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Volume LXXII, Number 15

“Trolleys, Trains, and Transit” at PPL . . . . . . . 5 PU Engineering and Arts Symposium . . . . . . . . . 7 Once Upon a Time in Memphis . . . . . . . . . . 16 PU Men’s Lax Tops Stony Brook to End Skid . . . 32 Incoming PU Freshman Crane Rows Across Atlantic . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Jake Bennett Helps PDS Boys’ Lax Defeat Lawrenceville . . . . . . . 35 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .22, 23

www.towntopics.com

Princeton Schools Explore Reform Efforts for Discipline, Conflict Prevention, Equity

Inequity in school punishment and persistently high rates of suspension and expulsion for students of color and students with special needs have been a problem at many schools across the country and a controversial issue locally, including a complaint filed with the Princeton Civil Rights Commission just last January. Rutgers University Psychology Professor Anne Gregory, a national expert on the subject of restorative justice, equity in school discipline, and community-building will speak to a gathering Thursday, April 12 at 7 p.m. in the John Witherspoon Middle School (JWMS) auditorium. In a presentation co-sponsored by Princeton Public Schools, Princeton Special Ed PTO, Princeton High School PTO, JWMS PTO, Committed & Faithful Princetonians, Not in Our Town Princeton, Princeton Civil Rights Commission, Princeton Youth Advisory Committee, and Minority Student Achievement network, Gregory will discuss reform efforts in school discipline and programming to prevent conflict and intervene constructively once conflict has occurred. Gregory has focused her research on Continued on Page 10

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Surveillance Footage Shows Troopers Shot Mielentz in Panera The New Jersey Attorney General’s office released footage Monday related to the March 20 shooting incident at the Panera Bread restaurant on Nassau Street. The video shows state troopers firing the shots that killed Scott L. Mielentz, the 56-year-old Lawrenceville man who entered the eatery that morning, wielding a BB pistol. “The shooting remains under investigation by the Attorney General’s Shooting Response Team (SRT),” reads a statement from the office. “However, certain records were released today in response to formal requests under the New Jersey Open Public Records Act and common law.” The records include footage from Panera’s surveillance system, 911 recordings, Computer-Aided Dispatch (CAD) reports, and information about the weapons involved. The video is posted online at http://bit.ly/2JvGpUk. On the tape, a man calls the Princeton Police Department at 10:28 a.m. saying, “There’s a guy with a gun at Panera.” Law enforcement officers from the local police department, the New Jersey State Police, and the FBI responded and attempted to negotiate with Mielentz for nearly five

hours. But he continued to hold the black pistol in his hand. In the video from Panera’s surveillance system, Mielentz pointed the pistol at officers. Two members of the State Police Technical Emergency and Mission Specialists (TEAMS) Unit, armed with M4 rifles, fired at him, striking him in the head and upper torso. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The weapon Mielentz was holding was later determined to be a black Crosman PFM BB pistol.

Mielentz was a former IT worker who is said to have suffered from medical, psychological, and financial problems. His motive in entering the restaurant with a gun has not been disclosed, but Princeton Police Chief Nick Sutter said after the incident that Mielentz was “a person in crisis.” After he entered the restaurant, which has since reopened, customers and staff were able to flee the building through a back door. Police secured the perimeter during the standoff, which lasted until just before 3 p.m. Continued on Page 8

Council Approves Budget for 2018, Hears Comments on Affordable Housing Princeton Council voted to adopt the $65 million budget for 2018 at its meeting on Monday night, April 9, first approving an amendment that would increase the use of surplus funds by $1 million. Of that $1 million, $626,000 is to pay down debt that was authorized in 2018. The remaining $372,000 reduces the tax levy, with no increase from last year to this year. Following the unanimous vote, Mayor Liz Lempert thanked members of the municipal staff and the Citizens Finance Advisory Committee (CFAC) for their work.

“Everybody always wants to put together a budget with no tax increase,” she said. “It’s easy to do that. It’s harder to put one together that’s responsible, and this is a responsible budget this year.” During the public comment period of the meeting, three residents urged Council to include the public in plans for how it is going to meet a court-ordered affordable housing requirement of 753 units. The town must submit its plans to the court by June 22. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Mary C. Jacobson ruled last month on Princeton’s requirement, also setting Continued on Page 10

Books . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 30 Cinema . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Classified Ads . . . . . . 40 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Music/Theater . . . . . . 24 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 39 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

IS IT SPRING YET?: Shoppers were bundled up as they strolled through Palmer Square on Sunday. Warmer weather is predicted for later this week. Downtown Princeton merchants discuss spring trends in this week’s Town Talk on page 6. (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

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UPCOMING HEALTH PROGRAMS Unless otherwise noted, call 609.394.4153 or visit capitalhealth.org/events to sign up for the following programs. HAVE YOU HAD THE CONVERSATION? Monday, April 16, 2018 | 6 – 8 p.m. Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center The New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute and Capital Health are sponsoring a community film screening and panel discussion on “Anna’s Story” to highlight the importance of discussing your end-of-life wishes with friends, family, and your doctors. Join us for a film screening of the short film “Anna’s Story” and a panel discussion to follow. Refreshments will be served.

FAMILY & FRIENDS CPR TRAINING Monday, April 30, 2018 | 6 – 8 p.m. TEAM 85 Sign up for this free class offered by the Capital Health Community Health Education and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) departments. Participants will be taught how to perform CPR on adults, children, and infants, and how to help people who are choking. This course is designed for family members, friends and members of the general community who want to learn CPR but do not need a completion card.

AARP SMART DRIVER COURSE Thursday, April 19, 2018 | 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Capital Health – Hamilton The AARP Smart Driver course teaches valuable defensive driving strategies and provides a refresher of the rules of the road. You must be 18 years of age or older and have a valid driver’s license to attend this course. Upon completion, you will receive a certificate to send to your insurance company (ask your auto insurance agent for details).

TALKING BACK: DISC REPLACEMENT VERSUS FUSION — A Conversation About the Latest Advances in Spine Surgery Tuesday, May 1, 2018 | 6 p.m Capital Health Medical Center – Hopewell NJ PURE Conference Center When physical therapy, medication, or injections aren’t easing your chronic back pain, surgery might be your best route to relief. And if you’re experiencing symptoms like decreased balance, difficulty walking, reduced fine motor skills in the hands, and problems with urination, they may be signs of a more serious condition that could be improved through surgery. Join DR. I. DAVID KAYE, board certified spine surgeon from Rothman Institute, to get a better understanding of your symptoms, learn about the latest advances in spine surgery, and receive guidance on which option may be right for you.

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Success of Pop-up Store Leads Miya Inc. to Sign Lease

Miya Table & Home has opened at 41 Palmer Square Princeton’s Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946 West. The Japanese retailer DONALD C. STUART, 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE, 1946-1973 Founding Editors/Publishers had operated a pop-up store during the holiday season, and DONALD C. STUART III, Editor/Publisher, 1981-2001 decided to extend its stay. LYNN ADAMS SMITH LYNN ADAMS SMITH, Editor-in-Chief “It is our honor to announce Publisher BILL ALDEN, Sports Editor that we will continue our retail ANNE LEVIN, Staff Writer ROBIN BROOMER journey with Miya, Inc. Miya, DONALD gILpIN, Staff Writer Advertising Director who originally signed on as FRANK WOJCIECHOWSKI, MELISSA BILYEU a holiday pop-up store, is a CHARLES R. pLOHN, ERICA M. CARDENAS Office Manager seamless fit for the Square. photographers JENNIFER COVILL Our missions align to offer STUART MITCHNER, LAURIE pELLICHERO, NANCY pLUM, Account Manager the community an upscale, JEAN STRATTON, KAM WILLIAMS, TAYLOR SMITH, WILLIAM UHL unique, modern, timeless CHARLES R. pLOHN Contributing Editors Account Manager and distinguished product USpS #635-500, published Weekly that Princeton never knew ERIN TOTO Subscription Rates: $51/yr (princeton area); $55/yr (NJ, NY & pA); $58/yr (all other areas) Account Manager Single Issues $5.00 First Class Mail per copy; 75¢ at newsstands was missing,” said Lori RaFor additional information, please write or call: bon, vice president of Palmer MONICA SANKEY Witherspoon Media Group Account Manager Square. 4438 Route 27, P.O. Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528 tel: 609-924-2200 www.towntopics.com fax: 609-924-8818 Named after founder ChoJOANN CELLA (ISSN 0191-7056) Account Manager suke Miyahira, Miya began as periodicals postage paid in princeton, NJ USpS #635-500 a small flower shop in New gINA HOOKEY postmaster, please send address changes to: p.O. Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528 Classified Ad Manager York City in the 1930s. Now in its third generation, the business is currently led by Bob Matsukawa, Miyahira’s grand-nephew and Matsukawa’s son. Over the years, the product selection has changed but the mission has remained the same: Bring the best of Japan home. Miya products can be found in retail stores, online sites, and restaurants around the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and beyond, but this retail shop in Princeton is the first time such an extensive range of Miya’s offerings is available directly to the public in one place. Miya Table & Home at Palmer Square features a variety of products made in, or inspired by, Japan. Primarily, a tableware shop, Miya Table & Home, also offers textiles, SHOWCASING STEM: New Jersey’s first-ever STEM Month was celebrated March 26 with a STEM stationery, and a few popular Fair at the State House in Trenton. The event presented 17 organizations from across the state. Japanese snacks. Visit www. Among those in attendance was Senator Teresa Ruiz, shown here with Association for Women miyacompany.com for more in Science student presenters Lalith Krishna Ashok, Udgita Pamidigantam, and Sieya Sadu. information.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Princeton Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting: Wednesday, April 11, 7 p.m. in the Conference Room, second floor. 65 Witherspoon Street. Neighborhood Zoning Initiative Public Meeting: Wednesday, April 11, 7-9 p.m. at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. The public is invited to attend this presentation addressing the impacts of development on Princeton’s traditional character, and provide feedback. Topics will include lot coverage, height, massing, floor area ratio, grading, landscaping, and more. Climate Change Discussion: Sustainable Princeton hosts an interactive discussion on Wednesday, April 11, 7 p.m., in the Community Room of the Municipal Building, 400 Witherspoon Street. Free, sustainableprinceton.org. PCDO Meeting: Sunday, April 15 at 7 p.m., the Princeton Community Democratic Organization meets at Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street. “The Dope on Marijuana Legislation” is the topic. www.princetondems.org. One Table Cafe: Friday, April 20, 6:30 p.m., at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, One Table Cafe invites guests to “pay what you will” at a dinner provided by Olives; guest speaker is Joyce Campbell, executive director of Trenton Area Soup Kitchen. Call (609) 2167770 to reserve. Summer Youth Employment: Princeton Human Services invites applications for the annual program for Princeton youth, ages 14-18, to work in municipal departments and local non-profits. Work 25 hours/week and earn minimum wage for eight weeks. Visit prince tonnj.gov/humanservices.html. Citizenship Preparation Classes: Wednesdays 7-8:30 p.m. at Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, the Latin American Task Force offers free classes to prepare immigrants for naturalization interviews to become a U.S. citizen. Classes are given for eight weeks in April and May. For more information, call (609) 9249529 ext. 220. National Prescription Take Back Day: Saturday, April 28, Mercer residents can dispose of unused and expired prescription drugs at the County Administration Building, 640 South Broad Street, Trenton, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. No needles or liquid solutions accepted. (609) 989-6111. College Scholarship Opportunities: Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Mercer County offers scholarships to Jewish students in the Mercer/ Bucks area, based on financial need. Visit jfcsonline.org/ scholarships-internships/ for information.

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BACK IN THE DAY: The Dinky train stop used to be closer to town, near Blair Arch on the Princeton University campus, as this archival photo from the Historical Society of Princeton’s program at Princeton Public Library shows. (Collection of Historical Society of Princeton)

Artifacts From Historical Society Collection On Display in “Trolleys, Trains, and Transit” One-Year Subscription: $10 Two-Year Subscription: $15 Subscription Information: 609.924.5400 ext. 30 or subscriptions@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

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Back in 1910, you could end up paying a fine if you got caught spitting while riding the trolley between Trenton and Princeton. “Any person who shall expectorate or spit on the floor, seat, or platform of any trolley passenger car in this state shall be deemed and adjudged to be a disorderly person, and upon conviction

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shall be subjected to a fine of not more than Ten Dollars for each offense,” reads a yellowed dispatch from the Trenton and Mercer County Traction Corporation. The warning notice is just one of the curious artifacts in a special exhibit going on display the evening of Tuesday, April 17, at Princeton Public Library’s Discovery Center. “Open Archive: Trolleys, Trains, and Transit” is a show of materials related to transportation, presented by the Historical Society of

might not make it to us out Find handmade and one-of-a-kind here.” [the historical society is based at Updike Farm on items that your family and friends Quaker Road]. will love. For Schwartz, digging is the best part of her job. The historical society’s collection is larger and more extensive than most people realize. “I love to share that with people, and in a format that’s a little more personal than an exhibit on the wall,” she said. “It’s a great way for us to pull out our holdings and look at everything in the collection.” Why a show on transportation? “The fact that we still have the Dinky line here shows how significant Princeton is related to travel,” said Schwartz. “So many people in this area Princeton and culled from commute by train. It is, and its extensive collect ion. Continued on Next Page Timetables, trolley tickets, and posters — one from a special ball for commuters, another from a theater company called “Princeton Junction and Back,” formed by those who took the train from Princeton to New York each workday — are all part of the show. But Stephanie Schwartz, the Historical Society’s curator of collections and research, wants at least some of the show to be a surprise. “The idea is to take things that people might normally see in a museum exhibit, but have them out in the open,” she said. “It allows them to get really up close and personal with the materials. My favorite thing about this is that we have no labels, which makes it different from what people are used to. So visitors can guide the conversation. They can make observations, ask questions — I’m always there, but we will follow the lead of where the conversation goes. Visitors can be the historians Richard Tang Yuk themselves.” Artistic Director The show is co-sponsored by the historical society and Jessica Beebe, soprano the library, and presented John Matthew Myers, tenor with support from the National Endowment for the Daniel Noyola, baritone Humanities. The historical Richard Tang Yuk, conductor society has organized open archive events in the past, to favorable response. The first was in collaboration Princeton Meadow Church with Princeton University Archives on the Princeton 545 Meadow Road and Slavery Project. Princeton, NJ “ We’v e b e e n w o r k i n g on doing more of these events,” said Schwartz. “A BUY TiCkeTs: lot of them are in collaborawww.voiceschorale.org • 609-474-0331 tion with the library, which gives us a great downtown hub to bring some of our maThese programs are made possible in part by the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission through funding from the Mercer County Board of Chosen Freeholders, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/ terials, and also make them Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. accessible to patrons who

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018 • 6

Trolleys, Trains, and Transit Continued from Preceding Page

has always been, integral to the town’s life and identity.” Schwartz will be on hand at the event, which will be held from 6:30-8 p.m. She plans to make some opening remarks and stick around to answer questions. “But mostly, we just want people to spend time with the collection,” she said. “That’s the idea.” —Anne Levin

© TOWN TALK A forum for the expression of opinions about local and national issues.

Question of the Week: “What are some of the trends for spring 2018?”

(Asked at shops in downtown Princeton) (Photos by Erica M. Cardenas)

Junior League, Lace Silhouettes Join Forces to Help HomeFront

T he Ju nior L eag ue of G r e a te r P r i n c e to n a n d Princeton-based women’s apparel boutique Lace Silhouettes recently collaborated on a special event to provide undergarments to 30 women at HomeFront’s Family Campus in Ewing. The event was h e l d a t H o m e F r o n t ’s 42,000-square-foot Family Preservation Center on the Family Campus that accommodates 38 families, giving them access to Choreography | José Limón on-site childcare, job training and other services deMusic | Norman Dello Joio signed to break the cycle of homelessness. The women at HomeFront often do not Choreography | Gerald Arpino have access to donations or Music | Maurice Ravel funds to obtain such highly personalized items. “Having a beautiful bra, Choreography | Artistic Director Douglas Martin professionally fit just for you, offers dignity and selfMusic | Igor Stravinsky respect for any woman, especially a woman struggling w ith homelessness. T he JLGP and Lace Silhouettes A mixed repertoire program of modern and contemporary ballets, featuring legendary created a very special evening for the women living at choreographers, glorious music, and the artistry and athleticism of ARB dancers. our campus – leaving everyone feeling pampered and beautiful,” said Liza Peck, special projects coordinator, HomeFront Family Campus. Ever y year, the Junior League of Greater Princeton contributes hundreds of hours serving at-risk women and underprivileged children in Mercer and Bucks counties. JLGP volunteers made special efforts to coordinate and facilitate this unique event. “We learned that many of HomeFront’s Factory clients arrive with only the representatives clothes on their backs. A bra is a necessity and not on hand to help something that is easy to you find your purchase for someone. A really good bra is expensive. perfect clubs! Having a properly fitted, Factory Come Try... high quality bra is pricerepresentatives Factory featuring less, especially when you is th g on hand to help Brin may only own just one,” representatives PING in for a you find your d a said Lauren Sgro, president, onperfect hand to help Junior League of Greater clubs! ance to CALLAWAY h c youCome find Try... your Princeton. TAYLOR MADE a featuring perfect clubs! Lace Silhouettes, with loTITLEIST cations in Palmer Square, it F PING Come Try... Custom Cape May, and Peddler’s featuring MIZUNO CALLAWAY r e v ri D 0 0 Village in Bucks County, 4 G Ping TAYLOR PINGMADE CLEVELAND donated the bras and unTITLEIST derwear through their disTOURCALLAWAY EDGE tributors and had profesMIZUNO TAYLOR MADE COBRA sional measurers on hand. CLEVELAND TITLEIST Julia Klein, associate buyer, TOUR EDGE foundations & lingerie, Lace MIZUNO COBRA Silhouettes, said, “I reached CLEVELAND XXIO out to several of my vendors for their support, asking if TOUR EDGE the vendors had donations COBRA to make in any way they XXIO could. Wacoal America Inc., Dana-Co LLC, Hanky Panky Ltd, Simone Perele, and Van de Velde N.V. all donated to this community service event. We combined these with donations from guests in our Princeton store, and donations from employees of L ace Silhouet tes and were able to raise money for over 350 undergarments.”

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Engineering and the arts will interweave in a variety of venues and manifestations April 12-13 on the Princeton University campus in a series of performances, panel sessions, and a keynote address by American sculptor and fiber artist Janet Echelman. T he event is presented by Princeton University’s Council on Science and Technology (CST) and is co-hosted by Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and by the Lewis Center for the Arts. CST’s inaugural “Living at the Intersection Symposium” will open on Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Murphy Dance Studio at the Lewis Center for the Arts with a performance of dance faculty member Rebecca Lazier’s “There Might Be Others.” Featuring So Percussion, New York dancers, Princeton alumni dancers, and guests, “There Might Be Others” is a dance, music, and engineering collaboration that examines the role of presence, performer agency, and collective de-

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cision-making to create a composition. From 7-8:30 p.m., faculty, students, and staff will showcase their work bridging engineering and the arts in the Forum of the Lewis Arts complex. The symposium will continue Friday at the Friend Center Convocation Room with the keynote address and panel discussions designed to “engage participants in a lively and forward-looking conversation about living at the intersection of engineering and the arts with researchers, artists, faculty, students, and professionals who create at or near this intersection,” according to Evelyn H. Laffey, senior associate director of CST. “People are really excited about this event,” Laffey said. “We thought it was time to bring these people together. So many of these faculty are more than their discipline or department labels. Part of the inspiration for this comes from courses we’ve developed in partnership with faculty and in supporting research that our faculty does.” She continued, “Many of these participants have collaborated for years, advancing their respective fields, but also pushing the boundaries towards new ways of doing dance, music, and engineering. Many of them have spoken at great length about how moving their collaboration has been.”

The four panel topics include Asking Questions; Taking Risks; Form Beyond Function; and Inspiration, Collaboration, and Pro cess, with the final panel presenting one example of an engineering-arts team that will discuss how they were inspired to collaborate, use processes within and across disciplinar y fields, advance their respective fields, and craft theoretical and physical spaces for working at the intersection of engineering and the arts. “Living at the Intersection” is designed to further CST’s mission to innovate and cultivate “opportunities to deepen and broaden participation in STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math]. Its mission “is founded on the belief that scientific and technological literacy are essential to responsible decision-making and innovation in the 21st century and help us make the world a better place.” CST also directs its efforts towards “ i m pr ov i n g t h e u n d e r standing of the fundamentals of STEM, exploring the societal impact of STEM, and investigating synergies between STEM and the arts, humanities, and social sciences.” All events in the two-day symposium are free and open to the public. To register, go to https://cst.prince ton.edu/symposium. —Donald Gilpin

Upcoming Event Reception and Video Screening to Celebrate the Naming of the

Arthur Lewis Auditorium

Wednesday, April 18 5-7 p.m. Arthur Lewis Auditorium, Robertson Hall President Eisgruber will speak at 6 p.m. A video tribute will play continuously in the auditorium, documenting Sir Arthur Lewis’ life and scholarship. RSVP required: http://bit.ly/ArthurLewis

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7 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

PU’s CST, Engineering, and Lewis Center Present “Living at the Intersection”


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018 • 8

Surveillance Footage

The new, popular trend, Cornerhouse to Hold Forum with candy flavors and low On Vaping for Students, Parents

continued from page one

In New Jersey, all investigations involving police deadly force are led by the Attorney General’s Independent Prosecutor Directive, which was issued in 2006 and strengthened in 2015. “The directive further provides that unless the undisputed facts indicate the use of force was justified under the law, the circumstances of the incident must ultimately be presented to a grand jury, composed of 23 civilians, for its independent review.” —Anne Levin

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Cornerhouse Behavioral Health, in conjunction with the Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance and the Princeton Police Department, will hold a forum, “Vaping, What YOU Need to Know,” on Monday, April 30, 7-9 p.m. at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. The program is designed to educate middle and high school parents, children, and other members of the community about what is happening in the world of ecigarettes, or vaping. Linda Richter, director of policy research and analysis at the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, is the guest speaker. A panel discussion and question and answer session will follow her talk.

prices, e-cigarettes are actually dangerous because of the nicotine, and in some cases, arsenic and lead, that is inhaled. The Juul vaporizer, which looks like a USB flash drive, is inexpensive and can be charged in a laptop. One Juul pod contains as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes. The devices are not regulated and can be easily purchased. For more information, call (609) 924-8018 or jwoodman@cornerhouse.org.

