates outside their district. People showed that they are committed.” Along with the PCDO, co-sponsoring organizations, that, Greenberg noted, will be “working together throughout the summer and fall to create results,” include Continued on Page 11

FAA Accepts Master Plan for Mercer Airport Improvements With acceptance by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) received last week, Trenton-Mercer Airport is now able to pursue plans for upgrading, updating, and modernizing. But these projects at the increasingly popular Ewing Township airport do not include an increase in the size or number of flights, according to Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes. “This is just to give people a better experience when they travel in and out,” he said Tuesday. “It’s something we’ve been waiting for a long time. The stamp of ap-

proval from the FAA allows us to move forward with scoping plans for a new terminal. The one we have now is about 55 or 60 years old and it lacks many of the modern amenities you’d expect from a growing airport.” It has been two decades since the airport has updated its master plan. Consultants Urban Engineers and McFarland Johnson have been working on the plan, which is funded 90 percent by the FAA and 10 percent by Mercer County. Three public meetings have been held during Continued on Page 4

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PRINCETON PARKLET RETURNS: The Arts Council of Princeton’s (ACP) third parklet officially opened on Saturday at its debut location in front of Small World Coffee on Witherspoon Street . Sponsors and supporters each said a few words about their part of the parklet and their support for public art in Princeton . Pictured, from left, are Jessica Durrie, owner of Small World Coffee; Jim Levin, ACP board president; Jim Waltman, executive director, The Watershed Institute; Councilman Tim Quinn; Maria Evan, ACP artist director; Kristin Appelget, director, community and regional affairs, Princeton University; Sherry MacLean, MacLean Agency; Councilwoman Leticia Fraga; Jim Davidge, Davidge Design Studio; and architect Joseph Hobart Weiss . (Photo Courtesy of ACP)

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TOWN TOPICS

this is a good time to make improvements. The passenger facility charge that everybody pays will go into those Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946 improvements.” Approval by the FAA does DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers not give the airport the green DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 light to start the construction project. It means that the LYNN ADAMS SMITH LYNN ADAMS SMITH, Editor-in-Chief agency has no safety conPublisher BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor cerns related to the master ANNE LEVIN, Staff Writer ROBIN BROOMER plan, and that it conforms DONALD gILpIN, Staff Writer Advertising Director to FAA standards. Mercer FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, MELISSA BILYEU County can now pursue enCHARLES R. pLOHN, ERICA M. CARDENAS Office Manager photographers vironmental approvals for JENNIFER COVILL beginning the terminal deSTUART MITCHNER, LAURIE pELLICHERO, NANCY pLUM, Account Manager sign process. Other projects, JEAN STRATTON, KAM WILLIAMS, TAYLOR SMITH, WILLIAM UHL CHARLES R. pLOHN Contributing Editors including taxiway reconstrucAccount Manager tion and design work, can be USpS #635-500, published Weekly ERIN TOTO Subscription Rates: $51/yr (princeton area); $55/yr (NJ, NY & pA); $58/yr (all other areas) initiated in coming months. Account Manager Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands The airport “will not beFor additional information, please write or call: MONICA SANKEY come a mini-Newark with Witherspoon Media Group Account Manager 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 multiple terminals and gates tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818 JOANN CELLA and more flights,” Hughes (ISSN 0191-7056) Account Manager said. “That is really not the periodicals postage paid in princeton, NJ USpS #635-500 plan here. The plan is now gINA HOOKEY postmaster, please send address changes to: p.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528 Classified Ad Manager that we have an ongoing concern, let’s make it the best exAirport Improvements website. The proposed up- flights to more than 35 cities. perience we can.” grade is to increase the capac- For residents of the local area —Anne Levin continued from page one ity to about 125,000 square and beyond, the airport has the process, and residents feet, while still providing four served as a welcome alternaof the neighborhood near hold rooms and four gates for tive to larger locations such as Newark and Philadelphia. the airport have expressed aircraft. concerns about noise, tree Better bathrooms, imThe planned changes will removal, and land acquisition. proved baggage collection, not alter the intimate feel. Hughes said no extensions and access to concessions “We’re trying to stay within On June 3, at 1:17 a.m., or dimensional changes to the after passing through secu- our budget, and also keep two runways have been pro- rity are also part of the plan. that small town feeling where police responded to Victoposed. “We don’t have plans Instead of walking onto the you can drive up, park your ria Mews on the report of to take over people’s houses. tarmac and climbing steps, car, go through security, and an unsecured window. An We don’t have plans to buy passengers will enter the air- get on the plane relatively unknown person forcefully houses,” he said. “If people craft via boarding bridges. quickly,” said Hughes. “That’s gained entry into the apartwant to stay in their houses, “For many customers, walk- what people love about Mer- ment through the window. they’ll be more than welcome ing onto the tarmac and up cer Airport. We don’t want to No description of the suspect was able to be obtained to do so. And the experience the steps is not something change that.” and no property was reportgoing forward will be much they can do easily,” Hughes Hughes said the airport has ed stolen. said. like it is right now.” gotten high marks from the On June 3, at 11:13 a.m., The airport, which opened FAA for security. “And they Improvements and changes a victim reported that her to the aging terminal will in- in 1929, is located on what have been very helpful in crease capacity. The existing was once a farm field. Sev- supporting our taxiway and white 2015 BMW X5 was terminal is 24,780 square eral commercial airlines have lighting improvements, which stolen from her driveway feet, and it processes more flown in and out of the air- have been going on for a long on Grover Avenue between than 377,000 passengers an- port over the years. Frontier time,” he said. “Frontier has June 2 at 9 p.m. and June nually, according to informa- Airlines is currently the only signed up for another five- 3 at 11 a.m. She was unsure tion from the Mercer County commercial carrier, offering year commitment, so we think if the vehicle was locked.

®

Police Blotter

The vehicle was tracked to Newark, N.J., but was gone when the area was checked by Newark P.D. On June 2, at 1:04 a.m., police received a call reporting a possibly impaired driver on University Place. They charged a 39-year-old male from Princeton with DWI and multiple motor vehicle summonses. On June 1, at 10:41 a.m., a victim came to the police lobby to report he was punched in the face by an unknown person while working at La Mezzaluna on May 12. The suspect is unknown at this time.

On May 31, at 10:29 a.m., a victim came to the police lobby to report that her work laptop was stolen from outside of a meeting room at the Nassau Inn on April 13 between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. It was a 15” Dell Latitude E 7450 valued at $1,000. On May 31, at 6:20 p.m., a victim came to the police lobby and reported that between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. someone stole his unlocked Trek bike valued at $200 from his carport. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Spirit of Princeton Flag Day Ceremony: Thursday, June 14 at noon, the event will be held at the Municipal Complex, 400 Witherspoon Street, and include a speech by Mayor Liz Lempert. Local schoolchildren will participate. www.spiritofprinceton.org. “Let’s Talk Climate”: Saturday, June 16, 9-10:30 a.m. at the Suzanne Patterson building, 45 Stockton Street, Sustainable Princeton hosts this zero-waste event. To register, visit sustainableprinceton.org. Child Car Seat Check-Up: This event was rescheduled from June 2 due to weather issues. It will now be held Saturday, June 23, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center, 2381 Lawrenceville Road. Certified technicians do free inspections and examine seats for correct use and installation. Reserve by emailing jmillner@sirc.org or (609) 896-9500 ext. 2215. Volunteer with Friends of Princeton Open Space: Help is needed for trail building and ecological restoration around Mountain Lakes. Most of the work is done on weekends. Call (609) 921-2772 or email info@fopos.org to volunteer. Donate for Guatemala Volcano Victims: Princeton’s Human Services Department is collecting first aid supplies, canned foods, personal hygiene, feminine care, and baby products, blankets, and towels through June 21 to send to victims of this recent disaster. Drop off Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at the office in Monument Hall, 1 Monument Drive.

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PFARS Is Just the Beginning For Young Rescue Workers

The 18 graduating high school seniors in the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad’s (PFARS) Cadet Program make up one of the largest groups of students to graduate as full emergency medical technicians (EMTs). All of them are headed for college in coming months.

Inspired by their experiences, more than one is planning on a career in emergency medicine. “It’s not unusual that several of them are interested in medicine,” said Mark Freda, PFARS president. “They go through a number of life lessons riding in the ambulance and they learn a lot of new skills. It makes sense.”

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T he graduating group includes Mary Rose Young ( Ramapo College); Catherine Yang (Wellesley College); Anna Zhang, Anjali Badeti, and Harrison Chiu ( Rutgers University); Eliz Dikener (Boston University); Katelyn Parsons (Carnegie-Mellon Universit y ) ; Adam Musa, Danial Khan, and Lana Musa (The College of New Jersey); Daniel Hubert (Vanderbilt University); Beth Blizzard (University of Virginia); Zahraa Abbasi and Alden Mallory ( Universit y of Colorado Boulder); Charles An and Everett Shen ( Princeton University); Oishi Goswami (New York University); and Tony Huang (Brandeis University). Lana Musa was the squad’s top call-taker for 2017. “She’s going to TCNJ in the BS/MD program. She is totally devoted to emergency medicine,” said Freda. “It’s her goal. What’s good for us is that she’ll be able to continue working with us.” Freda said many of the program’s graduates who move away from Princeton to attend college serve with the squad while on summer break. “Community service is a big motivation for them. And for many, so is an interest in medicine,” he said. According to information from PFARS, this year’s graduates have more than 8,000 hours of ser v ice between them. They must pass a rigorous course before being admitted to the Cadet Program, where they are trained on all of the modules within the squad before they can function as full EMTs. PFARS was founded in 1939 and includes 110 members. Emergency medical services are the organization’s primar y dut y.

Volunteers might be helping to deliver a baby one day; and responding to a respiratory emergency or cardiac arrest on another. The Cadet Program was originally just for males, but that changed in the 1970s. Students can apply at age 16. Those who pass the tests become provisional EMTs until they are 18, when they become full EMTs, according to state law. “It’s inspiring to see our Cadets contribute so much to the community,” said Freda. “I hope everyone in town knows how fortunate we are to have these dedicated volunteers.” —Anne Levin

5 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

CADETS OFF TO COLLEGE: Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (PFARS) boasts 18 area high school seniors in its Cadet Program, all headed for four-year colleges. Shown here sporting shirts with the names of the schools they will be attending, the group includes three interested in emergency medicine and several others who plan to study science or medicine.

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Metropolis Spa & Salon believes in making women feel and look great each day, and they have offered to do that for one dedicated local woman this June. W hen Jodi O’DonnellAmes contacted Metropolis Spa & Salon about getting a new haircut for a special occasion, salon founder Theresa Carr was quick to respond, “We are honored to support Jodi O’DonnellAmes in her extreme strength and positivity in supporting and educating the community about ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig’s disease).” O’Donnell-A mes is re ceiv ing t he Outstanding Philanthropist Award from the New Jersey Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFPNJ ) at their Excellence in Philanthropy Awards ceremony on Thursday, June 14. She contacted Metropolis for a haircut and was surprised by their response, “We read about the work you do and would like to offer you a new look from our team for the award ceremony.” Since 1981, this annual recognition event offers the opportunity for professional fundraisers to acknowledge the individuals and organizations who are advancing philanthropy in New Jersey. The event honors and celebrates the leaders in the field. O’Donnell-Ames is the founder and tireless volunteer of Hope Loves Company, a nonprofit dedicated to providing emotional and educational support to children and young adults who have had or have family members living with ALS. Hope Loves Company is the only nonprofit with this specific mission. O’DonnellAmes lost her husband Kevin to ALS in 2001. He was 36. O’Donnell-Ames has three children — now all young adults — who have lost a parent to ALS before turning 12, so she knew from personal experience how ALS affects a family, especially children. Hope Loves Company’s premier program is Camp HLC, which is a free weekend retreat in New Jersey. At Camp HLC, children and their families go for hikes, play games, and enjoy music therapy and rock wall climbing. Counselors are available for children and every camp includes teaching coping skills. Campers get to have fun, feel supported and celebrated, and make new friends. For more about HLC, visit www.hopelovescompany.org, or find them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Question of the Week: “What’s your favorite part of the rodeo?” (Asked at the 25th Annual Montgomery Rodeo in Skillman) (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

Jacob: “Watching them do tricks.” Eva: “Watching the horses and the cowboys trying to catch and tie up the bulls.” —Jacob and Eva Sudol, Lawrenceville

Teak: “My favorite part was when everybody got to dance with the owners at the beginning.” Liam: “It has to be all the games that they have here, and then watching the people wipe out. That’s pretty funny.” —Teak Toto and Liam Krimmel, Lawrenceville

Teagan: “Watching all of the different events. I love all of the animals and the cowgirls.” Ryleigh: “The cowgirls.” —Teagan and Ryleigh Farkas, Hamilton

Teddy: “When the horsey was chasing the cow. I also got to ride the bull.” Gilbert: “When the cowboy jumps onto the bull, and the cotton candy.” —Teddy, John, and Gilbert Cooper, Hopewell

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. 0gAO`OV3[WZg5WZPS`b =`WUW\OZZg^cPZWaVSRW\>`W\QSb]\;OUOhW\S 2`0O`PO`O/0`]e\ZSTbO\R2`:g\\S09]aa]e]T>`W\QSb]\:WTSabgZS;SRWQW\S

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or the past two years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,â€? explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problembased economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet‌This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.â€? “For the past two years, we have been offering our Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program as an optional program for our patients,â€? they continue. “Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice

was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care‌ We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively [do that].â€? Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,â€? the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.â€? Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 8

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Prayer Service and Vigil for Peace Seek Diplomacy Not War With Korea As preparations were continuing in Singapore for the summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, 50 people gathered at the Nassau Presbyterian Church on Sunday evening for an hourlong multifaith service for peace inside the church followed by a candlelight vigil outside. Sponsored by the Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action, the service was organized by the Rev. Dave Davis, senior pastor of Nassau Presbyterian and president of the Princeton Clergy Association, along with CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Robert Moore, and featured contributions from 10 different area faith leaders. Applauding the progress made so far in the summit talks, Moore said, “I’m pleased as long as the momentum goes forward. Di-

plomacy involves sticking with it even if you’re only getting a partial success.” Moore commented on the “positive, respectful” tone of the proceedings and the “great potential for progress.” He mentioned, “It’s going to take some time [about 15 years according to some experts] for the denuclearization of North Korea, but we have momentum now to confront this challenging, complex situation.” Moore expressed hope of continuing “towards abolishing nuclear weapons completely to make the world truly safe.” He described the multifaith gathering as “impressive in attracting such a diverse group of faith leaders,” including the Rev. Carlton Branscomb of First Baptist Church; the Rev. Karen Hernandez-Granzen of Westminster Presbyterian Church; Avis Hofstad

of First Church of Christ, Scientist; Salim Manzar, Muslim faith leader; Br. Chris McNabb, of Trinity Episcopal Church; the Rev. Bill Neely, of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton; Beverly Owens, music director at Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church; and Eberhard Wunderluch of the Baha’is of Princeton; in addition to Davis and Moore. “ We w a n t to e x p r e s s support for the intensified diplomacy to resolve the North Korea issue,” Moore said. “Until late last year, military threats and bluster were causing a highly dangerous context that could have led to war, intentionally or through miscalculation. We want to pray for and express good wishes for the diplomatic momentum to continue and result in peaceful resolution of the conflict.” —Donald Gilpin

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DIPLOMACY NOT WAR: About 50 people gathered for a multifaith service and candlelight vigil for peace at the Nassau Presbyterian Church on Nassau Street on Sunday night preceding the June 12 summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. (Photo by John Lien)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 10

Nutritionally Balanced, Free Meals Offered at Princeton Senior Center At several meetings of Princeton Council during the past year, a resident expressed concerns about cancellation of a program providing free meals for senior citizens. On June 5, the municipality announced that the initiative is back, based at the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Suzanne Patterson Building. Mercer County is now offering nutritionally balanced m e a l s M o n d ay t h r o u g h Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., for county residents 60 or older, or married to a resident 60 or older. Participants are encouraged to make a donation toward meals received.

Lunches provided each day include an appetizer, main entree, vegetables, bread, beverage, and dessert. All meals are specifically planned to provide at least one-third of an older person’s daily nutritional needs by a qualified nutritionist. The Princeton location is the latest to be added to Mercer County’s participation in the Nutrition Project for the Elderly. Additional locations include senior centers in Ewing Township, East Windsor, Lawrence Township, Pennington/Hopewell, Robbinsville, and Trenton. The Nutrition Project for the Elderly is an offshoot of

the Older Americans Act, which provides for many of the needs of the elderly in the United States. One of these needs was determined to be nutrition. Meals are served in centers that bring people together for activities and social contact. In the past, the county offered shuttle bus service between Princeton and the program at the Lawrence Senior Center. Free meals for seniors were provided at the Mt. Pisgah AME Church on Witherspoon Street for 30 years, but were discontinued, according to Mayor Liz Lempert. The resident who complained about the fact that

Princeton no longer had free meals for seniors “raised concerns, and we listened,” Lempert said on Monday. “We are very thankful to her for raising the issue. This was an important program to bring back to Princeton.” Implementing the initiative took some time. “We needed to get special equipment, and there were other bureaucratic hurdles,” Lempert said. “But thanks to the county, Susan Hoskins of the Princeton Senior Resource Center, [health officer] Jeff Grosser, and the municipality’s point person, it is up and running.” —Anne Levin

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Visitors can look out for Flag Day Ceremony fireflies’ signaling each othDedicated to Wadsworth

The Spirit of Princeton F lag Day ceremony w ill take place this year, rain or shine, on Thursday, June 14 at noon at the Princeton Municipal Complex Plaza, 369 Witherspoon Street. This year’s ceremony will be dedicated to the life and communit y spirit of Ray Wadsworth, one of the founders of The Spirit of Princeton. Wadsworth died May 31. Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert will speak, and Princeton public school students will participate in the ceremony. Entertainment will be provided by the Garden Statesmen performing barbershop quartet choral selections, and by bagpiper Ann Witt. The Spirit of Princeton is a not-for-profit, non-partisan com mu nit y organi zat ion that supports and implement events, such as Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Flag Day, to honor the men and women who have served the country. Visit www.spiritofprinceton.org for more information.

Terhune Firefly Festival Sparks Love of Nature

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Terhune Orchards holds its annual Firefly Festival on Sunday June 24, from 4-9 p.m. The farm is kept open late into the evening after dark, and participants can bring a blanket and lay down in the grass to watch fireflies blink in the twilight. Children can dress up as fireflies after painting wings and making antennas in the craft area. They can also decorate bug boxes to use to catch, and later release, a firefly as the sun goes down. During the afternoon Miss Amy and the Big Kids Band will entertain. Circus Place will showcase their Youth Circus Performance Troupe performing aerials, acrobatics, and juggling. Visitors can also participate in interactive workshops and learn to juggle, spin a plate, balance feathers, and walk a tight wire.

er while on a pony ride or a free wagon ride. Fireflies are mostly found along the edges of forests, wooded yard areas, and near streams or ponds. Terhune Orchards goes to great lengths to cultivate habitats for beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, and fireflies on it 200 acres of preserved farmlands. Old-fashioned farm suppers will be available at Pam’s Food Tent. Hot dogs, barbecued chicken, corn on the cob, salads, and gazpacho will be available along with apples, pies, donuts, and treats. The winery tasting room will stay open late for flights of wine tastings. Admission and parking is free. Craft activities are $5. Terhune is at 330 Cold Soil Road in Lawrence Township. For more information call (609) 924-2310 or visit www.terhuneorchards.com

YMCA Youth Summit Set for Late This Month

On Friday, June 29, the Y MCA of Pr inceton w ill hold the Youth Summit, for Mercer youth ages 14-18, at the Conference Center of Mercer County Community College in West Windsor. The goal is to bring diverse perspectives, voices, and ideas together to examine the meaning of service and leadership, and organize a service project that will be led and delivered by the par ticipants. The event is presented by ETS and will include workshops by HiTOPS, one love, Novo Nordisk, and the YMCA. Ad m is sion is $ 5. T he event begins at 9:30, includes breakfast and lunch, and concludes with a party from 4-5 p.m. To register, visit https://princetonymca. org/programs/teen-programs/youthsummit/.

