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Volume LXXIV, Number 43

LHT Full Moon Ride is a Bit Longer This Year . . . .5 PHS Students Advance Proposals For Positive Change in Community . . .8 Lambertville House Tour Goes Virtual . . . . . . . . 10 Sightings of the Ancient Mariner — Coleridge, Camus, and Mike Leigh's Peterloo . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Passage Theatre Presents Panther Hollow . . . . . 19 PU Concerts Opens Season With “Watch Party” . . . 20 PU Football Coach Surace Navigating Fall Without Games . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Lis Back in Form for PHS Girls’ Soccer After Missing 2019 Due to Injury . . . .34

Freshman Shaila Iyer Helps PHS Girls’ Tennis Start 10-0 . . . . . . . . . 33 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors . .22, 23 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . 25 Classified Ads . . . . . . 40 Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . 38 New To Us . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing Arts . . . . . 21 Police Blotter . . . . . . . 12 Real Estate . . . . . . . . 40 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Topics of the Town . . . . 5 Town Talk . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Council Hears Updates On Transportation Topics At Special Meeting Presentations on initiatives related to transportation were the focus of a special Princeton Council meeting held Monday evening, October 19. Mayor Liz Lempert began the meeting with a moment of silence in memory of Marvin Reed, a former mayor of Princeton Borough, who died on October 12 at age 89. “One of Marvin’s major passions was transportation, so I think he’d be glad we’re continuing his legacy tonight,” she said. “Both of the FreeB buses are named after him because of his dedication and advocacy to public transit.” Councilwoman Mia Sacks reported that the two existing FreeB vehicles have been retired due to wear and tear and excessive needs for maintenance. Going forward, the town is looking to a lease option instead of ownership, hopefully with a focus on hybrid and/or electric vehicles. “We’re also finalizing a proposal to the Transit Trust Fund to expand existing FreeB routes, to better connect the new Affordable Housing sites that will be coming on line,” she said. Municipal Engineer Deanna Stockton told Council that the Engineering Department has been working with the Bicycle Advisory Committee and the Police Department to determine the best type of pavement markings and signage along the Bike Boulevard routes. The aim is to have consistent, clear markings that will be put in place in the spring once budgets have been approved. Council President David Cohen updated Council on the Bike Map Project, reporting that a third printing of the map that was created about a decade ago shows not only bike routes but locations for bike parking. Copies are available at bike shops, and will be placed in the lower lobby of the police department headquarters in the municipal building. They are also available on the municipal website. Council voted to introduce an ordinance on bike parking. Cohen said the ordinance was important because of residential developments that are planned in conjunction with the town’s Affordable Housing obligation. “It’s a topic that comes up at every single Planning meeting,” he said. “The Planning Board will be in a much better place, being able to point to actual requirements rather than asking [developers] to do us a favor.” Continued on Page 9

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Heading Into Second Phase of Pandemic With case numbers on the rise, winter weather and the holiday season approaching, and more activities taking place indoors, the COVID-19 pandemic is entering its second phase, says Princeton Health Officer Jeff Grosser. The Princeton Health Department reported 18 active positive cases in town on Monday, October 19, a favorable number compared to other parts of the state and the nation at large, but nonetheless a significant increase in the past two months. There have been 11 cases reported in the past seven days in Princeton and 19 over the past two weeks. New Jersey health officials reported more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases in the state on Tuesday, October 20, with the largest number linked to private indoor gatherings. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy declined to announce any expansion of the 25 percent capacity restriction for restaurant dining. “Winter with COVID-19 was anticipated to be a difficult one,” wrote Princeton Press and Media Communications Director Fred Williams in an October 20 email. “Our region and our county in particular have benefited from the low transmission rates achieved over the summer months, but winter will always be a time of year when infection rates for airborne viruses proliferate.” Williams emphasized the importance

of following established COVID-19 guidelines — mask-wearing, social distancing, hand washing, and opting for the outdoors — as cooler temperatures and lower humidity combine with increased travel, indoor family gatherings, and holiday social events to raise risk levels. Grosser noted that early in the pandemic the incidence was highest among older adults, but since June, 18- to 29-year-olds have been the most infected demographic. This is also the age group

that is most likely to have mild symptoms or be asymptomatic. “What is concerning about this age group is the fact that this group is more likely to continue to increase community transmission of COVID-19,” said Grosser. “We have seen these circumstances arise particularly with college/university students returning home and spreading COVID-19 through their household.” Williams added, “During the holiday season and winter months it is especially Continued on Page 7

Princeton Remembers Marvin Reed, “Serving Everyone in the Community” Marvin Reed, who died on October 12 at age 89, had an immense variety of interests and accomplishments, and a lifelong commitment to public service during his careers in education, public relations, and local government. The focal point of his energy and attention was the town of Princeton. He was Princeton Borough mayor from 1990 to 2003 and councilman for a total of 19 years, in addition to the many other positions he held. “His most important legacy was his compassion and passion for making Princeton a better place,” said his daughter Liza O’Reilly in a phone conversation from Massachusetts, where she lives with

her family. “He always wanted to make it better.” She described his ability to work productively with others and to persevere in pursuit of what he believed in. She mentioned particularly the redevelopment of the Princeton Public Library and the surrounding downtown area. “He got a lot of opposition going into that,” she said, “but he just worked at things that he had a passion for and believed in making better.” She added, “He listened to people, but he kept moving forward. And it turned out that many of the things that he focused on and believed in did turn out to be the right things despite opposition.” Continued on Page 12

FALL MUSIC ON THE SQUARE: The Polish Nannies performed Sunday afternoon on the green at Palmer Square in downtown Princeton . The free concert series continues with Duo: Kindred Spirit on October 24 and School of Rock on October 31 . The concerts are from 12 to 2 p .m . (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)


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Gracia-Rivera as vice chair, interned for the organizaMercer Street Friends Names New Board Officers Wendy B. Kane as secre- tion. A Trenton native, she is

The board of trustees of Mercer Street Friends, a Trenton -based nonprof it dedicated to addressing issues of poverty in the city a n d t h r ou g h ou t M e r c e r Count y, has named Ken Blackwell, CEO of the Princeton-based InKlaritas, as its new chair. Joining Blackwell among the team of officers is Glenda

atary, and Jaap Ketting as treasurer. Blackwell came to the organization as a volunteer board member in 2017, but k new ab out Mercer Street Fr iends for more than 32 years as a member of Yardley Friends Meeting. Gracia-Rivera was a high school senior at Princeton Day School when she

now director of professional development and training at Rutgers Center for Women and Work. Kane has been a board member since 2014 and is chair of the development committee. Ketting continues in his role of treasurer, and chairs the finance and audit committee. For more information, visit mercerstreetfriends.org.

Topics In Brief

A Community Bulletin Voting Information: All registered voters have been mailed a ballot. It can be dropped in a mailbox, in secure drop boxes including one at 400 Witherspoon Street, or can be taken to one of the select number of polling places; at least one per town. You can also vote by provisional ballet in person, on Election Day, November 3, although only disabled voters will be allowed to use a machine. If you haven’t received a vote-by-mail ballot by now, call the Mercer County Clerk’s Office at (609) 989-6494 or 6495. For more information, visit nj.gov/state/elections. Flu Shot Clinics: Princeton is holding several flu shot clinics through November 14. All dates are subject to change due to COVID-19. Uninsured residents will be provided a free shot. For dates and locations, visit princetonnj.gov/events/princeton-flu-clinic. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day: On Saturday, October 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mercer County residents can drop off unused and expired prescription drugs and e-cigarette devices (without batteries) at the lot across from the Mercer County Administration Building, 640 South Broad Street, Trenton. For more information, call (609) 278-715. Princeton Shred-Fest: Saturday, October 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Princeton residents can drop off personal documents for shredding, along with household goods and clean clothing for donation. Recycle old medical equipment, electronics or computers, old bicycles, and broken items. princetonnj.gov/news/shred-fest-2020. Donors Sought for Holiday Gift Drive: Princeton’s Human Services department asks donors to donate gifts, or a gift card, for children, for the 22nd Annual Holiday Gift Drive. Visit princetonnj.gov/departments/ human-services and donate by Friday, November 27. Call (609) 688-2055 for additional information. Tax Bills Due November 1: Reconciled 2020 tax/sewer bills were mailed September 30. The fourth quarter payment is due November 1, with a 10-day grace period. Pay online, in a drop box in the Police Department lobby at 1 Valley Road, or mail to 400 Witherspoon Street, attention Tax Office, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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TO THE MOON AND BACK: The Lawrence Hopewell Trail’s annual moonlight ride has been transformed this year, thanks to the pandemic, into a virtual trip to the moon. Participants have multiple options that include more than biking.

LHT Annual Full Moon Ride Is a Bit Longer This Year

Yet another organization has turned a casualty of the pandemic into a positive opportunity. Administrators of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail (LHT) have transformed the annual Full Moon Bike Ride, a popular event since 2013,

into something much bigger, longer, and more informal. The 2020-2021 Journey to the Moon invites cyclists, runners, dog walkers, skaters, and even treadmill users to log as many of the 238,000 miles it would take to travel to the moon, on or off the trail. The initiative was launched on October 2, the first of this month’s two full moons, and the night the event would have been held if not for COVID-19. It runs through March 1, 2021.

TOPICS Of the Town

The annual Full Moon Bike Ride drew about 500 people last year. “Every year, it’s gotten bigger,’ said Markoe. “It’s a great event and people love it. Of course, this year we weren’t sure we could do it. So we decided to call it off. But then somebody came up with this idea of a virtual trip to the moon. And it has really taken off.” Participating in the fivemonth event is free. Those taking part can log their miles using the Journey to the Moon uploader (lhtrail.org/moonmiles/), and view the Journey to the Moontracker (lhtrail. org/moon-miles-tracker) to

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Allowing that the 238,0 0 0 - m i le j ou r n e y might be a big daunting to accomplish, distance will be recorded in “LHT miles” — equaling 22 miles each, or the actual length of the trail. That makes the virtual journey 10,818 LHT miles. 4 “We’re not sure you can cover 238,000 miles by ALWAYS CELEBR ATE BEAUT Y AND LOVE. walking your dog,” said Ruth Town Topics is the only weekly paper that reaches EVERY HOME IN PRINCETON, Town Topics making is theitonly a tremendously weekly papervaluable that reach pro Markoe, LHT board member. “So we’ve made this nJ 08528 toPIcs • tel: neWsPaPeR 609.924.2200 • 4438 • Fax: Route 609.9 2 adjustment. But havingtoWn said toPIcs neWsPaPeR • 4438 Route 27 noRth • KInGston,toWn 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528-0125 that, since we announced 609-924-5400 this a week ago on social media, people have already racked up 1,400 miles.” Being fit and being outdoors are the goals of the initiative. “Plus, we want to keep the trail in people’s minds,” said Markoe. “We hope people will get out, get exercise, and hopefully take part in a real Full Moon Ride next year.” Everyone, all ages and fitness levels, is welcome to take part. Groups are encouraged. “The LHT also hopes to inspire participants to reach out to friends and family around the world, joining the community in its efforts to ‘Journey to the Moon.’ With Halloween around the corner, participants are encouraged to log miles in costume,” reads a press release for the event. The LHT is a key member Handcrafted diamond bands by Hamilton artisans in a variety of shapes and sizes. of the 800-mile bike and peWe are here to help you commemorate life’s important occasions. destrian Circuit Trails that connect people to jobs, communities, and parks in the Greater Philadelphia region. It runs through public and private land in Lawrence and Hopewell townships, and is run by the Lawrence 92 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON. 609.683.4200 Hopewell Trail Corporation, SHOP ONLINE AT HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM a nonprofit that depends on community support.

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Full Moon Ride Continued from Preceding Page

check collective progress. On the LHT Facebook page, facts will be posted throughout the five months. “We’re thinking about songs, videos — anything related to the moon,” said Markoe, who hinted that a video of the famous TV sitcom The Honeymooners might be included. “People should join the Facebook group to post stuff.” “It’s absolutely free, and you don’t even really have to sign up,” she added. “You just have to go on the website to the form, put in your name, email, and the date, and how many miles you did that day. It’s completely on the honor system. The whole idea is just, ‘Get us to the moon.’ Let’s see how close we can get.” —Anne Levin

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Question of the Week:

“Do you think there should be trick-or-treating this year?” (Photos by Charles R. Plohn)

“I think so, because kids like it and they are really looking forward to it. I think we can try to keep it safe by everyone wearing masks and gloves and keeping outside.” —Maria Adylina, Princeton

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The New Jersey State Museum’s annual Halloween event is going virtual this year. The 9 th Annual Halloween Spooktacular will feature a special online Halloween show on Friday evening, October 30, by Mad Science, and a special goody bag for each participant. S p ac e for t h e v i r t u a l show is limited and registration is required to receive the private Zoom link and goody bag. Register at https://forms.gle/usVS4BSqq1oxyVkX7. The Mad Science Halloween show will take place at 6 p.m. on October 30 featuring a mixture of science and magic. Children will see a paper spider turn into a “real-live” spider. They will hear the tales of Count Eggbert and Countess Eggberta as they battle the wicked witch, then watch as the wicked witch is melted before their eyes. The audience will find out how the seemingly sane Mr. Bernoulli helped the Mad Scientist float an eyeball in the air. Then, as a grand finale, the Mad Scientist will introduce the audience to the eerie world of dry ice, making bubbling potions and lots of fearsome fog. Included with registration is a free Halloween goody bag for each child. Pick up for the goody bags will be at the Museum on Thursday, October 29 and Friday, October 30 from 3 to 5:30 p.m. Families may also choose to pick them up at the Trenton Free Public Library from October 28 through 30 until 4:30 p.m. Goody bags will not be mailed. Families can join a virtual costume parade by posting a picture of them in costume to the Spooktacular Halloween event on the New Jersey State Museum Facebook page (njstatemuseum), or post on Twitter (@ NJStateMuseum), or Instagram (nj_statemuseum) using the hashtag #NJSMHalloweenSpooktacular.

Clarification Political advertisements do not represent the views of Town Topics, and we will no longer offer paid e-blasts to political advertisers.

Batool: “It definitely is a challenging time with everything happening with COVID, but our kids are very adaptable and very understanding. I think it doesn’t hurt to take that extra special precaution to not go trick-or-treating. There are ways to celebrate Halloween differently, safely, and without actual trick-or-treating.” Vina: “We usually don’t go trick-or-treating, so this will not be too much different for our family. I think it is probably safest for people this year to not go.” —Batool Zaidi, Skillman with Vina Aljabary, Belle Mead

Jeff: “I think probably not. I think we should just be very careful.” Sam: “I think there shouldn’t be because we should be safe. But if things have cooled down with the virus a bit, then we could.” —Jeff and Sam Gibb, Princeton

Eli: “I believe there shouldn’t be trick-or-treating this year, just so we can help keep the virus contained and so people stay safe.” Zachary: “I think we should do more of the trick part. I think we do a lot of the treats and that it would be cool if we do more tricks.” —Eli and Zachary Diringer, Morristown

Habib: “I think there should be. As long as you wear a mask and keep your distance. People can leave candy in bowls outside and you don’t have to come up to the door.” Nur: “I think there should not be any trick-or-treating primarily because you feel responsible. A lot of elder people offer trick-or-treating, and it would be very risky inviting people to their homes.” Rania: “No, because due to what is happening this year with the COVID and everything, I don’t think it is safe because even if you are eating the candy that is inside the wrapper, you are still bringing it into your house and touching the wrapper.” —Habib, Nur, and Rania Oberoi, Skillman


continued from page one

important for this age group returning home from school or the military to self-quarantine before interacting with household family members and extended family and friends.” He went on to point out that contact tracing has shown that social gatherings where safety guidelines are not closely followed have been much more problematic in causing increased cases and spread than inschool learning, workplaces, indoor dining, and shopping which adhere to established safety protocols. Princeton University Meanwhile, Princeton University, also subject to the pandemic’s uncertainties, announced on October 19, “We are preparing for the possibility that we will be able to welcome back significantly more undergraduate students in the spring.” But the University will delay until the first week of December any final decisions about the spring semester. “Though the early fall has gone well on this campus and for many of our peers, the next six weeks will provide additional, and crucial, i n for m at ion,” P r i n ce ton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber wrote in an email letter to the University community. “Nobody expected September to be the hardest month. National infection rates have nevertheless risen to nearrecord levels; New Jersey’s rates are ticking upward; and challenges will likely increase as colder temperatures force people indoors, the flu season begins, and people gather for holiday celebrations.” Princeton University has resumed some on-campus graduate instruction and research programs this fall, but the undergraduate teaching program for this semester has been almost entirely remote. There are about 250 undergraduates in residence and any student, staff, or faculty member who is on campus for more than eight hours per week is required to participate in Princeton’s asymptomatic testing program, the results of which, according to Eisgruber, have been encouraging. If more undergraduate students are welcomed back for the spring term, “residential life will, of course, be far more constrained than what existed before the pandemic

began,” Eisgruber wrote. PHS Phasing In About 550 students returned to Princeton High School on Monday, October 19, the first time classes have been held in PHS since March. Principal Jessica Baxter said it all went well, with Cohort B students in the building this week and Cohort A due next week. About two-thirds of Princeton Public School (PPS) students have opted for hybrid schooling, with about one-third choosing to remain fully remote. Princeton Unified Middle School (PUMS, formerly John Witherspoon Middle School) remains on a remote learning plan this week with the phase-in of hybrid learning delayed until next Monday, October 26, when Cohort A will be welcomed back in person. Interim Superintendent Barry Galasso announced last Thursday, October 15, that referendum construction, including new HVAC units for classrooms, had been completed, but “in order to allow for cleaning and to provide our staff the opportunity to set up their classrooms,” in-person opening of PUMS would be delayed one week. PPS announced that as of last week it had received 93 requests from staff to work from home because of concerns about the coronavirus. Through last Tuesday PPS had granted “work from home” assignments for 20 staff members, and an additional five teacher requests were approved but not used. PPS has created a form, Accommodation Reconsideration Medical Certification, available for staff members who request to work from home. Five requests for additional personal protective equipment (PPE) have all been approved. The Monday, October 19 Princeton COVID-19 Update from Mayor Lempert and the Princeton Council noted the rise in cases in Princeton and advised, “Especially as the cooler weather pulls more of us back inside, we have to remain extra-vigilant. It is more important than ever to take precautions to limit your exposure to the virus so we can work together to contain its spread.” Grosser added a more specific warning, “Given the role of asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic transmission, all persons, including young adults, should take extra precautions to avoid transmission to family and

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Immigrant Entrepreneur Awards Include Lawrenceville Resident

The winners of the 8th Annual New Jersey Immigrant Entrepreneurs awards were honored virtually on Thursday, October 15, at 10 a.m. Mahesh Yadav, CEO of Optima Global Solutions in Lawrenceville, was presented with the David Sarnoff Award for Advocacy and Community Engagemen. Yadav is from India. Others honored come from India and China. The awards program featured keynote speaker Jeremy

Robbins of the New American Economy and a panel discussion with Patrick McGowan of Genova Burns, Ali Bokari of Unilever, and Rashaad Bajwa of Domain Computer. The online event was presented by the NJ Business Immigration Coalition in partnership with its members NJBIA and Einstein’s Alley. The awards honor immigrant business leaders helping New Jersey communities thrive. The program was created to highlight the social and economic contributions of New Jersey’s immigrants to communities throughout the state, and celebrate the important role of immigrants to today’s economy. The Immigrant Entrepreneur Awards were named for historic New Jersey immigrant entrepreneurs. The many nominees represent small mom and pop businesses as well as large corporations; ranging from high-tech firms to professional service providers, from manufacturing operations to restaurants and financial institutions. Combined, they employ hundreds of people and do billions in sales.

THE COMMUNITY STEPS UP: At Bryn Mawr Trust’s food drive on Saturday, October 17, nearly 700 food items were donated by members of the community to benefit Arm In Arm, which helps provide food and shelter for those in need. Pictured at the Arts Council of Princeton are, from left, Bryn Mawr Trust’s Deb Monaghan and President Kevin Tylus, mayoral candidate Mark Freda with his McCaffrey’s donation, and Bryn Mawr Trust’s Cindy Ricker and Sandra Gray.

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community members who are older or who have underlying medical conditions. This is particularly true with Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s holidays all within the next 8-10 weeks.” He continued, “Strict adherence to community mitigation strategies and personal preventive behaviors by younger adults is needed to help reduce their risk for infection and minimize subsequent transmission of SARSCoV-2 to persons at higher risk for severe COVID-19.” —Donald Gilpin

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HOW TO VOTE IN THE 2020 GENERAL ELECTION BY 8:00 P.M. ON NOVEMBER 3 Every active registered voter in New Jersey should receive a ballot in the mail. If it hasn’t arrived yet, track your vote-by-mail ballot status online at Vote.NJ.Gov or contact your County Clerk, listed on the County Election Officials page.

PHS Students Advance Program Proposals For Positive Change in Local Community Undaunted by the limitations of youth and inexperience or a seven-month pandemic lockdown, three Princeton High School students are looking to implement their original plans to make a difference in the local community — in health care, in youth engagement, and in the relationship between police and the young people of Princeton. Participants in the Social Pioneers Program of the NJ Youth Civics Coalition (NJYCC), formerly the Princeton Youth Program for Civic Engagement — senior Alice Feng, junior Jimmy Weinstein, and sophomore Han Li — were ready to present their proposals to community and government leaders at a pitch event in April. The event was canceled because of the pandemic, however, and the students have had to find other ways to advance their ideas.