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GEORGE WALKER Bleu for solo violin ALVIN SINGLETON Sweet Chariot DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN Fast Black Dance Machine STRAYHORN/ELLINGTON “Take the ‘A’ Train” ELLINGTON “Come Sunday” ELLINGTON “It Don’t Mean a Thing...” KENDALL WILLIAMS Taking a Chance

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Hamilton Jewelers’ Annual Bride and Groom Event

OPERATION SMILE: Hun School senior Ellie Briggs holds a satisfied customer of Operation Smile’s surgery center, which repairs cleft lips and palates in Bogota, Colombia. Briggs has visited Bogota three times, traveled to an Operation Smile student leadership conference in Rome, and raised nearly $2,000 for the charity at Hun. (Photo Courtesy of The Hun School)

Eve Niedergang’s Rally Kicks Off Campaign

Eve Niedergang, candidate for Princeton Council, will officially kick off her campaign on Sunday, April 15, at 1 p.m. at a rally in Tiger Park on Palmer Square. The public is encouraged to attend. Niedergang, whose campaign motto is “Building Community Together,” is committed to actively engaging with Princeton residents to better understand their concerns and to work

together to solve the issues that challenge all Princeton residents. Priorities include ensuring that Princeton is welcoming and affordable for all, identifying sensible growth solutions to address Princeton’s affordable housing needs, and maintaining Princeton’s commitment to environmental sustainability. Niedergang has been a community leader, organizer and volunteer in Princeton for more than 25 years. She has been endorsed by

Hamilton Jewelers will hold its annual event geared to brides and grooms on Saturday and Sunday, April 14 and 15. Ronnie Ross, brand ambassador for The Knot, will meet and greet couples to give advice and pointers about wedding planning. In addition, Hamilton will be offering a $500 American Express Gift card with the purchase of an engagement ring of $5,000 or more, and 20 percent off all wedding bands for these two days only. Attendees are invited to get a complimentary couples portrait valued at $150. Champagne and truffles while be served, and guests will also receive a set of crystal champagne flutes with their purchase. They will also be registered to win a Samsung 65” Smart TV valued at $1,499, and will receive gifts from partners such as Metropolis Spa & Salon, Viburnum Designs, Grounds for Sculpture, Janet Makrancy, and more. Hamilton Jewelers is at 92 Nassau Street. For more information, visit www.hamiltonjewelers.com/pages/ Bridal-Event.html.

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the Princeton Community Democratic Organization and the Princeton Democratic Municipal Committee. The Democratic Primary is June 5, 2018. ———


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 10

Reform Efforts continued from page one

disparities in school discipline and the persistence of African American adolescents being suspended and expelled from other groups at higher rates than adolescents. S eek ing to highlight best practices in eliminating disparities, she advocates a restorative approach to discipline where schools engage in problem solving with youth around conflict, making classroom instruction more motivating and engaging, and integrating student voice in the discipline process. Her work has also focused on teacher professional development, program development, implementation, and evaluation. She has been widely published in book chapters and peerreviewed journal articles, and her research has been supported by federal agencies and private foundations. She served on the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Resiliency and Strength in Black Children and Adolescents and consults with the U.S. Department of Justice on school discipline. Last January, 2017 Princeton High School graduate

Jamaica Ponder and her father Rhinold Ponder filed a complaint with the municipal civil rights commission claiming that Princeton Public Schools disproportionately suspend students of color, or with special needs. As reported by Planet Princeton, the complaint alleged that Jamaica Ponder was suspended and disciplined because of her race, gender, and advocacy for racial justice and equity. It also states that Ponder and her family were denied due process rights under school policy and state law throughout the suspension and appeal process. Ponder was suspended last June after she submitted a yearbook group photo including artwork in the background from her father’s art exhibit, “The Rise and Fall of The N-Word.” The picture was judged to have offensive language and images in its background. While 16 students were involved in creating the photo, only Jamaica, the only black person, was disciplined, according to the complaint. —Donald Gilpin

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Council Approves Budget continued from page one

West Windsor’s obligation at 1,500 units. “Obviously, I understand it is still technically a process of litigation, which is important,” resident Sam Bunting told the governing body. “But I really don’t see any obstacle to at least starting the conversation. Some of us are going to be very supportive of the plan, if its good. But if your plan is to hold it back until the last possible moment, that will undermine the people who would support it, and build up resistance in the town.” Lempert told Bunting and two others representing The Princeton Progressive Action Group that she appreciated their comments, and that everyone on the Council has expressed similar sentiments. “We want this to be in the public as soon as we can,” she said. “We hear you and we’re doing our best to do our process as quickly as we can so that we can have a public conversation.” Earlier in the meeting, Lempert had reported that Council is “continuing to work on a sustainable smart growth plan that meets our affordable housing obligations, and we’re assessing available options. We will need to adopt our housing element and Fair Share plan in advance of submitting them to the court.” The issue will need to be discussed and approved in public, but there are still some details to work out, she said. Council passed a resolution to authorize a one-year professional services agreement with Banisch Associates, a Flemington-based civil engineering firm, for planning services regarding the affordable housing issue. Also approved was a resolution authorizing payment of $168,768 to Princeton Public Schools for hazardous busing transportation costs in the 2017-18 school year. —Anne Levin

African Violet Exhibit At Community College

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Garden State African Violet Club presents an African Violet E xhibit and Plant Sale, Saturday, May 5, 12-4 p.m, at Mercer County Community College. The event will be held in the faculty dining room of the student center, and will include educational exhibits depicting all aspects of growing African violets and other gesneriads. Handson workshops will be done throughout the day. Hundreds of member and commercially grown African violet plants and gesneriads will be for sale. Members will be available to answer questions. For more information, contact GSAVCmail@gmail.com.

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11 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Concierge Medicine

There’s a new trend in healthcare, and it’s gaining momentum in our area. 0gAO`OV3[WZg5WZPS`b =`WUW\OZZg^cPZWaVSRW\>`W\QSb]\;OUOhW\S 2`0O`PO`O/0`]e\ZSTbO\R2`:g\\S09]aa]e]T>`W\QSb]\:WTSabgZS;SRWQW\S

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or the past two years, Dr. Lynne B. Kossow and Dr. Barbara A. Brown of Princeton Lifestyle Medicine have offered their patients far more than the traditional primary care practice. Most doctors see 25-30 patients a day for an average of 15 minutes, but Drs. Kossow and Brown see six to eight patients a day for up to an hour. In addition to providing treatment for acute illnesses, the doctors act as their clients’ healthcare coaches through Lifestyle Medicine, a scientific approach to patient wellness by effecting changes in areas such as diet, physical activity, and stress management. With the current shortage of primary care physicians and the abundance of high volume practices, this type of individualized attention is rare. However, by switching to a concierge format, doctors like Kossow and Brown are able to practice medicine that consists of this broad-spectrum care. Concierge medicine, also known as retainer-based medicine, is an umbrella term for private medical care wherein patients pay an out-of-pocket fee in exchange for enhanced care. Born in the 1990s, concierge medicine was once thought of as a service for the wealthy that charged patients a lofty fee for luxury medicine. In recent years, it has evolved to accommodate patients across all income brackets, leading to expanding interest among patients and their primary care doctors. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Private Physicians at the AAPP 2015 Fall Summit, more than 45 percent of 862 independent physicians would consider a concierge or similar membership model in the next three years. This may be due in part to our aging population needing increased and varied medical services, leading to an imbalanced patient/doctor ratio. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of insured patients, putting a further strain on primary care doctors. As a result, physicians are often unable to dedicate enough time to each patient. In the hopes of increasing both job and patient satisfaction in a financially sustainable way, primary physicians like Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are looking toward concierge medicine. “Where conventional medicine is failing is in the prevention and reversal of chronic diseases that are becoming an epidemic in the United States today,â€? explain the doctors. “The current insurance model is built upon a problembased economic reimbursement that encourages doctors to address medical problems very quickly. This leads to most doctors rushing to see 25-30 patients per day in order to make ends meet‌This is not how we have ever practiced. We always want to have the time to address the root cause of diseases that are preventable today.â€? “For the past two years, we have been offering our Lifestyle Medicine Concierge Program as an optional program for our patients,â€? they continue. “Lifestyle Medicine is a 21st century approach to healthcare that consolidates the very best characteristics of traditional medicine with the profound impact of lifestyle behaviors on health. As our program grew, it became readily apparent to us that integrating Lifestyle Medicine into our internal medicine practice

was the best way for us to continue to provide exceptional care‌ We feel that the concierge model is the only way to effectively [do that].â€? Concierge medical practices come in various forms, including those that reject insurance plans all together, but this is not the case for Princeton Lifestyle Medicine. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown accept insurance for all covered medical services. In addition, their patients pay an annual fee of $1,200 for the Lifestyle Medicine Concierge program, which gives them access to an elevated level of care. Trained at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the doctors are at the vanguard of their field, having lectured about their practice development model at The Institute of Lifestyle Medicine Conference in 2015. They are also members of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown’s practice is unique in that it offers patients comprehensive conventional medical care combined with lifestyle counseling. Patients interested in a natural approach to disease prevention are provided in-depth, individualized coaching based on their needs. The doctors can assist with everything from quitting smoking to creating a manageable diet and exercise plan. According to the doctors, this is an evidence-based practice that has been shown to prevent, reverse, or slow down heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. The concierge model offers Princeton Lifestyle Medicine patients additional benefits including access to the doctors’ emails, cell phone numbers, and private phone line, extended patient office visits, a one-hour consultation, and same or next day appointments. As a result, patients see Drs. Kossow and Brown not only as accomplished medical doctors, but health advocates, mentors, and even friends. “Our practice structure allows us to spend more time educating our patients about what may be going on with them medically,â€? the doctors explain. “We are better able to work with them as partners in their care and advocate for them with their specialists or if they are in the hospital. We provide tremendous support and guidance to them and their caretakers or family. We are happy to have this enhanced communication with our patients. It allows us to make social visits when they are hospitalized at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro so that we can stay in close touch while they are receiving care.â€? Concierge practices like Princeton Lifestyle Medicine focus the healthcare system on its most vital component: the patient-doctor relationship. The model emphasizes quality care instead of quick care, benefitting both parties. Dr. Brown and Kossow are now board certified as specialists in the practice of Lifestyle Medicine and are the only physicians in the Princeton area who are board certified in both Internal Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine. As leaders in both concierge and Lifestyle medicine, it comes as no surprise that Dr. Kossow and Dr. Brown are at the forefront of this effort, bringing Princeton into the future of healthcare.

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Rider Furniture: 1, 8, 9. Recycled Poly Furniture by CR Plastics. 4621 Route 27, Kingston; www.riderfurniture.com Rouge : 2. Epice printed scarf; $268. 7. Bold Colors! Loving this vibrant poppy red blazer from L’Agence; $595. 13. The Slingback Pump! Ganni Sabine kitten heel; $235. 45 Palmer Square West, Princeton; www.myrougegirl.com

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 14

Mailbox

Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08525

Noting Issues That Should Be Reviewed In Presentations for Bond Referendum

To the Editor: Ever mindful of the comment that there are lies, damned lies, and statistics, I have come across the following information. The Cranbury students make up about 17 percent of Princeton High School’s population. The high school facilities would not now and would not for at least 10 years be above capacity if the Cranbury students were not included in the high school population. Without the Cranbury students, there would be no need for an addition to the high school. Furthermore, the tuition rate per Cranbury student is about $17,200. According to the New Jersey Department of Education’s Guide to Education Spending, the budgeted costs amount per pupil in the Princeton Public Schools for 2016-2017 was $19,964. In addition, according to U.S. News, Princeton High School ranks sixth among 424 high schools in New Jersey. I have seen little of any of the above reviewed in presentations for the $137 million bond referendum. And there is little mention of how maintenance for expenses would significantly increase if the referendum covering the addition and reconfiguring of the high school is passed. It would be helpful to all voters if the above were discussed in detail before we are asked to approve the bond. PATRICIA A. TAYLOR Richard Court

the garden was available as a resource for teachers and students. Eve also made sure that the PTO supported the arts and music. One year the PTO funded an opera residency in collaboration with Opera New Jersey that culminated in an opera that the students wrote, produced, and performed in. She also spearheaded a fundraiser to acquire a piano for the school’s music department. Due to the enthusiasm with which parents greeted these programs, the PTO was able to not only expand the programs it offered but also to build up a surplus to use for future programming. In short, Eve took a good organization and made it even better, always mindful that every child should have the same opportunities as her own children. Eve would bring all of the qualities exemplified in her leadership of the PTO to the Princeton Council: an ability to engage with all members of a community; a zeal to include all; support for innovative approaches; and a commitment to the environment, the arts, and education. I urge all of you to join me in voting for Eve Niedergang in the Democratic Primary on June 5. JANE JEMAS Riverside Drive

to inspire me to this day, and I’m sure there are just as many more that I haven’t had the good fortune of meeting. It would be an incredible shame if that ability and that skill set could not be channeled into collective action on problems as difficult and as urgent as gun violence, but also issues like mental health, race, and privilege. Princeton has the opportunity to turn this energy into action. Imagine a community where things like violence, anxiety, masculinity, and their effects on people could be talked about in an open forum — students and adults alike. Imagine being an example for the rest of the country on how to make our schools safer not with guns or metal detectors, but teaching students how to be active and informed citizens. Survival of our students is far too low a bar to clear for a community I have seen so much from. Our goal should be for every student to flourish not only in the classroom, but as a person. Let us take advantage of the opportunity for reflection and bring students and young people to the table and have a discussion. ZACK DIGREGORIO William Livingston Court

Republicans Wishing to Participate in Democratic Princeton Board of Education Should Declare Primary Must Submit Declaration Form Today Total Moratorium on the Bond Issue For Now To the Editor:

To the Editor: We should all applaud the Princeton Board of Education’s decision to delay a vote on the proposed $137.1 million bond referendum. Now, we all must urge the Board to take the next difficult but important step: Declare a total moratorium on the bond issue for now. Let’s be clear. This call for a moratorium is not a judgment on the Board’s stewardship of public education in Princeton. Most of us who live and pay taxes in Princeton are proud of our schools and the teachers and administrators who serve our kids. But, we in New Jersey are in a financial crisis resulting from the Federal Income Tax Law of 2017. Until the legislature and governor can effect a workable and legal remedy, adding more bond debt is irresponsible. The 2017 Tax Law reduces the deduction for state and local taxes (SALT) to $10,000. For high tax states, like New Jersey, California, and New York, this is draconian and punishing – and may have been intentionally so – but it is the law. Governor Murphy may join with other states to fight this law but that outcome remains to be seen. For now, adding anything to the tax impact on assessed homes should be declared a non-starter. If the Board cannot step outside its own thinking on this issue, then, regrettably, voters must reject the referendum on October 2. The Princeton Board of Education is a non-partisan body and must stay out of politics. Instead, we citizens and voters must urge our state legislators and governor to come up with a reasonable solution that is sustainable in this new federal tax era and allows communities, like Princeton, to resume funding needed improvements. DAVID M. GOODMAN Duffield Place

The primary election to be held on June 5 for the two open Princeton Council seats will likely determine the ultimate winners in the November general election. Given that registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by five to one in Princeton, the Democratic Primary has produced the final general election outcome in recent council and mayoral elections. In reflecting on recent elections, some voters have expressed that they don’t have a voice in our local government. Many of the over 6,700 unaffiliated voters in Princeton may not realize that they can easily vote in the Democratic primary, either by changing their party affiliation prior to the election or by simply declaring that they would like to vote on the Democratic ticket at the polls on June 5. To the Editor: For Republicans who would like to participate in the I am writing to endorse Eve Niedergang for Princeton Democratic primary, they can do so by submitting a politiCouncil. I’ve known Eve since I was co-president of the cal party declaration form by April 11. All voters can check Riverside Elementary School PTO from 2003-05 and I their party affiliation on the website www.njelections.org, found in Eve a person who was willing to pitch in and where they may also print the Political Party Affiliation who could work with a wide range of people. She ran Declaration forms. There is no limit to the number of times the annual Book Fair at Riverside for several years and voters can change their political party affiliation. expanded its funding so that every child walked out of Historically, voter participation for “off-year,” or nonthe Book Fair with a book, regardless of means. She also presidential year, primary elections is very low, with fewer started the trick-or-treat for UNICEF program at the school than 10 percent of registered voters turning out to the to encourage our children to collect money to help poor polls. The more voters participating and voting in the prichildren throughout the world. Equity was always one of mary election, the better representation the election will her chief concerns. No wonder I worked hard to persuade have for the population at large. Eve to succeed me as PTO co-president in 2005. Our Council is the main legislative body that makes My faith in Eve’s abilities was well justified. As the PTO important decisions affecting our community. With many co-president, she expanded access to after-school and critical issues facing us and two open seats to fill, this is enrichment programs so that every child could attend. a very important election. Similarly, every child received a Riverside T-shirt annually, I encourage everyone to vote in the primary. Let your regardless of their family’s ability to pay. She also revitalvoice be heard. ized and expanded the PTO’s program of mini-grants to teachers. These grants allowed teachers to pursue new You can find out more about me and my platform at www. instructional goals and to purchase equipment and suppironeforcouncil.com. plies for special projects. Our School Garden program MICHELLE PIRONE LAMBROS To the Editor: was already under way but Eve raised money to fund yearGrover Avenue, The recently completed 87th annual Bryn Mawr-Wellesround care of the garden, expanding the time period that Candidate for Princeton Town Council ley Book Sale could not have been the resounding success it was without the help of over 100 volunteers and Princeton Day School. Our volunteers work throughout the year to collect and sort donated books, then expend a great deal of time and energy setting up and running the sale. Thank you for your dedication! We are also grateful for the warm and professional collaboration we enjoy with the PDS staff during the event What Is Advance Care Planning and when we sell over 80,000 books in just five days. TogethWhy Is It Important? er we raise college scholarship funds for Bryn Mawr and AdvanceWhat Care Planning and Is Advance Care Planning What Care Wellesleyand students from throughout central New Jersey. Is Advance Planning and Is Advance Care Planning and Health Care Quality What ersation of Your Life” is a program of The New Jersey ELIZABETH ROMANAUX Is It Important? Why Is It Important? Why IsIsItIt Important? Important? Why e (NJHCQI) designed Why to encourage individuals to engage in fruitful President, The Bryn Mawr Wellesley Book Sale

Eve Niedergang Would Bring Qualities Exemplified In Her Leadership of Riverside PTO to the Council

Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale a Success Thanks to PDS and Over 100 Volunteers

Princeton Community Democratic Organization

“Conversation of Your Life” isLearn a program of ThetoNew Health Care Quality with family, ueisaround end-of-life issues. how start the conversation a program of The New of Jersey Health Life” isCare atoJersey program Quality of The Care New Quality JerseyMarch Health Care Quality Is a Advance Care Planning and What nversation of“Conversation Your Life” is program of The New Jersey Health Institute (NJHCQI) designed to Your encourage individuals engage in fruitful for Our Lives Rally on Hinds Plaza , caregivers, and doctors about what you value in life using FIVE After Is It Important? Why dialogue around end-of-life issues. Learn how to start the conversation with family, dtute to encourage Institute individuals (NJHCQI) to engage designed in fruitful to encourage individuals to engage in fruitful designed to encourage individuals to engage in fruitful ES: (NJHCQI) a Living “with heart andwhat soul.” This document friends,Will caregivers, and doctors about you value in life using FIVE is written in There Will Be Strong Urge to Return to Normal ssues. Learn dialogue how toYour around start the conversation issues. with Learn family, how to start thefamily, conversation with family, “Conversation of Life” isend-of-life aheart program of TheThis New Jersey Health Care ogue around end-of-life issues. Learn how to start the with WISHES: a Living Will “with and soul.” document is conversation written inQuality ay language; and, helps start and structure important conversations about Institute (NJHCQI) designed to encourage individuals to engage in fruitful To the Editor: everyday language; and, helps start and structure important conversations about ors aboutdialogue what friends, youdoctors caregivers, value in lifeand using doctors FIVE about what you value in life using FIVE ds, caregivers, and what you value in life using FIVE around end-of-life issues. how toasas start conversation with family, times ofcare serious illness. It about is recognized athelegal document in 42 states in times of serious illness. It isLearn recognized a legal document in 42 states By now,isthe debris ith heart and WISHES: soul.” This a Living document Will is “with written heart in and soul.” This document written in from Hinds Plaza has been swept, friends, caregivers, and doctors about what you value in life using FIVE HES: a Living Will “with heart and soul.” This document is written in including New Jersey. ng New WISHES: Jersey. the air above Nassau Street quieted, and our tears wiped a Living Will “with heart and soul.” This document is written in ps start and everyday structure language; important and, conversations helps start about and structure important conversations about yday language; and, helps startstartand important conversations aboutour from faces. I have lived in Princeton for 22 years and everyday language; and, helps andstructure structure April 15, 2018important conversations about care in timesin of illness. serious is3:00 recognized as a legal document in 42 states ss. It is recognized times as a illness. legal ofItApril serious illness. in 42 It is states recognized as a legal document in 42 states nothing has made me prouder to call it home than seein times of care serious isItdocument recognized as a legal document in 42 states – 5:00 pm 15, 2018 including New Jersey. Charles Borromeo Church ing Witherspoon Street flooded with people of all walks including NewSt.3:00 Jersey. uding New Jersey. – 5:00Road pm 47April Skillman 15, 2018 of life at the March for Our Lives. Despite this tense and St. Charles Borromeo Skillman, NJ 08558 3:00 – 5:00 pm Church sobering reminder about how gun violence cannot simply April 15, 2018 St. AprilBorromeo 15, 2018 Church April 15, 2018 47Charles Skillman Road be someone else’s problem, odds are many from the March 47 Skillman Road 3:00 – 5:00 pm Local3:00 3:00emotional, – 5:00 pm –the5:00 pm ethical, Panel Discussion FeaturingSkillman, Experts: legal, medical, practical, NJ 08558 will return to their lives around town, which can often be Skillman, NJ 08558 and, spiritual aspects of conversations around death and dying. Charles BorromeoSt. Church St. Charles Charles Borromeo ChurchBorromeo Church called “quaint,” “comfortable,” or “idyllic.” There will be 47 Skillman Skillman Road a strong urge to return to normal.  Adalin Ball, Road Eldercare Educator, Somerset County on47 Aging and Disabilitypractical, Services 47Experts: Skillman Road Panel Discussion Featuring Local the legal,Office medical, ethical, emotional,  Victor Medina, Medina Law Group, LLC and, spiritual aspects of conversations around death and dying. Skillman, NJ 08558 Skillman, NJemotional, 08558 practical, iscussion Local Experts: the legal, medical, ethical, Skillman, NJ 08558 There will also be a strong urge to say “what can I really Featuring Mary Anne Serra, Director of Parish Nursing, Diocese of Camden

ritual aspects ofBall, conversations death and dying. Michael Reilly, Director of the around Hillsborough Funeral Home  Adalin Eldercare Educator, Somerset County Office on Aging and Disability Services

do?” or “we can never really eliminate gun violence or even make a dent.” A lot of the measures being proposed in Congress and evenpractical, in Florida won’t do much to curb gun emotional, Panel discussion will be followed by an in-depth discussion led by Mary Anne Serra on the or Medina, Medina Law Group, LLC violence as a whole. Not only is there a massive advocacy Five Wishes. sations around and, death and aspects dying. of conversations around death and dying. spiritual aspects ofspiritual conversations around death and dying. Question and Answer Period network with rock-solid financial backing in the firearms y Anne Serra, Director of Parish Nursing, Diocese of Camden Light discussion Refreshments Panel will be followed by an in-depth discussion led by Mary Anne Serra on the industry, but there are a lot of Americans, some of them hael Reilly, Director of the Hillsborough Funeral Home Five Wishes. tor, County Adalin Office Ball, on Eldercare Aging Educator, Services County Office on Aging and Disability Services dalinSomerset Ball, Eldercare Educator, Somerset County Office on Aging and Disability Services This event is free andand open Disability to adults ofSomerset all ages. our elected officials, who genuinely believe that guns not LightMedina Refreshments Group, LLC Victor Medina, Medina Law Group, LLC ictor Medina, Law Group, LLC Please invite your neighbors, family and friends. only make us safer, but are important cultural touchstones. nParish and Answer Period This event is Nursing, free and openDiocese toof adults ofof all Camden ages. Mary Anne Serra, Director of Nursing, Mary Diocese Anne ofParish Serra, Director Parish Nursing, Diocese of Camden Thisprogram is sponsored byCamden NJHCQI and The Catholic Community of Saint Charles Guns are durable, transportable goods; so here in PrincPlease invite your neighbors, family and friends. Borromeo. Conversation ofby Your is generously supported by Theled Horizon for Home Michael Reilly, of Home the Hillsborough Funeral Home e Hillsborough Director Michael Reilly, of the Hillsborough Funeral iscussion will beFuneral followed anLifeDirector in-depth discussion by Foundation Mary Anne Serra on the eton, what good can we really do?