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shade of blue. This country needs to move in a different continued from page one direction.” Princeton Marching Forward, A ndy K im, r unning in Indivisible Princeton, IndivisDistrict 3 (Burlington and ible Cranbury, Coalition for portions of Ocean counties) Peace Action, Action Together spoke about his background NJ, Montgomery Democratic growing up in Bordentown Organization, Bordentown as the son of Korean immiNeighbors Acting Together, grants. “This district gave Lawrence Citizen Activists, me the opportunity to dream Central Jersey Coalition for big,” he said. “Service is not Justice, West Windsor Demojust a job. It’s a way of life. cratic Club, and Hopewell ValI wanted to serve this counley Democratic Club. try.” Decr ying the present Kim, who worked as adcourse of the federal govvisor to the Defense Deernment, Coleman urged, partment and the Pentagon on national security in the Obama administration, is the historic running against Republican incumbent Tom MacArthur, who was in line with President Trump on 94 percent of votes in the House and was a leader of Republican efforts Established 1780 to repeal Obamacare. Summer Jewel “I recognize that our diGracious Country with Fine Cuisine June isDining that special month forAmerican the family, friends and business versity is what makes us “get-togethers.” All it takes is a phone call and visit to The Cranbury great,” Kim said. “This is Inn. The Cranbury Inn is known for its ability to plan and executewhat we’re fighting for.” your party/meeting needs with even a moments notice. To m M a l i n o w s k i , t h e We offer great food, excellent service, affordable pricing, airDemocratic nominee in the conditioned rooms and a beautiful/historic atmosphere. June also brings to the Cranbury Inn: Live Music every Saturday7th Congressional District Evening (7-11), Lobster and Prime Rib Specials every Friday,( Hunterdon and portions unlimited champagne Saturday and Sunday and our Famous Sunday Champagne Brunchof Essex, Morris, and Sus(11am-2pm), EspEcially for fathEr’s Day! sex counties) will be taking Adultscall 609-655-5595 on Leonard Lance, who has For $29 more for information, held the office for ten years. www.theCranburyInn.com Children under 3 FREE “I never thought I’d be 21 South Cranbury, Children ages 3-4main $10;St, 5-10 $15 NJ r u n n i n g for C o n g r e s s,” All major credit cards accepted stated Malinowski, who was Casual attire assistant secretary of state followed by for democracy, human rights and labor under Obama and a longtime director of Human Rights Watch. Noting the urgency of the moment, For details go to thecranburyinn.com he said, “Our country and our state are in trouble. We 21 S. Main St., Cranbury, NJ • 609-655-5595 must protect this country and our ideals. We are not All Major Credit Cards Accepted! going to allow him to win “We have the capacity to change it. It is a government of, by, and for the people. Elections across the country have been showing us that the people want something different. We must send to Congress people who share our values. These candidates deserve our support, our dollars, our time.” Reminding the gathering that she too is on the ballot, up for reelection to Congress, she continued, “New Jersey can be very instrumental in assuring that this Congress turns a good

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

“Flip NJ Blue”

CATCHING THE BLUE WAVE: Princeton Democrats and others rallied Sunday night in a meeting focused on flipping five New Jersey congressional districts from Republican to Democratic in the November election. From left, nominees who spoke included Andy Kim (District 3), Tom Malinowski (District 7), and Josh Welle (District 4). (Photo Courtesy of PCDO) the fight about who we are as a country, about who we are as a people.” Facing probably the toughest challenge of the five Democratic candidates for Congress, Josh Welle is running against Chris Smith, who has been in office for 38 years in the 4th District (most of Monmouth County and parts of Mercer and Ocean counties). “The pathway to win back the House goes through New Jersey,” said Welle, who served in the U.S. Navy for more than 12 years. “I’ve been to every town in this district and they’re tired of Chris Smith. The people of New Jersey are demanding action, and if you’re not taking action you’re going to be voted out.”

E mphasi z ing t he need “to preserve this fragile democracy,” Welle concluded, “This is our country, our climate, our future. If we don’t protect it, we’re going to lose it. We need a new generation of leaders.” Also represented at Sunday’s meeting though unable to attend in person were State Senator Jeff Van Drew, running in the second district (including eight counties in the southernmost part of the state) and former Navy pilot, federal prosecutor, and mother of four Mikie Sherrill running in the 11th District (including parts of Morris Passaic, Essex and Sussex counties). —Donald Gilpin

Chamber Block Party Planned for Palmer Square

The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce’s annual Block Party is planned for Tuesday, July 17, from 4-7 p.m. on Palmer Square, with a rain date July 19. The event is free to the public. Billed as the Mid-Summer Marketing Showcase, the event includes food, music, and prizes. This is the 12th year for the showcase. Sponsors include Northfield Bank, Trenton Thunder, Capital Health, and The Bank of Princeton. Vendor space is limited, so those interested are encouraged to sign up as soon as possible. More information is available by contacting Kate Stevens at kate @PrincetonChamber.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 12

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Benefits of Bike Lanes Outweigh Negatives According to Hamilton Avenue Residents

To the Editor: As residents of Hamilton Avenue, we would like to express our gratitude to our elected officials and volunteers who worked on the implementation of the Beta Bike Lane study. The Wiggins-Hamilton corridor is the preferred approach to downtown and Princeton University for many commuters and residents of Princeton, as well as the main artery between downtown and PHS, JWMS, and Westminster. For years, cyclists of all ages have chosen to ride on the Wiggins-Hamilton corridor; however, because of the traffic volume and lack of space for them to ride, cyclists frequently ride on the sidewalk. The sidewalks are not designed to accommodate traffic for both cyclists and pedestrians, creating an unsafe condition for the nearconstant flow of pedestrian traffic which includes people walking with dogs and young children walking to and from school. Cyclists that choose to ride in the street slow down traffic and are forced to deal with hostile drivers and unsafe conditions as a result of parked cars. Cycling and walking are increasingly popular forms of transport. As such, we are encouraged to see that Princeton is studying ways to embrace and support them to confront traffic, pollution, and obesity-related health issues. Creating bike lanes on the Wiggins-Hamilton corridor is a logical step toward the goal of having “complete streets” in town, and acknowledges and supports already-existing laws that give cyclists equal rights and access to the road. We realize that some residents are concerned about losing the (free) parking spaces in the Wiggins-Hamilton corridor (the loss of parking spaces in front of our home would inconvenience us personally as well). However, it is clear to us that, after having lived with the Beta Bike Lane, the benefits of having bike lanes far outweigh the negatives. One big improvement that we immediately noticed was the improved visibility which resulted from the elimination of on-street parking, making both biking and driving significantly safer. We strongly support the creation of a permanent bike lane in the Wiggins-Hamilton corridor and ask our elected officials to take action to make the bike lanes permanent. LAUREN AND NICK VALVANIS Hamilton Avenue

Wiggins Street Resident Has Strong Objection To Bike Lane Test on Wiggins and Hamilton

To the Editor: I am a bike rider. When we lived in New York City, I rode my bike to work in midtown and pedaled my two-year-old to playgroups on the back of my bike. There were no bike lanes then; bicyclists had to be careful. I am also a homeowner on Wiggins Street. I have created parking for four cars behind the building for the renters. I was unpleasantly surprised when I drove to the house to meet a workman on May 23 to find that all the parking places had been removed and replaced by a temporary bike lane. Where did the town expect the workman and me to park? Where are my tenants’ visitors supposed to park? Why are residents of the street not to be treated in the same way as residents on all other town streets? Obviously, Wiggins was chosen for the experiment as it is a through street and parallel to Nassau Street. However, it is certainly unfair to the residents of Wiggins and Hamilton Avenue to be penalized so that others may bicycle in “relative” safety. While I was at Wiggins between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., I saw exactly one bicyclist, and she was in the road. When I tried to fill out the survey posted on the municipal website, I found that it is geared completely to the bicyclist, with no questions to elicit any answer but those pertaining to biking. Please consider this my strong objection to the bike lane on Wiggins and Hamilton. CECILIA MATHEWS Wiggins Street

Alerting Princetonians to Revived Poor People’s Campaign and June 18 Event

organizing the Poor People’s Campaign of 1968. This movement is often remembered through images of Resurrection City, a temporary tent community of the poor, erected on the Washington Mall for about six weeks in May and June of that year. Sadly, the movement lost momentum after King’s assassination. Now it is being revived as the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. The co-chair, Rev. Dr. William Barber, became prominent when, as head of the North Carolina NAACP, he organized “Moral Mondays,” a series of weekly protests and acts of nonviolent civil disobedience aimed at opposing voter suppression and gerrymandering. After leaving the NAACP, Rev. Barber founded a social justice organization called Repairers of the Breach. Now, in collaboration with Rev. Liz Theoharis, founder of the Kairos Center for Religion, Rights, and Social Justice (at Union Theological Seminary), Dr. Barber is reviving the Poor People’s Campaign. The first phase of the new Poor People’s Campaign is almost complete. The final Monday rally will take place at 2 p.m. on Monday, June 18, on the plaza of the State House Annex, 131 W. State Street in Trenton. I urge those who can do so to show your support for poor people by joining us on the plaza. At this time, especially, it’s vital to demonstrate, by your presence that the status quo is not acceptable. For more about the NJ Poor People’s Campaign, see the facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/NewJerseyPPC/. KATHY O’LEARY WILCOX Old Georgetown Road

To the Editor: For the past five weeks, I’ve participated in the NJ Poor People’s Campaign. Every Monday afternoon, I’ve marched through downtown Trenton with a group of fellow citizens demanding government policies that will ensure a decent life for all Americans. By necessity, our list of demands is broad, including a living wage, clean air and water, and adequate healthcare for everyone. Our march takes us to the Statehouse Annex at 2 p.m., where we listen to the stories of people personally affected by the problems we’re targeting, such as a Newark mother whose family suffers medical problems resulting from polluted air and water. After the speeches, volunteer protesters engage in acts of nonviolent civil disobedience (such as lining up in the street, blocking traffic), resulting in arrest. That’s only what’s happening in New Jersey. Simultaneously, at statehouses in about 35 states across the country, protesters are being arrested at parallel demonstrations. But when I mention the Poor People’s Campaign to friends in Princeton, most have not heard about it. When Martin Luther King was assassinated, he was

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To the Editor: A colleague called me last night, jolted, after seeing the media coverage about Kate Spade’s suicide. She babysat years ago for people who lived in the building where Kate Spade lived, and she used to pass Kate and her husband in the lobby on occasion. “She always seemed so happy and vibrant,” she said to me. She probably was. This latest tragic suicide, leaving another adolescent without a mother, and scores of people reeling, is a reminder that no one is immune to tragedy and that the results can have long-lasting and far-reaching consequences. At a time of year when many of us are posting festive pictures of weddings, graduations, sports events, etc. showcasing happy moments in our lives and those of the lives of our children and families, it’s important to remember that those moments should be enjoyed and cherished. But it’s also important to recognize that there are moments (many of them) in our lives that are less happy and not Facebook or Instagram-worthy. We all have moments when we feel discouraged, embarrassed, lonely, and overwhelmed. We don’t share these moments with people on social media, but I wonder what it would look like if we did talk about them more openly. I wonder what it would take for that to happen. I don’t know that we’ll ever know much about Kate Spade’s tragic circumstances, but my hope is that her death will encourage others to seek help. For someone who has been in and out of therapy my entire life, it seems like a no-brainer to seek counseling whenever you’re feeling particularly stuck or overwhelmed. I believe in therapy and I love therapy. Making sure there is a support system in place and that there is someone to whom you can turn when you need help works. After all, Freud did call therapy the “talking cure.” WHITNEY B. ROSS, PhD Executive Director, Trinity Counseling Service

This is $19 million that the community would not otherwise need to borrow, and these upgrades will reduce future operating costs. New Jersey’s Clean Energy programs are among the most effective ways for public and private institutions to save on annual operating costs. For schools, such programs save taxpayer funds, reduce their carbon footprint, and demonstrate responsible facilities stewardship. Utilization of these programs along with facilities personnel proficient in project and building systems management, and the current maintenance technology, is crucial for ensuring healthy and safe learning environments for our children. Sustainable Princeton strongly encourages other Princeton schools, nonprofits, and businesses to take advantage of these programs. We serve as a resource in helping organizations to embark on this process. Buildings account for 45 percent of our community’s greenhouse gas emissions. Making them energy efficient is a critical step toward reducing our emissions and combating climate change. We commend the Princeton Public Library for recently conducting an energy audit. The audit identified the New Jersey Clean Energy program that will save hundreds of thousands of dollars in operating expenses while reducing the Library’s environmental impact. Again, we applaud Princeton Public Schools’ decision to take the first step in a process that is both fiscally prudent and environmentally responsible. MIA SACKS Board Secretary, Sustainable Princeton MOLLY JONES Executive Director, Sustainable Princeton CHRISTINE SYMINGTON Program Director, Sustainable Princeton

Municipal Committee ballot-placement process. All were given the same opportunity to present their platforms to the Municipal Committee and to participate in the PCDO debate. The community should know that neither Jean Durbin, the president of the PCDO, nor Scotia MacRae, the chair of the Municipal Committee (PDMC), publically endorsed any primary candidate and no primary candidate received funds from either of the two Democratic organizations in Princeton. The two candidates who received the first and second places on the primary ballot, along with the official Democratic slogan, have been active in both the PCDO and the Municipal Committee, but so were two of the other candidates. Ballot placement was determined by a vote of the elected members of the Municipal Committee who represent every one of the 22 voting districts in Princeton. It is true that the candidates listed at the top of the Democratic column on the ballot have an advantage, but it is also true, both in Princeton and in Mercer County, that winners of past primary elections have included candidates who did not receive the top slots in the Democratic column. In short, the two Democratic organizations in Princeton worked assiduously at every stage of the campaign to make sure that all the candidates had the same access to all the information needed to compete for Democratic Party support for the two open seats on Council. The final decision was made by the voters of Princeton. Only now will the two winning candidates receive “the support of the party apparatus” as we head toward the general election on November 6. We thank all of those passionate Democrats who had the courage to run for office, and we congratulate Dwaine Williamson and Eve Niedergang on becoming the Democratic Party nominees for Princeton Council. SCOTIA W. MACRAE Chair, Princeton Municipal Democratic Committee, Evelyn Place

13 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

Trinity Therapist Hopes That Kate Spade’s Death Encourages Others to Seek Help

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Schools Agreement continued from page one

Celebrating Excellence In Education The 2017-2018 school year has been filled with numerous accomplishments and outstanding work that reflects the talents of our students, educators, and support staff. Below are some of the many highlights from this year:

• The PHS Odyssey of the Mind team was awarded the Renatra Fusca Award at the World Finals. • The PHS bands raised funds to help students from the ELMERA Jazz Ensemble from Puerto Rico compete at the prestigious Berklee Jazz Festival. PHS band students collected donations and prepared care packages to send back to Puerto Rico for the ELMERA students to share with their communities. • The PHS Studio Band placed 1st at the Berklee Jazz Festival, the PHS Jazz Combo placed 2nd, and Princeton Studio Vocals placed 2nd. • Aiden Linkov, Noah Deitch, Maxwell Gorman, and Everett Shen took first place for their films at the second annual Walnut Lane Film Student Film Festival. • 23 PHS students committed to competing as NCAA athletes: Olivia Harrison, Will Hare, Paul Cooke, Nick Delaney, Colette Marciano, Devon Lis, Ryan Farrell, Sabine Waldeck, Andrew Beamer, Anna Cao, Ian Jacobs, Patrick Jacobs, Noah Lilienthal, Emily Curran , Alec Silverman, Alex Ackerman, Noam Davidov, Angela Rose Quinn, Varun Narayan, Elsa Fleurial, Michael Shen, Gracia DiBianco, and Abaigeal Ryan. • The Boys Soccer team became CVC Colonial Division Champions, Central Jersey Group IV Sectional champions for the first time in PHS history, and Group IV State Finalists for the first time in PHS history. • The PHS boys’ track and field and cross-country teams completed a sweep of the Mercer County Cross-Country, Indoor Track and Outdoor Track championships. The teams also swept the Group IV championships for the fall, winter and spring. • The Girls Volleyball team won the WJIVL championship for the second year in a row and earned the honors of Trenton Times Team of the Year, Coach of the Year, and Player of the Year - Anna Cao. • The Boys Ice Hockey team finished first in the CVC. • The Girls Ice Hockey team placed second in the Women’s Ice Hockey League of the Mid-Atlantic. • The Girls Lacrosse team placed first in the NJSIAA State Tournament for their Section. • The Girls Swimming 400 Free Relay team finished 1st at the Mercer County Tournament with a lead of more than 5 seconds. • The Boys Tennis team won the North II Group III Sectional Championship and the Group III semi-final. • The PHS Girls Field Hockey team advanced to the quarter-finals in their first year competing in Central Jersey Group IV, advanced the Mercer County Tournament finals, and was named the 2017 Trenton Times Team of the Year. • PHS student Erica Oake qualified to represent the United States in the Modern Pentathlon at the 2018 World Cup. • PHS student Daniel Hu was awarded a Bronze Medal at the Princeton University Physics Competition in November. • Riverside Elementary held its 40th annual Science Day, bringing in experts from a wide variety of science-related fields to engage students in exciting and educational science activities. • Littlebrook Elementary School was named a National Blue Ribbon School. • PHS students Simran Kaur, Sreyashi Ghosh, Juliet Malkowski, and Aileen Wu presented their research on Venus flytraps at the American Association for Plant Biologists Mid-Atlantic conference. • Littlebrook Elementary, Johnson Park Elementary, and John Witherspoon Middle School earned Bronze Certification for sustainability from Sustainable New Jersey. • The PHS Studio Band won the 2018 New Jersey State Jazz Championship and the PHS Jazz Ensemble came in second, making history as the first time the two bands ever placed both first and second in the competition. Studio Vocals won the New Jersey State Finals for the vocal division. • Led by Riverside science teacher Mark Eastburn and Community Park media specialist Bevan Jones, elementary students learned about the legislative process as they successfully campaigned for the endangered bog turtle to be named the New Jersey State Reptile. The bill is currently awaiting the governor’s approval. • The PHS Shore Bowl team placed 3rd in Scientific Expert Briefing at the National Ocean Sciences Bowl finals in Boulder, CO, and 7th in the overall competition. • 2018 Gold Key Recipients: Victoria Addonizio, Lucynda Amo, Nandeeta Bala, Stephanie Barrientos, Andrew Beamer, Helen Bennett, Sam Bezilla, Heather Birge, Beth Blizzard, Arden Brady, Julia Brown, Harshul Chanchlani, Rachel Cheng, Eliz Dikener, Alan Dong, Kelli Friedman, Emma Glasser, Amanda Gonzalez, Michael Gonzalez, Charles Griebell, Ceyda Guleryuz, Sam Harshbarger, Anna Jo, Barbara Kaminska, Matt Karns, Zoe Kim, Maritza Lazo, Kate Li, Victor Liao, Devon Lis, Saumya Malick, Christian Martin, Mary Mena, Coco Mi, Lisa Mishra, Adam Musa, Pridvhi Myneni, Easha, Nandyala, Hamza Nishtar, Stosh Omiecinski, Janki Raythattha, Kimberly Rojas, Lincoln Roth, Elian Rubin, Maisie Ryle, Ruth Schultz, Grayson Shanley-Barr, Everett Shen, Max Shi, Victoria Shwe, Anika Sonig, Shane Spring, Katie Stewart, Harry Tsui, Amanda VanDyck, Briani Vasquez-Gonsalez, Eli Wasserman, Leah Williamson, Amelia Wright, Charlie Yandrisevits, Denise Yang, Alexa Zammit, Grace Zhang, Molly Zuckerman Congratulations to all on their achievements! The PHS graduation will be held at 5:30 PM on the front lawn of Princeton High School.