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Jimmy Weinstein Weinstein, whose goal is to help build the relationship between the police department and the young people of Princeton, explained why he got involved in the Social Pioneers Program. “I have spent too many years complaining and listening to others complain, so I figured it is time to try and fix something that is terribly important in our community,” he wrote in an email. “I am opinionated, but I never act. This issue has always been important and a bit controversial, and I thought the least I could do was find a simple solution, even if it doesn’t create world peace.” In addressing the challenges of a relationship that Weinstein described as “rocky” and at times “severely strained,” Weinstein’s proposal, originally created in late 2019 before this year’s nationwide protests over policing, calls for many events where kids and police communicate with each other “to discuss different sides and stories, for kids to learn what to do during police confrontations, for police to learn kids’ opinions on what they feel should change.” He added, “The only way to get a solution is to discuss. If our youth and our police do not know each other, what is the point? This project looks to have

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everyone feel safe in their a successful community is town, and this is the best one that is giving back and way to start.” working together to solve its problems.” NJYCC has been active in the past few years working with area schools to build to build civics-related curriculum and support teachers with training and resources. Partnering with the Princeton Public Library, the Princeton Farmers Market, the Princeton Battlefield Society, the YMCA and others, NJYCC “focuses on empowering the next generation of citizens to make meaningful positive change in their communities,” according to NJYCC co-founder Neena Alice Feng Patil. The focus of Feng’s pro“These three students are gram is Community Health wonderful and amazing, and Workers (CHW), an organi- they came at this challenge zation that helps low-income for different reasons and and minority populations, with very different experifacilitating access to health ence,” she said. “Alice alcare systems and providing ready had experience workpsychosocial support. She ing on community projects noted that Princeton’s af- and crowdsourcing; Jimmy fordable housing units and is a wonderful, energetic low-income neighborhoods person who really wanted to are often overlooked. learn and be a part of con“Moreover, the language versations; and Han uses his barrier and unfamiliarity own experience to identify with the health care system needs, often starting with often prevent new immi- what was impactful for him, grants and vulnerable popu- what helped him to shape lations from seeking proper his mindset around wantcare,” she said, with CHW ing to be a member of his programs implemented only community and wanting to sporadically in the state. give other students that op“CHWs are critical to meet- portunity.” ing the current moment of COVID-19 in health care.” She continued, “A local CHW initiative that addresses health education and prevention, mobilizes local talents, generates income for vulnerable populations, and promotes community ownership would undoubtedly be beneficial to the well-being of the town as a whole.” Li’s plan is a multi-faceted one, seeking to get middle and high school students more involved in the Princeton community by helping Han Li them learn about civic engagement and find opporThe NJYCC created leadtunities to apply what they ership workshops for the learn. He looks forward to work- students, inviting commuing with teachers to either nity and education leaders create a separate class or to to help the students to think include education on civic about the root cause of the e ngag e m e nt i n ex is t i ng problems they are trying classes. “Then I want to cre- to solve and to build comate and advertise a website munication skills designed that can be used to promote to help them to influence different volunteer and other people through their words. In this pandemic year of civic opportunities around Princeton so that people, hybrid learning, when the especially teenagers, look- programs of these young ing for places to get involved social pioneers seem even in the community, can have more important than ever one site with all the differ- before, Patil is working with ent links and descriptions,” PHS to find the most effective forum for Feng, Weinhe said. Li emphasized the impor- stein, and Li to present and tance of the health of the then implement their ambicommunity rather than just tious programs. “NJ YCC not only pro the success of individuals. “A healthy, striving commu- vides me with information nity is the paragon of suc- on the importance of civics, cess, even more so than per- but also the opportunity to sonal success in any form,” bring changes into reality,” he said. “That’s also where said Feng. —Donald Gilpin charity comes in because

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Should a developer be unable to supply the parking, they can make a contribution instead, Cohen added. The ordinance lists between $500 and $1,000 to do so. Referencing a study of NJ Transit’s service on the Dinky train that connects Princeton to Princeton Junction on the Northeast Corridor Line, Sacks said NJ Transit is planning to make some major changes on the technology of the train cars it uses. Keeping the Dinky operating is a priority, and it has been made clear to NJ Transit that the municipality wants to be involved in the process going forward. “We feel confident that we’ll be kept in the loop on a bimonthly basis,” she said, adding that the agency is currently occupied with the effects of the pandemic. Regarding a switch to electric vehicles, Stockton said the state of New Jersey is developing a “tool kit” in the next few months. While a draft ordinance has been created through work with Sustainable Princeton, the town will wait to see what develops on a state level. C ou n c i lwom a n L e t i c ia Fraga spoke about the Permit Parking Task Force, saying a lot of research and leg work is already in progress. The group has been counting available parking spaces and taking note of residences that have no driveway or restricted driveways as a pilot program proposal is developed. “We have already identified a provider with the technology,” she said. “And since it would be a pilot program, it would be of no cost to us.” The program would be a license plate reader specifically for employee permits. Meetings with residents of the town’s “tree streets” and Bank Street are being planned, following which a proposal for a permit parking system would be drafted. Fraga added that since overnight parking has been permitted during the pandemic, it has to be decided whether or not that should be permanent. Additional projects discussed include current work on Paul Robeson Place, Wiggins Street, and Hamilton Avenue. Stockton reported on the Witherspoon Street Project and updated Council on draft design guidelines on the King’s Highway Historic District, which covers the portions of Routes 206 and 27 that connect Lawrenceville with Kingston. There was an update on the Nassau Streetscape, during which Stockton said the town is working to finalize a planting project that would be in front of businesses from Witherspoon Street to Vandeventer Avenue. Two r e s o l u t i o n s w e r e passed. One concerns removal of the taxi stand in front of Princeton University’s FitzRandolph Gate, which would allow for seven parking spots. The other is for removal of the NJ Transit bus stop on Nassau Street near Witherspoon Street, and installation of a new bus shelter and bike parking on Nassau Street near South Tulane Street. Both resolutions need to go before the New Jersey Department of Transportation for approval. The bridges on Washington

Street over Lake Carnegie and the D&R Canal towpath will need replacement in the future. “It’s coming, but not imminent,” said Stockton. Other topics included the town’s street light policy, and the Bicycle Advisory Committee’s efforts to focus on pedestrians as well as cyclists. Council voted to introduce an ordinance on the committee, and a public hearing on the measure will be held November 9. A presentation on Vision Zero, which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and severe injuries, was given by Jerry Foster and Lisa Serieyssol. Though not specifically related to transportation issues, Council approved a resolution appointing the Franklin Avenue Development Task Force. Council representatives Cohen, Sacks, and Michelle Pirone Lambros are joined by eight members of the public including Elizabeth Bromley, Harold Heft, Heidi Fichtenbaum, Joel Schwartz, and four others. —Anne Levin

TESU Foundation to Host Annual Grande Ball 2020 Virtually

Thomas Edison State University (TESU) Foundation will host its 29th Annual Grande Ball by Honoring Healthcare Heroes and Celebrating 2020: The Year of The Nurse on October 29 at 7 p.m., via Zoom. T he T E SU Fou ndat ion has selected Dr. Deborah Mican, vice president for Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer at Capital Health, as its honoree. TESU and Capital Health have a shared commitment to improving the communities they serve through quality healthcare and lifelong education.

Deborah Mican Misty Isak, associate vice president of Development at TESU, said, “Capital Health has a number of its nurse professionals serve as nurse educators and online course mentors in TESU’s nursing

programs. In turn Capital Health has hired a number of students who have come through the school’s prelicensure, bachelor’s and graduate-level nursing programs.” “We knew as we were planning the gala that we had to consider the possibility that we weren’t going to be able to gather in person due to health and safety concerns,” said Jaclyn Joworisak, Donor Relations and Advancement associate in the Office of Development at Thomas Edison State University. The Grande Ball, which was originally set to take place in early October, was pushed back as a result of the current pandemic. Joworisak added, “After exploring various options, we ultimately decided that we needed to adapt and change what we had done in the past to go virtual, like many events in 2020.” In previous years, those attending the Grande Ball participated in a networking cocktail hour. For this year’s v ir tual event, the TE SU Foundation will share cocktail recipes to registered attendees prior to the event, creating a sense of community for participants who want to replicate the recipe at home. In addition to the cocktails, the W. Cary Edwards School of Nursing simulation lab will play an important role in the evening as we film live from the lab. In order to bring an added element of enjoyment to this year’s event, TESU is asking registered participants to submit a name for the “newly born” infant simulator. The chosen name will be announced on the night of the event. The Foundation will promote sponsors by acknowledging them throughout the virtual celebration. Because guests aren’t limited by geography, sponsors will gain exposure to the broader TESU student and alumni population as they will be able to attend this year. Attendance is free, but registration is required. S i n c e t h i s ye ar’s e ve nt will be virtual and without charge, the Foundation is asking participants to consider making a donation in lieu of the cost of a ticket to attend the event. All registrants will receive a TESU mask, to be mailed postevent, and the gala will also feature door prizes and an online auction. Visit CharityAuction.Bid/TESU.

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Instead of a Live House Tour, Lambertville Opens Virtually It might seem that a house tour that can’t be viewed in person wouldn’t be worth taking. But the Lambertville Historical Society has come up with a virtual program for this weekend’s Lambertville House Tour, its biggest annual fundraiser, that actually offers more to see and experience than on the traditional tours the organization has held during the past 37 years. Organizers knew months ago that, thanks to the pandemic, opening the Delaware River town’s distinctive homes to the public would not be possible this year. After some brainstorming, they came up with a set of nine video tours of historic properties, with interior footage and aerial cinematography, produced by resident talent. Also included in the $10 admission are four presentations, and a

live Q&A session with local architects and a well known interior design professional. “When we realized we wouldn’t be able to do it, our biggest question was, ‘How do we keep the tradition alive?’” said Michael Menche, president of the Historical Society. “That was the main thing. So we thought a lot about how to do it virtually. You can’t recreate walking into a house. It’s just not the same. And we wanted to make it enchanting and informative, at a variety of levels in a virtual format.” The nine tours have different themes focused on row homes, stone manor estates, and more. Menche is particularly proud of the aerial cinematography by Federico Ferreri, which soars above the trees and gives sweeping views of the town. “It’s very dramatic. It’s stunning.

It gives you angles that you’ve never seen before,” he said. Among the houses included are the oldest in town, and a few others dating back a few centuries. None have been open before. “The houses we chose would not normally be on a regular house tour,” said Menche. “The owners actually prefer the virtual format to people walking through their houses. And some are on the outskirts of town.” The videos, which were created by documentary producer and local resident Gary P. Cohen, are set to music by local artists Carol Heffler, Dan Kassel, J.B. Kline, Pyrenesia, Stephen DiJoseph, and The Back Porch Jugband. The four presentations include “Vintage Living in Lambertville” by local author, designer and television personality Bob Richter; and examples

of historic restoration in residential and commercial properties by architects Michael Burns, Lisa Easton, and Gary O’Connor. “We really thought about the music we were using, which we wanted to be understated and elegant,” said Menche. “We thought about what track would make the most sense for each property. We were really striving for that enchantment.” Tours will take viewers from basements to attics. Some of the owners have creative collections of objects from salvage to antiques, including one of glass bottles found on the property. “We have such a variety. There is the oldest house in town, so anyone who wants to see where George Washington stayed, we checked that box,” Menche said. “And then we have four expert presentations. Two of the architects will be available for questions at each webinar.”

The tour is Saturday and Sunday, October 24 and 25. Webinars will take place at four different times during the weekend: 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. To register, visit lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. —Anne Levin

dispersal. He will also cover the general anatomy of flowers and use specific examples of native plants to illustrate many differences in floral structure and function that occur in nature. Visit bhwp.org for more information and registration.

At Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in New Hope, Pa., there are two remaining programs in the Thursday Nigh Nature series taking place this fall. On October 22, “Owls with Tyler Christensen” is scheduled. The October 29 program is “Ethnobotany and Flower Folklore with Alonso Abugattas.” The programs are at 7 p.m. and held via Zoom. Members pay $10; non-members $20. Also taking place on Zoom is “Knowing Native Plants: From Flowers to Seeds” on Saturday, November 7 from 2-4 p.m. The cost is $15 for members; $20 for non-members. Ed Lignowski, a former college botany/plant physiology professor, will answer questions about how angiosperms reproduce sexually, and more. He will discuss the life cycles of flowering plants, from pollination to fruit/seed

ence for Women will be held vir tually October 29-31. The event includes sessions and interactive networking rooms, nationally known speakers, keynote sessions, breakout sessions, morning yoga sessions, a virtual marketplace, prizes and raffles, and more. All sessions will be available on demand after the conference. Speakers incl u d e L e y m a n G b owe e, 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, social worker, women’s rights advocate, and founder of Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa; Kerri Kennedy, co - editor of Indivisible : Global Leaders for Shared Security; Victoria Arlen, ESPN host and Paralympic gold medalist and Dancing With the Stars contestant; and several others. To register, visit njconferenceforwomen.com.

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Marvin Reed

day and age.” Former Councilman Bernie Miller recalled Reed’s extraordinary vision and his ability to make that vision an enduring reality for Princeton. “I first got to know Marv when I was treasurer for the Friends of the Princeton Public Library,” Miller wrote in an email. “Long before most of us, Marv had recognized the need for a new and larger library to serve all of the residents of Princeton and be located in our central business district.” He continued, “But beyond the need for a new public library, Marv foresaw the opportunity to create a vibrant area around the library with apartments, shopping, and an attractive public space for both residents and visitors. Time has proven his vision for a new library and the redevelopment of the surrounding area to be correct. It is one of Marv’s many legacies to our town, and we will benefit from it for years to come. Marv’s insight and deep concern for all of the residents of Princeton will be greatly missed.” Reed’s son David, now living with his family in California, echoed Miller and others’ recollections of his father’s efforts on behalf of the whole community. “As I continue to reflect on

continued from page one

O’Reilly, who serves on her local school board, noted her father’s influence on her. “He was a mentor to me. He inspired me to go into public service, and my mother did too.” In 2018 Reed and his wife Ingrid were awarded the Leslie “Bud” Vivian Award for Community Service by the Princeton Area Community Foundation for a lifetime of service to many local, regional, and state level projects, committees, and organizations. O’Reilly continued, “He and I talked about campaigning, how you serve constituents, how you work with staff, and how you conduct meetings.” She described how she had been going through some of her father’s papers and had been particularly intrigued by the annual speeches he would give on New Year’s Day. “I was in awe of many of the profound things my father would say in these speeches,” she said. “He said them kindly and constructively but very pointedly. He really put himself out there. He wasn’t afraid to say things that he really believed in, but he said them kindly and respectfully, which is so refreshing in this

his life, what always comes to mind is his never-ending genuine interest in serving everyone in the community,” David Reed wrote in an email. “From the over 500 weddings over which he presided to the lengthy and careful attention he paid to the redevelopment of the library and adjacent public spaces to the relocation of the hospital, it is hard to comprehend how much effort and attention to detail would have been required. Only a short list of people will know how much he put into everything, but everyone in the Princeton community will be forever touched by the work he did.” Mildred Trotman, former Princeton Borough mayor and former councilwoman, met Reed in the 1980s when they were running for Council on a ticket with Barbara Sigmund, who was seeking re-election as mayor. “I don’t think I would have been in politics as an elected official for more than 26 years if it hadn’t been for his wisdom, patience, and stick-to-it-iveness as our friendship developed over all of those years,” Trotman said. “I will miss him so much.” She went on, “He was such a joy to be around and to work with. We didn’t agree all the time, of course, but unlike politics today we sat down and discussed. We respected each other’s opinion, and we made the best of it all, at the same time thinking what would be in the best interest of Princeton Borough. ” Trotman emphasized the thoroughness and attention to detail that characterized Reed’s contributions. “We must have walked every inch of Princeton Borough when we ran that first time. He was

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knowledgeable about many things, and those things about which he was not so knowledgeable —ask him in a day or two, and he would have risen to the occasion. He was a person for getting to the bottom of things and getting to know and assimilate information.” Mark Freda, who is running unopposed for Princeton mayor in next month’s election, recalls serving on Borough Council with Reed for many years. Emphasizing Reed’s continuing achievements even after stepping down from his post as mayor in 2003, Freda wrote in an email, “Marvin invested significant time and effort into his work on Council for this community. He was very knowledgeable on many topics and he continued to work for our community even after he stepped down as mayor. He did a lot of good for our community and he should be remembered for those contributions.” Reed’s interests stretched far and wide, with a great affinity for travel and the arts, including the culinary arts. Gail Ullman, who served on the Princeton Planning Board and many other local organizations, remembered fondly the way Reed fostered the relationship between Princeton and its sister city, Colmar, France, organizing week-long tours for Princeton residents to Alsace. “Those of us who joined him remember the beautiful little city, the vineyards sweeping up into the Vosges Mountains, the museums, the churches, and, most of all, the food. Daily, Marv managed hours-long lunches or dinners, or both, of incredible food and wine, thoughtfully including bus rides that allowed us to sleep

them off. He made those trips unforgettable. Marv absolutely loved organizing them.” An obituary for Marvin Reed appears on page 38 of this week’s Town Topics. —Donald Gilpin

Police Blotter On October 15, at 3:10 p.m., it was reported that vehicles parked on Turner Court were entered and contents of the center consoles had been rifled through. Nothing was reported stolen. On October 15, at 1:48 p.m., it was reported that someone placed a large yellow sticker on the driver side window of a car parked on Clay Street. The sticker stated she was illegally parked, and it was so difficult to remove that the window needs professional cleaning. On October 15, at 11:01

a.m., an employee of a store on Palmer Square reported a shoplifting in progress. The two suspects were seen entering a silver Chevy before officers arrived. The value of the items stolen was $1,350. On October 15, at 9:40 a.m., a resident of Quarry Street reported that someone used her credit card information to make a purchase of $665. She canceled her card and a second purchase for $270 was declined. On October 14, at 1:38 p.m., a 36-year-old male from Princeton was charged with DWI, subsequent to a 911 call to report an erratic driver on Nassau Street. On October 13, at 1:50 p.m., a male reported that his bank’s fraud department notified him that someone used his debit card to purchase $85.35 worth of merchandise from a Walmart in Las Vegas, NV. Unless otherwise noted, individuals arrested were later released.

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Princeton Public Library will continue its phased reopening of the Sands Library Building on Wednesday, Ocober 21, when all three floors of the building will be open for express services. Hours of operation will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 4-7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Contactless pickup of items placed on hold in the library catalog will continue 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (till 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday) and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. “We are pleased to build on the success of our Express Library by expanding those services to all floors, with staff at all of our service desks,” Jennifer Podolsky, the library’s executive director, said. “Customers will be able to browse our entire collection, except for children’s board books, and we are restoring more services. We know the public is eager to browse, but we recommend that visits be short and purposeful.” Cu s to m e r s w i l l e n te r through the doors on Hinds Plaza and exit onto Witherspoon Street. By-appointment hold pickup service will be available at the Sylvia Beach Way entrance. Customers can opt to pick up their holds in the library. In addition to browsing the collection and borrowing materials, customers can make use of individual workspace seating and 30-minute sessions on public computers. These workspaces are set up for individual work only and will not support work by groups or learning pods. Printing, scanning, copying and faxing services will be available. Interlibrary Loan service will resume during the expansion of express services. Programming, including author talks, book discussions, storytimes, meetings, and classes, will continue to be held online. “This is a significant step on our road to reopening,” Podolsky said. “We are expanding services in a way that puts the safety of the public and staff foremost. We have instituted best practices to ensure that goal. We will continue to assess the status of the virus in New Jersey and consult with the municipal Health Department, the library’s board of trustees and our colleagues at other libraries in the state as we consider the next steps in our plan.” The library closed on March 13 and began accepting returns of materials on June 24. Contactless pickup of items placed on hold in the library’s online catalog began July 8 and the Express Library opened in the Community Room on August 26. The library is in the Sands Library Building at 65 Witherspoon Street. For more information about library programs and services, call (609) 924-9529 or visit princetonlibrary.org.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 14

A FARM IS SAVED: Hunterdon Land Trust has preserved 71-acre Hope Hill Farm in Franklin Township from development. (Photo by Maria Valentina) Vartikar accepted an invi- Christian and Vartikar said. Hunterdon Land Trust Preserves Franklin Farm tation from a friend, Gary “In the process, we learned

Serendipity, hope, and a lot of hard work led to Hunterdon Land Trust’s ( HLT) latest preservation effort. The 71-acre Hope Hill Farm in Franklin Township attracted HLT’s attention for a number of reasons including “its location within the South Branch Raritan Watershed, the two tributaries running across the property, and the high percentage of impor tant statewide and prime soils on the property,” said HLT Land Acquisitions Director Jacqueline Middleton. The farm is comprised of notable quantities of Penn silt loam, Bow mansv ille loam, and Raritan silt loam, which are all ideal for crop production. This story begins in 2012 when New York City gallery operators and newlyweds Sarah Christian and Jason

Snyder, to visit his historic East Amwell home. They were enchanted by Hunterdon County, traveling its back roads, exploring its scenic views, and even visiting HLT’s Farmers’ Market. “We fell in love with Hunterdon County that weekend,” the couple said. “After a few more visits and lots of cruising around, we spotted a for-sale sign at the bottom of a long gravel driveway on one of the prettiest roads in the county.” They purchased the farm that fall. Originally a 10acre island parceled off from surrounding farmland, the property was increased by more than 60 acres when adjacent land became available for purchase. “We couldn’t bear to see the land developed, and the natural setting destroyed,”

that the land had once been a fruit orchard and a cow pasture.” The preservation means the couple will own the land and continue to farm it, but the property must remain as farmland in perpetuity. The couple sought to preserve the land for a number of reasons, chief among them that the nearby hillside sloping upward along the Raritan River, known as Sunnyside, is a recreation destination for fishing, walking, and biking. “A l o n g w i t h a d j a c e n t county preserves, there are several farms which give Sunnyside its splendor,” the couple said. “But our farm was the missing piece with more than 1,500 feet of frontage on River Road in two separate stretches.

The farm truly protects the natural and agricultural feel of the area, as well as the integrity of the watershed.” To learn more about preservation, they reached out to neighbor Lora Jones, who at that time served as secretary of Franklin Township’s Open Space Advisory Committee. Jones was well aware of the farm’s environmental importance and natural beauty. “River Road attracts hikers and cyclists year-round. Many of them have cited the calming effects of the landscape,” Jones said. “Come see it and you will know the feeling.” The process took several years and involved a number of twists and turns. In 2016, Jones contacted Hunterdon Land Trust for help securing funds for the property’s preservation. “It just so happens that HLT and the New Jersey Water Supply Authority had jointly applied for a federal grant with the Natural Resources Conservation Services called the Regional Conservation Partnership Program,” Middleton said. “HLT had federal money to use in specific watersheds including the South Branch.” The State Agriculture Development Committee, Hunterdon County, and Franklin Township also played key roles in this preservation effort. HLT, SADC, the county, Fr a n k l i n Tow n s h i p a n d NJ WSA worked together to secure federal and state funds to preserve the land. “It was another two and a half years until we got to sign on the dotted-line, but the wait was worth it,” the farm owners said.

Dual Admissions Program For Business Graduates

Mercer County Community College (MCCC) entered another agreement with a fouryear university, this time with New Jersey City University (NJCU). MCCC students who complete an associate degree in business administration will be seamlessly admitted with full junior status to NJCU’s School of Business. This partnership allows Mercer students to transfer their A.S. in business administration to a number of NJCU programs, including marketing, finance, accounting and more. Students can plan admission to NJCU as early as their first semester and may transfer at any point after earning their A.S. from Mercer. “Mercer has many articulation agreements with many institutions but this one is very unique,” said MCCC President Dr. Jianping Wang. “The population NJCU serves in Jersey City is very similar to the populations we serve in New Jersey’s capital city.” The MCCC-NJCU agreement is another advancement in long-term educational planning for Mercer students. As part of the arrangement, Mercer students will have access to NJCU admissions and financial aid advisors. Moreover, the

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agreement guarantees eligible students will have their place at NJCU reserved, further easing their transition to the University. According to Farah Bennani, dean of MCCC’s Business and STEM Division, “This partnership constitutes a milestone for our students.” She added that the partnership was made possible by the “collaborative efforts of Mercer Professors Laura Sosa, Josephine Mathias, Kenneth Horowitz, and Jonathan Rowe, as well as the NJCU team. “We have eliminated the challenges of transferring from a community college to a fouryear university, thus improving our students’ chance of overall success while supporting state and national completion goals,” Bennani said. “It also validates our program and strengthens our long-standing relationship with NJCU.” Prior to this collaboration, MCCC and NJCU initiated articulation between the colleges’ criminal justice programs. Those partnerships provide guaranteed pathways for students to transfer to NJCU upon program completion at MCCC, as well as an opportunity for students to transfer in the event they were not eligible for dual admission. To learn more about the agreement, visit mccc.edu.

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15 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 16

Mailbox

Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Town Topics Email letters to: editor@towntopics.com or mail to: Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, NJ 08528

Our grateful thanks to the Princeton Children’s Fund for founding and administering CERF and to the many volunteers from municipal and local social service organizations who served on the CERF Intake Committee and the CERF Steering Committee for providing case management services. TOSHI ABE PCH Trustee, Walnut Lane

Extending Thanks to PCF for Founding Coronavirus Emergency Relief Fund, a Community Collaboration Suppers Programs Invites Community To the Editor: To “A Seat at the Table” Event Oct. 29 On March 10, 2020, N.J. Gov. Phil Murphy declared a state of emergency in response to the coronavirus pandemic that had just claimed its first victims in the state. Soon after, all non-essential businesses were ordered to shut down and New Jersey residents were ordered to quarantine at home. Recognizing that many of our community’s residents would be in need of assistance, local organizations, including Princeton Community Housing, joined to form the Coronavirus Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). The goal of the fund was to “enable residents to be able to stay in their homes … maintain access to utility service that enables students to be connected to school and enable all residents to be connected to food resources and other necessities during this crisis.” CERF was a community collaboration, led by the Princeton Children’s Fund (PCF) that included Princeton Community Housing (PCH), Princeton Human Services Department, Princeton Senior Resource Center, and Send Hunger Packing Princeton. A fundraising goal of $500,000 was set. Contributions totaling over $435,000 were collected from donations by the Princeton University Relief Fund, the COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation, and from over 830 individuals. By July, CERF had received over 440 applications for assistance. A team of three intake coordinators and a 10 member steering committee gave generously of their time to review the applications. By July, over 440 applications had been reviewed and 353 grants were awarded. The average award was just over $3,000. Jordan Goodwin, the community activities coordinator at Princeton Community Village, served on the steering committee and notes, “CERF was extremely effective.… When I look back on the pandemic, I will remember the resilience of people who faced tremendous hardship and the sincere gratitude expressed for the generosity of the Princeton community, who came around to them during their time of great need.” Residents of PCH had 20 CERF applications approved (PCH manages 70 apartments at Griggs Farms, 238 units at Princeton Community Village (PCV), and three private homes). With CERF ending, PCH continues to support rent relief for its residents through its Coronavirus Emergency Rent Relief Program, which is funded by donations from individuals and by the NJ Pandemic Relief Fund and the Princeton Area Community Fund.