 Victor Medina, Medina Law Group, LLC and Answer Period of Parish Nursing, Diocese of Camden Question Mary Anne Serra, Director Ball, Eldercare Educator, Somerset County Office on Aging Disability Services  Michael Reilly, Director of theFeaturing Hillsborough Home alDiscussion Experts: Panel the legal, Discussion medical, ethical, emotional, Local Experts: practical, the and legal, medical, ethical, lin Featuring Local Experts: theFuneral legal, medical, ethical, emotional, practical,

New Jersey. To learn more visit: www.njhcqi.org/COYL.

This program is sponsored by NJHCQI and The Catholic Community of Saint Charles shes. Borromeo. Conversation of Your by Lifelogging is generously supported by The Horizon Foundation for The only problem with that line of thinking is that every Please register at Saint Charles, on to www.borromeo.org, or by calling St. Charles tion and Answer Answer Period New Question Jersey. Period To learnand more visit: www.njhcqi.org/COYL. Borromeo at 609-466-0300. great accomplishment in history has been impossible unefreshments Please register at Saint Charles, by logging on to www.borromeo.org, or by calling St. Charles til on itbywasn’t. I have metonsothe many of the most impressive, lddiscussion will be followed byled anby in-depth discussion bythe Mary Anne Serra the by an in-depth Panel discussion discussion will beMary followed Anne bySerra an led in-depth on discussion led Mary Anne Serra Borromeo at 609-466-0300. This event is free and open to adults of all ages. courageous people in my life in Princeton who continue Wishes. Five Wishes.

Please invite your neighbors, family and friends. t Refreshments Light Refreshments

ogram is sponsored by NJHCQI andand Theopen Catholic Community of Saint Charles event isoffree to adults ofand all ages. nt is free and openThis to adults all ages. This event is free open to adults of all ages.

PCDO 2018 March and Local and PCDO AprilMembership Membership Meeting County Endorsement Meeting

“The Dope on Marijuana Legalization”

Join the PCDO for a forum moderated by the NJLWV Panelists: featuring the seven Democratic candidates vying •The Honorable Reed Gusciora, Assemblyman, NJ Legislative District 15 for opensponsor Princeton Council seats. Members and two legislative of legalization (as ofLitterer, March 4) &will vote Director to endorse candidates. •Diane CEO Executive of The two New Jersey Prevention Network (NJPN) •Rory Esquire, former County prosecutorColavita, and current advisor Also,Wells, Freeholders AnnOcean Cannon, Pasquale to New Jersey Responsible Approaches to Marijuana (NJRAMP) and Sam Frisby will join us. Each of themPolicy is running •David L. Nathan, MD, DFAPA, a New Jersey based psychiatrist, educator, this year and will discuss of work upon and founder and Board President a of specific Doctors forarea Cannabis Regulation

which they are focusing. Members will be asked to

endorse theseApril unopposed incumbents byCenter, acclamation. 7:00 pm Sunday, 15 at the Suzanne Patterson 45 Stockton Street, Princeton Doors 6:30pm and the program willthe beginSuzanne at 7pm. 7:00open pmatSunday, March 18 at The event is free and open to the public. Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton. PCDO Upcoming Meetings and Events:

Doors open at 6:30pm and the program will begin May 20 “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know Sexual Harassment at 7pm. The event is free and openabout to the public. But Were Afraid to Ask,” featuring experts in gender equality and law

PCDO Upcoming Meetings and Events:

June 10 “Flip New Jersey Blue,” and meet Democratic Congressional Primary Winners in currently Republican districts, and fellow organizers April who will 15 work toLegalization help them win of Marijuana in New Jersey Come20 see usSexual at Communiversity, April 29, and help to register voters May Harassment and meet candidates and elected officials!

WantatoCongressional join the PCDO? District June 10 How to Flip

www.princetondems.org/join You don’t need to live in Princeton to become a member.

Want to join the PCDO? Paid for by PCDO, P.O. Box 481, www.princetondems.org/join Princeton, NJ 08542 You don’t need to live in Princeton to become a member.


15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Calling All Baby Boomers 60 or Older— We Want to Hear From You! We are introducing Springpoint Choice, a new program for active, independent, healthy adults who are planning for the future. Members who join Springpoint Choice will benefit from care coordination of future long-term care needs while gaining access to Springpoint Senior Living’s network of long-term care services and personalized health and wellness programs. To know how we can best meet your needs, we’re conducting special focus groups in your area on April 17, April 18 and April 19. If you prefer to remain in your current home, lead an active lifestyle, protect your assets and be assured of care when needed, this innovative program is for you!

Please share your opinions—join us for a discussion group and complimentary lunch. Choose a date and location that works best for you.

Tuesday, April 17, at 11:00 am

Forsgate Country Club 375 Forsgate Drive • Monroe, NJ 08831

Wednesday, April 18, at 11:00 am

Cherry Valley Country Club 125 Country Club Drive • Skillman, NJ 08558

Thursday, April 19, at 11:00 am

Cherry Valley Country Club 125 Country Club Drive • Skillman, NJ 08558

RSVP TODAY! 855-730-6908


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 16

BOOK REVIEW

Once Upon a Time in Memphis: Martin Luther King and William Faulkner Something is happening in Memphis, something is happening in our world. —Martin Luther King Jr., April 3, 1968 n the speech he delivered the night before the day he died, Martin Luther King imagined taking a “mental flight” across the Red Sea “through the wilderness on toward the promised land” to Greece and Mount Olympus, the Roman Empire, the Renaissance, then to Wittenberg and Martin Luther, to Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and to the 20th century, “the bankruptcy of the nation,” and Memphis, Tennessee. A “mental flight” more suited to my sense of the city where Chuck Berry’s Marie lives “high upon a ridge just a half a mile from the Mississippi bridge” is the one Bob Dylan performs in “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again,” where you’ll find the circle-drawing ragman, Shakespeare in the alley, the French girl who knows you well, the stolen post office, Mona and the eyelid-smoking railroad man, grandpa shooting the fire full of holes on Main Street, the preacher, the rainman, Ruthie and her honky tonk lagoon, the Panamanian moon, and the neon madmen of Grand Street. Since I like to think this song is more about Memphis than Mobile, you’ll also find Sun Records, Stax Volt, W.C. Handy, Beale Street, the Blues, William Faulkner’s Miss Reba, and the haunted hotel where a spectral Elvis appears as the radio plays “Blue Moon” in Mystery Train, Jim Jarmusch’s timeless ode to Memphis. Motel to Museum Last week’s 50th anniversary of the assassination has brought Memphis back into the national conversation. With a population 64 percent black, 30 percent white according to a recent article in the New York Times (“The Triumphs and Trials of Memphis”), Memphis is the poorest large metropolitan area in the country, in spite of the presence of companies like UPS, FedEx, International Paper, AutoZone, an NBA franchise, and a tourism industry that attracts more than 11.5 million visitors every year, thanks to Elvis and Graceland and of course the National Civil Rights Museum established on the site of the April 4, 1968 assassination, the Lorraine Motel, which was named for owner Walter Bailey’s wife Loree and the song “Sweet Lorraine.” The Lorraine’s post-assassination fate mirrors the troubled history of the city. According to the New Yorker’s Allyson Hobbs, Loree Bailey suffered a stroke when she heard the shot, dying on April 9, the day of King’s funeral. Her husband kept the motel going through the 1970s, turning Room 306 into a memorial preserved exactly as it had been, but after Bailey declared bankruptcy in 1982, the Lorraine became a brothel and might have been sold at auction had not a Save the Lorraine group bought it and transformed it into the museum in 1991. Pyramid vs. Skyscraper As a 12-year-old dreamer fixated on cit-

I

ies and skyscrapers, I had a schoolboy crush on Memphis. There was poetry in the name, and associated names like Beale Street, Gayoso, Chickasaw, a newspaper called the Commercial Appeal, and above all the fact that Memphis boasted the Sterick building, the tallest in the South at the time. Many years ago I was in Memphis traveling for a publisher, my job to talk up textbooks in the humanities to teachers in colleges and universities from Alabama to North Dakota. The high point of my visit to Memphis State was the hou r I sp ent w it h a quadriplegic history professor named Marcus O r r. A mus e d to hear of my adolescent attraction to the glamour of skyscrapers li ke t he Ste rick building, the man in the wheelchair told me about the time he met with “the city fathers,” who were all excited ab out a new skyscraper that would top the Sterick by ten f loors. W hen Orr asked them how high, they said 37 stories, 430 feet, and didn’t believe him when he told them that the great pyramid located 12 miles from the ruins of place their city had been named for was 25 feet higher. Faulkner’s Memphis From my window at the Chisca Plaza Motor Hotel, adjacent to the original Chisca Hotel on Main Street just around the corner from the the Lorraine, I could see the neon lights of Beale Street, “in comparison with which Harlem is a movie set,” as Faulkner observes in Light in August (1932). In that novel, the Rev. Gail Hightower’s wife dies after jumping or falling “from a hotel window in Memphis.” Her fate is echoed in a legend about the Sterick building, which has been empty for decades and is said to be haunted by the ghost of a woman who jumped to her death “to save herself from a loveless marriage.” Although Faulkner doesn’t mention the Sterick by name in his 1930 story “Dull Tale,” it’s “one of four tall buildings” that “form an upended tunnel up which the diapason of traffic echoes as at the bottom of a well.” There, where “the trolleys swing

crashing and groaning down the hill at the clanging of bells,” Memphis is “almost a city,” with “the restless life and movement of cities; the hurrying and purposeful going to-and-fro, as though the atomic components were being snowed down within a given boundary, to rush in whatever escaping direction and vanish like snow, already replaced and unmissed.” Memphis Day and Night What may be the most striking view of Memphis in Faulkner’s fiction comes in Sanctuary (1931) when the ill-fated coed Temple Drake sees at the foot of the bluff below Main Street “a narrow street of smoke-grimed frame houses w it h t iers of wooden galleries, set a little back in grassless plots, with now and then a forlorn and hardy tree of s om e shabby species …. From the bluff, beyond a line of office buildings terraced sharply against the sunfilled s k y, c a m e a sound of traff i c — m otor horns, trolleys — pass ing high overheaed on the river breeze; at the end of the street a trolley materialised in the narrow gap with an effect as of magic and vanished with a stupendous clatter.” Then there’s the night music of a later passage about a couple of callow youths who unsuspectingly mistake Miss Reba’s brothel for a hotel: “They could hear the city, evocative and strange, imminent and remote; threat and promise both — a deep, steady sound upon which invisible lights glittered and wavered: colored coiling shapes of splendor in which already women were beginning to move in suave attitudes of new delights and strange nostalgic promises.” Of her recently departed guests, Miss Reba says, “I ain’t especially tender-hearted, but after all it ain’t no use in helping young folks to learn this world’s meanness until they have to.” Beale Street The photograph on the cover of Preston Lauterbach’s Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis (W.W. Norton 2015) is from 1917, around the time “a young William

Faulkner heard the hidden history of the street” and “tales of Madam Mae Goodwin, a brothel keeper and a fence for black market diamonds.” Lauterbach pictures Faulkner as “bushy-haired and soft-spoken … with a pointy nose and dark eyes,” sporting “kneed-out trousers and threadbare coats.” Giving off “no indication of prosperity,” he looked like “a tag-along to his flashy chums. The girls didn’t work him too hard. When they did proposition young Faulkner, he played on his decidedly unsporty appearance, quipping, ‘No thank you, ma’am, I’m on my vacation,’” as if he were taking time off from a strenuous sex life. Another important American writer who makes a brief appearance in Beale Street Dynasty is Richard Wright. The future author of Native Son (1940) and Black Boy (1945) “lived in boarding houses throughout the Beale district from 1925 to 1927, working downtown in an optical factory.” Because blacks were not allowed to borrow books from the public library, Wright had to forge notes from a white co-worker in order to read H. L. Mencken, Theodore Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis, all of whom influenced his later work. In Uncle Tom’s Children (1938), he describes how he would stand at the check-out desk, “hat in hand, looking as unbookish as possible … No doubt if any of the white patrons had suspected that some of the volumes they enjoyed had been in the home of a Negro, they would not have tolerated it for an instant.” The St. Louis in Memphis Blues Again There’s an amusing reflection of Dylan’s Mobile/Memphis dynamic in the fact that W.C. Handy’s most famous composition, “The St. Louis Blues,” was written in Memphis. After the First World War, Handy’s blues became, in Lauterbach’s words, “a cultural password for a new age,” speaking to the “lost generation” of artists grappling with “the experiences of war.” F. Scott Fitzgerald referenced “Beale Street Blues” by name in The Great Gatsby while William Faulkner “subtly evoked ‘St. Louis Blues’ in the title of his story ‘That Evening Sun,’ and George Gershwin inscribed sheet music for ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ to Handy, saying thanks I couldn’t have done it without you.” A Great Singer The music of history is in Martin Luther King’s last speech at the Mason Temple in Memphis about the mountaintop and the promised land and “not fearing any man.” If you’ve witnessed the hair-raising power of his voice when he’s at the rhetorical top of his bent — as a speaker, he was a grπeat singer — you can imagine the music he made of those last words. If you stand in the corridor outside Room 306 at the National Civil Rights Museum, you’ll hear the recorded voice of Mahalia Jackson singing, among other things, “Take My Hand, Precious Lord,” the spiritual he asked to be performed the night of his last speech. —Stuart Mitchner

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY PRESENTS

EASTER JOURNEY A Concert of Hymns, Readings, and Homilies 7 p.m. | Saturday, April 14, 2018 Miller Chapel 64 Mercer St., Princeton

EASTRIDGE DESIGN HOME

featuring the Princeton Seminary Chapel Choir under the leadership of Martin Tel and Michael Gittens

342 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08540 (609) 921-2827 | eastridgedesign.com

For more information: 609.497.7890 | chapel.office@ptsem.edu

Store Hours: M–F 10am – 5pm

Concert is free and open to the public. ptsem.edu/events

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Grafton and Goodman Discuss Judaism April 17

Martin Goodman and Anthony Grafton will be at Labyrinth Books on Tuesday, April 17 at 6 p.m. to talk about Goodman’s book, A History of Judaism : From Its Origins to the Present ( Princeton Univ. Press $39.95). Julia Neuberger of the Literary Review calls A History of Judaism “a hugely welcome addition to the library of Jewish studies for the general reader and an absolute godsend for rabbis always perplexed by what book they should recommend to people about how Jewish beliefs and practices have evolved. Goodman has done both Jews and non-Jews a great service with this book, encapsulating most of Jewish thought over four millennia in one ext raordinar ily readable volume.” Martin Goodman is professor of Jewish studies at the University of Oxford, where he is president of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. His books include Rome and Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations and The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Studies. Anthony Grafton

908.359.8388

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Labyrinth Hosts Dialogue On Public Education

Bill Ayers and Rick Ayers will be discussing their book You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones: And 18 Other Myths about Teachers, Teachers’ Unions, and Public Education ( Penguin Random House $16) , co-authored w it h Cr ys t a l L au r a, on Wednesday, April 11 at 6 p.m. at Labyrinth Books. Jonathan Kozol, author of Rachel and Her Children, Savage Inequalities, and Amazing Grace says the book is “an artful and meticulous dissection of the interlocking web of myths and lies about our public schools that have been aggressively promoted by private-sector forces, right-wing politicians, and collusive neoliberals over the most recent 15 years. I hope it will be widely read by ever yone who loves and treasures children.” Bill Ayers is an author, activist, and educator whose previous books include To Teach : The Jour ney of a Teacher and Teaching Toward Freedom : Moral Commitment and

Ethical Action in the Classroom. Rick Ayers is an educator and the author of An Empty Seat in Class: Teaching and Learning After the Death of a Student, and, with William Ayers, Teaching the Taboo: Courage and Imagination in the Classroom. ———

reception with the author and a signed, soft- cover copy of The Invention of Nature Tickets are limited and are for sale at WashingtonCrossingPark.org/events. ———

Aesthetic Liberalism Subject Of Labyrinth Conversation David Russell and Barry

Best-Selling Author McCrea will be discussing At Washington Crossing Russell’s book Tact: AesWashington Crossing Historic Park in Pennsylvania will host New York Times best-selling author Andrea Wulf on Sunday, April 15 at 2 p.m. at the park’s visitor center. Wulf will discuss her book, The Invention of Nature, which chronicles the life of Prussian naturalist, explorer, and geographer Alexander von Humboldt. The book makes the case that von Humboldt created a vision of nature as one interconnected system that would later influence scientists, activists, and the public. In fact, on a visit to the United States, he visited the White House to discuss science and politics with Thomas Jefferson, who was inspired by von Humboldt’s life work. Wulf trained as a design historian at the Royal College of Art in London and is now a full-time, award-winning writer. She is the author of five books and has written for the New York Times, the Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, and the Guardian, among others. Ticket options for the lecture are: $15 per person for admittance to the lecture only; $35 per person for the lecture, entry into a w ine and cheese

thetic Liberalism and the Essay Form in 19th Century Britain (Princeton Univ. Press $35) at L abyrinth Books on Thursday, April 12 at 6 p.m. According to Isobel

Armstrong, author of Novel Politics: Democratic Imaginations in NineteenthCentury Fiction, “This is a momentous book. Tact, with its derivation from touch, becomes, for Russell, the art of feeling one’s way, an aesthetic, ethical, and political praxis that enables him to reclaim the essay as the core form, democratic and egalitarian, of 19th-century culture. Moving from Lamb, through Mill, Arnold, Eliot, and Pater, to the 20th-century incarnation of tact in the work of Marion Milner, Russell challenges our reading of major figures.” David Russell is associate

professor of English at the University of Oxford and a tutorial fellow of Corpus Christi College. Barry McCrea currently is visiting professor in the Humanities Council at Princeton University. He is professor of English and romance languages and literatures, at the University of Notre Dame and the author of The First Verse: a Novel, as well as of Languages of the Night: Minor Languages and the Literary Imagination in 20th Century Ireland and Europe. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council.

Lewis Center for the Arts Program in Theater presents

I Am in 5th Grade, You Are in Kindergarten

April 13, 14 19, 20 & 21 2018 • 8 p.m.

two short plays in honor of

Berlind Theater at McCarter Theatre Center

María Irene Fornés directed by

Elena Araoz

FNU LNU by Mac

Wellman

The Book of Miaou: Don’t Drink Everything Your Mother Pours You by

Migdalia Cruz

PRISMS arts.princeton.edu

This event is in conjunction with the Latinx Theater Commons María Irene Fornés Institute Symposium

Summer Institute 2018

@ Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science

Courses running from June 25 to August 3 Visit PRISMSUS.ORG for course descriptions and to register.

Exciting offerings for Middle School and High School Students

• AMC 10 Training Camp • Underwater Robotics • Bend It, Break It, & 3D Print It Again • Run Robot Run • Mathematics Quantitative to Structural • Write & Illustrate Science Fiction • College Admissions "Jump Start" for Juniors

Please call for more information 609-454-5580 ● 19 Lambert Drive | Princeton, NJ

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Books

is professor of history at Princeton University and the author of numerous books, including The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe ; Bring Out Your Dead : The Past as Revelation; Worlds Made by Words : Scholarship and Community in the Modern West; and Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline. This event is co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Humanities Council. ———


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 18

Parking for Ciclovia is tirement and volunteering. Annual Ciclovia Bike Ride Trenton, the group will follow a George Washington reavailable at the Quaker Sharon Hurley, CVA, PSRC’s On Quaker Road May 6

Princeton’s fifth annual Ciclovia will be held, rain or shine, on Sunday, May 6, from 1 to 4 p.m. on Quaker Road. The free event, which promotes healthy, active living, closes the road to vehicles and opens it for people to exercise play, and learn. Families can run, walk, skate, and ride bikes along the route. Healthful refreshments will be available for purchase from Tico’s Eatery & Juice Bar. Back for the second year is Chasing George, a 10-mile bike ride along the D&R Canal State Park path, in the spirit of the route Washington took on January 3, 1777 to fight in what became the Battle of Princeton. Starting at noon at the Douglass House at Mill Hill Park in

enactor to Princeton along the D&R Canal State Park trail. Historical talks will anchor the start and end of the ride. Online registration for Chasing George is available at www.princetonhistory.org, or by contacting Eve Mandel at eve@princetonhistory.org or (609) 921-6748 x102. The registration fee is $5 per person, or $10 per family. Individuals or families can also participate in a shorter version of the ride by joining the “troops” at the D&R Canal path entrance on Quaker Road around 1:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome to cheer at the finish line when the group arrives at the Washington route marker on Quaker Road (near Updike Farmstead) around 1:20 p.m.

Meeting or Mercer Mall. Organizations co-sponsoring this event are Greater Mercer TMA, East Coast Greenway, Historical Society of Princeton, Princeton Bicycle Advisory Committee, Princeton Freewheelers, Princeton Friends Meeting, Princeton Friends School, REI, and West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance. ———

Senior Resource Center Celebrates Volunteer Week

Princeton Senior Resource Center (PSRC) marks National Volunteer Week, April 15–21, with programs throughout the month. On April 23 at 7 p.m., The Engaged Retirement Lecture Series at the Princeton Public Library will focus on re-

director of support and guidance, will lead this interactive workshop to match skills and interests with community volunteer opportunities. On April 27, Mauri Tyler will hold an FYI seminar about Volunteerism and Longevity. Tyler was the program director at PSRC for 12 years. PSRC has over 375 volunteers serving aging adults. Whether working at the front desk, assisting with phone calls and answering, questions or serving to support and advise on the board of trustees, volunteers make a difference in the lives of aging adults. For information on volunteering at PSRC, contact Sharon Hurley at (609) 252-2362, or shurley@ princetonsenior.org.

JUDITH BUDWIG, REALTOR® 2017 NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence®

Sales Associate

Cell: 609-933-7886 jbudwig@glorianilson.com

R E A L E S T AT E 609-921-2600

Serving the Princeton area for over 20 years

Residential & Office Cleaning Fully Insured Renata Z. Yunque, owner/manager

609-683-5889

cleanhousehappyhouse@gmail.com www.cleanhousehappyhouse.com

For immediate attention, call the Princeton Renata for all your housecleaning and organizing needs.

Princeton University chaPel

worshiP service aPril 15, 2018 • 11 aM

GUest PreachinG sUnday

rev. reUben eckels world coUncil of chUrches

Music by the Princeton university chaPel choir


SALON ON STOCKTON • A LITTLE LITERARY FESTIVAL IN PRINCETON •

FRIDAY, APRIL 13 5:30 pm COVERING WAR: JOURNALISTS IN CONVERSATION MEET THE AUTHORS @ MORVEN MUSEUM & GARDEN 55 STOCKTON ST.

SATURDAY

APRIL 14 10:00-11:00 am SALLY MAGNUSSON

NEAL ASCHERSON

LYNNE OLSON

The Death of the Fronsac

Last Hope Island

An unforgettable novel of life in wartime, and of the tragic fate of Poland in the 20th Century: a story of sabotage, betrayal, and exile, told by one of Britain’s finest writers.