The Cranbury tuition, currently $17,439 per student, determined by the NJ DOE, is less than the $18,596 “actual per pupil cost,” according to state of New Jersey calculations, but under New Jersey state law Princeton cannot charge Cranbur y more than the $17,439 figure. Cranbury taxpayers, however, do pay separately for out-of-district special needs placement costs and busing, among other things. T he BOE presentation examined cuts in staff and programs that would be necessitated by loss of the revenue from Cranbur y, and pointed out that even without Cranbury, PHS and other district schools would continue to be overcrowded, according to demographic projections, which indicate a decrease in Cranbury students coming to PHS in future years. The information session continued with a discussion of pros and cons of each of the options, noting particularly the context of the facilities bond referendum scheduled for October 2. The interest on capital bonds from a referendum is included in the calculation of tuition charges, which means that any interest on improvements made at PHS through a referendum will be factored into tuition calculations for Cranbury students in the future. “This was a great example of civil and open discourse — very constructive,” Board member Greg Stankiewicz said, emphasizing the need for continuing transparency and objectivity in examining the issues. Not ing t he lim itat ions of time for public input at school board meetings, Behrend added, “In the forum Saturday I think people felt they were heard, and I think everybody who wanted to speak had time to speak.” Putting the send-receive discussion into the larger context of the upcoming referendum and the future of the school district, Behrend concluded, “The referendum is a watershed moment for the community. Together we can move forward, but it’s going to take all of us working together to face the challenges.” Referendum Plans Meeting The district will be holding a town hall meeting to discuss plans for the referendum next Monday, June 18, at John Witherspoon Middle School (JWMS) at 7 p.m. In a letter last week inviting families and staff to the town hall, Superintendent Steve Cochrane announced that the district had finalized an agreement to purchase a 15-acre property on Thanet Circle as part of the referendum proposal. Cochrane noted the “benefits to PPS and taxpayers” afforded by the size,

location, existing buildings, rental income, and future f lexibilit y of the Thanet property, which replaces earlier plans to purchase a smaller property on Herrontown Road and construct an addition at JWMS for administration. “The Board believes this much larger piece of property, located near the Princeton Shopping Center and minutes from our schools, offers short and long-term opportunities for PPS and our community,” Cochrane wrote. “If the referendum is approved, the property will provide space for central office administration, maintenance, and transportation. In the future, the property opens up other possibilities, such as additional athletic fields and a self-funding preschool center. —Donald Gilpin

Books Summer Reading Soiree at HSP’s Updike Farm Features Benedict

Marie Benedict will be the featured author at this year’s Summer Reading Soiree, a festive celebration of books taking place on Tuesday, June 19, at 6:30 p.m. The event is being held in the restored barn at the Historical Society of Princeton’s Updike Farmstead at 354 Quaker Road. Benedict will discuss and sign copies of her book, Carnegie’s Maid, during the event, and copies of The Other Einstein, her first historical novel, will also be available. Registration is not required. “We are excited to partner with the Historical Society of Princeton for the library’s third annual Summer Reading Soiree,” said Public Programming Librarian Janie Hermann. “The soiree, a lovely evening where we gather to share our enthusiasm about summer reading, is held each year in a location that reflects the theme of the book or author being featured. Marie Benedict is an author of historical novels, so holding the event at the Historical Society’s Updike Farmstead was the perfect match.” In addition to the chance to interact with Benedict, the Summer Reading Soiree is an opportunity to stroll the grounds of the Historical Society and visit its exhibits. All attendees will be entered in a drawing to win a basket of books and other prizes. Appetizers, sorbet, and sparkling beverages will be served. The Summer Reading Soiree is co-sponsored by the library and the Historical Society of Princeton with support from Labyrinth Books. This event is presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the NEH.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 8 at 8:00pm

z z a J une J Four performances celebrating three generations of jazz piano

JUNE 8 – 15

The Bad Plus

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 at 8:00pm

The Joey Alexander Trio THURSDAY, JUNE 14 at 8:00pm

Christian Sands

FRIDAY, JUNE 15 at 8:00pm

Fred Hersch Trio Fred Hersch Trio

Tickets start at $25

WITHERSPOON PAINTING COMPANY Joey Alexander

Jazz in June’s Steinway piano provided by Jacobs Music

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

Summer 2018


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 16

yoga

Art

on the lawn Thursday, June 21 | 6:30 pm Art Museum Lawn Explore the healing benefits of yoga while you enjoy a beautiful summer. Be sure to bring your own mat. Refreshments inside the Museum will follow. INSTRUCTOR Debbi Gitterman from YogaStream

always free and open to the public

artmuseum.princeton.edu

Late Thursdays are made possible by the generous support of Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970.

The Bridge Academy Class of 2018 is bridging the gap between potential and performance!

Left to Right: Blake Archer, Reed Grady, Prince Altman, Principal Susan Morris, Connor Chabot, and Brian Swal.

The Bridge Academy is a nonprofit school dedicated to educating and empowering students with language-based learning disabilities to reach their fullest potential through a comprehensive program developed around each child’s individual needs. For more information, visit www.banj.org

1958 B Lawrenceville Road Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 609-844-0770 www.banj.org

“RED SPOTTED NEWT”: Janice Annunziata’s photograph was selected as the winner of the Delaware River Basin’s (DRBC) Spring 2018 Photo Contest. The DRBC’s seasonal photo contest was founded to highlight amateur and professional photography representing the beauty, diversity, function, and significance of the water resources of the Delaware River Basin.

DRBC Spring Photo Contest Winner

The Delaware River Basin Commission ( DR BC ) has announced that Janice A n nu n z iata’s photo graph, titled “Red Spotted Newt,” was chosen as the winner of the commission’s Spring 2018 Photo Contest. Twent y-t wo photographs were submitted by 15 individuals for the contest. “Each photograph submitted to DRBC’s Spring Photo Contest highlighted not only the renewal and beauty of the basin’s water resources in spring, but also the variety of life — from plants to animals to humans — that depend on them,” said DRBC Executive Director Steve Tambini. “We thank everyone who entered the contest. While there were many exceptional entries to choose from, Janice’s photo stood out amongst the other entries for its focus on a creature native to the basin whose awakening from hibernation and migration to vernal pools to reproduce is one of the early signs that the spring season has finally arrived.” The winning image was chosen by a judging panel of three DRBC staff members and will be featured on the commission’s website at w w w.nj.gov/drbc/ basin/photo/photo-contest. html and on DRBC’s social media sites. The photo will also be published in the commission’s 2018 annual report, and the winner will receive a certificate of recognition. The purpose of DRBC’s seasonal photo contest is to highlight amateur and professional photography representing the beauty, diversity, function, and significance of the water resources of the Delaware River Basin, a 13,539-square-mile watershed. In legislation signed into law in December 2016, the U.S. Congress declared that “the Delaware River Basin is a national treasure of great cultural, environmental, ecological, and economic importance.” The Summer Photo Contest will begin on June 25 and has a deadline of August 1, 2018. Complete contest details, including instruc-

tions on how to submit photographs, are available on DRBC’s website listed above. To learn more about the commission, visit www.drbc. net.

“Generation Next” at West Windsor Arts Council

West Windsor Arts Council (WWAC) presents “Generation Next: The Family Show,” part of its annual “Generation Next” exhibition series, from June 25 through August 17. Based on an idea by artist Joy Kreves and curated by her daughter, Ivia Sky Yavelow, the exhibition includes work by 13 visual artists, each part of a family where two consecutive generations are artists. Working in various media and styles, the artists in this show all grew up around their family’s art or watched their children’s art develop. Seeing their work together invites viewers to consider how creative expression is passed through generations, and how living, working, and growing

surrounded by other artists can impact one’s work. In addition to the pieces in the show, images of work made during each artist’s childhood and /or while t hey were raising their children will be on view via printed reproductions at the gallery. Artists in the exhibition are: Nancy Azara, Megan Biddle, Michel Biddle, Liz Biddle, Susan Hoenig, Joy Kreves, Nana Olivas, Alice Shockey, Gwen Shockey, John Shockey, Elise Whittemore, Ella Whittemore Hill, and Ivia Sky Yavelow. A celebration of the creative spirit will be held at a reception on July 8 from 4 to 6 p.m., when the public will have a chance to view the show while meeting artists and enjoying snacks and beverages in the gallery. The West Windsor Arts Council galler y is at the West Windsor Arts Center at 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor. It is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays by appointment. For more information, call (609) 7161931 or visit www.westwindsorarts.org.

“PINK SPIRAL”: This piece by Nancy Azara is part of “Generation Next: The Family Show,” which includes work by 13 visual artists, each part of a family where two consecutive generations are artists. It runs June 25 through August 17 at the West Windsor Arts Center, with a reception on July 8 from 4 to 6 p.m.


17 â&#x20AC;¢ TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 18

“Cosmophilia” Exhibit At D&R Greenway

For a limited time only, D&R Greenway Land Trust is presenting a special exhibition by award-winning environmental artist Cameron (Cami) Davis. “Cosmophilia” will be on view June 21 through July 25 in D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton. There will be a reception and lecture on Thursday, June 21, 5:30 to 7 p.m. RSVP at rsvp@drgreenway.org. The artwork, on large canvases that draw the viewer into the space, “celebrates our hu man relat ionsh ip within a whole, living and evolving Ear th and cos mos,” says the artist. Her paint ings, ins tallat ions, and community art projects “explore the natural world

at the edges where inner and outer perceptions meet.” Her semi-abstract work explores the boundaries between observable phenomena and intuitive musings and improvisations. Using layers of paint and other media, Davis creates engaging visual imagery as a wake-up call to environmental disaster. A series titled “Endless Spring” is based on a Buddhist term for enlightenment. Davis asks, “Will we truly continue to experience the renewal of spring if we do not address climate change, if we do not address the evolution of consciousness?” This is the first time that all of the works in “Cosmophilia” are being shown in totality, and the exhibition w ill include several new pieces still in development in early June. When seen at

D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center gallery, “the art will move the viewer to experience a visual landscape where clear elements of nature and the abstract combine to inspire thinking beyond our day-to-day encounters,” says Linda Mead, president and CEO. “I am especially excited that the artist and her collaborator, composer Sam Guarnaccia, will share their inspiration and technique in a special lecture at the opening reception on June 21.” “Endless Spring” is part of a collaboration with Guarnaccia’s Emergent Universe Oratorio. The Oratorio’s 100 voiced choir and chamber orchestra libretto and spoken recitatives address the relevancy of the “journey of the universe” to these times. G aller y hours Monday

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through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.drgreenway.org. ———

Multimedia Artist Focuses On Homeless in New Exhibit

Mary Oestereicher Hamill is a multimedia artist and pioneer of par ticipator y photo-based art, shining a light on the needs of poor and marginalized people in our society. The Hunterdon Art Museum is presenting her multimedia work, “regardisregard,” through September 2. “regardisregard” is a dialogue that calls into question contemporary art’s engagement with issues of human suffering and privilege. The work is a result of a collaboration with 33 homeless men and women who were loaned camcorders to “THE UNIVERSE IS A GREEN DRAGON”: D&R Greenway Land film their world for a day. Trust presents a special exhibition by award-winning environmental artist Cameron (Cami) Davis. “Cosmophilia” will be on view June 21 through July 25 in D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center in Princeton. A reception and lecture are on Thursday, June 21, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

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Tr u s t , 1 P r e s e r v a t i o n Place, has “Layers of the Earth: From Core to Cloud” through June 15. “Cosmophilia” runs June 21 through July 25. www.drgreenway. org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City M u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “Ellarslie Open 35” juried exhibit through July 1. www.ellarslie.com. Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Indulgences: Loving Cars,” phot tographs by Larry Parsons, and “The Tie That Binds,” photographs by Carol King, through June 24. www.photo gallery14.com. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, has Michael Rees: Synthetic Cells” through July 14, and other exhibits. www. groundsforsculpture.org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “The Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery” and other exhibits. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, noon4 p.m. Thursday extended t hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. www. t princetonhistory.org. The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Rae Sloan Bredin: Harmony and Power” on th view through July 15, and present this ad for: present this ad for: “Virtually Rudy: New Dimensions in Sculpture” through $100 OFF $100 OFF Preview starts at 1 P.M. > Auction at 2 P.M. July 1. “View Finders: Four Art Times Two, PrinceOne per household One per household Photographic Voices” runs ton Brain and Spine, 731 through August 26, and Alexander Road Suite 200, “American Moderns: The has “The Impact of Art: artLegacy of Gerry and Marists find refuge and regenguerite Lenfest” is on view eration through their art” through October 21. www. ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE, ERRORS, AND OMISSIONS. ITEMS FROM THE ABOVE COLLECTIONS, ET AL. through August. michenerartmuseum.org. Arts Council of PrinceT he G aller y at MerAuction Conducted By: (973) 218-6058 t o n , 102 W i t h e r s p o o n cer County Community Street, has “Interwoven StoCollege, 1200 Old Trenries International” through ton Road in West Windsor, June 23. An artist talk and has “Mercer County Artists closing reception is June 23 2018” through July 9. at 1 p.m. www.artscouncil Morven Museum & Garofprinceton.org. present this ad for: den, 55 Stockton Street, has this present Artworks Trenton has its th “A Gentleman’s Pursuit: The th present this ad for: present this ad for: 12 annual Art All Night — Commodore’s Greenhouse” th Trenton at the Roebling Wire present this ad for: present this ad through October 21. www. for: $100 OFF $100 OFF Works Building, 675 South Preview starts at 1 P.M. > Auction at 2 P.M. morven.org. Clinton Avenue in Trenton, One$100 per household OFF One$100 per household OFF The Princeton UniversiPreview starts at 1 P.M. > Auction at 2 P.M. on Saturday, June 16 at 3 One per household ty Art Museum hasOne “Frank per hou One per household p.m. through Sunday, June One per household 17 at 3 p.m. w w w.ar tall Stella Unbound: Literature and Printmaking” through nighttrenton.org. October 23. ( 609 ) 258 Bernstein Gallery, Rob3788. ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE, ERRORS, AND OMISSIONS. ITEMS FROM THE ABOVE COLLECTIONS, ET AL. ertson Hall, Princeton UniWe s t W i n d s o r A r t s versity, has “Beirut: Theater ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE, ERRORS, AND OMISSIONS. ITEMS FROM THE ABOVE COLLECTIONS, ET AL. Auction Conducted By: (973) 218-6058 of Dreams,” photography C e n te r, 952 A lexander present this ad for: by Manal Abu - Shaneen, Road, has “Cross Cultural Auction Conducted By: (973) 218-6058 Currents” through June 22. through August 15. (609) 716-1931. ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE, ERRORS, AND OMISSIONS. ITEMS FROM THE ABOVE COLLECTIONS, ET AL.www.west D & R Greenway Land windsorarts.org. The videotaping occurred in Boston between 2001 and 2004. Hamill used video, photography, sound, sculpture, music, and live webcam technology for this project. The work includes music composed by Ruth Loman for four soloists and chorus singing words of the homeless excer pted from the tapes. Hamill is cur rently an artist/scholar at Brandeis University Women’s Studies Research Center. She and Chath Piersath form an artists’ collective directing the Cambodian War Widows Project, shown at the Bernstein Galler y, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Hamill’s art has been exhibited worldwide in Canada, England, France, India, Spain, and other countries. The Hunterdon Museum of Art is at 7 Lower Center Street in Clinton. Hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. — 5 p.m. and suggested admission is $5. For more information, call (980) 735-8415 or visit the website at www.hunterdonart museum.org.

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Concordia Chamber Players Open Princeton Festival With Musical Finesse

S

ummer brings many traditions to the Princeton area: the P-rade, fireworks on Reunions weekend, and other signs that three months of summer days stretch out ahead. One musical tradition which has become a staple of audience calendars is the Concordia Chamber Players concert which opens the Princeton Festival each year. Concordia Artistic Director Michelle Djokic annually brings an ensemble of refined chamber music players to Miller Chapel, and this year in particular set the tone for the festival with a performance of dramatic late 19th and early 20th-century music. With only three or four musicians on each piece, the Concordia Chamber Players concert on Saturday night at Miller Chapel stretched the ensemble into repertoire which even some of them had not known before. Zoltán Kodály’s 1905 Intermezzo for String Trio recalled the Hungarian peasant rhythms of the composer’s birthplace in a late Romantic harmonic style. The one-movement work, scored for violin, viola, and cello, opened with a Gypsy feel, with pizzicato cello replicating a zither. Violist Daniel Kim played melodies with a dark and rich tone, contrasted by pastoral lines from violinist Carmit Zori. Cellist Michelle Djokic kept the trio well unified as the three players easily moved among sections of the work. Djokic had her own opportunity to play a supple cello melody as the players brought Kodály’s lush work to a close. Sergei Rachmaninoff composed Trio élégiaque No. 1 a decade earlier than Kodály’s Intermezzo, but the Rachmaninoff work had a very different nationalistic feel. Scored for violin, cello, and piano, Trio élégiaque was likely Rachmaninoff ’s homage to a mentor or friend, and contained passages as virtuosic as any of the composer’s concerti. Zori and Djokic faced each other, rather than the audience, allowing for maximum communication as their two instruments accompanied rolling piano lines played by Michael Brown. Zori’s violin passages were often dark in mid-register, and Djokic displayed great strength of arm playing lyrical cello lines. Brown provided extensive cascading figures in the right hand on the keyboard, together with one short and dramatic solo piano section. Although the instrumental lines sounded very independent of one another,

the three players came together often to create musical drama within the piece. The ensemble paid tribute to another nationalistic composer in Jean Sibelius’ Suite in A major for string t r io. S ib el iu s comp os e d t h is work while in his early 20s, never intending the Suite to be published, and parts of the final movements have not survived. Like the two works preceding this on the program, Suite in A major paid tribute to Sibelius’s homeland with Finnish folk dance melodies. The second movement especially matched the gypsy feel of Kodály’s work, expertly led by violinist Zori. The four players of the Concordia joined forces for Antonin Dvořák’s Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat Major, a work which was just one piece of a significant but underperformed repertory of chamber music from the Czech composer. Dvořák’s piano quartets were overshadowed by his even more monumental piano quintets, but the members of the Concordia Chamber Players easily demonstrated why this particular quartet can stand among the most significant late 19th-century chamber works. he players began Dvoř ák’s fourmovement work with a unison fanfare which recurred as an anchor in the piece. The movement took off in majestic fashion, with a long lyrical melody from second violinist Kim. Zori’s melodic passages were solidly aided by Brown’s flowing piano accompaniment, and the four musicians added an element of delicacy to contrast the musical drama. This was a substantial chamber work of four movements, showing lyricism and harmonic opulence characteristic of late 19th-century music. Brown’s piano accompaniment recalled a harp at times, with elegant string melodies creating poignancy and a song-like texture. The fourth movement “Rondo” in particular was marked by a folk dance flavor, with sounds of a Gypsy dulcimer heard from the piano, as the “Rondo” refrain called for nonstop and fierce playing from all four musicians. The audience at Miller Chapel was in rapt attention as the drama unfolded, and the Concordia Chamber Players succeeded in kicking off the Princeton Festival with a rousing opening concert. —Nancy Plum

T

Photo Credit: Eduardo Patino

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The next events in the 2018 Princeton Festival include “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” June 10 to July 1 at the Matthews Acting Studio at 185 Nassau Street; and Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly,” which opens June 16 at 7:30 p.m. at McCarter Theatre Center’s Matthews Theater. For information visit www.princetonfestival.org.