To the Editor: On behalf of The Suppers Programs, we would like to invite the community to “A Seat at the Table” and share a delicious, healthy meal with us on Thursday, October 29, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Now more than ever, your health matters! The theme of this year’s free virtual event is inspired by our commitment to sharing information about the importance of healthy eating and fueling the body and the brain — by eating real, whole foods. At Suppers, we create a learning environment that is free from judgement for everyone and all communities. During these challenging times, many of us are looking at our health with a new perspective. You may be removed from the health resources and activities on which you normally rely. This is an opportunity for you to connect and learn how you can be your own best ally in health. Please visit The Suppers Programs’ website (thesuppersprograms.org) to RSVP and get information on how to preorder specially prepared Suppers-friendly meals from our community partners at Jammin’ Crepes and Terra Momo Restaurant Group. We hope you’ll join us on Thursday, October 29 as we welcome you to the Suppers table. FIONA CAPSTICK Board President, Leavitt Lane MARION REINSON Executive Director, Cherry Brook Drive KAREN ROSE TANK Chair, Annual Appeal Committee, Maclean Circle

Thanking Speakers, Guests, Sponsors, Organizers for W-J Historical Society Event

To the Editor: The decade was the 1980s, the situation was the busing of children to schools, the outcome was the bonding of two boys from different communities in Princeton! Taylor “Todd” Marrow III and Jason Harding met when they were students at Littlebrook School, continued through John Witherspoon Middle School, and graduated from Princeton High School. Last Tuesday evening they reunited on a Zoom meeting fundraiser for the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society (WJHCS). Their lasting friendship and respect for each other was evident as they shared their growing up days of childhood antics, confronting racial injustices, sharing the

love and care from both families and their educational journeys to becoming history professors. Todd, an associate professor at Chemeketa College in Salem, Oregon, and Jason Harding, a professor at Pennington School, gave an entertaining hour-long talk centering on a variety of topics influenced by race and history. Jason introduced Todd’s recently-released edited book, America Awakened by Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Both professors shared an evening of remembrances, history, and the joys and challenges of life. WJHCS publicly sends our gratitude and appreciation to Professor Taylor “Todd” Marrow III and Professor Jason Harding for an inspiring, enjoyable, and heartfelt evening. Our acknowledgements and thanks go out to the 84 persons who registered for this Zoom webinar with a special thank you to our sponsors, all of whom supported our fundraiser for the installation of 29 Heritage Plaques to commemorate noted African American establishments in Princeton. This fundraiser was conceived by Reverend Gregory Smith, event chairperson and close friend of both presenters. Mr. Julian Edgren, a Studio Hillier architect, and Mr. Jaime Escarpeta, a photographer and printing consultant, both served as the Zoom event technicians. SHIRLEY SATTERFIELD President, Trustees of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society

Durbin Will Fight for Causes That Make Community Stronger, Better Together

To the Editor: We are so excited that Jean Durbin is running for School Board. We first got to know Jean when our son Phillip was in Little League and Jim was a coach. I wasn’t usually able to sit with other parents at games because I was typically watching our oldest son Jimmy, who has autism and doesn’t like to sit for very long. Well one day at Farmview, Jean started talking with me near the bleachers. As I answered, Jimmy walked away and I said, “talk to you later.” And Jean just said, “I’ll walk with you.” And we had that conversation as we followed Jimmy through Farmview. For the parents of a child with special needs, this seemingly small gesture meant so much. It said: “I’ll go there with you — I want to hear what you have to say — I’ll walk in your shoes.” We haven’t forgotten. Since then we’ve seen Jean in action as president of the PCDO and know how hard she will work to fight for causes that make our community stronger and better together. We wholeheartedly endorse Jean for School Board this fall. MARY PHILLIPUK JIM CHRISTY Leigh Avenue


To the Editor: We recently opened our newly renovated childcare center, The Burke Foundation Early Childhood Center at YWCA Princeton. Our renovated program building has new classrooms, a lactation room, additional children’s bathroom, HVAC air filtration system, and — because of COVID-19 — comprehensive health, safety, and security protocols. Each morning starts with temperature checks and symptom screenings. For the health and safety of our staff and the families we serve, only staff, children, and essential workers are allowed in the building. This new check-in process has given my staff and I the opportunity to interact with each family on a daily basis, and our teachers are in constant communication with parents via ClassDojo, classroom phones, or emails. All staff wear masks and PPE, and children over the age of 2 are required and encouraged to wear masks each day. Children are resilient and have been quick to adapt to wearing masks once teachers explained it’s a way to keep each other safe. We’re also working closely with the Department of Children and Families’ Office of Licensing and Princeton Health Department, as well as Princeton Public Schools, to maintain our strict health and safety protocols. Despite all that has changed here at The Burke Foundation Early Childhood Center at YWCA Princeton, our mission remains the same: to provide high quality childcare and education to the families we serve. Our teachers still utilize a research-based curriculum that engages critical areas of cognitive, physical, and social development, and all of our classrooms are bilingual. We hope you and your family join us. To learn more about our program, visit ywcaprinceton.org/childcare. TARA O’SHEA Director of Childcare and Programs, YWCA Princeton

Supporting Candidates Hare, Lemon, And Johnson For Board of Education

To the Editor: I am writing this letter in support of Bill Hare, Karen Lemon, and Paul Johnson’s candidacies for the Princeton Board of Education. Although I am a member of the Princeton Board of Education, I am writing in my private, individual capacity as a Princeton resident and parent of two children attending PPS, and not on behalf of the Board of Education. I first met Bill Hare when he was first running for the Board in 2016, and subsequently served with him on the Board for two years. Bill was a terrific board member; he is smart, openminded, and compassionate. A patent lawyer, Bill pays attention to the details and is not afraid to push for things he thinks makes sense. For example, during his time as Finance Committee Chair, Bill suggested ideas for cost saving measures related to health plans, which were implemented and yielded significant savings for the district. Bill decided not to run for re-election last year, in large part because he felt the weight of the red tape in our system and that change was not coming fast enough for our kids and our taxpayers. Being away from the Board has given Bill the time needed to reflect upon the experience. Rather than remain on the sidelines, Bill wants to jump in again to be part of the solution. Bill is determined to ensure all students in Princeton are cared for, and that taxpayer dollars are well spent. Bill decided to run for the Board with Paul Johnson and Karen Lemon and focus on issues of diversity, affordability, and trust. Paul, a father of three children who attend PPS, is passionate about excellent education for all children. A fourth generation Princetonian, he is well known in our community as a soccer coach and works with kids of all ages. Paul is eager to foster change, and his energy and passion will serve our community well on the Board of Education. Karen and her wife have lived in Princeton for the past ten years. Karen holds an undergraduate degree in math education and recently retired from AT&T where she managed an annual

budget in excess of $500 million and spearheaded diversity and inclusion initiatives. Karen’s math background and corporate finance and diversity experience will help the Board to ensure Princeton schools remain the lighthouse district that we all treasure, and that Princeton remains affordable for all. Most importantly, Bill, Paul, and Karen are running for the Board for all of the right reasons: to build on our district’s outstanding record; to be prudent stewards of one of our town’s most valuable resources; and to ensure that the education and well-being of our students continues to be our district’s number one priority. Please join me in voting for Bill Hare, Paul Johnson, and Karen Lemon for Princeton Board of Education. DAFNA KENDAL Dodds Lane

BOE Candidate Durbin Will Work to Build Consensus and Solve Problems

To the Editor: I support Jean Durbin for the Board of Education. Yes, Jean is a smart, compassionate, and thoughtful leader whose approach is collaborative not confrontational. Yes, she’s trained as a social worker and a lawyer. And this combination of empathetic listening and understanding the intricacies of contracts and regulations are necessary skills, but they are not sufficient. What the Board of Education needs are members who will work to build consensus and solve problems. I met Jean when we were parent volunteers at Littlebrook School. She was a parent who cared deeply about other people’s children. She never maligned other parents or administrators and always worked to find solutions to problems, rather than looking for someone to blame when something needed fixing. When we found ourselves volunteers with the PCDO, Jean was a measured and collaborative leader, who rose above personal disagreements to lead the organization forward with a common goal. The Board of Education needs adults like Jean Durbin. I hope she has your vote too. CAROLINE A. CLEAVES Edgehill Street

Knowledge, Hard Work of Candidates Behrend, Tuck-Ponder, Durbin Will Best Serve Students

To the Editor: November’s coming, and again the only interesting local election is for Board of Education. I believe all candidates sincerely want to educate all our kids well and spend wisely, but some spending claims I’ve seen seem off base to me: • Opposition to the agreement to educate Cranbury kids at PHS. But on net it benefits PPS by $2-3 million/year (and can’t be revoked, anyway). • Opposition to the students’ new Macs as too costly. But they are more capable and better solve many issues such as in-class consistency, equity, testing, remote learning and security, while staying within the existing budget. • Objection to buying the Choir College. But no candidates favor that anyway. Princeton has top-ranked schools, despite bigger challenges than some neighboring districts. We have low student-teacher ratios and four neighborhood schools that are worth the cost. Adjusted for pensions (borne by the state), special education needs and pass-throughs, our per-pupil spending is not wasteful. There is very little wiggle room in the operating budget, due

to the “2 percent cap” and rising enrollment from new housing. What a shame it would be to sidetrack our improvements and harm our stellar reputation by cutting an already tight budget to save a fraction of 1 percent of our taxes! Beth Behrend, Michele Tuck-Ponder, and Jean Durbin clearly have more experience and energy around the operational details of our district. They have priorities that include wise spending and much more. I think their knowledge and hard work will best serve our students and, by keeping PPS a topranked district, our property values. BOB SCHWARTZ Grover Avenue

Books Second Amendment Subject Of October 22 Discussion

his writing has appeared in The Washington Post, NPR, Jennifer Carlson and Mi- The New Republic, and Prochael Siena-Arvalo will dis- Publica, among others. cuss Carlson’s new book, Late Medieval Europe Policing the Second Amendment (Princeton Univ. Press) Subject of Oct. 27 Talk Caroline Walker Bynum on October 22 at 7 p.m. The and Brooke Holmes will disprogram is co-hosted by The Princeton Public Library, cuss Bynum’s Dissimilar Princeton University Press, Similitudes: Devotional Objects in Late Medieval Euand Labyrinth Books. rope (Princeton Univ. Press) To register visit crowdcast. on Tuesday, October 27 at 6 io/e/secondamendment/regp.m. The Labyrinth/Library ister. livestream event is presented According to R.J. Young in partnership with the Princin the New York Times Book eton University Humanities Review, Carlson’s book “[E] Council. To register, visit xamines how the National crowdcast.io/e/croline-walkRifle Association became er-bynum. a driving influence behind Writing in Foreword ReAmerican policing for over views, Rachel Jagareski coma century, and emerges with ments, “Dissimilar Similithe idea that policing America tudes glides through history has not overcome its racially and iconography, revisiting charged beginning.” the assumptions of scholars Carlson is associate pro- and decoding the intricate fessor of sociology as well as meanings of holy objects. Its government and public policy probing essays are original, at the University of Arizona. revisionist interpretations that She is the author of Citizen- illuminate avenues for further Protectors: The Everyday study.” Politics of Guns in an Age of Bynum’s early, path-breakDecline. Her writing has aping books are Holy Feast and peared in numerous publicaHoly Fast and The Resurrections, including The Los Antion of the Body in Western geles Times, The Wall Street Christendom. Her most reJournal, and The Washington cent book is Christian MaPost. Michael Sierra-Arévalo teriality. She is professor is an assistant professor in emerita in the School of Histhe Department of Sociology torical Studies at the Institute at the University of Texas at for Advanced Study. Holmes Austin. His research shows is professor of classics at how danger and violence inPrinceton University and the fluence police culture, officer author of The Symptom and practice, and social inequality. the Subject: The Emergence His first book, Peril on Patrol: of the Physical Body in AnDanger, Death, and U.S. Pocient Greece and Gender: Anlicing, is forthcoming with tiquity and Its Legacy. Columbia University Press;

Let Lucy’s do the cooking

Letters to the Editor Policy Town Topics welcomes letters to the Editor, preferably on subjects related to Princeton. Letters must have a valid street address (only the street name will be printed with the writer’s name). Priority will be given to letters that are received for publication no later than Monday noon for publication in that week’s Wednesday edition. Letters must be no longer than 500 words and have no more than four signatures. All letters are subject to editing and to available space. At least a month’s time must pass before another letter from the same writer can be considered for publication. Letters are welcome with views about actions, policies, ordinances, events, performances, buildings, etc. However, we will not publish letters that include content that is, or may be perceived as, negative towards local figures, politicians, or political candidates as individuals. When necessary, letters with negative content may be shared with the person/group in question in order to allow them the courtesy of a response, with the understanding that the communications end there. Letters to the Editor may be submitted, preferably by email, to editor@towntopics.com, or by post to Town Topics, PO Box 125, Kingston, N.J. 08528. Letters submitted via mail must have a valid signature.

17 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 18

FILM/BOOK REVIEW

Sightings of the Ancient Mariner — Coleridge, Camus, and Mike Leigh’s “Peterloo” I could get to where the massacre happened in 15 minutes on the bus when I was a kid. —Director Mike Leigh, discussing Peterloo spent last Wednesday morning finishing The Plague and rereading The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. With Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s birthday a week away, it made sense to go from Albert Camus and his apparent conclusion that the plague “opens men’s eyes and forces them to take thought” to Coleridge’s concluding reference to the Mariner’s captive audience, the Wedding Guest, as a “sadder and wiser man.” Both narratives appear to end on a positive note. For Camus, it’s “to state quite simply what we learn in time of pestilence: that there are more things to admire in men than to despise.” For Coleridge, it’s “He prayeth best, who loveth best / All things both great and small.” Except that The Plague’s Doctor Rieux realizes at the close of the novel, as he listens to “the cries of joy rising from the town, that such joy is always imperiled ... that the plague bacillus never dies or disappears for good; that it can lie dormant for years and years ... that it bides its time in bedrooms, cellars, trunks, and bookshelves, and that perhaps the day would come when, for the bane and enlightening of men, it would rouse up its rats again and send them forth to die in a happy city.” And despite the freedom the bright-eyed Mariner feels after unloading the burden of his “ghastly tale” on the terrified Wedding Guest, he knows the “woeful agony” will return, when his heart within him “burns” and he must pass, “like night, from land to land,” with “strange power of speech” until he finds the man who must hear him (“To him my tale I teach”). Poetry Happening If you’ve been writing for most of your life, it’s tempting to identify with the romantic notion of wandering from land to land and listener to listener “with strange power of speech.” Through his verse, letters, notebooks, and marginalia, Coleridge has been a living breathing presence for me ever since I discovered him in my late teens among the books in my father’s study. As for “ancient,” well, he’s 248 years old today, October 21, 2020, and he’s still telling his tale; his Mariner’s still standing on the “rotting deck” of a plague-stricken ship on “a rotting sea,” with a crew of corpses because he shot the albatross, the “bird of good omen.” But after reading of those men, “all dead,” as “a thousand slimy things” lived on and “and so did I,” you’re with the Mariner seven stanzas later when he envisions the “water-snakes” moving “in tracks of shining white,” every track “a flash of golden fire,” and now they’re “happy living things” so

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beyond-words beautiful that “a spring of love gushed” from his heart. That sealed my bond with Coleridge, the day I ventured into a dull blue 700-page volume titled The Best of Coleridge and for the first time saw poetry coming to life on the page. The Rime of Peterloo I’ve just been stopped in my tracks and pulled aside by another ancient mariner in the form of British director Mike Leigh (a mere 77), who has a tale to tell that begins on the smoking battlefield wasteland of Waterloo and ends with the bright sunny holiday carnage of the Peterloo massacre, where on August 16, 1819, a cavalry of armed government militia charged into a crowd of some 60,000 people from Manchester and surrounding towns, gathered there for a peaceful protest calling for Parliamentary reform and an extension of voting r ight s. T he outcr y following the attack, which resulted in as many as 18 deaths and 700 wounded, led to the eventual founding of the Manchester Guardian and helped ma ke pos sible t he passing of the Great Reform Act 13 years later. Having finally settled down to watch Leigh’s two-and-a-half-hour epic Peterloo (2018), I’ve been wondering if the germ of his future mission was latent in the air when he was growing up and going to school a short bus ride away from the scene of the massacre on Manchester’s St. Peter’s Fields. I imagine a sort of fallout, a toxic cloud haunting the site of an event of that magnitude, something like the plague bacillus Camus tells us never dies or disappears for good but can “lie dormant for years and years.” And yet, as Leigh says in an April 2019 interview on wsws.org, “Nobody talked about it. Why, as primary school kids, we weren’t taken down there, a short distance, and marched around and told ‘this is what happened here,’ I have no idea.” Even though there were people of various generations working on the film, they didn’t know about this “seminal event in the history of democracy in Britain and the labor movement.” A hundred years later, Peterloo “resonates with so many things,” says Leigh. But “it’s not a polemic; it’s not a film that leaves you with a black and white message. I deliberately end it when your emotions are aroused.”

w w w. p e r i o d a rch i t e c t u re l t d . c o m

The Naked Mariner With admitted hindsight, it makes sense that the emotional momentum driving Leigh’s masterpiece Naked (1993) is embodied by a wild man from Manchester. A doom-saying variation on the Mariner, Johnny (David Thewlis) careens through the city-of-dreadful-night streets of London with his mad gaze fixed on the approach of the Millennium. “The end of the world is nigh!” he tells one stand-in for the Wedding Guest. “The game is up!” At one point he riffs on “the ubiquitous barcode that you’ll find on every bog roll and packet of johnnies and every poxy pork pie,” and how in The Book of Revelations “when the seven seals are broken open on the day of judgment and the seven angels blow the trumpets, when the third angel blows her bugle, wormwood will fall from the sky, wormwood will poison a third part of all the waters and a third part of all the land and many many many people will die! Now do you know what the Russian translation for wormwood is?... Chernobyl!” It’s hard to believe that Thewlis created his non-stop worddrunk performance w it hout benef it of a script. Like an inspired jazz musician or the most enlightened of rappers, he improvises whole cadenzas on the cosmic wretchedness of existence. His body English equally kinetic, he moves like a broken-winged bird of ill omen and howls like a werewolf (he plays Remus Lupin in the Harry Potter movies). The film’s concluding image shows him limping and hopping toward some unthinkable fate. The film world responded like the Wedding Guest, held by Johnny’s “skinny hand” and “glittering eye” (“The Mariner hath his will”). Thewlis won Best Actor at Cannes, and Leigh Best Director, and 25 years later Cannes rejected Peterloo. Joseph’s Journey What made Peterloo persona non grata at Cannes, resulting in a medium-low rating on Metacritic for a director whose films usually score high, is the rhetorical opposite of Naked’s most conspicuous feature: excessive speech. As much as my wife and I admired Ted Pope’s cinematography, the costumes, the sets, and the acting, there were moments when we asked ourselves if we had the patience to stay with the film. Clearly it was Leigh’s fascination with the human and political magnitude

of the event that moved him to allow the speechcifying an almost documentary latitude. As he told IndieWire in April 2019, “Here is democracy in action, here are genuine hopes that come out of genuine things in people’s lives. To be dealt with in this destructive, chaotic, blind, insensitive, self-serving way by people in power — all those things remain resonant.” In fact, the film’s most powerful single messenger hardly says a word. Just as Naked’s Johnny can’t stop talking, Joseph the 18-year-old Waterloo survivor can’t start. Imagine a youthful incarnation of the Mariner with a ghastly tale of war to tell, traumatized, struck dumb, voided by the experience rather than burning with it. Joseph is the first human figure we see, a shell-shocked, battle-weary redcoat wandering lost on the waste of Waterloo with a bugle in his hand. Probably his single most eloquent moment comes with the reflex that leads him to put the bugle to his lips and blow — for what? A pointless reveille on an abandoned battlefield. As it is, he has barely has the strength to stagger home to Manchester. A crucial element of Leigh’s genius is that he’s so unsparing with his characters. There’s a clip on YouTube showing the director standing on the battlefield coaching Dav id Foorst, the spirited, smiling young actor who pays Joseph. In the film, his weariness, his beyond PTSD trauma, almost precludes sympathy. The moment he finally breaks down sobbing in his mother’s arms is hard to watch. It’s wrenching, ugly, painful to think of, all the more when in a subsequent scene the government awards a six-figure fortune to Wellington in honor of his glorious victory. Joseph never shakes the weight of Waterloo from his shoulders. It’s still there when you see him caught up in the mob scene at the end, no less lost, no less stunned, in the sunny chaos of the massacre when he’s struck down by one of the cavalry. Leigh ends the film with the boy’s burial. keep thinking of how much greater the impact, to see Peterloo now, after eight months of coronavirus, a summer of growing civil unrest with an unhinged president stoking the chaos, clearing Lafayette Park of peaceful protesters on his way to his Bible-in-hand photo op. More than anything else, even the other side of Election Day, I think of the image of a man suffocated by the policeman’s knee on his throat. There are times in Peterloo when it’s as if Leigh’s knee is on your throat, the pressure relieved at the existential moment when just as you’re about to go black, the world becomes brutally brighter. —Stuart Mitchner

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Passage Theatre Presents a Prerecorded Performance of “Panther Hollow”; David Lee White Tackles Depression in Candid, Darkly Humorous Monologue

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assage Theatre has presented a prerecorded video of Panther Hollow. Writer and performer David Lee White’s candid, darkly humorous monologue was originally presented in March 2016, as part of Passage’s Solo Flights Festival. John Augustine was the stage director; the video was produced and directed by Susan Ryan. In an introduction, Managing Director Damion Parran acknowledges that the video was donated by White to Passage, for use as a fundraiser for the company’s upcoming season. Although the video was distributed via YouTube, its presentation was treated as a theatrical event; ticket buyers were emailed a link that entitled them to view the performance from October 17-20. White’s work with Passage has included serving as its managing director, and subsequently, its associate artistic director and resident playwright. Previously the company has presented his plays Blood: A Comedy, If I Could, In My Hood, I Would… and Slippery as Sin. Currently White is collaborating (with Richard Bradford and the members of The OK Trenton Ensemble) on The Ok Trenton Project, which is “scheduled to premiere as a full production in October of 2021,” according to Passage’s website. In a video interview for Passage, White was asked about the process of writing Panther Hollow. He credits previous Solo Flights productions with its inspiration. “A lot of people would come on and do these shows, and over the years I got really fascinated with them,” White says. “I thought, ‘I wonder if this is something I can do.’” Offering a taste of the humor that pervades his monologue, White adds, “I had always wanted to tell the story of my battle with clinical depression … because first of all, I thought, ‘that’s going to be a laugh riot!’” White explains that the recollection of this time in his life “felt like a story I had to offer … and the good news was that when I was 25 and going through this experience, I kept a notebook. So I kept a journal of all of these things that had happened to me … as I had moved across the country a number of times, I’ve kept this box filled with these journal pages and I thought, ‘well maybe it’s time to do something with them.’ So I started writing; it probably took me about eight months to a year to put the whole thing together.” For Panther Hollow the stage is decorated with only a desk, on which two glasses of water have been provided; a wooden chair; a music stand; and a whiteboard. Sporting a royal blue shirt, with a dark grey jacket and slacks, a bespectacled White enters,

White’s description of a “black cloud” in his stomach, which dissipates when he imagines committing suicide. He confesses these thoughts to his “opposite sex platonic best friend” Karen, who insists that he talk to a therapist. He finally finds a psychiatrist — identified as Dr. Woods — who treats him, despite his lack of means to pay her fee. Dr. Woods offers a moving description of the purpose of cognitive therapy, which she compares to a record player. “Every experience that we have in life creates a groove in our record. Sometimes our record gets a scratch in it, and we’re forced to listen to the same distorted sound, over and over and over again. And the purpose of therapy is not to get rid of the scratches; the purpose of therapy is to lift the needle over the scratch, and place it back down on the record, so that the music can continue to play.” A theme that emerges from Augustine’s staging, and White’s performance, is the extent to which an artist’s surroundings and life experiences become a part of their work. A photo of White as a younger (25-year-old) man is placed on the whiteboard; throughout the monologue White adds images related to his topics of discussion. These images include a photo of a skyscraper to illustrate his opening joke; drawings of women he either encounters or dreams about; and items connected with his therapy sessions, including a couch and a tissue. In some cases White removes images, choosing which thoughts will remain as part of a collage. The collage also provides a grim visual summary of the danger in White’s story. At one point, the photo of White is placed in the same (middle) horizontal register as a list of Pittsburgh’s suicide victims. In the top row are images of the means of the suicides, including a bridge and a tree. On the bottom are the images connected with the therapy sessions. This juxtaposition allows the audience to ask: will White’s name be added to those who chose to end their life, or will therapy save him? n answer comes from a concluding sequence in which White describes walking “through the lost neighborhood, past the tree, up the 136 steps, out of Panther Hollow”; the physical location “PANTHER HOLLOW”: Passage Theatre presented, to ticketed YouTube viewers, a prere- becomes a metaphor for his struggles at that corded video of “Panther Hollow.” Written and performed by David Lee White (above), and time in his life. He imagines a conversation directed by John Augustine, this candid and wry monologue describes the artist’s struggles in which he upbraids his younger self for his problems. Pointing at his photograph, with clinical depression at age 25. (Photo by Michael Goldstein) he adds, “But he’s not going to listen to me. And you know what? He shouldn’t, because For information about Passage Theatre’s upcoming events, call (609) 392-0766 I owe him big for the life I have now.” or visit passagetheatre.org. —Donald H. Sanborn III

carrying a journal. He sits, and smiles wryly as he briefly glances at the journal. Then he stands and addresses the audience. He opens with a grim joke about three construction workers on the top floor of a skyscraper. During their lunch break the first two workers complain about the kind of sandwiches that have been packed for them. The third worker also does this, adding, “If I get tuna on rye one more time, I am throwing myself off this building!” On the following day the first two workers are happy to have a different kind of sandwich. The third, however, still has tuna on rye. He “throws himself off of the building, and he plummets to the ground.” The first worker expresses sympathy and horror; the second worker offhandedly responds, “I know, he packs his own lunch.” White matter-of-factly reveals that at age 25 he “was suffering from clinical depression, and living in Pittsburgh. Now, those two things didn’t necessarily have anything to do with one another!”