A groundbreaking account by the best-selling author of how Britain became the base for the exiled leaders of Europe in their struggle to reclaim their continent from Hitler.

N O S R E T I R 4W

11:30 am-12:30 pm CHRISTOPHER DICKEY 1:30-2:30 pm LYNNE OLSON 3:00-4:00 pm NEAL ASCHERSON 4:30-5:30 pm WAR & DISPLACED LIVES: AUTHORS’ PANEL @ CENTER OF THEOLOGICAL INQUIRY 50 STOCKTON ST.

For tickets & information visit morven.org or call 609.924.8144 x113

SALLY MAGNUSSON The Sealwoman’s Gift

A Salon favorite’s novel that turns an historical event of violent abduction and slavery in 17th century Iceland and Algiers into an imaginative story of survival in a foreign land.

AT LUCE HALL

CHRISTOPHER DICKEY Our Man in Charleston

The award-winning author and foreign affairs editor tells the true story of a UK diplomat and secret agent at secession’s epicenter. It forever changes our view of the Civil War.

19 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

APRIL 14 2018


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 20

research program on religion and migration, and as a contribution to the Princeton Community Collaboration on Migrations this spring. “Our Town — Princeton” is a celebration of the people at the heart of our community with personal histories of migration in the past and in the present. For more information contact the Center’s director, William Storrar, at (609) 240-6478, or email william. storrar@ctinquiry.org.

Art

Artworks Art Making Day On April 21 and 28

“OUR TOWN — PRINCETON”: Carolyn Scott’s photographs will be featured from Sunday, April 15 through Friday, April 20 at the Center of Theological Inquiry, 50 Stockton Street, Princeton. The exhibit is a celebration of the people at the heart of Princeton, with personal histories of migration.

CTI hosts “Our Town — Stockton Street, from 1 to Princeton” Photo Exhibit 4 p.m.

Scottish artist Carolyn Scott will present her photographs of the diverse community of Princeton in a week-long exhibition at the Center of Theological Inquiry (CTI) from Sunday, April 15 to Friday, April 20, opening each day at the Center’s Luce Hall, 50

Scott is a documentary artist, working in photography, audio, and film to document the lives of people and places. For more about her work, visit www.carolynscottimages.com/index.htm. Scott’s exhibition was commissioned by the Center as part of its current

On April 21 and 28 the notion that the pleasure of art making is confined to trained artists and professionals will be upended as artists of all ages, cultures, backgrounds, and family structures are welcomed by Artworks to fully immerse themselves in the delightful act of making art and revel in the sheer beauty of self-expression at Art Making Day. Art Making Day is a free event that promotes the idea that entire communities can be connected and uplifted through various forms of creative expression. Hundreds of children and adults are expected to attend Art Making Day and explore the assorted “art stations” set up throughout Artworks’ building and four other partner organization spaces over two weekends. Artworks aims to convert its 40-foot-high sky-lit facility into an art making playground where visitors imaginations are welcome to go wild. Activities range from mural painting and pop art collage to a bike gear spirograph and an upcycled

Stories told in Light:

St. Paul Church Windows Jane Kupin Lay Leader; St. Paul Princeton

Free and Open to all

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DIGITAL ART: Photographs by Cranbury digital Camera Club members are on display through April 27 at the Gourgaud Gallery at Cranbury Town Hall. The organization concentrates on digital photographic techniques and methods. garden party. Guests are encouraged to submit their creations to the annual Art All Night festival occurring June 16 and 17 at the Roebling Machine Shop in Trenton. For a more detailed list of locations, times, and activities, visit: ww.artworkstrenton.org/artmaking-day. Artworks is located in downtown Trenton at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton. For information on Art All Night and other Artworks events and programs, go to artworkstrenton.org or call (609) 394-9436.

Cranbury Digital Camera Club Photography Exhibit

Photos from Cranbury digital Camera Club (CdCC) photographers are on display at the Gourgaud Gallery, located at Cranbury Town Hall, 23-A North

Main Street in Cranbury, through April 27. The photos selected by the photographers for the show depict various themes and subject matter. The photographers are from Cranbury, Hightstown, Monroe, West Windsor, and other communities in Central New Jersey. Their work has been on display at various galleries throughout New Jersey. The CdCC is a nonprofit organization that has been in operation for almost 10 years. The organization concentrates on digital photographic techniques and methods. Its goal is to provide an environment where amateurs and professionals can learn from each other to further develop their skills as photographers. Most of the members are from the Central Jersey area. Meetings are held twice each month

on the second and fourth Wednesdays. The CdCC organization has more than 100 members. The organization provides members with the opportunity to display their photos at various galleries and photo shows. Member competitions are held once a month during which the photographers can present their work to be judged in a positive environment that fosters improvement. Once a month invited guest speakers present various topics about their specialty to enhance the members’ photographic knowledge and methods. For more information, visit www. cranburydigitalcameraclub. com. Gourgaud Gallery is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. It will also be open Sunday, April 22 from 1 to 3 p.m.


21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Zen Ink

Paintings by Hakuin Ekaku

Call for Submissions: ‘Mercer County Artists 2018’

Calling local artists! Visual artists ages 18 or older who live, work, or attend school in Mercer County are invited to submit art for consideration for the “Mercer County Artists 2018” exhibition at The Gallery at Mercer County Community College ( MCCC ). Jurying takes place on Saturday, May 12, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The MCCC Gallery is located on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Artists may enter up to

Area Exhibits Art Times Two, Princeton Brain and Spine, 731 Alexander Road Suite 200, has “The Impact of Art: artists find refuge and regeneration through their art” through August. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Earth, Fire, Water, Ice, Debris: Five Artists Comment on the Environment” through May 5. Works by Helena Bien-

On the occasion of the loan to the Museum of five Japanese ink paintings by the Zen master Hakuin Ekaku (1685–1768), an interdisciplinary panel featuring:

Jane Hirshfield, Class of 1973, poet Mansheng Wang, artist Thomas Hare, William Sauter LaPorte ’28 Professor in Regional Studies and professor of Comparative Literature moderator Andrew Watsky, professor of Art and Archaeology and director of the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art A reception in the Museum will follow

always free and open to the public artmuseum.princeton.edu Hakuin Ekaku (1685–1768). Japanese, Edo period, 1615–1868. Shoki (detail). Lent by Member of the Class of 1963

Cosponsored by the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art

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stock, Diane Burko, Anita Glesta. Susan Hockaday, and Martha Vaughn. artscouncilof princeton.org. Center of Theological Inquiry, 50 Stockton Street, has “Our Town — Princeton,” photographs by Carolyn Scott as part of the “Migrations” series, April 15-20. (609) 6834797. D&R Greenway Land Tr ust, 1 Preser vation Place, has “Soul of a Tree” through April 20. www.drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, has “Going for the Gold: Trenton and the Olympics” through April 29. www.ellarslie.com. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: The Architect in Princeton,” “The Einstein Salon and Innovators Gallery,” and a show on John von Neumann, as well as a permanent exhibit of historic photographs. $4 admission Wednesday-Sunday, noon-4 p.m. Thursday extended hours till 7 p.m. and free admission 4-7 p.m. w w w.princetonhis tory.org. The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Magical & Real: Henriette Wyeth and Peter Hurd, a Retrospective” through May 6. “Rae Sloan Bredin: Harmony and Power” is on view through July 15, “Magical & Real: Henriette Wyeth and Peter Hurd, a Retrospective” is shown through May 6, and “Virtually Rudy: New Dimensions in Sculpture” is through July 1. www.michenerart museum.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “A Gentleman’s Pursuit: The Commodore’s Greenhouse” through June 3. morven.org. Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has “You Are What You Were: Portrait Collages by Trudy BorensteinSugiura” through May 6. The Princeton Universit y A r t Museum has “The Artist Sees Differently: Modern Still Lifes from the Phillips Collection” through April 29 and “Landscapes Beyond Cézanne” through May 13. (609) 258-3788. Rider University Art Gallery, Lawrenceville, shows works by Suzanne Dinger through April 15.

IT AT I V IN S M IS PR

Mercer County Communit y College’s ( MCCC’s ) James Kerney Campus Gallery (JKCG ) in downtown Trenton has announced the opening of “America in a Trance,” an exhibit by photographer Niko J. Kallianiotis, whose images of life in small Pennsylvania towns capture a fading picture of the American dream. The show runs from Thursday, April 12 through Thursday, May 10. On Wednesday, April 18, JKCG invites the community to an artist’s talk and reception with Kallianiotis from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. JKCG is located in MCCC’s Trenton Hall, 137 North Broad Street, across the street from the Kerney Building. Additional hours for this exhibit will be posted on the JKCG website: www.mccc. edu/JKCgallery. Kallianiotis was born in Greece, but im m ig rated to Scranton, Pa., 20 years ago. Since t hen he has crisscrossed the state, taking numerous photographs of Pe n n s ylv a n ia’s s m a l l towns, including Scranton, Aliquippa, Lehighton, and many places in between. He notes that he came to America with visions of prosperity and vibrancy based on Hollywood movies. But what he discovered was something very different. He has seen abandonment of buildings that once were sites of prosperous factories. He has seen casinos rising where industry once thrived. More recently, he has observed parallels between the troubled economy of his home country and the one in Pennsylvania: rising unemployment, a glut of services, and no industry. Now, he has turned those photos into the project he calls “America in a Trance.”

two original works completed since March 2016 in any media except photography. Drop-off is on May 12 between 9:30 a.m. and noon. This year, the gallery is also providing early drop-off on Thursday, May 10, noon to 3 p.m. Judging and pick-up of unaccepted works takes place May 12. An entry fee of $10 for one piece or $15 for two must accompany the entries. A list of accepted artworks will be posted at 3 p.m. outside the Gallery on May 12 and also posted on a website provided to all entrants. Works that are not accepted for the show should be picked up between 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. The juror for this year’s show is Philadelphia artist and curator Alexis Nutini. Born in Mexico City, Nutini received an MFA in printmaking from the Tyler School of Art in 2005 and a BA in fine art from St. Mary’s College of Maryland in 2000. He completed a Fulbright Fellowship in Barcelona, Spain, in 2001. Nutini is an adjunct professor at the Tyler School of Art and is a member of Napoleon, a collectively-run project space. He runs Dos Tres Press, a print shop in South Philadelphia, where he produces limited edition woodcuts and collaborative print based projects. The exhibit opens to the public on Monday, May 21 and runs through Monday, July 9. An opening reception takes place Wednesday, May 23 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Representatives from the college, the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and the West Windsor Arts Council will be on hand to announce more than $1,000 in purchase and merit prizes. For more information and a full prospectus, visit w w w.mccc. edu /gallery or call (609) 570-3589.

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“America in a Trance” Photo Exhibit at MCCC

Friday, April 20, 2 pm 101 McCormick Hall

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“HOUSES”: This photo by Niko J. Kallianiotis is part of “America in a Trance,” a photo exhibit at the James Kerney Campus Gallery at Mercer County Community College’s Trenton Campus running from April 12 through May 10. An artist talk and reception will be held Wednesday, April 18 from 5 to 7:30 p.m.

The PRIME is a crazy fun math competition for middle school students grades 6-8! Spend the day with students like YOU who love all things math. Hang out with Gold Medalists, including a special appearance by Peter Peng, Gold Medalist, US Math Olympiad Team and PRISMS Student!

Sat. April 21, 2018 9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Middle Schoolers Grade 6-8 Sign up at prismsus.org

Teams and individuals welcome

Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science 19 Lambert Drive, Princeton, NJ


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 22

Open House Sun 4/15 1-4pm 2 Audubon Lane, Princeton Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $1,349,000

22 Beechtree Lane, Plainsboro Twp Marketed by: Carole Tosches $699,900

NEWLY PRICED

209 Berkley Avenue, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Ivy Wen $849,000

34 Buckingham Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $500,000

PRESENTING

28 Carriage Trail, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Blanche Paul $670,000

10 Cheyenne Drive, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Barry A. Layne & Christina “Elvina” Grant $719,900

3 Crabapple Court, South Brunswick Twp Marketed by: Yael Zakut $509,999

202 Ivanhoe Drive, Robbinsville Twp Marketed by: John Terebey, Jr. $479,900

From Princeton, We Reach the World From Princeton, We Reach the World © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway © BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway


sm

of of P R I N C E T O N PRINCETON

PRESENTING

5 Lancashire Drive, West Windsor Twp Marketed by: John Terebey, Jr. $599,888

3735 Lawrenceville Princeton Road, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Rocco D’Armiento $2,999,000

1 Manchester Court, Manchester Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $825,000

3 Overlook Road, Hopewell Twp Marketed by: Donna M. Murray $948,000

NEWLY PRICED

PRESENTING

10 Roseberry Court, Lawrence Twp Marketed by: Judith “Judy” Brickman $565,000

27 Southern Way, Princeton Presenting Marketed by: Robin L. Wallack $1,199,000

PRESENTING

4 Sunflower Circle, Lumberton Twp Marketed by: Cherie Davis $579,900

54 Sycamore Lane, Montgomery Twp Marketed by: Christina “Elvina” Grant & Barry Layne $639,900

253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 253 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ | foxroach.com 609-924-1600 609-924-1600 | foxroach.com

23 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

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T h e f i l m is bas e d on “Blaze” Featured at the memoir Living in the Jim Thorpe Film Festival

908.359.8388

UNDER FIRE: The 2nd Annual Jim Thorpe Independent Film Festival’s April 12 opening night feature film is “Blaze,” co-written and directed by Ethan Hawke, starring Ben Dickey, Alia Shawkat, Josh Hamilton, and Charlie Sexton. “Blaze” is inspired by the life of Blaze Foley, the unsung songwriting legend of the Texas outlaw music movement that spawned the likes of Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson. The film is based on the memoir “Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze,” by Rosen, who also co-wrote the screenplay.

Piano Teachers Forum on April 13

The Piano Teachers Forum (PTF) will hold its next monthly meeting on Friday, April 13 at 9:45 a.m. (coffee at 9:15 a.m.) at Jacobs Music, 2540 Br u ns w ick Pike in Lawrenceville. Betty Stoloff will present “Dovetailing Methods and Piano Repertoire.” One day your student is playing “Take Off” and “Landing” from Time to Begin and in a blink of an eye this same student is playing “Etude, Op. 10 No. 3” of Chopin — how did it happen?

What appears to be seamless for the student is a carefully plotted out plan of sequential materials. This presentation will explore the intricate weaving of moving through the methods and appropriate supplementary pieces to the heart of the piano repertoire. For this year’s full program calendar, and other information about the Piano Teachers Forum, visit the website at www.pianoteachersforum. org, or email ptfannouncements@gmail.com. Visitors are welcome to attend PTF programs for a $20 guest fee at the door.

NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA XIAN ZHANG Music Director

THIS WEEKEND!

JASON ALEXANDER:

THE BROADWAY BOY with the NJSO BOB BERNHARDT conductor NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Apr 14–15

NJPAC in Newark | New Brunswick Performance on Apr 15 presented in collaboration with State Theatre New Jersey.

MCGEGAN CONDUCTS BEETHOVEN & MENDELSSOHN

with BEETHOVEN’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 1 and MENDELSSOHN’S SYMPHONY NO. 5, “REFORMATION” NICHOLAS MCGEGAN

Route 206 • Belle Mead

Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze, by Rosen, who also co-wrote the screenplay. Blaze was filmed in Louisiana and had its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January, and its second screening at SXSW in March. Blaze stars musician and first-time actor Ben Dickey in the title role, which won him the Sundance Special Jury Award for Achievement in Acting. Dickey will present Blaze in person on April 12 at the Mauch Chunk Opera House in Jim Thorpe, Pa., then play a live music set with his band, the Beaver Bayou Boys at the Mauch Chunk Opera House after the Blaze screening. JTIFF directors Todd Morris and Jocelyn O’Neil are thrilled to have such a prestigious Sundance-winning production launch the fourday festival, now in its second year. Said Morris: “We are so excited and honored to have Ethan Hawke’s beautiful film, BLAZE, kick off the second year of JTIFF and to have the artist who actually plays Blaze Foley introduce the film and perform live music from the soundtrack immediately after the screening.”

JASON ALEXANDER

The 2nd Annual Jim Thorpe Independent Film Festival’s April 12 opening night feature film is Blaze (2018 ), co-written and directed by Ethan Hawke, starring Ben Dickey, Alia Shawkat, Josh Hamilton, and Charlie Sexton. Blaze is inspired by the life of Blaze Foley, the unsung songwriting legend of the Texas outlaw music movement that spaw ned the likes of Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson. The film weaves together three different periods of time, braiding re-imagined versions of Blaze’s past, present, and future. The different strands explore his love affair with Sybil Rosen; his last, dark night on earth; and the impact his songs and death had on his fans, friends, and foes. The braided storyline terminates in a bittersweet ending that acknowledges Blaze’s profound highs and lows, as well as the impressions he made on the people who shared his journey.

330 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

NICHOLAS MCGEGAN conductor ROBERT LEVIN piano

Apr 21

State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick

BACH’S COMPLETE BRANDENBURGS

609-924-2310

ERIC WYRICK leader and violin soloist Members of the NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

www.terhuneorchards.com

Farm Store Open Daily 9-6 pm • Tasting Room Open Fri., Sat. & Sun. 12-6

May 18 & 20

ERIC WYRICK

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 24

Music and Theater

Princeton | New Brunswick

This weekend’s concerts are generously sponsored by the Investors Foundation.

Tickets start at $20!

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y5 a y, M ay 6 a rd , M u t Sa nday -5pm Su 0am sion 1 mis $

www.njsymphony.org | 1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476)

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This program is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

XIAN ZHANG MUSIC DIRECTOR

Kite Making • Kite Flying Food • Farm Store Farm Animals Sheep Shearing Live Country Music Herbs and Garden Plants Wine Tasting Room Open Fri., Sat. & Sun. 12-6

Wagon Rides Pony Rides Children’s Games & Activities

Jazz Vocal Collective Ensemble presents

It Might As Well Be Spring Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:30 p.m. Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin, Director The Jazz Vocal Collective Ensemble will showcase their original arrangements of classic and contemporary jazz compositions.

Live Music! Saturday: Stony Brook Blue Grass Sunday: Tookany Creek

CONCERT SPONSOR

TAPLIN AUDITORIUM Fine Hall FREE ADMISSION music.princeton.edu


25 â&#x20AC;¢ TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 26

JAZZ AND PIZZAZZ: Eddie Palmieri and his Afro Caribbean Jazz Sextet will perform on Saturday, May 5 at 8 p.m. at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium. “From start to finish, Palmieri (has) the audience dancing in their seats, delighting in the jubilance of the jazz master and his band,” says The Washington Post. “I love to see people dance,” says Palmieri. “I love to be happy and make people happy.” Tickets $10; students and seniors $5, are available online tickets.princeton. edu, by calling (609) 258-9220 or in person at the Frist Campus Center ticket office (Monday to Friday, noon-6 p.m.) or at the Lewis Arts complex (Monday to Friday, 4:30-8:30 p.m.).

Westminster Presents of a sand bar to describe “Journey: Crossing the Bar” the barrier between life and death.

———

Eddie Palmieri and His Afro Carribean Jazz Sextet

Blue Curtain, in cooperation with the department of Spanish & Portuguese, presOn April 14 at 7:30 p.m., ents Eddie Palmieri and his McCarter Theatre hosts Afro Caribbean Jazz Sextet Chinese dance performance on Saturday, May 5 at 8 p.m. at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium. Tickets cost $10; $5 for students and seniors. They are available online viatickets.princeton.edu, by calling (609) 258-9220, or in person at the Frist Campus Center ticket office (Monday to Friday, noon-6 p.m.) or at the Lewis Arts complex (Monday to Friday, 4:308:30 p.m.). ———

“Rhythm of the Dance” At McCarter Theatre

Dongli Li

at 5:30 p.m., Boheme Opera NJ brings two tales of love betrayed to Kendall Main Stage Theatre at The College of New Jersey Center for the Arts, 2000 Pennington Road in Ewing. Virtual sets by J. Matthew Root, recalling the Italian experience in Trenton’s Chambersburg, will heighten the intensity of this production, to be sung in Italian with projected English supertitles. Pre-curtain talks with musical themes will be offered one hour prior. Pietro Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Ruggero Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci are often paired together as a verismo (true-life) matched set with music and characters that reflect present-day love relationships. Based on a play by Giovanni Verga, Cavalleria Rusticana was written as a contest entry in 1890 and won first prize, receiving 60 curtain calls at its premiere in Rome. I Pagliacci was based on a case that the composer’s father, a judge, had tried, using a play-within-a-play concept to expose an illicit affair, with its 1892 premiere in Milan. Reminiscing about the long-time association of Boheme Opera with the Italian-American

“JOURNEY: CROSSING THE BAR”: James Jordan will conduct Westminster Schola Cantorum in a concert in Bristol Chapel at the campus of Westminster Choir College in Princeton on Friday, April 13 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors and are available by phone at 609-9212663 or online at www.rider.edu/arts. community in Trenton, Carl Carabelli, president of the Italian American National Hall of Fame, recollects the very beginning: “I recall the very first meeting with Joe at, I believe, the Neapolitan Club on Butler Street. Joe spoke on starting an opera company. Shortly thereafter, the first production was done in the parking lot of St. Joachim’s Church. That was the seed of a world-class opera company.” Tickets for Cavalleria Rusticana & I Pagliacci are available online 24/7 at

bit.ly/BONJ-CavPag or by phone at (609) 771-2775 and in person at the TCNJ box office at the Student Center, Monday to Friday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Tuesday/ Friday 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Ask about group sale discount for 10 or more in premiere and median sections. Student tickets are $15. Special needs shuttle will be available on campus. For information on Boheme Opera’s main stage and outreach, visit its new website in progress at www. bohemeopera.com.

“Cavalleria Rusticana,”

“Rhythm of the Dance.” “I Pagliacci” by Boheme Opera On Friday, April 20 at 8 “Rhythm of the Dance” showcases the diversity of p.m. and Sunday, April 22

“REQUIEM” A CAPPELLA: Westminster Williamson Voices, conducted by James Jordan, will present a concert titled “Requiem” on Saturday, April 14 at 8 p.m. at the Princeton Abbey in Princeton. This program features the world premiere of Peter Relph’s “Requiem,” a virtuosic work for a cappella choir and crotales, plus the premiere of Cortlandt Matthews’ “Psalmo,” a work using chant improvisation as its expressive vehicle. Works by Whitbourn, MacMillan, Lavoy, and Gjiello complete this exciting program of new compositions for choir. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors, and are available by phone at (609) 921-2663 or online at www.rider.edu/arts. The Program in Creative Writing presents

Althea Ward Clark w’21 2017-2018

READING SERIES April 18 • 4:30 pm

Wallace Thea, Lewis arts complex

Reading by: Jane Hirshfield Photo by Curt Richter

Jane Hirshfield is the author of eight collections of poetry, including, most recently, The Beauty; Come, Thief; After; Given Sugar, Given Salt; The Lives of the Heart; and The October Palace, as well as two books of essays. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement, Harper’s, The Nation, The American Poetry Review, The Best American Poetry Pushcart Prize Anthologies, and many other publications. Hirshfield’s honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Academy of American Poets. In 2012, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

Walter mosley

Novelist and social commentator Walter Mosley is the author of more than 40 books. The first African-American to serve on the board of directors of the National Book Awards, Mosley has received an O’Henry Award, The Sundance Risktaker Award, a Grammy, and two NAACP Image Awards for Outstanding Literary Work. In 2016, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Annual Edgar Awards and was named the first AfricanAmerican “Grand Master” by the Mystery Writers of America. His newest novel, Down the River Unto the Sea, centers on a former New York City police detective turned Brooklyn PI.