Photo by Lynn Redmile

Tighter-than-tight rhythms and vivid improvising from two “virtuosos on clarinet and saxophone” (The New York Times).

Saturday, June 23rd 8 pm

McCarter Theatre Center 91 University Place • Princeton, NJ

Tickets 609.258.2787 • princetonfestival.org

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

MUSIC REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 20

Music and Theater

“THE LAST DALAI LAMA?”: As part of its Art of Living Well series, Hopewell Theater presents “The Last Dalai Lama?” on Thursday, July 19 at 8 p.m. In it, the Dalai Lama explains that Tibetan Buddhism is both a religion and a “science of the mind”; he also shares his crystallized understanding of the nature of mind, and its part in the creation and alleviation of all of our suffering. His urgency and dedication come through as he now turns 82, and must deal with the questions of aging and death, and whether he will reincarnate as the Dalai Lama, or if he will be the last of the lineage that has existed for millennia. For tickets and more information, visit hopewelltheater.com or call (609) 466-1964.

FRED HERSCH TRIO AT MCCARTER: On Friday, June 15 at 8 p.m., the Fred Hersch Trio performs at McCarter Theatre as part of the Jazz in June Festival. For over 40 years, Fred Hersch has continued to innovate on the standard jazz repertoire. His accomplishments include ten Grammy nominations (including two this year) as well as 52 recordings as composer, bandleader, and theatrical conceptualist/innovator of individualistic jazz — “jazz for the 21st century” (New York Times). Pianist Jason Moran said, “Fred at the piano is like LeBron James on the basketball court — he’s perfection.” The title of his latest solo CD is “Open Book,” relating to Herch’s memoir “Good Things Happen Slowly,” which tells the story of how a gay Jewish child from Cincinnati broke into the highest reaches of New York’s jazz scene. Tickets start at $25. For tickets and more information, call (609) 258-2787 or visit mccarter.org.

Alaskan-Inspired Symphony a n d H e n r y Wa d s w o r t h powerment to the Hopewell Longfellow’s poem “Into T h e a t e r. I n t h e i r n e w By Tim Keyes Consort Tim Keyes Consort presents a program of works that include three new compositions by New Jersey composers on Saturday, June 16 at 8 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton. Included on the program will be works by New Jersey composers Kathryn Dauer and A ndrew Gav in. T he centerpiece of the evening’s presentation will be a new symphony by Tim Keyes, Symphony in Eb — Alaska: Land of the Midnight Sun, scored for choir and orchestra. Symphony in Eb — Alaska is inspired by a recent trip to Alaska by composer Tim Keyes. The work is structured in five movements and reflects on both the awesome grandeur and beauty of Alaska’s landscapes, as well as the warmth and intrigue of the native Tlinglit (kli kit) people. Emily Dickenson’s poem “The Consciousness that is Aware”

the Silent Land” are incorporated into the symphony, as well as a Tlinglit folk tale and an original text by the composer. The five movements capture the essence of numerous places in the Land of the Midnight Sun as evidenced in the movement’s titles; I. Seward: Port of Call, II. Glacier National Park, III. Ketchikan: Saxon Village, IV. Prudhoe Bay: Arctic Circle, V. Fairbanks: Denali. Tickets are also available from the Richardson box office at: (609) 258-5000 or online at www.princeton. edu/richaud. Ticket price is $35; student tickets are $15. For more information visit www.timkeyesconsort.org.

Motivational Presentation “Rock ‘N’ Roll With It”

On June 15, Brant Menswar, front man for the blues/soul band Big Kettle Drum, and singer-songwriter Jim Trick, present a night of song, stories, and em-

book, Rock ‘N’ Roll with It: Overcoming the Challenge of Change, Menswar and Trick share their powerful stories on the transformational power of change and guide us through the journey of embracing and thriving with life’s tidal changes. “It’s like a TED Talk with a soundtrack,” says Menswar. “We will each be playing songs from our catalogs and will have visuals, videos, and illustrations to create a multi-media experience that will leave the audience inspired and encouraged to change what’s possible.” In Rock ‘N’ Roll with It, Menswar, who nearly lost his son to a rare form of cancer, and Trick, who weighed 430 pounds and overcame a life of obesity, discovered new insight into creating intentional change. Through these life-altering experiences, they each learned that lasting change doesn’t happen overnight.

OPEN AIR FUNK/JAZZ FOR FREE: On June 21 at 6 p.m., join the Arts Council of Princeton in the Princeton Shopping Center Courtyard for the 35th annual Summer Concert Series, featuring local and regional jazz, folk, world, rock, and blues. Dirk Quinn is the guitarist for a high-energy funk/jazz band based out of Philadelphia that travels extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada. New performances will take place every Thursday, 6–8 p.m., from June 21–August 23, at the Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street, Princeton. To view a full lineup of performances, visit artscouncilofprinceton.org. Don’t forget to bring a lawn chair! In the event of inclement weather, concerts will be held inside the Arts Council’s Kristina Johnson Pop-Up Studio at the Princeton Shopping Center.

Featuring examples about real-life rock stars who have also faced massive change, such as Ed Sheeren and Def Leppard’s Rick Allen, the book uses the metaphor of rock ‘n’ roll — a world which both writers are quite familiar with — to offer three specific strategies for approaching change. D u r i ng t h e ir re s e arch into how people deal with change, Menswar and Trick reached out to world-class change makers to find out how they conquered the most difficult change in their lives. Exclusive interviews with New York Times bestselling author Rob Bell, Emmy award-winning sports journalist Andrea Kremer, the former head of counterintelligence for the CIA Paul Redmond, sports agent Molly Fletcher, and many others shed light into the human condition and real challenge to embrace vulnerability in the face of uncertainty. Tickets for the June 15 show will be available at the Hopewell Theater’s website, hopewelltheater.com.

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” Screening on June 22

Trenton Children’s Chorus (TCC ) will host a special screening of the critically acclaimed new documentary Won’t You Be My Neighbor? on Friday, June 22, 7 p.m. at the Princeton Garden Theatre (160 Nassau Street). Following the film will be a Q&A with Eliot Daley, who joined Fred Rogers as president of the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood organization during the early years. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? offers the adults, who were loved and nurtured

by Mister Rogers as children, a deep understanding of why they meant so much to him — and why he meant so much to them. It offers Americans a timely reminder of what it means for neighbors to truly care for each other,” says longtime Princeton resident Eliot Daley. I n Won’t You B e My Neighbor? Academy Awardwinning filmmaker Morgan Neville (20 Feet from Stardom) looks back on the legacy of Fred Rogers, focusing on his radically kind ideas. While the nation changed around him, Fred Rogers stood firm in his beliefs about the impor tance of protecting childhood. The Hollywood Reporter raves, “Both nostalgic and immediate, it’s a documentary you want to hug.” Tickets at $25 (includes a small popcorn and small fountain drink) can be purchased online by visiting www.trentonchildrenschorus.org or by calling the TCC office at (609) 2780822. Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies supports this program. The Trenton Children’s Chor us is an award-winning nonprofit organization providing exceptional music education and performance opportunities for hundreds of Trenton area youth since 1989.

citement of a live opera performance by offering a limited number of tickets to its production of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly at 40 percent off full price, including an intermission beverage. Participants must be 21 to 40 years old. The program is available for performances on Saturday, June 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 24 at 3 p.m. “Younger audiences across the country are discovering how much opera has to offer in terms of artistic and entertainment value,” said Richard Tang Yuk, the festival’s artistic and executive director. “We want to encourage young people to experience this glorious art form by giving them an incentive to attend one of the most beautiful and powerful operas in the repertoire.” The offer expires when all Young Friends tickets are sold, or at midnight the day before each performance. Full details on the program are available at princetonfestival.org/ticket-information. The Princeton Festival pr o d u c t i o n of Ma da ma Butterfly will also be presented Sunday, July 1 at 3 p.m. All performances are at the Matthews Theatre, McCarter Theatre Centre, 91 University Place, Princeton. For information and a complete listing of Princeton Festival events, visit www. “Young Friends of the princetonfestival.org or call Princeton Festival” Program (609) 258-ARTS (2787). The Princeton Festival has announced a new “Young Friends of the Princeton Festival” program, created ONLINE to make it easier for younger www.towntopics.com people to experience the ex-

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES: On Sunday, June 17 at 12:30 p.m., Princeton Garden Theatre presents National Theatre Live’s performance of “Macbeth.” One of Shakespeare’s most famous tragedies, directed by Rufus Norris, will see Rory Kinnear and Anne-Marie Duff return to the National Theatre to play Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Ruthlessly fighting to survive, the Macbeths are propelled towards the crown by forces of elemental darkness. Tickets cost $18 for general admission, and $16 for members. For tickets or more information, visit princetongardentheatre.org or call (609) 279-1999.


“A Beautiful Place, a Dangerous Place” — Rock and Roll, Baseball and the American Dream I had this dream America. Ray Davies, from “The Great Highway” he fate of this week’s column was decided when I saw a boyhood hero on the obituary page of Friday’s New York Times. The AP photo under the charismatic words St. Louis Cardinal Star shows Red Schoendienst leapfrogging over a baserunner and firing the ball in the direction of the greatest Cardinal of them all, his roommate and close friend Stan Musial. Until that moment, I’d been thinking about the American story told in a book and a record album by another hero of mine, Ray Davies, the poet laureate of British rock, who was a North London teenager when he had the dream he sings about on Americana (Legacy 2017). Singing to “rock’n’roll cowboys” whose “time has passed,” he asks “where do you go now? Do you give up the chase like an old retiree? Do you live in a dream or do you live in reality?” The old rock’n’roller will be 74 in a week. The old ballplayer made it to 95 and stayed in the game for seven decades, spending most of his life in a Cardinal uniform either as player, coach, manager, or, at the end, “senior special assistant to the GM.” The only time I ever saw Red in a suit and tie was when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown. A year later Ray and his band, the Kinks, were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Although he put on a suit when the Queen awarded him a CBE in 2004 and again when the Prince of Wales knighted him in 2016, he’s wearing a plaid flannel shirt in the studio videos from the Americana recording session. His answer to the question he asks movie cowboys comes loud and clear in “The Great Highway” when he tells himself “life is not a road movie, so wake up to reality.” Reality Bites In his memoir, Americana:The Kinks, The Riff, The Road: The Story (Sterling 2013), Davies provides a vivid and unsparing account of his near-fatal New Orleans moment of truth on January 4, 2004. Given his adolescent fascination with cowboys and the Wild West in “the land of ice cream, apple pie, and guns,” there’s a western-movie-showndown irony in his cinematic description of what happened when he “foolishly” chased after the mugger making off with his girlfriend’s purse: “It was already dusk, so the flash from the gun seemed to light up the street. Just as I saw the bright-colored light come out of the gun, I dived to my left … and felt a heavy thump as the bullet hit me. It was though the whole right side of my body had suddenly gone dead.” If he hadn’t fallen to the left, the bullet might have hit him in the chest or stomach. In the ambulance on the way to Charity Hospital, he heard the paramedic say his heartbeat was “dangerously slow.” Being a songwriter forever on his game, he made some notes on the gurney and turned the slow heartbeat that almost terminated him into a powerfully delivered rock and roll home run about life in Intensive Care that appears three years later

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on his LP, Workingman’s Cafe (2007). His other post-trauma solo album Other People’s Lives (2006) is charged with the same born-again rock’n’roll energy. While “Morphine Song” draws on the ER experience, the cheery feelgood tune “Life After Breakfast” was inspired by the ordeal of getting from the bedroom to the kitchen and back on crutches. “Anything to do with mobility became arduous,” Ray writes in Americana. “I would manage to make a cup of tea in the kitchen, and then realize there was no way to transport it to my bedside.” Cowboys and Ballplayers In the title song, “Americana,” Davies refers to his “school boy world” and “that great silver screen” with its “Wild West heroes.” Like Ray, I grew up immersed in cowboy movies, but it wasn’t long before I was trading my Hopalong Cassidy bubblegum cards for the far more precious baseball cards I kept in scrapbooks where pride of place always went to the Cardinals. What made Red Schoendienst one of my favorite players was knowing that he was best friends with my idol Stan Musial. If I thought of Stan and Red as grown-up Mark Twain characters, blame the baseball writers who hyped the freckled redhaired rookie as a Huck Finn who played hooky to go fishing in the Kaskaskia River and hitched from Germantown Illinois to St. Louis in a milk truck to try out for the team. Cardinal Summers In postwar summers my Republican grandparents would drive me the 60 miles from Topeka through fields of giant sunflowers to my Democrat grandparents in Overland Park, where my room overlooked U.S. 69 and I went to sleep every night to the road music of cars and trucks. Once the grandmothers realized how seriously I took the Redbirds, they each gave me a Cardinal uniform to wear while playing baseball on makeshift neighborhood fields. The grandmother in Topeka provided a regulation cap with the redbird on the front and a storebought jersey. The grandmother in Overland Park, who had a gift for painting watercolors of birds, made me a uniform complete with two beautiful cardinals with yellow beaks she had created herself and sewed in place on the somewhat clumsily

shaped branch of a bat. She also did the red piping on the sleeves. Though the kids I played ball with made fun of me for it, I wore the handmade uniform until I outgrew it a year later. Playing With the Jayhawks One prized souvenir of the Kansas summers was a statuette of a cartoon jayhawk, the KU mascot, blue body, yellow beak, red head, yellow feet. Though Ray doesn’t mention Kansas by name in the songs on Americana, my birth state is a presence on “the mighty plain.” Singing the title track with a wide-open-spaces country-music twang, he borrows the first line (“I wanna make my home where the buffalo roam”) from the Kansas state song “Home On the Range.” It’s as strange as it is gratifying to hear this “dream America” coming from the songwriter who helped make me an Anglophile with songs like “Waterloo Sunset,” “Shangri-La,” and “Victoria,” and he’s doing it with an American alt-country band called the Jayhawks. “A Place in Your Heart” Kinks fans may need more than one listen to recognize the Davies style in takedown songs like “The Deal,” about L.A. (“Isn’t it wonderful, marvelous?/Utterly surreal/Totally fabulous, fraudulent/Bogus and unreal”) and passionate rockers like “Poetry” (“And in a shopping mall somewhere you’ll be down on your knees/crying out loud/Where is the poetry?”). There’s a brilliant slice of Americana in “The Great Highway” (“Bright eyes like wishing wells/Instamatic kiss and tell”), including this snapshot: “A girl stands looking at the stars/Dressed in denim wearing shades/And Outside is the Great Highway …. She sips a coke walks away/It’s just a second in a day/But all her culture’s on display.” The highlight of the album mates two songs and two solo voices, “Message from the Road” and “A Place in Your Heart.” The first voice is Ray’s singing a chorus from the road, low and intimate, about being in another town (“but still I find that you are always on my mind”) answered by the lovely voice of Jayhawks keyboardist Karen Grotberg, haunting and tender, singing “Right now you’re in a far country …

Out of sight and out of mind/Always somewhere on the road.” The first time I heard the female voice it seemed almost intrusive; the next time it seemed just right; the time after that it was somewhere between heartbreak and sublimity, particularly when everything flows into “A Place in Your Heart,” the male and female voices singing poignant counterpoint while the ensemble comes together for a rousing rough and tumble road narrative around the refrain “West to East till we reach Omaha.” It’s exciting to hear a group of musicians making something beautiful and unique that at the same time evokes the days of movie cowboy nostalgia — a whole era of Americana brought into a brave new world of music. The back story of this remarkable two-part creation is told in the chapter in Americana about Ray’s musical adaptation of Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days, composed in the early 80s after his breakup with Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders: “It was sung by a love-struck princess as a group of hillbillies took [Jules] Verne and [Phineas] Fogg across the American Wild West. The hillbillies sang about the landscape while the princess supplied the romantic counterpoint. When I’d first met Chrissie Hynde, we discussed how difficult it would be for us to stay together …. I remember saying to Chris that even though things might not work out for us, I hoped we would both have a place in each other’s hearts. Overly romantic and ‘naff,’ to say the least, but true. Now I had to write a song that would encapsulate these emotions.” “Our Country” Thanks to flat-screen TV, HD, and major league baseball on demand, I can get closer to the game than I ever could in my wildest boyhood dreams. A few weekends ago I was right there with the big crowd during the ecstasy of two walk-off Cardinal wins against the Pirates, thanks to home runs by a Dominican named Yairo Muñoz and a guy from Hawaii named Kolten Wong (you know, the state Trump says Obama wasn’t born in). It’s hard not to be moved whenever the camera scanning the crowd zeroes in on a young couple or some kids like me and my friends 60 years ago or a grandmother like the one who made me the uniform or even some beefy red-faced guy in a Cardinal jersey I know may well be one of the people at Trump rallies cheering as the mad king raves on. If that guy and I were talking about the Cardinals, we’d get along fine, until we remembered the elephant in the White House. ay Davies’s American dream sits on the same brittle borderline. Our Country: Americana Act II is due for release on June 29. Davies is quoted in Rolling Stone saying that people who like the first album know where it’s going. Our Country “is what happens when you get there.” In an interview on ultimateclassicrock.com, he says, “I do hope America balances itself out. It’s slightly off-kilter at the moment …. It’s a beautiful place, but a dangerous place — as I found out.”

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RECORD REVIEW


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© BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation. © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. ® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.


23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

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Ocean’s 8 Female Gang Hatches Plan to Steal Priceless Diamond Necklace

CINEMA REVIEW

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he original Ocean’s 11 (1960) starred Frank Sinatra and a group of fellow Las Vegas headliners called the Rat Pack. The film was remade in 2001 with George Clooney starring as Danny Ocean along with ten other film stars. The story was again set in Vegas and also was about an elaborate casino heist. The picture was such a hit it spawned a couple of successful sequels, Ocean’s Twelve (2004) and Thirteen (2007). Ocean’s 8 is a refreshing departure from the original series. In addition to featuring an all-female gang, the film is set in New York City instead of Las Vegas. The movie opens with the late Danny Ocean’s little sister Debbie (Sandra Bullock), who is doing her best to convince a New Jersey parole board that she’s not at all like her con artist brother. However, as soon as Debbie is let out of jail, she goes on a brazen shoplifting spree at Bergdorf Goodman and cons a desk clerk at a luxury Manhattan hotel into giving

her a key to a suite. She then proceeds to mastermind an elaborate plan to steal a priceless diamond necklace during the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s (the Met) annual costume ball. Debbie recruits a team of cohorts, starting with her longtime partner in crime, Lou (Cate Blanchett). The rest of the crew is comprised of hi-tech whiz Nine Ball (Rihanna), jeweler Amita (Mindy Kaling), fashionista Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter), big screen diva Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway), Tammy, an ex-thief coaxed out of retirement (Sarah Paulson), and Constance, a trash-talking crook played by Awkwafina. The fun starts when the conspiracy is put into action in and around the museum. In addition to a really cool plan, there are a profusion of cameo appearances. Dozens of celebrities attend the marvelous Met gala, including Katie Holmes; Kim Kardashian and her sisters Kylie and Kendall Jenner; tennis pros S erena Williams and Maria Sharapova; Vo g u e e d itor - i n - ch i ef Anna Wintour; and designers Tommy Hilfiger and Alexander Wang; to name a few. Ultimately more lighthearted than edgy, Oceans 8 is a funfilled affair where all the famous faces that serve as backdrop almost upstage a delightful female crime caper. Excellent (HHHH). Rated PG-13 for profanity, drug use, and suggestive content. Running time: 110 minutes. Production St ud ios : S mokehous e Pictures/ Village Roadshow Pictures. DistribuWAIT UNTIL YOU HEAR WHAT I’VE COOKED UP FOR US: Debbie (Sandra Bullock, left) meets tor: War ner Brot her s with her longtime crime partner Lou (Cate Blanchett) to discuss her plan to steal a priceless Pictures. —Kam Williams diamond necklace during a gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Photo by Barry Wetcher, © 2016 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.)