As we might expect given this opening, the show’s subject matter is somber. This is mitigated by White’s deadpan style of delivery, which is mixed with enough intensity (punctuated by jittery use of hand movement) to hold our curiosity as to what he will say next. We learn the source of the play’s title. Panther Hollow is the name of the Pittsburgh neighborhood where White rented a century-old house, along with two roommates, when he was 25. White recounts that one of his roommates was appearing in a play (The Real Inspector Hound), and asked him to perform as a corpse, to substitute for an actor who failed to arrive. White describes the anxiety attacks he experienced when, as he lay face down on stage, he could not take a complete breath. Matters worsened when actors rolled a sofa above his head. White achieves striking dramatic effect at this point, by pausing his speech to take several audibly deep, pained breaths. One of the most disturbing segments is

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Panther Hollow

THEATER REVIEW


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 20

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Princeton University Concerts Opens Season With Virtual “Watch Party”

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rinceton University Concerts opened its 127th season last Thursday night with an old musical friend presenting a free live digital performance launched over YouTube. The Takács Quartet, which has appeared on the PU Concerts series 20 times in the past, broadcast a live performance from Chautauqua Auditorium on the campus of the University of Colorado, Boulder, where the string quartet is based. In Thursday night’s program, violinists Edward Dusinberre and Harumi Rhodes, violist Richard O’Neill, and cellist András Fejér presented an unusual concert spanning 250 years and including individual movements of some of the ensemble’s favorite works. The Takács Quartet began the concert with the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, whose string quartets are popular staples of chamber repertory. Mozart’s 1783 String Quartet No. 15 in D minor showed a strong influence of the composer’s mentor, Franz Josef Haydn, while allowing the four instrumentalists to explore their own musical personalities. The second of six string quartets Mozart dedicated to Haydn, this work moved away from Mozart’s chipper major keys to the key of D minor — a harmonic center Mozart reserved for such dark and ominous drama as Don Giovanni and the deathbed Requiem. The Takács players, performing the opening “allegro moderato,” began with a fierce dark character, as cellist Fejér led the ensemble through the opening passages. O’Neill’s viola playing spoke well in the all-wood Chautauqua Auditorium and the Quartet built musical intensity uniformly with dynamic swells well executed throughout the movement. Like Mozart, the late 19th-century English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor died prematurely in his mid-30s but was also prolific as a young composer. While a student at the Royal College of Music, Coleridge-Taylor composed five “character pieces” for string quartet — unusual in that most repertoire for the genre is comprised of larger works. Five Fantasiestücke for String Quartet showed the influence of the Romantic Robert Schumann, with a folk element also heard in the music of Dvorák and Bartók. The Takács Quartet performed the first and third of these character pieces, well capturing the restless harmonies of the opening “Prelude” and the multifaceted nature and technical difficulty of the third movement “Humoresque.” Second violinist Harumi Rhodes provided an especially dark melody in the opening movement, with Gypsy-like passages from all instruments in “Humoresque.” Despite the driving rhythms, the

Takács playing showed a hint of joy, conveying the music’s ebbs and flows cleanly. Renowned for his research into the folk music of his native Hungary and its subsequent fusion into his music, 20 th-century composer Béla Bartók blazed a trail for the field of ethnomusicology. Also showing talent at a young age, he composed the 1908 String Quartet No. 1 at the age of 27, possibly inspired by a violinist with whom he was infatuated. The Takács Quartet, named for its founder from the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest, paid tribute to its Hungarian roots by performing the final multifaceted movement of Bartók’s quartet. This work bridged musical styles between lush 19th-century Romanticism and the lean compactness of the early 20th-century Viennese School, evidenced by the improvisatory recitative “Introduzione” leading to an “allegro molto” full of rich melodies and intense repeated dissonances. Cellist Fejér led the way through the “Introduzione” with an elegant melodic line accompanied by sharp chords from the other three players. Fejér took his time with the music, setting up well a similar melody from Dusinberre stretching into the violin’s highest register. The ensemble expertly handled repeated rhythmic passages in the “allegro” section, communicating effectively among one another. Violinist Dusinberre and Rhodes provided an especially teasing musical “chase,” passing melodic material back and forth. he Takács Quartet closed the digital concert with two movements from the only string quartet composed by Impressionist French composer Claude Debussy, known for creating palettes of orchestral sound. Composed for the string quartet of a Belgian friend of Debussy, this work is introspective in its subtle harmonies and elegantly French melodic lines. Second violinist Harumi Rhodes was featured prominently in the third movement “andantino,” playing low in the instrument’s register. This movement was very much for the lower voices of the Quartet, with violist O’Neill also playing a prominent role in conveying melodic material. The closing movement led to a dramatic conclusion to the concert, with all players attentive to one another as an ensemble. Although unconventional in its presentation of numerous smaller movements rather than complete works for string quartet, the “Watch Party” of Princeton University Concerts enabled the online audience to hear a variety of music, from an acoustically great hall, by a top-notch ensemble. —Nancy Plum

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Princeton University Concerts will launch its next virtual “Watch Party” on Sunday, November 29 at 3 p.m. This digital performance will feature the renowned brother-sister duo of cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason and pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason in a performance of music by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and Saints-Saëns. The performance is free to the public and can be accessed from the Princeton University Concerts website at princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

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TELL ME A STORY: Joanie Leeds is one of two storytellers booked for the popular Milk & Cookies series presented online by State Theatre NJ.

Milk & Cookies Series To Be Available Online

State Theatre New Jersey announces the return of the storytelling series Milk & Cookies for fall 2020. A popular State Theatre program for more t han 10 years, the series will be available online. Two programs are geared to children ages 3-10 and their families. The series begins Saturday, October 24, with storyteller Charlot te Bla ke A ls ton ; fol lowed by musician Joanie Leeds on November 14. Alston has shared her African and African American tales with audiences from Cape Tow n to Car negie Hall, at events ranging from concerts in Japan to the U.S. Presidential Inaugural festivities. For her original kids music, singer-song-

writer Leeds has won first place in the USA Songwriting Competition, the Independent Music Award, Gold Parents’ Choice Award, NAPPA Gold Award, and Family Choice Award. One of the top nationally-touring kindie rock singers today, Leeds recently released her ninth studio album, All the Ladies. Patrons who donate will receive an email the day of the event at 10 a.m. with a link to watch the performance. The video can be viewed at any time and will be active from October 24 through December 23, 2020. To participate, a minimum donation of $10 per event is required and gives an entire household access to a Milk & Cookies show. To donate or for more information, visit STNJ.org.

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all public or private middle Arts Ed NJ Launches Solo and Ensemble Festival school and high school stu-

Arts Ed NJ, the statewide arts education policy and advocacy organization, has announced the inaugural New Jersey State Solo and Ensemble Festival (NJSEF) for the 2020/2021 school year to recognize student achievement in music education across the state. The NJSEF Festival has five primary goals: improve s t u d e nt s’ m u s ic p er for mance; increase students’ u nder s ta nd i ng of mus ic literature and music concepts ; motivate students to continue their study of music; establish standards of excellence in music performance; and provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship of music experiences to other life experiences. Open to

dents, the event will be held virtually in 2021 with both regional and state festivals, to provide opportunities for scholastic music students to showcase their talents either individually or in an ensemble. The festival will take place starting in February 2021. Students will submit their video performances online. Performances are adjudicated by judges, with each student performance receiving a rating. Students with the highest festival ratings will be invited to participate in the State Festival in April, 2021. A second regional festival will also take place in April. “With all of the cancelat ions of ac t iv it ies and events for our st udents

the state of New Jersey and plans to work closely with NFHS on this and future endeavors for the benefit of New Jersey arts students. Music educator and administrator Dennis Argul has been appointed as the director of the New Jersey Solo and Ensemble Festival and will be coordinating with committees comprised of New Jersey music educators on the development of the Festival as the event evolves. Arts Ed NJ and the NJSEF are committed to equity. In order to make participation widely available to all students, regardless of circumstances, there is no membership requirement (for schools or the music educator). Any students in grades 6-12 attending a public or private school, or is home schooled, may participate. Additionally, through the Grunin Foundation’s generosity, educators will be able to request scholarships to cover the cost of participation for students with demonstrated need. To learn more and to sign up for additional information, go to artsednj.org.

21 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

Performing Arts

across the state we believed we need to create some platform for our music educators to be able to showcase their students’ talents and musical growth in spite of the COVID19 Pandemic”, said Bob Morrison, director of Arts Ed NJ. “Providing this virtual festival during the current school year will provide something for our students to look forward to right now and set the stage for an annual solo and ensemble experience for future students.” T hrough the Solo and Ensemble experience, students learn the discipline of rehearsal, are challenged to advance their musical skills, perform for an adjudicator, and receive feedback on their performance. Students that perform at the highest level during the Regional Festival will be invited to advance to the State Solo and Ensemble Festival. Students may also perform for “comments only” from the adjudicators w ithout re ceiving a rating. Through practice, performance, and in receiving the constructive feedback offered by adjudicators, students will be encouraged to develop socially, emotionally, and artistically. The inaugural festival is being powered by the music education organization Music for All, which has provided the virtual platform and adjudication infrastructure. Additionally, the solo and ensemble repertoire list, comprised of more than 11,000 titles, has been made available through a cooperative arrangement with the Wisconsin School Music Association, which has more than 80 years of solo and ensemble festival experience. The New Jersey State Solo and Ensemble Festival grew out of discussions between Arts Ed NJ and the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) and is modeled after best practices from around the nation. Arts Ed NJ is working to become the NFHS performing arts affiliate for

Annual Costume and Prop Sale Held by Shakespeare Theatre

Find cost umes, props, crafts, and lots more at the The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey’s annual tag sale, being held Saturday, October 24 at the Thomas H. Kean Theatre Factory, 3 Vreeland Road in Florham Park. Hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The sale features bargains for costume-hunters, crafters, drama teachers, tag sale regulars, students, actors, artists, collectors, vinyl-lovers, furniture bargain-hunters, clothing mavens, and anyone looking for a deal. Among the items offered are props, shoes, gowns, knick k nacks, lamps, jewelr y, hats, masks, greeting cards, wigs, coats, artwork, flowers, belts, LP records, fabric, scenery, baskets, blankets, books, lights, frames, and more. For more information, visit shakespearenj.org.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 22

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 24

her Brooklyn-based weaving studio Weaving Hand, jeweler Lauren Eckert, and woodworker Janine Wang. Set in the wooded landscape of the Delaware Water Gap National Park in Layton, NJ, Peters Valley was first proposed in 1970 as a planned colony of artists and craftspeople. The resident blacksmiths, ceramists, fiber artists, metalsmiths, woodworkers, and photographers who populated the site’s 18th and 19th-century buildings created a vibrant community engaged in creating. Over time, as Peters Valley’s educational mission moved from the margins to the center, it grew into the craft school it is today, which brings together artists of local, national, and international renown with students for immersive materials-based workshops. The Hunterdon Art Museum is located at 7 Lower “SAME DAY NEW MESSAGE”: This work by Phillip McConnell is part of the “Art Against Racism: Center Street in Clinton. Memorial.Monument.Movement” virtual exhibit, which kicks off with a Livestream Launch on Admission is $7 for adults, Saturday, October 24 at 8 p.m. at artagainstracism.org. $5 for seniors and students; children under 12 are free. T hursday t hrough “Art Against Racism” Exhibit Racism : Memorial.Monu- “From the Ground Up” at Open Sunday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. ment.Movement” serves as a Livesteam Launch on Oct. 24 Hunterdon Art Museum For more information, visit “Art Against Racism: Me- living archive for preserving Hunterdon Art Museum the breadth of art inspired now features “From the hunterdonartmuseum.org. morial.Monument.Movem e n t ,” t h e n a t i o n w i d e by the Black Lives Matter Ground Up: Peters Valley “Virtual Art Throwdown” at virtual exhibition created to Movement. The exhibition, School of Craft” through Contemporary Art Center document the Black Lives searchable by contributor’s Ja nu ar y 10. “From t h e The Center for ContemMatter art movement, will n a m e a n d g e o g r a p h i c Ground Up,” will be the porary Art (The Center) in l o c a t i o n , w i l l c o n t i n u e kick off with a Livestream first-ever exhibition examin- Bedminster is holding a virL a u n c h o n S a t u r d a y , to be added to through ing Peters Valley’s 50-year tual fundraiser to celebrate October 24 at 8 p.m. ET. Inauguration Day. history and key moments its 50 th anniversary. The “Community-created art, that have defined the instiThe 90 -minute program, communit y is inv ited to moderated by Art Against inspired by the Black Lives tution – from its earliest for- participate in this free event Racism founder R hinold Matter movement, is the mation as an experimental taking place on Friday, OcPonder, will feature live and powerful voice of history,” craft colony, to the building tober 23 from 7 to 8:30 pre-recorded video of music, says artist/author/educator/ of its renowned Japanese p.m. poetry, performance, and curator and organizer Judith wood-fired or Anagama kiln The “Virtual Art Throwinterviews on the themes of K. Brodsky. “We must pre- in 1980, to the prominence down” consists of five teachserve these expressions of racial and social justice, as of women blacksmiths at well as a virtual video gal- protest and support. ‘Memo- Peters Valley in the early ing artists from The Center competing in a fast-paced lery of artwork. The artists rial.Monument.Movement’ 2000s. and friendly competition behind the artwork will talk is how we can prevent eraThe exhibition, curated creating an original work about what motivated them sure and keep these images by Elizabeth Essner, will of art using mystery items and what this moment in alive.” combine historical ephem- selected by attendees. The time means, and why it is The Livestream Launch era with significant works teaching artists competing so important to vote. is being produced by Cam- in fiber, jewelry, ceramics, w ill be Joseph Castroneron Ferrara, who has been To tune in to the free virwood, photography, and nova, Helen Marie Farrant, tual event, visit artagain- involved with Emmy award- metal by artists involved Andrea Gianchiglia, Wendy winning prime time shows at Peters Valley, as well as stracism.org. Hallstrom, and Oscar PeterFeatured guests will in- like Cash Cab (Discovery), on-site artist residencies to son. Wes Sherman will be clude poet and Newark BAFTA award winning doc- allow further engagement the master of ceremonies. Mayor Ras Baraka, who will umentaries like Rebuild- with artists working in craftGuests and the public will give a spoken word perfor- ing the World Trade Cen- based materials. have the chance to bid on ter (History Channel), and mance; artist, writer, and “We’ve been working with the artwork made during the scholar Nell Painter; Phila- other regional arts festivals the Hunterdon Art Museum event and work by The Cendelphia Mural Arts founder and fundraising events, in- and Essner for the past two ter’s faculty and other artists Jane Golden; emerging rap- cluding Art All Night - Tren- years to ensure this mile- from The Center. per Echezona, whose music ton 2020 that featured more stone exhibition includes Guests will also be treated is a rallying cry for social than 50 artists, musicians, pieces that communicate to a performance by artist and presenters. change and racial justice; the rich history and developFrank May who will per“Art Against Racism: Me- ment of contemporary craft poets Michelle Black Smithform a piece made just for morial.Monument.MoveTompkins, Gail Mitchell, and in America,” said Peters ValDavid Herrstrom; folk artist ment,” in partnership with ley Executive Director Kris- this occasion while creating David Brahinsky; Congress- Rutgers University, has in- tin Muller. “The interactive a sculpture which will be man Hank Johnson of Geor- vited artists, both individual artist residencies will also available in the online aucgia; and Kansas City mural and in collaborative groups; exemplify to visitors the ex- tion. The event is free, but artist and Black Summer community organizations; periential aspects of Peters 2020 curator Harold Smith. houses of worship; arts or- Valley’s immersive studio guests must R.S.V.P. to receive the Zoom link for the There will be live video of ganizations, galleries, and workshops.” evening and the cocktail public art from muralists in museums to participate. The “I’m thrilled to be able to Milwaukee, Trenton, Kansas exhibition includes sculpture, shed light on so many sto- recipe. For more information and City, San Diego, Bridgeport, projections, street art, fiber ries of artistic transformaart, spoken word, perfor- tion that have happened at to RSVP, visit https://bit. and Newark. “This is a national grass- mance, music, posters, mu- Peters Valley,” said Essner. ly/3iEPIlg. For more about The Cenroots project, a collection of rals, animation, digital proj- “The school has engaged voices across the country, ects, crafts, replacements hundreds of ar tists and ter for Contemporary Art, raised against racism by for toppled statues, or other thousands of students over visit ccabedminster.org. professional visual and per- creative forms of expression. its 50-year history, yet its T h e c on c e pt for “A r t story has never been told. New Virtual Series at forming artists and community activists,” said Ponder, Against R acism : Memo - “‘From the Ground Up’ cap- New Jersey State Museum T he New Jersey State who will host the livestream rial.Monument.Movement” tures the vital spirit and from the Arts Council of originated in a conversa- historic contributions of this Museum now presents the Princeton’s Taplin Gallery. tion between Ponder and important craft institution.” Autumn Evenings Series, a “These voices brought to- Brodsky about building on Selected ar tists whose new program of live digital gether will have national the success of his project, work will be in the exhibi- events. Join museum eduimpact, impressing upon Art Against Racism, created tion are Vivian Beer, Bruce cators and curators as they the American people the im- in 2019 as a series of ex- Dehner t, Faw n Navasie, host a lively discussion about portance of voting and the hibitions. Ponder has had a Luci Jockel, Kirk Mangus, a different theme each week, swell of indignation, pride, long career as a lawyer and Emil Milan, Shiro Otani, create a signature cocktail, and change in response to educator as well as being an Malcolm Mobutu Smith, Ste- and end the evening with a artist. Brodsky is a professor phen Shore, Toshiko Taka- round of trivia. The sessions Black Lives Matter.” Since the murder of George emerita at Rutgers Universi- ezu, Louise Todd Cope, MJ are free, but participants Floyd, artworks protesting ty, and an artist who, begin- Tyson, and Andrew Willner. must register so they can be sent the private Zoom link. Black lives lost to police ning with the Feminist Art Artist residencies during violence have emerged all movement of the 1970s, has the exhibition will include Visit the Events page on the New Jersey State Museum over the world. “Art Against worked for social justice. weaver Cynthia Alberto and

Art

website at nj.gov/state/museum to register. October 22 brings “Ghosts of NJ Past,” the theme for November 11 is “Contested Debates,” and on November 19 “Feasts, Festivals, and Commemorations” will be explored. Each event takes place on a Thursday evening at 8 p.m. on Zoom. The events are free, but pre-registration is required. Donations are gratefully accepted by the Museum Foundation and directly support Museum programs and events. T he New Jersey State Museum is currently closed due to the pandemic; however, staff continue working remotely to plan exhibitions and programs, answer research questions, and provide identifications of archaeological and natural history specimens for the public. In addition, work is taking place to ready the Museum for reopening, with reduced capacity, additional cleaning protocols, social distancing, and face coverings required. For more information, visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Zimmerli Museum Adds New Virtual Programs

The Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers offers a variety of virtual programs this fall, from longtime favorites to new ways of engaging with other art lovers. The series Saturday Sparks features t wo ar t workshops for adults on Zoom. On October 24, join Wes Sherman for “Impression Collage,” which explores various techniques for rubbings to capture different textures and forms. Inspired by the Zimmerli’s “’It makes me think of that awful day…’ The Natural World in the Anthropocene,” the session includes a brief discussion about several works in the exhibition. Tom Rutledge presents “Watercolors: At Sea” on November 14, guiding participants in advancing their skills by creating their own interpretations of a nautical scene from the Zimmerli’s collection. No experience is necessary, and all are welcome, but space is limited and sessions ($15-40) fill quickly. Participants must provide their own materials; supply lists are provided following registration. For complete details, visit go. rutgers.edu/artclasses. T he Zimmerli inv ites the public to a free, virtual screening of Political Advertisement X: 19522020 on October 27. This tenth iteration of the film ser ies by ar tists A ntoni Mu nt ad as a n d Mar s ha l l Reese surveys presidential campaign commercials and traces the impact of political media. Zoom registration is required at go.rutgers.edu/ rutgersPAX. Following the screening, the artists join a discussion moderated by Stuart Shapiro, associate dean of faculty and professor, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, and John Weingart, associate director, Eagleton Institute of Politics, and director, Education Programs and Center on the American Governor. Art Together offers free family art activities either live on Zoom or recorded to view at your convenience on Zimmerli at Home. Join upcoming sessions on

November 7 and December 5. Register (up to program start time) at go.rutgers. edu/arttogether. Artists of all ages are welcome, but sessions are best suited for ages 5 to 13, joined by their grown-ups. Recorded sessions are posted on Zimmerli at Home, including projects inspired by still life works in the museum’s collection and the exhibition Mood Books: The Children’s Stories of Alvin Tresselt and Roger Duvoisin. T he Zim merli remains closed to the public and inperson programs are suspended until further notice. News regarding operations will be posted at zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu.