Photo by Marcia Wilson

Westminster Schola Cantorum, led by conductor James Jordan, will present a concert titled “Journey: Crossing the Bar” on Friday, April 13 at 8 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on the campus of Westminster Choir College in Princeton. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors and are available by phone at (609) 921-2663 or online at www. rider.edu/arts. The program includes music by Mozart, Brahms, Lauridsen, and Mealor. A highlight will be the New Jersey premiere of the composition for which the concert is titled: Crossing the Bar by Anthony Bernarducci. The work is a setting of Tennyson’s poem with the same title, which the poet wrote three years before his death and employs the metaphor

Chinese dancing traditions that were built on profound aesthetics and tempered over thousands of years into an extensive and independent art form. In addition to classical Chinese dance, highlights of the program include various Chinese folk dances representing a wide range of ethnic groups such as Tibet, Han, Zhuang, and others. The colorful costumes and fluidity of the dancers’ body movements are seamlessly integrated to present the traditional aesthetics and deeply expressive powers that still resonate so true today. “Rhythm of the Dance” is produced by Chinese Culture Arts Association (CCAA). For tickets and more information, visit mccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787. ———

arts.princeton.edu


umber

❑ Address

27 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

_____ ______ Date & Time: ______________________ eduled to run ___________________. pay special attention to the following: okay) ❑ Expiration Date

MAMBO COMBO: On Tuesday, April 24 at 7:30 p.m., Cuban musician Roberto Fonseca will perform at McCarter Theatre. Pianist, composer, and artistic director of Cuba’s Jazz Plaza Festival in Santiago, Roberto Fonseca dominates the “new Cuban scene” and has toured with the Buena Vista Social Club and Omara Portuondo. His own style lies at the crossroads of jazz, traditional Cuban music, and soul. His first CD  “ABUC”  (Cuba spelled backwards) released last fall, is dedicated to the island he still calls home. A kaleidoscope of dancing colors, it incorporates many elements of the island’s traditions, ranging from contradanza, mambo, and cha-cha-cha to danzon, bolero, and even hip-hop. Tickets start at $56. For more information, visit mccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787.

“I Am in 5th Grade, You Are in Kindergarten”

LESSONS • RENTALS • INSTRUMENTS & MORE

Presented by the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theatre, McCarter Theater presents two short Montgomery Center • Rte 206 • 609-924-8282 • www.farringtonsmusic.com Next to ShopRite • 5 miles from Downtown • Free Parking Give Your Child the Music Advantage plays in honor of María Irene Fornés, collectively titled I Am in 5th Grade, You Are “…the most original musical thinker of our time.” in Kindergarten. Perfor—The New Yorker mances start at 8 p.m. and run from April 13 through •• piano • guitar • drums piano • guitar • drums April 21. For more informa•• violin •• voice tion, visit mccarter.org or violin voice •• flute flute • cello • clarinet • sax • trumpet •• flute • trombonecall (609) 258-2787. clarinet ••sax sax • trumpet FNU LNU by Mac WellPRINCETON: 609-924-8282• violin • clarinet • trumpet man, one of Fornés fellow ★ NEW LOCATION ★ avant garde play wrights, 947 RT. 206, Suite 204 musically follows a king 97-0032 (next to Audi dealer) of the numbers racket in 609-387-96311940 s Ta mpa, a s ma l l 609-448-7170 ETON JCT 609-924-8282 5 Minutes from Downtown BURLINGTONtime could-be killer named PRINCETON ons Only FREE HIGHTSTOWN PARKING Deezo, anarchists, talkwww.farringtonsmusic.com ing reptiles, and a stop at the county morgue. In the world premiere of Migdalia Cruz’s play, commissioned EDWARD T. CONE PERFORMERS-IN-RESIDENCE by Princeton, The Book of Miaou-Wow -Wow : Don’t D r ink Ever ything Your Mother Pours You, Fornés longtime friend and student presents a new play WEDNESDAY FREE admission. by Colette’s short APRIL 18, 2018 Tickets required. inspired story “Gribiche” and Fornés’ play Promenade about an Available at 7:30pm unconventional family of music.princeton.edu cabaret per for mers who 609-258-9220 Richardson unite to help one of their or at the door Auditorium in own who collapses on stage. It is also the story of people Alexander Hall who tell such stories and the Six Decades of Reich ones who listen, and a cabafeaturing a complete ret about women, reproducperformance of Drumming tive rights, and memory. with NEXUS Concurrent with this show Join us for a panel discussion is a production of Fornés at 6pm, and a post-concert landmark play, Fefu and talk-back with Steve Reich. Her Friends.

MUSIC LESSONS RENT ALS RENTALS SCHOOL BAND L O W R AT E S

LESSONS

chapel music presents

nts. ections if we hear from you by_________________________.a service of poetry, music and meditation with members of the jazz vespers ensemble and the chapel choir d will run as is. 9-452-7000 • FAX: 609-452-0033 COLD SOIL ROAD PRINCETON, NJ 08540

www.terhuneorchards.com (609) 924-2310

Winery Sunday Music Series

wednesday at 8pm april 18

Enjoy Music and Wine Tasting 1-4pm April 15: Brooke Dicaro April 22: Kingston Ridge April 29: Acoustic DouVer May 13: Jerry Steele May 20: Darla & Rich May 27: James Popik

14 varieties of wine are available by the glass, as well as light fare. No cover charge. Wine tasting is $7 per person.

Art and Wine April 21 1:30pm registration required

Farm market open: 9-6 weekdays, and 9-5 on Saturday and Sunday Enjoy the beginning of spring on the farm!!

university chapel admission free


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 28

CONCERTS . THEATRE . CHILDREN’S CONCERTS HOLIDAY . OPERA . COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

Presenting world-class performances and exhibits in Princeton and Lawrenceville

Learn more at www.rider.edu/arts

ART EXHIBITS . RECITALS . CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASSES . DANCE . MUSICAL THEATRE

CINEMA REVIEW

Ready Player One

Gamers Search for Easter Egg in Virtual Reality Adventure

I

t is 2045, a time when the planet has devolved into a desolate dystopia that is a combination of pollution, overpopulation, poverty, corruption, and global warming. Most of humanity lives in slums where they escape their misery by disappearing, via virtual reality, into the Oasis, a parallel universe co-created by James Halliday (Mark Rylance) and Ogden Morrow (Simon Pegg). Halliday is now in control of Oasis and Morrow is no longer associated with the firm. The picture’s point of departure is an unrecognizable Columbus, Ohio, that is a devastated metropolis that has been reduced to a wasteland of vertical “stacks,” i.e. mobile homes that are piled on top one another. We meet Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan), who is an orphaned teen who has been taken in by his Aunt Alice (Susan Lynch). Wade’s a gamer who goes by his online avatar Parzival. His best friend is Aech (Lena Waithe), although they’ve never actually met. In this world everyone prefers escaping into the Oasis instead of facing the post-apocalyptic squalor that is reality. A glimmer of hope of a way to escape appears in the will left behind by the recently-deceased Halliday. In a video, he announces a treasure hunt for an Easter egg that is hidden in the Oasis. The finder will not only be awarded control of the company Oasis, but will also

inherit half a trillion dollars. So, Wade forms the High Five, a team comprised of him, Aech, Art3mis (Olivia Cooke), and siblings Sho (Philip Zhao) and Daito (Win Morisaki). Of course, millions of other “Gunters” (egg hunters) join in the search, and the chief competitor is Innovative Online Industries (IOI), a video game conglomerate run by Nolan Sorrento (Ben Mendelsohn), who has a mammoth army of indentured players at his disposal. However, trust Steven Spielberg to work his movie magic. After establishing that implausible challenge, Ready Player One takes off at a dizzying pace, with the legendary director even including a romance between Wade and Art3mis. Wade has a big cyber crush on her even though he has no idea what she looks like in real life. She likes him, too, but hides behind her avatar, because she has a big birthmark on her face. The movie is vintage Spielberg! Excellent (HHHH). Rated PG-13 for action, violence, bloody images, suggestive material, partial nudity, and profanity. Running time: 140 minutes. Production Studios: Amblin Entertainment/Village Roadshow Pictures/ Reliance Entertainment/De Line Pictures/Farah Films & Management. Distributor: Warner Brothers Pictures. —Kam Williams

SUCCESS!: Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan, left), together with the other members of his group High Five, have found the Easter egg in the virtual world of Oasis and is receiving the key to the company and a half trillion dollars from the image of the deceased James Halliday (Mark Rylance). Will this new found wealth lead to a happy end for the group? (Photo by and Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures © 2017 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., Village Roadshow Films North America Inc., and RatPac-Dune Entertainment LLC - U.S., Can)


Kip Thorne, joint winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics, will deliver the department of physics’ 43rd Annual Donald R. Hamilton Lecture. His talk, “Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Colliding Stars,” will be held at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 12, in Princeton University’s McDonnell Hall, Room A-02. The lecture is free to the public. Thorne, a 1965 Princeton graduate alumnus and the Feynman Professor of

about the two types of waves that propagate through the universe: electromagnetic waves and gravitational waves. He will discuss how prior Princeton physicists’ research served as the foundation for the dawning field of gravitational astronomy, using the LIGO and VIRGO instruments to detect gravitational waves from colliding stars and black holes. Thorne will discuss this exciting work that is opening new windows onto the universe. Thorne shared the 2017

29 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Nobel Laureate Kip Thorne Theoretical Physics, Emeri- Nobel Prize with Caltech’s To Give Hamilton Lecture tus, at Caltech, will speak Barry C. Barish, the Ronald

and Maxine Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus, and MIT’s Rainer Weiss, professor of physics, emeritus. The Hamilton lectures are an endowed series of public talks given in honor of the late Donald Ross Hamilton, an atomic and nuclear experimental physicist who made major contributions to Princeton and the department of physics. More information about the Hamilton lectures and the £hysics events are available at www.princeton. edu/physics.

Joshua Redman & Brooklyn Rider Friday, May 18 – 8pm

Restaurant & Enoteca

W I N E TA S T I N G April 18, 2018 | 5:30 - 8:30 pm

Join us for a special evening full of flavorful wine and light hors d’oeuvre with our friends from Olê Imports who are making an exclusive visit to Eno Terra. Taste the most sought out w ines of Spain and Portugal. Meet the industry’s top growers and producers. Relax in good company. This is an evening you won’t want to miss. $25 via PayPal | $30 at the door (Excludes Tax)

For reservations:

www.enoterra.com | 609 497-1777

4484 Route 27, Kingston, New Jersey

mccarter.org | 609.258.2787 Signature Series sponsored by Made possible by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment of the Arts


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018 • 30

Calendar Wednesday, April 11 Noon: The Book Lover Luncheon at Princeton Public Library Benefit hosted by the Friends of the Princeton Public Library. Guest speaker Lisa See is a bestselling author (Snowflower and the Secret Fan, Peony in Love, Shanghai Girls, China Dolls, Dreams of Joy) who will discuss her latest book, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane. 6 p.m.: Bill Ayers and Rick Ayers discuss You Can’t Fire the Band Ones and 18 Other Myths about Teachers, Teachers’ Unions, and Public Education at Labyrinth Books of Princeton. 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Fri. 04/13/18 to Thurs. 04/19/18

Final Portrait

Fri-Sat: 2:50, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20 Sun-Thurs: 2:50, 5:00, 7:10 (R)

Finding Your Feet

Fri-Sat: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 Sun-Thurs: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 (PG-13)

Foxtrot

Fri-Thurs: 4:50 (R)

Beirut

Fri-Sat: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 (R) Sun-Thurs: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15 (R)

The Leisure Seeker Fri-Sat: 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 Sun-Thurs: 2:00, 4:35, 7:10 (R)

The Death of Stalin Fri-Sat: 2:20, 7:20, 9:50 Sun-Thurs: 2:20, 7:20 (R)

Isle of Dogs

Fri-Sat: 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50 Sun-Thurs: 2:35, 5:00, 7:25 (PG-13)

Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students). Thursday, April 12 6 p.m.: David Russell and Barry McCrea discuss Tact: Aesthetic Liberalism and the Essay Form in 19th C. Britain at Labryinth Books of Princeton. 7:30 p.m.: Cuban jazz artist Chucho Valdés performs at McCarter Theatre. 8 p.m.: Kip Thorne delivers a lecture on “Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Colliding Stars” at Princeton University’s McDonnell AO2. Free. Friday, April 13 11:30 a.m.: Stories, songs, and rhymes in Korean for children and families ages 2 and up at Princeton Public Library. Saturday, April 14 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Join Hamilton Jewelers at their Princeton location for their Annual Bridal Event. Receive $500 with engagement ring purchases of $5,000 or more and 20% off wedding bands. Ronnie Ross of The Knot will share the latest trends and tips for planning the perfect wedding (also on Sunday, April 15). 7:30 p.m.: “Rhythms of the Dance” showcases the diversity of Chinese dancing traditions over thousands of years. The performance will be held at McCarter Theatre. 8 p.m.: Princeton Chapel Choir and Orchestra perform Franz Joseph Haydn’s Mass for Troubled Times at Princeton University Chapel. Admission is free.

Sunday, April 15 3 p.m.: Award-winning juggler and Cirque du Soleil regular, Greg Kennedy, performs at McCarter Theatre. 3 p.m.: Seinfeld star Jason Alexander performs an evening of song and dance with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra at the State Theatre in New Brunswick. Monday, April 16 Recycling 6 p.m.: Dr. Willie Parker delivers a lecture on “Shall the Fundamentalists Win? A Moral Argument For Reproductive Justice” at Princeton University’s McCosh 10. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.: “I am Innocent: Meet and Greet with Centurion Staff” at the Princeton Public Library’s second floor reading room. This event is held in conjunction with “I am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison,” on view at the Princeton Public Library through June 1, 2018. Free.

Tuesday, April 17 6 p.m.: Martin Goodman and Anthony Grafton discuss A History of Judaism: From Its Origins to the Present at Labyrinth Books of Princeton.

Wednesday, April 18 7 to 9 p.m.: Arts Council of Princeton’s Community Stage Series at Solley Theater presents “Climate Cabaret,” a Princeton-born production featuring veteran performers

and writer/composer Stephen Hiltner. 8 to 10:30 p.m.: Contra Dance with the Princeton Country Dancers at the Suzanne Patterson Center. General admission is $10 ($5-$10 for students).

Hilarious,

Please join us for a fun evening of entertainment!

High-Energy

is Coming to Town! Saturday, April 2I • 8:30 pm Dessert Reception to Follow

Continuing Isle of Dogs (PG-13) The Death of Stalin (R)

GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS: $36

Special Program Cleo From 5 to 7 (1962) Thu, Apr 12 at 7:30 Prof Picks We Are the Best! (PG-13) Tue, Apr 17 at 7:30 Art on Screen Stalker (1979) Wed, Apr 18 at 7:30

For more information or to purchase tickets, contact www.thejewishcenter.org/Sarge

Showtimes change daily Visit for showtimes. PrincetonGardenTheatre.org

435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609.921.0100 • www.thejewishcenter.org The Jewish Center is a non-profit organization whose policy is to not deny membership or education to any person based on financial need.

Explore the Legacy of America’s Beloved Theatrical Family Delve into the rich layers of the Hammerstein family with the grandson of the beloved librettist and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II as he reveals his family’s personal and professional highlights as well as scandals and tragedies. PRESENTER OSCAR ANDY HAMMERSTEIN is a painter, writer, lecturer and family historian who has devoted much of his life to preserving his family’s heritage and their contribution to American culture.

JOIN US!

Thursday, April 26

RSVP by April 23 to 877-791-3389 100 Hollinshead Spring Road Skillman, New Jersey 08558 A Continuing Care Retirement Community stonebridgeatmontgomery.org This event will include an informational presentation about our community that will last at least 10 minutes. The guest speaker is not an employee or agent of or affiliated in any way with Springpoint. The guest speaker’s presentation, opinions, advice and comments are those of the speaker only.


• PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FARMERS’ MARKET •

‘The Right and the Left Yell at Us, So We Must Be Doing Something Well’: The Depoliticization of American Jewish Politics and Philanthropy Lila Corwin Berman

Enjoy local, organic, sustainable agriculture

WEDNESDAY N E S OP

April 11 through May 9 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Firestone Library/Chapel Plaza Featuring Jersey Fresh organic fruits and vegetables Locally made breads •• Cheeses •• Honey Organic sandwiches and salads •• Nut butters Gluten-free baked goods •• Cooking demonstration Student performances

Temple University Respondent:

Alison Isenberg Princeton University

Wednesday

Find us on Facebook at Princeton University Farmers’ Market

April 18, 2018 4:30 p.m. 219 Aaron Burr Hall

farmersmarket.princeton.edu market@princeton.edu 609-258-5144

ams.princeton.edu/events/american-jewish-studies

• PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FARMERS’ MARKET •

http://clipart-library.com/clipart/8TEbGprGc.htm

Cosponsored by the Departments of History and Politics

The 43rd Annual Donald R. Hamilton Lecture

APRIL 12, 2018 · 8 PM · McDonnell A02 A free lecture open to the public

Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Colliding Stars KIP THORNE Feynman Professor of Physics, Emeritus, Caltech Joint Winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics with Barry Barish and Rainer Weiss

The Department of Physics will also host on April 12:

A Celebration of the Legacy of Robert Dicke | Jadwin A10 2:00 PM 2:10 PM 2:55 PM 3:15 PM 4:30 PM

Introduction P. J. E. Peebles, Princeton University Break Rainer Weiss, MIT Curtis Callan, APS President Emeritus, dedication of APS Historic Plaque in appreciation of R. H. Dicke at Frist Campus Center/Palmer Lab

Princeton University Department of Physics · princeton.edu/physics/events

31 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

The Program in American Studies and the Program in Judaic Studies at Princeton University present The Lapidus Family Fund Lecture in American Jewish Studies


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 32

S ports

PU Men’s Lax Tops Stony Brook to End Skid, Fueled by Sowers’ Spectacular 9-Point Effort

E

ven though Michael Sowers was playing in just the 24th game of his career with the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team when the Tigers hosted Stony Brook last Saturday, the 5’8, 165-pound dynamo already looms large in program history. As a freshman, Sowers set a Princeton single-season record with 82 points on 41 goals and 41 assists in 15 appearances. Through the first eight games of the 2018 season, the native of Dresher, Pa. had tallied 14 goals and a nation-best 31 assists, becoming the fastest Princeton player ever to reach the career century mark in points when he achieved that feat in the fourth game. Despite Sowers’ heroics, Princeton entered the game against Stony Brook mired in a three-game losing streak. “We knew we had the talent, we just had to execute the coaches’ plan,” said Sowers, reflecting on Princeton’s mindset as it prepared to face the Seawolves. “It was more of just believing in ourselves and just having confidence.” The Tigers executed from the get-go on Saturday, jumping out to a 6-2 lead after the first quarter with Sowers contributing a goal and four assists. “If we were going to come

out here and be successful, we had to be flying around,” said Sowers. “We were playing at 100 speed all day, all the time, which is crucial for us.” Sowers kept flying around the field, ending up with four goals and five assists to match his single-game career-high of nine points as the Tigers cruised to a 16-8 win, improving to 4-5. “That is just the offense, some days it will be me, some days it will be [Austin] Sims, some days it will be Riley [Thompson].” Coach [Pat] March does a good job of putting us in spots to be successful,” said Sowers, who has now scored nine points in games on four occasions so far in his career. “I just had to make simple plays, I was lucky to do it. I know that if I just follow coach March’s plan, we are going to be successful. At the end of the day, getting a win is all that matters.” With the Tigers getting four goals apiece from both Sims and freshman Chris Brown, along with two from freshman Luke Crimmins and one piece from sophomore Philip Robertson and senior Riley Thompson, the Princeton offense displayed plenty of balance. “You see it in practice all the time and I think for us it was just a matter of coming out and doing it,” said

Sowers. “I don’t think we have put together a full game but I think today was pretty close to it.” Sowers has looked to do more talking on the field this season in the wake of the graduation of battle-tested stars Gavin McBride and Zach Currier. “Last year with Gavin [McBride], I didn’t really have to do that; I was able to sit behind him and Zach [Currier],” said Sowers. “This year with those guys gone, Simsy and I have taken the leadership role, being able to direct guys on the field a little bit.” Princeton head coach Matt Madalon can’t say enough about what Sowers is doing for the Tigers. “Michael did a really good job,” said Madalon. “Every game he plays here, he gets better and better. He is a real special one.” For the Tigers, defeating Stony Brook was really important. “The mindset here was that we wanted to get back in the win column; it was really just execute,” said Madalon. “We made some mistakes down the stretch against Brown [a 14-13 loss on March 31] that burned our guys. They weren’t going to let that define them. They said we are going to be a team that is going to finish.

The message I sent out to our guys today was that it was the best job we have done all year listening and executing. I know the guys hear us but to be able to put it into the execution was very good.” Madalon was particularly happy to see the execution he got from some of his younger players, including freshmen Brown and Crimmins along with sophomore midfielder Connor McCarthy. “It is a really good sign to see young guys stepping up, our first two middies this game were a freshman and sophomore in McCarthy and Crimmins,” said Madalon. “We were really happy at their performance.” Another good sign for Princeton was sharper play on face-offs and clears. “It was part of the execution; our systems aren’t changing so we are just playing a lot better within them,” said Madalon, whose team won 18-of-27 face-offs and was successful on all 14 clear attempts. “It was good to get back into the win column.” Madalon is looking for his squad to pile up more wins as it was slated to play at Siena on April 10 before hosting Dartmouth on April 14. “Losing is tough; it hurts the spirits,” said Madalon. “You get a couple of those losses and you start doubting yourself a little bit. I think it was nice to just have these guys play well; it was good for the guys.”

MIGHTY MIKE: Princeton University men’s lacrosse player Michael Sowers looks for an opening in recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore star attackman Sowers matched his singlegame career-high of nine points, tallying four goals and five assists to help Princeton defeat Stony Brook 16-8 and snap a three-game losing streak. The Tigers, who moved to 4-5 with the win, were slated to play at Siena on April 10 before hosting Dartmouth on April 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) Sowers, for his part, sees It is a step in the right direcgood things ahead for the tion.” Tigers. “Stony Brook is a —Bill Alden great team, they are always scrappy,” said Sowers. “So Tell them you saw to come out here and get a win like this, and put up 16 their ad in against that defense and a well-coached team, is definitely a confidence booster.