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AT THE CINEMA Action Point (R for profanity, sexuality, brief nudity, crude humor, drug use, and underage drinking). Johnny Knoxville stars in this stunt comedy as the crackpot owner of a daredevil theme park where the rides and attractions have been designed with danger in mind. With Brigette Lundy-Paine, Johnny Pemberton, and Susan Yeagley. Adrift (PG-13 for peril, profanity, partial nudity, mature themes, injury images, and brief drug use). A movie describing the real-life ordeal of a young couple (Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin) who encountered one of the worst hurricanes in recorded history while sailing in a small boat from Tahiti to San Diego. With Jeffrey Thomas, Elizabeth Hawthorne and Grace Palmer. Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13 for profanity, crude references, intense action, and pervasive violence). Nineteenth movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe series and the third in the Avengers series finds the team of superheroes joining forces with the Guardians of the Galaxy to thwart the attempt of a diabolical despot (Josh Brolin) who wants to destroy the universe. Cast includes Robert Downey, Jr, Elizabeth Olsen, Chadwick Boseman, Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Chris Pratt, Tom Holland, and Zoe Saldana. Book Club (PG-13 for profanity and sex-related material). Comedy about four lifelong friends (Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen, and Candice Bergen) whose sex lives are turned upside-down after their monthly book club discussion of Fifty Shades of Grey. Support cast includes Craig T. Nelson, Alicia Firestone, Don Johnson, Andy Garcia, Richard Dreyfuss, and Ed Begley, Jr. Breaking In (PG-13 for violence, bloody images, menacing, sexual references, and brief profanity). Thriller about a single-mom’s (Gabrielle Union) efforts to rescue her kids (Ajiona Alexus and Seth Carr) who are being held hostage by a gang of burglars barricaded inside her recently deceased father’s Malibu mansion. With Billy Burke, Christa Miller, Richard Cabral, and Jason George. Deadpool 2 (R for sexual references, graphic violence, brief drug use, and pervasive profanity). Eleventh movie in Marvel Comics’ X-Men series finds the title character (Ryan Reynolds) forming a team of superheroes to protect a young mutant (Julian Dennison) who is being hunted by a time-traveling cybernetic soldier (Josh Brolin). With Morena Baccarin, Zazie Beetz, and T.J. Miller. Disobedience (R for graphic sexuality). Story of forbidden love between two lesbian lovers (Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams) who were separated in their teens by their Orthodox Jewish community whose mutual attraction reignites when they are reunited years later. With Alessandro Nivola, Anton Lesser, and Cara Horgan. First Reformed (R for some disturbing violent images). Thriller, set in upstate New York, about a grieving pastor (Ethan Hawke) whose counseling of the depressed husband (Philip Ettinger) of a pregnant parishioner (Amanda Seyfried) fails in tragic fashion. Supporting cast includes Cedric the Entertainer, Michael Gaston, and Victoria Hill. Hereditary (R for violence, profanity, disturbing images, drug use, and brief nudity). Horror film about a family that finds itself facing sinister forces following the death of its reclusive matriarch. Ensemble cast includes Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne, and Ann Dowd. Hotel Artemis (R for violence, sexual references, pervasive profanity, and brief drug usage). Science-fiction movie set in a riot-torn Los Angeles about a nurse (Jodie Foster) who runs a secret emergency room for criminals. With Sterling K. Brown, Jeff Goldblum, Charlie Day, Sofia Boutella, and Dave Bautista. Incredibles 2 (PG for action and brief mild epithets). Animated sequel finds the Parr family and sidekick Lucius Best (Samuel L. Jackson) joining forces to defeat a villain (Bill Wise) who is hatching a plot to hypnotize humanity. Voice cast includes Craig T. Nelson, Holly Hunter, Catherine Keener, and Isabella Rossellini. Life of the Party (PG-13 for sexuality, partying, and drug use). Comedy about a housewife (Melissa McCarthy) who decides to go back to college to complete her degree at the same school as her daughter (Molly Gordon). Featuring Maya Rudolph, Gillian Jacobs, Jacki Weaver, and Stephen Root, with a cameo appearance by Christina Aguilera. Mary Shelley (PG-13 for sexuality, mature themes, and substance abuse). Elle Fanning is the title character in this biopic about the rebellious teen who married the poet Percy Shelley (Douglas Booth) before she wrote the literary classic Frankenstein. With Maisie Williams, Ben Hardy, and Bel Powley. Ocean’s 8 (PG-13 profanity, drug use, and suggestive content). Spinoff of the famous crime caper series has Danny Ocean’s estranged sister (Sandra Bullock) masterminding a $150 million-dollar jewel heist in New York City by an all-female gang. A-list cast includes Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Olivia Munn, Rihanna, Dakota Fanning, Helena Bonham Carter, Katie Holmes, Serena Williams, and Kim Kardashian. On Chesil Beach (R for nudity and sexuality). Adaptation of Ian McEwan’s bestselling novel of the same name, set in Dorset in the summer of ‘62, describing the courtship between a young couple (Saoirse Ronan and Billy Howie) that culminates in a bedroom crisis on their wedding night. With Emily Watson, Bebe Cave, and Samuel West. Overboard (PG-13 for suggestive material, profanity, and partial nudity). Comedy, loosely based on the 1987 classic of the same name, changes the script to be about a wealthy spoiled playboy (Eugenio Derbez) who is duped by his maid (Anna Faris) into believing they’re married, after he develops amnesia when he falls off his yacht. With Eva Longoria, John Hannah, and Swoosie Kurtz. Race 3 (Unrated). Third movie in the Bollywood action series has Shamsher (Anil Kapoor) entrusting his boss (Salman Khan) with the execution of a high-stakes heist that goes awry. Cast includes Jacqueline Fernandez, Bobby Deol, and Daisy Shah. In Hindi with subtitles. RBG (PG for mature themes and mild epithets). Biopic about the career of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Featuring commentary by Gloria Steinem and Nina Totenberg. The Rider (R for profanity and drug use). Biopic about a rising rodeo star Brady Blackburn’s (Brady Jandreau) search for new meaning in life after suffering a near-fatal kick to the head from a horse. With Tim Jandreau, Lilly Jandreau, Cat Clifford, and Lane Scott. The Seagull (PG-13 for violence, mature themes, drug use, and partial nudity). Adaptation of Chekhov’s classic play, set in Russia near the dawn of the 20th century, about an aging actress’s (Annette Bening) eventful visit to her brother’s (Brian Dennehy) sprawling, lakeside estate. With Saoirse Ronan, Elisabeth Ross, and Corey Stoll. Solo: A Star Wars Story (PG-13 for violence and science fiction action sequences). Second movie in the Star Wars anthology is about Han Solo’s (Alden Ehrenreich) early escapades in a dark and dangerous underworld where he meets his future co-pilot, Chewbacca (Jonas Suotamo). Supporting cast includes Donald Glover, Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke, and Thandie Newton. Superfly (R for pervasive profanity, graphic sexuality, violence, ethnic slurs, nudity, and drug use). Trevor Jackson plays the title character in this remake of the classic about a gruesome ghetto gang war. With Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, and Jennifer Morrison. Tag (R for pervasive profanity, crude humor, sexuality, drug use, and brief nudity). Comedy based on the real-life competition between a quintet of lifelong friends (Jon Hamm, Ed Helms, Hannibal Buress, Jake Johnson, and Jeremy Renner) who have been playing an elaborate version of the children’s game “Tag” for the past 30 years. Supporting cast includes Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Leslie Bibb, and Brian Dennehy. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (PG-13 for profanity and mature themes). Retrospective revisit of the life, philosophy, and legacy of Fred Rogers (1928-2003), the nurturing host of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, the syndicated TV series for preschoolers which ran on PBS for over three decades. Featuring appearances by his wife Joanne, Yo-Yo Ma, and Joe Negri. —Kam Williams

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Starting Friday American Animals (R) Continuing First Reformed (R) RBG (PG) Ends Thursday The Seagull (PG-13)

First Reformed

Hollywood Summer Nights Moontide (1942) Thu, June 14 at 7:30

Book Club

NTLive Macbeth Sun, June 17 at 12:30

RBG

Hollywood Summer Nights Heaven Can Wait (1942) Wed, June 20 at 7:30

Disobedience

Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

Fri-Sat: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Sun-Thurs: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20 (PG) Fri-Sat: 4:25, 9:20 (R) Sun-Thurs: 4:25

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

Fri. 06/15/18 to Thurs. 06/21/18


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 26

25th Annual Montgomery Professional Rodeo and Bullmania — Daube Farm, Skillman Photography by Charles R. Plohn

Calendar Wednesday, June 13 10:30 a.m.: Poetry Reading & Nature Walk at D&R G r e e n w a y L a n d Tr u s t . Guests are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch, blanket/beach chair. To register, email rsvp@drgreenway.org. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of The Awful Truth (1937) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Countr y Dancers at t he Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, June 14 10 a .m . to 3 p.m . : Princeton Summer Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Moontide (1942 ) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 7:30 p.m.: Cirque Italia, Italian Water Circus, at Quaker Bridge Mall in Lawrenceville (through Sunday). www.cirqueitalia.com. Friday, June 15 Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton, NJ includes farm-fresh p r o d u c e , c a fé , e at- i n foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood &

meats, g uest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards. Enjoy Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery’s award-winning w ines, w ine fare, and relaxing music every Friday night throughout the summer ( through Sep tember 7). 7:30 p.m.: Instrumental Sabbath Service at Adath Israel, located at 1958 L aw rencev ille Road in Lawrenceville. Saturday, June 16 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Stat ion in West Windsor. 8 p.m.: The Princeton Symphonic Brass, under the baton of Lawrence Kursar, will present “Moves and Movies” at Hillman Hall on the campus of Westminster Choir College, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton. “Moves a nd Mov ie s” showc as e s music from the world of dance and film, with songs to m ove you r fe e t a n d heart. Featuring the music of Louis Prima, Debussy, Brahms, Henr y Mancini, Richard Rogers, John Williams and more. Tickets on sale at www.psbrass.com/ tickets (Adults $15/ seniors $10/ kids under 16 $5) and will sold at the door 30 minutes prior to the event (Adults $17/ seniors $12/ kids under 16 $5). Sunday, June 17 12:30 p.m.: Screening of National Theatre Live’s Macbeth at P r inceton Garden Theatre. Monday, June 18 7 p.m.: Steven Lacosse, director of the Princeton Festival’s production of Madama Butterfly, and Claire Jan Ru Huang, assistant to the artistic director of the Festival host a panel discussion: Challenges in Performing Multi- Cultural Operas ; Princeton Public Library. Tuesday, June 19 6 : 30 p.m . : S u m m e r Reading Soiree with author Marie Benedict at the restored barn at the H i s to r i c a l S o c i e t y o f Princeton, 354 Quaker Road. Benedict will talk about and sign copies of her new book Carnegie’s Maid. Her first historical novel, The Other Einstein, will also be available for sale.

Wednesday, June 20 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Heaven Can Wait (1943) at Princeton Garden Theatre. 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Countr y Dancers at t he Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, June 21 10 a .m . to 3 p.m . : Princeton Summer Farmers Market at Hinds Plaza. 6 p.m.: Nell Painter discusses his book, Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over at Labyrinth Books of Princeton. 6:30 p.m.: Yoga on the Lawn at the Princeton University Art Museum. Enjoy the healing benefits of yoga outdoors. The instructor will be Debbi Gitterman of YogaStream. Guests should bring their own mat. 7:30 p.m.: Screening of Funny Girl (1968) at Princeton Garden Theatre. Friday, June 22 Noon to 8 p.m.: Stockton Market in Stockton, NJ includes farm-fresh p r o d u c e , c a fé , e at- i n foodstands, baked goods, local artisans, seafood & meats, g uest vendors, and more (also on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). 5 to 8 p.m.: Sunset Sips and Sounds at Terhune Orchards. Enjoy Terhune

Orchards Vineyard and Winery’s award-winning w ines, w ine fare, and relaxing music every Friday night throughout the summer ( through Sep tember 7). Saturday, June 23 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: West Windsor Community Farmers Market at the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the Princeton Junction Train Stat ion in West Windsor. Sunday, June 24 4 to 9 p.m.: Terhune Orchards Firef ly Festival is a fun-filled event for the whole family. The farm will be kept open late. Children can dress up as fireflies after painting wings and making antennas in the craft area. T here w ill also be an old-fashioned supper at Pam’s Food Tent. Admission and parking is free. Craft activities are $5. Monday, June 25 Recycling Tuesday, June 26 7 p.m.: YWCA Princeton’s Firecracker 5K at ETS Campus, 660 Rosedale Road in Princeton. O n l i ne re g is t rat ion is $30. Day of registration is $40. Register online at https://www.ywcaprince ton.org/news-events/5k/. Wednesday, June 27 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Countr y Dancers at t he Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students).


After Superb Senior Campaign for PU Baseball, PHS Alum Gross Selected by Astros in MLB Draft

C

motions of filling out questionnaires,” said Gross, who made only one appearance in his first two years with Princeton as he recovered from two operations on his shoulder. “I met with a few people in person. There wasn’t like an overreaching agreement that I was going to get drafted. I never thought that I was going to get drafted because of this extra year of eligibility at Duke. With all of the things that go into the draft, you never know.” Looking back on his senior year, which saw him earn a pair of Princeton team awards in addition to his All-Ivy recognition, Gross focused more his growth as a pitcher than any honors. “I don’t necessarily read too much into the whole accolades and honors and all of that stuff,” said Gross, who received the team’s Kafer Trophy given to a player who exemplifies loyalty and devotion to Princeton’s baseball interests, courage, modesty, perseverance, and determination under discouraging conditions and was named along with sophomore Eli Kimbell as a co-winner of the Edward J. Donovan Award for pitching excellence. “It is more ‘how do I look at how the season went?’ Outside of the slow start, it was OK. I know that I am better than what I showed this year and look to working hard this offseason and improving upon it next year.” One of the better moments this spring for Gross came when shut out Penn in a 3-0 win on April 14. “That was fun; to use a Princeton baseball key word, it was my resilience during that outing,” recalled Gross, who had seven strikeouts and no walks in the effort. “I gave up nine hits. I had a few innings with guys in scoring position and really battled my way through those jams and got out of them.” While the Tigers battled PRO PROSPECT: Ben Gross fires a pitch this spring in his senior hard down the stretch, they season for the Princeton University baseball team. The former Princeton High standout enjoyed a superb final campaign, going 4-5 with 52 strikeouts in 52 1/3 innings and a 4.47 ERA as he earned second-team All-Ivy League honors. Last week, he was selected by the Houston Astros in the 34th round of the 908.359.8388 Major League Baseball Draft. oming off a breakthrough junior season in 2017 which saw Ben Gross emerge as a star pitcher for the Princeton University baseball team after two years of struggling with injury, the senior righty got off to a rough start this spring. Gross, a former Princeton High standout, got rocked in his first two outings of 2018, suffering losses to North Carolina-Wilmington and South Carolina, surrendering 10 runs in six innings for a 15.00 ERA. But, recapturing his form, Gross got into a rhythm for the rest of the spring, ending up going 4-5 with 52 strikeouts in 52 1/3 innings and a 4.47 ERA. “I was experimenting a little bit which might have contributed to the slow start,” said the 6’2, 215-pound Gross.

“I went back to what worked for me last year and that ended up working out again this year: going with a fastball and a breaking ball that I can manipulate in terms of velocity and movement.” The late surge by Gross not only earned him second-team All-Ivy League honors, it put him on the radar of Major League Baseball as he got chosen by the Houston Astros in the 34th round of the MLB Draft last week. Having committed to attend a masters program at Duke University and play for its baseball program due to a year of eligibility remaining as a result of being sidelined by injury early in his Princeton career, Gross wasn’t expected to get the call from any of the MLB clubs. “I knew that a few teams liked me, going through the

(Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Route 206 • Belle Mead

dropped their final nine league games in ending up 10-27 overall and 7-14 Ivy. “That is always hard; it is the second year in a row that we got off to a pretty hot start during Ivy League play and kind of fell apart towards the end of the year,” said Gross, who served as a team captain this season. “At that point, it was more of going out there and playing for the name on the front of the jersey, who you are, and what you represent, and holding your head high. We didn’t finish it off with a very good ending, but the idea was there.” For Gross, having represented the Tigers over the

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“I don’t know what my role is going to be there. I want to build on what I have done at Princeton,” said Gross, “It will be interesting with all of the technology and resources that Duke has to see what sorts of developments can be made in my pitching.” Getting to utilize those resources could help Gross develop into an even better pro prospect. “The whole draft has to happen again,” said Gross. “It might not be the Astros who draft me; it might be a different team. There is no reason I can’t start a year later.” —Bill Alden

T he Hun School Congratulates

THE CL ASS OF 2018! THE BREADTH OF YOUR COLLEGE MATRICULATION REFLECTS THE STRENGTH AND DIVERSITY OF YOUR TALENTS, INTERESTS, AND HARD WORK. WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU.

146

244

102

graduates in the Class of 2018

universities who offered acceptances

universities where a graduate will attend

3

26, 3

96%

100%

states, countries where the Class of 2018 will attend college

graduates will attend one of their top 3 choices

Make Us Proud!

Arizona State University University of Arizona

Hobart and William Smith Colleges (3)

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Babson College (3)

College of the Holy Cross

University of Scranton

Barnard College

University of Indianapolis

University of South Carolina

Boston College

Ithaca College

University of Southern

Boston University

Jacksonville University

Brandeis University

Johns Hopkins University

Southern Methodist University

Bryn Mawr College

Lafayette College (2)

Spelman College

University of California,

Lehigh University (3)

University of St. Andrews, U.K.

Loyola Marymount University

St. John’s University

Loyola University Maryland (2)

St. Lawrence University

Marist College (2)

Stevens Institute of Technology

University of Maryland,

Stockton University

Berkeley University of California, Los Angeles Carnegie Mellon University Colby College

College Park

California

SUNY Oswego

Colgate University (2)

Merrimack College

Swarthmore College

University of Colorado

University of Miami (2)

Syracuse University (3)

University of Michigan

Temple University

Concordia University, Canada

The New School - All Divisions

Texas Christian University (2)

Connecticut College

New York University (4)

Trinity College

Davidson College (2)

Northeastern University

Tufts University

University of Delaware (2)

University of Notre Dame (2)

Union College

Dickinson College (2)

Pennsylvania State

United States Naval Academy

at Boulder (2)

Drexel University (3)

Serving the Princeton area for over 20 years

last four years is leaving him with some indelible memories. “Obviously the Ivy championship in 2016 is going to stick out for me,” said Gross. “Even if I didn’t contribute as much to the championship as I did that last couple of years, that was definitely the most fun I had over my four year career. Battling back from injury will stick out to me. I am definitely going to look back at my experience at Princeton and as my baseball career progresses, try to learn from what I have done here.” Gross is hoping to make progress at Duke as he joins its high-powered Atlantic Coast Conference program.