Area Exhibits Check websites for information on safety protocols. A r t i s t s’ G a l l e r y, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “In Our Nature” through November 1. Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. lambertvillearts.com. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Art and Music: Touching Sound” through October 24. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 1:30-4:30 p.m. artscouncilofprinceton. org. D & R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, has t he ongoi ng virtual galleries “Trail of Breadcr umbs : Nat ure in Fairytales” and “Portraits of Preservation: James Fiorentino Art.” The center is currently closed to the public. drgreenway.org. Ellarslie, Trenton’s City M u s e u m i n C ad w a lad e r Park, Park s ide Avenu e, Trenton, has “The Conversation Continues” and “On the Forefront: Trenton’s Junior 1, 1916,” both in the museum and online. Timed tickets required. ellarslie. org. Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road, has “A Virtual Tour of Hamilton’s Princeton” and the “Histor y @ Home” ser ies. princetonhistory.org. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, has “Dreaming of Utopia: Roos evelt, New Jers ey” through January 24 and the online exhibit “Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints Of New Jersey, 1761–1898.” Open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. morven.org. Old Barracks Museum, 101 Barrack Street, Trenton, has the ongoing virtual exhibits “When Women Vote — The Old Barracks and the Anti-Suffrage Movement” and “Sampler Collection.” The museum is now open to the public. Advance tickets are required. barracks.org. Phillips’ Mill, 2619 River Road, New Hope, Pa., has “91 s t A nnual Jur ied A r t Show” online through November 1. The mill is currently closed to the public. phillipsmill.org. Pr inceton Universit y Art Museum has a virtual tour of “Life Magazine and the Power of Photography” along w it h many online events. The museum is currently closed to the public. artmuseum.princeton.edu.


Wednesday, October 21 11 a.m.: Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children of Mercer and Burlington Counties hosts information session for potential advocates. RSVP by email to jduffy@casamercer.org. 4:30 p.m.: “When Women Lost the Vote,” virtual discussion sponsored by the Historical Society of Princeton, with Marcela Micucci, curatorial fellow at the Museum of the American Revolution. Tickets are “pay what you can.” princetonhistory. org. 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Ron Car ter, Deput y A ssistant Director, U.S. Marshall Service, is speaker. surveymonkey. com/r/B77YKFF. Thursday, October 22 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue parking lot, 46-80 Franklin Avenue. Music by Kingston Ridge. All customers must wear masks. princetonfarmersmarket.com. 10 a.m.: Princeton Merchants Association holds a Virtual Princeton Business Forum. princetonmerchants.org. 4-5 p.m.: Dr. Aly Cohen, founder of TheSmar tHuman.com, provides tips on how to make safer, smarter lifestyle choices in this webinar sponsored by The Suppers Program. https:// suppers.wildapricot.org/ event-3891918.

Saturday, October 24 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: West Windsor Communit y Far mers Market, Vaughn Drive Lot, West Windsor. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Flu shot clinic at Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive. Free for uninsured Princeton residents. (609) 497-7608. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Shakespeare Theatre of NJ’s annual Costume, Prop, and Ever y thing Else Sale, at Thomas H. Kean Theatre Factory, 3 Vreeland Road, Florham Park. Bargains on props, costumes, furniture, wigs, shoes, and much more. shakespearenj.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Dispose of unneeded and expired prescription drugs at the parking lot across from Mercer County Administration Building, 640 South Broad Street, Trenton. Also drop off e-cigarette devices after batteries have been removed. Call (609) 278-7159 for more information. 10 :30 a.m.: Pr inceton Academy Virtual Halloween Music Class, for prospective families. Register elementary-aged child for 30-minute class, Halloween costumes encouraged. Limited to 20. Register at princetonacademy.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.: Pumpkin Painting Party at Princeton Shopping Center. Choose a Halloween-themed or other piece, and paint outdoors under the covered walkway. $5 studio fees all day when painting a Fall/Halloween

item. Kids in costume get free studio fees. Reservations are required at princeton.colormemine.com. 11-12:30 p.m. and 2-3:30 p.m.: Lambertville House Tour, v ir tual event w ith 90-minute webinar showing examples of historic restoration in residential and commercial properties. $10, benefits Lambertville Historical Society. lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. 12-2 p.m.: Duo Kindred Spirit perform on the green at Palmer Square as part of Fall Music on the Square. Sunday, October 25 9-11 a.m.: Mindfulness in Nature: A Guided Sensor y Walk in the Forest, a workshop presented by Sustainable Princeton with Alex Crowley, nurse practitioner. To register, visit sustainableprinceton.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Fall Fun Family Weekend at Terhune Orchards, Cold Soil Road. Timed tickets must be purchased in advance at terhuneorchards.com. 11-12:30 p.m. and 2-3:30 p.m.: Lambertville House Tour, v ir tual event w ith 90-minute webinar showing examples of historic restoration in residential and commercial properties. $10, benefits Lambertville Historical Society. lambertvillehistoricalsociety.org. 1-3 p.m.: Virtual Open House at The Pennington School’s middle school. To register visit pennington.org. 2 p.m.: In a Zoom event, Benjamin Balint, co-author of Jerusalem: City of the Book, will discuss unusual caretakers of Jewish library collections; Father Columba Stewart, executive director

of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at Saint John’s University, will talk about rare early Christian and Islamic manuscripts; and Bedross Der Matossian, associate professor of history at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and president of the Society for Armenian Studies, will explore literary treasures of Armenian Jerusalem. Register at BildnerCenter.Rutgers.edu. 3:30 p.m.: “A Taste of K abba la h,” Z o om eve nt sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. With Daniel Matt. Exploring essential teachings of Kabbalah. This is the second of two sessions. 25. Free. adulteducation@thejewishcenter.org. Monday, October 26 Recycling 12:15 p.m.: C-PREE Bradford Seminar: “Make Clean Energy More Equitable by Investing in Frontline Climate Communities.” Free and open to the public. Speaker is Steph Speirs, co-founder and CEO of Solstice. princeton.edu. 4:30 p.m.: TIME magazine correspondent Charlotte Alter and Princeton University Professor Julian Zelizer speak at virtual Book Talk: “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.” Free and open to the public. Sponsored by University’s School of Public and International Affairs, and Labyrinth Books. princeton.edu. Tuesday, October 27 4-5 p.m.: Dr. Julie Pantelick speaks on “Nutritional Strategies for Gastrointestinal Health” at this webinar sponsored by The Suppers Program. https:// suppers.wildapricot.org/

event-3910941. 7 p.m.: “The Natural Web: Who Needs Plants?” Mary Ann Borge heads this virtual session sponsored by Sourland Conservancy on how plants support the animal species with which they coexist, and what benefit animals provide to plants in return. sourland.org. Wednesday, October 28 4-6 p.m.: Flu shot clinic at Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street. Free for uninsured Princeton residents. (609) 497-7608. 6-7 p.m.: “Paths to Success” online series sponsored by Princeton Family YMCA, for students grade six and up. Abi Shitta-Bey, high school math teacher a n d ST E M e d u c ator, is sp e a ker. s u r vey mon key. com/r/B77YKFF. Thursday, October 29 10 a.m.: NJ Conference for Women, a networking and educational event being held virtually. princetonmercerchamber.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue parking lot, 46-80 Franklin Avenue. Music by Jim Matlack. All customers must wear masks. princetonfarmersmarket.com. 7 p.m.: “Reparations for Descendants of Enslaved People,” a talk by local attorney Caroline Clarke, is a Zoom event presented by the Racial Justice Task Force of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Princeton. Register in advance. uuprinceton.org. 7 p.m.: Thomas Edison State University Foundation’s 29th Annual Grande Ball, free virtual celebration honoring healthcare heroes. Visit tesu.edu.

Safe in-person and online activities to meet you at your comfort level.

6 & 5 Nov.

thewatershed.org

25 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

Calendar

6 p.m.: “Finding Justice: The Untold Story of Women’s Fight for the Vote,” virtual screening and discussion with Justice Bell Foundation Executive Director Amanda Owen. Stephanie Schwartz, the Historical Society of Princeton’s curator of collections and research, will lecture on the history of women’s suffrage in Princeton. Tickets are “pay what you can.” princetonhistory.org. 8 p.m.: Great Minds Salon, “Environmental Advocacy in the Age of COVID-19: Challenges and Opportunities,” w ith Tirza S. Wahrman. Sponsored by The Jewish Center Princeton. Register to receive Zoom link by emailing adulteducation @ thejewishcenter.org. Friday, October 23 11:45 a.m.: “Medical Marijuana,” presented by Princeton Senior Resource Center on Zoom. Registered nurse Ken Wolski is the speaker. Free, but registration required. princetonsenior.org. 12 p.m.: “Healthcare Innovat ion in t he Capitol City,” part of the Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber’s Trenton Economic Development Series. Greg Paulson, executive director of the Trenton Health Team, speaks. Opening remarks by Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora. princetonmercerchamber.org. 12:30 -2 p.m.: Gotham City Network holds Zoom webinar about HomeWorks Trenton, an af ter-school residential program for marginalized girls. Natalie Tung is speaker. Reservations are required by emailing princetongotham@joshuazinder. com.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 26

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 30

Princeton Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Treats Physical and Emotional Conditions

S

ome people go to law s chool or busines s school; others learn on the job; still others go from career to career, seeking the right fit. But not many find their occupation unexpectedly in a serendipitous moment, as Steven Hoffman did.

IT’S NEW To Us

“I came to acupuncture through martial arts,” he explains. “I had jammed my thumb, and it was wrapped in a bandage when I came to my martial arts class. The instructor, also a trained acupuncturist, looked at it and said, ‘I’ll fix that!’ “He did, and it was instant relief. That was my introduction to acupuncture.” New Direction Not only was his thumb healed, the experience led

him into a new direction. He moved on from his career as owner of an environmental contracting company and became a healer in acupuncture. “I had always been active in sports, and interested in how the body works,” says Hoffman. “Now that I had seen the benefits of acupuncture personally, I determined that I wanted to help others overcome their painful conditions and feel better.” He studied at the Eastern School of Acupuncture and Traditional (Oriental) Medicine, and after three years, graduated as a licensed acupuncturist. In addition, he went on to graduate work, becoming a diplomate in Oriental medicine. Ten years ago, he opened Princeton Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, and this year, he relocated his practice to 166 Bunn Drive. Acupuncture, known as alternative medicine in some circles, involves the insertion of very thin (hair-like) needles into strategic points

of the body. A key component of Chinese medicine, it has been used for centuries to treat pain. Many Western practitioners view the acupuncture points as places to stimulate nerves, muscles, and connective tissue. Some believe that this stimulation boosts the body’s natural painkillers. Overall Wellness Traditionally, it has been used mainly to relieve discomfort associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, including headaches, backaches, neck pain, osteoarthritis, and dental pain. Increasingly, however, acupuncture is being used for overall wellness, including stress management. “Acupuncture provides help in several ways,” explains Hoffman. “It has an analgesic effect and promotes pain relief. It induces the body to produce specific hormones, such as Serotonin, which is a mood enhancer. “It also decreases inflammation. Acupuncture trains

the body to decrease the inflammatory response. In addition, it increases the blood flow, and the blood circulation helps heal the body.” Hoffman also incorporates electro acupuncture in his treatment. This can target specific neuro chemicals, he explains, and is a useful technique for many patients. The majority of Hoffman’s patients, who are all ages, are treated for joint pain, including back, neck, knee, hip, etc. However, he can also help patients with depression, anxiety, fatigue, and digestive problems. Overall wellness and stress management are on the minds of many today, as people continue to cope with COVID-19. “Stress is a big factor today,” reports Hoffman. “If someone comes in with neck pain, it can stem from stress and anxiety. It’s the ‘fight or flight’ syndrome, but if it’s on-going, low-level, and constant stress, it can stimulate the adrenal glands and produce adrenalin. This can become a problem.” “Tech Neck” Hoffman also notes the “tech neck” condition today, with stiff or painful necks

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HELP AND HEALING: “My services give my patients the best chance of not only healing, but achieving and maintaining optimal health so that they are not just ‘getting along,’ they are truly thriving.” Steven Hoffman, owner of Princeton Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, treats patients with a variety of medical conditions. seen in all ages, resulting from constantly looking down at a smartphone or other electronic devices. “Also,” he continues, “sometimes symptoms in one area can actually originate from another area. For example, hip pain can originate in the back. And digestive issues can be a problem. They can affect the organs, and the patient may not be getting the benefit of their nutrition.” In addition to the needles, Hoffman may prescribe a particular Chinese medicine herbal formula. Combined, the two remedies can bring further benefits to the patient. As he explains, “The acupuncture and formulas used together can help the blood flow. They work synergistically.” He also may prescribe vitamin D and fish oil supplements, and exercises to be done at home. “Each patient has individual symptoms and is treated accordingly,” he notes. When a new patient comes in, Hoffman first does a complete evaluation. “We get a full health review, a thorough exploration. When people come, they are often at their wit’s end. They have tried other remedies, but have had no relief. “We discuss the pain factor, how it affects their life. How is it interfering with what they want to do? Mostly, I focus on joint pain that is chronic and has become a serious problem.” Healing Process He points out that the patient’s age and severity of the condition are factors in the healing process. “The longer the problem has existed, the longer it will take to treat it. But I want people to know that there is help. The situation is not hopeless, and you are not helpless.” A typical treatment takes a half hour to 45 minutes, and six to 10 sterile one-time use needles are inserted into the areas he has identified as the focus points. The needles are so thin that most patients experience no discomfort, or very little. Results vary depending on the severity of the condition and length of time it has been present. A common treatment plan for a single complaint typically involves two treatments per week. The total number of treatments required will vary from patient to patient, and Hoffman provides a comprehensive

treatment plan with the number of visits clearly laid out so that there are no surprises. The age of the patient is also a factor. Typically older people take longer to heal, and as Hoffman says “Regarding age and healing ability, the sooner you come, the better. So don’t wait! “But I can prevent further problems and keep the condition from getting worse. I can also set up a maintenance program, and help you rediscover your energy and vitality. I’ll put you in touch with a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plan, herbal advice and nutritional support, wellness counseling, and tips on maintaining long-term health.” Diet can also be a factor, he adds, noting that certain foods can increase inflammation. “It’s a good idea to avoid cookies and candy,” he points out. “Try to eat one-ingredient foods — fruit, vegetables, seafood, and low-fat meat. This can make a difference.” Full Activity The virus is a factor in everyone’s lives today, and Hoffman is incorporating all the safety precautions in his practice. Everything is sterilized, sanitized, and disinfected, and no one is in the waiting room. Patients call or text from their car when they arrive. He is very encouraged as more studies show the benefits of acupuncture, and increasing numbers of people are coming to him for help. Indeed, helping his patients return to full activity is Hoffman’s main priority. “My goal is to let people know what I do and that I can help them. I want them to get back to their life. One of my most rewarding experiences was when I helped a patient whose only comfortable position was standing up. After treatment, he was able to say, ‘I feel better. I am finally able to sleep.’ This was very gratifying. “If you have ongoing pain or a condition that doesn’t get better, call today, don’t wait!” osts for treatment vary based on the condition and the length of time it has existed. Insurance plans cover acupuncture for certain conditions. Appointments are available Tuesday and Thursday afternoon and evening, and Saturday morning. For further information, call (609) 924-9500. Website: www.pa-om.com. —Jean Stratton

C


Working Through First Fall Without Football in Memory, PU Coach Surace Keeping Disciplined, Upbeat Approach

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ob Surace struggled to keep his emotions in check this July as he spoke virtually to members of the Princeton University football program in the wake of the Ivy League announcing it was canceling the 2020 fall sports season due to COVID-19 concerns. “When we found out that we weren’t playing, I got on a call with the parents, players, and coaches and I started breaking up, I was in tears,” said Princeton head coach Surace ’90, who is in his 11th season at the helm of the program. “My dad was a coach. I haven’t had a fall without football since I can literally remember. I have been on a sideline with my dad. I have been a player. I have been a coach. You are talking almost 50 years.” In dealing with the crazy year that is 2020, Surace has developed a daily routine to keep him on track. “I try to keep a really strict schedule,” said Surace. “I think it takes time to figure that out but literally, starting in May or so, I got into that routine. We are only allowed eight hours in the office during the week but almost everything I am doing, I can do from home.” In a normal season, Surace would be in the office at 6 a.m. from Sunday through Wednesday, leaving around 9 or 10 p.m. on those days. On Thursday, he would come in around 7 a.m. and leave around 8 in the evening and on Friday, he would arrive at 7 and be home for dinner if the Tigers weren’t on the road. Putting in those hours, Surace would feel ready for game day on Saturday. With no games this fall and working mainly from home, Surace begins his day at 6 a.m. by doing yoga or working out with his son AJ, a freshman quarterback for Notre Dame High football team. After that, Surace messages recruits for a couple of hours. From 9 to 11 a.m., he watches recruit videos, cleans up his e-mail, and works on other communications. After lunch, he searches social media for inspirational or instructional messages for his players, coaches, or himself. Later in the afternoon, he watches football videos to pick up ideas. He reserves time to take a daily walk with his wife Lisa, the associate head of school at Princeton Day School. In the evening, there are Zoom calls with recruits. Finally, Surace catches up on his reading, which centers mainly around football, current affairs, or self-help books with an occasional novel thrown in. True to form, the upbeat Surace is maintaining a positive approach. “From day one, my mindset is that I am an adult, it is different than if I was 20 and I was feeling like I was missing out, but as an adult, I can’t give off a ‘woe is me feeling,’” said Surace. While there is no in-person recruiting this fall, Surace

feels like he and his coaches are still building strong bonds with prospective Tiger players. “We are building great relationships but we have to do it differently,” said Surace. “In the NCAA, everything is a dead period here and so right now what people crave is relationships. We are craving responsible social interactions, most of them are by Zoom, phone, or messaging. I am on top of those and our coaches are on top of those. I love in-person so it has forced me to be a better coach to understand how to do things differently.” In the meantime, Surace is maintaining his close relationship to his current players, whether they are enrolled in school virtually or taking the year off. “I was doing a lot more big Zooms and team Zooms during the summer and spring,” said Surace, noting that around 15 percent of his squad, or approximately 20 players, are taking a leave from Princeton. “The players crave small groups so we are really doing way more with the position groups. Our assistant coaches have been great with that. I just want to value their time and what is happening with them. With a hundred players, everybody is going through different things. Some of them are doing fine, some of them are struggling. You are not going to hear about the struggle in a 100-person meeting. So I am trying to be a little more individualized as a player is going through a struggle and having the really deep 45-minute individual call as opposed to a Zoom with everybody on it.” There are a couple of key areas of concern for Surace as he works through those struggles. “My two biggest fears are the sense that even though Princeton has the greatest education in the country, they feel that it is not just quite as good,” said Surace. “We are probably doing it better than anybody because our professors and our faculty and our administrators are so good but they are missing something. It is just

keeping them going to make the best out of that. And then the isolation. The kids who are from backgrounds where they have more money, they can go and live together. For the kids coming from a lesser social economic standpoint, we are all doing our best to help them through it. They need it the most. When a class graduates, I feel so proud of all of them but the kid who really had to dig in and had to overcome more struggles, you just have a bigger smile.” The Princeton players, though, are digging in when it comes to staying in shape. “To a person, they love the working out,” said Surace. “It is truly the highlight of their day to be competing, whether it is on a lift or a run. They feel a connection with that so that part is great.” The COVID-19 restrictions have not kept the Princeton staff from remaining connected. “We typically have one staff meeting a week, and then every day I am on the phone with three or four different coaches and then we are on films together,” said Surace, “The staff meeting covers the big things. Then individually as they are trying to do things, we work through them together. Unitwise, they are working on schemes. I am worried that we are going to have too many plays. We have never been able to watch college football on Saturdays or NFL football on Sundays because we worked during those times. Now we are watching Mississippi against Alabama and I am ‘oh my god, I am calling the offensive coordinator.’ We are all getting so excited. I told them we can’t do everything, let’s be good at what we want to do.” Getting to see his son and his daughter Ali, a junior midfielder for the PDS girls’ soccer team, playing their games has been exciting for Surace. “One of the hardest things about working in athletics as a football coach you miss out on the fall events of your children,” said Surace. “To be on a call or a Zoom,

I can sit and watch a game while I am doing that and then get back to the game and give the full attention to it. I am fortunate that I have a teenage son who wants to be John Lovett, he wants to be a great, great quarterback. In between Zooms, he peppers me with questions and he wants to watch film. Every time AJ comes down the stairs and has football questions, I feel like it is talking with Kevin Davidson or Chad Kanoff.” Surace marvels at how his children and other young athletes have come through the challenges posed by the pandemic. “I think every high school or college kid who is playing right now knows that tomorrow is not guaranteed,” said Surace. “Sometimes when you do this as long as we have done this, you just assume that there is tomorrow. You coach a game, you win or lose, and then you move on. In mid-March, we realized that it can be taken away. For the kids who are playing right now, I just love their perspective and the kids who aren’t playing who are handling this so maturely. They understand what being responsible is. At my kids’ schools, there is not one kid who complains about social distancing or masks. They had something taken away from them from March through August. With the things that got taken away, they are going to have a different perspective the rest of

their lives.” As he navigates this unprecedented fall, Surace is keeping an even keel in handling his responsibilities. “We understand the big picture. We can understand why we are not playing, but it doesn’t mean that it

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PU Sports Roundup Tiger Squash Standouts Make Impact at Pro Event

Three former standouts and one current player in the Princeton Universit y squash program competed in the Professional Squash Association’s World Tour event in Cairo, Egypt last week, just a month after the PSA resumed competition following a break since March due to COVID-19. Nicole Bunyan ’15 extended her opponent to four games in the first round as Egypt’s Mariam Metwally advanced. Ranked 63rd in the world, the competition was her first on the tour since reaching the second round of the Queen City Open in Regina, Canada in March. Bunyan earned three AllAmerica honors as a Tiger. Olivia Fiechter ’18 made the second round in Cairo,

defeating the Netherlands’ Tessa ter Sluis in three games in the first round falling to Egypt’s Salma Hany in the next round. Fiechter and Bunyan have met twice in 2020, with Fiechter winning in the semifinals of the E.M. Noll Classic in Philadelphia in February and in the second round of the Racquet Club Pro Series in St. Louis the following week. Fiechter is ranked 32nd in the world, and the Egypt event marked her first PSA Tour stop since the Queen City tournament in March. Fiechter made the final of both tournaments in which she faced Bunyan, winning the Noll Classic and finishing runner-up at the Racquet Club event. Fiechter was a four-time All-America and four-time All-Ivy honoree during her time at Princeton. Todd Harrity ’13 defeated England’s Adrian Walker in five games in the first round before fifth-seeded Diego Elias defeated Harrity in four games in the second round.

Harrity is ranked 62nd in the world, and he was playing for the first time on the PSA Tour since the Oregon Open in February. The 2011 CSA (College Squash Association) individual champion and the top player on Princeton’s 2012 CSA team title winner, Harrity was a fourtime All-America, two-time Ivy Player of the Year, and four-time All-Ivy honoree. Junior Youssef Ibrahim won his way into the round of 16, defeating Scotland’s Alan Clyne in four games in the first round and England’s Declan James in five in the second round before running into fourth-seeded Paul Coll of New Zealand. Ranked 49th in the world and an All-America honoree last season, the event was his first on the PSA Tour since making the final of the Noll Classic.

year the school will be celebrating the stories, accomplishments and legacy of the women who have proudly worn Princeton uniforms. The Princeton Athletics Department year-long celebration will include digital and social platforms showcasing shor t stories, excerpts from a forthcoming book commemorating 50 Years of Women’s Athletics, special video content, group discussions, a speaker series, and “The First 50” podcast. In officially kicking the

celebration, Princeton Director of Athletics Mollie Marcoux Samaan ’91, a former Tiger women’s hockey and soccer standout, issued a letter to the community extolling the women who have competed for Princeton as “scholars, trailblazers, leaders, and champions.” She noted that Princeton women’s stellar record of athletic achievements includes “more than 200 Ivy League championships (nearly onethird of all titles awarded), 22 individual and 33 team national championships,

35 Oly mpians and four Rhodes Scholars, to name a few.” The achievements on the field are just part of the story of Princeton women’s athletics. “Even more impressive is the character of these women and the impactful and accomplished careers they have led, all while continuing their commitment to Education through Athletics and our current Tiger student-athletes,” asserted Samaan.