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For the Princeton University softball team, its loss to Dartmouth in the second game of a three-game set with the Big Green last weekend served as a microcosm of a rough start to the 2018 campaign. The Tigers jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the first inning in the contest on Friday and then, af ter sur render ing three runs, battled back to make it a 3-3 ballgame heading into the four th. Dar t mout h, t hough, an swered with two runs in the top of the next frame and added one each in the last three innings to pull away to a 8-6 win. “We let the moment get bigger than it truly is in the pressure situations,” said Princeton head coach Lisa Van Ackeren, whose team fell 12-1 in the finale against Dartmouth to end the weekend at 5-20 overall and 3-6 Ivy League. “We have to figure out how to stop the bleeding. It is key for us to figure out how to be tough and stable and recognize when somebody just needs to step up with a big play here and that

we are going to be OK.” Van Ackeren is seeing good mental toughness from freshman pitcher Allie Reynolds, who got the weekend off to a good start by hurling a three-hit shutout in a 6-0 victory. “Allie has got the makings to be a really, really strong pitcher for us; she has gotten a ton of time under her belt as a freshman,” said Van Ackeren, noting that junior hurler Riley Wilkinson has been sidelined by injury. “ S h e h a s s te p p e d u p and she has been emotionally steady, which is what we need. She is not really fazed by much. You walk to the field and you never know what the score is from watching her play. That is the mark of a really strong, composed pitcher. She has done a really good job for us in some really tough situations.” Kaylee Grant, Mackenzie Meyer, and Allison Harvey all had their moments at the plate against the Big Green over the weekend. Junior Grant went 2-for- 4 w ith two runs scored and two RBIs in the doubleheader on

THE RIGHT STUFF: Princeton University softball pitcher Allie Reynolds fires a pitch last weekend as the Tigers hosted Dartmouth in a three-game set. Freshman Reynolds earned a shutout as Princeton posted a 6-0 win in the first game of the weekend. The Big Green went on to win 8-6 and 12-1 in the final two games. The Tigers, who moved to 5-20 overall and 3-6 Ivy League, play a three-game set at Yale next weekend with a doubleheader on April 14 and a single game on April 15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Friday while freshman Meyer slugged a two-run homer in the second game and junior Harvey went 4-for7 with two runs and three RBIs on Friday. “Kaylee has struggled a little bit early on just to find her groove, but she always trusts the process,” said Van Ackeren. “She is one of those kids who doesn’t abort the plan and just continues to fight for it. Mackenzie has been such a good spark for us in so many ways this year. She is such an energy kid, she is the most excited kid to play everyday. Harvey has been Harvey, I think that is what she expects of herself. She wants to come up in the RBI situations, she wants to compete.” Ju n ior c atcher Keeley Walsh has given the Tigers some competitive fire. “Keeley is such a great influence on the whole team, she is as as steady as they come,” said Van Ackeren of Walsh, who is hitting .319 with two homers and 10 RBIs on the season. “She has done such a good job in a really difficult situation. She cares so much about our pitchers. After every game, regardless of her own performance, she is coming up and saying what can we do, how can we get better.” In the view of Van Ackeren, improved pitching is the key to Princeton playing better going forward. “It starts in the circle, if I said anything else I would be lying,” said Van Ackeren, whose staff has a 7.14 ERA. “It is big part of what we do. You look at any successful team and they all have strong pitching or stable pitching. That is what we are tasking our pitching staff with, trying to do whatever it takes to figure things out individually.You have to separate what has happened in the past and commit to only being forward thinking and progressive-minded.” The Tigers also need to take a stronger approach at the plate. “We need our offense to have quality at-bats; we have not gave that consistently through our lineup,” said Van Ackeren, “We will have a really good first inning and really good seventh inning and there is kind of a lull in between where we lose our commitment to having quality at bats. I think if we do that, we would put a little more pressure on opposing pitchers.” With Pr inceton hav ing won two straight Ivy League titles, Van Ackeren believes her squad has what it takes to move up the standings and finish in the top two to earn a spot in the league’s championship series. “We are couple of games away from becoming the team we know we can be,” maintained Van Ackeren, whose team plays a threegame set at Yale next weekend with a doubleheader on April 14 and a single game on April 15. “The good part about it is that we are in a situation where there is a ton of parity in the league. It has been all over the place. It is anybody’s race and I think our guys know that. It is just a matter of focusing on ourselves and controlling what we can control.” —Bill Alden

PU Men’s Heavyweights Win Childs Cup, Bringing 6-0 Record Into Clash at Harvard In building the Princeton Universit y men’s heav yweight rowing squad into one of the deepest programs in the nation, Greg Hughes has focused more on instilling a work ethic than stockpiling athletes. “It is not just about your talent and abilit y, it is about development,” said Princeton head coach Greg Hughes. “It is one of those i nt a ng ible t h i ng s ab out sports that we as a society learn. It doesn’t come down to a one-off or just getting lucky. Consistent, steady, day-to-day hard work over time will yield results.” Princeton has been seeing tangible results, with the top boat medaling four straight years at the Eastern Sprints and the Tigers winning the event’s Rowe Cup in two of the last three years given to the program that piles up the most points in all boats. On the national stage, Princeton’s varsity eight placed in the top four in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association championship regatta as well in each of the last four years. Last Saturday, as it hosted the Childs Cup regatta on Lake Carnegie, the Tigers displayed depth, winning all five races in the competition. Hughes credits senior captain Augustin Wambersie with setting a tone of diligence throughout the squad. “Augustin is one of those kind of guys who is a quiet leader; he is not the person that stands there in front of

a big group and has a lot to say,” said Hughes. “When he does speak, it is always really good. He has got a good head for sport and he is a great leader. He is one of those hard, quiet workers and very consistent. That has been really great to have.” It is great for Princeton to have a number of other good senior leaders, including Tom George, Will Chance, Leo Toch, and Tim Livingstone. “Tom raced last summer as the senior world championships in the men’s pair and he was the only U.S. college kid to make the A final,” said Hughes. “Will came here effectively as a novice and has worked his way up the ranks. He is just doing a great job and made real improvements through all of those year. Leo has been rowing up in the bow seat in the varsity. He made his way up through the third varsity and the second varsity and now he is in the varsity. Tim has done a really good job. Last year was a little bit harder for him, but he learned from it and he has made real improvements. We needed some guys prepared to step up and play a role and they have. It is still early obviously, there are big races to come. It has been a fun group to coach.” It has been fun for Hughes to welcome in a special group of freshmen to the program. “There are a lot of talented guys in this year’s

freshman class who are doing a great job in the 2V, 3V, 4V mix which has been awesome,” said Hughes. “It always takes time; it is a big step up from high school to college. Those guys have been doing a nice job developing. That has been a big part of our focus this spring, to put those guys in lots of different situations and give them all all the chance to learn and step up.” Hughes liked the way his rowers stepped up last Saturday across the board. “It was a solid effort for all of the boats,” said Hughes, whose top boat posted a winning time of 6:03.9 over the 2,000-meter course in improving to 6-0 with Penn taking second in 6:09.2 and Columbia coming in third at 6:12.8. “The varsity got the job done. It was also an opportunity for us to get a look at things that we need to work on. Those guys have a good head for that, so we were able to dissect that race and think about this week and what we want to work on and prepare for as we get ready for the ones to come.” The Tigers have a big race coming up this weekend as they face Harvard in Cambridge, Mass. on April 14 in the race for the Compton Cup. “It is pretty simple. It is about execution and putting up our best performance,” said Hughes. “I tend not to get caught up in opponents. There are nine people in our boat and we are going to make sure that is what is firing and get ready to go.” —Bill Alden

MAKING WAVES: The Princeton University men’s heavyweight varsity crew shows its form in a race this spring. Last Saturday, Princeton’s top boat defeated Penn and Columbia to win the Childs Cup. The Tigers, now 6-0, face Harvard in Cambridge, Mass. on April 14 in the race for the Compton Cup. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

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33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Princeton Softball Goes 1-2 Against Dartmouth, Needs to Sharpen Focus to Get on Right Track


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 34

In the morning, Princeton defeated both No. 13 Harvard and Cornell to win the Class of 1975 Cup, and the Tigers followed that in the afternoon with wins over No. 19 Dartmouth and Penn to retain the Class of 1984 Plaque. Princeton is next in action Tiger Men’s Tennis when it hosts Yale and Iowa on April 14 with the EisenFalls to Columbia Running into a buzz saw, berg Cup on the line. the Princeton Universit y men’s tennis team fell 4-0 PU Women’s Lightweights to 15th-ranked Columbia Tops Harvard-Radcliffe Leading wire-to-wire, the last Sunday. The Lions won the first Princeton University womt wo doubles matches to en’s lightweight varsity 8 claim the afternoon’s first defeated Harvard-Radcliffe point and did the same with to win the Class of 1999 the first three singles match- Cup last Saturday on Lake es to end before the match Carnegie. The Tigers posted a winwas halted with Columbia’s ning time of 7:16.9 over the win clinched. P r i n c e t o n , n o w 16 -9 2,000-meter course with overall and 1-2 Ivy League, the Crimson more than 12 hosts Yale on April 14 and seconds behind in 7:29.3. It marked Princeton’s first win at Brown on April 15. over Harvard-Radcliffe at Lake Carnegie since 2010. PU Men’s Lightweights The Tigers are next in acExcel in Home Opener Enjoying a big day in its tion when they compete in first regatta on Lake Carne- the Knecht Cup regatta at gie this spring, the Princeton Mercer Lake in nearby West University men’s lightweight Windsor. varsity eight defeated Dart- Princeton Men’s Golf mouth, Drexel, and Temple 4th at Invitational last Saturday. Evan Quinn starred as the The Tigers posted a win- Princeton University men’s ning time of 6:19.7 over the golf team placed four th 2,000-meter course with overall at the program’s anDartmouth taking second nual Princeton Invitational in 6:33.9, followed by Dela- at the Springdale Golf Club ware in 6:38.6 and Temple last weekend. in 6:58.0. Sophomore standout Princeton is next in ac- Quinn fired a one-under tion when it hosts Cornell 141 for the 36-hole event on April 14 in the race for to place fourth individually. JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT: Princeton University men’s hockey star the Platt Cup. Cornell’s Mike Graboyes Max Veronneau controls the puck in a game this past winter. Tiger Open Rowers won at -6, one stroke in Junior forward Veronneau and classmate Ryan Kuffner have Win Ivy Invitational front of Yale’s James NichHos t ing t he inaug ural olas w it h Penn’s Car ter both named as second-team CCM/AHCA Hockey All-Americans. Veronneau led Princeton in scoring with 55 points on 17 goals Ivy League Invitational last Thompson third at -3. and 38 assists while forward Kuffner tallied 52 points, scor- Saturday on Lake Carnegie, In the team standings, ing 29 goals and 23 assists. Kuffner’s 29 goals is a Princeton the fourth-ranked Princeton Princeton tied Cornell for single-season record, as he surpassed Jeff Halpern’s 28 from University women’s open fourth with a +8 score, six 1997-98. The pair, who each surpassed the 100-point career varsity 8 produced a pair strokes behind first place mark this season, are the first two Tigers to earn All-American of strong performances to Yale. honors since defenseman Taylor Fedun was a second-team se- retain two of their most hisThe Tigers are next in aclection in 2011. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) toric trophies. tion when they compete in

up a run and four hits with seven strikeouts. A day later, the Tigers fell 12-0. Princeton, now 7-13 overall and 4-2 Ivy League, host Seton Hall on April 11 before hosting a three-game Princeton Baseball set against Penn with a douGoes 2-1 at Brown Jumping into second place bleheader on April 14 and in the Ivy League standings, a single game on April 15. the Princeton Universit y PU Women’s Tennis baseball team went 2-1 in a three-game set at Brown last Defeats Columbia Nicole Kalhorn and Naweekend. thalie Rodilosso starred as The Tigers swept a douthe Princeton Universit y bleheader on Saturday, prewomen’s tennis team devailing 7-4 and 4-3. In the feated Columbia 6-1 last nightcap, former Princeton Sunday. High standout Ben Gross Junior Kalhor n posted got the win on the mound, going six innings, giving a win at third singles and freshman Rodilosso pre-

PU Sports Roundup

vailed at sixth singles. The pair also helped the Tigers earn the doubles point in the win as the Tigers improved to 15-3 overall and 3-0 Ivy League. Princeton plays at Yale on April 14 and at Brown on April 15.

CRIMSON TIDE: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Elizabeth George unloads the ball in recent action. Last Saturday, junior midfielder George scored five goals to help Princeton defeat Harvard 20-15. The Tigers, who improved to 6-4 overall and 2-1 Ivy League with the win over the Crimson, are slated to host Yale on April 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) the Ivy League Champion- with Harvard carding +38 to ships from April 20-22 at win the title. Stonewall in Elverson, Pa. The Tigers are next in action when they compete in PU Men’s Volleyball the Ivy League ChampionDefeats Sacred Heart G eorge Huhmann pro - ships from April 20-22 at duced a brilliant perfor- the Metedeconk National mance to help the Princeton Golf Club in Jackson, N.J. University men’s volleyball team defeat Sacred Heart 3-1 last Saturday. Sophomore star Huhmann posted a career-best 26 kills along with nine blocks to help the Tigers prevail 2523, 21-25, 25-15, 27-25. The Tigers, now 10 -14 overall and 6-6 EIVA, play at Penn State on April 13 and at St. Francis on April 14.

Tiger Women’s Golf 4th at Harvard Event

Maya Walton led the way as the Princeton University women’s golf team placed fourth at the Harvard Invitational title at the Oaks Club’s Heron Course in Osprey, Fla. last weekend. Sophomore Walton shot a seven-over 223 to place fifth individually in the threeround event. In the team standings, Princeton posted an overall score of +46 in taking fourth

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PU Women’s Water Polo Edges Michigan in OT

Sparked by Haley Wan, the 15th-ranked Princeton University women’s water polo team edged No. 9 Michigan 8-7 in double overtime last Sunday at Cambridge, Mass. Senior star Wan tallied two goals and three assists to help the Tigers improve to 17-7 overall and 4-0 Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA). Princeton wraps up regular season play with a busy weekend as it hosts George Washington and Brown on April 14 and Harvard and Bucknell on April 15.

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Having scored a total of six goals in losing its first two games this season, the Princeton High boys’ lacrosse team was looking to break out when it hosted Pennington last Thursday. “We are just working to come together on offense,” said PHS junior attackman Alex Park. “We have a couple of guys returning and we are trying to build up the young guys and get on the same page.” After PHS fell behind Pennington 1-0, Park helped get the Little Tigers on the right page. Junior Evan Filion got the Little Tigers in the board with 6:38 left in the first quarter and Park followed

with a tally 24 seconds later to put PHS up 2-1. “We got some good spacing, it is our offense working as a unit,” said Park, reflecting on his goal. “That is where we need to go and that is what we are doing.” PHS kept going offensively, pulling away to a 10-2 victory to break into the win column. “It was great, it was a great confidence booster,” said Park in assessing the triumph which saw him add a fourth quarter goal. “We had a great practice yesterday; we worked on our offense a lot. I love seeing the improvement that we made. It took us a while but

CENTRAL PARK: Princeton High boys’ lacrosse player Alex Park heads upfield in recent action. Last Thursday, junior attackman Park scored two goals to help PHS defeat Pennington 10-2 as it earned its first win of the season. The Little Tigers, who moved to 1-3 with a 6-3 loss at Monroe on Saturday, are slated to host Montgomery on April 14 before playing at WW/PNorth on April 16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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we got clicking. We shared the ball, our goals were distributed. We still have work to do; I like where we are going.” Park has worked hard to be a better player. “I play for the Blue Star club program,” said Park. “I think that has helped me with communicating on the field with the guys.” PHS head coach Chip Casto believes Park is going to be a big help for his squad this spring. “Alex works in the weight room and he is a club player, so he is committed,” said Casto. “He plays hard every game.” While Casto was happy to see his team post its first victory, he acknowledged that it needs to be much sharper. “It is always good to get a win, we have been working on the basics but there were still a lot of mistakes,” said Casto, who also got two goals apiece from Filion and freshman Patrick McDonald with Jay Jackson, Ben Drezner, Ben Quinones, and Dyan Westerman adding one each. “We were executing basic stuff, things that I think we should have been doing already. This team is a different team from last year, so they are moving in their own pace.” Senior tri-captains Ryan Farrell, Ian Jacobs, and Patrick Jacobs did some good stuff as the defensive end for the Little Tigers against Pennington. “It is senior heav y, we h ave g ot g o o d b a la n c e there,” said Casto. “As long as they are disciplined and poised, they can really help control things.” Going for ward, PHS is looking to develop more discipline when it comes to the basics. “We need to keep building the foundational blocks to success,” said Casto, whose squad moved to 1-3 with a 6-3 loss at Monroe on Saturday and is slated to host Montgomery on April 14 before playing at WW/P-North on April 16. “Tomorrow will just be banging away at the fundamentals that we need to build on to have success.” Park, for his part, believes the Little Tigers can enjoy success this spring if they keep things simple. “We just need to be playing as a team and moving the ball,” said Park. “I think we can play well together.” —Bill Alden

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PDS Boys’ Lax Gets Rare Win Over Lawrenceville As Sophomore Bennett Helps Trigger Offense

having Elon; he is probably the best player I have have ever been with on the field,” asserted Bennett. “He has such great vision and he is able to draw the slides. If you get open, he will definitely find you. That has made it a lot easier for me.” While Bennett is encouraged by PDS’ 3-1 start, he knows that there is room for improvement. “We have played really well in the first half against the big teams,” said Bennett. “But in the second half, our numbers have shown that we have gotten a little tired, so I think being able to finish games and staying strong for all four quarters is a big focus. It is getting away from that weariness in the fourth quarters and being able to still win face-offs to get the ball and run our offense.” —Bill Alden

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

With Junior Standout Park Leading the Attack, PHS Boys’ Lax Defeats Pennington for 1st Win

“I think the way teams Having been dominated by Lawrenceville over the approach me is a little difyears, the Princeton Day ferent; last year in the first School boys’ lacrosse team couple games coming in as a was looking to flip the script freshman no one really knew when the local rivals met what I was able to do,” said Bennett, who had a goal last Wednesday. “We came into it with a re- and two assists as PDS deally good game plan,” said feated Springside-Chestnut PDS sophomore attackman Hill (Pa.) 11-7 last Friday in Jake Bennett, reflecting on improving to 3-1. “I have to be a little more the matchup which last saw the Panthers post a win in creative. Last year, I would 1981. “In the past, they have just come up the right side had a lot more numbers than and get a shot that way. We us and they pushed transi- have to move the ball a little tion a lot. Here we wanted to more and get it in rotation. get the ball and settle down Just the aspect of being more conscious of what the a little bit.” PDS settled into a good defense is doing and how rhythm early on, jumping they are playing me has reout to a 9-1 halftime lead. ally helped.” Playing with senior star “We were able to hold the ball a little more,” said Ben- Tuckman has helped create nett. “After we got a couple additional scoring opportuof goals, we started figuring nities for Bennett. out that they were doing and “Another great thing is the skip passing was working really well.” The Panthers had to work hard to hold off a late rally by Big Red, pulling out a 13-11 win and hugging each other as they celebrated the landmark w in.“That was huge for us ; I remember two years ago we lost by one and last year we were beaten pretty handily,” said Bennett. “So to come back after that and get a good one like that was amazing, especially to do it with all of my teammates.” In Bennett’s view, a key to the victory for PDS was balanced scoring which saw Elon Tuckman, Cal Caputo, Jack Konopka, and Coby Auslander each score two goals. “The offense isn’t based around any one person ; you find a pocket of space or if you are able to get a good dodge, someone will definitely find you,” said To: ___________________________ Bennett. From: _________________________ Date & Time: __________________ “I think nearly all of our Herewere is aassisted. proof of Iyour goals don’tad, scheduled to run ___________________. think there was any where Please check it thoroughly and pay special attention to the following: there was one person run(Your checkthe mark willdetell us it’s okay) ning through entire fense. We are able to get rotations and find the open� Fax number � Phone number � Address � Expiration Date guy.” Bennett, for his part, was able to get open against the Big Red, tallying four goals and two assists in the vic- BREAKING THROUGH: Princeton Day School boys’ lacrosse tory. player Jake Bennett battles past a foe in a recent game. Soph“My first two goals were omore attackman Bennett tallied four goals and two assists to both off a pass where I was help PDS defeat Lawrenceville 13-11 last Wednesday. It was given a really good shot the Panthers’ first win over the Big Red since 1981. The Panfrom 10 yards or so,” said thers, who improved to 3-1 by defeating Springside-Chestnut Bennett. Hill (Pa.) 11-7 last Friday, are slated to play at the Hill School “After that, I felt a little (Pa.) on April 14 before hosting Seton Hall Prep on April 16. confidence and I started (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) dodging a little bit more and had a little success with Fast Food • Take-Out • Dine-In that.” Hunan ~ Szechuan The performance against Malaysian ~ Vietnamese the Big Red exemplified the Daily Specials • Catering Available progress Bennett has made since his freshman season. 157 Witherspoon St. • Princeton • Parking in Rear • 609-921-6950

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 36

Led by Scoring Outburst From Junior Star Cook, Hun Girls’ Lacrosse Rolls to 15-4 Win Over Stuart Zoe Cook didn’t waste any time setting the tone for the Hun School girls’ lacrosse team as it played at Stuart Country Day last Friday. The junior attacker tallied four goals and two assists as Hun built an 8-1 lead over the Tartans by halftime and never looked back on the way to a 15-4 win. “It was a really fast paced and I think we were really pumped up,” said Cook. “We had a really good practice yesterday; we were all on the same page. We really wanted to hit our stride early in the season and I think we accomplished that.” With Hun coming off a tough 16 - 4 loss to Lawrenceville two days earlier, Cook was pumped up to bounce back. “After that game I was fired up and really excited to get back out here,” said

Cook, who ended up with five goals and three assists against Stuart. As one of Hun’s most experienced players on attack, Cook is looking to shoulder more responsibility on the field. “I really li ke feed ing, I think that is one of my strong suits,” said Cook. “I try to make plays, I try to get my voice up so I can call for plays.” Cook is just one voice from her family on the Hun squad as the team’s head coach is her mother, Liz Cook, and her older sister, Josie, is a senior defender and team captain for the Raiders. “My mom has always been my coach, so I am used to it,” said Cook. “I don’t treat her like my mom, I treat her like a coach when I am on the field. I like that aspect; she pushes me to be the best I can.”

ATTACK MODE: Hun School girls’ lacrosse player Zoe Cook races to goal in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, junior star attacker Cook tallied five goals and three assists to help Hun defeat Stuart Country Day 15-4. The Raiders, who dropped to 2-3 with a 10-7 loss to Princeton High on Monday, host Peddie on April 11 before playing at Blair Academy on April 14.