University (2)

Vanderbilt University

Duke University

University of Pennsylvania

Vassar College

Duquesne University

University of Pittsburgh

Villanova University

Durham University, U.K.

Princeton University

University of Virginia (2)

Earlham College

Purdue University

Washington and Jefferson

The University of Edinburgh, U.K.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Elon University

Rider University

University of Washington

Emerson College

Rollins College (2)

Wesleyan University

Emory University (2)

Rutgers University (3)

College of William and Mary

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Sacred Heart University

Williams College

Florida International University

Saint Joseph’s University

University of Wisconsin,

Florida State University

Savannah College of Art

University of Florida Fordham University (3) Franklin & Marshall College (2) Furman University George Washington University Gettysburg College (3) Grinnell College Hamilton College Harvard University High Point University (4)

and Design

College

Madison (2)

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

S ports


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 28

Amaechi, who was third at the NCAA East Regionals and was the Ivy Heps runner-up and ECAC Champion. She set the Princeton record in her very first outing PU Track Star Amaechi and continued to improve all 7th in Discuss at NCAAs season. Undeterred by a deluge Princeton Men’s Hoops of rain that hit during the competition, Princeton Uni- To Play in Boardwalk Classic For the first time, the versity women’s track star Obiageri Amaechi placed Princeton University men’s seventh in the discus at the basketball team will play in NCAA Championships last Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall when the Tigers take weekend in Eugene, Ore. part in the Basketball Hall Freshman Amaechi had a of Fame Boardwalk Classic best heave of 177’8, becomon December 15. ing the first Tiger to advance Princeton will be part of to the NCAA Championships in the discus. Maggie Ewen a quadruple-header when of Arizona State finished it meets Iona in the event, first with a throw of 198’5. which includes games between Temple and DavidEarning first-team A llson, Penn State and North American honors with the Carolina State, and Virginia seventh-place finish capped Tech and Washington. a s u p e r b c a m p a ig n for The Tigers and Gaels have met six times, three on each team’s home cour t, with Princeton winning all six. T H E O F F I C E S T O R E Four of those meetings came between 1998 and 1992 with the other two coming in a home-and-home series during the 2006 - 07 and 2007-08 seasons. 28 Spring St, Princeton Princeton returns four of (next to Chuck’s) five starters from last season, headed by rising se609-924-0112 niors Devin Cannady (16.7 www.hinksons.com

PU Sports Roundup

330 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

points per game), Myles Stephens (15.3 ppg), along with a pair of rising sophomores in Sebastian Much (7.1 ppg) and Jerome Desrosiers (6.2 ppg). Cannady and Stephens started at least 28 games last season with Much (19) and Desrosiers (10) also in double figures.

PU Men’s Track Stars Shine at NCAA Meet

A trio of Princeton University men’s track stars performed well at the NCAA Championships last week in Eugene, Ore. Junior Adam Kelly placed ninth in the hammer throw with a best throw of 230’6 as he earned second-team All-America honors. Sophomore Conor Lundy clocked a personal best of 14:04.08 in taking 15th place and earning second-team AllA mer ica honors. S enior William Paulson competed in the 1,500 meters, clocking a time of 3:48.09 as he narrowly missed making the final.

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PROWLING CAT: Cat Caro ’17 heads up the field during her career with the Princeton University field hockey team. Caro will be playing for the U.S. National Team as it heads to South America this week for a five-game series against Argentina. Kathleen Sharkey ’13 will take part in the series while Princeton assistant David Williamson is the team’s goalkeeping coach. Also heading over to Argentina will be the USA’s U-21 team featuring Tiger rising senior stars Sophia Tornetta and Elise Wong. That group will play a three-game series against the host country’s U-21 team. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Free Admission Farm store daily 9-6 pm Wine Tasting Room Fri.-Sun. 12-6 pm 609-924-2310 • www.terhuneorchards.com

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Nils Wildberg was looking for a new activity in his freshman year at Princeton High and made a fateful decision. “I first started track in my freshman year in high school in the winter,” said Wildberg, who had focused on soccer prior to entering PHS in 2015. “I just saw what the school had to offer and it just caught my eye and I registered for it. I loved it instantly.” Starting as a sprinter and high jumper that winter, Wildberg transitioned to the long jump and triple jump that spring as he learned the ropes of his new pursuit. In sophomore s eason, Wildberg exper ienced a breakthrough in the long jump and has been flying high ever since. “T here was one meet, I think it was the Mercer Coaches Invitational where it was really windy and it was the first time I had a big jump way over 20 feet,” said Wildberg. “I thought to myself, I could compete at a high level.” Building on that effort, Wildberg went on to win the title in the long jump at the Mercer County Championships, take fifth at the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional meet, and qualify for the Meet of Champions (MOC). This spring in his junior campaign, Wildberg’s heroics have helped PHS produce a season for the ages that has seen the squad place first at the county, sectional, and state Group 4 meet. The sweep marked the program’s first outdoor county championship since 1982, its first outdoor sectional crown since 1989, and the first outdoor state title since 1981. In the long jump, Wildberg took third at the county

meet, sixth in the sectional, and third in the Group meet. In addition, he has emerged as top sprinter as well, winning the 200 at the county meet and helping the 4x100 relay to first. At the sectional meet, Wildberg was third in the 100 and part of the winning 4x100 relay. He helped the 4x100 finish third at the group meet. Last Saturday in the MOC at N or t h e r n B u rl i n g ton High, Wildberg soared to a personal record of of 23’ 8.5 to take second in the event with senior teammate Narayan taking third in 23’7.5. “This meet was what I have been training for this whole year, all summer and all season,” said Wildberg. “I really knew I could come in with full force and do my best against the best athletes in the state. It was a really fun experience.” It was a fun day all around at the MOC for PHS as its athletes set a number of school and personal records at the competition. S en ior s tar Will Hare placed second in 3,200 in a school record 9:07.12, Simon Schenk finished third in the pole vault with a mark of 15’ 0 to set a personal, school, and sophomore state record. Junior Paul Brennan came in third in the discus with a heave of 182’ 0, a PR and a school record. Sophomore Ben Kioko was seventh in the discus in a personal best and school record of 184’10; while the 4x800 relay of Nick Delaney, Jackson McCarthy, Acasio Pinheiro, Tucker Zullo set a school record of 7:47.75 in taking third. For Wildberg, training with senior star Narayan has helped him reach new heights. “Training with Varun is fantastic; it is really nice

and helpful to have someone push you so much,” said Wildberg. “You learn a lot of things from training with somebody as good as he is. It helps you advance your technique and skill.” Making advancements in the sprint events has been an ongoing process for Wildberg. “I didn’t really train that much for sprints at all,” said Wildberg, noting that working with fellow sprinters, Matt Perello, Jack Whetstone, and Narayan has been a major factor in his success. “In the beginning, I was more focused on jumps. Whenever we needed points in a meet, my coach would

put me in and I just ran and gradually improved with lifting and jump work.” In reflecting on the team’s historic spring, Wildberg sees it as a product of hard work and unity. “I would say that work ethic has played the biggest part,” said Wildberg, noting that the sprinters and jumpers have been training since last September. “ We h av e g o o d te a m chemistry as well. We are all able to talk to each other as friends and communicate with each other. We recently got a school record board in out school gym. We are breaking all of the records this year.” As Wildberg took off on his personal record jump last Saturday, he sensed that it was going to be something special.

“It felt really good, it felt like a great jump,” said Wildberg. “I was actually behind the board so I had a few more inches to go and could do an even bigger jump.” Next weekend, Wildberg will be on a bigger stage as he competes at the New Balance Nationals next weekend in Greensboro, N.C. “I am going to bring it all; my goal for my high school career is to get All A m e r i c a n at n at i o n a l s, which is top six,” said Wildberg, who will be joined by 15 other PHS teammates at the meet. “I am going to put everything I have on the line and go for it.” Looking ahead, Wildberg is confident that the Little Tigers can keep going for titles next season in his final high school campaign.

“We have an entire year to improve and I feel like we can pull off some big things next year,” said Wildberg. “Everybody on the team brings so much effort, especially our younger kids like Simon Schenk and Matt Perello. Hopefully they will be inspired to continue this winning streak.” Wildberg, for his part, ultimately plans to continue his track career in college. “I have a long way to go,” said Wildberg, who has started researching schools as he prepares for the recruiting process. “My performance is far from perfect and I have a lot more in me. I would like to compete at an even higher level if I can.” —Bill Alden

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609.896.3434 | 800.932.4476 | BORD ENPERLMAN .COM WILD RIDE: Princeton High boys’ track star Nils Wildberg flies through the air in the long jump at the Meet of Champions last Saturday at Northern Burlington High. Junior Wildberg took second in the event with a personal record leap of 23’ 8.5. Wildberg is one of 16 athletes from PHS who will be competing at the New Balance Nationals next weekend in Greensboro, N.C. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

Wildberg Soars to 2nd in Long Jump at MOC As PHS Boys’ Track Enjoys Record Breaking Day


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 30

Youthful PHS Softball Took Its Lumps But Gained Valuable Lessons in the Process Although the Princeton High softball team ended the season by falling 10-0 to South Brunswick in the opening round of the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional, it marked an important step for the youthful squad. “We didn’t expect to make the state tournament; we had a lot of girls on the team that were new to the varsity level,” said PHS head coach Marissa Soprano, whose team was seeded 16th in the sectional. “Just being in a state playoff game was nice, even if we had to play the top seed. We had a couple of innings where they didn’t score any runs and so to hold them down after a big inning was

nice, making sure we can stay in the game the best we can.” The Little Tigers posted a nice victory in their regular season finale as they defeated Princeton Day School 12-2. “We didn’t win that many games this season, so it was nice to be on the other side of it for the PDS game,” said Soprano, whose squad posted a final record of 2-18. “It was the last time the seniors would play in our field, so that was nice. We had essentially the whole lineup get on base, their pitcher walked quite a few girls so it was a good chance to use base running skills.”

SPECIAL K: Princeton High softball player Kylee Tucholski makes a play in a game this spring. Freshman pitcher Tucholski was a bright spot for PHS as it finished with a 2-18 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Senior star Bianca Guidi brought a lot of skill to the diamond over her PHS career. “Bianca has been our leader the past couple of seasons; she is the only athlete that I have had who has been with the varsity program for four years,” said Soprano. “She made a major impact behind the plate. She went into the catcher role halfway through just to give us a little more presence behind the plate. She is going to be a big loss to the program; she did a nice job this year.” G u id i ’s clas s m ate s on t he te am, K ate Wr ight, Kelli Friedman, and Sophie Mann - Shafir, also did a good job for PHS. “Kate Wright was in the varsity program last year, and her bat in the lineup will be missed,” said Soprano. “We moved her around this year on defense. Kelli played second base and in terms of her guidance to the younger girls, she was really good with the type of attitude she always brought to the program. Hopefully the girls she played with this year will be able to take that on. Sophie got on the field, she played third base or first base.” Soprano, for her part, believes the Little Tigers can take more steps for ward next spring. “Hopefully we can capitalize on what we did this year,” said Soprano, whose returning players include freshman Kylee Tucholski, sophomore Jordan Guidi, junior Cameron Provorny, junior Cosette Hansen, and junior Grace Forrest. “Our whole outfield was new as well as some of the infielders. It is just making sure that they learned from this season and can come back to the program and be the girls who can help out the incoming class next year. Kylee was our freshman pitcher and, with more work, she should be more consistent and pick up some speed as she goes.” —Bill Alden

Posting First Winning Campaign Since 2001, PHS Baseball Was Fueled by Team Chemistry Enjoy ing its f irst w in ning season since 2001, the Princeton High baseball team boasted a potent mix of pitching, hitting, and fielding in going 13-9. But PHS head coach Dave Roberts will tell you that the key ingredient to his squad’s success this spring was togetherness. “One of the things I said to them at the end is that if anybody ever tells you that team chemistry is not a big deal, they are wrong,” said Roberts. “It was a big deal for us. There were 16 guys who were in it, who wanted to be there, accepted their roles, and just really, really, wanted to make the year great and they did.” PHS made a great run in Mercer County Tournament, advancing to the semifinals where it fell 4-2 to Nottingham. “I def i n itely t h i n k we earned their respect, we could have won that game,” said Roberts, whose team had lost 16-1 to Nottingham in a regular season meeting between the teams in midApril. “I loved the way [ Ben ] Amon was pitching that day; I thought he would come out on top of that thing. It looked for a while there like it might but a couple of key things happened. We proved we belonged there, that is for sure.” The season ended on a down note as 13th-seeded PHS dropped a 2-0 nail-biter to fourth-seeded Sayreville in the opening round of the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional tournament as the Little Tigers couldn’t come up with the key hits in the defeat. “I don’t know if it was the long layoff,” said Roberts, whose team only managed two hits in the setback. “We had the whole week off, we were supposed to play a game with Ewing, and it kept getting rained out

Congratulations, Wilberforce Senior Class of 2018!

and it kept our timing from being a little better. We are not going to make excuses. We knew what we were getting, we weren’t nervous. I don’t know what the story was, we couldn’t get the bat on the ball.” In reflecting on the improvement made by PHS this spring, which saw it bounce back from a 6-17-1 campaign in 2017, Roberts cited strong pitching and improved defense as to key factors. “I honestly think the biggest areas of progress were A m on ( 2 - 5, 2.68 E R A , 53 strikeouts) and Teddy Durbin (4-1, 2.88 ERA, 48 strikeouts) really working on everything that we asked them to work on,” said Roberts. “We played better defensively, that is the reality. We played better. About midway through the season, even though we were 5-2, 5-3, I moved Mike Ramirez over to shortstop and that helped settle the infield down. I thought that was a big move for us.”

The team’s senior class made a big impact on and off the field. “They were a group dedicated to baseball and dedicated to winning and making their senior year great,” said Roberts, whose group of seniors included Paul Cooke, Mike Frost, John Girouard, Jaedyn Paria, Alec Silverman, David Valente, Zack Yoelson, and Ramirez. “The seniors were great. Alec had just an unbelievable year (.400 batting average and a team-high 19 RBIs) and Paul did what Paul does (.414 with a team-high 20 runs). Their contributions are just tremendous.” Roberts is confident that the program won’t have to wait 17 years for the next winning season. “I do think there is hope for next year; we are going to need to have some young guys step up,” said Roberts, who returns such standouts as Amon, Durbin, Tommy Reid, Guatam Chawla, Jay Ramirez, Owen Seals, and Tommy Delany. “We are going to be looking for a catcher for the first time in three years. There is some work to be done.” —Bill Alden

CLOSING STATEMENT: Princeton High baseball player Alec Silverman follows through on a swing in a game this spring. Senior catcher and Macalester College-bound Silverman enjoyed a big year, batting .400 with a team-high 19 RBIs in helping PHS go 13-9 and advance to the Mercer County Tournament semifinals. It marked the program’s first winning season since 2001. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Coming off a superb spring as the ace for the Princeton High baseball pitching staff, Teddy Durbin picked up where he left off as he took the mound for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball last week against Trenton Post 93/182. The lanky lefty displayed some dominant form, giving up a run and striking out 10 in six innings of work in the June 5 contest. “Tommy [Bocian] played really well behind the plate and was calling a good game,” said Durbin, a rising senior at PHS. “I just felt comfortable; my two seam and curve ball felt good today.” Showing his all-around game, Durbin contributed an RBI single in the bottom of the fifth inning to give Post 218 a 2-1 lead. “I was just looking for a fastball I could drive and put in a gap or a hole and it worked out,” said Durbin. Things didn’t work out well for Post 218, however, as the foes tied 2-2 after eight innings in a game to be completed on June 23. “We wanted to come in and just come away with a win,” said Durbin, noting that Post 218 started the season started by losing 4-1 and 6-5 in a doubleheader to Bordentown Post 26 on June 3. “We need to pick it up a little bit on the defensive end.” Coming into this summer, Post 218 appears to have more talent than in recent years, boasting a number of PHS standouts along with

some players from two-time state Prep A champ Hun and Prep B semifinalist Princeton Day School. “We have a lot of guys from the PHS team that are playing this year,” noted Durbin. “That is great for team chemistry.” As a reward for his fine season this spring for the Little Tigers, Durbin was named to another team, the Mercer County squad in the 2018 Carpenter Cup Classic. “That is a huge accomplishment. It is pretty fortunate for me to be a part of the team, it means a lot,” said Durbin, who will be joined on the Carpenter Cup squad by fellow Post 218 and PHS teammate Paul Cooke along with PDS stars and Post 218 players Matt Nyce and Luke Franzoni. Post 218 manager Tommy Parker believes Durbin can accomplish a lot this summer. “Teddy pitched a hell of a game today. He did all that he was supposed to do,” said Parker. “It was a great outing.” Parker lamented his team’s failure to do everything it could do to get some wins in the first week of the season. “We have had three tough games where we had our fate and opportunity in our hands and it just takes one flat moment,” said Parker, whose team dropped to 0-4 after being swept 5-0 and 8-1 by Broad Street Post 313 last Saturday. “These guys are good and they are going to take advantage of

it; all we had to do was put them away.” Noting that the swirl of high school graduation activities in the first few weeks of June has kept Post 218 from fielding a full squad, Parker is confident that it will start taking advantage of its opportunities. “We will be all right. They have to focus in those moments,” said Parker, who is hoping that Post 218 will get on the winning track as it hosts South Brunswick Post 401 on June 13, plays at Hamilton Post 31 on June 14, and then hosts Hopewell Post 339 on June 15, Lawrence Post 414 on June 16, and North Hamilton on June 17. “We have got pitching and hitting; we also have a good young core. These guys are pretty special and they are going to be good. When we get everybody groomed and up to pace, we will be good to go. They got to hang in there, they have to believe. It is on them. They have too much talent to not do well in this league.” Durbin, for his part, believes that Post 218 has the potential to do some big things this summer. “We have a good group of guys,” said Durbin. “We have been in three close games so far this year. If we can learn to finish, we can be a pretty special team.” —Bill Alden

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SPECIAL DELIVERY: Teddy Durbin delivers a pitch last week for the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team as it hosted Trenton Post 93/182. Rising Princeton High senior Durbin produced a superb mound effort in the June 5 contest, giving up a run and striking out 10 in six innings of work as the teams tied 2-2 after eight innings in a game to be completed on June 23. Post 218, which dropped to 0-4 after being swept 5-0 and 8-1 by Broad Street Post 313 last Saturday, will look to get on the winning track as it hosts South Brunswick Post 401 on June 13, plays at Hamilton Post 31 on June 14, and then hosts Hopewell Post 339 on June 15, Lawrence Post 414 on June 16, and North Hamilton on June 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In

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31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

PHS Standout Pitcher Durbin Shows His Stuff As Post 218 Baseball Battles Trenton to Standoff


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 32

Summer Men’s Hoops Primed for 30th Year As Packer Hall All-Stars Aim to Defend Title

TURNING 30: Zavon Johnson goes after the ball in action last year in the championship series in the Princeton Recreation Department Summer Men’s Basketball League. Johnson helped the underdog Packer Hall All-Stars defeat Majeski to earn the title. Johnson and Packer Hall will be back to defend their title in the league, which tips off its 30th year of action next week with opening night slated for June 18. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