50 Years of PU Women’s Athletics Being Celebrated

The 2020-21 academic year marks 50 Years of Women’s Athletics at Princeton University and over the

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HEADING TO CAMP: Carly Bullock ’20 races up the ice last winter during her senior season with the Princeton University women’s hockey team. Last week, high-scoring forward Bullock was chosen as an invitee for the 2020 USA Hockey Evaluation Camp set for October 25-31 in Blaine, Minn. In addition, a future Tiger player, Lacey Eden, who is planning to matriculate as a member of the Class of 2025, was also invited to the camp. It will be a return to Minnesota for both as Bullock is a native of Eden Prairie, Minn. while Eden, who hails from Annapolis, Md., prepped at Shattuck-St. Mary’s in Faribault, Minn. Bullock graduated with 95 goals and 159 points in her career, the fifth-most and sixth-most in program history, respectively. Eden helped the U.S. U-18 team win the 2020 IIHF (International Ice Hockey Federation) title in January, scoring goals in three of the team’s five games. The camp will serve to help form the roster for the 2021 IIHF Women’s World Championship in Nova Scotia in April. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Shaila Iyer is ahead of schedule when it comes to her role on the Princeton High girls’ tennis team. Ascending to the first singles spot in the PHS lineup this fall as a freshman, Iyer has even surprised herself. “I didn’t even think I would be on varsity this year, let alone be No. 1,” said Iyer. “For me and my mom, when we started tennis, our goal was to get to varsity as a junior.” L as t S at urday agains t visiting Hightstown, Iyer showed how she can be a force at the varsity level, posting a 6-3, 6-0 win over Diana Kalajdzic to help the Tigers defeat the Rams 5-0 in a battle of teams that brought 8-0 records into the match. “They beat us for the past four years and last year was the first time we won,” said Iyer. “We are really excited.” In her match against Kalajdzic, Iyer took a little while to get rolling. “A t t h e b e g i n n i n g of matches, I am a little bit tense; I have to figure out the player,” said Iyer, who star ted playing tennis around eight years ago and competes in USTA Middle States tournaments. “After I start doing that and after things start going a little more smoothly, I think I am really able to go to my fullest and play my best. In the second set, Iyer produced some dominant tennis. “I think really being aggressive and staying confident, even though I kept almost humbling myself, saying three games means nothing, 40-15 means nothing, keep it up,” said Iyer, reflecting on her approach in closing out the match. While playing at the top of the lineup as a freshman can be nerve-wracking, Iyer sees a plus in being younger than most of her foes. “I feel it gives the opponents a little more pressure, especially if they are upperclassmen,” said Iyer. “I think I use that to my advantage and it is fun.” It has been a lot of fun for Iyer to join the PHS squad this fall. “I actually hit with the Princeton Universit y coaches in a group there and I have watched a lot of the college matches there,” said Iyer. “It is a very similar dynamic; it is a lot different than USTA Middle States because you are all on your own.” PHS head coach Sarah Hibbert is excited to have a dynamic player like Iyer in her lineup. “Shaila has great groundstrokes, she is willing to mix it up and come to net,” said Hibbert. “S he is a tour na m ent

player so we are working on her adapting to high school. There are always some nerves in high school matches but it has been really nice to see how she has settled in. Playing today, it was very close at the beginning in the first set and then she was able to find her rhythm and pull away in the second.” Hibber t was excited to see her team pull away to the 5-0 triumph over rival Hightstown. “They have been a powerhouse t he last couple of years but we turned it around last year but it was a 3-2 nail-biter and in the counties was a point here or there,” said Hibbert, who guided PHS to the title at the Mercer County Tournament in 2019, snapping H ight s tow n’s t h re e - ye ar winning streak at the competition. “This year, I didn’t know what to expect going in, I told the girls that they have a lot of potential. I really thought we would really be able to pull out good wins, I said ‘let’s go for 5-0 ladies, we need three but I want five.’ They were able to respond.” Displaying her potential at second singles, freshman Eva Lependorf posted a 6-0, 6-2 win over Lara Koppel. “Eva is really doing well at second, she was comfortable today,” said Hibbert. “She has a very nice serve. She hits the ball really well, she has good point construction as well.” With Lependorf ’s older sister, junior star Bella, playing at third singles, the PHS lineup is very strong. “Having Bella at third singles after having been county champion at second last year, I have no complaints there,” said a smiling Hibbert of the older Lependorf, who defeated Anjali Rabindran 6-3, 6-2. “She is a solid player, she hits the ball really well. She constructs points nicely, she has a good serve. She brings the experience of having played singles for a year.” The battle-tested pair of juniors Sophia Kim and Lucia Marckioni at first doubles showed some grit last Saturday as they outlasted Morgan Koppel and Maeve McGowan 5-7, 6-3, 1-0 (1210). “Those two teams have gone back and forth the past couple of years, they have had some really good matches,” said Hibbert. “This is their second year at first doubles and is at least Hightstown’s second year together. Last year, Sophia and Lucia beat them in two tiebreaks in counties and they beat them in a third set when we won 3-2. They always have close matches

33 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020

Freshman Iyer Making Impact at First Singles, Helping PHS Girls’ Tennis Produce 10-0 Start

and today they were really able to gut it out in that tiebreak to close it out.” At second doubles, sophomore Monica Li and senior Annie Wei had a good match as well against Hightstown, posting a straight-set win over Siya Buddhadev and Laora Normand. “They are a new pairing but they really stepped up today, w inning four and four,” said Hibbert. “They have been playing nicely the last couple of matches. They played a fantastic match today. I am really pleased with how they have been playing.” With the state sectional tournament around the corner, Hibbert believes her squad, now ranked 11th in the state by NJ.com, is ready to step up down the stretch. “It is winning as many matches as possible,” said Hibbert, whose team defeated Lawrence 4.5-0.5 on Monday to improve to 10-0 and hosts Trenton Central on October 22. “I have no idea who we are going to face, I have no idea how it is going to be so we are just going to try to win as many matches and play as well as we can the whole way.” The precocious Iyer, for her part, is focused on living in the moment. “It is keeping calm, staying focused,” said Iyer. “I think those are the big points and IYER LEVEL PLAY: Princeton High girls’ tennis player Shaila Iyer hits a backhand in a recent not being over confident.” —Bill Alden match. Freshman Iyer has starred at first singles, helping PHS produce a 10-0 start. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 34

With Senior Star Beal Producing Late Tally, PDS Girls’ Soccer Edges Bishop Eustace 3-2 Kelly Beal struggled to get herself free around goal as the Princeton Day School girls’ soccer team hosted Bishop Eustace last Thursday. For much of the contest, speedy PDS senior forward Beal got stymied on runs from the flank. “It was kind of difficult to get me the ball this game but it is just how it happened,” said Beal. It came as no surprise to Beal and her teammates that they got a difficult game as they faced Bishop Eustace. “Coming into the game we knew that they were going to be tough competitors,” said Beal. “Maybe that rattled us a little bit coming in because this whole season matters so much to us because we never know when it is going to end.” PDS jumped out to an early 1-0 lead on a goal by junior Ali Surace with 33:39 left in the first half but the

Crusaders answered back with a tally four minutes later to knot the game at 1-1. The Panthers went ahead 2-1 on a goal by freshman Adriana Salzano late in the first half. Just after halftime, Bishop Eustace found the back of the net to make to 2-2, putting the Panthers on their heels. But in the waning moments of the contest the Panthers started to find a rhythm. “I think as the game went on, we started to gain a lot of momentum,” said Beal. With the game on the line, Beal knifed into the box and deftly dribbled past a defender and slotted the ball past the Crusader goalie with 51 seconds left to give the Panthers a 3-2 win. “It star ted w it h Tochi [Owunna], our freshman, she is really, really good and has been stepping it up,” “She played a ball out wide to Ava [Mattson] and Ava passed the ball inside

LATE SALVO: Princeton Day School girls’ soccer player Kelly Beal kicks the ball up the field in recent action. Last Thursday, senior star Beal scored the game-winning goal with 51 seconds remaining in regulation as PDS edged Bishop Eustace 3-2. The Panthers, who defeated Moorestown Friends 3-0 last Monday in improving to 4-1, host Montgomery on October 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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and I made a quick move and I played it in the closest corner.” With PDS posting its third straight win since a 3-2 opening day loss to Monroe, Beal believes that the Panthers are starting to get in synch. “We are gaining a lot of m om e nt u m,” s a id B e a l, who picked up an assist on Monday as PDS extended its winning streak by defeating Moorestown Friends 3-0. “We are going to have a pretty tough schedule and we want to make sure that we make the best of every game.” Beal and her classmates are looking to make the best of their final campaign. “I am taking it game by game; it is my senior year and it is the same with the other seniors,” said Beal. “We are especially looking forward to giving it our all each game.” PDS head coach Pat Trombetta wasn’t surprised to see Beal produce the gamewinning tally against Bishop Eustace. “At the end, we moved Kelly around a little bit and it paid off,” said Trombetta. “We moved her from the outside to up top. She gives us that ability to find the net when we need a goal. We rely on her heavily for that.” In reflecting on the matchup against Bishop Eustace, Trombetta knew his players would need to play hard to the final whistle. “They are in a tough conference down there, this is the first time we had played them,” said Trombetta. “This is exactly what we expected when we put them on the schedule, to have a game that was going to be hard-fought and go back and forth. It could have went either way.” While Trombetta was relieved to see the Panthers pull out the win, he believes that the team has plenty of room for improvement. “I don’t think we are playing at our potential yet,” said Trombetta, whose side is next in action when it hosts Montgomery on October 23. “We missed a few practices this week so I expected things to be a little bit sloppy today. They haven’t been on the field since Saturday so it is a little tricky not knowing what to expect out here. The bottom line is that the girls played well and persevered in the end.” In Trombetta’s view, the squad’s mix of veterans and talented newcomers should help it keep playing well. “The seniors are carrying the load for a good part but we have also got the younger players contributing,” said Trombetta, noting that freshmen Salzano and Owunna have been excelling. “The junior class is strong; Ali had the first one. It is a big win for us because we knew it was going to be a competitive game. It is good to play these new teams, especially the stronger teams.” Beal, for her part, is determined to compete as hard as possible every time she steps on the pitch this fall. “Even in our practices, everybody just gives it their all,” said Beal. “Coach T and our coaches push us to be our best.” —Bill Alden

Junior Lis Returning From Knee Injury with a Bang, Emerging as Go-To Finisher for PHS Girls’ Soccer During the 2019 season, Sophia Lis’ role on the Princeton High girls’ soccer squad was confined to cheering on her teammates and occasionally serving as a ball girl while she was recovering from a knee injury. Returning to action this fall, junior forward Lis has assumed a starring role, emerging as the go-to finisher for PHS. Last Thursday, Lis displayed her scoring touch against Notre Dame, tallying two goals to help the Tigers rally from deficits of 2-0 and 3-1 to pull out a 4-3 win in overtime. Lis is thrilled to be contributing again for PHS. “It is such a great feeling; I rehabbed all of last year during the season and I was ready this summer for my season and unfortunately due to corona we didn’t have the games,” said Lis, who tallied eight goals in the first four games of the season for the Tigers. “So this is me getting back into games and getting my stamina back. I was nervous coming back. It is always that thing are you as good as you were before. I think I am finally getting back into my groove and feeling the same way.” Against Notre Dame, PHS was not in a great groove as it fell behind 2-0 midway through the first half. “I thought we were overall possessing the ball well in the midfield but we just couldn’t get that last transition,” said Lis. “I was trying to stay high so the midfield could find me and play around that.” With 7:57 left in the half, freshman Casey Serxner found Lis, chipping the ball to the junior who promptly buried it in the back of the net. “Eventually they got that ball over and we got it in,” recalled Lis. “It was important for our stamina, we were getting tired out there and falling off which shouldn’t happen since we started so strong. That goal rejuvenated us and we were ready to go again.” But Notre Dame kept going strong after halftime, scoring again to go up 3-1. With 7:27 left in regulation, PHS senior midfielder Vanessa Ponce narrowed the gap to 3-2 as she curled in a free kick. “We got that one goal that came from Van,” said Lis. “That was a great one. We play well together on the field, that goal was really clutch for us. It was like the first half goal, we were back in it.” Two minutes later, Lis fought through a traffic jam in the box to slot the ball past the Irish goalie to make it 3-3 and force overtime. “It was me trying to power through and finish off the play before it went out of bounds,” said Lis. “I am just glad that I got to the ball before the goalie did because I didn’t want to interfere with the goalie. I was trying to get it right in front of her and luckily I did.” Having played Steinert to a 3-3 draw through two overtimes on October 7, PHS was determined to close the deal against Notre Dame and did so as sophomore Sarah Granozio scored with 4:14 remaining in the first extra session. “The Steinert game definitely prepared us for getting that last energy out of us,” said Lis. “We wanted it to be one overtime to end it and we got that.” In the view of Lis, the rally

spoke to the Tigers’ resolve. “It says we can really find the energy and dig it deep out of us if we put our mind to it and play together as a team,” said Lis. Playing up top with classmate Megan Rougas has given Lis extra energy on the field. “Megan and I met freshman year. We didn’t even know each other before that, but our sisters did,” said Lis, whose older sisters Devon ’18 and Taylor ’16 were star athletes at PHS, as was Lauren Rougas ’20. “It clicked instantly. It has been so fun; she definitely makes the team so much fun to play with.” Being around the team has helped Lis return to form. “I feel like they have been so supportive with me during my injury and even afterwards, making sure I felt comfortable with everything,” added Lis. “They really just made me feel comfortable on the field to play to my full potential.” PHS head coach Val Rodriguez was not comfortable with the way her team was playing as it dug the early hole against Notre Dame. “Our possession game looked very good early on,” said Rodriguez. “Then we just made a few mistakes, doubted ourselves and started playing frantic. As soon as we found our feet again, we were able to knock it and get behind them and create good opportunities.” Getting that tally to cut the deficit helped change the tone of the game for PHS. “That first half goal was very important,” said Rodriguez. “We made some smart, very heads up plays on our set pieces there, having Vanessa [Ponce] place that perfectly, having Casey [Serxner] chip it, she made a beautiful chip to Sophia.” Rodriguez saw Ponce’s goal as the turning point of the contest. “To be down 3-1, you start to

give up hope,” said Rodriguez. “Vanessa kept her composure and placed it exactly where it needed to be.” The composure displayed by Lis around the goal is key to the Tiger offense. “With Sophia’s talent and her knowledge of the game, she is our go-to, of course,” said Rodriguez. “We talk as a team in terms of we have a lot of go-tos but when push comes to shove, I trust that Sophia is going to get the job done.” Seeing Granozio get the job done in overtime was heartening to Rodriguez. “It was her first goal back in 18 months, she has been out for a long time,” said Rodriguez, whose team fell 3-0 to Hopewell Valley last Saturday to move to 3-1-1 and plays at Allentown on October 21 before hosting Nottingham on October 23. “She is such a good kid; I wouldn’t want a different person in from of the goal right there.” In the view of Rodriguez, her squad’s rally against Notre Dame was a good sign going forward. “This continues to show that heart because there have been years where we have been in battles and we haven’t come out on top,” said Rodriguez, noting that back-up sophomore goalie Catie Samaan come off the bench to make two brilliant saves. “I think that his team has that extra grit to go the length, play to the final whistle and come out on top.” Lis is ready to keep going hard as long as the season lasts. “We are trying to be as safe as possible outside of practices,” said Lis. “We are bringing it to every single game, knowing it could be our last for a week or two with one case of corona. We are just trying to keep that energy up.” —Bill Alden

BACK IN THE FLOW: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Sophia Lis controls the ball last Wednesday against Notre Dame. Junior star Lis tallied two goals to help PHS rally from deficits of 2-0 and 3-1 to pull out a 4-3 win overtime. Returning to action from missing all of 2019 due to a knee injury, Lis tallied eight goals in the first four games of the season. PHS, which fell 3-0 to Hopewell Valley last Saturday to move to 3-1-1, plays at Allentown on October 21 before hosting Nottingham on October 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)


“We traveled down to Virginia, we couldn’t pull out the win there (losing 28-14 to Life Christian) but it was definitely a good experience, playing a team that played a national schedule. We didn’t have the season we wanted to in terms of losing two games with that loss to Peddie. I think the team really came together; it was a great group of guys so it was a good experience, for sure.” T h i s s pr i n g, Fr a n z on i enjoyed anot her special experience as he won the Delaware Valley Chapter of the National Football Foundation’s Jack Stephan Top Scholarship Award, becoming the third Raider to win the award after Mark Savidge in 1964 and Richard Ziegler in 1970. “It meant a lot, if you look at the past winners of that award, there are some outstanding guys on that list,” said Franzoni. “To be considered in their presence and be a part of that elite group really meant a lot for me. Hun did a lot for me over my four years preparing me, not only on the football field but just for life in general and the next four years. To be able to give back in whatever small way I could there, bringing them some good recognition was definitely important to me.” In preparing for Brown, Franzoni worked with Hun strength and conditioning coach Na’ati Akauola before getting instructions from the Bears. “They sent a workout plan and stuff so I have been doing that,” said Franzoni. “It has been tough during quarantine. In the first months after the season I was training at Hun with coach A. He has been great; he has helped me a lot over my past four years.” In training through COVID-19 restrictions, Franzoni has been creative. “It is funny, as soon as quarantine started me and my brothers and a few of the local kids who I am friends with were all pretty bummed because there was nowhere to train,” said Franzoni. “We all combined some equipment that we had and we made a gym in my garage. As far as football stuff goes, I have been trying to get on fields as much as I can doing football specific stuff.” When Franzoni does get on t he field for Brow n, whether it is this spring or next fall, he will be bringing a different perspective on the sport. “It definitely makes you appreciate being able to play the game,” said Franzoni. “Sometimes you may take it for granted like it is just going to be there in the fall. When it gets taken away from you, it is a like a shot to the heart. It has been hard. It makes you even more hungry to get back out there and start playing again.” —Bill Alden TOUGH TO BEAR: Ian Franzoni sprints upfield in 2019 action during his senior season with the Hun School football team. Star running back Franzoni rushed for 1,178 yards and 12 touchdowns and made 12 receptions for 322 yards and four touchdowns in his final campaign for the Raiders. He committed to attend Brown University and play for its football program. With COVID-19 concerns leading the Ivy League to 908.359.8388 cancel its fall sports schedule, Franzoni is waiting to make his Route 206 • Belle Mead debut for the Bears. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Under nor mal circu m stances, Ian Franzoni would have been looking forward to enjoying a homecoming last Saturday as the Brown University football team had been slated to play at Princeton. But with COVID-19 concerns leading the Ivy League to cancel its 2020 fall sports schedule, former Hun School star running back and Brown freshman football commit Franzoni never left home in Robbinsville. While Franzoni may have to wait a while to play for Brown, deciding to attend the school and join its football program didn’t take long. “The schools that I were big on were the service academies; I had cousins who played at Navy so I was big on them,” said Franzoni, noting that Brown freshmen are currently scheduled to arrive on campus in January. “The Ivy League caught my attention in the middle of the season. Coach [Todd] Smith told me that Brown was interested. I went up there with John Parsons, our tight end, who is also going to be at Brown. We went up there and spent a day on campus. It was awesome. I loved it and coach [James] Perry offered me on that visit.” Having served as a backup to Josh Henderson, now playing at North Carolina, the previous three seasons, Franzoni appreciated Brown taking a shot on him. “I didn’t have that much film before this year,” said the 5’11 190-pound Franzoni. “So just knowing that they took a chance on me and they were the first ones to offer meant a lot to me.” Knowing about Perr y’s high-octane offensive approach, Fran zoni was

looking forward to making an impact for the Bears. “From everything I have heard, one of the things he is known for a lot is what he does offensively,” said Franzoni. “He runs more plays than anyone, he knows how to get it done offensively. So I am excited for that.” Looking back on his senior season for Hun, Franzoni was excited to assume a leading role. “I knew that I was going to have to take on a lot of responsibility, not only on the field but also as a leader for the team,” said Franzoni. “I prepared a lot during the offseason and I just knew that when the time came I was going to be ready.” It didn’t take long for Franzoni to demonstrate that he was ready for a big season as he rushed for 202 yards and two touchdowns as Hun rolled to a 44-7 victory over Chesire Academy (Conn.) in its season opener. “I think our opener against Chesire in Connecticut was a big one for me just to get the confidence up,” said Franzoni. “It was my first big start at running back. Coming into my senior year, knowing that I was going to be that guy, so to go in there and do well and get my confidence up definitely gave me a good boost for the rest of the season.” Franzoni gave Hun a huge boost over the fall, rushing for 1,178 yards and 12 touchdowns and making 12 receptions for 322 yards and four touchdowns as the Raiders went 6-2, including a forfeit win. “We got to play a lot of good teams and stuff so it was good,” said Franzoni, reflecting on his senior campaign.

35 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020

After Stellar Senior Season for Hun Football, Franzoni Waiting to Make Debut for Brown

After Rain - Solo Art Exhibition by Irene Feng An exhibition of multicultural perspectives on the sensory experiences of nature, self and societal advancement. Princeton Academy of Art is pleased to present an exhibition of 15 works by student Irene Feng that explore ancient Chinese life, modernity and a personal journey through Western culture. The dichotomy of soft, fluid abstract forms and chaotic scenes from eras in western history offers the viewer a brief glance into Irene’s psyche. These works both mirror and refute her desire to connect nature and modern technology into a symbiotic organism. Fleeting moments of peace in nature, stirring madness and glints of self are scattered through these works. In a world that is continually changing by means of technological innovation, how do we ensure that these advancements do not lead to further strain on the earth? How do we reach a point of equilibrium with nature and social advancement?

IRENE FENG – ARTIST Irene Feng is an art student of Princeton Academy of Art and a high schooler at Stuart Country Day School. She has been interested in art as a career for many years. Irene’s work explores the boundaries of balance and chaos, the natural and manmade and seeks to in time find balance between opposites. Irene States, “The world we live in is complex—rich and disconcerting, exciting and alarming. We are always at odds with ourselves and nature. It is my goal that through my art I’m able to show my generation that there is hope for true balance, without having to sacrifice technological advancement. Though my current works explore past and self, my future works will offer perhaps not entire solutions, but hope for the possibilities in store.” Her current works and current exhibition, “After Rain”, offer viewers a glimpse into what it means to be Chinese American during this time. Irene is drawn to nature, and believes that the connection between nature and technology is what will save our planet.


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020 • 36

Hun Football : Mason Shipp scored a touchdown on a 32-yard pass from Marco Lainez to provide a highlight as Hun fell 37-8 to Cherokee High last Saturday. The Raiders, now 2-1, are slated to return to action when they host Wyoming Seminary on November 7. Field Hockey : Lexi Thomas played well in a losing cause as Hun lost 1-0 to Stuart Country Day last Saturday. Junior goalie Thomas made seven saves for the Raiders, now 0-3. Hun plays at Princeton Day School on October 23. Girls’ Tennis: Producing a dominant performance, Hun defeated Stuart Country Day 5-0 last Saturday.

The Raiders won each match in straight sets as they improved to 3-1-1. Hun plays at the Pennington School on October 21 and then hosts Princeton Day School on October 26.