On the field, Cook has developed a connection with her sister. “We click pretty well,” said Cook. “When she is transitioning, I am right there with her. It is really fun to play with her.” Hun head coach Cook liked the way the Raiders clicked in the win over Stuart. “We built a lot of confidence in this game; we were catching and throwing a little better,” said Cook. “We had a great practice yesterday. We bounce back pretty quickly.” Cook credited her younger daughter with serving as a catalyst for the Hun offense. “Zoe was on today; she came out firing today,” said Cook. “She was feeling a little defeated from Lawrenceville and wanted to bounce back a little bit.” A lot of Hun players were firing away against Stuart as Kiera Black scored two goals while Emily Albanese, Hannah Bunce, Josie Cook, Grace Davis, Renee Nearing, and Sophie Tarditi added one apiece. “I think that was a real confidence booster for them to be able to trust each other and have other people score than the two or three main scorers we have had in the past,” said Cook. In Cook‘s view, the balanced scoring reflected a growing team unity. “Yesterday we were saying that we wanted to be a united team, and that a team that is united can beat a team with talent,” said Cook, whose team dropped to 2-3 with a 10-7 loss to Princeton High on Monday and will host Peddie on April 11 before playing at Blair Academy on April 14. “We want to be that true family. They really get along great together and they are truly happy for each other. We always talk about getting to play lacrosse and not having to play lacrosse. That is our focus on the season and whatever benefits come from it we will be excited about.” The younger Cook is excited about Hun’s potential this spring. “We have a pretty competitive schedule and I think we will do well,” asserted Cook. “Our clears and transitions can get a little messy. We need to work on stick skills. If we get that down, I think we can be a stronger team.” —Bill Alden

(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Senior Mundenar Shooting for Special Finish As PDS Girls’ Lax Learns From Early Losses Madison Mundenar helped the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team start on the right foot as it hosted Allentown last week. Just minutes into the April 3 contest, senior star Mundenar raced down the field, gathering in a feed from Gwen Allen and firing it into the back of the net to give the Panthers a 1-0 lead. “We always say get out of the gate, and that is something we felt we did better this game than when went against Hill,” said Mundenar. Things didn’t go well for PDS after that as Allentown jumped out to a 9-2 halftime lead and pulled away to an 18-7 win. “The second half wasn’t as strong; we just wanted to be first to the ball,” said Mundenar, who ended up with two goals in the loss. “Our big thing for this game was winning the draw; we worked a lot on that in practice. We are trying to figure that out because that is a big part of the game.” Wit h PDS hav ing won three straight state Prep B crowns, Mundenar is confident that that the Panthers will figure out how to get on the winning track. “I do think it is going to be beneficial to us in the end because we are starting with more high powered teams,” said Mundenar, who tallied seven goals to help PDS edge Hun 14-12 last Saturday and improve to 2-2. “We usually slowly get into that in the season. Although we may not be coming up with the wins early on, I do think by facing tougher competition in the beginning, we will be ready when it is tournament time.” Playing with fellow seniors Kyra Hall and Bridget Kane on attack gives Mundenar a comfort level on the field. “ We a l l a l w ay s k n o w where we are going to be on the field,” said Mundenar. “We all have our special positions. We need to keep our heads up and always look for each other. It is not clicking yet but it is early. The biggest thing is figuring out this offense. Coach [Jill] Thomas was just saying we have such a high powered offense, we have a lot of girls who can score. I am confident that we can figure it out. It is just going to take more time and some good practices.” PDS head coach Jill Thomas believes that the Panthers will benefit in the long run from playing high quality foes early in the season. “We have got to figure it out; we have played two g r e at op p o n e n t s ,” s a i d Thomas, whose team fell 17-7 to the Hill School (Pa.) in its season opener on March 28. “It is not where you start, it is where you finish.” T homas ack nowle dge s that the PDS needs to tighten up on the defensive end as it looks to fill the void left by the graduation of star Abby Atkeson.

“We are trying to jell on defe n s e,” s a id T hom as. “When you have the Prep defensive player of the year last year in Abby not there, they have to figure it out. They did a little bit better today. That is a great team and we are not a bad team.” Thomas is confident that the Panthers will end up being a very good team by the end of the spring. “We will get on the right track and get the right chemistry,” said Thomas, whose team hosts Pennington on April 11 before playing at Princeton High on April 12 and at Blair Academy on April 17. “We are used to being on

top, so we have to find out a way, when we are on the bottom to get back to the middle and then back to the top.” Mundenar, for her part, is looking to go out on top along with her eight classmates on the squad. “We have all been waiting for this last year, our mantra has been fourth one, best one,” said Mundenar, who is heading to St. Bonaventure, where she will be playing for its Division I women’s lacrosse program. “We have been together so long, we just want to end the season strong; not all of us will be playing next year so we all want to finish our season off well together and savor there opportunities.” —Bill Alden

ON TARGET: Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse player Madison Mundenar controls the ball in recent action. Last Saturday, senior star Mundenar tallied seven goals to help PDS edge Hun 14-12. The Panthers, now 2-2, host Pennington on April 11 before playing at Princeton High on April 12 and at Blair Academy on April 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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miles and you are basically heading westward the whole time,” said Crane. “As long as you are going west, you are pretty much good. You get close to the finishing in English harbor, it is smaller than a football field, and I got really nervous because the winds were picking up and it got really stormy. I was afraid that I was going to get smashed on the rocks. The Antiguan search and rescue actually met me a few miles out and helped me into the harbor.” Once he landed safely in the harbor, Crane was reunited with his family and enjoyed a hot meal. “I couldn’t walk at all because I had been in the water so long,” said Crane, who went from weighing 170 pounds at the start of the trip to 144 with a body fat of four percent at the finish. “The first thing I did was have the traditional ocean rower dinner, which is a cheeseburger, chips, and a cold Coca-Cola. It was definitely the best burger I have ever had.” Being in the water so long helped Crane gain some valuable lessons along the way. “It is learning about life, it is not just about the good moments,” said Crane. “I had plenty of lows. I had some of the saddest days of my life, but also some of the happiest. I learned that stillness isn’t necessarily a bad thing. People, especially in my generation, are always

ATLANTIC ADVENTURE: Oliver Crane celebrates in Antigua this past January after rowing across the Atlantic Ocean as part of the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge. Crane, a resident of Lawrenceville who is headed to Princeton University, rowed the 3,000-mile journey in 44 days, and at age 19, became the youngest person to ever row solo across the Atlantic. on the phone or doing something or going on social media. We think that sitting still, thinking, and reflecting is a waste of time and not being productive, but that really isn’t right.” Crane is looking for the trip to be productive in another way as he has used it as a vehicle to raise money for Oceana, an advocacy or g a n i z at i o n for o c e a n conservation, and HomeFr ont, a Tr e nton - b a s e d charity. Crane has raised about $65,000 for Oceania and just under $3,000 for HomeFront and plans

to keep that effort going by giving talks about his experience, including one to be presented at the Princeton boathouse later this spring. “Oceana works around the globe for ocean conservation,” said Crane, who has created a link for charitable contributions, www.crowdrise.com/homeward. “They work with governments to pass major legislation that protects ocean sanctuaries and establish sustainable fishing practices. Their goal is to conserve the ocean in a way that continues to feed the

world’s population for future generations.” As for his future in rowing, Crane is considering joining the Princeton crew program as a walk-on. “I talked to the coaches; they like to get rowers who are experienced to try out,” said Crane. “My body has been destroyed, going from best shape of my life to the worst. My back hurts and I have had to do a lot of therapy. It has been a while since I have gone on an ERG machine so we will see.” —Bill Alden

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“They blast a cannon in La Gomera; the adrenaline is pumping through your body but then within an hour, it really sets in that you just took the first stroke of a million and there is 3,000 miles to go,” said Crane. “I also realized ‘wow I am really alone now. I am a solo rower, there is no one else out there to help you.’ It is all on your shoulders.” Going solo meant that Crane faced an exhausting daily routine. “I had planned for doing two hours on and two hours off; I would do that on 24-hour cycle,” said Crane, who slept in a watertight cabin and consumed freeze-dried meals to keep fueled. “It is really important for solo rowers because you need to always be aware of your course. It became really important for me when my auto hull, a machine that automatically steers it when you are not awake, broke the night before the race. It made it more important that I stay awake, so I never slept for more than two hours at a time.” Taking advantage of favorable conditions, Crane rowed along as a steady clip. “I averaged about 65 miles a day,” said Crane. “The reason why you go to the Canary Islands to start is you get on the same route t hat C olu mbu s m ade it across, because it captures as much of the current and trade winds as you can to blow you across.” T he w i nds a nd w ave s caused some harrowing experiences for Crane as he capsized several times and nearly didn’t make it on one occasion. “The third time was really scary because I was using rowing straps and I would strap myself in really tightly,” said Crane. “When the boat flipped, I had trouble getting out of the straps and surfacing to breathe. Eventually I managed to kick out of my own shoes.” While Crane was constantly on alert, he was able to savor the beauty of the interplay between the sky and the sea. “On an everyday basis, the sunrise and the stars would make the water sparkle,” said Crane. “They would be so bright, they would reflect off of the water. It was amazing. I also saw whales. One day a whale popped up right in front of the boat within three feet.” Crane got anther surprise on December 25. “One of the coolest moments was on Christmas when a sailing yacht came up behind me,” recalled Crane. “It was a massive sailing yacht filled with 20-year-old kids. They came up next to me and pulled alongside and said ‘what’s up Ollie.’ They knew my name. I thought I was going crazy. They were tracking on the race tracker and they knew my course. They circled around me, sang Christmas carols, and went on their way.” As Crane made his way to landfall, he had some anxious moments. “It also got a little nervewracking, you row 3,000

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It took a while for Oliver Crane to develop a passion for rowing. “I first experienced crew at Mercer Rowing Club in eighth grade, but I didn’t really row much then,” said Crane, a resident of Lawrenceville. “A l l t h r o u g h m i d d l e school my main sport was ice hockey, but I ended up getting five concussions so I couldn’t do contact sports anymore. I ended up doing cross country and rowing at Peddie and fell in love with rowing after that.” After getting accepted to Princeton University and graduating from Peddie last spring, Crane decided to follow in the footsteps of his older siblings and take an adventurous gap year before starting college. With brother Carson having scaled the Seven Summits and another brother, David, having biked across Africa, and a sister, Bella, having hiked the Pacific Crest trail from Mexico to Canada, Crane ended up finding a challenge that would involve his passion for rowing. He came across a YouTube video regarding the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge and found his mission. “As soon as I watched the video, I said ‘I want to do this, I am going to do this,’” said Crane. Overcoming some initial resistance from his parents and then procuring a used boat that had been used in the event the year before, Crane put in the legwork to prepare for the voyage, “I had to meet all of these requ irements — cer tain training hours, all of the proper equipment,” said Crane, who did some of his training outside of Devon, England. “I found the boat last summer and registered in the summer and then I had two and a half months training, taking survival courses, navigation; all the on boat and on the water training. The biggest goal of training was to put on as much weight as possible, fat and muscle. It is not like other sports where you have to beef up with lots of muscle.” Crane left La Gomera, Canary Islands on December 14, 2017 and made landfall in Antigua on January 28. His crossing took 44 days and, in the process, t he 19 -year- old became the youngest person to row across the Atlantic. As Crane launched his trip, he quickly realized the ordeal ahead of him.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 38

Hun Baseball: Sparked by Dan Melnick, Hun defeated Peddie 9-1 last Saturday. Melnick went 3-for-3 with two doubles, two runs, and two R BIs as the Raiders improved to 2-1. Hun plays at Princeton Day School on April 11, at Pennington on April 12, at Blair Academy on April 13, and at Allentown on April 17. Softball: Jackie Drozd had a big game to help Hun defeat Doane Academy 10-4 last Monday. Drozd went 3-for-4 with two RBIs as the Raiders improved to 1-1. Hun hosts WW/P-South on April 12, plays at Blair Academy on April 13, and then hosts Peddie on April 17. Boys’ Lacrosse : Devon Cowan starred in a losing cause as Hun fell 10-9 at Lawrenceville last Saturday. Cowan tallied four goals for the Raiders, who moved to 2-1. Hun plays at Academy of New Church (Pa.) on April

13 and at Bergen Catholic on April 16. Boys’ Tenn is : Opening its 2018 campaign on a high note, Hun edged the George School (Pa.) 3-2 last Wednesday. Hun, which fell 7-0 to the Hill School (Pa.) on Saturday to move to 1-1, plays at Princeton Day School on April 11, hosts Peddie on April 12, plays at Blair Academy on April 13, and hosts Pennington on April 17.

goals and assist for the Red Raiders, who moved to 3-0. Pennington plays at Princeton Day School on April 11, at Hopewell Valley on April 13, and at Robbinsville on April 16.

Stuart

Lacrosse: Gin Gin Plehn played well in a losing cause as Stuart fell 19-9 to Gill St. Bernard’s last Monday. Senior attacker Plehn tallied four goals for the Tartans, who moved to 0-2. Stuart hosts Solebury School (Pa.) Baseball: Luke Blair had on April 11, plays at Rana big game as Pennington ney School on April 13, and GARDEN PARTY: Members of the Princeton Basketball Club (PBC) enjoy the moment after they defeated Oratory Prep 10-5 hosts Rutgers on April 17. held an intra-squad scrimmage at Madison Square Garden (MSG) in New York City during the last Friday. Blair went 2-forhalftime of the New York Knicks-Detroit Pistons March 31 contest. The boys played a three5 with two RBIs and a run minute game followed by the girls, who did the same, drawing cheers from the MSG crowd. The scored to help the Red Raidscrimmage capped off a successful season for the PBC, which saw several teams advancing ers improve to 1-1. Penningto the their league playoffs. ton plays at South Hunterdon on April 11, hosts Hun Notre Dame last Friday. The year’s goals is to purchase Registration is also availon April 12 and plays at Softball: Showing some of- Little Tigers, who fell to 0-2 a mobile soup kitchen and able by logging onto www. Princeton High on April 14. fensive punch in a losing ef- with the setback, host Tren- disaster unit for Samaritan hunschool.org/alumni/newsGirls’ Lacrosse: Sparked fort, PDS fell 22-14 to Tren- ton on April 11 and Notre Homeless Interim Program. and-events/index.aspx. by a huge performance from ton last Monday in its season Dame on April 12 before Maddi Seibel, Pennington opener. The Panthers are playing at Nottingham on Princeton Athletic Club Princeton Rec Department defeated Delran 8 -5 last slated to host Peddie on April 13 and then hosting Holding 6k Spring Run The Princeton Athletic Offering Lifeguard Course Monday. Seibel tallied seven April 12 and Hamilton on Allentown on April 16. T h e P r i n c e ton Re c r e Club is holding its annual April 17. Girls’ Lacrosse: Mariana ation Department is offer6-kilometer Spring trail run Boys’ Tennis: Starting its Lopez-Ona came up big as on April 14 at the Institute ing an American Red Cross Lifeguard Recer tification 2018 campaign on a high PHS defeated Hun 10-7 last Woods. Course at the Community note, PDS defeated Gill St. Monday. Junior star LopezThe run starts at 10 a.m. Park Pool in Princeton. Bernard’s 5-0 last Friday. Ona scored three goals to T h e Pa n t h e r s h o s t H u n help the Little Tigers im- at the Princeton Friends This course is available to on April 11, play at Pin- prove to 1- 4. PHS hosts School, 470 Quaker Road. current lifeguards that need This event is limited to 200 gry on April 12, and then Princeton Day School on to recertify their lifeguard host the Hill School ( Pa.) April 12, plays at Ranco- participants. All abilities are training. Lifeguards are recas Valley on April 13, and invited, including those who quired to recertify every two on April 16. then hosts Hightstown on wish to walk the course. years. The course will be For more information and taught by a PRD staff person April 16. Boys’ Tennis; Kevin Yang to register, log onto www. with current American Red provided a highlight as PHS princetonac.org. Cross Instructor Certificafell 3.5-1.5 to WW/P-South tion. The course fee is $153 last Monday. Yang pulled Run for Kate 5k and the program is open to Set For April 21 out a three-set win at third both Princeton residents Girls’ Lacrosse: Meg HillThe annual Run for Kate and non-residents. All trainsingles for the Little Timan came up big to help 5-kilometer run/walk will be Lawrenceville edge Sacred gers, who moved to 1-1. held on April 21 at the Hun ing materials are included. PHS hosts Hightstown on The course dates are June Heart (Conn.) 10-9 last SatSchool. 4 and 8 from 4:30 – 9 p.m. urday. Hillman tallied four April 11, plays at Hamilton Those interested in par- at the Community Park Pool goals and an assist as the on April 12, hosts WW/PBig Red improved to 5-0. North on April 16, and plays ticipating can register at complex. Participants must Lawrenceville plays at Pin- at Hightstown on April 17. Hun’s Chesebro Academic attend both sessions. Space Center at 8:30 a.m., with in the program is limited. gry on April 12 before hostthe event to start at 9 a.m. Individuals can register ing Friends Central ( Pa.) The course begins and ends online at: http://register. on April 14 and Peddie on at the academic center and communitypass.net/princApril 17. winds through the surround- eton. The course is located ing neighborhood. under the Tab “2018 BlueRegistration is also avail- fish Swim/Dive & Youth/ Run With Rotary able by logging onto www. Adult Water Programs.” For Slated for April 22 The annual Run With Ro- hunschool.org/page/alum more info, visit www.princetonrecreation.com or call tary 5-kilometer run and ni/alumni-weekend. The event was initiated by (609) 921-9480. Baseball : Teddy Durbin 1-mile ramble is being held produced a mound master- on April 22 at Skillman Park the school to celebrate the life of the late Kate Gorrie, piece as PHS defeated Notre in Montgomery Township. Dame 2-1 to split a doubleRunners and walkers of a beloved Hun student who header with the Irish last all ages and levels are wel- was dedicated to making Friday. Junior lefty Durbin come to participate, and for a difference in the lives of hurled a no-hitter with seven the competitive runner the those around her. All proFAST START: Princeton Day School baseball player Vinnie Gas- strikeouts and two walks. course is certified by US- ceeds from the race will benparro heads to first base last Thursday as PDS defeated Law- The Little Tigers fell 8-0 in ATF-NJ. One can register as efit The Katherine Gorrie renceville 10-7 in its season opener. Gasparro and the Pan- the other game of the twinan individual or on a team. ‘98 Memorial Scholarship thers kept rolling as they defeated the George School (Pa.) bill. On Monday, PHS deFund. Registration for the run 15-2 last Saturday. PDS, which moved to 3-0 with a 5-3 win feated Lawrenceville 14-7 in over Pingry on Monday, hosts Hun on April 11, and Peddie on improving to 3-1. Eli Okoye or ramble is available online PERSONAL PAPERWORK April 12, before playing at Nottingham on April 14 and at Con- powered the offense in the at w w w.RunWithRotar y. org. You may also register SOLUTIONS...AND MORE, INC. well Egan (Pa.) on April 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski) win over the Big Red, going Are you drowning in paperwork? on race day starting at 8:30 2-for-3 with three RBIs and a.m. The ramble will begin • Your own? a run scored. In upcoming at 10 a.m. followed by the •Your parents? action, the Little Tigers host race starting at 10:35 a.m. •Your small business? Trenton on April 11, play Get help with: The Run With Rotary is at Nottingham on April 13 •Paying bills and maintaining checking accounts organized by the Montgomand then host Pennington •Complicated medical insurance reimbursements •Quicken or organizing and filing on April 14 and Allentown ery/Rocky Hill Rotary Club, and is the Club’s main funon April 16. 609-371-1466 draising event. All proceeds Insured • Notary Public • www.ppsmore.com Softball: Unable to get its benefit local and internabats going, PHS lost 21-0 to tional charities. One of this Specialized Services for Seniors and Their Families, Busy Professionals

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Blanid E. Scott Longtime Princeton resident Blanid E. Scott died of natural causes at her home on April 3, 2018. She had recently celebrated her 94th birthday with her family on March 25. Mrs. Scott was born in Brook ly n, N.Y. in 1924 to B l a n i d M c G a d y E n nis and Dr. William Ennis. She attended St. Xavier’s i n Bro ok ly n b efore h er 1942 graduation from the C o nve nt of t h e S ac r e d Heart-Eden Hall in Torresdale, Pa. She worked for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York during World War II before moving to California to marry Princeton University alumnus David Janvier Scott in 1947.

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John Zullo John Zullo, 83 of Lawrencev ille, passed away peacefully at his home Monday, April 9, 2018. He was born in Carpinone, Italy, and came to America in 1950. He and his brother, Dominic, owned and operated Reilly’s Market in Princeton for several years. John retired from American Boychoir School in 1996. He was a lifetime member of Circulo Hispano Americano de Princeton. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, and cooking for friends. He is survived by his fiancée Catherine Consoli; daughter Anna Elbaum, and grandchildren, Christopher and Kimberly Elbaum; niece Carmen Imfeld of Florida, nephew Alfredo (Nicole) Zullo of Connecticut; cousin Eduardo Criscouli, and a special kind and caring friend, Dr. John Mercuro, who was considered a son. Calling hours will be held on Thursday April 12, 5-8 p.m. at Mather-Hodge, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. The funeral will be held

9 a.m. on Friday, April 13, 2018 f rom t he Mat herHodge Funeral Home. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Friday April 13, 10 a.m. at the Church of Saint Paul, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery.

of flowers, please donate to an environmental organization such as Washington Crossing Audubon or Green Acres. For online condolences, please visit www. parselsfh.com.

Joseph M. Pylka P ylka, Joseph M., 80, of Absecon, passed away peacefully, with his family by his side on April 4, 2018. He was predeceased by his parents, Karol and Mary (Czarnecki) Pylka. He was born in Jersey City, N.J. and grew up in New York City until the family moved to the Princeton area (Griggstown). He is survived by a son, John of Washington, D.C., and his sister, Carolyn Johnson of Absecon, with whom he shared a home. He attended the University of Florida in Gainesville. His professional career involved being a researcher and educator at Princeton University. His private life was comprised of an avid interest in the environment, hiking, canoeing, kayaking, and birding. He taught many nature and recreational courses at adult evening classes in the Princeton area. Visitation will be Thursday, April 12 at 10 a.m. at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church in Absecon, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment of cremains will be private. In lieu

Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co.

609-924-0147 www.riderfurniture.com Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5

On her 90th birthday her children donated a Yoshino Cherry Tree in her honor to Marquand Park. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her name to the Marquand Park Foundation. Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Still the Best in Custom Mirror Installations

45 Spring Street • Downtown Princeton • 924-2880

Phyllis Spiegel Phyllis Spiegel of Plainsboro died in February at age 85. Born in the Bronx, she visited over 40 countries and was an avid reader, filmgoer, and lover of classical music and The New York Times. After graduating from NYU she worked in magazine publishing and public relations before starting her own successful PR firm. She always said her greatest achievements were her sons Mark and Adam. She loved and admired their partners Sidney Wu & Guillemette Brouillat-Spiegel as well as nieces Debra Gordon, Fran Katz-Watson, and Marsha Shapiro. Of late, her grandson Seth was the joy

of her life. Living alone for decades, she filled her life with learning, intellectual pursuits, exercise classes, travel, and friends. She audited classes at Princeton University, regularly attended the Telluride Film Festival, and volunteered within the New Jersey foster care system and for the Literacy Volunteers. She believed that one should “Create your own life as you go” and that “Life is not a dress rehearsal.” A celebration of her life will be held at 11 a.m. on June 23rd at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton. All are welcome. Contributions in her name may be made to Plainsboro Public Library and the Society for Humanistic Judaism.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Obituaries

Mrs. Scott relocated to Pr inceton in 1960 w it h her husband and six children. She cut a familiar and welcoming figure to cou nt le s s P r i n ce ton ia n s who came of age in the 60s and 70s, presiding over a busy household where an a nt iq u e p o ol t able a n d the latest music were in constant play. Throughout her long life, many of her children’s grow n friends and classmates from Stuart Country Day School, Princeton High School, and the Lawrenceville School made a special point of visiting her home whenever they returned to town. She will be remembered and cherished by all who knew her for impeccable manners, effortless style, genuine warmth, and undying loyalty. Mrs. Scot t was prede ceased by her husband David in 1991 and her eldest son, David J. Scott, Jr. in 1981. She is survived by her children Sheila N. Scott of New York, N.Y.; Bridgett L. Scott of Yardley, Pa.; Samuel R. Scott (Kimberly) of Tampa, Fla.; Peter M. Scott (Julie) of Washington, D.C.; and Nora C. Scott of London, U.K.; grandchildren Samuel R. Scott,Jr. of New York, N.Y.; Katharine N. Kennedy-Sloane of London, U.K.; Abigail J. Scott of Tampa Fla.; Charlotte P. Scott, Bridgett R. D. Scott, and Audrey F. Scott (all of Washington D.C.); and a sister, Sheelagh Rabo of Armonk, N.Y.