As the Princeton Recreation Depar tment Men’s Summer Basketball League tips off its 30th year of action this week, the core of 20-something players will be looking to knock off a veteran outfit. Last summer, the Packer Hall All-Stars, a team comprised mainly of relatively grizzled former College of New Jersey players, produced an unlikely title run, as the seventh-seeded squad swept top-seeded and defe n d i n g ch a m p M aj e s k i Foundation in the best-ofthree championship series. With the 2018 campaign slated to start on June 18 at the Community Park courts, the Packer Hall squad will be in the sights of the other six teams. “They are loaded up for bear this year, they know they are going to have a target on their backs,” said Evan Moorhead, the league’s commissioner and the Rec Department’s assistant director of recreation. “They have Nick Brackett and have added both of

his brothers, Bobby [former TCNJ star] and former NFL player Brett Brackett. That should be interesting; they are going to have a presence under the boards. Last year’s playoff MVP Khalid Lewis is back for them and they have Zavon Johnson. They are not going to sneak on anybody. I fully expect that they are going to be one of the teams to beat this year.” Majeski, who is made up of current TCNJ players, has the talent to regain the title despite losing some key players to graduation. “Joe Montano is their captain this year,” said Moorhead. “They have got Jordan Glover back. Liam Byrne is a good shooter. Randy Walko is a good player; he has a nice inside outside game. Niall Carpenter is a kid who went to Hun and had a good winter for them. They will be strong. They have the benefit of playing together in the winter too which gives them that chemistry.” The LoyalTees entry figures to be a strong title contender as well, featuring

several former Princeton High hoops stars. “L oyalTee s is anot her group who I think is going to be one of the teams to beat. Davon [Black] is the captain of that group; he is the one putting the roster together,” said Moorhead. “It has a strong local flavor with Davon, Lior Levy, and Zahrion Blue. They added Nick Davidson, who was the leading scorer in the league last year. They are going to be very strong. Davon, more than anything, knows what it takes to win. He grew up here; I have respect for a guy that this means something extra to him.” A four t h s quad, Apex Sport, should add some extra spice to the mix. “Chris Bellofatto is back in the league, he took a onet wo year hiatus,” added Moorhead. “A lot of those guys played with him before. I think Nick Santalucia led the league in scoring three or four years back. Jeff Drezewaircz was the league’s newcomer of the year t wo years ago. Mitch Phillips was a free agent; he was a guy who graduated from Pennington this year. He is 6’7 and is going to NYU. I think they should be solid because most of those guys have played in the league before.” The other three teams in the league are Cure Insurance, NJ Spiritwear, and

Gomo Health. Cure Insurance is guided by manager Phil Vigliano and should include include some local talent while Spiritwear will feature former Princeton Day School star John McArthur. The Gomo team includes Ryan Joh nson, Trey Murrrill, and Karron Johnson Jr., who previously starred for King’s Pizzarama, a title finalist in 2016. The league’s staying power is being celebrated this summer. “It started in 1989 so our motto is ‘still here,’” said Moorhead. “We plan to put together another summer Hall of Fame class. It has been a few years and we are due to induct another class into the Hall. We have been playing up the 30th year on our Facebook page a lot. We have been running a lot of old pictures and articles just to reminisce on the golden era, if you will, which is I would say from early ’90s to mid-2000s. We have a rich tradition of history here in the Princeton Summer league, so we like to remind people of that and relive some of that.” People around town are looking forward to witnessing more histor y as the games start next week. “The excitement is brewing. The basketball courts are getting a fresh coat of paint and a makeover this year with all new backboards and rims,” said Moorhead. “We are looking forward to having our great fan support like we always do.” —Bill Alden

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G irls’ Trac k : The PHS 4x400-meter relay of Jackie Patterson, Colleen Linko, G abr ielle G o ddard, and Raina Williamson came up big at the Meet of Champions held last Saturday at Northern Burlington High. The quartet set a school record, running 3: 54.62 (previous record 3:55.70) to take seventh. Senior star and Columbia-bound Patterson placed 11th in the 400 dash, clocking a time of 57.00.

Local Sports Field Hockey Umpire Course Being Offered On-Line

Due to a shortage of field hockey umpires in the area, there are opportunities to get into officiating. The certification process is straightforward and the pay starts at about $50 per hour. Most school games start around 4 p.m. and there are club tournaments on weekends. O ne c a n b e g i n le ar n ing the basics from home through an online course offered at UmpireHockey.org, written and presented by longtime umpire and former U.S. national team member Cris Maloney.

ETS Firecracker 5k Slated for June 26

Sixers Hoops Camps Slated for PDS, Stuart

The Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA will be holding basketball camps for boys and girls this summer at Princeton Day School and Stuart Country Day School. The camp at PDS will take place from June 26-29 while the session at Stuart runs from August 6-10. The program includes a full day camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for boys and girls ages 7-13 and a Little Sixers Day Camp from 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. for boys and

girls ages 5-7. Log onto sixerscamps.com or call (610) 668-7676 for further information.

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Vintage Baseball Event Scheduled for June 23

The Historical Society of Princeton will present its annual 19th century baseball game on June 23, starting at 11 a.m. at Greenway Meadows Park, 275 Rosedale Road. The event is free and open to all; spectators are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets. Par t game, par t show, and part history lesson, the Flemington Neshanock and the Talbot Fairplays Base Ball Club of Maryland will play a competitive match of bare-handed baseball, wearing period uniforms and using rules from 1864 or 1873. The event will also include a short lesson on the history of the game and a recitation of “Casey at the Bat” by Brad “Brooklyn” Shaw. For more information, log onto princetonhistory.org.

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

PHS

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SEMI TOUGH: Princeton High boys’ tennis player Noah Lilienthal smacks a forehand in action this spring. Last Wednesday, senior star and Wesleyan University-bound Lilienthal reached the semifinal of the NJSIAA state singles tournament at Mercer County Park against a familiar foe, Robert Siniakowicz of WW/P-South. Brown University-bound and third-seeded Siniakowicz topped second-seeded Lilienthal 7-6 (9), 6-3 in a tightly-played match. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 34

Obituaries

Judith Peck Erdman Judith Peck Erdman of Princeton and Edgartown, Mass., passed away peacefully on June 8th with her four children by her side. She was 92 years old. Judy was born on May 11th, 1926, in New Ro chelle, N.Y., to her parents Edna H. Peck and Frederic C. Peck. Her father was chairman of Peck & Peck, a prominent women’s clothing concern based in NYC. and founded by her grandfather in 1890. When she was seven years old her family moved to Rye, N.Y., where she attended Rye Country Day School and learned to play tennis at the Manursing Island Club, a sport that she would enjoy into her 80s. In 1940 she enrolled as a boarder at the Miss Porter’s School in Farmington, Conn., from which she graduated in 1944. While at Farmington she was captain of the “Squirrels,” one of three intercampus sports teams, and established several lifelong friendships. Throughout her childhood she enjoyed summer trips with her family to the Adirondack League Club, situated on Little Moose Lake in Old Forge, N.Y. Upon graduating f rom Miss Porter’s, Judy joined her parents in their NYC. apartment at 485 Park Avenue. After attending the Barmore Secretarial School she first worked at Vogue

Magazine and then at Junior Bazaar Magazine, where she was secretary to the editor. She was on a blind date when she met the love of her life, Harold B. Erdman, whom she married on September 25, 1948. Judy and Hal lived in NYC, Greenwich, Conn., and Phoenix, A r i z. b efore s et t li ng i n Hal’s hometown of Princeton. While bringing up four children in Princeton and summering with her family in Martha’s Vineyard, Judy brought joy to ever yone she knew. She was warm and friendly, bright and shiny, graceful and poised, and had a wonderful ability to see the positive in everyone. Judy had joyous times in Princeton with her family and many close friends. Between school, ice hockey, ballet, and playdates, she found time to take her four young children to see the Beatles at Shea Stadium in 1965, an experience none of them would ever forget. In Princeton, she was a member of the Nassau Presbyterian Church, the Pretty Brook Tennis Club, the Springdale Golf Club, the Contemporary Garden Club of Princeton, the Present Day Club, and the Nassau Club. In Martha’s Vineyard, she was a member of the Edgartown Yacht Club, the Chappaquiddick Beach Club, a n d Cr ack at u xe t, where she swam in the surf with her grandchildren. Judy was pre-deceased by her twin older sisters, Anne Cumpston and Jane Halsell, and her loving husband of 65 years, Harold B. Erdman. She is survived by her four children, Guy Erdman, Fred (and Cindy) Erdman, Jody Erdman, and Carl (and Debra) Erdman; nine grandchildren; two great-grandsons; four brothers-in-law; and 18 nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Miss Porter’s School, 60 Main St re e t, Far m i ng ton, C T 06032 and the Princeton Area Community Foundation, 15 Princess Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648. A celebration of her life will be

held on September 22nd was donated to Thomas Jefat the Nassau Presbyterian ferson University School of Church in Princeton, NJ. Medicine in Philadelphia. The family asked that any memorial gifts be sent to Pennswood Village, 1382 Newtown-Langhorn Road, Newtown, PA 18940.

condolences may be shared at (www.stephensfuneral. com). A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to The Allentown Rescue Mission (www.allentownrescuemission.org).

Brenda Mary Davies On Saturday, December 2nd 2017, former Princeton resident Brenda Mary Davies celebrated her 100th birthday on November 26, 2017, with 20 friends and family at Pennswood Village retirement community in Newtown, Pa. Brenda, née Deakin, born in Birmingham, England, in 1917, received a centenarian congratulation letter from Buckingham Palace with a photograph and the signature of Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II. Brenda’s three children — Christine, Hugh, and Philip — accompanied by three of her grandchildren and two nieces who flew over from England for the occasion, led the toasts and birthday salutations. Brenda Mar y Dav ies passed away peacefully on May 10th. Her former husband, Horton Marlais Davies, had passed on May 11, 2005. The couple had em ig rated f rom O xford, England in January 1956, when Horton had accepted a professorship in the Depar tment of Religion at Princeton University where he taught until his retirement in 1984. The couple divorced in 1972. Brenda, a graduate of Froebel training in England, taught kindergarten for several years at the former Miss Mason’s School on Bayard Lane, Princeton. According to her wishes, her body

Richard Lee Landauer Ann Puffer McGoldrick September 30, 1962 — June 10, 2018 Richard Lee Landauer, age 55, passed away in Allentown on June 10, 2018. Richard grew up in Princeton, and was the son of the late Harry Lee Landauer and Sallie Warren Landauer. He was also predeceased by brothers, Keith Landauer and Mark Landauer. Richard graduated from Princeton High School, and was a talented carpenter. Richard had a very kind and generous heart, would help anyone in need, and was always a faithful friend. Richard loved the beach, salt and fresh water fishing, and rock and roll. He especially loved his family, and relished family get-togethers and holiday dinners. He was most proud of his two sons, Evan Landauer, of West Virginia, and Keith Landauer, currently serving in the Air Force. Aside from his sons, Richard is survived by his sister and brotherin-law, Susan and Joseph Cimerola, of Allentown; his brother, Allen Lee Smith, of Cherokee, N.C.; and several aunts, cousins, nieces, and nephews. Arrangements are under the direction of Stephens Funeral Home, Inc., Allentown, Pa. Memories and

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Ann Puffer McGoldrick, a resident of Princeton for 51 years, died suddenly on May 23rd at the age of 75. Ann was born in Boston to Charlotte Chapman Puffer and Robert W. Puffer, Jr. She grew up in Wellesley, Massachusetts where she attended the Dana Hall School. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from Vassar College in 1965, writing her senior thesis on the Israeli-Palestine conflict. In 1966, at age 23, she married her beloved John L. McGoldrick. Together, t hey were a for m idable team. They moved to Princeton, where they lived for the remainder of her life. Early on, she worked for the Educational Testing Service, where, among other things, she was instr umental in developing the GRE exam. Ann’s contributions to the Princeton community were deep and broad, and demonstrated her passion for social and political issues, and especially later in her life, to the arts. Ann was elected to the Board of Education for the Princeton Public Schools for 12 years, and served as President for a number of years. She was deeply committed to the students of Princeton

and cared particularly about issues of equity. She served on the Princeton Borough Zoning Board for 17 years, and was involved with The Crisis Ministry (now Arm In Arm), which helps secure basic needs of food and housing to residents of Mercer County. A Friend of the Institute for Advanced Study since 1999, she served on its E xecutive Commit tee from 2001 to 2006. More recently, she was a valued member of the Institutional Review Board of Princeton University. Her sharp mind, no-nonsense manner, and willingness to speak up on issues she cared about made her an invaluable asset to these organizations. Ann was, in all things, a “do-er”, a practical person who got things done, and who valued that quality in others. Ann was a strong advocate for the arts, and had a special passion for choral music. She provided volunteer support to the choirs at Trinity Church, and served on the board of Young Audiences of New Jersey. One of the great joys of her life was The Princeton Singers, the extraordinary singing group, with whom she was involved for 35 years. As Chair of The Princeton Singers Board, she worked tirelessly to support and foster the group, whose music brought her tremendous happiness. Above all else, Ann was a devoted w ife, mother, grandmother, sister, and f r iend. She was steady, kind, and generous, and was humble beyond measure, always thinking about what she could do for others and wishing to keep herself out of the spotlight. Those who loved her always had a staunch and loving ally. She was an expert chef, a whiz at the New York Times crossword puzzle, a voracious consumer of political news, and a strong advocate who possessed a rare gentleness and grace. She was a suppor ter of Democratic causes, except when she saw special talent and wisdom on the other side. She was genuinely and fiercely egalitarian, with no exceptions. She deeply loved the summers she spent with family and friends on Cape Cod since 1966, and was rejuvenated each year by the natural beauty and solace she found there. Her absence will be acutely felt on the beaches of Wellfleet this summer, and every summer to come. Ann is survived by John, her husband of 51 years; son Scott McGoldrick and his wife Linda Noel, of Princeton; daughter Jennifer Solomon and her husband Josh Solomon, of Needham, Massachusetts; grandchildren Olivia and Julia McGoldrick, and Sam and Nathaniel Solomon, all the apples of her eye; brother Robert W. Puffer, III and his wife Jane Puffer of Acton, Massachusetts; and countless friends. A memorial service in her honor will be held on Saturday, June 16 at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, beginning at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Arm In Arm (www. arminarm.org, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton) or The Princeton Singers (w w w. princetonsingers.org, P.O. Box 344, Princeton).


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Ann Hochschild Poole Ann “Rooney” Hochschild Poole, 93, died peacefully on June 5, 2018 in her home at Stonebridge, in Skillman, N.J. She was born August 29, 1924 in New York City the eldest child of Walter Hochschild and Kathrin Samstag. She attended The Brearley School, New York, N.Y., was graduated cum laude from Vassar College in 1946, and earned a master’s degree in counseling from Rider University in 1983. In 1947 she married Richard G. Poole Sr. of Lake Forest, Ill., with whom she raised four children in Clinton, N.Y. before mov ing abroad to France in 1964. They returned in 1966 to Princeton, N.J. After receiving her master’s degree she worked at several agencies in the Princeton area, including the Counseling Center at Rider University. Together with her daughter she created and led workshops on mother-daughter relationships, which she conducted at the Princeton YMCA/YWCA. She served on the board of Family and Children’s Services of Central New Jersey, volunteered at the Lewis School and the Princeton Hospital, and was active in the Home Friends Program of the Princeton Senior Resource Center. A lover of music and the performing arts, she acted in a number of amateur musical theater performances in upstate New York and performed with PJ&B Productions in Princeton, N.J. She was a lifelong patron of New York’s theaters and regularly attended McCarter Theatre in Princeton until the time of her death. She is preceded in death by her husband, Richard G. Poole Sr.; and her two sisters, Patricia Hochschild Labalme (George Labalme Jr.) and Lynn Hochschild Boillot (Claude E. Boillot). She is survived by her three sons and one daughter, Richard G. Poole Jr. (Kathryn Gately) of DeKalb, Ill., Peter W. Poole (Kathleen Eickman) of Rochester, N.H., Kathrin W. Poole (Howard Tomlinson) of Princeton, N.J., and Walter H. Poole (Suvarnala Yelur i ) of Phnom Pen h, Cambodia; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Her cremated remains will be buried in Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y., in the Adirondack Park, where a private service will be held. A memorial service will be held in Princeton, N.J. at a later date to be announced. In lieu of flowers, gifts in her memory may be made to The Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts (PO Box 205, Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812; www.adirondackarts.org/ product/8DDF932/donation); and the Indian Lake Theater (PO Box 517, Indian Lake, NY 12842; www.indianlaketheater.org/supportus/).

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Otto Marcolini

Otto Marcolini, Princeton native, passed silently into history on Friday, March 30, 2018. Ot to was the o n l y s o n of L u c i a a n d Luigi of Princeton and had four sisters: Laura, Anna, Monica. Otto Marcolini was a selfmade man, interested in just about everything under the sun; a high school graduate who self-educated after entering the workforce. He worked in the trades and construction for 45 years and belonged to the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Local 5. He was a lifelong member in the AFL/CIO Bricklayers National Union, and worked on most of the major public and private buildings in Mercer County. They included many buildings at Princeton University, ETS, and BMS, Trenton State College, and the Princeton School projects. He was a regular around all of the local golf courses and enjoyed challenging people to match wits with his fantastic memory! Otto loved golf, as a former caddie and student of the game toting bags around golf clubs in the Princeton area. (For more informaton Google — L.A. Parker: Nobody knows Mercer County golf like Otto Marcolini.) He was a friend at Lawrenceville’s local farms and shops and was loved and will be missed by all. The Saturday morning Maidenhead Bagel Breakfast Club is not the same without him! His philosophies as he lived his life included bear no malice, be nice to his fellow man, do his share of the work, just give kindness, and forgiveness is less of a burden. The greatest advice he offered to those in other generations was to respect their elders’ advice and do not feel sorry for yourself and your situation, life can be cruel and any feeling of illness will pass, make the best effort you can every day. Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and Otto chased it ‘til the end! S ur v ive d by h is g re at nephew and his wife James and Kristen Steinmetz, Otto raised Jim as his own son and was instrumental in getting him through college. Otto was also stepfather to his former wife Angela’s son, Alfred. It is the wish of his family that a memorial graveside burial and service be held at St. Paul’s Cem eter y (216 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542 ), on June 29, his 94th birthday, at 10 a.m. In lieu of f lowe r s pl e a s e s e n d donations to St Paul’s school athletics via m heucke @ stpaulsofprinceton.org. Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Pr inceton, NJ 08542. (609) 924-0018.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 36

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finish, like new, $5,000. Call (609) • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 647-0092. TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: HOME, OFFICE, SCHOOL for & 06-13 • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 ads greater than 60 words in length. GETS TOP RESULTS! windhamstitches.com tf Saturday June 16th, 9-12. 455 Ewing BABYSITTING ASSISTANT Street, off Terhune Road, Princeton. 04-25-19 Whether it’s selling furniture, finding available. AVAILABLE: • 3household, weeks:PIANO: $40.00 • 4Model weeks: • 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates Antiques, bric-a-brac, Steinway L (6’0”). $50.00 LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING a lost pet, or having a garage sale, vintage toys, vintage kitchen, vintage Restored to excellent condition. Ideal M.A. Graduate Degree holder enESTATE LIQUIDATION & POWER WASHING: • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inchtirely• all bold face type: $10.00/week TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! linen, garden tools, fishing & tennis for professional available for long-term and/or musician or serious equipment, tools, lots of art, clothes, fan, some furniture, etc. Stop by for great bargains!! 06-13