Pennington Football: Xavier Brooks and Marcus Robinson tallied touchdowns in a losing cause as Pennington fell 1412 to Hopewell Valley last Saturday. Brooks scored on a three-yard run while Robinson had a 60-yard TD reception as the Red Raiders moved to 1-1. Pennington plays at the Academy of New Church (Pa.) on October 21. Field Hockey : Sammi Moonay and Jules Harris each scored goals as Pennington edged Hun 2-1 last

Wednesday. The Red Raiders, now 1-1-1, play at South Hunterdon on October 22 before hosting Princeton Day School on October 24. Boys’ Soccer: Sparked by Stas Korzeniowski, Pennington defeated Princeton Day School 2-0 last Saturday in its season opener. Korzeniowski tallied both goals for the Red Raiders in the victory. Pennington hosts the Hun School on October 24. G i r l s’ S o c c e r : Ky l i s Daigle and Morgan Kotch each found the back of the net to help Pennington defeat Hunterdon Central 2-0 last Monday. Goalie Sophia Kav ulich recorded eight saves in earning the shutout as the Red Raiders improved to 2-0. Pennington plays at the Hun School on October 24 and at Archbishop Ryan (Pa.) on October 25. G irls’ Tennis : Sweep- LEANING IN: Princeton High field hockey player Aleena Inayat, right, goes after the ball in ing the singles matches, recent action. Last Thursday, junior defender Inayat contributed a goal to help PHS defeat Hopewell Valley 6-2. The Tigers, who improved to 5-0 with the victory, are slated to play at Nottingham on October 22 and at Ewing on October 27. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Pennington defeated Stuart Country Day 4-1 last Wednesday. Polaris Hayes posted a straight-set win at first singles as did Praslin Hayes at second singles and Lauren Becker at third singles as the Red Raiders improved to 1-1. Pennington hosts Hun School on October 21 before playing at Princeton Day School on October 23.

5-0 to Hun last Saturday. Szabo and Chen forced a second-set tiebreaker in losing 6-2, 7-6 (7-2) to Mahika Chadha and Lindsay Armstrong. The Tartans, now Field Hockey: Lily Har- 0-4, play at Princeton Day lan scored the lone goal of School on October 27. the contest as Stuart edged Hun 1-0 last Saturday. Junior goalie Audrey Blandford recorded seven saves in earning the shutout for the Tartans, now 2-0-1. Stuart hosts Princeton Day School Football: Moses Santizo on October 21 and South scored on a one-yard touchHunterdon on October 24. Tennis: The second dou- down run in a losing cause bles pair of Mia Szabo and as PHS fell 7-6 at Pitman Vivian Chen battled hard in last Friday evening. The Field Hockey: Haley Sul- a losing cause as Stuart fell Tigers, now 1-2, host New Egypt on October 24. livan had a strong game in a losing cause as PDS fell 7-3 at Moorestown Friends 3-1 last Monday. Sullivan tallied two goals for the Panthers, now 1-2. PDS plays at Stuart Country Day on October 21 before hosting Hun on October 23 and Pennington on October 26. VO LU ME 8 / O C TO B E R : Boys’ Soccer: Getting its offense rolling, PDS defeated Moorestown Friends 3-1 last Monday. The Panthers, In the summer months of the now 2-3-1, play at St. Joe’s pandemic we’ve noticed lots of Metuchen on October 27. homeowners doing renovations, G i r l s’ Te n n i s : N e h a additions, and upgrades to their Khandkar posted a straightset win at first singles to set homes. Sometimes, however, a the tone as PDS topped simple “upgrade” can turn into Stuart 5-0 last Thursday. a downright nightmare. Khandkar defeated Anna Dawson 6-3, 6-1 to help Outdoor decking was installed in two different the Panthers improve to homes of our clients. It became apparent that 5-0. PDS hosts Moorestown the decks were not constructed with the proper Friends on October 21 and materials, and they were in danger of collapse. Pennington on October 23 before playing at Hun on Each of the homeowners’ claims were well into the October 24. tens of thousands of dollars, and in both cases the

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MCCC Athletics Committee Announces HOF Ceremony

Out of concern for the safety and well-being of the community, Mercer County Community College (MCCC) and the MCCC Foundation Athletics Committee have decided to reschedule the college’s Inaugural Athletics Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony to June 12, 2021 at the Trenton Country Club. Originally scheduled for November 2020, the induction ceremony will honor three of the college’s national championship teams and 15 individuals who have made exceptional contributions as players, coaches, or administrators to MCCC’s more than half-century of sports excellence. All proceeds from the event will go toward vital scholarship support for MCCC’s student athletes and improvement of the college’s athletic facilities. In response to the rescheduling, two anonymous local donors have launched a Matching Gift Challenge to triple all gifts (including the popular “Name Your Scholarship” donations) made to the Athletics Hall of Fame campaign AN from now through Princeton Athletic OFFER Club December 31, 2020. For Holding Winter 6K time contributed, is NOW to upgrade your homeDec. with5 everThe y dollar The Princeton Athletic the anonymous donors will a new high efficiency contribute a dollar, up to Club ( PAC ) is holding its heating and cooling system.Wonder Run annual Winter $10,000 per donor, with by a clearing Raise a happy, healthy home the air, pure and simple. 6K on December 5 over the goal of raising $30,000 in UP TO OR Institute Woods course. total. The run starts at 10 a.m. HEALTHY AIRMCCC PACKAGE ONLY $2,950 Donations to the from the Princeton Friends At h lIncludes e t i c s Electronic H a l l ofAirFa m e Cleaner, Humidifier and Air Scrubber campaign are fully tax de- School and the event is limductible. The impact to the ited to 200 participants. ONathletes NEW QUALIFYING The run will be chip timed. student will be TRANE triHEATING & COOLING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTSinare invited, pled for gifts made by SYSTEMS De- All abilities cember 31. For example: cluding those who prefer to $10 becomes $30, which walk the course. covers the registration fees Online registration and

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full details regarding the event and race protocols are available at www.princetonac.org. The entry fee is $35 up to three weeks prior to the race and includes a T-shirt. From 21 days to 72 hours prior (online only), the entry fee goes up to $40, including a T-shirt. Sign up at the event will be $55 if space is available, credit card only. The PAC is a nonprofit, all-volunteer running club for the community that promotes running for the fun and health of it and stages several running events each year.

37 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

Local Sports

for one student; $200 becomes $600, which covers the tuition for a three-credit course; and $800 becomes $2,400, which covers fulltime tuition for one semester (12 credits). Gifts can be made online at www.mccc.edu/hof. Any checks mailed to the MCCC Foundation should be marked “Athletics Hall of Fame Match.” The MCCC Vikings are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Region XIX and the Garden State Athletic Conference (GSAC ). Mercer’s storied athletics history includes 14 national championship teams, (eight in men’s soccer, four in women’s tennis, and two in men’s basketball), with almost 250 student athletes achieving NJCAA All-American status and hundreds more gaining Region XIX and GSAC honors. In addition, over the past decade more than 50 Viking student athletes have been recognized as NJCAA Academic All-Americans. The MCCC Athletics Hall of Fame was created to honor exceptional teams and outstanding individuals. For questions about the event or to lear n more about more about supporting the MCCC Athletics Hall of Fame, once can contact Tatiana Dodge at dodget@ mccc.edu.

PHS Athletic Hall of Fame Postponing 2020 Ceremony

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Princeton High Athletic Hall of Fame Committee will not be holding its annual Hall of Fame induction ceremony this fall. The next induction ceremony is currently scheduled for November 13, 2021. The Committee, though, continues to accept nominations from the public for future Hall of Fame classes. For a nomination form, one c a n v is it t he com mittee’s website at princetonhs/rschoolteams.com/ page/3142 or e-mail princetonhighhof@gmail.com. Individuals interested in contributing to the Hall of Fame Scholarship Fund may also contact the Committee at that email address.

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TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 38

Obituaries

Marvin R. Reed Marvin R. Reed, Jr. died peacefully on October 12, 2020 after a lengthy battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was 89 years old. A resident of the greater Princeton area for over 60 years, he moved to Stonebridge at Montgomery in Skillman, New Jersey, five years ago. Marvin served as mayor of Princeton Borough from 1990 to 2003. Born July 30, 1931 to Marie and Marvin R. Reed Sr. in Vineland, New Jersey, Marvin lived his early years in South Jersey. He graduated from Vineland High School in 1948 and attended Rutgers University on a state scholarship. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1952. S h or t ly a f te r c ol l e g e, Marvin was drafted into the U.S. Army at the time of the Korean War. After his initial training, he was sent to the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, where he was selected to work on

the guided missile system program. His service and experience in the South and at the Arsenal would forever shape his lifelong commitment to public service and civil rights. Af ter his discharge in 1954, he began a 31-year career with the New Jersey Education Association (NJEA) in Trenton as the assistant editor of the NJEA magazine. His professional career evolved quickly, and he soon became Director of Communications for the NJEA. He also took on leadership roles in New Jersey school and college development efforts and taxation and municipal reform issues until his retirement in 1986. In 1957, Marvin discovered Princeton while residing with several friends on Jefferson Road. His life changed forever in 1958 when he met Ingrid Wagner, also from Vineland, who was working in New York City while he was in the N YU Graduate Communication program. They were married a year later in Vineland and settled in Princeton. They soon became active members of the Unitarian-Universalist Church of Princeton. Early in 1961, the Reeds purchased their first home in one of Morris Milgram’s planned communities called Glen Acres in West Windsor — a small cluster of suburban homes designed specifically to foster the integration of Black and white families. Marvin and Ingrid would go on to have two children, David and Liza. The family felt lucky to spend their childhood growing up in this special place and continue to

maintain connections with their many Glenview Drive neighbors. In 1974, the Reeds moved to Princeton Borough where their family could walk and bike to town and school. In 1984 then Mayor of Princeton Borough, Barbara Sigmund, asked Marvin to run for a seat on the Borough Council which he won. Following Sigmund’s death in 1990 Marvin became Mayor, a post he would hold for 13 years. He will be remembered for his contributions to dozens of public projects, local, regional, and State, as well as his management of the relationship between the Princeton community and Princeton University. His legacy lives on in many ways. Marvin led the effort to redevelop the Princeton Public Library, the Albert Hinds Plaza, adjacent retail spaces, and Spring Street parking garage. In addition to town administration and policy development responsibilities, he enjoyed presiding over weddings and was proud to have married over 500 couples during his tenure! While Mayor, he served on the League of Municipalities Executive Committee and chaired its Cable Television Study. He was also appointed to the State’s Local Unit Alignment, Reorganization and Consolidation C o m m i s s i o n ( L UA R C C ) and served as President of Downtown New Jersey. Follow ing his years as Mayor, Marvin served as Chair of the Redevelopment Task Force of New Jersey Future, on the Princeton Planning Board, and took an integral role in the relocation of Princeton Hospital

and the redevelopment of the hospital’s former location. In 2018, Marvin and Ingrid were awarded the Leslie ‘Bud’ Vivian Award for Community Service by the Princeton Area Community Foundation honoring their combined lifetime of service to dozens of local, regional, and State level projects, committees, and organizations. Throughout their adult lives Mar v in and Ing r id maintained a strong interest in the arts and travel. They were enthusiastic supporters of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Princeton Opera Festival, and Arts Council. As followers of theatre, opera, and film, they often made these activities the focal point of their travel adventures around the world including memorable visits to Colmar, France, the American West, and regular visits to the island of St. John in the US Virgin Islands. In lieu of a traditional vacation home, they acquired a small apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in partnership w it h good fr iends. T his proved to be a magnet for family gatherings as well as providing a home base for their energetic interest in everything New York City. Further details of Marvin’s life and contributions to the Princeton community can be found in the Princeton Personality profile from the November 7, 2007 issue of Town Topics and the August 2011 issue of Princeton Magazine with a story about his life and partnership with Ingrid. Mar v in is sur v ived by

Ingrid, his wife of 60 years, a son David Reed and his wife Nan of Orinda, California, and a daughter Liza O’Reilly and her husband Tom of Hingham, Massachusetts, as well as granddaughters Cecilia, Jacquelyn, and Agnes O’Reilly, and grandson Owen Reed. To celebrate Marvin’s life, consider: a walk around d ow ntow n P r i n c e to n , a ride on the FreeB Marvin I or Marvin II, a visit to the Princeton Public Library, a s top at H i n d s Pla z a, or a donat ion to Pr inceton Community Housing (pchhomes.org ) to honor Marvin’s commitment to affordable housing and helping people live a better life.

Irwin Litt, M.D. Irwin Litt, M.D., of Princeton, New Jersey, passed away in August of 2020 at the age of 83. Irv was born, raised, and educated in Philadelphia, attending South Philadelphia High School for Boys, and completing his undergraduate and medical training at Temple University. He interned in Brooklyn, New York, and was subsequently commissioned as a

Captain in the United States Air Force, serving as a General Medical Officer. He returned to Temple University to complete his residency in radiology and a fellowship in inter ventional radiology, and soon after joined what is now the University Radiology Group in New Jersey. Irv practiced with this group for his entire career, specializing in mammography and dedicating himself to women’s health for decades. He mentored medical students and residents and worked tirelessly on behalf of his patients. He loved his profession. Irv lived a full life with his wife of 57 years, Barbara. His three children and their spouses as well as eight grandchildren brought him much joy. He loved them all. In his free time, he was a music enthusiast with a passion for jazz, blues, classical music, and opera. He loved theater and visiting New York City, as well as travel, always with his trusty camera by his side. Irv was an avid reader of newspapers, magazines, medical journals, and books. For years he audited classes at Princeton University and later attended classes at the Senior Resource Center, and he enjoyed spending time with his friends in the Old Guard and 55 Plus social groups. Private funeral services were held due to COVID. Charitable contributions in Irv’s memory may be sent to The Jewish Center in Princeton (thejewishcenter. org) or Greenwood House (greenwoodhouse.org). To send condolences to the family, visit orlandsmemorialchapel.com.

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Preaching Sunday, Oct 25, 2020

Rev. Alison L. Boden, Ph.D. Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel


On October 11th 2020, loving husband, father of two, and grandfather of three, Brigadier General (Ret.) Guy Keller Dean III died at the age of 80. Guy was born in Princeton, NJ, in October of 1939 to Guy K. Dean, Jr. and Marion F. Dean. He spent his childhood in Plainsboro, NJ, and attended Princeton Country Day School through 1955. Guy then studied at Woodberry Forest School in Virginia, graduating in 1958. Guy went on to Rutgers University, where he rowed varsity crew, sang in the Glee Club, acted in the Queens Theater Guild, and enjoyed fraternity brotherhood at Delta Sigma Phi, graduating in 1962 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. After college, Guy enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving on active duty as a Special Agent with the Intelligence Corps at NATO Headquarters and in Paris, France. Guy transferred to the U.S. Army Reserves in 1966 while pursuing a career in banking over the next 30 years.

membership in the Princeton Rotary Club and the Nassau Club of Princeton. Additionally he was active in many genealogical and patriotic organizations, serving as New Jersey chapter Vice President of the Society of the Cincinnati, President of the Military Society of the War of 1812, and he held leadership positions with many other organizations such as the Society of Colonial Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the Baronial Order of the Magna Carta, and more. Guy was a lover of history, classical and jazz music, Tiger and Scarlet Knight football, dog walks throughout the Princeton and Rocky Hill nature ways, and being active with Trinity Church Princeton. He was especially fond of peaceful summers in Buck Hill Falls, PA. Guy is survived by his wife of 50 years, Victoria; his daughter Wistar, son-in-law Andrew and granddaughter Elizabeth Wallace of Norwalk, CT; his son Andrew, daughter-in-law Ashleigh, grandson Aston and granddaughter Amelia Dean of Jacksonville, FL; his sister Marion and brother-in-law Peter Hall of Gloucester, VA; and his brother John Dean of Canyon Lake, TX. A private ser vice with burial was held for immediate family on 17 October at Trinity Church, Princeton. A larger memorial service will be planned for a later date. Donations in Guy’s name would be appreciated to the Buck Hill Conservation Foundation (buckhillconservation. org); Trinity Church, Princeton (trinityprinceton.org); or the Society of the Cincinnati (societyofthecincinnati.org).

Daniel B. Rew Daniel B. Rew, 60, died peacefully at home with his family in Bay Head, NJ, on October 12, 2020. He spent the last year with family and friends, painting, baking, and walking in between treatments for colon cancer. Dan was born on September 6, 1960 in Berkeley, CA, to Ella May Green Rew and David Robertson Rew. Ella and David met in California after growing up as children of missionaries in Kenya and the Belgian Congo respectively, a unique perspective on life that Dan found invaluable. They raised Dan and his siblings Ritch and Sherry around the world, moving between California, Paris, Texas, and Connecticut. In 1982 Dan graduated with a Bachelors in Environmental Science at Texas A&M and set off for New York City to attend the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. He met the love of his life over a drafting table at the University of Virginia where he then graduated with a Master of Architecture in 1987. Dan and Pam were married at the Bay Head Yacht Club on September 26, 1987. Dan believed in books. He treated himself, family, and friends to books at every opportunity. He believed in lines and never forgetting his sketchbook.

RECTORY OF GIOUS SERVICES

He loved towers and careful details. He could hold whole buildings in his mind, turning them over to make them better, more responsible, more comfortable. And always simpler. He believed in starting a project by reading a book and starting the day with a long breakfast. He believed in running a quick six miles to let himself think. He believed in not trying to be perfect. He composed his complex buildings with trace paper and careful models. Over his career, he received countless AIA design awards, leading several carbon-neutral and sustainable research facilities, laboratories, and an emerging technology and innovation center. He was proud to become a partner at CUH2A and eventually a Design Director and Vice President of Sustainability at HDR Architecture. His projects were located across the world and included infectious disease research, a library and a residence for students at the Cape Eleuthera Institute, and a tiny playhouse for his three daughters. Dan spent his time running dozens of marathons, playing weeknight basketball at the neighborhood park, and watching his girls in countless sailing regattas. He rarely missed a Texas A&M football game, loved racing his brothers-in-law to the top of Stratton Mountain, and made his mother’s lace cookies every Christmas. Dan and Pam raised their three daughters in Princeton to be confident and curious about the world. He adored them with passion and pride, his only regret was leaving them too soon. He is survived by his wife of 33 years, Pamela Lucas Rew of Bay Head, NJ, and their three daughters: Margaret Rew of Washington, DC, her husband Owen Weinstein; Jane Rew

Buckley of New York City, her husband Mike Buckley; and Julia Rew of New York City. To add to those riches Pam and Dan spent the last ten months doting over their first grandchild, Kailie Ella Buckley. He will be greatly missed by his brother, Ritch Rew, and sister, Sherry Nunez, their families; and his many beloved in-laws, out-laws, running buddies, colleagues, and friends. We are indebted to Memorial Sloan Kettering’s many years of research that informed the thoughtful care and chemo regimens that kept Dan comfortable over the past year. Father Dowd, a family friend who married Pam and Dan, will be holding a private family service this week. The Rew girls will travel this spring to spread his ashes in the places he loved the most. Once it is safe for a larger gathering, Dan asked that we host a celebration of his life with his community of friends and colleagues. If you would like to attend this event, please contact the family at remembering. dan.rew@gmail.com. We have established a memorial fund at the University of Virginia School of Architecture in Dan’s name. You can make a contribution at givenext100. com, or by mailing a check to: School of Architecture Foundation, Campbell Hall P.O. Box 400122, Charlottesville, VA 22904. Indicate in special instructions “For Dan Rew Memorial Fund.” Our hope is that these funds will support students as they too create a library which will enrich their study and passion for architecture. Thank you to our family — loud and loyal fans of Dan. Thank you to the many, many people who have reached out with stories and condolences.

39 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2020

Brigadier General Guy Keller Dean III

Guy was commissioned as an Officer in the U.S. Army Reserves in March of 1968. Later, he graduated from the National Graduate Trust School at Northwestern University in 1974 and earned a Master of Arts in Business degree from Rider College in 1981. Guy worked at various banks in New Jersey, becoming Vice President and Senior Trust Officer at PNC Bank at Palmer Square in Princeton, NJ. In 1993 Guy’s service with the Army Reser ves ended and he transitioned to the New York State Guard where he reached the rank of Colonel. In 1995 Guy began a new civilian career as well, becoming a Certified Financial Planner and Certified Life Underwriter with MetLife Securities, where he worked for the following 25 years. In 2004 Guy Joined the Veteran Corps of Artillery State of New York, the state’s oldest military command, where he rose to the rank of Brigadier General in 2017 at the time of his retirement. Guy’s military decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, the New York Conspicuous Service Medal, the New York Meritorious Service Medal, and numerous others. Throughout his 55 consecutive years of service in the armed forces and two careers in business, Guy volunteered on several boards, including t he Pr inceton YMCA and Mercer Medical Center, was a founding member and treasurer of the Buck Hill Conservation Foundation, was President of the New Jersey Association of Financial and Insurance Advisors, and enjoyed

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124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

10:00 a.m. Worship Service

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m.

Rev. Jenny Walz, Lead Pastor ¡EresSmith siempre bienvenido! Midweek Meditation Noon Christian ScienceTuesdays Reading at Room 178 Nassau Street, ages Princeton ‘Compassion Camp’ for children 2 to 5th grade Youth group andMonday choir onthrough SundaySaturday evening from 10 - 4 609-924-0919 – Open

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10:00 Children’s School During this timea.m. of COVID-19 crisis, Sunday Witherspoon is finding new ways to continue our worship. WhileBible our sanctuary and Youth Study doors may be closed, church is open and we will find new avenues to proclaim the Gospel and to Adult Bible Classes as one faith community! (Acontinue multi-ethnic congregation)

ECUMENICAL CHRISTIAN WORSHIP

609-924-1666 • Fax Join us for worship on Facebook Live609-924-0365 every Sunday at 10:00 a.m.

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DIRECTORY OF SUNDAYS at 11:00 RELIGIOUS SERVICES Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

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Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

witherspoonchurch.org

Recorded and live stream sermons can also be found on our website - witherspoonchurch.org

Join our mailing list to receive notices of our special services, Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church bible study and virtual fellowship. During the COVID-19 crisis our church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ office is closed, however, please email witherspoon@verizon.net or leave a 10:00 a.m. Worship Service message at our church office and a staff member will get back to you. 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m. and Youth Bible Study hrinceton 26 n, Pastor Wednesday Testimony Meeting and Nursery at 7:30 p.m. Pastor Church office: (609) 924-1666 Adult Bible Classes 0 pm n,5:30 Pastor bienvenido! on siempre our Facebook page on Sunday. (A multi-ethnic congregation) 7:00 pmp.m.Join us for services ¡Eres 5:30and p.m. Christian Science Reading Room :30 5:00 p.m. 609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 178 Nassau Street, Princeton 27 and 5:00 y:30 at 7:00 p.m. p.m. www.facebook.com/trinityprinceton :30 am witherspoonchurch.org 609-924-0919 – Open Monday through Saturday from 10 - 4 at 7:00 p.m. e II, 9:00 am

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9:15 am Adult Formation AN EPISCOPAL PARISH 10:00 am Worship Trinity Church SundayHoly Week 11:00 am Hour 8:00 HolyCoffee Eucharist, Rite I &a.m. Easter Schedule

Rector ssociate of Music w.trinityprinceton.org

www.trinityprinceton.org Tuesday

St. Paul’s Catholic Church St. Paul’s Catholic Church 216Nassau Nassau Street, 214 Street,Princeton Princeton 214 Nassau Street, Princeton Saturday, March 26 Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ Visit csprinceton.org for more information

Our Christian Science Reading Room is now open, 178 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ

Thursday March 24 12:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

5:30

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton

For details contact: clerk@csprinceton.org

Tenebrae Service, 7:00 pm

The Rev. Canon Dr. Kara Slade, The. Assoc. Rector, The Rev. Joanne Epply-Schmidt, Assoc. Rector, Rev. Paul Jeanes III, Rector Mr. Tom Whittemore, Director of MusicDirector of Music Br. Christopher McNabb, Curate • Mr. Tom Whittemore, Friday, March 25 33 Mercer St. Princeton 609-924-2277 www.trinityprinceton.org The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 am The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Stations of the Cross, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Evening Prayer, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm The Prayer Book Service for Good Friday, 7:00 pm

Wherever you are on your journey of faith, come worship with us

We currently hold virtual online services: Sunday Church Service and Sunday School at 10:30 am Wednesday Testimony meetings at 7:30 pm

9:00 a.m. Christian Education for All Ages March 23 10:00Wednesday, a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm 5:00 p.m. Evensong with Communion following Go to our website for more Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers for information. Healing, 5:30 pm

Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 12:00 pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing and Wednesday Stripping of the Altar, 7:00 pm The Rev. Paul III, Rector, Keeping Watch, 8:00Jeanes pm –with Mar. 25, 7:00 amPrayer p.m. Holy Eucharist Healing

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Wherever you are on your journey of faith, you are always welcome to worship with us at:

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton 16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 609-924-5801 – www.csprinceton.org

Sunday Church Service, Sunday School and Nursery at 10:30 a.m.