Memorial Service George W. Pitcher A memorial service for the late George W. Pitcher will be held on Saturday, April 21 at 10 a.m. in the Princeton University Chapel. The Reverend Sue Anne Steffey Morrow will lead the service which will include readings, tributes, and music. A luncheon for family, friends and colleagues will follow at Prospect House. A Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Princeton University and a trustee of the Edward T. Cone Foundation, Pitcher died peacefully at his home in Princeton on January 12 at the age of 92. He was the author of The Philosophy of Wittgenstein, Berkeley, and A Theory of Perception, as well as the memoir The Dogs Who Came to Stay.

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES AN EPISCOPAL PARISH

Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 8:00&a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I Easter Schedule

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for Healing, 5:30 pm Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

Tuesday Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm Keeping Watch, 8:00 pm –with Mar. Healing 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist

The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Friday, March 25

33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton

214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Msgr. Joseph Rosie, Pastor Easter Egg Hunt, 3:00 pm Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor Saturday 5:30pmp.m. The GreatVigil Vigil ofMass: Easter, 7:00 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 27 Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 Mass in Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. p.m. Eucharist, Rite I, 7:30 am MassFestive in Holy Spanish: Sunday at 7:00 p.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 9:00 am Festive Choral Eucharist, Rite II, 11:00 am The. Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector The Rev. Nancy J. Hagner, Associate Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of Music

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

¡Eres siempre bienvenido! Christian Science Reading Room

178 Nassau Street, Princeton

609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study Adult Bible Classes (A multi-ethnic congregation) 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 witherspoonchurch.org


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 40

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS MasterCard

VISA

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. SPRING IS HERE! GARAGE SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED

CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732.

= GREAT WEEKEND! CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: CHARMING PRINCETON Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

tf

APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Call (609) 924-4210.

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 326-9386.

FOR RENT: Professional office space well located in high traffic area with easy access parking nearby Princeton Shopping Center. With a complete renovation & the paint still drying, the space includes 2 separate office spaces with a powder room & reception area & storage area. Each space has great natural light, all privately tucked away on the lower level on a well-kept landscaped lot. Contact (609) 947-4718. 04-11-4t

THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404.

ily, unique full day aquatics program ideal for children of working parents, swim and dive teams. Http://www. nassauswimclub.org 04-11-5t

serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613.

Irene Lee, Classified Manager 04-11/06-27

LIQUIDATION • Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check.ESTATE SERVICE: FRENCH NATIVE TEACHER: • 25 words or tfless: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words I will cleaninoutlength. attics, basements, 04-11-3t 20 yrs. experience. Our students garages & houses. Single items • 3 weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 • teenagers 6 weeks: $72.00 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. are children, or adults. GARAGE SALE: Saturday, April 14, LOCATION, LOCATION, to entire estates. No job too big or starting 9 am. 25 MacLean Street, Preparation for French exams. Very SWIM CLUB: LOCATION– NASSAU • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold92face type: NASSAU $10.00/week 04-11 small. In business over 35 years, (between Witherspoon & John). patient. Call Parisian French School Summer fun for the entire fam(609) 924-2200 ext 10

Household goods, books, artwork, furniture, heaters, air conditioners, upright freezer, bikes, clothes, shoes, etc. 04-11

LAMBERTVILLE MOVING SALE: Friday & Saturday April 13 & 14 from 9:30-3. 32 Lincoln Avenue, Lambertville. Antique furniture, Modern sofa & chair, artwork including a Gordon Haaf painting. China, carpets, lots of collectibles, costume jewelry, linens, books. Interesting sale! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 04-11 OFFICES WITH PARKING: Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 03-14-5t SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Combo BR / sitting room/ study, (28’x17’). Bright, w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,200/mo. utilities included. (609) 924-4210. 04-11 HOUSECLEANING: For houses, apartments & offices. Experienced, English speaking, great references, own transportation. Please contact: Adileusa (973) 951-2485. 03-28-3t

STREET, PRINCETON:

at (609) 419-0075.

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com

10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $3,190 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932.

tf

03-14-6t

04-11-2t 6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME:

HOME FOR RENT:

LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf PRINCETON RENTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245.

Traditional, well-maintained 3 BR center hall Colonial in Princeton. Walk to schools, restaurants & shops. Hardwood floors. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 04-04-3t PROFESSIONAL HOUSE SITTER/HANDYMAN: Do all kinds of home repairs, maintenance, house painting, etc. for living situation. Lived in Princeton for 22 years. References available. (609) 477-8424. 04-04-3t

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

WEIGHT-LOSS: Improves health and longevity. Our weight management program is medically supervised. Prescription and non-prescription approach. Saturday office hours. Forrestal Professional Center, telephone (609) 297-8272. www. accordwellness.com

tf

04-11-3t

tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

2 Room Office Suite on 4th floor of Hamilton Jeweler Building overlooking Princeton University, Nassau Hall & FitzRandolph Gate. Perfect for professional, investor, start-up. Contact: Suzanne Carroll (609) 924-6294 or ejgursky@comcast.net 04-04-4t CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY:

by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 03-21-6t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-04-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 04-04-4t ELDER CARE AVAILABLE: Compassionate caregiver with over 30 years experience. Own transportation, references available. (609) 240-4576. 04-11-4t

12-31-18 SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES:

JAQUELINE CLEANING SERVICE: 7 years experience. Good references. (609) 356-6497; (425) 518-4296; jaquelineservices@gmail.com 03-07-12t

Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Furnished or unfurnished. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Perfect for a lawyer. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 02-21-12t

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 04-04-8t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

02-21/05-09

12-31-18 TK PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469.

tf

08-23-18

Town Topics — Tops for Real Estate Advertising Town Topics is THE preferred resource for weekly real estate offerings in the greater Princeton area and beyond. Every Wednesday, Town Topics reaches every home in Princeton and all high traffic business areas in town, as well as the communities of Lawrenceville, Pennington, Hopewell, Skilllman, Rocky Hill, and Montgomery. We ARE the area’s only community newspaper and most trusted resource since 1946! Call to reserve your space today! (609) 924-2200, ext 27 CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: 12 pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $23.95 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $61.00 • 4 weeks: $78 • 6 weeks: $116 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $34


Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18 AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware. Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-12-18 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 05-10-18 HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription! We have prices for 1 or 2 years -call (609)924-2200x10 to get more info! tf

SPRING IS HERE! GARAGE SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know!

HOUSECLEANING: For houses, apartments & offices. Experienced, English speaking, great references, own transportation. Please contact: Adileusa (973) 951-2485. 03-28-3t CARPENTRY: General Contracting in Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Licensed and insured. Call Julius Sesztak (609) 466-0732. tf CHARMING PRINCETON APT: Fully furnished, 2 bedrooms, picture windows overlooking yard. W/D, cable, wireless high-speed internet, parking. Utilities included. No smoking or pets. $2,500/mo. Call (609) 924-4210. 04-11 HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, etc. EPA certified. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www.elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com tf LOLIO’S WINDOW WASHING & POWER WASHING: Free estimate. Next day service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning available. References available upon request. 30 years experience. (609) 271-8860. tf PRINCETON RENTAL: Sunny, 2-3 BR, Western Section. Big windows overlooking elegant private garden. Sliding doors to private terrace. Fireplace, library w/built-in bookcases, cathedral ceiling w/clerestory windows. Oak floors, recessed lighting, central AC. Modern kitchen & 2 baths. Walk to Nassau St. & train. Off-street parking. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright disciple. (609) 924-5245. tf PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER

tf GARAGE SALE: Saturday, April 14, starting 9 am. 25 MacLean Street, (between Witherspoon & John). Household goods, books, artwork, furniture, heaters, air conditioners, upright freezer, bikes, clothes, shoes, etc. 04-11 LAMBERTVILLE MOVING SALE: Friday & Saturday April 13 & 14 from 9:30-3. 32 Lincoln Avenue, Lambertville. Antique furniture, Modern sofa & chair, artwork including a Gordon Haaf painting. China, carpets, lots of collectibles, costume jewelry, linens, books. Interesting sale! Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. 04-11 OFFICES WITH PARKING: Ready for move-in. Renovated and refreshed. 1, 3 and 6 room suites. Historic Nassau Street Building. (609) 213-5029. 03-14-5t SPACIOUS FURNISHED ROOM: Combo BR / sitting room/ study, (28’x17’). Bright, w/windows on 3 sides, kitchen privileges, W/D access, wireless internet, parking, 1.4 miles from Nassau Hall @ Princeton University. $1,200/mo. utilities included. (609) 924-4210. 04-11

CLEANING, IRONING, LAUNDRY:

by Polish women with a lot of experience. Excellent references, own transportation. Please call Inga at (609) 530-1169, leave message. 03-21-6t ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 04-04-4t CONTRERAS PAINTING: Interior, exterior, wallpaper removal, deck staining. 16 years experience. Fully insured, free estimates. Call (609) 954-4836; ronythepainter@ live.com 04-04-4t ELDER CARE AVAILABLE: Compassionate caregiver with over 30 years experience. Own transportation, references available. (609) 240-4576. 04-11-4t FOR RENT: Professional office space well located in high traffic area with easy access parking nearby Princeton Shopping Center. With a complete renovation & the paint still drying, the space includes 2 separate office spaces with a powder room & reception area & storage area. Each space has great natural light, all privately tucked away on the lower level on a well-kept landscaped lot. Contact (609) 947-4718. 04-11-4t

Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

NASSAU SWIM CLUB: Summer fun for the entire family, unique full day aquatics program ideal for children of working parents, swim and dive teams. Http://www. nassauswimclub.org 04-11-5t

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf

JAQUELINE CLEANING SERVICE: 7 years experience. Good references. (609) 356-6497; (425) 518-4296; jaquelineservices@gmail.com 03-07-12t

FRENCH NATIVE TEACHER: 20 yrs. experience. Our students are children, teenagers or adults. Preparation for French exams. Very patient. Call Parisian French School at (609) 419-0075. 04-11-2t 6 BEDROOM RUSTIC COUNTRY HOME: 10 minutes north of Princeton, in the small village of Blawenburg, Skillman, $3,190 discounted monthly rent: http://princetonrentals. homestead.com or (609) 333-6932. 03-14-6t HOME FOR RENT:

(609) 924-2200 ext 10

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION– 92 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON: 2 Room Office Suite on 4th floor of Hamilton Jeweler Building overlooking Princeton University, Nassau Hall & FitzRandolph Gate. Perfect for professional, investor, start-up. Contact: Suzanne Carroll (609) 924-6294 or ejgursky@comcast.net 04-04-4t

Traditional, well-maintained 3 BR center hall Colonial in Princeton. Walk to schools, restaurants & shops. Hardwood floors. Full attic & basement. Off-street parking. No pets. $3,300/mo. plus utilities. (609) 737-2520. 04-04-3t

Wells Tree & Landscape, Inc

THE OFFICE STORE

609-430-1195 Wellstree.com

Taking care of Princeton’s trees

28 Spring St, Princeton

Local family owned business for over 40 years

(next to Chuck’s)

609-924-0112

www.hinksons.com

“Always Professional, Always Personal” ǣ  ōsNjOsNj NŸȖŘǼɴ ǻŸƼ ƻNjŸ_ȖOsNjʰ Ý Ìɚs ǼÌs ĨŘŸɠĶs_¶s Ř_sɮƼsNjǼÞǣsǼŸOŸȖŘǣsĶOĶÞsŘǼǣǼÌNjŸȖ¶ÌǼÌsÌŸŎsEȖɴÞض ŸNjǣsĶĶÞضƼNjŸOsǣǣŘ_ǼŸƼNjsƼNjsǼÌsŎ¯ŸNjOȖNjNjsŘǼŎNjĨsǼ OŸŘ_ÞǼÞŸŘǣʳ Ý Ÿ¯¯sNj Ŏɴ OĶÞsŘǼǣ ǼÌs ÌÞ¶ÌsǣǼ ĶsɚsĶ Ÿ¯ ǣsNjɚÞOs ƼŸǣǣÞEĶsʳÝǼɠŸȖĶ_EsŎɴƼĶsǣȖNjsǼŸÌsĶƼɴŸȖʵ

TC

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PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE in beautiful historic building. Princeton address. Furnished or unfurnished. Free parking. Conference room, kitchenette and receptionist included. Collegial atmosphere. Perfect for a lawyer. Contact Liz: (609) 514-0514; ez@zuckfish.com 02-21-12t

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

PROFESSIONAL HOUSE SITTER/HANDYMAN: Do all kinds of home repairs, maintenance, house painting, etc. for living situation. Lived in Princeton for 22 years. References available. (609) 477-8424. 04-04-3t WEIGHT-LOSS: Improves health and longevity. Our weight management program is medically supervised. Prescription and non-prescription approach. Saturday office hours. Forrestal Professional Center, telephone (609) 297-8272. www. accordwellness.com 04-11-3t MAINE VACATION: Blue Hill Peninsula near Deer Isle & Acadia. Boating excursions including sunset sails, lighthouse cruises. Kayaking. Swimming. Hiking. Relaxing. Foodie paradise, including farm-to-table dinners. 3 BR, 2 full baths, sunporch. June, September, October $650/weekly; July, August $800/weekly. Plus cleaning & taxes. (207) 326-9386. 04-11-3t

NEW CONSTRUCTION IN A WALK-EVERYWHERE NEIGHBORHOOD

One of Princeton’s outstanding builders has meticulously crafted this beautiful house. First floor includes living room with fireplace, formal dining room, spacious kitchen, breakfast room and powder room. Upstairs, Master Bedroom, Master Bath, with soaking tub, 3 additional bedrooms, for a total of 4 bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths. Finished basement and two-car garage. Walk or bike to school and shopping. BRAND NEW AND BEAUTIFUL. $1,189,000 Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1330151

www.stockton-realtor.com

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

WE BUY CARS


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018• 42

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. 04-04-8t TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read.

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 02-21/05-09 BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18

tf THE MAID PROFESSIONALS: Leslie & Nora, cleaning experts. Residential & commercial. Free estimates. References upon request. (609) 2182279, (609) 323-7404. 04-11/06-27 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 12-31-18

AWARD WINNING SLIPCOVERS Custom fitted. Pillows, cushions, table linens, window treatments, and bedding. Fabrics and hardware.

TK PAINTING:

Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10 for more details.

J.O. PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Painting for interior & exterior, framing, dry wall, spackle, trims, doors, windows, floors, tiles & more. 20 years experience. Call (609) 305-7822. 08-02-18

Interior, exterior. Power-washing, wallpaper removal, plaster repair, Venetian plaster, deck staining. Renovation of kitchen cabinets. Front door and window refinishing. Excellent references. Free estimates. Call (609) 947-3917 04-04/09-26 I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 08-23-18

Fran Fox (609) 577-6654 windhamstitches.com 04-12-18 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 30 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com

WE BUY CARS

Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936

Belle Mead Garage

Princeton References

(908) 359-8131

•Green Company

Ask for Chris tf

HIC #13VH07549500 05-10-18

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE, LLC CURRENT RENTALS *********************************

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS: Princeton – $1,600/mo. 2nd floor office on Nassau Street with parking. Available now. Princeton – $1,700/mo. 1 BR, 1 bath apartment. Heat, water & 1 parking space included in rent. Available 7/10/18. Princeton – $1,775/mo. Charming Studio in Palmer Square elevator building. Furnished. Available 6/1/18.

SEEKING CERTIFIED TEACHERS: Part-time after-school and/or Saturday position at The Dyslexia Center of Princeton. Work 1:1 with students; paid training for you to learn methods used at our center. Requirements: Teaching certification in any grade level, any specialty, from any state, OR at least three years’ experience teaching in independent school. BEFORE contacting us, review website at www.DyslexiaPrinceton.org. Then send a cover letter/email; attach your resume. Contact information: DyslexiaPrinceton@verizon.net or Margaret Tuttle, Director; The Dyslexia Center of Princeton, 138 Ewing Street, Princeton, NJ 08540. 04-11

Princeton – $2,200/mo. 2nd floor, FURNISHED, 2 BR, 1 bath apartment. LR, kitchen, deck, 1-car garage included. Available 6/10/18. Princeton – $2,600/mo. Spacious penthouse in Palmer Square elevator building. 1 BR, 2 bath, living room & eat-in kitchen. Beautifully furnished (but could be unfurnished). Heat & hot water included in rent. Available now. Princeton – $3,200/mo. 3 BR, 2 bath, LR/GR, DR, kitchen, laundry room. Near schools & shopping center. Available now.

Innovative Design • Expert Installation s)NNOVATIVE$ESIGN Professional Care s%XPERT)NSTALLATION Ph 908-284-4944 Fx 908-788-5226 s0ROFESSIONAL#ARE dgreenscapes@embarqmail.com License #13VH06981800

Princeton – $3,400/mo. 3 BR, 3½ baths. Furnished. Shortterm. Available 5/1/18 through 10/31/18.

Ph-908-284-4944 Fax-908-788-5226 dgreenscapes@embarqmail.com

We have customers waiting for houses!

License #13VH02102300

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE.

WHEN SELECTING AN AGENT, EXPERIENCE COUNTS If you’re selling your home, setting the “right” price can be difficult. Relying on an agent to research the local market is a wise idea - but even then, there are pitfalls. Determining a fair and accurate price for any home requires a deep understanding of the local and regional real estate markets at any given time. And since those markets are always changing, you need an agent with a lot of experience to interpret and even predict those shifts in order to make sure your home sells quickly and at the best possible price. What’s more, the features buyers are most interested in are also in flux. Again, your agent’s experience is key. Agents with a lot of experience are skilled in assessing a home’s features, location and other variables in terms of the pool of buyers who are most likely to be interested in your home. Plus, they have the tools and know-how to effectively market your home’s best features so it compares favorably with competing homes. In the end, an experienced agent can help your home sell faster - and for the best possible price. And as a seller, what more could you ask for?

609-921-1900 ● 609-577-2989 (cell) ● info@BeatriceBloom.com ● BeatriceBloom.com Facebook.com/PrincetonNJRealEstate ● twitter.com/PrincetonHome ● BlogPrincetonHome.com

We list, We sell, We manage. If you have a house to sell or rent we are ready to service you! Call us for any of your real estate needs and check out our website at: http://www.stockton-realtor.com See our display ads for our available houses for sale.

32 Chambers Street Princeton, NJ 08542 (609) 924-1416 Martha F. Stockton, Broker-Owner HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 06-28-18 MUSIC LESSONS: Voice, piano, guitar, drums, trumpet, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, saxophone, banjo, mandolin, uke & more. One-on-one. $32/ half hour. Ongoing music camps. CALL TODAY! FARRINGTON’S MUSIC, Montgomery (609) 9248282; West Windsor (609) 897-0032, www.farringtonsmusic.com 07-19-18

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE… A Princeton Tradition Experience ✦ Honesty ✦ Integrity 32 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 (800) 763-1416 ✦ (609) 924-1416

Witherspoon Media Group Custom Design, Printing, Publishing and Distribution

· Newsletters · Brochures · Postcards · Books · Catalogues · Annual Reports For additional info contact: melissa.bilyeu@ witherspoonmediagroup.com

AN OLD FASHIONED HOUSE PERFECT FOR A CONTEMPORARY BUYER

Yesterday’s charm with today’s amenities in the Historic Wilmot House, Circa 1830, 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room/parlor, new kitchen, inviting back yard and garage. Charm and character at a very reasonable price. In a most desirable Ewing Township neighborhood. $177,000

Virtual Tour: www.realestateshows.com/1349823

www.stockton-realtor.com

4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 609-924-5400


Mortgage

Insurance

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2018

Real Estate

Realt

Closing Services

PRINCETON $1,680,000 Situated in the desirable Ettl Farm community, this Elkins model makes a dramatic statement on many levels. Features include front-to-back living and dining room, two stone fireplaces, two-story family room with floor-to-ceiling windows, and two stairways to the upstairs. The kitchen offers a center island with Quartz countertops, extensive cabinets, pantry, breakfast area with a skylight, and door opening to a brick patio and large back yard. Five upstairs bedrooms include two sets of two bedrooms with shared bath which feature hardwood floors. The master bedroom has a sitting room, walk-in closet, and adjacent king-sized bathroom with raised tub. The finished basement includes a mini kitchenette and a fourth full bath. Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

OPEN SUNDAY 1- 4 PM

NEW LISTING

HOPEWELL TWP. $499,999 Set in the heart of Hopewell Valley, in the neighborhood of Princeton Farms is this bright 4 BR, 2.5 BA with a pretty back yard and impressive room sizes. Dir: Weldon Way to Drummond Dr.

PRINCETON $650,000 This 4 BR, 2 BA, 2-story home in Littlebrook offers a screened-in porch and formal living room with brick fireplace. Special features include HW floors, newer windows and a partially finished walk-out basement.

Victoria Holly 201-790-1939 (cell) & Christine Alleyne 609-865-1505 (cell)

Beatrice Bloom 609-577-2989 (cell)

NEW LISTING

OPEN SUNDAY 1- 4PM

PRINCETON $880,000 Prepare to be impressed w/ this newly constructed 2008 Danish Design home with clean lines, soaring windows. Enter from an interior courtyard patio with 3 sets of glass doors.

WEST WINDSOR $885,000 Come see this 4 bedroom, 2 full- and 1-half bathroom home located in the beautiful Hunters Run subdivision. Features include a finished basement and tons of upgrades. Dir: 10 Sunset Court.

Susan Eelman 609-240-2520 (cell)

Eric Payne 609-955-1310 (cell) & Kari Adams-Riddick 609-213-0276 (cell)

Princeton Office | 609-921-1900

R E A L T O R S

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CB Princeton Town Topics 4.11.18.qxp_CB Previews 4/10/18 10:04 AM Page 1

COLDWELL BANKER NEWLY PRICED

Princeton | 5/5.5 | $1,799,000

NEWLY PRICED

NEWLY PRICED

Princeton | 5/3 | $1,395,000

Hillsborough Twp | 4/3 | $1,099,000

145 Ridgeview Circle

330 Stone Cliff Road

Heidi A. Hartmann Search MLS 1000261627 on CBHomes.com

Heidi A. Hartmann Search MLS 1005794721 on CBHomes.com

74 Wertsville Road Salomon “Sal” Massoud Search MLS 1000127140 on CBHomes.com

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING. BROKERS OPEN TODAY NOON - 2

NEW LISTING

Hamilton Twp | 4/3.5 | $825,000

Montgomery Twp | 4/2.5 | $710,000

12 Hampton Court

West Windsor Twp | 4/2 | $500,000 418 Village Rd E

William Chulamanis Search MLS 1000362048 on CBHomes.com

Elizabeth Zuckerman / Stephanie Will Search MLS 1000367144 on CBHomes.com

Lisa Weil Search MLS 1000364846 on CBHomes.com

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

125 Merrick Road

Montgomery Twp | 3/2.5 | $468,500

49 Garfield Way

Princeton | 3/2.5 | $390,000 71 David Brearly Court

Hamilton Twp | 2/2.5 | $325,000 33 Pizzullo Road

Gail Zervos Search MLS 1000343342 on CBHomes.com

Connie Huang Search MLS 1000313444 on CBHomes.com

Deborah Hornstra Search MLS 1000363384 on CBHomes.com

COLDWELLBANKERHOMES.COM/PRINCETON Princeton Office 10 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 | 609.921.1411 Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. All associates featured are licensed with NJ Department of State as a Broker or Salesperson. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Town Topics Newspaper April 11, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper April 11, 2018  

Witherspoon Media Group