NEIGHBORHOOD BLOCK SALE: Saturday June 16, 9am-1pm. Off River Road, Belle Mead: Wilshire, Ridgeview, Hoagland, Riveredge, Griggstown, Catskill. Look for balloons. Rain or shine. 06-13 ESTATE SALE: 10 Madison Street, Princeton. Friday June 15, 3pm-7pm & Sat-Sun, 8-5. Multigenerational home filled with antiques, pottery, furniture, vintage dresses, china sets, advertising, sewing machines/tables & so much more. One weekend only, don’t miss out! 06-13 PRINCETON YARD SALE: Saturday, June 16, 9:30-2:30, 204 South Harrison. Antiques, collectible boxes, violins, floral supplies/pots, garden, china, records, CDs, wicker, Talbots woman, books, bedding, craft kits, much more. 06-13 MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Dorann Avenue, Princeton. Saturday, June 16th, 8 am–2 pm. No rain date. 06-13 YARD SALE: Loads of toys, unused infant & toddler clothing & baby items. Adult clothing. Vocal, piano, opera scores/songbooks. Furniture. Household. Electronics, accessories. Books. Healthy garden perennials. Kettle drums. Xylophone. 50 Valley Road, Princeton. June 16 & 17 starting at 9 am. 06-13

student. Located in Hopewell Township. $7,000 asking price, call (609) 358-3634 for more information or appointment to audition. 06-13 HOUSE FOR RENT: with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. (609) 731-6904. 05-30-3t

PRINCETON-nice studio /apartment in town with private entrance, private bath, off-street parking. Low rent for tenant willing to provide a small amount of housekeeping in the house. May be suitable for someone employed with flexible hours or a retired person. Low rent with possibility of some income for tenant willing to provide some assistance to retired university professor. Reply by fax (609) 924-6934 or email vidodds@ aol.com 06-06-2t CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

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JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

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LAMBERTVILLE 609.397.1974 MONTGOMERY 908.874.0000 PENNINGTON 609.737.7765 PRINCETON 609.921.1050

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Please visit CallawayHenderson.com for personalized driving directions to all of our public open houses being held this weekend. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

HAGEMAN LANE • PRINCETON Norman T Callaway, Jr $3,300,000 C allawayHenderson.com/id/1000864482


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 38

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18

YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! (609) 924-2200 ext 10

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Saturday June 16th, 9-12. 455 Ewing Street, off Terhune Road, Princeton. Antiques, bric-a-brac, household, vintage toys, vintage kitchen, vintage linen, garden tools, fishing & tennis equipment, tools, lots of art, clothes, fan, some furniture, etc. Stop by for great bargains!! 06-13 NEIGHBORHOOD BLOCK SALE: Saturday June 16, 9am-1pm. Off River Road, Belle Mead: Wilshire, Ridgeview, Hoagland, Riveredge, Griggstown, Catskill. Look for balloons. Rain or shine. 06-13 ESTATE SALE: 10 Madison Street, Princeton. Friday June 15, 3pm-7pm & Sat-Sun, 8-5. Multigenerational home filled with antiques, pottery, furniture, vintage dresses, china sets, advertising, sewing machines/tables & so much more. One weekend only, don’t miss out! 06-13

PRINCETON YARD SALE: Saturday, June 16, 9:30-2:30, 204 South Harrison. Antiques, collectible boxes, violins, floral supplies/pots, garden, china, records, CDs, wicker, Talbots woman, books, bedding, craft kits, much more. 06-13

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE RENTALS:

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Dorann Avenue, Princeton. Saturday, June 16th, 8 am–2 pm. No rain date. 06-13

Princeton Studio– $1,500/mo. 1 bath, full kitchen, heat, hot water, 1 parking space included in rent. Available 9/8/18.

YARD SALE: Loads of toys, unused infant & toddler clothing & baby items. Adult clothing. Vocal, piano, opera scores/songbooks. Furniture. Household. Electronics, accessories. Books. Healthy garden perennials. Kettle drums. Xylophone. 50 Valley Road, Princeton. June 16 & 17 starting at 9 am. 06-13

Princeton Office – $1,600/mo. 2nd floor OFFICE with parking. Vacant: Available now.

2007 BMW 3 SERIES for sale. Automatic, black, in good shape, 1 owner, 150,000 miles, asking $4,000. Please call Philip (609) 921-6176. 06-13 PIANO FOR SALE: Boston piano by Steinway. Upright, black satin finish, like new, $5,000. Call (609) 647-0092. 06-13 PIANO: Steinway Model L (6’0”). Restored to excellent condition. Ideal for professional musician or serious student. Located in Hopewell Township. $7,000 asking price, call (609) 358-3634 for more information or appointment to audition. 06-13

Princeton Apt. – $1,700/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, dining area, kitchen. Available now. Princeton – $1,700/mo. 2nd floor apt. 1 BR, 1 bath LR w/ adjacent enclosed porch. Available 7/15/18. Princeton – $1,800/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath, LR, kitchen. Includes 1 parking space. NO PETS. NO SMOKING. MAXIMUM OCCUPANCY 1 PERSON. Available 9/8/18. Princeton – $2,100/mo. 2 BR, 2 bath, LR, DR, eat-in kitchen. Washer/dryer in basement. Available 9/8/18. Princeton Office – $2,200/mo. 5-room OFFICE with powder room. Front-to-back on 1st floor. Available now. Princeton – $3,900/mo. Contemporary Ranch, 3 BR, 2 baths. Available 8/1/18.

We have customers waiting for houses! STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

THE PRICE IS RIGHT: WHEN TO LOWER YOUR ASKING PRICE If you’ve just put your home on the market, there’s one topic neither you nor your agent wants to think about (yet): Lowering your price. After all, you have a lot invested in your home, financially and emotionally. But as unpalatable as it may seem to drop your price, it’s often a very smart move that can help you sell your home faster - and in some cases, it may even start a bidding war. Ideally, you want to lower your price just once to avoid looking “desperate” to sell. So that means the new price has to be spot on. With the right price, your home may attract several interested buyers, all eager to bid up the price so they can snap up that bargain before it gets away. How do you know when it's time to lower the price? Ask your agent. They spend all day watching market fluctuations, gauging buyer interest, looking at comparable properties and evaluating other variables that are influencing home prices in your neighborhood. Trust their advice. Remember - they work for you, and they truly have your best interests at heart.

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at:

HOUSE FOR RENT: with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. (609) 731-6904. 05-30-3t PRINCETON-nice studio /apartment in town with private entrance, private bath, off-street parking. Low rent for tenant willing to provide a small amount of housekeeping in the house. May be suitable for someone employed with flexible hours or a retired person. Low rent with possibility of some income for tenant willing to provide some assistance to retired university professor. Reply by fax (609) 924-6934 or email vidodds@ aol.com 06-06-2t CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PIED-Á-TERRE IN PARIS available for one year starting September 1st. $2000/mo. Fully furnished-600 sq. feet. Contact salvagnac@yahoo.fr 06-06-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Live-in or out. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 06-06-3t 4 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,090 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 05-16-6t

http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 Chambers Street Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. Stockton, Broker-Owner

TOWN TOPICS is

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters

printed

· Brochures

entirely

· Postcards

on recycled 609-921-1900 ● 609-577-2989 (cell) ● info@BeatriceBloom.com ● BeatriceBloom.com Facebook.com/PrincetonNJRealEstate ● twitter.com/PrincetonHome ● BlogPrincetonHome.com

paper.

· Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

THE SPRING MARKET HAS BEEN EXCEPTIONALLY BRISK FOR STOCKTON REAL ESTATE AND OUR CLIENTS. This year we have listed and sold properties almost immediately. Give us a call so that we can assist you in buying or selling quickly and profitably. Buying, selling, renting, or property management we are a full service real estate office for all your real estate needs. Let Stockton Real Estate, LLC help you. www.stockton-realtor.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

A Fresh Take on Consignment “I Can’t Believe it’s Consignment” Pieces Curated with New, Custom Furniture from C.R. Laine, Wesley Hall & Harden

AS YOUR

FAVORITE ‘FURNITURE STORE’ ON

1225 State Road (Rt.206), Princeton, NJ 08540 (find us in the shopping center that is home to Princeton Fitness & Wellness)

Open Tuesday-Saturday: 10am-6pm

www.elephantintheroomdesign.com

609.454.3378


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 40

OPEN HOUSE, Saturday, June 16th, 1:00-4:00 PM 2 Glenbrook Court, Lawrenceville, NJ

The Essence of Elegant Simplicity Lawrence Township - Capturing the golden sunshine afforded by its corner lot, this distinctive Lawrenceville residence impresses with its understated elegance, long list of premium updates and sophisticated centerpiece: a custom Spyglass Design kitchen with heated limestone floor. Custom front doors open onto the large foyer with its parquet floor, wainscoting and Baldwin hardware that can be found throughout. Showcasing Marvin windows and a wonderful entertaining flow are refined living and dining rooms and a fireside family room with fine built-ins. The spectacular gourmet kitchen is a chef’s dream. It features a center island, walnut counters and high-end appliances that include a Wolf range, wine cooler and Sub Zero paneled fridge. A matching built-in buffet provides the perfect display surface for brunch or blooms. Steps away are a laundry room, powder room and an office that can double as a guest room. A heated marble floor adds luxury to a renovated 2nd floor hall bath serving three secondary bedrooms, two of which have built-ins and share a room-size closet. The expansive master suite invites relaxation with hardwood flooring, skylit bath and organized walk-in. Exercise or play in the partially finished basement. Spend sunny days in the professionally landscaped, fenced backyard – a private haven with an expansive patio, cast iron English gate and lush specimen plantings. Close to charming downtown Lawrenceville and just minutes to Princeton. 4/5 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths. Offered at $659,000

Martha “Jane” Weber Sales Associate 609.921.1050 office 609.462.1563 cell janeweber@callawayhenderson.com Search for homes at www.MarthaJaneWeber.com Home seller has shared ownership in the Town Topics.

4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.


41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018 • 42

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Contact Liz: (609) 5140514; ez@zuckfish.com 05-23-12t HOME, OFFICE, SCHOOL & BABYSITTING ASSISTANT AVAILABLE: M.A. Graduate Degree holder entirely available for long-term and/or shorter term assistance, babysitting & office & academic support (ages 5 & older) in Princeton & the surrounding areas. Extensive experience with family & home, office organization & drives own 5-star safety rating car for errands & own transportation. Resume & references available. Please call Annie: (609) 414-2835. 05-30-6t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 873-3168. 05-30-9t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 06-06-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 06-06-4t HOUSE CLEANING: By an experienced Polish lady. Call Barbara (609) 273-4226. Weekly or biweekly. Honest & reliable. References available. 06-13-5t HOUSECLEANING/ HOUSEKEEPING: Professional cleaning service. Experienced, references, honest & responsible. Reasonable price. Call Ursula (609) 635-7054 for free estimate. 06-13-6t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS!

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 05-16/08-01 THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 04-11/06-27 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS

Pillows, cushions, table linens,

YARD SALE +

Fabrics and hardware.

TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654

= GREAT WEEKEND!

windhamstitches.com

Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

04-25-19

(609) 924-2200 ext 10

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18 TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

(908) 359-8131 tf

Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-16-19

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Saturday June 16th, 9-12. 455 Ewing Street, off Terhune Road, Princeton. Antiques, bric-a-brac, household, vintage toys, vintage kitchen, vintage linen, garden tools, fishing & tennis equipment, tools, lots of art, clothes, fan, some furniture, etc. Stop by for great bargains!! 06-13 NEIGHBORHOOD BLOCK SALE: Saturday June 16, 9am-1pm. Off River Road, Belle Mead: Wilshire, Ridgeview, Hoagland, Riveredge, Griggstown, Catskill. Look for balloons. Rain or shine. 06-13 ESTATE SALE: 10 Madison Street, Princeton. Friday June 15, 3pm-7pm & Sat-Sun, 8-5. Multigenerational home filled with antiques, pottery, furniture, vintage dresses, china sets, advertising, sewing machines/tables & so much more. One weekend only, don’t miss out! 06-13 PRINCETON YARD SALE: Saturday, June 16, 9:30-2:30, 204 South Harrison. Antiques, collectible boxes, violins, floral supplies/pots, garden, china, records, CDs, wicker, Talbots woman, books, bedding, craft kits, much more. 06-13 MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Dorann Avenue, Princeton. Saturday, June 16th, 8 am–2 pm. No rain date. 06-13

Belle Mead Garage

Ask for Chris

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs

A Gift Subscription!

window treatments, and bedding.

WE BUY CARS

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN?

We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

Custom fitted.

Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go!

tf

MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18

YARD SALE: Loads of toys, unused infant & toddler clothing & baby items. Adult clothing. Vocal, piano, opera scores/songbooks. Furniture. Household. Electronics, accessories. Books. Healthy garden perennials. Kettle drums. Xylophone. 50 Valley Road, Princeton. June 16 & 17 starting at 9 am. 06-13 2007 BMW 3 SERIES for sale. Automatic, black, in good shape, 1 owner, 150,000 miles, asking $4,000. Please call Philip (609) 921-6176. 06-13 PIANO FOR SALE: Boston piano by Steinway. Upright, black satin finish, like new, $5,000. Call (609) 647-0092. 06-13

PIANO: Steinway Model L (6’0”). Restored to excellent condition. Ideal for professional musician or serious student. Located in Hopewell Township. $7,000 asking price, call (609) 358-3634 for more information or appointment to audition. 06-13 HOUSE FOR RENT: with Princeton address. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. (609) 731-6904. 05-30-3t PRINCETON-nice studio /apartment in town with private entrance, private bath, off-street parking. Low rent for tenant willing to provide a small amount of housekeeping in the house. May be suitable for someone employed with flexible hours or a retired person. Low rent with possibility of some income for tenant willing to provide some assistance to retired university professor. Reply by fax (609) 924-6934 or email vidodds@ aol.com 06-06-2t CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area COOK/HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for elderly couple. 3-5 years experience necessary, references preferable. Live-in an option. (609) 921-7218. 06-06-2t

COVANCE INC. SEEKS SENIOR STATISTICAL PROGRAMMER: PRINCETON, NJ. Dev. SAS programs for SDTM, ADaM, client-defined analysis datasets, Patient Profiles, Tables, Listings & Graphs in support of Statistical Analysis Plan, posters, manuscripts, Integrated of Summary of Safety (ISS) & Integrated Summary of Efficacy (ISE). Provide technical planning to include overseeing set-up of key macros & SAS programs. Work on complex problems where analysis of situations or data requires an evaluation of intangible variables; development of technical solutions to abstract problems which require the use of ingenuity & creativity. Review draft & final production runs for project to ensure quality & consistency. Represent Statistical Programming during client audits ensuring study documentation is maintained & filed according to processes. Position is 100% remote, Applicant can work from home. Must possess at least master’s or equiv. in CS, Life Science, Mathematical, Statistical or rltd fld & at least 3 yrs of work exp. in SAS programming. In the alternative, must possess at least a bachelor’s or its equiv. in CS, Life Science, Mathematical, Statistical or rltd fld & at least 5 yrs of progressive work exp. in SAS programming would be acceptable. Must possess at least 3 yrs of exp. w: programming NONMEM & PK merge files; creating, interpreting & annotating OpenCDISC (Pinnacle-21) Validator reports; therapeutic area of Genetic Disease; & therapeutic area of Neurology. Must possess at least 2 years of exp. creating Study Data Reviewer Guide; at least 1 yr of exp. creating define xml file; & at least 1 yr of exp. in therapeutic area of oncology. Resume to resumes@covance.com 06-13-18

Part-time Program Facilitator Corner House, Princeton With a maximum of 6 hours per week Salary Range: $25.00 · To oversee all aspects of a Corner House student leadership team (Ex. Student Board, GAIA, TAG) that serve local high school students. · Coordinate recruitment of high school students including interview, application and selection process. · Lead and facilitate weekly team meetings including team building, training students and designing workshops. · Establish and maintain relationships with area public and private schools for provision of workshops.

For more information and to apply online at: http://www.princetonnj.gov/employment.html Open until filled.

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf PIED-Á-TERRE IN PARIS available for one year starting September 1st. $2000/mo. Fully furnished-600 sq. feet. Contact salvagnac@yahoo.fr 06-06-3t HOME HEALTH AIDE/ COMPANION AVAILABLE: NJ certified with 20 years experience. Live-in or out. Valid drivers license & references. Looking for employment, also available night shift. Experienced with disabled & elderly. Please call Inez, (609) 227-9873. 06-06-3t 4 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $2,090 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 05-16-6t

Featuring gifts that are distinctly Princeton

SELL YOUR HOME NOW • WE PAY CASH

• NO HOMEOWNER INSPECTION

• WE PAY TOP DOLLAR

• NO REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS

• WE BUY HOMES IN ANY CONDITION

• NO HIDDEN COSTS

• WE BUY VACANT LAND

• NO HASSLE

• QUICK AND EASY CLOSING

• FREE NO OBLIGATION QUOTE

Phone 609-430-3080

www.heritagehomesprinceton.com igorbar2000@gmail.com Igor L. Barsky, Lawrence Barsky

www.princetonmagazinestore.com


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43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2018

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PRINCETON $1,630,000 This spacious home makes a dramatic statement on many levels. Features include two stone fireplaces and a two-story family room with floor-to-ceiling windows. The kitchen is highlighted by a center island with Quartz countertops, breakfast area and views of the patio and back yard. Five bedrooms include two sets of two bedrooms with shared bath. The master bedroom has a sitting room, walk-in closet and bathroom with raised tub. The finished basement includes a mini kitchenette and full bath. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW PRICE

MONTGOMERY WOODS TOWNHOME MONTGOMERY TWP. $359,000 Meticulous upgrades make this townhome the new benchmark for makeovers in Montgomery Woods! Offers value, convenience & luxury. Near downtown Princeton, commuting roads and rails. Denise Varga 609-439-3605 (cell)

PENNINGTON $479,900 Best location in Wellington Manor with all day Sunny exposure bordered by Green acres on three sides with forever views. Home offers 3 BRs, 2 full BAs and open floor plan. Michael Mayo 713-449-6498 (cell)

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

PRINCETON $925,000 Located in Riverside. Features include 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, large, bright living spaces, renovated kitchen and a large bonus office space off of the master bedroom. Ingela Kostenbader 609-902-5302 (cell)

PRINCETON $780,000 Bi-level on gorgeous Littlebrook property ready for the next owner to update. Open living/dining room combination with hardwood floors and custom built-in bookcases. Kitchen overlooks back yard. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

R E A L T O R S

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CB Princeton Town Topics 6.13.18.qxp_CB Previews 6/12/18 11:56 AM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

Princeton | 4 / 3.5 | $2,475,000 551 Lake Drive

Princeton | 5 / 4.5 | $1,350,000 175 Arreton Road

Princeton | 5 / 4.5 | $1,345,000 430 Nassau Street

Carina Dowell Search MLS 1000217266 on CBHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann and Hua “Henry” Yang Search MLS 1000449652 on CBHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann Search MLS 1000263902 on CBHomes.com

NEW LISTING • BROKERS OPEN TODAY 11 – 1

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

Princeton | 4 / 3.5 | $1,295,000 9 Fairway Drive

West Windsor Twp | 5 / 4 | $910,000 3 Colt Circle

West Windsor Twp | 5 / 4 | $825,000 67 Danville Drive

Heidi A. Hartmann Search MLS 1001813214 on CBHomes.com

Catherine O’Connell Search MLS 1000455372 on CBHomes.com

Donna Reilly & Ellen Calman Search MLS 1000723256 on CBHomes.com

NEWLY PRICED

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

Hamilton Twp | 4 / 3.5 | $799,900 125 Merrick Road

Princeton | 4 / 2.5 | $735,000 17 Rocky Hill Road

Lawrence Twp | 3 / 2 | $389,900 488 Drexel Avenue

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1000362048 on CBHomes.com

Charles Watkins Search MLS 1001767734 on CBHomes.com

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1001767526 on CBHomes.com

COLDWELLBANKERHOMES.COM/PRINCETON Princeton Office 10 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1411 Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. All associates featured are licensed with NJ Department of State as a Broker or Salesperson. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper June 13, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper June 13, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group