Monday through Saturday 10am-4pm. Curbside pickup and free local delivery are available. Please call ahead 609-924-0919, readingroom@csprinceton.org

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School and Youth Bible Study


TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 40

to place an order:

“un” tel: 924-2200 Ext. 10 fax: 924-8818 e-mail: classifieds@towntopics.com

CLASSIFIEDS MasterCard

VISA

The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE. tf

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

LAWRENCEVILLE TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: Corner unit. 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath. Pool/Tennis. All appliances available. Call (609) 216-0092. $1,800/ mo. plus utilities.

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 921-7469.

10-21-3t

09-30-21

ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21

HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t

ST. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Irene Lee, Classified Manager Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified,

loved

and

preserved

throughout the world now and forever. • Deadline: 2pm TuesdayPRINCETON • Payment: All ads be pre-paid, HOUSE FOR must SUPERIOR HANDYMAN Cash, credit card, or check. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3½ baths, WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR SERVICES: • 25 words or less: $15.00 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? Western Section, 1 acre. All renovatMULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Experienced in all residential home us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, ed. Detached• garage. Walk to train & • 38-2weeks: $40.00 • 4 weeks: $50.00 6 weeks: $72.00 6 Estimate/References/ month and annual discount rates available. Friday, October 23 from & Saturrepairs.•Free pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a University. Call (609) 216-0092. day, October 24 from 8-1. 585 Route A Gift Subscription! Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. day. By the 9th day your prayer will • Ads with line spacing: $20.00/inch • all bold face type: $10.00/week 518 in Skillman, opposite Burnt Hill 10-21-3t Rd. Jewelry, household, antiques, toys, garden, bric-a-brac, art, dolls, furniture, books, CDs, some clothes, kitchen, etc! Go down driveway to garage & park in back. 10-21 POWERHOUSE PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 117 Hunt Drive. Thursday 10/22, Friday 10/23 & Saturday 10/24, from 9:30-3. Home filled with designer furnishings. Baker, Restoration Hardware, West Elm, Ralph Lauren, Frontgate, custom. Carpets, decorative accessories. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 10-21 HOUSECLEANING AVAILABLE by Polish lady. Please call Monika for a free estimate. (609) 540-2874. 09-30-4t ST. JUDE’S NOVENA: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. By the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t

CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/11. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-21 HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t

PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000 tf

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t

superiorhandymanservices-nj.com

08-12/10-28

SINGING LESSONS Graduate of MSM. 30 years experience, teacher at Princeton Adult School. Extra large studios in NYC & Princeton. Virtual or in-person in a safe studio. Great gifts for the holidays. (609) 497-0543 or abm165w66@gmail.com 10-21-4t CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t

JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON

WE BUY CARS

Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST:

tf

Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130

BUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613.

07-15-21

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

01-15-21

“You can put such things that clutter your home to good use by giving them away." —John Michaels

be answered. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude. PM 10-07-3t PROFESSIONAL BABYSITTER Available for after school babysitting in Pennington, Lawrenceville, and Princeton areas. Please text or call (609) 216-5000

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris tf

tf

YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

HANDYMAN: General duties at your service! High skill levels in indoor/outdoor painting, sheet rock, deck work, power washing & general on the spot fix up. Carpentry, tile installation, moulding, masonry, etc. T/A “Elegant Remodeling”, www. elegantdesignhandyman.com Text or call Roeland (609) 933-9240 or roelandvan@gmail.com It’s time for deck rehabilitation & refinishing! You may text to request one of my job videos from my projects & receive it by text or email. STAY SAFE.

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Friday, October 23 from 8-2 & Saturday, October 24 from 8-1. 585 Route 518 in Skillman, opposite Burnt Hill Rd. Jewelry, household, antiques, toys, garden, bric-a-brac, art, dolls, furniture, books, CDs, some clothes, kitchen, etc! Go down driveway to garage & park in back. 10-21 POWERHOUSE PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 117 Hunt Drive. Thursday 10/22, Friday 10/23 & Saturday 10/24, from 9:30-3. Home filled with designer furnishings. Baker, Restoration Hardware, West Elm, Ralph Lauren, Frontgate, custom. Carpets, decorative accessories. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 10-21

tf CARPENTRY/ HOME IMPROVEMENT in the Princeton area since 1972. No job too small. Call Julius Sesztak, (609) 466-0732 tf STRING LESSONS ONLINE: Violin/Viola lessons. Fiddling, Traditional & Suzuki Methods. Ms. D., Master Of Music, violin/viola pedagogy. Teaches all ages/levels, in Princeton area since 1995. FREE INTRO LESSON until 11/11. Call (609) 924-5933; cldamerau@yahoo.com 10-21

Specialists

2nd & 3rd Generations

MFG., CO.

609-452-2630

A. Pennacchi & Sons Co. Established in 1947

MASON CONTRACTORS RESTORE-PRESERVE-ALL MASONRY

Mercer County's oldest, reliable, experienced firm. We serve you for all your masonry needs.

Heidi Joseph Sales Associate, REALTOR® Office: 609.924.1600 Mobile: 609.613.1663 heidi.joseph@foxroach.com

BRICK~STONE~STUCCO NEW~RESTORED

Insist on … Heidi Joseph.

Simplest Repair to the Most Grandeur Project, our staff will accommodate your every need!

Call us as your past generations did for over 72 years!

Complete Masonry & Waterproofing Services

Paul G. Pennacchi, Sr., Historical Preservationist #5. Support your community businesses. Princeton business since 1947.

PRINCETON OFFICE | 253 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08540

609.924.1600 | www.foxroach.com

©2013 An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.© Equal Housing Opportunity. lnformation not verified or guaranteed. If your home is currently listed with a Broker, this is not intended as a solicitation.

CLASSIFIED RATE INFO:

609-394-7354 paul@apennacchi.com

Gina Hookey, Classified Manager

Deadline: Noon Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 25 words or less: $24.80 • each add’l word 15 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length. • 3 weeks: $63.70 • 4 weeks: $81 • 6 weeks: $121 • 6 month and annual discount rates available. • Employment: $35


ROSA’S CLEANING SERVICE LLC: For houses, apartments, offices, daycare, banks, schools & much more. Has good English, own transportation. 25 years of experience. Cleaning license. References. Please call (609) 751-2188. 10-07-4t

HOME REPAIR SPECIALIST: Interior/exterior repairs, carpentry, trim, rotted wood, power washing, painting, deck work, sheet rock/ spackle, gutter & roofing repairs. Punch list is my specialty. 40 years experience. Licensed & insured. Call Creative Woodcraft (609) 586-2130 07-15-21

HOUSE FOR RENT: Nestled on historic country estate. Princeton address in Lawrence Township. 3 BR, LR/DR w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen, garage, laundry, hardwood floors. Includes lawn & snow maintenance. Move-in ready. No pets, smoke free, $2,400. Available now. (609) 731-6904. 10-14-3t LAWRENCEVILLE TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: Corner unit. 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath. Pool/Tennis. All appliances available. Call (609) 216-0092. $1,800/ mo. plus utilities. 10-21-3t PRINCETON HOUSE FOR SALE: 5-6 bedrooms, 3½ baths, Western Section, 1 acre. All renovated. Detached garage. Walk to train & University. Call (609) 216-0092. 10-21-3t

CREATIVE CLEANING SERVICES: All around cleaning services to fit your everyday needs. Very reli able, experienced & educated. Weekly, biweekly & monthly. Please call Matthew/Karen Geisenhoner at (609) 587-0231; Email creativecleaningservices@outlook. com 09-23-8t

MEDICAL OFFICE

SPACE • FOR • LEASE

SUPERIOR HANDYMAN SERVICES: Experienced in all residential home repairs. Free Estimate/References/ Insured. (908) 966-0662 or www. superiorhandymanservices-nj.com 08-12/10-28 JOES LANDSCAPING INC. OF PRINCETON Property Maintenance and Specialty Jobs Commercial/Residential Over 45 Years of Experience •Fully Insured •Free Consultations Email: joeslandscapingprinceton@ gmail.com Text (only) (609) 638-6846 Office (609) 216-7936 Princeton References •Green Company HIC #13VH07549500 06-03-21 TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIEDS GETS TOP RESULTS! Whether it’s selling furniture, finding a lost pet, or having a garage sale, TOWN TOPICS is the way to go! We deliver to ALL of Princeton as well as surrounding areas, so your ad is sure to be read. (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com tf

Montgomery Commons Rt. 206 & Applegate Road | Princeton | NJ

Prestigious Princeton mailing address OFFICE 209

Built to suit tenant spaces with private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities

12’

10’ 11”

OFFICE 15’ 1” 207

CL.

10’ 11” 10’ 11”

T.R.

11’ 10”

4’

SINGING LESSONS Graduate of MSM. 30 years experience, teacher at Princeton Adult School. Extra large studios in NYC & Princeton. Virtual or in-person in a safe studio. Great gifts for the holidays. (609) 497-0543 or abm165w66@gmail.com 10-21-4t

I BUY ALL KINDS of Old or Pretty Things: China, glass, silver, pottery, costume jewelry, evening bags, fancy linens, paintings, small furniture, etc. Local woman buyer. (609) 9217469. 09-30-21

SUITES AVAILABLE:

OFFICE 206

SUITE 822 | 830 SF (+/-)

HOUSECLEANING: Experienced, English speaking, great references, reliable with own transportation. Weekly & bi-weekly cleaning. Green cleaning available. Susan, (732) 8733168. I have my own PPE for your protection. 09-23-8t

Premier Series suites with upgraded flooring, counter tops, cabinets & lighting available 219 Parking spaces available on-site with handicap accessibility VERIZON FIOS AVAILABLE & high-speed internet access

Medical/Office Suites Available: 630 & 830 sf (+/-)

(908) 874-8686 | LarkenAssociates.com Immediate Occupancy | Brokers Protected | Raider Realty is a Licensed Real Estate Broker No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information herein and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice and to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals and clients.

Two Great Princeton Options

51 Grasmere Way, Princeton, NJ Located in a leafy enclave just off of Princeton’s most picturesque winding road, close to a selection of renowned schools and recreational opportunities, this all brick house has no shortage of space or style. Every room is airy and generous in scale, especially the open kitchen and twostory family room. A handsomely detailed study crowned with a barrel vaulted ceiling overlooks the stone spa with waterfalls. An amazing stone terrace with meadow views runs the length of the house. The 4/5-bedroom floor plan offers ultimate flexibility with a main level suite, as well as a finished basement. $2,200,000

265 Herrontown Road, Princeton, NJ The possibilities at this scenic 3.3-acre property are endless! The simplest is to move right into the well-built ranch and enjoy it as it is with hardwood floors, a bright and open living/dining room and a big deck. You may also opt to expand and add a bedroom or two to supplement the existing three. Finally, buyers with big dreams may choose to start with a clean slate and build brand new. No matter what, the deep level lot with its sweeping front lawn and backyard shrouded in privacy can accommodate all your outdoor wishes - a pool, vegetable garden, or hammock strung between two tall trees. $735,000

Barbara Blackwell Broker Associate 4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542

(609) 921-1050 Office (609) 915-5000 Cell bblackwell@callawayhenderson.com For more information about properties, the market in general, or your home in particular, please give me a call.

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice.

41 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

HOME HEALTH AIDE: 25 years of experience. Available mornings to take care of your loved one, transport to appointments, run errands. I am well known in Princeton. Top care, excellent references. The best, cell (609) 356-2951; or (609) 751-1396. tf


$1150 0% HEALTHY AIR PACKAGE ONLY $2,950

TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEDNESDAY, OCTObER 21, 2020 • 42

Includes Electronic Air Cleaner, Humidifier and Air Scrubber ON NEW QUALIFYING TRANE HEATING & COOLING SYSTEMS

FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

ONLINE

www.towntopics.com

bUYING: Antiques, paintings, Oriental rugs, coins, clocks, furniture, old toys, military, books, cameras, silver, costume & fine jewelry. Guitars & musical instruments. I buy single items to entire estates. Free appraisals. (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 ESTATE LIQUIDATION SERVICE: I will clean out attics, basements, garages & houses. Single items to entire estates. No job too big or small. In business over 35 years, serving all of Mercer County. Call (609) 306-0613. 01-15-21 WHAT’S A GREAT GIFT FOR A FORMER PRINCETONIAN? A Gift Subscription!

TRUS

ce 1993 T TsinR U since 1 S T 993 #885895 9

SEE # LICEENN SSEE##0955440 000 S 01545 MBB LLLIC UM ICEENN IC P LU R #13VH -R 59 C G E A HHVV R AC TO R R N S E # 8 8 0

BING PLUM G IN T NING CONT B L IC E S E # 9 5 4000 A E H NGDITIOL E N1 3 V H 0 1 5 4 5 N I O B P LU M C M IR C - RTOLR IC PLAU N REG # RMA SNRG E O H VA N H G C E T A R I O T I IT D NH REENATOECORNS AT HEGAETECRHG I&TUBIO N DA EY HH ITCO N WBLAATTER S&A AIEKRAN N S E M L H R K C N E WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM IT H T K T S IT EO

Belle Mead Garage (908) 359-8131 Ask for Chris

Call today for a free estimate!

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Friday, October 23 from 8-2 & Saturday, October 24 from 8-1. 585 Route 518 in Skillman, opposite Burnt Hill Rd. Jewelry, household, antiques, toys, garden, bric-a-brac, art, dolls, furniture, books, CDs, some clothes, kitchen, etc! Go down driveway to garage & park in back. 10-21

HVACR LICENSE # IS 19HC00095400

WWW.TINDALLRANSON.COM

• • • •

Family owned & operated Licensed & Insured 30 Years in business Maintenance agreements

36-MONTH INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE

PART-TIME HELP SOUGHT in fall/winter, for an interesting & intelligent elderly woman. Reliable, patient, & fun. Must be able to lift a transport wheelchair if necessary. English or French speaker sought. Own car. (917) 838-9107. 10-21

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE

SENIOR RESEARCH USER SPECIALIST

Wednesday morning delivery for small Princeton route. If interested, please contact Gina Hookey at classifieds@towntopics.com

tf

609-924-3434

609-924-3434

Service, Repair and Installation: ---- Furnace ---- Air Conditioner/ Ductless A/C ---- Water Heaters/Tankless ---- Humidifier ---- Gas piping

WE bUY CARS

YARD SALE + TOWN TOPICS CLASSIFIED = GREAT WEEKEND! Put an ad in the TOWN TOPICS to let everyone know! Call (609) 924-2200 ext. 10; classifieds@towntopics.com DEADLINE: Tues before 12 noon tf

609-924-3434

G Y AUD RENO ENERGEN & BATH KITCH

Call (609) 924-2200 ext 10; circulation@towntopics.com tf

Employment Opportunities in the Princeton Area

POWERHOUSE PRINCETON MOVING SALE: 117 Hunt Drive. Thursday 10/22, Friday 10/23 & Saturday 10/24, from 9:30-3. Home filled with designer furnishings. Baker, Restoration Hardware, West Elm, Ralph Lauren, Frontgate, custom. Carpets, decorative accessories. Photos can be seen on estatesales.net, MG Estate Services. COVID protocol in place, please wear a mask. 10-21

(#6493): Master’s deg in Human Dvlpmt, Cognitive Studies, Comp Sci, Humancomputer Interaction, Graphic Dsgn, or Web Dsgn + 5 yrs exp. Exp gained through adv deg research OK. Use prototyping; usability studies & evals; dsgn, usability & accessibility standards to design & evaluate assessment & learning software apps that are visually engaging, accessible and easy to use. F/T. Educational Testing Service. Princeton, NJ. Send CV to: Ritu Sahai, Immigration & Relo Coordinator, ETS, 660 Rosedale Rd, MS-10J, Princeton, NJ 08541. No calls/recruiters. 10-21

TECHNICAL LEAD

An Equal Opportunity Employer 4438 Route 27 North, Kingston, NJ 08528 609-924-2200 ext. 10

JOb CODE CT6397 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ) Wrks in the healthcare domain. Anlyz functional rqmts & interpret them as tech specs. ID datatypes & data formats support’d & dsgn interoperability. Bld, config & deploy dashboards & rprts for visualiz’g data & processed results. Implemt standrd & cust security packages, protocols & formats for encrypt’n, reliability & fault tolerance. Uses tools such as Apache, Java, SQL & JavaScript. Bach’s deg in Comp Sci./Eng./IT or frgn equiv +4yrs of exp. Loc’n: Princeton, NJ & various unanticipatd Loc’n w/in the U.S., reloc maybe req. Please refer to job code & email res to: us_jobs@ citiustech.com 10-21

Brian Wisner

Broker Associate | Luxury Collection

TECHNICAL SPECIALIST

JOb CODE CT6398 (CitiusTech, Princeton, NJ) wrks in the healthcare domain. Resp for C: 732.588.8000 coordinat’g w/different teams w/ O: 609.921.9202 in the organizat’n for different tasks on projts. Wrks in Scrum team to imBroker Associate | Luxury Collection E : bwisner19@gmail.com plemt prod rqmt; troubleshoot & fix : BrianSellsNJ.com BrokerWAssociate | Luxury Collection of Princeton product’n issues. Dvlps applics us’g C: 732.588.8000 C#, Java, Python, Javascript. Uses O: 609.921.9202 343 Nassau St. tools such as Visual Studio, Eclipse, Princeton, NJ 08540 C: 732.588.8000 7Edit, Jenkins & SSMS. Bach’s deg E : bwisner19@gmail.com in Comp Sci./Eng. or frgn equiv Broker Associate | Luxury Collection O: 609.921.9202 W : BrianSellsNJ.com +2yrs of exp or will accept Assoc deg w/4yrs of wrk exp in the IT fld. Loc’n: 343 Nassau St. Lic: 1432491 E : bwisner19@gmail.com Princeton, NJ 08540 Princeton, NJ & various unanticipatd C: 732.588.8000 2016 W : BrianSellsNJ.com Each Office Independently Owned and Operated of Princeton loc’ns w/in the U.S., reloc maybe rqd. O: 609.921.9202 Please refer to job code & email res 343 Nassau St. Lic: 1432491 to: us_jobs@citiustech.com E Independently : bwisner19@gmail.com Each Office Owned and Operated Princeton, NJ 08540 10-21 W : BrianSellsNJ.com

Brian Wisner

Brian Wisner

Brian Wisner

of Princeton

CREATIVE FALL FRONT PORCH DÉCOR IDEAS

with Beatrice Bloom

2016

of Princeton Ready to go beyond traditional orange and yellow pumpkins for your autumn outdoor decorating? Create an eye-catching front porch or entryway by combining traditional fall items with an unexpected theme or color palette. These creative displays can last through the entire fall season.

♦Victorian Elegance – Blend purple, gray, and black to create a dramatic Victorian

343 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540

Lic: 1432491 2016

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

Princeton Charter School

Lic: 1432491 2016

theme. Start with some decorative urn planters in either black or gray. Fill planters with purple mums, ornamental kale, and accent them with gourds of different shapes and sizes painted in black or shades of gray. ♦Rustic Farmhouse – Pair white mums with creamy white and yellow pumpkins. Display them on and around haybales or in galvanized tubs. Complete the look with cornstalks, a decorated vintage shovel or rake, and a fall twig wreath on the door. ♦Coastal Autumn – Give traditional pumpkins a beachy twist. Paint pumpkins or gourds of different sizes in sea-inspired blues and greens. Display larger pumpkins inside wooden crates, and place tiny pumpkins in wire baskets. Add some coastal elements such as seashells, starfish, pieces of driftwood, or wooden buoys to complete the look.

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540

A public school serving 424 students in grades K-8 Seeks qualified applicants for the following 2020-2021 position: IN-PerSoN SuPPort / AIDe Monday through Friday 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM Immediate opening 2 years college and prior experience managing and supervising children ages 5- 14 preferred. Submit applications to pcsoffice@princetoncharter.org or via mail to Gail Wilbur, PCS, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, NJ, 08540

Family Owned and Operated

American Furniture Exchange

Princeton Charter School

Charlie has been serving the Princeton community for 25 years

FLESCH’S ROOFING • Residential & Commercial • Cedar Shake • Shingle & Slate Roofs

30 Years of

100 Bunn Drive, Experience! For All Your Roofing, Flashing & Gutter Needs Princeton, NJAntiques 08540 – Jewelry – Watches – Guitars – Cameras • Copper/Tin/Sheet Metal • Flat Roofs • Built-In Gutters

• Seamless Gutters & - Coins424 – Artwork – Diamonds – Furniture ADownspouts public schoolBooks serving Unique Items • Gutter Cleaning students in grades K-8 I Will Buy Single Items to the Entire Estate! • Roof Maintenance Seeks qualified applicants

609-394-2427

Free Estimates • Quality Service • Repair Work

Are You Moving? House Cleanout Service Available!

609-306-0613

for the following 2020-2021 position: LIC#13VH02047300

Daniel Downs (Owner) Serving all of Mercer County Area

IN-PerSoN SuPPort / AIDe Monday through Friday 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM


Move-In-Ready and Quick-Delivery Homes in Beautiful New Hope These exclusive residences span 3,600 square feet, offering abundant space and privacy. Our move-in-ready option features the most in-demand extras and upgrades to make your new home feel perfect as soon as you step through the door.

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TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR

Open, Contemporary Floorplans Private Elevators Full Basement Two-Car Rear Garages Private Gated Community

Experience our model residence from the comfort of home. Visit rabbitruncreek.com/tour to view an immersive in-home video tour.

Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

Starting at $1,150,000 215.862.5800 | RabbitRunCreek.com Rte 202 (Lower York Road) & Rabbit Run Drive, New Hope, PA

In-person tours available: Wednesday–Friday | 10am–5pm Saturday–Sunday | 12pm–4pm

43 • TOWN TOPICS, PRINCETON, N.J., WEdNESday, OCTObER 21, 2020

OPEN THE DOOR TO GRACIOUS LIVING


THE FOOD THE FOOD YOU YOUWANT WANT FROM FROMTHE THE THE FOOD

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created Brick Farm Markettotobebethe thededicated dedicatedoutlet outlet for for our our farm. We We created Brick Farm Market farm. We created Brick Farm Market to be the dedicated outlet for our farm. We aare a full-service market located withina stone’s a stone’sthrow throwofofthe thesource, source, Double Double Brook Farm. We are full-service located within We are amarket full-service market located within a stone’s throw of the source, Double Brook Farm.Brook Farm. 65 East Broad Street • Hopewell, NJNJ 08525 609.466.6500 • WWW.brickfarmarket.com 65 East Broad Street • Hopewell, 08525 •• 609.466.6500 • WWW.brickfarmarket.com

65 East Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525 • 609.466.6500 • WWW.brickfarmarket.com

Profile for Witherspoon Media Group

Town Topics Newspaper, October 21, 2020